Science.gov

Sample records for cerebellar tonsillar descent

  1. Microscopy of tonsillar smears and sections in tonsillar gonorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Veien, N K; From, E; Kvorning, S A

    1976-01-01

    Microscopy of methylene-blue and Gram-stained smears from the tonsillar surface and an immunofluorescence (IF) test were carried out for 130 patients, 129 with genital and/or anal gonorrhoea, 27 of whom also had tonsillar gonorrhoea. One patient had only tonsillar gonorrhoea. 5 of the 28 patients with tonsillar gonorrhoea had acute tonsillitis and for these, agreement was found between culture, light microscopy and IF test, while only 5 of the remaining 23 patients had positive microscopy. Among the 102 patients who did not have tonsillar gonorrhoea a few false-positive light microscopies and IF tests were found. Microscopy of haematoxylin-eosin stained sections of 8 tonsils from 4 patients with recurrent tonsillitis and tonsillar gonorrhoea showed subacute tonsillitis. Methylene-blue and Gram-stained sections revealed gram-negative diplococci morphologically similar to gonococci. The bacteria were located in the superficial layers of the mucous membrane (frequently intracellularly in leukocytes) and occasionally in cellular debris in the crypts. PMID:63217

  2. Hypertrophy, Tonsillar (Enlarged Tonsils) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Safe Concussions: What to Know A to Z: Hypertrophy, Tonsillar (Enlarged Tonsils) KidsHealth > Parents > A to Z > ... to Know Keep in Mind A to Z: Hypertrophy, Tonsillar (Enlarged Tonsils) May also be called: Enlarged ...

  3. Congenital Hairy Polyp of Posterior Tonsillar Pillar

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Shahid; Talat, Nabila; Saleem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Congenital hairy polyps are exceedingly rare congenital anomalies. We report a case of congenital hairy polyp arising from posterior tonsillar pillar which was excised with bipolar cautry. PMID:26023478

  4. Cerebellar Degeneration

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Degeneration? Cerebellar degeneration is a process in which neurons in the cerebellum - the area of the brain ... proteins that are necessary for the survival of neurons. Associated diseases: Diseases that are specific to the ...

  5. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePLUS

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  6. Descent vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popov, Y. I.

    1985-01-01

    The creation of descent vehicles marked a new stage in the development of cosmonautics, involving the beginning of manned space flight and substantial progress in space research on the distant bodies of the Solar System. This booklet describes these vehicles and their structures, systems, and purposes. It is intended for the general public interested in modern problems of space technology.

  7. Cerebellar Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Perlman

    2000-05-01

    There is nothing more discouraging than for a patient to be given a specific diagnosis, then to be told that there is nothing that can be done. Physicians are equally disheartened to see exponential progress being made in the understanding of the pathophysiology of a complex disorder but few direct benefits resulting for their patients. Over the past 5 years, molecular genetic research has completely revolutionized the way in which the progressive cerebellar ataxias are classified and diagnosed, but it has yet to produce effective gene-based, neuroprotective, or neurorestorative therapies. The treatment of cerebellar ataxia remains primarily a neurorehabilitation challenge, employing physical, occupational, speech, and swallowing therapy; adaptive equipment; driver safety training; and nutritional counseling. Modest additional gains are seen with the use of medications that can improve imbalance, incoordination, or dysarthria (amantadine, buspirone, acetazolamide); cerebellar tremor (clonazepam, propranolol); and cerebellar or central vestibular nystagmus (gabapentin, baclofen, clonazepam). Many of the progressive cerebellar syndromes have associated features involving other neurologic systems (eg, spasticity, dystonia or rigidity, resting or rubral tremor, chorea, motor unit weakness or fatigue, autonomic dysfunction, peripheral or posterior column sensory loss, neuropathic pain or cramping, double vision, vision and hearing loss, dementia, and bowel, bladder, and sexual dysfunction), which can impede the treatment of the ataxic symptoms or can worsen with the use of certain drugs. Treatment of the associated features themselves may in turn worsen the ataxia either directly (as side effects of medication) or indirectly (eg, relaxation of lower limb spasticity that was acting as a stabilizer for an ataxic gait). Secondary complications of progressive ataxia can include deconditioning or immobility, weight loss or gain, skin breakdown, recurrent pulmonary and urinary tract infections, aspiration, occult respiratory failure, and obstructive sleep apnea, all of which can be life threatening. Depression in the patient and family members is common. Although no cures exist for most of the causes of cerebellar ataxia and there are as yet no proven ways to protect neurons from premature cell death or to restore neuronal populations that have been lost, symptomatic treatment can greatly improve the quality of life of these patients and prevent complications that could hasten death. Supportive interventions should always be offered-- education about the disease itself, genetic counseling, individual and family counseling, referral to support groups and advocacy groups, and guidance to online resources. Misinformation, fear, depression, hopelessness, isolation, and financial and interpersonal stress can often cause more harm to the patient and caregiver than the ataxia itself. PMID:11096749

  8. Theoretical and clinical aspects of the tonsillar function.

    PubMed

    Siegel, G

    1983-09-01

    A general review of the state of the art in tonsillar function research is given. A proliferation of B lymphocytes, evoked by antigens and/or polyclonal activators, occurs in the tonsil. Such a process, i.e. the supply of B cells to the organism facilitating a number of immune reactions, is to be considered the main function of the tonsil. The formation of antibodies must be regarded as a by-effect caused by an intratonsillar defence mechanism; it is helpful in safeguarding the structural and functional integrity of the organ. A model of the tonsil on the basis of cybernetics is derived from the results obtained and from the histological structure of the organ. Tonsillar involution is characterized by a decline in B cell proliferation, eventually leading to a weakening of the intratonsillar defence mechanism. Genetic disposition and defective functioning of the intratonsillar defence mechanism are discussed as pathogenetic factors in tonsillitis. PMID:6607904

  9. Cf-252 neutron brachytherapy for advanced tonsillar-oropharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Californium-252 was found to be very effective for clearing and controlling large T3-T4 tumors of the tonsillar-oropharyngeal region. A single Cf-NT treatment was combined with 6000 cGy of Co-60 irradiation and was well tolerated. With multiple insertions, the external beam dose was reduced. Although the patients for this study were elderly, feeble and generally of low performance status, 100% tumor clearance and 67% local control was possible. Cf-NT and radiation was readily combined with additional surgery.

  10. Ascent/Descent Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Charles; Andrew, Robert; Roe, Scott; Frye, Ronald; Harvey, Michael; Vu, Tuan; Balachandran, Krishnaiyer; Bly, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent Software Suite has been used to support a variety of NASA Shuttle Program mission planning and analysis activities, such as range safety, on the Integrated Planning System (IPS) platform. The Ascent/Descent Software Suite, containing Ascent Flight Design (ASC)/Descent Flight Design (DESC) Configuration items (Cis), lifecycle documents, and data files used for shuttle ascent and entry modeling analysis and mission design, resides on IPS/Linux workstations. A list of tools in Navigation (NAV)/Prop Software Suite represents tool versions established during or after the IPS Equipment Rehost-3 project.

  11. Acute fatal parainfectious cerebellar swelling in two children. A rare or an overlooked situation?

    PubMed

    Roulet Perez, E; Maeder, P; Cotting, J; Eskenazy-Cottier, A C; Deonna, T

    1993-12-01

    We report 2 previously healthy children who developed sudden unexpected respiratory arrest and brain death, during a presumed Epstein-Barr meningitis in one case and a multisystemic infection of unknown etiology in the other. Diffuse swelling of the cerebellum with upward transtentorial and downward tonsillar herniation, shown by brain CT-scan and MRI obtained after the acute event, was the most probable cause of death. Review of CT images performed before or at the onset of deterioration already showed discrete signs of early upward herniation of the cerebellar vermis that were initially overlooked. At autopsy in the first case, an acute lymphomonocytic meningoencephalitis with predominant involvement of the cerebellum was observed. Few similar cases were found in the literature, indicating that acute cerebellar swelling is either a very rare or an unrecognized, possibly preventable cause of death in acute inflammatory or non-inflammatory encephalopathies in children. PMID:8133984

  12. Exclusive radiation therapy: The treatment of early tonsillar tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Lusinchi, A.; Wibault, P.; Marandas, P.; Kunkler, I.; Eschwege, F. )

    1989-08-01

    One hundred and ninety-three T1 or T2 tumors of the tonsillar region have been treated by exclusive external irradiation between 1970 and 1982. Seventy-five percent of these tumors were classified as T2. There was no relationship between T and N stages. The nodal involvement was essentially linked to the macroscopic appearance of the tumor (superficial or nodular) and to the histology. The 5-year survival rate of the whole population was 58%. N stage and macroscopic appearance only influenced the survival. The local control was 88% for T1, 79% for T2. The main prognostic factors for local control were the histological type, with a 93% local control rate for poorly differentiated tumors versus 73% for well differentiated ones, and the macroscopic appearance, with a 83% local control rate for nodular tumors versus 75% for superficial ones. Superficial tumors spreading forward the anterior pilar have a higher local failure rate. All the patients' charts have been reviewed, and we observed a high percentage of marginal recurrences. The technique of irradiation, above all in case of a superficial tumor, must take into account the possibility of geographic miss and keep large safety margins.

  13. Low Morning Serum Cortisol Levels in Children with Tonsillar Hypertrophy and Moderate-to-Severe OSA

    PubMed Central

    Malakasioti, Georgia; Alexopoulos, Emmanouel I.; Varlami, Vasiliki; Chaidas, Konstantinos; Liakos, Nikolaos; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos; Kaditis, Athanasios G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic tonsillar tissue in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has enhanced expression of glucocorticoid receptors, which may reflect low endogenous cortisol levels. We have evaluated the effect of the interaction between tonsillar hypertrophy and OSA severity on morning serum cortisol levels. Methods: Children with and without snoring underwent polysomnography, tonsillar size grading, and measurement of morning serum cortisol. Results: Seventy children (2-13 years old) were recruited: 30 with moderate-to-severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] > 5 episodes/h), 26 with mild OSA (AHI > 1 and ? 5), and 14 controls (no snoring; AHI ? 1). Tonsillar hypertrophy was present in 56.7%, 53.8%, and 42.9% of participants in each group, respectively. Application of a general linear model demonstrated a significant effect of the interaction between severity of OSA and tonsillar hypertrophy on cortisol levels (P = 0.04), after adjustment for obesity, gender, and age. Among children with tonsillar hypertrophy, subjects with moderate-to-severe OSA (n = 17; AHI 14.7 ± 10.6), mild OSA (n = 14; AHI 2.3 ± 1.2), and control participants (n = 6; AHI 0.7 ± 0.2) were significantly different regarding cortisol levels (P = 0.02). Subjects with moderate-to-severe OSA had lower cortisol (16.9 ± 8.7 mcg/dL) than those with mild OSA (23.3 ± 4.2; P = 0.01) and those without OSA (controls) (23.6 ± 5.3 mcg/dL; P = 0.04). In contrast, children with normal-size tonsils and moderate-to-severe OSA, mild OSA, and controls did not differ in cortisol levels. Conclusions: Children with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea and the phenotype of hypertrophic tonsils have reduced morning serum cortisol levels and potentially decreased glucocorticoid inhibitory effects on tonsillar growth. Citation: Malakasioti G; Alexopoulos EI; Varlami V; Chaidas K; Liakos N; Gourgoulianis K; Kaditis AG. Low morning serum cortisol levels in children with tonsillar hypertrophy and moderate-to-severe OSA. SLEEP 2013;36(9):1349-1354. PMID:23997368

  14. Cerebellar abiotrophy in a miniature schnauzer

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Michelle L.; Blas-Machado, Uriel

    2003-01-01

    A 3.5-month-old miniature schnauzer was presented for signs of progressive cerebellar ataxia. Necropsy revealed cerebellar abiotrophy. This is the first reported case of cerebellar abiotrophy in a purebred miniature schnauzer. PMID:13677598

  15. Cerebellar learning mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Freeman, John H

    2015-09-24

    The mechanisms underlying cerebellar learning are reviewed with an emphasis on old arguments and new perspectives on eyeblink conditioning. Eyeblink conditioning has been used for decades a model system for elucidating cerebellar learning mechanisms. The standard model of the mechanisms underlying eyeblink conditioning is that there two synaptic plasticity processes within the cerebellum that are necessary for acquisition of the conditioned response: (1) long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses and (2) long-term potentiation (LTP) at mossy fiber-interpositus nucleus synapses. Additional Purkinje cell plasticity mechanisms may also contribute to eyeblink conditioning including LTP, excitability, and entrainment of deep nucleus activity. Recent analyses of the sensory input pathways necessary for eyeblink conditioning indicate that the cerebellum regulates its inputs to facilitate learning and maintain plasticity. Cerebellar learning during eyeblink conditioning is therefore a dynamic interactive process which maximizes responding to significant stimuli and suppresses responding to irrelevant or redundant stimuli. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID:25289586

  16. Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme presenting as hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage: case report.

    PubMed

    Laki?evi?, Goran; Arnautovi?, Kenan; Muževi?, Dario; Chesney, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Background Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is rare and presents with increased intracranial pressure and cerebellar signs. The recommended treatment is radical resection, if possible, with radiation and chemotherapy. Clinical Presentation A 53-year-old man presented with hypertensive cerebellar bleeding and a 2-day history of severe headaches, nausea, vomiting, gait instability, and elevated blood pressure. Computed tomography (CT) showed a left cerebellar hematoma with no obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid and no hydrocephalus. CT angiography showed no signs of pathologic blood vessels in the posterior cranial fossa. The patient was observed in the hospital and discharged. Subsequent CT showed complete hematoma resorption. Two weeks later, he developed headaches, nausea, and worsening cerebellar symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 4-cm diameter tumor in the left cerebellar hemisphere where the hemorrhage was located. The tumor was radically resected and diagnosed as GBM. The patient underwent radiation and chemotherapy. At a follow-up of 1.5 years, MRIs showed no tumor recurrence. Conclusion Hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage may be the first presentation of underlying tumor, specifically GBM. Patients undergoing surgery for cerebellar hemorrhage should have clot specimens sent for histologic examination and have pre- and postcontrast MRIs. Patients not undergoing surgery should have MRIs done after hematoma resolution to rule out underlying tumor. PMID:25097829

  17. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components. PMID:24954915

  18. Entry, Descent, Landing Animation (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Entry, Descent, Landing animation

    This animation illustrates the path the Stardust return capsule will follow once it enters Earth's atmosphere.

  19. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000), ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000) and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000). Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder), ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, ?-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED), aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1), and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning), electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia. PMID:17112370

  20. Changes in chemokines and chemokine receptor expression on tonsillar B cells upon Epstein–Barr virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Ehlin-Henriksson, Barbro; Liang, Wu; Cagigi, Alberto; Mowafi, Frida; Klein, George; Nilsson, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are likely to play important roles in the pathogenesis of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) -associated disease. The primary EBV infection occurs in the oropharynx where the virus infects mainly tonsillar B cells. We have previously shown that CXCR4 expression on tonsillar B cells is modulated by EBV. Here, CXCR5 and CCR7 expression, which is important for migration into lymphoid tissue, was followed for 14 days after EBV infection of tonsillar B cells. Early after infection (2 days) there were only minor changes in CXCR5 and CCR7 expression. However, at day 7 the expression of CXCR5, as well as of CCR7, was decreased and by day 14 these molecules were no longer present at the cell surface. Furthermore, EBV infection affects the chemotactic response to CXCL13 and CCL21 (the ligands for CXCR5 and CCR7, respectively) with a reduction of ligand-induced migration at day 2. Using gene expression profiling, we identified an additional set of chemokines and chemokine receptors that were changed upon EBV infection in comparison with non-infected tonsillar B cells. In particular, messenger RNA expression for CCR9 and the complement receptor C5AR1 was increased. Both receptors mediate homing to mucosal tissue. The alterations of the expression of these molecules may lead to retention of EBV-infected tonsillar B cells in the interfollicular region of the tonsil. PMID:19604305

  1. Prevalence of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA in Chinese children with tonsillar and/or adenoidal hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiao-cheng; Chen, Xiao-ping; Yao, Wen-hao; Zhang, Yi; Sun, Guang-bin; Tan, Xue-jun

    2014-06-01

    Tonsillar and adenoidal hypertrophy are prevalent otolaryngologic disorders in children, but their pathogenesis is largely unknown. The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in 146 tonsil and/or adenoid tissue specimens from 104 Chinese children with tonsillar and/or adenoidal hypertrophy were screened using flow-through hybridization gene-chip technology and real-time fluorescence-based quantitative PCR. Then, the relationships between the prevalence of the viruses and other clinical characteristics of tonsillar and/or adenoidal hypertrophy were analyzed. No patient had HPV DNA. EBV DNA was detected in 19/42 (45.2%) tonsil tissues and 72/104 (69.2%) adenoid tissue specimens (P?tonsillar and/or adenoidal hypertrophy. Adenoid tissues might more susceptible than tonsil tissues to EBV infection. In addition, EBV infection did not aggravate snoring in patients with tonsillar and/or adenoidal hypertrophy. PMID:24615954

  2. Speech prosody in cerebellar ataxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Maureen

    The present study sought an acoustic signature for the speech disturbance recognized in cerebellar degeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for a radiological rating of cerebellar involvement in six cerebellar ataxic dysarthric speakers. Acoustic measures of the [pap] syllables in contrastive prosodic conditions and of normal vs. brain-damaged patients were used to further our understanding both of the speech degeneration that accompanies cerebellar pathology and of speech motor control and movement in general. Pair-wise comparisons of the prosodic conditions within the normal group showed statistically significant differences for four prosodic contrasts. For three of the four contrasts analyzed, the normal speakers showed both longer durations and higher formant and fundamental frequency values in the more prominent first condition of the contrast. The acoustic measures of the normal prosodic contrast values were then used as a model to measure the degree of speech deterioration for individual cerebellar subjects. This estimate of speech deterioration as determined by individual differences between cerebellar and normal subjects' acoustic values of the four prosodic contrasts was used in correlation analyses with MRI ratings. Moderate correlations between speech deterioration and cerebellar atrophy were found in the measures of syllable duration and f0. A strong negative correlation was found for F1. Moreover, the normal model presented by these acoustic data allows for a description of the flexibility of task- oriented behavior in normal speech motor control. These data challenge spatio-temporal theory which explains movement as an artifact of time wherein longer durations predict more extreme movements and give further evidence for gestural internal dynamics of movement in which time emerges from articulatory events rather than dictating those events. This model provides a sensitive index of cerebellar pathology with quantitative acoustic analyses.

  3. Ectopic Oral Tonsillar Tissue: A Case Series with Bilateral and Solitary Presentations and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Masashi; Nagao, Toru; Saito, Terumi; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Ohto, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Akihito; Komaki, Kanji; Naganawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    An ectopic tonsil is defined as tonsillar tissue that develops in areas outside of the four major tonsil groups: the palatine, lingual, pharyngeal, and tubal tonsils. The occurrence of tonsillar tissue in the oral cavity in ectopic locations, its prevalence, and its developmental mechanisms that belong to its formation remain unclear. In this report, we describe a rare case of bilateral symmetric ectopic oral tonsillar tissue located at the ventral surface of the tongue along with two solitary cases arising from the floor of the mouth. The role of immune system and its aberrant response leading to ectopic deposits desires further studies. As an ectopic tonsil may simulate a benign soft tissue tumor, this case series highlights the importance of this entity in our clinical differential diagnosis of oral soft tissue masses. PMID:25664186

  4. Simulation Test Of Descent Advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Green, Steven M.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes piloted-simulation test of Descent Advisor (DA), subsystem of larger automation system being developed to assist human air-traffic controllers and pilots. Focuses on results of piloted simulation, in which airline crews executed controller-issued descent advisories along standard curved-path arrival routes. Crews able to achieve arrival-time precision of plus or minus 20 seconds at metering fix. Analysis of errors generated in turns resulted in further enhancements of algorithm to increase accuracies of its predicted trajectories. Evaluations by pilots indicate general support for DA concept and provide specific recommendations for improvement.

  5. Molecular Mapping to Species Level of the Tonsillar Crypt Microbiota Associated with Health and Recurrent Tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Anders; Fagö-Olsen, Helena; Sørensen, Christian Hjort; Kilian, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    The human palatine tonsils, which belong to the central antigen handling sites of the mucosal immune system, are frequently affected by acute and recurrent infections. This study compared the microbiota of the tonsillar crypts in children and adults affected by recurrent tonsillitis with that of healthy adults and children with tonsillar hyperplasia. An in-depth 16S rRNA gene based pyrosequencing approach combined with a novel strategy that included phylogenetic analysis and detection of species-specific sequence signatures enabled identification of the major part of the microbiota to species level. A complex microbiota consisting of between 42 and 110 taxa was demonstrated in both children and adults. This included a core microbiome of 12 abundant genera found in all samples regardless of age and health status. Yet, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria species, and Streptococcus pneumoniae were almost exclusively detected in children. In contrast, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae was present in all samples. Obligate anaerobes like Porphyromonas, Prevotella, and Fusobacterium were abundantly present in children, but the species diversity of Porphyromonas and Prevotella was larger in adults and included species that are considered putative pathogens in periodontal diseases, i.e. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, and Tannerella forsythia. Unifrac analysis showed that recurrent tonsillitis is associated with a shift in the microbiota of the tonsillar crypts. Fusobacterium necrophorum, Streptococcus intermedius and Prevotella melaninogenica/histicola were associated with recurrent tonsillitis in adults, whereas species traditionally associated with acute tonsillitis like pyogenic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus were scarce. The findings suggest that recurrent tonsillitis is a polymicrobial infection in which interactions within consortia of taxa play an etiologic role. The study contributes to the human microbiome data, to the understanding of the etiology of infections affecting the tonsils, and forms a basis for further insight into the consequences of the intense microbe-host interactions that take place in the tonsils. PMID:23437130

  6. Plasma and tonsillar tissue pharmacokinetics of teicoplanin following intramuscular administration to children.

    PubMed

    Aarons, L; Rowland, M; Khan, A; Taborelli, G; Ferrea, G; Tarantino, V; Fioredda, F; Rosina-Parenti, R; Cavenaghi, L; Borgonovi, M

    1998-10-01

    The population pharmacokinetics of teicoplanin in plasma and tonsillar tissue in children was determined following intramuscular administration. Thirty seven patients in all received either a single 5 mg/kg dose; 2 doses of 5 mg/kg, 12 h apart; 3 doses of 5 mg/kg, 12 h apart; or, a single 10 mg/kg dose. Limited data, comprising a maximum of 2 blood samples and 1 tonsillar sample were taken from each patient, with the maximum time being 48 h after the first dose of teicoplanin (in the 3 x 5 mg/kg dosing schedule). All plasma data were analyzed simultaneously by a maximum likelihood method employing a modified EM algorithm. A first-order absorption, one-compartment disposition model was fitted to the data. Mean parameter values (with lower and upper 95% confidence intervals) were: clearance/bioavailability, 0.024 L h(-1) kg(-1) (0.020-0.027); volume of distribution/bioavailability, 0.61 L kg(-1) (0.54-0.70); absorption rate constant, 0.43 h(-1) (0.31-0.61). A first-order transfer model for distribution of teicoplanin between plasma and tonsillar tissue was fitted to the tonsil data. The mean parameter values (95% confidence intervals) were: transfer rate constant between plasma and tonsils 0.49 h(-1) (0.35-0.67); transfer rate constant between tonsils and plasma 0.73 h(-1) (0.52-1.03). These rate constants correspond to a distribution half-life of 0.95 h and an equilibrium distribution concentration ratio between tonsillar tissue and plasma of 0.67. After normalising clearance and volume of distribution for body weight, there was no further influence of body weight on the pharmacokinetic parameters. Also, there was no effect of dose, and as two formulations were used, one for the 5 mg/kg dose and the other for the 10 mg/kg dose, no effect of formulation on the pharmacokinetics of teicoplanin after im (intramuscular) administration was found. PMID:9795079

  7. Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration Information Page Synonym(s): ... Publications and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration? Ataxia often occurs ...

  8. Descent into theDescent into theDescent into theDescent into the Hell of VenusHell of VenusHell of VenusHell of Venus

    E-print Network

    Alfonseca, Manuel

    Descent into theDescent into theDescent into theDescent into the Hell of VenusHell of VenusHell of VenusHell of Venus Manuel AlfonsecaManuel AlfonsecaManuel AlfonsecaManuel Alfonseca #12;Manuel Alfonseca 2 #12;Descent into the Hell of Venus 3 DESCENT INTO THE HELL OF VENUS Manuel Alfonseca All Rights

  9. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new therapy to manage cerebellar disorders associated with hyperexcitatory CNS disorders like ethanol withdrawal. PMID:25195804

  10. Functionality of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from tonsillar tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sada-Ovalle, I; Talayero, A; Chavéz-Galán, L; Barrera, L; Castorena-Maldonado, A; Soda-Merhy, A; Torre-Bouscoulet, L

    2012-01-01

    For many years, tonsillectomy has been used routinely in children to treat chronic or recurrent acute tonsillitis. Palatine tonsils are secondary lymphoid organs and the major barrier protecting the digestive and respiratory tracts from potential invasive microorganisms. They have been used as sources of lymphoid tissue; however, despite the hundreds of papers published on tonsillectomy, no studies addressing the functionality of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from chronically infected tonsils have yet been published. The aim of this study was to analyse the functionality of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with respect to tonsillar tissue. We used an affordable approach to measure the frequency of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, the direct ex-vivo cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells, memory T cell phenotype, cytokine profile and DC phenotype. Our results demonstrate that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from tonsillar tissue are totally functional, as shown by their ability to produce cytokines, to degranulate and to differentiate into effector-memory T cells. PMID:22471281

  11. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  12. Descent theory for semiorthogonal decompositions

    SciTech Connect

    Elagin, Alexei D

    2012-05-31

    We put forward a method for constructing semiorthogonal decompositions of the derived category of G-equivariant sheaves on a variety X under the assumption that the derived category of sheaves on X admits a semiorthogonal decomposition with components preserved by the action of the group G on X. This method is used to obtain semiorthogonal decompositions of equivariant derived categories for projective bundles and blow-ups with a smooth centre as well as for varieties with a full exceptional collection preserved by the group action. Our main technical tool is descent theory for derived categories. Bibliography: 12 titles.

  13. 43 CFR 10.14 - Lineal descent and cultural affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. 10.14 Section 10...General § 10.14 Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. (a) General. This...procedures for determining lineal descent and cultural affiliation between...

  14. 43 CFR 10.14 - Lineal descent and cultural affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. 10.14 Section 10...General § 10.14 Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. (a) General. This...procedures for determining lineal descent and cultural affiliation between...

  15. 43 CFR 10.14 - Lineal descent and cultural affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. 10.14 Section 10...General § 10.14 Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. (a) General. This...procedures for determining lineal descent and cultural affiliation between...

  16. 43 CFR 10.14 - Lineal descent and cultural affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 true Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. 10.14 Section 10...General § 10.14 Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. (a) General. This...procedures for determining lineal descent and cultural affiliation between...

  17. 43 CFR 10.14 - Lineal descent and cultural affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. 10.14 Section 10...General § 10.14 Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. (a) General. This...procedures for determining lineal descent and cultural affiliation between...

  18. Descent Relations in Cubic Superstring Field Theory

    E-print Network

    I. Ya. Aref'eva; R. V. Gorbachev; P. B. Medvedev; D. V. Rychkov

    2008-01-15

    The descent relations between string field theory (SFT) vertices are characteristic relations of the operator formulation of SFT and they provide self-consistency of this theory. The descent relations and in the NS fermionic string field theory in the kappa and discrete bases are established. Different regularizations and schemes of calculations are considered and relations between them are discussed.

  19. Ant Colony Optimization and Stochastic Gradient Descent

    E-print Network

    Libre de Bruxelles, Université

    Ant Colony Optimization and Stochastic Gradient Descent Nicolas Meuleau Marco Dorigo IRIDIA@iridia.ulb.ac.be mdorigo@ulb.ac.be Keywords heuristic, ant system, ant colony optimization, combinatorial optimi- zation between the two techniques known as ant colony optimization (ACO) and stochastic gradient descent. More

  20. Predictability of Top of Descent Location for Operational Idle-Thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel L.

    2010-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the trajectory predictor and its uncertainty models, commercial flights executed idle-thrust descents at a specified descent speed, and the recorded data included the specified descent speed profile, aircraft weight, and the winds entered into the FMS as well as the radar data. The FMS computed the intended descent path assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and the controllers and pilots then endeavored to allow the FMS to fly the descent to the meter fix with minimal human intervention. The horizontal flight path, cruise and meter fix altitudes, and actual TOD location were extracted from the radar data. Using approximately 70 descents each in Boeing 757 and Airbus 319/320 aircraft, multiple regression estimated TOD location as a linear function of the available predictive factors. The cruise and meter fix altitudes, descent speed, and wind clearly improve goodness of fit. The aircraft weight improves fit for the Airbus descents but not for the B757. Except for a few statistical outliers, the residuals have absolute value less than 5 nmi. Thus, these predictive factors adequately explain the TOD location, which indicates the data do not include excessive noise.

  1. Learning of Sensory Sequences in Cerebellar Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frings, Markus; Boenisch, Raoul; Gerwig, Marcus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Timmann, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    A possible role of the cerebellum in detecting and recognizing event sequences has been proposed. The present study sought to determine whether patients with cerebellar lesions are impaired in the acquisition and discrimination of sequences of sensory stimuli of different modalities. A group of 26 cerebellar patients and 26 controls matched for…

  2. Consensus Paper: Management of Degenerative Cerebellar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ilg, W.; Bastian, A. J.; Boesch, S.; Burciu, R. G.; Celnik, P.; Claaßen, J.; Feil, K.; Kalla, R.; Miyai, I.; Nachbauer, W.; Schöls, L.; Strupp, M.; Synofzik, M.; Teufel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of motor symptoms of degenerative cerebellar ataxia remains difficult. Yet there are recent developments that are likely to lead to significant improvements in the future. Most desirable would be a causative treatment of the underlying cerebellar disease. This is currently available only for a very small subset of cerebellar ataxias with known metabolic dysfunction. However, increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of hereditary ataxia should lead to an increasing number of medically sensible drug trials. In this paper, data from recent drug trials in patients with recessive and dominant cerebellar ataxias will be summarized. There is consensus that up to date, no medication has been proven effective. Aminopyridines and acetazolamide are the only exception, which are beneficial in patients with episodic ataxia type 2. Aminopyridines are also effective in a subset of patients presenting with downbeat nystagmus. As such, all authors agreed that the mainstays of treatment of degenerative cerebellar ataxia are currently physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. For many years, well-controlled rehabilitation studies in patients with cerebellar ataxia were lacking. Data of recently published studies show that coordinative training improves motor function in both adult and juvenile patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the well-known contribution of the cerebellum to motor learning, possible mechanisms underlying improvement will be outlined. There is consensus that evidence-based guidelines for the physiotherapy of degenerative cerebellar ataxia need to be developed. Future developments in physiotherapeutical interventions will be discussed including application of non-invasive brain stimulation. PMID:24222635

  3. [Low-temperature radiofrequency technology treatment of spontaneous tonsillar hemorrhage: a case report].

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongyue; Gu, Jianhua

    2014-10-01

    Patient, 30-year-old, male,was admitted to our hospital because of discontinuously spit fresh blood without any inducing factors for three days. In the course, the patient suffered mild dry sensation of pharyngeal, poor spirit condition, fatigue, poor sleep, poor appetite and was with black stool 2 times. Physical examination: T36. 6°C, R 21/min, P98/min, BP135/90 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa). Bilateral tonsils were III hypertrophy and with scar shape surfaces. The left tonsil's surface had longitudinal small blood vessels markedly dilated. His oropharynx, laryngopharynx and laryngeal did not be find any obvious bleeding sites. Laboratory findings: WBC 13.82 x 10(9)/L, N 0.8084, L 0.1632, Hb 81.00 g/L, HCT 25.20; PT 9.60 s, APTT 25.50 s, TT 15.80 s, FIB 1.900 g/L. After 3 hours of admission,the patient spit out fresh blood again,checked the body to see:the left peri-tonsil with fresh blood and found a slowly bleeding site at the 1/3 junction of the middle lower part of left tonsil's rear surface, the size was about 0.5 cm x 0.6 cm. We finally diagnosed spontaneous tonsillar hemorrhage and successfully managed with low-temperature radiofrequency technology. PMID:25764770

  4. Perceptual timing in cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Nichelli, P; Alway, D; Grafman, J

    1996-09-01

    This study examined time perception in 12 patients with cerebellar degeneration (CD) and in 13 normal controls (NC). We used a time bisection procedure with four interval conditions (100-900 msec; 8-32 sec; 100-600 msec; 100-325 msec). Each subject's bisection point, discrimination ability (the Weber ratio) and precision (the inverse of the proportion of unexplained variance) was calculated for each condition. CD patients' performance on the 100-900 msec time bisection condition suggested a possible time discrimination deficit, which was confirmed with intervals in the range of 100-600 msec. Time discrimination was normal on the 100-325 msec condition and impaired on the 8-32 sec bisection task. However, when discriminating long intervals, CD patients also showed a precision deficit, which points to impaired sustained attention and/or decision processes. Our findings corroborate the view that cerebellar timing processes are not limited to the motor system but are also used in perceptual computations. PMID:8822733

  5. Homozygous deletion of the very low density lipoprotein receptor gene causes autosomal recessive cerebellar hypoplasia with cerebral gyral simplification.

    PubMed

    Boycott, Kym M; Flavelle, Shauna; Bureau, Alexandre; Glass, Hannah C; Fujiwara, T Mary; Wirrell, Elaine; Davey, Krista; Chudley, Albert E; Scott, James N; McLeod, D Ross; Parboosingh, Jillian S

    2005-09-01

    An autosomal recessive syndrome of nonprogressive cerebellar ataxia and mental retardation is associated with inferior cerebellar hypoplasia and mild cerebral gyral simplification in the Hutterite population. An identity-by-descent mapping approach using eight patients from three interrelated Hutterite families localized the gene for this syndrome to chromosome region 9p24. Haplotype analysis identified familial and ancestral recombination events and refined the minimal region to a 2-Mb interval between markers D9S129 and D9S1871. A 199-kb homozygous deletion encompassing the entire very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) gene was present in all affected individuals. VLDLR is part of the reelin signaling pathway, which guides neuroblast migration in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. To our knowledge, this syndrome represents the first human lipoprotein receptor malformation syndrome and the second human disease associated with a reelin pathway defect. PMID:16080122

  6. Feature Clustering for Accelerating Parallel Coordinate Descent

    SciTech Connect

    Scherrer, Chad; Tewari, Ambuj; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Haglin, David J.

    2012-12-06

    We demonstrate an approach for accelerating calculation of the regularization path for L1 sparse logistic regression problems. We show the benefit of feature clustering as a preconditioning step for parallel block-greedy coordinate descent algorithms.

  7. Lunar descent using sequential engine shutdown

    E-print Network

    Springmann, Philip N

    2006-01-01

    The notion of sequential engine shutdown is introduced and its application to lunar descent is motivated. The concept calls for the utilization of multiple fixed thrust engines in place of a single continuously throttleable ...

  8. Paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia and the paraneoplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Sadaf; Recio, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia, also known as paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, is one of the wide array of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes in which neurological symptoms are indirectly caused by an underlying malignancy, most commonly gynecological, breast, or lung cancer or Hodgkin's lymphoma. We describe a patient with severe cerebellar dysfunction attributed to a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. The case highlights the need to look for paraneoplastic syndromes—both to discover malignancies early, at a treatable stage, and, as in our case, to address very distressing symptoms for the patient's relief even if the malignancy is not curable. PMID:25829659

  9. Human factors by descent energy management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes some of the results of a human factors study of energy management during descent using standard aircraft displays. Discussions with pilots highlighted the practical constraints involved and the techniques (algorithms) used to accomplish the descent. The advantages and disadvantages of these algorithms are examined with respect to workload and their sensitivity to disturbances. Vertical navigation and flight performance computers are discussed in terms of the information needed for effective pilot monitoring and takeover

  10. Apollo experience report: Descent propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammock, W. R., Jr.; Currie, E. C.; Fisher, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    The propulsion system for the descent stage of the lunar module was designed to provide thrust to transfer the fully loaded lunar module with two crewmen from the lunar parking orbit to the lunar surface. A history of the development of this system is presented. Development was accomplished primarily by ground testing of individual components and by testing the integrated system. Unique features of the descent propulsion system were the deep throttling capability and the use of a lightweight cryogenic helium pressurization system.

  11. Descent relations in cubic superstring field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, I. Y.; Gorbachev, R.; Medvedev, P. B.; Rychkov, D. V.

    2008-01-01

    The descent relations between string field theory (SFT) vertices are characteristic relations of the operator formulation of SFT and they provide self-consistency of this theory. The descent relations langleV2|V1rangle and langleV3|V1rangle in the NS fermionic string field theory in the ? and discrete bases are established. Different regularizations and schemes of calculations are considered and relations between them are discussed.

  12. Descent Advisor Preliminary Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were: (1) to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional and flight-management system equipped jet transports, (2) to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and (3) to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 seconds late with a standard deviation of 13.1 seconds. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  13. Descent advisor preliminary field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional- and flight-management-system-equipped jet transports, to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 sec late with a standard deviation of 13.1 sec. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  14. [Elderly patient with cerebellar malignant astrocytoma].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Hideya; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Moroi, Junta; Hanyu, Noriaki; Sawada, Motofumi; Kobayashi, Norikata; Mutou, Tatsuji; Hikichi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Akifumi; Yasui, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Yasuji

    2008-09-01

    Malignant cerebellar astrocytoma is very rare and the prognosis is extremely poor. We report herein the case of an elderly patient with malignant cerebellar astrocytoma. This 80-year-old man initially presented with dizziness and ataxia of the right hand. Metastatic cerebellar tumor was diagnosed on first admission, based on a past history of colon cancer treated by surgery and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings supporting the diagnosis of metastasis. The patient underwent gamma knife surgery (20 Gy) and was discharged. Follow-up after discharge was insufficient. Two years after gamma knife surgery, he returned to our hospital complaining of dizziness, headache, and right limb ataxia. MRI revealed a cystic mass in the right cerebellar hemisphere, and the lesion was removed by right suboccipital craniotomy. The tumor represented malignant astrocytoma. Optimal management of patients harboring sush difficult. to-treat tumors, including the role of gamma-knife radiosurgery, is discussed. PMID:18800635

  15. Synchrony and neural coding in cerebellar circuits

    PubMed Central

    Person, Abigail L.; Raman, Indira M.

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum regulates complex movements and is also implicated in cognitive tasks, and cerebellar dysfunction is consequently associated not only with movement disorders, but also with conditions like autism and dyslexia. How information is encoded by specific cerebellar firing patterns remains debated, however. A central question is how the cerebellar cortex transmits its integrated output to the cerebellar nuclei via GABAergic synapses from Purkinje neurons. Possible answers come from accumulating evidence that subsets of Purkinje cells synchronize their firing during behaviors that require the cerebellum. Consistent with models predicting that coherent activity of inhibitory networks has the capacity to dictate firing patterns of target neurons, recent experimental work supports the idea that inhibitory synchrony may regulate the response of cerebellar nuclear cells to Purkinje inputs, owing to the interplay between unusually fast inhibitory synaptic responses and high rates of intrinsic activity. Data from multiple laboratories lead to a working hypothesis that synchronous inhibitory input from Purkinje cells can set the timing and rate of action potentials produced by cerebellar nuclear cells, thereby relaying information out of the cerebellum. If so, then changing spatiotemporal patterns of Purkinje activity would allow different subsets of inhibitory neurons to control cerebellar output at different times. Here we explore the evidence for and against the idea that a synchrony code defines, at least in part, the input–output function between the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. We consider the literature on the existence of simple spike synchrony, convergence of Purkinje neurons onto nuclear neurons, and intrinsic properties of nuclear neurons that contribute to responses to inhibition. Finally, we discuss factors that may disrupt or modulate a synchrony code and describe the potential contributions of inhibitory synchrony to other motor circuits. PMID:23248585

  16. Reference energy-altitude descent guidance: Simulator evaluation. [aircraft descent and fuel conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbot, K. H.; Knox, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Descent guidance was developed to provide a pilot with information to ake a fuel-conservative descent and cross a designated geographical waypoint at a preselected altitude and airspeed. The guidance was designed to reduce fuel usage during the descent and reduce the mental work load associated with planning a fuel-conservative descent. A piloted simulation was conducted to evaluate the operational use of this guidance concept. The results of the simulation tests show that the use of the guidance reduced fuel consumption and mental work load during the descent. Use of the guidance also decreased the airspeed error, but had no effect on the altitude error when the designated waypoint was crossed. Physical work load increased with the use of the guidance, but remained well within acceptable levels. The pilots found the guidance easy to use as presented and reported that it would be useful in an operational environment.

  17. Implications on cerebellar function from information coding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiming

    2008-01-01

    One function of the cerebellar cortex is to process information. There are at least two types of information. Temporal information is encoded in the timing pattern of action and synaptic potentials, whereas structural information is encoded in the spatial pattern of the cerebellar synaptic circuitry. Intuitively, analysis of highly complex information in the time domain would require a cerebellar cortex with structural complexity to match. Information theory offers a way to estimate quantitatively both types of information and thereby helps to test hypotheses or advance theories of cerebellar neurobiology. These estimates suggest: (i) That the mossy-fiber-granule-cell system carries far more (temporal) information than the climbing fiber system, (ii) that Purkinje cells extract only a fraction of the (temporal) information from their afferents, and (iii) that the cerebellar cortex has a large (spatial) information coding capacity. Concerning information, one can argue that the cerebellar cortex analyzes temporal information in its afferents as a search engine, in search of coincidental mossy fiber events based on timing cues provided by climbing fiber events. Results of successive searches are continuously being converted into structural information encoded in the spatial distribution pattern of granule-cell-Purkinje-cell synapses along granule cell axons, thereby providing an adaptive and indeed self-correcting dimension to the structural information code. The search engine operation involves cellular mechanisms acting on temporal events and is part of an associative learning process. The conversion and generation of structural information involves neuroplasticity mechanisms acting at the synaptic level, with electrophysiological as well as structural consequences, and may be part of the short- and long-term memory process. These and other attributes qualify the cerebellar cortex as a dynamic information processing center, contributing to memory and learning while linking motor output with sensory events. PMID:18418669

  18. Assessment of GPS radiosonde descent data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Ratnam, M.; Pravallika, N.; babu, S. Ravindra; Basha, G.; Pramitha, M.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.

    2013-12-01

    Radiosondes are widely used to obtain basic meteorological parameters such as pressure (P), temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), and horizontal winds during the balloon ascent up to the altitude of balloon burst, usually ∼32-35 km. Data from the radiosondes released from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), a tropical station in India, has been collected during the ascent and during the descent as well without attaching any parachute or its equivalent since the year 2008. In the present study an attempt has been made to characterize the radiosonde descent data with the main objective of exploring its usefulness and reliability for scientific purposes. We compared the data obtained during ascent and descent phases of the same sounding. The mean differences in T, RH and horizontal winds between ascent and descent data are found to be small and are sometimes even within the uncertainty of the measurements and/or expected diurnal variation itself. The very good consistency observed between the ascent and the descent data shows that one more profile of the meteorological parameters can be constructed within 3 h of time of balloon launch practically at no additional cost. Further checks are done by utilizing the 3 hourly radiosonde observations collected during the Tropical Tropopause Dynamics campaign conducted at Gadanki. In the process of checking the consistency between the radiosonde ascent and descent data, several new findings are arrived at and are reported in this study. In general, it has taken more than half-an-hour for the balloon to reach the ground from the burst altitude. It is also observed that the fall velocity is close to 10 m s-1 near the surface. Finally, it is suggested to record also the observations when the balloon is descending as this information is also useful for scientific purposes.

  19. Assessment of GPS radiosonde descent data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Ratnam, M.; Pravallika, N.; Babu, S. Ravindra; Basha, G.; Pramitha, M.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.

    2014-04-01

    Radiosondes are widely used to obtain basic meteorological parameters such as pressure (P), temperature (T), relative humidity (RH) and horizontal winds during the balloon ascent up to the altitude of balloon burst, usually ~ 32-35 km. Data from the radiosondes released from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), a tropical station in India, have been collected during the ascent and during the descent as well without attaching any parachute or its equivalent since the year 2008. In the present study an attempt has been made to characterize the radiosonde descent data with the main objective of exploring its usefulness and reliability for scientific purposes. We compared the data obtained during ascent and descent phases of the same sounding. The mean differences in T, RH and horizontal winds between ascent and descent data are found to be small and are sometimes even within the uncertainty of the measurements and/or expected diurnal variation itself. The very good consistency observed between the ascent and the descent data shows that one more profile of the meteorological parameters can be constructed within 3 h of time of balloon launch practically at no additional cost. Further checks are done by utilizing the 3-hourly radiosonde observations collected during the Tropical Tropopause Dynamics campaigns conducted at Gadanki. In the process of checking the consistency between the radiosonde ascent and descent data, several new findings are arrived at and are reported in this study. In general, it has taken more than half an hour for the balloon to reach the ground from the burst altitude. It is also observed that the fall velocity is close to 10 m s-1 near the surface. Finally, it is suggested to record the observations also when the balloon is descending as this information is useful for scientific purposes.

  20. Entry, Descent, and Landing With Propulsive Deceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    The future exploration of the Solar System will require innovations in transportation and the use of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems at many planetary landing sites. The cost of space missions has always been prohibitive, and using the natural planetary and planet s moons atmospheres for entry, descent, and landing can reduce the cost, mass, and complexity of these missions. This paper will describe some of the EDL ideas for planetary entry and survey the overall technologies for EDL that may be attractive for future Solar System missions.

  1. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 (often shortened to ARCA1 ) On this ... January 2015 What is ARCA1? Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 (ARCA1) is a condition characterized by ...

  3. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...cerebellar stimulator is a device used to stimulate electrically a patient's cerebellar cortex for the treatment of intractable epilepsy, spasticity, and some movement disorders. The stimulator consists of an implanted receiver with electrodes that are...

  4. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-06-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD)) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis.

  5. Cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibo; Lin, Zhanmin; Voges, Kai; Ju, Chiheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Bosman, Laurens WJ; Ruigrok, Tom JH; Hoebeek, Freek E

    2014-01-01

    Due to the uniform cyto-architecture of the cerebellar cortex, its overall physiological characteristics have traditionally been considered to be homogeneous. In this study, we show in awake mice at rest that spiking activity of Purkinje cells, the sole output cells of the cerebellar cortex, differs between cerebellar modules and correlates with their expression of the glycolytic enzyme aldolase C or zebrin. Simple spike and complex spike frequencies were significantly higher in Purkinje cells located in zebrin-negative than zebrin-positive modules. The difference in simple spike frequency persisted when the synaptic input to, but not intrinsic activity of, Purkinje cells was manipulated. Blocking TRPC3, the effector channel of a cascade of proteins that have zebrin-like distribution patterns, attenuated the simple spike frequency difference. Our results indicate that zebrin-discriminated cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies, which depend on activation of TRPC3, and that this property is relevant for all cerebellar functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02536.001 PMID:24843004

  6. Peroxisomal Disorders: A Review on Cerebellar Pathologies.

    PubMed

    De Munter, Stephanie; Verheijden, Simon; Régal, Luc; Baes, Myriam

    2015-11-01

    Peroxisomes are organelles with diverse metabolic tasks including essential roles in lipid metabolism. They are of utmost importance for the normal functioning of the nervous system as most peroxisomal disorders are accompanied with neurological symptoms. Remarkably, the cerebellum exquisitely depends on intact peroxisomal function both during development and adulthood. In this review, we cover all aspects of cerebellar pathology that were reported in peroxisome biogenesis disorders and in diseases caused by dysfunction of the peroxisomal ?-oxidation, ?-oxidation or ether lipid synthesis pathways. We also discuss the phenotypes of mouse models in which cerebellar pathologies were recapitulated and search for connections with the metabolic abnormalities. It becomes increasingly clear that besides the most severe forms of peroxisome dysfunction that are associated with developmental cerebellar defects, milder impairments can give rise to ataxia later in life. PMID:26201894

  7. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage following thoracic spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Morofuji, Yoichi; Tsunoda, Keishi; Takeshita, Tomonori; Hayashi, Kentaro; Kitagawa, Naoki; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Izumi

    2009-03-01

    A 51-year-old man underwent surgery for ossification of the ligamentum flavum at the T9-T10 levels. Intraoperatively, the dura was opened unintentionally and a subcutaneous suction drain was placed. The patient complained of severe headache and nausea postoperatively. Brain computed tomography obtained 3 days after the surgery demonstrated remote cerebellar hemorrhage and hydrocephalus. Suboccipital decompression, C1 laminectomy, and ventriculostomy were performed and his symptoms subsided 2 months later. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage following spinal surgery is extremely rare, but may occur after any type of spinal surgery resulting in dural tear or intradural manipulation. Early diagnosis is particularly important for the treatment of remote cerebellar hemorrhage following spinal surgery. PMID:19318737

  8. Research study: STS-1 Orbiter Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The conversion of STS-1 orbiter descent data from AVE-SESAME contact programs to the REEDA system and the reduction of raw radiosonde data is summarized. A first difference program, contact data program, plot data program, and 30 second data program were developed. Six radiosonde soundings were taken. An example of the outputs of each of the programs is presented.

  9. Descent Assisted Split Habitat Lunar Lander Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Goodliff, Kandyce; Cornelius, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The Descent Assisted Split Habitat (DASH) lunar lander concept utilizes a disposable braking stage for descent and a minimally sized pressurized volume for crew transport to and from the lunar surface. The lander can also be configured to perform autonomous cargo missions. Although a braking-stage approach represents a significantly different operational concept compared with a traditional two-stage lander, the DASH lander offers many important benefits. These benefits include improved crew egress/ingress and large-cargo unloading; excellent surface visibility during landing; elimination of the need for deep-throttling descent engines; potentially reduced plume-surface interactions and lower vertical touchdown velocity; and reduced lander gross mass through efficient mass staging and volume segmentation. This paper documents the conceptual study on various aspects of the design, including development of sortie and outpost lander configurations and a mission concept of operations; the initial descent trajectory design; the initial spacecraft sizing estimates and subsystem design; and the identification of technology needs

  10. America's Descent into Madness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes America's descent into madness under the regime of neoliberalism that has emerged in the United States since the late 1970s. In part, this is due to the emergence of a public pedagogy produced by the corporate-owned media that now saturates Americans with a market-driven value system that undermines those formative…

  11. Distinct Cerebellar Contributions to Intrinsic Connectivity Networks

    PubMed Central

    Habas, Christophe; Kamdar, Nirav; Nguyen, Daniel; Keller, Katherine; Beckmann, Christian F.; Menon, Vinod; Greicius, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Convergent data from various scientific approaches strongly implicate cerebellar systems in non-motor functions. The functional anatomy of these systems has been pieced together from disparate sources such as animal studies, lesion studies in humans, and structural and functional imaging studies in humans. To better define this distinct functional anatomy, in the current study we delineate the role of the cerebellum in several non-motor systems simultaneously and in the same subjects using resting state functional connectivity MRI. Independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to resting state data from two independent datasets to identify common cerebellar contributions to several previously identified intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) involved in executive control, episodic memory/self-reflection, salience detection, and sensorimotor function. We found distinct cerebellar contributions to each of these ICNs. The neocerebellum participates in: 1. the right and left executive control networks (especially crus I and II), 2. the salience network (lobule VI), and 3. the default-mode network (lobule IX). Little to no overlap was detected between these cerebellar regions and the sensorimotor cerebellum (lobules V–VI). Clusters were also located in pontine and dentate nuclei, prominent points of convergence for cerebellar input and output respectively. The results suggest that the most phylogenetically recent part of the cerebellum, particularly crus I and II make contributions to parallel cortico-cerebellar loops involved in executive control, salience detection, and episodic memory/self-reflection. The largest portions of the neocerebellum take part in the executive control network implicated in higher cognitive functions such as working memory. PMID:19571149

  12. The Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome and Its Relation to Cerebellar Cognitive Function and the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Karin S.; Khademian, Zarir P.; Keating, Robert F.; Packer, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS), consisting of diminished speech output, hypotonia, ataxia, and emotional lability, occurs after surgery in up to 25% of patients with medulloblastoma and occasionally after removal of other posterior fossa tumors. Although the mutism is transient, speech rarely normalizes and the syndrome is…

  13. Vergence Deficits in Patients with Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, T.; Sprenger, A.; Neumann, G.; Machner, B.; Gottschalk, S.; Rambold, H.; Helmchen, C.

