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Sample records for cerebellar tonsillar descent

  1. Surgical management of cerebellar tonsillar herniation in three patients with macrocephaly-cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Conway, Robert L; Danielpour, Moise; Graham, John M

    2007-04-01

    The authors report on three patients with a congenital brain overgrowth syndrome, macrocephaly-cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita (M-CMTC), who experienced neurological sequelae associated with herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. In two of these patients, the authors document postnatal brain overgrowth that contributed to recurrent descent of the cerebellar tonsils and complicated the surgical treatment in one of the patients. The authors address the neurosurgical concerns related to this syndrome with special attention to acquired tonsillar ectopia and postulate that some patients may be at risk for progressive tonsillar herniation and consequent neurological symptoms due to cerebellar overgrowth. Ectopic cerebellar tonsils have been reported previously in cases of M-CMTC, and this phenomenon may be a secondary event associated with brain overgrowth rather than due to a congenitally small posterior fossa. PMID:17465364

  2. Hypertrophy, Tonsillar (Enlarged Tonsils) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Child All About Food Allergies A to Z: Hypertrophy, Tonsillar (Enlarged Tonsils) KidsHealth > For Parents > A to ... A A A Text Size A to Z: Hypertrophy, Tonsillar (Enlarged Tonsils) May also be called: Enlarged ...

  3. Hypertrophy, Tonsillar (Enlarged Tonsils) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Palsy: Caring for Your Child A to Z: Hypertrophy, Tonsillar (Enlarged Tonsils) KidsHealth > For Parents > A to ... A A A Text Size A to Z: Hypertrophy, Tonsillar (Enlarged Tonsils) May also be called: Enlarged ...

  4. Tonsillar ectopia in idiopathic scoliosis: does it play a role in the pathogenesis and prognosis or is it only an incidental finding?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing controversy about the significance of tonsillar ectopia among patients with idiopathic scoliosis (IS). Aim To find out if tonsillar ectopia occurs more frequently among patients with IS and if it plays any etiological or prognostic role in IS. Study design Retrospective study. Methods Retrospective analysis of 155 consecutive spine MRIs (79 patients with IS and 76 controls; aged 7-25 years; 55% were female) with regard to the position of the cerebellar tonsils in relation to foramen magnum and the sagittal diameter of foramen magnum. All images were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability analysis was performed by calculation of κ-value, intraclass correlation coefficient, and systematic and random errors. The occurrence of tonsillar ectopia among patients with IS and controls was estimated and the association of tonsillar ectopia with different predictors has been tested. Statistical significance was set to P ≤ 0.05. Results The interobserver and intraobserver agreement with regard to the occurrence of tonsillar ectopia was almost perfect (κ 0.84 and 0.89, respectively). Tonsillar ectopia was found in 37% of patients with IS compared with 13% among controls (p < 0.001 and odds ratio of 3.8, 95% CI 1.7-8.5). The occurrence of tonsillar ectopia was not associated with the severity of scoliotic deformity (p = 0.85), or rapid progression of scoliosis (p = 0.76). Neurological deficit occurs twice as frequently in patients with tonsillar ectopia as in those with no tonsillar ectopia. Two of five patients with tonsillar ectopia showed improvement of their neurological deficit after the surgical correction of scoliosis. Conclusion As tonsillar ectopia is significantly more frequent among patients with IS and may exhibit some prognostic utility in patients with neurological deficit, we forward the hypothesis that tonsillar ectopia may play a role in the development of the deformity in some patients with IS. However, occurrence of tonsillar ectopia among 13% of controls precludes stating a definitive role of tonsillar ectopia in the pathogenesis of IS. Some patients with IS, tonsillar ectopia and neurological deficit showed neurological improvement following the surgical correction of scoliosis. PMID:19909551

  5. Seckel syndrome with asymptomatic tonsillar herniation and congenital mirror movements.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Rajoo; Mukherjee, Kabita

    2010-02-01

    Seckel syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of recessive inheritance characterized by prenatal-onset growth retardation, abnormally small head, varying degrees of mental retardation and an unusual ''beak-like'' protrusion of the nose. Additionally, it is associated with multiple organ system anomalies, including that of the central nervous system. An 8-year-old male child with typical features of Seckel syndrome and asymptomatic cerebellar tonsillar herniation diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging associated with congenital mirror movements of the upper extremities is described. The child, additionally, had agenesis of the corpus callosum. Previously reported central nervous system anomalies associated with congenital mirror movements include corpus callosal agenesis and cranio-vertebral anomalies, both of which were present in this child. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of congenital mirror movements occurring in association with Seckel syndrome. PMID:19372093

  6. Congenital Hairy Polyp of Posterior Tonsillar Pillar

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Shahid; Talat, Nabila; Saleem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Congenital hairy polyps are exceedingly rare congenital anomalies. We report a case of congenital hairy polyp arising from posterior tonsillar pillar which was excised with bipolar cautry. PMID:26023478

  7. Descent vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popov, Y. I.

    1985-01-01

    The creation of descent vehicles marked a new stage in the development of cosmonautics, involving the beginning of manned space flight and substantial progress in space research on the distant bodies of the Solar System. This booklet describes these vehicles and their structures, systems, and purposes. It is intended for the general public interested in modern problems of space technology.

  8. Cerebellar Degeneration

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Degeneration? Cerebellar degeneration is a process in which neurons in the cerebellum - the area of the brain ... proteins that are necessary for the survival of neurons. Associated diseases: Diseases that are specific to the ...

  9. Upper airway obstruction from tonsillar infection in adults.

    PubMed

    Stone, C K; Thomas, S H

    1994-03-01

    We report the case of a 23-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with severe upper airway obstruction resulting from infection of the palatine tonsils. Manifestations of tonsillar infection and airway obstruction included hoarseness and extreme difficulty breathing, severe sore throat and inability to swallow liquids or solids. Urgent otolaryngologic consultation was obtained, and the patient was taken directly to the operating suite for nasotracheal intubation with tracheostomy standby. The patient was maintained on broad-spectrum antibiotics and was discharged after a hospital course complicated by pulmonary oedema, tracheitis and difficulty weaning from the ventilator, requiring temporary tracheostomy. The Monospot test was negative for infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We could find no previously reported cases of adults with severe palatine tonsillar-induced airway obstruction which was not due to infection with EBV (mononucleosis). The airway management of obstruction due to palatine tonsillar hypertrophy is discussed. PMID:9422136

  10. Cerebellar mutism.

    PubMed

    Kper, Michael; Timmann, Dagmar

    2013-12-01

    Cerebellar mutism occurs in about 25% of children following posterior fossa tumor surgery. It is usually accompanied by other neurological and behavioral disturbances. Mutism is transient in nature lasting several days to months and is frequently followed by dysarthria. In addition, impairment of language and other neuropsychological functions can be found after long term follow up in the majority of patients. The pathophysiological background of mutism may be higher speech dysfunction mediated by crossed cerebello-cerebral diaschisis which is frequently found during the mute period. Foremost injury to the bilateral dentatothalamocortical tract appears to be critical for the development of cerebello-cerebral diaschisis and subsequent mutism. Direct cerebellar injury is the likely reason for persisting deficits after the mute period. Minimization of injury to the dentatothalamocortical tract during surgery may be promising in the prevention of mutism. While there is no established treatment of mutism, early speech and rehabilitation therapy is recommended. PMID:23398780

  11. Ascent/Descent Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Charles; Andrew, Robert; Roe, Scott; Frye, Ronald; Harvey, Michael; Vu, Tuan; Balachandran, Krishnaiyer; Bly, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent Software Suite has been used to support a variety of NASA Shuttle Program mission planning and analysis activities, such as range safety, on the Integrated Planning System (IPS) platform. The Ascent/Descent Software Suite, containing Ascent Flight Design (ASC)/Descent Flight Design (DESC) Configuration items (Cis), lifecycle documents, and data files used for shuttle ascent and entry modeling analysis and mission design, resides on IPS/Linux workstations. A list of tools in Navigation (NAV)/Prop Software Suite represents tool versions established during or after the IPS Equipment Rehost-3 project.

  12. Theoretical and clinical aspects of the tonsillar function.

    PubMed

    Siegel, G

    1983-09-01

    A general review of the state of the art in tonsillar function research is given. A proliferation of B lymphocytes, evoked by antigens and/or polyclonal activators, occurs in the tonsil. Such a process, i.e. the supply of B cells to the organism facilitating a number of immune reactions, is to be considered the main function of the tonsil. The formation of antibodies must be regarded as a by-effect caused by an intratonsillar defence mechanism; it is helpful in safeguarding the structural and functional integrity of the organ. A model of the tonsil on the basis of cybernetics is derived from the results obtained and from the histological structure of the organ. Tonsillar involution is characterized by a decline in B cell proliferation, eventually leading to a weakening of the intratonsillar defence mechanism. Genetic disposition and defective functioning of the intratonsillar defence mechanism are discussed as pathogenetic factors in tonsillitis. PMID:6607904

  13. Radiation therapy of carcinoma of the tonsillar region

    SciTech Connect

    Fayos, J.V.; Morales, P.

    1983-02-01

    From 1960 through 1976, 353 consecutive patients with carcinoma of the tonsillar region were primarily treated with radiation therapy. The mean age of patients was 58 years with males predominating (78%). Patients were classified according to a TNM and stage classification. Most of the tumors were large, and the specific site of origin could not be determined in 33% of the patients. The predominant identifiable sites were the soft palate and uvula, 18%, the anterior tonsillar pillar, 18%, and the tonsilar fossa, 13%. Patients were treated with radiation to doses of 6700 rad given in 48 days and 33 fractions using Cobalt 60 radiation. We found a 91.7% control rate for patients with T1 disease and 76.9%, 49.5%, and 25% for T2, T3, and T4 patients, respectively. The overall local control rate was 62.3%. Surgery was used most often in recurrences for Stage III patients. Salvage surgery was carried out in 93 patients. Surgery was more successful in controlling the disease in patients in whom the primary was controlled by irradiation. Overall, the tumors in 43% of the patients who had surgery were subsequently controlled as a result of this treatment. Metastasis occurred rapidly, with 75 of the patients exhibiting metastases by 18 months. Complications were not related to dose but were slightly higher in patients who had surgery (5%). We conclude that radiation therapy is the preferred treatment for Stage I and II squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar region. No satisfactory results were obtained in Stage IV; other approaches should be tried.

  14. Factors controlling testis descent.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Acerini, Carlo L

    2008-12-01

    Descent of the testis from an intra-abdominal site in foetal life to an extracorporeal location after birth is a mandatory developmental process to ensure that the mature testis promotes normal spermatogenesis. The two phases of transabdominal and inguinoscrotal descent occur approximately during the first and last thirds of gestation respectively. Key anatomical events to release the testis from its urogenital ridge location and to guide the free gonad into the scrotum are the degeneration of the cranio-suspensory ligament and a thickening of the gubernaculum. Androgens play a role in both these processes, particularly with respect to enabling the testis to traverse the inguinal canal in the final phase of descent. Experiments in animals suggest that androgens mediate this effect via the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide by the genitofemoral nerve, but direct evidence for such a mechanism is lacking in humans. The transabdominal phase of descent is under the control of insulin-like 3 (INSL3), a product of the Leydig cells. Definitive evidence of its role in rodent testis descent is illustrated by the phenotype of bilateral cryptorchidism in Insl3-/- null mice. Circulating levels of INSL3 are higher in boys at puberty, are undetectable in girls and are lower in boys with undescended testes. A minority also have a mutation either in the INSL3 gene or affecting its receptor gene, relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 2 (LGRF8). Other factors that may play a role in testis descent include the anti-Mullerian hormone and members of the HOX gene family. Evidence that the prevalence of undescended testis may be increasing provides a phenotypic readout for the effects of postulated chemicals in the environment interfering in some way with the action of factors that control testis descent. Epidemiological studies point to profound geographical variations in prevalence in countries such as Denmark and Finland. Associations have been found with levels of chemicals labelled as endocrine disruptors being higher in breast milk samples from mothers with cryptorchid boys when compared with controls. The adverse effects of these compounds (e.g. bisphenol A) can be replicated in the offspring of dams exposed during pregnancy. A sensitive marker of an anti-androgen effect of a compound is a reduction in the anogenital distance, an anthropometric measurement that is significantly greater in males compared with females. The observation of an association between the anogenital distance in infant boys and the level of pesticides in the urine of their mothers in late gestation indicates that this has the potential to be a useful surrogate marker of the effects of environmental chemicals on testis descent in human population studies. The rightful place for the testis at birth is in the scrotum in order to provide the temperature differential essential for normal spermatogenesis. Appropriate screening programmes and early surgical intervention are the prerequisites to ensure optimal fertility in adulthood and a considerably lessened risk of testis cancer. PMID:18647820

  15. Regulation of testicular descent.

    PubMed

    Hutson, John M; Li, Ruili; Southwell, Bridget R; Newgreen, Don; Cousinery, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Testicular descent occurs in two morphologically distinct phases, each under different hormonal control from the testis itself. The first phase occurs between 8 and 15 weeks when insulin-like hormone 3 (Insl3) from the Leydig cells stimulates the gubernaculum to swell, thereby anchoring the testis near the future inguinal canal as the foetus grows. Testosterone causes regression of the cranial suspensory ligament to augment the transabdominal phase. The second, or inguinoscrotal phase, occurs between 25 and 35 weeks, when the gubernaculum bulges out of the external ring and migrates to the scrotum, all under control of testosterone. However, androgen acts mostly indirectly via the genitofemoral nerve (GFN), which produces calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) to control the direction of migration. In animal models the androgen receptors are in the inguinoscrotal fat pad, which probably produces a neurotrophin to masculinise the GFN sensory fibres that regulate gubernacular migration. There is little direct evidence that this same process occurs in humans, but CGRP can regulate closure of the processus vaginalis in inguinal hernia, confirming that the GFN probably mediates human testicular descent by a similar mechanism as seen in rodent models. Despite increased understanding about normal testicular descent, the common causes of cryptorchidism remain elusive. PMID:25690562

  16. The B-cell development in tonsillar lymphoid follicles.

    PubMed

    Brandtzaeg, P

    1996-01-01

    The palatine tonsils, and particularly the nasopharyngeal tonsil (adenoid), may be functionally comparable to nasal-associated lymphoid tissue in rodents. Primary follicles occur in human tonsils at 16 weeks' gestation, and formation of germinal centres (GC) takes place shortly after birth. The GC arise in T-cell-dependent B-cell responses and are associated with: i) clonal expansion; ii) somatic hypermutation in immunoglobulin variable (Ig V)-region genes; iii) positive selection of B cells based on affinity for antigen; iv) differentiation to memory B cells and plasma cells; and v) induction of the J-chain gene. The follicular dendritic cells (FDC) of GC retain native antigen which stimulates growth of B-cell blasts and hypermutation of their Ig V genes. The resulting centrocytes die by apoptosis unless they are selected by antigen. Cognate interaction between CD4+ helper T cells and B cells is important to promote downstream switching of the heavy chain constant (CH) genes. In human tonsillar GC this process normally gives rise mainly to IgG (55%-72%) and IgA (13%-18%) immunocytes, both isotypes normally being partially associated with J-chain expression (36% and 29%, respectively). Because J chain is a key peptide in secretory IgA, tonsillar GC may contribute precursor cells to mucosal effector sites. Thus, mucosal immunity can be induced in the airways by nasal immunization, and the level of nasopharyngeal and salivary secretory IgA is decreased after adenotonsillectomy. PMID:9082810

  17. Complementary curves of descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.; Lipscombe, Trevor C.

    2013-01-01

    The shapes of two wires in a vertical plane with the same starting and ending points are described as complementary curves of descent if beads frictionlessly slide down both of them in the same time, starting from rest. Every analytic curve has a unique complement, except for a cycloid (solution of the brachistochrone problem), which is self complementary. A striking example is a straight wire whose complement is a lemniscate of Bernoulli. Alternatively, the wires can be tracks down which round objects undergo a rolling race. The level of presentation is appropriate for an intermediate undergraduate course in classical mechanics.

  18. [Isolation of FDC-lymphocyte clusters from human tonsillar tissues].

    PubMed

    Takemoto, N

    2000-11-01

    Follicular B cells and follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) form FDC-lymphocyte clusters and play a central role in events related to humoral immunity in the lymphoid follicle (LF). The secondary LF is divided into five zones, each of which exhibits functional differences. However, the distribution of the clusters across the five follicular zones remains unclear. We here report a procedure for isolating FDC-lymphocyte clusters from fixed tonsillar tissues and compare of the structure of clusters isolated from three follicular zones: the mantle, light and dark zones. First, the germinal centers (GCs) of the secondary LFs were removed under a stereoscope, and the GCs were enzymatically digested for 20, 30, 40 and 50 minutes at 37 degrees C. The FDC-lymphocyte clusters were then isolated using a discontinuous density gradient and a Magnetic Particle Concentrator, followed by microbeads. The number of isolated medium sized clusters composed of 6-25 cells was greatest when the samples were incubated for 40 minutes. To detect the mantle, light and dark zones, and GCs, isolated FDC-lymphocyte clusters from each zone were immunostained. Their cell structures were then compared. The clusters were composed mainly of B cells (comprising about 80% of the cells in each cluster, on average), T cells, natural killer/T cells and macrophages were also observed, but less frequently. The proportions of CD 45 RO-positive cells and CD4-positive cells were clearly different for each zone, with CD4-positive cells in the majority. No clear differences in isolated clusters from fixed and unfixed tonsillar tissues were observed. Our data indicate that this procedure is suitable for isolating FDC-lymphocyte clusters from fixed lymphoid tissues and that the proportions of cells composing the clusters differ in the three follicular zones. PMID:11187756

  19. Acute fatal parainfectious cerebellar swelling in two children. A rare or an overlooked situation?

    PubMed

    Roulet Perez, E; Maeder, P; Cotting, J; Eskenazy-Cottier, A C; Deonna, T

    1993-12-01

    We report 2 previously healthy children who developed sudden unexpected respiratory arrest and brain death, during a presumed Epstein-Barr meningitis in one case and a multisystemic infection of unknown etiology in the other. Diffuse swelling of the cerebellum with upward transtentorial and downward tonsillar herniation, shown by brain CT-scan and MRI obtained after the acute event, was the most probable cause of death. Review of CT images performed before or at the onset of deterioration already showed discrete signs of early upward herniation of the cerebellar vermis that were initially overlooked. At autopsy in the first case, an acute lymphomonocytic meningoencephalitis with predominant involvement of the cerebellum was observed. Few similar cases were found in the literature, indicating that acute cerebellar swelling is either a very rare or an unrecognized, possibly preventable cause of death in acute inflammatory or non-inflammatory encephalopathies in children. PMID:8133984

  20. Terminal Descent Sensor Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Curtis W.

    2009-01-01

    Sulcata software simulates the operation of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) radar terminal descent sensor (TDS). The program models TDS radar antennas, RF hardware, and digital processing, as well as the physics of scattering from a coherent ground surface. This application is specific to this sensor and is flexible enough to handle end-to-end design validation. Sulcata is a high-fidelity simulation and is used for performance evaluation, anomaly resolution, and design validation. Within the trajectory frame, almost all internal vectors are represented in whatever coordinate system is used to represent platform position. The trajectory frame must be planet-fixed. The platform body frame is specified relative to arbitrary reference points relative to the platform (spacecraft or test vehicle). Its rotation is a function of time from the trajectory coordinate system specified via dynamics input (file for open loop, callback for closed loop). Orientation of the frame relative to the body is arbitrary, but constant over time. The TDS frame must have a constant rotation and translation from the platform body frame specified at run time. The DEM frame has an arbitrary, but time-constant, rotation and translation with respect to the simulation frame specified at run time. It has the same orientation as sigma0 frame, but is possibly translated. Surface sigma0 has the same arbitrary rotation and translation as DEM frame.

  1. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... movement due to disease or injury to the cerebellum in the brain. ... of acute cerebellar ataxia include: Abscess of the cerebellum Alcohol, medications, and insecticides Bleeding into the cerebellum ...

  2. Incidence of tonsillar cancer in northern Sweden: Impact of human papilloma virus

    PubMed Central

    LOIZOU, CHRISTOS; LAURELL, GRAN; LINDQUIST, DAVID; FVERMAN, CHARLOTTE; STEFANSSON, KRISTINA; NYLANDER, KARIN; OLOFSSON, KATARINA

    2015-01-01

    The incidence rate of tonsillar cancer is increasing worldwide. The current study identifies a parallel increase in the incidence of tonsillar cancer, human papilloma virus (HPV) and p16 expression among a population from northern Sweden, a sparsely populated area, confirming the strong association between p16 and HPV infection in tonsillar tissue. Data from the Swedish Cancer Registry was assessed to identify cases of tonsillar cancer in the northern territorial area of Sweden. HPV DNA was extracted from paraffin embedded diagnostic biopsies and detected by polymerase chain reaction using general primers Gp5+/6+ and CpI/IIG. Expression of p16 was identified by immunochemistry. Patients were grouped into urban or rural residence categories. A total of 214 cases were identified, comprising 155 (72.4%) men and 59 (27.6%) women, and 65 of these patients, who presented between 2000 and 2012, were analyzed. The overall median age for the analyzed patients was 58 years; 48 (74%) were males (median age, 57.5 years) and 17 (26%) were females (median age, 65 years). Of the 65 specimens, 59 (91%) were positive for HPV, and 62 (95%) expressed p16. The incidence of tonsillar cancer in the cohort demonstrated a 2-fold increase between 1990 and 2013; specifically, a 2.7-fold increase was observed in men whilst the female group exhibited only a small increase. These findings demonstrate a strong association between p16 expression and HPV infection in tonsillar malignancies. The incidence of HPV-positive tonsillar cancer has increased in recent years, even in sparsely populated regions, as demonstrated in northern Sweden. PMID:26788170

  3. Entry, Descent, Landing Animation (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Entry, Descent, Landing animation

    This animation illustrates the path the Stardust return capsule will follow once it enters Earth's atmosphere.

  4. Exclusive radiation therapy: the treatment of early tonsillar tumors.

    PubMed

    Lusinchi, A; Wibault, P; Marandas, P; Kunkler, I; Eschwege, F

    1989-08-01

    One hundred and ninety-three T1 or T2 tumors of the tonsillar region have been treated by exclusive external irradiation between 1970 and 1982. Seventy-five percent of these tumors were classified as T2. There was no relationship between T and N stages. The nodal involvement was essentially linked to the macroscopic appearance of the tumor (superficial or nodular) and to the histology. The 5-year survival rate of the whole population was 58%. N stage and macroscopic appearance only influenced the survival. The local control was 88% for T1, 79% for T2. The main prognostic factors for local control were the histological type, with a 93% local control rate for poorly differentiated tumors versus 73% for well differentiated ones, and the macroscopic appearance, with a 83% local control rate for nodular tumors versus 75% for superficial ones. Superficial tumors spreading forward the anterior pilar have a higher local failure rate. All the patients' charts have been reviewed, and we observed a high percentage of marginal recurrences. The technique of irradiation, above all in case of a superficial tumor, must take into account the possibility of "geographic miss" and keep large safety margins. PMID:2502507

  5. Grade 4 tonsillar hypertrophy associated with decreased retronasal olfactory function: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cayonu, Melih; Salihoglu, Murat; Altundag, Aytug; Tekeli, Hakan; Kayabasoglu, Grkan

    2014-08-01

    Tonsillar hypertrophy is common in children, but it can also be present in adults. Enlarged tonsils, a significant anatomical barrier, may affect the flow of odor molecules from the oral cavity to the nasal passages, which has not yet been studied. Thus, we aimed to investigate the mass effect of palatine tonsillar hypertrophy on retronasal olfaction. This study was carried out in 146 subjects, with a mean age of 22.1 2.2 years, ranging 20-29 years. An oropharyngeal examination of the participants was completed, and tonsillar hypertrophy was graded according to the subjective tonsil size scale. The participants were divided into four groups according to their tonsil size grading; then, each subject's orthonasal olfactory and retronasal olfactory functions were assessed using "Sniffin' Sticks" and retronasal olfactory testing. There were no differences observed between the groups in terms of age, gender, cigarette smoking, or alcohol consumption. In addition, there was no difference between the groups in terms of "Sniffin' Sticks" subtests and TDI scores. It was determined that the retronasal olfactory scores of the participants with grade 4 tonsil size were significantly lower than the retronasal olfactory scores of the participants with grade 1 tonsil size. The current investigation demonstrates that grade 4 tonsillar hypertrophy has significant negative effects on the retronasal route of olfactory sensing, when compared with grade 1 tonsillar hypertrophy. PMID:24609735

  6. Does cooling the tonsillar fossae during thermal welding tonsillectomy have an effect on postoperative pain and healing?

    PubMed

    Tepe Karaca, Ci?dem; Celebi, Saban; Oysu, Ca?atay; Celik, Oner

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of cooling the tonsillar fossa during thermal welding tonsillectomy on pain and wound healing. Prospective, blinded, clinical study was conducted. 30 patients who underwent tonsillectomy by thermal welding were evaluated. When one of the tonsillar fossa was cooled by isotonic fluid, the other has left untreated. Postoperative pain and mucosal healing pattern were assessed. Data were recorded and statistically analyzed. Healing process of the cooled down tonsillar fossae were significantly better on the 7th and 14th postoperative day (p < 0.01). Control tonsillar fossae had significantly higher pain scores on the 3rd, 7th and 14th postoperative day (p < 0.05). Administration of isotonic fluid, during thermal welding tonsillectomy for cooling tonsillar fossae, accelerates wound-healing process significantly and decreases tonsillectomy related pain complaints post-operatively. PMID:22843096

  7. Human Papillomavirus and Tonsillar and Base of Tongue Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramqvist, Torbjrn; Grn, Nathalie; Dalianis, Tina

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 was recognized as a risk factor by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), where tonsillar and base of tongue cancer (TSCC and BOTSCC) dominate. Furthermore, patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC, had a much better clinical outcome than those with corresponding HPV-negative cancer and other head and neck cancer. More specifically, survival was around 80% for HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC vs. 40% five-year disease free survival, for the corresponding HPV-negative tumors with conventional radiotherapy and surgery, while this could not be observed for HPV-positive OSCC at other sites. In addition, the past 2040 years in many Western Countries, the incidence of HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC has risen, and >70% are men. This has resulted in a relative increase of patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC that may not need the intensified chemo-radiotherapy (with many more severe debilitating side effects) often given today to patients with head and neck cancer. However, before tapering therapy, one needs to enable selection of patients for such treatment, by identifying clinical and molecular markers that together with HPV-positive status will better predict patient prognosis and response to therapy. To conclude, there is a new increasing group of patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC with good clinical outcome, where options for better-tailored therapy are needed. For prevention, it would be of benefit to vaccinate both girls and boys against HPV16 infection. For potential future screening the ways to do so need optimizing. PMID:25803099

  8. Low Morning Serum Cortisol Levels in Children with Tonsillar Hypertrophy and Moderate-to-Severe OSA

    PubMed Central

    Malakasioti, Georgia; Alexopoulos, Emmanouel I.; Varlami, Vasiliki; Chaidas, Konstantinos; Liakos, Nikolaos; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos; Kaditis, Athanasios G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic tonsillar tissue in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has enhanced expression of glucocorticoid receptors, which may reflect low endogenous cortisol levels. We have evaluated the effect of the interaction between tonsillar hypertrophy and OSA severity on morning serum cortisol levels. Methods: Children with and without snoring underwent polysomnography, tonsillar size grading, and measurement of morning serum cortisol. Results: Seventy children (2-13 years old) were recruited: 30 with moderate-to-severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] > 5 episodes/h), 26 with mild OSA (AHI > 1 and ? 5), and 14 controls (no snoring; AHI ? 1). Tonsillar hypertrophy was present in 56.7%, 53.8%, and 42.9% of participants in each group, respectively. Application of a general linear model demonstrated a significant effect of the interaction between severity of OSA and tonsillar hypertrophy on cortisol levels (P = 0.04), after adjustment for obesity, gender, and age. Among children with tonsillar hypertrophy, subjects with moderate-to-severe OSA (n = 17; AHI 14.7 10.6), mild OSA (n = 14; AHI 2.3 1.2), and control participants (n = 6; AHI 0.7 0.2) were significantly different regarding cortisol levels (P = 0.02). Subjects with moderate-to-severe OSA had lower cortisol (16.9 8.7 mcg/dL) than those with mild OSA (23.3 4.2; P = 0.01) and those without OSA (controls) (23.6 5.3 mcg/dL; P = 0.04). In contrast, children with normal-size tonsils and moderate-to-severe OSA, mild OSA, and controls did not differ in cortisol levels. Conclusions: Children with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea and the phenotype of hypertrophic tonsils have reduced morning serum cortisol levels and potentially decreased glucocorticoid inhibitory effects on tonsillar growth. Citation: Malakasioti G; Alexopoulos EI; Varlami V; Chaidas K; Liakos N; Gourgoulianis K; Kaditis AG. Low morning serum cortisol levels in children with tonsillar hypertrophy and moderate-to-severe OSA. SLEEP 2013;36(9):1349-1354. PMID:23997368

  9. Simulation Test Of Descent Advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Green, Steven M.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes piloted-simulation test of Descent Advisor (DA), subsystem of larger automation system being developed to assist human air-traffic controllers and pilots. Focuses on results of piloted simulation, in which airline crews executed controller-issued descent advisories along standard curved-path arrival routes. Crews able to achieve arrival-time precision of plus or minus 20 seconds at metering fix. Analysis of errors generated in turns resulted in further enhancements of algorithm to increase accuracies of its predicted trajectories. Evaluations by pilots indicate general support for DA concept and provide specific recommendations for improvement.

  10. Misdiagnosis of Cerebellar Infarctions

    PubMed Central

    Sangha, Navdeep; Albright, Karen C.; Peng, Hui; Vahidy, Farhaan; Boehme, Amelia; Chen, Zhongxue; Savitz, Sean I.

    2015-01-01

    Background This retrospective study addresses for the first time the differences in clinical features and outcomes between those individuals with a cerebellar infarct who were correctly diagnosed on initial presentation compared to those who experienced delayed diagnosis. Methods A retrospective review was conducted of our stroke registry from 09/2003 to 02/2011. Forty seven patients had an isolated cerebellar infarction confirmed by MRI. Misdiagnosis was defined as the diagnosis given by the first physician. Results Among 47 patients identified, 59.6% had delayed diagnosis. Five patients in the correct diagnosis group received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, compared to none in the delayed diagnosis group. Complaints of weakness were protective from delayed diagnosis (OR 0.087, 95% CI 0.019-0.393, p = 0.001). Conclusion Patients with an isolated cerebellar infarction need to be considered when patients present with acute non-specific symptoms. Critical components of the neurological examination are omitted which are imperative to diagnose cerebellar infarcts. A thorough neurological examination may increase clinical suspicion of an ischemic stroke. PMID:25373805

  11. EXOMARS Descent Module GNC Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portigliotti, S.; Capuano, M.; Montagna, M.; Martella, P.; Venditto, P.

    2007-08-01

    The ExoMars mission is the first ESA led robotic mission of the Aurora Programme and combines technology development with investigations of major scientific interest. Italy is by far the major contributor to the mission through the strong support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). ExoMars will search for traces of past and present life, characterize the Mars geochemistry and water distribution, improve the knowledge of the Mars environment and geophysics, and identify possible surface hazards to future human exploration missions. ExoMars will also validate the technology for safe Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) of a large size Descent Module (DM) carrying a Rover with medium range surface mobility and the access to subsurface. The ExoMars project is presently undergoing its Phase B1 with Thales Alenia Space-Italia as Industrial Prime Contractor. Additionally, as Descent Module responsible, a dedicated simulation tool is under development in Thales Alenia Space-Italia, Turin site, for the end-to-end design and validation / verification of the DM Entry Descent and Landing.

  12. Tonsillar Syphilis: an Unusual Site of Infection Detected by Treponema pallidum PCR

    PubMed Central

    Smith, John R. M.; Tsang, Raymond S. W.

    2015-01-01

    With the reemergence of syphilis, it is important that both clinical and public health practitioners recognize the various clinical manifestations of this disease (formerly known as the great imitator) and become familiar with the newer diagnostic tests. Here we report the first case of tonsillar syphilis diagnosed by PCR. PMID:26179306

  13. Tonsillar Syphilis: an Unusual Site of Infection Detected by Treponema pallidum PCR.

    PubMed

    Smith, John R M; Tsang, Raymond S W; Kadkhoda, Kamran

    2015-09-01

    With the reemergence of syphilis, it is important that both clinical and public health practitioners recognize the various clinical manifestations of this disease (formerly known as "the great imitator") and become familiar with the newer diagnostic tests. Here we report the first case of tonsillar syphilis diagnosed by PCR. PMID:26179306

  14. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias.

    PubMed

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya; Yoneda, Makoto; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto's encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Miller Fisher syndrome, ataxia associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Humoral mechanisms, cell-mediated immunity, inflammation, and vascular injuries contribute to the cerebellar deficits in immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias. PMID:25823827

  15. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias.

    PubMed

    Marelli, C; Cazeneuve, C; Brice, A; Stevanin, G; Drr, A

    2011-05-01

    Cerebellar ataxias with autosomal dominant transmission (ADCA) are far rarer than sporadic cases of cerebellar ataxia. The identification of genes involved in dominant forms has confirmed the genetic heterogeneity of these conditions and of the underlying mechanisms and pathways. To date, at least 28 genetic loci and, among them, 20 genes have been identified. In many instances, the phenotype is not restricted to cerebellar dysfunction but includes more complex multisystemic neurological deficits. Seven ADCA (SCA1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 17, and dentatorubro-pallido-luysian atrophy) are caused by repeat expansions in the corresponding proteins; phenotype-genotype correlations have shown that repeat size influences the progression of the disease, its severity and clinical differences among patients, including the phenomenon of anticipation between generations. All other ADCA are caused either by non-coding repeat expansions, conventional mutations or large rearrangements in genes with different functions. This review will focus on the genetic features of ADCA and on the clinical differences among the different forms. PMID:21546047

  16. Cerebellar abiotrophy in a miniature schnauzer

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Michelle L.; Blas-Machado, Uriel

    2003-01-01

    A 3.5-month-old miniature schnauzer was presented for signs of progressive cerebellar ataxia. Necropsy revealed cerebellar abiotrophy. This is the first reported case of cerebellar abiotrophy in a purebred miniature schnauzer. PMID:13677598

  17. Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme presenting as hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage: case report.

    PubMed

    Laki?evi?, Goran; Arnautovi?, Kenan; Muevi?, Dario; Chesney, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Background Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is rare and presents with increased intracranial pressure and cerebellar signs. The recommended treatment is radical resection, if possible, with radiation and chemotherapy. Clinical Presentation A 53-year-old man presented with hypertensive cerebellar bleeding and a 2-day history of severe headaches, nausea, vomiting, gait instability, and elevated blood pressure. Computed tomography (CT) showed a left cerebellar hematoma with no obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid and no hydrocephalus. CT angiography showed no signs of pathologic blood vessels in the posterior cranial fossa. The patient was observed in the hospital and discharged. Subsequent CT showed complete hematoma resorption. Two weeks later, he developed headaches, nausea, and worsening cerebellar symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 4-cm diameter tumor in the left cerebellar hemisphere where the hemorrhage was located. The tumor was radically resected and diagnosed as GBM. The patient underwent radiation and chemotherapy. At a follow-up of 1.5 years, MRIs showed no tumor recurrence. Conclusion Hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage may be the first presentation of underlying tumor, specifically GBM. Patients undergoing surgery for cerebellar hemorrhage should have clot specimens sent for histologic examination and have pre- and postcontrast MRIs. Patients not undergoing surgery should have MRIs done after hematoma resolution to rule out underlying tumor. PMID:25097829

  18. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components. PMID:24954915

  19. Ultrastructural study of postnatal development of the tonsillar crypt epithelium of the musk shrew, Suncus murinus.

    PubMed

    Tohya, K; Kimura, M

    1992-09-01

    An ultrastructural study was made of the postnatal development of the tonsillar crypt epithelium in the musk shrew, Suncus murinus. On day 3 after birth, a particular kind of large lymphoid cell was first seen to move through the basement membrane into the epithelium. The next migration was that of lymphocytes, which passed through holes in the basement membrane. On days 5 to 7, the lymphocytes formed clusters, and pale epithelial cells of low electron density appeared. The cell clusters and pale epithelial cells fused on day 10. By day 14, these epithelial cells extended cytoplasmic projections to the surface of the epithelium, which had many heterophagic vacuoles and some microvilli-like structures. These findings suggest that the lymphoepithelial relationship is important for the organization of the immunological microenvironment in tonsillar crypt epithelium of the neonatal musk shrew. PMID:1416082

  20. Cerebellar agenesis revisited.

    PubMed

    Boyd, C A R

    2010-03-01

    New clinical and employment information, together with over-looked previously published information, on a patient (H.C.) is reviewed. H.C., who died at the age of 76 in 1939, was found, by chance during anatomical dissection, to lack a cerebellum. This synthesis challenges an unusual and interesting account of cerebellar agenesis published in Brain in 1994 by Glickstein (see also Glickstein, 2006), in which the allegedly 'bogus' oral history of this individual's motor skills was held to have led to 'medical myth making'. Part of the burden of the 1994 paper was to show that 'cerebellar agenesis is always associated with profound motor deficits'. Glickstein therefore focussed on an apparent 'exception' to this conclusion, concerning the brain of a single case, H.C., who died 70 years ago, who 'had given rise to an oral tradition alleging that normal movement is possible despite total cerebellar agenesis'. Glickstein (1994) concludes 'despite an oral tradition to the contrary there is absolutely no evidence about the motor capacities of this man during his life'. Rather remarkably, an extensive history of this individual has become available, its significance becoming noted only this year; this complements and adds to a previous brief history published on H.C. (and not mentioned in the 1994 paper; see below). The new evidence includes the death certificate stating the man's occupation to have been 'manual labourer' with all the implications relevant to his supposed incapacity. The written historical record thus confronts the alleged 'myth'. It is interesting to note how medical records on an undoubtedly very ordinary citizen were recorded in London in the 1930s (before the NHS was set up in 1949) and how they could be made accessible to clinical colleagues in east London in the middle of World War II blitz bombing of the capital. PMID:19843649

  1. Age-related differences in human palatine tonsillar B cell subsets and immunoglobulin isotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jino; Chang, Dong-Yeop; Kim, Sang-Wook; Choi, Yoon Seok; Jeon, Sea-Yuong; Racanelli, Vito; Kim, Dae Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2016-02-01

    The tonsils provide defense of the upper aerodigestive tract against pathogens. Although long known to undergo functional changes with age, the precise changes occurring within tonsillar B cell populations remain undefined. In the present study, we investigated age-related changes in palatine tonsillar B cell subsets and immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes. Palatine tonsils were obtained from forty-two tonsillectomy patients without tonsillitis who were divided into three groups: young children (4-9years), adolescents (10-19years), and adults (20-60years). Tonsillar B cells were then analyzed by flow cytometry. Using expression of CD38 and IgD to define B cell subsets, we found that the frequency of germinal center (GC) B cells in the tonsils was significantly higher, and the frequency of memory B cells lower, in young children as compared to adolescents and adults. Within the GC B cell subsets, adults had a higher frequency of IgA(+) cells and a lower frequency of IgM(+) cells as compared to individuals in the younger age groups. Moreover, young children had a higher frequency of IgG(+) cells in the GC B cell subsets than did individuals in the older age groups. We also observed an abundance of IgM(+) cells among memory B cells and plasmablasts in young children and IgA(+) cells in adults. In summary, the proportion of GC B cells in palatine tonsillar B cells decreases with age, while the proportion of memory B cells increases with age. In addition, Ig isotypes in tonsils preferentially switch from IgM to IgA as individuals age. PMID:25618165

  2. Crossed Cerebellar Diaschisis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuguang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xu, Kai; Hu, Chunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) describes a depression of oxidative metabolism glucose and blood flow in the cerebellum secondary to a supratentorial lesion in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. PET/MR has the potential to become a powerful tool for demonstrating and imaging intracranial lesions .We herein report 3 cases of CCD imaging using a tri-modality PET/CTMR set-up for investigating the value of adding MRI rather than CT to PET in clinical routine. We describe 3 patients with CCD and neurological symptoms in conjunction with abnormal cerebral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/CTMR) manifestations including arterial spin-labeling (ASL) and T2-weighted images. In all, 18FDG-PET/CT detected positive FDG uptake in supratentorial lesions, and hypometabolism with atrophy in the contralateral cerebellum. More than that, hybrid PET/MRI provided a more accurate anatomic localization and ASL indicated disruption of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway. Using pathology or long-term clinical follow-up to confirm the PET and ASL findings, the supratentorial lesions of the 3 patients were respectively diagnosed with cerebral infarction, recurrent glioma, and metastasis. The reports emphasize the signi?cance of multimodality radiological examinations. Multimodality imaging contributes to proper diagnosis, management, and follow-up of supratentorial lesions with CCD. PMID:26765477

  3. The 2001 Mars Descent Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malin, M. C.; Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1999-01-01

    The overall objective of the 2001 Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) experiment is to acquire and analyze close-up pictures of surface features at and in the immediate vicinity of the Mars Surveyor 2001 (MS'01) landing site, in order to provide geologic and physical context for the results of lander and rover investigations, to provide near-realtime planning information for lander and rover operations, and to study specific attributes of the geology and geomorphology of Mars. Observational goals include studies of. 1) surface morphology (e.g., nature and distribution of landforms indicating past and present environmental processes); 2) local and regional geography (e.g., context for other lander instruments--precise location, detailed local relief); and 3) relationships to features seen in orbiter data. Based on the MS'98 MARDI experiment, it is anticipated that the MS'01 descent imager will provide panchromatic images of the landing site over a 73.4 degrees field-of-view (FOV) with a resolution of 1.25 mrad/pixel (12.5 cm/pixel from 100 m Nested images at a scale ratios of 2.5: 1 or better will be acquired. The anticipated results of this investigation include: 1) detailed knowledge of the local and regional setting of the MS'01 landing site, documented using geologic and topographic maps, 2) a specific link between the landing site and the rest of Mars as seen from orbit, and 3) serendipitous discovery of geomorphic processes at scales between those seen from orbit and those seen from the surface. MARDI consists of optics and four small electronics boards: the focal plane assembly, clock board, data acquisition system electronics, and power supply. The original design was developed under Planetary Definition and Development Program funding, although the flight design is considerably simplified for reliability and ease of manufacturing. It is characterized by relatively small physical size (about 5.5 x 8.5 x 12 cm about 500 gm) low power (<4 W, including power supply losses), and high science performance (1000 x 1000 pixel, low noise images, and ultimate geometric resolution better than 1 cm/pixel). Depending on the descent profile that actually occurs, MARDI will acquire up to 100 Mbits of image data, spanning three orders of magnitude in scale, during the roughly 60 seconds between heatshield jettison and spacecraft touchdown.

  4. The embryology of testicular descent.

    PubMed

    Wensing, C J

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of the role of the gubernaculum testis in the migration of the testis from the intra-abdominal to the scrotal position. The morphological differences in the process between carnivores, ungulates and man on the one hand and rodents on the other are stressed. The importance of gubernacular outgrowth, gubernacular regression as well as the importance of intra-abdominal pressure is emphasized. The effects of some forms of abnormal gubernacular development on testicular descent are described. The hormonal factors possibly involved in the regulation of the gubernacular reaction are evaluated. LH-RH, gonadotropins, AMH and testosterone seem not to be responsible for gubernacular outgrowth but a low molecular weight fraction of a fetal testicular extract, called descendin, is stimulatory to gubernacular cells. There are indications that testosterone plays a role in the initiation of gubernacular regression. PMID:2907890

  5. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000), ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000) and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000). Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder), ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED), aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1), and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning), electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia. PMID:17112370

  6. Automated cerebellar lobule segmentation with application to cerebellar structural analysis in cerebellar disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Ye, Chuyang; Bogovic, John A; Carass, Aaron; Jedynak, Bruno M; Ying, Sarah H; Prince, Jerry L

    2016-02-15

    The cerebellum plays an important role in both motor control and cognitive function. Cerebellar function is topographically organized and diseases that affect specific parts of the cerebellum are associated with specific patterns of symptoms. Accordingly, delineation and quantification of cerebellar sub-regions from magnetic resonance images are important in the study of cerebellar atrophy and associated functional losses. This paper describes an automated cerebellar lobule segmentation method based on a graph cut segmentation framework. Results from multi-atlas labeling and tissue classification contribute to the region terms in the graph cut energy function and boundary classification contributes to the boundary term in the energy function. A cerebellar parcellation is achieved by minimizing the energy function using the α-expansion technique. The proposed method was evaluated using a leave-one-out cross-validation on 15 subjects including both healthy controls and patients with cerebellar diseases. Based on reported Dice coefficients, the proposed method outperforms two state-of-the-art methods. The proposed method was then applied to 77 subjects to study the region-specific cerebellar structural differences in three spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) genetic subtypes. Quantitative analysis of the lobule volumes shows distinct patterns of volume changes associated with different SCA subtypes consistent with known patterns of atrophy in these genetic subtypes. PMID:26408861

  7. Prevalence of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA in Chinese children with tonsillar and/or adenoidal hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiao-cheng; Chen, Xiao-ping; Yao, Wen-hao; Zhang, Yi; Sun, Guang-bin; Tan, Xue-jun

    2014-06-01

    Tonsillar and adenoidal hypertrophy are prevalent otolaryngologic disorders in children, but their pathogenesis is largely unknown. The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in 146 tonsil and/or adenoid tissue specimens from 104 Chinese children with tonsillar and/or adenoidal hypertrophy were screened using flow-through hybridization gene-chip technology and real-time fluorescence-based quantitative PCR. Then, the relationships between the prevalence of the viruses and other clinical characteristics of tonsillar and/or adenoidal hypertrophy were analyzed. No patient had HPV DNA. EBV DNA was detected in 19/42 (45.2%) tonsil tissues and 72/104 (69.2%) adenoid tissue specimens (P?tonsillar and/or adenoidal hypertrophy. Adenoid tissues might more susceptible than tonsil tissues to EBV infection. In addition, EBV infection did not aggravate snoring in patients with tonsillar and/or adenoidal hypertrophy. PMID:24615954

  8. Predictability of Top of Descent Location for Operational Idle-Thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel L.

    2010-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the trajectory predictor and its uncertainty models, commercial flights executed idle-thrust descents at a specified descent speed, and the recorded data included the specified descent speed profile, aircraft weight, and the winds entered into the FMS as well as the radar data. The FMS computed the intended descent path assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and the controllers and pilots then endeavored to allow the FMS to fly the descent to the meter fix with minimal human intervention. The horizontal flight path, cruise and meter fix altitudes, and actual TOD location were extracted from the radar data. Using approximately 70 descents each in Boeing 757 and Airbus 319/320 aircraft, multiple regression estimated TOD location as a linear function of the available predictive factors. The cruise and meter fix altitudes, descent speed, and wind clearly improve goodness of fit. The aircraft weight improves fit for the Airbus descents but not for the B757. Except for a few statistical outliers, the residuals have absolute value less than 5 nmi. Thus, these predictive factors adequately explain the TOD location, which indicates the data do not include excessive noise.

  9. Speech prosody in cerebellar ataxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Maureen

    The present study sought an acoustic signature for the speech disturbance recognized in cerebellar degeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for a radiological rating of cerebellar involvement in six cerebellar ataxic dysarthric speakers. Acoustic measures of the [pap] syllables in contrastive prosodic conditions and of normal vs. brain-damaged patients were used to further our understanding both of the speech degeneration that accompanies cerebellar pathology and of speech motor control and movement in general. Pair-wise comparisons of the prosodic conditions within the normal group showed statistically significant differences for four prosodic contrasts. For three of the four contrasts analyzed, the normal speakers showed both longer durations and higher formant and fundamental frequency values in the more prominent first condition of the contrast. The acoustic measures of the normal prosodic contrast values were then used as a model to measure the degree of speech deterioration for individual cerebellar subjects. This estimate of speech deterioration as determined by individual differences between cerebellar and normal subjects' acoustic values of the four prosodic contrasts was used in correlation analyses with MRI ratings. Moderate correlations between speech deterioration and cerebellar atrophy were found in the measures of syllable duration and f0. A strong negative correlation was found for F1. Moreover, the normal model presented by these acoustic data allows for a description of the flexibility of task- oriented behavior in normal speech motor control. These data challenge spatio-temporal theory which explains movement as an artifact of time wherein longer durations predict more extreme movements and give further evidence for gestural internal dynamics of movement in which time emerges from articulatory events rather than dictating those events. This model provides a sensitive index of cerebellar pathology with quantitative acoustic analyses.

  10. Redistribution of crossed cerebellar diaschisis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Intenzo, C.M.; Bell, R.

    1989-04-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis refers to a functional decrease in blood flow to the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the infarcted or ischemic cerebral hemisphere. This phenomenon can be depicted using PET as well as using SPECT. This condition, seen on early I-123 IMP brain scans, can show redistribution on the three hour delayed scan, presumably due to normal non-specific amine receptor sites of the affected cerebellum. One such case is reported.

  11. Ectopic Oral Tonsillar Tissue: A Case Series with Bilateral and Solitary Presentations and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Masashi; Nagao, Toru; Saito, Terumi; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Ohto, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Akihito; Komaki, Kanji; Naganawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    An ectopic tonsil is defined as tonsillar tissue that develops in areas outside of the four major tonsil groups: the palatine, lingual, pharyngeal, and tubal tonsils. The occurrence of tonsillar tissue in the oral cavity in ectopic locations, its prevalence, and its developmental mechanisms that belong to its formation remain unclear. In this report, we describe a rare case of bilateral symmetric ectopic oral tonsillar tissue located at the ventral surface of the tongue along with two solitary cases arising from the floor of the mouth. The role of immune system and its aberrant response leading to ectopic deposits desires further studies. As an ectopic tonsil may simulate a benign soft tissue tumor, this case series highlights the importance of this entity in our clinical differential diagnosis of oral soft tissue masses. PMID:25664186

  12. Molecular Mapping to Species Level of the Tonsillar Crypt Microbiota Associated with Health and Recurrent Tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Anders; Fag-Olsen, Helena; Srensen, Christian Hjort; Kilian, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    The human palatine tonsils, which belong to the central antigen handling sites of the mucosal immune system, are frequently affected by acute and recurrent infections. This study compared the microbiota of the tonsillar crypts in children and adults affected by recurrent tonsillitis with that of healthy adults and children with tonsillar hyperplasia. An in-depth 16S rRNA gene based pyrosequencing approach combined with a novel strategy that included phylogenetic analysis and detection of species-specific sequence signatures enabled identification of the major part of the microbiota to species level. A complex microbiota consisting of between 42 and 110 taxa was demonstrated in both children and adults. This included a core microbiome of 12 abundant genera found in all samples regardless of age and health status. Yet, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria species, and Streptococcus pneumoniae were almost exclusively detected in children. In contrast, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae was present in all samples. Obligate anaerobes like Porphyromonas, Prevotella, and Fusobacterium were abundantly present in children, but the species diversity of Porphyromonas and Prevotella was larger in adults and included species that are considered putative pathogens in periodontal diseases, i.e. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, and Tannerella forsythia. Unifrac analysis showed that recurrent tonsillitis is associated with a shift in the microbiota of the tonsillar crypts. Fusobacterium necrophorum, Streptococcus intermedius and Prevotella melaninogenica/histicola were associated with recurrent tonsillitis in adults, whereas species traditionally associated with acute tonsillitis like pyogenic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus were scarce. The findings suggest that recurrent tonsillitis is a polymicrobial infection in which interactions within consortia of taxa play an etiologic role. The study contributes to the human microbiome data, to the understanding of the etiology of infections affecting the tonsils, and forms a basis for further insight into the consequences of the intense microbe-host interactions that take place in the tonsils. PMID:23437130

  13. Molecular mapping to species level of the tonsillar crypt microbiota associated with health and recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Anders; Fag-Olsen, Helena; Srensen, Christian Hjort; Kilian, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    The human palatine tonsils, which belong to the central antigen handling sites of the mucosal immune system, are frequently affected by acute and recurrent infections. This study compared the microbiota of the tonsillar crypts in children and adults affected by recurrent tonsillitis with that of healthy adults and children with tonsillar hyperplasia. An in-depth 16S rRNA gene based pyrosequencing approach combined with a novel strategy that included phylogenetic analysis and detection of species-specific sequence signatures enabled identification of the major part of the microbiota to species level. A complex microbiota consisting of between 42 and 110 taxa was demonstrated in both children and adults. This included a core microbiome of 12 abundant genera found in all samples regardless of age and health status. Yet, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria species, and Streptococcus pneumoniae were almost exclusively detected in children. In contrast, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae was present in all samples. Obligate anaerobes like Porphyromonas, Prevotella, and Fusobacterium were abundantly present in children, but the species diversity of Porphyromonas and Prevotella was larger in adults and included species that are considered putative pathogens in periodontal diseases, i.e. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, and Tannerella forsythia. Unifrac analysis showed that recurrent tonsillitis is associated with a shift in the microbiota of the tonsillar crypts. Fusobacterium necrophorum, Streptococcus intermedius and Prevotella melaninogenica/histicola were associated with recurrent tonsillitis in adults, whereas species traditionally associated with acute tonsillitis like pyogenic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus were scarce. The findings suggest that recurrent tonsillitis is a polymicrobial infection in which interactions within consortia of taxa play an etiologic role. The study contributes to the human microbiome data, to the understanding of the etiology of infections affecting the tonsils, and forms a basis for further insight into the consequences of the intense microbe-host interactions that take place in the tonsils. PMID:23437130

  14. Plasma and tonsillar tissue pharmacokinetics of teicoplanin following intramuscular administration to children.

    PubMed

    Aarons, L; Rowland, M; Khan, A; Taborelli, G; Ferrea, G; Tarantino, V; Fioredda, F; Rosina-Parenti, R; Cavenaghi, L; Borgonovi, M

    1998-10-01

    The population pharmacokinetics of teicoplanin in plasma and tonsillar tissue in children was determined following intramuscular administration. Thirty seven patients in all received either a single 5 mg/kg dose; 2 doses of 5 mg/kg, 12 h apart; 3 doses of 5 mg/kg, 12 h apart; or, a single 10 mg/kg dose. Limited data, comprising a maximum of 2 blood samples and 1 tonsillar sample were taken from each patient, with the maximum time being 48 h after the first dose of teicoplanin (in the 3 x 5 mg/kg dosing schedule). All plasma data were analyzed simultaneously by a maximum likelihood method employing a modified EM algorithm. A first-order absorption, one-compartment disposition model was fitted to the data. Mean parameter values (with lower and upper 95% confidence intervals) were: clearance/bioavailability, 0.024 L h(-1) kg(-1) (0.020-0.027); volume of distribution/bioavailability, 0.61 L kg(-1) (0.54-0.70); absorption rate constant, 0.43 h(-1) (0.31-0.61). A first-order transfer model for distribution of teicoplanin between plasma and tonsillar tissue was fitted to the tonsil data. The mean parameter values (95% confidence intervals) were: transfer rate constant between plasma and tonsils 0.49 h(-1) (0.35-0.67); transfer rate constant between tonsils and plasma 0.73 h(-1) (0.52-1.03). These rate constants correspond to a distribution half-life of 0.95 h and an equilibrium distribution concentration ratio between tonsillar tissue and plasma of 0.67. After normalising clearance and volume of distribution for body weight, there was no further influence of body weight on the pharmacokinetic parameters. Also, there was no effect of dose, and as two formulations were used, one for the 5 mg/kg dose and the other for the 10 mg/kg dose, no effect of formulation on the pharmacokinetics of teicoplanin after im (intramuscular) administration was found. PMID:9795079

  15. Descent Advisor Preliminary Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were: (1) to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional and flight-management system equipped jet transports, (2) to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and (3) to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 seconds late with a standard deviation of 13.1 seconds. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  16. Descent advisor preliminary field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional- and flight-management-system-equipped jet transports, to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 sec late with a standard deviation of 13.1 sec. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  17. Feature Clustering for Accelerating Parallel Coordinate Descent

    SciTech Connect

    Scherrer, Chad; Tewari, Ambuj; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Haglin, David J.

    2012-12-06

    We demonstrate an approach for accelerating calculation of the regularization path for L1 sparse logistic regression problems. We show the benefit of feature clustering as a preconditioning step for parallel block-greedy coordinate descent algorithms.

  18. Apollo experience report: Descent propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammock, W. R., Jr.; Currie, E. C.; Fisher, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    The propulsion system for the descent stage of the lunar module was designed to provide thrust to transfer the fully loaded lunar module with two crewmen from the lunar parking orbit to the lunar surface. A history of the development of this system is presented. Development was accomplished primarily by ground testing of individual components and by testing the integrated system. Unique features of the descent propulsion system were the deep throttling capability and the use of a lightweight cryogenic helium pressurization system.

  19. Descent relations in cubic superstring field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, I. Y.; Gorbachev, R.; Medvedev, P. B.; Rychkov, D. V.

    2008-01-01

    The descent relations between string field theory (SFT) vertices are characteristic relations of the operator formulation of SFT and they provide self-consistency of this theory. The descent relations langleV2|V1rangle and langleV3|V1rangle in the NS fermionic string field theory in the κ and discrete bases are established. Different regularizations and schemes of calculations are considered and relations between them are discussed.

  20. Functionality of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from tonsillar tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sada-Ovalle, I; Talayero, A; Chavz-Galn, L; Barrera, L; Castorena-Maldonado, A; Soda-Merhy, A; Torre-Bouscoulet, L

    2012-01-01

    For many years, tonsillectomy has been used routinely in children to treat chronic or recurrent acute tonsillitis. Palatine tonsils are secondary lymphoid organs and the major barrier protecting the digestive and respiratory tracts from potential invasive microorganisms. They have been used as sources of lymphoid tissue; however, despite the hundreds of papers published on tonsillectomy, no studies addressing the functionality of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from chronically infected tonsils have yet been published. The aim of this study was to analyse the functionality of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with respect to tonsillar tissue. We used an affordable approach to measure the frequency of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, the direct ex-vivo cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells, memory T cell phenotype, cytokine profile and DC phenotype. Our results demonstrate that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from tonsillar tissue are totally functional, as shown by their ability to produce cytokines, to degranulate and to differentiate into effector-memory T cells. PMID:22471281

  1. [Elemental deficits underlying cerebellar ataxia].

    PubMed

    Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2009-07-01

    Since classical studies by Babinski and Holmes, various symptoms have been described as cerebellar ataxia. Then, what are elemental factors underlying such symptoms? Here three pathophysiological characteristics are stressed. First, spatial incoordination in muscle activations occurs commonly in various limb movements and gaits, resulting in jerky and irregular movements. Second, deficits in anticipation lead to loss of accuracy and smoothness in limb movements, for most of movements are carried out at a high speed without visual feedback, and anticipatory and preprogrammed control by the cerebellum is necessary. Third, adaptation in reflexes is disordered. The gain of stretch reflexes during standing are exaggerated in patients with cerebellar ataxia compared with controls, causing large sways during walking. Among these elemental characteristics, dysfunction in anticipation and adaptation can be well explained by internal model theory, a hypothesis based on synaptic plasticity in the cerebellar circuits. PMID:19715167

  2. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new therapy to manage cerebellar disorders associated with hyperexcitatory CNS disorders like ethanol withdrawal. PMID:25195804

  3. Transoral, retromolar, para-tonsillar approach to the styloid process in 6 patients with Eagles syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Alexander W.; Scheller, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Eagles syndrome is caused by an elongated or mineralised styloid process and characterised by facial and pharyngeal pain, odynophagia and dysphagia. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings. However radiologic imaging, like panoramic radiograph, helps to confirm the diagnosis. There are different treatments of the Eagles syndrome. Anti-inflammatory medication (carbamazepime, corticosteroids) and/or surgical interventions are established. The aim of the different surgical techniques is to resect the elongated styloid process near the skull base. Study Design: A transoral, retromolar, para-tonsillar approach was performed to expose and resect the elongated calcified styloid process in a consecutive series of six patients. The use of different angled ring curettes, generally used in hypophysis surgery, facilitated the preparation of the styloid process through the surrounding tissue to the skull base, without a compromise to the surrounding tissue. Clinical examinations were performed pre- and postoperatively (3 month and after 1 year after surgery) in all patients. Results: No intra- or postoperative complications were observed. The hypophysis ring curettes facilitated the preparation of the styloid process to the skull base. Conclusions: The transoral, retromolar, para-tonsillar approach is a secure and fast method to resect an elongated symptomatic styloid process. Side effects of the classical transoral trans-tonsillar approach did not occur. Key words:Retromolar, para-tonsillar approach, Eagle syndrome, clinical features. PMID:24121903

  4. [Cerebellar cyst associated with cytoarchitectonic abnormalities in the cerebellar cortex].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, J; Takase, K; Fukami, T; Matsumoto, K; Ii, K

    1983-07-01

    The patient, 64-year-old female, had episode of sudden attack of severe vertigo, headache, nausea, and vomiting which lasted for about twenty minutes on May 20th in 1980. She had hypertension, polyp of stomach, diverticuli of duodenum in her past history. Neurological examination on her admission revealed fine horizontal nystagmus on bilateral gaze and slight clumsy movement on left F-N test. On plain skull and cervical X-P, atlanto-occipital fusion and Klippel-Feil syndrome (C2-C3 fusion) were seen. Plain CT scanning revealed a large cystic lesion which extended from the vermis to the left cerebellar hemisphere. No enhanced area was seen. The forth ventricle was seemed to be enlarged. And the left-sided dorsal part of the forth ventricle attached to the cyst. Metrizamide CT cisternogram showed there was no direct communication between them. Angiographically, the vertebrobasilar arteries were noted sclerotic changes and poor vascularities in the left cerebellar hemisphere was noted. On opening the dura during surgery, the left cerebellar hemisphere appeared bulging state and the bilateral cerebellar tonsils were hypoplastic. Outer thin membrane of the cyst was removed. The cyst has no communication with the subarachnoid space as well as with the forth ventricle. The cystic fluid was slightly yellowish, but had no Froin's sign. Reddish-gray color nodular area, which seemed to be similar to mural nodule macroscopically, was noted in the area of inner surface of the cyst. This part was removed. Histological findings of this area showed abnormal architecture with malarranged layer of cerebellar cortex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6626388

  5. Reference energy-altitude descent guidance: Simulator evaluation. [aircraft descent and fuel conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbot, K. H.; Knox, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Descent guidance was developed to provide a pilot with information to ake a fuel-conservative descent and cross a designated geographical waypoint at a preselected altitude and airspeed. The guidance was designed to reduce fuel usage during the descent and reduce the mental work load associated with planning a fuel-conservative descent. A piloted simulation was conducted to evaluate the operational use of this guidance concept. The results of the simulation tests show that the use of the guidance reduced fuel consumption and mental work load during the descent. Use of the guidance also decreased the airspeed error, but had no effect on the altitude error when the designated waypoint was crossed. Physical work load increased with the use of the guidance, but remained well within acceptable levels. The pilots found the guidance easy to use as presented and reported that it would be useful in an operational environment.

  6. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  7. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy

  8. Linking oscillations in cerebellar circuits

    PubMed Central

    Courtemanche, Richard; Robinson, Jennifer C.; Aponte, Daniel I.

    2013-01-01

    In many neuroscience fields, the study of local and global rhythmicity has been receiving increasing attention. These network influences could directly impact on how neuronal groups interact together, organizing for different contexts. The cerebellar cortex harbors a variety of such local circuit rhythms, from the rhythms in the cerebellar cortex per se, or those dictated from important afferents. We present here certain cerebellar oscillatory phenomena that have been recorded in rodents and primates. Those take place in a range of frequencies: from the more known oscillations in the 4–25 Hz band, such as the olivocerebellar oscillatory activity and the granule cell layer oscillations, to the more recently reported slow (<1 Hz oscillations), and the fast (>150 Hz) activity in the Purkinje cell layer. Many of these oscillations appear spontaneously in the circuits, and are modulated by behavioral imperatives. We review here how those oscillations are recorded, some of their modulatory mechanisms, and also identify some of the cerebellar nodes where they could interact. A particular emphasis has been placed on how these oscillations could be modulated by movement and certain neuropathological manifestations. Many of those oscillations could have a definite impact on the way information is processed in the cerebellum and how it interacts with other structures in a variety of contexts. PMID:23908606

  9. [Acute cerebellar ataxia in childhood].

    PubMed

    Betancourt Fursow, Yaline; Jimnez Len, Juan Carlos; Jimnez Betancourt, Cristina S

    2013-01-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia of childhood is the most frequent neurological complication of chickenpox virus infection. Acute cerebellar ataxia is categorized within the group of acute postinfectious complications. The aims of this study were: (I) to evaluate the clinical presentation, management, and follow-up of children hospitalized due to acute cerebellar ataxia in a tertiary pediatric hospital, where immunization for chickenpox is not available, and (II) to describe the differential diagnosis of acute postinfectious cerebellitis. We evaluated 95 patients with acute cerebellar ataxia. The diagnostic criteria for acute ataxia were: Acute-onset loss of coordination or gait difficulties, with or without nystagmus, lasting less than 48 hours in a previously healthy child. All children met the inclusion criteria, except those with drug-induced ataxia in whom duration should be less than 24 hours for inclusion in the study. The data were recorded in a clinical pediatrics and neurological chart. Among immunosuppressed patients acute cerebellar ataxia was most frequently due to chickenpox. Most of the patients were male. Age at presentation ranged from preschool to 5 years of age. Time lapse between presentation of the rash and hospital admission ranged from 1 to 3 days. CSF study was performed in 59.5% of the cases. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scan showed edema in 33.3%. Intravenous acyclovir was used in 23 patients, however, no significant differences were found in clinical manifestations and follow-up between treated and untreated patients. Ataxia was the first clinical manifestation. Mean hospital stay ranged from 2 to 11 days with a mean of 4 days. PMID:24072049

  10. Mars Science Laboratory Rover and Descent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    In this February 17, 2009, image, NASA's Mars Science Laboratory rover is attached to the spacecraft's descent stage. The image was taken inside the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    This is the way the spacecraft will look after it comes out of its protective aeroshell and is descending to the Martian surface in 2012. Here, the descent stage sits on top of the rover, with its eight main engines straddling the rover structure. The rover is the big white box below the descent stage. At this point, the rover lacks its appendages (robotic arm, mast and most wheels), as these elements are still being assembled and were not needed for space-simulation testing of the spacecraft in late 2008.

  11. [Induction chemotherapy in T1 and T2 tumors of the tonsillar area].

    PubMed

    Lartigau, E; Eschwege, F; Lusinchi, A; Wibault, P; Luboinski, B

    1993-01-01

    Tumors of the tonsillar Fossa classed T1T2 are generally treated by irradiation with high rates of local control. Patient survival is related to the risk of developing distant metastatic disease and second head and neck cancers. The use of induction chemotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck gives a high rate of clinical tumor response and for this reason, it is increasingly used in standard treatment regimens. However, the long term results in terms of improved local control and improved survival (from a decreased rate of metastases) has not been clearly demonstrated. In addition, the toxicity of primary chemotherapy is not negligible. After review of the literature, the role of induction chemotherapy should be evaluated only in reference to randomized trials. PMID:8317863

  12. Treatment of a Patient with Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia by the Anterior Tonsillar Pillar Method

    PubMed Central

    Isbir, Cemil Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    We describe the case of a 65-year-old patient with glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Pain was triggered by swallowing, yawning, or cold food. We used the anterior tonsillar pillar method for the injection of drugs; a relatively new glossopharyngeal nerve (GPN) block which was described by Benumof (Anesthesiology 1991;75:1094-1096). Performing this GPN block, daily levobupivacaine (Chirocaine 5 mg/ml) and oral amitriptyline (Laroxyl 10 mg) were given, as well as methylprednisolone acetate injectable suspension (Depo-Medrol 40 mg/ml) once only at the beginning of the treatment. A 010 point visual analogue scale was used daily to evaluate the pain. Pain was successfully controlled with a steroid added to the GPN block and orally administered tricyclic antidepressant. We think that this treatment is effective for glossopharyngeal neuropathy and could be of interest to pain management physicians. PMID:21468360

  13. Assessment of GPS radiosonde descent data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Ratnam, M.; Pravallika, N.; Babu, S. Ravindra; Basha, G.; Pramitha, M.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.

    2014-04-01

    Radiosondes are widely used to obtain basic meteorological parameters such as pressure (P), temperature (T), relative humidity (RH) and horizontal winds during the balloon ascent up to the altitude of balloon burst, usually ~ 32-35 km. Data from the radiosondes released from Gadanki (13.5 N, 79.2 E), a tropical station in India, have been collected during the ascent and during the descent as well without attaching any parachute or its equivalent since the year 2008. In the present study an attempt has been made to characterize the radiosonde descent data with the main objective of exploring its usefulness and reliability for scientific purposes. We compared the data obtained during ascent and descent phases of the same sounding. The mean differences in T, RH and horizontal winds between ascent and descent data are found to be small and are sometimes even within the uncertainty of the measurements and/or expected diurnal variation itself. The very good consistency observed between the ascent and the descent data shows that one more profile of the meteorological parameters can be constructed within 3 h of time of balloon launch practically at no additional cost. Further checks are done by utilizing the 3-hourly radiosonde observations collected during the Tropical Tropopause Dynamics campaigns conducted at Gadanki. In the process of checking the consistency between the radiosonde ascent and descent data, several new findings are arrived at and are reported in this study. In general, it has taken more than half an hour for the balloon to reach the ground from the burst altitude. It is also observed that the fall velocity is close to 10 m s-1 near the surface. Finally, it is suggested to record the observations also when the balloon is descending as this information is useful for scientific purposes.

  14. Assessment of GPS radiosonde descent data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Ratnam, M.; Pravallika, N.; babu, S. Ravindra; Basha, G.; Pramitha, M.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.

    2013-12-01

    Radiosondes are widely used to obtain basic meteorological parameters such as pressure (P), temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), and horizontal winds during the balloon ascent up to the altitude of balloon burst, usually ∼32-35 km. Data from the radiosondes released from Gadanki (13.5 N, 79.2 E), a tropical station in India, has been collected during the ascent and during the descent as well without attaching any parachute or its equivalent since the year 2008. In the present study an attempt has been made to characterize the radiosonde descent data with the main objective of exploring its usefulness and reliability for scientific purposes. We compared the data obtained during ascent and descent phases of the same sounding. The mean differences in T, RH and horizontal winds between ascent and descent data are found to be small and are sometimes even within the uncertainty of the measurements and/or expected diurnal variation itself. The very good consistency observed between the ascent and the descent data shows that one more profile of the meteorological parameters can be constructed within 3 h of time of balloon launch practically at no additional cost. Further checks are done by utilizing the 3 hourly radiosonde observations collected during the Tropical Tropopause Dynamics campaign conducted at Gadanki. In the process of checking the consistency between the radiosonde ascent and descent data, several new findings are arrived at and are reported in this study. In general, it has taken more than half-an-hour for the balloon to reach the ground from the burst altitude. It is also observed that the fall velocity is close to 10 m s-1 near the surface. Finally, it is suggested to record also the observations when the balloon is descending as this information is also useful for scientific purposes.

  15. Entry, Descent, and Landing With Propulsive Deceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    The future exploration of the Solar System will require innovations in transportation and the use of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems at many planetary landing sites. The cost of space missions has always been prohibitive, and using the natural planetary and planet s moons atmospheres for entry, descent, and landing can reduce the cost, mass, and complexity of these missions. This paper will describe some of the EDL ideas for planetary entry and survey the overall technologies for EDL that may be attractive for future Solar System missions.

  16. America's Descent into Madness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes America's descent into madness under the regime of neoliberalism that has emerged in the United States since the late 1970s. In part, this is due to the emergence of a public pedagogy produced by the corporate-owned media that now saturates Americans with a market-driven value system that undermines those formative…

  17. Research study: STS-1 Orbiter Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The conversion of STS-1 orbiter descent data from AVE-SESAME contact programs to the REEDA system and the reduction of raw radiosonde data is summarized. A first difference program, contact data program, plot data program, and 30 second data program were developed. Six radiosonde soundings were taken. An example of the outputs of each of the programs is presented.

  18. Descent Assisted Split Habitat Lunar Lander Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Goodliff, Kandyce; Cornelius, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The Descent Assisted Split Habitat (DASH) lunar lander concept utilizes a disposable braking stage for descent and a minimally sized pressurized volume for crew transport to and from the lunar surface. The lander can also be configured to perform autonomous cargo missions. Although a braking-stage approach represents a significantly different operational concept compared with a traditional two-stage lander, the DASH lander offers many important benefits. These benefits include improved crew egress/ingress and large-cargo unloading; excellent surface visibility during landing; elimination of the need for deep-throttling descent engines; potentially reduced plume-surface interactions and lower vertical touchdown velocity; and reduced lander gross mass through efficient mass staging and volume segmentation. This paper documents the conceptual study on various aspects of the design, including development of sortie and outpost lander configurations and a mission concept of operations; the initial descent trajectory design; the initial spacecraft sizing estimates and subsystem design; and the identification of technology needs

  19. America's Descent into Madness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes America's descent into madness under the regime of neoliberalism that has emerged in the United States since the late 1970s. In part, this is due to the emergence of a public pedagogy produced by the corporate-owned media that now saturates Americans with a market-driven value system that undermines those formative

  20. 14 CFR 23.69 - Enroute climb/descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... climb/descent. (a) All engines operating. The steady gradient and rate of climb must be determined at.... The steady gradient and rate of climb/descent must be determined at each weight, altitude, and...

  1. 14 CFR 23.69 - Enroute climb/descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... climb/descent. (a) All engines operating. The steady gradient and rate of climb must be determined at.... The steady gradient and rate of climb/descent must be determined at each weight, altitude, and...

  2. A Descent Rate Control Approach to Developing an Autonomous Descent Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Travis D.

    Circular parachutes have been used for aerial payload/personnel deliveries for over 100 years. In the past two decades, significant work has been done to improve the landing accuracies of cargo deliveries for humanitarian and military applications. This dissertation discusses the approach developed in which a circular parachute is used in conjunction with an electro-mechanical reefing system to manipulate the landing location. Rather than attempt to steer the autonomous descent vehicle directly, control of the landing location is accomplished by modifying the amount of time spent in a particular wind layer. Descent rate control is performed by reversibly reefing the parachute canopy. The first stage of the research investigated the use of a single actuation during descent (with periodic updates), in conjunction with a curvilinear target. Simulation results using real-world wind data are presented, illustrating the utility of the methodology developed. Additionally, hardware development and flight-testing of the single actuation autonomous descent vehicle are presented. The next phase of the research focuses on expanding the single actuation descent rate control methodology to incorporate a multi-actuation path-planning system. By modifying the parachute size throughout the descent, the controllability of the system greatly increases. The trajectory planning methodology developed provides a robust approach to accurately manipulate the landing location of the vehicle. The primary benefits of this system are the inherent robustness to release location errors and the ability to overcome vehicle uncertainties (mass, parachute size, etc.). A separate application of the path-planning methodology is also presented. An in-flight path-prediction system was developed for use in high-altitude ballooning by utilizing the path-planning methodology developed for descent vehicles. The developed onboard system improves landing location predictions in-flight using collected flight information during the ascent and descent. Simulation and real-world flight tests (using the developed low-cost hardware) demonstrate the significance of the improvements achievable when flying the developed system.

  3. Cerebellar Degeneration Associated with Sjgren's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Jung; Lee, Myoung Chong; Lee, Jae-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Background Neurologic manifestations of primary Sjgren's syndrome (PSS) have been reported to vary from sensory polyneuropathy to encephalopathy or psychiatric problems. However, marked cerebellar degeneration associated with PSS has rarely been reported. Case Report We describe a patient with Sjgren's syndrome who exhibited rapidly progressive cerebellar ataxia, nystagmus, cognitive decline, and psychiatric problems. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed marked atrophy of the cerebellum, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography demonstrated glucose hypometabolism of the cerebellum. Conclusions Our PSS patient exhibited a progressive course of cerebellar syndrome, as evidenced by cerebellar atrophy on serial brain images. PMID:22787501

  4. Cerebellar cryptococcoma in an immunocompetent adult patient.

    PubMed

    Nakwan, Narongwit; Songjamrat, Apiradee; Tungsinmonkong, Kobkul; Nakwan, Narongsak

    2009-09-01

    Isolated cerebellar cryptococcoma in an immunocompetent patient is a rare condition. We report a case of an immunocompetent adult with isolated cerebellar cryptococcoma. The patient presented with chronic headaches for one year and was found to have multiple cerebellar abscesses on imaging. Our patient underwent resection of the lesion and the cryptococcoma was subsequently diagnosed by histological examination. We initiated treatment with antifungal medicine and was successfully treated after 6 months of therapy. A cryptococcoma may be a cause of isolated cerebellar abscess in immunocompetent patients despite not finding cryptococcal antigen in the serum. PMID:19842386

  5. The cerebellum, cerebellar disorders, and cerebellar research--two centuries of discoveries.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Research on the cerebellum is evolving rapidly. The exquisiteness of the cerebellar circuitry with a unique geometric arrangement has fascinated researchers from numerous disciplines. The painstaking works of pioneers of these last two centuries, such as Rolando, Flourens, Luciani, Babinski, Holmes, Cajal, Larsell, or Eccles, still exert a strong influence in the way we approach cerebellar functions. Advances in genetic studies, detailed molecular and cellular analyses, profusion of brain imaging techniques, emergence of behavioral assessments, and reshaping of models of cerebellar function are generating an immense amount of knowledge. Simultaneously, a better definition of cerebellar disorders encountered in the clinic is emerging. The essentials of a trans-disciplinary blending are expanding. The analysis of the literature published these last two decades indicates that the gaps between domains of research are vanishing. The launch of the society for research on the cerebellum (SRC) illustrates how cerebellar research is burgeoning. This special issue gathers the contributions of the inaugural conference of the SRC dedicated to the mechanisms of cerebellar function. Contributions were brought together around five themes: (1) cerebellar development, death, and regeneration; (2) cerebellar circuitry: processing and function; (3) mechanisms of cerebellar plasticity and learning; (4) cerebellar function: timing, prediction, and/or coordination?; (5) anatomical and disease perspectives on cerebellar function. PMID:18855093

  6. Consensus paper: management of degenerative cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed

    Ilg, W; Bastian, A J; Boesch, S; Burciu, R G; Celnik, P; Claaen, J; Feil, K; Kalla, R; Miyai, I; Nachbauer, W; Schls, L; Strupp, M; Synofzik, M; Teufel, J; Timmann, D

    2014-04-01

    Treatment of motor symptoms of degenerative cerebellar ataxia remains difficult. Yet there are recent developments that are likely to lead to significant improvements in the future. Most desirable would be a causative treatment of the underlying cerebellar disease. This is currently available only for a very small subset of cerebellar ataxias with known metabolic dysfunction. However, increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of hereditary ataxia should lead to an increasing number of medically sensible drug trials. In this paper, data from recent drug trials in patients with recessive and dominant cerebellar ataxias will be summarized. There is consensus that up to date, no medication has been proven effective. Aminopyridines and acetazolamide are the only exception, which are beneficial in patients with episodic ataxia type 2. Aminopyridines are also effective in a subset of patients presenting with downbeat nystagmus. As such, all authors agreed that the mainstays of treatment of degenerative cerebellar ataxia are currently physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. For many years, well-controlled rehabilitation studies in patients with cerebellar ataxia were lacking. Data of recently published studies show that coordinative training improves motor function in both adult and juvenile patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the well-known contribution of the cerebellum to motor learning, possible mechanisms underlying improvement will be outlined. There is consensus that evidence-based guidelines for the physiotherapy of degenerative cerebellar ataxia need to be developed. Future developments in physiotherapeutical interventions will be discussed including application of non-invasive brain stimulation. PMID:24222635

  7. Consensus Paper: Management of Degenerative Cerebellar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ilg, W.; Bastian, A. J.; Boesch, S.; Burciu, R. G.; Celnik, P.; Claaßen, J.; Feil, K.; Kalla, R.; Miyai, I.; Nachbauer, W.; Schöls, L.; Strupp, M.; Synofzik, M.; Teufel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of motor symptoms of degenerative cerebellar ataxia remains difficult. Yet there are recent developments that are likely to lead to significant improvements in the future. Most desirable would be a causative treatment of the underlying cerebellar disease. This is currently available only for a very small subset of cerebellar ataxias with known metabolic dysfunction. However, increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of hereditary ataxia should lead to an increasing number of medically sensible drug trials. In this paper, data from recent drug trials in patients with recessive and dominant cerebellar ataxias will be summarized. There is consensus that up to date, no medication has been proven effective. Aminopyridines and acetazolamide are the only exception, which are beneficial in patients with episodic ataxia type 2. Aminopyridines are also effective in a subset of patients presenting with downbeat nystagmus. As such, all authors agreed that the mainstays of treatment of degenerative cerebellar ataxia are currently physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. For many years, well-controlled rehabilitation studies in patients with cerebellar ataxia were lacking. Data of recently published studies show that coordinative training improves motor function in both adult and juvenile patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the well-known contribution of the cerebellum to motor learning, possible mechanisms underlying improvement will be outlined. There is consensus that evidence-based guidelines for the physiotherapy of degenerative cerebellar ataxia need to be developed. Future developments in physiotherapeutical interventions will be discussed including application of non-invasive brain stimulation. PMID:24222635

  8. Learning of Sensory Sequences in Cerebellar Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frings, Markus; Boenisch, Raoul; Gerwig, Marcus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Timmann, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    A possible role of the cerebellum in detecting and recognizing event sequences has been proposed. The present study sought to determine whether patients with cerebellar lesions are impaired in the acquisition and discrimination of sequences of sensory stimuli of different modalities. A group of 26 cerebellar patients and 26 controls matched for

  9. Prevalence of Microorganisms and Immunoglobulins in Children with Tonsillar Hypertrophy and Adenoiditis

    PubMed Central

    Miramontes, Henrique Prestes; Fagundes, Djalma Jos; Jurgielewicz, Julia Coelho Lima e; Miramontes Neto, Haroldo Prestes; Oliveira, Renan Gianotto de; Oliveira, Gustavo Gianotto de; Souza, Maria Rosa Machado de

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:?Benign idiopathic tonsillar hypertrophy (HBI) may affect a child's quality of life and sleep. Several studies have sought to relate the clinical features of HBI with the infectious and/or immunologic changes that occur. Objective:?To increase the knowledge of the etiology of HBI. Data Synthesis:?From 2012 to 2013 we conducted a retrospective observational study of 101 children with HBI who underwent tonsillectomies at Ambulatory ENT General Hospital of the East Zone of So Paulo City, a region with a poor socioeconomic population. Preoperative serologic results were available to confirm mononucleosis, cytomegalovirus, anti-streptolysin O (ASLO) and immunoglobulins. The mean patient age was 5.8 years (55% male, 45% female). Using the Mann-Whitney U test, we identified significant gender differences in the parameters of immunoglobulins (Ig) M (IgM), IgA, and IgE. Forty-seven percent of the patients had increased ASLO levels, and 37% had increased IgE levels. Conclusion:?An evaluation of a patient's serologic parameters and laboratory results may be relevant to the etiology and prevention of HBI. Based on the results obtained from the study sample, the identification of etiologic agents and causative factors remain a public health challenge that affects the quality of life of children. PMID:25992111

  10. Tonsillar application of AT-2 SIV affords partial protection against rectal challenge with SIVmac239

    PubMed Central

    Vagenas, Panagiotis; Williams, Vennansha G.; Piatak, Michael; Bess, Julian W.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Blanchard, James L.; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    While mucosal responses are important for preventing infections with HIV, the optimal strategies for inducing them remain unclear. To evaluate vaccine strategies targeting the oral mucosal lymphoid tissue inductive sites as an approach to provide immunity at distal sites, we vaccinated healthy macaques via the palatine/lingual tonsils with aldrithiol 2 (AT-2) inactivated SIVmac239, combined with CpG-C immunostimulatory oligonucleotide (CpG-C ISS-ODN , C274) as the adjuvant. Macaques received 5 doses of C274 or control ODN C661 and AT-2 SIV on the tonsillar tissues every 6 weeks before being challenged rectally with SIVmac239, 8 weeks after the last immunization. Although no T or B cell responses were detected in the blood prior to challenge, Ab responses were detected in the rectum . Immunization with AT-2 SIV significantly reduced the frequency of infection compared to non-immunized controls, irrespective of adjuvant. In the vaccinated animals that became infected, peak viremias were somewhat reduced. SIV-specific responses were detected in the blood once animals became infected with no detectable differences between the differently immunized groups and the controls. This work provides evidence that vaccine immunogens applied to the oral mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues can provide benefit against rectal challenge, a finding with important implications for mucosal vaccination strategies. PMID:19779309

  11. [Low-temperature radiofrequency technology treatment of spontaneous tonsillar hemorrhage: a case report].

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongyue; Gu, Jianhua

    2014-10-01

    Patient, 30-year-old, male,was admitted to our hospital because of discontinuously spit fresh blood without any inducing factors for three days. In the course, the patient suffered mild dry sensation of pharyngeal, poor spirit condition, fatigue, poor sleep, poor appetite and was with black stool 2 times. Physical examination: T36. 6C, R 21/min, P98/min, BP135/90 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa). Bilateral tonsils were III hypertrophy and with scar shape surfaces. The left tonsil's surface had longitudinal small blood vessels markedly dilated. His oropharynx, laryngopharynx and laryngeal did not be find any obvious bleeding sites. Laboratory findings: WBC 13.82 x 10(9)/L, N 0.8084, L 0.1632, Hb 81.00 g/L, HCT 25.20; PT 9.60 s, APTT 25.50 s, TT 15.80 s, FIB 1.900 g/L. After 3 hours of admission,the patient spit out fresh blood again,checked the body to see:the left peri-tonsil with fresh blood and found a slowly bleeding site at the 1/3 junction of the middle lower part of left tonsil's rear surface, the size was about 0.5 cm x 0.6 cm. We finally diagnosed spontaneous tonsillar hemorrhage and successfully managed with low-temperature radiofrequency technology. PMID:25764770

  12. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae exploits cytokeratin 18-positive epithelial cells of porcine tonsillar crypts as an invasion gateway.

    PubMed

    Harada, Tomoyuki; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Eguchi, Masahiro; Shi, Fang; Sato, Masumi; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Shimoji, Yoshihiro

    2013-06-15

    Tonsils are important organs for mucosal immunity and are gateways for various pathogens, including bacteria and viruses. The purpose of the present study was to reveal how Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, the causative agent of swine erysipelas, invades the mucosal epithelium of the tonsils of pigs. Two germ-free piglets were orally infected with E. rhusiopathiae Koganei 65-0.15, an attenuated vaccine strain in Japan, and their tonsils of the soft palate were histologically examined four weeks after infection. Bacterial organisms were observed in dilated crypt lumens and a few epithelial cells of the crypt. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that some epithelial cells of the crypt were positive for cytokeratin (CK) 18, a specific marker for M cells in the Peyer's patches of pigs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that bacterial antigens were present in the cytoplasm of CK 18-positive epithelial cells. Furthermore, an ultramicroscopic examination revealed that the bacteria-containing epithelial cells did not have microfolds or microvilli, both of which are characteristic of membranous epithelial cells (M cells), and that they were in close contact with intraepithelial phagocytes. Thus, the present observations suggest that the tonsillar crypt epithelium is a site of persistent infection for orally administered E. rhusiopathiae, and the bacteria exploit cytokeratin 18-positive epithelial cells of the crypts as portals of entry into the body. PMID:23601839

  13. Cellular and molecular basis of cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Salvador; Andreu, Abraham; Mecklenburg, Nora; Echevarria, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering, and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification, and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function. PMID:23805080

  14. Kinetic analysis of stair descent: Part 1. Forwards step-over-step descent.

    PubMed

    Cluff, Tyler; Robertson, D Gordon E

    2011-03-01

    This study examined lower extremity biomechanics during the initiation of stair descent from an upright, static posture. Seventeen healthy subjects (aged 23±2.4 years) descended a five-step, steel-reinforced, wooden laboratory staircase (34° decline). Ten trials of stair descent were separated into two blocks of five trials. Beginning from an upright posture, subjects descended the staircase at their preferred velocity (0.53±0.082 m/s) and continued the length of the laboratory walkway (∼4 m). Joint mechanics were contrasted between gait cycles. Relative to the initiation cycle at the top of the staircase, the dissipative knee extensor (K3) and hip flexor (H2) moments and powers were independent of progression velocity and approximated steady-state (i.e., constant) values after the first cycle of the trail limb (Step 5 to Step 3). In contrast, a salient relationship was observed between progression velocity and ankle joint mechanics at initial-contact. The plantiflexor moment, power and work at initial-contact (A1) increased with centre of mass velocity. Our results demonstrate that while the knee extensor moment is the primary dissipater of mechanical energy in stair descent, the ankle plantiflexors are the primary dissipaters associated with increased progression velocity. In addition, the results show that steady-state stair descent may not be attained during the first gait cycle of the trail limb. These data shed light on locomotive strategies used in stair descent and can be applied in biomechanical models of human stair gait. Researchers and practitioners should take into consideration the influence of gait cycle and progression velocity when evaluating lower extremity function in stair descent. PMID:21292489

  15. X-linked disorders with cerebellar dysgenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    X-linked disorders with cerebellar dysgenesis (XLCD) are a genetically heterogeneous and clinically variable group of disorders in which the hallmark is a cerebellar defect (hypoplasia, atrophy or dysplasia) visible on brain imaging, caused by gene mutations or genomic imbalances on the X-chromosome. The neurological features of XLCD include hypotonia, developmental delay, intellectual disability, ataxia and/or other cerebellar signs. Normal cognitive development has also been reported. Cerebellar dysgenesis may be isolated or associated with other brain malformations or multiorgan involvement. There are at least 15 genes on the X-chromosome that have been constantly or occasionally associated with a pathological cerebellar phenotype. 8 XLCD loci have been mapped and several families with X-linked inheritance have been reported. Recently, two recurrent duplication syndromes in Xq28 have been associated with cerebellar hypoplasia. Given the report of several forms of XLCD and the excess of males with ataxia, this group of conditions is probably underestimated and families of patients with neuroradiological and clinical evidence of a cerebellar disorder should be counseled for high risk of X-linked inheritance. PMID:21569638

  16. Cerebellar Motor Function in Spina Bifida Meningomyelocele

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Maureen; Salman, Michael S.; Juranek, Jenifer; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2010-01-01

    Spina bifida meningomyelocele (SBM), a congenital neurodevelopmental disorder, involves dysmorphology of the cerebellum, and its most obvious manifestations are motor deficits. This paper reviews cerebellar neuropathology and motor function across several motor systems well studied in SBM in relation to current models of cerebellar motor and timing function. Children and adults with SBM have widespread motor deficits in trunk, upper limbs, eyes, and speech articulators that are broadly congruent with those observed in adults with cerebellar lesions. The structure and function of the cerebellum are correlated with a range of motor functions. While motor learning is generally preserved in SBM, those motor functions requiring predictive signals and precise calibration of the temporal features of movement are impaired, resulting in deficits in smooth movement coordination as well as in the classical cerebellar triad of dysmetria, ataxia, and dysarthria. That motor function in individuals with SBM is disordered in a manner phenotypically similar to that in adult cerebellar lesions, and appears to involve similar deficits in predictive cerebellar motor control, suggests that age-based cerebellar motor plasticity is limited in individuals with this neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:20652468

  17. Effect of Prematurity on Cerebellar Growth.

    PubMed

    Sancak, Selim; Gursoy, Tugba; Imamoglu, Ebru Yal?n; Karatekin, Gner; Ovali, Fahri

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate cerebellar growth of preterm infants. Vermis height and transverse cerebellar diameter were measured by cranial ultrasonography in 38 preterm infants (27-32 weeks) at birth and term equivalent age. Measurements were compared with 40 term appropriate-for-gestational-age infants. Preterms at term equivalent age had larger vermis height than term infants (2.39 0.25 cm vs 2.25 0.18 cm, P = .005), whereas no significant difference was found in the transverse cerebellar diameter (5.32 0.38 cm vs 5.44 0.23 cm, P = .13). Vermis height and transverse cerebellar diameter of appropriate-for-gestational-age preterm infants (n = 29) were found larger than small-for-gestational-age ones (n = 9). Vermis height and transverse cerebellar diameter at term equivalent age of appropriate-for-gestational-age preterm infants born before and after 29 weeks of age showed no significant difference. Cerebellar growth is preserved in extreme preterms. However, being small for gestational age may have deleterious effects on cerebellar development. PMID:25971263

  18. System for Estimating Horizontal Velocity During Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Andrew; Cheng, Yang; Wilson, Reg; Goguen, Jay; Martin, Alejandro San; Leger, Chris; Matthies, Larry

    2007-01-01

    The descent image motion estimation system (DIMES) is a system of hardware and software, designed for original use in estimating the horizontal velocity of a spacecraft descending toward a landing on Mars. The estimated horizontal velocity is used in generating rocket-firing commands to reduce the horizontal velocity as part of an overall control scheme to minimize the landing impact. DIMES can also be used for estimating the horizontal velocity of a remotely controlled or autonomous aircraft for purposes of navigation and control.

  19. Paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia and the paraneoplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Sadaf; Recio, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia, also known as paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, is one of the wide array of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes in which neurological symptoms are indirectly caused by an underlying malignancy, most commonly gynecological, breast, or lung cancer or Hodgkin's lymphoma. We describe a patient with severe cerebellar dysfunction attributed to a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. The case highlights the need to look for paraneoplastic syndromesboth to discover malignancies early, at a treatable stage, and, as in our case, to address very distressing symptoms for the patient's relief even if the malignancy is not curable. PMID:25829659

  20. Regression Analysis of Top of Descent Location for Idle-thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel; Bronsvoort, Jesper; McDonald, Greg

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, multiple regression analysis is used to model the top of descent (TOD) location of user-preferred descent trajectories computed by the flight management system (FMS) on over 1000 commercial flights into Melbourne, Australia. The independent variables cruise altitude, final altitude, cruise Mach, descent speed, wind, and engine type were also recorded or computed post-operations. Both first-order and second-order models are considered, where cross-validation, hypothesis testing, and additional analysis are used to compare models. This identifies the models that should give the smallest errors if used to predict TOD location for new data in the future. A model that is linear in TOD altitude, final altitude, descent speed, and wind gives an estimated standard deviation of 3.9 nmi for TOD location given the trajec- tory parameters, which means about 80% of predictions would have error less than 5 nmi in absolute value. This accuracy is better than demonstrated by other ground automation predictions using kinetic models. Furthermore, this approach would enable online learning of the model. Additional data or further knowl- edge of algorithms is necessary to conclude definitively that no second-order terms are appropriate. Possible applications of the linear model are described, including enabling arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the FMS even in congested airspace. In particular, a model for TOD location that is linear in the independent variables would enable decision support tool human-machine interfaces for which a kinetic approach would be computationally too slow.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Families Resources for Health Professionals What glossary definitions help with understanding lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia? ataxia ; ... 22, 2016 Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications U.S. National Library of Medicine , National Institutes of ...

  2. Cerebellar vermian hypoplasia in a Cocker Spaniel

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji-Hey; Kim, Dae-Yong; Yoon, Jung-hee; Kim, Wan Hee

    2008-01-01

    An eight-week-old female Cocker Spaniel was presented with ataxia, dysmetria and intention tremor. At 16 weeks, the clinical signs did not progress. Investigation including imaging studies of the skull and cerebrospinal fluid analysis were performed. The computed tomography revealed a cyst-like dilation at the level of the fourth ventricle associated with vermal defect in the cerebellum. After euthanasia, a cerebellar hypoplasia with vermal defect was identified on necropsy. A polymerase chain reaction amplification of cerebellar tissue revealed the absence of an in utero parvoviral infection. Therefore, the cerebellar hypoplasia in this puppy was consistent with diagnosis of primary cerebellar malformation comparable to Dandy-Walker syndrome in humans. PMID:18487946

  3. [Elderly patient with cerebellar malignant astrocytoma].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Hideya; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Moroi, Junta; Hanyu, Noriaki; Sawada, Motofumi; Kobayashi, Norikata; Mutou, Tatsuji; Hikichi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Akifumi; Yasui, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Yasuji

    2008-09-01

    Malignant cerebellar astrocytoma is very rare and the prognosis is extremely poor. We report herein the case of an elderly patient with malignant cerebellar astrocytoma. This 80-year-old man initially presented with dizziness and ataxia of the right hand. Metastatic cerebellar tumor was diagnosed on first admission, based on a past history of colon cancer treated by surgery and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings supporting the diagnosis of metastasis. The patient underwent gamma knife surgery (20 Gy) and was discharged. Follow-up after discharge was insufficient. Two years after gamma knife surgery, he returned to our hospital complaining of dizziness, headache, and right limb ataxia. MRI revealed a cystic mass in the right cerebellar hemisphere, and the lesion was removed by right suboccipital craniotomy. The tumor represented malignant astrocytoma. Optimal management of patients harboring sush difficult. to-treat tumors, including the role of gamma-knife radiosurgery, is discussed. PMID:18800635

  4. Reversible hypomagnesaemia-induced subacute cerebellar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sedehizadeh, Saam; Keogh, Michael; Wills, Adrian J

    2011-08-01

    Magnesium is the second most abundant intracellular cation and is a fundamental cofactor in a multitude of cellular enzymatic reactions. Magnesium deficiency causes diverse clinical features predominantly due to cardio- and neurotoxicity. We describe a case of severe hypomagnesaemia associated with intermittent downbeat nystagmus, cerebellar ataxia, generalised convulsions and a supraventricular tachycardia. On MRI imaging, a transient lesion of the cerebellar nodulus was observed, which has not, to our knowledge, been previously described in isolated hypomagnesaemia. PMID:20607440

  5. Cerebellar granulocytic sarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Baytan, Birol; Evim, Melike Sezgin; Gne?, Adalet Meral; Kocaeli, Hasan; Balaban, Saduman; Korfal?, Ender; Tzner, Nkhet

    2012-06-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma is a rare tumor composed of immature granulocytic cells that is usually associated with acute myelogenous leukemia. Intraparenchymal cranial localization without skull, meningeal, or bone marrow invasion is extremely rare. The mechanisms of intraparenchymal cranial localization of GS remains unknown, as only 10 cases with cerebellar granulocytic sarcoma have been previously reported. Herein, we report a four year old boy with cerebellar localization of granulocytic sarcoma. PMID:24744651

  6. Cerebellar Granulocytic Sarcoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Baytan, Birol; Evim, Melike Sezgin; Gne?, Adalet Meral; Kocaeli, Hasan; Balaban, ?aduman; Korfal?, Ender; Tzner, Nkhet

    2012-01-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma is a rare tumor composed of immature granulocytic cells that is usually associated with acute myelogenous leukemia. Intraparenchymal cranial localization without skull, meningeal, or bone marrow invasion is extremely rare. The mechanisms of intraparenchymal cranial localization of GS remains unknown, as only 10 cases with cerebellar granulocytic sarcoma have been previously reported. Herein, we report a four year old boy with cerebellar localization of granulocytic sarcoma. PMID:24744651

  7. Synchrony and neural coding in cerebellar circuits

    PubMed Central

    Person, Abigail L.; Raman, Indira M.

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum regulates complex movements and is also implicated in cognitive tasks, and cerebellar dysfunction is consequently associated not only with movement disorders, but also with conditions like autism and dyslexia. How information is encoded by specific cerebellar firing patterns remains debated, however. A central question is how the cerebellar cortex transmits its integrated output to the cerebellar nuclei via GABAergic synapses from Purkinje neurons. Possible answers come from accumulating evidence that subsets of Purkinje cells synchronize their firing during behaviors that require the cerebellum. Consistent with models predicting that coherent activity of inhibitory networks has the capacity to dictate firing patterns of target neurons, recent experimental work supports the idea that inhibitory synchrony may regulate the response of cerebellar nuclear cells to Purkinje inputs, owing to the interplay between unusually fast inhibitory synaptic responses and high rates of intrinsic activity. Data from multiple laboratories lead to a working hypothesis that synchronous inhibitory input from Purkinje cells can set the timing and rate of action potentials produced by cerebellar nuclear cells, thereby relaying information out of the cerebellum. If so, then changing spatiotemporal patterns of Purkinje activity would allow different subsets of inhibitory neurons to control cerebellar output at different times. Here we explore the evidence for and against the idea that a synchrony code defines, at least in part, the inputoutput function between the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. We consider the literature on the existence of simple spike synchrony, convergence of Purkinje neurons onto nuclear neurons, and intrinsic properties of nuclear neurons that contribute to responses to inhibition. Finally, we discuss factors that may disrupt or modulate a synchrony code and describe the potential contributions of inhibitory synchrony to other motor circuits. PMID:23248585

  8. Cerebellar Purkinje cell activity drives motor learning

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Vu, T.D.Barbara; Kimpo, Rhea R; Rinaldi, Jacob M; Kohli, Arunima; Zeng, Hongkui; Deisseroth, Karl; Raymond, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    The climbing fiber input to the cerebellar cortex is thought to provide instructive signals that drive the induction of motor skill learning. We found that optogenetic activation of Purkinje cells, the sole output neurons of the cerebellar cortex, can also drive motor learning in mice. This dual control over the induction of learning by climbing fibers and Purkinje cells can expand the learning capacity of motor circuits. PMID:24162651

  9. Expression of CC chemokine receptor 7 in tonsillar cancer predicts cervical nodal metastasis, systemic relapse and survival

    PubMed Central

    Pitkin, L; Luangdilok, S; Corbishley, C; Wilson, P O G; Dalton, P; Bray, D; Mady, S; Williamson, P; Odutoye, T; Rhys Evans, P; Syrigos, K N; Nutting, C M; Barbachano, Y; Eccles, S; Harrington, K J

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) in squamous cell cancer of the tonsil with respect to patterns of spread, relapse-free, overall and disease-specific survival. Eighty-four patients with squamous cell cancer of the tonsil were identified. There was a male predominance of 3?:?1 and the median age at diagnosis was 53 (range 3586) years. The median duration of follow-up was 33 (range 2124) months. There was a significant association between CCR7 immunopositivity and synchronous cervical nodal metastasis in patients with tonsillar cancer (Spearman's correlation coefficient 0.564; P<0.001). Relapse-free (P=0.0175), overall (P=0.0136) and disease-specific (P=0.0062) survival rates were significantly lower in patients whose tumours expressed high levels of CCR7. On multivariate analysis, high-level CCR7 staining predicted relapse-free (hazard ratio 3.0, 95% confidence intervals 1.18.0, P=0.026) and disease-specific (hazard ratio 10.2, 95% confidence intervals 2.148.6, P=0.004) survival. Fifteen percent of patients with the highest level of tumour CCR7 immunopositivity relapsed with systemic metastases. These data demonstrated that CCR7 expression was associated with cervical nodal and systemic metastases from tonsillar cancers. High levels of CCR7 expression predicted a poor prognosis. PMID:17687340

  10. 43 CFR 10.14 - Lineal descent and cultural affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. 10.14 Section 10.14 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS General 10.14 Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. (a) General. This section identifies...

  11. 25 CFR 11.711 - Descent and distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Descent and distribution. 11.711 Section 11.711 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Probate Proceedings 11.711 Descent and distribution. (a) The court shall distribute...

  12. 25 CFR 11.711 - Descent and distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Descent and distribution. 11.711 Section 11.711 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Probate Proceedings 11.711 Descent and distribution. (a) The court shall distribute...

  13. Error Analysis of Stochastic Gradient Descent Ranking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Tang, Yi; Li, Luoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Xuelong; Tang, Yuanyan

    2012-12-31

    Ranking is always an important task in machine learning and information retrieval, e.g., collaborative filtering, recommender systems, drug discovery, etc. A kernel-based stochastic gradient descent algorithm with the least squares loss is proposed for ranking in this paper. The implementation of this algorithm is simple, and an expression of the solution is derived via a sampling operator and an integral operator. An explicit convergence rate for leaning a ranking function is given in terms of the suitable choices of the step size and the regularization parameter. The analysis technique used here is capacity independent and is novel in error analysis of ranking learning. Experimental results on real-world data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in ranking tasks, which verifies the theoretical analysis in ranking error. PMID:23292808

  14. Error analysis of stochastic gradient descent ranking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Tang, Yi; Li, Luoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Xuelong; Tang, Yuanyan

    2013-06-01

    Ranking is always an important task in machine learning and information retrieval, e.g., collaborative filtering, recommender systems, drug discovery, etc. A kernel-based stochastic gradient descent algorithm with the least squares loss is proposed for ranking in this paper. The implementation of this algorithm is simple, and an expression of the solution is derived via a sampling operator and an integral operator. An explicit convergence rate for leaning a ranking function is given in terms of the suitable choices of the step size and the regularization parameter. The analysis technique used here is capacity independent and is novel in error analysis of ranking learning. Experimental results on real-world data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in ranking tasks, which verifies the theoretical analysis in ranking error. PMID:24083315

  15. Distributed Control by Lagrangian Steepest Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.; Bieniawski, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Often adaptive, distributed control can be viewed as an iterated game between independent players. The coupling between the players mixed strategies, arising as the system evolves from one instant to the next, is determined by the system designer. Information theory tells us that the most likely joint strategy of the players, given a value of the expectation of the overall control objective function, is the minimizer of a function o the joint strategy. So the goal of the system designer is to speed evolution of the joint strategy to that Lagrangian mhimbhgpoint,lowerthe expectated value of the control objective function, and repeat Here we elaborate the theory of algorithms that do this using local descent procedures, and that thereby achieve efficient, adaptive, distributed control.

  16. Planetary entry, descent, and landing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichkhadze, K.; Vorontsov, V.; Polyakov, A.; Ivankov, A.; Taalas, P.; Pellinen, R.; Harri, A.-M.; Linkin, V.

    2003-04-01

    Martian meteorological lander (MML) is intended for landing on the Martian surface in order to monitor the atmosphere at landing point for one Martian year. MMLs shall become the basic elements of a global network of meteorological mini-landers, observing the dynamics of changes of the atmospheric parameters on the Red Planet. The MML main scientific tasks are as follows: (1) Study of vertical structure of the Martian atmosphere throughout the MML descent; (2) On-surface meteorological observations for one Martian year. One of the essential factors influencing the lander's design is its entry, descent, and landing (EDL) sequence. During Phase A of the MML development, five different options for the lander's design were carefully analyzed. All of these options ensure the accomplishment of the above-mentioned scientific tasks with high effectiveness. CONCEPT A (conventional approach): Two lander options (with a parachute system + airbag and an inflatable airbrake + airbag) were analyzed. They are similar in terms of fulfilling braking phases and completely analogous in landing by means of airbags. CONCEPT B (innovative approach): Three lander options were analyzed. The distinguishing feature is the presence of inflatable braking units (IBU) in their configurations. SELECTED OPTION (innovative approach): Incorporating a unique design approach and modern technologies, the selected option of the lander represents a combination of the options analyzed in the framework of Concept B study. Currently, the selected lander option undergoes systems testing (Phase D1). Several MMLs can be delivered to Mars in frameworks of various missions as primary or piggybacking payload: (1) USA-led "Mars Scout" (2007); (2) France-led "NetLander" (2007/2009); (3) Russia-led "Mars-Deimos-Phobos sample return" (2007); (4) Independent mission (currently under preliminary study); etc.

  17. Evidence of Bacterial Biofilms among Infected and Hypertrophied Tonsils in Correlation with the Microbiology, Histopathology, and Clinical Symptoms of Tonsillar Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alasil, Saad Musbah; Omar, Rahmat; Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Dhabaan, Ghulam N.

    2013-01-01

    Diseases of the tonsils are becoming more resistant to antibiotics due to the persistence of bacteria through the formation of biofilms. Therefore, understanding the microbiology and pathophysiology of such diseases represent an important step in the management of biofilm-related infections. We have isolated the microorganisms, evaluated their antimicrobial susceptibility, and detected the presence of bacterial biofilms in tonsillar specimens in correlation with the clinical manifestations of tonsillar diseases. Therefore, a total of 140 palatine tonsils were collected from 70 patients undergoing tonsillectomy at University Malaya Medical Centre. The most recovered isolate was Staphylococcus aureus (39.65%) followed by Haemophilus influenzae (18.53%). There was high susceptibility against all selected antibiotics except for cotrimoxazole. Bacterial biofilms were detected in 60% of patients and a significant percentage of patients demonstrated infection manifestation rather than obstruction. In addition, an association between clinical symptoms like snore, apnea, nasal obstruction, and tonsillar hypertrophy was found to be related to the microbiology of tonsils particularly to the presence of biofilms. In conclusion, evidence of biofilms in tonsils in correlation with the demonstrated clinical symptoms explains the recalcitrant nature of tonsillar diseases and highlights the importance of biofilm's early detection and prevention towards better therapeutic management of biofilm-related infections. PMID:24454384

  18. [Postpartum secondary cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with axial transtentorial and tonsillar herniation as a complication of intracranial hypotension syndrome after spinal anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Kraayvanger, L; Berlit, P

    2014-12-01

    We describe the case of a 28-year-old postpartum female patient who suffered from a secondary cerebral venous sinus thrombosis due to an intracranial hypotension syndrome with axial transtentorial and tonsillar herniation and the clinical signs of incarceration after spinal anaesthesia. PMID:25489758

  19. Bridle Device in Mars Science Laboratory Descent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This view of a portion of the descent stage of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory shows two of the stage's three spherical fuel tanks flanking the bridle device assembly. The photograph was taken in early October 2008 from the center of the descent stage looking outward. The top of the descent stage is toward the top of the image.

    The bridle device assembly is about two-thirds of a meter, or 2 feet, from top to bottom, and has two main parts. The cylinder on the top is the descent brake. The conical-shaped mechanism below that is the bridle assembly, including a spool of nylon and Vectran cords that will be attached to the rover.

    When pyrotechnic bolts fire to sever the rigid connection between the rover and the descent stage, gravity will pull the tethered rover away from the descent stage. The bridle or tether, attached to three points on the rover, will unspool from the bridle assembly, beginning from the larger-diameter portion. The rotation rate of the assembly, hence the descent rate of the rover, will be governed by the descent brake. Inside the housing of that brake are gear boxes and banks of mechanical resistors engineered to prevent the bridle from spooling out too quickly or too slowly. The length of the bridle will allow the rover to be lowered about 7.5 meters (25 feet) while still tethered to the descent stage.

    The Starsys division of SpaceDev Inc., Poway, Calif., provided the descent brake. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., built the bridle assembly. Vectran is a product of Kuraray Co. Ltd., Tokyo. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

  20. Neuropsychological consequences of cerebellar tumour resection in children: cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome in a paediatric population.

    PubMed

    Levisohn, L; Cronin-Golomb, A; Schmahmann, J D

    2000-05-01

    Acquired cerebellar lesions in adults have been shown to produce impairments in higher function as exemplified by the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. It is not yet known whether similar findings occur in children with acquired cerebellar lesions, and whether developmental factors influence their presentation. In studies to date, survivors of childhood cerebellar tumours who demonstrate long-term deficits in cognitive functions have undergone surgery as well as cranial irradiation or methotrexate treatment. Investigation of the effects of the cerebellar lesion independent of the known deleterious effects of these agents is important for understanding the role of the cerebellum in cognitive and affective development and for informing treatment and rehabilitation strategies. If the cerebellar contribution to cognition and affect is significant, then damage in childhood may influence a wide range of psychological processes, both as an immediate consequence and as these processes fail to develop normally later on. In this study we evaluated neuropsychological data in 19 children who underwent resection of cerebellar tumours but who received neither cranial irradiation nor methotrexate chemotherapy. Impairments were noted in executive function, including planning and sequencing, and in visual-spatial function, expressive language, verbal memory and modulation of affect. These deficits were common and in some cases could be dissociated from motor deficits. Lesions of the vermis in particular were associated with dysregulation of affect. Behavioural deficits were more apparent in older than younger children. These results reveal that clinically relevant neuropsychological changes may occur following cerebellar tumour resection in children. Age at the time of surgery and the site of the cerebellar lesion influence the neurobehavioural outcome. The results of the present study indicate that the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is evident in children as well as in adults, and they provide further clinical evidence that the cerebellum is an essential node in the distributed neural circuitry subserving higher-order behaviours. PMID:10775548

  1. Implications on cerebellar function from information coding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiming

    2008-01-01

    One function of the cerebellar cortex is to process information. There are at least two types of information. Temporal information is encoded in the timing pattern of action and synaptic potentials, whereas structural information is encoded in the spatial pattern of the cerebellar synaptic circuitry. Intuitively, analysis of highly complex information in the time domain would require a cerebellar cortex with structural complexity to match. Information theory offers a way to estimate quantitatively both types of information and thereby helps to test hypotheses or advance theories of cerebellar neurobiology. These estimates suggest: (i) That the mossy-fiber-granule-cell system carries far more (temporal) information than the climbing fiber system, (ii) that Purkinje cells extract only a fraction of the (temporal) information from their afferents, and (iii) that the cerebellar cortex has a large (spatial) information coding capacity. Concerning information, one can argue that the cerebellar cortex analyzes temporal information in its afferents as a search engine, in search of coincidental mossy fiber events based on timing cues provided by climbing fiber events. Results of successive searches are continuously being converted into structural information encoded in the spatial distribution pattern of granule-cell-Purkinje-cell synapses along granule cell axons, thereby providing an adaptive and indeed self-correcting dimension to the structural information code. The search engine operation involves cellular mechanisms acting on temporal events and is part of an associative learning process. The conversion and generation of structural information involves neuroplasticity mechanisms acting at the synaptic level, with electrophysiological as well as structural consequences, and may be part of the short- and long-term memory process. These and other attributes qualify the cerebellar cortex as a dynamic information processing center, contributing to memory and learning while linking motor output with sensory events. PMID:18418669

  2. Simulator Evaluation of a New Cockpit Descent Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Barry; Palmer, Everett; Smith, Nancy; Rosekind, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate flight crew performance of the "Precision Descent," a new cockpit procedure designed to support the Descent Advisor (DA), one of the components in a new air traffic control advisory system called the "Center-TRACON Automation System" (CTAS). The DA predicts when aircraft will reach a specific waypoint on the arrival route, and presents controllers with clearance advisories designed to improve the sequencing of arriving aircraft. The effectiveness of the DA depends on the aircraft's descent trajectory: where it begins descent, what speed it maintains, how fast and at what altitude it crosses the bottom-of-descent waypoint. The Precision Descent allows controllers to assign these descent parameters to the flight crew. A Field Evaluation of the DA was conducted in Denver in 1995. Three separate clearances using standard ATC phraseology were used to support the cockpit descent procedure during this evaluation. The number and length of these clearances caused problems for both controllers and flight crews, causing readback errors, repeat requests and procedure misunderstandings. These observations led to a focus group meeting in which controller and pilot participants in the 1995 FE assisted in the redesign of the procedure. The Precision Descent eliminates one clearance used in the earlier study, and greatly reduces the length of the remaining clearances. This was accomplished by using non-standard clearance phraseology that relies on a published procedure chart for correct interpretation. Eight type-rated flight crews flew eight Precision Descents in a Boeing 747-400 simulator. No training was provided: crews received either a procedure chart or a procedure chart with a flight manual bulletin describing procedure techniques. Video and digital data were recorded for each descent. Preliminary results indicate that moving information from the verbal clearance to the chart was successful: the shorter clearances and the procedure's default crossing restriction were understood, and procedure compliance of 81% was observed across all descents on six independent compliance measures. Some readback errors and procedure misunderstandings were still observed, however; particularly when descent clearances deviated from the normative procedure.

  3. Progression of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae infection in three pig herds. Development of tonsillar carrier state, arthritis and antibodies in serum and synovial fluid in pigs from birth to slaughter.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn-Olsen, T; Nielsen, N C; Friis, N F; Nielsen, J

    1999-11-01

    In this investigation, natural infection with Mycoplasma hyosynoviae was followed in groups of individual pigs in three different herds with regard to occurrence of tonsillar carrier state, clinical arthritis and development of antibodies in serum and in synovial fluid. Antibodies were detected by a polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) developed for experimental use. The infection with M. hyosynoviae progressed very differently in the three herds investigated. In one herd, the infection was apparently limited to adult pigs. In a second herd, all pigs became tonsillar carriers of M. hyosynoviae, but no mycoplasma-related arthritis nor any serological response was demonstrated within the growing-finishing period. In the third herd investigated, tonsillar infection was detected in all pigs, clinical cases of M. hyosynoviae arthritis followed and a moderate serological response was observed in some, but not all, pigs. In all three herds, M. hyosynoviae infection was carried in the tonsils of the adult pigs, but it was only occasionally transmitted from sows to piglets. Maternal antibodies were transferred to the piglets and persisted for approximately 8-12 weeks. After weaning, some pigs became infected before 20 weeks of age, while others did not. In the majority of cases, the tonsillar infection was established from 11 weeks of age or older. A latent tonsillar infection was present for a period of several weeks within the group of investigated pigs before cases of generalized infection and arthritis were seen. In some cases, generalization of M. hyosynoviae infection in the blood and in joints was observed in spite of the detection of an active serological response a few weeks earlier. The present work suggests that generalization of the infection and development of arthritis may depend on age, immunity, virulence factors and/or infection pressure; in some herds maybe combined with certain triggering mechanisms such as stress and lowered general resistance. PMID:10605365

  4. Cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibo; Lin, Zhanmin; Voges, Kai; Ju, Chiheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Bosman, Laurens WJ; Ruigrok, Tom JH; Hoebeek, Freek E

    2014-01-01

    Due to the uniform cyto-architecture of the cerebellar cortex, its overall physiological characteristics have traditionally been considered to be homogeneous. In this study, we show in awake mice at rest that spiking activity of Purkinje cells, the sole output cells of the cerebellar cortex, differs between cerebellar modules and correlates with their expression of the glycolytic enzyme aldolase C or zebrin. Simple spike and complex spike frequencies were significantly higher in Purkinje cells located in zebrin-negative than zebrin-positive modules. The difference in simple spike frequency persisted when the synaptic input to, but not intrinsic activity of, Purkinje cells was manipulated. Blocking TRPC3, the effector channel of a cascade of proteins that have zebrin-like distribution patterns, attenuated the simple spike frequency difference. Our results indicate that zebrin-discriminated cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies, which depend on activation of TRPC3, and that this property is relevant for all cerebellar functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02536.001 PMID:24843004

  5. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  6. The cerebellar-hypothalamic circuits: potential pathways underlying cerebellar involvement in somatic-visceral integration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Ning; Yung, Wing-Ho; Kwok-Chong Chow, Billy; Chan, Ying-Shing; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2006-08-30

    The cerebellum has been considered only as a classical subcortical center for motor control. However, accumulating experimental and clinical evidences have revealed that the cerebellum also plays an important role in cognition, for instance, in learning and memory, as well as in emotional behavior and in nonsomatic activities, such as visceral and immunological responses. Although it is not yet clear through which pathways such cerebellar nonsomatic functions are mediated, the direct bidirectional connections between the cerebellum and the hypothalamus, a high autonomic center, have recently been demonstrated in a series of neuroanatomical investigations on a variety of mammals and indicated to be potential pathways underlying the cerebellar autonomic modulation. The direct hypothalamocerebellar projections originate from the widespread hypothalamic nuclei/areas and terminate in both the cerebellar cortex as multilayered fibers and the cerebellar nuclei. Immunohistochemistry studies have offered fairly convincing evidence that some of these projecting fibers are histaminergic. It has been suggested that through their excitatory effects on cerebellar cortical and nuclear cells mediated by metabotropic histamine H(2) and/or H(1) receptors, the hypothalamocerebellar histaminergic fibers participate in cerebellar modulation of somatic motor as well as non-motor responses. On the other hand, the direct cerebellohypothalamic projections arise from all cerebellar nuclei (fastigial, anterior and posterior interpositus, and dentate nuclei) and reach almost all hypothalamic nuclei/areas. Neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that these connections may be involved in feeding, cardiovascular, osmotic, respiratory, micturition, immune, emotion, and other nonsomatic regulation. These observations provide support for the hypothesis that the cerebellum is an essential modulator and coordinator for integrating motor, visceral and behavioral responses, and that such somatic-visceral integration through the cerebellar circuitry may be fulfilled by means of the cerebellar-hypothalamic circuits. PMID:16497381

  7. Bilateral representation in the deep cerebellar nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Soteropoulos, Demetris S; Baker, Stuart N

    2008-01-01

    The cerebellum is normally assumed to represent ipsilateral movements. We tested this by making microelectrode penetrations into the deep cerebellar nuclei (mainly nucleus interpositus) of monkeys trained to perform a reach and grasp task with either hand. Following weak single electrical stimuli, many sites produced clear bilateral facilitation of multiple forelimb muscles. The short onset latencies, which were similar for each side, suggested that at least some of the muscle responses were mediated by descending tracts originating in the brainstem, rather than via the cerebral cortex. Additionally, cerebellar neurones modulated their discharge with both ipsilateral and contralateral movements. This was so, even when we carefully excluded contralateral trials with evidence of electromyogram modulation on the ipsilateral side. We conclude that the deep cerebellar nuclei have a bilateral movement representation, and relatively direct, powerful access to limb muscles on both sides of the body. This places the cerebellum in an ideal position to coordinate bilateral movements. PMID:18187463

  8. Surface erosion caused on Mars from Viking descent engine plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, R. E.; Moore, H. J.; Scott, R. F.; Shorthill, R. W.; Spitzer, C. R.

    1980-11-01

    During the Martian landings the descent engine plumes on Viking Lander 1 (VL-1) and Viking Lander 2 (VL-2) eroded the Martian surface materials. This had been anticipated and investigated both analytically and experimentally during the design phase of the Viking spacecraft. This paper presents data on erosion obtained during the tests of the Viking descent engine and the evidence for erosion by the descent engines of VL-1 and VL-2 on Mars. From these and other results, it is concluded that there are four distinct surface materials on Mars: (1) drift materials, (2) crusty to cloddy material, (3) blocky material, and (4) rock.

  9. Surface erosion caused on Mars from Viking descent engine plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutton, R.E.; Moore, H.J.; Scott, R.F.; Shorthill, R.W.; Spitzer, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    During the Martian landings the descent engine plumes on Viking Lander 1 (VL-1) and Viking Lander 2 (VL-2) eroded the Martian surface materials. This had been anticipated and investigated both analytically and experimentally during the design phase of the Viking spacecraft. This paper presents data on erosion obtained during the tests of the Viking descent engine and the evidence for erosion by the descent engines of VL-1 and VL-2 on Mars. From these and other results, it is concluded that there are four distinct surface materials on Mars: (1) drift material, (2) crusty to cloddy material, (3) blocky material, and (4) rock. ?? 1980 D. Reidel Publishing Co.

  10. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  11. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  12. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  13. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  15. Pharmacologic trials in the treatment of cerebellar tremor.

    PubMed

    Koller, W C

    1984-03-01

    We studied the effect of long-term administration of propranolol hydrochloride and isoniazid and the acute action of ethyl alcohol on cerebellar tremor in patients with multiple sclerosis and primary cerebellar degeneration in a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover test. None of the drugs decreased the severity of either static or kinetic cerebellar tremors. PMID:6365047

  16. Orion Entry, Descent, and Landing Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoelscher, Brian R.

    2007-01-01

    The Orion Entry, Descent, and Landing simulation was created over the past two years to serve as the primary Crew Exploration Vehicle guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) design and analysis tool at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Advanced NASA Technology Architecture for Exploration Studies (ANTARES) simulation is a six degree-of-freedom tool with a unique design architecture which has a high level of flexibility. This paper describes the decision history and motivations that guided the creation of this simulation tool. The capabilities of the models within ANTARES are presented in detail. Special attention is given to features of the highly flexible GN&C architecture and the details of the implemented GN&C algorithms. ANTARES provides a foundation simulation for the Orion Project that has already been successfully used for requirements analysis, system definition analysis, and preliminary GN&C design analysis. ANTARES will find useful application in engineering analysis, mission operations, crew training, avionics-in-the-loop testing, etc. This paper focuses on the entry simulation aspect of ANTARES, which is part of a bigger simulation package supporting the entire mission profile of the Orion vehicle. The unique aspects of entry GN&C design are covered, including how the simulation is being used for Monte Carlo dispersion analysis and for support of linear stability analysis. Sample simulation output from ANTARES is presented in an appendix.

  17. Distributed Method to Optimal Profile Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geun I.

    Current ground automation tools for Optimal Profile Descent (OPD) procedures utilize path stretching and speed profile change to maintain proper merging and spacing requirements at high traffic terminal area. However, low predictability of aircraft's vertical profile and path deviation during decent add uncertainty to computing estimated time of arrival, a key information that enables the ground control center to manage airspace traffic effectively. This paper uses an OPD procedure that is based on a constant flight path angle to increase the predictability of the vertical profile and defines an OPD optimization problem that uses both path stretching and speed profile change while largely maintaining the original OPD procedure. This problem minimizes the cumulative cost of performing OPD procedures for a group of aircraft by assigning a time cost function to each aircraft and a separation cost function to a pair of aircraft. The OPD optimization problem is then solved in a decentralized manner using dual decomposition techniques under inter-aircraft ADS-B mechanism. This method divides the optimization problem into more manageable sub-problems which are then distributed to the group of aircraft. Each aircraft solves its assigned sub-problem and communicate the solutions to other aircraft in an iterative process until an optimal solution is achieved thus decentralizing the computation of the optimization problem.

  18. Infection of primary human tonsillar lymphoid cells by KSHV reveals frequent but abortive infection of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Myoung, Jinjong; Ganem, Don

    2011-01-01

    The lymphotropic herpesvirus KSHV principally infects B cells in vivo and is linked to several human B cell lymphoproliferative syndromes. Here we examine the susceptibility of primary tonsillar lymphocytes to infection by a recombinant KSHV (rKSHV.219) that constitutively expresses GFP. At an MOI of ~ 1, ca 5–10% of CD19+ B cells became GFP-positive. Surprisingly, in the same culture many more T cells became infected. However, in contrast to isolated B cells, isolated infected T cells did not support correct viral transcription and did not produce infectious virus, indicating the presence of one or more post-entry blocks to lytic KSHV replication in T cells. No immortalization or transformation has yet been observed in either B or T cells. These results affirm the feasibility of studying KSHV infection in primary lymphoid cells, and help to rationalize the detection of KSHV DNA in rare human T cell lymphomas in vivo. PMID:21353276

  19. Immunoglobulin G4-Related Sclerosing Disease Manifesting as Bilateral Tonsillar Hypertrophy on MR Images: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mee Hyun; Lee, Yul; Yoon, Dae Young; Hong, Hye Sook; Hong, Min Eui

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease (IgG4-SD) is currently recognized as a distinct systemic disease involving various organs. We reported the imaging findings of a case of pathologically confirmed IgG4-SD involving bilateral palatine tonsils. CT and MRI showed diffuse enlargement of both palatine tonsils with homogeneous contrast enhancement. Focal contour bulging was noted in the right palatine tonsil. Lesions appeared as isointense on T1-weighted and slightly hyperintense on T2-weighted MRI images, as compared with muscle. The T2-weighted MRI image showed a striated pattern in both tonsils. Despite its rare occurrence, IgG4-SD should be included in the differential diagnoses of patients with symptomatic bilateral tonsillar hypertrophy that is non-responsive to medication. PMID:26798227

  20. Post-heatstroke parkinsonism and cerebellar dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Biary, N; Madkour, M M; Sharif, H

    1995-02-01

    A case is presented of a 45-year-old woman who developed parkinsonism, cerebellar dysfunction, aphasia and flaccid paralysis secondary to heat stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed irregular patchy areas of increased signal intensity in the white matter of both cerebral hemispheres and the left striatum, remaining unchanged over a follow-up period of two years. Cerebellar atrophy, while not seen on initial examination, was present on the follow-up study done one year later and became more marked after two years. PMID:7788975

  1. Asymmetries in Cerebellar Plasticity and Motor Learning.

    PubMed

    Titley, Heather K; Hansel, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Synaptic plasticity at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapse has long been considered a cellular correlate for cerebellar motor learning. Functionally, long-term depression and long-term potentiation at these synapses seem to be the reverse of each other, with both pre- and post-synaptic expression occurring in both. However, different cerebellar motor learning paradigms have been shown to be asymmetric and not equally reversible. Here, we discuss the asymmetric reversibility shown in the vestibulo-ocular reflex and eyeblink conditioning and suggest that different cellular plasticity mechanisms might be recruited under different conditions leading to unequal reversibility. PMID:25578035

  2. The Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome and Its Relation to Cerebellar Cognitive Function and the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Karin S.; Khademian, Zarir P.; Keating, Robert F.; Packer, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS), consisting of diminished speech output, hypotonia, ataxia, and emotional lability, occurs after surgery in up to 25% of patients with medulloblastoma and occasionally after removal of other posterior fossa tumors. Although the mutism is transient, speech rarely normalizes and the syndrome is

  3. Design and Development of the MSL Descent Stage Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Guernsey, Carl S.

    2013-01-01

    On August 5, 2012, The Mars Science Laboratory mission successfully landed the largest interplanetary rover ever built, Curiosity, on the surface of Mars. The Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of this mission was by far the most complex landing ever attempted on a planetary body. The Descent Stage Propulsion System played an integral and critical role during Curiosity's EDL. The Descent Stage Propulsion System was a one of a kind hydrazine propulsion system designed specifically for the EDL phase of the MSL mission. It was designed, built, and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the design and development of the MSL Descent Stage Propulsion System. Driving requirements, system design, component selection, operational sequence of the system at Mars, new developments, and key challenges will be discussed.