    2009-01-01

    The cerebellum is part of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar circuit for conjugate eye movements. Recent animal data suggest an additional role of the cerebellum for the control of binocular alignment and disconjugate, i.e. vergence eye movements. The latter is separated into two different components: fast vergence (to step targets) and slow vergence…

  14. Effect of Methamidophos on cerebellar neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Ibhazehiebo, K; Iyawe, V I; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Methamidophos is a toxic organophosphorus compound that inhibits acetlycholinesterase activity, and induces neurotoxicity. It is a synthetic chemical commonly used as pesticides to limit pest damages to cultivated plants. Currently, there is serious public health concern over its safety and use due to its global nature, persistence and bioaccumulations. We have previously reported that methamidophos suppressed thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-mediated transcription, but did not dissociate the interaction between TR and its response element (thyroid hormone response element; TRE), neither did it interact with nuclear cofactors. In the present study, we investigated the effects of methamidophos on cerebellar neuronal cells. Using primary cerebellar culture from new born rats, We observed that Purkinje cell dendrite arborization were greatly impaired in the absence of thyroid hormone (TH), However, low dose methamidophos 10-6 M did not significantly impair dendrite arborization of cerebellar Purkinje cells in the presence of thyroid hormone (TH). However, using granule cell reaggregate culture, we observed that low dose methamidophos 10-6 M remarkably suppressed granule cell neurite extension in the presence of TH. Taken together, our study shows that low dose methamidophos may negatively impact TH-mediated cerebellar neuronal cell development and function, and consequently could interfere with TH-regulated neuronal events. PMID:24937384

  15. Active force perception depends on cerebellar function

    PubMed Central

    Bhanpuri, Nasir H.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2012-01-01

    Damage to the cerebellum causes characteristic movement abnormalities but is thought to have minimal impact on somatosensory perception. Traditional clinical assessments of patients with cerebellar lesions reveal no perceptual deficits despite the fact that the cerebellum receives substantial somatosensory information. Given that abnormalities have been reported in predicting the visual consequences of movement, we suspect that the cerebellum broadly participates in perception when motor output is required (i.e., active perception). Thus we hypothesize that cerebellar integrity is essential for somatosensory perception that requires motor activity, but not passive somatosensory perception. We compared the perceptual acuity of human cerebellar patients to that of healthy control subjects in several different somatosensory perception tasks with minimal visual information. We found that patients were worse at active force and stiffness discrimination but similar to control subjects with regard to passive cutaneous force detection, passive proprioceptive detection, and passive proprioceptive discrimination. Furthermore, the severity of movement symptoms as assessed by a clinical exam was positively correlated with impairment of active force perception. Notably, within the context of these perceptual tasks, control subjects and cerebellar patients displayed similar movement characteristics, and hence differing movement strategies are unlikely to underlie the differences in perception. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the cerebellum is vital to sensory prediction of self-generated movement and suggest a general role for the cerebellum in multiple forms of active perception. PMID:22190620

  16. A probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter.

    PubMed

    van Baarsen, K M; Kleinnijenhuis, M; Jbabdi, S; Sotiropoulos, S N; Grotenhuis, J A; van Cappellen van Walsum, A M

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and their connectivity are gaining attraction, due to the important role the cerebellum plays in cognition and motor control. Atlases of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei are used to locate regions of interest in clinical and neuroscience studies. However, the white matter that connects these relay stations is of at least similar functional importance. Damage to these cerebellar white matter tracts may lead to serious language, cognitive and emotional disturbances, although the pathophysiological mechanism behind it is still debated. Differences in white matter integrity between patients and controls might shed light on structure-function correlations. A probabilistic parcellation atlas of the cerebellar white matter would help these studies by facilitating automatic segmentation of the cerebellar peduncles, the localization of lesions and the comparison of white matter integrity between patients and controls. In this work a digital three-dimensional probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter is presented, based on high quality 3T, 1.25mm resolution diffusion MRI data from 90 subjects participating in the Human Connectome Project. The white matter tracts were estimated using probabilistic tractography. Results over 90 subjects were symmetrical and trajectories of superior, middle and inferior cerebellar peduncles resembled the anatomy as known from anatomical studies. This atlas will contribute to a better understanding of cerebellar white matter architecture. It may eventually aid in defining structure-function correlations in patients with cerebellar disorders. PMID:26385011

  17. Anatomy and approaches along the cerebellar-brainstem fissures.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Ken; Yagmurlu, Kaan; Kohno, Michihiro; Rhoton, Albert L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Fissure dissection is routinely used in the supratentorial region to access deeply situated pathology while minimizing division of neural tissue. Use of fissure dissection is also practical in the posterior fossa. In this study, the microsurgical anatomy of the 3 cerebellar-brainstem fissures (cerebellomesencephalic, cerebellopontine, and cerebellomedullary) and the various procedures exposing these fissures in brainstem surgery were examined. METHODS Seven cadaveric heads were examined with a microsurgical technique and 3 with fiber dissection to clarify the anatomy of the cerebellar-brainstem and adjacent cerebellar fissures, in which the major vessels and neural structures are located. Several approaches directed along the cerebellar surfaces and fissures, including the supracerebellar infratentorial, occipital transtentorial, retrosigmoid, and midline suboccipital approaches, were examined. The 3 heads examined using fiber dissection defined the anatomy of the cerebellar peduncles coursing in the depths of these fissures. RESULTS Dissections directed along the cerebellar-brainstem and cerebellar fissures provided access to the posterior and posterolateral midbrain and upper pons, lateral pons, floor and lateral wall of the fourth ventricle, and dorsal and lateral medulla. CONCLUSIONS Opening the cerebellar-brainstem and adjacent cerebellar fissures provided access to the brainstem surface hidden by the cerebellum, while minimizing division of neural tissue. Most of the major cerebellar arteries, veins, and vital neural structures are located in or near these fissures and can be accessed through them. PMID:26274986

  18. A Mixed Cell Culture Model for Assessment of Proliferation in Tonsillar Tissues from Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea or Recurrent Tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    Serpero, Laura D.; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Dayyat, Ehab; Goldman, Julie L.; Kim, Jinkwan; Gozal, David

    2009-01-01

    Background Recurrent infective tonsillitis (RI) and obstructive sleep apnea(OSA) are the major indications for adenotonsillectomy (T&A) in children. However, little is known on the determinants of lymphadenoid tissue proliferation in the pediatric upper airway. Aim To develop an in vitro culture system allowing for assessment of tonsillar or adenoidal proliferation under basal or stimulated conditions. Methods Tonsils surgically removed from pediatric patients with obstructive sleep apnea and recurrent tonsillitis during T&A, were dissociated using standard methods. Whole cell tonsillar cultures were either maintained in normal medium or stimulated with LPS (25 ?g /ml) and concanavalin A (10 ?g/ml) for 24 hours (STIM). Cellular proliferation was evaluated by [3H] thymidine incorporation. In parallel, supernatants were collected after 48 hours, and concentration of cytokines was measured using standard ELISA procedures. Results Basal proliferative rates were increased in the OSA group (305.2 ± 40.6 cpm; n=31) compared to RI group (232.8 ± 31.9 cpm; n=26; p <0.001). No significant differences in proliferative rates emerged after STIM between OSA and RI. Furthermore, basal TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-8 concentrations in the supernatant were increased in OSA-derived cultures compared to RI, but IL-8 was higher after STIM in RI, while IL-6 remained increased in OSA. Conclusions The proliferative rates and concentrations of inflammatory mediators in tonsillar cell cultures from children with OSA and RI suggest that lymphadenoid tissue proliferation in these 2 conditions may be regulated by different mechanisms. This novel method may allow for future development of specific therapeutic interventions aiming to curtail and reverse tonsillar and adenoidal hypertrophy in children in a disease-specific manner. PMID:19266584

  19. Structured Connectivity in Cerebellar Inhibitory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rieubland, Sarah; Roth, Arnd; Häusser, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Summary Defining the rules governing synaptic connectivity is key to formulating theories of neural circuit function. Interneurons can be connected by both electrical and chemical synapses, but the organization and interaction of these two complementary microcircuits is unknown. By recording from multiple molecular layer interneurons in the cerebellar cortex, we reveal specific, nonrandom connectivity patterns in both GABAergic chemical and electrical interneuron networks. Both networks contain clustered motifs and show specific overlap between them. Chemical connections exhibit a preference for transitive patterns, such as feedforward triplet motifs. This structured connectivity is supported by a characteristic spatial organization: transitivity of chemical connectivity is directed vertically in the sagittal plane, and electrical synapses appear strictly confined to the sagittal plane. The specific, highly structured connectivity rules suggest that these motifs are essential for the function of the cerebellar network. PMID:24559679

  20. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    D'Mello, Anila M.; Stoodley, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD. PMID:26594140

  1. Fingolimod does not enhance cerebellar remyelination in the cuprizone model.

    PubMed

    Alme, Maria Nordheim; Nystad, Agnes E; Bø, Lars; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Vedeler, Christian A; Wergeland, Stig; Torkildsen, Øivind

    2015-08-15

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is approved for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. In vitro studies have found that fingolimod stimulates remyelination in cerebellar slices, but in vivo animal studies have not detected any positive effect on cerebral remyelination. The discrepant findings could be a result of different mechanisms underlying cerebral and cerebellar remyelination. The cuprizone model for de- and remyelination was used to evaluate whether fingolimod had an impact on cerebellar remyelination in vivo. We found that fingolimod did not have any effect on cerebellar remyelination, number of mature oligodendrocytes, microglia or astrocytes when fed after cuprizone exposure. PMID:26198937

  2. Activation of neurons in the cerebellar nuclei and ascending reticular formation by stimulation of the cerebellar surface.

    PubMed

    Bantli, H; Bloedel, J R; Tolbert, D

    1976-11-01

    Electrical stimulation of the cerebellar surface has been used therapeutically for the control of certain epileptic seizure and motor disorders. Recent hypotheses suggest that the therapeutic results in the treatment of epilepsy might be a consequence of the activation of Purkinje cells which subsequently inhibit the epileptic activity in the cerebrocellular loop. These experiments establish that an anatomical substrate exists whereby the effects of stimulating the cerebellar surface might be mediated by the ascending reticular formation and the non-specific thalamic nuclei. Specifically, the stimulation of the cerebellar surface activates not only Purkinje cells but also cerebellar afferent systems, climbing fibers and mossy fibers, and neurons in the cerebellar nuclei and reticular formation. In addition, recordings from neurons in the ascending reticular formation suggest that stimulation of the cerebellar surface can affect processing of ascending sensory information, thus influencing neural integration of non-specific sensory system. PMID:972338

  3. Descent Relations and Oscillator Level Truncation Method

    E-print Network

    I. Ya. Aref'eva; R. Gorbachev; P. B. Medvedev; D. V. Rychkov

    2006-06-08

    We reexamine the oscillator level truncation method in the bosonic String Field Theory (SFT) by calculation the descent relation =Z_3

  4. System for Estimating Horizontal Velocity During Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Andrew; Cheng, Yang; Wilson, Reg; Goguen, Jay; Martin, Alejandro San; Leger, Chris; Matthies, Larry

    2007-01-01

    The descent image motion estimation system (DIMES) is a system of hardware and software, designed for original use in estimating the horizontal velocity of a spacecraft descending toward a landing on Mars. The estimated horizontal velocity is used in generating rocket-firing commands to reduce the horizontal velocity as part of an overall control scheme to minimize the landing impact. DIMES can also be used for estimating the horizontal velocity of a remotely controlled or autonomous aircraft for purposes of navigation and control.

  5. The GABAergic neurones of the cerebellar nuclei in the rat: projections to the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Batini, C; Buisseret-Delmas, C; Compoint, C; Daniel, H

    1989-05-01

    The presence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the neurones of the cerebellar nucleocortical pathway is here reported. The pathway was identified by retrograde tracer and the GABA content was revealed immunohistochemically. It was found that most of the neurones giving rise to the reciprocal, non-reciprocal and symmetrical projections are indeed GABA-immunoreactive. They were observed in all the subdivisions of the nucleus medialis, of the nucleus interpositus and of the nucleus lateralis sending axons respectively to the sagittal zones A, C1-3 and D of the cerebellar cortex. The nucleus vestibularis lateralis and the related sagittal zone B were devoid of such projections. PMID:2471118

  6. Regression Analysis of Top of Descent Location for Idle-thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel; Bronsvoort, Jesper; McDonald, Greg

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, multiple regression analysis is used to model the top of descent (TOD) location of user-preferred descent trajectories computed by the flight management system (FMS) on over 1000 commercial flights into Melbourne, Australia. The independent variables cruise altitude, final altitude, cruise Mach, descent speed, wind, and engine type were also recorded or computed post-operations. Both first-order and second-order models are considered, where cross-validation, hypothesis testing, and additional analysis are used to compare models. This identifies the models that should give the smallest errors if used to predict TOD location for new data in the future. A model that is linear in TOD altitude, final altitude, descent speed, and wind gives an estimated standard deviation of 3.9 nmi for TOD location given the trajec- tory parameters, which means about 80% of predictions would have error less than 5 nmi in absolute value. This accuracy is better than demonstrated by other ground automation predictions using kinetic models. Furthermore, this approach would enable online learning of the model. Additional data or further knowl- edge of algorithms is necessary to conclude definitively that no second-order terms are appropriate. Possible applications of the linear model are described, including enabling arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the FMS even in congested airspace. In particular, a model for TOD location that is linear in the independent variables would enable decision support tool human-machine interfaces for which a kinetic approach would be computationally too slow.

  7. Cerebellar strokes: a clinical outcome review of 79 cases

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Zhi Xu; Yang, Wei Ren Eugene; Seet, Edwin; Koh, Kiok Miang; Teo, Ke Jia; Low, Shiong Wen; Chou, Ning; Yeo, Tseng Tsai; Venketasubramanian, N

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cerebellar infarcts and haemorrhages are relatively uncommon, accounting for less than 10% of all strokes. The objective of the present study was to quantify and compare the outcomes of patients with cerebellar infarct and those of patients with cerebellar haemorrhage, as well as to identify the risk factors that predict poor outcome in patients with cerebellar stroke. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of consecutive patients admitted to National University Hospital, Singapore, between 2004 and 2006, within one week of cerebellar stroke onset. Baseline data included demographics, concomitant comorbidities, and the presence or absence of brainstem compression and hydrocephalus (on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging). The Glasgow Outcome Scale and modified Rankin Score were used to assess outcome at discharge and at six months after discharge. RESULTS A total of 79 patients with cerebellar stroke were admitted during the study period. Of these 79 patients, 17.7% died and 31.6% had poor outcomes at six months after discharge. Patients with cerebellar haemorrhage were found to be more likely to have poor outcomes as compared to patients with cerebellar infarct, both at discharge (odds ratio [OR] 4.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–14.1) and at six months after discharge (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.6–17.2). When compared to small lesions (< 5 cm3), lesions > 20 cm3 were significantly associated with poorer outcomes and the development of hydrocephalus and brainstem compression. CONCLUSION Cerebellar strokes are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The outcomes of patients with cerebellar haemorrhage are more likely to be worse than those of patients with cerebellar infarct. PMID:25820846

  8. Krylov Subspace Descent for Deep Learning

    E-print Network

    Vinyals, Oriol

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a second order optimization method to learn models where both the dimensionality of the parameter space and the number of training samples is high. In our method, we construct on each iteration a Krylov subspace formed by the gradient and an approximation to the Hessian matrix, and then use a subset of the training data samples to optimize over this subspace. As with the Hessian Free (HF) method of [7], the Hessian matrix is never explicitly constructed, and is computed using a subset of data. In practice, as in HF, we typically use a positive definite substitute for the Hessian matrix such as the Gauss-Newton matrix. We investigate the effectiveness of our proposed method on deep neural networks, and compare its performance to widely used methods such as stochastic gradient descent, conjugate gradient descent and L-BFGS, and also to HF. Our method leads to faster convergence than either L-BFGS or HF, and generally performs better than either of them in cross-validation accuracy. It ...

  9. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam D.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Rivellini, Tomasso P.; Chen, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory project recently places the Curiosity rove on the surface of Mars. With the success of the landing system, the performance envelope of entry, descent and landing capabilities has been extended over the previous state of the art. This paper will present an overview to the MSL entry, descent and landing system design and preliminary flight performance results.

  10. Coordinate Descent with Arbitrary Sampling II: Expected Separable Overapproximation

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    general approach, which is based on the study of eigenvalues associated with samplings and the data, Accelerated Coordinate Descent Meth- ods for Big Data Optimization. Most of the material of this paperCoordinate Descent with Arbitrary Sampling II: Expected Separable Overapproximation Zheng Qu Peter

  11. Coordinate Descent with Arbitrary Sampling I: Algorithms and Complexity

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    Introduction With the dawn of the big data age, there has been a growing interest in solving optimization the EPSRC Grant EP/K02325X/1, Accelerated Coordinate Descent Meth- ods for Big Data Optimization. MostCoordinate Descent with Arbitrary Sampling I: Algorithms and Complexity Zheng Qu Peter Richt

  12. Cortical network functional connectivity in the descent to sleep

    E-print Network

    Larson-Prior, Linda

    dreaming (7, 15, 16). REM sleep is also marked by atonia in skeletal muscles, reducing the abilityCortical network functional connectivity in the descent to sleep Linda J. Larson-Priora,1 , John M, 2009 (sent for review June 6, 2008) Descent into sleep is accompanied by disengagement of the con

  13. Coevolution by Common Descent of Fungal Symbionts Grass Hosts

    E-print Network

    Burns, Jacqueline K.

    Coevolution by Common Descent of Fungal Symbionts Grass Hosts Christopher L. Schardl,* Adrian Clavicipitaceae) that are ecologically obligate symbionts of grasses. Because they can enhance host fitness of coevolution by common descent of Epichlol?'and grass species was addressed by surveying grasses

  14. Distinct Critical Cerebellar Subregions for Components of Verbal Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Freya E.; Grube, Manon; Von Kriegstein, Katharina; Kumar, Sukhbinder; English, Philip; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    A role for the cerebellum in cognition has been proposed based on studies suggesting a profile of cognitive deficits due to cerebellar stroke. Such studies are limited in the determination of the detailed organisation of cerebellar subregions that are critical for different aspects of cognition. In this study we examined the correlation between…

  15. Bridle Device in Mars Science Laboratory Descent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This view of a portion of the descent stage of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory shows two of the stage's three spherical fuel tanks flanking the bridle device assembly. The photograph was taken in early October 2008 from the center of the descent stage looking outward. The top of the descent stage is toward the top of the image.

    The bridle device assembly is about two-thirds of a meter, or 2 feet, from top to bottom, and has two main parts. The cylinder on the top is the descent brake. The conical-shaped mechanism below that is the bridle assembly, including a spool of nylon and Vectran cords that will be attached to the rover.

    When pyrotechnic bolts fire to sever the rigid connection between the rover and the descent stage, gravity will pull the tethered rover away from the descent stage. The bridle or tether, attached to three points on the rover, will unspool from the bridle assembly, beginning from the larger-diameter portion. The rotation rate of the assembly, hence the descent rate of the rover, will be governed by the descent brake. Inside the housing of that brake are gear boxes and banks of mechanical resistors engineered to prevent the bridle from spooling out too quickly or too slowly. The length of the bridle will allow the rover to be lowered about 7.5 meters (25 feet) while still tethered to the descent stage.

    The Starsys division of SpaceDev Inc., Poway, Calif., provided the descent brake. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., built the bridle assembly. Vectran is a product of Kuraray Co. Ltd., Tokyo. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

  16. New evidence for the cerebellar involvement in personality traits

    PubMed Central

    Picerni, Eleonora; Petrosini, Laura; Piras, Fabrizio; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Cutuli, Debora; Chiapponi, Chiara; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Following the recognition of its role in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum has been involved in cognitive, emotional, and even personality domains. This study investigated the relationships between cerebellar macro- and micro-structural variations and temperamental traits measured by Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). High resolution T1-weighted, and Diffusion Tensor Images of 100 healthy subjects aged 18–59 years were acquired by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance scanner. In multiple regression analyses, cerebellar Gray Matter (GM) or White Matter (WM) volumes, GM Mean Diffusivity (MD), and WM Fractional Anisotropy (FA) were used as dependent variables, TCI scores as regressors, gender, age, and education years as covariates. Novelty Seeking scores were associated positively with the cerebellar GM volumes and FA, and negatively with MD. No significant association between Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence or Persistence scores and cerebellar structural measures was found. The present data put toward a cerebellar involvement in the management of novelty. PMID:24106465

  17. Two-dimensional Experiments With Descent Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubiak, B.

    We examine the question of convergence of four descent variational algorithms: con- jugate gradient (cg), conjugate gradient squared (cgs), generalized minimum resid- ual (gmres) and transpose-free quasi minimal residual method (tfqmr) using two- dimensional, realistic, randomly located observational network. For the case of ac- curate uncorrelated observations and weakly correlated background error we define three diagnostic techniques and tested them for three different background error cor- relation models: SOAR, Gaussian and compact spline. The convergence rate depends largely on the condition number of innovation matrix. We found that practical mea- sure of the convergence can be based on estimating the norm of the gradient of the cost function. The norm is defined as the square root of the sum of the elements of the gradient and can be estimated at each iteration step. Other diagnostic techniques tested are more costly and can be used in simple situations only.

  18. Distributed Control by Lagrangian Steepest Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.; Bieniawski, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Often adaptive, distributed control can be viewed as an iterated game between independent players. The coupling between the players mixed strategies, arising as the system evolves from one instant to the next, is determined by the system designer. Information theory tells us that the most likely joint strategy of the players, given a value of the expectation of the overall control objective function, is the minimizer of a function o the joint strategy. So the goal of the system designer is to speed evolution of the joint strategy to that Lagrangian mhimbhgpoint,lowerthe expectated value of the control objective function, and repeat Here we elaborate the theory of algorithms that do this using local descent procedures, and that thereby achieve efficient, adaptive, distributed control.

  19. JC virus infection of hematopoietic progenitor cells, primary B lymphocytes, and tonsillar stromal cells: implications for viral latency.

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, M C; Atwood, W J; Gravell, M; Tornatore, C S; Major, E O

    1996-01-01

    The human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) infects myelin-producing cells in the central nervous system, resulting in the fatal demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). JCV-induced PML occurs most frequently in immunosuppressed individuals, with the highest incidence in human immunodeficiency type 1-infected patients, ranging between 4 and 6% of all AIDS cases. Although JCV targets a highly specialized cell in the central nervous system, infection is widespread, with more than 80% of the human population worldwide demonstrating serum antibodies. A number of clinical and laboratory studies have now linked the pathogenesis of PML with JCV infection in lymphoid cells. For example, JCV-infected lymphocytes have been suggested as possible carriers of virus to the brain following reactivation of a latent infection in lymphoid tissues. To further define the cellular tropism associated with JCV, we have attempted to infect immune system cells, including CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from human fetal liver, primary human B lymphocytes, and human tonsillar stromal cells. Our results demonstrate that these cell types as well as a CD34+ human cell line, KG-1a, are susceptible to JCV infection. JCV cannot, however, infect KG-1, a CD34+ cell line which differentiates into a macrophage-like cell when treated with phorbol esters. In addition, peripheral blood B lymphocytes isolated by flow cytometry from a PML patient demonstrate JCV infection. These results provide direct evidence that JCV is not strictly neurotropic but can infect CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells and those cells which have differentiated into a lymphocytic, but not monocytic, lineage. PMID:8794345

  20. Surface erosion caused on Mars from Viking descent engine plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, R. E.; Moore, H. J.; Scott, R. F.; Shorthill, R. W.; Spitzer, C. R.

    1980-11-01

    During the Martian landings the descent engine plumes on Viking Lander 1 (VL-1) and Viking Lander 2 (VL-2) eroded the Martian surface materials. This had been anticipated and investigated both analytically and experimentally during the design phase of the Viking spacecraft. This paper presents data on erosion obtained during the tests of the Viking descent engine and the evidence for erosion by the descent engines of VL-1 and VL-2 on Mars. From these and other results, it is concluded that there are four distinct surface materials on Mars: (1) drift materials, (2) crusty to cloddy material, (3) blocky material, and (4) rock.

  1. Contribution of Cerebellar Sensorimotor Adaptation to Hippocampal Spatial Memory

    PubMed Central

    Passot, Jean-Baptiste; Sheynikhovich, Denis; Duvelle, Éléonore; Arleo, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Complementing its primary role in motor control, cerebellar learning has also a bottom-up influence on cognitive functions, where high-level representations build up from elementary sensorimotor memories. In this paper we examine the cerebellar contribution to both procedural and declarative components of spatial cognition. To do so, we model a functional interplay between the cerebellum and the hippocampal formation during goal-oriented navigation. We reinterpret and complete existing genetic behavioural observations by means of quantitative accounts that cross-link synaptic plasticity mechanisms, single cell and population coding properties, and behavioural responses. In contrast to earlier hypotheses positing only a purely procedural impact of cerebellar adaptation deficits, our results suggest a cerebellar involvement in high-level aspects of behaviour. In particular, we propose that cerebellar learning mechanisms may influence hippocampal place fields, by contributing to the path integration process. Our simulations predict differences in place-cell discharge properties between normal mice and L7-PKCI mutant mice lacking long-term depression at cerebellar parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. On the behavioural level, these results suggest that, by influencing the accuracy of hippocampal spatial codes, cerebellar deficits may impact the exploration-exploitation balance during spatial navigation. PMID:22485133

  2. Recent binge drinking predicts smaller cerebellar volumes in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lisdahl, Krista M.; Thayer, Rachel; Squeglia, Lindsay M.; McQueeny, Tim M.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2012-01-01

    Background The current study examined the effects of recent binge drinking on cerebellar morphometry in a sample of healthy adolescents. Methods Participants were 106 teenagers (46 bingers and 60 controls) aged 16–19 who received a high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. FreeSurfer segmented and quantified the volume of each cerebellum. Maximum drinks during a binge in the past three months and duration since last binge were examined as predictors of cerebellar volume, after controlling for potentially confounding variables. Results In the 106 teens, higher peak drinks predicted smaller left hemisphere cerebellar gray (f2=.06, p = .02) and white matter (f2=.08, p = .02) and right hemisphere cerebellar gray matter (f2=.08, p = .006), and marginally predicted smaller right hemisphere cerebellar white matter (f2=.05, p = .09). Gender did not moderate these effects. Conclusion More intense adolescent binge drinking is linked to smaller cerebellar volumes even in healthy teens, above and beyond variability attributable to risk factors for binge drinking. Longitudinal research is needed to see if cerebellar volumes worsen with protracted drinking and recover with abstinence. Interventions aimed at improving brain structure in adolescent binge drinkers are necessary given the high prevalence of risky drinking in youth PMID:23154095

  3. Descent relations in type-0A and type-0B theories David Mattoon Thompson*

    E-print Network

    Romps, David M.

    Descent relations in type-0A and type-0B theories David Mattoon Thompson* Jefferson Physical of this added complication, we find the descent relations for D-branes in the type-0A and 0B theories insight into type-0 D-branes by working out the descent relations for type-0 theories. Sen's descent

  4. A Coordinate Descent Algorithm for Learning Compact Ranking Functions

    E-print Network

    Singer, Yoram

    A Coordinate Descent Algorithm for Learning Compact Ranking Functions Mark Stevens stevensm@google.com Samy Bengio bengio@google.com Yoram Singer singer@google.com Abstract Algorithms for learning to rank

  5. Automation for Accommodating Fuel-Efficient Descents in Constrained Airspace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coopenbarger, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous descents at low engine power are desired to reduce fuel consumption, emissions and noise during arrival operations. The challenge is to allow airplanes to fly these types of efficient descents without interruption during busy traffic conditions. During busy conditions today, airplanes are commonly forced to fly inefficient, step-down descents as airtraffic controllers work to ensure separation and maximize throughput. NASA in collaboration with government and industry partners is developing new automation to help controllers accommodate continuous descents in the presence of complex traffic and airspace constraints. This automation relies on accurate trajectory predictions to compute strategic maneuver advisories. The talk will describe the concept behind this new automation and provide an overview of the simulations and flight testing used to develop and refine its underlying technology.

  6. Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium collaborates on epidemiologic studies to address the high burden of prostate cancer and to understand the causes of etiology and outcomes among men of African ancestry.

  7. Explicit 8-Descent on Elliptic Curves Sebastian Karl Michael Stamminger

    E-print Network

    Stoll, Michael

    of Defense : December 09, 2005 School of Engineering and Science #12;ii #12;Abstract In this thesis I was the driving force for developing this method of 8-descent. With the program I wrote I was able to find

  8. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...be determined for the most critical uncontrolled descent that can result from any single failure of the heater assembly, fuel cell system, gas value system, or maneuvering vent system, or from any single tear in the balloon envelope between...

  9. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...be determined for the most critical uncontrolled descent that can result from any single failure of the heater assembly, fuel cell system, gas value system, or maneuvering vent system, or from any single tear in the balloon envelope between...

  10. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...be determined for the most critical uncontrolled descent that can result from any single failure of the heater assembly, fuel cell system, gas value system, or maneuvering vent system, or from any single tear in the balloon envelope between...

  11. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...be determined for the most critical uncontrolled descent that can result from any single failure of the heater assembly, fuel cell system, gas value system, or maneuvering vent system, or from any single tear in the balloon envelope between...

  12. Randomized coordinate descent methods for big data optimization 

    E-print Network

    Takac, Martin

    2014-07-01

    This thesis consists of 5 chapters. We develop new serial (Chapter 2), parallel (Chapter 3), distributed (Chapter 4) and primal-dual (Chapter 5) stochastic (randomized) coordinate descent methods, analyze their complexity ...

  13. Ascent/descent ancillary data production user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brans, H. R.; Seacord, A. W., II; Ulmer, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent Ancillary Data Product, also called the A/D BET because it contains a Best Estimate of the Trajectory (BET), is a collection of trajectory, attitude, and atmospheric related parameters computed for the ascent and descent phases of each Shuttle Mission. These computations are executed shortly after the event in a post-flight environment. A collection of several routines including some stand-alone routines constitute what is called the Ascent/Descent Ancillary Data Production Program. A User's Guide for that program is given. It is intended to provide the reader with all the information necessary to generate an Ascent or a Descent Ancillary Data Product. It includes descriptions of the input data and output data for each routine, and contains explicit instructions on how to run each routine. A description of the final output product is given.

  14. Germline recessive mutations in PI4KA are associated with perisylvian polymicrogyria, cerebellar hypoplasia and arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Howard, Malcolm F; Wisniewski, Eva; Popitsch, Niko; Knight, Samantha J L; Keays, David A; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Cox, Helen; Cox, Phillip; Balla, Tamas; Taylor, Jenny C; Kini, Usha

    2015-07-01

    Polymicrogyria (PMG) is a structural brain abnormality involving the cerebral cortex that results from impaired neuronal migration and although several genes have been implicated, many cases remain unsolved. In this study, exome sequencing in a family where three fetuses had all been diagnosed with PMG and cerebellar hypoplasia allowed us to identify regions of the genome for which both chromosomes were shared identical-by-descent, reducing the search space for causative variants to 8.6% of the genome. In these regions, the only plausibly pathogenic mutations were compound heterozygous variants in PI4KA, which Sanger sequencing confirmed segregated consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. The paternally transmitted variant predicted a premature stop mutation (c.2386C>T; p.R796X), whereas the maternally transmitted variant predicted a missense substitution (c.5560G>A; p.D1854N) at a conserved residue within the catalytic domain. Functional studies using expressed wild-type or mutant PI4KA enzyme confirmed the importance of p.D1854 for kinase activity. Our results emphasize the importance of phosphoinositide signalling in early brain development. PMID:25855803

  15. Germline recessive mutations in PI4KA are associated with perisylvian polymicrogyria, cerebellar hypoplasia and arthrogryposis

    PubMed Central

    Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Howard, Malcolm F.; Wisniewski, Eva; Popitsch, Niko; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Keays, David A.; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Cox, Helen; Cox, Phillip; Balla, Tamas; Taylor, Jenny C.; Kini, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Polymicrogyria (PMG) is a structural brain abnormality involving the cerebral cortex that results from impaired neuronal migration and although several genes have been implicated, many cases remain unsolved. In this study, exome sequencing in a family where three fetuses had all been diagnosed with PMG and cerebellar hypoplasia allowed us to identify regions of the genome for which both chromosomes were shared identical-by-descent, reducing the search space for causative variants to 8.6% of the genome. In these regions, the only plausibly pathogenic mutations were compound heterozygous variants in PI4KA, which Sanger sequencing confirmed segregated consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. The paternally transmitted variant predicted a premature stop mutation (c.2386C>T; p.R796X), whereas the maternally transmitted variant predicted a missense substitution (c.5560G>A; p.D1854N) at a conserved residue within the catalytic domain. Functional studies using expressed wild-type or mutant PI4KA enzyme confirmed the importance of p.D1854 for kinase activity. Our results emphasize the importance of phosphoinositide signalling in early brain development. PMID:25855803

  16. Air-Traffic Controllers Evaluate The Descent Advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Leonard; Volckers, Uwe; Erzberger, Heinz

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of Descent Advisor algorithm: software automation aid intended to assist air-traffic controllers in spacing traffic and meeting specified times or arrival. Based partly on mathematical models of weather conditions and performances of aircraft, it generates suggested clearances, including top-of-descent points and speed-profile data to attain objectives. Study focused on operational characteristics with specific attention to how it can be used for prediction, spacing, and metering.

  17. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for detecting Mycoplasma hyosynoviae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis in pen-based oral, tonsillar, and nasal fluids

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Leslie; Erickson, Barbara Z.; Wang, Chong; Raymond, Matthew; Strait, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma (M.) hyorhinis and M. hyosynoviae are pathogens known to cause disease in pigs post-weaning. Due to their fastidious nature, there is increased need for culture-independent diagnostic platforms to detect these microorganisms. Therefore, this study was performed to develop and optimize quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays to rapidly detect M. hyorhinis and M. hyosynoviae in pen-based oral fluids as well as nasal and tonsillar fluids as proxies for samples used in swine herd surveillance. Two methods of genomic DNA extraction, automated versus manual, were used to compare diagnostic test performance. A wean-to-finish longitudinal study was also carried out to demonstrate the reproducibility of using pen-based oral fluids. Overall, pen-based oral and tonsillar fluids were more likely to be positive for both types of bacteria whereas only M. hyorhinis was detected in nasal fluids. DNA extraction protocols were shown to significantly influence test result. Although the initial detection time somewhat differed, both organisms were repeatedly detected in the longitudinal study. Overall, this study evaluated two qPCR methods for rapid and specific detection of either mycoplasma. Results from the present investigation can serve as a foundation for future studies to determine the prevalence of the two microorganisms, environmental load, and effectiveness of veterinary interventions for infection control. PMID:25643803

  18. Orion Entry, Descent, and Landing Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoelscher, Brian R.

    2007-01-01

    The Orion Entry, Descent, and Landing simulation was created over the past two years to serve as the primary Crew Exploration Vehicle guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) design and analysis tool at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Advanced NASA Technology Architecture for Exploration Studies (ANTARES) simulation is a six degree-of-freedom tool with a unique design architecture which has a high level of flexibility. This paper describes the decision history and motivations that guided the creation of this simulation tool. The capabilities of the models within ANTARES are presented in detail. Special attention is given to features of the highly flexible GN&C architecture and the details of the implemented GN&C algorithms. ANTARES provides a foundation simulation for the Orion Project that has already been successfully used for requirements analysis, system definition analysis, and preliminary GN&C design analysis. ANTARES will find useful application in engineering analysis, mission operations, crew training, avionics-in-the-loop testing, etc. This paper focuses on the entry simulation aspect of ANTARES, which is part of a bigger simulation package supporting the entire mission profile of the Orion vehicle. The unique aspects of entry GN&C design are covered, including how the simulation is being used for Monte Carlo dispersion analysis and for support of linear stability analysis. Sample simulation output from ANTARES is presented in an appendix.

  19. Distributed Method to Optimal Profile Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geun I.

    Current ground automation tools for Optimal Profile Descent (OPD) procedures utilize path stretching and speed profile change to maintain proper merging and spacing requirements at high traffic terminal area. However, low predictability of aircraft's vertical profile and path deviation during decent add uncertainty to computing estimated time of arrival, a key information that enables the ground control center to manage airspace traffic effectively. This paper uses an OPD procedure that is based on a constant flight path angle to increase the predictability of the vertical profile and defines an OPD optimization problem that uses both path stretching and speed profile change while largely maintaining the original OPD procedure. This problem minimizes the cumulative cost of performing OPD procedures for a group of aircraft by assigning a time cost function to each aircraft and a separation cost function to a pair of aircraft. The OPD optimization problem is then solved in a decentralized manner using dual decomposition techniques under inter-aircraft ADS-B mechanism. This method divides the optimization problem into more manageable sub-problems which are then distributed to the group of aircraft. Each aircraft solves its assigned sub-problem and communicate the solutions to other aircraft in an iterative process until an optimal solution is achieved thus decentralizing the computation of the optimization problem.

  20. Mapping cerebellar abiotrophy in Australian Kelpies.

    PubMed

    Shearman, J R; Cook, R W; McCowan, C; Fletcher, J L; Taylor, R M; Wilton, A N

    2011-12-01

    An autosomal recessive form of cerebellar abiotrophy occurs in Australian Kelpie dogs. Clinical signs range from mild ataxia with intention tremor to severe ataxia with seizures. A whole-genome mapping analysis was performed using Affymetrix Canine SNP array v2 on 11 affected and 19 control dogs, but there was no significant association with disease. A homozygosity analysis identified a three megabase region likely to contain the disease mutation. The region spans 29.8-33?Mb on chromosome 3, for which all affected dogs were homozygous for a common haplotype. Microsatellite markers were developed in the candidate region for linkage analysis that resulted in a logarithm of odds score suggestive of linkage. The candidate region contains 29 genes, none of which are known to cause ataxia. PMID:22035013

  1. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Sun; Cho, Jin Whan

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes. PMID:26090078

  2. Chronic THC intake modifies fundamental cerebellar functions.

    PubMed

    Stella, Nephi

    2013-08-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal bioactive component in the Cannabis plant, is truly a captivating drug. Acute and chronic THC intake produces a spectrum of biological effects ranging from transient psychotropic effects to prolonged medicinal benefits, many of which have been fostered for centuries by our society. In the July 2013 issue of the JCI, Cutando et al. combined mouse genetics with classic mouse behavioral analysis to deepen our understanding of the physiological consequence of subchronic THC intake on eyeblink reflexes, a fundamental neuronal adaptive response, revealing that this regimen leads to downregulation of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (referred to as CB1 in the Cutando et al. article) in cerebellar stress fibers and the activation of microglia, raising provocative new questions about the safety profile of regimented THC intake. PMID:23863631

  3. Chronic THC intake modifies fundamental cerebellar functions

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Nephi

    2013-01-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal bioactive component in the Cannabis plant, is truly a captivating drug. Acute and chronic THC intake produces a spectrum of biological effects ranging from transient psychotropic effects to prolonged medicinal benefits, many of which have been fostered for centuries by our society. In the July 2013 issue of the JCI, Cutando et al. combined mouse genetics with classic mouse behavioral analysis to deepen our understanding of the physiological consequence of subchronic THC intake on eyeblink reflexes, a fundamental neuronal adaptive response, revealing that this regimen leads to downregulation of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (referred to as CB1 in the Cutando et al. article) in cerebellar stress fibers and the activation of microglia, raising provocative new questions about the safety profile of regimented THC intake. PMID:23863631

  4. The role of serotonin in cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Oostland, M; van Hooft, J A

    2013-09-17

    In adult animals, the cerebellum is richly innervated by serotonin: serotonergic fibres are the third main afferent fibres into the cerebellum. However, the physiology of the serotonergic system and its functional significance are not fully known during development in the cerebellum. In this review we will focus on the serotonergic regulation of the cerebellum during postnatal development. We hypothesize a powerful role for serotonin in the physiology of the developing cerebellum. A presumably tonic activation of serotonin receptors by binding of serotonin becomes specific by temporally and spatially restricted expression of different serotonin receptors, each with their own (sometimes antagonizing) functions. During the first postnatal week, activation of 5-HT? receptors expressed by both granule cells and Purkinje cells stimulates dendritic growth and synapse formation. Later, activation of 5-HT? receptors expressed by granule cells limits dendritic growth of Purkinje cells via mediating the secretion of reelin, influences physiological maturation of Purkinje cells, modulates synaptic plasticity at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses and thereby affects competition with the climbing fibres on Purkinje cell dendrites resulting in proper climbing fibre elimination. Last, activation of 5-HT? receptors expressed by granule cells and Purkinje cells both during late postnatal development and in the mature cerebellum promotes the stability of synaptic activity. Thus, we propose that serotonin controls cerebellar development in three phases: (1) stimulation of dendritic growth and formation of synapses, (2) hard-wiring of neuronal connections with limits to dendritic growth but ensuring synaptic plasticity, and (3) stabilization of synapses. Taken together, serotonin receptors expressed by different cells in the cerebellum have a specialized role during postnatal development, but with some similar main effects. Distinct spatial and temporal expression of these receptors gives serotonin a powerful and specific role in cerebellar development. PMID:23721821

  5. Past, Present and Future Therapeutics for Cerebellar Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Marmolino, D; Manto, M

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are a group of disabling neurological disorders. Patients exhibit a cerebellar syndrome and can also present with extra-cerebellar deficits, namely pigmentary retinopathy, extrapyramidal movement disorders, pyramidal signs, cortical symptoms (seizures, cognitive impairment/behavioural symptoms), and peripheral neuropathy. Recently, deficits in cognitive operations have been unraveled. Cerebellar ataxias are heterogeneous both at the phenotypic and genotypic point of view. Therapeutical trials performed during these last 4 decades have failed in most cases, in particular because drugs were not targeting a deleterious pathway, but were given to counteract putative defects in neurotransmission. The identification of the causative mutations of many hereditary ataxias, the development of relevant animal models and the recent identifications of the molecular mechanisms underlying ataxias are impacting on the development of new drugs. We provide an overview of the pharmacological treatments currently used in the clinical practice and we discuss the drugs under development. PMID:20808545

  6. Hypertension-induced cerebellar encephalopathy and hydrocephalus in a male.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang-Lin; Hsu, Wen-Chin; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Lui, Tai-Ngar

    2006-01-01

    Hypertensive encephalopathy is believed to be caused by an abrupt elevation in systemic blood pressure. It rarely occurs in children and can be neurologically devastating if it is not recognized and treated immediately. This report describes an 11-year-old male who presented with edema and a cerebellar lesion, with acute obstructive hydrocephalus resulting from hypertensive encephalopathy. A shunt was inserted to relieve pressure in the acute stage. The patient's hydrocephalus and cerebellar swelling subsided when his blood pressure was controlled. The cerebellar lesion had been initially diagnosed as a glioma. In children, a cerebellar lesion occurring with acute obstructive hydrocephalus and hypertensive encephalopathy is rare but reversible. Clinicians should be aware of this condition because it might be misdiagnosed as a tumor of the posterior fossa. PMID:16376285

  7. Late Onset of Cerebellar Abiotrophy in a Boxer Dog

    PubMed Central

    Gumber, Sanjeev; Cho, Doo-Youn; Morgan, Timothy W.

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar abiotrophy is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system and has been reported in humans and animals. This case report documents clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical findings of cerebellar abiotrophy in an adult Boxer dog. A 3.5-year-old, female, tan Boxer dog presented with a six-week history of left-sided head tilt. Neurological examination and additional diagnostics during her three subsequent visits over 4.5 months revealed worsening of neurological signs including marked head pressing, severe proprioceptive deficits in all the four limbs, loss of menace response and palpebral reflex in the left eye, and a gradual seizure lasting one hour at her last visit. Based on the immunohistochemical staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and histopathological examination of cerebellum, cerebellar cortical abiotrophy was diagnosed. This is the first reported case of cerebellar abiotrophy in a Boxer dog to our knowledge. PMID:21151662

  8. Reevaluating the role of LTD in cerebellar motor learning.

    PubMed

    Schonewille, Martijn; Gao, Zhenyu; Boele, Henk-Jan; Veloz, Maria F Vinueza; Amerika, Wardell E; Simek, Antonia A M; De Jeu, Marcel T; Steinberg, Jordan P; Takamiya, Kogo; Hoebeek, Freek E; Linden, David J; Huganir, Richard L; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2011-04-14

    Long-term depression at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses (PF-PC LTD) has been proposed to be required for cerebellar motor learning. To date, tests of this hypothesis have sought to interfere with receptors (mGluR1) and enzymes (PKC, PKG, or ?CamKII) necessary for induction of PF-PC LTD and thereby determine if cerebellar motor learning is impaired. Here, we tested three mutant mice that target the expression of PF-PC LTD by blocking internalization of AMPA receptors. Using three different cerebellar coordination tasks (adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, eyeblink conditioning, and locomotion learning on the Erasmus Ladder), we show that there is no motor learning impairment in these mutant mice that lack PF-PC LTD. These findings demonstrate that PF-PC LTD is not essential for cerebellar motor learning. PMID:21482355

  9. Genetics Home Reference: VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... time. Children with VLDLR -associated cerebellar hypoplasia may learn to walk later in childhood, usually after the age of 6, although some are never able to walk independently. In one Turkish family, affected people walk on their hands and ...

  10. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Behera, Sanjay Kumar; Dhir, Manmath Kumar; Senapati, Satya Bhusan

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different. PMID:25002780

  11. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Behera, Sanjay Kumar; Dhir, Manmath Kumar; Senapati, Satya Bhusan

    2014-07-01

    Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different. PMID:25002780

  12. Reevaluating the Role of LTD in Cerebellar Motor Learning

    PubMed Central

    Schonewille, Martijn; Gao, Zhenyu; Boele, Henk-Jan; Veloz, Maria F. Vinueza; Amerika, Wardell E.; Simek, Antonia A.M.; De Jeu, Marcel T.; Steinberg, Jordan P.; Takamiya, Kogo; Hoebeek, Freek E.; Linden, David J.; Huganir, Richard L.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term depression at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses (PF-PC LTD) has been proposed to be required for cerebellar motor learning. To date, tests of this hypothesis have sought to interfere with receptors (mGluR1) and enzymes (PKC, PKG, or ?CamKII) necessary for induction of PF-PC LTD and thereby determine if cerebellar motor learning is impaired. Here, we tested three mutant mice that target the expression of PF-PC LTD by blocking internalization of AMPA receptors. Using three different cerebellar coordination tasks (adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, eyeblink conditioning, and locomotion learning on the Erasmus Ladder), we show that there is no motor learning impairment in these mutant mice that lack PF-PC LTD. These findings demonstrate that PF-PC LTD is not essential for cerebellar motor learning. PMID:21482355

  13. Altered cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients ON and OFF L-DOPA medication.

    PubMed

    Festini, Sara B; Bernard, Jessica A; Kwak, Youngbin; Peltier, Scott; Bohnen, Nicolaas I; Müller, Martijn L T M; Dayalu, Praveen; Seidler, Rachael D

    2015-01-01

    Although nigrostriatal changes are most commonly affiliated with Parkinson's disease, the role of the cerebellum in Parkinson's has become increasingly apparent. The present study used lobule-based cerebellar resting state functional connectivity to (1) compare cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients both ON and OFF L-DOPA medication and controls, and to (2) relate variations in cerebellar connectivity to behavioral performance. Results indicated that, when contrasted to the control group, Parkinson's patients OFF medication had increased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity, whereas Parkinson's patients ON medication had decreased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity. Moreover, analyses relating levels of cerebellar connectivity to behavioral measures demonstrated that, within each group, increased levels of connectivity were most often associated with improved cognitive and motor performance, but there were several instances where increased connectivity was related to poorer performance. Overall, the present study found medication-variant cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients, further demonstrating cerebellar changes associated with Parkinson's disease and the moderating effects of medication. PMID:25954184

  14. Altered cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients ON and OFF L-DOPA medication

    PubMed Central

    Festini, Sara B.; Bernard, Jessica A.; Kwak, Youngbin; Peltier, Scott; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Müller, Martijn L. T. M.; Dayalu, Praveen; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2015-01-01

    Although nigrostriatal changes are most commonly affiliated with Parkinson's disease, the role of the cerebellum in Parkinson's has become increasingly apparent. The present study used lobule-based cerebellar resting state functional connectivity to (1) compare cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients both ON and OFF L-DOPA medication and controls, and to (2) relate variations in cerebellar connectivity to behavioral performance. Results indicated that, when contrasted to the control group, Parkinson's patients OFF medication had increased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity, whereas Parkinson's patients ON medication had decreased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity. Moreover, analyses relating levels of cerebellar connectivity to behavioral measures demonstrated that, within each group, increased levels of connectivity were most often associated with improved cognitive and motor performance, but there were several instances where increased connectivity was related to poorer performance. Overall, the present study found medication-variant cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients, further demonstrating cerebellar changes associated with Parkinson's disease and the moderating effects of medication. PMID:25954184

  15. Disrupted cortico-cerebellar connectivity in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jessica A.; Peltier, Scott J.; Wiggins, Jillian Lee; Jaeggi, Susanne M.; Buschkuehl, Martin; Fling, Brett W.; Kwak, Youngbin; Jonides, John; Monk, Christopher S.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2013-01-01

    Healthy aging is marked by declines in a variety of cognitive and motor abilities. A better understanding of the aging brain may aid in elucidating the neural substrates of these behavioral effects. Investigations of resting state functional brain connectivity have provided insights into pathology, and to some degree, healthy aging. Given the role of the cerebellum in both motor and cognitive behaviors, as well as its known volumetric declines with age, investigating cerebellar networks may shed light on the neural bases of age-related functional declines. We mapped the resting state networks of the lobules of the right hemisphere and the vermis of the cerebellum in a group of healthy older adults and compared them to those of young adults. We report disrupted cortico-cerebellar resting state network connectivity in older adults. These results remain even when controlling for cerebellar volume, signal-to-noise ratio, and signal-to-fluctuation noise ratio. Specifically, there was consistent disruption of cerebellar connectivity with both the striatum and the medial temporal lobe. Associations between connectivity strength and both sensorimotor and cognitive task performance indicate that cerebellar engagement with the default mode network and striatal pathways is associated with better performance for older adults. These results extend our understanding of the resting state networks of the aging brain to include cortico-cerebellar networks, and indicate that age differences in network connectivity strength are important for behavior. PMID:23792980

  16. Cerebellum and procedural learning: evidence from focal cerebellar lesions.

    PubMed

    Molinari, M; Leggio, M G; Solida, A; Ciorra, R; Misciagna, S; Silveri, M C; Petrosini, L

    1997-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of focal cerebellar lesions on procedural learning. Eight patients with cerebellar lesions and six control subjects were tested in a serial reaction-time task. A four-choice reaction-time task was employed in which the stimuli followed (or not) a sequence repeated 10 times, with the subjects aware (or not) of the item sequence. Learning was manifested by the reduction in response latency over the sequential blocks. Acquisition of declarative knowledge of the sequence was also tested. Reaction times displayed by patients with cerebellar lesions, even though they tended to be longer than those of control subjects in all testing conditions, significantly differed from control subjects only when the stimuli were presented in sequence. The reaction times in sequential trials were still statistically significant when simple motor response times were taken into account. Cerebellar patients were also significantly impaired in detecting and repeating the sequence. On the other hand, when the sequence was learned before testing, motor performances were significantly improved in all subjects. These data indicate that cerebellar lesions induce specific impairment in the procedural learning of a motor sequence and suggest a role of the cerebellar circuitry in detecting and recognizing event sequences. PMID:9365368

  17. Neurodevelopmental Malformations of the Cerebellar Vermis in Genetically Engineered Rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Raddy L; Van Dine, Sarah E; Gilbert, Mary E; Leheste, Joerg R; Torres, German

    2015-12-01

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformations are almost exclusively found along the primary fissure and are indicative of deficits of neuronal migration during cerebellar development. In the present report, we test the prediction that genetically engineered rats on Sprague-Dawley or Long-Evans backgrounds will also exhibit the same cerebellar malformations. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that three different transgenic lines on two different backgrounds had cerebellar malformations. Heterotopia in transgenic rats had identical cytoarchitecture as that observed in wild-type rats including altered morphology of Bergmann glia. In light of the possibility that heterotopia could affect results from behavioral studies, these data suggest that histological analyses be performed in studies of cerebellar function or development when using genetically engineered rats on these backgrounds in order to have more careful interpretation of experimental findings. PMID:25700682

  18. Emotions and their cognitive control in children with cerebellar tumors.

    PubMed

    Hopyan, Talar; Laughlin, Suzanne; Dennis, Maureen

    2010-11-01

    A constellation of deficits, termed the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS), has been reported following acquired cerebellar lesions. We studied emotion identification and the cognitive control of emotion in children treated for acquired tumors of the cerebellum. Participants were 37 children (7-16 years) treated for cerebellar tumors (19 benign astrocytomas (AST), 18 malignant medulloblastomas (MB), and 37 matched controls (CON). The Emotion Identification Task investigated recognition of happy and sad emotions in music. In two cognitive control tasks, we investigated whether children could identify emotion in situations in which the emotion in the music and the emotion in the lyrics was either congruent or incongruent. Children with cerebellar tumors identified emotion as accurately and quickly as controls (p > .05), although there was a significant interaction of emotions and group (p < .01), with the MB group performing less accurately identifying sad emotions, and both cerebellar tumor groups were impaired in the cognitive control of emotions (p < .01). The fact that childhood acquired cerebellar tumors disrupt cognitive control of emotion rather than emotion identification provides some support for a model of the CCAS as a disorder, not so much of emotion as of the regulation of emotion by cognition. PMID:20887648

  19. Human Scleral Structural Stiffness Increases More Rapidly With Age in Donors of African Descent Compared to Donors of European Descent

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Massimo A.; Grytz, Rafael; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Bruno, Luigi; Girkin, Christopher A.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We tested the hypothesis that the variation of peripapillary scleral structural stiffness with age is different in donors of European (ED) and African (AD) descent. Methods. Posterior scleral shells from normal eyes from donors of European (n = 20 pairs; previously reported) and African (n = 9 pairs) descent aged 0 and 90 years old were inflation tested within 48 hours post mortem. Scleral shells were pressurized from 5 to 45 mm Hg and the full-field, 3-dimensional (3D) deformation of the outer surface was recorded at submicrometric accuracy using speckle interferometry (ESPI). Mean maximum principal (tensile) strain of the peripapillary and midperipheral regions surrounding the optic nerve head (ONH) were fit using a functional mixed effects model that accounts for intradonor variability, same-race correlation, and spatial autocorrelation to estimate the effect of race on the age-related changes in mechanical scleral strain. Results. Mechanical tensile strain significantly decreased with age in the peripapillary sclera in the African and European descent groups (P < 0.001), but the age-related stiffening was significantly greater in the African descent group (P < 0.05). Maximum principal strain in the peripapillary sclera was significantly higher than in the midperipheral sclera for both ethnic groups. Conclusions. The sclera surrounding the ONH stiffens more rapidly with age in the African descent group compared to the European group. Stiffening of the peripapillary sclera with age may be related to the higher prevalence of glaucoma in the elderly and persons of African descent. PMID:25237162

  20. Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill' (QTVR)

    In late November 2005 while descending 'Husband Hill,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the most detailed panorama so far of the 'Inner Basin,' the rover's next target destination. Spirit acquired the 405 individual images that make up this 360-degree view of the surrounding terrain using five different filters on the panoramic camera. The rover took the images on Martian days, or sols, 672 to 677 (Nov. 23 to 28, 2005 -- the Thanksgiving holiday weekend).