  4. Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium collaborates on epidemiologic studies to address the high burden of prostate cancer and to understand the causes of etiology and outcomes among men of African ancestry.

  5. Automation for Accommodating Fuel-Efficient Descents in Constrained Airspace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coopenbarger, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous descents at low engine power are desired to reduce fuel consumption, emissions and noise during arrival operations. The challenge is to allow airplanes to fly these types of efficient descents without interruption during busy traffic conditions. During busy conditions today, airplanes are commonly forced to fly inefficient, step-down descents as airtraffic controllers work to ensure separation and maximize throughput. NASA in collaboration with government and industry partners is developing new automation to help controllers accommodate continuous descents in the presence of complex traffic and airspace constraints. This automation relies on accurate trajectory predictions to compute strategic maneuver advisories. The talk will describe the concept behind this new automation and provide an overview of the simulations and flight testing used to develop and refine its underlying technology.

  6. Ascent/descent ancillary data production user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brans, H. R.; Seacord, A. W., II; Ulmer, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent Ancillary Data Product, also called the A/D BET because it contains a Best Estimate of the Trajectory (BET), is a collection of trajectory, attitude, and atmospheric related parameters computed for the ascent and descent phases of each Shuttle Mission. These computations are executed shortly after the event in a post-flight environment. A collection of several routines including some stand-alone routines constitute what is called the Ascent/Descent Ancillary Data Production Program. A User's Guide for that program is given. It is intended to provide the reader with all the information necessary to generate an Ascent or a Descent Ancillary Data Product. It includes descriptions of the input data and output data for each routine, and contains explicit instructions on how to run each routine. A description of the final output product is given.

  7. Adult leptomeningeal cerebellar heterotopia in contact with the posterior inferior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin

    2013-03-01

    A leptomeningeal mass was encountered during microdissection of a 63-year-old male cadaver, located dorsal to the left side of the medulla oblongata. The structure was compressing the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and was composed of cerebellar-like tissue. Immunohistochemistry for S100 protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein and neurofilaments (NF, the triplet proteins and the 200kD antibody) on paraffin-embedded samples confirmed the cerebellar heterotopion. Abundant Lewy-like degenerative bodies were also identified within the heterotopion; they were positive for the NF triplet and negative for the 200kD neurofilaments. Purkinje cells were rare. This is the first evidence of a leptomeningeal cerebellar heterotopia in contact with PICA in adult. Such subtentorial heterotopias, even if rare, should be searched for during clinical, paraclinical and surgical explorations of the posterior fossa. PMID:22585456

  8. Air-Traffic Controllers Evaluate The Descent Advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Leonard; Volckers, Uwe; Erzberger, Heinz

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of Descent Advisor algorithm: software automation aid intended to assist air-traffic controllers in spacing traffic and meeting specified times or arrival. Based partly on mathematical models of weather conditions and performances of aircraft, it generates suggested clearances, including top-of-descent points and speed-profile data to attain objectives. Study focused on operational characteristics with specific attention to how it can be used for prediction, spacing, and metering.

  9. Entry descent and landing systems for future missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncy, J.; Lebleu, D.; Arfi, P.; Schipper, A. M.

    2010-07-01

    In 2005, the Huygens probe, designed by Thales Alenia Space, France, successfully completed its entry and descent in Titan's atmosphere. In the frame of the Aurora Exploration Program, ESA has initiated industrial studies for the ExoMars mission. The Thales Alenia Space France-led consortium was awarded the contract for the design, development and manufacturing of the Entry and Descent System under Thales Alenia SpaceItaly mission prime. Huygens and ExoMars constitute major European milestones in the field of atmospheric entry and descent. Eight out of the ten bodies larger than Mercury in the Solar System have a significant atmosphere to descent in, either to reach a solid surface, or to explore the atmosphere itself. The gained experience in Entry Descent and Landing design will enhance European industry capability to contribute to future planetary exploration missions. This paper assesses the different environments and conditions that Entry Descent and Landing Systems will meet. It discusses how Europe's Huygens and ExoMars experience will apply in such environments and identifies the critical technologies needed to complement it. It concludes on the elements of a roadmap for the related technological development.

  10. A descent of the aurora over Lapland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiter, Daniel; Partamies, Noora

    2014-05-01

    A very large statistical study (? 4 105 measurements) into the peak emission height of the aurora has shown that the aurora over Lapland descended significantly between 1996 and 2007. The study was performed using images from a network of ground-based all-sky cameras which form part of the MIRACLE (Magnetometers-Ionospheric Radar-All-sky Cameras Large Experiment) network, and are located at various observation stations across northern Finland and Sweden. The height of the aurora was first measured about a century ago. Since then, it has generally been assumed that the peak emission height of any particular auroral emission is constant for similar geomagnetic conditions. The present work was motivated by the need to improve estimates of the height of the aurora used to calculate other ionospheric and auroral properties, such as optical flow velocities and auroral arc widths. In recent years MIRACLE has produced approximately 105 images of the aurora per station per year. In order to analyse such a large number of images, a novel fast and automatic method was developed for finding the peak emission height of an auroral structure from a pair of all-sky camera images with overlapping fields of view. This method has been applied to all auroral images recorded by the MIRACLE intensified CCD cameras in operation between 1996 and 2007. Such a large data set allows the study of variations in the height of the aurora with time (yearly, monthly, hourly) and with solar and geomagnetic indices such as F10.7 and Kp. Results from the statistical study show that the peak emission height of green (557.7 nm, O1S - O1D transition) aurora over Lapland descended by about 10 km between 1996 and 2007. This descent occurred independently of the solar cycle, and is thought to be due to a cooling and contraction of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  11. Cerebellar Hypoplasia and Dysmorphia in Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    Toelle, Sandra P; Poretti, Andrea; Weber, Peter; Seute, Tatjana; Bromberg, Jacoline E C; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2015-12-01

    Unidentified bright objects (UBO) and tumors are well-known cerebellar abnormalities in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Literature reports on malformative cerebellar anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), however, are scant. We retrospectively studied the clinical and neuroimaging findings of 5 patients with NF1 (4 females, age 6 to 29years at last follow-up) and cerebellar anomalies. Cerebellar symptoms on neurological examination were mild or even not evident whereas learning disabilities were more or less pronounced in four patients. Two patients had cerebellar hypoplasia (diffusely enlarged cerebellar interfoliar spaces) and three cerebellar dysmorphias involving mainly one cerebellar hemisphere. In NF1, malformative cerebellar anomalies are rare (estimated prevalence of about 1%), but most likely underestimated and easily overlooked, because physicians tend to focus on more prevalent, obvious, and well-known findings such as optic pathway gliomas, other tumors, and UBO. This kind of cerebellar anomaly in NF1 has most likely a malformative origin, but the exact pathogenesis is unknown. The individual clinical significance is difficult to determine. We suggest that cerebellar anomalies should be systematically evaluated in neuroimaging studies of NF1 patients. PMID:25728839

  12. Vergence Deficits in Patients with Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, T.; Sprenger, A.; Neumann, G.; Machner, B.; Gottschalk, S.; Rambold, H.; Helmchen, C.

    2009-01-01

    The cerebellum is part of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar circuit for conjugate eye movements. Recent animal data suggest an additional role of the cerebellum for the control of binocular alignment and disconjugate, i.e. vergence eye movements. The latter is separated into two different components: fast vergence (to step targets) and slow vergence

  13. Cerebellar syndrome following neuroleptic induced heat stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Lefkowitz, D; Ford, C S; Rich, C; Biller, J; McHenry, L C

    1983-01-01

    We report a patient in whom extreme hyperthermia, rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure and a residual pancerebellar syndrome occurred while taking a combination of perphenazine and amitriptyline. We postulate that impaired thermoregulation due to psychotropic drugs was responsible for the development of heat stroke and that the cerebellar syndrome resulted directly from the elevated temperature. PMID:6842224

  14. Memory in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Appollonio, I M; Grafman, J; Schwartz, V; Massaquoi, S; Hallett, M

    1993-08-01

    Eleven patients with relatively selective cerebellar degeneration and 11 normal control subjects underwent a comprehensive neurologic and neuropsychological examination. The neuropsychological tests assessed general intellectual ability, different aspects of memory (effortful, automatic, and implicit memory processes), speed of information processing, and verbal fluency (using both category and letter fluency tasks). The results indicated that cerebellar patients were significantly impaired only on tasks requiring the use of executive functions, such as the initiation/perseveration subtest of the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale or the fluency tests, and on memory measures requiring greater processing effort. They performed normally on automatic and implicit measures of memory. Performance on the effortful memory and executive measures was not associated with neurologic variables or mood state. After controlling for the initiation/perseveration deficit, the effortful memory scores of the cerebellar patients were no longer different from those of controls. The present study suggests that memory in patients with relatively pure cerebellar dysfunction is only partially compromised and that the impairment is secondary to a deficit in executive functions. PMID:8351008

  15. Radiation-induced cerebellar chondrosarcoma. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, M.; Perrin, R.G.; Platts, M.E.; Simpson, W.J.

    1984-07-01

    The authors report a case of chondrosarcoma arising in the cerebellum 16 years after treatment of a cerebellar malignant astrocytoma by subtotal resection and irradiation. It is thought that the chondrosarcoma arising within the intracranial cavity was a probable consequence of previous ionizing radiation.

  16. Acute cerebellar ataxia, acute cerebellitis, and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jay; Mitchell, Wendy G

    2012-11-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia and acute cerebellitis represent a process characterized by parainfectious, postinfectious, or postvaccination cerebellar inflammation. There is considerable overlap between these entities. The mildest cases of acute cerebellar ataxia represent a benign condition that is characterized by acute truncal and gait ataxia, variably with appendicular ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria, and hypotonia. It occurs mostly in young children, presents abruptly, and recovers over weeks. Neuroimaging is normal. Severe cases of cerebellitis represent the other end of the spectrum, presenting with acute cerebellar signs often overshadowed by alteration of consciousness, focal neurological deficits, raised intracranial pressure, hydrocephalus, and even herniation. Neuroimaging is abnormal and the prognosis is less favorable than in acute cerebellar ataxia. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis may be confused with acute cerebellitis when the clinical findings are predominantly cerebellar, but lesions on neuroimaging are usually widespread. Paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is often initially misdiagnosed as acute cerebellar ataxia, but has very specific features, course, and etiopathogensis. PMID:22805251

  17. Human Scleral Structural Stiffness Increases More Rapidly With Age in Donors of African Descent Compared to Donors of European Descent

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Massimo A.; Grytz, Rafael; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Bruno, Luigi; Girkin, Christopher A.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We tested the hypothesis that the variation of peripapillary scleral structural stiffness with age is different in donors of European (ED) and African (AD) descent. Methods. Posterior scleral shells from normal eyes from donors of European (n = 20 pairs; previously reported) and African (n = 9 pairs) descent aged 0 and 90 years old were inflation tested within 48 hours post mortem. Scleral shells were pressurized from 5 to 45 mm Hg and the full-field, 3-dimensional (3D) deformation of the outer surface was recorded at submicrometric accuracy using speckle interferometry (ESPI). Mean maximum principal (tensile) strain of the peripapillary and midperipheral regions surrounding the optic nerve head (ONH) were fit using a functional mixed effects model that accounts for intradonor variability, same-race correlation, and spatial autocorrelation to estimate the effect of race on the age-related changes in mechanical scleral strain. Results. Mechanical tensile strain significantly decreased with age in the peripapillary sclera in the African and European descent groups (P < 0.001), but the age-related stiffening was significantly greater in the African descent group (P < 0.05). Maximum principal strain in the peripapillary sclera was significantly higher than in the midperipheral sclera for both ethnic groups. Conclusions. The sclera surrounding the ONH stiffens more rapidly with age in the African descent group compared to the European group. Stiffening of the peripapillary sclera with age may be related to the higher prevalence of glaucoma in the elderly and persons of African descent. PMID:25237162

  18. Retrocerebellar arachnoid cyst resulting in syringomyelia in a patient without tonsillar herniation: successful surgical treatment with reconstruction of CSF flow in the foramen magnum region.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liyong; Emich, Stephan; Fu, Wenzhuo; Chen, Zan; Hao, Wu; Ling, Feng; Jian, Fengzeng

    2016-04-01

    A retrocerebellar arachnoid cyst causing syringomyelia is extremely rare without tonsillar herniation. The authors present a 44-year-old woman with symptoms of foramen magnum compression and syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large retrocerebellar arachnoid cyst with a large cervicothoracic syrinx but no signs of tonsillar herniation or hydrocephalus. The patient underwent a foramen magnum decompression with C1 laminectomy, microsurgical fenestration of the cyst, and duraplasty. After successful reconstruction of CSF flow, the patient experienced a relief of symptoms and a significant reduction of the syrinx. The intraoperative findings support the theory of a piston mechanism in the development of syringomyelia. Additional arachnoidal adhesions may also obstruct the CSF flow around the craniocervical junction. We recommend the surgical treatment should consist of an adequate decompression of the foramen magnum, wide microsurgical arachnoidal debridement, and duraplasty with autologous grafts sutured in a watertight way. PMID:26728365

  19. Ageing shows a pattern of cerebellar degeneration analogous, but not equal, to that in patients suffering from cerebellar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Hulst, Thomas; van der Geest, Jos N; Thrling, M; Goericke, S; Frens, Maarten A; Timmann, Dagmar; Donchin, Opher

    2015-08-01

    Ageing generally leads to impairments in cognitive function and the ability to execute and learn new movements. While the causes of these impairments are often multi-factorial, integrity of the cerebellum in an elderly population is an important predictive factor of both motor function and cognitive function. A similar association between cerebellar integrity and function is true for cerebellar patients. We set out to investigate the analogies between the pattern of cerebellar degeneration of a healthy ageing population and cerebellar patients. We quantified cerebellar regional volumes by applying voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to a publicly available dataset of MR images obtained in 313 healthy subjects aged between 18 and 96 years and a dataset of MR images of 21 cerebellar patients. We observed considerable overlap in regions with the strongest loss of cerebellar volume in the two datasets. In both datasets, the anterior lobe of the cerebellum (lobules I-V) and parts of the superior cerebellum (primarily lobule VI) showed the strongest degeneration of cerebellar volume. However, the most significant voxels in cerebellar patients were shifted posteriorly (lobule VII) compared to the voxels that degenerate most with age in the healthy population. The results showed a pattern of significant degeneration of the posterior motor region (lobule VIIIb) in both groups, and significant degeneration of lobule IX and X in the healthy population, but not in cerebellar patients. Furthermore, we saw strong volumetric degeneration of functionally defined cerebellar regions associated with cerebral somatomotor function in both groups. Predominance of degeneration in the anterior lobe and lobule VI suggests impairment of motor function in both groups, while we suggest that the posterior shift of degeneration in cerebellar patients would be associated with relatively stronger impairment of higher motor function and cognitive function. Thus, these results may explain the specific symptomology associated with cerebellar degeneration in ageing and in cerebellar patients. PMID:25896930

  20. Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) on the Mars Polar Lander

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malin, M.C.; Caplinger, M.A.; Carr, M.H.; Squyres, S.; Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Mars Descent Imager, or MARDI, experiment on the Mars Polar Lander (MPL) consists of a camera characterized by small physical size and mass (???6 ?? 6 ?? 12 cm, including baffle; <500 gm), low power requirements (<2.5 W, including power supply losses), and high science performance (1000 x 1000 pixel, low noise). The intent of the investigation is to acquire nested images over a range of resolutions, from 8 m/pixel to better than 1 cm/pixel, during the roughly 2 min it takes the MPL to descend from 8 km to the surface under parachute and rocket-powered deceleration. Observational goals will include studies of (1) surface morphology (e.g., nature and distribution of landforms indicating past and present environmental processes); (2) local and regional geography (e.g., context for other lander instruments: precise location, detailed local relief); and (3) relationships to features seen in orbiter data. To accomplish these goals, MARDI will collect three types of images. Four small images (256 x 256 pixels) will be acquired on 0.5 s centers beginning 0.3 s before MPL's heatshield is jettisoned. Sixteen full-frame images (1024 X 1024, circularly edited) will be acquired on 5.3 s centers thereafter. Just after backshell jettison but prior to the start of powered descent, a "best final nonpowered descent image" will be acquired. Five seconds after the start of powered descent, the camera will begin acquiring images on 4 s centers. Storage for as many as ten 800 x 800 pixel images is available during terminal descent. A number of spacecraft factors are likely to impact the quality of MARDI images, including substantial motion blur resulting from large rates of attitude variation during parachute descent and substantial rocket-engine-induced vibration during powered descent. In addition, the mounting location of the camera places the exhaust plume of the hydrazine engines prominently in the field of view. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Design of automation tools for management of descent traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz; Nedell, William

    1988-01-01

    The design of an automated air traffic control system based on a hierarchy of advisory tools for controllers is described. Compatibility of the tools with the human controller, a key objective of the design, is achieved by a judicious selection of tasks to be automated and careful attention to the design of the controller system interface. The design comprises three interconnected subsystems referred to as the Traffic Management Advisor, the Descent Advisor, and the Final Approach Spacing Tool. Each of these subsystems provides a collection of tools for specific controller positions and tasks. This paper focuses primarily on the Descent Advisor which provides automation tools for managing descent traffic. The algorithms, automation modes, and graphical interfaces incorporated in the design are described. Information generated by the Descent Advisor tools is integrated into a plan view traffic display consisting of a high-resolution color monitor. Estimated arrival times of aircraft are presented graphically on a time line, which is also used interactively in combination with a mouse input device to select and schedule arrival times. Other graphical markers indicate the location of the fuel-optimum top-of-descent point and the predicted separation distances of aircraft at a designated time-control point. Computer generated advisories provide speed and descent clearances which the controller can issue to aircraft to help them arrive at the feeder gate at the scheduled times or with specified separation distances. Two types of horizontal guidance modes, selectable by the controller, provide markers for managing the horizontal flightpaths of aircraft under various conditions. The entire system consisting of descent advisor algorithm, a library of aircraft performance models, national airspace system data bases, and interactive display software has been implemented on a workstation made by Sun Microsystems, Inc. It is planned to use this configuration in operational evaluations at an en route center.

  2. A Mixed Cell Culture Model for Assessment of Proliferation in Tonsillar Tissues from Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea or Recurrent Tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    Serpero, Laura D.; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Dayyat, Ehab; Goldman, Julie L.; Kim, Jinkwan; Gozal, David

    2009-01-01

    Background Recurrent infective tonsillitis (RI) and obstructive sleep apnea(OSA) are the major indications for adenotonsillectomy (T&A) in children. However, little is known on the determinants of lymphadenoid tissue proliferation in the pediatric upper airway. Aim To develop an in vitro culture system allowing for assessment of tonsillar or adenoidal proliferation under basal or stimulated conditions. Methods Tonsils surgically removed from pediatric patients with obstructive sleep apnea and recurrent tonsillitis during T&A, were dissociated using standard methods. Whole cell tonsillar cultures were either maintained in normal medium or stimulated with LPS (25 ?g /ml) and concanavalin A (10 ?g/ml) for 24 hours (STIM). Cellular proliferation was evaluated by [3H] thymidine incorporation. In parallel, supernatants were collected after 48 hours, and concentration of cytokines was measured using standard ELISA procedures. Results Basal proliferative rates were increased in the OSA group (305.2 40.6 cpm; n=31) compared to RI group (232.8 31.9 cpm; n=26; p <0.001). No significant differences in proliferative rates emerged after STIM between OSA and RI. Furthermore, basal TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-8 concentrations in the supernatant were increased in OSA-derived cultures compared to RI, but IL-8 was higher after STIM in RI, while IL-6 remained increased in OSA. Conclusions The proliferative rates and concentrations of inflammatory mediators in tonsillar cell cultures from children with OSA and RI suggest that lymphadenoid tissue proliferation in these 2 conditions may be regulated by different mechanisms. This novel method may allow for future development of specific therapeutic interventions aiming to curtail and reverse tonsillar and adenoidal hypertrophy in children in a disease-specific manner. PMID:19266584

  3. Reduction of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus pharyngo-tonsillar infections associated with use of the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Gregori, Giuseppe; Righi, Ornella; Risso, Paolo; Boiardi, Goffreda; Demuru, Giovanni; Ferzetti, Anna; Galli, Antonio; Ghisoni, Marco; Lenzini, Sonia; Marenghi, Claudio; Mura, Caterina; Sacchetti, Roberto; Suzzani, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent pharyngo-tonsillar infections caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS) occur frequently in young children, and the treatment of these infections contributes substantially to the total current requirement for antibiotic prescribing. Our study goal was to assess through a retrospective observational analysis whether the administration of the oral probiotic, Streptococcus salivarius K12 (SsK12), could reduce the occurrence of GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections in children who had a recent history of recurrent episodes of these infections. Twelve primary care pediatricians identified, through their databases, a total of 130 children who had experienced recurrent GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections over a period of at least 6–12 months prior to their inclusion in the study. Of these children, 76 then undertook a 90-day program requiring once-a-day dosing with a commercially available (Bactoblis) lozenge containing SsK12. No probiotic supplement was given to the remaining 54 (control) children. Each subject was monitored for the occurrence of GABHS pharyngo-tonsillitis and also for acute otitis media, bronchitis, sinusitis, and bronchopneumonia for at least 12 months following their entry to the study. Even 9 months after the use of SsK12 had been stopped, the probability of new GABHS infections was significantly lower (P>0.001) when compared to the period before dosing commenced. When compared to the untreated children, those taking SsK12 appear to have had significantly fewer GABHS infections both during the 90-day period of prophylaxis and during the following 9 months (P<0.001). These observations are supportive of the use of probiotic SsK12 for the control of recurrent GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections in children, and as an associated benefit, the use of this probiotic could lead to reduced antibiotic consumption. Follow-up controlled prospective studies should now be initiated in order to further establish the efficacy of this newly emerging prophylactic strategy. PMID:26855579

  4. Reduction of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus pharyngo-tonsillar infections associated with use of the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Gregori, Giuseppe; Righi, Ornella; Risso, Paolo; Boiardi, Goffreda; Demuru, Giovanni; Ferzetti, Anna; Galli, Antonio; Ghisoni, Marco; Lenzini, Sonia; Marenghi, Claudio; Mura, Caterina; Sacchetti, Roberto; Suzzani, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent pharyngo-tonsillar infections caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS) occur frequently in young children, and the treatment of these infections contributes substantially to the total current requirement for antibiotic prescribing. Our study goal was to assess through a retrospective observational analysis whether the administration of the oral probiotic, Streptococcus salivarius K12 (SsK12), could reduce the occurrence of GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections in children who had a recent history of recurrent episodes of these infections. Twelve primary care pediatricians identified, through their databases, a total of 130 children who had experienced recurrent GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections over a period of at least 6-12 months prior to their inclusion in the study. Of these children, 76 then undertook a 90-day program requiring once-a-day dosing with a commercially available (Bactoblis) lozenge containing SsK12. No probiotic supplement was given to the remaining 54 (control) children. Each subject was monitored for the occurrence of GABHS pharyngo-tonsillitis and also for acute otitis media, bronchitis, sinusitis, and bronchopneumonia for at least 12 months following their entry to the study. Even 9 months after the use of SsK12 had been stopped, the probability of new GABHS infections was significantly lower (P>0.001) when compared to the period before dosing commenced. When compared to the untreated children, those taking SsK12 appear to have had significantly fewer GABHS infections both during the 90-day period of prophylaxis and during the following 9 months (P<0.001). These observations are supportive of the use of probiotic SsK12 for the control of recurrent GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections in children, and as an associated benefit, the use of this probiotic could lead to reduced antibiotic consumption. Follow-up controlled prospective studies should now be initiated in order to further establish the efficacy of this newly emerging prophylactic strategy. PMID:26855579

  5. A probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter.

    PubMed

    van Baarsen, K M; Kleinnijenhuis, M; Jbabdi, S; Sotiropoulos, S N; Grotenhuis, J A; van Cappellen van Walsum, A M

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and their connectivity are gaining attraction, due to the important role the cerebellum plays in cognition and motor control. Atlases of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei are used to locate regions of interest in clinical and neuroscience studies. However, the white matter that connects these relay stations is of at least similar functional importance. Damage to these cerebellar white matter tracts may lead to serious language, cognitive and emotional disturbances, although the pathophysiological mechanism behind it is still debated. Differences in white matter integrity between patients and controls might shed light on structure-function correlations. A probabilistic parcellation atlas of the cerebellar white matter would help these studies by facilitating automatic segmentation of the cerebellar peduncles, the localization of lesions and the comparison of white matter integrity between patients and controls. In this work a digital three-dimensional probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter is presented, based on high quality 3T, 1.25mm resolution diffusion MRI data from 90 subjects participating in the Human Connectome Project. The white matter tracts were estimated using probabilistic tractography. Results over 90 subjects were symmetrical and trajectories of superior, middle and inferior cerebellar peduncles resembled the anatomy as known from anatomical studies. This atlas will contribute to a better understanding of cerebellar white matter architecture. It may eventually aid in defining structure-function correlations in patients with cerebellar disorders. PMID:26385011

  6. Anatomy and approaches along the cerebellar-brainstem fissures.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Ken; Yagmurlu, Kaan; Kohno, Michihiro; Rhoton, Albert L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Fissure dissection is routinely used in the supratentorial region to access deeply situated pathology while minimizing division of neural tissue. Use of fissure dissection is also practical in the posterior fossa. In this study, the microsurgical anatomy of the 3 cerebellar-brainstem fissures (cerebellomesencephalic, cerebellopontine, and cerebellomedullary) and the various procedures exposing these fissures in brainstem surgery were examined. METHODS Seven cadaveric heads were examined with a microsurgical technique and 3 with fiber dissection to clarify the anatomy of the cerebellar-brainstem and adjacent cerebellar fissures, in which the major vessels and neural structures are located. Several approaches directed along the cerebellar surfaces and fissures, including the supracerebellar infratentorial, occipital transtentorial, retrosigmoid, and midline suboccipital approaches, were examined. The 3 heads examined using fiber dissection defined the anatomy of the cerebellar peduncles coursing in the depths of these fissures. RESULTS Dissections directed along the cerebellar-brainstem and cerebellar fissures provided access to the posterior and posterolateral midbrain and upper pons, lateral pons, floor and lateral wall of the fourth ventricle, and dorsal and lateral medulla. CONCLUSIONS Opening the cerebellar-brainstem and adjacent cerebellar fissures provided access to the brainstem surface hidden by the cerebellum, while minimizing division of neural tissue. Most of the major cerebellar arteries, veins, and vital neural structures are located in or near these fissures and can be accessed through them. PMID:26274986

  7. Structured Connectivity in Cerebellar Inhibitory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rieubland, Sarah; Roth, Arnd; Husser, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Summary Defining the rules governing synaptic connectivity is key to formulating theories of neural circuit function. Interneurons can be connected by both electrical and chemical synapses, but the organization and interaction of these two complementary microcircuits is unknown. By recording from multiple molecular layer interneurons in the cerebellar cortex, we reveal specific, nonrandom connectivity patterns in both GABAergic chemical and electrical interneuron networks. Both networks contain clustered motifs and show specific overlap between them. Chemical connections exhibit a preference for transitive patterns, such as feedforward triplet motifs. This structured connectivity is supported by a characteristic spatial organization: transitivity of chemical connectivity is directed vertically in the sagittal plane, and electrical synapses appear strictly confined to the sagittal plane. The specific, highly structured connectivity rules suggest that these motifs are essential for the function of the cerebellar network. PMID:24559679

  8. Physiologic changes associated with cerebellar dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Shakkottai, Vikram G.

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurologic disorder characterized by sustained involuntary muscle contractions. Lesions responsible for unilateral secondary dystonia are confined to the putamen, caudate, globus pallidus and thalamus. Dysfunction of these structures is suspected to play a role in both primary and secondary dystonia. Recent evidence has suggested that the cerebellum may play a role in the pathophysiology of dystonia. The role of the cerebellum in ataxia, a disorder of motor incoordination is well established. How may the cerebellum contribute to two apparently very different movement disorders? This review will discuss the idea of whether in some cases, ataxia and dystonia lie in the same clinical spectrum, and whether graded perturbations in cerebellar function may explain a similar causative role for the cerebellum in these two different motor disorders. The review also proposes a model for cerebellar dystonia based on the available animal models of this disorder. PMID:24879387

  9. An update on Spino-cerebellar ataxias.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Banashree; Paul, Pritikanta; Paul, Madhuparna; Kumar, Hrishikesh

    2013-07-01

    The dominantly inherited ataxias, also known as Spino-cerebellar ataxias (SCAs), are rapidly expanding entities. New mutations are being identified at remarkable regularity. Recent awareness of molecular abnormalities in SCAs has addressed some of the long sought questions, but gaps in knowledge still exist. Three major categories of SCAs, according to molecular mechanisms, have evolved over recent few years: Polyglutamate expansion ataxia, non-coding zone repeat ataxia, and ataxia due to conventional mutation. Using the fulcrum of these mechanisms, the article provides an update of SCAs. Shared and specific clinical features, genetic abnormalities, and possible links between molecular abnormalities and cerebellar degeneration have been discussed. Emphasis has been placed on the mechanisms of polyglutamate toxicity. PMID:24101804

  10. Cerebellar secretin modulates eyeblink classical conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jason R.; Robinson, Gain M.; Dean, Aaron M.; Schoenberg, Heidi E.; Williams, Michael R.; Morielli, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that intracerebellar infusion of the neuropeptide secretin enhances the acquisition phase of eyeblink conditioning (EBC). Here, we sought to test whether endogenous secretin also regulates EBC and to test whether the effect of exogenous and endogenous secretin is specific to acquisition. In Experiment 1, rats received intracerebellar infusions of the secretin receptor antagonist 5-27 secretin or vehicle into the lobulus simplex of cerebellar cortex immediately prior to sessions 13 of acquisition. Antagonist-infused rats showed a reduction in the percentage of eyeblink CRs compared with vehicle-infused rats. In Experiment 2, rats received intracerebellar infusions of secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 12 of extinction. Secretin did not significantly affect extinction performance. In Experiment 3, rats received intracerebellar infusions of 5-27 secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 12 of extinction. The secretin antagonist did not significantly affect extinction performance. Together, our current and previous results indicate that both exogenous and endogenous cerebellar secretin modulate acquisition, but not extinction, of EBC. We have previously shown that (1) secretin reduces surface expression of the voltage-gated potassium channel ?-subunit Kv1.2 in cerebellar cortex and (2) intracerebellar infusions of a Kv1.2 blocker enhance EBC acquisition, much like secretin. Kv1.2 is almost exclusively expressed in cerebellar cortex at basket cellPurkinje cell pinceaus and Purkinje cell dendrites; we propose that EBC-induced secretin release from PCs modulates EBC acquisition by reducing surface expression of Kv1.2 at one or both of these sites. PMID:25403455

  11. Crew Procedures for Continuous Descent Arrivals Using Conventional Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Williams, David H.; Lewis, Elliot T,

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results from a simulation study which investigated the use of Continuous Descent Arrival (CDA) procedures for conducting a descent through a busy terminal area, using conventional transport-category automation. This research was part of the Low Noise Flight Procedures (LNFP) element within the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) Project, that addressed development of flight guidance, and supporting pilot and Air Traffic Control (ATC) procedures for low noise operations. The procedures and chart were designed to be easy to understand, and to make it easy for the crew to make changes via the Flight Management Computer Control-Display Unit (FMC-CDU) to accommodate changes from ATC. The test runs were intended to represent situations typical of what exists in many of today's terminal areas, including interruptions to the descent in the form of clearances issued by ATC.

  12. [Autoantibodies associated with autoimmune-mediated cerebellar ataxia].

    PubMed

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Nanri, Kazunori

    2013-04-01

    Various autoantibodies are associated with autoimmune-mediated cerebellar ataxia. Anti-Yo, -Zic, -CARPVIII, -Tr, -Ri, -Hu, -Ma, -CRMP-5, -ANNA-3, -PCA-2, -VGCC, and -mGluR antibodies (Abs) are found in paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia, whereas anti-GAD, -thyroid, and -gliadin Abs are found in non-paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia. Most of these antibodies are not pathogenic but are diagnostic markers. However, anti-VGCC, anti-mGluR, and anti-GAD Abs have been shown to cause cerebellar ataxia, because administration of these Abs mimics cerebellar ataxia in vivo. Experiments using in vitro preparations show that anti-VGCC Ab depresses excitatory synaptic transmissions, and anti-GAD Ab suppresses inhibitory synaptic transmissions. Anti-mGluR Ab interferes with the induction of synaptic plasticity. These results suggest that pathogenic Abs elicit cerebellar synaptic dysfunction, and thereby cause ataxia in patients. PMID:23568983

  13. From cerebellar texture to movement optimization.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Fahad

    2014-10-01

    The cerebellum is a major site for supervised procedural learning and appears to be crucial for optimizing sensorimotor performance. However, the site and origin of the supervising signal are still elusive. Furthermore, its relationship with the prominent neuronal circuitry remains puzzling. In this paper, I will review the relevant information and seek to synthesize a working hypothesis that explains the unique cerebellar structure. The aim of this review was to link the distinctive functions of the cerebellum, as derived from cerebellar lesion studies, with potential elementary computations, as observed by a bottom-up approach from the cerebellar microcircuitry. The parallel fiber geometry is ideal for performing millisecond computations that extract instructive signals. In this scenario, the higher time derivatives of kinematics such as acceleration and/or jerk that occur during motor performance are detected via a tidal wave mechanism and are used (with appropriate gating) as the instructive signal to guide motor smoothing. The advantage of such a mechanism is that movements are optimized by reducing "jerkiness" which, in turn, lowers their energy requirements. PMID:25037239

  14. Cerebellar activation during copying geometrical shapes.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Scott M; Jerde, Trenton A; Tzagarakis, Charidimos; Georgopoulos, Maria-Alexandra; Tsekos, Nikolaos; Amirikian, Bagrat; Kim, Seong-Gi; U?urbil, Kmil; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P

    2003-12-01

    We studied functional MRI activation in the cerebellum during copying 9 geometrical shapes (equilateral triangle, isosceles triangle, square, diamond, vertical trapezoid, pentagon, hexagon, circle, and vertical lemniscate). Twenty subjects were imaged during 3 consecutive 45-s periods (rest, visual presentation, and copying). First, there was a positive relation between cerebellar activation and the peak speed of individual movements. This effect was strongest in the lateral and posterior ipsilateral cerebellum but it was also present in the paramedian zones of both cerebellar hemispheres and in the vermis. A finer grain analysis of the relations between the time course of the blood oxygenation level-dependent activation and movement parameters revealed a significant relation to hand position and speed but not to acceleration. Second, there was a significant relation between the intensity of voxel activation during visual presentation and the speed of the upcoming movement. The spatial distribution of these voxels was very similar to that of the voxels activated during copying, indicating that the cerebellum might be involved in motor rehearsal, in addition to its role during movement execution. Finally, a factor analysis of the intensity of activated voxels in the ipsilateral cerebellum during copying (adjusted for the speed effect) extracted 3 shape factors. Factor 1 reflected "roundness," factor 2 "upward pointing," and factor 3 "pointing (up or down) and elongation." These results link cerebellar activation to more global, spatial aspects of copying. PMID:14665685

  15. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Anila M; Stoodley, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD. PMID:26594140

  16. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    D'Mello, Anila M.; Stoodley, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD. PMID:26594140

  17. Mars Smart Lander Simulations for Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striepe, S. A.; Way, D. W.; Balaram, J.

    2002-01-01

    Two primary simulations have been developed and are being updated for the Mars Smart Lander Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL). The high fidelity engineering end-to-end EDL simulation that is based on NASA Langley's Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) and the end-to-end real-time, hardware-in-the-loop simulation testbed, which is based on NASA JPL's (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing (DSENDS). This paper presents the status of these Mars Smart Lander EDL end-to-end simulations at this time. Various models, capabilities, as well as validation and verification for these simulations are discussed.

  18. Rosetta Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and Philae's Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-09-01

    In November 2014 the Rosetta mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its Philae lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more challenging. Philae fell almost radially towards 67P, as shown in an animation produced by the European Space Agency (ESA) prior to the event. Below, we investigate whether it is possible to model the spacecraft's descent time and impact speed using concepts taught in an introductory physics course.

  19. Flight Data Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Elmain M.; Winterhalter, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Winterhalter, NASA Engineering and Safety Center Chief Engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center sponsor a 3-year effort to collect entry, descent, and landing material and to establish a NASA-wide archive to serve the material. The principle focus of this task was to identify entry, descent, and landing repository material that was at risk of being permanently lost due to damage, decay, and undocumented storage. To provide NASA-wide access to this material, a web-based digital archive was created. This document contains the outcome of the effort.

  20. Space shuttle descent design: From development to operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crull, T. J.; Hite, R. E., III

    1985-01-01

    The descent guidance system, the descent trajectories design, and generating of the associated flight products are discussed. The programs which allow the successful transitions from development to STS operations, resulting in reduced manpower requirements and compressed schedules for flight design cycles are addressed. The topics include: (1) continually upgraded tools for the job, i.e., consolidating tools via electronic data transfers, tailoring general purpose software for needs, easy access to tools through an interactive approach, and appropriate flexibility to allow design changes and provide growth capability; (2) stabilizing the flight profile designs (I-loads) in an uncertain environment; and (3) standardizing external interfaces within performance and subsystems constraints of the Orbiter.

  1. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis Study: Phase 1 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Davis, Jody L.; Komar, David R.; Munk, Michelle M.; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Powell, Richard W.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Stanley, Douglas O.; Wilhite, Alan W.; Kinney, David J.; McGuire, M. Kathleen; Arnold, James O.; Howard, Austin R.; Sostaric, Ronald R.; Studak, Joseph W.; Zumwalt, Carlie H.; Llama, Eduardo G.; Casoliva, Jordi; Ivanov, Mark C.; Clark, Ian; Sengupta, Anita

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and human-scale missions. This paper summarizes the motivation, approach and top-level results from Year 1 of the study, which focused on landing 10-50 mt on Mars, but also included a trade study of the best advanced parachute design for increasing the landed payloads within the EDL architecture of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission

  2. Identification of RNA aptamers that internalize into HPV-16 E6/E7 transformed tonsillar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gourronc, Francoise A; Rockey, William M; Thiel, William H; Giangrande, Paloma H; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J

    2013-11-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) associated oropharyngeal cancers are on a significant increase and better therapeutic strategies are needed. The HPV-16 oncogenes E6 and E7 are expressed in HPV-associated cancers and are able to transform human tonsillar epithelial cells (HTECs). We used cell-Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) to select for RNA aptamers that entered into HPV-16 E6/E7-HTECs. After 12 rounds of cell-SELEX, a pool of aptamers was obtained that had significantly greater internalization capacity (~5-fold) into E6/E7-HTECs as compared to primary HTECs or fibroblasts. Analysis of individual aptamers from the pool indicated variable internalization into E6/E7-HTECs (1-8-fold as compared to a negative control). Most of the individual aptamers internalized into E6/E7 and primary HTECs with similar efficiency, while one aptamer exhibited ~3-fold better internalization into E6/E7-HTECs. Aptamers that internalize into cells may be useful for delivering therapeutic agents to HPV-16 associated malignancies. PMID:24074596

  3. Fingolimod does not enhance cerebellar remyelination in the cuprizone model.

    PubMed

    Alme, Maria Nordheim; Nystad, Agnes E; B, Lars; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Vedeler, Christian A; Wergeland, Stig; Torkildsen, ivind

    2015-08-15

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is approved for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. In vitro studies have found that fingolimod stimulates remyelination in cerebellar slices, but in vivo animal studies have not detected any positive effect on cerebral remyelination. The discrepant findings could be a result of different mechanisms underlying cerebral and cerebellar remyelination. The cuprizone model for de- and remyelination was used to evaluate whether fingolimod had an impact on cerebellar remyelination in vivo. We found that fingolimod did not have any effect on cerebellar remyelination, number of mature oligodendrocytes, microglia or astrocytes when fed after cuprizone exposure. PMID:26198937

  4. Guidelines for treatment of immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias.

    PubMed

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Honnorat, Jrme

    2015-01-01

    Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include gluten ataxia, paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, GAD antibody associated cerebellar ataxia, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Despite the identification of an increasing number of immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias, there is no proposed standardized therapy. We evaluated the efficacies of immunotherapies in reported cases using a common scale of daily activity. The analysis highlighted the importance of removal of autoimmune triggering factors (e.g., gluten or cancer) and the need for immunotherapy evaluation (e.g., corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, immunosuppressants) and adaptation according to each subtype. PMID:26561527

  5. Cerebellar Ataxia and Overactive Bladder after Encephalitis Affecting the Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Megumi; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Tsunoyama, Kuniko; Takahashi, Osamu; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina; Terada, Hitoshi; Tomaru, Takanobu

    2009-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the regions that contribute to urinary dysfunction in humans. A 43-year-old woman at age 35 had an acute onset of encephalitis that led to fever, generalized convulsion and coma. Six months after the disease onset, she regained consciousness and developed generalized myoclonus, cerebellar ataxia and overactive bladder, e.g., urinary urgency, daytime urinary frequency, and urinary incontinence. Eight years after the disease onset, she was revealed to have cerebellar atrophy on MRI, cerebellar hypoperfusion on SPECT, and detrusor overactivity on urodynamic study. Selective inflammation in the cerebellum seemed to produce cerebellar ataxia and overactive bladder in our case. PMID:20847832

  6. Visually Guided Step Descent in Children with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowie, Dorothy; Braddick, Oliver; Atkinson, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have impairments in visuospatial tasks and in manual visuomotor control, consistent with parietal and cerebellar abnormalities. Here we examined whether individuals with WS also have difficulties in visually controlling whole-body movements. We investigated visual control of stepping down at a change of…

  7. Visually Guided Step Descent in Children with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowie, Dorothy; Braddick, Oliver; Atkinson, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have impairments in visuospatial tasks and in manual visuomotor control, consistent with parietal and cerebellar abnormalities. Here we examined whether individuals with WS also have difficulties in visually controlling whole-body movements. We investigated visual control of stepping down at a change of

  8. Simulation Results for Airborne Precision Spacing along Continuous Descent Arrivals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.; Baxley, Brian T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a fast-time simulation experiment and a high-fidelity simulator validation with merging streams of aircraft flying Continuous Descent Arrivals through generic airspace to a runway at Dallas-Ft Worth. Aircraft made small speed adjustments based on an airborne-based spacing algorithm, so as to arrive at the threshold exactly at the assigned time interval behind their Traffic-To-Follow. The 40 aircraft were initialized at different altitudes and speeds on one of four different routes, and then merged at different points and altitudes while flying Continuous Descent Arrivals. This merging and spacing using flight deck equipment and procedures to augment or implement Air Traffic Management directives is called Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing, an important subset of a larger Airborne Precision Spacing functionality. This research indicates that Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing initiated while at cruise altitude and well prior to the Terminal Radar Approach Control entry can significantly contribute to the delivery of aircraft at a specified interval to the runway threshold with a high degree of accuracy and at a reduced pilot workload. Furthermore, previously documented work has shown that using a Continuous Descent Arrival instead of a traditional step-down descent can save fuel, reduce noise, and reduce emissions. Research into Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing is a cooperative effort between government and industry partners.

  9. "Rosetta" Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and "Philae's" Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In November 2014 the "Rosetta" mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its "Philae" lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more…

  10. Stress within a Bicultural Context for Adolescents of Mexican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Andrea J.; Roberts, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Folkman and Lazarus's theory of stress and coping was used to develop a measure assessing the perceived stress within a bicultural context. Middle school students of Mexican descent (N=881) reported their perceived stress from intergenerational acculturation gaps, within-group discrimination, out-group discrimination, and monolingual stress.

  11. A Portfolio of Outstanding Americans of Mexican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelevier, Benjamin, Jr.

    A cross section of Mexican American achievement is presented in a portfolio of 37 portraits of outstanding Americans of Mexican descent. Drawn in black and white on heavy paper stock by Mr. David L. Rodriguez, the sketches are suitable for display purposes. With the likenesses are biographical sketches in both English and Spanish which were

  12. Elderhostels: Teaching and Learning with Americans of German Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichmann, Eberhard; Reichmann, Ruth M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes three workshops designed for an Elderhostel program whose audience is largely Americans of German descent and the grandparents of today's students. The workshop topics include an introduction to the German-American experience and German-American studies; German American customs, beliefs, and traditions; and German-American genealogy,

  13. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Performance: Uncontrolled descent. 31.19 Section 31.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... single failure of the heater assembly, fuel cell system, gas value system, or maneuvering vent system,...

  14. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance: Uncontrolled descent. 31.19 Section 31.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... single failure of the heater assembly, fuel cell system, gas value system, or maneuvering vent system,...

  15. Whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Anne K; Neptune, Richard R; Sinitski, Emily H; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-04-01

    The generation of whole-body angular momentum is essential in many locomotor tasks and must be regulated in order to maintain dynamic balance. However, angular momentum has not been investigated during stair walking, which is an activity that presents a biomechanical challenge for balance-impaired populations. We investigated three-dimensional whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent and compared it to level walking. Three-dimensional body-segment kinematic and ground reaction force (GRF) data were collected from 30 healthy subjects. Angular momentum was calculated using a 13-segment whole-body model. GRFs, external moment arms and net joint moments were used to interpret the angular momentum results. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was greater for stair ascent relative to level walking. In the transverse and sagittal planes, the range of angular momentum was smaller in stair ascent and descent relative to level walking. Significant differences were also found in the ground reaction forces, external moment arms and net joint moments. The sagittal plane angular momentum results suggest that individuals alter angular momentum to effectively counteract potential trips during stair ascent, and reduce the range of angular momentum to avoid falling forward during stair descent. Further, significant differences in joint moments suggest potential neuromuscular mechanisms that account for the differences in angular momentum between walking conditions. These results provide a baseline for comparison to impaired populations that have difficulty maintaining dynamic balance, particularly during stair ascent and descent. PMID:24636222

  16. Women of African Descent: Persistence in Completing Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iddrisu, Vannetta Bailey

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the educational persistence of women of African descent (WOAD) in pursuit of a doctorate degree at universities in the southeastern United States. WOAD are women of African ancestry born outside the African continent. These women are heirs to an inner dogged determination and spirit to survive despite all odds (Pulliam, 2003,…

  17. Origin of INSL3-mediated testicular descent in therian mammals

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Il; Semyonov, Jenia; Chang, Chia Lin; Yi, Wei; Warren, Wesley; Hsu, Sheau Yu Teddy

    2008-01-01

    Testicular descent is a unique physiological adaptation found in therian mammals allowing optimal spermatogenesis below core body temperature. Recent studies show that INSL3, produced by Leydig cells, and its receptor LGR8 (RXFP2) are essential for mediating the transabdominal phase of testicular descent during early development. However, the origin and genetic basis for this physiological adaptation is not clear. Using syntenic mapping and the functional characterization of contemporary and resurrected relaxin family hormones, we show that derivation of INSL3-mediated testicular descent involved the duplication of an ancestral RLN3-like gene that encodes an indiscriminate ligand for LGR7 (RXFP1) and LGR8. This event was followed by acquisition of the LGR7-selective characteristics by a daughter gene (RLN3) prior to the evolution of the common ancestor of monotremes, marsupials, and placentals. A subsequent mutation of the other daughter gene (INSL3) occurred before the emergence of therian mammals, which then led to the derivation of the reciprocal LGR8-specific characteristics of INSL3. The stepwise evolution of these independent signaling pathways through gene duplication and subsequent divergence is consistent with Darwinian theory of selection and adaptation, and the temporal proximity suggests an association between these genetic events and the concurrent evolution of testicular descent in ancestral therian mammals. PMID:18463305

  18. "Rosetta" Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and "Philae's" Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In November 2014 the "Rosetta" mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its "Philae" lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more

  19. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements 31.19 Performance: Uncontrolled descent. (a... from any single tear in the balloon envelope between tear stoppers: (1) The maximum vertical velocity..., with the balloon descending at the maximum vertical velocity determined in paragraph (a)(1) of...

  20. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements 31.19 Performance: Uncontrolled descent. (a... from any single tear in the balloon envelope between tear stoppers: (1) The maximum vertical velocity..., with the balloon descending at the maximum vertical velocity determined in paragraph (a)(1) of...

  1. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements 31.19 Performance: Uncontrolled descent. (a... from any single tear in the balloon envelope between tear stoppers: (1) The maximum vertical velocity..., with the balloon descending at the maximum vertical velocity determined in paragraph (a)(1) of...

  2. Cerebellar strokes: a clinical outcome review of 79 cases

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Zhi Xu; Yang, Wei Ren Eugene; Seet, Edwin; Koh, Kiok Miang; Teo, Ke Jia; Low, Shiong Wen; Chou, Ning; Yeo, Tseng Tsai; Venketasubramanian, N

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cerebellar infarcts and haemorrhages are relatively uncommon, accounting for less than 10% of all strokes. The objective of the present study was to quantify and compare the outcomes of patients with cerebellar infarct and those of patients with cerebellar haemorrhage, as well as to identify the risk factors that predict poor outcome in patients with cerebellar stroke. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of consecutive patients admitted to National University Hospital, Singapore, between 2004 and 2006, within one week of cerebellar stroke onset. Baseline data included demographics, concomitant comorbidities, and the presence or absence of brainstem compression and hydrocephalus (on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging). The Glasgow Outcome Scale and modified Rankin Score were used to assess outcome at discharge and at six months after discharge. RESULTS A total of 79 patients with cerebellar stroke were admitted during the study period. Of these 79 patients, 17.7% died and 31.6% had poor outcomes at six months after discharge. Patients with cerebellar haemorrhage were found to be more likely to have poor outcomes as compared to patients with cerebellar infarct, both at discharge (odds ratio [OR] 4.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.314.1) and at six months after discharge (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.617.2). When compared to small lesions (< 5 cm3), lesions > 20 cm3 were significantly associated with poorer outcomes and the development of hydrocephalus and brainstem compression. CONCLUSION Cerebellar strokes are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The outcomes of patients with cerebellar haemorrhage are more likely to be worse than those of patients with cerebellar infarct. PMID:25820846

  3. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group and the Reconstruction of the Huygens Probe Entry and Descent Trajectory at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David H.; Kazeminejad, Bobby; Lebreton*, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Cassini/Huygens, a flagship mission to explore the rings, atmosphere, magnetic field, and moons that make up the Saturn system, is a joint endeavor of NASA, the European Space Agency, and Agenzia Spaziale Italiana. Comprising two spacecraft - a Saturn orbiter built by NASA and a Titan entry/descent probe built by the European Space Agency - Cassini/Huygens was launched in October 1997 and arrived at Saturn in 2004. The Huygens probe parachuted to the surface of Titan in January 2005. During the descent, six science instruments provided measurements of Titan's atmosphere, clouds, and winds, and photographed Titan's surface. It was recognized early in the Huygens program that to correctly interpret and correlate results from the probe science experiments and to provide a reference set of data for ground truth calibration of the Cassini orbiter remote sensing observations, an accurate reconstruction of the probe entry and descent trajectory and surface landing location would be necessary. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group (DTWG) was chartered in 1996 as a subgroup of the Huygens Science Working Team. With membership comprising representatives from all the probe engineering and instrument teams as well as representatives of industry and the Cassini and Huygens Project Scientists, the DTWG presented an organizational framework within which instrument data was shared, the entry and descent trajectory reconstruction implemented, and the trajectory reconstruction efficiently disseminated. The primary goal of the Descent Trajectory Working Group was to develop retrieval methodologies for the probe descent trajectory reconstruction from the entry interface altitude of 1270 km to the surface using navigation data, and engineering and science data acquired by the instruments on the Huygens Probe, and to provide a reconstruction of the Huygens probe trajectory from entry to the surface of Titan that is maximally consistent with all available engineering and science data sets. The official project entry and descent trajectory reconstruction effort was published by the DTWG in 2007. A revised descent trajectory was released in 2010 that accounts for updated measurements of Titan's pole coordinates derived from radar images of Titan taken during Cassini flybys after 2007. The effect of the updated pole positions on Huygens is a southward shift of the trajectory by about 0.3 degrees with a much smaller effect of less than 0.01 degree in the zonal (west to east) direction. The revised Huygens landing coordinates of 192.335 degrees West and 10.573 degrees South with longitude and latitude residuals of respectively 0.035 degrees and 0.007 degrees, respectively, are in excellent agreement with results of recent landing site investigations using visual and radar images from the Cassini VIMS instrument. Acknowledgements *J.-P.L's work was performed while at ESA/ESTEC. DA and BK would like to express appreciation to the European Space Agency's Research and Scientific Support Department for funding the Descent Trajectory Working Group. The work of the Descent Trajectory Working Group would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of all the Huygens principal investigators and their teams, and the science and engineering data provided from each experiment team, including M. Fulchignoni and the HASI Team, H. Niemann and the GCMS Team, J. Zarnecki and the SSP Team, M. Tomasko and the DISR Team, M. Bird and the DWE Team, and G. Israel and the ACP Team. Additionally, special thanks for many years of support to D.L. Matson, R.T. Mitchell, M. Pérez-Ayúcar, O. Witasse; J. Jones, D. Roth, N. Strange on the Cassini Navigation Team at JPL; A.-M. Schipper and P. Couzin at Thales Alenia; C. Sollazzo, D. Salt, J. Wheadon and S. Standley from the Huygens Ops Team; and R. Trautner and H. Svedhem on the Radar Team at ESTEC.

  4. Huygens probe entry and descent trajectory analysis and reconstruction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. H.; Kazeminejad, B.; Gaborit, V.; Ferri, F.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    2005-04-01

    Cassini/Huygens is a joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/European Space Agency (ESA)/Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) mission on its way to explore the Saturnian system. The ESA Huygens Probe is scheduled to be released from the Orbiter on 25 December 2004 and enter the atmosphere of Titan on 14 January 2005. Probe delivery to Titan, arbitrarily defined to occur at a reference altitude of 1270 km above the surface of Titan, is the responsibility of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). ESA is then responsible for safely delivering the probe from the reference altitude to the surface. The task of reconstructing the probe trajectory and attitude from the entry point to the surface has been assigned to the Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group (DTWG), a subgroup of the Huygens Science Working Team. The DTWG will use data provided by the Huygens Probe engineering subsystems and selected data sets acquired by the scientific payload. To correctly interpret and correlate results from the probe science experiments and to provide a reference set of data for possible "ground-truthing" Orbiter remote sensing measurements, it is essential that the trajectory reconstruction be performed as early as possible in the post-flight data analysis phase. The reconstruction of the Huygens entry and descent trajectory will be based primarily on the probe entry state vector provided by the Cassini Navigation Team, and measurements of acceleration, pressure, and temperature made by the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument (HASI). Other data sets contributing to the entry and descent trajectory reconstruction include the mean molecular weight of the atmosphere measured by the probe Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) in the upper atmosphere and the Surface Science Package (SSP) speed of sound measurement in the lower atmosphere, accelerations measured by the Central and Radial Accelerometer Sensor Units (CASU/RASU), and the probe altitude by the two probe radar altimeters during the latter stages of the descent. In the last several hundred meters, the altitude determination will be constrained by measurements from the SSP acoustic sounder. Other instruments contributing data to the entry and descent trajectory and attitude determination include measurements of the zonal wind drift by the Doppler Wind Experiment (DWE), and probe zonal and meridional drift and probe attitude by the Descent Imager and Spectral Radiometer (DISR). In this paper, the need for and the methods by which the Huygens Probe entry and descent trajectory will be reconstructed are reviewed.

  5. Measurement of CPAS Main Parachute Rate of Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is being designed to land the Orion Crew Module (CM) at a safe rate of descent at splashdown. Flight test performance must be measured to a high degree of accuracy to ensure this requirement is met with the most efficient design possible. Although the design includes three CPAS Main parachutes, the requirement is that the system must not exceed 33 ft/s under two Main parachutes, should one of the Main parachutes fail. Therefore, several tests were conducted with clusters of two Mains. All of the steady-state rate of descent data are normalized to standard sea level conditions and checked against the limit. As the Orion design gains weight, the system is approaching this limit to within measurement precision. Parachute "breathing," cluster interactions, and atmospheric anomalies can cause the rate of descent to vary widely and lead to challenges in characterizing parachute terminal performance. An early test had contradictory rate of descent results from optical trajectory and Differential Global Positioning Systems (DGPS). A thorough analysis of the data sources and error propagation was conducted to determine the uncertainty in the trajectory. It was discovered that the Time Space Position Information (TSPI) from the optical tracking provided accurate position data. However, the velocity from TPSI must be computed via numerical differentiation, which is prone to large error. DGPS obtains position through pseudo-range calculations from multiple satellites and velocity through Doppler shift of the carrier frequency. Because the velocity from DGPS is a direct measurement, it is more accurate than TSPI velocity. To remedy the situation, a commercial off-the-shelf product that combines GPS and an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) was purchased to significantly improve rate of descent measurements. This had the added benefit of solving GPS dropouts during aircraft extraction. Statistical probability distributions for CPAS Main parachute rate of descent and drag coefficient were computed and plotted. Using test data, a terminal rate of descent at splashdown can be estimated as a function of canopy loading.

  6. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergei; Koryanov, Valeri; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Haukka, Harri; Finchenko, Valeri; Martynov, Maxim; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Victor; Martin, Susana

    2015-04-01

    We have developed an atmospheric re-entry and descent system concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques that were originally developed for Mars. The ultimate goal of this EU-funded RITD-project (Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development) was to assess the benefits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develop a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and even Lunar applications envisaged include the use of the EDLS approach in returning payloads of 4-8 kg down to the surface. Our development and assessments show clearly that this kind of inflatable technology originally developed for the Martian atmosphere, is feasible for use by Earth entry and descent applications. The preliminary results are highly promising indicating that the current Mars probe design could be used as it is for the Earth. According tp our analyses, the higher atmospheric pressure at an altitude of 12 km and less requires an additional pressurizing device for the in atable system increasing the entry mass by approximately 2 kg. These analyses involved the calculation of 120 different atmospheric entry and descent trajectories. The analysis of the existing technologies and current trends have indicated that the kind of inflatable technology pursued by RITD has high potential to enhance the European space technology expertise. This kind of technology is clearly feasible for utilization by Earth entry and descent applications.

  7. Cerebellar control of gait and interlimb coordination.

    PubMed

    Vinueza Veloz, Mara Fernanda; Zhou, Kuikui; Bosman, Laurens W J; Potters, Jan-Willem; Negrello, Mario; Seepers, Robert M; Strydis, Christos; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic and intrinsic processing in Purkinje cells, interneurons and granule cells of the cerebellar cortex have been shown to underlie various relatively simple, single-joint, reflex types of motor learning, including eyeblink conditioning and adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. However, to what extent these processes contribute to more complex, multi-joint motor behaviors, such as locomotion performance and adaptation during obstacle crossing, is not well understood. Here, we investigated these functions using the Erasmus Ladder in cell-specific mouse mutant lines that suffer from impaired Purkinje cell output (Pcd), Purkinje cell potentiation (L7-Pp2b), molecular layer interneuron output (L7-??2), and granule cell output (?6-Cacna1a). We found that locomotion performance was severely impaired with small steps and long step times in Pcd and L7-Pp2b mice, whereas it was mildly altered in L7-??2 and not significantly affected in ?6-Cacna1a mice. Locomotion adaptation triggered by pairing obstacle appearances with preceding tones at fixed time intervals was impaired in all four mouse lines, in that they all showed inaccurate and inconsistent adaptive walking patterns. Furthermore, all mutants exhibited altered front-hind and left-right interlimb coordination during both performance and adaptation, and inconsistent walking stepping patterns while crossing obstacles. Instead, motivation and avoidance behavior were not compromised in any of the mutants during the Erasmus Ladder task. Our findings indicate that cell type-specific abnormalities in cerebellar microcircuitry can translate into pronounced impairments in locomotion performance and adaptation as well as interlimb coordination, highlighting the general role of the cerebellar cortex in spatiotemporal control of complex multi-joint movements. PMID:25139623

  8. Foxc1 dependent mesenchymal signalling drives embryonic cerebellar growth.

    PubMed

    Haldipur, Parthiv; Gillies, Gwendolyn S; Janson, Olivia K; Chizhikov, Victor V; Mithal, Divakar S; Miller, Richard J; Millen, Kathleen J

    2014-01-01

    Loss of Foxc1 is associated with Dandy-Walker malformation, the most common human cerebellar malformation characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia and an enlarged posterior fossa and fourth ventricle. Although expressed in the mouse posterior fossa mesenchyme, loss of Foxc1 non-autonomously induces a rapid and devastating decrease in embryonic cerebellar ventricular zone radial glial proliferation and concurrent increase in cerebellar neuronal differentiation. Subsequent migration of cerebellar neurons is disrupted, associated with disordered radial glial morphology. In vitro, SDF1α, a direct Foxc1 target also expressed in the head mesenchyme, acts as a cerebellar radial glial mitogen and a chemoattractant for nascent Purkinje cells. Its receptor, Cxcr4, is expressed in cerebellar radial glial cells and conditional Cxcr4 ablation with Nes-Cre mimics the Foxc1-/- cerebellar phenotype. SDF1α also rescues the Foxc1-/- phenotype. Our data emphasizes that the head mesenchyme exerts a considerable influence on early embryonic brain development and its disruption contributes to neurodevelopmental disorders in humans. PMID:25513817

  9. Pre- and Postnatal Neuroimaging of Congenital Cerebellar Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-02-01

    The human cerebellum has a protracted development that makes it vulnerable to a broad spectrum of developmental disorders including malformations and disruptions. Starting from 19 to 20weeks of gestation, prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reliably study the developing cerebellum. Pre- and postnatal neuroimaging plays a key role in the diagnostic work-up of congenital cerebellar abnormalities. Diagnostic criteria for cerebellar malformations and disruptions are based mostly on neuroimaging findings. The diagnosis of a Dandy-Walker malformation is based on the presence of hypoplasia, elevation, and counterclockwise upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, which extends posteriorly filling out the posterior fossa. For the diagnosis of Joubert syndrome, the presence of the molar tooth sign (thickened, elongated, and horizontally orientated superior cerebellar peduncles and an abnormally deep interpeduncular fossa) is needed. The diagnostic criteria of rhombencephalosynapsis include a complete or partial absence of the cerebellar vermis and continuity of the cerebellar hemispheres across the midline. Unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia is defined by the complete aplasia or hypoplasia of one cerebellar hemisphere. Familiarity with these diagnostic criteria as well as the broad spectrum of additional neuroimaging findings is important for a correct pre- and postnatal diagnosis. A correct diagnosis is essential for management, prognosis, and counseling of the affected children and their family. PMID:26166429

  10. Neocortical networks entrain neuronal circuits in cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Roš, Hana; Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Yu, Yuguo; Šestan, Nenad; McCormick, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Activity in neocortex is often characterized by synchronized oscillations of neurons and networks, resulting in the generation of a local field potential and electroencephalogram. Do the neuronal networks of the cerebellum also generate synchronized oscillations and are they under the influence of those in the neocortex? Here we show that in the absence of any overt external stimulus, the cerebellar cortex generates a slow oscillation that is correlated with that of the neocortex. Disruption of the neocortical slow oscillation abolishes the cerebellar slow oscillation, whereas blocking cerebellar activity has no overt effect on the neocortex. We provide evidence that the cerebellar slow oscillation results in part from the activation of granule, Golgi, and Purkinje neurons. In particular, we show that granule and Golgi cells discharge trains of single spikes, and Purkinje cells generate complex spikes, during the Up state of the slow oscillation. Purkinje cell simple spiking is weakly related to the cerebellar and neocortical slow oscillation in a minority of cells. Our results indicate that the cerebellum generates rhythmic network activity that can be recorded as an LFP in the anesthetized animal, which is driven by synchronized oscillations of the neocortex. Furthermore, we show that correlations between neocortical and cerebellar LFPs persist in the awake animal, indicating that neocortical circuits modulate cerebellar neurons in a similar fashion in natural behavioral states. Thus, the projection neurons of the neocortex collectively exert a driving and modulatory influence on cerebellar network activity. PMID:19692605

  11. The Cerebellum and Language: Evidence from Patients with Cerebellar Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoodley, Catherine J.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and imaging studies suggest that the cerebellum is involved in language tasks, but the extent to which slowed language production in cerebellar patients contributes to their poor performance on these tasks is not clear. We explored this relationship in 18 patients with cerebellar degeneration and 16 healthy controls who completed measures

  12. Distinct Critical Cerebellar Subregions for Components of Verbal Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Freya E.; Grube, Manon; Von Kriegstein, Katharina; Kumar, Sukhbinder; English, Philip; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    A role for the cerebellum in cognition has been proposed based on studies suggesting a profile of cognitive deficits due to cerebellar stroke. Such studies are limited in the determination of the detailed organisation of cerebellar subregions that are critical for different aspects of cognition. In this study we examined the correlation between

  13. Acute cerebellar vertigo in a fighter pilot.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Chapnik, Leah; Ulanovski, David; Goldstein, Liav; Azaria, Bella; Sherer, Yaniv; Barenboim, Erez

    2004-10-01

    Vertigo is a frequently encountered complaint among aviators. This complaint is usually labyrinthine in origin. We present a case of a combat jet fighter pilot who experienced a vertiginous episode during flight that nearly resulted in a mishap. Work-up revealed a dissecting aneurysm of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Coiling of the aneurysm was performed. This case emphasizes the importance of performing a complete vestibular evaluation in aviators with acute vertigo. Since central nervous system causes may be responsible for vertiginous events, and when undiagnosed may result in a recurrence during flight, magnetic resonance scanning should be considered in those with no obvious peripheral cause for their vertigo. PMID:15497373

  14. Cerebellar abscess. A review of 47 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, M D; Russell, J A

    1975-01-01

    Forty-seven cases of cerebellar abscess have been reviewed, 93% of which were secondary to otogenic disease. There has been little change in the annual incidence during the period of time under review. The overall mortality was 41%, but with successive decades the mortality has increased. Three factors appear to be of importance in determining survival: the patient's ability to control his infection; reduction of the effect of the posterior fossa mass, preferably by complete excision of the abscess under antibiotic cover; and, in the case of otogenic abscess, an adequate radical mastoidectomy with bone removal to the site of attachment of the abscess to the dura mater. PMID:1151412

  15. Cerebellar loops: a review of the nucleocortical pathway.

    PubMed

    Houck, Brenda D; Person, Abigail L

    2014-06-01

    Feedback pathways are a common circuit motif in vertebrate brains. Reciprocal interconnectivity is seen between the cerebral cortex and thalamus as well as between basal ganglia structures, for example. Here, we review the literature on the nucleocortical pathway, a feedback pathway from the cerebellar nuclei to the cerebellar cortex, which has been studied anatomically but has remained somewhat obscure. This review covers the work examining this pathway on a number of levels, ranging from its existence in numerous species, its organization within cerebellar circuits, its cellular composition, and a discussion of its potential roles in motor control. Recent interest in cerebellar modular organization raises the profile of this neglected cerebellar pathway, and it is hoped that this review will consolidate knowledge gained over several decades of research into a useful format, spurring new investigations into this evolutionarily conserved pathway. PMID:24362758

  16. New evidence for the cerebellar involvement in personality traits

    PubMed Central

    Picerni, Eleonora; Petrosini, Laura; Piras, Fabrizio; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Cutuli, Debora; Chiapponi, Chiara; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Following the recognition of its role in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum has been involved in cognitive, emotional, and even personality domains. This study investigated the relationships between cerebellar macro- and micro-structural variations and temperamental traits measured by Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). High resolution T1-weighted, and Diffusion Tensor Images of 100 healthy subjects aged 1859 years were acquired by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance scanner. In multiple regression analyses, cerebellar Gray Matter (GM) or White Matter (WM) volumes, GM Mean Diffusivity (MD), and WM Fractional Anisotropy (FA) were used as dependent variables, TCI scores as regressors, gender, age, and education years as covariates. Novelty Seeking scores were associated positively with the cerebellar GM volumes and FA, and negatively with MD. No significant association between Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence or Persistence scores and cerebellar structural measures was found. The present data put toward a cerebellar involvement in the management of novelty. PMID:24106465

  17. Carcinoma of the tonsillar fossa. A nonradomized comparison of preoperative radiation and surgery or irradiation alone: long-term results

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.C.; Purdy, J.A.; Breaux, S.R.; Ogura, J.H.; Von Essen, S.

    1982-12-01

    The results of therapy in 218 patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the tonsillar fossa are reported. Ninety-eight patients were treated with irradiation alone (5500-7000 rad). One hundred twenty patients were treated with preoperative radiation (2000-3000 rad) and en bloc radical tonsillectomy with ipsilateral lymph node dissection. The actuarial three year survival on patients with T1 tumors was 76%; T2, 40%; T3, 42%; and T4, 25%. The patients with no cervical lymphadenopathy or with a small metastatic lymph node (N/sub 1/,N/sub 2/) had better survival (50% at five years) than those with fixed lymph nodes (20%-30%). The primary tumor recurrence rate in the T1-T2 groups was about 20% in the patients treated with preoperative radiation and surgery in contrast to 35% to 40% for those treated with radiation alone. The local recurrences in the patients with T3 lesions were 30% with both treatment groups; with T4 lesions recurrences noted in 50% of the patients receiving irradiation alone and 75% in the patients treated with preoperative radiation and surgery. The local recurrence rate in the neck was about 10% for the NO patients, 30% for N1, and 30% for the patients with N2 and N3 cervical lymph node stage groups. There was no significant difference in the survival or in the frequency of recurrences in the primary or neck in the patients treated with radiation alone or preoperative radiation and surgery. Fatal major complications were noted in eight of the 120 patients treated with preoperative radiation and surgery (6.6%) in contrast to only one in the 98 patients treated with radiation alone. Other less severe complications were noted in 40% of the patients treated with preoperative radiation and surgery and in 32.6% of those treated with radiation therapy alone.

  18. Carcinoma of the tonsillar fossa: A nonrandomized comparison of irradiation alone or combined with surgery: Long-term results

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.A.; Carmichael, T.; Devineni, V.R.; Simpson, J.R.; Frederickson, J.; Sessions, D.; Spector, G.; Fineberg, B. )

    1991-07-01

    The results of therapy are reported in 296 patients with histologically proven epidermoid carcinoma of the tonsillar fossa; 127 were treated with irradiation alone (5,500 to 7,000 cGy), 133 with preoperative radiotherapy (2,000 to 3,000 cGy) or were initially planned for preoperative irradiation but treated with radiotherapy alone, and 36 with postoperative irradiation (5,000 to 6,000 cGy). The operation in all but 4 patients consisted of an en bloc radical tonsillectomy with ipsilateral lymph node dissection. Actuarial 5-year no evidence of disease (NED) was as follows: survival rates for patients with T1 tumors, 76%; T2, 54%; T3, 45%; and T4, 20%. Patients with no cervical lymphadenopathy or with a small metastatic lymph node (N1) had better relapse-free survival (60% to 70% at 5 years) than those with large or fixed lymph nodes (30% to 40%). Primary tumor recurrence rate in the T1-T2 groups was about 20% in patients treated with irradiation and surgery and 30% for those treated with irradiation alone (difference not statistically significant), 30% in patients with stage T3 lesions in all treatment groups, and 33% in patients with T4 disease treated with surgery and postoperative irradiation compared to 52% with irradiation alone (p = 0.03). The overall recurrence rate in the neck was about 20% for the N0 patients, 25% for N1, and 30% for those with N2 and N3 cervical lymph nodes in the 4 treatment groups. The incidence of contralateral neck recurrences was about 8% with the various treatment modalities.

  19. Loss of Smarc proteins impairs cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Natalia; Schmidt, Christin; Ahlfeld, Julia; Pschl, Julia; Dittmar, Stefanie; Pfister, Stefan M; Kool, Marcel; Kerl, Kornelius; Schller, Ulrich

    2014-10-01

    SMARCA4 (BRG1) and SMARCB1 (INI1) are tumor suppressor genes that are crucially involved in the formation of malignant rhabdoid tumors, such as atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT). AT/RTs typically affect infants and occur at various sites of the CNS with a particular frequency in the cerebellum. Here, granule neurons and their progenitors represent the most abundant cell type and are known to give rise to a subset of medulloblastoma, a histologically similar embryonal brain tumor. To test how Smarc proteins influence the development of granule neurons and whether this population may serve as cellular origin for AT/RTs, we specifically deleted Smarca4 and Smarcb1 in cerebellar granule cell precursors. Respective mutant mice displayed severe ataxia and motor coordination deficits, but did not develop any tumors. In fact, they suffered from a severely hypoplastic cerebellum due to a significant inhibition of granule neuron precursor proliferation. Molecularly, this was accompanied by an enhanced activity of Wnt/?-catenin signaling that, by itself, is known to cause a nearly identical phenotype. We further used an hGFAP-cre allele, which deleted Smarcb1 much earlier and in a wider neural precursor population, but we still did not detect any tumor formation in the CNS. In summary, our results emphasize cell-type-dependent roles of Smarc proteins and argue against cerebellar granule cells and other progeny of hGFAP-positive neural precursors as the cellular origin for AT/RTs. PMID:25274825

  20. Insights into cerebellar development and medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bihannic, Laure; Ayrault, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar development is an extensive process that begins during early embryonic stages and persists more than one year after birth in human. Therefore, the cerebellum is susceptible to acquire various developmental abnormalities leading to numerous diseases such as medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric malignant brain tumor. One third of the patients with medulloblastoma are incurable and survivors have a poor quality of life due to the aggressiveness of the broad-spectrum treatments. Within the past few years, it has been highlighted that medulloblastoma is a heterogeneous disease that is divided in four molecular subgroups. This recent advance in the field, combined with the development of associated preclinical models for each subgroup, should enable, in the future, the discovery and use of targeted therapy in clinical treatments for each subtype of medulloblastoma. In this review, we first aim to show how deregulation of cerebellar development can lead to medulloblastoma formation and then to present the advances in the molecular subgrouping of medulloblastoma and the associated preclinical models. PMID:26688373

  1. Analysis of various descent trajectories for a hypersonic-cruise, cold-wall research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.

    1975-01-01

    The probable descent operating conditions for a hypersonic air-breathing research airplane were examined. Descents selected were cruise angle of attack, high dynamic pressure, high lift coefficient, turns, and descents with drag brakes. The descents were parametrically exercised and compared from the standpoint of cold-wall (367 K) aircraft heat load. The descent parameters compared were total heat load, peak heating rate, time to landing, time to end of heat pulse, and range. Trends in total heat load as a function of cruise Mach number, cruise dynamic pressure, angle-of-attack limitation, pull-up g-load, heading angle, and drag-brake size are presented.

  2. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haukka, H.; Heilimo, J.; Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Koryanov, V.; Arruego, I.; Schmidt, W.; Finchenko, V.; Martynov, M.; Ponomarenko, A.; Kazakovtsev, V.; Martin, S.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an atmospheric re-entry and descent system concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques that were originally developed for Mars. The ultimate goal of this EU-funded RITD-project (Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development) was to assess the benefits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develop a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and even Lunar applications envisaged include the use of the EDLS approach in returning payloads of 4-8 kg down to the surface.

  3. Efficient Sensor Placement Optimization Using Gradient Descent and Probabilistic Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Vahab; Lévesque, Julien-Charles; Gagné, Christian; Parizeau, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We are proposing an adaptation of the gradient descent method to optimize the position and orientation of sensors for the sensor placement problem. The novelty of the proposed method lies in the combination of gradient descent optimization with a realistic model, which considers both the topography of the environment and a set of sensors with directional probabilistic sensing. The performance of this approach is compared with two other black box optimization methods over area coverage and processing time. Results show that our proposed method produces competitive results on smaller maps and superior results on larger maps, while requiring much less computation than the other optimization methods to which it has been compared. PMID:25196164

  4. Helicopter optimal descent and landing after power loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    An optimal control solution is obtained for the descent and landing of a helicopter after the loss of power in level flight. The model considers the helicopter vertical velocity, horizontal velocity, and rotor speed; and it includes representations of ground effect, rotor inflow time lag, pilot reaction time, rotor stall, and the induced velocity curve in the vortex ring state. The control (rotor thrust magnitude and direction) required to minimize the vertical and horizontal velocity at contact with the ground is obtained using nonlinear optimal control theory. It is found that the optimal descent after power loss in hover is a purely vertical flight path. Good correlation, even quantitatively, is found between the calculations and (non-optimal) flight test results.

  5. A Symmetric Time-Varying Cluster Rate of Descent Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    A model of the time-varying rate of descent of the Orion vehicle was developed based on the observed correlation between canopy projected area and drag coefficient. This initial version of the model assumes cluster symmetry and only varies the vertical component of velocity. The cluster fly-out angle is modeled as a series of sine waves based on flight test data. The projected area of each canopy is synchronized with the primary fly-out angle mode. The sudden loss of projected area during canopy collisions is modeled at minimum fly-out angles, leading to brief increases in rate of descent. The cluster geometry is converted to drag coefficient using empirically derived constants. A more complete model is under development, which computes the aerodynamic response of each canopy to its local incidence angle.

  6. Two descent hybrid conjugate gradient methods for optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Zhou, Weijun

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we propose two new hybrid nonlinear conjugate gradient methods, which produce sufficient descent search direction at every iteration. This property depends neither on the line search used nor on the convexity of the objective function. Under suitable conditions, we prove that the proposed methods converge globally for general nonconvex functions. The numerical results show that both hybrid methods are efficient for the given test problems from the CUTE library.

  7. Flight Management System Execution of Idle-Thrust Descents in Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel L.

    2011-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the trajectory predictor and its error models, commercial flights executed idle-thrust descents, and the recorded data includes the target speed profile and FMS intent trajectories. The FMS computes the intended descent path assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and any intervention by the controllers that alters the FMS execution of the descent is recorded so that such flights are discarded from the analysis. The horizontal flight path, cruise and meter fix altitudes, and actual TOD location are extracted from the radar data. Using more than 60 descents in Boeing 777 aircraft, the actual speeds are compared to the intended descent speed profile. In addition, three aspects of the accuracy of the FMS intent trajectory are analyzed: the meter fix crossing time, the TOD location, and the altitude at the meter fix. The actual TOD location is within 5 nmi of the intent location for over 95% of the descents. Roughly 90% of the time, the airspeed is within 0.01 of the target Mach number and within 10 KCAS of the target descent CAS, but the meter fix crossing time is only within 50 sec of the time computed by the FMS. Overall, the aircraft seem to be executing the descents as intended by the designers of the onboard automation.

  8. Abnormal cerebellar morphometry in abstinent adolescent marijuana users

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Krista Lisdahl; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Functional neuroimaging data from adults have, in general, found frontocerebellar dysfunction associated with acute and chronic marijuana (MJ) use (Loeber & Yurgelun-Todd, 1999). One structural neuroimaging study found reduced cerebellar vermis volume in young adult MJ users with a history of heavy polysubstance use (Aasly et al., 1993). The goal of this study was to characterize cerebellar volume in adolescent chronic MJ users following one month of monitored abstinence. Method Participants were MJ users (n=16) and controls (n=16) aged 16-18 years. Extensive exclusionary criteria included history of psychiatric or neurologic disorders. Drug use history, neuropsychological data, and structural brain scans were collected after 28 days of monitored abstinence. Trained research staff defined cerebellar volumes (including three cerebellar vermis lobes and both cerebellar hemispheres) on high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. Results Adolescent MJ users demonstrated significantly larger inferior posterior (lobules VIII-X) vermis volume (p<.009) than controls, above and beyond effects of lifetime alcohol and other drug use, gender, and intracranial volume. Larger vermis volumes were associated with poorer executive functioning (p’s<.05). Conclusions Following one month of abstinence, adolescent MJ users had significantly larger posterior cerebellar vermis volumes than non-using controls. These greater volumes are suggested to be pathological based on linkage to poorer executive functioning. Longitudinal studies are needed to examine typical cerebellar development during adolescence and the influence of marijuana use. PMID:20413277

  9. Contribution of Cerebellar Sensorimotor Adaptation to Hippocampal Spatial Memory

    PubMed Central

    Passot, Jean-Baptiste; Sheynikhovich, Denis; Duvelle, lonore; Arleo, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Complementing its primary role in motor control, cerebellar learning has also a bottom-up influence on cognitive functions, where high-level representations build up from elementary sensorimotor memories. In this paper we examine the cerebellar contribution to both procedural and declarative components of spatial cognition. To do so, we model a functional interplay between the cerebellum and the hippocampal formation during goal-oriented navigation. We reinterpret and complete existing genetic behavioural observations by means of quantitative accounts that cross-link synaptic plasticity mechanisms, single cell and population coding properties, and behavioural responses. In contrast to earlier hypotheses positing only a purely procedural impact of cerebellar adaptation deficits, our results suggest a cerebellar involvement in high-level aspects of behaviour. In particular, we propose that cerebellar learning mechanisms may influence hippocampal place fields, by contributing to the path integration process. Our simulations predict differences in place-cell discharge properties between normal mice and L7-PKCI mutant mice lacking long-term depression at cerebellar parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. On the behavioural level, these results suggest that, by influencing the accuracy of hippocampal spatial codes, cerebellar deficits may impact the exploration-exploitation balance during spatial navigation. PMID:22485133

  10. Neural correlates of impaired emotional face recognition in cerebellar lesions.

    PubMed

    Adamaszek, Michael; Kirkby, Kenneth C; D'Agata, Fedrico; Olbrich, Sebastian; Langner, Sönke; Steele, Christopher; Sehm, Bernhard; Busse, Stefan; Kessler, Christof; Hamm, Alfons

    2015-07-10

    Clinical and neuroimaging data indicate a cerebellar contribution to emotional processing, which may account for affective-behavioral disturbances in patients with cerebellar lesions. We studied the neurophysiology of cerebellar involvement in recognition of emotional facial expression. Participants comprised eight patients with discrete ischemic cerebellar lesions and eight control patients without any cerebrovascular stroke. Event-related potentials (ERP) were used to measure responses to faces from the Karolinska Directed Emotional Faces Database (KDEF), interspersed in a stream of images with salient contents. Images of faces augmented N170 in both groups, but increased late positive potential (LPP) only in control patients without brain lesions. Dipole analysis revealed altered activation patterns for negative emotions in patients with cerebellar lesions, including activation of the left inferior prefrontal area to images of faces showing fear, contralateral to controls. Correlation analysis indicated that lesions of cerebellar area Crus I contribute to ERP deviations. Overall, our results implicate the cerebellum in integrating emotional information at different higher order stages, suggesting distinct cerebellar contributions to the proposed large-scale cerebral network of emotional face recognition. PMID:25912431

  11. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Effects on Saccade Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    van der Geest, Jos N.; Kengne Kamga, Sandra; Verhage, M. Claire; Donchin, Opher; Frens, Maarten A.

    2015-01-01

    Saccade adaptation is a cerebellar-mediated type of motor learning in which the oculomotor system is exposed to repetitive errors. Different types of saccade adaptations are thought to involve distinct underlying cerebellar mechanisms. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) induces changes in neuronal excitability in a polarity-specific manner and offers a modulatory, noninvasive, functional insight into the learning aspects of different brain regions. We aimed to modulate the cerebellar influence on saccade gains during adaptation using tDCS. Subjects performed an inward (n = 10) or outward (n = 10) saccade adaptation experiment (25% intrasaccadic target step) while receiving 1.5?mA of anodal cerebellar tDCS delivered by a small contact electrode. Compared to sham stimulation, tDCS increased learning of saccadic inward adaptation but did not affect learning of outward adaptation. This may imply that plasticity mechanisms in the cerebellum are different between inward and outward adaptation. TDCS could have influenced specific cerebellar areas that contribute to inward but not outward adaptation. We conclude that tDCS can be used as a neuromodulatory technique to alter cerebellar oculomotor output, arguably by engaging wider cerebellar areas and increasing the available resources for learning. PMID:25821604

  12. Update on the Pharmacotherapy of Cerebellar Ataxia and Nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Feil, Katharina; Bremova, Tatiana; Muth, Carolin; Schniepp, Roman; Teufel, Julian; Strupp, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Pharmacological treatment of cerebellar ataxias and cerebellar nystagmus still remains difficult. The efficacy of most of the agents recommended in the past for symptomatic or even causative therapy could not be proven in larger state-of-the art clinical trials. Exceptions are (a) 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) for episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2): one observational and one randomized controlled trial showed a significant effect on the number of attacks of ataxia and quality of life; (b) aminopyridines in cerebellar downbeat nystagmus (DBN): two randomized controlled trials and several observational studies demonstrate a significant improvement of the intensity of DBN, visual acuity, and postural imbalance. In both diseases the sustained-release form is evidently also efficient; (c) 4-AP in cerebellar gait ataxia: evidence comes from two observational studies. (d) chlorzoxazone in DBN which, however, was so far demonstrated in only one observational study; (e) the modified amino acid acetyl-DL-leucine: evidently effective in cerebellar ataxias, shown in three observational studies, one on patients with Niemann-Pick type C; its mode of action has to be evaluated in animal models and on a cellular/electrophysiological level. There are ongoing randomized placebo-controlled trials on EA2 with 4-AP versus acetazolamide (EAT-2-TREAT), cerebellar gait ataxia with 4-AP (FACEG), and a multinational trial on cerebellar ataxia with acetyl-DL-leucine (ALCAT). PMID:26519380

  13. Airborne Management of Traffic Conflicts in Descent With Arrival Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doble, Nathan A.; Barhydt, Richard; Krishnamurthy, Karthik

    2005-01-01

    NASA is studying far-term air traffic management concepts that may increase operational efficiency through a redistribution of decisionmaking authority among airborne and ground-based elements of the air transportation system. One component of this research, En Route Free Maneuvering, allows trained pilots of equipped autonomous aircraft to assume responsibility for traffic separation. Ground-based air traffic controllers would continue to separate traffic unequipped for autonomous operations and would issue flow management constraints to all aircraft. To evaluate En Route Free Maneuvering operations, a human-in-the-loop experiment was jointly conducted by the NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers. In this experiment, test subject pilots used desktop flight simulators to resolve conflicts in cruise and descent, and to adhere to air traffic flow constraints issued by test subject controllers. Simulators at NASA Langley were equipped with a prototype Autonomous Operations Planner (AOP) flight deck toolset to assist pilots with conflict management and constraint compliance tasks. Results from the experiment are presented, focusing specifically on operations during the initial descent into the terminal area. Airborne conflict resolution performance in descent, conformance to traffic flow management constraints, and the effects of conflicting traffic on constraint conformance are all presented. Subjective data from subject pilots are also presented, showing perceived levels of workload, safety, and acceptability of autonomous arrival operations. Finally, potential AOP functionality enhancements are discussed along with suggestions to improve arrival procedures.

  14. Titan Explorer Entry, Descent and Landing Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Jody L.; Lindberg, Robert E.; Lockwood, Mary Kae

    2006-01-01

    The Titan Explorer mission concept includes an orbiter, entry probe and inflatable airship designed to take remote and in-situ measurements of Titan's atmosphere. A modified entry, descent and landing trajectory at Titan that incorporates mid-air airship inflation (under a parachute) and separation is developed and examined for Titan Explorer. The feasibility of mid-air inflation and deployment of an airship under a parachute is determined by implementing and validating an airship buoyancy and inflation model in the trajectory simulation program, Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2). A nominal POST2 trajectory simulation case study is generated which examines different descent scenarios by varying airship inflation duration, orientation, and separation. The buoyancy model incorporation into POST2 is new to the software and may be used in future trajectory simulations. Each case from the nominal POST2 trajectory case study simulates a successful separation between the parachute and airship systems with sufficient velocity change as to alter their paths to avoid collision throughout their descent. The airship and heatshield also separate acceptably with a minimum distance of separation from the parachute system of 1.5 km. This analysis shows the feasibility of airship inflation on a parachute for different orientations, airship separation at various inflation times, and preparation for level-flight at Titan.

  15. Free-falls and parachute descents in the standard atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, A P

    1947-01-01

    A detailed table of the standard equilibrium velocity and standard equilibrium time is presented for bodies falling in the standard atmosphere. This table gives the velocity at various altitudes and the time of fall from sea level to -4000 feet and from 80,000 feet to sea level. In addition to this standard table, there are given short tables and charts of an open-parachute descent and free-falls; the terminal velocity at sea level, and the variation of the weight-to-drag ratio (2w/cds)1/2 for various weight jumpers from 90 to 30 feet in open-parachute descent; and estimations of drag coefficients of silk and nylon parachutes. The table of standard equilibrium velocities and standard equilibrium times may be used directly for open-parachute descents, given the weight of the jumper, the diameter of the parachute, and the drag coefficient. For free-falls starting from horizontal flight, approximately 14 seconds must be added to the equilibrium time given in the table to obtain the total time to sea level. (author)

  16. Factors Associated with Sleep Disturbance in Women of Mexican Descent

    PubMed Central

    Heilemann, MarySue V.; Choudhury, Shonali M.; Kury, Felix Salvador; Lee, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The aims were to identify the most useful parameters of acculturation in relation to self reported sleep disturbance and describe risk factors for sleep disturbance in women of Mexican descent. Background Little is known about acculturation as a factor for poor sleep in the context of other personal factors such as income or sense of resilience or mastery for Latinas in the United States. Methods These personal factors were incorporated into a modification of the Conceptual Framework of Impaired Sleep to guide our secondary analysis of self-reported sleep disturbance. Cross sectional data from a convenience sample of 312 women of Mexican descent of childbearing age (21-40 years) located in an urban California community were collected and previously analyzed in relation to depressive symptoms and post traumatic stress disorder. The General Sleep Disturbance Scale (in English and Spanish) was used to assess sleep disturbance. Results Early socialization to the United States during childhood was the most useful acculturation parameter for understanding self reported sleep disturbance in this sample. In a multivariate regression analysis, three factors (higher acculturation, lower income, and higher depressive symptoms) were significant in accounting for 40% of the variance in sleep disturbance. Conclusion When low income Latinas of Mexican descent report sleep problems, clinicians should probe for environmental sleep factors associated with low income, such as noise, over-crowding, and exposure to trauma and violence, and refer the woman to psychotherapy and counselling rather than merely prescribe a sleep medication. PMID:22221152

  17. Lunar Surface Access Module Descent Engine Turbopump Technology: Detailed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, Erika; Forbes, John C.; Thornton, Randall J.

    2010-01-01

    The need for a high specific impulse LOX/LH2 pump-fed lunar lander engine has been established by NASA for the new lunar exploration architecture. Studies indicate that a 4-engine cluster in the thrust range of 9,000-lbf each is a candidate configuration for the main propulsion of the manned lunar lander vehicle. The lander descent engine will be required to perform multiple burns including the powered descent onto the lunar surface. In order to achieve the wide range of thrust required, the engines must be capable of throttling approximately 10:1. Working under internal research and development funding, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been conducting the development of a 9,000-lbf LOX/LH2 lunar lander descent engine technology testbed. This paper highlights the detailed design and analysis efforts to develop the lander engine Fuel Turbopump (FTP) whose operating speeds range from 30,000-rpm to 100,000-rpm. The capability of the FTP to operate across this wide range of speeds imposes several structural and dynamic challenges, and the small size of the FTP creates scaling and manufacturing challenges that are also addressed in this paper.

  18. Lunar Surface Access Module Descent Engine Turbopump Technology: Detailed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alarez, Erika; Thornton, Randall J.; Forbes, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The need for a high specific impulse LOX/LH2 pump-fed lunar lander engine has been established by NASA for the new lunar exploration architecture. Studies indicate that a 4-engine cluster in the thrust range of 9,000-lbf each is a candidate configuration for the main propulsion of the manned lunar lander vehicle. The lander descent engine will be required to perform minor mid-course corrections, a Lunar Orbit Insertion (LOI) burn, a de-orbit burn, and the powered descent onto the lunar surface. In order to achieve the wide range of thrust required, the engines must be capable of throttling approximately 10:1. Working under internal research and development funding, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been conducting the development of a 9,000-lbf LOX/LH2 lunar lander descent engine testbed. This paper highlights the detailed design and analysis efforts to develop the lander engine Fuel Turbopump (FTP) whose operating speeds range from 30,000-rpm to 100,000-rpm. The capability of the FTP to operate across this wide range of speeds imposes several structural and dynamic challenges, and the small size of the FTP creates scaling and manufacturing challenges that are also addressed in this paper.

  19. A new method for forecasting the solar cycle descent time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakad, Bharati; Kakad, Amar; Sai Ramesh, Durbha

    2015-08-01

    The prediction of an extended solar minimum is extremely important because of the severity of its impact on the near-earth space. Here, we present a new method for predicting the descent time of the forthcoming solar cycle (SC); the method is based on the estimation of the Shannon entropy. We use the daily and monthly smoothed international sunspot number. For each nth SC, we compute the parameter [Tpre]n by using information on the descent and ascent times of the n - 3th and nth SCs, respectively. We find that [Tpre] of nth SC and entropy can be effectively used to predict the descent time of the n + 2th SC. The correlation coefficient between [Td]n+2 - [Tpre]n and [E]n is found to be 0.95. Using these parameters the prediction model is developed. Solar magnetic field and F10.7 flux data are available for SCs 21-22 and 19-23, respectively, and they are also utilized to get estimates of the Shannon entropy. It is found that the Shannon entropy, a measure of randomness inherent in the SC, is reflected well in the various proxies of the solar activity (viz sunspot, magnetic field, F10.7 flux). The applicability and accuracy of the prediction model equation is verified by way of association of least entropy values with the Dalton minimum. The prediction model equation also provides possible criteria for the occurrence of unusually longer solar minima.

  20. Learning curves for stochastic gradient descent in linear feedforward networks.

    PubMed

    Werfel, Justin; Xie, Xiaohui; Seung, H Sebastian

    2005-12-01

    Gradient-following learning methods can encounter problems of implementation in many applications, and stochastic variants are sometimes used to overcome these difficulties. We analyze three online training methods used with a linear perceptron: direct gradient descent, node perturbation, and weight perturbation. Learning speed is defined as the rate of exponential decay in the learning curves. When the scalar parameter that controls the size of weight updates is chosen to maximize learning speed, node perturbation is slower than direct gradient descent by a factor equal to the number of output units; weight perturbation is slower still by an additional factor equal to the number of input units. Parallel perturbation allows faster learning than sequential perturbation, by a factor that does not depend on network size. We also characterize how uncertainty in quantities used in the stochastic updates affects the learning curves. This study suggests that in practice, weight perturbation may be slow for large networks, and node perturbation can have performance comparable to that of direct gradient descent when there are few output units. However, these statements depend on the specifics of the learning problem, such as the input distribution and the target function, and are not universally applicable. PMID:16212768

  1. Entry, Descent, and Landing Performance of the Mars Phoenix Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Prince, Jill L.; Wueen, Eric M.; Cruz, Juan R.; Grover, Myron R.

    2008-01-01

    On May 25, 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander successfully landed on the northern arctic plains of Mars. An overview of a preliminary reconstruction analysis performed on each entry, descent, and landing phase to assess the performance of Phoenix as it descended is presented and a comparison to pre-entry predictions is provided. The landing occurred 21 km further downrange than the predicted landing location. Analysis of the flight data revealed that the primary cause of Phoenix s downrange landing was a higher trim total angle of attack during the hypersonic phase of the entry, which resulted in Phoenix flying a slightly lifting trajectory. The cause of this higher trim attitude is not known at this time. Parachute deployment was 6.4 s later than prediction. This later deployment time was within the variations expected and is consistent with a lifting trajectory. The parachute deployment and inflation process occurred as expected with no anomalies identified. The subsequent parachute descent and powered terminal landing also behaved as expected. A preliminary reconstruction of the landing day atmospheric density profile was found to be lower than the best apriori prediction, ranging from a few percent less to a maximum of 8%. A comparison of the flight reconstructed trajectory parameters shows that the actual Phoenix entry, descent, and landing was close to pre-entry predictions. This reconstruction investigation is currently ongoing and the results to date are in the process of being refined.

  2. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for detecting Mycoplasma hyosynoviae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis in pen-based oral, tonsillar, and nasal fluids

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Leslie; Erickson, Barbara Z.; Wang, Chong; Raymond, Matthew; Strait, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma (M.) hyorhinis and M. hyosynoviae are pathogens known to cause disease in pigs post-weaning. Due to their fastidious nature, there is increased need for culture-independent diagnostic platforms to detect these microorganisms. Therefore, this study was performed to develop and optimize quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays to rapidly detect M. hyorhinis and M. hyosynoviae in pen-based oral fluids as well as nasal and tonsillar fluids as proxies for samples used in swine herd surveillance. Two methods of genomic DNA extraction, automated versus manual, were used to compare diagnostic test performance. A wean-to-finish longitudinal study was also carried out to demonstrate the reproducibility of using pen-based oral fluids. Overall, pen-based oral and tonsillar fluids were more likely to be positive for both types of bacteria whereas only M. hyorhinis was detected in nasal fluids. DNA extraction protocols were shown to significantly influence test result. Although the initial detection time somewhat differed, both organisms were repeatedly detected in the longitudinal study. Overall, this study evaluated two qPCR methods for rapid and specific detection of either mycoplasma. Results from the present investigation can serve as a foundation for future studies to determine the prevalence of the two microorganisms, environmental load, and effectiveness of veterinary interventions for infection control. PMID:25643803

  3. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for detecting Mycoplasma hyosynoviae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis in pen-based oral, tonsillar, and nasal fluids.

    PubMed

    Gomes Neto, Joo Carlos; Bower, Leslie; Erickson, Barbara Z; Wang, Chong; Raymond, Matthew; Strait, Erin L

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma (M.) hyorhinis and M. hyosynoviae are pathogens known to cause disease in pigs post-weaning. Due to their fastidious nature, there is increased need for culture-independent diagnostic platforms to detect these microorganisms. Therefore, this study was performed to develop and optimize quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays to rapidly detect M. hyorhinis and M. hyosynoviae in pen-based oral fluids as well as nasal and tonsillar fluids as proxies for samples used in swine herd surveillance. Two methods of genomic DNA extraction, automated versus manual, were used to compare diagnostic test performance. A wean-to-finish longitudinal study was also carried out to demonstrate the reproducibility of using pen-based oral fluids. Overall, pen-based oral and tonsillar fluids were more likely to be positive for both types of bacteria whereas only M. hyorhinis was detected in nasal fluids. DNA extraction protocols were shown to significantly influence test result. Although the initial detection time somewhat differed, both organisms were repeatedly detected in the longitudinal study. Overall, this study evaluated two qPCR methods for rapid and specific detection of either mycoplasma. Results from the present investigation can serve as a foundation for future studies to determine the prevalence of the two microorganisms, environmental load, and effectiveness of veterinary interventions for infection control. PMID:25643803

  4. Germline recessive mutations in PI4KA are associated with perisylvian polymicrogyria, cerebellar hypoplasia and arthrogryposis

    PubMed Central

    Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Howard, Malcolm F.; Wisniewski, Eva; Popitsch, Niko; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Keays, David A.; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Cox, Helen; Cox, Phillip; Balla, Tamas; Taylor, Jenny C.; Kini, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Polymicrogyria (PMG) is a structural brain abnormality involving the cerebral cortex that results from impaired neuronal migration and although several genes have been implicated, many cases remain unsolved. In this study, exome sequencing in a family where three fetuses had all been diagnosed with PMG and cerebellar hypoplasia allowed us to identify regions of the genome for which both chromosomes were shared identical-by-descent, reducing the search space for causative variants to 8.6% of the genome. In these regions, the only plausibly pathogenic mutations were compound heterozygous variants in PI4KA, which Sanger sequencing confirmed segregated consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. The paternally transmitted variant predicted a premature stop mutation (c.2386C>T; p.R796X), whereas the maternally transmitted variant predicted a missense substitution (c.5560G>A; p.D1854N) at a conserved residue within the catalytic domain. Functional studies using expressed wild-type or mutant PI4KA enzyme confirmed the importance of p.D1854 for kinase activity. Our results emphasize the importance of phosphoinositide signalling in early brain development. PMID:25855803

  5. Synaptogenesis in the foetal and neonatal cerebellar system. 2. Pontine nuclei and cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Sarnat, Harvey B; Flores-Sarnat, Laura; Auer, Roland N

    2013-01-01

    Precise temporal and spatial sequences of synaptogenesis were demonstrated in 172 human foetuses and neonates post-mortem in transverse paraffin sections of pons and cerebellar vermis and hemispheres, using synaptophysin immunoreactivity of this protein of synaptic vesicular walls. The pontine nuclei exhibit a transitory patchy pattern not predicted from the uniform histology and reminiscent of the corpus striatum; synaptic vesicle reactivity appears at 20 weeks and is uniform by 34 weeks. In the cerebellar cortex, the vermis matures sooner than the cerebellar hemispheres and the paravermal portions earlier than the lateral folia. The earliest synapses occur around the somata of Purkinje neurons and later in the internal granular layer, but synaptic glomeruli are not well formed until after 26 weeks. The normal patterns here shown, together with earlier data of the Guillain-Mollaret triangle, provide controls for the interpretation of synaptic delay or precociousness and other pathological patterns in malformations, genetic/metabolic conditions and prenatal acquired insults affecting the human foetus. PMID:23796553

  6. Mars Science Laboratory: Entry, Descent, and Landing System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Powell, Richard W.; Chen, Allen; Steltzner, Adam D.; San Martin, Alejandro M.; Burkhart, Paul D.; mendeck, Gavin F.

    2006-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems, by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. To do so, MSL will fly a guided lifting entry at a lift-to-drag ratio in excess of that ever flown at Mars, deploy the largest parachute ever at Mars, and perform a novel Sky Crane maneuver. Through improved altitude capability, increased latitude coverage, and more accurate payload delivery, MSL is allowing the science community to consider the exploration of previously inaccessible regions of the planet. The MSL EDL system is a new EDL architecture based on Viking heritage technologies and designed to meet the challenges of landing increasing massive payloads on Mars. In accordance with level-1 requirements, the MSL EDL system is being designed to land an 850 kg rover to altitudes as high as 1 km above the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter defined areoid within 10 km of the desired landing site. Accordingly, MSL will enter the largest entry mass, fly the largest 70 degree sphere-cone aeroshell, generate the largest hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio, and deploy the largest Disk-Gap-Band supersonic parachute of any previous mission to Mars. Major EDL events include a hypersonic guided entry, supersonic parachute deploy and inflation, subsonic heatshield jettison, terminal descent sensor acquisition, powered descent initiation, sky crane terminal descent, rover touchdown detection, and descent stage flyaway. Key performance metrics, derived from level-1 requirements and tracked by the EDL design team to indicate performance capability and timeline margins, include altitude and range at parachute deploy, time on radar, and propellant use. The MSL EDL system, which will continue to develop over the next three years, will enable a notable extension in the advancement of Mars surface science by delivering more science capability than ever before to the surface of Mars. This paper describes the current MSL EDL system performance as predicted by end-to-end EDL simulations, highlights the sensitivity of this baseline performance to several key environmental assumptions, and discusses some of the challenges faced in delivering such an unprecedented rover payload to the surface of Mars.

  7. Mars Science Laboratory: Entry, Descent, and Landing System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Powell, Richard W.; Chen, Allen; SanMartin, A. Miguel; Burkhart, P. Daniel; Mendeck, Gavin F.

    2007-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems, by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. To do so, MSL will fly a guided lifting entry at a lift-to-drag ratio in excess of that ever flown at Mars, deploy the largest parachute ever at Mars, and perform a novel Sky Crane maneuver. Through improved altitude capability, increased latitude coverage, and more accurate payload delivery, MSL is allowing the science community to consider the exploration of previously inaccessible regions of the planet. The MSL EDL system is a new EDL architecture based on Viking heritage technologies and designed to meet the challenges of landing increasing massive payloads on Mars. In accordance with level-1 requirements, the MSL EDL system is being designed to land an 850 kg rover to altitudes as high as 1 km above the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter defined areoid within 10 km of the desired landing site. Accordingly, MSL will enter the largest entry mass, fly the largest 70 degree sphere-cone aeroshell, generate the largest hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio, and deploy the largest Disk-Gap-Band supersonic parachute of any previous mission to Mars. Major EDL events include a hypersonic guided entry, supersonic parachute deploy and inflation, subsonic heatshield jettison, terminal descent sensor acquisition, powered descent initiation, sky crane terminal descent, rover touchdown detection, and descent stage flyaway. Key performance metrics, derived from level-1 requirements and tracked by the EDL design team to indicate performance capability and timeline margins, include altitude and range at parachute deploy, time on radar, and propellant use. The MSL EDL system, which will continue to develop over the next three years, will enable a notable extension in the advancement of Mars surface science by delivering more science capability than ever before to the surface of Mars. This paper describes the current MSL EDL system performance as predicted by end-to-end EDL simulations, highlights the sensitivity of this baseline performance to several key environmental assumptions, and discusses some of the challenges faced in delivering such an unprecedented rover payload to the surface of Mars.

  8. Mapping cerebellar abiotrophy in Australian Kelpies.

    PubMed

    Shearman, J R; Cook, R W; McCowan, C; Fletcher, J L; Taylor, R M; Wilton, A N

    2011-12-01

    An autosomal recessive form of cerebellar abiotrophy occurs in Australian Kelpie dogs. Clinical signs range from mild ataxia with intention tremor to severe ataxia with seizures. A whole-genome mapping analysis was performed using Affymetrix Canine SNP array v2 on 11 affected and 19 control dogs, but there was no significant association with disease. A homozygosity analysis identified a three megabase region likely to contain the disease mutation. The region spans 29.8-33?Mb on chromosome 3, for which all affected dogs were homozygous for a common haplotype. Microsatellite markers were developed in the candidate region for linkage analysis that resulted in a logarithm of odds score suggestive of linkage. The candidate region contains 29 genes, none of which are known to cause ataxia. PMID:22035013

  9. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Sun; Cho, Jin Whan

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes. PMID:26090078

  10. Late Onset of Cerebellar Abiotrophy in a Boxer Dog

    PubMed Central

    Gumber, Sanjeev; Cho, Doo-Youn; Morgan, Timothy W.

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar abiotrophy is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system and has been reported in humans and animals. This case report documents clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical findings of cerebellar abiotrophy in an adult Boxer dog. A 3.5-year-old, female, tan Boxer dog presented with a six-week history of left-sided head tilt. Neurological examination and additional diagnostics during her three subsequent visits over 4.5 months revealed worsening of neurological signs including marked head pressing, severe proprioceptive deficits in all the four limbs, loss of menace response and palpebral reflex in the left eye, and a gradual seizure lasting one hour at her last visit. Based on the immunohistochemical staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and histopathological examination of cerebellum, cerebellar cortical abiotrophy was diagnosed. This is the first reported case of cerebellar abiotrophy in a Boxer dog to our knowledge. PMID:21151662

  11. Hypertension-induced cerebellar encephalopathy and hydrocephalus in a male.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang-Lin; Hsu, Wen-Chin; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Lui, Tai-Ngar

    2006-01-01

    Hypertensive encephalopathy is believed to be caused by an abrupt elevation in systemic blood pressure. It rarely occurs in children and can be neurologically devastating if it is not recognized and treated immediately. This report describes an 11-year-old male who presented with edema and a cerebellar lesion, with acute obstructive hydrocephalus resulting from hypertensive encephalopathy. A shunt was inserted to relieve pressure in the acute stage. The patient's hydrocephalus and cerebellar swelling subsided when his blood pressure was controlled. The cerebellar lesion had been initially diagnosed as a glioma. In children, a cerebellar lesion occurring with acute obstructive hydrocephalus and hypertensive encephalopathy is rare but reversible. Clinicians should be aware of this condition because it might be misdiagnosed as a tumor of the posterior fossa. PMID:16376285

  12. Past, Present and Future Therapeutics for Cerebellar Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Marmolino, D; Manto, M

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are a group of disabling neurological disorders. Patients exhibit a cerebellar syndrome and can also present with extra-cerebellar deficits, namely pigmentary retinopathy, extrapyramidal movement disorders, pyramidal signs, cortical symptoms (seizures, cognitive impairment/behavioural symptoms), and peripheral neuropathy. Recently, deficits in cognitive operations have been unraveled. Cerebellar ataxias are heterogeneous both at the phenotypic and genotypic point of view. Therapeutical trials performed during these last 4 decades have failed in most cases, in particular because drugs were not targeting a deleterious pathway, but were given to counteract putative defects in neurotransmission. The identification of the causative mutations of many hereditary ataxias, the development of relevant animal models and the recent identifications of the molecular mechanisms underlying ataxias are impacting on the development of new drugs. We provide an overview of the pharmacological treatments currently used in the clinical practice and we discuss the drugs under development. PMID:20808545

  13. Novel Approaches to Studying the Genetic Basis of Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Sajan, Samin A.; Waimey, Kathryn E.

    2010-01-01

    The list of genes that when mutated cause disruptions in cerebellar development is rapidly increasing. The study of both spontaneous and engineered mouse mutants has been essential to this progress, as it has revealed much of our current understanding of the developmental processes required to construct the mature cerebellum. Improvements in brain imaging, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the emergence of better classification schemes for human cerebellar malformations, have recently led to the identification of a number of genes which cause human cerebellar disorders. In this review we argue that synergistic approaches combining classical molecular techniques, genomics, and mouse models of human malformations will be essential to fuel additional discoveries of cerebellar developmental genes and mechanisms. PMID:20387026

  14. Genetics Home Reference: VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... condition has also been reported in families from Iran and Turkey. What genes are related to VLDLR- ... associated cerebellar hypoplasia? This condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, which means both copies of ...

  15. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Behera, Sanjay Kumar; Dhir, Manmath Kumar; Senapati, Satya Bhusan

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different. PMID:25002780

  16. Cerebellar contributions to neurological soft signs in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Hirjak, Dusan; Thomann, Philipp A; Kubera, Katharina M; Stieltjes, Bram; Wolf, Robert C

    2016-02-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) are frequently found in psychiatric disorders of significant neurodevelopmental origin, e.g., in patients with schizophrenia and autism. Yet NSS are also present in healthy individuals suggesting a neurodevelopmental signature of motor function, probably as a continuum between health and disease. So far, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying these motor phenomena in healthy persons, and it is even less known whether the cerebellum contributes to NSS expression. Thirty-seven healthy young adults (mean age = 23 years) were studied using high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and "resting-state" functional MRI at three Tesla. NSS levels were measured using the "Heidelberg Scale." Cerebellar gray matter volume was investigated using cerebellum-optimized voxel-based analysis methods. Cerebellar function was assessed using regional homogeneity (ReHo), a measure of local network strength. The relationship between cerebellar structure and function and NSS was analyzed using regression models. There was no significant relationship between cerebellar volume and NSS (p < 0.005, uncorrected for height, p < 0.05 corrected for spatial extent). Positive associations with cerebellar lobule VI activity were found for the "motor coordination" and "hard signs" NSS domains. A negative relationship was found between lobule VI activity and "complex motor task" domain (p < 0.005, uncorrected for height, p < 0.05 corrected for spatial extent). The data indicate that in healthy young adults, distinct NSS domains are related to cerebellar activity, specifically with activity of cerebellar subregions with known cortical somatomotor projections. In contrast, cerebellar volume is not predictive of NSS in healthy persons. PMID:25708455

  17. Esophoria or esotropia in adulthood: a sign of cerebellar dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Hfner, Katharina; Frenzel, Claudia; Kremmyda, Olympia; Adrion, Christine; Bardins, Stanislavs; Glasauer, Stefan; Brandt, Thomas; Strupp, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Convergent strabismus is a common diagnosis in early childhood, when it is mostly considered benign. If it develops later in life, strabismus can, however, be a sign of neurological disease. In these cases the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are largely unknown. In this retrospective case-control study we analyzed the neuro-ophthalmological examination reports of 400 adult patients who presented at the German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders to determine an association between ocular misalignment and cerebellar dysfunction. Patients with cerebellar signs (i.e., cerebellar ataxia and/or cerebellar ocular motor signs) had a 4.49 (95% CI [1.60; 13.78]) times higher frequency of ocular misalignment and specifically a 13.3 (95% CI [3.80; 55.73]) times increased frequency of esophoria/esotropia (ESO) during distant gaze than patients without cerebellar dysfunction. ESO when looking into the distance was associated with saccadic smooth pursuit, dysmetria of saccades, and downbeat nystagmus (DBN) (? (2) test, p<0.0001 for all associations). Patients with cerebellar dysfunction also showed mildly impaired eye abduction (? (2) test, left eye and right eye: p<0.0001), associated with horizontal gaze-evoked nystagmus (? (2) test, p<0.0001). The association of ESO and DBN implicates a pathophysiological involvement of the cerebellar flocculus, while the association with dysmetric saccades suggests involvement of the oculomotor vermis. This is compatible with animal studies showing that the pathways of the flocculus/posterior interposed nucleus and vermis/nucleus fastigii are both involved in vergence movements and static binocular alignment. From a clinical point of view, a newly diagnosed esophoria/esotropia only during distant gaze may be a sign of a cerebellar disease. PMID:25522697

  18. Isolated cerebellar toxoplasmosis as a complication of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Pott, H; Castelo, A

    2013-01-01

    Isolated cerebellar mass lesion is an uncommon presentation of toxoplasmosis. The authors report one rare case in a 50-year-old HIV-infected male patient who presented with clipped speech, gait ataxia and incoordination. The cerebellar toxoplasmosis was suspected based on imaging findings, despite the atypical location. This case highlights the need for a high index of clinical suspicion among HIV-infected patients with neurological manifestations and suspicious neuroimaging findings. PMID:23512507

  19. Peripheral nerve involvement in hereditary cerebellar and multisystem degenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Berciano, Jos; Garca, Antonio; Infante, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary ataxias (HA) encompass an increasing number of degenerative disorders characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia usually accompanied by extracerebellar semeiology including peripheral nerve involvement. Classically, HA were classified according to their pathological hallmark comprising three main forms: (1) spinal form predominantly with degeneration of spinocerebellar tracts, posterior columns, and pyramidal tracts (Friedreich's ataxia, FA); (2) olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA); and (3) cortical cerebellar atrophy (CCA). In the 1980s Harding proposed a clinico-genetic classification based upon age of onset, modality of transmission, and clinical semeiology. The main categories in this classification were as follows: (1) early onset cerebellar ataxia (EOCA) with age of onset below 25 years and usually with autosomal recessive (AR) transmission (this group encompasses FA and syndromes different from FA); (2) autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) with adult onset and with either cerebellar-plus syndrome or pure cerebellar semeiology; and (3) idiopathic late onset onset cerebellar ataxia (ILOCA). With the advent of molecular genetics, the nosology of HA has been in a state of constant flux. At present EOCA comprises at least 17 genotypes (designated with the acronym of ARCA derived from AR cerebellar ataxia), whereas under the umbrella of ADCA 30 genotypes have been reported. In this chapter we will review peripheral nerve involvement in classical pathological entities (OPCA and CCA), ARCA, ADCA, and ILOCA paying special attention to the most prevalent syndromes in each category. As a general rule, nerve involvement is relatively common in any form of ataxia except ILOCA, the most common pattern being either sensory or sensorimotor neuronopathy with a dying-back process. An exception to this rule is AR spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay where nerve conduction studies show the characteristic pattern of intermediate neuropathy implying that sacsin mutation causes both axonal and Schwann cell dysfunction. PMID:23931821

  20. Disrupted cortico-cerebellar connectivity in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jessica A.; Peltier, Scott J.; Wiggins, Jillian Lee; Jaeggi, Susanne M.; Buschkuehl, Martin; Fling, Brett W.; Kwak, Youngbin; Jonides, John; Monk, Christopher S.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2013-01-01

    Healthy aging is marked by declines in a variety of cognitive and motor abilities. A better understanding of the aging brain may aid in elucidating the neural substrates of these behavioral effects. Investigations of resting state functional brain connectivity have provided insights into pathology, and to some degree, healthy aging. Given the role of the cerebellum in both motor and cognitive behaviors, as well as its known volumetric declines with age, investigating cerebellar networks may shed light on the neural bases of age-related functional declines. We mapped the resting state networks of the lobules of the right hemisphere and the vermis of the cerebellum in a group of healthy older adults and compared them to those of young adults. We report disrupted cortico-cerebellar resting state network connectivity in older adults. These results remain even when controlling for cerebellar volume, signal-to-noise ratio, and signal-to-fluctuation noise ratio. Specifically, there was consistent disruption of cerebellar connectivity with both the striatum and the medial temporal lobe. Associations between connectivity strength and both sensorimotor and cognitive task performance indicate that cerebellar engagement with the default mode network and striatal pathways is associated with better performance for older adults. These results extend our understanding of the resting state networks of the aging brain to include cortico-cerebellar networks, and indicate that age differences in network connectivity strength are important for behavior. PMID:23792980

  1. Transplantation and Stem Cell Therapy for Cerebellar Degenerations.

    PubMed

    Cendelin, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-based and regenerative therapy may become a hopeful treatment for neurodegenerative diseases including hereditary cerebellar degenerations. Neurotransplantation therapy mainly aims to substitute lost cells, but potential effects might include various mechanisms including nonspecific trophic effects and stimulation of endogenous regenerative processes and neural plasticity. Nevertheless, currently, there remain serious limitations. There is a wide spectrum of human hereditary cerebellar degenerations as well as numerous cerebellar mutant mouse strains that serve as models for the development of effective therapy. By now, transplantation has been shown to ameliorate cerebellar function, e.g. in Purkinje cell degeneration mice, Lurcher mutant mice and mouse models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and type 2 and Niemann-Pick disease type C. Despite the lack of direct comparative studies, it appears that there might be differences in graft development and functioning between various types of cerebellar degeneration. Investigation of the relation of graft development to specific morphological, microvascular or biochemical features of the diseased host tissue in various cerebellar degenerations may help to identify factors determining the fate of grafted cells and potential of their functional integration. PMID:26155762

  2. Cerebellum and procedural learning: evidence from focal cerebellar lesions.

    PubMed

    Molinari, M; Leggio, M G; Solida, A; Ciorra, R; Misciagna, S; Silveri, M C; Petrosini, L

    1997-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of focal cerebellar lesions on procedural learning. Eight patients with cerebellar lesions and six control subjects were tested in a serial reaction-time task. A four-choice reaction-time task was employed in which the stimuli followed (or not) a sequence repeated 10 times, with the subjects aware (or not) of the item sequence. Learning was manifested by the reduction in response latency over the sequential blocks. Acquisition of declarative knowledge of the sequence was also tested. Reaction times displayed by patients with cerebellar lesions, even though they tended to be longer than those of control subjects in all testing conditions, significantly differed from control subjects only when the stimuli were presented in sequence. The reaction times in sequential trials were still statistically significant when simple motor response times were taken into account. Cerebellar patients were also significantly impaired in detecting and repeating the sequence. On the other hand, when the sequence was learned before testing, motor performances were significantly improved in all subjects. These data indicate that cerebellar lesions induce specific impairment in the procedural learning of a motor sequence and suggest a role of the cerebellar circuitry in detecting and recognizing event sequences. PMID:9365368

  3. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, G; Bertolino, A; Massaquoi, S G; Campbell, G; Patronas, N J; Bonavita, S; Barnett, A S; Alger, J R; Hallett, M

    1996-01-01

    Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging, we studied the cerebellum of 9 patients with cerebellar degeneration and of 9 age-matched normal control subjects. This technique permits the simultaneous measurement of N-acetylaspartate, choline-containing compounds, creatine/phosphocreatine, and lactate signal intensities from four 15-mm slices divided into 0.84-ml single-volume elements. Because patients with cerebellar degeneration often show substantial atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we specifically chose to analyze the spectroscopic signals only from tissue that did not have an atrophic appearance on the MRI. The spectroscopic findings showed a significant reduction of N-acetylaspartate in all parts of the cerebellum, a significant correlation with MRI scores of cerebellar atrophy, and a significant correlation with clinical rating scores of cerebellar disturbance. Our method of analysis suggests the presence of a neurodegenerative process in cerebellar areas that do not appear to be atrophic on the MRI. Some limitations of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the present study were related to the partial field inhomogeneity characteristics of the posterior fossa, the anatomical location of the cerebellum, and the particularly severe cerebellar atrophy in some of the patients. PMID:8572670

  4. Powered Descent Guidance with General Thrust-Pointing Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M., III; Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The Powered Descent Guidance (PDG) algorithm and software for generating Mars pinpoint or precision landing guidance profiles has been enhanced to incorporate thrust-pointing constraints. Pointing constraints would typically be needed for onboard sensor and navigation systems that have specific field-of-view requirements to generate valid ground proximity and terrain-relative state measurements. The original PDG algorithm was designed to enforce both control and state constraints, including maximum and minimum thrust bounds, avoidance of the ground or descent within a glide slope cone, and maximum speed limits. The thrust-bound and thrust-pointing constraints within PDG are non-convex, which in general requires nonlinear optimization methods to generate solutions. The short duration of Mars powered descent requires guaranteed PDG convergence to a solution within a finite time; however, nonlinear optimization methods have no guarantees of convergence to the global optimal or convergence within finite computation time. A lossless convexification developed for the original PDG algorithm relaxed the non-convex thrust bound constraints. This relaxation was theoretically proven to provide valid and optimal solutions for the original, non-convex problem within a convex framework. As with the thrust bound constraint, a relaxation of the thrust-pointing constraint also provides a lossless convexification that ensures the enhanced relaxed PDG algorithm remains convex and retains validity for the original nonconvex problem. The enhanced PDG algorithm provides guidance profiles for pinpoint and precision landing that minimize fuel usage, minimize landing error to the target, and ensure satisfaction of all position and control constraints, including thrust bounds and now thrust-pointing constraints.

  5. Entry, Descent, and Landing for Human Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Michelle M.; DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of a human mission to Mars is landing safely on the Martian surface. Mars has such low atmospheric density that decelerating large masses (tens of metric tons) requires methods that have not yet been demonstrated, and are not yet planned in future Mars missions. To identify the most promising options for Mars entry, descent, and landing, and to plan development of the needed technologies, NASA's Human Architecture Team (HAT) has refined candidate methods for emplacing needed elements of the human Mars exploration architecture (such as ascent vehicles and habitats) on the Mars surface. This paper explains the detailed, optimized simulations that have been developed to define the mass needed at Mars arrival to accomplish the entry, descent, and landing functions. Based on previous work, technology options for hypersonic deceleration include rigid, mid-L/D (lift-to-drag ratio) aeroshells, and inflatable aerodynamic decelerators (IADs). The hypersonic IADs, or HIADs, are about 20% less massive than the rigid vehicles, but both have their technology development challenges. For the supersonic regime, supersonic retropropulsion (SRP) is an attractive option, since a propulsive stage must be carried for terminal descent and can be ignited at higher speeds. The use of SRP eliminates the need for an additional deceleration system, but SRP is at a low Technology Readiness Level (TRL) in that the interacting plumes are not well-characterized, and their effect on vehicle stability has not been studied, to date. These architecture-level assessments have been used to define the key performance parameters and a technology development strategy for achieving the challenging mission of landing large payloads on Mars.

  6. Altered cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients ON and OFF L-DOPA medication

    PubMed Central

    Festini, Sara B.; Bernard, Jessica A.; Kwak, Youngbin; Peltier, Scott; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Müller, Martijn L. T. M.; Dayalu, Praveen; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2015-01-01

    Although nigrostriatal changes are most commonly affiliated with Parkinson's disease, the role of the cerebellum in Parkinson's has become increasingly apparent. The present study used lobule-based cerebellar resting state functional connectivity to (1) compare cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients both ON and OFF L-DOPA medication and controls, and to (2) relate variations in cerebellar connectivity to behavioral performance. Results indicated that, when contrasted to the control group, Parkinson's patients OFF medication had increased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity, whereas Parkinson's patients ON medication had decreased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity. Moreover, analyses relating levels of cerebellar connectivity to behavioral measures demonstrated that, within each group, increased levels of connectivity were most often associated with improved cognitive and motor performance, but there were several instances where increased connectivity was related to poorer performance. Overall, the present study found medication-variant cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients, further demonstrating cerebellar changes associated with Parkinson's disease and the moderating effects of medication. PMID:25954184

  7. Altered cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients ON and OFF L-DOPA medication.

    PubMed

    Festini, Sara B; Bernard, Jessica A; Kwak, Youngbin; Peltier, Scott; Bohnen, Nicolaas I; Mller, Martijn L T M; Dayalu, Praveen; Seidler, Rachael D

    2015-01-01

    Although nigrostriatal changes are most commonly affiliated with Parkinson's disease, the role of the cerebellum in Parkinson's has become increasingly apparent. The present study used lobule-based cerebellar resting state functional connectivity to (1) compare cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients both ON and OFF L-DOPA medication and controls, and to (2) relate variations in cerebellar connectivity to behavioral performance. Results indicated that, when contrasted to the control group, Parkinson's patients OFF medication had increased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity, whereas Parkinson's patients ON medication had decreased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity. Moreover, analyses relating levels of cerebellar connectivity to behavioral measures demonstrated that, within each group, increased levels of connectivity were most often associated with improved cognitive and motor performance, but there were several instances where increased connectivity was related to poorer performance. Overall, the present study found medication-variant cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients, further demonstrating cerebellar changes associated with Parkinson's disease and the moderating effects of medication. PMID:25954184

  8. Post-Plasmodium vivax malaria cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis: A new form of delayed cerebellar ataxia or cerebellar variant of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis?

    PubMed Central

    Kasundra, Gaurav M.; Bhargava, Amita Narendra; Bhushan, Bharat; Shubhakaran, Khichar; Sood, Isha

    2015-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is commonly seen after viral and bacterial infections, immunization, and Plasmodium falciparum (PF) malaria. Plasmodium vivax (PV) rarely causes ADEM. We report a 14-year-old female patient who presented with acute onset bilateral cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis, 2 weeks after recovery from PV. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral cerebellar hyperintensities suggestive of ADEM. No specific viral etiology was found on cerebrospinal fluid examination. Patient responded well to treatment without any sequelae. Thus, PV too is an important cause of ADEM along with PF. Two of the previously reported cases had co-infection with falciparum malaria. The only other two reported cases, as also this patient, are from Asia. A geographical or racial predisposition needs to be evaluated. Also, a possibility of post-PV delayed cerebellar ataxia, which is classically described post-PF infection, may be considered as it may be clinically, radiologically, and prognostically indistinguishable from a milder presentation of ADEM. PMID:25878748

  9. Apollo 16, LM-11 descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.

    1974-01-01

    The performance of the LM-11 descent propulsion system during the Apollo 16 missions was evaluated and found satisfactory. The average engine effective specific impulse was 0.1 second higher than predicted, but well within the predicted one sigma uncertainty of 0.2 seconds. Several flight measurement discrepancies existed during the flight as follows: (1) the chamber pressure transducer had a noticeable drift, exhibiting a maximum error of about 1.5 psi at approximately 130 seconds after engine ignition, (2) the fuel and oxidizer interface pressure measurements appeared to be low during the entire flight, and (3) the fuel propellant quantity gaging system did not perform within expected accuracies.