    This image is an approximately true-color rendering using camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters. Seams between individual frames have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

    'Home Plate,' a bright, semi-circular feature scientists hope to investigate, is harder to discern in this image than in earlier views taken from higher up the hill. Spirit acquired this more oblique view, known as the 'Seminole panorama,' from about halfway down the south flank of Husband Hill, 50 meters (164 feet) or so below the summit. Near the center of the panorama, on the horizon, are 'McCool Hill' and 'Ramon Hill,' named, like Husband Hill, in honor of the fallen astronauts of the space shuttle Columbia. Husband Hill is visible behind the rover, on the right and left sides of the panorama. An arc of rover tracks made while avoiding obstacles and getting into position to examine rock outcrops can be traced over a long distance by zooming in to explore the panorama in greater detail.

    Spirit is now significantly farther downhill toward the center of this panorama, en route to Home Plate and other enigmatic soils and outcrop rocks in the quest to uncover the history of Gusev Crater and the 'Columbia Hills.'

  1. Cerebellar-Motor Dysfunction in Schizophrenia and Psychosis-Risk: The Importance of Regional Cerebellar Analysis Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jessica A.; Mittal, Vijay A.

    2014-01-01

    Motor abnormalities in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis are well documented. An accumulating body of work has also highlighted motor abnormalities related to cerebellar dysfunction in schizophrenia including eye-blink conditioning, timing, postural control, and motor learning. We have also recently found evidence for motor dysfunction in individuals at ultra high-risk for psychosis (1–3). This is particularly relevant as the cerebellum is thought to be central to the cognitive dysmetria model of schizophrenia, and these overt motor signs may point to more general cerebellar dysfunction in the etiology of psychotic disorders. While studies have provided evidence indicative of motor cerebellar dysfunction in at-risk populations and in schizophrenia, findings with respect to the cerebellum have been mixed. One factor potentially contributing to these mixed results is the whole-structure approach taken when investigating the cerebellum. In non-human primates, there are distinct closed-loop circuits between the cerebellum, thalamus, and brain with motor and non-motor cortical regions. Recent human neuroimaging has supported this finding and indicates that there is a cerebellar functional topography (4), and this information is being missed with whole-structure approaches. Here, we review cerebellar-motor dysfunction in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis. We also discuss cerebellar abnormalities in psychosis, and the cerebellar functional topography. Because of the segregated functional regions of the cerebellum, we propose that it is important to look at the structure regionally in order to better understand its role in motor dysfunction in these populations. This is analogous to approaches taken with the basal ganglia, where each region is considered separately. Such an approach is necessary to better understand cerebellar pathophysiology on a macro-structural level with respect to the pathogenesis of psychosis. PMID:25505424

  2. Design of automation tools for management of descent traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz; Nedell, William

    1988-01-01

    The design of an automated air traffic control system based on a hierarchy of advisory tools for controllers is described. Compatibility of the tools with the human controller, a key objective of the design, is achieved by a judicious selection of tasks to be automated and careful attention to the design of the controller system interface. The design comprises three interconnected subsystems referred to as the Traffic Management Advisor, the Descent Advisor, and the Final Approach Spacing Tool. Each of these subsystems provides a collection of tools for specific controller positions and tasks. This paper focuses primarily on the Descent Advisor which provides automation tools for managing descent traffic. The algorithms, automation modes, and graphical interfaces incorporated in the design are described. Information generated by the Descent Advisor tools is integrated into a plan view traffic display consisting of a high-resolution color monitor. Estimated arrival times of aircraft are presented graphically on a time line, which is also used interactively in combination with a mouse input device to select and schedule arrival times. Other graphical markers indicate the location of the fuel-optimum top-of-descent point and the predicted separation distances of aircraft at a designated time-control point. Computer generated advisories provide speed and descent clearances which the controller can issue to aircraft to help them arrive at the feeder gate at the scheduled times or with specified separation distances. Two types of horizontal guidance modes, selectable by the controller, provide markers for managing the horizontal flightpaths of aircraft under various conditions. The entire system consisting of descent advisor algorithm, a library of aircraft performance models, national airspace system data bases, and interactive display software has been implemented on a workstation made by Sun Microsystems, Inc. It is planned to use this configuration in operational evaluations at an en route center.

  3. Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) on the Mars Polar Lander

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malin, M.C.; Caplinger, M.A.; Carr, M.H.; Squyres, S.; Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Mars Descent Imager, or MARDI, experiment on the Mars Polar Lander (MPL) consists of a camera characterized by small physical size and mass (???6 ?? 6 ?? 12 cm, including baffle; <500 gm), low power requirements (<2.5 W, including power supply losses), and high science performance (1000 x 1000 pixel, low noise). The intent of the investigation is to acquire nested images over a range of resolutions, from 8 m/pixel to better than 1 cm/pixel, during the roughly 2 min it takes the MPL to descend from 8 km to the surface under parachute and rocket-powered deceleration. Observational goals will include studies of (1) surface morphology (e.g., nature and distribution of landforms indicating past and present environmental processes); (2) local and regional geography (e.g., context for other lander instruments: precise location, detailed local relief); and (3) relationships to features seen in orbiter data. To accomplish these goals, MARDI will collect three types of images. Four small images (256 x 256 pixels) will be acquired on 0.5 s centers beginning 0.3 s before MPL's heatshield is jettisoned. Sixteen full-frame images (1024 X 1024, circularly edited) will be acquired on 5.3 s centers thereafter. Just after backshell jettison but prior to the start of powered descent, a "best final nonpowered descent image" will be acquired. Five seconds after the start of powered descent, the camera will begin acquiring images on 4 s centers. Storage for as many as ten 800 x 800 pixel images is available during terminal descent. A number of spacecraft factors are likely to impact the quality of MARDI images, including substantial motion blur resulting from large rates of attitude variation during parachute descent and substantial rocket-engine-induced vibration during powered descent. In addition, the mounting location of the camera places the exhaust plume of the hydrazine engines prominently in the field of view. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Role of cerebellar adrenomedullin in blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Leticia; Israel, Anita

    2015-12-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) and their receptor components, calcitonin-receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP1, RMP2 and RAMP3) are widely expressed in the central nervous system, including cerebellum. We have shown that AM binding sites are altered in cerebellum during hypertension, suggesting a role for cerebellar adrenomedullinergic system in blood pressure regulation. To further evaluate the role of AM in cerebellum, we assessed the expression of AM, RAMP1, RAMP2, RAMP3 and CRLR in the cerebellar vermis of 8 and 16week old spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. In addition, the effect of microinjection of AM into rat cerebellar vermis on arterial blood pressure (BP) was determined. Animals were sacrificed by decapitation and cerebellar vermis was dissected for quantification of AM, CRLR, RAMP1, RAMP2 and RAMP3 expression using western blot analysis. Another group of male, 16week old SHR and WKY rats was anesthetized, and a cannula was implanted in the cerebellar vermis. Following recovery AM (0.02 to 200pmol/5?L) or vehicle was injected into cerebellar vermis. BP was determined, before and after treatments, by non-invasive plethysmography. In addition, to establish the receptor subtype involved in AM action in vivo, animals received microinjections of AM22-52 (200pmol/5?L), an AM1 receptor antagonist, or the CGRP1 receptor antagonist, CGRP8-37 (200pmol/5?L) into the cerebellar vermis, administered simultaneously with AM or vehicle microinjection. Cannulation was verified post mortem with the in situ injection of a dye solution. Our findings demonstrated that the expression of CRLR, RAMP1 and RAMP3 was higher in cerebellum of SHR rats, while AM and RAMP2 expression was lower than those of WKY rats, both in 8 and 16week old rats. In vivo microinjection of AM into the cerebellar vermis caused a profound, dose dependent, hypotensive effect in SHR but not in normotensive WKY rats. Coinjections of a putative AM receptor antagonist, AM22-52 abolished the decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) evoked by AM, showing that AM acts through its AM1 receptor in the vermis to reduce MAP. These findings demonstrate a dysregulation of cerebellar AM-system during hypertension, and suggest that cerebellar AM plays an important role in the regulation of BP. Likewise; they constitute a novel mechanism of BP control which has not been described so far. PMID:26259851

  5. A Cerebellar Neuroprosthetic System: Computational Architecture and in vivo Test

    PubMed Central

    Herreros, Ivan; Giovannucci, Andrea; Taub, Aryeh H.; Hogri, Roni; Magal, Ari; Bamford, Sim; Prueckl, Robert; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Emulating the input–output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuroprosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention, and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model’s inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans. PMID:25152887

  6. Cerebellar infarct patterns: The SMART-Medea study

    PubMed Central

    De Cocker, Laurens J.L.; Geerlings, Mirjam I.; Hartkamp, Nolan S.; Grool, Anne M.; Mali, Willem P.; Van der Graaf, Yolanda; Kloppenborg, Raoul P.; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous studies on cerebellar infarcts have been largely restricted to acute infarcts in patients with clinical symptoms, and cerebellar infarcts have been evaluated with the almost exclusive use of transversal MR images. We aimed to document the occurrence and 3D-imaging patterns of cerebellar infarcts presenting as an incidental finding on MRI. Methods We analysed the 1.5 Tesla MRI, including 3D T1-weighted datasets, of 636 patients (mean age 62 ± 9 years, 81% male) from the SMART-Medea study. Cerebellar infarct analyses included an assessment of size, cavitation and gliosis, of grey and white matter involvement, and of infarct topography. Results One or more cerebellar infarcts (mean 1.97; range 1–11) were detected in 70 out of 636 patients (11%), with a total amount of 138 infarcts identified, 135 of which showed evidence of cavitation. The average mean axial diameter was 7 mm (range 2–54 mm), and 131 infarcts (95%) were smaller than 20 mm. Hundred-thirty-four infarcts (97%) involved the cortex, of which 12 in combination with subcortical white matter. No infarcts were restricted to subcortical branches of white matter. Small cortical infarcts involved the apex of a deep (pattern 1) or shallow fissure (pattern 2), or occurred alongside one (pattern 3) or opposite sides (pattern 4) of a fissure. Most (87%) cerebellar infarcts were situated in the posterior lobe. Conclusions Small cerebellar infarcts proved to be much more common than larger infarcts, and preferentially involved the cortex. Small cortical infarcts predominantly involved the posterior lobes, showed sparing of subcortical white matter and occurred in characteristic topographic patterns. PMID:26106556

  7. Visually Guided Step Descent in Children with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowie, Dorothy; Braddick, Oliver; Atkinson, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have impairments in visuospatial tasks and in manual visuomotor control, consistent with parietal and cerebellar abnormalities. Here we examined whether individuals with WS also have difficulties in visually controlling whole-body movements. We investigated visual control of stepping down at a change of…

  8. Aprosencephaly and cerebellar dysgenesis in SIBS

    SciTech Connect

    Florell, S.R.; Townsend, J.J.; Klatt, E.C.

    1996-06-28

    Aprosencephaly is a rare, lethal malformation sequence of the central nervous system that has been attributed to a postneuralation encephaloclastic process. We describe autopsy findings consistent with aprosencephaly in 2 fetuses conceived from a consanguineous mating (first cousins). Both showed anecephalic manifestations; however, the crania were intact, with fused sutures. The neuropathologic findings were essentially identical. Each fetus had complete absence of the telecephalon and pyramidal tracts, rudimentary diencephalic and mesencephalic structures, primitive cerebellar hemispheres, posterolateral clusters of primitive neural cells in the medullas suggesting an abnormality of neural migration, a normally-formed spinal cord, and retinal dysplasia within normally-formed globes. In addition, both fetuses manifested a peculiar perivascular mesenchymal proliferation seen only within the central nervous system. The similarity of these cases, coupled with parental consanguinity, suggests a primary malformation in brain development due to the homozygous representation of a mutant allele. We hypothesize that these patients may represent a defect in a gene important in brain development, the nature of which has yet to be elucidated. 26 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Forebrain-Cerebellar Interactions During Learning

    PubMed Central

    Weible, Aldis P.; Galvez, Roberto; Disterhoft, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebral cortex and cerebellum are high level neural centers that must interact cooperatively to generate coordinated and efficient goal directed movements, including those necessary for a well-timed conditioned response. In this review we describe the progress made in utilizing the forebrain-dependent trace eyeblink conditioning paradigm to understand the neural substrates mediating cerebro-cerebellar interactions during learning and consolidation of conditioned responses. This review expands upon our previous hypothesis that the interaction occurs at sites that project to the pontine nuclei (Weiss & Disterhoft, 1996), by offering more details on the function of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex during acquisition and the circuitry involved in facilitating pontine input to the cerebellum as a necessary requisite for trace eyeblink conditioning. Our discussion describes the role of the hippocampus, caudal anterior cingulate gyrus, basal ganglia, thalamus, and sensory cortex, including the benefit of utilizing the whisker barrel cortical system. We propose that permanent changes in the sensory cortex, along with input from the caudate and claustrum, and a homologue of the primate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, serve to bridge the stimulus free trace interval and allow the cerebellum to generate a well-timed conditioned response.

  10. Crew Procedures for Continuous Descent Arrivals Using Conventional Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Williams, David H.; Lewis, Elliot T,

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results from a simulation study which investigated the use of Continuous Descent Arrival (CDA) procedures for conducting a descent through a busy terminal area, using conventional transport-category automation. This research was part of the Low Noise Flight Procedures (LNFP) element within the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) Project, that addressed development of flight guidance, and supporting pilot and Air Traffic Control (ATC) procedures for low noise operations. The procedures and chart were designed to be easy to understand, and to make it easy for the crew to make changes via the Flight Management Computer Control-Display Unit (FMC-CDU) to accommodate changes from ATC. The test runs were intended to represent situations typical of what exists in many of today's terminal areas, including interruptions to the descent in the form of clearances issued by ATC.

  11. Complete response after chemotherapy and radiotherapy of a tonsillar histiocytic sarcoma with regional lymph node involvement: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xingxing; Zhang, Li; Wang, Jian; Gu, Yajia; Tuan, Jeffrey; Ma, Xuejun; Hong, Xiaonan; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaomao

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of tonsillar histiocytic sarcoma (HS) with regional lymph node involvement and complete response after multi-disciplinary therapy. Immunohistochemistry showed strong positive tumor staining for CD 68, and negative staining for CD20, CD45R0 and CD30 and non-cohesive proliferation of neoplastic histiocytes. Systemic chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and etoposide (CHOP-E) chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy was delivered to the patient. No evidence of recurrent disease existed on regular follow up three years later. The diagnostic methods and the practical treatment solutions are discussed here. We believe that although HS has been regarded as a potentially fatal disease entity, there remain some cases that do not pursue such an aggressive clinical course.

  12. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  13. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Porras-García, M. Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M.; Armengol, José Á.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input–output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum. PMID:23630472

  14. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Porras-García, M Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M; Armengol, José Á

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input-output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum. PMID:23630472

  15. Structural Basis of Cerebellar Microcircuits in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Cerminara, Nadia L.; Aoki, Hanako; Loft, Michaela; Apps, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The topography of the cerebellar cortex is described by at least three different maps, with the basic units of each map termed “microzones,” “patches,” and “bands.” These are defined, respectively, by different patterns of climbing fiber input, mossy fiber input, and Purkinje cell (PC) phenotype. Based on embryological development, the “one-map” hypothesis proposes that the basic units of each map align in the adult animal and the aim of the present study was to test this possibility. In barbiturate anesthetized adult rats, nanoinjections of bidirectional tracer (Retrobeads and biotinylated dextran amine) were made into somatotopically identified regions within the hindlimb C1 zone in copula pyramidis. Injection sites were mapped relative to PC bands defined by the molecular marker zebrin II and were correlated with the pattern of retrograde cell labeling within the inferior olive and in the basilar pontine nuclei to determine connectivity of microzones and patches, respectively, and also with the distributions of biotinylated dextran amine-labeled PC terminals in the cerebellar nuclei. Zebrin bands were found to be related to both climbing fiber and mossy fiber inputs and also to cortical representation of different parts of the ipsilateral hindpaw, indicating a precise spatial organization within cerebellar microcircuitry. This precise connectivity extends to PC terminal fields in the cerebellar nuclei and olivonuclear projections. These findings strongly support the one-map hypothesis and suggest that, at the microcircuit level of resolution, the cerebellar cortex has a common plan of spatial organization for major inputs, outputs, and PC phenotype. PMID:24133249

  16. Flight Data Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Elmain M.; Winterhalter, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Winterhalter, NASA Engineering and Safety Center Chief Engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center sponsor a 3-year effort to collect entry, descent, and landing material and to establish a NASA-wide archive to serve the material. The principle focus of this task was to identify entry, descent, and landing repository material that was at risk of being permanently lost due to damage, decay, and undocumented storage. To provide NASA-wide access to this material, a web-based digital archive was created. This document contains the outcome of the effort.

  17. Mars Smart Lander Simulations for Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striepe, S. A.; Way, D. W.; Balaram, J.

    2002-01-01

    Two primary simulations have been developed and are being updated for the Mars Smart Lander Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL). The high fidelity engineering end-to-end EDL simulation that is based on NASA Langley's Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) and the end-to-end real-time, hardware-in-the-loop simulation testbed, which is based on NASA JPL's (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing (DSENDS). This paper presents the status of these Mars Smart Lander EDL end-to-end simulations at this time. Various models, capabilities, as well as validation and verification for these simulations are discussed.

  18. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis Study: Phase 1 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Davis, Jody L.; Komar, David R.; Munk, Michelle M.; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Powell, Richard W.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Stanley, Douglas O.; Wilhite, Alan W.; Kinney, David J.; McGuire, M. Kathleen; Arnold, James O.; Howard, Austin R.; Sostaric, Ronald R.; Studak, Joseph W.; Zumwalt, Carlie H.; Llama, Eduardo G.; Casoliva, Jordi; Ivanov, Mark C.; Clark, Ian; Sengupta, Anita

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and human-scale missions. This paper summarizes the motivation, approach and top-level results from Year 1 of the study, which focused on landing 10-50 mt on Mars, but also included a trade study of the best advanced parachute design for increasing the landed payloads within the EDL architecture of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission

  19. Rosetta Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and Philae's Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-09-01

    In November 2014 the Rosetta mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its Philae lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more challenging. Philae fell almost radially towards 67P, as shown in an animation produced by the European Space Agency (ESA) prior to the event. Below, we investigate whether it is possible to model the spacecraft's descent time and impact speed using concepts taught in an introductory physics course.

  20. Cerebellar pathology does not impair performance on identification or categorization tasks

    E-print Network

    Jacobs, Lucia

    Cerebellar pathology does not impair performance on identification or categorization tasks SHAWN W of the cerebellum to these tasks, we tested patients with cerebellar pathology (seven with bilateral degeneration three tasks and performance did not vary with the extent of cerebellar pathology. Although

  1. A computational study of synaptic mechanisms of partial memory transfer in cerebellar

    E-print Network

    Masuda, Naoki

    to the nuclei are active during a pause in Purkinje-cell activities. Furthermore, assuming that mossy fibers There is a debate regarding whether motor memory is stored in the cerebellar cortex, or the cerebellar nuclei, or both. Memory may be acquired in the cortex and then be transferred to the cerebellar nuclei. Based

  2. A taxonomy of descent algorithms for nonlinear programs and variational inequalities

    E-print Network

    Patriksson, Michael

    A taxonomy of descent algorithms for nonlinear programs and variational inequalities Michael describes the problem and the choices of cost approximating mappings and merit functions. The taxonomy. Taxonomy, classification, nonlinear programs, variational inequalities, descent algo­ rithms, cost

  3. Cerebellar Development and Autism Spectrum Disorder in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Maria; Sahin, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 50% of patients with the genetic disease tuberous sclerosis complex present with autism spectrum disorder. Although a number of studies have investigated the link between autism and tuberous sclerosis complex, the etiology of autism spectrum disorder in these patients remains unclear. Abnormal cerebellar function during critical phases of development could disrupt functional processes in the brain, leading to development of autistic features. Accordingly, the authors review the potential role of cerebellar dysfunction in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorder in tuberous sclerosis complex. The authors also introduce conditional knockout mouse models of Tsc1 and Tsc2 that link cerebellar circuitry to the development of autistic-like features. Taken together, these preclinical and clinical investigations indicate the cerebellum has a profound regulatory role during development of social communication and repetitive behaviors. PMID:26303409

  4. Saccade velocity in idiopathic and autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed Central

    Bürk, K; Fetter, M; Skalej, M; Laccone, F; Stevanin, G; Dichgans, J; Klockgether, T

    1997-01-01

    Slow saccades are often found in degenerative ataxia. Experimental studies have shown that horizontal saccades are generated in the paramedian pontine reticular formation and that lesions in this area produce slow saccades. Based on these findings, saccade slowing should be a frequent feature of olivopontocerebellar atrophy, a type of cerebellar degeneration with prominent involvement of the pons. To test this hypothesis, saccade velocity was measured in 31 patients with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) and 17 patients with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia (IDCA). Saccade velocity was reduced in most patients with ADCA whereas it was normal in IDCA although olivopontocerebellar atrophy occurred in both groups. Saccade velocities correlated with pontine size in ADCA but not in IDCA. The data disprove the hypothesis that saccadic slowing is a clinical hallmark of olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Instead, only patients with ADCA and morphological features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy have slow saccades. Images PMID:9219762

  5. Presynaptic Calcium Signalling in Cerebellar Mossy Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Louiza B.; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1?s affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette. PMID:20162034

  6. Management and Outcome of Spontaneous Cerebellar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jungin; Cho, Tack Geun; Moon, Jae Gon; Kim, Chang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Spontaneous cerebellar hemorrhage (SCH) is less common than supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage. This study investigated the treatment of SCH and the relation between its clinical and radiological manifestation and outcome. Materials and Methods We presented a SCH management protocol in our institute and analyzed the clinical and radiological findings in 41 SCH patients. The outcomes of each method (surgery and conservative treatment) were compared among patients with initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 9-13 and hematoma volume greater than 10 mL. Results Two (4.9%), 16 (39%), and 23 (56.1%) patients had an initial GCS score of 3-8, with 3-8, 9-13, and 14-15, respectively. Initial GCS score showed significant correlation with Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score (p = 0.005). The mean largest hematoma diameter was 3.2 ± 1.5 cm, and the mean volume was 11.0 ± 11.5 mL. Both of them showed significant inverse correlation with GOS score (p < 0.001). Among patients with an initial GCS score of 9-13 and hematoma volumes greater than 10 mL, 3 (50%) had good outcome and 3 (50%) had poor outcome in the surgical, and all of those in the conservative treatment group had poor outcomes. The outcome distribution differed significantly in the surgical and conservative groups (p = 0.030). Conclusion Initial GCS score and largest hematoma diameter and volume on brain computed tomography are important determinants of outcome in SCH patients. The surgery group showed better outcome than the conservative treatment group among those with an intermediate neurological status and large hematomas. PMID:26523254

  7. Hypertensive encephalopathy presenting with isolated brain stem and cerebellar edema.

    PubMed

    Bhagavati, Satyakam; Chum, Florence; Choi, Jai

    2008-10-01

    Hypertensive encephalopathy typically presents with headache and confusion and bilateral parietooccipital vasogenic edema. Brain stem and cerebellar edema in hypertensive encephalopathy usually occurs in association with these typical supratentorial changes and is usually asymptomatic. We report here an uncommon hypertensive patient with isolated, severe, and symptomatic brain stem and cerebellar edema with fourth ventricular obstruction and mild hydrocephalus. Rapid treatment of hypertension resulted in clinical and radiological improvement. Prompt recognition of the cause and aggressive treatment of hypertension in such patients are crucial to relieve edema and prevent life-threatening progression. PMID:18321248

  8. Cerebellar atrophy in a patient with velocardiofacial syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, D R; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Zackai, E H; Emanuel, B S; Driscoll, D A; Whitaker, L A; Fischbeck, K H

    1995-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome and DiGeorge syndrome have not previously been associated with central nervous system degeneration. We report a 34 year old man who presented for neurological evaluation with cerebellar atrophy of unknown aetiology. On historical review, he had neonatal hypocalcaemia, an atrial septal defect, and a corrected cleft palate. His physical examination showed the characteristic facies of velocardiofacial syndrome as well as dysmetria and dysdiadocho-kinesia consistent with cerebellar degeneration. Molecular cytogenetic studies showed a deletion of 22q11.2. This man is the first reported patient with the association of a neurodegenerative disorder and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Images PMID:7562973

  9. The Challenge of Mars EDL (Entry, Descent, and Landing)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sostaric, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the some of the challenges of Martian atmospheric entry, descent and landing (EDL) on the surface of Mars. It reviews some of the technological difficulties, and some solutions that are being developed for future unmanned missions with larger payloads than previous landers, and ultimately human spacecraft landing.

  10. On the Convergence of Descent Methods for Monotone Variational Inequalities

    E-print Network

    Patriksson, Michael

    On the Convergence of Descent Methods for Monotone Variational Inequalities M. Patriksson 1 Abstract. Recently, Zhu and Marcotte [15] established the convergence of a modified de­ scent algorithm] and Larsson and Patriksson [7], we show that this convergence result may be used to establish the convergence

  11. Origin of INSL3-mediated testicular descent in therian mammals

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Il; Semyonov, Jenia; Chang, Chia Lin; Yi, Wei; Warren, Wesley; Hsu, Sheau Yu Teddy

    2008-01-01

    Testicular descent is a unique physiological adaptation found in therian mammals allowing optimal spermatogenesis below core body temperature. Recent studies show that INSL3, produced by Leydig cells, and its receptor LGR8 (RXFP2) are essential for mediating the transabdominal phase of testicular descent during early development. However, the origin and genetic basis for this physiological adaptation is not clear. Using syntenic mapping and the functional characterization of contemporary and resurrected relaxin family hormones, we show that derivation of INSL3-mediated testicular descent involved the duplication of an ancestral RLN3-like gene that encodes an indiscriminate ligand for LGR7 (RXFP1) and LGR8. This event was followed by acquisition of the LGR7-selective characteristics by a daughter gene (RLN3) prior to the evolution of the common ancestor of monotremes, marsupials, and placentals. A subsequent mutation of the other daughter gene (INSL3) occurred before the emergence of therian mammals, which then led to the derivation of the reciprocal LGR8-specific characteristics of INSL3. The stepwise evolution of these independent signaling pathways through gene duplication and subsequent divergence is consistent with Darwinian theory of selection and adaptation, and the temporal proximity suggests an association between these genetic events and the concurrent evolution of testicular descent in ancestral therian mammals. PMID:18463305

  12. Monocular Hand Pose Estimation Using Variable Metric Gradient-Descent

    E-print Network

    Paragios, Nikos

    a fundamental role in inter-human communication. An efficient hand motion tracking system would provide naturalMonocular Hand Pose Estimation Using Variable Metric Gradient-Descent Martin de La Gorce - Nikos.de-la-gorce,nikos.paragios}@ecp.fr Abstract In this paper, we propose a novel model-based approach to recover 3D hand pose from 2D images

  13. "Rosetta" Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and "Philae's" Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In November 2014 the "Rosetta" mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its "Philae" lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more…

  14. Dictionary Learning with Large Step Gradient Descent for Sparse Representations

    E-print Network

    Plumbley, Mark

    Dictionary Learning with Large Step Gradient Descent for Sparse Representations Boris Mailhé and Mark D. Plumbley Queen Mary University of London School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science.name@eecs.qmul.ac.uk Abstract. This work presents a new algorithm for dictionary learn- ing. Existing algorithms such as MOD

  15. Regularization Paths for Generalized Linear Models via Coordinate Descent

    E-print Network

    Hastie, Trevor

    Regularization Paths for Generalized Linear Models via Coordinate Descent Jerome Friedman Trevor-vector machine [Hastie et al., 2004]. 6. The graphical lasso [Friedman et al., 2008] for sparse covariance esti models. Recent rediscoveries include Friedman et al. [2007] and Wu and Lange [2008a]. The first paper

  16. Abuse against Women with Disabilities of Mexican Descent: Cultural Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Noreen M.; Reed, Bruce J.; Sanchez, Rubi

    2008-01-01

    Although considerable attention has been focused on violence against women with disabilities, environmental and cultural factors that contribute to this violence have received limited attention. This paper examines violence against women of Mexican descent with disabilities. Recommendations are offered to researchers, educators, and service…

  17. A Portfolio of Outstanding Americans of Mexican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelevier, Benjamin, Jr.

    A cross section of Mexican American achievement is presented in a portfolio of 37 portraits of outstanding Americans of Mexican descent. Drawn in black and white on heavy paper stock by Mr. David L. Rodriguez, the sketches are suitable for display purposes. With the likenesses are biographical sketches in both English and Spanish which were…

  18. FINITE DESCENT OBSTRUCTIONS AND RATIONAL POINTS ON CURVES

    E-print Network

    Stoll, Michael

    FINITE DESCENT OBSTRUCTIONS AND RATIONAL POINTS ON CURVES MICHAEL STOLL Abstract. Let k be a number: September 28, 2007. 2000 Mathematics Subject Classification. Primary 11G10, 11G30, 11G35, 14G05, 14G25, 14H

  19. LANDER program manual: A lunar ascent and descent simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    LANDER is a computer program used to predict the trajectory and flight performance of a spacecraft ascending or descending between a low lunar orbit of 15 to 500 nautical miles (nm) and the lunar surface. It is a three degree-of-freedom simulation which is used to analyze the translational motion of the vehicle during descent. Attitude dynamics and rotational motion are not considered. The program can be used to simulate either an ascent from the Moon or a descent to the Moon. For an ascent, the spacecraft is initialized at the lunar surface and accelerates vertically away from the ground at full thrust. When the local velocity becomes 30 ft/s, the vehicle turns downrange with a pitch-over maneuver and proceeds to fly a gravity turn until Main Engine Cutoff (MECO). The spacecraft then coasts until it reaches the requested holding orbit where it performs an orbital insertion burn. During a descent simulation, the lander begins in the holding orbit and performs a deorbit burn. It then coasts to pericynthion, where it reignites its engines and begins a gravity turn descent. When the local horizontal velocity becomes zero, the lander pitches up to a vertical orientation and begins to hover in search of a landing site. The lander hovers for a period of time specified by the user, and then lands.

  20. Large-Scale Matrix Factorization with Distributed Stochastic Gradient Descent

    E-print Network

    Waldmann, Uwe

    Large-Scale Matrix Factorization with Distributed Stochastic Gradient Descent Rainer Gemulla1 Peter on web-scale datasets using, e.g., MapReduce. DSGD can handle a wide variety of matrix factorizations. We)designed to handle web-scale datasets. For this reason, low-rank matrix factorization has received much attention

  1. Large-Scale Matrix Factorization with Distributed Stochastic Gradient Descent

    E-print Network

    Waldmann, Uwe

    Large-Scale Matrix Factorization with Distributed Stochastic Gradient Descent Rainer Gemulla1 Peter)designed to handle web-scale datasets. For this reason, low-rank matrix factorization has received much attention to approximately factor large matrices with millions of rows, millions of columns, and billions of nonzero elements

  2. Descents and nodal load in scale-free networks.

    PubMed

    Bareinboim, Elias; Barbosa, Valmir C

    2008-04-01

    The load of a node in a network is the total traffic going through it when every node pair sustains a uniform bidirectional traffic between them on shortest paths. We express nodal load in terms of the more elementary notion of a node's descents in breadth-first-search [(BFS) or shortest-path] trees and study both the descent and nodal-load distributions in the case of scale-free networks. Our treatment is both semianalytical (combining a generating-function formalism with simulation-derived BFS branching probabilities) and computational for the descent distribution; it is exclusively computational in the case of the load distribution. Our main result is that the load distribution, even though it can be disguised as a power law through subtle (but inappropriate) binning of the raw data, is in fact a succession of sharply delineated probability peaks, each of which can be clearly interpreted as a function of the underlying BFS descents. This find is in stark contrast with previously held belief, based on which a power law of exponent -2.2 was conjectured to be valid regardless of the exponent of the power-law distribution of node degrees. PMID:18517694

  3. Evaluation of Fuel Benefits Depending on Continuous Descent Approach Procedures

    E-print Network

    Sun, Dengfeng

    1 Evaluation of Fuel Benefits Depending on Continuous Descent Approach Procedures Yi Cao, Li was simulated based on actual recorded traffic data. The fuel burn for the simulated traffic was estimated using the Base of Aircraft Data (BADA) Thrust Specific Fuel Consumption model and compared to a baseline

  4. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group and the Reconstruction of the Huygens Probe Entry and Descent Trajectory at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David H.; Kazeminejad, Bobby; Lebreton*, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Cassini/Huygens, a flagship mission to explore the rings, atmosphere, magnetic field, and moons that make up the Saturn system, is a joint endeavor of NASA, the European Space Agency, and Agenzia Spaziale Italiana. Comprising two spacecraft - a Saturn orbiter built by NASA and a Titan entry/descent probe built by the European Space Agency - Cassini/Huygens was launched in October 1997 and arrived at Saturn in 2004. The Huygens probe parachuted to the surface of Titan in January 2005. During the descent, six science instruments provided measurements of Titan's atmosphere, clouds, and winds, and photographed Titan's surface. It was recognized early in the Huygens program that to correctly interpret and correlate results from the probe science experiments and to provide a reference set of data for ground truth calibration of the Cassini orbiter remote sensing observations, an accurate reconstruction of the probe entry and descent trajectory and surface landing location would be necessary. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group (DTWG) was chartered in 1996 as a subgroup of the Huygens Science Working Team. With membership comprising representatives from all the probe engineering and instrument teams as well as representatives of industry and the Cassini and Huygens Project Scientists, the DTWG presented an organizational framework within which instrument data was shared, the entry and descent trajectory reconstruction implemented, and the trajectory reconstruction efficiently disseminated. The primary goal of the Descent Trajectory Working Group was to develop retrieval methodologies for the probe descent trajectory reconstruction from the entry interface altitude of 1270 km to the surface using navigation data, and engineering and science data acquired by the instruments on the Huygens Probe, and to provide a reconstruction of the Huygens probe trajectory from entry to the surface of Titan that is maximally consistent with all available engineering and science data sets. The official project entry and descent trajectory reconstruction effort was published by the DTWG in 2007. A revised descent trajectory was released in 2010 that accounts for updated measurements of Titan's pole coordinates derived from radar images of Titan taken during Cassini flybys after 2007. The effect of the updated pole positions on Huygens is a southward shift of the trajectory by about 0.3 degrees with a much smaller effect of less than 0.01 degree in the zonal (west to east) direction. The revised Huygens landing coordinates of 192.335 degrees West and 10.573 degrees South with longitude and latitude residuals of respectively 0.035 degrees and 0.007 degrees, respectively, are in excellent agreement with results of recent landing site investigations using visual and radar images from the Cassini VIMS instrument. Acknowledgements *J.-P.L's work was performed while at ESA/ESTEC. DA and BK would like to express appreciation to the European Space Agency's Research and Scientific Support Department for funding the Descent Trajectory Working Group. The work of the Descent Trajectory Working Group would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of all the Huygens principal investigators and their teams, and the science and engineering data provided from each experiment team, including M. Fulchignoni and the HASI Team, H. Niemann and the GCMS Team, J. Zarnecki and the SSP Team, M. Tomasko and the DISR Team, M. Bird and the DWE Team, and G. Israel and the ACP Team. Additionally, special thanks for many years of support to D.L. Matson, R.T. Mitchell, M. Pérez-Ayúcar, O. Witasse; J. Jones, D. Roth, N. Strange on the Cassini Navigation Team at JPL; A.-M. Schipper and P. Couzin at Thales Alenia; C. Sollazzo, D. Salt, J. Wheadon and S. Standley from the Huygens Ops Team; and R. Trautner and H. Svedhem on the Radar Team at ESTEC.

  5. Measurement of CPAS Main Parachute Rate of Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is being designed to land the Orion Crew Module (CM) at a safe rate of descent at splashdown. Flight test performance must be measured to a high degree of accuracy to ensure this requirement is met with the most efficient design possible. Although the design includes three CPAS Main parachutes, the requirement is that the system must not exceed 33 ft/s under two Main parachutes, should one of the Main parachutes fail. Therefore, several tests were conducted with clusters of two Mains. All of the steady-state rate of descent data are normalized to standard sea level conditions and checked against the limit. As the Orion design gains weight, the system is approaching this limit to within measurement precision. Parachute "breathing," cluster interactions, and atmospheric anomalies can cause the rate of descent to vary widely and lead to challenges in characterizing parachute terminal performance. An early test had contradictory rate of descent results from optical trajectory and Differential Global Positioning Systems (DGPS). A thorough analysis of the data sources and error propagation was conducted to determine the uncertainty in the trajectory. It was discovered that the Time Space Position Information (TSPI) from the optical tracking provided accurate position data. However, the velocity from TPSI must be computed via numerical differentiation, which is prone to large error. DGPS obtains position through pseudo-range calculations from multiple satellites and velocity through Doppler shift of the carrier frequency. Because the velocity from DGPS is a direct measurement, it is more accurate than TSPI velocity. To remedy the situation, a commercial off-the-shelf product that combines GPS and an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) was purchased to significantly improve rate of descent measurements. This had the added benefit of solving GPS dropouts during aircraft extraction. Statistical probability distributions for CPAS Main parachute rate of descent and drag coefficient were computed and plotted. Using test data, a terminal rate of descent at splashdown can be estimated as a function of canopy loading.

  6. Analysis of various descent trajectories for a hypersonic-cruise, cold-wall research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.

    1975-01-01

    The probable descent operating conditions for a hypersonic air-breathing research airplane were examined. Descents selected were cruise angle of attack, high dynamic pressure, high lift coefficient, turns, and descents with drag brakes. The descents were parametrically exercised and compared from the standpoint of cold-wall (367 K) aircraft heat load. The descent parameters compared were total heat load, peak heating rate, time to landing, time to end of heat pulse, and range. Trends in total heat load as a function of cruise Mach number, cruise dynamic pressure, angle-of-attack limitation, pull-up g-load, heading angle, and drag-brake size are presented.

  7. Diffusion tensor imaging of the human cerebellar pathways and their interplay with cerebral macrostructure

    PubMed Central

    Keser, Zafer; Hasan, Khader M.; Mwangi, Benson I.; Kamali, Arash; Ucisik-Keser, Fehime Eymen; Riascos, Roy F.; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Francisco, Gerard E.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar white matter (WM) connections to the central nervous system are classified functionally into the Spinocerebellar (SC), vestibulocerebellar (VC), and cerebrocerebellar subdivisions. The SC pathways project from spinal cord to cerebellum, whereas the VC pathways project from vestibular organs of the inner ear. Cerebrocerebellar connections are composed of feed forward and feedback connections between cerebrum and cerebellum including the cortico-ponto-cerebellar (CPC) pathways being of cortical origin and the dentate-rubro-thalamo-cortical (DRTC) pathway being of cerebellar origin. In this study we systematically quantified the whole cerebellar system connections using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI). Ten right-handed healthy subjects (7 males and 3 females, age range 20–51 years) were studied. DT-MRI data were acquired with a voxel size = 2 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm at a 3.0 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The DT-MRI data were prepared and analyzed using anatomically-guided deterministic tractography methods to reconstruct the SC, DRTC, fronto-ponto-cerebellar (FPC), parieto-ponto-cerebellar (PPC), temporo-ponto-cerebellar (TPC) and occipito-ponto-cerebellar (OPC). The DTI-attributes or the cerebellar tracts along with their cortical representation (Brodmann areas) were presented in standard Montréal Neurological Institute space. All cerebellar tract volumes were quantified and correlated with volumes of cerebral cortical, subcortical gray matter (GM), cerebral WM and cerebellar GM, and cerebellar WM. On our healthy cohort, the ratio of total cerebellar GM-to-WM was ~3.29 ± 0.24, whereas the ratio of cerebral GM-to-WM was approximately 1.10 ± 0.11. The sum of all cerebellar tract volumes is ~25.8 ± 7.3 mL, or a percentage of 1.6 ± 0.45 of the total intracranial volume (ICV). PMID:25904851

  8. Multimodal evoked potentials in multiple system and late onset cerebellar atrophies.

    PubMed

    Arpa, J; López-Pajares, R; Cruz-Martínez, A; Palomo, F; Ferrer, T; Caminero, A B; Rodríguez-Albariño, A; Alonso, M; Lacasa, T; Nos, J

    1995-01-01

    Forty subjects were clinically examined using scales for cerebellar, pyramidal, parkinsonian, and mental status and by quantitative evaluation of neuroimages. The patients were classified into two groups: cerebellar-plus and "pure" cerebellar syndromes. Patients with "pure" cerebellar syndrome were diagnosed as autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia III (ADCA III) or "pure idiopathic" late-onset cerebellar ataxia (ILOCA) in this series. Patients with cerebellar-plus syndrome were diagnosed as multiple system atrophy (MSA), subclassified as either ILOCA-plus, ADCA I, ADCA II or autosomal recessive LOCA. We have used visual (VEP), brainstem auditory (BAEP) and somatosensory (SEP) evoked potentials in order to establish their diagnostic validity. Cerebellar-plus syndrome and "pure" cerebellar syndrome showed overlapping VEP, BAEP and SEP abnormalities. VEP P100 latency, however, shows a certain ability to differentiate between the two groups (p = 0.08) and appears useful in distinguishing between sporadic cerebellar-plus syndromes (MSA or ILOCA-plus) and "pure" cerebellar syndromes (p < 0.02). The incidence of prolonged N9-N13 latency was significantly higher in the latter subgroup (p < 0.04) as well. Within cerebellar-plus syndromes, VEP, BAEP and SEP abnormalities were more frequent in inherited cases (ADCA I and II, along with autosomal recessive LOCA) than in sporadic ones. The most apparent differences were a higher incidence of abnormal BAEPs at brainstem level (p < 0.002), and of both peripheral and possible central SEP impairment in hereditary cerebellar-plus syndrome than in sporadic cerebellar-plus syndrome (p < 0.03). EP investigation is useful to a certain extent in differentiating between some variants of LOCA. PMID:7576727

  9. Cerebellar blood flow in schizophrenic patients and normal control subjects.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, J L; Devous, M D; Moeller, F G; Paulman, R G; Raese, J D; Gregory, R R

    1995-05-31

    We used 133Xe dynamic single-photon emission computed tomography (DSPECT) to measure the resting cerebellar blood flow in 17 neuroleptic-free schizophrenic and schizophreniform patients and 13 normal control subjects. A subset of these subjects (11 patients and 7 control subjects) additionally underwent activation studies during the Wisconsin Card Sorting (WCS) and Number Matching (NM) tests. Baseline relative cerebellar blood flow was significantly lower in older patients than in age-matched control subjects. For absolute cerebellar flow, there was a significant difference between patients and control subjects in the overall activation response (patients: NM 13.4% increase, WCS 15.7% increase; control subjects: NM 3.1% decrease, WCS 0.0% change). This difference was more pronounced in older subjects. Cerebral blood flow significantly increased during NM (patients: 21.3% increase, control subjects: 6.5% increase) and WCS (patients: 16.5% increase, control subjects: 9.7% increase). The difference in the magnitude of cerebral NM activation between schizophrenic patients and control subjects, although not statistically significant, may call into question the appropriateness of using NM as a control task in schizophrenic patients. Finally, we found no differences between the effects of WCS and NM on cerebellar or cerebral blood flow. Because of the small number of subjects in each group, the results of this study should be interpreted cautiously. PMID:7568566

  10. Verb Generation in Children and Adolescents with Acute Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, B.; Schoch, B.; Hein-Kropp, C.; Dimitrova, A.; Hovel, M.; Ziegler, W.; Gizewski, E. R.; Timmann, D.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine verb generation in a larger group of children and adolescents with acute focal lesions of the cerebellum. Nine children and adolescents with cerebellar tumours participated. Subjects were tested a few days after tumour surgery. For comparison, a subgroup was tested also 1 or 2 days before surgery. None…

  11. Familial cerebellar ataxia presenting with down beat nystagmus.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, G D

    1980-01-01

    Two brothers are described who during their fourth decade presented with isolated down beat nystagmus and later developed a progressive cerebellar ataxia. The nature of this unusual oculomotor disorder and its rare occurrence in other inherited conditions are discussed. PMID:7381864

  12. Predicting and correcting ataxia using a model of cerebellar function

    PubMed Central

    Bhanpuri, Nasir H.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar damage results in uncoordinated, variable and dysmetric movements known as ataxia. Here we show that we can reliably model single-joint reaching trajectories of patients (n = 10), reproduce patient-like deficits in the behaviour of controls (n = 11), and apply patient-specific compensations that improve reaching accuracy (P < 0.02). Our approach was motivated by the theory that the cerebellum is essential for updating and/or storing an internal dynamic model that relates motor commands to changes in body state (e.g. arm position and velocity). We hypothesized that cerebellar damage causes a mismatch between the brain’s modelled dynamics and the actual body dynamics, resulting in ataxia. We used both behavioural and computational approaches to demonstrate that specific cerebellar patient deficits result from biased internal models. Our results strongly support the idea that an intact cerebellum is critical for maintaining accurate internal models of dynamics. Importantly, we demonstrate how subject-specific compensation can improve movement in cerebellar patients, who are notoriously unresponsive to treatment. PMID:24812203

  13. Cerebellar Damage Produces Selective Deficits in Verbal Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravizza, Susan M.; Mccormick, Cristin A.; Schlerf, John E.; Justus, Timothy; Ivry, Richard B.; Fiez, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    The cerebellum is often active in imaging studies of verbal working memory, consistent with a putative role in articulatory rehearsal. While patients with cerebellar damage occasionally exhibit a mild impairment on standard neuropsychological tests of working memory, these tests are not diagnostic for exploring these processes in detail. The…

  14. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children with Cerebellar Malformations: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Marie-Eve; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations are increasingly diagnosed in the fetal period. Consequently, their consideration requires stressful and often critical decisions from both clinicians and families. This has resulted in an emergent need to understand better the impact of these early life lesions on child development. We performed a comprehensive literature…

  15. Brief Communications Cerebellar-Dependent Learning in Larval Zebrafish

    E-print Network

    Schuman, Erin M.

    Brief Communications Cerebellar-Dependent Learning in Larval Zebrafish Mark Aizenberg1,2 and Erin M ability to monitor the activity of neuronal populations in vivo. The developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an animal model that circumvents these problems, because zebrafish larvae possess a rich behavioral

  16. Speech and Language Findings Associated with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paslawski, Teresa; Duffy, Joseph R.; Vernino, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is an autoimmune disease that can be associated with cancer of the breast, lung, and ovary. The clinical presentation of PCD commonly includes ataxia, visual disturbances, and dysarthria. The speech disturbances associated with PCD have not been well characterized, despite general acceptance that…

  17. Is a Cerebellar Deficit the Underlying Cause of Reading Disabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irannejad, Shahrzad; Savage, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether children with dyslexia differed in their performance on reading, phonological, rapid naming, motor, and cerebellar-related tasks and automaticity measures compared to reading age (RA)-matched and chronological age (CA)-matched control groups. Participants were 51 children attending mainstream English elementary…

  18. Eyeblink Conditioning Deficits Indicate Timing and Cerebellar Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, S.M.; Kieffaber, P.D.; Carroll, C.A.; Vohs, J.L.; Tracy, J.A.; Shekhar, A.; O'Donnell, B.F.; Steinmetz, J.E.; Hetrick, W.P.

    2005-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that individuals with schizophrenia manifest abnormalities in structures (cerebellum and basal ganglia) and neurotransmitter systems (dopamine) linked to internal-timing processes. A single-cue tone delay eyeblink conditioning paradigm comprised of 100 learning and 50 extinction trials was used to examine cerebellar

  19. Flight Management System Execution of Idle-Thrust Descents in Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel L.

    2011-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the trajectory predictor and its error models, commercial flights executed idle-thrust descents, and the recorded data includes the target speed profile and FMS intent trajectories. The FMS computes the intended descent path assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and any intervention by the controllers that alters the FMS execution of the descent is recorded so that such flights are discarded from the analysis. The horizontal flight path, cruise and meter fix altitudes, and actual TOD location are extracted from the radar data. Using more than 60 descents in Boeing 777 aircraft, the actual speeds are compared to the intended descent speed profile. In addition, three aspects of the accuracy of the FMS intent trajectory are analyzed: the meter fix crossing time, the TOD location, and the altitude at the meter fix. The actual TOD location is within 5 nmi of the intent location for over 95% of the descents. Roughly 90% of the time, the airspeed is within 0.01 of the target Mach number and within 10 KCAS of the target descent CAS, but the meter fix crossing time is only within 50 sec of the time computed by the FMS. Overall, the aircraft seem to be executing the descents as intended by the designers of the onboard automation.

  20. Cerebellar damage diminishes long-latency responses to multijoint perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Trautman, Paxson; Rasquinha, Russell J.; Bhanpuri, Nasir H.; Scott, Stephen H.; Bastian, Amy J.