  10. Shuttle program: OFT ascent/descent ancillary data requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C., Jr.; Knoedler, J.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements are presented for the ascent/descent (A/D) navigation and attitude-dependent ancillary data products to be generated for the space shuttle orbiter in support of the orbital flight test (OFT) flight test requirements, MPAD guidance and navigation performance assessment, and the mission evaluation team. The A/D ancillary data support for OFT mission evaluation activities is confined to providing postflight position, velocity, attitude, and associated navigation and attitude derived parameters for the Orbiter over particular flight phases and time intervals.

  11. OFT ascent/descent ancillary data requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C., Jr.; Abramson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Requirements are presented for the ascent/descent (A/D) navigation and attitude-dependent ancillary data products to be generated for the space shuttle orbiter in support of orbital flight test requirements, MPAD guidance and navigation performance assessment, and the mission evaluation team. It was intended that this document serve as the sole requirements control instrument between MPB/MPAD and the A/D ancillary data users. The requirements are primarily functional in nature, but some detail level requirements are also included.

  12. [Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis in patients of African descent].

    PubMed

    Maia, Morgana Lima e; Trevisam, Paula Grasiele Carvalho; Minicucci, Marcos; Mazeto, Glaucia M F S; Azevedo, Paula S

    2014-10-01

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (THPP) is an endocrine emergency marked by recurrent attacks of muscle weakness associated with hypokalemia and thyrotoxicosis. Asiatic male patients are most often affected. On the other hand, African descents rarely present this disease. The case described shows an afrodescendant patient with hypokalemia and tetraparesis, whose diagnosis of hyperthyroidism was considered during this crisis. The THPP, although rare, is potentially lethal. Therefore, in cases of flaccid paresis crisis this diagnosis should always be considered, especially if associated with hypokalemia. In this situation, if no previous diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, this should also be regarded. PMID:25372590

  13. A piloted simulator evaluation of a ground-based 4D descent advisor algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Davis, Thomas J.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1987-01-01

    A ground-based, four-dimensional (4D) descent-advisor algorithm is under development at NASA Ames Research Center. The algorithm combines detailed aerodynamic, propulsive, and atmospheric models with an efficient numerical integration scheme to generate 4D descent advisories. This paper investigates the ability of the 4D descent advisor algorithm to provide adequate control of arrival time for aircraft not equipped with on-board 4D guidance systems. A piloted simulation was conducted to determine the precision with which the descent advisor could predict the 4D trajectories of typical straight-in descents flown by airline pilots under different wind conditions. The effects of errors in the estimation of wind and initial aircraft weight were also studied. A description of the descent advisor as well as the results of the simulation studies are presented.

  14. A piloted simulator evaluation of a ground-based 4-D descent advisor algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Green, Steven M.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1990-01-01

    A ground-based, four dimensional (4D) descent-advisor algorithm is under development at NASA-Ames. The algorithm combines detailed aerodynamic, propulsive, and atmospheric models with an efficient numerical integration scheme to generate 4D descent advisories. The ability is investigated of the 4D descent advisor algorithm to provide adequate control of arrival time for aircraft not equipped with on-board 4D guidance systems. A piloted simulation was conducted to determine the precision with which the descent advisor could predict the 4D trajectories of typical straight-in descents flown by airline pilots under different wind conditions. The effects of errors in the estimation of wind and initial aircraft weight were also studied. A description of the descent advisor as well as the result of the simulation studies are presented.

  15. STS-1 operational flight profile. Volume 5: Descent, cycle 3. Appendix C: Monte Carlo dispersion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The results of three nonlinear the Monte Carlo dispersion analyses for the Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) Orbiter Descent Operational Flight Profile, Cycle 3 are presented. Fifty randomly selected simulation for the end of mission (EOM) descent, the abort once around (AOA) descent targeted line are steep target line, and the AOA descent targeted to the shallow target line are analyzed. These analyses compare the flight environment with system and operational constraints on the flight environment and in some cases use simplified system models as an aid in assessing the STS-1 descent flight profile. In addition, descent flight envelops are provided as a data base for use by system specialists to determine the flight readiness for STS-1. The results of these dispersion analyses supersede results of the dispersion analysis previously documented.

  16. Detection of human polyomaviruses MCPyV, HPyV6, and HPyV7 in malignant and non-malignant tonsillar tissues.

    PubMed

    Saláková, Martina; Košlabová, Eva; Vojtěchová, Zuzana; Tachezy, Ruth; Šroller, Vojtěch

    2016-04-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is associated with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare skin malignancy. Human polyomavirus six and seven (HPyV6 and HPyV7) were identified on a skin but have not been associated with any pathology. The serology data suggest that infection with polyomaviruses occurs in childhood and they are widespread in population. However, the site of persistent infection has not been identified. Altogether, 103 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens and five fresh frozen tissues (FF) of non-malignant tonsils and 97 FFPE and 15 FF samples of tonsillar carcinomas were analyzed by qPCR for the presence of MCPyV, HPyV6, and HPyV7 DNA. All MCPyV DNA positive FF tissues were screened for the expression of early viral transcripts. Overall prevalence of MCPyV, HPyV6, and HPyV7 in non-malignant tonsillar tissues was 10.2%, 4.6%, and, 0.9%, respectively. The prevalence of MCPyV DNA in non-malignant tonsils increased with age (P < 0.05). While the prevalence of MCPyV DNA was significantly higher in the tumors than non-malignant tissues (35.7% vs. 10.2%) (P < 0.001), the prevalence of HPyV6 DNA (5.4% vs. 4.6%) and HPyV7 DNA (1.8% vs. 0.9%) were comparable. In all MCPyV DNA positive FF tissues early transcripts were detected. MCPyV, HPyV6, and HPyV7 DNAs were found in tonsils, suggesting that the tonsils may be a site of viral latency. The viral load was low indicating that only a fraction of cells are infected. The higher prevalence of MCPyV DNA was detected in tonsillar tumors but there was no difference in the viral load between tumor and healthy tissues. J. Med. Virol. 88:695-702, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26381295

  17. Cerebellar-Motor Dysfunction in Schizophrenia and Psychosis-Risk: The Importance of Regional Cerebellar Analysis Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jessica A.; Mittal, Vijay A.

    2014-01-01

    Motor abnormalities in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis are well documented. An accumulating body of work has also highlighted motor abnormalities related to cerebellar dysfunction in schizophrenia including eye-blink conditioning, timing, postural control, and motor learning. We have also recently found evidence for motor dysfunction in individuals at ultra high-risk for psychosis (13). This is particularly relevant as the cerebellum is thought to be central to the cognitive dysmetria model of schizophrenia, and these overt motor signs may point to more general cerebellar dysfunction in the etiology of psychotic disorders. While studies have provided evidence indicative of motor cerebellar dysfunction in at-risk populations and in schizophrenia, findings with respect to the cerebellum have been mixed. One factor potentially contributing to these mixed results is the whole-structure approach taken when investigating the cerebellum. In non-human primates, there are distinct closed-loop circuits between the cerebellum, thalamus, and brain with motor and non-motor cortical regions. Recent human neuroimaging has supported this finding and indicates that there is a cerebellar functional topography (4), and this information is being missed with whole-structure approaches. Here, we review cerebellar-motor dysfunction in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis. We also discuss cerebellar abnormalities in psychosis, and the cerebellar functional topography. Because of the segregated functional regions of the cerebellum, we propose that it is important to look at the structure regionally in order to better understand its role in motor dysfunction in these populations. This is analogous to approaches taken with the basal ganglia, where each region is considered separately. Such an approach is necessary to better understand cerebellar pathophysiology on a macro-structural level with respect to the pathogenesis of psychosis. PMID:25505424

  18. Conceptual design of "Exomars-2018" Descent Module developed by federal enterprise "Lavochkin Association"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khartov, V. V.; Martynov, M. B.; Lukiyanchikov, A. V.; Alexashkin, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Goals and tasks for "ExoMars-2018" mission and share of responsibilities between European partners and p]Russia are presented. The main design requirements for a Descent Module (DM) that define its design concept as well as design specific features are given. The structure of the descent module, thermal control, means for securing systems interaction onboard the spacecraft "ExoMars-2018", and radio communication with the descent module are examined.

  19. An evaluation of descent strategies for TNAV-equipped aircraft in an advanced metering environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.; Schwab, R. W.; Groce, J. L.; Coote, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated were the effects on system throughput and fleet fuel usage of arrival aircraft utilizing three 4D RNAV descent strategies (cost optimal, clean-idle Mach/CAS and constant descent angle Mach/CAS), both individually and in combination, in an advanced air traffic control metering environment. Results are presented for all mixtures of arrival traffic consisting of three Boeing commercial jet types and for all combinations of the three descent strategies for a typical en route metering airport arrival distribution.

  20. Role of cerebellar adrenomedullin in blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Leticia; Israel, Anita

    2015-12-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) and their receptor components, calcitonin-receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP1, RMP2 and RAMP3) are widely expressed in the central nervous system, including cerebellum. We have shown that AM binding sites are altered in cerebellum during hypertension, suggesting a role for cerebellar adrenomedullinergic system in blood pressure regulation. To further evaluate the role of AM in cerebellum, we assessed the expression of AM, RAMP1, RAMP2, RAMP3 and CRLR in the cerebellar vermis of 8 and 16week old spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. In addition, the effect of microinjection of AM into rat cerebellar vermis on arterial blood pressure (BP) was determined. Animals were sacrificed by decapitation and cerebellar vermis was dissected for quantification of AM, CRLR, RAMP1, RAMP2 and RAMP3 expression using western blot analysis. Another group of male, 16week old SHR and WKY rats was anesthetized, and a cannula was implanted in the cerebellar vermis. Following recovery AM (0.02 to 200pmol/5?L) or vehicle was injected into cerebellar vermis. BP was determined, before and after treatments, by non-invasive plethysmography. In addition, to establish the receptor subtype involved in AM action in vivo, animals received microinjections of AM22-52 (200pmol/5?L), an AM1 receptor antagonist, or the CGRP1 receptor antagonist, CGRP8-37 (200pmol/5?L) into the cerebellar vermis, administered simultaneously with AM or vehicle microinjection. Cannulation was verified post mortem with the in situ injection of a dye solution. Our findings demonstrated that the expression of CRLR, RAMP1 and RAMP3 was higher in cerebellum of SHR rats, while AM and RAMP2 expression was lower than those of WKY rats, both in 8 and 16week old rats. In vivo microinjection of AM into the cerebellar vermis caused a profound, dose dependent, hypotensive effect in SHR but not in normotensive WKY rats. Coinjections of a putative AM receptor antagonist, AM22-52 abolished the decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) evoked by AM, showing that AM acts through its AM1 receptor in the vermis to reduce MAP. These findings demonstrate a dysregulation of cerebellar AM-system during hypertension, and suggest that cerebellar AM plays an important role in the regulation of BP. Likewise; they constitute a novel mechanism of BP control which has not been described so far. PMID:26259851

  1. Accelerated Mini-batch Randomized Block Coordinate Descent Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tuo; Yu, Mo; Wang, Yiming; Arora, Raman; Liu, Han

    2014-01-01

    We consider regularized empirical risk minimization problems. In particular, we minimize the sum of a smooth empirical risk function and a nonsmooth regularization function. When the regularization function is block separable, we can solve the minimization problems in a randomized block coordinate descent (RBCD) manner. Existing RBCD methods usually decrease the objective value by exploiting the partial gradient of a randomly selected block of coordinates in each iteration. Thus they need all data to be accessible so that the partial gradient of the block gradient can be exactly obtained. However, such a batch setting may be computationally expensive in practice. In this paper, we propose a mini-batch randomized block coordinate descent (MRBCD) method, which estimates the partial gradient of the selected block based on a mini-batch of randomly sampled data in each iteration. We further accelerate the MRBCD method by exploiting the semi-stochastic optimization scheme, which effectively reduces the variance of the partial gradient estimators. Theoretically, we show that for strongly convex functions, the MRBCD method attains lower overall iteration complexity than existing RBCD methods. As an application, we further trim the MRBCD method to solve the regularized sparse learning problems. Our numerical experiments shows that the MRBCD method naturally exploits the sparsity structure and achieves better computational performance than existing methods. PMID:25620860

  2. Stereotypes of women of Asian descent in midwifery: some evidence.

    PubMed

    Bowler, I M

    1993-03-01

    The subject of this paper is part of a larger study which investigated the delivery of maternity care to women of South Asian descent in Britain (Bowler, 1990). An ethnographic approach was used and the main method of data collection was non-participant observation in antenatal clinics, labour and postnatal wards in a teaching hospital maternity unit. These observations were supported by data from interviews with midwives. It was found that the midwives commonly use stereotypes of women in order to help them to provide care. These stereotypes are particularly likely to be used in situations where the midwife has difficulty (through pressure of time or other circumstances) in getting to know an individual woman. The stereotype of women of Asian descent contained four main themes: communication problems; failure to comply with care and service abuse; making a fuss about nothing; a lack of normal maternal instinct. Reasons for stereotyping are explored. Effects on service provision in the areas of family planning and breast feeding are highlighted. PMID:8492731

  3. Arachnid aloft: directed aerial descent in neotropical canopy spiders.

    PubMed

    Yanoviak, Stephen P; Munk, Yonatan; Dudley, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The behaviour of directed aerial descent has been described for numerous taxa of wingless hexapods as they fall from the tropical rainforest canopy, but is not known in other terrestrial arthropods. Here, we describe similar controlled aerial behaviours for large arboreal spiders in the genus Selenops (Selenopidae). We dropped 59 such spiders from either canopy platforms or tree crowns in Panama and Peru; the majority (93%) directed their aerial trajectories towards and then landed upon nearby tree trunks. Following initial dorsoventral righting when necessary, falling spiders oriented themselves and then translated head-first towards targets; directional changes were correlated with bilaterally asymmetric motions of the anterolaterally extended forelegs. Aerial performance (i.e. the glide index) decreased with increasing body mass and wing loading, but not with projected surface area of the spider. Along with the occurrence of directed aerial descent in ants, jumping bristletails, and other wingless hexapods, this discovery of targeted gliding in selenopid spiders further indicates strong selective pressures against uncontrolled falls into the understory for arboreal taxa. PMID:26289654

  4. Controller evaluations of the descent advisor automation aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Leonard; Volckers, Uwe; Erzberger, Heinz

    1989-01-01

    An automation aid to assist air traffic controllers in efficiently spacing traffic and meeting arrival times at a fix has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The automation aid, referred to as the descent advisor (DA), is based on accurate models of aircraft performance and weather conditions. The DA generates suggested clearances, including both top-of-descent point and speed profile data, for one or more aircraft in order to achieve specific time or distance separation objectives. The DA algorithm is interfaced with a mouse-based, menu-driven controller display that allows the air traffic controller to interactively use its accurate predictive capability to resolve conflicts and issue advisories to arrival aircraft. This paper focuses on operational issues concerning the utilization of the DA, specifically, how the DA can be used for prediction, intrail spacing, and metering. In order to evaluate the DA, a real time simulation was conducted using both current and retired controller subjects. Controllers operated in teams of two, as they do in the present environment; issues of training and team interaction will be discussed. Evaluations by controllers indicated considerable enthusiasm for the DA aid, and provided specific recommendations for using the tool effectively.

  5. Efficient Love wave modeling via Sobolev gradient steepest descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Matt; Ferguson, John; McMechan, George

    2016-02-01

    A new method for finding solutions to ordinary differential equation boundary value problems is introduced, in which Sobolev gradient steepest descent is used to determine eigenfunctions and eigenvalues simultaneously in an iterative scheme. The technique is then applied to the 1-D Love wave problem. The algorithm has several advantages when computing dispersion curves. It avoids the problem of mode skipping, and can handle arbitrary Earth structure profiles in depth. For a given frequency range, computation times scale approximately as the square root of the number of frequencies, and the computation of dispersion curves can be implemented in a fully parallel manner over the modes involved. The steepest descent solutions are within a fraction of a percent of the analytic solutions for the first 25 modes for a two-layer model. Since all corresponding eigenfunctions are computed along with the dispersion curves, the impact on group and phase velocity of the displacement behavior with depth is thoroughly examined. The dispersion curves are used to compute synthetic Love wave seismograms that include many higher order modes. An example includes addition of attenuation to a model with a low velocity zone, with values as low as Q = 20. Finally, a confirming comparison is made with a layer matrix method on the upper 700 km of a whole Earth model.

  6. High mammographic density in women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Percent mammographic density (PMD) adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer and is known to be approximately 60% heritable. Here we report a finding of an association between genetic ancestry and adjusted PMD. Methods We selected self-identified Caucasian women in the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute Cohort whose screening mammograms placed them in the top or bottom quintiles of age-adjusted and body mass index-adjusted PMD. Our final dataset included 474 women with the highest adjusted PMD and 469 with the lowest genotyped on the Illumina 1 M platform. Principal component analysis (PCA) and identity-by-descent analyses allowed us to infer the women's genetic ancestry and correlate it with adjusted PMD. Results Women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, as defined by the first principal component of PCA and identity-by-descent analyses, represented approximately 15% of the sample. Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, defined by the first principal component of PCA, was associated with higher adjusted PMD (P = 0.004). Using multivariate regression to adjust for epidemiologic factors associated with PMD, including age at parity and use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, did not attenuate the association. Conclusions Women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, based on genetic analysis, are more likely to have high age-adjusted and body mass index-adjusted PMD. Ashkenazi Jews may have a unique set of genetic variants or environmental risk factors that increase mammographic density. PMID:23668689

  7. Complete response after chemotherapy and radiotherapy of a tonsillar histiocytic sarcoma with regional lymph node involvement: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xingxing; Zhang, Li; Wang, Jian; Gu, Yajia; Tuan, Jeffrey; Ma, Xuejun; Hong, Xiaonan; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaomao

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of tonsillar histiocytic sarcoma (HS) with regional lymph node involvement and complete response after multi-disciplinary therapy. Immunohistochemistry showed strong positive tumor staining for CD 68, and negative staining for CD20, CD45R0 and CD30 and non-cohesive proliferation of neoplastic histiocytes. Systemic chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and etoposide (CHOP-E) chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy was delivered to the patient. No evidence of recurrent disease existed on regular follow up three years later. The diagnostic methods and the practical treatment solutions are discussed here. We believe that although HS has been regarded as a potentially fatal disease entity, there remain some cases that do not pursue such an aggressive clinical course. PMID:26629225

  8. Gaze holding deficits discriminate early from late onset cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Tarnutzer, Alexander A; Weber, K P; Schuknecht, B; Straumann, D; Marti, S; Bertolini, G

    2015-08-01

    The vestibulo-cerebellum calibrates the output of the inherently leaky brainstem neural velocity-to-position integrator to provide stable gaze holding. In healthy humans small-amplitude centrifugal nystagmus is present at extreme gaze-angles, with a non-linear relationship between eye-drift velocity and eye eccentricity. In cerebellar degeneration this calibration is impaired, resulting in pathological gaze-evoked nystagmus (GEN). For cerebellar dysfunction, increased eye drift may be present at any gaze angle (reflecting pure scaling of eye drift found in controls) or restricted to far-lateral gaze (reflecting changes in shape of the non-linear relationship) and resulting eyed-drift patterns could be related to specific disorders. We recorded horizontal eye positions in 21 patients with cerebellar neurodegeneration (gaze-angle=40) and clinically confirmed GEN. Eye-drift velocity, linearity and symmetry of drift were determined. MR-images were assessed for cerebellar atrophy. In our patients, the relation between eye-drift velocity and gaze eccentricity was non-linear, yielding (compared to controls) significant GEN at gaze-eccentricities?20. Pure scaling was most frequently observed (n=10/18), followed by pure shape-changing (n=4/18) and a mixed pattern (n=4/18). Pure shape-changing patients were significantly (p=0.001) younger at disease-onset compared to pure scaling patients. Atrophy centered around the superior/dorsal vermis, flocculus/paraflocculus and dentate nucleus and did not correlate with the specific drift behaviors observed. Eye drift in cerebellar degeneration varies in magnitude; however, it retains its non-linear properties. With different drift patterns being linked to age at disease-onset, we propose that the gaze-holding pattern (scaling vs. shape-changing) may discriminate early- from late-onset cerebellar degeneration. Whether this allows a distinction among specific cerebellar disorders remains to be determined. PMID:25980905

  9. Microvascular anatomy of the cerebellar parafloccular perforating space.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Pablo; Dujovny, Manuel; Onyekachi, Ibe; Sockwell, Noressia; Cremaschi, Fabián; Savastano, Luis E

    2016-02-01

    OBJECT The cerebellopontine angle is a common site for tumor growth and vascular pathologies requiring surgical manipulations that jeopardize cranial nerve integrity and cerebellar and brainstem perfusion. To date, a detailed study of vessels perforating the cisternal surface of the middle cerebellar peduncle-namely, the paraflocculus or parafloccular perforating space-has yet to be published. In this report, the perforating vessels of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in the parafloccular space, or on the cisternal surface of the middle cerebellar peduncle, are described to elucidate their relevance pertaining to microsurgery and the different pathologies that occur at the cerebellopontine angle. METHODS Fourteen cadaveric cerebellopontine cisterns (CPCs) were studied. Anatomical dissections and analysis of the perforating arteries of the AICA and posterior inferior cerebellar artery at the parafloccular space were recorded using direct visualization by surgical microscope, optical histology, and scanning electron microscope. A comprehensive review of the English-language and Spanish-language literature was also performed, and findings related to anatomy, histology, physiology, neurology, neuroradiology, microsurgery, and endovascular surgery pertaining to the cerebellar flocculus or parafloccular spaces are summarized. RESULTS A total of 298 perforating arteries were found in the dissected specimens, with a minimum of 15 to a maximum of 26 vessels per parafloccular perforating space. The average outer diameter of the cisternal portion of the perforating arteries was 0.11 ± 0.042 mm (mean ± SD) and the average length was 2.84 ± 1.2 mm. Detailed schematics and the surgical anatomy of the perforating vessels at the CPC and their clinical relevance are reported. CONCLUSIONS The parafloccular space is a key entry point for many perforating vessels toward the middle cerebellar peduncle and lateral brainstem, and it must be respected and protected during surgical approaches to the cerebellopontine angle. PMID:26339858

  10. A Cerebellar Neuroprosthetic System: Computational Architecture and in vivo Test

    PubMed Central

    Herreros, Ivan; Giovannucci, Andrea; Taub, Aryeh H.; Hogri, Roni; Magal, Ari; Bamford, Sim; Prueckl, Robert; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Emulating the input–output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuroprosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention, and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model’s inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans. PMID:25152887

  11. Cerebellar infarct patterns: The SMART-Medea study

    PubMed Central

    De Cocker, Laurens J.L.; Geerlings, Mirjam I.; Hartkamp, Nolan S.; Grool, Anne M.; Mali, Willem P.; Van der Graaf, Yolanda; Kloppenborg, Raoul P.; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous studies on cerebellar infarcts have been largely restricted to acute infarcts in patients with clinical symptoms, and cerebellar infarcts have been evaluated with the almost exclusive use of transversal MR images. We aimed to document the occurrence and 3D-imaging patterns of cerebellar infarcts presenting as an incidental finding on MRI. Methods We analysed the 1.5Tesla MRI, including 3D T1-weighted datasets, of 636 patients (mean age 629years, 81% male) from the SMART-Medea study. Cerebellar infarct analyses included an assessment of size, cavitation and gliosis, of grey and white matter involvement, and of infarct topography. Results One or more cerebellar infarcts (mean 1.97; range 111) were detected in 70 out of 636 patients (11%), with a total amount of 138 infarcts identified, 135 of which showed evidence of cavitation. The average mean axial diameter was 7mm (range 254mm), and 131 infarcts (95%) were smaller than 20mm. Hundred-thirty-four infarcts (97%) involved the cortex, of which 12 in combination with subcortical white matter. No infarcts were restricted to subcortical branches of white matter. Small cortical infarcts involved the apex of a deep (pattern 1) or shallow fissure (pattern 2), or occurred alongside one (pattern 3) or opposite sides (pattern 4) of a fissure. Most (87%) cerebellar infarcts were situated in the posterior lobe. Conclusions Small cerebellar infarcts proved to be much more common than larger infarcts, and preferentially involved the cortex. Small cortical infarcts predominantly involved the posterior lobes, showed sparing of subcortical white matter and occurred in characteristic topographic patterns. PMID:26106556

  12. Aprosencephaly and cerebellar dysgenesis in SIBS

    SciTech Connect

    Florell, S.R.; Townsend, J.J.; Klatt, E.C.

    1996-06-28

    Aprosencephaly is a rare, lethal malformation sequence of the central nervous system that has been attributed to a postneuralation encephaloclastic process. We describe autopsy findings consistent with aprosencephaly in 2 fetuses conceived from a consanguineous mating (first cousins). Both showed anecephalic manifestations; however, the crania were intact, with fused sutures. The neuropathologic findings were essentially identical. Each fetus had complete absence of the telecephalon and pyramidal tracts, rudimentary diencephalic and mesencephalic structures, primitive cerebellar hemispheres, posterolateral clusters of primitive neural cells in the medullas suggesting an abnormality of neural migration, a normally-formed spinal cord, and retinal dysplasia within normally-formed globes. In addition, both fetuses manifested a peculiar perivascular mesenchymal proliferation seen only within the central nervous system. The similarity of these cases, coupled with parental consanguinity, suggests a primary malformation in brain development due to the homozygous representation of a mutant allele. We hypothesize that these patients may represent a defect in a gene important in brain development, the nature of which has yet to be elucidated. 26 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. ?6 integrin subunit regulates cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Giovanni; De Arcangelis, Adle; Pfister, Vronique; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding several basal lamina components as well as their cellular receptors disrupt normal deposition and remodeling of the cortical basement membrane resulting in a disorganized cerebral and cerebellar cortex. The ?6 integrin was the first ? subunit associated with cortical lamination defects and formation of neural ectopias. In order to understand the precise role of ?6 integrin in the central nervous system (CNS), we have generated mutant mice carrying specific deletion of ?6 integrin in neuronal and glia precursors by crossing ?6 conditional knockout mice with Nestin-Cre line. Cerebral cortex development occurred properly in the resulting ?6fl/fl;nestin-Cre mutant animals. Interestingly, however, cerebellum displayed foliation pattern defects although granule cell (GC) proliferation and migration were not affected. Intriguingly, analysis of Bergmann glial (BG) scaffold revealed abnormalities in fibers morphology associated with reduced processes outgrowth and altered actin cytoskeleton. Overall, these data show that ?6 integrin receptors are required in BG cells to provide a proper fissure formation during cerebellum morphogenesis. PMID:23722246

  14. Rapidly progressive cerebellar ataxia in West Wales

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khalid; Amin, Reem; Yoganathan, Kathir G; Powell, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML) is a severe demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that is caused by the JC virus infection. It is often fatal or severely disabling. PML exclusively happens in the context of cell-mediated immunosuppression. Prior to the era of HIV, PML was mainly confined to patients with haematological malignancies and rheumatological diseases. The HIV epidemic in the early eighties led to massive expansion in the incidence and prevalence of the disease. PML has also been recognised to happen due to treatment with monoclonal antibodies such as natalizumab, which is used as a disease-modifying agent for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis and other monoclonal antibodies used in dermatological and haematological conditions. The clinical picture is that of cognitive decline, visual disturbance and hemiparesis. The correct clinicoradiological picture combined with demonstrating the JC virus DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using PCR (PMR) is enough to establish the diagnosis. Brain biopsy is rarely needed. Immune reconstitution represents the mainstay in the treatment of PML. We present a case of a 47-year-old man who presented with progressive cerebellar ataxia. Investigations confirmed PML. He was found to be HIV positive. We also review the literature. PMID:24265345

  15. Distributed Cerebellar Motor Learning: A Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity Model

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Niceto R.; Garrido, Jesús A.; Naveros, Francisco; Carrillo, Richard R.; D'Angelo, Egidio; Ros, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Deep cerebellar nuclei neurons receive both inhibitory (GABAergic) synaptic currents from Purkinje cells (within the cerebellar cortex) and excitatory (glutamatergic) synaptic currents from mossy fibers. Those two deep cerebellar nucleus inputs are thought to be also adaptive, embedding interesting properties in the framework of accurate movements. We show that distributed spike-timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms (STDP) located at different cerebellar sites (parallel fibers to Purkinje cells, mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus cells, and Purkinje cells to deep cerebellar nucleus cells) in close-loop simulations provide an explanation for the complex learning properties of the cerebellum in motor learning. Concretely, we propose a new mechanistic cerebellar spiking model. In this new model, deep cerebellar nuclei embed a dual functionality: deep cerebellar nuclei acting as a gain adaptation mechanism and as a facilitator for the slow memory consolidation at mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. Equipping the cerebellum with excitatory (e-STDP) and inhibitory (i-STDP) mechanisms at deep cerebellar nuclei afferents allows the accommodation of synaptic memories that were formed at parallel fibers to Purkinje cells synapses and then transferred to mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. These adaptive mechanisms also contribute to modulate the deep-cerebellar-nucleus-output firing rate (output gain modulation toward optimizing its working range). PMID:26973504

  16. Upregulation of cortico-cerebellar functional connectivity after motor learning.

    PubMed

    Mehrkanoon, Saeid; Boonstra, Tjeerd W; Breakspear, Michael; Hinder, Mark; Summers, Jeffery J

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between the cerebellum and primary motor cortex are crucial for the acquisition of new motor skills. Recent neuroimaging studies indicate that learning motor skills is associated with subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices. The neuronal processes underlying the motor-learning-induced plasticity are not well understood. Here, we investigate changes in functional connectivity in source-reconstructed electroencephalography (EEG) following the performance of a single session of a dynamic force task in twenty young adults. Source activity was reconstructed in 112 regions of interest (ROIs) and the functional connectivity between all ROIs was estimated using the imaginary part of coherence. Significant changes in resting-state connectivity were assessed using partial least squares (PLS). We found that subjects adapted their motor performance during the training session and showed improved accuracy but with slower movement times. A number of connections were significantly upregulated after motor training, principally involving connections within the cerebellum and between the cerebellum and motor cortex. Increased connectivity was confined to specific frequency ranges in the mu- and beta-bands. Post hoc analysis of the phase spectra of these cerebellar and cortico-cerebellar connections revealed an increased phase lag between motor cortical and cerebellar activity following motor practice. These findings show a reorganization of intrinsic cortico-cerebellar connectivity related to motor adaptation and demonstrate the potential of EEG connectivity analysis in source space to reveal the neuronal processes that underpin neural plasticity. PMID:26767943

  17. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  18. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Porras-Garca, M. Elena; Ruiz, Roco; Prez-Villegas, Eva M.; Armengol, Jos .

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main inputoutput organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum. PMID:23630472

  19. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Porras-Garca, M Elena; Ruiz, Roco; Prez-Villegas, Eva M; Armengol, Jos

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input-output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum. PMID:23630472

  20. Cerebellar liponeurocytoma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    WANG, KE; NI, MING; WANG, LIANG; JIA, GUIJUN; WU, ZHEN; ZHANG, LIWEI; ZHANG, JUNTING

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar liponeurocytoma is rare, and the clinical characteristics and treatment strategy remain unclear. In the present study, a case of cerebellar liponeurocytoma was retrospectively reported and a literature review was performed. A 45-year-old female presented due to occipital headaches, exhibiting a hoarse voice and a broad-based gait. Pre-operative magnetic resonance images revealed a lesion occupying the right hemisphere of the cerebellum and the inferior vermis, compressing the medulla oblongata from the right side, and extending through the foramen magnum to the C2 level. A total resection was performed, and pathological analysis of the lesion showed positivity for synaptophysin, S-100 and neuronal nuclear antigen, partial positivity for Olig-2, and negativity for glial fibrillary acidic protein and epithelial membrane antigen. In addition, the Ki-67 index was low (<5%). Thus, a diagnosis of cerebellar liponeurocytoma was determined. Total resection was successful and the patient was followed up closely. A review of the literature showed that cerebellar liponeurocytoma is mainly located in the cerebellum, with rare extra-cerebellar cases. Certain studies have suggested that the tumor may be located supratentorially and subtentorially, and should be renamed as solely liponeurocytoma. Total resection of the tumor contributes to an improved prognosis, while a subtotal resection and high Ki-67 index lead to recurrence. The tumor is similar to a tumor of low malignancy, with long-term recurrence. Radiation is recommended when there is residual tumor, recurrence or when the Ki-67 is high.

  1. Evaluation of vertical profiles to design continuous descent approach procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, Priyank

    The current research focuses on predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of Continuous Descent Approach (CDA), which is among the key concepts of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The idle-thrust CDA is a fuel economical, noise and emission abatement procedure, but requires increased separation to accommodate for variability and uncertainties in vertical and speed profiles of arriving aircraft. Although a considerable amount of researches have been devoted to the estimation of potential benefits of the CDA, only few have attempted to explain the predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of CDA. The analytical equations derived using flight dynamics and Base of Aircraft and Data (BADA) Total Energy Model (TEM) in this research gives insight into dependency of vertical profile of CDA on various factors like wind speed and gradient, weight, aircraft type and configuration, thrust settings, atmospheric factors (deviation from ISA (DISA), pressure and density of the air) and descent speed profile. Application of the derived equations to idle-thrust CDA gives an insight into sensitivity of its vertical profile to multiple factors. This suggests fixed geometric flight path angle (FPA) CDA has higher degree of predictability and lesser variability at the cost of non-idle and low thrust engine settings. However, with optimized design this impact can be overall minimized. The CDA simulations were performed using Future ATM Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) based on radar-track and aircraft type data (BADA) of the real air-traffic to some of the busiest airports in the USA (ATL, SFO and New York Metroplex (JFK, EWR and LGA)). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA shows 1) mean geometric FPAs derived from various simulated vertical profiles are consistently shallower than 3 glideslope angle and 2) high level of variability in vertical profiles of idle-thrust CDA even in absence of uncertainties in external factors. Analysis from operational feasibility perspective suggests that two key features of the performance based Flight Management System (FMS) i.e. required time of arrival (RTA) and geometric descent path would help in reduction of unpredictability associated with arrival time and vertical profile of aircraft guided by the FMS coupled with auto-pilot (AP) and auto-throttle (AT). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA also suggests that for procedure design window type, 'AT or above' and 'AT or below' altitude and FPA constraints are more realistic and useful compared to obsolete 'AT' type altitude constraint.

  2. Development of an analytical guidance algorithm for lunar descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chomel, Christina Tvrdik

    In recent years, NASA has indicated a desire to return humans to the moon. With NASA planning manned missions within the next couple of decades, the concept development for these lunar vehicles has begun. The guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) computer programs that will perform the function of safely landing a spacecraft on the moon are part of that development. The lunar descent guidance algorithm takes the horizontally oriented spacecraft from orbital speeds hundreds of kilometers from the desired landing point to the landing point at an almost vertical orientation and very low speed. Existing lunar descent GN&C algorithms date back to the Apollo era with little work available for implementation since then. Though these algorithms met the criteria of the 1960's, they are cumbersome today. At the basis of the lunar descent phase are two elements: the targeting, which generates a reference trajectory, and the real-time guidance, which forces the spacecraft to fly that trajectory. The Apollo algorithm utilizes a complex, iterative, numerical optimization scheme for developing the reference trajectory. The real-time guidance utilizes this reference trajectory in the form of a quartic rather than a more general format to force the real-time trajectory errors to converge to zero; however, there exist no guarantees under any conditions for this convergence. The proposed algorithm implements a purely analytical targeting algorithm used to generate two-dimensional trajectories "on-the-fly"' or to retarget the spacecraft to another landing site altogether. It is based on the analytical solutions to the equations for speed, downrange, and altitude as a function of flight path angle and assumes two constant thrust acceleration curves. The proposed real-time guidance algorithm has at its basis the three-dimensional non-linear equations of motion and a control law that is proven to converge under certain conditions through Lyapunov analysis to a reference trajectory formatted as a function of downrange, altitude, speed, and flight path angle. The two elements of the guidance algorithm are joined in Monte Carlo analysis to prove their robustness to initial state dispersions and mass and thrust errors. The robustness of the retargeting algorithm is also demonstrated.

  3. Cerebellar hemorrhage after embolization of ruptured vertebral dissecting aneurysm proximal to PICA including parent artery

    PubMed Central

    Tamase, Akira; Kamide, Tomoya; Mori, Kentaro; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Shima, Hiroshi; Seki, Shunsuke; Nomura, Motohiro

    2014-01-01

    Background: Some complications related to vertebral artery occlusion by endovascular technique have been reported. However, cerebellar hemorrhage after vertebral artery occlusion in subacute phase is rare. In this report, we describe a patient who showed cerebellar hemorrhage during hypertensive therapy for vasospasm after embolization of a vertebral dissecting aneurysm. Case Description: A 56-year-old female with a ruptured vertebral dissecting aneurysm proximal to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery developed cerebellar hemorrhage 15 days after embolization of the vertebral artery, including the dissected site. In this patient, the preserved posterior inferior cerebellar artery fed by retrograde blood flow might have been hemodynamically stressed during hypertensive and antiplatelet therapies for subarachnoid hemorrhage, resulting in cerebellar hemorrhage. Conclusion: Although cerebellar hemorrhage is not prone to occur in the nonacute stage of embolization of the vertebral artery, it should be taken into consideration that cerebellar hemorrhage may occur during hypertensive treatment. PMID:24872921

  4. The Role of la Familia for Women of Mexican Descent Who Are Leaders in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizondo, Sandra Gray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to describe the role of "la familia" for women of Mexican descent as it relates to their development as leaders and their leadership in academia. Purposeful sampling was utilized to reach the goal of 18 participants who were female academic leaders of Mexican descent teaching full time in

  5. Ethnic Identity and Acculturative Stress as Mediators of Depression in Students of Asian Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantrip, Crystal; Mazzetti, Francesco; Grasso, Joseph; Gill, Sara; Miller, Janna; Haner, Morgynn; Rude, Stephanie; Awad, Germine

    2015-01-01

    This study underscored the importance of addressing the well-being of college students of Asian descent, because these students had higher rates of depression and lower positive feelings about their ethnic group compared with students of European descent, as measured by the Affirmation subscale of the Ethnic Identity Scale. Affirmation mediated…

  6. Ethnic Identity and Acculturative Stress as Mediators of Depression in Students of Asian Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantrip, Crystal; Mazzetti, Francesco; Grasso, Joseph; Gill, Sara; Miller, Janna; Haner, Morgynn; Rude, Stephanie; Awad, Germine

    2015-01-01

    This study underscored the importance of addressing the well-being of college students of Asian descent, because these students had higher rates of depression and lower positive feelings about their ethnic group compared with students of European descent, as measured by the Affirmation subscale of the Ethnic Identity Scale. Affirmation mediated

  7. The Role of la Familia for Women of Mexican Descent Who Are Leaders in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizondo, Sandra Gray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to describe the role of "la familia" for women of Mexican descent as it relates to their development as leaders and their leadership in academia. Purposeful sampling was utilized to reach the goal of 18 participants who were female academic leaders of Mexican descent teaching full time in…

  8. Prostate Cancer in Men of African Descent: Opportunities for Global Research Collaborations

    Cancer.gov

    Prostate cancer disproportionately affects men of African descent in terms of incidence, morbidity, and mortality worldwide. Significant knowledge gaps exist about the factors that predict disparities in prostate cancer incidence and outcomes between men of African descent and other ethnic or racial groups.

  9. The Yearly Variation in Fall-Winter Arctic Winter Vortex Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Newman, Paul A.

    1999-01-01

    Using the change in HALOE methane profiles from early September to late March, we have estimated the minimum amount of diabatic descent within the polar which takes place during Arctic winter. The year to year variations are a result in the year to year variations in stratospheric wave activity which (1) modify the temperature of the vortex and thus the cooling rate; (2) reduce the apparent descent by mixing high amounts of methane into the vortex. The peak descent amounts from HALOE methane vary from l0km -14km near the arrival altitude of 25 km. Using a diabatic trajectory calculation, we compare forward and backward trajectories over the course of the winter using UKMO assimilated stratospheric data. The forward calculation agrees fairly well with the observed descent. The backward calculation appears to be unable to produce the observed amount of descent, but this is only an apparent effect due to the density decrease in parcels with altitude. Finally we show the results for unmixed descent experiments - where the parcels are fixed in latitude and longitude and allowed to descend based on the local cooling rate. Unmixed descent is found to always exceed mixed descent, because when normal parcel motion is included, the path average cooling is always less than the cooling at a fixed polar point.

  10. Management and Outcome of Spontaneous Cerebellar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jungin; Cho, Tack Geun; Moon, Jae Gon; Kim, Chang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Spontaneous cerebellar hemorrhage (SCH) is less common than supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage. This study investigated the treatment of SCH and the relation between its clinical and radiological manifestation and outcome. Materials and Methods We presented a SCH management protocol in our institute and analyzed the clinical and radiological findings in 41 SCH patients. The outcomes of each method (surgery and conservative treatment) were compared among patients with initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 9-13 and hematoma volume greater than 10 mL. Results Two (4.9%), 16 (39%), and 23 (56.1%) patients had an initial GCS score of 3-8, with 3-8, 9-13, and 14-15, respectively. Initial GCS score showed significant correlation with Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score (p = 0.005). The mean largest hematoma diameter was 3.2 ± 1.5 cm, and the mean volume was 11.0 ± 11.5 mL. Both of them showed significant inverse correlation with GOS score (p < 0.001). Among patients with an initial GCS score of 9-13 and hematoma volumes greater than 10 mL, 3 (50%) had good outcome and 3 (50%) had poor outcome in the surgical, and all of those in the conservative treatment group had poor outcomes. The outcome distribution differed significantly in the surgical and conservative groups (p = 0.030). Conclusion Initial GCS score and largest hematoma diameter and volume on brain computed tomography are important determinants of outcome in SCH patients. The surgery group showed better outcome than the conservative treatment group among those with an intermediate neurological status and large hematomas. PMID:26523254

  11. Mars Exploration Rover: Launch, Cruise, Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, James K.; Manning, Robert M.; Adler, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Project was an ambitious effort to land two highly capable rovers on Mars and concurrently explore the Martian surface for three months each. Launched in June and July of 2003, cruise operations were conducted through January 4, 2004 with the first landing, followed by the second landing on January 25. The prime mission for the second rover ended on April 27, 2004. This paper will provide an overview of the launch, cruise, and landing phases of the mission, including the engineering and science objectives and challenges involved in the selection and targeting of the landing sites, as well as the excitement and challenges of atmospheric entry, descent and landing execution.

  12. Apollo 16 LM-11 descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    The performance of the LM-11 Descent Propulsion System during the Apollo 16 Mission was evaluated and found to be satisfactory. The average engine effective specific impulse was 0.1 second higher than predicted, but well within the predicted 1 sigma uncertainty of 0.2 seconds. The engine performance corrected to standard inlet conditions for the FTP portion of the burn at 50 seconds after ignition was as follows: thrust, 9839 lbf; specific impulse, 306.9 sec; and propellant mixture ratio, 1.592. These values are +0.34, +0.03 and +0.0 percent different, respectively, from the values reported from engine acceptance tests and were within specification limits. Several flight measurement discrepancies that existed during the flight are discussed.

  13. En route Descent Advisor Concept for Efficient Arrival Metering Conformance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven; Vivona, Robert; Coppenbarger, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The En-route Descent Advisor (EDA) is a suite of decision support tool (DST) capabilities for en route sector subject to metering restrictions such as those generated by the Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) Traffic Management Advisor. EDA assists controllers with high-density arrival metering by providing fuel-efficient metering-conformance advisories, integrated with conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) capabilities, to minimize deviations from the user s preferred trajectory. These DST capabilities will enable controllers to change their procedures from ones that are oriented towards sector management to procedures oriented towards trajectory management. Although adaptable to current procedures and airspace structure, EDA is intended as a tool for transitioning traffic from a Free Flight environment to an efficiently organized flow into terminal airspace. This paper describes the transition airspace problem and EDA concept, defines the key benefit mechanisms that will be enabled by EDA capabilities, and presents a traffic scenario to illustrate the use of the tool.

  14. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, Ravi; Burkhart, P. Dan; Chen, Allen; Comeaux, Keith A.; Guernsey, Carl S.; Devin, M. Kipp; Mendeck, Gavin F.; Powell, Richard W.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Sell, Steven W.; Steltzner, Adam D.; Way, David W.

    2008-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. In addition to landing more mass than prior missions to Mars, MSL will offer access to regions of Mars that have been previously unreachable. The MSL EDL sequence is a result of a more stringent requirement set than any of its predecessors. Notable among these requirements is landing a 900 kg rover in a landing ellipse much smaller than that of any previous Mars lander. In meeting these requirements, MSL is extending the limits of the EDL technologies qualified by the Mars Viking, Mars Pathfinder, and Mars Exploration Rover missions.

  15. CryoScout: A Descent Through the Mars Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.; Saunders, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    CryoScout was proposed as a subsurface investigation of the stratigraphic climate record embedded in Mars North Polar cap. After landing on a gentle landscape in the midst of the mild summer season, CryoScout was to use the continuous polar sunlight to power the descent of a cryobot, a thermal probe, into the ice at a rate of about 1 m per day. CryoScout would probe deep enough into this time capsule to see the effects of planetary obliquity variations and discrete events such as dust storms or volcanic eruptions. By penetrating tens of meters of ice, the mission would explore at least one of the dominant "MOC layers" observed in exposed layered terrain.

  16. Mars exploration rovers entry, descent, and landing trajectory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Knocke, Philip C.

    2007-09-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover mission successfully landed two rovers "Spirit" and "Opportunity" on Mars on January 4th and 25th of 2004, respectively. In this paper, the trajectory analysis performed to define the entry, descent, and landing (EDL) scenario is described. The entry requirements and constraints are presented, as well as uncertainties used in a Monte Carlo dispersion analysis to statistically assess the robustness of the entry design to off-nominal conditions. In the analysis, six-degree-of-freedom and three-degree-offreedom trajectory results are compared to assess the entry characteristics of the capsule. Comparison of the pre-entry results to preliminary post-landing reconstruction data shows all EDL parameters were within the requirements. In addition, the final landing locations for both Spirit and Opportunity were within 15 km from the target.

  17. Steepest descent ballistic deposition of complex shaped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topic, Nikola; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2016-03-01

    We present an efficient event-driven algorithm for sequential ballistic deposition of complex-shaped rigid particles. Each of the particles is constructed from hard spheres (typically 5 … 1000) of variable radii. The sizes and relative positions of the spheres may mutually overlap and can be chosen such that the surface of the resulting particle appears relatively smooth. In the sequential deposition process, by performing steps of rolling and linear motion, the particles move along the steepest descent in a landscape formed by the boundaries and previously deposited particles. The computer time for the simulation of a deposition process depends on the total number of spheres but only weakly on the sizes and shapes of the particles. The proposed algorithm generalizes the Visscher-Bolsterli algorithm [1] which is frequently used for packing of spheres, to non-spherical particles. The proposed event-driven algorithm allows simulations of multi-million particle systems using desktop computers.

  18. Overview of the Phoenix Entry, Descent and Landing System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grover, Myron R., III; Cichy, Benjamin D.; Desai, Prasun N.

    2008-01-01

    NASA s Phoenix Mars Lander began its journey to Mars from Cape Canaveral, Florida in August 2007, but its journey to the launch pad began many years earlier in 1997 as NASA s Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. In the intervening years, the entry, descent and landing (EDL) system architecture went through a series of changes, resulting in the system flown to the surface of Mars on May 25th, 2008. Some changes, such as entry velocity and landing site elevation, were the result of differences in mission design. Other changes, including the removal of hypersonic guidance, the reformulation of the parachute deployment algorithm, and the addition of the backshell avoidance maneuver, were driven by constant efforts to augment system robustness. An overview of the Phoenix EDL system architecture is presented along with rationales driving these architectural changes.

  19. Analysis of Atmospheric Mesoscale Models for Entry, Descent and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, D. M.; Schofield, J. T.; Michaels, T. I.; Rafkin, S. C. R.; Richardson, M. I.; Toigo, A. D.

    2003-01-01

    Each Mars Exploration Rover (MER) is sensitive to the martian winds encountered near the surface during the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) process. These winds are strongly influenced by local (mesoscale) conditions. In the absence of suitable wind observations, wind fields predicted by martian mesoscale atmospheric models have been analyzed to guide landing site selection. Two different models were used, the MRAMS model and the Mars MM5 model. In order to encompass both models and render their results useful to the EDL engineering team, a series of statistical techniques were applied to the model results. These analyses cover the high priority landing sites during the expected landing times (1200 to 1500 local time). The number of sites studied is limited by the computational and analysis cost of the mesoscale models.

  20. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Koryanov, Vsevolod; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Haukka, Harri; Finchenko, Valery; Martynov, Maxim; Ostresko, Boris; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Viktor; Martin, Susanna; Siili, Tero

    2014-05-01

    A new generation of inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) for Mars has been developed. It is used in both the initial atmospheric entry and atmospheric descent before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator into Martian surface. The EDLS applicability to Earth's atmosphere is studied by the EU/RITD [1] project. Project focuses to the analysis and tests of the transonic behaviour of this compact and light weight payload entry system at the Earth re-entry. 1. EDLS for Earth The dynamical stability of the craft is analysed, concentrating on the most critical part of the atmospheric re-entry, the transonic phase. In Martian atmosphere the MetNet vehicle stability during the transonic phase is understood. However, in the more dense Earth's atmosphere, the transonic phase is shorter and turbulence more violent. Therefore, the EDLS has to be sufficiently dynamically stable to overcome the forces tending to deflect the craft from its nominal trajectory and attitude. The preliminary design of the inflatable EDLS for Earth will be commenced once the scaling of the re-entry system and the dynamical stability analysis have been performed. The RITD-project concentrates on mission and applications achievable with the current MetNet-type (i.e. 'Mini-1' category) of lander, and on requirements posed by other type Earth re-entry concepts. 2. Entry Angle Determination for Mini-1 - lander For successful Earth landing, the suitable re-entry angle and velocity with specific descent vehicle (DV) mass and heat flux parameters need to be determined. These key parameters in determining the Earth re-entry for DV are: qmax (kW/m2): maximal specific heat flux, Q (MJ/m2): specific integral heat flux to DV front shield, m (kg): descent vehicle (DV) mass, V (m/s): re-entry velocity and ? (deg.): flight-path angle at Earth re-entry For Earth re-entry, the calculation results in the optimal value of entry velocity for MetNet ('Mini-1' category) -type lander, with mass of 22kg, being VSOL = 5268 m/s. Using the basic pre-defined parameters for MetNet-type of lander in Earth atmosphere, we get the optimal angle of ? = -3.06 degrees for Earth re-entry. 3. Payload Mass for Earth Entry DV One of the key elements in Earth entry lander is the amount of available payload mass. The payload mass depends on, e.g., the lander size, landing type (soil or water), heat shield durability and additional landing gear. The payload mass will have an impact to the center of gravity of the lander. The payload with a 'low' CoG (compared the the lander structure) has a larger tolerance than the payload with 'high' CoG. In cases where payload CoG causes instability, the extra balance mass can be used to adjust CoG. This balance mass will reduce the available payload mass. A major limitation for payload mass is the heat shielding. Acknowledgements The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n 263255. References [1] http://ritd.fmi.fi

  1. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Martynov, Maxim; Schmidt, Walter; Harri, Ari-Matti; Vsevolod Koryanov, D.; Kazakovtcev, Victor; Haukka, Harri; Arruego, Ignacio; Finchenko, Valery; Ostresko, Boris; Ponomarenko, Andrei; Martin, Susanna; Siili, Tero

    Abstract A new generation of inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) or Mars has been developed. It is used in both the initial atmospheric entry and atmospheric descent before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator into Martian surface. The EDLS applicability to Earths atmosphere is studied by the EU/RITD [1] project. Project focuses to the analysis and tests of the transonic behaviour of this compact and light weight payload entry system at the Earth re-entry 1. EDLS for Earth The dynamical stability of the craft is analysed, concentrating on the most critical part of the atmospheric re-entry, the transonic phase. In Martian atmosphere the MetNet vehicle stability during the transonic phase is understood. However, in the more dense Earths atmosphere, the transonic phase is shorter and turbulence more violent. Therefore, the EDLS has to be sufficiently dynamically stable to overcome the forces tending to deflect the craft from its nominal trajectory and attitude. The preliminary design of the inflatable EDLS for Earth will be commenced once the scaling of the re-entry system and the dynamical stability analysis have been performed. The RITD-project concentrates on mission and applications achievable with the current MetNet-type (i.e. Mini-1 category) of lander, and on requirements posed by other type Earth re-entry concepts. 2. Entry Angle Determination for Mini-1 - lander For successful Earth landing, the suitable re-entry angle and velocity with specific descent vehicle (DV) mass and heat flux parameters need to be determined. These key parameters in determining the Earth re-entry for DV are: - qmax (kW/m2): maximal specific heat flux, - Q (MJ/m2): specific integral heat flux to DV front shield, - m (kg): descent vehicle (DV) mass, - V (m/s): re-entry velocity and - theta(deg.): flight-path angle at Earth re-entry For Earth re-entry, the calculation results in the optimal value of entry velocity for MetNet (Mini-1 category) -type lander, with mass of 22kg, being VSOL = 5268 m/s. Using the basic pre-defined parameters for MetNet-type of lander in Earth atmosphere, we get the optimal angle of = -3.06 degrees for Earth re-entry. 3. Payload Mass for Earth Entry DV One of the key elements in Earth entry lander is the amount of available payload mass. The payload mass depends on, e.g., the lander size, landing type (soil or water), heat shield durability and additional landing gear. The payload mass will have an impact to the center of gravity of the lander. The payload with a low CoG (compared the the lander structure) has a larger tolerance than the payload with high CoG. In cases where payload CoG causes instability, the extra balance mass can be used to adjust CoG. This balance mass will reduce the available payload mass. A major limitation for payload mass is the heat shielding. Acknowledgements The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Communitys Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n 263255. References [1] http://ritd.fmi.fi

  2. Mars Exploration Rovers Entry, Descent, and Landing Trajectory Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Knocke, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover mission successfully landed two rovers "Spirit" and "Opportunity" on Mars on January 4th and 25th of 2004, respectively. The trajectory analysis performed to define the entry, descent, and landing (EDL) scenario is described. The entry requirements and constraints are presented, as well as uncertainties used in a Monte Carlo dispersion analysis to statistically assess the robustness of the entry design to off-nominal conditions. In the analysis, six-degree-of-freedom and three-degree-of-freedom trajectory results are compared to assess the entry characteristics of the capsule. Comparison of the preentry results to preliminary post-landing reconstruction data shows that all EDL parameters were within the requirements. In addition, the final landing position for both "Spirit" and "Opportunity" were within 15 km of the predicted landing location.

  3. Assessment on EXPERT Descent and Landing System Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, H.; Muylaert, J.; Northey, D.; Riley, D.

    2009-01-01

    EXPERT is a re-entry vehicle designed for validation of aero-thermodynamic models, numerical schemes in Computational Fluid Dynamics codes and test facilities for measuring flight data under an Earth re-entry environment. This paper addresses the design for the descent and landing sequence for EXPERT. It includes the descent sequence, the choice of drogue and main parachutes, and the parachute deployment condition, which can be supersonic or subsonic. The analysis is based mainly on an engineering tool, PASDA, together with some hand calculations for parachute sizing and design. The tool consists of a detailed 6-DoF simulation performed with the aerodynamics database of the vehicle, an empirical wakes model and the International Standard Atmosphere database. The aerodynamics database for the vehicle is generated by DNW experimental data and CFD codes within the framework of an ESA contract to CIRA. The analysis will be presented in terms of altitude, velocity, accelerations, angle-of- attack, pitch angle and angle of rigging line. Discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of each parachute deployment condition is included in addition to some comparison with the available data based on a Monte-Carlo method from a Russian company, FSUE NIIPS. Sensitivity on wind speed to the performance of EXPERT is shown to be strong. Supersonic deployment of drogue shows a better performance in stability at the expense of a larger G-load than those from the subsonic deployment of drogue. Further optimization on the parachute design is necessary in order to fulfill all the EXPERT specifications.

  4. Y Chromosome Lineages in Men of West African Descent

    PubMed Central

    Keita, Shomarka O. Y.; Kittles, Rick A.

    2012-01-01

    The early African experience in the Americas is marked by the transatlantic slave trade from ?1619 to 1850 and the rise of the plantation system. The origins of enslaved Africans were largely dependent on European preferences as well as the availability of potential laborers within Africa. Rice production was a key industry of many colonial South Carolina low country plantations. Accordingly, rice plantations owners within South Carolina often requested enslaved Africans from the so-called Grain Coast of western Africa (Senegal to Sierra Leone). Studies on the African origins of the enslaved within other regions of the Americas have been limited. To address the issue of origins of people of African descent within the Americas and understand more about the genetic heterogeneity present within Africa and the African Diaspora, we typed Y chromosome specific markers in 1,319 men consisting of 508 west and central Africans (from 12 populations), 188 Caribbeans (from 2 islands), 532 African Americans (AAs from Washington, DC and Columbia, SC), and 91 European Americans. Principal component and admixture analyses provide support for significant Grain Coast ancestry among African American men in South Carolina. AA men from DC and the Caribbean showed a closer affinity to populations from the Bight of Biafra. Furthermore, 3040% of the paternal lineages in African descent populations in the Americas are of European ancestry. Diverse west African ancestries and sex-biased gene flow from EAs has contributed greatly to the genetic heterogeneity of African populations throughout the Americas and has significant implications for gene mapping efforts in these populations. PMID:22295064

  5. Abnormal Head Impulse Test in a Unilateral Cerebellar Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Seol-Hee; Jung, Jin-Man; Kwon, Do-Young; Park, Moon Ho; Choi, June; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background The findings of head impulse tests (HIT) are usually normal in cerebellar lesions. Case Report A 46-year-old male presented with progressive dizziness and imbalance of 3 weeks duration. The patient exhibited catch-up saccades during bedside horizontal HIT to either side, which was more evident during the rightward HIT. However, results of bithermal caloric tests and rotatory chair test were normal. MRI revealed a lesion in the inferior cerebellum near the flocculus. Conclusions This case provides additional evidence that damage to the flocculus or its connections may impair the vestibulo-ocular reflex only during high-speed stimuli, especially when the stimuli are applied to the contralesional side. By observing accompanying cerebellar signs, the abnormal HIT findings caused by a cerebellar disorder can be distinguished from those produced by peripheral vestibular disorders. PMID:25749819

  6. Excitatory Cerebellar Nucleocortical Circuit Provides Internal Amplification during Associative Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenyu; Proietti-Onori, Martina; Lin, Zhanmin; Ten Brinke, Michiel M; Boele, Henk-Jan; Potters, Jan-Willem; Ruigrok, Tom J H; Hoebeek, Freek E; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2016-02-01

    Closed-loop circuitries between cortical and subcortical regions can facilitate precision of output patterns, but the role of such networks in the cerebellum remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterize the role of internal feedback from the cerebellar nuclei to the cerebellar cortex in classical eyeblink conditioning. We find that excitatory output neurons in the interposed nucleus provide efference-copy signals via mossy fibers to the cerebellar cortical zones that belong to the same module, triggering monosynaptic responses in granule and Golgi cells and indirectly inhibiting Purkinje cells. Upon conditioning, the local density of nucleocortical mossy fiber terminals significantly increases. Optogenetic activation and inhibition of nucleocortical fibers in conditioned animals increases and decreases the amplitude of learned eyeblink responses, respectively. Our data show that the excitatory nucleocortical closed-loop circuitry of the cerebellum relays a corollary discharge of premotor signals and suggests an amplifying role of this circuitry in controlling associative motor learning. PMID:26844836

  7. Epstein-Barr virus-associated cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khalid; Lawthom, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia is a common neurological presentation. It can be acute, subacute or chronic. Neurological complications of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are well-recognised with a variety of presentations. Acute cerebellar ataxia is a rare, but an established complication. It has been described as the sole manifestation of EBV infection without the systemic features of infectious mononucleosis. The pathophysiology is not clear. The course of the illness may last for a few months with a benign outcome, though serious complications can happen. We present a case of a 38-year-old man who presented with an acute cerebellar ataxia owing to EBV infection, along with a review of the literature. PMID:23608862

  8. Early Childhood Obesity is Associated with Compromised Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer L; Couch, Jessica; Schwenk, Krista; Long, Michelle; Towler, Stephen; Theriaque, Douglas W; He, Guojun; Liu, Yijun; Driscoll, Daniel J; Leonard, Christiana M

    2009-01-01

    As part of a study investigating commonalities between Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS a genetic imprinting disorder) and early-onset obesity of unknown etiology (EMO) we measured total cerebral and cerebellar volume on volumetric MRI images. Individuals with PWS (n=16) and EMO (n=12) had smaller cerebellar volumes than a control group of 15 siblings (p=0.02 control vs. EMO; p=0.0005 control vs. PWS), although there was no difference among the groups in cerebral volume. Individuals with PWS and EMO also had impaired cognitive function: general intellectual ability (GIA): PWS 65 25; EMO 81 19; and Controls 112 13 (p<0.0001 controls vs. PWS and controls vs. EMO). As both conditions are characterized by early-onset obesity and slowed cognitive development, these results raise the possibility that early childhood obesity retards both cerebellar and cognitive development. PMID:19437203

  9. Excitatory Cerebellar Nucleocortical Circuit Provides Internal Amplification during Associative Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhenyu; Proietti-Onori, Martina; Lin, Zhanmin; ten Brinke, Michiel M.; Boele, Henk-Jan; Potters, Jan-Willem; Ruigrok, Tom J.H.; Hoebeek, Freek E.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Closed-loop circuitries between cortical and subcortical regions can facilitate precision of output patterns, but the role of such networks in the cerebellum remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterize the role of internal feedback from the cerebellar nuclei to the cerebellar cortex in classical eyeblink conditioning. We find that excitatory output neurons in the interposed nucleus provide efference-copy signals via mossy fibers to the cerebellar cortical zones that belong to the same module, triggering monosynaptic responses in granule and Golgi cells and indirectly inhibiting Purkinje cells. Upon conditioning, the local density of nucleocortical mossy fiber terminals significantly increases. Optogenetic activation and inhibition of nucleocortical fibers in conditioned animals increases and decreases the amplitude of learned eyeblink responses, respectively. Our data show that the excitatory nucleocortical closed-loop circuitry of the cerebellum relays a corollary discharge of premotor signals and suggests an amplifying role of this circuitry in controlling associative motor learning. PMID:26844836

  10. An unusual cause of adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Ramshekhar N.; Sanghani, Nirav; Javali, Mahendra; Jain, Neeraj; Shah, Arun B.