    2013-01-01

    Damage to the cerebellum can cause significant problems in the coordination of voluntary arm movements. One prominent idea is that incoordination stems from an inability to predictively account for the complex mechanical interactions between the arm's several joints. Motivated by growing evidence that corrective feedback control shares important capabilities and neural substrates with feedforward control, we asked whether cerebellar damage impacts feedback stabilization of the multijoint arm appropriate for the arm's intersegmental dynamics. Specifically, we tested whether cerebellar dysfunction impacts the ability of posterior deltoid to incorporate elbow motion in its long-latency response (R2 = 45–75 ms and R3 = 75–100 ms after perturbation) to an unexpected torque perturbation. Healthy and cerebellar-damaged subjects were exposed to a selected pattern of shoulder-elbow displacements to probe the response pattern from this shoulder extensor muscle. The healthy elderly subjects expressed a long-latency response linked to both shoulder and elbow motion, including an increase/decrease in shoulder extensor activity with elbow flexion/extension. Critically, cerebellar-damaged subjects displayed the normal pattern of activity in the R3 period indicating an intact ability to rapidly integrate multijoint motion appropriate to the arm's intersegmental dynamics. However, cerebellar-damaged subjects had a lower magnitude of activity that was specific to the long-latency period (both R2 and R3) and a slightly delayed onset of multijoint sensitivity. Taken together, our results suggest that the basic motor pattern of the long-latency response is housed outside the cerebellum and is scaled by processes within the cerebellum. PMID:23390311

  1. Adaptive robotic control driven by a versatile spiking cerebellar network.

    PubMed

    Casellato, Claudia; Antonietti, Alberto; Garrido, Jesus A; Carrillo, Richard R; Luque, Niceto R; Ros, Eduardo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in a large number of different neural processes, especially in associative learning and in fine motor control. To develop a comprehensive theory of sensorimotor learning and control, it is crucial to determine the neural basis of coding and plasticity embedded into the cerebellar neural circuit and how they are translated into behavioral outcomes in learning paradigms. Learning has to be inferred from the interaction of an embodied system with its real environment, and the same cerebellar principles derived from cell physiology have to be able to drive a variety of tasks of different nature, calling for complex timing and movement patterns. We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN) with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. Encoding and decoding strategies based on neuronal firing rates were applied. Adaptive motor control protocols with acquisition and extinction phases have been designed and tested, including an associative Pavlovian task (Eye blinking classical conditioning), a vestibulo-ocular task and a perturbed arm reaching task operating in closed-loop. The SNN processed in real-time mossy fiber inputs as arbitrary contextual signals, irrespective of whether they conveyed a tone, a vestibular stimulus or the position of a limb. A bidirectional long-term plasticity rule implemented at parallel fibers-Purkinje cell synapses modulated the output activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. In all tasks, the neurorobot learned to adjust timing and gain of the motor responses by tuning its output discharge. It succeeded in reproducing how human biological systems acquire, extinguish and express knowledge of a noisy and changing world. By varying stimuli and perturbations patterns, real-time control robustness and generalizability were validated. The implicit spiking dynamics of the cerebellar model fulfill timing, prediction and learning functions. PMID:25390365

  2. Sun1 deficiency leads to cerebellar ataxia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-Ya; Yu, I.-Shing; Huang, Chien-Chi; Chen, Chia-Yen; Wang, Wan-Ping; Lin, Shu-Wha; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Chi, Ya-Hui

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Migration and organization of the nucleus are essential for the proliferation and differentiation of cells, including neurons. However, the relationship between the positioning of the nucleus and cellular morphogenesis remains poorly understood. Inherited recessive cerebellar ataxia has been attributed to mutations in SYNE1, a component of the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Regardless, Syne1-mutant mice present with normal cerebellar development. The Sad1-Unc-84 homology (SUN)-domain proteins are located at the inner nuclear membrane and recruit Syne proteins through the KASH domain to the outer nuclear membrane. Here, we report an unrecognized contribution of Sun1 and Sun2 to the postnatal development of murine cerebellum. Mice depleted of Sun1 showed a marked reduction in the cerebellar volume, and this phenotype is exacerbated with additional loss of a Sun2 allele. Consistent with these histological changes, Sun1?/? and Sun1?/?Sun2+/? mice exhibited defective motor coordination. Results of immunohistochemical analyses suggested that Sun1 is highly expressed in Purkinje cells and recruits Syne2 to the periphery of the nucleus. Approximately 33% of Purkinje cells in Sun1?/? mice and 66% of Purkinje cells in Sun1?/?Sun2+/? mice were absent from the surface of the internal granule layer (IGL), whereas the proliferation and migration of granule neurons were unaffected. Furthermore, the Sun1?/?Sun2+/? Purkinje cells exhibited retarded primary dendrite specification, reduced dendritic complexity and aberrant patterning of synapses. Our findings reveal a cell-type-specific role for Sun1 and Sun2 in nucleokinesis during cerebellar development, and we propose the use of Sun-deficient mice as a model for studying cerebellar ataxia that is associated with mutation of human SYNE genes or loss of Purkinje cells. PMID:26035387

  3. Adaptive Robotic Control Driven by a Versatile Spiking Cerebellar Network

    PubMed Central

    Casellato, Claudia; Antonietti, Alberto; Garrido, Jesus A.; Carrillo, Richard R.; Luque, Niceto R.; Ros, Eduardo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in a large number of different neural processes, especially in associative learning and in fine motor control. To develop a comprehensive theory of sensorimotor learning and control, it is crucial to determine the neural basis of coding and plasticity embedded into the cerebellar neural circuit and how they are translated into behavioral outcomes in learning paradigms. Learning has to be inferred from the interaction of an embodied system with its real environment, and the same cerebellar principles derived from cell physiology have to be able to drive a variety of tasks of different nature, calling for complex timing and movement patterns. We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN) with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. Encoding and decoding strategies based on neuronal firing rates were applied. Adaptive motor control protocols with acquisition and extinction phases have been designed and tested, including an associative Pavlovian task (Eye blinking classical conditioning), a vestibulo-ocular task and a perturbed arm reaching task operating in closed-loop. The SNN processed in real-time mossy fiber inputs as arbitrary contextual signals, irrespective of whether they conveyed a tone, a vestibular stimulus or the position of a limb. A bidirectional long-term plasticity rule implemented at parallel fibers-Purkinje cell synapses modulated the output activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. In all tasks, the neurorobot learned to adjust timing and gain of the motor responses by tuning its output discharge. It succeeded in reproducing how human biological systems acquire, extinguish and express knowledge of a noisy and changing world. By varying stimuli and perturbations patterns, real-time control robustness and generalizability were validated. The implicit spiking dynamics of the cerebellar model fulfill timing, prediction and learning functions. PMID:25390365

  4. Adaptive filters and internal models: multilevel description of cerebellar function.

    PubMed

    Porrill, John; Dean, Paul; Anderson, Sean R

    2013-11-01

    Cerebellar function is increasingly discussed in terms of engineering schemes for motor control and signal processing that involve internal models. To address the relation between the cerebellum and internal models, we adopt the chip metaphor that has been used to represent the combination of a homogeneous cerebellar cortical microcircuit with individual microzones having unique external connections. This metaphor indicates that identifying the function of a particular cerebellar chip requires knowledge of both the general microcircuit algorithm and the chip's individual connections. Here we use a popular candidate algorithm as embodied in the adaptive filter, which learns to decorrelate its inputs from a reference ('teaching', 'error') signal. This algorithm is computationally powerful enough to be used in a very wide variety of engineering applications. However, the crucial issue is whether the external connectivity required by such applications can be implemented biologically. We argue that some applications appear to be in principle biologically implausible: these include the Smith predictor and Kalman filter (for state estimation), and the feedback-error-learning scheme for adaptive inverse control. However, even for plausible schemes, such as forward models for noise cancellation and novelty-detection, and the recurrent architecture for adaptive inverse control, there is unlikely to be a simple mapping between microzone function and internal model structure. This initial analysis suggests that cerebellar involvement in particular behaviours is therefore unlikely to have a neat classification into categories such as 'forward model'. It is more likely that cerebellar microzones learn a task-specific adaptive-filter operation which combines a number of signal-processing roles. PMID:23391782

  5. Cerebellar Purkinje cell p75 neurotrophin receptor and autistic behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lotta, L T; Conrad, K; Cory-Slechta, D; Schor, N F

    2014-01-01

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is normally expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells throughout the lifespan. Children with autism spectrum behavior exhibit apparent cerebellar Purkinje cell loss. Cerebellar transcriptome changes seen in the murine prenatal valproate exposure model of autism include all of the proteins known to constitute the p75NTR interactome. p75NTR is a modulator of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox potential, and others have suggested that aberrant response to oxidant stress has a major role in the pathogenesis of autism. We have created Purkinje cell-selective p75NTR knockout mice that are the progeny of hemizygous Cre-Purkinje cell protein 2 C57Bl mice and p75NTR floxed C57Bl mice. These Cre-loxP mice exhibit complete knockout of p75NTR in ~50% of the cerebellar Purkinje cells. Relative to Cre-only mice and wild-type C57Bl mice, this results in a behavioral phenotype characterized by less allogrooming of (P<0.05; one-way analysis of variance) and socialization or fighting with (each P<0.05) other mice; less (1.2-fold) non-ambulatory exploration of their environment than wild-type (P<0.01) or Cre only (P<0.01) mice; and almost twofold more stereotyped jumping behavior than wild-type (P<0.05) or Cre (P<0.02) mice of the same strain. Wild-type mice have more complex dendritic arborization than Cre-loxP mice, with more neurites per unit area (P<0.025, Student's t-test), more perpendicular branches per unit area (P<0.025) and more short branches/long neurite (P<0.0005). Aberrant developmental regulation of expression of p75NTR in cerebellar Purkinje cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of autism. PMID:25072321

  6. Efficient Sensor Placement Optimization Using Gradient Descent and Probabilistic Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Vahab; Lévesque, Julien-Charles; Gagné, Christian; Parizeau, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We are proposing an adaptation of the gradient descent method to optimize the position and orientation of sensors for the sensor placement problem. The novelty of the proposed method lies in the combination of gradient descent optimization with a realistic model, which considers both the topography of the environment and a set of sensors with directional probabilistic sensing. The performance of this approach is compared with two other black box optimization methods over area coverage and processing time. Results show that our proposed method produces competitive results on smaller maps and superior results on larger maps, while requiring much less computation than the other optimization methods to which it has been compared. PMID:25196164

  7. A Symmetric Time-Varying Cluster Rate of Descent Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    A model of the time-varying rate of descent of the Orion vehicle was developed based on the observed correlation between canopy projected area and drag coefficient. This initial version of the model assumes cluster symmetry and only varies the vertical component of velocity. The cluster fly-out angle is modeled as a series of sine waves based on flight test data. The projected area of each canopy is synchronized with the primary fly-out angle mode. The sudden loss of projected area during canopy collisions is modeled at minimum fly-out angles, leading to brief increases in rate of descent. The cluster geometry is converted to drag coefficient using empirically derived constants. A more complete model is under development, which computes the aerodynamic response of each canopy to its local incidence angle.

  8. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haukka, H.; Heilimo, J.; Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Koryanov, V.; Arruego, I.; Schmidt, W.; Finchenko, V.; Martynov, M.; Ponomarenko, A.; Kazakovtsev, V.; Martin, S.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an atmospheric re-entry and descent system concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques that were originally developed for Mars. The ultimate goal of this EU-funded RITD-project (Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development) was to assess the benefits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develop a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and even Lunar applications envisaged include the use of the EDLS approach in returning payloads of 4-8 kg down to the surface.

  9. Scaling Up Coordinate Descent Algorithms for Large ?1 Regularization Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Scherrer, Chad; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Tewari, Ambuj; Haglin, David J.

    2012-07-03

    We present a generic framework for parallel coordinate descent (CD) algorithms that has as special cases the original sequential algorithms of Cyclic CD and Stochastic CD, as well as the recent parallel Shotgun algorithm of Bradley et al. We introduce two novel parallel algorithms that are also special cases---Thread-Greedy CD and Coloring-Based CD---and give performance measurements for an OpenMP implementation of these.

  10. Airborne Management of Traffic Conflicts in Descent With Arrival Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doble, Nathan A.; Barhydt, Richard; Krishnamurthy, Karthik

    2005-01-01

    NASA is studying far-term air traffic management concepts that may increase operational efficiency through a redistribution of decisionmaking authority among airborne and ground-based elements of the air transportation system. One component of this research, En Route Free Maneuvering, allows trained pilots of equipped autonomous aircraft to assume responsibility for traffic separation. Ground-based air traffic controllers would continue to separate traffic unequipped for autonomous operations and would issue flow management constraints to all aircraft. To evaluate En Route Free Maneuvering operations, a human-in-the-loop experiment was jointly conducted by the NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers. In this experiment, test subject pilots used desktop flight simulators to resolve conflicts in cruise and descent, and to adhere to air traffic flow constraints issued by test subject controllers. Simulators at NASA Langley were equipped with a prototype Autonomous Operations Planner (AOP) flight deck toolset to assist pilots with conflict management and constraint compliance tasks. Results from the experiment are presented, focusing specifically on operations during the initial descent into the terminal area. Airborne conflict resolution performance in descent, conformance to traffic flow management constraints, and the effects of conflicting traffic on constraint conformance are all presented. Subjective data from subject pilots are also presented, showing perceived levels of workload, safety, and acceptability of autonomous arrival operations. Finally, potential AOP functionality enhancements are discussed along with suggestions to improve arrival procedures.

  11. Factors Associated with Sleep Disturbance in Women of Mexican Descent

    PubMed Central

    Heilemann, MarySue V.; Choudhury, Shonali M.; Kury, Felix Salvador; Lee, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The aims were to identify the most useful parameters of acculturation in relation to self reported sleep disturbance and describe risk factors for sleep disturbance in women of Mexican descent. Background Little is known about acculturation as a factor for poor sleep in the context of other personal factors such as income or sense of resilience or mastery for Latinas in the United States. Methods These personal factors were incorporated into a modification of the Conceptual Framework of Impaired Sleep to guide our secondary analysis of self-reported sleep disturbance. Cross sectional data from a convenience sample of 312 women of Mexican descent of childbearing age (21-40 years) located in an urban California community were collected and previously analyzed in relation to depressive symptoms and post traumatic stress disorder. The General Sleep Disturbance Scale (in English and Spanish) was used to assess sleep disturbance. Results Early socialization to the United States during childhood was the most useful acculturation parameter for understanding self reported sleep disturbance in this sample. In a multivariate regression analysis, three factors (higher acculturation, lower income, and higher depressive symptoms) were significant in accounting for 40% of the variance in sleep disturbance. Conclusion When low income Latinas of Mexican descent report sleep problems, clinicians should probe for environmental sleep factors associated with low income, such as noise, over-crowding, and exposure to trauma and violence, and refer the woman to psychotherapy and counselling rather than merely prescribe a sleep medication. PMID:22221152

  12. A new method for forecasting the solar cycle descent time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakad, Bharati; Kakad, Amar; Sai Ramesh, Durbha

    2015-08-01

    The prediction of an extended solar minimum is extremely important because of the severity of its impact on the near-earth space. Here, we present a new method for predicting the descent time of the forthcoming solar cycle (SC); the method is based on the estimation of the Shannon entropy. We use the daily and monthly smoothed international sunspot number. For each nth SC, we compute the parameter [Tpre]n by using information on the descent and ascent times of the n - 3th and nth SCs, respectively. We find that [Tpre] of nth SC and entropy can be effectively used to predict the descent time of the n + 2th SC. The correlation coefficient between [Td]n+2 - [Tpre]n and [E]n is found to be 0.95. Using these parameters the prediction model is developed. Solar magnetic field and F10.7 flux data are available for SCs 21-22 and 19-23, respectively, and they are also utilized to get estimates of the Shannon entropy. It is found that the Shannon entropy, a measure of randomness inherent in the SC, is reflected well in the various proxies of the solar activity (viz sunspot, magnetic field, F10.7 flux). The applicability and accuracy of the prediction model equation is verified by way of association of least entropy values with the Dalton minimum. The prediction model equation also provides possible criteria for the occurrence of unusually longer solar minima.

  13. Titan Explorer Entry, Descent and Landing Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Jody L.; Lindberg, Robert E.; Lockwood, Mary Kae

    2006-01-01

    The Titan Explorer mission concept includes an orbiter, entry probe and inflatable airship designed to take remote and in-situ measurements of Titan's atmosphere. A modified entry, descent and landing trajectory at Titan that incorporates mid-air airship inflation (under a parachute) and separation is developed and examined for Titan Explorer. The feasibility of mid-air inflation and deployment of an airship under a parachute is determined by implementing and validating an airship buoyancy and inflation model in the trajectory simulation program, Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2). A nominal POST2 trajectory simulation case study is generated which examines different descent scenarios by varying airship inflation duration, orientation, and separation. The buoyancy model incorporation into POST2 is new to the software and may be used in future trajectory simulations. Each case from the nominal POST2 trajectory case study simulates a successful separation between the parachute and airship systems with sufficient velocity change as to alter their paths to avoid collision throughout their descent. The airship and heatshield also separate acceptably with a minimum distance of separation from the parachute system of 1.5 km. This analysis shows the feasibility of airship inflation on a parachute for different orientations, airship separation at various inflation times, and preparation for level-flight at Titan.

  14. Lunar Surface Access Module Descent Engine Turbopump Technology: Detailed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alarez, Erika; Thornton, Randall J.; Forbes, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The need for a high specific impulse LOX/LH2 pump-fed lunar lander engine has been established by NASA for the new lunar exploration architecture. Studies indicate that a 4-engine cluster in the thrust range of 9,000-lbf each is a candidate configuration for the main propulsion of the manned lunar lander vehicle. The lander descent engine will be required to perform minor mid-course corrections, a Lunar Orbit Insertion (LOI) burn, a de-orbit burn, and the powered descent onto the lunar surface. In order to achieve the wide range of thrust required, the engines must be capable of throttling approximately 10:1. Working under internal research and development funding, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been conducting the development of a 9,000-lbf LOX/LH2 lunar lander descent engine testbed. This paper highlights the detailed design and analysis efforts to develop the lander engine Fuel Turbopump (FTP) whose operating speeds range from 30,000-rpm to 100,000-rpm. The capability of the FTP to operate across this wide range of speeds imposes several structural and dynamic challenges, and the small size of the FTP creates scaling and manufacturing challenges that are also addressed in this paper.

  15. Lunar Surface Access Module Descent Engine Turbopump Technology: Detailed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, Erika; Forbes, John C.; Thornton, Randall J.

    2010-01-01

    The need for a high specific impulse LOX/LH2 pump-fed lunar lander engine has been established by NASA for the new lunar exploration architecture. Studies indicate that a 4-engine cluster in the thrust range of 9,000-lbf each is a candidate configuration for the main propulsion of the manned lunar lander vehicle. The lander descent engine will be required to perform multiple burns including the powered descent onto the lunar surface. In order to achieve the wide range of thrust required, the engines must be capable of throttling approximately 10:1. Working under internal research and development funding, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been conducting the development of a 9,000-lbf LOX/LH2 lunar lander descent engine technology testbed. This paper highlights the detailed design and analysis efforts to develop the lander engine Fuel Turbopump (FTP) whose operating speeds range from 30,000-rpm to 100,000-rpm. The capability of the FTP to operate across this wide range of speeds imposes several structural and dynamic challenges, and the small size of the FTP creates scaling and manufacturing challenges that are also addressed in this paper.

  16. Learning curves for stochastic gradient descent in linear feedforward networks.

    PubMed

    Werfel, Justin; Xie, Xiaohui; Seung, H Sebastian

    2005-12-01

    Gradient-following learning methods can encounter problems of implementation in many applications, and stochastic variants are sometimes used to overcome these difficulties. We analyze three online training methods used with a linear perceptron: direct gradient descent, node perturbation, and weight perturbation. Learning speed is defined as the rate of exponential decay in the learning curves. When the scalar parameter that controls the size of weight updates is chosen to maximize learning speed, node perturbation is slower than direct gradient descent by a factor equal to the number of output units; weight perturbation is slower still by an additional factor equal to the number of input units. Parallel perturbation allows faster learning than sequential perturbation, by a factor that does not depend on network size. We also characterize how uncertainty in quantities used in the stochastic updates affects the learning curves. This study suggests that in practice, weight perturbation may be slow for large networks, and node perturbation can have performance comparable to that of direct gradient descent when there are few output units. However, these statements depend on the specifics of the learning problem, such as the input distribution and the target function, and are not universally applicable. PMID:16212768

  17. Entry, Descent, and Landing Performance of the Mars Phoenix Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Prince, Jill L.; Wueen, Eric M.; Cruz, Juan R.; Grover, Myron R.

    2008-01-01

    On May 25, 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander successfully landed on the northern arctic plains of Mars. An overview of a preliminary reconstruction analysis performed on each entry, descent, and landing phase to assess the performance of Phoenix as it descended is presented and a comparison to pre-entry predictions is provided. The landing occurred 21 km further downrange than the predicted landing location. Analysis of the flight data revealed that the primary cause of Phoenix s downrange landing was a higher trim total angle of attack during the hypersonic phase of the entry, which resulted in Phoenix flying a slightly lifting trajectory. The cause of this higher trim attitude is not known at this time. Parachute deployment was 6.4 s later than prediction. This later deployment time was within the variations expected and is consistent with a lifting trajectory. The parachute deployment and inflation process occurred as expected with no anomalies identified. The subsequent parachute descent and powered terminal landing also behaved as expected. A preliminary reconstruction of the landing day atmospheric density profile was found to be lower than the best apriori prediction, ranging from a few percent less to a maximum of 8%. A comparison of the flight reconstructed trajectory parameters shows that the actual Phoenix entry, descent, and landing was close to pre-entry predictions. This reconstruction investigation is currently ongoing and the results to date are in the process of being refined.

  18. Mars Science Laboratory: Entry, Descent, and Landing System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Powell, Richard W.; Chen, Allen; Steltzner, Adam D.; San Martin, Alejandro M.; Burkhart, Paul D.; mendeck, Gavin F.

    2006-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems, by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. To do so, MSL will fly a guided lifting entry at a lift-to-drag ratio in excess of that ever flown at Mars, deploy the largest parachute ever at Mars, and perform a novel Sky Crane maneuver. Through improved altitude capability, increased latitude coverage, and more accurate payload delivery, MSL is allowing the science community to consider the exploration of previously inaccessible regions of the planet. The MSL EDL system is a new EDL architecture based on Viking heritage technologies and designed to meet the challenges of landing increasing massive payloads on Mars. In accordance with level-1 requirements, the MSL EDL system is being designed to land an 850 kg rover to altitudes as high as 1 km above the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter defined areoid within 10 km of the desired landing site. Accordingly, MSL will enter the largest entry mass, fly the largest 70 degree sphere-cone aeroshell, generate the largest hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio, and deploy the largest Disk-Gap-Band supersonic parachute of any previous mission to Mars. Major EDL events include a hypersonic guided entry, supersonic parachute deploy and inflation, subsonic heatshield jettison, terminal descent sensor acquisition, powered descent initiation, sky crane terminal descent, rover touchdown detection, and descent stage flyaway. Key performance metrics, derived from level-1 requirements and tracked by the EDL design team to indicate performance capability and timeline margins, include altitude and range at parachute deploy, time on radar, and propellant use. The MSL EDL system, which will continue to develop over the next three years, will enable a notable extension in the advancement of Mars surface science by delivering more science capability than ever before to the surface of Mars. This paper describes the current MSL EDL system performance as predicted by end-to-end EDL simulations, highlights the sensitivity of this baseline performance to several key environmental assumptions, and discusses some of the challenges faced in delivering such an unprecedented rover payload to the surface of Mars.

  19. Mars Science Laboratory: Entry, Descent, and Landing System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Powell, Richard W.; Chen, Allen; SanMartin, A. Miguel; Burkhart, P. Daniel; Mendeck, Gavin F.

    2007-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems, by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. To do so, MSL will fly a guided lifting entry at a lift-to-drag ratio in excess of that ever flown at Mars, deploy the largest parachute ever at Mars, and perform a novel Sky Crane maneuver. Through improved altitude capability, increased latitude coverage, and more accurate payload delivery, MSL is allowing the science community to consider the exploration of previously inaccessible regions of the planet. The MSL EDL system is a new EDL architecture based on Viking heritage technologies and designed to meet the challenges of landing increasing massive payloads on Mars. In accordance with level-1 requirements, the MSL EDL system is being designed to land an 850 kg rover to altitudes as high as 1 km above the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter defined areoid within 10 km of the desired landing site. Accordingly, MSL will enter the largest entry mass, fly the largest 70 degree sphere-cone aeroshell, generate the largest hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio, and deploy the largest Disk-Gap-Band supersonic parachute of any previous mission to Mars. Major EDL events include a hypersonic guided entry, supersonic parachute deploy and inflation, subsonic heatshield jettison, terminal descent sensor acquisition, powered descent initiation, sky crane terminal descent, rover touchdown detection, and descent stage flyaway. Key performance metrics, derived from level-1 requirements and tracked by the EDL design team to indicate performance capability and timeline margins, include altitude and range at parachute deploy, time on radar, and propellant use. The MSL EDL system, which will continue to develop over the next three years, will enable a notable extension in the advancement of Mars surface science by delivering more science capability than ever before to the surface of Mars. This paper describes the current MSL EDL system performance as predicted by end-to-end EDL simulations, highlights the sensitivity of this baseline performance to several key environmental assumptions, and discusses some of the challenges faced in delivering such an unprecedented rover payload to the surface of Mars.

  20. Role of olivary electrical coupling in cerebellar motor learning.

    PubMed

    Van Der Giessen, Ruben S; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K; van Dorp, Stijn; De Gruijl, Jornt R; Cupido, Alexander; Khosrovani, Sara; Dortland, Bjorn; Wellershaus, Kerstin; Degen, Joachim; Deuchars, Jim; Fuchs, Elke C; Monyer, Hannah; Willecke, Klaus; De Jeu, Marcel T G; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2008-05-22

    The level of electrotonic coupling in the inferior olive is extremely high, but its functional role in cerebellar motor control remains elusive. Here, we subjected mice that lack olivary coupling to paradigms that require learning-dependent timing. Cx36-deficient mice showed impaired timing of both locomotion and eye-blink responses that were conditioned to a tone. The latencies of their olivary spike activities in response to the unconditioned stimulus were significantly more variable than those in wild-types. Whole-cell recordings of olivary neurons in vivo showed that these differences in spike timing result at least in part from altered interactions with their subthreshold oscillations. These results, combined with analyses of olivary activities in computer simulations at both the cellular and systems level, suggest that electrotonic coupling among olivary neurons by gap junctions is essential for proper timing of their action potentials and thereby for learning-dependent timing in cerebellar motor control. PMID:18498740

  1. Vertebral artery dissection and cerebellar infarction following chiropractic manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W?L; Chern, C?H; Wu, Y?L; Lee, C?H

    2006-01-01

    Vertebral artery dissection (VAD) associated with chiropractic cervical manipulation is a rare but potentially disabling condition. In this report, we present a young patient manifesting with repeated vertigo. Owing to the initial misdiagnosis, the patient later developed cerebellar stroke with inability to stand or walk. Vertigo and disequilibrium are the usual presenting symptoms of this condition, which can result from inner ear or vestibular nerve dysfunction, vertebrobasilar insufficiency, and even lethal cerebellar infarction or haemorrhage; these last two, although rarely seen in young adults, can be caused by traumatic or spontaneous arterial injury, including injury secondary to chiropractic cervical manipulation. A number of cases of VAD associated with chiropractic cervical manipulation have been reported, but rarely in the emergency medicine literature. We present a case of this rare occurrence, and discuss the diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:16373786

  2. Ruptured Total Intrameatal Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Cheol; Chang, In Bok; Lee, Ho Kook

    2015-01-01

    Among the distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysms, a unique aneurysm at the meatal loop inside the internal auditory meatus is extremely rare. The authors report a case of surgically treated total intrameatal AICA aneurysm. A 62-year-old female patient presenting with sudden bursting headache and neck pain was transferred to our department. Computed tomography and digital subtraction angiography showed subarachnoid hemorrhage at the basal, prepontine cistern and an aneurysm of the distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery inside the internal auditory meatus. Surgery was performed by retrosigmoid craniotomy with unroofing of the internal auditory meatus. The aneurysm was identified between the seventh and eighth cranial nerve in the meatus and was removed from the canal and clipped with a small straight Sugita clip. After operation the patient experienced transient facial paresis and tinnitus but improved during follow up. PMID:26361531

  3. Fast versus slow: different saccadic behavior in cerebellar ataxias.

    PubMed

    Rufa, Alessandra; Federighi, Pamela

    2011-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder primarily characterized by involvement of the brainstem and cerebellum, basal ganglia, spinal cord, cerebral cortex, but white matter is also involved. In late-onset cerebellar ataxia (LOCA), the cerebellum is mainly involved, as demonstrated by clinical and neuroradiological findings. These neurodegenerative diseases are often associated with progressive abnormalities in eye movement control, particularly saccadic changes. We recorded saccadic eye movements in eight SCA2 patients and 10 LOCA patients. Here, we suggest that abnormalities in saccadic parameters differ in the two groups of patients according to specific anatomical substrates. The different saccadic behavior observed in these two clinically distinct degenerative cerebellar diseases offers the opportunity to simplify some general mechanisms of saccadic motor control. Like his mentor Fred Plum, John Leigh strongly encouraged younger neuroscientists to tackle neurological problems by investigating "pathological physiology." With this teaching in mind, we studied patients with rare neurometabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21950987

  4. Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome Presented as Severe Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pesic, Danilo; Peljto, Amir; Lukic, Biljana; Milovanovic, Maja; Svetozarevic, Snezana; Lecic Tosevski, Dusica

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of findings confirm the significance of cerebellum in affecting regulation and early learning. Most consistent findings refer to association of congenital vermis anomalies with deficits in nonmotor functions of cerebellum. In this paper we presented a young woman who was treated since sixteen years of age for polysubstance abuse, affective instability, and self-harming who was later diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. Since the neurological and neuropsychological reports pointed to signs of cerebellar dysfunction and dysexecutive syndrome, we performed magnetic resonance imaging of brain which demonstrated partially developed vermis and rhombencephalosynapsis. These findings match the description of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome and show an overlap with clinical manifestations of borderline personality disorder. PMID:24715924

  5. Remote Cerebellar Infarction after Supratentorial Craniotomy and Its Management: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seon-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar infarction resulting from supratentorial craniotomy is uncommon event and its management has been controversial. After removal of space occupying lesion on right frontal area, two cases of remote cerebellar infarctions occurred. We reviewed each cases and the techniques to manage such complications are discussed. Early extraventricular catheter insertion and midline suboccipital craniectomy were effectively performed in obtunded patients from cerebellar infarction. PMID:26605273

  6. New dynamics in cerebellar Purkinje cells: torus canards.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Mark A; Traub, Roger D; Kopell, Nancy J

    2008-08-01

    We describe a transition from bursting to rapid spiking in a reduced mathematical model of a cerebellar Purkinje cell. We perform a slow-fast analysis of the system and find that-after a saddle node bifurcation of limit cycles-the full model dynamics temporarily follow a repelling branch of limit cycles. We propose that the system exhibits a dynamical phenomenon new to realistic, biophysical applications: torus canards. PMID:18764509

  7. Mapping the development of cerebellar Purkinje cells in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hamling, Kyla R; Tobias, Zachary J C; Weissman, Tamily A

    2015-11-01

    The cells that comprise the cerebellum perform a complex integration of neural inputs to influence motor control and coordination. The functioning of this circuit depends upon Purkinje cells and other cerebellar neurons forming in the precise place and time during development. Zebrafish provide a useful platform for modeling disease and studying gene function, thus a quantitative metric of normal zebrafish cerebellar development is key for understanding how gene mutations affect the cerebellum. To begin to quantitatively measure cerebellar development in zebrafish, we have characterized the spatial and temporal patterning of Purkinje cells during the first 2 weeks of development. Differentiated Purkinje cells first emerged by 2.8 days post fertilization and were spatially patterned into separate dorsomedial and ventrolateral clusters that merged at around 4 days. Quantification of the Purkinje cell layer revealed that there was a logarithmic increase in both Purkinje cell number as well as overall volume during the first 2 weeks, while the entire region curved forward in an anterior, then ventral direction. Purkinje cell dendrites were positioned next to parallel fibers as early as 3.3 days, and Purkinje cell diameter decreased significantly from 3.3 to 14 days, possibly due to cytoplasmic reappropriation into maturing dendritic arbors. A nearest neighbor analysis showed that Purkinje cells moved slightly apart from each other from 3 to 14 days, perhaps spreading as the organized monolayer forms. This study establishes a quantitative spatiotemporal map of Purkinje cell development in zebrafish that provides an important metric for studies of cerebellar development and disease. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 75: 1174-1188, 2015. PMID:25655100

  8. Electrophysiological monitoring of injury progression in the rat cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ordek, Gokhan; Proddutur, Archana; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Pfister, Bryan J.; Sahin, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    The changes of excitability in affected neural networks can be used as a marker to study the temporal course of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The cerebellum is an ideal platform to study brain injury mechanisms at the network level using the electrophysiological methods. Within its crystalline morphology, the cerebellar cortex contains highly organized topographical subunits that are defined by two main inputs, the climbing (CFs) and mossy fibers (MFs). Here we demonstrate the use of cerebellar evoked potentials (EPs) mediated through these afferent systems for monitoring the injury progression in a rat model of fluid percussion injury (FPI). A mechanical tap on the dorsal hand was used as a stimulus, and EPs were recorded from the paramedian lobule (PML) of the posterior cerebellum via multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). Post-injury evoked response amplitudes (EPAs) were analyzed on a daily basis for 1 week and compared with pre-injury values. We found a trend of consistently decreasing EPAs in all nine animals, losing as much as 72 ± 4% of baseline amplitudes measured before the injury. Notably, our results highlighted two particular time windows; the first 24 h of injury in the acute period and day-3 to day-7 in the delayed period where the largest drops (~50% and 24%) were observed in the EPAs. In addition, cross-correlations of spontaneous signals between electrode pairs declined (from 0.47 ± 0.1 to 0.35 ± 0.04, p < 0.001) along with the EPAs throughout the week of injury. In support of the electrophysiological findings, immunohistochemical analysis at day-7 post-injury showed detectable Purkinje cell loss at low FPI pressures and more with the largest pressures used. Our results suggest that sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) recorded from the cerebellar surface can be a useful technique to monitor the course of cerebellar injury and identify the phases of injury progression even at mild levels. PMID:25346664

  9. Morphological analysis of embryonic cerebellar grafts in SCA2 mice.

    PubMed

    Purkartova, Zdenka; Tuma, Jan; Pesta, Martin; Kulda, Vlastimil; Hajkova, Lucie; Sebesta, Ondrej; Vozeh, Frantisek; Cendelin, Jan

    2014-01-13

    SCA2 transgenic mice are thought to be a useful model of human spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. There is no effective therapy for cerebellar degenerative disorders, therefore neurotransplantation could offer hope. The aim of this work was to assess the survival and morphology of embryonic cerebellar grafts transplanted into the cerebellum of adult SCA2 mice. Four month-old homozygous SCA2 and negative control mice were treated with bilateral intracerebellar injections of an enhanced green fluorescent protein-positive embryonic cerebellar cell suspension. Graft survival and morphology were examined three months later. Graft-derived Purkinje cells and the presence of astrocytes in the graft were detected immunohistochemically. Nissl and hematoxylin-eosin techniques were used to visualize the histological structure of the graft and surrounding host tissue. Grafts survived in all experimental mice; no differences in graft structure, between SCA2 homozygous and negative mice, were found. The grafts contained numerous Purkinje cells but long distance graft-to-host axonal connections to the deep cerebellar nuclei were rarely seen. Relatively few astrocytes were found in the center of the graft. No signs of inflammation or tissue destruction were seen in the area around the grafts. Despite good graft survival and the presence of graft-derived Purkinje cells, the structure of the graft did not seem to promise any significant specific functional effects. We have shown that the graft is available for long-term experiments. Nevertheless, it would be beneficial to search for ways of enhancement of connections between the graft and host. PMID:24269873

  10. Imaging Spectrum of Cerebellar Pathologies: A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Richa

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cerebellum is a crucial structure of hindbrain which helps in maintaining motor tone, posture, gait and also coordinates skilled voluntary movements including eye movements. Cerebellar abnormalities have different spectrum, presenting symptoms and prognosis as compared to supratentorial structures and brainstem. This article intends to review the various pathological processes involving the cerebellum along with their imaging features on MR, which are must to know for all radiologists, neurologists and neurosurgeons for their prompt diagnosis and management. PMID:25806100

  11. Endogenous cerebellar neurogenesis in adult mice with progressive ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Csaba, Zsolt; Peineau, Stéphane; Srivastava, Rupali; Rasika, Sowmyalakshmi; Mani, Shyamala; Gressens, Pierre; El Ghouzzi, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transplanting exogenous neuronal progenitors to replace damaged neurons in the adult brain following injury or neurodegenerative disorders and achieve functional amelioration is a realistic goal. However, studies so far have rarely taken into consideration the preexisting inflammation triggered by the disease process that could hamper the effectiveness of transplanted cells. Here, we examined the fate and long-term consequences of human cerebellar granule neuron precursors (GNP) transplanted into the cerebellum of Harlequin mice, an adult model of progressive cerebellar degeneration with early-onset microgliosis. Methods Human embryonic stem cell-derived progenitors expressing Atoh1, a transcription factor key to GNP specification, were generated in vitro and stereotaxically transplanted into the cerebellum of preataxic Harlequin mice. The histological and functional impact of these transplants was followed using immunolabeling and Rotarod analysis. Results Although transplanted GNPs did not survive beyond a few weeks, they triggered the proliferation of endogenous nestin-positive precursors in the leptomeninges that crossed the molecular layer and differentiated into mature neurons. These phenomena were accompanied by the preservation of the granule and Purkinje cell layers and delayed ataxic changes. In vitro neurosphere generation confirmed the enhanced neurogenic potential of the cerebellar leptomeninges of Harlequin mice transplanted with exogenous GNPs. Interpretation The cerebellar leptomeninges of adult mice contain an endogenous neurogenic niche that can be stimulated to yield mature neurons from an as-yet unidentified population of progenitors. The transplantation of human GNPs not only stimulates this neurogenesis, but, despite the potentially hostile environment, leads to neuroprotection and functional amelioration. PMID:25574472

  12. Cerebellar hypoplasia in mice lacking selenoprotein biosynthesis in neurons.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Eva K; Bharathi, B Suman; Hatfield, Dolph; Conrad, Marcus; Brielmeier, Markus; Schweizer, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    Selenium exerts many, if not most, of its physiological functions as a selenocysteine moiety in proteins. Selenoproteins are involved in many biochemical processes including regulation of cellular redox state, calcium homeostasis, protein biosynthesis, and degradation. A neurodevelopmental syndrome called progressive cerebello-cortical atrophy (PCCA) is caused by mutations in the selenocysteine synthase gene, SEPSECS, demonstrating that selenoproteins are essential for human brain development. While we have shown that selenoproteins are required for correct hippocampal and cortical interneuron development, little is known about the functions of selenoproteins in the cerebellum. Therefore, we have abrogated neuronal selenoprotein biosynthesis by conditional deletion of the gene encoding selenocysteyl tRNA([Ser]Sec) (gene symbol Trsp). Enzymatic activity of cellular glutathione peroxidase and cytosolic thioredoxin reductase is reduced in cerebellar extracts from Trsp-mutant mice. These mice grow slowly and fail to gain postural control or to coordinate their movements. Histological analysis reveals marked cerebellar hypoplasia, associated with Purkinje cell death and decreased granule cell proliferation. Purkinje cell death occurs along parasagittal stripes as observed in other models of Purkinje cell loss. Neuron-specific inactivation of glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) used the same Cre driver phenocopies tRNA([Ser]Sec) mutants in several aspects: cerebellar hypoplasia, stripe-like Purkinje cell loss, and reduced granule cell proliferation. Parvalbumin-expressing GABAergic interneurons (stellate and/or basket cells) are virtually absent in tRNA([Ser]Sec)-mutant mice, while some remained in Gpx4-mutant mice. Our data show that selenoproteins are specifically required in postmitotic neurons of the developing cerebellum, thus providing a rational explanation for cerebellar hypoplasia as occurring in PCCA patients. PMID:24599700

  13. STS-1 operational flight profile. Volume 5: Descent, cycle 3. Appendix C: Monte Carlo dispersion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The results of three nonlinear the Monte Carlo dispersion analyses for the Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) Orbiter Descent Operational Flight Profile, Cycle 3 are presented. Fifty randomly selected simulation for the end of mission (EOM) descent, the abort once around (AOA) descent targeted line are steep target line, and the AOA descent targeted to the shallow target line are analyzed. These analyses compare the flight environment with system and operational constraints on the flight environment and in some cases use simplified system models as an aid in assessing the STS-1 descent flight profile. In addition, descent flight envelops are provided as a data base for use by system specialists to determine the flight readiness for STS-1. The results of these dispersion analyses supersede results of the dispersion analysis previously documented.

  14. A piloted simulator evaluation of a ground-based 4D descent advisor algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Davis, Thomas J.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1987-01-01

    A ground-based, four-dimensional (4D) descent-advisor algorithm is under development at NASA Ames Research Center. The algorithm combines detailed aerodynamic, propulsive, and atmospheric models with an efficient numerical integration scheme to generate 4D descent advisories. This paper investigates the ability of the 4D descent advisor algorithm to provide adequate control of arrival time for aircraft not equipped with on-board 4D guidance systems. A piloted simulation was conducted to determine the precision with which the descent advisor could predict the 4D trajectories of typical straight-in descents flown by airline pilots under different wind conditions. The effects of errors in the estimation of wind and initial aircraft weight were also studied. A description of the descent advisor as well as the results of the simulation studies are presented.

  15. A piloted simulator evaluation of a ground-based 4-D descent advisor algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Green, Steven M.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1990-01-01

    A ground-based, four dimensional (4D) descent-advisor algorithm is under development at NASA-Ames. The algorithm combines detailed aerodynamic, propulsive, and atmospheric models with an efficient numerical integration scheme to generate 4D descent advisories. The ability is investigated of the 4D descent advisor algorithm to provide adequate control of arrival time for aircraft not equipped with on-board 4D guidance systems. A piloted simulation was conducted to determine the precision with which the descent advisor could predict the 4D trajectories of typical straight-in descents flown by airline pilots under different wind conditions. The effects of errors in the estimation of wind and initial aircraft weight were also studied. A description of the descent advisor as well as the result of the simulation studies are presented.

  16. Effect of 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor, 4-MAPC, on testicular descent in male rat.

    PubMed

    Ngyuen, M M; Lemmi, C A; Rajfer, J

    1991-05-01

    Testicular descent has been reported to be a dihydrotestosterone (DHT) dependent event. To further elucidate the role of DHT in the process of testicular descent, a group of rats were treated with the 5-alpha reductase inhibitor, 4-MAPC, from birth to day 28 of age and the incidence of testicular descent as well as ventral prostate weight was noted at day 29 of age. It was determined that in the doses used, 4-MAPC failed to prevent testicular descent. Because 4-MAPC inhibited ventral prostate weight by only 53% (as compared to a 75% inhibition by castration), the failure of the 4-MAPC to prevent testicular descent could be due to its inability to completely inhibit tissue 5-alpha reductase activity. The results of this study do not mitigate against the role of other nonhormonal factors working in tandem with DHT in the induction of testicular descent in this animal model. PMID:2016800

  17. Hippocampal and cerebellar mossy fibre boutons – same name, different function

    PubMed Central

    Delvendahl, Igor; Weyhersmüller, Annika; Ritzau-Jost, Andreas; Hallermann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Over a century ago, the Spanish anatomist Ramón y Cajal described ‘mossy fibres’ in the hippocampus and the cerebellum, which contain several presynaptic boutons. Technical improvements in recent decades have allowed direct patch-clamp recordings from both hippocampal and cerebellar mossy fibre boutons (hMFBs and cMFBs, respectively), making them ideal models to study fundamental properties of synaptic transmission. hMFBs and cMFBs have similar size and shape, but each hMFB contacts one postsynaptic hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neuron, while each cMFB contacts ?50 cerebellar granule cells. Furthermore, hMFBs and cMFBs differ in terms of their functional specialization. At hMFBs, a large number of release-ready vesicles and low release probability (<0.1) contribute to marked synaptic facilitation. At cMFBs, a small number of release-ready vesicles, high release probability (?0.5) and rapid vesicle reloading result in moderate frequency-dependent synaptic depression. These presynaptic mechanisms, in combination with faster postsynaptic currents of cerebellar granule cells compared with hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons, enable much higher transmission frequencies at cMFB compared with hMFB synapses. Analysing the underling mechanisms of synaptic transmission and information processing represents a fascinating challenge and may reveal insights into the structure–function relationship of the human brain. PMID:23297303

  18. [Pharmacotherapy of Vestibular Disorders, Nystagmus and Cerebellar Disorders].

    PubMed

    Feil, K; Böttcher, N; Kremmyda, O; Muth, C; Teufel, J; Zwergal, A; Brandt, T; Strupp, M

    2015-09-01

    There are currently different groups of drugs for the pharmacotherapy of vertigo, nystagmus and cerebellar disorders: antiemetics; anti-inflammatories, antimenieres, and antimigraineous medications and antidepressants, anticonvulsants, aminopyridines as well as acetyl-DL-leucine. In acute unilateral vestibulopathy, corticosteroids improve the recovery of peripheral vestibular function, but currently there is not sufficient evidence for a general recommendation. There is insufficient evidence to support the view that 16 mg t. i. d. or 48 mg t. i. d. betahistine has an effect in Menière's disease. Therefore, higher dosages are recommended. In animal studies, it was shown that betahistine increases cochlear blood flow. In vestibular paroxysmia, oxcarbazepine was effective (one randomized controlled trial (RCT)). Aminopyridines are recommended for the treatment of downbeat nystagmus (two RCTs) and episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, one RCT). There has been no RCT on the efficacy of beta-blockers or topiramate but one RCT on flunarizine in vestibular migraine. Based on clinical experience, a treatment analogous to that for migraine without aura can be recommended. Acetyl-DL-leucine improved cerebellar ataxia (two observational studies); it also accelerated central compensation in an animal model of acute unilateral lesion, but RCTs were negative. There are ongoing RCTs on treatment of vestibular paroxysmia with carbamazepine (VESPA), acute unilateral vestibulopathy with betahistine (BETAVEST), vestibular migraine with metoprolol (PROVEMIG), benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with vitamin D (VitD@BPPV), EA2 with 4-aminopyridine versus acetazolamide (EAT-2-TREAT), and cerebellar ataxias with acetyl-DL-leucine (ALCAT). PMID:26421856

  19. Deficits in reflexive covert attention following cerebellar injury

    PubMed Central

    Striemer, Christopher L.; Cantelmi, David; Cusimano, Michael D.; Danckert, James A.; Schweizer, Tom A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally the cerebellum has been known for its important role in coordinating motor output. Over the past 15 years numerous studies have indicated that the cerebellum plays a role in a variety of cognitive functions including working memory, language, perceptual functions, and emotion. In addition, recent work suggests that regions of the cerebellum involved in eye movements also play a role in controlling covert visual attention. Here we investigated whether regions of the cerebellum that are not strictly tied to the control of eye movements might also contribute to covert attention. To address this question we examined the effects of circumscribed cerebellar lesions on reflexive covert attention in a group of patients (n = 11) without any gross motor or oculomotor deficits, and compared their performance to a group of age-matched controls (n = 11). Results indicated that the traditional RT advantage for validly cued targets was significantly smaller at the shortest (50 ms) SOA for cerebellar patients compared to controls. Critically, a lesion overlap analysis indicated that this deficit in the rapid deployment of attention was linked to damage in Crus I and Crus II of the lateral cerebellum. Importantly, both cerebellar regions have connections to non-motor regions of the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices—regions important for controlling visuospatial attention. Together, these data provide converging evidence that both lateral and midline regions of the cerebellum play an important role in the control of reflexive covert visual attention. PMID:26300756

  20. Infratentorial hygroma secondary to decompressive craniectomy after cerebellar infarction.

    PubMed

    Tejada-Solís, S; Díez-Valle, R; Domínguez-Echavarri, P D; García de Eulate-Ruiz, M R; Gómez-Ibáñez, A

    2009-10-01

    We present a case of expansive CSF collection in the cerebellar convexity. The patient was a 74 years old lady who one month before had suffered a cerebellar infarct complicated with acute hydrocephalus. She had good evolution after decompressive craniectomy without shunting. Fifteen days after surgery, the patient started with new positional vertigo, nausea and vomiting and a wound CSF fistula that needed ventriculoperitoneal shunt (medium pressure) because conservative treatment failed. After shunting, the fistula closed, but the patient symptoms worsened. The MRI showed normal ventricular size with a cerebellar hygroma, extending to the posterior interhemispheric fissure. The collection had no blood signal and expanded during observation. A catheter was implanted in the collection and connected to the shunt. The patient became asymptomatic after surgery, and the hygromas had disappeared in control CT at one month. This case shows an infrequent problem of CSF circulation at posterior fossa that resulted in vertigo of central origin. A higroma-ventricle-peritoneal shunt solved the symptoms of the patient. PMID:19830371

  1. Sustained Reduction of Cerebellar Activity in Experimental Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rijkers, Kim; Moers-Hornikx, Véronique M. P.; Hemmes, Roelof J.; Aalbers, Marlien W.; Temel, Yasin; Vles, Johan S. H.; Hoogland, Govert

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence suggests a role for the cerebellum in seizure control, while no data are available on cerebellar activity between seizures. We hypothesized that interictal regional activity of the deep cerebellar nuclei is reduced in epilepsy and tested this in an animal model by using ?FosB and cytochrome oxidase (COX) (immuno)histochemistry. The expression of these two markers of neuronal activity was analysed in the dentate nucleus (DN), interpositus nucleus (IN), and fastigial nucleus (FN) of the cerebellum of fully amygdala kindled rats that were sacrificed 48 hours after their last seizure. The DN and FN of kindled rats exhibited 25 to 29% less ?FosB immunopositive cells than their respective counterpart in sham controls (P < 0.05). COX expression in the DN and FN of kindled animals was reduced by 32 to 33% compared to respective control values (P < 0.05). These results indicate that an epileptogenic state is characterized by decreased activity of deep cerebellar nuclei, especially the DN and FN. Possible consequences may include a decreased activation of the thalamus, contributing to further seizure spread. Restoration of FN activity by low frequency electrical stimulation is suggested as a possible treatment option in chronic epilepsy. PMID:26417599

  2. ?-Catenin is critical for cerebellar foliation and lamination.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yang, Hong-Bin; Zhou, Bing; Lou, Hui-Fang; Duan, Shumin

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum has a conserved foliation pattern and a well-organized layered structure. The process of foliation and lamination begins around birth. ?-catenin is a downstream molecule of Wnt signaling pathway, which plays a critical role in tissue organization. Lack of ?-catenin at early embryonic stages leads to either prenatal or neonatal death, therefore it has been difficult to resolve its role in cerebellar foliation and lamination. Here we used GFAP-Cre to ablate ?-catenin in neuronal cells of the cerebellum after embryonic day 12.5, and found an unexpected role of ?-catenin in determination of the foliation pattern. In the mutant mice, the positions of fissure formation were changed, and the meninges were improperly incorporated into fissures. At later stages, some lobules were formed by Purkinje cells remaining in deep regions of the cerebellum and the laminar structure was dramatically altered. Our results suggest that ?-catenin is critical for cerebellar foliation and lamination. We also found a non cell-autonomous role of ?-catenin in some developmental properties of major cerebellar cell types during specific stages. PMID:23691221

  3. [Progressive degenerative myoclonic epilepsy. Systematized olivo-cerebellar lesions].

    PubMed

    Habib, M; Roger, J; Khalil, R; Pellissier, J F; Bureau, M; Boudouresques, G; Delpuech, F

    1985-01-01

    A 15 year-old North-African female showed typical symptoms and evolution of Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy of the Unverricht type. Pathological examination failed to show either inclusion bodies or any other storage material. The only relevant findings included degenerative changes in the inferior olives and, to a lesser extent, in the cerebellar cortex. The site of lesions was remarkable: in the inferior olives, lesions were bilaterally and symmetrically restricted to the external angles (lateral lamellae); in the cerebellum, loss of Purkinje cells and ascending fibres of the molecular layer was prominent in the lateralmost part of the hemispheres (semilunar lobules). Such a topography implies a system disorder involving the olivo-cerebellar pathway, particularly in that part which projects to the neocerebellum. Twelve other clinico-pathological cases of progressive myoclonus epilepsy of the degenerative group are reviewed. It is suggested that, here again, lesions--although more diffuse--may be related to a primarily olivo-cerebellar involvement. PMID:3925524

  4. Executive Function Deficits in Patients after Cerebellar Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Mak, Monika; Tyburski, Ernest; Madany, ?ukasz; Soko?owski, Andrzej; Samochowiec, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum has long been perceived as a structure responsible for the human motor function. According to the contemporary approach, however, it plays a significant role in complex behavior regulatory processes. The aim of this study was to describe executive functions in patients after cerebellar surgery. The study involved 30 patients with cerebellar pathology. The control group comprised 30 neurologically and mentally healthy individuals, matched for sex, age, and number of years of education. Executive functions were measured by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT), Trail Making Test (TMT), and working memory by the Digit Span. Compared to healthy controls, patients made more Errors and Perseverative errors in the WCST, gave more Perseverative responses, and had a lower Number of categories completed. The patients exhibited higher response times in all three parts of the SCWT and TMT A and B. No significant differences between the two groups were reported in their performance of the SCWT and TMT with regard to the measures of absolute or relative interference. The patients had lower score on the backward Digit Span. Patients with cerebellar pathology may exhibit some impairment within problem solving and working memory. Their worse performance on the SCWT and TMT could, in turn, stem from their poor motor-somatosensory control, and not necessarily executive deficits. Our results thus support the hypothesis of the cerebellum's mediating role in the regulation of the activity of the superordinate cognitive control network in the brain. (JINS, 2016, 22, 47-57). PMID:26626541

  5. Glutamatergic cerebellar granule neurons synthesize and secrete reelin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sinagra, Mélanie; Gonzalez Campo, Cecilia; Verrier, Danièle; Moustié, Olivier; Manzoni, Olivier J; Chavis, Pascale

    2008-08-01

    In the postnatal forebrain, the extracellular matrix protein reelin is expressed and secreted by subsets of GABAergic neurons, whereas in the cerebellum reelin is detected in glutamatergic cells of the granule cell layer. Thus, various regions of the postnatal brain present different patterns of reelin expression, whose significance remains unknown. We combined immunocytochemical and pharmacological approaches to characterize the phenotypic and temporal profiles of reelin expression in dissociated cultures of cerebellar granule neurons. A single type of reelin immunoreactivity, identified by a punctate labelling, was present in the somata of the majority of neurons. This immunoreactivity was observed throughout maturation and was exclusively present in glutamatergic neurons expressing the vesicular glutamate transporter 1. Neurons containing the reelin receptors apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (Apoer2) and very low-density lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr) represented about 80% of cerebellar neurons. The vast majority of reelin-positive neurons coexpressed Apoer2, suggesting that reelin immunoreactivity resulted in part from receptor-bound reelin. Inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide completely abolished reelin immunoreactivity. In contrast, blocking protein secretion with brefeldin A did not affect the proportion of punctate neurons but revealed a subpopulation of neurons characterized by a solid reelin staining. These data show for the first time that a homogeneous population of glutamatergic neurons can synthesize and secrete reelin in cerebellar granule cells in vitro. PMID:19678965

  6. Junctophilin-mediated channel crosstalk essential for cerebellar synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Sho; Kishimoto, Yasushi; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Furutani, Kazuharu; Shimizu, Hidemi; Fukaya, Masahiro; Nishi, Miyuki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kondo, Hisatake; Kano, Masanobu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Iino, Masamitsu; Takeshima, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Functional crosstalk between cell-surface and intracellular ion channels plays important roles in excitable cells and is structurally supported by junctophilins (JPs) in muscle cells. Here, we report a novel form of channel crosstalk in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). The generation of slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) following complex spikes in PCs required ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release and the subsequent opening of small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels in somatodendritic regions. Despite the normal expression levels of these channels, sAHP was abolished in PCs from mutant mice lacking neural JP subtypes (JP-DKO), and this defect was restored by exogenously expressing JPs or enhancing SK channel activation. The stimulation paradigm for inducing long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber–PC synapses adversely established long-term potentiation in the JP-DKO cerebellum, primarily due to the sAHP deficiency. Furthermore, JP-DKO mice exhibited impairments of motor coordination and learning, although normal cerebellar histology was retained. Therefore, JPs support the Ca2+-mediated communication between voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, RyRs and SK channels, which modulates the excitability of PCs and is fundamental to cerebellar LTD and motor functions. PMID:17347645

  7. Remote Cerebellar Hemorrhage Complicating Unintended Durotomy in Lumbar Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Millgram, Michael A; Ashkenazi, Ely; Rand, Nahshon

    2015-01-01

    Study design Case reports and retrospective review of accidental durotomies in lumbar surgeries during 5 years. Objectives To draw attention to a potentially serious complication of incidental durotomy-remote cerebellar hemorrhage. Summary and background data Accidental durotomy is a frequent complication of spinal surgery. In most cases the outcome of incidental durotomy is favorable. A delayed potentially serious complication of CSF loss during and after lumbar surgery is remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH). Methods During 2008-2012, 1169 lumbar spine procedures were performed at our spine center. In 210 surgeries incidental or intentional durotomies occurred. All patients with durotomies were managed with suturing of the dural wound followed by deep wound drainage left for 5 days and tight wound closure. Results Of the 210 patients with CSF loss three patients were identified to suffer from RCH-an incidence of 0.26%. The three patients ages 56, 67 and 75 years developed RCH between 36-192 hours after surgery. All three were managed with supportive treatment and close clinical supervision. A gradual clinical and radiological improvement was noted in all three patients. Conclusions Severe headache after spinal surgery and or declining mental status should not be attributed only to low CSF pressure secondary to dural tearing. It can also be the result of remote cerebral or cerebellar hemorrhage. Once the diagnosis of RCH is made, close clinical supervision is mandatory. In most cases non-operative supportive treatment may lead to eventual full clinical recovery. PMID:26273547

  8. Cerebellar Output in Zebrafish: An Analysis of Spatial Patterns and Topography in Eurydendroid Cell Projections

    PubMed Central

    Heap, Lucy A.; Goh, Chi Ching; Kassahn, Karin S.; Scott, Ethan K.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum is a brain region responsible for motor coordination and for refining motor programs. While a great deal is known about the structure and connectivity of the mammalian cerebellum, fundamental questions regarding its function in behavior remain unanswered. Recently, the zebrafish has emerged as a useful model organism for cerebellar studies, owing in part to the similarity in cerebellar circuits between zebrafish and mammals. While the cell types composing their cerebellar cortical circuits are generally conserved with mammals, zebrafish lack deep cerebellar nuclei, and instead a majority of cerebellar output comes from a single type of neuron: the eurydendroid cell. To describe spatial patterns of cerebellar output in zebrafish, we have used genetic techniques to label and trace eurydendroid cells individually and en masse. We have found that cerebellar output targets the thalamus and optic tectum, and have confirmed the presence of pre-synaptic terminals from eurydendroid cells in these structures using a synaptically targeted GFP. By observing individual eurydendroid cells, we have shown that different medial-lateral regions of the cerebellum have eurydendroid cells projecting to different targets. Finally, we found topographic organization in the connectivity between the cerebellum and the optic tectum, where more medial eurydendroid cells project to the rostral tectum while lateral cells project to the caudal tectum. These findings indicate that there is spatial logic underpinning cerebellar output in zebrafish with likely implications for cerebellar function. PMID:23554587

  9. Conceptual design of "Exomars-2018" Descent Module developed by federal enterprise "Lavochkin Association"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khartov, V. V.; Martynov, M. B.; Lukiyanchikov, A. V.; Alexashkin, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Goals and tasks for "ExoMars-2018" mission and share of responsibilities between European partners and p]Russia are presented. The main design requirements for a Descent Module (DM) that define its design concept as well as design specific features are given. The structure of the descent module, thermal control, means for securing systems interaction onboard the spacecraft "ExoMars-2018", and radio communication with the descent module are examined.