    2009-01-01

    We report an unusual case of sporadic adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism. A 40-year-old unmarried man presented with progressive ataxia and dysarthria along with complaints of non-development of secondary sexual characteristics and erectile dysfunction. There were complaints of intermittent diarrhea. Clinical examination revealed a pan-cerebellar syndrome with features of hypoandrogenism. No eye movement abnormalities were evident. There were signs of malabsorption. Investigations confirmed the presence of auto-antibodies found in celiac disease, and a duodenal biopsy confirmed the same. Hypoandrogenism was postulated to be due to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism which has been mentioned in a few patients of celiac disease. However, the pattern seen in our patient was of a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. This is probably secondary to an autoimmune hypophysitis seen in some patients in the absence of other clinical manifestations. Autoantibody testing should be a diagnostic necessity in any adult with a sporadic cerebellar ataxia. PMID:20151008

  11. Ground reaction forces and frictional demands during stair descent: effects of age and illumination.

    PubMed

    Christina, Kathryn A; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2002-04-01

    Stair descent is an inherently risky and demanding task that older adults often encounter in everyday life. It is believed that slip between the foot or shoe sole and the stair surface may play a role in stair related falls, however, there are no reports on slip resistance requirements for stair descent. The aim of this study was to determine the required coefficient of friction (RCOF) necessary for safe stair descent in 12 young and 12 older adults, under varied illuminance conditions. The RCOF during stair descent was found to be comparable in magnitude and time to that for overground walking, and thus, with adequate footwear and dry stair surfaces, friction does not appear to be a major determinant of stair safety. Illuminance level had little effect on the dependent variables quantified in this study. However, the older participants demonstrated safer strategies than the young during stair descent, as reflected by differences in the ground reaction forces and lower RCOF. PMID:11869909

  12. Analysis of foot clearance in firefighters during ascent and descent ofstairs.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Richard M; Horn, Gavin P; Rosengren, Karl S; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2016-01-01

    Slips, trips, and falls are a leading cause of injury to firefighters with many injuries occurring while traversing stairs, possibly exaggerated by acute fatigue from firefighting activities and/or asymmetric load carriage. This study examined the effects that fatigue, induced by simulated firefighting activities, and hose load carriage have on foot clearance while traversing stairs. Landing and passing foot clearances for each stair during ascent and descent of a short staircase were investigated. Clearances decreased significantly (p<0.05) post-exercise for nine of 12 ascent parameters and increased for two of eight descent parameters. Load carriage resulted in significantly decreased (p<0.05) clearance over three ascent parameters, and one increase during descent. Decreased clearances during ascent caused by fatigue or load carriage may result in an increased trip risk. Increased clearances during descent may suggest use of a compensation strategy to ensure stair clearance or an increased risk of over-stepping during descent. PMID:26360190

  13. Modulatory effects of theta burst stimulation on cerebellar nonsomatic functions.

    PubMed

    Demirtas-Tatlidede, Asli; Freitas, Catarina; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Schmahmann, Jeremy D

    2011-09-01

    Clinical and functional imaging studies suggest that the cerebellar vermis is involved in the regulation of a range of nonsomatic functions including cardiovascular control, thirst, feeding behavior, and primal emotions. Cerebello-hypothalamic circuits have been postulated to be a potential neuroanatomical substrate underlying this modulation. We tested this putative relationship between the cerebellar vermis and nonsomatic functions by stimulating the cerebellum noninvasively via neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation. In this randomized, counter-balanced, within-subject study, intermittent theta burst stimulation (TBS) was applied on three different days to the vermis and the right and left cerebellar hemispheres of 12 right-handed normal subjects with the aim of modulating activity in the targeted cerebellar structure. TBS-associated changes were investigated via cardiovascular monitoring, a series of emotionally arousing picture stimuli, subjective analog scales for primal emotions, and the Profile of Mood States test. All 36 sessions of cerebellar stimulation were tolerated well without serious adverse events. Cardiovascular monitoring pointed to a mild but significant decrease in heart rate subsequent to vermal stimulation; no changes were detected in systolic or diastolic blood pressure measurements. Subjective ratings detected a significant increase in Thirst and a trend toward increased Appetite following vermal stimulation. These observations are consistent with existing neurophysiological and neuroimaging data indicating a role for the cerebellum in the regulation of visceral responses. In conjunction with the modulatory function of the cerebellum, our results suggest a role for the vermis in somatovisceral integration likely through cerebello-hypothalamic pathways. Further research is warranted to elucidate the potential mechanisms underlying the cerebellar modulation of nonsomatic functions. PMID:21132574

  14. Unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia and mesencephalic malformation in a Hanoverian foal.

    PubMed

    Schröder, S; Schmidt, M J; Preis, S; Klumpp, S; Köhler, K; Kuchelmeister, K; Herden, C

    2013-01-01

    Neurological cases, especially in foals, are rare in the daily practical work. The most common causes are traumata and infectious diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). This case report provides further insights into the wide spectrum of possible neuropathological lesions by detailing a complex malformation with unilateral neurological signs that occurred later post natum. Thus, clinicians should also be aware of malformations in case of respective neurological patients. A Hanoverian foal was presented with progressive ataxia. General and blood examination revealed no further alterations. By neurologic examination, a unilateral hypermetria was diagnosed and a cysternography of the head was performed. A cerebellar malformation was assumed and the foal was euthanized due to poor prognosis. At necropsy, a unilateral absence of a cerebellar hemisphere and vermis accompanied by contralateral malformation of the mesencephalon was diagnosed. The missing areas of the right cerebellar hemisphere were replaced by a cystic formation. The left part of the mesencephalic lamina quadrigemina was reduced in size and the corpus callosum was hypoplastic. Additional microscopical findings were most obvious near the cyst formation and included angiofibrosis in remaining cerebellar and mesencephalic parenchyma and leptomeninges, heterotopia of cerebellar neurons, sclerosis in cerebellar cortex, focal proliferation of meningeal cells and mild mononuclear perivascular infiltrates. Occassional irregular neuronal arrangement in the mesencephalon was also present. Infectious agents such as Borna disease virus, rabies virus, and equine herpesvirus were not detected. Therefore, the complex malformation in this foal might have been caused by a destructive, possibly ischemic event, or could represent a sequel of a primary retrocerebellar cyst with accompanying compression of adjacent parenchyma. PMID:23608891

  15. Modulatory Effects of Theta Burst Stimulation on Cerebellar Nonsomatic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Demirtas-Tatlidede, Asli; Freitas, Catarina; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and functional imaging studies suggest that the cerebellar vermis is involved in the regulation of a range of nonsomatic functions including cardiovascular control, thirst, feeding behavior, and primal emotions. Cerebello-hypothalamic circuits have been postulated to be a potential neuroanatomical substrate underlying this modulation. We tested this putative relationship between the cerebellar vermis and nonsomatic functions by stimulating the cerebellum noninvasively via neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation. In this randomized, counter-balanced, within-subject study, intermittent theta burst stimulation (TBS) was applied on three different days to the vermis and the right and left cerebellar hemispheres of 12 right-handed normal subjects with the aim of modulating activity in the targeted cerebellar structure. TBS-associated changes were investigated via cardiovascular monitoring, a series of emotionally arousing picture stimuli, subjective analog scales for primal emotions, and the Profile of Mood States test. All 36 sessions of cerebellar stimulation were tolerated well without serious adverse events. Cardiovascular monitoring pointed to a mild but significant decrease in heart rate subsequent to vermal stimulation; no changes were detected in systolic or diastolic blood pressure measurements. Subjective ratings detected a significant increase in Thirst and a trend toward increased Appetite following vermal stimulation. These observations are consistent with existing neurophysiological and neuroimaging data indicating a role for the cerebellum in the regulation of visceral responses. In conjunction with the modulatory function of the cerebellum, our results suggest a role for the vermis in somatovisceral integration likely through cerebello-hypothalamic pathways. Further research is warranted to elucidate the potential mechanisms underlying the cerebellar modulation of nonsomatic functions. PMID:21132574

  16. Low-titer anti-GAD-antibody-positive cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Nanri, Kazunori; Niwa, Hisayoshi; Mitoma, Hiroshi; Takei, Asako; Ikeda, Junko; Harada, Toshihide; Okita, Mitsunori; Takeguchi, Masafumi; Taguchi, Takeshi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2013-04-01

    The majority of cases of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-antibody-positive cerebellar ataxia are reported to have high levels of anti-GAD antibody, and the diagnostic value of low titers of anti-GAD antibody in a patient with cerebellar ataxia is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to verify the characteristics of low-titer-anti-GAD-antibody-positive cerebellar ataxia patients and the diagnostic value of low titers of anti-GAD antibody in patients with cerebellar ataxia. The subjects were six patients positive for low-titer GAD antibody (<100U/mL). We examined them with MRI, including voxel-based morphometry, and with single-photon emission computed tomography and monitored the GAD antibody index in the cerebrospinal fluid. The levels of antineuronal, antigliadin, anti-SS-A, antithyroid antibodies, and of vitamins E, B1, and B12 were determined. Thoracic and abdominal CT scans were performed to exclude a paraneoplastic origin. We treated three patients with immunotherapy. All cases showed cortical cerebellar atrophy. The GAD antibody index in three of the five patients reviewed was >1.0. Two of the six patients were thyroid antibody-positive, and one was both antinuclear- and anti-SS-A antibody-positive. After the administration of immunotherapy to three patients, two showed clear effectiveness, and one, transient effectiveness. Effectiveness was greatest in the two patients with familial occurrence of the disease. In cerebellar ataxia, regardless of family history or isolated illness, it is critical to measure the GAD antibody level, and, even with a low titer level, if the result is positive, immunotherapy should be considered. PMID:22923147

  17. Hypertensive encephalopathy presenting with isolated brain stem and cerebellar edema.

    PubMed

    Bhagavati, Satyakam; Chum, Florence; Choi, Jai

    2008-10-01

    Hypertensive encephalopathy typically presents with headache and confusion and bilateral parietooccipital vasogenic edema. Brain stem and cerebellar edema in hypertensive encephalopathy usually occurs in association with these typical supratentorial changes and is usually asymptomatic. We report here an uncommon hypertensive patient with isolated, severe, and symptomatic brain stem and cerebellar edema with fourth ventricular obstruction and mild hydrocephalus. Rapid treatment of hypertension resulted in clinical and radiological improvement. Prompt recognition of the cause and aggressive treatment of hypertension in such patients are crucial to relieve edema and prevent life-threatening progression. PMID:18321248

  18. Sudden Onset of Oromandibular Dystonia after Cerebellar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Alper; Yilmaz, Rezzak; Selcuk, Ferda; Akbostanc?, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    Background We present the case of a 65-year-old female with sudden-onset involuntary mouth opening, deviation of the jaw, facial grimacing, and tongue movements that started 6 months prior to her admission. Case Report She was diagnosed with oromandibular dystonia. Differential diagnosis of oromandibular dystonia and various etiologies were investigated. Neuroimaging studies revealed a left cerebellar infarction. Discussion To our knowledge, this case is the first oromandibular dystonia presenting with cerebellar ischemic stroke. Possible roles of the cerebellum for the pathophysiology of oromandibular dystonia are discussed. PMID:25374766

  19. Inside the Thompson laboratory during the "cerebellar years" and the continuing cerebellar story.

    PubMed

    Lavond, D G; Wikgren, J; Nokia, M S

    2011-02-01

    This paper is based on the talk by one of the authors (DL) given at the symposium for the retirement of RF Thompson (RF Thompson: A bridge between 20th and 21st century neuroscience). We first make some informal observations of the historical times and research conditions in the Thompson laboratory when the cerebellum was found to play a critical role in eye lid classical conditioning, the "cerebellar years". These conditions influenced our collaborative international program on the phenomenon known as "transfer of training" or "savings". Our research shows that the appearance of "savings" is an artifact of the order of testing, and depends upon the functioning of the contralateral interpositus nucleus (IPN) in a way that is complementary to the role of the IPN in normal eyelid classical conditioning. PMID:21073973

  20. Cerebellar ataxia as a possible complication of babesiosis in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, L S

    1994-09-01

    A 6-month-old Miniature Doberman Pinscher was presented with inappetance and cerebellar signs. Babesia canis organisms were found on a capillary bloodsmear. The cerebellar signs resolved rapidly following treatment with diminazene aceturate. A 7-month-old Siberian Husky developed cerebellar signs, blindness and quadriparesis 9 d after presentation with clinical signs typical of uncomplicated canine babesiosis. The dog responded favourably to treatment with prednisolone. Both acute and delayed cerebellar ataxia have been associated with malaria in humans. The clinical signs shown by these dogs were similar to those reported for malaria in humans. Cerebellar ataxia should be considered a possible complication of canine babesiosis. PMID:7595921

  1. Verb Generation in Children and Adolescents with Acute Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, B.; Schoch, B.; Hein-Kropp, C.; Dimitrova, A.; Hovel, M.; Ziegler, W.; Gizewski, E. R.; Timmann, D.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine verb generation in a larger group of children and adolescents with acute focal lesions of the cerebellum. Nine children and adolescents with cerebellar tumours participated. Subjects were tested a few days after tumour surgery. For comparison, a subgroup was tested also 1 or 2 days before surgery. None…

  2. Cerebellar Damage Produces Selective Deficits in Verbal Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravizza, Susan M.; Mccormick, Cristin A.; Schlerf, John E.; Justus, Timothy; Ivry, Richard B.; Fiez, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    The cerebellum is often active in imaging studies of verbal working memory, consistent with a putative role in articulatory rehearsal. While patients with cerebellar damage occasionally exhibit a mild impairment on standard neuropsychological tests of working memory, these tests are not diagnostic for exploring these processes in detail. The

  3. Speech and Language Findings Associated with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paslawski, Teresa; Duffy, Joseph R.; Vernino, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is an autoimmune disease that can be associated with cancer of the breast, lung, and ovary. The clinical presentation of PCD commonly includes ataxia, visual disturbances, and dysarthria. The speech disturbances associated with PCD have not been well characterized, despite general acceptance that…

  4. Cerebellar Morphology in Tourette Syndrome and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Russell H.; Bansal, Ravi; Xu, Dongrong; Hao, Xuejun; Liu, Jun; Sanchez, Juan; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neuroanatomical and functional imaging studies have identified the cerebellum as an integral component of motor and language control. Few studies, however, have investigated the role of the cerebellum in Tourette syndrome (TS), a condition defined by the presence of semi-involuntary movements and sounds. Methods Magnetic resonance imaging was conducted in 163 persons with TS and 147 control participants. Multivariate linear regression models were used to explore effects on cerebellar surface morphology and underlying volumes for the main diagnosis effects of TS as well as comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Additionally, the correlations of symptom severity with cerebellar morphology were also assessed. Results The TS group demonstrated reduced volumes of the cerebellar hemispheres bilaterally that derived primarily from reduced gray matter in crus I and lobules VI, VIIB, and VIIIA. These decreased regional volumes accompanied increasing tic symptom severity and motoric disinhibition as demonstrated by a finger tapping test. Males had reduced volumes of these same regions compared with females, irrespective of diagnosis. Comorbid OCD was associated with relative enlargement of these regions in proportion to the increasing severity of OCD symptoms. Interpretation The cerebellum is involved in the pathogenesis of TS and tic-related OCD. Baseline gender differences in cerebellar morphology may in part account for the more prevalent expression of TS in males. PMID:20437583

  5. Widespread demyelination in the cerebellar cortex in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kutzelnigg, Alexandra; Faber-Rod, Jens C; Bauer, Jan; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Sorensen, Per S; Laursen, Henning; Stadelmann, Christine; Brck, Wolfgang; Rauschka, Helmut; Schmidbauer, Manfred; Lassmann, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Neocortical demyelination in the forebrain has recently been identified as an important pathological feature of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we describe that the cerebellar cortex is a major predilection site for demyelination, in particular in patients with primary and secondary progressive MS. In these patients, on average, 38.7% of cerebellar cortical area is affected, reaching in extreme examples up to 92%. Cerebellar cortical demyelination occurs mainly in a band-like manner, affecting multiple folia. The lesions are characterized by primary demyelination with relative axonal and neuronal preservation, although some axonal spheroids and a moderate reduction of Purkinje cells are present. Although cortical demyelination sometimes occurs together with demyelination in the adjacent white matter (leukocortical lesions), in most instances, the cortex was affected independently from white matter lesions. We found no correlation between demyelination in the cortex and the white matter, and in some cases, extensive cortical demyelination was present in the near absence of white matter lesions. Our data identify cortical demyelination as a potential substrate of cerebellar dysfunction in MS. PMID:17493036

  6. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children with Cerebellar Malformations: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Marie-Eve; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations are increasingly diagnosed in the fetal period. Consequently, their consideration requires stressful and often critical decisions from both clinicians and families. This has resulted in an emergent need to understand better the impact of these early life lesions on child development. We performed a comprehensive literature

  7. Familial cerebellar ataxia presenting with down beat nystagmus.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, G D

    1980-01-01

    Two brothers are described who during their fourth decade presented with isolated down beat nystagmus and later developed a progressive cerebellar ataxia. The nature of this unusual oculomotor disorder and its rare occurrence in other inherited conditions are discussed. PMID:7381864

  8. Eyeblink Conditioning Deficits Indicate Timing and Cerebellar Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, S.M.; Kieffaber, P.D.; Carroll, C.A.; Vohs, J.L.; Tracy, J.A.; Shekhar, A.; O'Donnell, B.F.; Steinmetz, J.E.; Hetrick, W.P.

    2005-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that individuals with schizophrenia manifest abnormalities in structures (cerebellum and basal ganglia) and neurotransmitter systems (dopamine) linked to internal-timing processes. A single-cue tone delay eyeblink conditioning paradigm comprised of 100 learning and 50 extinction trials was used to examine cerebellar

  9. Speech and Language Findings Associated with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paslawski, Teresa; Duffy, Joseph R.; Vernino, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is an autoimmune disease that can be associated with cancer of the breast, lung, and ovary. The clinical presentation of PCD commonly includes ataxia, visual disturbances, and dysarthria. The speech disturbances associated with PCD have not been well characterized, despite general acceptance that

  10. Verb Generation in Children and Adolescents with Acute Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, B.; Schoch, B.; Hein-Kropp, C.; Dimitrova, A.; Hovel, M.; Ziegler, W.; Gizewski, E. R.; Timmann, D.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine verb generation in a larger group of children and adolescents with acute focal lesions of the cerebellum. Nine children and adolescents with cerebellar tumours participated. Subjects were tested a few days after tumour surgery. For comparison, a subgroup was tested also 1 or 2 days before surgery. None

  11. Cerebellar Zonal Patterning Relies on Purkinje Cell Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    White, Joshua J.; Arancillo, Marife; Stay, Trace L.; George-Jones, Nicholas A.; Levy, Sabrina L.; Heck, Detlef H.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar circuits are patterned into an array of topographic parasagittal domains called zones. The proper connectivity of zones is critical for motor coordination and motor learning, and in several neurological diseases cerebellar circuits degenerate in zonal patterns. Despite recent advances in understanding zone function, we still have a limited understanding of how zones are formed. Here, we focused our attention on Purkinje cells to gain a better understanding of their specific role in establishing zonal circuits. We used conditional mouse genetics to test the hypothesis that Purkinje cell neurotransmission is essential for refining prefunctional developmental zones into sharp functional zones. Our results show that inhibitory synaptic transmission in Purkinje cells is necessary for the precise patterning of Purkinje cell zones and the topographic targeting of mossy fiber afferents. As expected, blocking Purkinje cell neurotransmission caused ataxia. Using in vivo electrophysiology, we demonstrate that loss of Purkinje cell communication altered the firing rate and pattern of their target cerebellar nuclear neurons. Analysis of Purkinje cell complex spike firing revealed that feedback in the cerebellar nuclei to inferior olive to Purkinje cell loop is obstructed. Loss of Purkinje neurotransmission also caused ectopic zonal expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, which is only expressed in adult Purkinje cells when calcium is dysregulated and if excitability is altered. Our results suggest that Purkinje cell inhibitory neurotransmission establishes the functional circuitry of the cerebellum by patterning the molecular zones, fine-tuning afferent circuitry, and shaping neuronal activity. PMID:24920627

  12. Translational Approach to Behavioral Learning: Lessons from Cerebellar Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Cheron, Guy; Dan, Bernard; Márquez-Ruiz, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The role of cerebellar plasticity has been increasingly recognized in learning. The privileged relationship between the cerebellum and the inferior olive offers an ideal circuit for attempting to integrate the numerous evidences of neuronal plasticity into a translational perspective. The high learning capacity of the Purkinje cells specifically controlled by the climbing fiber represents a major element within the feed-forward and feedback loops of the cerebellar cortex. Reciprocally connected with the basal ganglia and multimodal cerebral domains, this cerebellar network may realize fundamental functions in a wide range of behaviors. This review will outline the current understanding of three main experimental paradigms largely used for revealing cerebellar functions in behavioral learning: (1) the vestibuloocular reflex and smooth pursuit control, (2) the eyeblink conditioning, and (3) the sensory envelope plasticity. For each of these experimental conditions, we have critically revisited the chain of causalities linking together neural circuits, neural signals, and plasticity mechanisms, giving preference to behaving or alert animal physiology. Namely, recent experimental approaches mixing neural units and local field potentials recordings have demonstrated a spike timing dependent plasticity by which the cerebellum remains at a strategic crossroad for deciphering fundamental and translational mechanisms from cellular to network levels. PMID:24319600

  13. The history of the development of the cerebellar examination.

    PubMed

    Fine, Edward J; Ionita, Catalina C; Lohr, Linda

    2002-12-01

    The cerebellar examination evolved from observations of experimental lesions made by neurophysiologists and clinical descriptions of patients with trauma to the cerebellum. At the beginning of the 19th century, neurophysiologists such as Luigi Rolando, Marie-Jean-Pierre Flourens, and John Call Dalton, Jr. ablated portions of the cerebellum of a variety of animals and observed staggering gait, clumsiness, and falling from side to side without loss of strength. They concluded that the cerebellum coordinated voluntary movements. In 1899, Joseph Francois Flix Babinski observed that patients with cerebellar lesions could not execute complex movements without breaking down into their elemental movements and described the defect as dysmetria. In 1902, Babinski coined the term dysdiodochokinesis to describe the inability to perform rapid execution of movements requiring alternate contractions of agonist and antagonist muscles. Gordon Holmes in 1904 described the phenomena of rebound, noting that if a limb ipsilateral to a cerebellar lesion is suddenly released from tension, the appendage will flail. In 1917, Gordon Holmes reported hypotonia and dysmetria in men wounded by gunshot wounds to their cerebellum. These observations were rapidly included in descriptions of the cerebellar examination in popular contemporaneous textbooks of neurology. Modern observations have demonstrated that the cerebellum influences such cognitive functions such as planning, verbal fluency, abstract reasoning, prosody, and use of correct grammar. PMID:12539058

  14. Is a Cerebellar Deficit the Underlying Cause of Reading Disabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irannejad, Shahrzad; Savage, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether children with dyslexia differed in their performance on reading, phonological, rapid naming, motor, and cerebellar-related tasks and automaticity measures compared to reading age (RA)-matched and chronological age (CA)-matched control groups. Participants were 51 children attending mainstream English elementary

  15. Predicting and correcting ataxia using a model of cerebellar function

    PubMed Central

    Bhanpuri, Nasir H.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar damage results in uncoordinated, variable and dysmetric movements known as ataxia. Here we show that we can reliably model single-joint reaching trajectories of patients (n = 10), reproduce patient-like deficits in the behaviour of controls (n = 11), and apply patient-specific compensations that improve reaching accuracy (P < 0.02). Our approach was motivated by the theory that the cerebellum is essential for updating and/or storing an internal dynamic model that relates motor commands to changes in body state (e.g. arm position and velocity). We hypothesized that cerebellar damage causes a mismatch between the brain’s modelled dynamics and the actual body dynamics, resulting in ataxia. We used both behavioural and computational approaches to demonstrate that specific cerebellar patient deficits result from biased internal models. Our results strongly support the idea that an intact cerebellum is critical for maintaining accurate internal models of dynamics. Importantly, we demonstrate how subject-specific compensation can improve movement in cerebellar patients, who are notoriously unresponsive to treatment. PMID:24812203

  16. Descent strategy comparisons for TNAV-equipped aircraft under airplane-preferred operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.

    1989-01-01

    Three 4-D descent strategies were evaluated which were employed by TNAV-equipped aircraft in an advanced metering air traffic control environment. The Flow Management Evaluation Model (FMEM) was used to assess performance using three criteria when traffic enters the simulation under preferred cruise operating conditions (altitude and speed): throughput, fuel usage, and conflict probability. In comparison to an evaluation previously performed under NASA contract, the current analysis indicates that the optimal descent strategy is preferred over the clean-idle and constant descent angle (CFPA) strategies when all three criteria are considered.

  17. Rapid Generation of Optimal Asteroid Powered Descent Trajectories Via Convex Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin; Lu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a convex optimization based method that can rapidly generate the fuel optimal asteroid powered descent trajectory. The ultimate goal is to autonomously design the optimal powered descent trajectory on-board the spacecraft immediately prior to the descent burn. Compared to a planetary powered landing problem, the major difficulty is the complex gravity field near the surface of an asteroid that cannot be approximated by a constant gravity field. This paper uses relaxation techniques and a successive solution process that seeks the solution to the original nonlinear, nonconvex problem through the solutions to a sequence of convex optimal control problems.

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging of the human cerebellar pathways and their interplay with cerebral macrostructure

    PubMed Central

    Keser, Zafer; Hasan, Khader M.; Mwangi, Benson I.; Kamali, Arash; Ucisik-Keser, Fehime Eymen; Riascos, Roy F.; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Francisco, Gerard E.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar white matter (WM) connections to the central nervous system are classified functionally into the Spinocerebellar (SC), vestibulocerebellar (VC), and cerebrocerebellar subdivisions. The SC pathways project from spinal cord to cerebellum, whereas the VC pathways project from vestibular organs of the inner ear. Cerebrocerebellar connections are composed of feed forward and feedback connections between cerebrum and cerebellum including the cortico-ponto-cerebellar (CPC) pathways being of cortical origin and the dentate-rubro-thalamo-cortical (DRTC) pathway being of cerebellar origin. In this study we systematically quantified the whole cerebellar system connections using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI). Ten right-handed healthy subjects (7 males and 3 females, age range 2051 years) were studied. DT-MRI data were acquired with a voxel size = 2 mm 2 mm 2 mm at a 3.0 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The DT-MRI data were prepared and analyzed using anatomically-guided deterministic tractography methods to reconstruct the SC, DRTC, fronto-ponto-cerebellar (FPC), parieto-ponto-cerebellar (PPC), temporo-ponto-cerebellar (TPC) and occipito-ponto-cerebellar (OPC). The DTI-attributes or the cerebellar tracts along with their cortical representation (Brodmann areas) were presented in standard Montral Neurological Institute space. All cerebellar tract volumes were quantified and correlated with volumes of cerebral cortical, subcortical gray matter (GM), cerebral WM and cerebellar GM, and cerebellar WM. On our healthy cohort, the ratio of total cerebellar GM-to-WM was ~3.29 0.24, whereas the ratio of cerebral GM-to-WM was approximately 1.10 0.11. The sum of all cerebellar tract volumes is ~25.8 7.3 mL, or a percentage of 1.6 0.45 of the total intracranial volume (ICV). PMID:25904851

  19. Multimodal evoked potentials in multiple system and late onset cerebellar atrophies.

    PubMed

    Arpa, J; Lpez-Pajares, R; Cruz-Martnez, A; Palomo, F; Ferrer, T; Caminero, A B; Rodrguez-Albario, A; Alonso, M; Lacasa, T; Nos, J

    1995-01-01

    Forty subjects were clinically examined using scales for cerebellar, pyramidal, parkinsonian, and mental status and by quantitative evaluation of neuroimages. The patients were classified into two groups: cerebellar-plus and "pure" cerebellar syndromes. Patients with "pure" cerebellar syndrome were diagnosed as autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia III (ADCA III) or "pure idiopathic" late-onset cerebellar ataxia (ILOCA) in this series. Patients with cerebellar-plus syndrome were diagnosed as multiple system atrophy (MSA), subclassified as either ILOCA-plus, ADCA I, ADCA II or autosomal recessive LOCA. We have used visual (VEP), brainstem auditory (BAEP) and somatosensory (SEP) evoked potentials in order to establish their diagnostic validity. Cerebellar-plus syndrome and "pure" cerebellar syndrome showed overlapping VEP, BAEP and SEP abnormalities. VEP P100 latency, however, shows a certain ability to differentiate between the two groups (p = 0.08) and appears useful in distinguishing between sporadic cerebellar-plus syndromes (MSA or ILOCA-plus) and "pure" cerebellar syndromes (p < 0.02). The incidence of prolonged N9-N13 latency was significantly higher in the latter subgroup (p < 0.04) as well. Within cerebellar-plus syndromes, VEP, BAEP and SEP abnormalities were more frequent in inherited cases (ADCA I and II, along with autosomal recessive LOCA) than in sporadic ones. The most apparent differences were a higher incidence of abnormal BAEPs at brainstem level (p < 0.002), and of both peripheral and possible central SEP impairment in hereditary cerebellar-plus syndrome than in sporadic cerebellar-plus syndrome (p < 0.03). EP investigation is useful to a certain extent in differentiating between some variants of LOCA. PMID:7576727

  20. GDNF-induced cerebellar toxicity: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Luz, Matthias; Mohr, Erich; Fibiger, H Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant-methionyl human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is known for its neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects in rodent and primate models of Parkinson's disease (PD). When administered locally into the putamen of Parkinsonian subjects, early clinical studies showed its potential promise as a disease-modifying agent. However, the development of GDNF for the treatment of PD has been significantly clouded by findings of cerebellar toxicity after continuous intraputamenal high-dose administration in a 6-month treatment/3-month recovery toxicology study in rhesus monkeys. Specifically, multifocal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss affecting 1-21% of the cerebellar cortex was observed in 4 of 15 (26.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.5-52.4%) animals treated at the highest dose level tested (3000?g/month). No cerebellar toxicity was observed at lower doses (450 and 900?g/month) in the same study, or at similar or higher doses (up to 10,000?g/month) in subchronic or chronic toxicology studies testing intermittent intracerebroventricular administration. While seemingly associated with the use of GDNF, the pathogenesis of the cerebellar lesions has not been fully understood to date. This review integrates available information to evaluate potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a consolidated assessment of the findings. While other explanations are considered, the existing evidence is most consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of GDNF into cerebrospinal fluid during chronic infusions into the putamen down-regulates GDNF receptors on Purkinje cells, and that subsequent acute withdrawal of GDNF generates the observed lesions. The implications of these findings for clinical studies with GDNF are discussed. PMID:26535469

  1. Sun1 deficiency leads to cerebellar ataxia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-Ya; Yu, I.-Shing; Huang, Chien-Chi; Chen, Chia-Yen; Wang, Wan-Ping; Lin, Shu-Wha; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Chi, Ya-Hui

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Migration and organization of the nucleus are essential for the proliferation and differentiation of cells, including neurons. However, the relationship between the positioning of the nucleus and cellular morphogenesis remains poorly understood. Inherited recessive cerebellar ataxia has been attributed to mutations in SYNE1, a component of the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Regardless, Syne1-mutant mice present with normal cerebellar development. The Sad1-Unc-84 homology (SUN)-domain proteins are located at the inner nuclear membrane and recruit Syne proteins through the KASH domain to the outer nuclear membrane. Here, we report an unrecognized contribution of Sun1 and Sun2 to the postnatal development of murine cerebellum. Mice depleted of Sun1 showed a marked reduction in the cerebellar volume, and this phenotype is exacerbated with additional loss of a Sun2 allele. Consistent with these histological changes, Sun1?/? and Sun1?/?Sun2+/? mice exhibited defective motor coordination. Results of immunohistochemical analyses suggested that Sun1 is highly expressed in Purkinje cells and recruits Syne2 to the periphery of the nucleus. Approximately 33% of Purkinje cells in Sun1?/? mice and 66% of Purkinje cells in Sun1?/?Sun2+/? mice were absent from the surface of the internal granule layer (IGL), whereas the proliferation and migration of granule neurons were unaffected. Furthermore, the Sun1?/?Sun2+/? Purkinje cells exhibited retarded primary dendrite specification, reduced dendritic complexity and aberrant patterning of synapses. Our findings reveal a cell-type-specific role for Sun1 and Sun2 in nucleokinesis during cerebellar development, and we propose the use of Sun-deficient mice as a model for studying cerebellar ataxia that is associated with mutation of human SYNE genes or loss of Purkinje cells. PMID:26035387

  2. Automated MRI cerebellar size measurements using active appearance modeling.

    PubMed

    Price, Mathew; Cardenas, Valerie A; Fein, George

    2014-12-01

    Although the human cerebellum has been increasingly identified as an important hub that shows potential for helping in the diagnosis of a large spectrum of disorders, such as alcoholism, autism, and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, the high costs associated with manual segmentation, and low availability of reliable automated cerebellar segmentation tools, has resulted in a limited focus on cerebellar measurement in human neuroimaging studies. We present here the CATK (Cerebellar Analysis Toolkit), which is based on the Bayesian framework implemented in FMRIB's FIRST. This approach involves training Active Appearance Models (AAMs) using hand-delineated examples. CATK can currently delineate the cerebellar hemispheres and three vermal groups (lobules I-V, VI-VII, and VIII-X). Linear registration with the low-resolution MNI152 template is used to provide initial alignment, and Point Distribution Models (PDM) are parameterized using stellar sampling. The Bayesian approach models the relationship between shape and texture through computation of conditionals in the training set. Our method varies from the FIRST framework in that initial fitting is driven by 1D intensity profile matching, and the conditional likelihood function is subsequently used to refine fitting. The method was developed using T1-weighted images from 63 subjects that were imaged and manually labeled: 43 subjects were scanned once and were used for training models, and 20 subjects were imaged twice (with manual labeling applied to both runs) and used to assess reliability and validity. Intraclass correlation analysis shows that CATK is highly reliable (average test-retest ICCs of 0.96), and offers excellent agreement with the gold standard (average validity ICC of 0.87 against manual labels). Comparisons against an alternative atlas-based approach, SUIT (Spatially Unbiased Infratentorial Template), that registers images with a high-resolution template of the cerebellum, show that our AAM approach offers superior reliability and validity. Extensions of CATK to cerebellar hemisphere parcels are envisioned. PMID:25192657

  3. Patterns of regional cerebellar atrophy in genetic frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bocchetta, Martina; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Cash, David M.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Warren, Jason D.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder with a strong genetic component. The cerebellum has not traditionally been felt to be involved in FTD but recent research has suggested a potential role. Methods We investigated the volumetry of the cerebellum and its subregions in a cohort of 44 patients with genetic FTD (20 MAPT, 7 GRN, and 17 C9orf72 mutation carriers) compared with 18 cognitively normal controls. All groups were matched for age and gender. On volumetric T1-weighted magnetic resonance brain images we used an atlas propagation and label fusion strategy of the Diedrichsen cerebellar atlas to automatically extract subregions including the cerebellar lobules, the vermis and the deep nuclei. Results The global cerebellar volume was significantly smaller in C9orf72 carriers (mean (SD): 99989 (8939) mm3) compared with controls (108136 (7407) mm3). However, no significant differences were seen in the MAPT and GRN carriers compared with controls (104191 (6491) mm3 and 107883 (6205) mm3 respectively). Investigating the individual subregions, C9orf72 carriers had a significantly lower volume than controls in lobule VIIa-Crus I (15% smaller, p < 0.0005), whilst MAPT mutation carriers had a significantly lower vermal volume (10% smaller, p = 0.001) than controls. All cerebellar subregion volumes were preserved in GRN carriers compared with controls. Conclusion There appears to be a differential pattern of cerebellar atrophy in the major genetic forms of FTD, being relatively spared in GRN, localized to the lobule VIIa-Crus I in the superior-posterior region of the cerebellum in C9orf72, the area connected via the thalamus to the prefrontal cortex and involved in cognitive function, and localized to the vermis in MAPT, the ‘limbic cerebellum’ involved in emotional processing. PMID:26977398

  4. Automated MRI Cerebellar Size Measurements Using Active Appearance Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Price, Mathew; Cardenas, Valerie A.; Fein, George

    2014-01-01

    Although the human cerebellum has been increasingly identified as an important hub that shows potential for helping in the diagnosis of a large spectrum of disorders, such as alcoholism, autism, and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, the high costs associated with manual segmentation, and low availability of reliable automated cerebellar segmentation tools, has resulted in a limited focus on cerebellar measurement in human neuroimaging studies. We present here the CATK (Cerebellar Analysis Toolkit), which is based on the Bayesian framework implemented in FMRIBs FIRST. This approach involves training Active Appearance Models (AAM) using hand-delineated examples. CATK can currently delineate the cerebellar hemispheres and three vermal groups (lobules IV, VIVII, and VIIIX). Linear registration with the low-resolution MNI152 template is used to provide initial alignment, and Point Distribution Models (PDM) are parameterized using stellar sampling. The Bayesian approach models the relationship between shape and texture through computation of conditionals in the training set. Our method varies from the FIRST framework in that initial fitting is driven by 1D intensity profile matching, and the conditional likelihood function is subsequently used to refine fitting. The method was developed using T1-weighted images from 63 subjects that were imaged and manually labeled: 43 subjects were scanned once and were used for training models, and 20 subjects were imaged twice (with manual labeling applied to both runs) and used to assess reliability and validity. Intraclass correlation analysis shows that CATK is highly reliable (average test-retest ICCs of 0.96), and offers excellent agreement with the gold standard (average validity ICC of 0.87 against manual labels). Comparisons against an alternative atlas-based approach, SUIT (Spatially Unbiased Infratentorial Template), that registers images with a high-resolution template of the cerebellum, show that our AAM approach offers superior reliability and validity. Extensions of CATK to cerebellar hemisphere parcels is envisioned. PMID:25192657

  5. Adaptive filters and internal models: multilevel description of cerebellar function.

    PubMed

    Porrill, John; Dean, Paul; Anderson, Sean R

    2013-11-01

    Cerebellar function is increasingly discussed in terms of engineering schemes for motor control and signal processing that involve internal models. To address the relation between the cerebellum and internal models, we adopt the chip metaphor that has been used to represent the combination of a homogeneous cerebellar cortical microcircuit with individual microzones having unique external connections. This metaphor indicates that identifying the function of a particular cerebellar chip requires knowledge of both the general microcircuit algorithm and the chip's individual connections. Here we use a popular candidate algorithm as embodied in the adaptive filter, which learns to decorrelate its inputs from a reference ('teaching', 'error') signal. This algorithm is computationally powerful enough to be used in a very wide variety of engineering applications. However, the crucial issue is whether the external connectivity required by such applications can be implemented biologically. We argue that some applications appear to be in principle biologically implausible: these include the Smith predictor and Kalman filter (for state estimation), and the feedback-error-learning scheme for adaptive inverse control. However, even for plausible schemes, such as forward models for noise cancellation and novelty-detection, and the recurrent architecture for adaptive inverse control, there is unlikely to be a simple mapping between microzone function and internal model structure. This initial analysis suggests that cerebellar involvement in particular behaviours is therefore unlikely to have a neat classification into categories such as 'forward model'. It is more likely that cerebellar microzones learn a task-specific adaptive-filter operation which combines a number of signal-processing roles. PMID:23391782

  6. Adaptive Robotic Control Driven by a Versatile Spiking Cerebellar Network

    PubMed Central

    Casellato, Claudia; Antonietti, Alberto; Garrido, Jesus A.; Carrillo, Richard R.; Luque, Niceto R.; Ros, Eduardo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in a large number of different neural processes, especially in associative learning and in fine motor control. To develop a comprehensive theory of sensorimotor learning and control, it is crucial to determine the neural basis of coding and plasticity embedded into the cerebellar neural circuit and how they are translated into behavioral outcomes in learning paradigms. Learning has to be inferred from the interaction of an embodied system with its real environment, and the same cerebellar principles derived from cell physiology have to be able to drive a variety of tasks of different nature, calling for complex timing and movement patterns. We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN) with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. Encoding and decoding strategies based on neuronal firing rates were applied. Adaptive motor control protocols with acquisition and extinction phases have been designed and tested, including an associative Pavlovian task (Eye blinking classical conditioning), a vestibulo-ocular task and a perturbed arm reaching task operating in closed-loop. The SNN processed in real-time mossy fiber inputs as arbitrary contextual signals, irrespective of whether they conveyed a tone, a vestibular stimulus or the position of a limb. A bidirectional long-term plasticity rule implemented at parallel fibers-Purkinje cell synapses modulated the output activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. In all tasks, the neurorobot learned to adjust timing and gain of the motor responses by tuning its output discharge. It succeeded in reproducing how human biological systems acquire, extinguish and express knowledge of a noisy and changing world. By varying stimuli and perturbations patterns, real-time control robustness and generalizability were validated. The implicit spiking dynamics of the cerebellar model fulfill timing, prediction and learning functions. PMID:25390365

  7. Cerebellar damage diminishes long-latency responses to multijoint perturbations.

    PubMed

    Kurtzer, Isaac; Trautman, Paxson; Rasquinha, Russell J; Bhanpuri, Nasir H; Scott, Stephen H; Bastian, Amy J

    2013-04-01

    Damage to the cerebellum can cause significant problems in the coordination of voluntary arm movements. One prominent idea is that incoordination stems from an inability to predictively account for the complex mechanical interactions between the arm's several joints. Motivated by growing evidence that corrective feedback control shares important capabilities and neural substrates with feedforward control, we asked whether cerebellar damage impacts feedback stabilization of the multijoint arm appropriate for the arm's intersegmental dynamics. Specifically, we tested whether cerebellar dysfunction impacts the ability of posterior deltoid to incorporate elbow motion in its long-latency response (R2 = 45-75 ms and R3 = 75-100 ms after perturbation) to an unexpected torque perturbation. Healthy and cerebellar-damaged subjects were exposed to a selected pattern of shoulder-elbow displacements to probe the response pattern from this shoulder extensor muscle. The healthy elderly subjects expressed a long-latency response linked to both shoulder and elbow motion, including an increase/decrease in shoulder extensor activity with elbow flexion/extension. Critically, cerebellar-damaged subjects displayed the normal pattern of activity in the R3 period indicating an intact ability to rapidly integrate multijoint motion appropriate to the arm's intersegmental dynamics. However, cerebellar-damaged subjects had a lower magnitude of activity that was specific to the long-latency period (both R2 and R3) and a slightly delayed onset of multijoint sensitivity. Taken together, our results suggest that the basic motor pattern of the long-latency response is housed outside the cerebellum and is scaled by processes within the cerebellum. PMID:23390311

  8. Physiological and morphological development of the rat cerebellar Purkinje cell

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Bruce E; Turner, Ray W

    2005-01-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells integrate multimodal afferent inputs and, as the only projection neurones of the cerebellar cortex, are key to the coordination of a variety of motor- and learning-related behaviours. In the neonatal rat the cerebellum is undeveloped, but over the first few postnatal weeks both the structure of the cerebellum and cerebellar-dependent behaviours mature rapidly. Maturation of Purkinje cell physiology is expected to contribute significantly to the development of cerebellar output. However, the ontogeny of the electrophysiological properties of the Purkinje cell and its relationship to maturation of cell morphology is incompletely understood. To address this problem we performed a detailed in vitro electrophysiological analysis of the spontaneous and intracellularly evoked intrinsic properties of Purkinje cells obtained from postnatal rats (P0 to P90) using whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Cells were filled with neurobiotin to enable subsequent morphological comparisons. Three stages of physiological and structural development were identified. During the early postnatal period (P0 to ?P9) Purkinje cells were characterized by an immature pattern of Na+-spike discharge, and possessed only short multipolar dendrites. This was followed by a period of rapid maturation (from ?P12 to ?P18), consisting of changes in Na+-spike discharge, emergence of repetitive bursts of Na+ spikes terminated by Ca2+ spikes (Ca2+Na+ bursts), generation of the trimodal pattern, and a significant expansion of the dendritic tree. During the final stage (> P18 to P90) there were minor refinements of cell output and a plateau in dendritic area. Our results reveal a rapid transition of the Purkinje cell from morphological and physiological immaturity to adult characteristics over a short developmental window, with a close correspondence between changes in cell output and dendritic growth. The development of Purkinje cell intrinsic electrophysiological properties further matches the time course of other measures of cerebellar structural and functional maturation. PMID:16002452

  9. Adaptive robotic control driven by a versatile spiking cerebellar network.

    PubMed

    Casellato, Claudia; Antonietti, Alberto; Garrido, Jesus A; Carrillo, Richard R; Luque, Niceto R; Ros, Eduardo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in a large number of different neural processes, especially in associative learning and in fine motor control. To develop a comprehensive theory of sensorimotor learning and control, it is crucial to determine the neural basis of coding and plasticity embedded into the cerebellar neural circuit and how they are translated into behavioral outcomes in learning paradigms. Learning has to be inferred from the interaction of an embodied system with its real environment, and the same cerebellar principles derived from cell physiology have to be able to drive a variety of tasks of different nature, calling for complex timing and movement patterns. We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN) with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. Encoding and decoding strategies based on neuronal firing rates were applied. Adaptive motor control protocols with acquisition and extinction phases have been designed and tested, including an associative Pavlovian task (Eye blinking classical conditioning), a vestibulo-ocular task and a perturbed arm reaching task operating in closed-loop. The SNN processed in real-time mossy fiber inputs as arbitrary contextual signals, irrespective of whether they conveyed a tone, a vestibular stimulus or the position of a limb. A bidirectional long-term plasticity rule implemented at parallel fibers-Purkinje cell synapses modulated the output activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. In all tasks, the neurorobot learned to adjust timing and gain of the motor responses by tuning its output discharge. It succeeded in reproducing how human biological systems acquire, extinguish and express knowledge of a noisy and changing world. By varying stimuli and perturbations patterns, real-time control robustness and generalizability were validated. The implicit spiking dynamics of the cerebellar model fulfill timing, prediction and learning functions. PMID:25390365

  10. Long lasting cerebellar alterations after perinatal asphyxia in rats.

    PubMed

    Campanille, Vernica; Saraceno, G Ezequiel; Rivire, Stphanie; Logica, Tamara; Klliker, Rodolfo; Capani, Francisco; Castilla, Roco

    2015-07-01

    The developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to injury before, at and after birth. Among possible insults, hypoxia suffered as a consequence of perinatal asphyxia (PA) exhibits the highest incidence levels and the cerebellar circuitry appears to be particularly susceptible, as the cellular makeup and the quantity of inputs change quickly during days and weeks following birth. In this work, we have used a murine model to induce severe global PA in rats at the time of birth. Short-term cerebellar alterations within this PA model have been previously reported but whether such alterations remain in adulthood has not been conclusively determined yet. For this reason, and given the crucial cerebellar role in determining connectivity patterns in the brain, the aim of our work is to unveil long-term cerebellum histomorphology following a PA insult. Morphological and cytological neuronal changes and glial reaction in the cerebellar cortex were analyzed at postnatal 120 (P120) following injury performed at birth. As compared to control, PA animals exhibited: (1) an increase in molecular and granular thickness, both presenting lower cellular density; (2) a disarrayed Purkinje cell layer presenting a higher number of anomalous calbindin-stained cells. (3) focal swelling and marked fragmentation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) in Purkinje cell dendrites and, (4) an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in Bergmann cells and the granular layer. In conclusion, we demonstrate that PA produces long-term damage in cellular histomorphology in rat cerebellar cortex which could be involved in the pathogenesis of cognitive deficits observed in both animals and humans. PMID:26116983

  11. Cerebellar Purkinje cell p75 neurotrophin receptor and autistic behavior.

    PubMed

    Lotta, L T; Conrad, K; Cory-Slechta, D; Schor, N F

    2014-01-01

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is normally expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells throughout the lifespan. Children with autism spectrum behavior exhibit apparent cerebellar Purkinje cell loss. Cerebellar transcriptome changes seen in the murine prenatal valproate exposure model of autism include all of the proteins known to constitute the p75NTR interactome. p75NTR is a modulator of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox potential, and others have suggested that aberrant response to oxidant stress has a major role in the pathogenesis of autism. We have created Purkinje cell-selective p75NTR knockout mice that are the progeny of hemizygous Cre-Purkinje cell protein 2 C57Bl mice and p75NTR floxed C57Bl mice. These Cre-loxP mice exhibit complete knockout of p75NTR in ~50% of the cerebellar Purkinje cells. Relative to Cre-only mice and wild-type C57Bl mice, this results in a behavioral phenotype characterized by less allogrooming of (P<0.05; one-way analysis of variance) and socialization or fighting with (each P<0.05) other mice; less (1.2-fold) non-ambulatory exploration of their environment than wild-type (P<0.01) or Cre only (P<0.01) mice; and almost twofold more stereotyped jumping behavior than wild-type (P<0.05) or Cre (P<0.02) mice of the same strain. Wild-type mice have more complex dendritic arborization than Cre-loxP mice, with more neurites per unit area (P<0.025, Student's t-test), more perpendicular branches per unit area (P<0.025) and more short branches/long neurite (P<0.0005). Aberrant developmental regulation of expression of p75NTR in cerebellar Purkinje cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of autism. PMID:25072321

  12. Description of the computations and pilot procedures for planning fuel-conservative descents with a small programmable calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, D. D.; Knox, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A simplified flight management descent algorithm was developed and programmed on a small programmable calculator. It was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The algorithm may also be used for planning fuel conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard temperature effects. The flight management descent algorithm and the vertical performance modeling required for the DC-10 airplane is described.

  13. Description of the computations and pilot procedures for planning fuel-conservative descents with a small programmable calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Vicroy, D.D.; Knox, C.E.

    1983-05-01

    A simplified flight management descent algorithm was developed and programmed on a small programmable calculator. It was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The algorithm may also be used for planning fuel conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard temperature effects. The flight management descent algorithm and the vertical performance modeling required for the DC-10 airplane is described.

  14. Development of a Mars Airplane Entry, Descent, and Flight Trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James E.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    2001-01-01

    An entry, descent, and flight (EDF) trajectory profile for a Mars airplane mission is defined as consisting of the following elements: ballistic entry of an aeroshell; supersonic deployment of a decelerator parachute; subsonic release of a heat shield; release, unfolding, and orientation of an airplane to flight attitude; and execution of a pull up maneuver to achieve trimmed, horizontal flight. Using the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) a trajectory optimization problem was formulated. Model data representative of a specific Mars airplane configuration, current models of the Mars surface topography and atmosphere, and current estimates of the interplanetary trajectory, were incorporated into the analysis. The goal is to develop an EDF trajectory to maximize the surface-relative altitude of the airplane at the end of a pull up maneuver, while subject to the mission design constraints. The trajectory performance was evaluated for three potential mission sites and was found to be site-sensitive. The trajectory performance, examined for sensitivity to a number of design and constraint variables, was found to be most sensitive to airplane mass, aerodynamic performance characteristics, and the pull up Mach constraint. Based on the results of this sensitivity study, an airplane-drag optimized trajectory was developed that showed a significant performance improvement.

  15. Race, language, and mental evolution in Darwin's descent of man.

    PubMed

    Alter, Stephen G

    2007-01-01

    Charles Darwin was notoriously ambiguous in his remarks about the relationship between human evolution and biological race. He stressed the original unity of the races, yet he also helped to popularize the notion of a racial hierarchy filling the gaps between the highest anthropoids and civilized Europeans. A focus on Darwin's explanation of how humans initially evolved, however, shows that he mainly stressed not hierarchy but a version of humanity's original mental unity. In his book The Descent of Man, Darwin emphasized a substantial degree of mental development (including the incipient use of language) in the early, monogenetic phase of human evolution. This development, he argued, necessarily came before primeval man's numerical increase, geographic dispersion, and racial diversification, because only thus could one explain how that group was able to spread at the expense of rival ape-like populations. This scenario stood opposed to a new evolutionary polygenism formulated in the wake of Darwin's Origin of Species by his ostensible supporters Alfred Russel Wallace and Ernst Haeckel. Darwin judged this outlook inadequate to the task of explaining humanity's emergence. PMID:17623873

  16. Minimum Landing Error Powered-Descent Guidance for Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars; Acikmese, Behcet

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm improves the accuracy with which a lander can be delivered to the surface of Mars. The main idea behind this innovation is the use of a lossless convexification, which converts an otherwise non-convex constraint related to thruster throttling to a convex constraint, enabling convex optimization to be used. The convexification leads directly to an algorithm that guarantees finding the global optimum of the original nonconvex optimization problem with a deterministic upper bound on the number of iterations required for convergence. In this innovation, previous work in powered-descent guidance using convex optimization is extended to handle the case where the lander must get as close as possible to the target given the available fuel, but is not required to arrive exactly at the target. The new algorithm calculates the minimum-fuel trajectory to the target, if one exists, and calculates the trajectory that minimizes the distance to the target if no solution to the target exists. This approach poses the problem as two Second-Order Cone Programs, which can be solved to global optimality with deterministic bounds on the number of iterations required.

  17. STS-40 descent BET products: Development and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, Kevin F.; Wood, James S.; Findlay, John T.

    1991-01-01

    Descent Best Estimate Trajectory (BET) Data were generated for the final Orbiter Experiments Flight, STS-40. This report discusses the actual development of these post-flight products: the inertial BET, the Extended BET, and the Aerodynamic BET. Summary results are also included. The inertial BET was determined based on processing Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRSS) coherent Doppler data in conjunction with observations from eleven C-band stations, to include data from the Kwajalein Atoll and the usual California coastal radars, as well as data from five cinetheodolite cameras in the vicinity of the runways at EAFB. The anchor epoch utilized for the trajectory reconstruction was 53,904 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) seconds which corresponds to an altitude at epoch of approximately 708 kft. Atmospheric data to enable development of an Extended BET for this mission were upsurped from the JSC operational post-flight BET. These data were evaluated based on Space Shuttle-derived considerations as well as model comparisons. The Aerodynamic BET includes configuration information, final mass properties, and both flight-determined and predicted aerodynamic performance estimates. The predicted data were based on the final pre-operational databook, updated to include flight determined incrementals based on an earlier ensemble of flights. Aerodynamic performance comparisons are presented and correlated versus statistical results based on twenty-two previous missions.

  18. Preliminary Study of a Model Rotor in Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlister, K. W.; Tung, C.; Sharpe, D. L.; Huang, S.; Hendley, E. M.

    2000-01-01

    Within a program designed to develop experimental techniques for measuring the trajectory and structure of vortices trailing from the tips of rotor blades, the present preliminary study focuses on a method for quantifying the trajectory of the trailing vortex during descent flight conditions. This study also presents rotor loads and blade surface pressures for a range of tip-path plane angles and Mach numbers. Blade pressures near the leading edge and along the outer radius are compared with data obtained on the same model rotor, but in open jet facilities. A triangulation procedure based on two directable laser-light sheets, each containing an embedded reference, proved effective in defining the spatial coordinates of the trailing vortex. When interrogating a cross section of the flow that contains several trailing vortices, the greatest clarity was found to result when the flow is uniformly seeded. Surface pressure responses during blade-vortex interactions appeared equally sensitive near the leading edge and along the outer portion of the blade, but diminished rapidly as the distance along the blade chord increased. The pressure response was virtually independent of whether the tip-path plane angle was obtained through shaft tilt or cyclic pitch. Although the shape and frequency of the pressure perturbations on the advancing blade during blade-vortex interaction are similar to those obtained in open-jet facilities, the angle of the tip-path plane may need to be lower than the range covered in this study.

  19. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam D.; Burkhart, P. Dan; Chen, Allen; Comeaux, Keith A.; Guernsey, Carl S.; Kipp, Devin M.; Lorenzoni, Leila V.; Mendeck, Gavin F.; Powell, Richard W.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Sell, Steven W.; Prakash, Ravi; Way, David W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. In addition to landing more mass than prior missions to Mars, MSL will offer access to regions of Mars that have been previously unreachable. The MSL EDL sequence is a result of a more stringent requirement set than any of its predecessors. Notable among these requirements is landing a 900 kg rover in a landing ellipse much smaller than that of any previous Mars lander. In meeting these requirements, MSL is extending the limits of the EDL technologies qualified by the Mars Viking, Mars Pathfinder, and Mars Exploration Rover missions. Thus, there are many design challenges that must be solved for the mission to be successful. Several pieces of the EDL design are technological firsts, such as guided entry and precision landing on another planet, as well as the entire Sky Crane maneuver. This paper discusses the MSL EDL architecture and discusses some of the challenges faced in delivering an unprecedented rover payload to the surface of Mars.

  20. Beaconless stochastic parallel gradient descent laser beam control: numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Piatrou, Piotr; Roggemann, Michael

    2007-09-20

    We apply a target-in-the-loop strategy to the case of adaptive optics beam control in the presence of strong atmospheric turbulence for air-to-ground directed energy laser applications. Using numerical simulations we show that in the absence of a cooperative beacon to probe the atmosphere it is possible to extract information suitable for effective beam control from images of the speckled and strongly turbulence degraded intensity distribution of the laser energy at the target. We use a closed-loop, single-deformable-mirror adaptive optics system driven by a target-in-the-loop stochastic parallel gradient descent optimization algorithm minimizing a mean-radius performance metric defined on the image of the laser beam intensity distribution formed at the receiver. We show that a relatively low order 25-channel zonal adaptive optical beam control system controlled in this way is capable of achieving a high degree of turbulence compensation with respect to energy concentration if the tilt can be corrected separately. PMID:17882306

  1. Physics-based Entry, Descent and Landing Risk Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Huynh, Loc C.; Manning, Ted

    2014-01-01

    A physics-based risk model was developed to assess the risk associated with thermal protection system failures during the entry, descent and landing phase of a manned spacecraft mission. In the model, entry trajectories were computed using a three-degree-of-freedom trajectory tool, the aerothermodynamic heating environment was computed using an engineering-level computational tool and the thermal response of the TPS material was modeled using a one-dimensional thermal response tool. The model was capable of modeling the effect of micrometeoroid and orbital debris impact damage on the TPS thermal response. A Monte Carlo analysis was used to determine the effects of uncertainties in the vehicle state at Entry Interface, aerothermodynamic heating and material properties on the performance of the TPS design. The failure criterion was set as a temperature limit at the bondline between the TPS and the underlying structure. Both direct computation and response surface approaches were used to compute the risk. The model was applied to a generic manned space capsule design. The effect of material property uncertainty and MMOD damage on risk of failure were analyzed. A comparison of the direct computation and response surface approach was undertaken.

  2. Orion Entry, Descent, and Landing Performance and Mission Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broome, Joel M.; Johnson, Wyatt

    2007-01-01

    The Orion Vehicle is the next spacecraft to take humans into space and will include missions to ISS as well as missions to the Moon. As part of that challenge, the vehicle will have to accommodate multiple mission design concepts, since return from Low Earth Orbit and return from the Moon can be quite different. Commonality between the different missions as it relates to vehicle systems, guidance capability, and operations concepts is the goal. Several unique mission design concepts include the specification of multiple land-based landing sites for a vehicle with closed-loop direct and skip entry guidance, followed by a parachute descent and landing attenuation system. This includes the ability of the vehicle to accurately target and land at a designated landing site, including site location aspects, landing site size, and landing opportunities assessments. Analyses associated with these mission design and flight performance challenges and constraints will be discussed as well as potential operational concepts to provide feasibility and/or mission commonality.

  3. HLA Type Inference via Haplotypes Identical by Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Manu N.; Gusev, Alexander; Pe'Er, Itsik

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genes play a major role in adaptive immune response and are used to differentiate self antigens from non self ones. HLA genes are hyper variable with nearly every locus harboring over a dozen alleles. This variation plays an important role in susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases and needs to be matched on for organ transplantation. Unfortunately, HLA typing by serological methods is time consuming and expensive compared to high throughput Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data. We present a new computational method to infer per-locus HLA types using shared segments Identical By Descent (IBD), inferred from SNP genotype data. IBD information is modeled as graph where shared haplotypes are explored among clusters of individuals with known and unknown HLA types to identify the latter. We analyze performance of the method in a previously typed subset of the HapMap population, achieving accuracy of 96% in HLA-A, 94% in HLA-B, 95% in HLA-C, 77% in HLA-DR1, 93% in HLA-DQA1 and 90% in HLA-DQB1 genes. We compare our method to a tag SNP based approach and demonstrate higher sensitivity and specificity. Our method demonstrates the power of using shared haplotype segments for large-scale imputation at the HLA locus.

  4. Estimating Controller Intervention Probabilities for Optimized Profile Descent Arrivals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; Erzberger, Heinz; Huynh, Phu V.

    2011-01-01

    Simulations of arrival traffic at Dallas/Fort-Worth and Denver airports were conducted to evaluate incorporating scheduling and separation constraints into advisories that define continuous descent approaches. The goal was to reduce the number of controller interventions required to ensure flights maintain minimum separation distances of 5 nmi horizontally and 1000 ft vertically. It was shown that simply incorporating arrival meter fix crossing-time constraints into the advisory generation could eliminate over half of the all predicted separation violations and more than 80% of the predicted violations between two arrival flights. Predicted separation violations between arrivals and non-arrivals were 32% of all predicted separation violations at Denver and 41% at Dallas/Fort-Worth. A probabilistic analysis of meter fix crossing-time errors is included which shows that some controller interventions will still be required even when the predicted crossing-times of the advisories are set to add a 1 or 2 nmi buffer above the minimum in-trail separation of 5 nmi. The 2 nmi buffer was shown to increase average flight delays by up to 30 sec when compared to the 1 nmi buffer, but it only resulted in a maximum decrease in average arrival throughput of one flight per hour.

  5. Engineering description of the ascent/descent bet product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seacord, A. W., II

    1986-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent output product is produced in the OPIP routine from three files which constitute its input. One of these, OPIP.IN, contains mission specific parameters. Meteorological data, such as atmospheric wind velocities, temperatures, and density, are obtained from the second file, the Corrected Meteorological Data File (METDATA). The third file is the TRJATTDATA file which contains the time-tagged state vectors that combine trajectory information from the Best Estimate of Trajectory (BET) filter, LBRET5, and Best Estimate of Attitude (BEA) derived from IMU telemetry. Each term in the two output data files (BETDATA and the Navigation Block, or NAVBLK) are defined. The description of the BETDATA file includes an outline of the algorithm used to calculate each term. To facilitate describing the algorithms, a nomenclature is defined. The description of the nomenclature includes a definition of the coordinate systems used. The NAVBLK file contains navigation input parameters. Each term in NAVBLK is defined and its source is listed. The production of NAVBLK requires only two computational algorithms. These two algorithms, which compute the terms DELTA and RSUBO, are described. Finally, the distribution of data in the NAVBLK records is listed.

  6. Eigenanalysis of SNP data with an identity by descent interpretation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuwen; Weir, Bruce S

    2016-02-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is widely used in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and the principal component axes often represent perpendicular gradients in geographic space. The explanation of PCA results is of major interest for geneticists to understand fundamental demographic parameters. Here, we provide an interpretation of PCA based on relatedness measures, which are described by the probability that sets of genes are identical-by-descent (IBD). An approximately linear transformation between ancestral proportions (AP) of individuals with multiple ancestries and their projections onto the principal components is found. In addition, a new method of eigenanalysis "EIGMIX" is proposed to estimate individual ancestries. EIGMIX is a method of moments with computational efficiency suitable for millions of SNP data, and it is not subject to the assumption of linkage equilibrium. With the assumptions of multiple ancestries and their surrogate ancestral samples, EIGMIX is able to infer ancestral proportions (APs) of individuals. The methods were applied to the SNP data from the HapMap Phase 3 project and the Human Genome Diversity Panel. The APs of individuals inferred by EIGMIX are consistent with the findings of the program ADMIXTURE. In conclusion, EIGMIX can be used to detect population structure and estimate genome-wide ancestral proportions with a relatively high accuracy. PMID:26482676

  7. Aphasia and neglect are uncommon in cerebellar disease: negative findings in a prospective study in acute cerebellar stroke.