  10. An evaluation of descent strategies for TNAV-equipped aircraft in an advanced metering environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.; Schwab, R. W.; Groce, J. L.; Coote, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated were the effects on system throughput and fleet fuel usage of arrival aircraft utilizing three 4D RNAV descent strategies (cost optimal, clean-idle Mach/CAS and constant descent angle Mach/CAS), both individually and in combination, in an advanced air traffic control metering environment. Results are presented for all mixtures of arrival traffic consisting of three Boeing commercial jet types and for all combinations of the three descent strategies for a typical en route metering airport arrival distribution.

  11. Specific cerebellar activation during Braille reading in blind subjects.

    PubMed

    Gizewski, Elke R; Timmann, Dagmar; Forsting, Michael

    2004-07-01

    The traditional view that the cerebellum is involved only in the control of movements has been changed recently. It has been suggested that the human cerebellum is involved in cognition and language. Likewise, besides cortical activity in sensorimotor and visual areas, an increased global activation of the cerebellum has been revealed during Braille reading in blind subjects. Our purpose was to investigate whether there is cerebellar activation during Braille reading by blind subjects other than sensorimotor activation related to finger movements. Early blind and normal sighted subjects were studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during Braille reading, tactile discrimination of nonsense dots, dots forming symbols, and finger tapping. The experiments were done in block design. Echo planar imaging sequences were carried out on a 1.5-T MR scanner. All blind individuals reading Braille showed robust activation of the posterior and lateral aspects of cerebellar hemispheral lobules Crus I bilaterally but more predominately on the right side. Additionally, activation was present in the medial cerebellum within lobules IV, V, and VIIIA, predominantly on the right. Discriminating nonsense dots did not reveal any activation of Crus I, but did reveal activation within the medial part of lobules IV, V, and VIIIA, predominately on the right. Analysis of sighted subjects during reading of printed text revealed activation of the posterolateral cerebellar hemisphere in Crus I bilaterally, predominantly on the right. Tactile analysis of dots representing symbols revealed an activation in lobules IV and VIII and in right Crus II but not in Crus I. In conclusion, parts of cerebellar activation during Braille reading in blind subjects (i.e., within lobules IV, V, and VIII) overlap with the known hand representation within the cerebellum and are likely related to the sensorimotor part of the task. Cerebellar activation during Braille reading within bilateral Crus I may be due to language processes or inner speech similar to those found during text reading in normal sighted subjects. Object recognition did not account for Crus I activation. PMID:15195289

  12. Entry, Descent, and Landing for Human Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Michelle M.; DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of a human mission to Mars is landing safely on the Martian surface. Mars has such low atmospheric density that decelerating large masses (tens of metric tons) requires methods that have not yet been demonstrated, and are not yet planned in future Mars missions. To identify the most promising options for Mars entry, descent, and landing, and to plan development of the needed technologies, NASA's Human Architecture Team (HAT) has refined candidate methods for emplacing needed elements of the human Mars exploration architecture (such as ascent vehicles and habitats) on the Mars surface. This paper explains the detailed, optimized simulations that have been developed to define the mass needed at Mars arrival to accomplish the entry, descent, and landing functions. Based on previous work, technology options for hypersonic deceleration include rigid, mid-L/D (lift-to-drag ratio) aeroshells, and inflatable aerodynamic decelerators (IADs). The hypersonic IADs, or HIADs, are about 20% less massive than the rigid vehicles, but both have their technology development challenges. For the supersonic regime, supersonic retropropulsion (SRP) is an attractive option, since a propulsive stage must be carried for terminal descent and can be ignited at higher speeds. The use of SRP eliminates the need for an additional deceleration system, but SRP is at a low Technology Readiness Level (TRL) in that the interacting plumes are not well-characterized, and their effect on vehicle stability has not been studied, to date. These architecture-level assessments have been used to define the key performance parameters and a technology development strategy for achieving the challenging mission of landing large payloads on Mars.

  13. Powered Descent Guidance with General Thrust-Pointing Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M., III; Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The Powered Descent Guidance (PDG) algorithm and software for generating Mars pinpoint or precision landing guidance profiles has been enhanced to incorporate thrust-pointing constraints. Pointing constraints would typically be needed for onboard sensor and navigation systems that have specific field-of-view requirements to generate valid ground proximity and terrain-relative state measurements. The original PDG algorithm was designed to enforce both control and state constraints, including maximum and minimum thrust bounds, avoidance of the ground or descent within a glide slope cone, and maximum speed limits. The thrust-bound and thrust-pointing constraints within PDG are non-convex, which in general requires nonlinear optimization methods to generate solutions. The short duration of Mars powered descent requires guaranteed PDG convergence to a solution within a finite time; however, nonlinear optimization methods have no guarantees of convergence to the global optimal or convergence within finite computation time. A lossless convexification developed for the original PDG algorithm relaxed the non-convex thrust bound constraints. This relaxation was theoretically proven to provide valid and optimal solutions for the original, non-convex problem within a convex framework. As with the thrust bound constraint, a relaxation of the thrust-pointing constraint also provides a lossless convexification that ensures the enhanced relaxed PDG algorithm remains convex and retains validity for the original nonconvex problem. The enhanced PDG algorithm provides guidance profiles for pinpoint and precision landing that minimize fuel usage, minimize landing error to the target, and ensure satisfaction of all position and control constraints, including thrust bounds and now thrust-pointing constraints.

  14. OFT ascent/descent ancillary data requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C., Jr.; Abramson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Requirements are presented for the ascent/descent (A/D) navigation and attitude-dependent ancillary data products to be generated for the space shuttle orbiter in support of orbital flight test requirements, MPAD guidance and navigation performance assessment, and the mission evaluation team. It was intended that this document serve as the sole requirements control instrument between MPB/MPAD and the A/D ancillary data users. The requirements are primarily functional in nature, but some detail level requirements are also included.

  15. Shuttle program: OFT ascent/descent ancillary data requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C., Jr.; Knoedler, J.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements are presented for the ascent/descent (A/D) navigation and attitude-dependent ancillary data products to be generated for the space shuttle orbiter in support of the orbital flight test (OFT) flight test requirements, MPAD guidance and navigation performance assessment, and the mission evaluation team. The A/D ancillary data support for OFT mission evaluation activities is confined to providing postflight position, velocity, attitude, and associated navigation and attitude derived parameters for the Orbiter over particular flight phases and time intervals.

  16. Apollo 16, LM-11 descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.

    1974-01-01

    The performance of the LM-11 descent propulsion system during the Apollo 16 missions was evaluated and found satisfactory. The average engine effective specific impulse was 0.1 second higher than predicted, but well within the predicted one sigma uncertainty of 0.2 seconds. Several flight measurement discrepancies existed during the flight as follows: (1) the chamber pressure transducer had a noticeable drift, exhibiting a maximum error of about 1.5 psi at approximately 130 seconds after engine ignition, (2) the fuel and oxidizer interface pressure measurements appeared to be low during the entire flight, and (3) the fuel propellant quantity gaging system did not perform within expected accuracies.

  17. Low-dose cisplatin converts the tumor microenvironment into a permissive state for HSVtk-induced antitumor immunity in HPV16-related tonsillar carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goh, Ah Ra; Shin, Seung-Pil; Jung, Na-Rae; Ryu, Chang-Hwan; Eom, Hyeon Seok; Lee, John H; Choi, Kyungho; Lee, Sang-Jin; Jung, Yuh-S

    2015-01-28

    An adenovirus harboring the HSV thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene under the regulation of a trans-splicing ribozyme that targets telomerase is cytotoxic to cancer cells because it inhibits DNA replication (Ad5mTR). Furthermore, it induces anti-tumor immunity by activating cytotoxic T cells. Because multiple chemotherapeutic agents also activate cytotoxic T-cell immunity during the direct killing process of tumor cells, we herein explored whether low-dose cisplatin could synergize with cytotoxic Ad5mTR to potentiate its therapeutic effect by boosting anti-tumor immunity in a murine HPV16-associated tonsillar carcinoma model. Tumor regression was enhanced when low-dose (1?mg/kg) cisplatin was added to suicide gene therapy using Ad5mTR. Meanwhile, 1?mg/kg cisplatin alone had no tumor-suppressive effects and did not result in any systemic toxicity. Thus, cisplatin along with Ad5mTR improved tumor clearance by increasing the number of E7-specific CD8+ T cells. Specifically, analysis of the tumors and lymph nodes supported improved immune clearance by increasing the number of E7-specific CD8+ T cells inside tumors (40%, P?

  18. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Descent and Landing Simulation Using DSENDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, P. Daniel; Casoliva, Jordi; Balaram, Bob

    2013-01-01

    The most recent planetary science mission to Mars was Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) with the Curiosity rover, launched November 26, 2011 and landed at Gale Crater on August 6, 2012. This spacecraft was the first use at Mars of a complete closed-loop Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) system, including guided entry with a lifting body that greatly reduces dispersions during the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) phase to achieve a 25 km X 20 km landing error relative to the selected Gale Crater landing target. In order to confirm meeting the above landing criteria, high-fidelity simulation of the EDL phase is required. The tool used for 6DOF EDL trajectory verification analysis is Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing (DSENDS), which is a high-fidelity simulation tool from JPLs Dynamics and Real-Time Simulation Laboratory for the development, test and operations of aero-flight vehicles. DSENDS inherent capability is augmented for MSL with project-specific models of atmosphere, aerodynamics, sensors and thrusters along with GN&C flight software to enable high-fidelity trajectory simulation. This paper will present the model integration and independent verification experience of the JPL EDL trajectory analysis team.

  19. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Descent and Landing Simulation Using DSENDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, P. Daniel; Casoliva, Jordi; Balaram, Bob

    2013-01-01

    The most recent planetary science mission to Mars is Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) with the Curiosity rover, launched November 26, 2011 and landed at Gale Crater on August 6, 2012. This spacecraft was the first use at Mars of a complete closed-loop Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) system, including guided entry with a lifting body that greatly reduces dispersions during the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) phase to achieve a 25 km x 20 km landing error relative to the selected Gale Crater landing target. In order to confirm meeting the above landing criteria, high-fidelity simulation of the EDL phase is required. The tool used for 6DOF EDL trajectory verification analysis is Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing (DSENDS), which is a high-fidelity simulation tool from JPLs Dynamics and Real-Time Simulation Laboratory for the development, test and operations of aero-flight vehicles. DSENDS inherent capability is augmented for MSL with project-specific models of atmosphere, aerodynamics, sensors and thrusters along with GN&C flight software to enable high-fidelity trajectory simulation. This paper will present the model integration and independent verification experience of the JPL EDL trajectory analysis team.

  20. Controller evaluations of the descent advisor automation aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Leonard; Volckers, Uwe; Erzberger, Heinz

    1989-01-01

    An automation aid to assist air traffic controllers in efficiently spacing traffic and meeting arrival times at a fix has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The automation aid, referred to as the descent advisor (DA), is based on accurate models of aircraft performance and weather conditions. The DA generates suggested clearances, including both top-of-descent point and speed profile data, for one or more aircraft in order to achieve specific time or distance separation objectives. The DA algorithm is interfaced with a mouse-based, menu-driven controller display that allows the air traffic controller to interactively use its accurate predictive capability to resolve conflicts and issue advisories to arrival aircraft. This paper focuses on operational issues concerning the utilization of the DA, specifically, how the DA can be used for prediction, intrail spacing, and metering. In order to evaluate the DA, a real time simulation was conducted using both current and retired controller subjects. Controllers operated in teams of two, as they do in the present environment; issues of training and team interaction will be discussed. Evaluations by controllers indicated considerable enthusiasm for the DA aid, and provided specific recommendations for using the tool effectively.

  1. Accelerated Mini-batch Randomized Block Coordinate Descent Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tuo; Yu, Mo; Wang, Yiming; Arora, Raman; Liu, Han

    2014-01-01

    We consider regularized empirical risk minimization problems. In particular, we minimize the sum of a smooth empirical risk function and a nonsmooth regularization function. When the regularization function is block separable, we can solve the minimization problems in a randomized block coordinate descent (RBCD) manner. Existing RBCD methods usually decrease the objective value by exploiting the partial gradient of a randomly selected block of coordinates in each iteration. Thus they need all data to be accessible so that the partial gradient of the block gradient can be exactly obtained. However, such a “batch” setting may be computationally expensive in practice. In this paper, we propose a mini-batch randomized block coordinate descent (MRBCD) method, which estimates the partial gradient of the selected block based on a mini-batch of randomly sampled data in each iteration. We further accelerate the MRBCD method by exploiting the semi-stochastic optimization scheme, which effectively reduces the variance of the partial gradient estimators. Theoretically, we show that for strongly convex functions, the MRBCD method attains lower overall iteration complexity than existing RBCD methods. As an application, we further trim the MRBCD method to solve the regularized sparse learning problems. Our numerical experiments shows that the MRBCD method naturally exploits the sparsity structure and achieves better computational performance than existing methods. PMID:25620860

  2. Arachnid aloft: directed aerial descent in neotropical canopy spiders.

    PubMed

    Yanoviak, Stephen P; Munk, Yonatan; Dudley, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The behaviour of directed aerial descent has been described for numerous taxa of wingless hexapods as they fall from the tropical rainforest canopy, but is not known in other terrestrial arthropods. Here, we describe similar controlled aerial behaviours for large arboreal spiders in the genus Selenops (Selenopidae). We dropped 59 such spiders from either canopy platforms or tree crowns in Panama and Peru; the majority (93%) directed their aerial trajectories towards and then landed upon nearby tree trunks. Following initial dorsoventral righting when necessary, falling spiders oriented themselves and then translated head-first towards targets; directional changes were correlated with bilaterally asymmetric motions of the anterolaterally extended forelegs. Aerial performance (i.e. the glide index) decreased with increasing body mass and wing loading, but not with projected surface area of the spider. Along with the occurrence of directed aerial descent in ants, jumping bristletails, and other wingless hexapods, this discovery of targeted gliding in selenopid spiders further indicates strong selective pressures against uncontrolled falls into the understory for arboreal taxa. PMID:26289654

  3. Incidence of Dysarthria in Children with Cerebellar Tumors: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, S.; Schoch, B.; Ozimek, A.; Gorissen, B.; Hein-Kropp, C.; Kaiser, O.; Hovel, M.; Wieland, R.; Gizewski, E.; Timmann, D.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated dysarthric symptoms in children with cerebellar tumors. Ten children with cerebellar tumors and 10 orthopedic control children were tested prior and one week after surgery. Clinical dysarthric symptoms were quantified in spontaneous speech. Syllable durations were analyzed in syllable repetition and sentence…

  4. Parvovirus associated cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus in day-old broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus were detected in day-old broiler chickens. Brains of chickens evaluated at necropsy appeared to be abnormal; some were disfigured and cerebellae appeared to be smaller than normal. Histopathologic examination of brains revealed cerebellar folia that were sho...

  5. Voxel-based morphometry shows no decreases in cerebellar gray matter

    E-print Network

    Gaser, Christian

    Voxel-based morphometry shows no decreases in cerebellar gray matter volume in essential tremor C.R. Siebner, PhD; and G. Deuschl, PhD Abstract--Objective: To investigate cerebellar gray matter volume-resolution T1-weighted MRI to compare gray and white matter density between 27 patients with ET and 27 age

  6. The Control of Rate and Timing of Spikes in the Deep Cerebellar Nuclei by Inhibition

    E-print Network

    Jaeger, Dieter

    The Control of Rate and Timing of Spikes in the Deep Cerebellar Nuclei by Inhibition Volker Gauck and inhibition. This indicates that the net synaptic driving force for realistic input levels in vivo may spiking by inhibitory input that can be achieved in this way in the deep cerebellar nuclei may

  7. Congenital torticollis due to sternomastoid aplasia with unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V R Ravi; Sabapathy, S Raja; Duraisami, Vijayagiri

    2012-10-01

    Congenital torticollis is most commonly caused by sternomastoid contracture. Aplasia of sternomastoid muscle causing congenital torticollis, though rare, has been reported. However the association of cerebellar hypoplasia with sternomastoid aplasia is extremely rare. The authors describe a case of congenital torticollis due to absence of the left sternomastoid with ipsilateral cerebellar hypoplasia, confirmed by MRI. PMID:21997867

  8. Purkinje Cell Activity in the Cerebellar Anterior Lobe after Rabbit Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, John T.; Steinmetz, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    The cerebellar anterior lobe may play a critical role in the execution and proper timing of learned responses. The current study was designed to monitor Purkinje cell activity in the rabbit cerebellar anterior lobe after eyeblink conditioning, and to assess whether Purkinje cells in recording locations may project to the interpositus nucleus.…

  9. Cerebellar granuloprival degeneration in an Australian kelpie and a Labrador retriever dog.

    PubMed

    Huska, Jonathan; Gaitero, Luis; Snyman, Heindrich N; Foster, Robert A; Pumarola, Marti; Rodenas, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    A 7-month-old Australian kelpie dog and a 14-month-old Labrador retriever dog were diagnosed with an uncommon form of cerebellar abiotrophy called cerebellar granuloprival degeneration. This was characterized by a loss of the granular neurons with relative sparing of the Purkinje neurons. PMID:23814302

  10. Cerebellar granuloprival degeneration in an Australian kelpie and a Labrador retriever dog

    PubMed Central

    Huska, Jonathan; Gaitero, Luis; Snyman, Heindrich N.; Foster, Robert A.; Pumarola, Marti; Rodenas, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    A 7-month-old Australian kelpie dog and a 14-month-old Labrador retriever dog were diagnosed with an uncommon form of cerebellar abiotrophy called cerebellar granuloprival degeneration. This was characterized by a loss of the granular neurons with relative sparing of the Purkinje neurons. PMID:23814302

  11. Modulation of error-sensitivity during a prism adaptation task in people with cerebellar degeneration

    E-print Network

    Shadmehr, Reza

    Modulation of error-sensitivity during a prism adaptation task in people with cerebellar of error-sensi- tivity during a prism adaptation task in people with cerebellar degeneration. J to reach to a target while viewing the scene through wedge prisms. The prisms were computer controlled

  12. Intact Ability to Learn Internal Models of Arm Dynamics in Huntington's Disease But Not Cerebellar Degeneration

    E-print Network

    Shadmehr, Reza

    Intact Ability to Learn Internal Models of Arm Dynamics in Huntington's Disease But Not Cerebellar internal models of arm dynamics in Huntington's disease but not cerebellar degeneration. J Neurophysiol 93 reported that while on-line error correction was disturbed in patients with Huntington's disease (HD

  13. The Cerebellar Deficit Hypothesis and Dyslexic Tendencies in a Non-Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, Rebecca L.; Stirling, John

    2005-01-01

    In order to assess the relationship between cerebellar deficits and dyslexic tendencies in a non-clinical sample, 27 primary school children aged 8-9 completed a cerebellar soft signs battery and were additionally assessed for reading age, sequential memory, picture arrangement and knowledge of common sequences. An average measure of the soft…

  14. Surface-based display of volume-averaged cerebellar imaging data Jrn Diedrichsen & Ewa Zotow

    E-print Network

    Diedrichsen, Jörn

    surfaces, the method uses a white- and grey-matter surface defined on volume-averaged anatomical data-representation and the volume of the underlying cerebellar grey matter. The map allows users to visualize the activation state of the complete cerebellar grey matter in one concise view, equally revealing both the anterior-posterior (lobular

  15. Spatial and Temporal Sequence Learning in Patients with Parkinson's Disease or Cerebellar Lesions

    E-print Network

    Jacobs, Lucia

    Spatial and Temporal Sequence Learning in Patients with Parkinson's Disease or Cerebellar Lesions in sequence learning is not clear. In the current study, Parkinson's patients, patients with cerebellar damage between the two patient groups. Whereas the Parkinson's patients learned the spatial and temporal

  16. THE MARS SCIENCE LABORATORY (MSL) MARS DESCENT IMAGER (MARDI) FLIGHT INSTRUMENT. M. C. Malin1

    E-print Network

    THE MARS SCIENCE LABORATORY (MSL) MARS DESCENT IMAGER (MARDI) FLIGHT INSTRUMENT. M. C. Malin1 , M­Berkeley, 6 NASA Ames Research Center, 7 University of Washington, 8 US Geologi- cal Survey­Flagstaff, 9 University of California­Davis, 17 Planetary Science Institute. Introduction: The Mars Descent Imager (MARDI

  17. On log flat descent Luc Illusie, Chikara Nakayama, and Takeshi Tsuji

    E-print Network

    Illusie, Luc

    On log flat descent Luc Illusie, Chikara Nakayama, and Takeshi Tsuji Abstract We prove the log flat descent of log ´etaleness, log smoothness, and log flatness for log schemes. Contents §1. Review of log of the following results, which were announced by K. Kato in [4]. Theorem 0.1. Let f : X Y be a morphism of fs log

  18. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Part II AH-1G ROTOR IN LOW SPEED DESCENT FLIGHT

    E-print Network

    chapter, results were given for the UH-60A rotor in a high-speed forward flight condition. In this chapterCHAPTER V RESULTS AND DISCUSSION ­ Part II AH-1G ROTOR IN LOW SPEED DESCENT FLIGHT In the previous, results are presented for a two-bladed AH-1G rotor in a low-speed descent condition. In low speed forward

  19. Moral Darwinism: Ethical Evidence for the Descent of ROBERT T. PENNOCK

    E-print Network

    Pennock, Robert T.

    Moral Darwinism: Ethical Evidence for the Descent of Man ROBERT T. PENNOCK Department of Philosophy an extended discussion of the nature of human morality, and the ethical theory which he sketches is not simply evidence for human descent from animal ancestors. Darwin must rebut the argument that, because of our moral

  20. Comparative Vocal Production and the Evolution of Speech: Reinterpreting the Descent of the Larynx

    E-print Network

    Fitch, Tecumseh

    Comparative Vocal Production and the Evolution of Speech: Reinterpreting the Descent of the Larynx to #12;deduce the timing and order of speech-related adaptations such as the descent of the larynx. (1969) that the human vocal tract differs from that in other primates in having a lowered larynx (Figure

  1. Prostate Cancer in Men of African Descent: Opportunities for Global Research Collaborations

    Cancer.gov

    Prostate cancer disproportionately affects men of African descent in terms of incidence, morbidity, and mortality worldwide. Significant knowledge gaps exist about the factors that predict disparities in prostate cancer incidence and outcomes between men of African descent and other ethnic or racial groups.

  2. The Yearly Variation in Fall-Winter Arctic Winter Vortex Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Newman, Paul A.

    1999-01-01

    Using the change in HALOE methane profiles from early September to late March, we have estimated the minimum amount of diabatic descent within the polar which takes place during Arctic winter. The year to year variations are a result in the year to year variations in stratospheric wave activity which (1) modify the temperature of the vortex and thus the cooling rate; (2) reduce the apparent descent by mixing high amounts of methane into the vortex. The peak descent amounts from HALOE methane vary from l0km -14km near the arrival altitude of 25 km. Using a diabatic trajectory calculation, we compare forward and backward trajectories over the course of the winter using UKMO assimilated stratospheric data. The forward calculation agrees fairly well with the observed descent. The backward calculation appears to be unable to produce the observed amount of descent, but this is only an apparent effect due to the density decrease in parcels with altitude. Finally we show the results for unmixed descent experiments - where the parcels are fixed in latitude and longitude and allowed to descend based on the local cooling rate. Unmixed descent is found to always exceed mixed descent, because when normal parcel motion is included, the path average cooling is always less than the cooling at a fixed polar point.

  3. TWO-COVER DESCENT ON HYPERELLIPTIC CURVES NILS BRUIN AND MICHAEL STOLL

    E-print Network

    Stoll, Michael

    TWO-COVER DESCENT ON HYPERELLIPTIC CURVES NILS BRUIN AND MICHAEL STOLL Abstract. We describe associated to D C. Date: March 14, 2008. 1991 Mathematics Subject Classification. Primary 11G30; Secondary, descent. Research of the first author supported by NSERC. 1 #12;2 NILS BRUIN AND MICHAEL STOLL (3) Test

  4. Ethnic Identity and Acculturative Stress as Mediators of Depression in Students of Asian Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantrip, Crystal; Mazzetti, Francesco; Grasso, Joseph; Gill, Sara; Miller, Janna; Haner, Morgynn; Rude, Stephanie; Awad, Germine

    2015-01-01

    This study underscored the importance of addressing the well-being of college students of Asian descent, because these students had higher rates of depression and lower positive feelings about their ethnic group compared with students of European descent, as measured by the Affirmation subscale of the Ethnic Identity Scale. Affirmation mediated…

  5. RESEARCH ARTICLE The descent of ant: field-measured performance of gliding ants

    E-print Network

    Koehl, Mimi

    RESEARCH ARTICLE The descent of ant: field-measured performance of gliding ants Yonatan Munk1,2, *, Stephen P. Yanoviak3 , M. A. R. Koehl2 and Robert Dudley2,4 ABSTRACT Gliding ants avoid predatory attacks descent towards nearby tree trunks. The ecologically relevant measure of performance for gliding ants

  6. Depression and Emotional Reactivity: Variation Among Asian Americans of East Asian Descent and European Americans

    E-print Network

    Gross, James J.

    Depression and Emotional Reactivity: Variation Among Asian Americans of East Asian Descent that depressed individuals tend to show diminished emotional reactivity (J. G. Gehricke & A. J. Fridlund, 2002; G) of depressed and nonde- pressed EAs and Asian Americans of East Asian descent (AAs) to sad and amusing films

  7. Cerebellar Contribution to Context Processing in Extinction Learning and Recall.

    PubMed

    Chang, D-I; Lissek, S; Ernst, T M; Thürling, M; Uengoer, M; Tegenthoff, M; Ladd, M E; Timmann, D

    2015-12-01

    Whereas acquisition of new associations is considered largely independent of the context, context dependency is a hallmark of extinction of the learned associations. The hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex are known to be involved in context processing during extinction learning and recall. Although the cerebellum has known functional and anatomic connections to the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex, cerebellar contributions to context processing of extinction have rarely been studied. In the present study, we reanalyzed functional brain imaging data (fMRI) of previous work investigating context effects during extinction in a cognitive associative learning paradigm in 28 young and healthy subjects (Lissek et al. Neuroimage. 81:131-3, 2013). In that study, event-related fMRI analysis did not include the cerebellum. The 3 T fMRI dataset was reanalyzed using a spatial normalization method optimized for the cerebellum. Data of seven participants had to be excluded because the cerebellum had not been scanned in full. Cerebellar activation related to context change during extinction learning was most prominent in lobule Crus II bilaterally (p??2.53; partially corrected by predetermined cluster size). No significant cerebellar activations were observed related to context change during extinction retrieval. The posterolateral cerebellum appears to contribute to context-related processes during extinction learning, but not (or less) during extinction retrieval. The cerebellum may support context learning during extinction via its connections to the hippocampus. Alternatively, the cerebellum may support the shifting of attention to the context via its known connections to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Because the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is critically involved in context-related processes during extinction retrieval, and there are no known connections between the cerebellum and the vmPFC, the cerebellum may be less important during extinction recall. PMID:25863813

  8. Regular Patterns in Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Simple Spike Trains

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soon-Lim; Hoebeek, Freek E.; Schonewille, Martijn; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Aertsen, Ad; De Schutter, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Background Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC) in vivo are commonly reported to generate irregular spike trains, documented by high coefficients of variation of interspike-intervals (ISI). In strong contrast, they fire very regularly in the in vitro slice preparation. We studied the nature of this difference in firing properties by focusing on short-term variability and its dependence on behavioral state. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an analysis based on CV2 values, we could isolate precise regular spiking patterns, lasting up to hundreds of milliseconds, in PC simple spike trains recorded in both anesthetized and awake rodents. Regular spike patterns, defined by low variability of successive ISIs, comprised over half of the spikes, showed a wide range of mean ISIs, and were affected by behavioral state and tactile stimulation. Interestingly, regular patterns often coincided in nearby Purkinje cells without precise synchronization of individual spikes. Regular patterns exclusively appeared during the up state of the PC membrane potential, while single ISIs occurred both during up and down states. Possible functional consequences of regular spike patterns were investigated by modeling the synaptic conductance in neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). Simulations showed that these regular patterns caused epochs of relatively constant synaptic conductance in DCN neurons. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that the apparent irregularity in cerebellar PC simple spike trains in vivo is most likely caused by mixing of different regular spike patterns, separated by single long intervals, over time. We propose that PCs may signal information, at least in part, in regular spike patterns to downstream DCN neurons. PMID:17534435

  9. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity in motor and association networks in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Shinn, Ann K.; Baker, Justin T.; Lewandowski, Kathryn E.; Öngür, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating illness characterized by disturbances in multiple domains. The cerebellum is involved in both motor and non-motor functions, and the “cognitive dysmetria” and “dysmetria of thought” models propose that abnormalities of the cerebellum may contribute to schizophrenia signs and symptoms. The cerebellum and cerebral cortex are reciprocally connected via a modular, closed-loop network architecture, but few schizophrenia neuroimaging studies have taken into account the topographical and functional heterogeneity of the cerebellum. In this study, using a previously defined 17-network cerebral cortical parcellation system as the basis for our functional connectivity seeds, we systematically investigated connectivity abnormalities within the cerebellum of 44 schizophrenia patients and 28 healthy control participants. We found selective alterations in cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity. Specifically, schizophrenia patients showed decreased cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity in higher level association networks (ventral attention, salience, control, and default mode networks) relative to healthy control participants. Schizophrenia patients also showed increased cerebro-cerebellar connectivity in somatomotor and default mode networks, with the latter showing no overlap with the regions found to be hypoconnected within the same default mode network. Finally, we found evidence to suggest that somatomotor and default mode networks may be inappropriately linked in schizophrenia. The relationship of these dysconnectivities to schizophrenia symptoms, such as neurological soft signs and altered sense of agency, is discussed. We conclude that the cerebellum ought to be considered for analysis in all future studies of network abnormalities in SZ, and further suggest the cerebellum as a potential target for further elucidation, and possibly treatment, of the underlying mechanisms and network abnormalities producing symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:25852520

  10. Contralateral cerebellar hypometabolism: a predictor for stroke outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Serrati, C; Marchal, G; Rioux, P; Viader, F; Petit-Taboué, M C; Lochon, P; Luet, D; Derlon, J M; Baron, J C

    1994-01-01

    Contralateral cerebellar hypometabolism (CCH) is a well established remote functional effect of cerebral damage. Because CCH has been reported to be reversible in acute stroke in at least some patients, the value of cerebellar metabolic asymmetry (CbMA; a reflection of the degree of CCH) as a predictor of stroke outcome has been assessed. Measurements of cerebellar oxygen consumption were performed by positron emission tomography (PET) in 16 patients within 5-30 hours of onset of their first ever middle cerebral artery territory stroke, and again 13-56 days later in 12 survivors. The neurological state was quantified at the time of each PET study and at day 60, with both the Mathew and Orgogozo scales. In the early PET study, the CbMAs ranged from around 0% to nearly 50% (individually significant at p < 0.05 in 9/16 patients) but were neither strongly nor consistently correlated with neurological outcome or recovery at day 60. Similarly, the changes in CbMAs from the early to the late PET study were not correlated with the concomitant neurological evolution. At the late PET study, however, there were excellent positive correlations between CbMAs and both neurological status and size of infarction (assessed by CT in the chronic stage). The correlation with neurological status was explained by the correlation with size of infarction. The poor predictive value of CbMAs in the early PET study may be partly because the cerebral metabolic disturbance might still be evolving at this early stage in some cases. Despite this lack of a strong quantitative link between CbMAs at the early PET study and outcome, the outcome was good in all the patients who did not exhibit significant CCH, suggesting that lack of CCH may predict good outcome in acute middle cerebral artery stroke. PMID:8126499

  11. Probabilistic identification of cerebellar cortical neurones across species.

    PubMed

    Van Dijck, Gert; Van Hulle, Marc M; Heiney, Shane A; Blazquez, Pablo M; Meng, Hui; Angelaki, Dora E; Arenz, Alexander; Margrie, Troy W; Mostofi, Abteen; Edgley, Steve; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Ekerot, Carl-Fredrik; Jörntell, Henrik; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Holtzman, Tahl

    2013-01-01

    Despite our fine-grain anatomical knowledge of the cerebellar cortex, electrophysiological studies of circuit information processing over the last fifty years have been hampered by the difficulty of reliably assigning signals to identified cell types. We approached this problem by assessing the spontaneous activity signatures of identified cerebellar cortical neurones. A range of statistics describing firing frequency and irregularity were then used, individually and in combination, to build Gaussian Process Classifiers (GPC) leading to a probabilistic classification of each neurone type and the computation of equi-probable decision boundaries between cell classes. Firing frequency statistics were useful for separating Purkinje cells from granular layer units, whilst firing irregularity measures proved most useful for distinguishing cells within granular layer cell classes. Considered as single statistics, we achieved classification accuracies of 72.5% and 92.7% for granular layer and molecular layer units respectively. Combining statistics to form twin-variate GPC models substantially improved classification accuracies with the combination of mean spike frequency and log-interval entropy offering classification accuracies of 92.7% and 99.2% for our molecular and granular layer models, respectively. A cross-species comparison was performed, using data drawn from anaesthetised mice and decerebrate cats, where our models offered 80% and 100% classification accuracy. We then used our models to assess non-identified data from awake monkeys and rabbits in order to highlight subsets of neurones with the greatest degree of similarity to identified cell classes. In this way, our GPC-based approach for tentatively identifying neurones from their spontaneous activity signatures, in the absence of an established ground-truth, nonetheless affords the experimenter a statistically robust means of grouping cells with properties matching known cell classes. Our approach therefore may have broad application to a variety of future cerebellar cortical investigations, particularly in awake animals where opportunities for definitive cell identification are limited. PMID:23469215

  12. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized...for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized... (a) General. When operating a turbine engine powered airplane with a...

  13. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized...for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized... (a) General. When operating a turbine engine powered airplane with a...

  14. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized...for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized... (a) General. When operating a turbine engine powered airplane with a...

  15. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized...for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized... (a) General. When operating a turbine engine powered airplane with a...

  16. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized...for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized... (a) General. When operating a turbine engine powered airplane with a...

  17. Analysis of foot clearance in firefighters during ascent and descent of stairs.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Richard M; Horn, Gavin P; Rosengren, Karl S; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2016-01-01

    Slips, trips, and falls are a leading cause of injury to firefighters with many injuries occurring while traversing stairs, possibly exaggerated by acute fatigue from firefighting activities and/or asymmetric load carriage. This study examined the effects that fatigue, induced by simulated firefighting activities, and hose load carriage have on foot clearance while traversing stairs. Landing and passing foot clearances for each stair during ascent and descent of a short staircase were investigated. Clearances decreased significantly (p < 0.05) post-exercise for nine of 12 ascent parameters and increased for two of eight descent parameters. Load carriage resulted in significantly decreased (p < 0.05) clearance over three ascent parameters, and one increase during descent. Decreased clearances during ascent caused by fatigue or load carriage may result in an increased trip risk. Increased clearances during descent may suggest use of a compensation strategy to ensure stair clearance or an increased risk of over-stepping during descent. PMID:26360190

  18. Epstein-Barr virus encephalitis presenting as cerebellar hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sabat, Shyam; Agarwal, Amit; Zacharia, Thomas; Labib, Samuel; Yousef, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) belongs to the human herpesvirus family and is ubiquitously found in the adult human population. The most common clinical manifestation of EBV is the syndrome of infectious mononucleosis. Central nervous system involvement by EBV is rare, with very few cases of EBV encephalitis reported in the literature. The majority of these cases report cerebral cortical changes on magnetic resonance imaging. We present a rare case of EBV encephalitis in a young patient with meningitis-like symptoms and cerebellar hemorrhage on magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26475484

  19. Extra-Axial Medulloblastoma in the Cerebellar Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eui Jin

    2014-01-01

    Extra-axial medulloblastoma is a rare phenomenon. We report a case in a 5-year-old boy who presented with nausea, vomiting, and gait disturbance. He was treated with total removal of the tumor. This is the first case of an extra-axially located medulloblastoma occurring in the cerebellar hemisphere posteriolateral to the cerebellopontine angle in Korea. Although the extra-axial occurrence of medulloblastoma is rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of extra-axial lesions of the posterior fossa in children. PMID:25237434

  20. Application of a simple cerebellar model to geologic surface mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagens, A.; Doveton, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Neurophysiological research into the structure and function of the cerebellum has inspired computational models that simulate information processing associated with coordination and motor movement. The cerebellar model arithmetic computer (CMAC) has a design structure which makes it readily applicable as an automated mapping device that "senses" a surface, based on a sample of discrete observations of surface elevation. The model operates as an iterative learning process, where cell weights are continuously modified by feedback to improve surface representation. The storage requirements are substantially less than those of a conventional memory allocation, and the model is extended easily to mapping in multidimensional space, where the memory savings are even greater. ?? 1991.

  1. Cerebellar gray matter and lobular volumes correlate with core autism symptoms

    PubMed Central

    D'Mello, Anila M.; Crocetti, Deana; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Stoodley, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroanatomical differences in the cerebellum are among the most consistent findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but little is known about the relationship between cerebellar dysfunction and core ASD symptoms. The newly-emerging existence of cerebellar sensorimotor and cognitive subregions provides a new framework for interpreting the functional significance of cerebellar findings in ASD. Here we use two complementary analyses — whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and the SUIT cerebellar atlas — to investigate cerebellar regional gray matter (GM) and volumetric lobular measurements in 35 children with ASD and 35 typically-developing (TD) children (mean age 10.4 ± 1.6 years; range 8–13 years). To examine the relationships between cerebellar structure and core ASD symptoms, correlations were calculated between scores on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) and Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI) and the VBM and volumetric data. Both VBM and the SUIT analyses revealed reduced GM in ASD children in cerebellar lobule VII (Crus I/II). The degree of regional and lobular gray matter reductions in different cerebellar subregions correlated with the severity of symptoms in social interaction, communication, and repetitive behaviors. Structural differences and behavioral correlations converged on right cerebellar Crus I/II, a region which shows structural and functional connectivity with fronto-parietal and default mode networks. These results emphasize the importance of the location within the cerebellum to the potential functional impact of structural differences in ASD, and suggest that GM differences in cerebellar right Crus I/II are associated with the core ASD profile. PMID:25844317

  2. Relative sparing of the parietal cortex in cerebellar ataxia documented by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, J; Grond, M; Hilker, R; Ghaemi, M; Jacobs, A; Heiss, W

    2000-12-01

    With the intention to assess remote effects of cerebellar dysfunction, 23 patients with inherited or idiopathic cerebellar ataxia were studied with positron emission tomography (PET) and 2[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). Eight patients (group 1) suffered from early onset cerebellar ataxia (EOCA, age of symptom onset <20 years), nine patients (group 2) from late onset cerebellar ataxia (LOCA, symptom onset between the ages of 20 and 50), and six patients (group 3) experienced symptom onset beyond the age of 50 years. The pattern of cerebral glucose metabolism in cerebellar ataxia was compared to the results in a control group of 16 healthy subjects. In all patients, a reduction in relative (EOCA, group 1) or absolute (LOCA, groups 2 and 3) values of regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMR(glu)) occurred in both cerebellar hemispheres as well as the vermis and both dentate nuclei. In patients from all groups presenting with a clinical syndrome of pure cerebellar ataxia, impairment of regional glucose metabolism also extended to the pontine and brainstem regions. In contrast to this infratentorial reduction of rCMR(glu) in all patients, in those with LOCA, a significant relative increase in rCMR(glu) was present in distinct supratentorial cortical regions, namely the cuneus, the pre-cuneus and the gyrus supramarginalis in the patients of group 2. In group 3, this significant relative increase in rCMR(glu) was restricted to the cuneus. Thus, FDG-PET in patients suffering from cerebellar ataxia shows distinct patterns of altered glucose metabolism which exceed pure cerebellar impairment. Most importantly, FDG-PET yields insight into the influence of cerebellar disease on supratentorial glucose metabolism and documents impairment of supratentorial neuronal function with relative sparing of the parietal cortex. PMID:11154806

  3. Evaluation of vertical profiles to design continuous descent approach procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, Priyank

    The current research focuses on predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of Continuous Descent Approach (CDA), which is among the key concepts of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The idle-thrust CDA is a fuel economical, noise and emission abatement procedure, but requires increased separation to accommodate for variability and uncertainties in vertical and speed profiles of arriving aircraft. Although a considerable amount of researches have been devoted to the estimation of potential benefits of the CDA, only few have attempted to explain the predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of CDA. The analytical equations derived using flight dynamics and Base of Aircraft and Data (BADA) Total Energy Model (TEM) in this research gives insight into dependency of vertical profile of CDA on various factors like wind speed and gradient, weight, aircraft type and configuration, thrust settings, atmospheric factors (deviation from ISA (DISA), pressure and density of the air) and descent speed profile. Application of the derived equations to idle-thrust CDA gives an insight into sensitivity of its vertical profile to multiple factors. This suggests fixed geometric flight path angle (FPA) CDA has higher degree of predictability and lesser variability at the cost of non-idle and low thrust engine settings. However, with optimized design this impact can be overall minimized. The CDA simulations were performed using Future ATM Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) based on radar-track and aircraft type data (BADA) of the real air-traffic to some of the busiest airports in the USA (ATL, SFO and New York Metroplex (JFK, EWR and LGA)). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA shows 1) mean geometric FPAs derived from various simulated vertical profiles are consistently shallower than 3° glideslope angle and 2) high level of variability in vertical profiles of idle-thrust CDA even in absence of uncertainties in external factors. Analysis from operational feasibility perspective suggests that two key features of the performance based Flight Management System (FMS) i.e. required time of arrival (RTA) and geometric descent path would help in reduction of unpredictability associated with arrival time and vertical profile of aircraft guided by the FMS coupled with auto-pilot (AP) and auto-throttle (AT). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA also suggests that for procedure design window type, 'AT or above' and 'AT or below' altitude and FPA constraints are more realistic and useful compared to obsolete 'AT' type altitude constraint.

  4. Cerebellar TMS in Treatment of a Patient with Cerebellar Ataxia: Evidence from Clinical, Biomechanics and Neurophysiological Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Farzan, Faranak; Wu, Yunfen; Manor, Brad; Anastasio, Elana M.; Lough, Matthew; Novak, Vera; Greenstein, Patricia E.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    We describe a patient with a probable diagnosis of idiopathic late-onset cerebellar atrophy who shows improvement of limb coordination, speech and gait following 21 days of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to scalp regions presumably corresponding to the cerebellum. This case study provides, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of gait improvement in response to TMS therapy in ataxia, as well as neurophysiological evidence in support of modification of cerebello-cortical interaction that may underlie some of the improvements. PMID:23625327

  5. En route Descent Advisor Concept for Efficient Arrival Metering Conformance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven; Vivona, Robert; Coppenbarger, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The En-route Descent Advisor (EDA) is a suite of decision support tool (DST) capabilities for en route sector subject to metering restrictions such as those generated by the Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) Traffic Management Advisor. EDA assists controllers with high-density arrival metering by providing fuel-efficient metering-conformance advisories, integrated with conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) capabilities, to minimize deviations from the user s preferred trajectory. These DST capabilities will enable controllers to change their procedures from ones that are oriented towards sector management to procedures oriented towards trajectory management. Although adaptable to current procedures and airspace structure, EDA is intended as a tool for transitioning traffic from a Free Flight environment to an efficiently organized flow into terminal airspace. This paper describes the transition airspace problem and EDA concept, defines the key benefit mechanisms that will be enabled by EDA capabilities, and presents a traffic scenario to illustrate the use of the tool.

  6. Overview of the Phoenix Entry, Descent and Landing System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grover, Myron R., III; Cichy, Benjamin D.; Desai, Prasun N.

    2008-01-01

    NASA s Phoenix Mars Lander began its journey to Mars from Cape Canaveral, Florida in August 2007, but its journey to the launch pad began many years earlier in 1997 as NASA s Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. In the intervening years, the entry, descent and landing (EDL) system architecture went through a series of changes, resulting in the system flown to the surface of Mars on May 25th, 2008. Some changes, such as entry velocity and landing site elevation, were the result of differences in mission design. Other changes, including the removal of hypersonic guidance, the reformulation of the parachute deployment algorithm, and the addition of the backshell avoidance maneuver, were driven by constant efforts to augment system robustness. An overview of the Phoenix EDL system architecture is presented along with rationales driving these architectural changes.

  7. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Koryanov, Vsevolod; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Haukka, Harri; Finchenko, Valery; Martynov, Maxim; Ostresko, Boris; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Viktor; Martin, Susanna; Siili, Tero

    2014-05-01

    A new generation of inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) for Mars has been developed. It is used in both the initial atmospheric entry and atmospheric descent before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator into Martian surface. The EDLS applicability to Earth's atmosphere is studied by the EU/RITD [1] project. Project focuses to the analysis and tests of the transonic behaviour of this compact and light weight payload entry system at the Earth re-entry. 1. EDLS for Earth The dynamical stability of the craft is analysed, concentrating on the most critical part of the atmospheric re-entry, the transonic phase. In Martian atmosphere the MetNet vehicle stability during the transonic phase is understood. However, in the more dense Earth's atmosphere, the transonic phase is shorter and turbulence more violent. Therefore, the EDLS has to be sufficiently dynamically stable to overcome the forces tending to deflect the craft from its nominal trajectory and attitude. The preliminary design of the inflatable EDLS for Earth will be commenced once the scaling of the re-entry system and the dynamical stability analysis have been performed. The RITD-project concentrates on mission and applications achievable with the current MetNet-type (i.e. 'Mini-1' category) of lander, and on requirements posed by other type Earth re-entry concepts. 2. Entry Angle Determination for Mini-1 - lander For successful Earth landing, the suitable re-entry angle and velocity with specific descent vehicle (DV) mass and heat flux parameters need to be determined. These key parameters in determining the Earth re-entry for DV are: qmax (kW/m2): maximal specific heat flux, Q (MJ/m2): specific integral heat flux to DV front shield, m (kg): descent vehicle (DV) mass, V (m/s): re-entry velocity and ? (deg.): flight-path angle at Earth re-entry For Earth re-entry, the calculation results in the optimal value of entry velocity for MetNet ('Mini-1' category) -type lander, with mass of 22kg, being VSOL = 5268 m/s. Using the basic pre-defined parameters for MetNet-type of lander in Earth atmosphere, we get the optimal angle of ? = -3.06 degrees for Earth re-entry. 3. Payload Mass for Earth Entry DV One of the key elements in Earth entry lander is the amount of available payload mass. The payload mass depends on, e.g., the lander size, landing type (soil or water), heat shield durability and additional landing gear. The payload mass will have an impact to the center of gravity of the lander. The payload with a 'low' CoG (compared the the lander structure) has a larger tolerance than the payload with 'high' CoG. In cases where payload CoG causes instability, the extra balance mass can be used to adjust CoG. This balance mass will reduce the available payload mass. A major limitation for payload mass is the heat shielding. Acknowledgements The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 263255. References [1] http://ritd.fmi.fi

  8. Gradient descent learning in and out of equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Caticha, Nestor; Araujo de Oliveira, Evaldo

    2001-06-01

    Relations between the off thermal equilibrium dynamical process of on-line learning and the thermally equilibrated off-line learning are studied for potential gradient descent learning. The approach of Opper to study on-line Bayesian algorithms is used for potential based or maximum likelihood learning. We look at the on-line learning algorithm that best approximates the off-line algorithm in the sense of least Kullback-Leibler information loss. The closest on-line algorithm works by updating the weights along the gradient of an effective potential, which is different from the parent off-line potential. A few examples are analyzed and the origin of the potential annealing is discussed.

  9. Time-controlled descent guidance in uncertain winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menga, G.; Erzberger, H.

    1975-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for constructing a statistical model of the altitude-dependent mean wind profile from the historical record of wind measurements at particular locations. The model is constructed by fitting a Markov process, with altitude as the stage variable, to the historical wind data. The wind model, together with the aircraft dynamics and the error characteristics of the navigation system, are incorporated in the design of a state estimator, which gives the minimum variance estimate of the aircraft state and the wind vector. The state and wind estimates are used as inputs to a linear feedback law for guiding the aircraft along the nominal trajectory. An example design of a time-constrained (4D RNAV) descent guidance system is presented, showing tracking accuracy, control activity, and probability of arrival time with and without the wind estimator.

  10. Mars Exploration Rovers Entry, Descent, and Landing Trajectory Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Knocke, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover mission successfully landed two rovers "Spirit" and "Opportunity" on Mars on January 4th and 25th of 2004, respectively. The trajectory analysis performed to define the entry, descent, and landing (EDL) scenario is described. The entry requirements and constraints are presented, as well as uncertainties used in a Monte Carlo dispersion analysis to statistically assess the robustness of the entry design to off-nominal conditions. In the analysis, six-degree-of-freedom and three-degree-of-freedom trajectory results are compared to assess the entry characteristics of the capsule. Comparison of the preentry results to preliminary post-landing reconstruction data shows that all EDL parameters were within the requirements. In addition, the final landing position for both "Spirit" and "Opportunity" were within 15 km of the predicted landing location.

  11. Estradiol improves cerebellar memory formation by activating estrogen receptor beta.

    PubMed

    Andreescu, Corina E; Milojkovic, Bogdan A; Haasdijk, Elize D; Kramer, Piet; De Jong, Frank H; Krust, Andrée; De Zeeuw, Chris I; De Jeu, Marcel T G

    2007-10-01

    Learning motor skills is critical for motor abilities such as driving a car or playing piano. The speed at which we learn those skills is subject to many factors. Yet, it is not known to what extent gonadal hormones can affect the achievement of accurate movements in time and space. Here we demonstrate via different lines of evidence that estradiol promotes plasticity in the cerebellar cortex underlying motor learning. First, we show that estradiol enhances induction of long-term potentiation at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapse, whereas it does not affect long-term depression; second, we show that estradiol activation of estrogen receptor beta receptors in Purkinje cells significantly improves gain-decrease adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, whereas it does not affect general eye movement performance; and third, we show that estradiol increases the density of parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses, whereas it does not affect the density of climbing fiber synapses. We conclude that estradiol can improve motor skills by potentiating cerebellar plasticity and synapse formation. These processes may be advantageous during periods of high estradiol levels of the estrous cycle or pregnancy. PMID:17913916

  12. Mechanisms of Ethanol-induced Death of Cerebellar Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Maternal ethanol exposure during pregnancy may cause fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation. The most deleterious effect of fetal alcohol exposure is inducing neuroapoptosis in the developing brain. Ethanol-induced loss of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) underlies many of the behavioral deficits observed in FASD. The cerebellum is one of the brain areas that is most susceptible to ethanol during development. Ethanol exposure causes a loss of both cerebellar Purkinje cells and granule cells. This review focuses on the toxic effect of ethanol on cerebellar granule cells (CGC) and the underlying mechanisms. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that ethanol induces apoptotic death of CGC. The vulnerability of CGC to ethanol-induced death diminishes over time as neurons mature. Several mechanisms for ethanol-induced apoptosis of CGC have been suggested. These include inhibition of NMDA receptors, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, disturbance of potassium channel currents, thiamine deficiency, and disruption of translational regulation. Cultures of CGC provide an excellent system to investigate cellular/molecular mechanisms of ethanol-induced neurodegeneration and to evaluate interventional strategies. This review will also discuss the approaches leading to neuroprotection against ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis. PMID:20927663

  13. Microarchitectural changes during development of the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Mecha, Miriam; Peña-Melián, Angel L; Blanco, Maria J

    2010-01-01

    The cerebellum is a highly conserved structure in the Central Nervous System (CNS) of vertebrates, and is involved in the coordination of voluntary motor behaviour. Supporting this function, the cerebellar cortex presents a layered structure which requires a precise spatial and temporal coordination of proliferation, migration and differentiation events. One of the characteristics of the developing cortex is the formation of the external granule cell layer (EGL) in the outermost part. The EGL is a highly proliferative transient layer which disappears when cells migrate inwards to form the inner granule cell layer. The balance between proliferation and migration leads to changes in EGL thickness, and might be related to "indentations" observed in the surface of the developing chick cerebellum. We have extended the observation of this feature to quail and mouse, supporting the idea that this phenomenon forms part of the mechanisms of cerebellar morphogenesis. Different factors involved in both mitotic activity and migration were analyzed in this study. Our results indicate that proliferation, more than formation of raphes for cell migration, is involved in the formation of indentations in the EGL. In addition, we show that vessels penetrating from the pial surface divide the EGL into regular regions at the time of the appearance of bulges and furrows. We conclude that indentations are the result of a coincidence in time of both the increase in thickness of the EGL and the establishment of the embryonic vascular pattern, which confers a characteristic transitory morphology to the surface of folia. PMID:20209441

  14. Speech prosody in Friedreich's and olivo-ponto cerebellar atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Maureen

    2001-05-01

    A critical issue in the study of speech motor control is the identification of the mechanisms that generate the temporal flow of serially ordered articulatory events. Two staged models of serial ordered events (Lashley, 1951; Lindblom, 1963) claim that time controls events whereas dynamic models predict a relative relation between time and space. Each of these models predicts a different relation between the acoustic measures of formant frequency and segmental duration. The most recent method described herein provides a sensitive index of speech deterioration which is both acoustically robust and phonetically systematic. Both acoustic and magnetic resonance imaging measures were used to describe the speech disturbance in two neurologically distinct groups of cerebellar ataxia: Friedreich's ataxia and olivo-ponto cerebellar ataxia. The speaking task was designed to elicit six different prosodic conditions and four prosodic contrasts. All subjects read the same syllable embedded in a sentence, under six different prosodic conditions. Pair-wise comparisons derived from the six conditions were used to describe (1) final lengthening, (2) phrasal accent, (3) nuclear accent and (4) syllable reduction. An estimate of speech deterioration as determined by individual and normal subects' acoustic values of syllable duration, formant and fundamental frequencies was used in correlation analyses with magnetic resonance imaging ratings.