    PubMed

    Frank, Benedikt; Maschke, Matthias; Groetschel, Hanjo; Berner, Maike; Schoch, Beate; Hein-Kropp, Christoph; Gizewski, Elke Ruth; Ziegler, Wolfram; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Timmann, Dagmar

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine if the most frequent cognitive disorders after cortical damage with a well-known cerebral lateralization, namely aphasia, neglect and extinction, are present in an unselected series of continuously admitted patients with acute cerebellar stroke. Twenty-two adults with acute cerebellar stroke were compared with 22 age- and education-matched healthy control subjects. High-resolution magnetic resonance images showed infarctions of the left cerebellar hemisphere in 12 and of the right hemisphere in ten patients. Standard aphasia tests revealed no statistically significant difference comparing patients with right- and left-sided ischemia and controls, whereas patients with left-sided ischemia showed mild deficits in a verb generation task. Neglect and extinction tasks revealed no significant differences between groups. Our findings support previous observations in the literature that cerebellar patients frequently perform within the normal range in standard neuropsychological tests. This does not exclude, however, that abnormalities may be present in more sophisticated testing of language and visuospatial functions. PMID:20680538

  8. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS): A Novel Approach to Understanding Cerebellar Function in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J; Edwards, Dylan J; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar-motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar-thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions. PMID:25406224

  9. Aberrant cerebellar development of transgenic mice expressing dominant-negative thyroid hormone receptor in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lu; Iwasaki, Toshiharu; Xu, Ming; Lesmana, Ronny; Xiong, Yu; Shimokawa, Noriaki; Chin, William W; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2015-04-01

    To study the role of the thyroid hormone (TH) in cerebellar development, we generated transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative TH receptor (TR) in cerebellar Purkinje cells. A mutant human TRβ1 (G345R), which binds to the TH-response element but cannot bind to T3, was subcloned into exon 4 of the full-length L7/Pcp-2 gene, which is specifically expressed in Purkinje and retinal rod bipolar cells. The transgene was specifically expressed in Purkinje cells in the postnatal cerebellum. Purkinje cell dendrite arborization was significantly delayed in the transgenic mice. Surprisingly, granule cell migration was also significantly delayed. In the primary cerebellar culture, TH-induced Purkinje cell dendrite arborization was also suppressed. In quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis, the expression levels of several TH-responsive genes were altered. The expression levels of inositol trisphosphate receptor type 1 and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptorα mRNAs, which are mainly expressed in Purkinje cells, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA, which is expressed in both Purkinje and granule cells, were significantly decreased. The expression levels of neurotrophin-3 and hairless mRNAs, which are mainly expressed in granule cells, and myelin basic protein mRNA, which is mainly expressed in oligodendrocytes, were also decreased. The motor coordination of transgenic mice was significantly disrupted. These results indicate that TH action through its binding to TR in Purkinje cells is required for the normal cerebellar development. TH action through TR in Purkinje cells is also important for the development of other subsets of cerebellar cells such as granule cells and oligodendrocytes. PMID:25603044

  10. Timing Tasks Synchronize Cerebellar and Frontal Ramping Activity and Theta Oscillations: Implications for Cerebellar Stimulation in Diseases of Impaired Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Krystal L.

    2016-01-01

    Timing is a fundamental and highly conserved mammalian capability, yet the underlying neural mechanisms are widely debated. Ramping activity of single neurons that gradually increase or decrease activity to encode the passage of time has been speculated to predict a behaviorally relevant temporal event. Cue-evoked low-frequency activity has also been implicated in temporal processing. Ramping activity and low-frequency oscillations occur throughout the brain and could indicate a network-based approach to timing. Temporal processing requires cognitive mechanisms of working memory, attention, and reasoning, which are dysfunctional in neuropsychiatric disease. Therefore, timing tasks could be used to probe cognition in animals with disease phenotypes. The medial frontal cortex and cerebellum are involved in cognition. Cerebellar stimulation has been shown to influence medial frontal activity and improve cognition in schizophrenia. However, the mechanism underlying the efficacy of cerebellar stimulation is unknown. Here, we discuss how timing tasks can be used to probe cerebellar interactions with the frontal cortex and the therapeutic potential of cerebellar stimulation. The goal of this theory and hypothesis manuscript is threefold. First, we will summarize evidence indicating that in addition to motor learning, timing tasks involve cognitive processes that are present within both the cerebellum and medial frontal cortex. Second, we propose methodologies to investigate the connections between these areas in patients with Parkinson’s disease, autism, and schizophrenia. Lastly, we hypothesize that cerebellar transcranial stimulation may rescue medial frontal ramping activity, theta oscillations, and timing abnormalities, thereby restoring executive function in diseases of impaired cognition. This hypothesis could inspire the use of timing tasks as biomarkers for neuronal and cognitive abnormalities in neuropsychiatric disease and promote the therapeutic potential of the cerebellum in diseases of impaired cognition. PMID:26834650

  11. Challenges of Dealing With Atmospheres: Entry, Descent and Landing - Duration: 31 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Whether landing on Mars or returning to Earth, one of the most challenging parts of any mission is the entry, descent and landing. Just think -- a spacecraft hurtling through space at thousands of ...

  12. Descent graphs in pedigree analysis: applications to haplotyping, location scores, and marker-sharing statistics.

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, E.; Lange, K.

    1996-01-01

    The introduction of stochastic methods in pedigree analysis has enabled geneticists to tackle computations intractable by standard deterministic methods. Until now these stochastic techniques have worked by running a Markov chain on the set of genetic descent states of a pedigree. Each descent state specifies the paths of gene flow in the pedigree and the founder alleles dropped down each path. The current paper follows up on a suggestion by Elizabeth Thompson that genetic descent graphs offer a more appropriate space for executing a Markov chain. A descent graph specifies the paths of gene flow but not the particular founder alleles traveling down the paths. This paper explores algorithms for implementing Thompson's suggestion for codominant markers in the context of automatic haplotyping, estimating location scores, and computing gene-clustering statistics for robust linkage analysis. Realistic numerical examples demonstrate the feasibility of the algorithms. PMID:8651310

  13. A conflict analysis of 4D descent strategies in a metered, multiple-arrival route environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.; Harris, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    A conflict analysis was performed on multiple arrival traffic at a typical metered airport. The Flow Management Evaluation Model (FMEM) was used to simulate arrival operations using Denver Stapleton's arrival route structure. Sensitivities of conflict performance to three different 4-D descent strategies (clear-idle Mach/Constant AirSpeed (CAS), constant descent angle Mach/CAS and energy optimal) were examined for three traffic mixes represented by those found at Denver Stapleton, John F. Kennedy and typical en route metering (ERM) airports. The Monte Carlo technique was used to generate simulation entry point times. Analysis results indicate that the clean-idle descent strategy offers the best compromise in overall performance. Performance measures primarily include susceptibility to conflict and conflict severity. Fuel usage performance is extrapolated from previous descent strategy studies.

  14. Antarctic Polar Descent and Planetary Wave Activity Observed in ISAMS CO from April to July 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. R.; Stanford, J. L.; Nakamura, N.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Taylor, F. W.; Remedios, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Antarctic polar descent and planetary wave activity in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere are observed in ISAMS CO data from April to July 1992. CO-derived mean April-to-May upper stratosphere descent rates of 15 K/day (0.25 km/day) at 60 S and 20 K/day (0.33 km/day) at 80 S are compared with descent rates from diabatic trajectory analyses. At 60 S there is excellent agreement, while at 80 S the trajectory-derived descent is significantly larger in early April. Zonal wavenumber 1 enhancement of CO is observed on 9 and 28 May, coincident with enhanced wave 1 in UKMO geopotential height. The 9 May event extends from 40 to 70 km and shows westward phase tilt with height, while the 28 May event extends from 40 to 50 km and shows virtually no phase tilt with height.

  15. Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) Technology Investments Within NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, M. M.

    2014-06-01

    NASAs Space Technology Mission Directorate has several investments in entry, descent and landing technologies, across its nine programs. This presentation will give a top-level view of the various investments.

  16. User's manual for a fuel-conservative descent planning algorithm implemented on a small programmable calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified flight management descent algorithm was developed and programmed on a small programmable calculator. It was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The algorithm may also be used for planning fuel conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard temperature effects. An explanation and examples of how the algorithm is used, as well as a detailed flow chart and listing of the algorithm are contained.

  17. Apollo 15 mission report, supplement 4: Descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.; Wood, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of a postflight analysis of the LM-10 Descent Propulsion System (DPS) during the Apollo 15 Mission are reported. The analysis determined the steady state performance of the DPS during the descent phase of the manned lunar landing. Flight measurement discrepancies are discussed. Simulated throttle performance results are cited along with overall performance results. Evaluations of the propellant quantity gaging system, propellant loading, pressurization system, and engine are reported. Graphic illustrations of the evaluations are included.

  18. Analysis of Flight Management System Predictions of Idle-Thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel

    2010-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the predictor and its uncertainty models, descents from cruise to the meter fix were executed using vertical navigation in a B737-700 simulator and a B777-200 simulator, both with commercial FMSs. For both aircraft types, the FMS computed the intended descent path for a specified speed profile assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and then it controlled the avionics without human intervention. The test matrix varied aircraft weight, descent speed, and wind conditions. The first analysis in this paper determined the effect of the test matrix parameters on the FMS computation of TOD location, and it compared the results to those for the current ground predictor in the Efficient Descent Advisor (EDA). The second analysis was similar but considered the time to fly a specified distance to the meter fix. The effects of the test matrix variables together with the accuracy requirements for the predictor will determine the allowable error for the predictor inputs. For the B737, the EDA prediction of meter fix crossing time agreed well with the FMS; but its prediction of TOD location probably was not sufficiently accurate to enable idle-thrust descents in congested airspace, even though the FMS and EDA gave similar shapes for TOD location as a function of the test matrix variables. For the B777, the FMS and EDA gave different shapes for the TOD location function, and the EDA prediction of the TOD location is not accurate enough to fully enable the concept. Furthermore, the differences between the FMS and EDA predictions of meter fix crossing time for the B777 indicated that at least one of them was not sufficiently accurate.

  19. The Huygens Probe Descent Trajectory Working Group: Organizational framework, goals, and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David H.; Kazeminejad, Bobby; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Witasse, Olivier; Prez-Aycar, Miguel; Matson, Dennis L.

    2007-11-01

    Cassini/Huygens, a flagship mission to explore the rings, atmosphere, magnetic field, and moons that make up the Saturn system, is a joint endeavor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the European Space Agency, and Agenzia Spaziale Italiana. Comprising two spacecraft - a Saturn orbiter built by NASA and a Titan entry/descent probe built by the European Space Agency - Cassini/Huygens was launched in October 1997. The Huygens probe parachuted to the surface of Titan in January 2005. During the descent, six science instruments provided in situ measurements of Titan's atmosphere, clouds, and winds, and photographed Titan's surface. To correctly interpret and correlate results from the probe science experiments, and to provide a reference set of data for ground-truth calibration of orbiter remote sensing measurements, an accurate reconstruction of the probe entry and descent trajectory and surface landing location is necessary. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group was chartered in 1996 as a subgroup of the Huygens Science Working Team to develop and implement an organizational framework and retrieval methodologies for the probe descent trajectory reconstruction from the entry altitude of 1270 km to the surface using navigation data, and engineering and science data acquired by the instruments on the Huygens Probe. This paper presents an overview of the Descent Trajectory Working Group, including the history, rationale, goals and objectives, organizational framework, rules and procedures, and implementation.

  20. Supervised descent method with low rank and sparsity constraints for robust face alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yubao; Hu, Bin; Deng, Jiankang; Li, Xing

    2015-03-01

    Supervised Descent Method (SDM) learns the descent directions of nonlinear least square objective in a supervised manner, which has been efficiently used for face alignment. However, SDM still may fail in the cases of partial occlusions and serious pose variations. To deal with this issue, we present a new method for robust face alignment by utilizing the low rank prior of human face and enforcing sparse structure of the descent directions. Our approach consists of low rank face frontalization and sparse descent steps. Firstly, in terms of the low rank prior of face image, we recover such a low-rank face from its deformed image and the associated deformation despite significant distortion and corruption. Alignment of the recovered frontal face image is more simple and effective. Then, we propose a sparsity regularized supervised descent model by enforcing the sparse structure of the descent directions under the l1constraint, which makes the model more effective in computation and robust to partial occlusion. Extensive results on several benchmarks demonstrate that the proposed method is robust to facial occlusions and pose variations

  1. Atmospheric Environments for Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, Carl G.; Braun, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Scientific measurements of atmospheric properties have been made by a wide variety of planetary flyby missions, orbiters, and landers. Although landers can make in-situ observations of near-surface atmospheric conditions (and can collect atmospheric data during their entry phase), the vast majority of data on planetary atmospheres has been collected by remote sensing techniques from flyby and orbiter spacecraft (and to some extent by Earth-based remote sensing). Many of these remote sensing observations (made over a variety of spectral ranges), consist of vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature as a function of atmospheric pressure level. While these measurements are of great interest to atmospheric scientists and modelers of planetary atmospheres, the primary interest for engineers designing entry descent and landing (EDL) systems is information about atmospheric density as a function of geometric altitude. Fortunately, as described in in this paper, it is possible to use a combination of the gas-law relation and the hydrostatic balance relation to convert temperature-versus-pressure, scientific observations into density-versus-altitude data for use in engineering applications. The following section provides a brief introduction to atmospheric thermodynamics, as well as constituents, and winds for EDL. It also gives methodology for using atmospheric information to do "back-of-the-envelope" calculations of various EDL aeroheating parameters, including peak deceleration rate ("g-load"), peak convective heat rate. and total heat load on EDL spacecraft thermal protection systems. Brief information is also provided about atmospheric variations and perturbations for EDL guidance and control issues, and atmospheric issues for EDL parachute systems. Subsequent sections give details of the atmospheric environments for five destinations for possible EDL missions: Venus. Earth. Mars, Saturn, and Titan. Specific atmospheric information is provided for these destinations, and example results are presented for the "back-of-the-envelope" calculations mentioned above.

  2. Analysis of atmospheric mesoscale models for entry, descent, and landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, D. M.; Schofield, J. T.; Michaels, T. I.; Rafkin, S. C. R.; Richardson, M. I.; Toigo, A. D.

    2003-11-01

    Each Mars Exploration Rover (MER) is sensitive to the Martian winds encountered near the surface during the entry, descent, and landing (EDL) process. These winds are strongly influenced by local (mesoscale) conditions. In the absence of suitable wind observations, wind fields predicted by Martian mesoscale atmospheric models have been analyzed to guide landing site selection. In order to encompass the available models and render them useful to the EDL engineering team, a series of statistical techniques was applied to the model results. These analyses cover the high-priority landing sites during the expected landing times (1200-1500 LT). The number of sites studied is limited by the computational and analysis cost of the mesoscale models. The statistical measures concentrate on the effective mean wind (the wind as seen by the landing system) and on the vertical structure of the horizontal winds. Both aspects are potentially hazardous to the MER landing system. In addition, a number of individual wind profiles from the mesoscale model were processed into a form that can be used directly by the EDL Monte Carlo simulations. The statistical analysis indicates that the Meridiani Planum and Elysium landing sites are probably safe. The Gusev Crater and Isidis Basin sites may be safe, but further analysis by the EDL engineers will be necessary to quantify the actual risk. Finally, the winds at the Melas Chasma landing site (and presumably other Valles Marineris landing sites) are dangerous. While the statistical parameters selected for these studies were primarily of engineering and safety interest, the techniques are potentially useful for more general scientific analyses. One interesting result of the current analysis is that the depth of the convective boundary layer (and thus the resulting energy density) appears to be primarily driven by the existence of a well-organized mesoscale (or regional) circulation, primarily driven by large-scale topographic features at Mars.

  3. Optimal sliding guidance algorithm for Mars powered descent phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibben, Daniel R.; Furfaro, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Landing on large planetary bodies (e.g. Mars) with pinpoint accuracy presents a set of new challenges that must be addressed. One such challenge is the development of new guidance algorithms that exhibit a higher degree of robustness and flexibility. In this paper, the Zero-Effort-Miss/Zero-Effort-Velocity (ZEM/ZEV) optimal sliding guidance (OSG) scheme is applied to the Mars powered descent phase. This guidance algorithm has been specifically designed to combine techniques from both optimal and sliding control theories to generate an acceleration command based purely on the current estimated spacecraft state and desired final target state. Consequently, OSG yields closed-loop trajectories that do not need a reference trajectory. The guidance algorithm has its roots in the generalized ZEM/ZEV feedback guidance and its mathematical equations are naturally derived by defining a non-linear sliding surface as a function of the terms Zero-Effort-Miss and Zero-Effort-Velocity. With the addition of the sliding mode and using Lyapunov theory for non-autonomous systems, one can formally prove that the developed OSG law is globally finite-time stable to unknown but bounded perturbations. Here, the focus is on comparing the generalized ZEM/ZEV feedback guidance with the OSG law to explicitly demonstrate the benefits of the sliding mode augmentation. Results show that the sliding guidance provides a more robust solution in off-nominal scenarios while providing similar fuel consumption when compared to the non-sliding guidance command. Further, a Monte Carlo analysis is performed to examine the performance of the OSG law under perturbed conditions.

  4. Mars 2020 Entry, Descent and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Wright, Henry; White, Todd; Schoenenberger, Mark; Santos, Jose; Karlgaard, Chris; Kuhl, Chris; Oishi, TOmo; Trombetta, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    This paper will introduce Mars Entry Descent and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI2) on NASA's Mars2020 mission. Mars2020 is a flagship NASA mission with science and technology objectives to help answer questions about possibility of life on Mars as well as to demonstrate technologies for future human expedition. Mars2020 is scheduled for launch in 2020. MEDLI2 is a suite of instruments embedded in the heatshield and backshell thermal protection systems of Mars2020 entry vehicle. The objectives of MEDLI2 are to gather critical aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics and TPS performance data during EDL phase of the mission. MEDLI2 builds up the success of MEDLI flight instrumentation on Mars Science Laboratory mission in 2012. MEDLI instrumentation suite measured surface pressure and TPS temperature on the heatshield during MSL entry into Mars. MEDLI data has since been used for unprecedented reconstruction of aerodynamic drag, vehicle attitude, in-situ atmospheric density, aerothermal heating, transition to turbulence, in-depth TPS performance and TPS ablation. [1,2] In addition to validating predictive models, MEDLI data has highlighted extra margin available in the MSL forebody TPS, which can potentially be used to reduce vehicle parasitic mass. MEDLI2 expands the scope of instrumentation by focusing on quantities of interest not addressed in MEDLI suite. The type the sensors are expanded and their layout on the TPS modified to meet these new objectives. The paper will provide key motivation and governing requirements that drive the choice and the implementation of the new sensor suite. The implementation considerations of sensor selection, qualification, and demonstration of minimal risk to the host mission will be described. The additional challenges associated with mechanical accommodation, electrical impact, data storage and retrieval for MEDLI2 system, which extends sensors to backshell will also be described.

  5. Mars Exploration Rover Entry, Descent, and Landing: A Thermal Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuyuki, Glenn T.; Sunada, Eric T.; Novak, Keith S.; Kinsella, Gary M.; Phillip, Charles J.

    2005-01-01

    Perhaps the most challenging mission phase for the Mars Exploration Rovers was the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL). During this phase, the entry vehicle attached to its cruise stage was transformed into a stowed tetrahedral Lander that was surrounded by inflated airbags through a series of complex events. There was only one opportunity to successfully execute an automated command sequence without any possible ground intervention. The success of EDL was reliant upon the system thermal design: 1) to thermally condition EDL hardware from cruise storage temperatures to operating temperature ranges; 2) to maintain the Rover electronics within operating temperature ranges without the benefit of the cruise single phase cooling loop, which had been evacuated in preparation for EDL; and 3) to maintain the cruise stage propulsion components for the critical turn to entry attitude. Since the EDL architecture was inherited from Mars Pathfinder (MPF), the initial EDL thermal design would be inherited from MPF. However, hardware and implementation differences from MPF ultimately changed the MPF inheritance approach for the EDL thermal design. With the lack of full inheritance, the verification and validation of the EDL thermal design took on increased significance. This paper will summarize the verification and validation approach for the EDL thermal design along with applicable system level thermal testing results as well as appropriate thermal analyses. In addition, the lessons learned during the system-level testing will be discussed. Finally, the in-flight EDL experiences of both MER-A and -B missions (Spirit and Opportunity, respectively) will be presented, demonstrated how lessons learned from Spirit were applied to Opportunity.

  6. A psychometric study of chronic cerebellar stimulation in man.

    PubMed

    Riklan, M; Cullinan, T; Shulman, M; Cooper, I S

    1976-10-01

    Groups of patients with intractable epilepsy or spasticity of varying etiologies underwent psychological testing before and during chronic cerebellar cortex stimulation, a neurosurgical technique designed for the relief of these symptoms. The battery of psychological tests permitted a standardized assessment of intellectual, memory, and perceptual functions. Other behavioral dimensions were assessed through structured interviews. No apparent declines in higher integrative functions followed shorter or longer term cerebellar stimulation. In contrast, stimulated patients tended to show increments in tests of recent memory and verbal output beyond that of unoperated comparison groups. Subjective reports of increased "alertness" and reduced depression and anxiety were also frequently given. Psychological and neural factors may both contribute to the observed behavioral alterations. It was concluded that the cerebellum participates in behavioral functions by modifying cortical and subcortical mechanisms relevant to integrative behavior and emotions. Specific hypotheses were presented. PMID:786383

  7. Cerebellar networks with the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Bostan, Andreea C.; Dum, Richard P.; Strick, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    The dominant view of cerebellar function has been that it is exclusively concerned with motor control and coordination. Recent results from neuroanatomical, behavioral and imaging studies have profoundly changed this view. Neuroanatomical studies using virus transneuronal tracers have demonstrated that the output from the cerebellum reaches vast areas of the neocortex, including regions of prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex. Furthermore, it has recently become clear that the cerebellum is reciprocally connected with the basal ganglia, indicating that the two subcortical structures are part of a densely interconnected network. Altogether, these results provide the neuroanatomical substrate for cerebellar involvement in non-motor functions mediated by the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex, as well as in processes traditionally associated with the basal ganglia. PMID:23579055

  8. Short latency cerebellar modulation of the basal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Christopher H.; Fremont, Rachel; Arteaga-Bracho, Eduardo E.; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    The graceful, purposeful motion of our body is an engineering feat which remains unparalleled in robotic devices using advanced artificial intelligence. Much of the information required for complex movements is generated by the cerebellum and the basal ganglia in conjunction with the cortex. Cerebellum and basal ganglia have been thought to communicate with each other only through slow multi-synaptic cortical loops, begging the question as to how they coordinate their outputs in real time. Here we show in mice that the cerebellum rapidly modulates the activity of the striatum via a disynaptic pathway. Under physiological conditions this short latency pathway is capable of facilitating optimal motor control by allowing the basal ganglia to incorporate time-sensitive cerebellar information and by guiding the sign of cortico-striatal plasticity. Conversely, under pathological condition this pathway relays aberrant cerebellar activity to the basal ganglia to cause dystonia. PMID:25402853

  9. Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome Presented as Severe Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pesic, Danilo; Peljto, Amir; Lukic, Biljana; Milovanovic, Maja; Svetozarevic, Snezana; Lecic Tosevski, Dusica

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of findings confirm the significance of cerebellum in affecting regulation and early learning. Most consistent findings refer to association of congenital vermis anomalies with deficits in nonmotor functions of cerebellum. In this paper we presented a young woman who was treated since sixteen years of age for polysubstance abuse, affective instability, and self-harming who was later diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. Since the neurological and neuropsychological reports pointed to signs of cerebellar dysfunction and dysexecutive syndrome, we performed magnetic resonance imaging of brain which demonstrated partially developed vermis and rhombencephalosynapsis. These findings match the description of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome and show an overlap with clinical manifestations of borderline personality disorder. PMID:24715924

  10. Speech and language findings associated with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Paslawski, Teresa; Duffy, Joseph R; Vernino, Steven

    2005-08-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is an autoimmune disease that can be associated with cancer of the breast, lung, and ovary. The clinical presentation of PCD commonly includes ataxia, visual disturbances, and dysarthria. The speech disturbances associated with PCD have not been well characterized, despite general acceptance that dysarthria is often part of the initial presentation. A retrospective study was conducted of the speech, language, and swallowing concerns of patients with PCD evaluated at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, between 1990 and 2001. Prospective speech and language assessments were then conducted with 5 patients who had PCD. While ataxic dysarthria was the most common speech diagnosis, a spastic component was recognized frequently enough to suggest that the subacute (days to weeks) emergence and progression of an ataxic or mixed ataxic-spastic dysarthria in the setting of a more diffuse cerebellar ataxia should raise suspicions about PCD and justify further investigation of a possible immune-related etiology. PMID:16229671

  11. Ruptured Total Intrameatal Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Cheol; Chang, In Bok; Lee, Ho Kook

    2015-01-01

    Among the distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysms, a unique aneurysm at the meatal loop inside the internal auditory meatus is extremely rare. The authors report a case of surgically treated total intrameatal AICA aneurysm. A 62-year-old female patient presenting with sudden bursting headache and neck pain was transferred to our department. Computed tomography and digital subtraction angiography showed subarachnoid hemorrhage at the basal, prepontine cistern and an aneurysm of the distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery inside the internal auditory meatus. Surgery was performed by retrosigmoid craniotomy with unroofing of the internal auditory meatus. The aneurysm was identified between the seventh and eighth cranial nerve in the meatus and was removed from the canal and clipped with a small straight Sugita clip. After operation the patient experienced transient facial paresis and tinnitus but improved during follow up. PMID:26361531

  12. Cerebellar and oculomotor dysfunction induced by rapid infusion of pethidine

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yang-Hong; Ou, Kuang-Ling; Chu, Po-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Pethidine is an opioid that gains its popularity for the effective pain control through acting on the opioid-receptors. However, rapid pain relief sometimes brings about unfavourable side effects that largely limit its clinical utility. Common side effects include nausea, vomiting and hypotension. In patients with impaired renal and liver function, and those who need long-term pain control, pethidine may cause excitatory central nervous system (CNS) effects through its neurotoxic metabolite, norpethidine, resulting in irritability and seizure attack. On the contrary, though not clinically apparent, pethidine potentially causes inhibitory impacts on the CNS and impairs normal cerebellar and oculomotor function in the short term. In this case report, we highlight opioid's inhibitory side effects on the cerebellar structure that causes dysmetria, dysarthria, reduced smooth pursuit gain and decreased saccadic velocity. PMID:24618873

  13. Vertebral artery dissection and cerebellar infarction following chiropractic manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W?L; Chern, C?H; Wu, Y?L; Lee, C?H

    2006-01-01

    Vertebral artery dissection (VAD) associated with chiropractic cervical manipulation is a rare but potentially disabling condition. In this report, we present a young patient manifesting with repeated vertigo. Owing to the initial misdiagnosis, the patient later developed cerebellar stroke with inability to stand or walk. Vertigo and disequilibrium are the usual presenting symptoms of this condition, which can result from inner ear or vestibular nerve dysfunction, vertebrobasilar insufficiency, and even lethal cerebellar infarction or haemorrhage; these last two, although rarely seen in young adults, can be caused by traumatic or spontaneous arterial injury, including injury secondary to chiropractic cervical manipulation. A number of cases of VAD associated with chiropractic cervical manipulation have been reported, but rarely in the emergency medicine literature. We present a case of this rare occurrence, and discuss the diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:16373786

  14. Movement-related cortical potentials in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Tarkka, I M; Massaquoi, S; Hallett, M

    1993-08-01

    We studied the topographic distribution of scalp-recorded, averaged movement-related cortical potentials occurring immediately before and after the onset of voluntary movements in six patients with cerebellar degenerative disease. We placed 26 electrodes on the scalp overlying the sensorimotor area and recorded cortical potentials related to abduction of the index finger. The amplitudes and latencies of the potentials were normal in all patients except two, in whom the negative slope (NS') was absent. All patients had an abnormal topographic pattern of potentials compared with normal subjects. The initial slope of motor potential (isMP), which was focal and contralateral in the normal subjects, was diffuse and bilateral in the patients. The topography of the frontal peak of motor potential (fpMP) was more posterior in the patients than in normal subjects. The patterns found in this preliminary study indicate a derangement of sensorimotor cortex activity in voluntary movement as a consequence of cerebellar dysfunction. PMID:8213057

  15. Cognitive planning deficit in patients with cerebellar atrophy.

    PubMed

    Grafman, J; Litvan, I; Massaquoi, S; Stewart, M; Sirigu, A; Hallett, M

    1992-08-01

    We compared the performance of 12 patients with cerebellar atrophy (CA) and 12 normal controls matched for age and education on the Tower of Hanoi, a nine-problem task that requires cognitive planning. CA patients performed significantly worse than controls on this task despite no difference in planning and between-move pause times. A reanalysis of the data using just the subgroup of patients with pure cerebellar cortical atrophy (CCA) (N = 9) replicated the above results and also showed that CCA patients had significantly increased planning times compared with controls. Neither age, sex, education level, severity of dementia, word fluency, response time, memory, nor visuomotor procedural learning predicted CA or CCA performance. This deficit in cognitive planning suggests a functional link between the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and the frontal lobe concerning specific cognitive processes. However, the exact role of the cerebellum in cognitive planning remains undetermined. PMID:1641142

  16. Fast versus slow: different saccadic behavior in cerebellar ataxias.

    PubMed

    Rufa, Alessandra; Federighi, Pamela

    2011-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder primarily characterized by involvement of the brainstem and cerebellum, basal ganglia, spinal cord, cerebral cortex, but white matter is also involved. In late-onset cerebellar ataxia (LOCA), the cerebellum is mainly involved, as demonstrated by clinical and neuroradiological findings. These neurodegenerative diseases are often associated with progressive abnormalities in eye movement control, particularly saccadic changes. We recorded saccadic eye movements in eight SCA2 patients and 10 LOCA patients. Here, we suggest that abnormalities in saccadic parameters differ in the two groups of patients according to specific anatomical substrates. The different saccadic behavior observed in these two clinically distinct degenerative cerebellar diseases offers the opportunity to simplify some general mechanisms of saccadic motor control. Like his mentor Fred Plum, John Leigh strongly encouraged younger neuroscientists to tackle neurological problems by investigating "pathological physiology." With this teaching in mind, we studied patients with rare neurometabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21950987

  17. Bistability of cerebellar Purkinje cells modulated by sensory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Loewenstein, Yonatan; Mahon, Sverine; Chadderton, Paul; Kitamura, Kazuo; Sompolinsky, Haim; Yarom, Yosef; Husser, Michael

    2005-02-01

    A persistent change in neuronal activity after brief stimuli is a common feature of many neuronal microcircuits. This persistent activity can be sustained by ongoing reverberant network activity or by the intrinsic biophysical properties of individual cells. Here we demonstrate that rat and guinea pig cerebellar Purkinje cells in vivo show bistability of membrane potential and spike output on the time scale of seconds. The transition between membrane potential states can be bidirectionally triggered by the same brief current pulses. We also show that sensory activation of the climbing fiber input can switch Purkinje cells between the two states. The intrinsic nature of Purkinje cell bistability and its control by sensory input can be explained by a simple biophysical model. Purkinje cell bistability may have a key role in the short-term processing and storage of sensory information in the cerebellar cortex. PMID:15665875

  18. Cerebellar histogenesis in rats exposed to 2450-MHz microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, E.N.

    1988-08-01

    Pregnant rats were either exposed or sham exposed from day 13 of gestation until birth to 2450-MHz linearly polarized microwaves at 10 mW/sq cm. A third matching group served as cage control. After birth, the pups were kept with their mothers for 21 days without any treatment, and at age 21 their brains were prepared for histological analysis. There was a statistically significant difference in the cerebellar area among the three exposure groups. The differences was seen only in the females and not in the males. Purkinje cell density was not significantly different (P>0.05) among the three exposure groups. However, Purkinje cell density in the females was highest in the microwave exposed rats and lowest in the cage controls. The differences in the cerebellar area among the three groups may not be attributed to microwave exposure but to some unidentifiable factor which differentiated the cage controls from both exposure groups.

  19. Morphological analysis of embryonic cerebellar grafts in SCA2 mice.

    PubMed

    Purkartova, Zdenka; Tuma, Jan; Pesta, Martin; Kulda, Vlastimil; Hajkova, Lucie; Sebesta, Ondrej; Vozeh, Frantisek; Cendelin, Jan

    2014-01-13

    SCA2 transgenic mice are thought to be a useful model of human spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. There is no effective therapy for cerebellar degenerative disorders, therefore neurotransplantation could offer hope. The aim of this work was to assess the survival and morphology of embryonic cerebellar grafts transplanted into the cerebellum of adult SCA2 mice. Four month-old homozygous SCA2 and negative control mice were treated with bilateral intracerebellar injections of an enhanced green fluorescent protein-positive embryonic cerebellar cell suspension. Graft survival and morphology were examined three months later. Graft-derived Purkinje cells and the presence of astrocytes in the graft were detected immunohistochemically. Nissl and hematoxylin-eosin techniques were used to visualize the histological structure of the graft and surrounding host tissue. Grafts survived in all experimental mice; no differences in graft structure, between SCA2 homozygous and negative mice, were found. The grafts contained numerous Purkinje cells but long distance graft-to-host axonal connections to the deep cerebellar nuclei were rarely seen. Relatively few astrocytes were found in the center of the graft. No signs of inflammation or tissue destruction were seen in the area around the grafts. Despite good graft survival and the presence of graft-derived Purkinje cells, the structure of the graft did not seem to promise any significant specific functional effects. We have shown that the graft is available for long-term experiments. Nevertheless, it would be beneficial to search for ways of enhancement of connections between the graft and host. PMID:24269873

  20. Space-occupying cerebellar infarction: complications, treatment, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Hermann; Witsch, Jens; Zweckberger, Klaus; Jttler, Eric

    2013-05-01

    Space-occupying brain edema is a frequent and one of the most dreaded complications in ischemic cerebellar stroke. Because the tight posterior fossa provides little compensating space, any space-occupying lesion can lead to life-threatening complications through brainstem compression or compression of the fourth ventricle and subsequent hydrocephalus, both of which may portend transtentorial/transforaminal herniation. Patients with large cerebellar infarcts should be treated and monitored very early on in an experienced stroke unit or (neuro)intensive care unit. The general treatment of ischemic cerebellar infarction does not differ from that of supratentorial ischemic strokes. Treatment strategies for space-occupying edema include pharmacological antiedema and intracranial pressure-lowering therapies, ventricular drainage by means of an extraventricular drain, and suboccipital decompressive surgery, with or without resection of necrotic tissue. Timely escalation of treatment is crucial and should be guided by clinical and neuroradiological rationales. Patients in a coma after hydrocephalus and/or local brainstem compression may also benefit from more aggressive surgical treatment, as long as the conditions are reversible. Contrary to the general belief that outcome in survivors of space-occupying cerebellar stroke is usually good, recent studies suggest that for many of these patients, the long-term outcome is not good. In particular, advanced age and additional brainstem infarction seem to be predictors for poor outcome. Further trials are necessary to investigate these findings systematically and provide better selection criteria to help guide decisions about surgical therapies, which should always be carried out in close cooperation among neurointensive care physicians, neurologists, and neurosurgeons. PMID:23634927

  1. Mapping the development of cerebellar Purkinje cells in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hamling, Kyla R; Tobias, Zachary J C; Weissman, Tamily A

    2015-11-01

    The cells that comprise the cerebellum perform a complex integration of neural inputs to influence motor control and coordination. The functioning of this circuit depends upon Purkinje cells and other cerebellar neurons forming in the precise place and time during development. Zebrafish provide a useful platform for modeling disease and studying gene function, thus a quantitative metric of normal zebrafish cerebellar development is key for understanding how gene mutations affect the cerebellum. To begin to quantitatively measure cerebellar development in zebrafish, we have characterized the spatial and temporal patterning of Purkinje cells during the first 2 weeks of development. Differentiated Purkinje cells first emerged by 2.8 days post fertilization and were spatially patterned into separate dorsomedial and ventrolateral clusters that merged at around 4 days. Quantification of the Purkinje cell layer revealed that there was a logarithmic increase in both Purkinje cell number as well as overall volume during the first 2 weeks, while the entire region curved forward in an anterior, then ventral direction. Purkinje cell dendrites were positioned next to parallel fibers as early as 3.3 days, and Purkinje cell diameter decreased significantly from 3.3 to 14 days, possibly due to cytoplasmic reappropriation into maturing dendritic arbors. A nearest neighbor analysis showed that Purkinje cells moved slightly apart from each other from 3 to 14 days, perhaps spreading as the organized monolayer forms. This study establishes a quantitative spatiotemporal map of Purkinje cell development in zebrafish that provides an important metric for studies of cerebellar development and disease. PMID:25655100

  2. Bilateral cerebellar activation in unilaterally challenged essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Broersma, Marja; van der Stouwe, Anna M.M.; Buijink, Arthur W.G.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Groot, Paul F.C.; Speelman, Johannes D.; Tijssen, Marina A.J.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most common hyperkinetic movement disorders. Previous research into the pathophysiology of ET suggested underlying cerebellar abnormalities. Objective In this study, we added electromyography as an index of tremor intensity to functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (EMG-fMRI) to study a group of ET patients selected according to strict criteria to achieve maximal homogeneity. With this approach we expected to improve upon the localization of the bilateral cerebellar abnormalities found in earlier fMRI studies. Methods We included 21 propranolol sensitive patients, who were not using other tremor medication, with a definite diagnosis of ET defined by the Tremor Investigation Group. Simultaneous EMG-fMRI recordings were performed while patients were off tremor medication. Patients performed unilateral right hand and arm extension, inducing tremor, alternated with relaxation (rest). Twenty-one healthy, age- and sex-matched participants mimicked tremor during right arm extension. EMG power variability at the individual tremor frequency as a measure of tremor intensity variability was used as a regressor, mathematically independent of the block regressor, in the general linear model used for fMRI analysis, to find specific tremor-related activations. Results Block-related activations were found in the classical upper-limb motor network, both for ET patients and healthy participants in motor, premotor and supplementary motor areas. In ET patients, we found tremor-related activations bilaterally in the cerebellum: in left lobules V, VI, VIIb and IX and in right lobules V, VI, VIIIa and b, and in the brainstem. In healthy controls we found simulated tremor-related activations in right cerebellar lobule V. Conclusions Our results expand on previous findings of bilateral cerebellar involvement in ET. We have identified specific areas in the bilateral somatomotor regions of the cerebellum: lobules V, VI and VIII. PMID:26909321

  3. Torsin A Localization in the Mouse Cerebellar Synaptic Circuitry.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Francesca; Vanni, Valentina; Ponterio, Giulia; Tassone, Annalisa; Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Bonsi, Paola; Pisani, Antonio; Mandolesi, Georgia

    2013-01-01

    Torsin A (TA) is a ubiquitous protein belonging to the superfamily of proteins called "ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities" (AAA(+) ATPase). To date, a great deal of attention has been focused on neuronal TA since its mutant form causes early-onset (DYT1) torsion dystonia, an inherited movement disorder characterized by sustained muscle contractions and abnormal postures. Interestingly, it has been proposed that TA, by interacting with the cytoskeletal network, may contribute to the control of neurite outgrowth and/or by acting as a chaperone at synapses could affect synaptic vesicle turnover and neurotransmitter release. Accordingly, both its peculiar developmental expression in striatum and cerebellum and evidence from DYT1 knock-in mice suggest that TA may influence dendritic arborization and synaptogenesis in the brain. Therefore, to better understand TA function a detailed description of its localization at synaptic level is required. Here, we characterized by means of rigorous quantitative confocal analysis TA distribution in the mouse cerebellum at postnatal day 14 (P14), when both cerebellar synaptogenesis and TA expression peak. We observed that the protein is broadly distributed both in cerebellar cortex and in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). Of note, Purkinje cells (PC) express high levels of TA also in the spines and axonal terminals. In addition, abundant expression of the protein was found in the main GABA-ergic and glutamatergic inputs of the cerebellar cortex. Finally, TA was observed also in glial cells, a cellular population little explored so far. These results extend our knowledge on TA synaptic localization providing a clue to its potential role in synaptic development. PMID:23840813

  4. Torsin A Localization in the Mouse Cerebellar Synaptic Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Ponterio, Giulia; Tassone, Annalisa; Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Bonsi, Paola; Pisani, Antonio; Mandolesi, Georgia

    2013-01-01

    Torsin A (TA) is a ubiquitous protein belonging to the superfamily of proteins called ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities (AAA+ ATPase). To date, a great deal of attention has been focused on neuronal TA since its mutant form causes early-onset (DYT1) torsion dystonia, an inherited movement disorder characterized by sustained muscle contractions and abnormal postures. Interestingly, it has been proposed that TA, by interacting with the cytoskeletal network, may contribute to the control of neurite outgrowth and/or by acting as a chaperone at synapses could affect synaptic vesicle turnover and neurotransmitter release. Accordingly, both its peculiar developmental expression in striatum and cerebellum and evidence from DYT1 knock-in mice suggest that TA may influence dendritic arborization and synaptogenesis in the brain. Therefore, to better understand TA function a detailed description of its localization at synaptic level is required. Here, we characterized by means of rigorous quantitative confocal analysis TA distribution in the mouse cerebellum at postnatal day 14 (P14), when both cerebellar synaptogenesis and TA expression peak. We observed that the protein is broadly distributed both in cerebellar cortex and in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). Of note, Purkinje cells (PC) express high levels of TA also in the spines and axonal terminals. In addition, abundant expression of the protein was found in the main GABA-ergic and glutamatergic inputs of the cerebellar cortex. Finally, TA was observed also in glial cells, a cellular population little explored so far. These results extend our knowledge on TA synaptic localization providing a clue to its potential role in synaptic development. PMID:23840813

  5. Imaging Spectrum of Cerebellar Pathologies: A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Richa

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cerebellum is a crucial structure of hindbrain which helps in maintaining motor tone, posture, gait and also coordinates skilled voluntary movements including eye movements. Cerebellar abnormalities have different spectrum, presenting symptoms and prognosis as compared to supratentorial structures and brainstem. This article intends to review the various pathological processes involving the cerebellum along with their imaging features on MR, which are must to know for all radiologists, neurologists and neurosurgeons for their prompt diagnosis and management. PMID:25806100

  6. Sensitivity of cerebellar glutathione system to neonatal ionizing radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Di Toro, C G; Di Toro, P A; Zieher, L M; Guelman, L R

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are relevant components of living organisms that, besides their role in the regulation of different important physiological functions, when present in excess are capable to affect cell oxidative status, leading to damage of cellular molecules and disturbance of normal cell function. ROS accumulation has been associated with a variety of conditions such as neurodegenerative diseases and ionizing radiation exposure. Cell ability to counteract ROS overproduction depends on the capacity of the endogenous antioxidant defenses--which includes the glutathione (GSH) system--to cope with. Since developing central nervous system (CNS) is especially sensitive to ROS-induced damage, the aim of the present work was to evaluate ROS, reduced GSH and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels in the cerebellum at different developmental ages after irradiation, in order to test if any changes were induced on these key oxidative stress-related cellular markers that might explain the high cerebellar vulnerability to radiation-induced injury. Since intracellular levels of GSH are maintained by glutathione reductase (GSHr), this enzymatic activity was also evaluated. Newborn Wistar rats were irradiated in their cephalic ends and the different parameters were measured, from 1h to 90 days post-irradiation. Results showed that an early transient increase in ROS levels followed by a decrease in cerebellar weight at 3-5 days post-irradiation were induced. An increase in cerebellar GSH levels was induced at 30 days after irradiation, together with a decrease in GSHr activity. These results support the hypothesis that ROS may represent a marker of damage prior to radiation-induced cell death. In contrast, it would be suggested that GSH system might play a role in the compensatory mechanisms triggered to counteract radiation-induced cerebellar damage. PMID:17267041

  7. Electrophysiological monitoring of injury progression in the rat cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ordek, Gokhan; Proddutur, Archana; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Pfister, Bryan J.; Sahin, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    The changes of excitability in affected neural networks can be used as a marker to study the temporal course of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The cerebellum is an ideal platform to study brain injury mechanisms at the network level using the electrophysiological methods. Within its crystalline morphology, the cerebellar cortex contains highly organized topographical subunits that are defined by two main inputs, the climbing (CFs) and mossy fibers (MFs). Here we demonstrate the use of cerebellar evoked potentials (EPs) mediated through these afferent systems for monitoring the injury progression in a rat model of fluid percussion injury (FPI). A mechanical tap on the dorsal hand was used as a stimulus, and EPs were recorded from the paramedian lobule (PML) of the posterior cerebellum via multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). Post-injury evoked response amplitudes (EPAs) were analyzed on a daily basis for 1 week and compared with pre-injury values. We found a trend of consistently decreasing EPAs in all nine animals, losing as much as 72 ± 4% of baseline amplitudes measured before the injury. Notably, our results highlighted two particular time windows; the first 24 h of injury in the acute period and day-3 to day-7 in the delayed period where the largest drops (~50% and 24%) were observed in the EPAs. In addition, cross-correlations of spontaneous signals between electrode pairs declined (from 0.47 ± 0.1 to 0.35 ± 0.04, p < 0.001) along with the EPAs throughout the week of injury. In support of the electrophysiological findings, immunohistochemical analysis at day-7 post-injury showed detectable Purkinje cell loss at low FPI pressures and more with the largest pressures used. Our results suggest that sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) recorded from the cerebellar surface can be a useful technique to monitor the course of cerebellar injury and identify the phases of injury progression even at mild levels. PMID:25346664

  8. Hippocampal and cerebellar atrophy in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Till; Ldecke, Daniel; Spies, Lothar; Wittmann, Linus; Westphal, Manfred; Flitsch, Jrg

    2015-11-01

    OBJECT Cushing's disease (CD) may cause atrophy of different regions of the human brain, mostly affecting the hippocampus and the cerebellum. This study evaluates the use of 3-T MRI of newly diagnosed patients with CD to detect atrophic degeneration with voxel-based volumetry. METHODS Subjects with newly diagnosed, untreated CD were included and underwent 3-T MRI. Images were analyzed using a voxelwise statistical test to detect reduction of brain parenchyma. In addition, an atlas-based volumetric study for regions likely to be affected by CD was performed. RESULTS Nineteen patients with a mean disease duration of 24 months were included. Tumor markers included adre-nocorticotropic hormone (median 17.5 pmol/L), cortisol (949.4 nmol/L), and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (5.4 ?mol/L). The following values are expressed as the mean SD. The voxelwise statistical test revealed clusters of significantly reduced gray matter in the hippocampus and cerebellum, with volumes of 2.90 0.26 ml (right hippocampus), 2.89 0.28 ml (left hippocampus), 41.95 4.67 ml (right cerebellar hemisphere), and 42.11 4.59 ml (left cerebellar hemisphere). Healthy control volunteers showed volumes of 3.22 0.25 ml for the right hippocampus, 3.23 0.25 ml for the left hippocampus, 50.87 4.23 ml for the right cerebellar hemisphere, and 50.42 3.97 ml for the left cerebellar hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS Patients with untreated CD show significant reduction of gray matter in the cerebellum and hippocampus. These changes can be analyzed and objectified with the quantitative voxel-based method described in this study. PMID:26646929

  9. [Pharmacotherapy of Vestibular Disorders, Nystagmus and Cerebellar Disorders].

    PubMed

    Feil, K; Böttcher, N; Kremmyda, O; Muth, C; Teufel, J; Zwergal, A; Brandt, T; Strupp, M

    2015-09-01

    There are currently different groups of drugs for the pharmacotherapy of vertigo, nystagmus and cerebellar disorders: antiemetics; anti-inflammatories, antimenieres, and antimigraineous medications and antidepressants, anticonvulsants, aminopyridines as well as acetyl-DL-leucine. In acute unilateral vestibulopathy, corticosteroids improve the recovery of peripheral vestibular function, but currently there is not sufficient evidence for a general recommendation. There is insufficient evidence to support the view that 16 mg t. i. d. or 48 mg t. i. d. betahistine has an effect in Menière's disease. Therefore, higher dosages are recommended. In animal studies, it was shown that betahistine increases cochlear blood flow. In vestibular paroxysmia, oxcarbazepine was effective (one randomized controlled trial (RCT)). Aminopyridines are recommended for the treatment of downbeat nystagmus (two RCTs) and episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, one RCT). There has been no RCT on the efficacy of beta-blockers or topiramate but one RCT on flunarizine in vestibular migraine. Based on clinical experience, a treatment analogous to that for migraine without aura can be recommended. Acetyl-DL-leucine improved cerebellar ataxia (two observational studies); it also accelerated central compensation in an animal model of acute unilateral lesion, but RCTs were negative. There are ongoing RCTs on treatment of vestibular paroxysmia with carbamazepine (VESPA), acute unilateral vestibulopathy with betahistine (BETAVEST), vestibular migraine with metoprolol (PROVEMIG), benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with vitamin D (VitD@BPPV), EA2 with 4-aminopyridine versus acetazolamide (EAT-2-TREAT), and cerebellar ataxias with acetyl-DL-leucine (ALCAT). PMID:26421856

  10. FABP4 is a candidate marker of cerebellar liponeurocytomas.

    PubMed

    Anghileri, Elena; Eoli, Marica; Paterra, Rosina; Ferroli, Paolo; Pollo, Bianca; Cuccarini, Valeria; Maderna, Emanuela; Tringali, Giovanni; Saini, Marco; Salsano, Ettore; Finocchiaro, Gaetano

    2012-07-01

    Cerebellar liponeurocytoma (cLPN) is a very rare central nervous system (CNS) tumour recently recognized as a clinical and pathological entity distinct from medulloblastoma (MB), and included in the WHO classification of CNS tumours under the heading "glioneuronal tumours". cLPN typically develop in adult age and have a favourable prognosis compared with MB. In this work, we reviewed the clinical and neuroradiological data of two novel cases of adult cLPN diagnosed at our institution; one patient developed distant metastases. We tried to identify novel molecular markers for this malignancy. We found that the transcription factor NEUROG1 (but not ATOH1) is expressed in cLPN, unlike normal adult cerebellum, and that fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), typically found in adipocytes, is significantly overexpressed compared with both normal adult cerebellum and human MB. These findings suggest cLPN occur as a result of transformation of cerebellar progenitors, which are distinct from cerebellar granule progenitors, and aberrantly differentiate into adipocyte-like tumour cells. They also suggest that analysis of FABP4 expression is of help to differentiate cLPN from MB. PMID:22476608

  11. Sustained Reduction of Cerebellar Activity in Experimental Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rijkers, Kim; Moers-Hornikx, Vronique M. P.; Hemmes, Roelof J.; Aalbers, Marlien W.; Temel, Yasin; Vles, Johan S. H.; Hoogland, Govert

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence suggests a role for the cerebellum in seizure control, while no data are available on cerebellar activity between seizures. We hypothesized that interictal regional activity of the deep cerebellar nuclei is reduced in epilepsy and tested this in an animal model by using ?FosB and cytochrome oxidase (COX) (immuno)histochemistry. The expression of these two markers of neuronal activity was analysed in the dentate nucleus (DN), interpositus nucleus (IN), and fastigial nucleus (FN) of the cerebellum of fully amygdala kindled rats that were sacrificed 48 hours after their last seizure. The DN and FN of kindled rats exhibited 25 to 29% less ?FosB immunopositive cells than their respective counterpart in sham controls (P < 0.05). COX expression in the DN and FN of kindled animals was reduced by 32 to 33% compared to respective control values (P < 0.05). These results indicate that an epileptogenic state is characterized by decreased activity of deep cerebellar nuclei, especially the DN and FN. Possible consequences may include a decreased activation of the thalamus, contributing to further seizure spread. Restoration of FN activity by low frequency electrical stimulation is suggested as a possible treatment option in chronic epilepsy. PMID:26417599

  12. Deficits in reflexive covert attention following cerebellar injury

    PubMed Central

    Striemer, Christopher L.; Cantelmi, David; Cusimano, Michael D.; Danckert, James A.; Schweizer, Tom A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally the cerebellum has been known for its important role in coordinating motor output. Over the past 15 years numerous studies have indicated that the cerebellum plays a role in a variety of cognitive functions including working memory, language, perceptual functions, and emotion. In addition, recent work suggests that regions of the cerebellum involved in eye movements also play a role in controlling covert visual attention. Here we investigated whether regions of the cerebellum that are not strictly tied to the control of eye movements might also contribute to covert attention. To address this question we examined the effects of circumscribed cerebellar lesions on reflexive covert attention in a group of patients (n = 11) without any gross motor or oculomotor deficits, and compared their performance to a group of age-matched controls (n = 11). Results indicated that the traditional RT advantage for validly cued targets was significantly smaller at the shortest (50 ms) SOA for cerebellar patients compared to controls. Critically, a lesion overlap analysis indicated that this deficit in the rapid deployment of attention was linked to damage in Crus I and Crus II of the lateral cerebellum. Importantly, both cerebellar regions have connections to non-motor regions of the prefrontal and posterior parietal corticesregions important for controlling visuospatial attention. Together, these data provide converging evidence that both lateral and midline regions of the cerebellum play an important role in the control of reflexive covert visual attention. PMID:26300756

  13. The Changeable Nervous System: Studies On Neuroplasticity In Cerebellar Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Seil, Fredrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Circuit reorganization after injury was studied in a cerebellar culture model. When cerebellar cultures derived from newborn mice were exposed at explantation to a preparation of cytosine arabinoside that destroyed granule cells and oligodendrocytes and compromised astrocytes, Purkinje cells surviving in greater than usual numbers were unensheathed by astrocytic processes and received twice the control number of inhibitory axosomatic synapses. Purkinje cell axon collaterals sprouted and many of their terminals formed heterotypical synapses with other Purkinje cell dendritic spines. The resulting circuit reorganization preserved inhibition in the cerebellar cortex. Following this reorganization, replacement of the missing granule cells and glia was followed by a restitution of the normal circuitry. Most of these developmental and reconstructive changes were not dependent on neuronal activity, the major exception being inhibitory synaptogenesis. The full complement of inhibitory synapses did not develop in the absence of neuronal activity, which could be mitigated by application of exogenous TrkB receptor ligands. Inhibitory synaptogenesis could also be promoted by activity-induced release of endogenous TrkB receptor ligands or by antibody activation of the TrkB receptor. PMID:24933693

  14. Executive Function Deficits in Patients after Cerebellar Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Mak, Monika; Tyburski, Ernest; Madany, Łukasz; Sokołowski, Andrzej; Samochowiec, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum has long been perceived as a structure responsible for the human motor function. According to the contemporary approach, however, it plays a significant role in complex behavior regulatory processes. The aim of this study was to describe executive functions in patients after cerebellar surgery. The study involved 30 patients with cerebellar pathology. The control group comprised 30 neurologically and mentally healthy individuals, matched for sex, age, and number of years of education. Executive functions were measured by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT), Trail Making Test (TMT), and working memory by the Digit Span. Compared to healthy controls, patients made more Errors and Perseverative errors in the WCST, gave more Perseverative responses, and had a lower Number of categories completed. The patients exhibited higher response times in all three parts of the SCWT and TMT A and B. No significant differences between the two groups were reported in their performance of the SCWT and TMT with regard to the measures of absolute or relative interference. The patients had lower score on the backward Digit Span. Patients with cerebellar pathology may exhibit some impairment within problem solving and working memory. Their worse performance on the SCWT and TMT could, in turn, stem from their poor motor-somatosensory control, and not necessarily executive deficits. Our results thus support the hypothesis of the cerebellum's mediating role in the regulation of the activity of the superordinate cognitive control network in the brain. (JINS, 2016, 22, 47-57). PMID:26626541

  15. Cerebellar vermis H₂ receptors mediate fear memory consolidation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Riboldi, A M; Silva-Marques, B; Mattioli, R

    2015-02-01

    Histaminergic fibers are present in the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum and have a high density in the vermis and flocullus. Evidence supports that the cerebellar histaminergic system is involved in memory consolidation. Our recent study showed that histamine injections facilitate the retention of an inhibitory avoidance task, which was abolished by pretreatment with an H2 receptor antagonist. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intracerebellar post training injections of H1 and H2 receptor antagonists as well as the selective H2 receptor agonist on fear memory consolidation. The cerebellar vermi of male mice were implanted with guide cannulae, and after three days of recovery, the inhibitory avoidance test was performed. Immediately after a training session, animals received a microinjection of the following histaminergic drugs: experiment 1, saline or chlorpheniramine (0.016, 0.052 or 0.16 nmol); experiment 2, saline or ranitidine (0.57, 2.85 or 5.07 nmol); and experiment 3, saline or dimaprit (1, 2 or 4 nmol). Twenty-four hours later, a retention test was performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests. Animals microinjected with chlorpheniramine did not show any behavioral effects at the doses that we used. Intra-cerebellar injection of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine inhibited, while the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit facilitated, memory consolidation, suggesting that H2 receptors mediate memory consolidation in the inhibitory avoidance task in mice. PMID:25524412

  16. Evidence for Cerebellar Contributions to Adaptive Plasticity in Speech Perception.

    PubMed

    Guediche, Sara; Holt, Lori L; Laurent, Patryk; Lim, Sung-Joo; Fiez, Julie A

    2015-07-01

    Human speech perception rapidly adapts to maintain comprehension under adverse listening conditions. For example, with exposure listeners can adapt to heavily accented speech produced by a non-native speaker. Outside the domain of speech perception, adaptive changes in sensory and motor processing have been attributed to cerebellar functions. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigates whether adaptation in speech perception also involves the cerebellum. Acoustic stimuli were distorted using a vocoding plus spectral-shift manipulation and presented in a word recognition task. Regions in the cerebellum that showed differences before versus after adaptation were identified, and the relationship between activity during adaptation and subsequent behavioral improvements was examined. These analyses implicated the right Crus I region of the cerebellum in adaptive changes in speech perception. A functional correlation analysis with the right Crus I as a seed region probed for cerebral cortical regions with covarying hemodynamic responses during the adaptation period. The results provided evidence of a functional network between the cerebellum and language-related regions in the temporal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. Consistent with known cerebellar contributions to sensorimotor adaptation, cerebro-cerebellar interactions may support supervised learning mechanisms that rely on sensory prediction error signals in speech perception. PMID:24451660

  17. Microsurgery and endovascular treatment of posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sejkorov, A; Cihl?, F; Hej?l, A; Lodin, J; Vachata, P; Same, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms located on the posterior inferior cerebellar artery are rare, and treatment guidelines for them have not yet been established. In this paper, we present the results of a retrospective study which analyzes the management and treatment of 15 patients with posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms from 2004 to 2013. The aneurysms were ruptured and presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Of the 15 aneurysms, ten were of saccular, three fusiform, and two were dissecting. Computed tomography angiography or digital subtraction angiography revealed other aneurysms or intracerebral artery hypoplasia in seven patients. Either surgical or endovascular treatment was performed depending on the localization and morphology of the aneurysm. Six aneurysms were coiled, and surgery was performed in nine cases. Of the nine surgically treated patients, six (75%) had good outcomes. Of the six patients treated using endovascular procedures, three patients (50%) recovered. Patient outcomes were classified using the Hunt&Hess scale. Patients with Hunt&Hess 1-3 recovered without a neurological deficit. On the other hand, patients with Hunt&Hess 4-5 had a risk of up to 93% of death or a poor outcome. In two cases of endovascular and in two cases before any therapy, aneurysmal rebleeding occurred and resulted in deterioration of clinical state of the patient and a poor prognosis with high risk of death. This study shows the necessity of acute treatment of posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm, of thorough diagnostic, and of interdisciplinary cooperation. PMID:26296429

  18. Hippocampal and cerebellar mossy fibre boutons same name, different function

    PubMed Central

    Delvendahl, Igor; Weyhersmller, Annika; Ritzau-Jost, Andreas; Hallermann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Over a century ago, the Spanish anatomist Ramn y Cajal described mossy fibres in the hippocampus and the cerebellum, which contain several presynaptic boutons. Technical improvements in recent decades have allowed direct patch-clamp recordings from both hippocampal and cerebellar mossy fibre boutons (hMFBs and cMFBs, respectively), making them ideal models to study fundamental properties of synaptic transmission. hMFBs and cMFBs have similar size and shape, but each hMFB contacts one postsynaptic hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neuron, while each cMFB contacts ?50 cerebellar granule cells. Furthermore, hMFBs and cMFBs differ in terms of their functional specialization. At hMFBs, a large number of release-ready vesicles and low release probability (<0.1) contribute to marked synaptic facilitation. At cMFBs, a small number of release-ready vesicles, high release probability (?0.5) and rapid vesicle reloading result in moderate frequency-dependent synaptic depression. These presynaptic mechanisms, in combination with faster postsynaptic currents of cerebellar granule cells compared with hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons, enable much higher transmission frequencies at cMFB compared with hMFB synapses. Analysing the underling mechanisms of synaptic transmission and information processing represents a fascinating challenge and may reveal insights into the structurefunction relationship of the human brain. PMID:23297303

  19. Remote Cerebellar Infarction after Supratentorial Craniotomy and Its Management: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seon-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar infarction resulting from supratentorial craniotomy is uncommon event and its management has been controversial. After removal of space occupying lesion on right frontal area, two cases of remote cerebellar infarctions occurred. We reviewed each cases and the techniques to manage such complications are discussed. Early extraventricular catheter insertion and midline suboccipital craniectomy were effectively performed in obtunded patients from cerebellar infarction. PMID:26605273

  20. Atrophy of the Cerebellar Vermis in Essential Tremor: Segmental Volumetric MRI Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyeeun; Lee, Dong-Kyun; Lee, Jong-Min; Huh, Young-Eun; Youn, Jinyoung; Louis, Elan D; Cho, Jin Whan

    2016-04-01

    Postmortem studies of essential tremor (ET) have demonstrated the presence of degenerative changes in the cerebellum, and imaging studies have examined related structural changes in the brain. However, their results have not been completely consistent and the number of imaging studies has been limited. We aimed to study cerebellar involvement in ET using MRI segmental volumetric analysis. In addition, a unique feature of this study was that we stratified ET patients into subtypes based on the clinical presence of cerebellar signs and compared their MRI findings. Thirty-nine ET patients and 36 normal healthy controls, matched for age and sex, were enrolled. Cerebellar signs in ET patients were assessed using the clinical tremor rating scale and International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. ET patients were divided into two groups: patients with cerebellar signs (cerebellar-ET) and those without (classic-ET). MRI volumetry was performed using CIVET pipeline software. Data on whole and segmented cerebellar volumes were analyzed using SPSS. While there was a trend for whole cerebellar volume to decrease from controls to classic-ET to cerebellar-ET, this trend was not significant. The volume of several contiguous segments of the cerebellar vermis was reduced in ET patients versus controls. Furthermore, these vermis volumes were reduced in the cerebellar-ET group versus the classic-ET group. The volume of several adjacent segments of the cerebellar vermis was reduced in ET. This effect was more evident in ET patients with clinical signs of cerebellar dysfunction. The presence of tissue atrophy suggests that ET might be a neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26062905

  1. Aerodynamics of Reentry Vehicle Clipper at Descent Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Yu. P.; Reshetin, A. G.; Dyadkin, A. A.; Petrov, N. K.; Simakova, T. V.; Tokarev, V. A.

    2005-02-01

    From Gagarin spacecraft to reusable orbiter Buran, RSC Energia has traveled a long way in the search for the most optimal and, which is no less important, the most reliable spacecraft for manned space flight. During the forty years of space exploration, in cooperation with a broad base of subcontractors, a number of problems have been solved which assure a safe long stay in space. Vostok and Voskhod spacecraft were replaced with Soyuz supporting a crew of three. During missions to a space station, it provides crew rescue capability in case of a space station emergency at all times (the spacecraft life is 200 days).The latest modification of Soyuz spacecraft -Soyuz TMA -in contrast to its predecessors, allows to become a space flight participant to a person of virtually any anthropometric parameters with a mass of 50 to 95 kg capable of withstanding up to 6 g load during descent. At present, Soyuz TMA spacecraft are the state-of-the-art, reliable and only means of the ISS crew delivery, in-flight support and return. Introduced on the basis of many years of experience in operation of manned spacecraft were not only the principles of deep redundancy of on-board systems and equipment, but, to assure the main task of the spacecraft -the crew return to Earth -the principles of functional redundancy. That is, vital operations can be performed by different systems based on different physical principles. The emergency escape system that was developed is the only one in the world that provides crew rescue in case of LV failure at any phase in its flight. Several generations of space stations that have been developed have broadened, virtually beyond all limits, capabilities of man in space. The docking system developed at RSC Energia allowed not only to dock spacecraft in space, but also to construct in orbit various complex space systems. These include large space stations, and may include in the future the in-orbit construction of systems for the exploration of the Moon and Mars.. Logistics spacecraft Progress have been flying regularly since 1978. The tasks of these unmanned spacecraft include supplying the space station with all the necessities for long-duration missions, such as propellant for the space station propulsion system, crew life support consumables, scientific equipment for conducting experiments. Various modifications of the spacecraft have expanded the space station capabilities. 1988 saw the first, and, much to our regret, the last flight of the reusable orbiter Buran.. Buran could deliver to orbit up to 30 tons of cargo, return 20 tons to Earth and have a crew of up to 10. However, due to our country's economic situation the project was suspended.