  15. Postnatal cerebellar defects in mice deficient in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhoutao; Schwahn, Bernd C; Wu, Qing; He, Xinying; Rozen, Rima

    2005-08-01

    Patients with severe deficiency of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) suffer from a wide variety of neurological problems, which can begin in the neonatal period. MTHFR is a critical enzyme in folate metabolism; the product of the MTHFR reaction, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, is required for homocysteine remethylation to methionine and synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). To understand the mechanisms by which MTHFR deficiency leads to significant neuropathology, we examined early postnatal brain development in mice with a homozygous knockout of the Mthfr gene. These mice displayed a dramatically reduced size of the cerebellum and cerebral cortex, with enlarged lateral ventricles. Mthfr deficiency affected granule cell maturation, but not neurogenesis. Depletion of external granule cells and disorganization of Purkinje cells were mainly confined to the anterior lobules of mutant cerebella. Decreased cellular proliferation and increased cell death contributed to the granule cell loss. Reduced expression of Engrailed-2 (En2), Reelin (Reln) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor type 1 (Itpr1) genes was observed in the cerebellum. Supplementation of Mthfr(+/-) dams with an alternate methyl donor, betaine, reduced cerebellar abnormalities in the Mthfr(-/-) pups. Our findings suggest that MTHFR plays a role in cerebellar patterning, possibly through effects on proliferation or apoptosis. PMID:15979267

  16. Biosensor measurement of purine release from cerebellar cultures and slices

    PubMed Central

    Eason, Robert; Dale, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    We have previously described an action-potential and Ca2+-dependent form of adenosine release in the molecular layer of cerebellar slices. The most likely source of the adenosine is the parallel fibres, the axons of granule cells. Using microelectrode biosensors, we have therefore investigated whether cultured granule cells (from postnatal day 7–8 rats) can release adenosine. Although no purine release could be detected in response to focal electrical stimulation, purine (adenosine, inosine or hypoxanthine) release occurred in response to an increase in extracellular K+ concentration from 3 to 25 mM coupled with addition of 1 mM glutamate. The mechanism of purine release was transport from the cytoplasm via an ENT transporter. This process did not require action-potential firing but was Ca2+dependent. The major purine released was not adenosine, but was either inosine or hypoxanthine. In order for inosine/hypoxanthine release to occur, cultures had to contain both granule cells and glial cells; neither cellular component was sufficient alone. Using the same stimulus in cerebellar slices (postnatal day 7–25), it was possible to release purines. The release however was not blocked by ENT blockers and there was a shift in the Ca2+ dependence during development. This data from cultures and slices further illustrates the complexities of purine release, which is dependent on cellular composition and developmental stage. PMID:21103217

  17. Aspm sustains postnatal cerebellar neurogenesis and medulloblastoma growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Scott E; Garcia, Idoia; Crowther, Andrew J; Li, Shiyi; Stewart, Alyssa; Liu, Hedi; Lough, Kendall J; O'Neill, Sean; Veleta, Katherine; Oyarzabal, Esteban A; Merrill, Joseph R; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Gershon, Timothy R

    2015-11-15

    Alterations in genes that regulate brain size may contribute to both microcephaly and brain tumor formation. Here, we report that Aspm, a gene that is mutated in familial microcephaly, regulates postnatal neurogenesis in the cerebellum and supports the growth of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Cerebellar granule neuron progenitors (CGNPs) express Aspm when maintained in a proliferative state by sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, and Aspm is expressed in Shh-driven medulloblastoma in mice. Genetic deletion of Aspm reduces cerebellar growth, while paradoxically increasing the mitotic rate of CGNPs. Aspm-deficient CGNPs show impaired mitotic progression, altered patterns of division orientation and differentiation, and increased DNA damage, which causes progenitor attrition through apoptosis. Deletion of Aspm in mice with Smo-induced medulloblastoma reduces tumor growth and increases DNA damage. Co-deletion of Aspm and either of the apoptosis regulators Bax or Trp53 (also known as p53) rescues the survival of neural progenitors and reduces the growth restriction imposed by Aspm deletion. Our data show that Aspm functions to regulate mitosis and to mitigate DNA damage during CGNP cell division, causes microcephaly through progenitor apoptosis when mutated, and sustains tumor growth in medulloblastoma. PMID:26450969

  18. Y chromosome lineages in men of west African descent.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jada Benn; Doura, Menahem B; Keita, Shomarka O Y; Kittles, Rick A

    2012-01-01

    The early African experience in the Americas is marked by the transatlantic slave trade from ?1619 to 1850 and the rise of the plantation system. The origins of enslaved Africans were largely dependent on European preferences as well as the availability of potential laborers within Africa. Rice production was a key industry of many colonial South Carolina low country plantations. Accordingly, rice plantations owners within South Carolina often requested enslaved Africans from the so-called "Grain Coast" of western Africa (Senegal to Sierra Leone). Studies on the African origins of the enslaved within other regions of the Americas have been limited. To address the issue of origins of people of African descent within the Americas and understand more about the genetic heterogeneity present within Africa and the African Diaspora, we typed Y chromosome specific markers in 1,319 men consisting of 508 west and central Africans (from 12 populations), 188 Caribbeans (from 2 islands), 532 African Americans (AAs from Washington, DC and Columbia, SC), and 91 European Americans. Principal component and admixture analyses provide support for significant Grain Coast ancestry among African American men in South Carolina. AA men from DC and the Caribbean showed a closer affinity to populations from the Bight of Biafra. Furthermore, 30-40% of the paternal lineages in African descent populations in the Americas are of European ancestry. Diverse west African ancestries and sex-biased gene flow from EAs has contributed greatly to the genetic heterogeneity of African populations throughout the Americas and has significant implications for gene mapping efforts in these populations. PMID:22295064

  19. Assessment on EXPERT Descent and Landing System Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, H.; Muylaert, J.; Northey, D.; Riley, D.

    2009-01-01

    EXPERT is a re-entry vehicle designed for validation of aero-thermodynamic models, numerical schemes in Computational Fluid Dynamics codes and test facilities for measuring flight data under an Earth re-entry environment. This paper addresses the design for the descent and landing sequence for EXPERT. It includes the descent sequence, the choice of drogue and main parachutes, and the parachute deployment condition, which can be supersonic or subsonic. The analysis is based mainly on an engineering tool, PASDA, together with some hand calculations for parachute sizing and design. The tool consists of a detailed 6-DoF simulation performed with the aerodynamics database of the vehicle, an empirical wakes model and the International Standard Atmosphere database. The aerodynamics database for the vehicle is generated by DNW experimental data and CFD codes within the framework of an ESA contract to CIRA. The analysis will be presented in terms of altitude, velocity, accelerations, angle-of- attack, pitch angle and angle of rigging line. Discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of each parachute deployment condition is included in addition to some comparison with the available data based on a Monte-Carlo method from a Russian company, FSUE NIIPS. Sensitivity on wind speed to the performance of EXPERT is shown to be strong. Supersonic deployment of drogue shows a better performance in stability at the expense of a larger G-load than those from the subsonic deployment of drogue. Further optimization on the parachute design is necessary in order to fulfill all the EXPERT specifications.

  20. Mechanisms of human cerebellar dysmetria: experimental evidence and current conceptual bases

    PubMed Central

    Manto, Mario

    2009-01-01

    The human cerebellum contains more neurons than any other region in the brain and is a major actor in motor control. Cerebellar circuitry is unique by its stereotyped architecture and its modular organization. Understanding the motor codes underlying the organization of limb movement and the rules of signal processing applied by the cerebellar circuits remains a major challenge for the forthcoming decades. One of the cardinal deficits observed in cerebellar patients is dysmetria, designating the inability to perform accurate movements. Patients overshoot (hypermetria) or undershoot (hypometria) the aimed target during voluntary goal-directed tasks. The mechanisms of cerebellar dysmetria are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of cerebellar pathways in controlling fundamental aspects of movement control such as anticipation, timing of motor commands, sensorimotor synchronization, maintenance of sensorimotor associations and tuning of the magnitudes of muscle activities. An overview of recent advances in our understanding of the contribution of cerebellar circuitry in the elaboration and shaping of motor commands is provided, with a discussion on the relevant anatomy, the results of the neurophysiological studies, and the computational models which have been proposed to approach cerebellar function. PMID:19364396

  1. Dissociation of locomotor and cerebellar deficits in a murine Angelman syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Caroline F; Schonewille, Martijn; Gao, Zhenyu; Aronica, Eleonora M A; Judson, Matthew C; Philpot, Benjamin D; Hoebeek, Freek E; van Woerden, Geeske M; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-11-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurological disorder that is associated with prominent movement and balance impairments that are widely considered to be due to defects of cerebellar origin. Here, using the cerebellar-specific vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) paradigm, we determined that cerebellar function is only mildly impaired in the Ube3am-/p+ mouse model of AS. VOR phase-reversal learning was singularly impaired in these animals and correlated with reduced tonic inhibition between Golgi cells and granule cells. Purkinje cell physiology, in contrast, was normal in AS mice as shown by synaptic plasticity and spontaneous firing properties that resembled those of controls. Accordingly, neither VOR phase-reversal learning nor locomotion was impaired following selective deletion of Ube3a in Purkinje cells. However, genetic normalization of ?CaMKII inhibitory phosphorylation fully rescued locomotor deficits despite failing to improve cerebellar learning in AS mice, suggesting extracerebellar circuit involvement in locomotor learning. We confirmed this hypothesis through cerebellum-specific reinstatement of Ube3a, which ameliorated cerebellar learning deficits but did not rescue locomotor deficits. This double dissociation of locomotion and cerebellar phenotypes strongly suggests that the locomotor deficits of AS mice do not arise from impaired cerebellar cortex function. Our results provide important insights into the etiology of the motor deficits associated with AS. PMID:26485287

  2. [Activation of cerebellar B-type ?-aminobutyric acid receptor modulates optokinetic reflex adaptation].

    PubMed

    Shirai, Yoshihiro; Sasajima, Toshifumi; Uchiyama, Shu; Takegoshi, Yoshihiro; Tsushima, Eikichi; Tabata, Toshihide

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex, the brain region responsible for motor coordination and learning expresses a high density of B-type ?-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAbR). Previous in vitro and in situ studies indicated that cerebellar GABAbR may mediate multiple forms of inhibitory and excitatory modulation of cerebellar circuits. Nevertheless, the in vivo influence of cerebellar GABAbR activation is unclear. As the first step in addressing this issue, we examined how pharmacological activation of cerebellar GABAbR modulates optokinetic reflex (OKR), an involuntary cerebellum-dependent eye movement for stabilizing the retinal image against the drift of the visual scene. We injected baclofen, a GABAbR-selective agonist, or control saline into the cerebellar flocculi of adult mice and then performed 1-h OKR measurement sessions on two consecutive days. In the day 1 session, the baclofen (5 nM)-injected mice and control mice showed similar initial OKR gains and similar training-induced increases in the OKR gain (OKR adaptation). This result suggests that GABAbR activation does not affect cerebellar computation for executing OKR and formation of short-term memory for OKR adaptation. At the beginning of the day 2 session, the baclofen (5 nM or 50 ?M)-injected mice showed an OKR gain higher than that achieved in the day 1 session while the control mice did not. This result suggests that GABAbR activation may facilitate the formation of OKR adaptation-related long-term memory. These findings provide a new insight into the functional architecture of the cerebellar circuits and indicate GABAbR to be a new target of pharmacological therapy against diseases with cerebellar dysfunction. PMID:24304601

  3. Restoring Cognitive Functions Using Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Techniques in Patients with Cerebellar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Paul A.; Miall, R. Chris

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the possibility of modulating the excitability of cerebro–cerebellar circuits bi-directionally using transcranial electrical brain stimulation, in a manner akin to that observed using magnetic stimulation protocols. It has been proposed that cerebellar stimulation activates Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, leading to inhibition of the dentate nucleus, which exerts a tonic facilitatory drive onto motor and cognitive regions of cortex through a synaptic relay in the ventral–lateral thalamus. Some cerebellar deficits present with cognitive impairments if damage to non-motor regions of the cerebellum disrupts the coupling with cerebral cortical areas for thinking and reasoning. Indeed, white matter changes in the dentato–rubral tract correlate with cognitive assessments in patients with Friedreich ataxia, suggesting that this pathway is one component of the anatomical substrate supporting a cerebellar contribution to cognition. An understanding of the physiology of the cerebro–cerebellar pathway previously helped us to constrain our interpretation of results from two recent studies in which we showed cognitive enhancements in healthy participants during tests of arithmetic after electrical stimulation of the cerebellum, but only when task demands were high. Others studies have also shown how excitation of the prefrontal cortex can enhance performance in a variety of working memory tasks. Thus, future efforts might be guided toward neuro-enhancement in certain patient populations, using what is commonly termed “non-invasive brain stimulation” as a cognitive rehabilitation tool to modulate cerebro–cerebellar circuits, or for stimulation over the cerebral cortex to compensate for decreased cerebellar drive to this region. This article will address these possibilities with a review of the relevant literature covering ataxias and cerebellar cognitive affective disorders, which are characterized by thalamo–cortical disturbances. PMID:24765079

  4. [The effect of anthropometric factors on human cerebellar mass and its age dynamics].

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, A Iu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to examine the dependence of human cerebellar mass and its age dynamics on the body length and body-build type. The study was carried out on 295 objects--the corpses of the individuals of both sexes (173 males and 122 females) who died at the age of 20-99 years. The length of the body, the transverse diameter of the chest and the cerebellar mass were measured. Somatotype was determined by the Rees-Eysenck index. It was found that human cerebellar mass ranged from 103 to 197 g (with the average of 144 ± 1.0 g) and was significantly greater in men than in women (150.5 ± 1.3 g vs. 133.9 ± 1.2 g, P < 0.001). Age affected cerebellar mass in men (R = -0.46) more, than in women (R = -0.43). In men, a period of relative stability of the cerebellar mass lasted up to about 50 years and then was followed by a period of its decrease. In women, the stable period was observed until approximately 70 years. The cerebellar mass was related to the body length (R = 0.35 for men and R = 0.36 for women). The dependence of the cerebellar mass on the body length was greater in men (1.0 g/cm) greater than in women (0.5 g/cm): with the increase of the body length the difference in the values of the cerebellar mass between men and women was found to grow. The cerebellar mass in the individuals with various body-build types was not significantly different PMID:25552081

  5. Tract Profiles of the Cerebellar White Matter Pathways in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Yael; Travis, Katherine E; Ben-Shachar, Michal; Yeom, Kristen W; Feldman, Heidi M

    2015-12-01

    Intact development of cerebellar connectivity is essential for healthy neuromotor and neurocognitive development. To date, limited knowledge about the microstructural properties of the cerebellar peduncles, the major white matter tracts of the cerebellum, is available for children and adolescents. Such information would be useful as a comparison for studies of normal development, clinical conditions, or associations of cerebellar structures with cognitive and motor functions. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the variability in diffusion measures of the cerebellar peduncles within individuals and within a normative sample of healthy children. Participants were 19 healthy children and adolescents, aged 9-17 years, mean age 13.0?±?2.3. We analyzed diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data with deterministic tractography. We generated tract profiles for each of the cerebellar peduncles by extracting four diffusion properties (fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean, radial, and axial diffusivity) at 30 equidistant points along each tract. We were able to identify the middle cerebellar peduncle and the bilateral inferior and superior cerebellar peduncles in all participants. The results showed that within each of the peduncles, the diffusion properties varied along the trajectory of the tracts. However, the tracts showed consistent patterns of variation across individuals; the coefficient of variation for FA across individual profiles was low (?20 %) for each tract. We observed no systematic variation of the diffusion properties with age. These cerebellar tract profiles of the cerebellar peduncles can serve as a reference for future studies of children across the age range and for children and adolescents with clinical conditions that affect the cerebellum. PMID:25648754

  6. Description of the computations and pilot procedures for planning fuel-conservative descents with a small programmable calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Vicroy, D.D.; Knox, C.E.

    1983-05-01

    A simplified flight management descent algorithm was developed and programmed on a small programmable calculator. It was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The algorithm may also be used for planning fuel conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard temperature effects. The flight management descent algorithm and the vertical performance modeling required for the DC-10 airplane is described.

  7. An autopsy case of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with prominent degeneration in olivo-ponto-cerebellar system.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Y; Ichikawa, K; Fujioka, A; Tsutsumi, A; Yorifuji, S; Miyoshi, K

    1991-01-01

    We describe a sporadic case of adult-onset, complex I deficiency mitochondrial encephalomyopathy (MEM), the clinical and pathological features of which failed to fit any of the known subgroups of MEM, such as Kearns-Sayre syndrome, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes or myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibers. Clinically, this patient had only progressive cerebellar ataxia, generalized muscle weakness and hearing loss. The principal finding at autopsy was degeneration of the olivo-ponto-cerebellar system. This case suggests that mitochondrial disease could underlie some cases of olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy. PMID:1792871

  8. Novel SIL1 mutations cause cerebellar ataxia and atrophy in a French-Canadian family.

    PubMed

    Noreau, Anne; La Piana, Roberta; Marcoux, Camille; Dion, Patrick A; Brais, Bernard; Bernard, Geneviève; Rouleau, Guy A

    2015-10-01

    Two French-Canadian sibs with cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria were seen in our neurogenetics clinic. The older brother had global developmental delay and spastic paraplegia. Brain MRIs from these two affected individuals showed moderate to severe cerebellar atrophy. To identify the genetic basis for their disease, we conducted a whole exome sequencing (WES) investigation using genomic DNA prepared from the affected sibs and their healthy father. We identified two mutations in the SIL1 gene, which is reported to cause Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome. This study emphasizes how the diagnosis of patients with ataxic gait and cerebellar atrophy may benefit from WES to identify the genetic cause of their condition. PMID:26260654

  9. Rapid Generation of Optimal Asteroid Powered Descent Trajectories Via Convex Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin; Lu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a convex optimization based method that can rapidly generate the fuel optimal asteroid powered descent trajectory. The ultimate goal is to autonomously design the optimal powered descent trajectory on-board the spacecraft immediately prior to the descent burn. Compared to a planetary powered landing problem, the major difficulty is the complex gravity field near the surface of an asteroid that cannot be approximated by a constant gravity field. This paper uses relaxation techniques and a successive solution process that seeks the solution to the original nonlinear, nonconvex problem through the solutions to a sequence of convex optimal control problems.

  10. Upper limb cerebellar motor function in children with spina bifida

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, Derryn; Fletcher, Jack M.; Mahy, Caitlin E. V.; Hetherington, Ross; MacGregor, Daune; Drake, James M.; Salman, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate upper limb cerebellar motor function in children with spina bifida myelomeningocele (SBM) and in typically developing controls. Methods Participants with SBM, who had either upper level spinal lesions (n=23) or lower level spinal lesions (n=65), and controls (n=37) completed four upper limb motor function tasks (posture, rebound, limb dysmetria, and diadochokinesis) under four different physical and cognitive challenge conditions. Functional independence was assessed by parental questionnaire. Results Fewer SBM participants were able to complete the posture task, and they were less likely than controls to obtain a perfect rebound score. Participants with SBM showed impaired performance in either time, accuracy, or both, on the limb dysmetria and diadochokinesis tasks but responded like controls to physical and cognitive challenges. Conclusions Because upper limb motor performance predicted aspects of functional independence, we conclude that upper limb impairments in children with SBM are significant and have direct implications for the level of independent functioning in children with SBM. PMID:19823846

  11. Synaptic representation of locomotion in single cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Kate; Mathy, Alexandre; Duguid, Ian; Häusser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a crucial role in the regulation of locomotion, but how movement is represented at the synaptic level is not known. Here, we use in vivo patch-clamp recordings to show that locomotion can be directly read out from mossy fiber synaptic input and spike output in single granule cells. The increase in granule cell spiking during locomotion is enhanced by glutamate spillover currents recruited during movement. Surprisingly, the entire step sequence can be predicted from input EPSCs and output spikes of a single granule cell, suggesting that a robust gait code is present already at the cerebellar input layer and transmitted via the granule cell pathway to downstream Purkinje cells. Thus, synaptic input delivers remarkably rich information to single neurons during locomotion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07290.001 PMID:26083712

  12. Clinical and neuroanatomical predictors of cerebellar mutism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Law, Nicole; Greenberg, Mark; Bouffet, Eric; Taylor, Michael D; Laughlin, Suzanne; Strother, Douglas; Fryer, Christopher; McConnell, Dina; Hukin, Juliette; Kaise, Caelyn; Wang, Frank; Mabbott, Donald J

    2012-10-01

    Cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) is an important medical challenge in the management of pediatric posterior fossa brain tumors, because it occurs in a subset of children following tumor resection. A definitive clinical profile and neuroanatomical substrate associated with CMS remains unclear. We investigated the relationship between presurgical and clinical variables and the incidence of CMS, along with diffusion tensor imaging, to characterize the integrity of cerebello-thalamo-cerebral white matter pathways. Seventeen children with posterior fossa tumors and CMS, 34 children with posterior fossa tumors without CMS, and 28 healthy children were enrolled in this study. Bilateral cerebello-thalamo-cerebral pathways were delineated and segmented into anatomical regions. Mean integrity measures for each region were compared among children with CMS, children without CMS, and healthy children. Left-handedness, medulloblastoma histology, and larger tumor size distinguished between patients with CMS and patients without CMS (P < .04). Right cerebellar white matter within the cerebello-thalamo-cerebral pathway was compromised in children with CMS relative to children without CMS and healthy children (P < .02). We provide a potential schema for CMS risk among children treated for posterior fossa tumors. Left-handed children treated for medulloblastoma may be the most at risk for CMS, and unilateral, localized damage within the cerebello-thalamo-cerebral pathway at the level of the right cerebellum is implicated in the presentation of CMS. This disruption in communication between the right cerebellum and left frontal cortex may contribute to speech-language problems observed in children with CMS. Our findings may be relevant for surgical planning and speech-language therapy to mitigate symptoms of CMS. PMID:22952198

  13. Directional abnormalities of vestibular and optokinetic responses in cerebellar disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, M. F.; Zee, D. S.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Directional abnormalities of vestibular and optokinetic responses in patients with cerebellar degeneration are reported. Three-axis magnetic search-coil recordings of the eye and head were performed in eight cerebellar patients. Among these patients, examples of directional cross-coupling were found during (1) high-frequency, high-acceleration head thrusts; (2) constant-velocity chair rotations with the head fixed; (3) constant-velocity optokinetic stimulation; and (4) following repetitive head shaking. Cross-coupling during horizontal head thrusts consisted of an inappropriate upward eye-velocity component. In some patients, sustained constant-velocity yaw-axis chair rotations produced a mixed horizontal-torsional nystagmus and/or an increase in the baseline vertical slow-phase velocity. Following horizontal head shaking, some patients showed an increase in the slow-phase velocity of their downbeat nystagmus. These various forms of cross-coupling did not necessarily occur to the same degree in a given patient; this suggests that different mechanisms may be responsible. It is suggested that cross-coupling during head thrusts may reflect a loss of calibration of brainstem connections involved in the direct vestibular pathways, perhaps due to dysfunction of the flocculus. Cross-coupling during constant-velocity rotations and following head shaking may result from a misorientation of the angular eye-velocity vector in the velocity-storage system. Finally, responses to horizontal optokinetic stimulation included an inappropriate torsional component in some patients. This suggests that the underlying organization of horizontal optokinetic tracking is in labyrinthine coordinates. The findings are also consistent with prior animal-lesion studies that have shown a role for the vestibulocerebellum in the control of the direction of the VOR.

  14. Cerebellar stimulation for cerebral palsy spasticity, function, and seizures.

    PubMed

    Davis, R

    2000-01-01

    Chronic cerebellar stimulation (CCS) applied to the superio-medial cortex reduces generalized cerebral spasticity, athetoid movements, and seizures. Eighteen clinics have reported on 600 cerebral palsy (CP) patients who comprise 90% of those treated with CCS. CP patients have varying degrees of limited abilities interfered with by spasticity (primitive reflexes, increased muscle tone, co-contractions, and spasms) and by athetoid movements in two-thirds of the patients. With CCS, spasticity reduction occurred in 85% (marked 25%, moderate 34%, mild 27%) and resulted in improvements in patient drooling, speech, respiration, posture, motor performance, gait, joint range of motion, and mood states. Radiofrequency (RF)-linked stimulators were used initially with serious equipment and calibration problems; 68% of 422 patients improved. When totally implantable controlled-currrent stimulators were used, 86% of 178 patients improved. Our double-blind study of 20 CP patients using this implantable stimulator showed 12 (60%) improved in motor performance, joint range of motion, and profile of mood states when the stimulator was ON. When abilities are graded (1: poor to 9: best), the seven patients with the higher functioning grades (5-8) all improved (99% confidence level). Intractable seizures occurred in 27 (8%) of our CP patients. At a 17-year follow-up, 19 patients contacted were using or had used CCS with 10 (53%) seizure-free and 6 (32%) with reduced seizures. CCS should be given by a totally implanted controlled-current stimulator (1-4 microCoulombs/sq. cm. /phase, 150-200 Hz) applied intermittently to the superio-medial cerebellar cortex for safe, effective, and continuous results. PMID:11036180

  15. Recent identity by descent in human genetic data - methods and applications 

    E-print Network

    Glodzik, Dominik

    2014-11-28

    The thesis describes algorithms for detecting regions of recent identity by descent (IBD) from human genetic data and its applications in optimising resequencing studies, genomic predictions and detecting Mendelian ...

  16. A conflict analysis of 4D descent strategies in a metered, multiple-arrival route environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.; Harris, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    A conflict analysis was performed on multiple arrival traffic at a typical metered airport. The Flow Management Evaluation Model (FMEM) was used to simulate arrival operations using Denver Stapleton's arrival route structure. Sensitivities of conflict performance to three different 4-D descent strategies (clear-idle Mach/Constant AirSpeed (CAS), constant descent angle Mach/CAS and energy optimal) were examined for three traffic mixes represented by those found at Denver Stapleton, John F. Kennedy and typical en route metering (ERM) airports. The Monte Carlo technique was used to generate simulation entry point times. Analysis results indicate that the clean-idle descent strategy offers the best compromise in overall performance. Performance measures primarily include susceptibility to conflict and conflict severity. Fuel usage performance is extrapolated from previous descent strategy studies.

  17. User's manual for a fuel-conservative descent planning algorithm implemented on a small programmable calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified flight management descent algorithm was developed and programmed on a small programmable calculator. It was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The algorithm may also be used for planning fuel conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard temperature effects. An explanation and examples of how the algorithm is used, as well as a detailed flow chart and listing of the algorithm are contained.

  18. GENERALIZED EXPLICIT DESCENT AND ITS APPLICATION TO CURVES OF GENUS 3

    E-print Network

    Poonen, Bjorn

    , AND MICHAEL STOLL Abstract. We introduce a common generalization of essentially all known methods for explicit Classification. Primary 11G30; Secondary 11G10, 14G25, 14H45. Key words and phrases. Descent, Selmer group, genus

  19. GENERALIZED EXPLICIT DESCENT AND ITS APPLICATION TO CURVES OF GENUS 3

    E-print Network

    Stoll, Michael

    , AND MICHAEL STOLL Abstract. We introduce a common generalization of essentially all known methods for explicit Subject Classification. Primary 11G30; Secondary 11G10, 14G25, 14H45. Key words and phrases. Descent

  20. Antarctic Polar Descent and Planetary Wave Activity Observed in ISAMS CO from April to July 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. R.; Stanford, J. L.; Nakamura, N.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Taylor, F. W.; Remedios, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Antarctic polar descent and planetary wave activity in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere are observed in ISAMS CO data from April to July 1992. CO-derived mean April-to-May upper stratosphere descent rates of 15 K/day (0.25 km/day) at 60 S and 20 K/day (0.33 km/day) at 80 S are compared with descent rates from diabatic trajectory analyses. At 60 S there is excellent agreement, while at 80 S the trajectory-derived descent is significantly larger in early April. Zonal wavenumber 1 enhancement of CO is observed on 9 and 28 May, coincident with enhanced wave 1 in UKMO geopotential height. The 9 May event extends from 40 to 70 km and shows westward phase tilt with height, while the 28 May event extends from 40 to 50 km and shows virtually no phase tilt with height.

  1. Challenges of Dealing With Atmospheres: Entry, Descent and Landing - Duration: 31 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Whether landing on Mars or returning to Earth, one of the most challenging parts of any mission is the entry, descent and landing. Just think -- a spacecraft hurtling through space at thousands of ...

  2. A taxonomy of descent algorithms for nonlinear programs and variational inequalities

    E-print Network

    Patriksson, Michael

    A taxonomy of descent algorithms for nonlinear programs and the choices of cost approximating mappings and merit functions. The* * taxonomy is illustrated on classical algorithms and is utilized to interrelate known alg* *orithm frameworks. Keywords. Taxonomy

  3. The Experiences for People of Asian Descent in Professional Positions in American College Sport 

    E-print Network

    Shim, Kun Soo

    2014-12-16

    The purpose of this study was to understand the role that race and ethnicity plays in the experiences for people of Asian descent in professional positions in American college sport. Specifically, this study sought to ...

  4. Descent graphs in pedigree analysis: applications to haplotyping, location scores, and marker-sharing statistics.

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, E.; Lange, K.

    1996-01-01

    The introduction of stochastic methods in pedigree analysis has enabled geneticists to tackle computations intractable by standard deterministic methods. Until now these stochastic techniques have worked by running a Markov chain on the set of genetic descent states of a pedigree. Each descent state specifies the paths of gene flow in the pedigree and the founder alleles dropped down each path. The current paper follows up on a suggestion by Elizabeth Thompson that genetic descent graphs offer a more appropriate space for executing a Markov chain. A descent graph specifies the paths of gene flow but not the particular founder alleles traveling down the paths. This paper explores algorithms for implementing Thompson's suggestion for codominant markers in the context of automatic haplotyping, estimating location scores, and computing gene-clustering statistics for robust linkage analysis. Realistic numerical examples demonstrate the feasibility of the algorithms. PMID:8651310

  5. Dicer Is Required for Normal Cerebellar Development and to Restrain Medulloblastoma Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zindy, Frederique; Lee, Youngsoo; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Ayrault, Olivier; Merzoug, Leila Ben; Li, Yang; McKinnon, Peter J.; Roussel, Martine F.

    2015-01-01

    Dicer, a ribonuclease III enzyme, is required for the maturation of microRNAs. To assess its role in cerebellar and medulloblastoma development, we genetically deleted Dicer in Nestin-positive neural progenitors and in mice lacking one copy for the Sonic Hedgehog receptor, Patched 1. We found that conditional loss of Dicer in mouse neural progenitors induced massive Trp53-independent apoptosis in all proliferative zones of the brain and decreased proliferation of cerebellar granule progenitors at embryonic day 15.5 leading to abnormal cerebellar development and perinatal lethality. Loss of one copy of Dicer significantly accelerated the formation of mouse medulloblastoma of the Sonic Hedgehog subgroup in Patched1-heterozygous mice. We conclude that Dicer is required for proper cerebellar development, and to restrain medulloblastoma formation. PMID:26091048

  6. JC Virus Variant Associated with Cerebellar Atrophy in a Patient with AIDS?

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Damien; Bouldouyre, Marie-Anne; Mercier-Delarue, Séverine; Seilhean, Danielle; Zagdanski, Anne-Marie; Delaugerre, Constance; Simon, François; Molina, Jean-Michel; Legoff, Jerôme

    2011-01-01

    The human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) is the agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). It has also recently been involved in cerebellar atrophy. Factors involved in this entity are elusive. We present a case of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patient with PML and cerebellar atrophy. In addition to a compartmentalization of JCV strains between urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and cerebellum, specific rearrangements in the JCV regulatory region were observed in the cerebellum, resulting in alterations of transcription factor binding sites. Our data underline the importance of searching for JCV in HIV-infected patients with cerebellar disorders and suggest that mutations in the regulatory region may be involved in cerebellar degeneration. PMID:21430099

  7. A case of 3p deletion syndrome associated with cerebellar hemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Muromoto, Sato; Hino-Fukuyo, Naomi; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Atsuo; Sato, Hiroki; Sato, Yuko; Nakayama, Tojo; Kubota, Yuki; Kakisaka, Yosuke; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Md, Shigeo Kure

    2016-02-01

    We described clinical course of a 24-year-old woman with 3p deletion syndrome associated with cerebellar hemangioblastoma at the age of 16years old. She presented dysmorphic facial features, growth retardation and severe psychomotor retardation associated with 3p deletion syndrome. We identified de novo 3p deletion encompassing p25 by using array-based comparative genomic hybridization, where causative gene of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease located. Surgical therapy for cerebellar hemangioblastoma was performed, and histological examination was consistent in cerebellar hemangioblastoma. She showed no other tumors associated VHL disease till 24years old. This is the first case report of a patient with 3p deletion syndrome whose cerebellar hemangioblastoma may be associated with VHL disease. Repeat imaging studies were recommended for the patients with 3p deletion syndrome. PMID:26365017

  8. Cerebellar-dependent delay eyeblink conditioning in adolescents with Specific Language Impairment

    E-print Network

    Steinmetz, Adam B.; Rice, Mabel L.

    2010-12-05

    cerebellar pathways. This is the first study of EBC in affected adolescents and controls. 16 adolescent controls, 15 adolescents with SLI, and 12 adult controls participated in a delay EBC task. Affected children had low general language performance...

  9. Neurocomputing 26}27 (1999) 271}276 Adaptive leaky integrator models of cerebellar Purkinje cells

    E-print Network

    Steuber, Volker

    1999-01-01

    Neurocomputing 26}27 (1999) 271}276 Adaptive leaky integrator models of cerebellar Purkinje cells.J. Willshaw / Neurocomputing 26}27 (1999) 271}276 #12;Fig. 1. Simulation results for repeated presentations

  10. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing System Development Challenges and Preliminary Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam D.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory project recently landed the Curiosity rover on the surface of Mars. With the success of the landing system, the performance envelope of entry, descent, and landing capabilities has been extended over the previous state of the art. This paper will present an overview of the MSL entry, descent, and landing system, a discussion of a subset of its development challenges, and include a discussion of preliminary results of the flight reconstruction effort.

  11. Analysis of Flight Management System Predictions of Idle-Thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel

    2010-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the predictor and its uncertainty models, descents from cruise to the meter fix were executed using vertical navigation in a B737-700 simulator and a B777-200 simulator, both with commercial FMSs. For both aircraft types, the FMS computed the intended descent path for a specified speed profile assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and then it controlled the avionics without human intervention. The test matrix varied aircraft weight, descent speed, and wind conditions. The first analysis in this paper determined the effect of the test matrix parameters on the FMS computation of TOD location, and it compared the results to those for the current ground predictor in the Efficient Descent Advisor (EDA). The second analysis was similar but considered the time to fly a specified distance to the meter fix. The effects of the test matrix variables together with the accuracy requirements for the predictor will determine the allowable error for the predictor inputs. For the B737, the EDA prediction of meter fix crossing time agreed well with the FMS; but its prediction of TOD location probably was not sufficiently accurate to enable idle-thrust descents in congested airspace, even though the FMS and EDA gave similar shapes for TOD location as a function of the test matrix variables. For the B777, the FMS and EDA gave different shapes for the TOD location function, and the EDA prediction of the TOD location is not accurate enough to fully enable the concept. Furthermore, the differences between the FMS and EDA predictions of meter fix crossing time for the B777 indicated that at least one of them was not sufficiently accurate.

  12. Apollo 15 mission report, supplement 4: Descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.; Wood, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of a postflight analysis of the LM-10 Descent Propulsion System (DPS) during the Apollo 15 Mission are reported. The analysis determined the steady state performance of the DPS during the descent phase of the manned lunar landing. Flight measurement discrepancies are discussed. Simulated throttle performance results are cited along with overall performance results. Evaluations of the propellant quantity gaging system, propellant loading, pressurization system, and engine are reported. Graphic illustrations of the evaluations are included.

  13. Synaptic Inhibition, Excitation, and Plasticity in Neurons of the Cerebellar Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Nan; Raman, Indira M.

    2010-01-01

    Neurons of the cerebellar nuclei generate the non-vestibular output of the cerebellum. Like other neurons, they integrate excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs and filter them through their intrinsic properties to produce patterns of action potential output. The synaptic and intrinsic features of cerebellar nuclear cells are unusual in several respects, however: these neurons receive an overwhelming amount of basal and driven inhibition from Purkinje neurons, but are also spontaneously active, producing action potentials even without excitation. Moreover, not only is spiking by nuclear cells sensitive to the amount of inhibition, but the strength of inhibition is also sensitive to the amount of spiking, through multiple forms of long-term plasticity. Here, we review the properties of synaptic excitation and inhibition, their short-term plasticity, and their influence on action potential firing of cerebellar nuclear neurons, as well as the interactions among excitation, inhibition, and spiking that produce long-term changes in synaptic strength. The data provide evidence that electrical and synaptic signaling in the cerebellar circuit is both plastic and resilient: the strength of IPSPs and EPSPs readily changes as the activity of cerebellar nuclear cells is modified. Notably, however, many of the identified forms of plasticity have an apparently homeostatic effect, responding to perturbations of input by restoring cerebellar output toward pre-perturbation values. Such forms of self-regulation appear consistent with the role of cerebellar output in coordinating movements. In contrast, other forms of plasticity in nuclear cells, including a long-term potentiation of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and excitation-driven increases in intrinsic excitability, are non-homeostatic, and instead appear suited to bring the circuit to a new set point. Interestingly, the combinations of inhibitory and excitatory stimuli that potentiate EPSCs resemble patterns of activity predicted to occur during eyelid conditioning, suggesting that this form long-term potentiation, perhaps amplified by intrinsic plasticity, may represent a cellular mechanism that is engaged during cerebellar learning. PMID:19847585

  14. Race, language, and mental evolution in Darwin's descent of man.

    PubMed

    Alter, Stephen G

    2007-01-01

    Charles Darwin was notoriously ambiguous in his remarks about the relationship between human evolution and biological race. He stressed the original unity of the races, yet he also helped to popularize the notion of a racial hierarchy filling the gaps between the highest anthropoids and civilized Europeans. A focus on Darwin's explanation of how humans initially evolved, however, shows that he mainly stressed not hierarchy but a version of humanity's original mental unity. In his book The Descent of Man, Darwin emphasized a substantial degree of mental development (including the incipient use of language) in the early, monogenetic phase of human evolution. This development, he argued, necessarily came before primeval man's numerical increase, geographic dispersion, and racial diversification, because only thus could one explain how that group was able to spread at the expense of rival ape-like populations. This scenario stood opposed to a new evolutionary polygenism formulated in the wake of Darwin's Origin of Species by his ostensible supporters Alfred Russel Wallace and Ernst Haeckel. Darwin judged this outlook inadequate to the task of explaining humanity's emergence. PMID:17623873

  15. HLA Type Inference via Haplotypes Identical by Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Manu N.; Gusev, Alexander; Pe'Er, Itsik

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genes play a major role in adaptive immune response and are used to differentiate self antigens from non self ones. HLA genes are hyper variable with nearly every locus harboring over a dozen alleles. This variation plays an important role in susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases and needs to be matched on for organ transplantation. Unfortunately, HLA typing by serological methods is time consuming and expensive compared to high throughput Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data. We present a new computational method to infer per-locus HLA types using shared segments Identical By Descent (IBD), inferred from SNP genotype data. IBD information is modeled as graph where shared haplotypes are explored among clusters of individuals with known and unknown HLA types to identify the latter. We analyze performance of the method in a previously typed subset of the HapMap population, achieving accuracy of 96% in HLA-A, 94% in HLA-B, 95% in HLA-C, 77% in HLA-DR1, 93% in HLA-DQA1 and 90% in HLA-DQB1 genes. We compare our method to a tag SNP based approach and demonstrate higher sensitivity and specificity. Our method demonstrates the power of using shared haplotype segments for large-scale imputation at the HLA locus.

  16. Lunar Module Eagle Upon Descent to the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Carrying astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., the Lunar Module (LM) 'Eagle' was the first crewed vehicle to land on the Moon. The LM landed on the moon's surface on July 20, 1969 in the region known as Mare Tranquilitatis (the Sea of Tranquility). The LM is shown here making its descent to the lunar surface, while Astronaut Collins piloted the Command Module in a parking orbit around the Moon. The Apollo 11 mission launched from The Kennedy Space Center, Florida aboard a Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The 3-man crew aboard the flight consisted of Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module pilot. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface. As he stepped off the LM, Armstrong proclaimed, 'That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind'. He was followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin, describing the lunar surface as Magnificent desolation. The crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material which was returned to Earth for analysis. The surface exploration was concluded in 2½ hours. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. von Braun.

  17. Minimum Landing Error Powered-Descent Guidance for Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars; Acikmese, Behcet

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm improves the accuracy with which a lander can be delivered to the surface of Mars. The main idea behind this innovation is the use of a lossless convexification, which converts an otherwise non-convex constraint related to thruster throttling to a convex constraint, enabling convex optimization to be used. The convexification leads directly to an algorithm that guarantees finding the global optimum of the original nonconvex optimization problem with a deterministic upper bound on the number of iterations required for convergence. In this innovation, previous work in powered-descent guidance using convex optimization is extended to handle the case where the lander must get as close as possible to the target given the available fuel, but is not required to arrive exactly at the target. The new algorithm calculates the minimum-fuel trajectory to the target, if one exists, and calculates the trajectory that minimizes the distance to the target if no solution to the target exists. This approach poses the problem as two Second-Order Cone Programs, which can be solved to global optimality with deterministic bounds on the number of iterations required.

  18. STS-40 descent BET products: Development and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, Kevin F.; Wood, James S.; Findlay, John T.

    1991-01-01

    Descent Best Estimate Trajectory (BET) Data were generated for the final Orbiter Experiments Flight, STS-40. This report discusses the actual development of these post-flight products: the inertial BET, the Extended BET, and the Aerodynamic BET. Summary results are also included. The inertial BET was determined based on processing Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRSS) coherent Doppler data in conjunction with observations from eleven C-band stations, to include data from the Kwajalein Atoll and the usual California coastal radars, as well as data from five cinetheodolite cameras in the vicinity of the runways at EAFB. The anchor epoch utilized for the trajectory reconstruction was 53,904 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) seconds which corresponds to an altitude at epoch of approximately 708 kft. Atmospheric data to enable development of an Extended BET for this mission were upsurped from the JSC operational post-flight BET. These data were evaluated based on Space Shuttle-derived considerations as well as model comparisons. The Aerodynamic BET includes configuration information, final mass properties, and both flight-determined and predicted aerodynamic performance estimates. The predicted data were based on the final pre-operational databook, updated to include flight determined incrementals based on an earlier ensemble of flights. Aerodynamic performance comparisons are presented and correlated versus statistical results based on twenty-two previous missions.

  19. Physics-based Entry, Descent and Landing Risk Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Huynh, Loc C.; Manning, Ted

    2014-01-01

    A physics-based risk model was developed to assess the risk associated with thermal protection system failures during the entry, descent and landing phase of a manned spacecraft mission. In the model, entry trajectories were computed using a three-degree-of-freedom trajectory tool, the aerothermodynamic heating environment was computed using an engineering-level computational tool and the thermal response of the TPS material was modeled using a one-dimensional thermal response tool. The model was capable of modeling the effect of micrometeoroid and orbital debris impact damage on the TPS thermal response. A Monte Carlo analysis was used to determine the effects of uncertainties in the vehicle state at Entry Interface, aerothermodynamic heating and material properties on the performance of the TPS design. The failure criterion was set as a temperature limit at the bondline between the TPS and the underlying structure. Both direct computation and response surface approaches were used to compute the risk. The model was applied to a generic manned space capsule design. The effect of material property uncertainty and MMOD damage on risk of failure were analyzed. A comparison of the direct computation and response surface approach was undertaken.

  20. Development of a Mars Airplane Entry, Descent, and Flight Trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James E.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    2001-01-01

    An entry, descent, and flight (EDF) trajectory profile for a Mars airplane mission is defined as consisting of the following elements: ballistic entry of an aeroshell; supersonic deployment of a decelerator parachute; subsonic release of a heat shield; release, unfolding, and orientation of an airplane to flight attitude; and execution of a pull up maneuver to achieve trimmed, horizontal flight. Using the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) a trajectory optimization problem was formulated. Model data representative of a specific Mars airplane configuration, current models of the Mars surface topography and atmosphere, and current estimates of the interplanetary trajectory, were incorporated into the analysis. The goal is to develop an EDF trajectory to maximize the surface-relative altitude of the airplane at the end of a pull up maneuver, while subject to the mission design constraints. The trajectory performance was evaluated for three potential mission sites and was found to be site-sensitive. The trajectory performance, examined for sensitivity to a number of design and constraint variables, was found to be most sensitive to airplane mass, aerodynamic performance characteristics, and the pull up Mach constraint. Based on the results of this sensitivity study, an airplane-drag optimized trajectory was developed that showed a significant performance improvement.

  1. The Descent Rates of the Shear Zones of the Equatorial QBO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnersley, Jonathan S.; Pawson, Steven

    1996-07-01

    The influence of vertical advection on the descent rate of the zero-wind line in both phases of the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) is investigated with the help of the `THIN AIR' stratosphere two-and-a-half-dimensional model. The model QBO is forced by two symmetric easterly and westerly waves, and yet the model reproduces qualitatively the observed asymmetry in the descent rates of the two shear zones due to the enhanced heating during easterly descent combined with the equatorial heating induced by the extratropical planetary waves. Observations show that the maximum easterly accelerations occur predominantly from May until July, which is when the modeled equatorial planetary-wave-induced heating rates are weakest. Hence, model results are consistent with the theory that vertical advection induced by extratropical planetary waves slows significantly the descent of the easterly shear zone. The model also shows the observed increase in vertical wind shear during stalling of the easterly descent (which increases the impact of vertical advection). In the model, the effect of cross-equatorial advection of momentum by the mean flow is negligible compared to the vertical advection. Changes in the propagation of planetary waves depending on the sign of the equatorial zonal wind have a small effect on the modeled equatorial heating rates and therefore do not play a large part in producing the modeled asymmetry in descent rates.

  2. Adaptive control of 2-wheeled balancing robot by cerebellar neuronal network model.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Ohata, Yohei; Kawamoto, Tomohiro; Hirata, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    A new adaptive motor controller was constructed, and tested on the control of a 2-wheeled balancing robot in simulation and real world. The controller consists of a feedback (PD) controller and a cerebellar neuronal network model. The structure of the cerebellar model was configured based upon known anatomical neuronal connection in the cerebellar cortex. Namely it consists of 120 granular (Gr) cells, 1 Golgi cell, 6 basket/stellate cells, and 1 Purkinje (Pk) cell. Each cell is described by a typical artificial neuron model that outputs a weighted sum of inputs after a sigmoidal nonlinear transformation. The 2 components of the proposed controller work in parallel, in a way that the cerebellar model adaptively modifies the synaptic weights between Gr and Pk as in the real cerebellum to minimize the output of the PD controller. We demonstrate that the proposed controller successfully controls a 2-wheeled balancing robot, and the cerebellar model rapidly takes over the PD controller in simulation. We also show that an abrupt load change on the robot, which the PD controller alone cannot compensate for, can be adaptively compensated by the cerebellar model. We further confirmed that the proposed controller can be applied to the control of the robot in real world. PMID:21096127

  3. Terra incognita-cerebellar contributions to neuropsychiatric and cognitive dysfunction in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rachel H; Devenney, Emma; Kiernan, Matthew C; Halliday, Glenda M; Hodges, John R; Hornberger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Although converging evidence has positioned the human cerebellum as an important relay for intact cognitive and neuropsychiatric processing, changes in this large structure remain mostly overlooked in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a disease which is characterized by cognitive and neuropsychiatric deficits. The present study assessed whether degeneration in specific cerebellar subregions associate with indices of cognition and neuropsychiatric performance in bvFTD. Our results demonstrate a relationship between cognitive and neuropsychiatric decline across various domains of memory, language, emotion, executive, visuospatial function, and motivation and the degree of gray matter degeneration in cerebellar lobules V-VII. Most notably, bilateral cerebellar lobule VII and the posterior vermis emerged as distinct for memory processes, the right cerebellar hemisphere underpinned emotion, and the posterior vermis was highlighted in language dysfunction in bvFTD. Based on cortico-cerebellar connectivity maps, these findings in the cerebellum are consistent with the neural connections with the cortices involved in these domains in patients with bvFTD. Overall, the present study underscores the significance of cortical-cerebellar networks associated with cognition and neuropsychiatric dysfunction in bvFTD. PMID:26191000

  4. Integrated plasticity at inhibitory and excitatory synapses in the cerebellar circuit

    PubMed Central

    Mapelli, Lisa; Pagani, Martina; Garrido, Jesus A.; D’Angelo, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    The way long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD) are integrated within the different synapses of brain neuronal circuits is poorly understood. In order to progress beyond the identification of specific molecular mechanisms, a system in which multiple forms of plasticity can be correlated with large-scale neural processing is required. In this paper we take as an example the cerebellar network, in which extensive investigations have revealed LTP and LTD at several excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Cerebellar LTP and LTD occur in all three main cerebellar subcircuits (granular layer, molecular layer, deep cerebellar nuclei) and correspondingly regulate the function of their three main neurons: granule cells (GrCs), Purkinje cells (PCs) and deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN) cells. All these neurons, in addition to be excited, are reached by feed-forward and feed-back inhibitory connections, in which LTP and LTD may either operate synergistically or homeostatically in order to control information flow through the circuit. Although the investigation of individual synaptic plasticities in vitro is essential to prove their existence and mechanisms, it is insufficient to generate a coherent view of their impact on network functioning in vivo. Recent computational models and cell-specific genetic mutations in mice are shedding light on how plasticity at multiple excitatory and inhibitory synapses might regulate neuronal activities in the cerebellar circuit and contribute to learning and memory and behavioral control. PMID:25999817

  5. Population-based study of acquired cerebellar ataxia in Al-Kharga district, New Valley, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Farghaly, Wafaa MA; El-Tallawy, Hamdy N; Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Rageh, Tarek A; Hakeem, Nabil Abdel; Abo-Elfetoh, Noha M

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this research was to determine the prevalence and etiology of acquired ataxia in Al-Kharga district, New Valley, Egypt. Methods: A population-based study of acquired ataxia was conducted in a defined geographical region with a total population of 62,583. A door-to-door survey was used to identify cases of acquired cerebellar ataxia. Patients with acquired cerebellar ataxia at any age and of both genders were included. Cases of known inherited cerebellar ataxia, acquired neurological disorders with ataxia as a minor feature, or pure acquired sensory ataxia, were excluded. Results: We identified 17 cases of acquired ataxia, of which eight were vascular, six were an ataxic cerebral palsy subtype, and three involved postencephalitic ataxia. The crude prevalence rate for acquired ataxia was 27.16/100,000 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 14.3–40.1). The mean age of the patients at interview was 31.8 (range 4–72) years, with a male to female ratio of 2.1:1. The most frequent presenting complaint was disturbance of gait (90.7%). The majority (92%) were ambulatory, but only 9.3% were independently self-caring. Conclusion: This population-based study provides an insight into acquired cerebellar ataxia within a defined region, and may inform decisions about the rational use of health care resources for patients with acquired cerebellar ataxia. The most common causes of acquired cerebellar ataxia in this region were cerebrovascular injury and cerebral palsy. PMID:21552320

  6. Using human induced pluripotent stem cells to model cerebellar disease: Hope and hype

    PubMed Central

    Wiethoff, Sarah; Arber, Charles; Li, Abi; Wray, Selina; Houlden, Henry; Patani, Rickie

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum forms a highly ordered and indispensible component of motor function within the adult neuraxis, consisting of several distinct cellular subtypes. Cerebellar disease, through a variety of genetic and acquired causes, results in the loss of function of defined subclasses of neurons, and remains a significant and untreatable health care burden. The scarcity of therapies in this arena can partially be explained by unresolved disease mechanisms due to inaccessibility of human cerebellar neurons in a relevant experimental context where initiating disease mechanisms could be functionally elucidated, or drug screens conducted. In this review we discuss the potential promise of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for regenerative neurology, with a particular emphasis on in vitro modelling of cerebellar degeneration. We discuss progress made thus far using hiPSC-based models of neurodegeneration, noting the relatively slower pace of discovery made in modelling cerebellar dysfunction. We conclude by speculating how strategies attempting cerebellar differentiation from hiPSCs can be refined to allow the generation of accurate disease models. This in turn will permit a greater understanding of cerebellar pathophysiology to inform mechanistically rationalised therapies, which are desperately needed in this field. PMID:25985846

  7. [Tonsillar microsurgery by bipolar dissection].

    PubMed

    Sánchez del Hoyo, A; Lacosta Nicolás, J L; Má Salóm, J; Martínez Torre, I; Fernández Martín, M J

    1995-01-01

    The 66 amygdalectomies done by the AA. under general anesthesia and tracheal intubation are considered in two groups. The first one was composed by 32 patients operated following a dissection and coagulation procedure with the aid of a bipolar forceps and under microscopical magnification. The second group, 34 cases, underwent the classical procedure with ligature of the bleeding vessels. The usage of the bipolar forceps procure lesser loss of blood as compared with the dissection-ligature procedure. On the contrary, the bipolar clip method showed and increased postoperative pain and also the lagging of the swallow function. Both techniques presented with very similar complications (bleeding, edema, loca infection). PMID:7573857

  8. Spontaneously resolving cerebellar syndrome as a sequelae of dengue viral infection: a case series from Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Weeratunga, Praveen N; Caldera, H P Manjula C; Gooneratne, I Kishara; Gamage, Ranjanie; Perera, W Sujith P; Ranasinghe, Gayan V; Niraj, Mahboob

    2014-06-01

    Sri Lanka is hyperendemic for dengue viral infection. Dengue has a wide spectrum of neurological manifestations including previously reported Sri Lankan cases with a 6th nerve palsy and a cerebellar syndrome from a co-infection with dengue and Epstein-Barr virus. This series describes a spontaneously resolving cerebellar syndrome following a dengue viral infection. Dengue is potentially an important cause of cerebellar syndromes in countries hyperendemic for the disease; patients need further studies to identify the responsible serotypes. PMID:23840070

  9. Experiments on liquid immiscibility along tholeiitic liquid lines of descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlier, Bernard; Grove, Timothy L.

    2012-07-01

    Crystallization experiments have been conducted on compositions along tholeiitic liquid lines of descent to define the compositional space for the development of silicate liquid immiscibility. Starting materials have 46-56 wt% SiO2, 11.7-17.7 wt% FeOtot, and Mg-number between 0.29 and 0.36. These melts fall on the basaltic trends relevant for Mull, Iceland, Snake River Plain lavas and for the Sept Iles layered intrusion, where large-scale liquid immiscibility has been recognized. At one atmosphere under anhydrous conditions, immiscibility develops below 1,000-1,020°C in all of these compositionally diverse lavas. Extreme iron enrichment is not necessary; immiscibility also develops during iron depletion and silica enrichment. Variations in melt composition control the development of silicate liquid immiscibility along the tholeiitic trend. Elevation of Na2O + K2O + P2O5 + TiO2 promotes the development of two immiscible liquids. Increasing melt CaO and Al2O3 stabilizes a single-liquid field. New data and published phase equilibria show that anhydrous, low-pressure fractional crystallization is the most favorable condition for unmixing during differentiation. Pressure inhibits immiscibility because it expands the stability field of high-Ca clinopyroxene, which reduces the proportion of plagioclase in the crystallizing assemblage, thus enhancing early iron depletion. Magma mixing between primitive basalt and Fe-Ti-P-rich ferrobasalts can serve to elevate phosphorous and alkali contents and thereby promote unmixing. Water might decrease the temperature and size of the two-liquid field, potentially shifting the binodal (solvus) below the liquidus, leading the system to evolve as a single-melt phase.

  10. Analysis of atmospheric mesoscale models for entry, descent, and landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, D. M.; Schofield, J. T.; Michaels, T. I.; Rafkin, S. C. R.; Richardson, M. I.; Toigo, A. D.

    2003-11-01

    Each Mars Exploration Rover (MER) is sensitive to the Martian winds encountered near the surface during the entry, descent, and landing (EDL) process. These winds are strongly influenced by local (mesoscale) conditions. In the absence of suitable wind observations, wind fields predicted by Martian mesoscale atmospheric models have been analyzed to guide landing site selection. In order to encompass the available models and render them useful to the EDL engineering team, a series of statistical techniques was applied to the model results. These analyses cover the high-priority landing sites during the expected landing times (1200-1500 LT). The number of sites studied is limited by the computational and analysis cost of the mesoscale models. The statistical measures concentrate on the effective mean wind (the wind as seen by the landing system) and on the vertical structure of the horizontal winds. Both aspects are potentially hazardous to the MER landing system. In addition, a number of individual wind profiles from the mesoscale model were processed into a form that can be used directly by the EDL Monte Carlo simulations. The statistical analysis indicates that the Meridiani Planum and Elysium landing sites are probably safe. The Gusev Crater and Isidis Basin sites may be safe, but further analysis by the EDL engineers will be necessary to quantify the actual risk. Finally, the winds at the Melas Chasma landing site (and presumably other Valles Marineris landing sites) are dangerous. While the statistical parameters selected for these studies were primarily of engineering and safety interest, the techniques are potentially useful for more general scientific analyses. One interesting result of the current analysis is that the depth of the convective boundary layer (and thus the resulting energy density) appears to be primarily driven by the existence of a well-organized mesoscale (or regional) circulation, primarily driven by large-scale topographic features at Mars.

  11. Atmospheric Environments for Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, Carl G.; Braun, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Scientific measurements of atmospheric properties have been made by a wide variety of planetary flyby missions, orbiters, and landers. Although landers can make in-situ observations of near-surface atmospheric conditions (and can collect atmospheric data during their entry phase), the vast majority of data on planetary atmospheres has been collected by remote sensing techniques from flyby and orbiter spacecraft (and to some extent by Earth-based remote sensing). Many of these remote sensing observations (made over a variety of spectral ranges), consist of vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature as a function of atmospheric pressure level. While these measurements are of great interest to atmospheric scientists and modelers of planetary atmospheres, the primary interest for engineers designing entry descent and landing (EDL) systems is information about atmospheric density as a function of geometric altitude. Fortunately, as described in in this paper, it is possible to use a combination of the gas-law relation and the hydrostatic balance relation to convert temperature-versus-pressure, scientific observations into density-versus-altitude data for use in engineering applications. The following section provides a brief introduction to atmospheric thermodynamics, as well as constituents, and winds for EDL. It also gives methodology for using atmospheric information to do "back-of-the-envelope" calculations of various EDL aeroheating parameters, including peak deceleration rate ("g-load"), peak convective heat rate. and total heat load on EDL spacecraft thermal protection systems. Brief information is also provided about atmospheric variations and perturbations for EDL guidance and control issues, and atmospheric issues for EDL parachute systems. Subsequent sections give details of the atmospheric environments for five destinations for possible EDL missions: Venus. Earth. Mars, Saturn, and Titan. Specific atmospheric information is provided for these destinations, and example results are presented for the "back-of-the-envelope" calculations mentioned above.

  12. Application of inflatable aeroshell structures for Entry Descent and Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurewicz, David; Lichodziejewski, Leo; Tutt, Ben; Gilles, Brian; Brown, Glen

    Future space missions will require improvements in the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) phases of the mission architecture. The focus of this paper is to discuss recent advances in analysis, fabrication techniques, ground testing, and flight testing of a stacked torus Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) and its application to the future of EDL. The primary structure of a stacked torus HIAD consists of nested inflatable tori of increasing major diameter bonded and strapped to form a rigid structure after inflation. The underlying structure of the decelerator is covered with a flexible Thermal Protection System (TPS) capable of high heat flux. The inflatable aeroshell and TPS are packed around a centerbody within the launch fairing and deployed prior to atmospheric reentry. Recent fabrication of multiple HIADs between 3 and 6 meters has led to significant advances in process control and validation of the scalability of the technology. Progress has been made in generating and validating LS-DYNA FEA models to replicate flight loading in addition to analytical models of substructures. Coupon and component testing has improved the validation of modeling techniques and assumptions at the subsystem level. A ground testing campaign at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Center (NFAC) wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research center generated substantial aerodynamic and loading data to validate full system modeling with comparable dynamic pressures to a hypersonic reentry. The Inflatable Reentry Vehicle - 3 (IRVE-3) sounding rocket flight test was conducted with NASA Langley Research Center in July 2012. The IRVE-3 mission verified the structural and thermal performance of the stacked torus configuration. Further development of the stacked torus configuration is currently being conducted to increase the thermal capability, deceleration loads, and understanding of the interactions and effects of constituent components. The results of this research have expanded the- feasible flight envelope of stacked torus HIAD designs over a range of sizes, loading conditions, and heating.

  13. Modulation of error-sensitivity during a prism adaptation task in people with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hanajima, Ritsuko; Shadmehr, Reza; Ohminami, Shinya; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Shirota, Yuichiro; Shimizu, Takahiro; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Terao, Yasuo; Tsuji, Shoji; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Uchimura, Motoaki; Inoue, Masato; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    Cerebellar damage can profoundly impair human motor adaptation. For example, if reaching movements are perturbed abruptly, cerebellar damage impairs the ability to learn from the perturbation-induced errors. Interestingly, if the perturbation is imposed gradually over many trials, people with cerebellar damage may exhibit improved adaptation. However, this result is controversial, since the differential effects of gradual vs. abrupt protocols have not been observed in all studies. To examine this question, we recruited patients with pure cerebellar ataxia due to cerebellar cortical atrophy (n = 13) and asked them to reach to a target while viewing the scene through wedge prisms. The prisms were computer controlled, making it possible to impose the full perturbation abruptly in one trial, or build up the perturbation gradually over many trials. To control visual feedback, we employed shutter glasses that removed visual feedback during the reach, allowing us to measure trial-by-trial learning from error (termed error-sensitivity), and trial-by-trial decay of motor memory (termed forgetting). We found that the patients benefited significantly from the gradual protocol, improving their performance with respect to the abrupt protocol by exhibiting smaller errors during the exposure block, and producing larger aftereffects during the postexposure block. Trial-by-trial analysis suggested that this improvement was due to increased error-sensitivity in the gradual protocol. Therefore, cerebellar patients exhibited an improved ability to learn from error if they experienced those errors gradually. This improvement coincided with increased error-sensitivity and was present in both groups of subjects, suggesting that control of error-sensitivity may be spared despite cerebellar damage. PMID:26311179

  14. Comparative neuronal morphology of the cerebellar cortex in afrotherians, carnivores, cetartiodactyls, and primates.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Bob; Johnson, Nicholas L; Wahl, Devin; Schall, Matthew; Maseko, Busisiwe C; Lewandowski, Albert; Raghanti, Mary A; Wicinski, Bridget; Butti, Camilla; Hopkins, William D; Bertelsen, Mads F; Walsh, Timothy; Roberts, John R; Reep, Roger L; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C; Manger, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Although the basic morphological characteristics of neurons in the cerebellar cortex have been documented in several species, virtually nothing is known about the quantitative morphological characteristics of these neurons across different taxa. To that end, the present study investigated cerebellar neuronal morphology among eight different, large-brained mammalian species comprising a broad phylogenetic range: afrotherians (African elephant, Florida manatee), carnivores (Siberian tiger, clouded leopard), cetartiodactyls (humpback whale, giraffe) and primates (human, common chimpanzee). Specifically, several neuron types (e.g., stellate, basket, Lugaro, Golgi, and granule neurons; N = 317) of the cerebellar cortex were stained with a modified rapid Golgi technique and quantified on a computer-assisted microscopy system. There was a 64-fold variation in brain mass across species in our sample (from clouded leopard to the elephant) and a 103-fold variation in cerebellar volume. Most dendritic measures tended to increase with cerebellar volume. The cerebellar cortex in these species exhibited the trilaminate pattern common to all mammals. Morphologically, neuron types in the cerebellar cortex were generally consistent with those described in primates (Fox et al., 1967) and rodents (Palay and Chan-Palay, 1974), although there was substantial quantitative variation across species. In particular, Lugaro neurons in the elephant appeared to be disproportionately larger than those in other species. To explore potential quantitative differences in dendritic measures across species, MARSplines analyses were used to evaluate whether species could be differentiated from each other based on dendritic characteristics alone. Results of these analyses indicated that there were significant differences among all species in dendritic measures. PMID:24795574

  15. Comparative neuronal morphology of the cerebellar cortex in afrotherians, carnivores, cetartiodactyls, and primates

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Bob; Johnson, Nicholas L.; Wahl, Devin; Schall, Matthew; Maseko, Busisiwe C.; Lewandowski, Albert; Raghanti, Mary A.; Wicinski, Bridget; Butti, Camilla; Hopkins, William D.; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Walsh, Timothy; Roberts, John R.; Reep, Roger L.; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Manger, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Although the basic morphological characteristics of neurons in the cerebellar cortex have been documented in several species, virtually nothing is known about the quantitative morphological characteristics of these neurons across different taxa. To that end, the present study investigated cerebellar neuronal morphology among eight different, large-brained mammalian species comprising a broad phylogenetic range: afrotherians (African elephant, Florida manatee), carnivores (Siberian tiger, clouded leopard), cetartiodactyls (humpback whale, giraffe) and primates (human, common chimpanzee). Specifically, several neuron types (e.g., stellate, basket, Lugaro, Golgi, and granule neurons; N = 317) of the cerebellar cortex were stained with a modified rapid Golgi technique and quantified on a computer-assisted microscopy system. There was a 64-fold variation in brain mass across species in our sample (from clouded leopard to the elephant) and a 103-fold variation in cerebellar volume. Most dendritic measures tended to increase with cerebellar volume. The cerebellar cortex in these species exhibited the trilaminate pattern common to all mammals. Morphologically, neuron types in the cerebellar cortex were generally consistent with those described in primates (Fox et al., 1967) and rodents (Palay and Chan-Palay, 1974), although there was substantial quantitative variation across species. In particular, Lugaro neurons in the elephant appeared to be disproportionately larger than those in other species. To explore potential quantitative differences in dendritic measures across species, MARSplines analyses were used to evaluate whether species could be differentiated from each other based on dendritic characteristics alone. Results of these analyses indicated that there were significant differences among all species in dendritic measures. PMID:24795574

  16. Tracer-Based Determination of Vortex Descent in the 1999-2000 Arctic Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James R.; Hurst, Dale F.; Elkins, James W.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Herman, Robert L.; Webster, Christopher R.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed analysis of available in situ and remotely sensed N2O and CH4 data measured in the 1999-2000 winter Arctic vortex has been performed in order to quantify the temporal evolution of vortex descent. Differences in potential temperature (theta) among balloon and aircraft vertical profiles (an average of 19-23 K on a given N2O or CH4 isopleth) indicated significant vortex inhomogeneity in late fall as compared with late winter profiles. A composite fall vortex profile was constructed for November 26, 1999, whose error bars encompassed the observed variability. High-latitude, extravortex profiles measured in different years and seasons revealed substantial variability in N2O and CH4 on theta surfaces, but all were clearly distinguishable from the first vortex profiles measured in late fall 1999. From these extravortex-vortex differences, we inferred descent prior to November 26: 397+/-15 K (1sigma) at 30 ppbv N2O and 640 ppbv CH4, and 28+/-13 K above 200 ppbv N2O and 1280 ppbv CH4. Changes in theta were determined on five N2O and CH4 isopleths from November 26 through March 12, and descent rates were calculated on each N2O isopleth for several time intervals. The maximum descent rates were seen between November 26 and January 27: 0.82+/-0.20 K/day averaged over 50-250 ppbv N2O. By late winter (February 26-March 12), the average rate had decreased to 0.10+/-0.25 K/day. Descent rates also decreased with increasing N2O; the winter average (November 26-March 5) descent rate varied from 0.75+/-0.10 K/day at 50 ppbv to 0.40+/-0.11 K/day at 250 ppbv. Comparison of these results with observations and models of descent in prior years showed very good overall agreement. Two models of the 1999-2000 vortex descent, SLIMCAT and REPROBUS, despite theta offsets with respect to observed profiles of up to 20 K on most tracer isopleths, produced descent rates that agreed very favorably with the inferred rates from observation.

  17. Recurrent cerebellar hemorrhage: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yung-Tsan; Hsieh, Ming-Fu; Chu, Heng-Yi; Lu, Shao-Chi; Chang, Shin-Tsu; Li, Tsung-Ying

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of cerebellar hemorrhage (CH) that recurred in other hemisphere after 4 months of the first attack. A 58-year-old man presented with general weakness and computerized tomography (CT) of the brain showed a 41 mm hematoma in the right cerebellum with intraventricular extension. The satisfactory outcome was obtained after emergency surgical intervention and intensive rehabilitation. However, the patient irregularly took the prescribed anti-hypertensive medication. Four months after first attack, the recurrent CH in left side showed by brain CT. Only 2 cases of recurrent CH have been published thus far. The patient is the third reported case of recurrent CH and the second case in which CH recurred in the other hemisphere. Further, no patient has been reported to develop recurrence of CH in such a short period after the first onset. We discuss the possible pathophysiology, clinical course, treatment outcome, risk factors associated with such events and the importance of blood pressure control for preventing recurrence. PMID:20461487

  18. Remote Cerebellar Hemorrhage after Revision Lumbar Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Justin M.; Calvert, Graham; Spiker, William R.; Brodke, Darrel S.; Lawrence, Brandon D.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Case report. Objective?To report a case of remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) without intraoperative dural tear after revision lumbar spine surgery. RCH is a rare postoperative complication following spine surgery. RCH has previously been reported only in cases with intraoperative dural tear or durotomy. Methods?Case report and literature review. Results?A 58-year-old woman underwent removal of L4–S1 posterior spinal instrumented fusion (PSIF) implants and L3–L4 decompressive laminectomy with PSIF. There was no intraoperative dural tear. After doing well initially, the patient developed new neurologic symptoms and was found to have RCH. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large dural defect. After repair of the dura, the patient had dramatic improvement of her neurologic symptoms. At 1-year follow-up, the patient continued to have no neurologic sequelae. Conclusion?This report demonstrates that RCH can occur without intraoperative dural tear. Although rare, any patient with new onset of declining neurologic symptoms following spine surgery should have a brain MRI and should have RCH on the differential diagnosis. PMID:26682108

  19. Remote Cerebellar Hemorrhage after Revision Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Haller, Justin M; Calvert, Graham; Spiker, William R; Brodke, Darrel S; Lawrence, Brandon D

    2015-12-01

    Study Design?Case report. Objective?To report a case of remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) without intraoperative dural tear after revision lumbar spine surgery. RCH is a rare postoperative complication following spine surgery. RCH has previously been reported only in cases with intraoperative dural tear or durotomy. Methods?Case report and literature review. Results?A 58-year-old woman underwent removal of L4-S1 posterior spinal instrumented fusion (PSIF) implants and L3-L4 decompressive laminectomy with PSIF. There was no intraoperative dural tear. After doing well initially, the patient developed new neurologic symptoms and was found to have RCH. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large dural defect. After repair of the dura, the patient had dramatic improvement of her neurologic symptoms. At 1-year follow-up, the patient continued to have no neurologic sequelae. Conclusion?This report demonstrates that RCH can occur without intraoperative dural tear. Although rare, any patient with new onset of declining neurologic symptoms following spine surgery should have a brain MRI and should have RCH on the differential diagnosis. PMID:26682108

  20. Components of action potential repolarization in cerebellar parallel fibres

    PubMed Central

    Pekala, Dobromila; Baginskas, Armantas; Szkudlarek, Hanna J; Raastad, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Repolarization of the presynaptic action potential is essential for transmitter release, excitability and energy expenditure. Little is known about repolarization in thin, unmyelinated axons forming en passant synapses, which represent the most common type of axons in the mammalian brain's grey matter. We used rat cerebellar parallel fibres, an example of typical grey matter axons, to investigate the effects of K+ channel blockers on repolarization. We show that repolarization is composed of a fast tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive component, determining the width and amplitude of the spike, and a slow margatoxin (MgTX)-sensitive depolarized after-potential (DAP). These two components could be recorded at the granule cell soma as antidromic action potentials and from the axons with a newly developed miniaturized grease-gap method. A considerable proportion of fast repolarization remained in the presence of TEA, MgTX, or both. This residual was abolished by the addition of quinine. The importance of proper control of fast repolarization was demonstrated by somatic recordings of antidromic action potentials. In these experiments, the relatively broad K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine reduced the fast repolarization, resulting in bursts of action potentials forming on top of the DAP. We conclude that repolarization of the action potential in parallel fibres is supported by at least three groups of K+ channels. Differences in their temporal profiles allow relatively independent control of the spike and the DAP, whereas overlap of their temporal profiles provides robust control of axonal bursting properties. PMID:25239461

  1. Structural and functional MRI abnormalities of cerebellar cortex and nuclei in SCA3, SCA6 and Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Stefanescu, Maria R; Dohnalek, Moritz; Maderwald, Stefan; Thürling, Markus; Minnerop, Martina; Beck, Andreas; Schlamann, Marc; Diedrichsen, Joern; Ladd, Mark E; Timmann, Dagmar

    2015-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 and Friedreich's ataxia are common hereditary ataxias. Different patterns of atrophy of the cerebellar cortex are well known. Data on cerebellar nuclei are sparse. Whereas cerebellar nuclei have long been thought to be preserved in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, histology shows marked atrophy of the nuclei in Friedreich's ataxia and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. In the present study susceptibility weighted imaging was used to assess atrophy of the cerebellar nuclei in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (n = 12, age range 41-76 years, five female), Friedreich's ataxia (n = 12, age range 21-55 years, seven female), spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (n = 10, age range 34-67 years, three female), and age- and gender-matched controls (total n = 23, age range 22-75 years, 10 female). T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were used to calculate the volume of the cerebellum. In addition, ultra-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed with optimized normalization methods to assess function of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei during simple hand movements. As expected, the volume of the cerebellum was markedly reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, preserved in Friedreich's ataxia, and mildy reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. The volume of the cerebellar nuclei was reduced in the three patient groups compared to matched controls (P-values < 0.05; two-sample t-tests). Atrophy of the cerebellar nuclei was most pronounced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6. On a functional level, hand-movement-related cerebellar activation was altered in all three disorders. Within the cerebellar cortex, functional magnetic resonance imaging signal was significantly reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 and Friedreich's ataxia compared to matched controls (P-values < 0.001, bootstrap-corrected cluster-size threshold; two-sample t-tests). The difference missed significance in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. Within the cerebellar nuclei, reductions were significant when comparing spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 and Friedreich's ataxia to matched controls (P < 0.01, bootstrap-corrected cluster-size threshold; two-sample t-tests). Susceptibility weighted imaging allowed depiction of atrophy of the cerebellar nuclei in patients with Friedreich's ataxia and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. In spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, pathology was not restricted to the cerebellar cortex but also involved the cerebellar nuclei. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data, on the other hand, revealed that pathology in Friedreich's ataxia and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 is not restricted to the cerebellar nuclei. There was functional involvement of the cerebellar cortex despite no or little structural changes. PMID:25818870

  2. Global Patterns of Prostate Cancer Incidence, Aggressiveness, and Mortality in Men of African Descent

    PubMed Central

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Devesa, Susan S.; Chang, Bao-Li; Bunker, Clareann H.; Cheng, Iona; Cooney, Kathleen; Eeles, Rosalind; Fernandez, Pedro; Giri, Veda N.; Gueye, Serigne M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Heyns, Chris F.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ingles, Sue Ann; Isaacs, William; Jalloh, Mohamed; John, Esther M.; Kibel, Adam S.; Kidd, LaCreis R.; Layne, Penelope; Leach, Robin J.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Okobia, Michael N.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Park, Jong Y.; Patrick, Alan L.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Ragin, Camille; Roberts, Robin A.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Stanford, Janet L.; Strom, Sara; Thompson, Ian M.; Witte, John; Xu, Jianfeng; Yeboah, Edward; Hsing, Ann W.; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita M.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the leading cancer among men of African descent in the USA, Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The estimated number of CaP deaths in SSA during 2008 was more than five times that among African Americans and is expected to double in Africa by 2030. We summarize publicly available CaP data and collected data from the men of African descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate (MADCaP) Consortium and the African Caribbean Cancer Consortium (AC3) to evaluate CaP incidence and mortality in men of African descent worldwide. CaP incidence and mortality are highest in men of African descent in the USA and the Caribbean. Tumor stage and grade were highest in SSA. We report a higher proportion of T1 stage prostate tumors in countries with greater percent gross domestic product spent on health care and physicians per 100,000 persons. We also observed that regions with a higher proportion of advanced tumors reported lower mortality rates. This finding suggests that CaP is underdiagnosed and/or underreported in SSA men. Nonetheless, CaP incidence and mortality represent a significant public health problem in men of African descent around the world. PMID:23476788

  3. Global patterns of prostate cancer incidence, aggressiveness, and mortality in men of african descent.

    PubMed

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Devesa, Susan S; Chang, Bao-Li; Bunker, Clareann H; Cheng, Iona; Cooney, Kathleen; Eeles, Rosalind; Fernandez, Pedro; Giri, Veda N; Gueye, Serigne M; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Heyns, Chris F; Hu, Jennifer J; Ingles, Sue Ann; Isaacs, William; Jalloh, Mohamed; John, Esther M; Kibel, Adam S; Kidd, Lacreis R; Layne, Penelope; Leach, Robin J; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Okobia, Michael N; Ostrander, Elaine A; Park, Jong Y; Patrick, Alan L; Phelan, Catherine M; Ragin, Camille; Roberts, Robin A; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Stanford, Janet L; Strom, Sara; Thompson, Ian M; Witte, John; Xu, Jianfeng; Yeboah, Edward; Hsing, Ann W; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita M

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the leading cancer among men of African descent in the USA, Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The estimated number of CaP deaths in SSA during 2008 was more than five times that among African Americans and is expected to double in Africa by 2030. We summarize publicly available CaP data and collected data from the men of African descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate (MADCaP) Consortium and the African Caribbean Cancer Consortium (AC3) to evaluate CaP incidence and mortality in men of African descent worldwide. CaP incidence and mortality are highest in men of African descent in the USA and the Caribbean. Tumor stage and grade were highest in SSA. We report a higher proportion of T1 stage prostate tumors in countries with greater percent gross domestic product spent on health care and physicians per 100,000 persons. We also observed that regions with a higher proportion of advanced tumors reported lower mortality rates. This finding suggests that CaP is underdiagnosed and/or underreported in SSA men. Nonetheless, CaP incidence and mortality represent a significant public health problem in men of African descent around the world. PMID:23476788

  4. Increased variability in finger position occurs throughout overarm throws made by cerebellar and unskilled subjects.

    PubMed

    Timmann, D; Citron, R; Watts, S; Hore, J

    2001-12-01

    We investigated the ability of cerebellar patients and unskilled subjects to control finger grip position and the amplitude of finger opening during a multijoint overarm throw. This situation is of interest because the appropriate finger control requires predicting the magnitude of back forces from the ball on the finger throughout the throw and generating the appropriate level and rate of change of finger flexor torque to oppose the back force. Cerebellar patients, matched controls, and unskilled subjects threw tennis balls and tennis-sized balls of different weights. In all cases angular positions of five arm segments in three dimension were recorded at 1,000 Hz with the search-coil technique as subjects threw from a seated position. When the hand was stationary, cerebellar patients showed a normal ability to grip the ball and open the fingers and drop the ball. In contrast, in overarm throws where a back force occurred on the fingers, cerebellar patients showed an abnormally large variability in amplitude of the change in finger position when gripping, in amplitude of finger opening, and in amplitude of the change in finger position 10 ms after ball release. This was not due to more trial-to-trial variation in throwing speed. When throwing balls of increasing weights, both controls and cerebellar patients had increasing finger flexions after ball release that indicated that, on average, both scaled finger force in proportion to ball weight during the throw. Unlike skilled controls, cerebellar patients showed a small (<20 degrees ) increase in the amplitude of finger opening with balls of increasing weight. However, neither the increase in variability of finger position nor the increase in finger amplitude with balls of increasing weight were unique cerebellar signs because both were observed to various degrees in unskilled throwers. It is concluded that in the absence of either normal cerebellar function or skill, the central neural activity that controls finger opening in throwing can increase finger flexor force to oppose an increase in back force from heavier balls and can open the fingers but cannot control finger force or finger opening precisely and consistently from throw to throw. These results fit with the idea that cerebellar disorders are greater in multijoint than single-joint movements because control of force is more complicated. They are also consistent with the hypothesis that the cerebellum produces skill in movement by reducing variability in the timing and force of muscle contractions. PMID:11731529

  5. Aerodynamics of Reentry Vehicle Clipper at Descent Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Yu. P.; Reshetin, A. G.; Dyadkin, A. A.; Petrov, N. K.; Simakova, T. V.; Tokarev, V. A.

    2005-02-01

    From Gagarin spacecraft to reusable orbiter Buran, RSC Energia has traveled a long way in the search for the most optimal and, which is no less important, the most reliable spacecraft for manned space flight. During the forty years of space exploration, in cooperation with a broad base of subcontractors, a number of problems have been solved which assure a safe long stay in space. Vostok and Voskhod spacecraft were replaced with Soyuz supporting a crew of three. During missions to a space station, it provides crew rescue capability in case of a space station emergency at all times (the spacecraft life is 200 days).The latest modification of Soyuz spacecraft -Soyuz TMA -in contrast to its predecessors, allows to become a space flight participant to a person of virtually any anthropometric parameters with a mass of 50 to 95 kg capable of withstanding up to 6 g load during descent. At present, Soyuz TMA spacecraft are the state-of-the-art, reliable and only means of the ISS crew delivery, in-flight support and return. Introduced on the basis of many years of experience in operation of manned spacecraft were not only the principles of deep redundancy of on-board systems and equipment, but, to assure the main task of the spacecraft -the crew return to Earth -the principles of functional redundancy. That is, vital operations can be performed by different systems based on different physical principles. The emergency escape system that was developed is the only one in the world that provides crew rescue in case of LV failure at any phase in its flight. Several generations of space stations that have been developed have broadened, virtually beyond all limits, capabilities of man in space. The docking system developed at RSC Energia allowed not only to dock spacecraft in space, but also to construct in orbit various complex space systems. These include large space stations, and may include in the future the in-orbit construction of systems for the exploration of the Moon and Mars.. Logistics spacecraft Progress have been flying regularly since 1978. The tasks of these unmanned spacecraft include supplying the space station with all the necessities for long-duration missions, such as propellant for the space station propulsion system, crew life support consumables, scientific equipment for conducting experiments. Various modifications of the spacecraft have expanded the space station capabilities. 1988 saw the first, and, much to our regret, the last flight of the reusable orbiter Buran.. Buran could deliver to orbit up to 30 tons of cargo, return 20 tons to Earth and have a crew of up to 10. However, due to our country's economic situation the project was suspended.

  6. Anatomic and angiographic findings of cerebellar arteriovenous malformations: Report of a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Robert, Th; Blanc, R; Ciccio, G; Redjem, H; Fahed, R; Smajda, S; Piotin, M

    2015-11-15

    Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare and comprise only 5-10% of cerebral AVM. The concentration of eloquent neurological systems and the high rate of bleeding presentation of AVMs particularly in this location complicate the management of such lesions. New therapeutic options, especially in endovascular neurosurgery, have fundamentally modified the strategy and, also, the outcome of cerebellar AVMs. Between 1995 and 2013, demographic, clinical and angiographic data of cerebral AVMs have been prospectively collected. We analyzed data of patients treated for a cerebellar AVM, focusing on the angiographic anatomy. Fifty-nine patients (mean age : 35years, male to female ratio : 2) were consecutively treated for a cerebellar AVM. 81.4% of them presented bleeding at admission. 20 AVMs (33.9%) were in eloquent areas. The Spetzler-Martin grade was I or II in 36 cases (51%). An associated aneurysm was noted in more than 40% of cases and a venous drainage anomaly in 70%. The vast majority of cases of this series presented an anatomical risk factor of bleeding. Patients with cerebellar AVMs presented with bleeding more often than patients with supratentorial AVMs, justifying an aggressive management. The analysis of angio-architecture highlighted the high rate of associated aneurysm and/or venous drainage anomalies that could explain the tendency to bleed of such lesion. PMID:26412159

  7. Electro-oculogram in multiple system and late onset cerebellar atrophies.

    PubMed

    Arpa, J; Sarriá, J; Cruz-Martínez, A; López-Pajares, R; Ferrer, T; Palomo, F; Alonso, M; Vivancos, F; Nos, J; Iváñez, V

    1995-01-01

    The present investigation uses electrooculogram to evaluate multiple system atrophy (MSA) and late onset cerebellar atrophies (LOCAs), both idiopathic (ILOCA) and late onset autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA). Forty cases were clinically examined using scales for cerebellar, pyramidal, parkinsonian, mental status and neuroimaging quantitative evaluations. The patients were classified into three groups: olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), striatonigral degeneration (SND), Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS), and LOCA. We have used direct current electro-oculography in order to establish their validity in making the diagnosis. Cerebellar signs were significantly correlated with impaired VOR-fix gain and OKN, abnormalities of saccades, and reduced smooth pursuit gain (p < 0.05). Pons atrophy was significantly correlated with impaired VOR-fix gain (p < 0.01), abnormalities of saccades (p < 0.01), and reduced smooth pursuit gain (p < 0.05). Cerebellar hemisphere atrophy was significantly correlated only with impaired VOR-fix gain (p < 0.05), and medulla oblongata atrophy only with abnormalities of saccades (p < 0.05). Gaze-evoked nystagmus was found in 42.8% of patients with OPCA, and only in 14.2% with SND, but was not found in LOCA patients (t test, p < 0.05). In patients with OPCA, the combination of gaze-evoked nystagmus, abnormalities of sinusoidal VOR and reduced OKN gain measurements was very frequent, while infrequent in both LOCA (Fisher's exact test, p < 0.05) and SND subjects (p < 0.01). SDS also showed abnormalities of the oculomotor system. PMID:8556607

  8. Descent and Landing Triggers for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Exploration Flight Test-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihari, Brian D.; Semrau, Jeffrey D.; Duke, Charity J.

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) will perform a flight test known as Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) currently scheduled for 2014. One of the primary functions of this test is to exercise all of the important Guidance, Navigation, Control (GN&C), and Propulsion systems, along with the flight software for future flights. The Descent and Landing segment of the flight is governed by the requirements levied on the GN&C system by the Landing and Recovery System (LRS). The LRS is a complex system of parachutes and flight control modes that ensure that the Orion MPCV safely lands at its designated target in the Pacific Ocean. The Descent and Landing segment begins with the jettisoning of the Forward Bay Cover and concludes with sensing touchdown. This paper discusses the requirements, design, testing, analysis and performance of the current EFT-1 Descent and Landing Triggers flight software.

  9. Recovering the attitude of the Huygens descent module using DISR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizk, B.; Tomasko, M. G.; Bushroe, M. W.; McFarlane, E. A.; See, C.

    2004-02-01

    Data from a combination of DISR instruments will allow probe attitude reconstruction during the descent phase. The radiances measured by the DISR Sun Sensor (SS), Side-Looking Imager (SLI) and Solar Aureole (SA 1, 2, 3 and 4) cameras as they are exposed to different sections of Titan sky and surface while the descent module spins, will be compared to a model of the satellite's absolute sky brightness in order to discern deviations from a baseline simulations with no tips or tilts. Thus the attitude of the probe can be deduced. Deriving the attitude allows High-Resolution Imager (HRI) and Medium-Resolution Imager (MRI) ground tracks to be assembled by correlating ground features from image to image and altitudes determined from SLI measurements of the level of the horizon. Hence the descent trajectory can be determined.

  10. Huygens’ entry and descent through Titan's atmosphere—Methodology and results of the trajectory reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazeminejad, Bobby; Atkinson, David H.; Pérez-Ayúcar, Miguel; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Sollazzo, Claudio

    2007-11-01

    The European Space Agency's Huygens probe separated from the NASA Cassini spacecraft on 25 December 2004, after having been attached for a 7-year interplanetary journey and three orbits around Saturn. The probe reached the predefined NASA/ESA interface point on 14 January 2005 at 09:05:52.523 (UTC) and performed a successful entry and descent sequence. The probe softly impacted on Titan's surface on the same day at 11:38:10.77 (UTC) with a speed of about 4.54 m/s. The probe entry and descent trajectory was reconstructed from the estimated initial state vector provided by the Cassini Navigation team, the probe housekeeping data, and measurements from the scientific payload. This paper presents the methodology and discuss the results of the reconstruction effort. Furthermore the probe roll rate was reconstructed prior to the main entry phase deceleration pulse and throughout the entire descent phase under the main and drogue parachute.

  11. Advances in POST2 End-to-End Descent and Landing Simulation for the ALHAT Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jody L.; Striepe, Scott A.; Maddock, Robert W.; Hines, Glenn D.; Paschall, Stephen, II; Cohanim, Babak E.; Fill, Thomas; Johnson, Michael C.; Bishop, Robert H.; DeMars, Kyle J.; Sostaric, Ronald r.; Johnson, Andrew E.

    2008-01-01

    Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) is used as a basis for an end-to-end descent and landing trajectory simulation that is essential in determining design and integration capability and system performance of the lunar descent and landing system and environment models for the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project. The POST2 simulation provides a six degree-of-freedom capability necessary to test, design and operate a descent and landing system for successful lunar landing. This paper presents advances in the development and model-implementation of the POST2 simulation, as well as preliminary system performance analysis, used for the testing and evaluation of ALHAT project system models.

  12. Experimental liquid line of descent and liquid immiscibility for basalt 70017. [lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, M. J.; Hess, P. C.; Daniel, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    The paper describes one possible liquid line of descent produced for a high-titanium mare basalt composition through an arbitrarily chosen series of partial equilibrium and fractional crystallization experiments on basalt 70017. The liquid line of descent leading to immiscibility at 994 C is characterized by enrichment of FeO, K2O, SiO2, and MnO and depletion of MgO and TiO2 in the residual liquids. The composition of the residual liquid at the onset of immiscibility is ferrobasaltic, and the initial appearance of immiscible liquids in the form of silica-rich spherules is in the vicinity of plagioclase-liquid contacts. The integrated bulk composition of the areas of finely exsolved liquids indicates that the trend of the liquid line of descent is at a small angle to the tie lines joining the two liquids.

  13. High sensitivity quantitative analysis of cobalt uptake in rat cerebellar granule cells with and without excitatory amino acids

    E-print Network

    Gilbert, Pupa Gelsomina De Stasio

    High sensitivity quantitative analysis of cobalt uptake in rat cerebellar granule cells and glutamate on the uptake of cobalt in primary rat cerebellar granule neurons, by using inductively coupled also found that cobalt uptake is not significantly altered by the presence of glutamate receptor

  14. Reflections on Speech Motor Control Based on Phonatory and DDK Tasks in Dysarthric Subjects with Lesions in Different Cerebellar Loci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandana, V. P.

    2007-01-01

    There are very few acoustic studies reflecting on the localization of speech function within the different loci of the cerebellum. Task based performance profile of subjects with lesion in different cerebellar loci is not reported. Also, the findings on nonfocal cerebellar lesions cannot be generalized to lesions restricted to the cerebellum.…

  15. Cerebellar Purkinje cell death in the P/Q -type voltage-gated calcium ion channel mutant mouse, leaner 

    E-print Network

    Frank-Cannon, Tamy Catherine

    2006-04-12

    . These disorders include phenotypes such as a progressive cerebellar atrophy and ataxia. The leaner mouse also carries a mutation in the alpha(1A) subunit of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels, which results in a severe cerebellar atrophy and ataxia...

  16. Surface-Based Display of Volume-Averaged Cerebellar Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Diedrichsen, Jörn; Zotow, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a flat representation of the human cerebellum, useful for visualizing functional imaging data after volume-based normalization and averaging across subjects. Instead of reconstructing individual cerebellar surfaces, the method uses a white- and grey-matter surface defined on volume-averaged anatomical data. Functional data can be projected along the lines of corresponding vertices on the two surfaces. The flat representation is optimized to yield a roughly proportional relationship between the surface area of the 2D-representation and the volume of the underlying cerebellar grey matter. The map allows users to visualize the activation state of the complete cerebellar grey matter in one concise view, equally revealing both the anterior-posterior (lobular) and medial-lateral organization. As examples, published data on resting-state networks and task-related activity are presented on the flatmap. The software and maps are freely available and compatible with most major neuroimaging packages. PMID:26230510

  17. Isolated cerebellar involvement in vitamin B12 deficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Dubey, Rachana; Gulati, Sheffali; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Atin

    2014-11-01

    Deficiency of vitamin B12 causes megaloblastic anemia and nervous system demyelination. Structures affected in the nervous system include spinal cord, cranial and peripheral nerves, and brain white matter. A 9-year-old boy presented with knuckle hyperpigmentation and oral ulcers for 3 years, pallor and easy fatigability for 6 months, gait abnormalities for 3 months, and abnormal speech and behavioral abnormalities for 3 days. On examination, he had physical signs of megaloblastic anemia, mood swings with intermittent hallucinations, and features of cerebellar impairment. Blood investigations revealed megaloblastic anemia, and pernicious anemia was ruled out. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral cerebellar signal changes. He received treatment for vitamin B12 deficiency and appropriate nutritional counseling. Three months later, he showed significant clinical and radiologic resolution. To our knowledge, isolated cerebellar involvement as the sole neurologic manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency has not been described previously in children. PMID:24346315

  18. Minimum-Cost Aircraft Descent Trajectories with a Constrained Altitude Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Minghong G.; Sadovsky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical formula for solving the speed profile that accrues minimum cost during an aircraft descent with a constrained altitude profile is derived. The optimal speed profile first reaches a certain speed, called the minimum-cost speed, as quickly as possible using an appropriate extreme value of thrust. The speed profile then stays on the minimum-cost speed as long as possible, before switching to an extreme value of thrust for the rest of the descent. The formula is applied to an actual arrival route and its sensitivity to winds and airlines' business objectives is analyzed.

  19. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis: Exploration Class Simulation Overview and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Davis, Jody L.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Powell, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and exploration or human-scale missions. The year one exploration class mission activity considered technologies capable of delivering a 40-mt payload. This paper provides an overview of the exploration class mission study, including technologies considered, models developed and initial simulation results from the EDL-SA year one effort.

  20. Overview of the NASA Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Dwyer-Cianciolo, Alicia M.; Kinney, David J.; Howard, Austin R.; Chen, George T.; Ivanov, Mark C.; Sostaric, Ronald R.; Westhelle, Carlos H.

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and human-scale missions. This paper summarizes the approach and top-level results from Year 1 of the Study, which focused on landing 10-50 mt on Mars, but also included a trade study of the best advanced parachute design for increasing the landed payloads within the EDL architecture of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission.

  1. Tumour type and size are high risk factors for the syndrome of "cerebellar" mutism and subsequent dysarthria

    PubMed Central

    Catsman-Berrevoet..., C.; Van Dongen, H. R; Mulder, P.; y, G; Paquier, P.; Lequin, M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—"Cerebellar mutis" and subsequent dysarthria (MSD) is a documented complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. In this prospective study the following risk factors for MSD were assessed: type, size and site of the tumour; hydrocephalus at presentation and after surgery, cerebellar incision site, postoperative infection, and cerebellar swelling.?METHODS—In a consecutive series of 42 children with a cerebellar tumour, speech and neuroradiological studies (CT and MRI) were systematically analysed preoperatively and postoperatively. Speech was assessed using the Mayo Clinic lists and the severity of dysarthria using the Michigan rating scale.?RESULTS—Twelve children (29%) developed MSD postoperatively. The type of tumour, midline localisation, and vermal incision were significant single independent risk factors. In addition, an interdependency of possible risk factors (tumour>5 cm, medulloblastoma) was found.?CONCLUSION—MSD often occurs after paediatric cerebellar tumour removal and is most likely after removal of a medulloblastoma with a maximum lesion diameter>5 cm.?? PMID:10567492

  2. Normal cerebellar development in S100B-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Björn; Laffer, Björn; Hirnet, Daniela; Rothermundt, Matthias; Ambree, Oliver; Lohr, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The calcium-binding protein S100B has been shown to support neuron proliferation, migration and neurite growth in vitro, while the significance of S100B for neuronal development in vivo is controversial. We have investigated the effect of S100B deficiency on cerebellar development in S100B knockout mice at an age of 5 and 10 days after birth (P5 and P10). This time range covers important developmental steps in the cerebellum such as granule cell proliferation and migration, as well as dendritic growth of Purkinje cells. Bergmann glial cells contain a particularly high concentration of S100B and serve as scaffold for both migrating granule cells and growing Purkinje cell dendrites. This renders the postnatal cerebellum ideal as a model system to study the importance of S100B for glial and neuronal development. We measured the length of Bergmann glial processes, the width of the external granule cell layer as a measure of granule cell proliferation, the decrease in width of the external granule cell layer between P5 and P10 as a measure of granule cell migration, and the length of Purkinje cell dendrites in wild-type and S100B knockout mice. None of these parameters showed significant differences between wild-type and knockout mice. In addition, wild-type and knockout mice performed equally in locomotor behaviour tests. The results indicate that S100B-deficient mice have normal development of the cerebellum and no severe impairment of motor function. PMID:25342137

  3. Cerebellar contributions to different phases of visceral aversive extinction learning.

    PubMed

    Kattoor, Joswin; Thürling, Markus; Gizewski, Elke R; Forsting, Michael; Timmann, Dagmar; Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2014-02-01

    The cerebellum is increasingly recognized to contribute to non-motor functions, including cognition and emotion. Although fear conditioning has been studied for elucidating the pathophysiology of anxiety, the putative role of the cerebellum is still unknown. Fear conditioning could also be important in the etiology of chronic abdominal pain which often overlaps with anxiety. Hence, in this exploratory analysis, we investigated conditioned anticipatory activity in the cerebellum in a visceral aversive fear conditioning paradigm using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We extended and reanalyzed a previous dataset for different learning phases, i.e., acquisition, extinction, and reinstatement, utilizing an advanced normalizing method of the cerebellum. In 30 healthy humans, visual conditioned stimuli (CS(+)) were paired with painful rectal distensions as unconditioned stimuli (US), while other visual stimuli (CS(-)) were presented without US. During extinction, all CSs were presented without US, whereas during reinstatement, a single, unpaired US was presented. During acquisition, posterolateral cerebellar areas including Crus I, Crus II, and VIIb and parts of the dentate nucleus were activated in response to the CS(+) compared to the CS(-). During extinction, activation related to CS(+) presentation was detected in Crus I, Crus II, IV, V, VI, VIIb, IX, and vermis. Neural correlates of reinstatement were found in Crus I, Crus II, IV, V, and IX. We could show for the first time that the cerebellum is involved in abdominal pain-related associative learning processes. Together, these findings contribute to our understanding of the cerebellum in aversive learning and memory processes relevant to the pathophysiology of chronic abdominal pain. PMID:23925594

  4. Effect of methotrexate on cerebellar development in infant rats

    PubMed Central

    SUGIYAMA, Akihiko; SUN, Jing; UEDA, Kota; FURUKAWA, Satoshi; TAKEUCHI, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Six-day-old rats were treated intraperitoneal injections with methotrexate 1 mg/kg, and the cerebellum was examined. Both the length and width of the vermis decreased in the methotrexate-treated group instead of the control from 4 day after treatment (DAT) onward. A significant reduction in the width of the external granular layer was detected on 2 and 3 DAT in the methotrexate group. By 4 DAT, the width of the external granular layer of the methotrexate group was indistinguishable from the control, and by 8 DAT, it was greater than that of the control. The molecular layer of methotrexate group on 8 and 15 DAT was thinner than that of the control. On 1 DAT, in the methotrexate group, there were many TUNEL and cleaved caspase-3-positive granular cells throughout the external granular layer, and they decreased time-dependently. On 1 DAT, in the methotrexate group, phospho-histone H3-positive cells in the external granular layer were fewer than in the control and tended to increase on 2–4 DAT. The p21-positive-rate of the external granule cells in the MTX group was higher than in the control on 1–4 DAT. These results suggested that methotrexate exposure on postnatal day 6 induces a delay, slowing in the migration of external granular cells to the inner granular layer, attributed to decrease or inhibition in the production of external granular cells that had arisen from apoptosis and the decrease in cell proliferative activity, resulting in cerebellar hypoplasia. PMID:25754651

  5. Impaired Cerebellar-Dependent Eyeblink Conditioning in First-Degree Relatives of Individuals With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bolbecker, Amanda R.; Kent, Jerillyn S.; Petersen, Isaac T.; Klaunig, Mallory J.; Forsyth, Jennifer K.; Howell, Josselyn M.; Westfall, Daniel R.; O’Donnell, Brian F.; Hetrick, William P.

    2014-01-01

    Consistent with reports of cerebellar structural, functional, and neurochemical anomalies in schizophrenia, robust cerebellar-dependent delay eyeblink conditioning (dEBC) deficits have been observed in the disorder. Impaired dEBC is also present in schizotypal personality disorder, an intermediate phenotype of schizophrenia. The present work sought to determine whether dEBC deficits exist in nonpsychotic first-degree relatives of individuals with schizophrenia. A single-cue tone dEBC paradigm consisting of 10 blocks with 10 trials each (9 paired and 1 unpaired trials) was used to examine the functional integrity of cerebellar circuitry in schizophrenia participants, individuals with a first-degree relative diagnosed with schizophrenia, and healthy controls with no first-degree relatives diagnosed with schizophrenia. The conditioned stimulus (a 400ms tone) coterminated with the unconditioned stimulus (a 50ms air puff to the left eye) on paired trials. One relative and 2 healthy controls were removed from further analysis due to declining conditioned response rates, leaving 18 schizophrenia participants, 17 first-degree relatives, and 16 healthy controls. Electromyographic data were subsequently analyzed using growth curve models in hierarchical linear regression. Acquisition of dEBC conditioned responses was significantly impaired in schizophrenia and first-degree relative groups compared with controls. This finding that cerebellar-mediated associative learning deficits are present in first-degree relatives of individuals with schizophrenia provides evidence that dEBC abnormalities in schizophrenia may not be due to medication or course of illness effects. Instead, the present results are consistent with models of schizophrenia positing cerebellar-cortical circuit abnormalities and suggest that cerebellar abnormalities represent a risk marker for the disorder. PMID:23962891

  6. Morphometric magnetic resonance imaging and genetic testing in cerebellar abiotrophy in Arabian horses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebellar abiotrophy (CA) is a rare but significant disease in Arabian horses caused by progressive death of the Purkinje cells resulting in cerebellar ataxia characterized by a typical head tremor, jerky head movements and lack of menace response. The specific role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to support clinical diagnosis has been discussed. However, as yet MR imaging has only been described in one equine CA case. The role of MR morphometry in this regard is currently unknown. Due to the hereditary nature of the disease, genetic testing can support the diagnosis of CA. Therefore, the objective of this study was to perform MR morphometric analysis and genetic testing in four CA-affected Arabian horses and one German Riding Pony with purebred Arabian bloodlines in the third generation. Results CA was diagnosed pathohistologically in the five affected horses (2 months - 3 years) supported by clinical signs, necropsy, and genetic testing which confirmed the TOE1:g.2171G>A SNP genotype A/A in all CA-affected horses. On MR images morphometric analysis of the relative cerebellar size and relative cerebellar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space were compared to control images of 15 unaffected horses. It was demonstrated that in MR morphometric analyses, CA affected horses displayed a relatively smaller cerebellum compared to the entire brain mass than control animals (P = 0.0088). The relative cerebellar CSF space was larger in affected horses (P = 0.0017). Using a cut off value of 11.0% for relative cerebellar CSF space, the parameter differentiated between CA-affected horses and controls with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 93.3%. Conclusions In conclusion, morphometric MRI and genetic analysis could be helpful to support the diagnosis of CA in vivo. PMID:23702154

  7. Fixation of a Gene by Drift is Unlikely in Large Populations, neither Identity by Descent nor Identity by Type

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Russell Bruce

    1 Fixation of a Gene by Drift is Unlikely in Large Populations, neither Identity by Descent nor ancestor of all the genes at a locus (common ancestors exist for nucleotide base pairs, not entire genes at a locus in a large population are not identical, neither by descent nor by type. At the level of the gene

  8. Impairment of emotional facial expression and prosody discrimination due to ischemic cerebellar lesions.

    PubMed

    Adamaszek, M; D'Agata, F; Kirkby, K C; Trenner, M U; Sehm, B; Steele, C J; Berneiser, J; Strecker, K

    2014-06-01

    A growing literature points to a specific role of the cerebellum in affect processing. However, understanding of affect processing disturbances following discrete cerebellar lesions is limited. We administered the Tübingen Affect Battery to assess recognition of emotional facial expression and emotional prosody in 15 patients with a cerebellar infarction and 10 age-matched controls. On emotional facial expression tasks, patients compared to controls showed impaired selection and matching of facial affect. On prosody tasks, patients showed marked impairments in naming affect and discriminating incongruencies. These deficits were more pronounced for negative affects. Our results confirm a significant role of the cerebellum in processing emotional recognition, a component of social cognition. PMID:24281851

  9. Smart-Divert Powered Descent Guidance to Avoid the Backshell Landing Dispersion Ellipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M.; Acikmese, Behcet

    2013-01-01

    A smart-divert capability has been added into the Powered Descent Guidance (PDG) software originally developed for Mars pinpoint and precision landing. The smart-divert algorithm accounts for the landing dispersions of the entry backshell, which separates from the lander vehicle at the end of the parachute descent phase and prior to powered descent. The smart-divert PDG algorithm utilizes the onboard fuel and vehicle thrust vectoring to mitigate landing error in an intelligent way: ensuring that the lander touches down with minimum- fuel usage at the minimum distance from the desired landing location that also avoids impact by the descending backshell. The smart-divert PDG software implements a computationally efficient, convex formulation of the powered-descent guidance problem to provide pinpoint or precision-landing guidance solutions that are fuel-optimal and satisfy physical thrust bound and pointing constraints, as well as position and speed constraints. The initial smart-divert implementation enforced a lateral-divert corridor parallel to the ground velocity vector; this was based on guidance requirements for MSL (Mars Science Laboratory) landings. This initial method was overly conservative since the divert corridor was infinite in the down-range direction despite the backshell landing inside a calculable dispersion ellipse. Basing the divert constraint instead on a local tangent to the backshell dispersion ellipse in the direction of the desired landing site provides a far less conservative constraint. The resulting enhanced smart-divert PDG algorithm avoids impact with the descending backshell and has reduced conservatism.

  10. Localization of Mars rovers using descent and surface-based image data

    E-print Network

    Olson, Clark F.