  2. Shake rattle and roll: the bony labyrinth and aerial descent in squamates.

    PubMed

    Boistel, Renaud; Herrel, Anthony; Lebrun, Renaud; Daghfous, Gheylen; Tafforeau, Paul; Losos, Jonathan B; Vanhooydonck, Bieke

    2011-12-01

    Controlled aerial descent has evolved many times independently in vertebrates. Squamates (lizards and snakes) are unusual in that respect due to the large number of independent origins of the evolution of this behavior. Although some squamates such as flying geckos of the genus Ptychozoon and the flying dragons of the genus Draco show obvious adaptations including skin flaps or enlarged ribs allowing them to increase their surface area and slow down their descent, many others appear unspecialized. Yet, specializations can be expected at the level of the sensory and neural systems allowing animals to maintain stability during controlled aerial descent. The vestibular system is a likely candidate given that it is an acceleration detector and is well-suited to detect changes in pitch, roll and yaw. Here we use conventional and synchrotron μCT scans to quantify the morphology of the vestibular system in squamates able to perform controlled aerial descent compared to species characterized by a terrestrial or climbing life style. Our results show the presence of a strong phylogenetic signal in the data with the vestibular system in species from the same family being morphologically similar. However, both our shape analysis and an analysis of the dimensions of the vestibular system showed clear differences among animals with different life-styles. Species able to perform a controlled aerial descent differed in the position and shape of the inner ear, especially of the posterior ampulla. Given the limited stability of squamates against roll and the fact that the posterior ampulla is tuned to changes in roll this suggests an adaptive evolution of the vestibular system in squamates using controlled aerial descent. Future studies testing for similar differences in other groups of vertebrates known to use controlled aerial descent are needed to test the generality of this observation. PMID:21700578

  3. Re-defining the cerebellar cortex as an assembly of non-uniform Purkinje cell microcircuits

    PubMed Central

    Cerminara, Nadia L; Lang, Eric J; Sillitoe, Roy V; Apps, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The adult mammalian cerebellar cortex is generally assumed to have a uniform cytoarchitecture. Differences in cerebellar function are thought to arise, in the main, through distinct patterns of input and output connectivity, rather than as a result of variations in cortical microcircuitry. However, evidence from anatomical, physiological and genetic studies is increasingly challenging this orthodoxy and there are now various lines of evidence that the cerebellar cortex is non uniform. Here we develop the hypothesis that regional differences in cerebellar cortical microcircuit properties lead to important differences in information processing. PMID:25601779

  4. Conservative management in a rare case of spontaneous bilateral cerebellar haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lalla, Rakesh; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Verma, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage is usually associated with various risk factors such as hypertension, aneurysm, bleeding diatheses, anticoagulant use, amyloid angiopathy and remote bleed occurring after supratentorial and spinal surgery. Simultaneous bilateral cerebellar haemorrhage is rarely observed outside the setting of known precipitants and may follow a rapid downhill course. We present an unusual case of a young man who presented to us with sudden-onset cerebellar signs due to haemorrhage occurring in both the cerebellar hemispheres. Our patient had a favourable outcome with conservative management despite having bilateral cerebellar haematoma with partial obliteration of the fourth ventricle. PMID:22707701

  5. Cerebellar Output in Zebrafish: An Analysis of Spatial Patterns and Topography in Eurydendroid Cell Projections

    PubMed Central

    Heap, Lucy A.; Goh, Chi Ching; Kassahn, Karin S.; Scott, Ethan K.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum is a brain region responsible for motor coordination and for refining motor programs. While a great deal is known about the structure and connectivity of the mammalian cerebellum, fundamental questions regarding its function in behavior remain unanswered. Recently, the zebrafish has emerged as a useful model organism for cerebellar studies, owing in part to the similarity in cerebellar circuits between zebrafish and mammals. While the cell types composing their cerebellar cortical circuits are generally conserved with mammals, zebrafish lack deep cerebellar nuclei, and instead a majority of cerebellar output comes from a single type of neuron: the eurydendroid cell. To describe spatial patterns of cerebellar output in zebrafish, we have used genetic techniques to label and trace eurydendroid cells individually and en masse. We have found that cerebellar output targets the thalamus and optic tectum, and have confirmed the presence of pre-synaptic terminals from eurydendroid cells in these structures using a synaptically targeted GFP. By observing individual eurydendroid cells, we have shown that different medial-lateral regions of the cerebellum have eurydendroid cells projecting to different targets. Finally, we found topographic organization in the connectivity between the cerebellum and the optic tectum, where more medial eurydendroid cells project to the rostral tectum while lateral cells project to the caudal tectum. These findings indicate that there is spatial logic underpinning cerebellar output in zebrafish with likely implications for cerebellar function. PMID:23554587

  6. Anatomical and functional relationships between deep cerebellar nuclei and cerebellar cortical Crus II in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Nan; Jin, Hua; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Guo, Ao; Shi, Jin-Di; Feng, Jun-Yang; Li, Jia; Shen, Xuan-Xi; Shi, Yu; Qiu, De-Lai; Chu, Chun-Ping

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that an air-puff stimulation on the ipsilateral whisker pad evoked responses in molecular layer (ML) and Purkinje cell (PC) layer in cerebellar cortex folium Crus II. We used anterograde tracing and electrophysiological methods to investigate the anatomical and functional relationships between the trigeminal tactile response area in the cerebellar cortex Crus II and deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) in living mice. We found that the axons of tactile activated PCs projected in anterior part (IntA) and posterior part (IntP), and dorsolateral hump (IntDL) of ipsilateral interposed cerebellar nucleus (ICN). In ICN, the tactile stimulus evoked-field potential expressed a sequence of two negative components N1 and N2, while extracellular recordings from ICN neurons revealed that an increase in spike frequency in response to tactile stimulus. When the duration of facial air-puff stimulus were ?30ms, stimulation off response (Roff) were observed in the ICN, but an increase in the duration of facial air-puff stimulation did not significantly affect the amplitude of Ron (N1 and N2) and Roff. The latency and time to peak of N1 in ICN were significantly shorter than that of N1 in the ML, but the latency and time to peak of N2 in ICN were significantly later than that of P1 in the ML. The present results suggest that the facial sensory information, at least in part, is transferred to ICN by PC axons from Crus II, which evokes excitation in ICN neurons. PMID:26547033

  7. Correlation of LMP10 Expression and Clinical Outcome in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Positive and HPV-Negative Tonsillar and Base of Tongue Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tertipis, Nikolaos; Haeggblom, Linnea; Nordfors, Cecilia; Grn, Nathalie; Nsman, Anders; Vlastos, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Aim To examine LMP10 expression and its possible impact on clinical outcome in human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and HPV-negative tonsillar and base of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC and BOTSCC). Background Outcome is better in HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC compared to matching HPV-negative tumours, with roughly 80% vs. 40% 5-year disease free survival (DFS) with less aggressive treatment than todays chemoradiotherapy. Since current treatment often results in harmful side effects, less intensive therapy, with sustained patient survival would be an attractive alternative. However, other markers together with HPV status are necessary to select patients and for this purpose LMP10 expression is investigated here in parallel to HPV status and clinical outcome. Materials and Methods From 385 patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 at the Karolinska University Hospital, 278 formalin fixed paraffin embedded TSCC and BOTSCC biopsies, with known HPV DNA status, were tested for LMP10 nuclear and cytoplasmic expression (fraction of positive cells and staining intensity). The data was then correlated to clinical outcome. Results An absent/low compared to a moderate/high LMP10 nuclear fraction of positive cells was correlated to a better 3-year DFS in the HPV-positive group of patients (log-rank p?=?0.005), but not in the HPV-negative group. In the HPV-negative group of patients, in contrast to the HPV-positive group, moderate/high LMP10 cytoplasmic fraction and weak/moderate/high LMP10 cytoplasmic intensity correlated to a better 3-year DFS (p?=?0.003 and p?=?0.001) and 3-year overall survival (p?=?0.001 and 0.009). Conclusion LMP10 nuclear expression in the HPV-positive group and LMP10 cytoplasmic expression in the HPV-negative group of patients correlated to better clinical outcome. PMID:24752327

  8. Flavoprotein imaging in the cerebellar cortex in vivo: cellular and metabolic basis and insights into cerebellar function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wangcai; Chen, Gang; Ebner, Timothy J.

    2009-02-01

    Flavoprotein autofluorescence is an activity dependent intrinsic signal. Flavoproteins are involved in the electron transport chain and change their fluorescence according to the cellular redox state. We have been using flavoprotein autofluorescence in the cerebellum to examine properties of cerebellar circuits. Studies have also focused on understanding the cellular and metabolic origins of this intrinsic optical signal. Parallel fiber stimulation evokes a beamlike response intersected by bands of decreased fluorescence. The beam response is biphasic, with an early fluorescence increase (light phase) followed by a slower decrease (dark phase). We show this signal originates from flavoproteins as determined by its wavelength selectivity and sensitivity to blockers of the electron transport chain. Selectively blocking glutamate receptors abolished the on-beam light phase with the dark phase remaining intact. This demonstrates that the light phase is due to postsynaptic neuronal activation and suggests the dark phase is primarily due to glial activation. The bands of reduced fluorescence intersecting the beam are primarily neuronal in origin, mediated by GABAergic transmission, and due to the inhibitory action of molecular layer interneurons on Purkinje cells and the interneurons themselves. This parasagittally organized molecular layer inhibition differentially modulates the spatial pattern of cerebellar cortical activity. Flavoprotein imaging also reveals the functional architectures underlying the responses to inferior olive and peripheral whisker pad stimulation. Therefore, flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging is providing new insights into cerebellar cortical function and neurometabolic coupling.

  9. Planning fuel-conservative descents in an airline environmental using a small programmable calculator: Algorithm development and flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Vicroy, D. D.; Simmon, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    A simple, airborne, flight-management descent algorithm was developed and programmed into a small programmable calculator. The algorithm may be operated in either a time mode or speed mode. The time mode was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel-conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The speed model was designed for planning fuel-conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path for both modes was calculated for a constant with considerations given for the descent Mach/airspeed schedule, gross weight, wind, wind gradient, and nonstandard temperature effects. Flight tests, using the algorithm on the programmable calculator, showed that the open-loop guidance could be useful to airline flight crews for planning and executing fuel-conservative descents.

  10. Tracer-Based Determination of Vortex Descent in the 1999-2000 Arctic Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James R.; Hurst, Dale F.; Elkins, James W.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Herman, Robert L.; Webster, Christopher R.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed analysis of available in situ and remotely sensed N2O and CH4 data measured in the 1999-2000 winter Arctic vortex has been performed in order to quantify the temporal evolution of vortex descent. Differences in potential temperature (theta) among balloon and aircraft vertical profiles (an average of 19-23 K on a given N2O or CH4 isopleth) indicated significant vortex inhomogeneity in late fall as compared with late winter profiles. A composite fall vortex profile was constructed for November 26, 1999, whose error bars encompassed the observed variability. High-latitude, extravortex profiles measured in different years and seasons revealed substantial variability in N2O and CH4 on theta surfaces, but all were clearly distinguishable from the first vortex profiles measured in late fall 1999. From these extravortex-vortex differences, we inferred descent prior to November 26: 397+/-15 K (1sigma) at 30 ppbv N2O and 640 ppbv CH4, and 28+/-13 K above 200 ppbv N2O and 1280 ppbv CH4. Changes in theta were determined on five N2O and CH4 isopleths from November 26 through March 12, and descent rates were calculated on each N2O isopleth for several time intervals. The maximum descent rates were seen between November 26 and January 27: 0.82+/-0.20 K/day averaged over 50-250 ppbv N2O. By late winter (February 26-March 12), the average rate had decreased to 0.10+/-0.25 K/day. Descent rates also decreased with increasing N2O; the winter average (November 26-March 5) descent rate varied from 0.75+/-0.10 K/day at 50 ppbv to 0.40+/-0.11 K/day at 250 ppbv. Comparison of these results with observations and models of descent in prior years showed very good overall agreement. Two models of the 1999-2000 vortex descent, SLIMCAT and REPROBUS, despite theta offsets with respect to observed profiles of up to 20 K on most tracer isopleths, produced descent rates that agreed very favorably with the inferred rates from observation.

  11. Global patterns of prostate cancer incidence, aggressiveness, and mortality in men of african descent.

    PubMed

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Devesa, Susan S; Chang, Bao-Li; Bunker, Clareann H; Cheng, Iona; Cooney, Kathleen; Eeles, Rosalind; Fernandez, Pedro; Giri, Veda N; Gueye, Serigne M; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Heyns, Chris F; Hu, Jennifer J; Ingles, Sue Ann; Isaacs, William; Jalloh, Mohamed; John, Esther M; Kibel, Adam S; Kidd, Lacreis R; Layne, Penelope; Leach, Robin J; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Okobia, Michael N; Ostrander, Elaine A; Park, Jong Y; Patrick, Alan L; Phelan, Catherine M; Ragin, Camille; Roberts, Robin A; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Stanford, Janet L; Strom, Sara; Thompson, Ian M; Witte, John; Xu, Jianfeng; Yeboah, Edward; Hsing, Ann W; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita M

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the leading cancer among men of African descent in the USA, Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The estimated number of CaP deaths in SSA during 2008 was more than five times that among African Americans and is expected to double in Africa by 2030. We summarize publicly available CaP data and collected data from the men of African descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate (MADCaP) Consortium and the African Caribbean Cancer Consortium (AC3) to evaluate CaP incidence and mortality in men of African descent worldwide. CaP incidence and mortality are highest in men of African descent in the USA and the Caribbean. Tumor stage and grade were highest in SSA. We report a higher proportion of T1 stage prostate tumors in countries with greater percent gross domestic product spent on health care and physicians per 100,000 persons. We also observed that regions with a higher proportion of advanced tumors reported lower mortality rates. This finding suggests that CaP is underdiagnosed and/or underreported in SSA men. Nonetheless, CaP incidence and mortality represent a significant public health problem in men of African descent around the world. PMID:23476788

  12. Quadratic steepest descent on potential energy surfaces. I. Basic formalism and quantitative assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun-Qiang; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    1993-10-01

    A novel second-order algorithm is formulated for determining steepest-descent lines on potential energy surfaces. The reaction path is deduced from successive exact steepest-descent lines of local quadratic approximations to the surface. At each step, a distinction is made between three points: the center for the local quadratic Taylor expansion of the surface, the junction of the two adjacent local steepest-descent line approximations, and the predicted approximation to the true steepest-descent line. This flexibility returns a more efficient yield from the calculated information and increases the accuracy of the local quadratic approximations by almost an order of magnitude. In addition, the step size is varied with the curvature and, if desired, can be readjusted by a trust region assessment. Applications to the Gonzalez-Schlegel and the Mller-Brown surfaces show the method to compare favorably with existing methods. Several measures are given for assessing the accuracy achieved without knowledge of the exact steepest-descent line. The optimal evaluation of the predicted gradient and curvature for dynamical applications is discussed.

  13. Global Patterns of Prostate Cancer Incidence, Aggressiveness, and Mortality in Men of African Descent

    PubMed Central

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Devesa, Susan S.; Chang, Bao-Li; Bunker, Clareann H.; Cheng, Iona; Cooney, Kathleen; Eeles, Rosalind; Fernandez, Pedro; Giri, Veda N.; Gueye, Serigne M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Heyns, Chris F.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ingles, Sue Ann; Isaacs, William; Jalloh, Mohamed; John, Esther M.; Kibel, Adam S.; Kidd, LaCreis R.; Layne, Penelope; Leach, Robin J.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Okobia, Michael N.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Park, Jong Y.; Patrick, Alan L.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Ragin, Camille; Roberts, Robin A.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Stanford, Janet L.; Strom, Sara; Thompson, Ian M.; Witte, John; Xu, Jianfeng; Yeboah, Edward; Hsing, Ann W.; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita M.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the leading cancer among men of African descent in the USA, Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The estimated number of CaP deaths in SSA during 2008 was more than five times that among African Americans and is expected to double in Africa by 2030. We summarize publicly available CaP data and collected data from the men of African descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate (MADCaP) Consortium and the African Caribbean Cancer Consortium (AC3) to evaluate CaP incidence and mortality in men of African descent worldwide. CaP incidence and mortality are highest in men of African descent in the USA and the Caribbean. Tumor stage and grade were highest in SSA. We report a higher proportion of T1 stage prostate tumors in countries with greater percent gross domestic product spent on health care and physicians per 100,000 persons. We also observed that regions with a higher proportion of advanced tumors reported lower mortality rates. This finding suggests that CaP is underdiagnosed and/or underreported in SSA men. Nonetheless, CaP incidence and mortality represent a significant public health problem in men of African descent around the world. PMID:23476788

  14. Comparison of minimum-action and steepest-descent paths in gradient systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Leines, Grisell; Rogal, Jutta

    2016-02-01

    On high-dimensional and complex potential energy surfaces, the identification of the most likely mechanism for the transition between local minima is a challenging task. Usually the steepest-descent path is used interchangeably with the minimum-energy path and is associated with the most likely path. Here we compare the meaning of the steepest-descent path in complex energy landscapes to the path integral formulation of a trajectory that minimizes the action functional for Brownian dynamics. In particular, for energy landscapes with bifurcation points and multiple minima and saddle points, there can be several steepest-descent paths associated with specific saddles that connect two predetermined states but largely differ from the path of maximum likelihood. The minimum-action path, however, additionally takes into account the scalar work along the trajectory. Minimizing the scalar work can be less ambiguous in the identification of the most likely path in different gradient systems. It can also be used to distinguish between multiple steepest-descent paths that connect reactant and product states. We illustrate that in systems with complex energy landscapes a careful assessment of the steepest-descent path is thus advisable. Here the evaluation of the action can provide valuable information on the analysis and description of the most likely path.

  15. Cerebellar atrophy in Parkinson's disease and its implication for network connectivity.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Claire; Hornberger, Michael; Balsters, Joshua H; Halliday, Glenda M; Lewis, Simon J G; Shine, James M

    2016-03-01

    Pathophysiological and atrophic changes in the cerebellum are documented in Parkinson's disease. Without compensatory activity, such abnormalities could potentially have more widespread effects on both motor and non-motor symptoms. We examined how atrophic change in the cerebellum impacts functional connectivity patterns within the cerebellum and between cerebellar-cortical networks in 42 patients with Parkinson's disease and 29 control subjects. Voxel-based morphometry confirmed grey matter loss across the motor and cognitive cerebellar territories in the patient cohort. The extent of cerebellar atrophy correlated with decreased resting-state connectivity between the cerebellum and large-scale cortical networks, including the sensorimotor, dorsal attention and default networks, but with increased connectivity between the cerebellum and frontoparietal networks. The severity of patients' motor impairment was predicted by a combination of cerebellar atrophy and decreased cerebellar-sensorimotor connectivity. These findings demonstrate that cerebellar atrophy is related to both increases and decreases in cerebellar-cortical connectivity in Parkinson's disease, identifying potential cerebellar driven functional changes associated with sensorimotor deficits. A post hoc analysis exploring the effect of atrophy in the subthalamic nucleus, a cerebellar input source, confirmed that a significant negative relationship between grey matter volume and intrinsic cerebellar connectivity seen in controls was absent in the patients. This suggests that the modulatory relationship of the subthalamic nucleus on intracerebellar connectivity is lost in Parkinson's disease, which may contribute to pathological activation within the cerebellum. The results confirm significant changes in cerebellar network activity in Parkinson's disease and reveal that such changes occur in association with atrophy of the cerebellum. PMID:26794597

  16. Huygens entry and descent through Titan's atmosphereMethodology and results of the trajectory reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazeminejad, Bobby; Atkinson, David H.; Prez-Aycar, Miguel; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Sollazzo, Claudio

    2007-11-01

    The European Space Agency's Huygens probe separated from the NASA Cassini spacecraft on 25 December 2004, after having been attached for a 7-year interplanetary journey and three orbits around Saturn. The probe reached the predefined NASA/ESA interface point on 14 January 2005 at 09:05:52.523 (UTC) and performed a successful entry and descent sequence. The probe softly impacted on Titan's surface on the same day at 11:38:10.77 (UTC) with a speed of about 4.54 m/s. The probe entry and descent trajectory was reconstructed from the estimated initial state vector provided by the Cassini Navigation team, the probe housekeeping data, and measurements from the scientific payload. This paper presents the methodology and discuss the results of the reconstruction effort. Furthermore the probe roll rate was reconstructed prior to the main entry phase deceleration pulse and throughout the entire descent phase under the main and drogue parachute.

  17. Recovering the attitude of the Huygens descent module using DISR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizk, B.; Tomasko, M. G.; Bushroe, M. W.; McFarlane, E. A.; See, C.

    2004-02-01

    Data from a combination of DISR instruments will allow probe attitude reconstruction during the descent phase. The radiances measured by the DISR Sun Sensor (SS), Side-Looking Imager (SLI) and Solar Aureole (SA 1, 2, 3 and 4) cameras as they are exposed to different sections of Titan sky and surface while the descent module spins, will be compared to a model of the satellite's absolute sky brightness in order to discern deviations from a baseline simulations with no tips or tilts. Thus the attitude of the probe can be deduced. Deriving the attitude allows High-Resolution Imager (HRI) and Medium-Resolution Imager (MRI) ground tracks to be assembled by correlating ground features from image to image and altitudes determined from SLI measurements of the level of the horizon. Hence the descent trajectory can be determined.

  18. Preliminary assessment of the Mars Science Laboratory entry, descent, and landing simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, David W.

    On August 5, 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, successfully landed inside Gale Crater. This landing was the seventh successful landing and fourth rover to be delivered to Mars. Weighing nearly one metric ton, Curiosity is the largest and most complex rover ever sent to investigate another planet. Safely landing such a large payload required an innovative Entry, Descent, and Landing system, which included the first guided entry at Mars, the largest supersonic parachute ever flown at Mars, and the novel Sky Crane landing system. A complete, end-to-end, six degree-of-freedom, multi-body computer simulation of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing sequence was developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. In-flight data gathered during the successful landing is compared to pre-flight statistical distributions, predicted by the simulation. These comparisons provide insight into both the accuracy of the simulation and the overall performance of the Entry, Descent, and Landing system.

  19. Control of stair ascent and descent with a powered transfemoral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Brian Edward; Varol, Huseyin Atakan; Huff, Amanda; Erdemir, Erdem; Goldfarb, Michael

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a finite state-based control system for a powered transfemoral prosthesis that provides stair ascent and descent capability. The control system was implemented on a powered prosthesis and evaluated by a unilateral, transfemoral amputee subject. The ability of the powered prosthesis to provide stair ascent and descent capability was assessed by comparing the gait kinematics, as recorded by a motion capture system, with the kinematics provided by a passive prosthesis, in addition to those recorded from a set of healthy subjects. The results indicate that the powered prosthesis provides gait kinematics that are considerably more representative of healthy gait, relative to the passive prosthesis, for both stair ascent and descent. PMID:23096120

  20. Descent and Landing Triggers for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Exploration Flight Test-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihari, Brian D.; Semrau, Jeffrey D.; Duke, Charity J.

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) will perform a flight test known as Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) currently scheduled for 2014. One of the primary functions of this test is to exercise all of the important Guidance, Navigation, Control (GN&C), and Propulsion systems, along with the flight software for future flights. The Descent and Landing segment of the flight is governed by the requirements levied on the GN&C system by the Landing and Recovery System (LRS). The LRS is a complex system of parachutes and flight control modes that ensure that the Orion MPCV safely lands at its designated target in the Pacific Ocean. The Descent and Landing segment begins with the jettisoning of the Forward Bay Cover and concludes with sensing touchdown. This paper discusses the requirements, design, testing, analysis and performance of the current EFT-1 Descent and Landing Triggers flight software.

  1. Experimental liquid line of descent and liquid immiscibility for basalt 70017. [lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, M. J.; Hess, P. C.; Daniel, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    The paper describes one possible liquid line of descent produced for a high-titanium mare basalt composition through an arbitrarily chosen series of partial equilibrium and fractional crystallization experiments on basalt 70017. The liquid line of descent leading to immiscibility at 994 C is characterized by enrichment of FeO, K2O, SiO2, and MnO and depletion of MgO and TiO2 in the residual liquids. The composition of the residual liquid at the onset of immiscibility is ferrobasaltic, and the initial appearance of immiscible liquids in the form of silica-rich spherules is in the vicinity of plagioclase-liquid contacts. The integrated bulk composition of the areas of finely exsolved liquids indicates that the trend of the liquid line of descent is at a small angle to the tie lines joining the two liquids.

  2. Evolutionary analyses of non-genealogical bonds produced by introgressive descent

    PubMed Central

    Bapteste, Eric; Lopez, Philippe; Bouchard, Frdric; Baquero, Fernando; McInerney, James O.; Burian, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    All evolutionary biologists are familiar with evolutionary units that evolve by vertical descent in a tree-like fashion in single lineages. However, many other kinds of processes contribute to evolutionary diversity. In vertical descent, the genetic material of a particular evolutionary unit is propagated by replication inside its own lineage. In what we call introgressive descent, the genetic material of a particular evolutionary unit propagates into different host structures and is replicated within these host structures. Thus, introgressive descent generates a variety of evolutionary units and leaves recognizable patterns in resemblance networks. We characterize six kinds of evolutionary units, of which five involve mosaic lineages generated by introgressive descent. To facilitate detection of these units in resemblance networks, we introduce terminology based on two notions, P3s (subgraphs of three nodes: A, B, and C) and mosaic P3s, and suggest an apparatus for systematic detection of introgressive descent. Mosaic P3s correspond to a distinct type of evolutionary bond that is orthogonal to the bonds of kinship and genealogy usually examined by evolutionary biologists. We argue that recognition of these evolutionary bonds stimulates radical rethinking of key questions in evolutionary biology (e.g., the relations among evolutionary players in very early phases of evolutionary history, the origin and emergence of novelties, and the production of new lineages). This line of research will expand the study of biological complexity beyond the usual genealogical bonds, revealing additional sources of biodiversity. It provides an important step to a more realistic pluralist treatment of evolutionary complexity. PMID:23090996

  3. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS)

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P.; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J.; Edwards, Dylan J.; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M.; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R. Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A.; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S. Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar–motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar–thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions. PMID:25406224

  4. Cerebellar Contribution to Context Processing in Extinction Learning and Recall.

    PubMed

    Chang, D-I; Lissek, S; Ernst, T M; Thrling, M; Uengoer, M; Tegenthoff, M; Ladd, M E; Timmann, D

    2015-12-01

    Whereas acquisition of new associations is considered largely independent of the context, context dependency is a hallmark of extinction of the learned associations. The hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex are known to be involved in context processing during extinction learning and recall. Although the cerebellum has known functional and anatomic connections to the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex, cerebellar contributions to context processing of extinction have rarely been studied. In the present study, we reanalyzed functional brain imaging data (fMRI) of previous work investigating context effects during extinction in a cognitive associative learning paradigm in 28 young and healthy subjects (Lissek et al. Neuroimage. 81:131-3, 2013). In that study, event-related fMRI analysis did not include the cerebellum. The 3T fMRI dataset was reanalyzed using a spatial normalization method optimized for the cerebellum. Data of seven participants had to be excluded because the cerebellum had not been scanned in full. Cerebellar activation related to context change during extinction learning was most prominent in lobule Crus II bilaterally (p??2.53; partially corrected by predetermined cluster size). No significant cerebellar activations were observed related to context change during extinction retrieval. The posterolateral cerebellum appears to contribute to context-related processes during extinction learning, but not (or less) during extinction retrieval. The cerebellum may support context learning during extinction via its connections to the hippocampus. Alternatively, the cerebellum may support the shifting of attention to the context via its known connections to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Because the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is critically involved in context-related processes during extinction retrieval, and there are no known connections between the cerebellum and the vmPFC, the cerebellum may be less important during extinction recall. PMID:25863813

  5. Cerebellar Integrity in the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - Frontotemporal Dementia Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Rachel H.; Devenney, Emma; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Kwok, John B.; Hodges, John R.; Kiernan, Matthew C.; Halliday, Glenda M.; Hornberger, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are multisystem neurodegenerative disorders that manifest overlapping cognitive, neuropsychiatric and motor features. The cerebellum has long been known to be crucial for intact motor function although emerging evidence over the past decade has attributed cognitive and neuropsychiatric processes to this structure. The current study set out i) to establish the integrity of cerebellar subregions in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia spectrum (ALS-bvFTD) and ii) determine whether specific cerebellar atrophy regions are associated with cognitive, neuropsychiatric and motor symptoms in the patients. Seventy-eight patients diagnosed with ALS, ALS-bvFTD, behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), most without C9ORF72 gene abnormalities, and healthy controls were investigated. Participants underwent cognitive, neuropsychiatric and functional evaluation as well as structural imaging using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to examine the grey matter subregions of the cerebellar lobules, vermis and crus. VBM analyses revealed: i) significant grey matter atrophy in the cerebellum across the whole ALS-bvFTD continuum; ii) atrophy predominantly of the superior cerebellum and crus in bvFTD patients, atrophy of the inferior cerebellum and vermis in ALS patients, while ALS-bvFTD patients had both patterns of atrophy. Post-hoc covariance analyses revealed that cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms were particularly associated with atrophy of the crus and superior lobule, while motor symptoms were more associated with atrophy of the inferior lobules. Taken together, these findings indicate an important role of the cerebellum in the ALS-bvFTD disease spectrum, with all three clinical phenotypes demonstrating specific patterns of subregional atrophy that associated with different symptomology. PMID:25144223

  6. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity in motor and association networks in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Shinn, Ann K.; Baker, Justin T.; Lewandowski, Kathryn E.; ngr, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating illness characterized by disturbances in multiple domains. The cerebellum is involved in both motor and non-motor functions, and the cognitive dysmetria and dysmetria of thought models propose that abnormalities of the cerebellum may contribute to schizophrenia signs and symptoms. The cerebellum and cerebral cortex are reciprocally connected via a modular, closed-loop network architecture, but few schizophrenia neuroimaging studies have taken into account the topographical and functional heterogeneity of the cerebellum. In this study, using a previously defined 17-network cerebral cortical parcellation system as the basis for our functional connectivity seeds, we systematically investigated connectivity abnormalities within the cerebellum of 44 schizophrenia patients and 28 healthy control participants. We found selective alterations in cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity. Specifically, schizophrenia patients showed decreased cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity in higher level association networks (ventral attention, salience, control, and default mode networks) relative to healthy control participants. Schizophrenia patients also showed increased cerebro-cerebellar connectivity in somatomotor and default mode networks, with the latter showing no overlap with the regions found to be hypoconnected within the same default mode network. Finally, we found evidence to suggest that somatomotor and default mode networks may be inappropriately linked in schizophrenia. The relationship of these dysconnectivities to schizophrenia symptoms, such as neurological soft signs and altered sense of agency, is discussed. We conclude that the cerebellum ought to be considered for analysis in all future studies of network abnormalities in SZ, and further suggest the cerebellum as a potential target for further elucidation, and possibly treatment, of the underlying mechanisms and network abnormalities producing symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:25852520

  7. [A case of cerebellar syndrome associated with HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Seika; Wate, Reika; Shinde, Akiyo; Asayama, Shinya; Nakano, Satoshi; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2009-10-01

    A 36-year-old man was hospitalized because of subacutely progressive gait disturbance. Neurological examination disclosed severe ataxia of gait and trunk and moderate ataxia of the four limbs, without signs of cognitive impairment. There were no manifestations of systemic infections. Brain MRI showed mild atrophy of the cerebellar vermis and hemispheres. Extensive laboratory search failed to disclose the cause of subacute ataxia. Cerebellar ataxia progressed, leading to the patient becoming wheelchair-bound two months after admission, when PCR analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid was positive for Epstein-Barr, JC, and hepatitis B viruses. In addition, the quantity of serum HIV1-RNA was 2.9 x 10(4) copies, the absolute count of CD4+ lymphocyte was 28/mm3, and the CD4/CD8 ratio was 0.04, despite clear denials by both the patient and his wife regarding any apparent infectious opportunities. Accordingly thereafter, highly active antiretroviral therapy was initiated. Several weeks after the initiation of therapy, ataxia stabilized with disappearance of serum HIV and cerebrospinal fluid JCV viral load. He returned to his occupation 20 months after disease onset without progression of ataxia or development of other neurological dysfunctions including dementia. We could not establish the exact pathogenesis of ataxia in this patient It could have been primary cerebellar degeneration caused by HIV, or the other viruses detected (EBV, JCV) or autoimmune mechanisms caused by these viruses. However, HIV infection should be considered as an etiology in clinical setting of subacute ataxia, particularly in a young or immunocompromised patient. PMID:19999147

  8. Probabilistic Identification of Cerebellar Cortical Neurones across Species

    PubMed Central

    Van Dijck, Gert; Van Hulle, Marc M.; Heiney, Shane A.; Blazquez, Pablo M.; Meng, Hui; Angelaki, Dora E.; Arenz, Alexander; Margrie, Troy W.; Mostofi, Abteen; Edgley, Steve; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Ekerot, Carl-Fredrik; Jrntell, Henrik; Dalley, Jeffrey W.; Holtzman, Tahl

    2013-01-01

    Despite our fine-grain anatomical knowledge of the cerebellar cortex, electrophysiological studies of circuit information processing over the last fifty years have been hampered by the difficulty of reliably assigning signals to identified cell types. We approached this problem by assessing the spontaneous activity signatures of identified cerebellar cortical neurones. A range of statistics describing firing frequency and irregularity were then used, individually and in combination, to build Gaussian Process Classifiers (GPC) leading to a probabilistic classification of each neurone type and the computation of equi-probable decision boundaries between cell classes. Firing frequency statistics were useful for separating Purkinje cells from granular layer units, whilst firing irregularity measures proved most useful for distinguishing cells within granular layer cell classes. Considered as single statistics, we achieved classification accuracies of 72.5% and 92.7% for granular layer and molecular layer units respectively. Combining statistics to form twin-variate GPC models substantially improved classification accuracies with the combination of mean spike frequency and log-interval entropy offering classification accuracies of 92.7% and 99.2% for our molecular and granular layer models, respectively. A cross-species comparison was performed, using data drawn from anaesthetised mice and decerebrate cats, where our models offered 80% and 100% classification accuracy. We then used our models to assess non-identified data from awake monkeys and rabbits in order to highlight subsets of neurones with the greatest degree of similarity to identified cell classes. In this way, our GPC-based approach for tentatively identifying neurones from their spontaneous activity signatures, in the absence of an established ground-truth, nonetheless affords the experimenter a statistically robust means of grouping cells with properties matching known cell classes. Our approach therefore may have broad application to a variety of future cerebellar cortical investigations, particularly in awake animals where opportunities for definitive cell identification are limited. PMID:23469215

  9. Late onset cerebellar degeneration in a middle-aged cat.

    PubMed

    Negrin, Arianna; Bernardini, Marco; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Castagnaro, Massimo

    2006-12-01

    Cerebellar degeneration (abiotrophy) (CD) is a spontaneous and accelerated degeneration of one or several mature cerebellar neuronal cell populations and has been described in many domestic animals, especially in dogs, with numerous breed-related cases. In cats, CD is mentioned as a rare sporadic entity. Late onset CDs are exceptionally uncommon and only two cases are reported in young adults, both aged 18 months. This report describes clinical and pathological findings of a late onset feline CD in a 9-year-old male Persian cat. The cat was presented with a history of progressive ataxia lasting 2 years. Neurological examination revealed severe neurological deficits such as generalised and severe ataxia, hypermetria in all four limbs, and bilateral absence of menace response. The lesion was diffusely localised in cerebellum. On gross pathology, the cerebellum appeared of normal size and shape and kidneys were characterised by mild hyperaemia. Histologically, lesions were limited to the cerebellum and kidneys. In the cerebellum, all cerebellar folia of both hemispheres and the vermis were affected. Changes were characterised by severe and diffuse loss of Purkinje cells, loss of cellularity in the granular layer, mild astrogliosis associated with moderate hypertrophy of Bergmann's glia. Immunohistochemistry for feline parvovirus antigen revealed a negative result. Renal lesions consisted of chronic fibrosis associated with chronic interstitial nephritis. CD is a rare disease and occurs commonly in puppies or young animals, who are clinically normal at birth and usually develop neurological signs within a few weeks or months after birth. This report represents the first case of CD in a middle-aged cat. PMID:16781880

  10. Probabilistic identification of cerebellar cortical neurones across species.

    PubMed

    Van Dijck, Gert; Van Hulle, Marc M; Heiney, Shane A; Blazquez, Pablo M; Meng, Hui; Angelaki, Dora E; Arenz, Alexander; Margrie, Troy W; Mostofi, Abteen; Edgley, Steve; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Ekerot, Carl-Fredrik; Jrntell, Henrik; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Holtzman, Tahl

    2013-01-01

    Despite our fine-grain anatomical knowledge of the cerebellar cortex, electrophysiological studies of circuit information processing over the last fifty years have been hampered by the difficulty of reliably assigning signals to identified cell types. We approached this problem by assessing the spontaneous activity signatures of identified cerebellar cortical neurones. A range of statistics describing firing frequency and irregularity were then used, individually and in combination, to build Gaussian Process Classifiers (GPC) leading to a probabilistic classification of each neurone type and the computation of equi-probable decision boundaries between cell classes. Firing frequency statistics were useful for separating Purkinje cells from granular layer units, whilst firing irregularity measures proved most useful for distinguishing cells within granular layer cell classes. Considered as single statistics, we achieved classification accuracies of 72.5% and 92.7% for granular layer and molecular layer units respectively. Combining statistics to form twin-variate GPC models substantially improved classification accuracies with the combination of mean spike frequency and log-interval entropy offering classification accuracies of 92.7% and 99.2% for our molecular and granular layer models, respectively. A cross-species comparison was performed, using data drawn from anaesthetised mice and decerebrate cats, where our models offered 80% and 100% classification accuracy. We then used our models to assess non-identified data from awake monkeys and rabbits in order to highlight subsets of neurones with the greatest degree of similarity to identified cell classes. In this way, our GPC-based approach for tentatively identifying neurones from their spontaneous activity signatures, in the absence of an established ground-truth, nonetheless affords the experimenter a statistically robust means of grouping cells with properties matching known cell classes. Our approach therefore may have broad application to a variety of future cerebellar cortical investigations, particularly in awake animals where opportunities for definitive cell identification are limited. PMID:23469215

  11. Properties of bilateral spinocerebellar activation of cerebellar cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Geborek, Pontus; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Jrntell, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to explore the cerebellar cortical inputs from two spinocerebellar pathways, the spinal border cell-component of the ventral spinocerebellar tract (SBC-VSCT) and the dorsal spinocerebellar tract (DSCT), respectively, in the sublobule C1 of the cerebellar posterior lobe. The two pathways were activated by electrical stimulation of the contralateral lateral funiculus (coLF) and the ipsilateral LF (iLF) at lower thoracic levels. Most granule cells in sublobule C1 did not respond at all but part of the granule cell population displayed high-intensity responses to either coLF or iLF stimulation. As a rule, Golgi cells and Purkinje cell simple spikes responded to input from both LFs, although Golgi cells could be more selective. In addition, a small population of granule cells responded to input from both the coLF and the iLF. However, in these cases, similarities in the temporal topography and magnitude of the responses suggested that the same axons were stimulated from the two LFs, i.e., that the axons of individual spinocerebellar neurons could be present in both funiculi. This was also confirmed for a population of spinal neurons located within known locations of SBC-VSCT neurons and dorsal horn (dh) DSCT neurons. We conclude that bilateral spinocerebellar responses can occur in cerebellar granule cells, but the VSCT and DSCT systems that provide the input can also be organized bilaterally. The implications for the traditional functional separation of VSCT and DSCT systems and the issue whether granule cells primarily integrate functionally similar information or not are discussed. PMID:25386122

  12. Cerebellar granuloprival degeneration in an Australian kelpie and a Labrador retriever dog.

    PubMed

    Huska, Jonathan; Gaitero, Luis; Snyman, Heindrich N; Foster, Robert A; Pumarola, Marti; Rodenas, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    A 7-month-old Australian kelpie dog and a 14-month-old Labrador retriever dog were diagnosed with an uncommon form of cerebellar abiotrophy called cerebellar granuloprival degeneration. This was characterized by a loss of the granular neurons with relative sparing of the Purkinje neurons. PMID:23814302

  13. Parvovirus associated cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus in day-old broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus were detected in day-old broiler chickens. Brains of chickens evaluated at necropsy appeared to be abnormal; some were disfigured and cerebellae appeared to be smaller than normal. Histopathologic examination of brains revealed cerebellar folia that were sho...

  14. The Cerebellar Deficit Hypothesis and Dyslexic Tendencies in a Non-Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, Rebecca L.; Stirling, John

    2005-01-01

    In order to assess the relationship between cerebellar deficits and dyslexic tendencies in a non-clinical sample, 27 primary school children aged 8-9 completed a cerebellar soft signs battery and were additionally assessed for reading age, sequential memory, picture arrangement and knowledge of common sequences. An average measure of the soft

  15. Purkinje Cell Activity in the Cerebellar Anterior Lobe after Rabbit Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, John T.; Steinmetz, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    The cerebellar anterior lobe may play a critical role in the execution and proper timing of learned responses. The current study was designed to monitor Purkinje cell activity in the rabbit cerebellar anterior lobe after eyeblink conditioning, and to assess whether Purkinje cells in recording locations may project to the interpositus nucleus.

  16. Cerebellar Volume in Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Disorder with and without Psychotic Features

    PubMed Central

    Laidi, Charles; d’Albis, Marc-Antoine; Wessa, Michèle; Linke, Julia; Phillips, Mary; Delavest, Marine; Bellivier, Frank; Versace, Amelia; Almeida, Jorge; Sarrazin, Samuel; Poupon, Cyril; Le Dudal, Katia; Daban, Claire; Hamdani, Nora; Leboyer, Marion; Houenou, Josselin

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is growing evidence that cerebellum plays a crucial role in cognition and emotional regulation. Cerebellum is likely to be involved in the physiopathology of both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The objective of our study was to compare cerebellar size between patients with bipolar disorder patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls in a multicenter sample. In addition, we studied the influence of psychotic features on cerebellar size in bipolar patients. Method One hundred and fifteen bipolar I patients, thirty-two patients with schizophrenia and fifty-two healthy controls underwent 3 Tesla MRI. Automated segmentation of cerebellum was performed using FreeSurfer software. Volumes of cerebellar cortex and white matter were extracted. Analyses of covariance were conducted and age, sex and intracranial volume were considered as covariates. Results Bilateral cerebellar cortical volumes were smaller in patients with schizophrenia compared to patients with bipolar I disorder and healthy controls. We found no significant difference of cerebellar volume between bipolar patients with and without psychotic features. No change was evidenced in white matter. Conclusion Our results suggest that reduction of cerebellar cortical volume is specific to schizophrenia. Cerebellar dysfunction in bipolar disorder, if present, appears to be more subtle than a reduction in cerebellar volume. PMID:25430729

  17. Large-scale mitochondrial DNA deletion underlying familial multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar subtype.

    PubMed

    Alsemari, Abdulaziz; Al-Hindi, Hindi Nasser

    2016-02-01

    A family with mitochondrial inheritance of multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar subtype. MRI brain shows significant cerebellar atrophy with mild pontine atrophy and the classical hot cross bun sign in Pons. The muscle biopsy was indicative of mitochondrial myopathy. Mitochondrial DNA analysis revealed a low-level large mtDNA deletion, m.3264_1607del12806bp. PMID:26862402

  18. Cerebellar arachnoid cyst in a firesetter: the weight of organic lesions in arson.

    PubMed Central

    Heidrich, A; Schmidtke, A; Lesch, K P; Hofmann, E; Becker, T

    1996-01-01

    A 52-year-old female patient was accused of arson; the patient had had an arachnoid cyst of the cerebellar vermis. Even after surgery, she showed marked instability of mood and pseudologia fantastica, but did not suffer from cognitive impairment. Possible associations of the presence of this cerebellar arachnoid cyst and behavioral disturbances are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8935333

  19. Incidence of Dysarthria in Children with Cerebellar Tumors: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, S.; Schoch, B.; Ozimek, A.; Gorissen, B.; Hein-Kropp, C.; Kaiser, O.; Hovel, M.; Wieland, R.; Gizewski, E.; Timmann, D.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated dysarthric symptoms in children with cerebellar tumors. Ten children with cerebellar tumors and 10 orthopedic control children were tested prior and one week after surgery. Clinical dysarthric symptoms were quantified in spontaneous speech. Syllable durations were analyzed in syllable repetition and sentence

  20. Autosomal dominant late onset cerebellar ataxia with myoclonus, peripheral neuropathy and sensorineural deafness: a clinicopathological report.

    PubMed Central

    Baraitser, M; Gooddy, W; Halliday, A M; Harding, A E; Rudge, P; Scaravilli, F

    1984-01-01

    Three members of a family were affected by an autosomal dominant disorder comprising cerebellar ataxia, sensorineural deafness, myoclonus, and peripheral neuropathy. This is the second kindred with this syndrome reported to date. Necropsy of the proband showed loss of cells in the dentate nuclei, a reduced amount of cerebellar white matter, and pallor of the gracile tracts in the spinal cord. Images PMID:6319613

  1. Cerebellar granuloprival degeneration in an Australian kelpie and a Labrador retriever dog

    PubMed Central

    Huska, Jonathan; Gaitero, Luis; Snyman, Heindrich N.; Foster, Robert A.; Pumarola, Marti; Rodenas, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    A 7-month-old Australian kelpie dog and a 14-month-old Labrador retriever dog were diagnosed with an uncommon form of cerebellar abiotrophy called cerebellar granuloprival degeneration. This was characterized by a loss of the granular neurons with relative sparing of the Purkinje neurons. PMID:23814302

  2. Overview of the NASA Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Dwyer-Cianciolo, Alicia M.; Kinney, David J.; Howard, Austin R.; Chen, George T.; Ivanov, Mark C.; Sostaric, Ronald R.; Westhelle, Carlos H.

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and human-scale missions. This paper summarizes the approach and top-level results from Year 1 of the Study, which focused on landing 10-50 mt on Mars, but also included a trade study of the best advanced parachute design for increasing the landed payloads within the EDL architecture of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission.

  3. Steepest Descent Trajectories on Isosurfaces of the Scalar Field and of Fluctuations of the Scalar Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasukov, V. V.; Moldovanova, E. A.; Il'kin, E. E.; Novoselov, V. V.; Rozhkova, S. V.; Rozhkova, O. V.

    2015-05-01

    It has been shown that steepest descent trajectories on an isosurface of the scalar field or of fluctuations of the scalar curvature can serve as the geometric skeleton of galaxies, these trajectories simultaneously being isolines of the isosurface. Isolines and isosurfaces can generate matter via the mechanism of spontaneous emission of the Lemaître-Friedmann primordial atom. Steepest descent trajectories on an isosurface of fluctuations of the scalar curvature can also serve as the skeleton of quantum inhomogeneities of the density in GTR.

  4. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis: Exploration Class Simulation Overview and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Davis, Jody L.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Powell, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and exploration or human-scale missions. The year one exploration class mission activity considered technologies capable of delivering a 40-mt payload. This paper provides an overview of the exploration class mission study, including technologies considered, models developed and initial simulation results from the EDL-SA year one effort.

  5. Initial Field Evaluation of Pilot Procedures for Flying CTAS Descent Clearances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Everett; Goka, Tsuyoshi; Cashion, Patricia; Feary, Michael; Graham, Holly; Smith, Nancy; Shafto, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) is a new support system that is designed to assist air traffic controllers in the management of arrival traffic. CTAS will provide controllers with more information about current air traffic, enabling them to provide clearances for efficient, conflict-free descents that help achieve an orderly stream of aircraft at the final approach fix. CTAS is a computer-based system that functions as a "ground-based FMS" that can predict flight trajectories and arrival times for all incoming aircraft. CTAS uses an aircraft's cruise airspeed; current air traffic, winds and temperature; performance characteristics of the aircraft type; and individual airline preferences to create a flight profile from cruise altitude to the final approach fix. Controllers can use this flight profile to provide a descent clearance that will allow an aircraft to fly an efficient descent and merge more smoothly with other arriving aircraft. A field test of the CTAS Descent Advisor software was conducted at the Denver Center for aircraft arriving at the Stapleton International Airport from September 12-29. CTAS Descent clearances were given to a NASA flight test aircraft and to 77 airline flights that arrived during low traffic periods. For the airline portion of the field test, cockpit procedures and pilot briefing packages for both FMS equipped and unequipped aircraft were developed in cooperation with an airline. The procedures developed for the FMS equipped aircraft were to fly a VNAV descent at a controller specified speed to cross a metering fix at a specified altitude and speed. For nonFMS aircraft, the clearance also specified a CTAS calculated top-of-descent point. Some CTAS related flight deck issues included how much time was available to the pilots' for compliance, the amount of information that needed to be interpreted in the clearance and possible repercussions of misunderstandings. Data collected during the study ranged from subjective data (including the airline pilots' opinions and comments about the new descent clearances and procedures) to objective data (including observations of aircraft performance from the flight deck). This paper will present data and the resulting changes in the design of the procedures and clearance phraseology.

  6. Minimum-Cost Aircraft Descent Trajectories with a Constrained Altitude Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Minghong G.; Sadovsky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical formula for solving the speed profile that accrues minimum cost during an aircraft descent with a constrained altitude profile is derived. The optimal speed profile first reaches a certain speed, called the minimum-cost speed, as quickly as possible using an appropriate extreme value of thrust. The speed profile then stays on the minimum-cost speed as long as possible, before switching to an extreme value of thrust for the rest of the descent. The formula is applied to an actual arrival route and its sensitivity to winds and airlines' business objectives is analyzed.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus encephalitis presenting as cerebellar hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sabat, Shyam; Agarwal, Amit; Zacharia, Thomas; Labib, Samuel; Yousef, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) belongs to the human herpesvirus family and is ubiquitously found in the adult human population. The most common clinical manifestation of EBV is the syndrome of infectious mononucleosis. Central nervous system involvement by EBV is rare, with very few cases of EBV encephalitis reported in the literature. The majority of these cases report cerebral cortical changes on magnetic resonance imaging. We present a rare case of EBV encephalitis in a young patient with meningitis-like symptoms and cerebellar hemorrhage on magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26475484

  8. Application of a simple cerebellar model to geologic surface mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagens, A.; Doveton, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Neurophysiological research into the structure and function of the cerebellum has inspired computational models that simulate information processing associated with coordination and motor movement. The cerebellar model arithmetic computer (CMAC) has a design structure which makes it readily applicable as an automated mapping device that "senses" a surface, based on a sample of discrete observations of surface elevation. The model operates as an iterative learning process, where cell weights are continuously modified by feedback to improve surface representation. The storage requirements are substantially less than those of a conventional memory allocation, and the model is extended easily to mapping in multidimensional space, where the memory savings are even greater. ?? 1991.

  9. Fingolimod Attenuates Splenocyte-Induced Demyelination in Cerebellar Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Adam J.; Mir, Anis K.; Dev, Kumlesh K.

    2014-01-01

    The family of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) is G-protein-coupled, comprised of subtypes S1PR1-S1PR5 and activated by the endogenous ligand S1P. The phosphorylated version of Fingolimod (pFTY720), an oral therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS), induces S1PR1 internalisation in T cells, subsequent insensitivity to S1P gradients and sequestering of these cells within lymphoid organs, thus limiting immune response. S1PRs are also expressed in neuronal and glial cells where pFTY720 is suggested to directly protect against lysolecithin-induced deficits in myelination state in organotypic cerebellar slices. Of note, the effect of pFTY720 on immune cells already migrated into the CNS, prior to treatment, has not been well established. We have previously found that organotypic slice cultures do contain immune cells, which, in principle, could also be regulated by pFTY720 to maintain levels of myelin. Here, a mouse organotypic cerebellar slice and splenocyte co-culture model was thus used to investigate the effects of pFTY720 on splenocyte-induced demyelination. Spleen cells isolated from myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein immunised mice (MOG-splenocytes) or from 2D2 transgenic mice (2D2-splenocytes) both induced demyelination when co-cultured with mouse organotypic cerebellar slices, to a similar extent as lysolecithin. As expected, in vivo treatment of MOG-immunised mice with FTY720 inhibited demyelination induced by MOG-splenocytes. Importantly, in vitro treatment of MOG- and 2D2-splenocytes with pFTY720 also attenuated demyelination caused by these cells. In addition, while in vitro treatment of 2D2-splenocytes with pFTY720 did not alter cell phenotype, pFTY720 inhibited the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFNγ) and interleukin 6 (IL6) from these cells. This work suggests that treatment of splenocytes by pFTY720 attenuates demyelination and reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine release, which likely contributes to enhanced myelination state induced by pFTY720 in organotypic cerebellar slices. PMID:24911000

  10. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes. PMID:26929222

  11. Late effects of radiotherapy on patients with cerebellar medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, C.L.; Palkes, H.; Talent, B.; Kovnar, E.; Clouse, J.W.; Thomas, P.R.

    1984-09-01

    Nine long-term survivors of cerebellar medulloblastoma treated with surgery and irradiation were retrospectively examined with a complete battery of neuropsychological tests and the results compared with their nonirradiated siblings. Significant decreased scores were found in the full-scale intelligence quotients (IQ), performance IQ, and verbal IQ with all nine irradiated patients scoring below their siblings. Also, educational quotients (EQ) of the irradiated patients were 12 to 17 points below the nonirradiated siblings with arithmetic EQ significantly decreased. Most severely affected were those children younger than 8 years at time of irradiation. No correlation was found with whole-brain dose, or objective physical or neurologic findings.

  12. Hereditary lissencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia in Churra lambs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lissencephaly is a rare developmental brain disorder in veterinary and human medicine associated with defects in neuronal migration leading to a characteristic marked reduction or absence of the convolutional pattern of the cerebral hemispheres. In many human cases the disease has a genetic basis. In sheep, brain malformations, mainly cerebellar hypoplasia and forms of hydrocephalus, are frequently due to in utero viral infections. Although breed-related malformations of the brain have been described in sheep, breed-related lissencephaly has not been previously recorded in a peer reviewed publication. Results Here we report neuropathological findings in 42 newborn lambs from a pure Churra breed flock, with clinical signs of weakness, inability to walk, difficulty in sucking and muscular rigidity observed immediately after birth. All the lambs showed near-total agyria with only a rudimentary formation of few sulci and gyri, and a severe cerebellar hypoplasia. On coronal section, the cerebral grey matter was markedly thicker than that of age-matched unaffected lambs and the ventricular system was moderately dilated. Histologically, the normal layers of the cerebral cortex were disorganized and, using an immunohistochemical technique against neurofilaments, three layers were identified instead of the six present in normal brains. The hippocampus was also markedly disorganised and the number and size of lobules were reduced in the cerebellum. Heterotopic neurons were present in different areas of the white matter. The remainder of the brain structures appeared normal. The pathological features reported are consistent with the type LCH-b (lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia group b) defined in human medicine. No involvement of pestivirus or bluetongue virus was detected by immunohistochemistry. An analysis of pedigree data was consistent with a monogenic autosomal recessive pattern inheritance. Conclusions The study describes the clinical and pathological findings of lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia in Churra lambs for which an autosomal recessive inheritance was the most likely cause. Histopathological features observed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus are consistent with a possible failure in neuronal migration during brain development. This report suggests that lissencephaly should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital neurological disease in newborn lambs showing weakness, inability to walk and difficulty sucking. PMID:23938146

  13. Cerebellar hemorrhage in extremely low birth weight siblings: is there a familial disposition?

    PubMed

    Sabir, Hemmen; Felsberg, Jörg; Liebner, Stefan; Hadzik, Berit; Mayatepek, Ertan; Hoehn, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Cerebellar hemorrhage is an underrecognized complication in the preterm neonate. It is multifactorial including combined maternal, intrapartum, and early postnatal factors. We present the case of 2 preterm brothers, 24 + 1 and 24 + 3 weeks of gestation, who both died because of cerebellar hemorrhage. We sought familial pathogenic factors predisposing to cerebellar hemorrhage. Cerebral imaging performed by ultrasonography through the anterior fontanel was normal and showed no signs of bleeding or brain edema. Postmortem neuropathologic findings confirmed cerebellar hemorrhagic lesions in both infants. Cerebellar vessels showed no signs of morphologic disorders or malformations. There might be a hint to a familial disposition. Neonatal cranial ultrasound protocols should include brainstem and posterior fossa examination with specific scans through the mastoid fontanel. PMID:21311081

  14. Cerebellar ataxia and epilepsy with anti-GAD antibodies: treatment with IVIG and plasmapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Zoya; Parton, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody (GAD-65) catalyses glutamate conversion into ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the central nervous system and in the pancreatic ? cells. Antibodies targeting GAD-65 are of uncertain pathogenic significance and occur in stiff person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia, epilepsy, limbic encephalitis and combinations thereof and diabetes mellitus. A 45-year-old man with a cerebellar gait ataxia, dysmetria, nystagmus and mild cerebellar dysarthria was diagnosed with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus a year after the onset of neurological symptoms. He also developed complex and tonic-clonic seizures, resistant to anticonvulsant medication and deteriorated cognitively. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid serology, and imaging supported the diagnosis of GAD-65 cerebellar ataxia and epilepsy. He was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and subsequently plasmapheresis. We report the outcome of 3?years of treatment, which resulted in the improvement of cerebellar signs (particularly gait), with some ultimate decline of efficacy. PMID:24419643

  15. Cerebellar cortical degeneration in three English bulldogs: clinical and neuropathological findings.

    PubMed

    Gandini, G; Botteron, C; Brini, E; Fatzer, R; Diana, A; Jaggy, A

    2005-06-01

    This case report describes the clinical and neuropathological findings in three young English bulldogs affected by cerebellar cortical degeneration. The dogs, born from the same parents, were presented with clinical signs indicating progressive cerebellar dysfunction: a wide-based stance, severe cerebellar ataxia characterised by marked hypermetria, spasticity, and intention tremors of the head and trunk with loss of balance. On histopathological examination, lesions were confined to the cerebellum and consisted of diffuse degenerative cortical lesions, and there was a loss of Purkinje and granule cells. The history, clinical signs and neuropathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of cerebellar cortical degeneration. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of cerebellar cortical degeneration in the English bulldog. PMID:15971900

  16. Case Series: Fractional Anisotropy Profiles of the Cerebellar Peduncles in Adolescents Born Preterm With Ventricular Dilation.

    PubMed

    Travis, Katherine E; Leitner, Yael; Ben-Shachar, Michal; Yeom, Kristen W; Feldman, Heidi M

    2016-03-01

    This case series assesses white matter microstructure of the cerebellar peduncles in 4 adolescents born preterm with enlarged ventricles and reduced white matter volume in the cerebrum but no apparent injury to the cerebellum. Subjects (ages 12-17 years, gestational age 26-32 weeks, birth weight 825-2211 g) were compared to a normative sample of 19 full-term controls (9-17 years, mean gestational age 39 weeks, mean birth weight 3154 g). Tract profiles for each of the cerebellar peduncles were generated by calculating fractional anisotropy at 30 points along the central portion of each tract. One or more case subjects exhibited higher fractional anisotropy beyond the 90th percentile in the inferior, middle, and superior cerebellar peduncles. Findings demonstrate that differences in cerebellar white matter microstructure can be detected in the absence of macrostructural cerebellar abnormalities. PMID:26116381

  17. Babinski's contributions to cerebellar symptomatology: building the basis of the neurological examination.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, José Luiz; Barsottini, Orlando G P; Goetz, Christopher G

    2013-12-01

    Several assumptions about the function of the cerebellum and semiotic signs have been described over the centuries. Among the long list of famous researchers who have provided a strong contribution and who have left their names on the highway of cerebellar research, Joseph Babinski appears as a prominent name. The description of various forms of cerebellar symptomatology was a major part of Babinski's work, and clinical terms that he introduced, namely hypermetry , diadochokinesia , and asynergy , remain part of contemporary clinical vocabulary. Babinski studied cerebellar signs in many patients and was able to conduct longitudinal studies that permitted him to understand the evolution of cerebellar dysfunction. Babinski contributions to cerebellar symptomatology continue to influence the most modern theories, including functional and neuropathological studies. PMID:24347019

  18. Diagnostic Approach to Childhood-onset Cerebellar Atrophy: A 10-Year Retrospective Study of 300 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Blaser, Susan; Yoon, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary ataxias associated with cerebellar atrophy are a heterogeneous group of disorders. Selection of appropriate clinical and genetic tests for patients with cerebellar atrophy poses a diagnostic challenge. Neuroimaging is a crucial initial investigation in the diagnostic evaluation of ataxia in childhood, and the presence of cerebellar atrophy helps guide further investigations. We performed a detailed review of 300 patients with confirmed cerebellar atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging over a 10-year period. A diagnosis was established in 47% of patients: Mitochondrial disorders were most common, followed by the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, ataxia telangectasia, and late GM2-gangliosidosis. We review the common causes of cerebellar atrophy in childhood and propose a diagnostic approach based on correlating specific neuroimaging patterns with clinical and genetic diagnoses. PMID:22764178

  19. Cerebellar gray matter and lobular volumes correlate with core autism symptoms

    PubMed Central

    D'Mello, Anila M.; Crocetti, Deana; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Stoodley, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroanatomical differences in the cerebellum are among the most consistent findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but little is known about the relationship between cerebellar dysfunction and core ASD symptoms. The newly-emerging existence of cerebellar sensorimotor and cognitive subregions provides a new framework for interpreting the functional significance of cerebellar findings in ASD. Here we use two complementary analyses — whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and the SUIT cerebellar atlas — to investigate cerebellar regional gray matter (GM) and volumetric lobular measurements in 35 children with ASD and 35 typically-developing (TD) children (mean age 10.4 ± 1.6 years; range 8–13 years). To examine the relationships between cerebellar structure and core ASD symptoms, correlations were calculated between scores on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) and Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI) and the VBM and volumetric data. Both VBM and the SUIT analyses revealed reduced GM in ASD children in cerebellar lobule VII (Crus I/II). The degree of regional and lobular gray matter reductions in different cerebellar subregions correlated with the severity of symptoms in social interaction, communication, and repetitive behaviors. Structural differences and behavioral correlations converged on right cerebellar Crus I/II, a region which shows structural and functional connectivity with fronto-parietal and default mode networks. These results emphasize the importance of the location within the cerebellum to the potential functional impact of structural differences in ASD, and suggest that GM differences in cerebellar right Crus I/II are associated with the core ASD profile. PMID:25844317

  20. Cerebellar gray matter and lobular volumes correlate with core autism symptoms.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Anila M; Crocetti, Deana; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Stoodley, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    Neuroanatomical differences in the cerebellum are among the most consistent findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but little is known about the relationship between cerebellar dysfunction and core ASD symptoms. The newly-emerging existence of cerebellar sensorimotor and cognitive subregions provides a new framework for interpreting the functional significance of cerebellar findings in ASD. Here we use two complementary analyses - whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and the SUIT cerebellar atlas - to investigate cerebellar regional gray matter (GM) and volumetric lobular measurements in 35 children with ASD and 35 typically-developing (TD) children (mean age 10.4 ± 1.6 years; range 8-13 years). To examine the relationships between cerebellar structure and core ASD symptoms, correlations were calculated between scores on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) and Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI) and the VBM and volumetric data. Both VBM and the SUIT analyses revealed reduced GM in ASD children in cerebellar lobule VII (Crus I/II). The degree of regional and lobular gray matter reductions in different cerebellar subregions correlated with the severity of symptoms in social interaction, communication, and repetitive behaviors. Structural differences and behavioral correlations converged on right cerebellar Crus I/II, a region which shows structural and functional connectivity with fronto-parietal and default mode networks. These results emphasize the importance of the location within the cerebellum to the potential functional impact of structural differences in ASD, and suggest that GM differences in cerebellar right Crus I/II are associated with the core ASD profile. PMID:25844317