    Localization of Mars rovers using descent and surface-based image data Rongxing Li, Fei Ma 20 September 2001; published 30 August 2002. [1] The planned 2003 Mars Exploration Rover (MER Planetology: Solar System Objects: Mars; KEYWORDS: Mars rover, localization, mapping, topography, bundle

  11. A molecular signature of an arrest of descent in human parturition

    PubMed Central

    MITTAL, Pooja; ROMERO, Roberto; TARCA, Adi L.; DRAGHICI, Sorin; NHAN-CHANG, Chia-Ling; CHAIWORAPONGSA, Tinnakorn; HOTRA, John; GOMEZ, Ricardo; KUSANOVIC, Juan Pedro; LEE, Deug-Chan; KIM, Chong Jai; HASSAN, Sonia S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was undertaken to identify the molecular basis of an arrest of descent. Study Design Human myometrium was obtained from women in term labor (TL; n=29) and arrest of descent (AODes, n=21). Gene expression was characterized using Illumina® HumanHT-12 microarrays. A moderated t-test and false discovery rate adjustment were applied for analysis. Confirmatory qRT-PCR and immunoblot was performed in an independent sample set. Results 400 genes were differentially expressed between women with an AODes compared to those with TL. Gene Ontology analysis indicated enrichment of biological processes and molecular functions related to inflammation and muscle function. Impacted pathways included inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton. Overexpression of HIF1A, IL-6, and PTGS2 in AODES was confirmed. Conclusion We have identified a stereotypic pattern of gene expression in the myometrium of women with an arrest of descent. This represents the first study examining the molecular basis of an arrest of descent using a genome-wide approach. PMID:21284969

  12. To appear in Neural Networks On the Momentum Term in Gradient Descent Learning

    E-print Network

    Qian, Ning

    and damped harmonic oscillators. The momentum term improves the speed of convergence by bringing some eigen, Gradient descent learning algorithm, Damped harmonic oscillator, Critical damping, Learning rate, Speed rigorous studies of its mechanisms. In this paper, I show that in the limit of continuous time

  13. Contributed Article On the momentum term in gradient descent learning algorithms

    E-print Network

    Qian, Ning

    minimum is equivalent to a set of coupled and damped harmonic oscillators. The momentum term improves descent learning algorithm; Damped harmonic oscillator; Critical damping; Learning rate; Speed the speed of learning, there have been few rigorous studies of its mechanisms. In this paper, I show

  14. On Polynomial Systems Arising from a Weil Descent Christophe Petit and Jean-Jacques Quisquater

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    On Polynomial Systems Arising from a Weil Descent Christophe Petit and Jean-Jacques Quisquater UCL) christophe.petit@uclouvain.be, jjq@uclouvain.be Abstract. In the last two decades, many computational equations. In this paper, we revisit a class of polynomial systems introduced by Faug`ere, Perret, Petit

  15. Scalable I/O-Bound Parallel Incremental Gradient Descent for Big Data Analytics in GLADE

    E-print Network

    Rusu, Florin

    Scalable I/O-Bound Parallel Incremental Gradient Descent for Big Data Analytics in GLADE Chengie a much sought-after competitive edge, big data analyt- ics tools promising to deliver this additional bit-1-4503-2202-7/13/6 ...$15.00. proven on a series of big data analytics tasks ranging from simple to high-cardinality group

  16. Use of steepest descent and various approximations for efficient computation of minimum noise aircraft landing trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, G.; Witt, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    The following areas related to landing trajectory optimization research were discussed: (1) programming and modifying the steepest descent optimization procedure, (2) successfully iterating toward the optimum for a four-mile trajectory, (3) beginning optimization runs for a twenty-mile trajectory, and (4) adapt wind tunnel data for computer usage. Other related areas were discussed in detail in the two previous annual reports.

  17. Sexual Health Discussions between African-American Mothers and Mothers of Latino Descent and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Ashley; Ellis, Monica U.; Castellanos, Ted; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Sneed, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined approaches used by African-American mothers and mothers of Latino descent for informal sex-related discussions with their children to inform sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV intervention development efforts. We recruited mothers (of children aged 12-15) from youth service agencies and a university in southern California.…

  18. Tree Block Coordinate Descent for MAP in Graphical Models David Sontag Tommi Jaakkola

    E-print Network

    Jaakkola, Tommi S.

    - magnetic models and matching problems), the MAP assignment can be found efficiently using LP relax- ationsTree Block Coordinate Descent for MAP in Graphical Models David Sontag Tommi Jaakkola Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139

  19. High-resolution detection of identity by descent in unrelated individuals.

    PubMed

    Browning, Sharon R; Browning, Brian L

    2010-04-01

    Detection of recent identity by descent (IBD) in population samples is important for population-based linkage mapping and for highly accurate genotype imputation and haplotype-phase inference. We present a method for detection of recent IBD in population samples. Our method accounts for linkage disequilibrium between SNPs to enable full use of high-density SNP data. We find that our method can detect segments of a length of 2 cM with moderate power and negligible false discovery rate in Illumina 550K data in Northwestern Europeans. We compare our method with GERMLINE and PLINK, and we show that our method has a level of resolution that is significantly better than these existing methods, thus extending the usefulness of recent IBD in analysis of high-density SNP data. We survey four genomic regions in a sample of UK individuals of European descent and find that on average, at a given location, our method detects IBD in 2.7 per 10,000 pairs of individuals in Illumina 550K data. We also present methodology and results for detection of homozygosity by descent (HBD) and survey the whole genome in a sample of 1373 UK individuals of European descent. We detect HBD in 4.7 individuals per 10,000 on average at a given location. Our methodology is implemented in the freely available BEAGLE software package. PMID:20303063

  20. DSENDS -A High-Fidelity Dynamics and Spacecraft Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface Landing12

    E-print Network

    and instrument simulations for terrain imaging lidars and radars. The simulator hosts guidance/navigation-fidelity spacecraft simulator for Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) on planetary and small-bodies. This simulator into a Matlab/Simulink environment where control analysts can use the same high-fidelity simulation used in real

  1. Links to the Past Genealogy is the study of the descent of families and persons

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    Genealogy: Links to the Past #12;Genealogy is the study of the descent of families and persons fromWhy do people become involved in genealogy?in genealogy? Interested in where they come from Health issues for beginners. Many of the large genealogy websites provide advice, tutorials and record forms for those just

  2. EXPLICIT ISOGENY DESCENT ON ELLIPTIC CURVES ROBERT L. MILLER AND MICHAEL STOLL

    E-print Network

    Stoll, Michael

    EXPLICIT ISOGENY DESCENT ON ELLIPTIC CURVES ROBERT L. MILLER AND MICHAEL STOLL Abstract AND MICHAEL STOLL This can be used to obtain upper bounds for r on the one hand, but also leads to informationF Sel( ) (Q, E) = r + dimF E(Q)[ ] , then it follows that the -primary part of X(Q, E) is trivial

  3. FINITE DESCENT OBSTRUCTION ON CURVES AND DAVID HELM AND JOSE FELIPE VOLOCH

    E-print Network

    Voloch, Felipe

    is the only obstruction to the existence of rational points. Bruin and Stoll [1] have provided extensive field case. Also, Stoll [12] has looked at this question from the point of view of finite abelian Subject Classification. Primary 11G30; Secondary 14G25. Key words and phrases. descent obstruction

  4. A Wind Tunnel Study on the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) Lander Descent Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soriano, J. Francisco; Coquilla, Rachael V.; Wilson, Gregory R.; Seiff, Alvin; Rivell, Tomas

    2001-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to determine the accuracy of the Mars Pathfinder lander local pressure readings in accordance with the actual ambient atmospheric pressures of Mars during parachute descent. In order to obtain good measurements, the plane of the lander pressure sensor opening should ideally be situated so that it is parallel to the freestream. However, due to two unfavorable conditions, the sensor was positioned in locations where correction factors are required. One of these disadvantages is due to the fact that the parachute attachment point rotated the lander's center of gravity forcing the location of the pressure sensor opening to be off tangent to the freestream. The second and most troublesome factor was that the lander descends with slight oscillations that could vary the amplitude of the sensor readings. In order to accurately map the correction factors required at each sensor position, an experiment simulating the lander descent was conducted in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Using a 115 scale model at Earth ambient pressures, the test settings provided the necessary Reynolds number conditions in which the actual lander was possibly subjected to during the descent. In the analysis and results of this experiment, the readings from the lander sensor were converted to the form of pressure coefficients. With a contour map of pressure coefficients at each lander oscillatory position, this report will provide a guideline to determine the correction factors required for the Mars Pathfinder lander descent pressure sensor readings.

  5. A Finite-Differences Derivative-Descent Approach for Estimating Form

    E-print Network

    Gosavi, Abhijit

    of features, including straightness, flatness, circu- larity, sphericity, and cylindricity. For measuring form-errorA Finite-Differences Derivative-Descent Approach for Estimating Form Error in Precision Bell Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260-2050 Background: Form-error measurement is mandatory for the qual- ity

  6. INEXACT COORDINATE DESCENT Rachael Tappenden (Joint work with Jacek Gondzio & Peter Richtarik)

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    . Applications for coordinate descent methods: Clockwise from top left: Aircraft design and timetabling, protein loop closure, distributed data, support vector machines. 2. MOTIVATION & APPLICATIONS Variants mint Vi(x, t) + (i). The error can't be too big! We restrict (i) (F(x) - F) + for , 0. Algorithm

  7. Forward stair descent with hybrid neuroprosthesis after paralysis: Single case study demonstrating feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Bulea, Thomas C.; Kobetic, Rudi; Audu, Musa L.; Schnellenberger, John R.; Pinault, Gilles; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to negotiate stairs is important for community access and independent mobility but requires more effort and strength than level walking. For this reason, previous attempts to utilize functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) to restore stair navigation after spinal cord injury (SCI) have had limited success and are not readily generalizable. Stair descent is particularly challenging because it requires energy absorption via eccentric muscle contractions, a task not easily accomplished with FNS. This article presents the design and initial testing of a hybrid neuroprosthesis with a variable impedance knee mechanism (VIKM-HNP) for stair descent. Using a 16-channel percutaneous FNS system, a muscle activation pattern was synthesized to descend stairs with the VIKM-HNP in a step-by-step fashion. A finite state control system was implemented to deactivate knee extensor stimulation and utilize the VIKM-HNP to absorb energy and regulate descent speed. Feasibility testing was performed on one individual with complete thoracic-level SCI. Stair descent was achieved with maximum upper-limb forces of less than 45% body weight compared with previously reported value of 70% with FNS only. The experiments also provided insight into design requirements for future hybrid systems for stair navigation, the implications of which are discussed. PMID:25437932

  8. A Critical Analysis of Western Perspectives on Families of Arab Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitin, Ben K.; Allen, Katherine R.; Bekheet, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Western research on families of Arab descent has increased in the current decade, compared to the previous 30 years. In this review of 256 empirical articles, through a critical postcolonial lens, domestic violence and family planning were the two most established areas of study. Generally, samples have come from a small group of countries such as…

  9. Ionospheric evidence of thermosphere-to-stratosphere descent of polar NOX1 Mark A. Clilverd1

    E-print Network

    Otago, University of

    Ionospheric evidence of thermosphere-to-stratosphere descent of polar NOX1 Mark A. Clilverd1, and in the presence of strong polar vortex36 conditions, descend into the stratosphere [Solomon et al., 1982b]. During the northern hemisphere winter of 2003-2004 significant levels of5 stratospheric odd nitrogen (NOX) were

  10. Access to Health Care Among Latinos of Mexican Descent in "Colonias" in Two Texas Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Larry; Arizmendi, Lydia; Cornelius, Llewellyn J.

    2004-01-01

    Critical to resolving the problem of health disparities among Latinos is examining the needs within ethnic subpopulations. This paper focused on the unique challenges encountered by one ethnic subpopulation -- Latinos of Mexican descent living in colonias. Findings reaffirm the importance of looking within ethnic subpopulations to understand the…

  11. Continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) on left cerebellar hemisphere affects mental rotation tasks during music listening.

    PubMed

    Picazio, Silvia; Oliveri, Massimiliano; Koch, Giacomo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Petrosini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests an association between spatial and music domains. A cerebellar role in music-related information processing as well as in spatial-temporal tasks has been documented. Here, we investigated the cerebellar role in the association between spatial and musical domains, by testing performances in embodied (EMR) or abstract (AMR) mental rotation tasks of subjects listening Mozart Sonata K.448, which is reported to improve spatial-temporal reasoning, in the presence or in the absence of continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) of the left cerebellar hemisphere. In the absence of cerebellar cTBS, music listening did not influence either MR task, thus not revealing a "Mozart Effect". Cerebellar cTBS applied before musical listening made subjects faster (P?=?0.005) and less accurate (P?=?0.005) in performing the EMR but not the AMR task. Thus, cerebellar inhibition by TBS unmasked the effect of musical listening on motor imagery. These data support a coupling between music listening and sensory-motor integration in cerebellar networks for embodied representations. PMID:23724071

  12. Ex Vivo Culture of Chick Cerebellar Slices and Spatially Targeted Electroporation of Granule Cell Precursors.

    PubMed

    Hanzel, Michalina; Wingate, Richard J T; Butts, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar external granule layer (EGL) is the site of the largest transit amplification in the developing brain, and an excellent model for studying neuronal proliferation and differentiation. In addition, evolutionary modifications of its proliferative capability have been responsible for the dramatic expansion of cerebellar size in the amniotes, making the cerebellum an excellent model for evo-devo studies of the vertebrate brain. The constituent cells of the EGL, cerebellar granule progenitors, also represent a significant cell of origin for medulloblastoma, the most prevalent paediatric neuronal tumour. Following transit amplification, granule precursors migrate radially into the internal granular layer of the cerebellum where they represent the largest neuronal population in the mature mammalian brain. In chick, the peak of EGL proliferation occurs towards the end of the second week of gestation. In order to target genetic modification to this layer at the peak of proliferation, we have developed a method for genetic manipulation through ex vivo electroporation of cerebellum slices from embryonic Day 14 chick embryos. This method recapitulates several important aspects of in vivo granule neuron development and will be useful in generating a thorough understanding of cerebellar granule cell proliferation and differentiation, and thus of cerebellum development, evolution and disease. PMID:26709704

  13. Volume of cerebellar vermis in monozygotic twins discordant for combat exposure: Lack of relationship to

    E-print Network

    implicated the cerebellar vermis in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but there have been no structural neuroimaging studies of this brain structure in PTSD. We utilized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with manual the PTSD and non-PTSD veterans for any vermis volume, and no significant main effects or interactions when

  14. Counseling a Patient with the Antenatal Diagnosis of a Cerebellar Abnormality and a Pharyngeal Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Francois, Lissa; Tyagi, Rachanna; Hegyi, Thomas; Santolaya-Forgas, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction?Prenatal counseling with regards to the prognosis of a cerebellar abnormality is hindered not only by the diverse clinical presentations but also by the presence of subtle findings. We present a case of a distinct combination of asymmetric cerebellar hypoplasia secondary to an anterior meningoencephalocele through a clival defect that caused a severe airway obstruction in the newborn. Case Description?A 21-year-old gravida 4 para 0 mother with a dichorionic–diamniotic twin pregnancy was referred for a second trimester sonographic survey. An asymmetric cerebellar hypoplasia, mega cisterna magna, and a pharyngeal cystic mass were noted on twin A. Magnetic resonance imaging report confirmed posterior fossa abnormalities and shed no light on the differential diagnosis of the cystic mass. The pregnancy ended by Cesarean delivery at 32 weeks? gestation after a preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Twin A had a severe airway obstruction. Postnatal evaluation confirmed a midline anterior meningoencephalocele through a defect in the clivus. The microarray chromosomal analysis demonstrated a 5q15 variant with uncertain clinical significance. Conclusion?Antenatal recognition of the unique combination of a cerebellar hypoplasia with a pharyngeal cyst can impact the prenatal counseling as well as neonatal management. PMID:25452890

  15. Cerebellar Ataxia with Bilateral Vestibulopathy: Description of a Syndrome and Its Characteristic Clinical Sign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migliaccio, Americo A.; Halmagyi, G. Michael; McGarvie, Leigh A.; Cremer, Phillip D.

    2004-01-01

    We report four patients with the syndrome of cerebellar ataxia with bilateral vestibulopathy (CABV) and, using search coil oculography, we validate its characteristic clinical sign, namely impairment of the visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex (VVOR) or doll's head reflex. In our four patients, CABV began in the sixth decade of life; they are…

  16. Cerebellar Patients Demonstrate Preserved Implicit Knowledge of Association Strengths in Musical Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillmann, Barbara; Justus, Timothy; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    Recent findings suggest the involvement of the cerebellum in perceptual and cognitive tasks. Our study investigated whether cerebellar patients show musical priming based on implicit knowledge of tonal-harmonic music. Participants performed speeded phoneme identification on sung target chords, which were either related or less-related to prime…

  17. DISRUPTION OF CEREBELLAR MATURATION BY AN ANTIMITOTIC AGENT IMPAIRS THE ONTOGENY OF EYEBLINK CONDITIONING IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study represents an attempt to establish a relationship between maturation of the cerebellum and the ontogeny of eyeblink conditioning in the rat. xperiments 1 and 2 examined the effects of disrupting cerebellar maturation by neonatal exposure to the antimitotic agent methyl...

  18. Cerebellar models of associative memory: Three papers from IEEE COMPCON spring 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raugh, Michael R. (editor)

    1989-01-01

    Three papers are presented on the following topics: (1) a cerebellar-model associative memory as a generalized random-access memory; (2) theories of the cerebellum - two early models of associative memory; and (3) intelligent network management and functional cerebellum synthesis.

  19. Cerebellar asymmetry and its relation to cerebral asymmetry estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danhong; Buckner, Randy L.

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetry of the human cerebellum was investigated using intrinsic functional connectivity. Regions of functional asymmetry within the cerebellum were identified during resting-state functional MRI (n = 500 subjects) and replicated in an independent cohort (n = 500 subjects). The most strongly right lateralized cerebellar regions fell within the posterior lobe, including crus I and crus II, in regions estimated to link to the cerebral association cortex. The most strongly left lateralized cerebellar regions were located in lobules VI and VIII in regions linked to distinct cerebral association networks. Comparison of cerebellar asymmetry with independently estimated cerebral asymmetry revealed that the lateralized regions of the cerebellum belong to the same networks that are strongly lateralized in the cerebrum. The degree of functional asymmetry of the cerebellum across individuals was significantly correlated with cerebral asymmetry and varied with handedness. In addition, cerebellar asymmetry estimated at rest predicted cerebral lateralization during an active language task. These results demonstrate that functional lateralization is likely a unitary feature of large-scale cerebrocerebellar networks, consistent with the hypothesis that the cerebellum possesses a roughly homotopic map of the cerebral cortex including the prominent asymmetries of the association cortex. PMID:23076113

  20. Distributed cerebellar plasticity implements generalized multiple-scale memory components in real-robot sensorimotor tasks

    PubMed Central

    Casellato, Claudia; Antonietti, Alberto; Garrido, Jesus A.; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; D'Angelo, Egidio; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a crucial role in motor learning and it acts as a predictive controller. Modeling it and embedding it into sensorimotor tasks allows us to create functional links between plasticity mechanisms, neural circuits and behavioral learning. Moreover, if applied to real-time control of a neurorobot, the cerebellar model has to deal with a real noisy and changing environment, thus showing its robustness and effectiveness in learning. A biologically inspired cerebellar model with distributed plasticity, both at cortical and nuclear sites, has been used. Two cerebellum-mediated paradigms have been designed: an associative Pavlovian task and a vestibulo-ocular reflex, with multiple sessions of acquisition and extinction and with different stimuli and perturbation patterns. The cerebellar controller succeeded to generate conditioned responses and finely tuned eye movement compensation, thus reproducing human-like behaviors. Through a productive plasticity transfer from cortical to nuclear sites, the distributed cerebellar controller showed in both tasks the capability to optimize learning on multiple time-scales, to store motor memory and to effectively adapt to dynamic ranges of stimuli. PMID:25762922

  1. Cerebellar Nuclear Neurons Use Time and Rate Coding to Transmit Purkinje Neuron Pauses

    PubMed Central

    Sudhakar, Shyam Kumar; Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; De Schutter, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Neurons of the cerebellar nuclei convey the final output of the cerebellum to their targets in various parts of the brain. Within the cerebellum their direct upstream connections originate from inhibitory Purkinje neurons. Purkinje neurons have a complex firing pattern of regular spikes interrupted by intermittent pauses of variable length. How can the cerebellar nucleus process this complex input pattern? In this modeling study, we investigate different forms of Purkinje neuron simple spike pause synchrony and its influence on candidate coding strategies in the cerebellar nuclei. That is, we investigate how different alignments of synchronous pauses in synthetic Purkinje neuron spike trains affect either time-locking or rate-changes in the downstream nuclei. We find that Purkinje neuron synchrony is mainly represented by changes in the firing rate of cerebellar nuclei neurons. Pause beginning synchronization produced a unique effect on nuclei neuron firing, while the effect of pause ending and pause overlapping synchronization could not be distinguished from each other. Pause beginning synchronization produced better time-locking of nuclear neurons for short length pauses. We also characterize the effect of pause length and spike jitter on the nuclear neuron firing. Additionally, we find that the rate of rebound responses in nuclear neurons after a synchronous pause is controlled by the firing rate of Purkinje neurons preceding it. PMID:26630202

  2. Long-term supratentorial brain structure and cognitive function following cerebellar tumour resections in childhood.

    PubMed

    Moberget, T; Andersson, S; Lundar, T; Due-Tønnessen, B J; Heldal, A; Endestad, T; Westlye, L T

    2015-03-01

    The cerebellum is connected to extensive regions of the cerebrum, and cognitive deficits following cerebellar lesions may thus be related to disrupted cerebello-cerebral connectivity. Moreover, early cerebellar lesions could affect distal brain development, effectively inducing long-term changes in brain structure and cognitive function. Here, we characterize supratentorial brain structure and cognitive function in 20 adult patients treated for cerebellar tumours in childhood (mean age at surgery: 7.1 years) and 26 matched controls. Relative to controls, patients showed reduced cognitive function and increased grey matter density in bilateral cingulum, left orbitofrontal cortex and the left hippocampus. Within the patient group, increased grey matter density in these regions was associated with decreased performance on tests of processing speed and executive function. Further, diffusion tensor imaging revealed widespread alterations in white matter microstructure in patients. While current ventricle volume (an index of previous hydrocephalus severity it patients) was associated with grey matter density and white matter microstructure in patients, this could only partially account for the observed group differences in brain structure and cognitive function. In conclusion, our results show distal effects of cerebellar lesions on cerebral integrity and wiring, likely caused by a combination of neurodegenerative processes and perturbed neurodevelopment. PMID:25665770

  3. Surface-based atlases of cerebellar cortex in the human, macaque, and mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Essen, David C.

    2002-01-01

    This study describes surface reconstructions and associated flat maps that represent the highly convoluted shape of cerebellar cortex in three species: human, macaque, and mouse. The reconstructions were based on high-resolution structural MRI data obtained from other laboratories. The surface areas determined for the fiducial reconstructions are about 600 cm(2) for the human, 60 cm(2) for the macaque, and 0.8 cm(2) for the mouse. As expected from the ribbon-like pattern of cerebellar folding, the cerebellar flat maps are elongated along the axis parallel to the midline. However, the degree of elongation varies markedly across species. The macaque flat map is many times longer than its mean width, whereas the mouse flat map is only slightly elongated and the human map is intermediate in its aspect ratio. These cerebellar atlases, along with associated software for visualization and for mapping experimental data onto the atlas, are freely available to the neuroscience community (see http:/brainmap.wustl.edu).

  4. Compensatory striatal–cerebellar connectivity in mild–moderate Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Simioni, Alison C.; Dagher, Alain; Fellows, Lesley K.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine depletion in the putamen is associated with altered motor network functional connectivity in people with Parkinson's disease (PD), but the functional significance of these changes remains unclear, attributed to either pathological or compensatory mechanisms in different studies. Here, we examined the effects of PD on dorsal caudal putamen functional connectivity, off and on dopamine replacement therapy (DRT), using resting state fMRI. Motor performance was assessed with the Purdue pegboard task. Twenty-one patients with mild–moderate Parkinson's disease were studied twice, once after an overnight DRT washout and once after the administration of a standard dose of levodopa (Sinemet), and compared to 20 demographically-matched healthy control participants. PD patients off DRT showed increased putamen functional connectivity with both the cerebellum (lobule V) and primary motor cortex (M1), relative to healthy controls. Greater putamen–cerebellar functional connectivity was significantly correlated with better motor performance, whereas greater putamen–M1 functional connectivity was predictive of poorer motor performance. The administration of levodopa improved motor performance in the PD group, as expected, and reduced putamen–cerebellar connectivity to levels comparable to the healthy control group. The strength of putamen–cerebellar functional connectivity continued to predict motor performance in the PD group while on levodopa. These findings argue that increased putamen–M1 functional connectivity reflects a pathological change, deleterious to motor performance. In contrast, increased putamen–cerebellar connectivity reflects a compensatory mechanism.

  5. PMPCA mutations cause abnormal mitochondrial protein processing in patients with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Jobling, Rebekah K; Assoum, Mirna; Gakh, Oleksandr; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian A; Mignot, Cyril; Roze, Emmanuel; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Lévy, Nicolas; Prasad, Chitra; Paton, Tara; Paterson, Andrew D; Roslin, Nicole M; Marshall, Christian R; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Roëckel-Trevisiol, Nathalie; Scherer, Stephen W; Rouleau, Guy A; Mégarbané, André; Isaya, Grazia; Delague, Valérie; Yoon, Grace

    2015-06-01

    Non-progressive cerebellar ataxias are a rare group of disorders that comprise approximately 10% of static infantile encephalopathies. We report the identification of mutations in PMPCA in 17 patients from four families affected with cerebellar ataxia, including the large Lebanese family previously described with autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia and short stature of Norman type and localized to chromosome 9q34 (OMIM #213200). All patients present with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, and the majority have intellectual disability of variable severity. PMPCA encodes ?-MPP, the alpha subunit of mitochondrial processing peptidase, the primary enzyme responsible for the maturation of the vast majority of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins, which is necessary for life at the cellular level. Analysis of lymphoblastoid cells and fibroblasts from patients homozygous for the PMPCA p.Ala377Thr mutation and carriers demonstrate that the mutation impacts both the level of the alpha subunit encoded by PMPCA and the function of mitochondrial processing peptidase. In particular, this mutation impacts the maturation process of frataxin, the protein which is depleted in Friedreich ataxia. This study represents the first time that defects in PMPCA and mitochondrial processing peptidase have been described in association with a disease phenotype in humans. PMID:25808372

  6. Sequence Learning Is Preserved in Individuals with Cerebellar Degeneration when the Movements Are Directly Cued

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Rebecca M. C.; Ivry, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar pathology is associated with impairments on a range of motor learning tasks including sequence learning. However, various lines of evidence are at odds with the idea that the cerebellum plays a central role in the associative processes underlying sequence learning. Behavioral studies indicate that sequence learning, at least with short…

  7. A spiking network model of cerebellar Purkinje cells and molecular layer interneurons exhibiting irregular firing

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, William; Hecht-Nielsen, Robert; Yamazaki, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    While the anatomy of the cerebellar microcircuit is well-studied, how it implements cerebellar function is not understood. A number of models have been proposed to describe this mechanism but few emphasize the role of the vast network Purkinje cells (PKJs) form with the molecular layer interneurons (MLIs)—the stellate and basket cells. We propose a model of the MLI-PKJ network composed of simple spiking neurons incorporating the major anatomical and physiological features. In computer simulations, the model reproduces the irregular firing patterns observed in PKJs and MLIs in vitro and a shift toward faster, more regular firing patterns when inhibitory synaptic currents are blocked. In the model, the time between PKJ spikes is shown to be proportional to the amount of feedforward inhibition from an MLI on average. The two key elements of the model are: (1) spontaneously active PKJs and MLIs due to an endogenous depolarizing current, and (2) adherence to known anatomical connectivity along a parasagittal strip of cerebellar cortex. We propose this model to extend previous spiking network models of the cerebellum and for further computational investigation into the role of irregular firing and MLIs in cerebellar learning and function. PMID:25520646

  8. Cerebellar stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xin; Guan, Wuqiang; Yu, Yong-Chun; Fu, Yinghui

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • No new neurons and astrocytes are generated in adult mouse cerebellum. • Very few mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells exist, and most of them are quiescent. • Cell proliferation rate is diversified among cerebellar regions and decreases over time. - Abstract: Although previous studies implied that cerebellar stem cells exist in some adult mammals, little is known about whether these stem cells can produce new neurons and astrocytes. In this study by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, we found that there are abundant BrdU{sup +} cells in adult mouse cerebellum, and their quantity and density decreases significantly over time. We also found cell proliferation rate is diversified in different cerebellar regions. Among these BrdU{sup +} cells, very few are mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells, and the vast majority of cerebellar stem cells are quiescent. Data obtained by in vivo retrovirus injection indicate that stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse cerebellum. Instead, some cells labeled by retrovirus are Iba1{sup +} microglia. These results indicate that very few stem cells exist in adult mouse cerebellum, and none of these stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and astrogenesis under physiological condition.

  9. Neuropsychological Evaluation and Follow-Up of Children with Cerebellar Cortical Dysplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jissendi-Tchofo, Patrice; Pandit, Florence; Soto-Ares, Gustavo; Vallee, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To describe neuropsychological disturbances and the developmental course associated with cerebellar cortical dysplasia (CCD). Method: The neuroimaging findings from 10 children (five males, five females; aged 3-10y) with CCD were reviewed and classified. These children all underwent clinical neurological examination and neuropsychological…

  10. Relational Speech Timing in Dysarthria Associated with Cerebellar Lesions in Different Loci: Word Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandana, V. P.; Manjula, R.

    2006-01-01

    Cerebellum plays an important role in speech motor control. Various tasks like sustained phonation, diadochokinesis and conversation have been used to tap the speech timing abilities of dysarthric clients with cerebellar lesion. It has recently been proposed that not all areas of the cerebellum may be involved in speech motor control; especially…

  11. ARSACS in the Dutch population: a frequent cause of early-onset cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Rowdy P. P.; Pijl, Benjamin J.; Timmermans, Janneke; Cruysberg, Johannes R. M.; Bos, Maaike M.; Schelhaas, Helenius J.; van de Warrenburg, Bart. P. C.; Knoers, Nine V. A. M.; Scheffer, Hans; Kremer, Berry

    2008-01-01

    Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS: MIM 270550) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by early-onset cerebellar ataxia with spasticity and peripheral neuropathy. This disorder, considered to be rare, was first described in the late seventies among French Canadians in the isolated Charlevoix-Saguenay region of Quebec. Nowadays, it is known that the disorder is not only limited to this region but occurs worldwide. Our objective was to identify cases of autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) in Dutch patients with recessive early-onset cerebellar ataxia by sequencing the complete SACS gene. In a Dutch cohort of 43 index patients with ataxia onset before age 25, we identified 16 index patients (total 23 patients) with mutations in the SACS gene. Nine of them had homozygous mutations, and seven of them had compound heterozygous mutations. Retrospectively, the phenotype of patients carrying mutations was remarkably uniform: cerebellar ataxia with onset before age 13 years, lower limb spasticity and sensorimotor axonal neuropathy, and cerebellar (vermis) atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging, consistent with the core ARSACS phenotype previously described. The high rate of mutations (37%) identified in this cohort of Dutch patients suggests that ARSACS is substantially more frequent than previously estimated. We predict that the availability of SACS mutation analysis as well as an increasing awareness of the characteristic ARSACS phenotype will lead to the diagnosis of many additional patients, possibly even at a younger age. PMID:18465152

  12. Walking in circles: navigation deficits from Parkinson's disease but not from cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Paquette, C; Franzén, E; Jones, G M; Horak, F B

    2011-09-01

    Little is known on the role of neuronal structures for spatial navigation. Our goal was to examine how Parkinson's disease (PD) and cerebellar ataxia, as human lesion models of the basal ganglia and cerebellum, affect spatial navigation round a circular walking path, blindfolded. Twelve subjects with idiopathic PD (ON and OFF medication), eight subjects with cerebellar ataxia and a control group of 20 age-matched healthy subjects participated. All groups performed well when walking around the circle with eyes open. In the eyes-closed condition, control subjects overshot the outlined trajectory but returned to their initial position, thus walking a further distance with eyes closed than with eyes open. When OFF medication, PD subjects navigated a larger radius than controls with eyes closed. When ON levodopa, PD subjects walked a similar distance as controls but with even larger errors in endpoint. Surprisingly, cerebellar patients navigated the circular walking task in the eyes closed condition with even more accuracy (i.e. following the outlined circle) than control and PD subjects. We conclude that blindfolded navigation around a previously seen circle requires intact basal ganglia, but not cerebellar input. PMID:21704129

  13. Neuroprotective Role of Liver Growth Factor “LGF” in an Experimental Model of Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Calatrava-Ferreras, Lucía; Gonzalo-Gobernado, Rafael; Reimers, Diana; Herranz, Antonio S.; Jiménez-Escrig, Adriano; Díaz-Gil, Juan José; Casarejos, María José; Montero-Vega, María Teresa; Bazán, Eulalia

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias (CA) comprise a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by a lack of motor coordination. They are caused by disturbances in the cerebellum and its associated circuitries, so the major therapeutic goal is to correct cerebellar dysfunction. Neurotrophic factors enhance the survival and differentiation of selected types of neurons. Liver growth factor (LGF) is a hepatic mitogen that shows biological activity in neuroregenerative therapies. We investigate the potential therapeutic activity of LGF in the 3-acetylpiridine (3-AP) rat model of CA. This model of CA consists in the lesion of the inferior olive-induced by 3-AP (40 mg/kg). Ataxic rats were treated with 5 µg/rat LGF or vehicle during 3 weeks, analyzing: (a) motor coordination by using the rota-rod test; and (b) the immunohistochemical and biochemical evolution of several parameters related with the olivo-cerebellar function. Motor coordination improved in 3-AP-lesioned rats that received LGF treatment. LGF up-regulated NeuN and Bcl-2 protein levels in the brainstem, and increased calbindin expression and the number of neurons receiving calbindin-positive projections in the cerebellum. LGF also reduced extracellular glutamate and GABA concentrations and microglia activation in the cerebellum. In view of these results, we propose LGF as a potential therapeutic agent in cerebellar ataxias. PMID:25338046

  14. Effects of Cerebellar Nuclear Inactivation on the Learning of a Complex Forelimb Movement in Cats

    E-print Network

    Bracha, Vlastislav

    Effects of Cerebellar Nuclear Inactivation on the Learning of a Complex Forelimb Movement in Cats forelimb movement in cats. J. Neurophysiol. Lisberger et al. 1984; Robinson 1976), and the adaptation 79 al. 1983). Changes in the activity of cerebel-and dentate nuclei on the capacity of cats to acquire

  15. Enhanced AMPA Receptor Function Promotes Cerebellar Long-Term Depression Rather than Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Beugen, Boeke J.; Qiao, Xin; Simmons, Dana H.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Hansel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Ampakines are allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors that facilitate hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning, and have been considered for the treatment of cognition and memory deficits. Here, we show that the ampakine CX546 raises the amplitude and slows the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at cerebellar

  16. Normal motor adaptation in cervical dystonia: a fundamental cerebellar computation is intact.

    PubMed

    Sadnicka, Anna; Patani, Bansi; Saifee, Tabish A; Kassavetis, Panagiotis; Pareés, Isabel; Korlipara, Prasad; Bhatia, Kailash P; Rothwell, John C; Galea, Joseph M; Edwards, Mark J

    2014-10-01

    The potential role of the cerebellum in the pathophysiology of dystonia has become a focus of recent research. However, direct evidence for a cerebellar contribution in humans with dystonia is difficult to obtain. We examined motor adaptation, a test of cerebellar function, in 20 subjects with primary cervical dystonia and an equal number of aged matched controls. Adaptation to both visuomotor (distorting visual feedback by 30°) and forcefield (applying a velocity-dependent force) conditions were tested. Our hypothesis was that cerebellar abnormalities observed in dystonia research would translate into deficits of cerebellar adaptation. We also examined the relationship between adaptation and dystonic head tremor as many primary tremor models implicate the cerebellothalamocortical network which is specifically tested by this motor paradigm. Rates of adaptation (learning) in cervical dystonia were identical to healthy controls in both visuomotor and forcefield tasks. Furthermore, the ability to adapt was not clearly related to clinical features of dystonic head tremor. We have shown that a key motor control function of the cerebellum is intact in the most common form of primary dystonia. These results have important implications for current anatomical models of the pathophysiology of dystonia. It is important to attempt to progress from general statements that implicate the cerebellum to a more specific evidence-based model. The role of the cerebellum in this enigmatic disease perhaps remains to be proven. PMID:24872202

  17. Cerebellar damage impairs the self-rating of regret feeling in a gambling task

    PubMed Central

    Clausi, Silvia; Coricelli, Giorgio; Pisotta, Iolanda; Pavone, Enea Francesco; Lauriola, Marco; Molinari, Marco; Leggio, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Anatomical, clinical, and neuroimaging evidence implicates the cerebellum in processing emotions and feelings. Moreover recent studies showed a cerebellar involvement in pathologies such as autism, schizophrenia and alexithymia, in which emotional processing have been found altered. However, cerebellar function in the modulation of emotional responses remains debated. In this study, emotions that are involved directly in decision-making were examined in 15 patients (six males; age range 17–60 years) affected by cerebellar damage and 15 well matched healthy controls. We used a gambling task, in which subjects’ choices and evaluation of outcomes with regard to their anticipated and actual emotional impact were analyzed. Emotions, such as regret and relief, were elicited, based on the outcome of the unselected gamble. Interestingly, despite their ability to avoid regret in subsequent choices, patients affected by cerebellar lesions were significantly impaired in evaluating the feeling of regret subjectively. These results demonstrate that the cerebellum is involved in conscious recognizing of negative feelings caused by the sense of self-responsibility for an incorrect decision. PMID:25999829

  18. Ablation of Cerebellar Nuclei Prevents H-Reflex Down-Conditioning in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiang Yang; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2005-01-01

    While studies of cerebellar involvement in learning and memory have described plasticity within the cerebellum, its role in acquisition of plasticity elsewhere in the CNS is largely unexplored. This study set out to determine whether the cerebellum is needed for acquisition of the spinal cord plasticity that underlies operantly conditioned…

  19. Cerebellar-Dependent Expression of Motor Learning during Eyeblink Conditioning in Head-Fixed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heiney, Shane A.; Wohl, Margot P.; Chettih, Selmaan N.; Ruffolo, Luis I.

    2014-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning in restrained rabbits has served as an excellent model of cerebellar-dependent motor learning for many decades. In mice, the role of the cerebellum in eyeblink conditioning is less clear and remains controversial, partly because learning appears to engage fear-related circuits and lesions of the cerebellum do not abolish the learned behavior completely. Furthermore, experiments in mice are performed using freely moving systems, which lack the stability necessary for mapping out the essential neural circuitry with electrophysiological approaches. We have developed a novel apparatus for eyeblink conditioning in head-fixed mice. Here, we show that the performance of mice in our apparatus is excellent and that the learned behavior displays two hallmark features of cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning in rabbits: (1) gradual acquisition; and (2) adaptive timing of conditioned movements. Furthermore, we use a combination of pharmacological inactivation, electrical stimulation, single-unit recordings, and targeted microlesions to demonstrate that the learned behavior is completely dependent on the cerebellum and to pinpoint the exact location in the deep cerebellar nuclei that is necessary. Our results pave the way for using eyeblink conditioning in head-fixed mice as a platform for applying next-generation genetic tools to address molecular and circuit-level questions about cerebellar function in health and disease. PMID:25378152

  20. Topographical organization of the cerebellar cortical projection to nucleus interpositus anterior in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Garwicz, M; Ekerot, C F

    1994-01-01

    1. A new methodological approach for detailed study of the organization of the cerebellar corticonuclear projection was evaluated in barbiturate-anaesthetized cats. Extracellular field potentials were simultaneously recorded in nucleus interpositus anterior and in the forelimb area of the C3 zone, at the cerebellar surface. On electrical and natural stimulation of the forelimb skin, the evoked positive field potentials in the nucleus and the climbing fibre field potentials in the cerebellar cortex had similar characteristics, indicating that the nuclear potentials were related to climbing fibre activity. 2. Application of a local anaesthetic to the cerebellar surface reversibly diminished the positive field potentials in the nucleus, demonstrating that the potentials were dependent on cerebellar cortical activity. It was thus concluded that the positive field potentials were mainly generated by climbing fibre-activated Purkinje cells and reflected synaptic inhibitory potentials in nuclear neurones. Accordingly, the positive field potentials in the nucleus could be used to reveal the termination area of Purkinje cells activated by a specific climbing fibre input evoked on peripheral stimulation. 3. The topographical organization of the cerebellar cortical projection to the forelimb part of nucleus interpositus anterior was then investigated by systematically mapping the cutaneous tactile and nociceptive 'receptive fields' of the positive field potentials at different sites in the nucleus. Five groups of receptive fields were distinguished and tentatively divided into a total of nineteen subgroups. 4. Each group of receptive fields corresponded to one or two of the previously described receptive field classes of climbing fibres to the C1, C3 and Y zones and was represented in a single area of the nucleus. Within each area there was an orderly representation of different receptive fields. The results suggest that microzones in the C1, C3 and Y zones with similar climbing fibre input project to a common set of neurones in nucleus interpositus anterior. 5. We propose a modular organization for the cerebellar control of forelimb movements through the rubrospinal tract. Each module would consist of a set of neurones in nucleus interpositus anterior and their afferent microzones in the C1, C3 and Y zones. A module would control a specific group of muscles and receive a homogeneous climbing fibre input related to the movement controlled. Images Figure 7 (cont.) Figure 7 PMID:8006811

  1. Posttraumatic Cerebellar Infarction after Repeated Sport-related Minor Head Injuries in a Young Adult: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    MATSUMOTO, Hiroaki; YOSHIDA, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    A healthy 23-year-old man suffered helmet-to-helmet collisions with an opponent during American football game twice within 3 days. He then experienced continuous vomiting and dizziness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed acute infarction in the right cerebellar hemisphere, and magnetic resonance angiography revealed transient stenosis of the right superior cerebellar artery. Although minor head injury is not usually accompanied by complications, posttraumatic ischemic stroke has been reported on rare occasions. We report a case of cerebellar infarction after repeated sports-related minor head injuries in a young adult and discuss the etiology. PMID:25746313

  2. MRI findings in AOA2: Cerebellar atrophy and abnormal iron detection in dentate nucleus?

    PubMed Central

    Frismand, Solène; Salem, Hannoun; Panouilleres, Muriel; Pélisson, Denis; Jacobs, Stéphane; Vighetto, Alain; Cotton, François; Tilikete, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia type 2 (AOA2) is one of the most frequent types of autosomal degenerative cerebellar ataxia. The first objective of this work was to identify specific cerebellar atrophy using MRI in patients with AOA2. Since increased iron deposits have been reported in degenerative diseases, our second objective was to report iron deposits signals in the dentate nuclei in AOA2. Five patients with AOA2 and 5 age-matched controls were subjects in a 3T MRI experiment that included a 3D turbo field echo T1-weighted sequence. The normalized volumes of twenty-eight cerebellar lobules and the percentage of atrophy (relative to controls) of the 4 main cerebellar regions (flocculo-nodular, vermis, anterior and posterior) were measured. The dentate nucleus signals using 3D fast field echo sequence for susceptibility-weighted images (SWI) were reported, as a measure of iron content. We found that all patients had a significant atrophy of all cerebellar lobules as compared to controls. The percentage of atrophy was the highest for the vermis, consistent with patients' oculomotor presentation, and for the anterior lobe, consistent with kinetic limb ataxia. We also describe an absence of hypointensity of the iron signal on SWI in the dentate nucleus of all patients compared to control subjects. This study suggests that patients with Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia type 2 present MRI patterns consistent with their clinical presentation. The absence of SWI hypointensity in dentate nucleus is a new radiological sign which was identified in all patients. The specificity of this absence of signal must be further determined in AOA2. PMID:24179805

  3. The autism susceptibility gene met regulates zebrafish cerebellar development and facial motor neuron migration

    PubMed Central

    Elsen, Gina E.; Choi, Louis Y.; Prince, Victoria E.; Ho, Robert K.

    2009-01-01

    During development, Met signaling regulates a range of cellular processes including growth, differentiation, survival and migration. The Met gene encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor, which is activated by Hgf (hepatocyte growth factor) ligand. Altered regulation of human MET expression has been implicated in autism. In mouse, Met signaling has been shown to regulate cerebellum development. Since abnormalities in cerebellar structure have been reported in some autistic patients, we have used the zebrafish to address the role of Met signaling during cerebellar development and thus further our understanding of the molecular basis of autism. We find that zebrafish met is expressed in the cerebellar primordium, later localizing to the ventricular zone (VZ), with the hgf1 and hgf2 ligand genes expressed in surrounding tissues. Morpholino knockdown of either Met or its Hgf ligands leads to a significant reduction in the size of the cerebellum, primarily as a consequence of reduced proliferation. Met signaling knockdown disrupts specification of VZ-derived cell types, and also reduces granule cell numbers, due to an early effect on cerebellar proliferation and/or as an indirect consequence of loss of signals from VZ-derived cells later in development. These patterning defects preclude analysis of cerebellar neuronal migration, but we have found that Met signaling is necessary for migration of hindbrain facial motor neurons. In summary, we have described roles for Met signaling in coordinating growth and cell type specification within the developing cerebellum, and in migration of hindbrain neurons. These functions may underlie the correlation between altered MET regulation and Autism Spectrum Disorders. PMID:19732764

  4. Thalamic territories innervated by cerebellar nuclear afferents in the hedgehog tenrec, Echinops telfairi.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H

    1998-12-21

    To gain more insight into the evolution and functional significance of cerebrocerebellar circuits, the cerebellothalamic projections were studied with anterograde tracer substances in the Madagascan lesser hedgehog, tenrec. This insectivore shows one of the lowest size indices among mammals for both the cerebellar nuclei and the neocortex. Almost all cerebellodiencephalic target areas found in the tenrec have been described in other mammals. The intensity and extent of particular projections, however, vary considerably in the tenrec compared with the other mammals investigated so far. The most remarkable finding may be the tenrec's cerebellar projection to the nucleus ventralis medialis. This projection is the most prominent cerebellothalamic projection and originates in predominantly the lateral portion of the cerebellar nuclear complex. The projection to the caudolateral portion of the ventralis anterior complex (VAC) is located immediately rostral to the area receiving ascending somatosensory afferents and appears to originate, in particular, from the intermediate cerebellar nuclear complex. Another cerebellothalamic focus of terminations lies in the paralamellar region of the VAC, whereas the proper intralaminar nuclei, at best, receive a sparse cerebellar input. A faint-to-moderate projection, on the other hand, has been traced consistently to the ventral portion of the lateralis posterior-pulvinar complex and the adjacent dorsal geniculate nucleus. In addition, there are prominent cerebellosubthalamic projections to the zona incerta and the ventral geniculate nucleus. The latter projection is confined mainly to the ventralmost subdivision, which has been shown previously to receive ascending somatosensory, but not retinal, afferents. With the exception of the nucleus ventralis medialis, the projections were essentially confined to the contralateral side. PMID:9853902

  5. Local flow management/profile descent algorithm. Fuel-efficient, time-controlled profiles for the NASA TSRV airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groce, J. L.; Izumi, K. H.; Markham, C. H.; Schwab, R. W.; Thompson, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Local Flow Management/Profile Descent (LFM/PD) algorithm designed for the NASA Transport System Research Vehicle program is described. The algorithm provides fuel-efficient altitude and airspeed profiles consistent with ATC restrictions in a time-based metering environment over a fixed ground track. The model design constraints include accommodation of both published profile descent procedures and unpublished profile descents, incorporation of fuel efficiency as a flight profile criterion, operation within the performance capabilities of the Boeing 737-100 airplane with JT8D-7 engines, and conformity to standard air traffic navigation and control procedures. Holding and path stretching capabilities are included for long delay situations.

  6. Broad therapeutic benefit after RNAi expression vector delivery to deep cerebellar nuclei: implications for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 therapy.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Megan S; Boudreau, Ryan L; Davidson, Beverly L

    2014-03-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is an autosomal dominant, late-onset neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the ataxin-1 protein, which causes progressive neurodegeneration in cerebellar Purkinje cells and brainstem nuclei. Here, we tested if reducing mutant ataxin-1 expression would significantly improve phenotypes in a knock-in (KI) mouse model that recapitulates spatial and temporal aspects of SCA1. Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), expressing inhibitory RNAs targeting ataxin-1, were injected into the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) of KI mice. This approach induced ataxin-1 suppression in the cerebellar cortex and in brainstem neurons. RNA interference (RNAi) of ataxin-1 preserved cerebellar lobule integrity and prevented disease-related transcriptional changes for over a year. Notably, RNAi therapy also preserved rotarod performance and neurohistology. These data suggest that delivery of AAVs encoding RNAi sequences against ataxin-1, to DCN alone, may be sufficient for SCA1 therapy. PMID:24419082

  7. Cell Signaling and Neurotoxicity: 3H-Arachidonic acid release (Phospholipase A2) in cerebellar granule neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell signaling is a complex process which controls basic cellular activities and coordinates actions to maintain normal cellular homeostasis. Alterations in signaling processes have been associated with neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and cerebellar ataxia, as well as, ...

  8. A new form of cerebellar long-term potentiation is postsynaptic and depends on nitric oxide but

    E-print Network

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    but not cAMP Varda Lev-Ram*, Scott T. Wong , Daniel R. Storm , and Roger Y. Tsien*§ *Department by Roger Y. Tsien, April 5, 2002 Long-term depression (LTD) at cerebellar parallel fiber (PF)-Purkinje cell

  9. Broad Therapeutic Benefit After RNAi Expression Vector Delivery to Deep Cerebellar Nuclei: Implications for Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Megan S; Boudreau, Ryan L; Davidson, Beverly L

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is an autosomal dominant, late-onset neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the ataxin-1 protein, which causes progressive neurodegeneration in cerebellar Purkinje cells and brainstem nuclei. Here, we tested if reducing mutant ataxin-1 expression would significantly improve phenotypes in a knock-in (KI) mouse model that recapitulates spatial and temporal aspects of SCA1. Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), expressing inhibitory RNAs targeting ataxin-1, were injected into the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) of KI mice. This approach induced ataxin-1 suppression in the cerebellar cortex and in brainstem neurons. RNA interference (RNAi) of ataxin-1 preserved cerebellar lobule integrity and prevented disease-related transcriptional changes for over a year. Notably, RNAi therapy also preserved rotarod performance and neurohistology. These data suggest that delivery of AAVs encoding RNAi sequences against ataxin-1, to DCN alone, may be sufficient for SCA1 therapy. PMID:24419082

  10. Cerebellar Contributions to Visual Attention and Visual Working Memory Revealed by Functional MRI and Intrinsic Functional Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Brissenden, James; Levin, Emily; Osher, David; Rosen, Maya; Halko, Mark; Somers, David

    2015-09-01

    The study of cerebellum function has been traditionally limited to the motor domain. Recent research, however, has begun to characterize the cerebellum's role in cognition (see Schmahmann, 2010) and has demonstrated intrinsic functional connectivity between cerebral cortical networks and distinct cerebellar regions (Buckner et al., 2011). Here, in two separate fMRI experiments, we investigated whether cerebro-cerebellar connectivity of dorsal attention network (DAN) predicts cerebellar activation during visual attention and visual working memory (VWM) task performance. In experiment 1 (N=8), subjects performed a multiple-object tracking task. In experiment 2 (N=9), subjects performed a VWM change detection task using oriented bars. Memory load was varied across blocks (set size: SS0, SS1, or SS4). Both experiments employed resting-state functional connectivity analysis using cortical network seeds (Yeo et al., 2011) to parcellate cerebro-cerebellar networks in individual subjects. In experiment 1, a region-of-interest analysis revealed a robust attentional effect within cerebellar regions functionally connected to the cortical DAN (p< .01). Conversely, cerebellar regions functionally connected to the cortical default mode network (DMN) showed reliable deactivation (p< .001). In experiment 2, contrasting SS4 with SS0 and SS1 resulted in a similar pattern of competitive interaction between cerebellar nodes of the DAN and DMN. Load-dependent activation spatially corresponded with cerebellar DAN nodes (SS4-SS0: p< .005; SS4-SS1: p< .0001) and load-dependent deactivation was observed within cerebellar DMN nodes (SS4-SS0: p< .005; SS4-SS1: p< .0005). Across both experiments the strength of intrinsic functional connectivity, with either the cortical DAN or the cortical DMN, significantly predicted the response of individual cerebellar voxels (Experiment 1: rDAN =.67, rDMN =-.71; Experiment 2: rDAN =.60, rDMN =-.56). Our results indicate that cerebellar nodes of the DAN contribute to network function across a diverse range of attentive and working memory conditions. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26325920

  11. The Uncertain Significance of Low Vitamin D levels in African Descent Populations: A Review of the Bone and Cardiometabolic Literature

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Michelle Y; Thoreson, Caroline K; Ramsey, Natalie L M; Ricks, Madia; Sumner, Anne E

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D levels in people of African descent are often described as inadequate or deficient. Whether low vitamin D levels in people of African descent lead to compromised bone or cardiometabolic health is unknown. Clarity on this issue is essential because if clinically significant vitamin D deficiency is present, vitamin D supplementation is necessary. However, if vitamin D is metabolically sufficient, vitamin D supplementation could be wasteful of scarce resources and even harmful. In this review vitamin D physiology is described with a focus on issues specific to populations of African descent such as the influence of melanin on endogenous vitamin D production and lactose intolerance on the willingness of people to ingest vitamin D fortified foods. Then data on the relationship of vitamin D to bone and cardiometabolic health in people of African descent are evaluated. PMID:24267433

  12. 25 CFR 18.104 - May a tribe include provisions in its tribal probate code regarding the distribution and descent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...a tribe include provisions in its tribal probate code regarding the distribution and descent of trust...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROBATE TRIBAL PROBATE CODES Approval of Tribal Probate Codes § 18.104 May a tribe include provisions...

  13. 25 CFR 18.104 - May a tribe include provisions in its tribal probate code regarding the distribution and descent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...a tribe include provisions in its tribal probate code regarding the distribution and descent of trust...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROBATE TRIBAL PROBATE CODES Approval of Tribal Probate Codes § 18.104 May a tribe include provisions...

  14. 25 CFR 18.104 - May a tribe include provisions in its tribal probate code regarding the distribution and descent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...a tribe include provisions in its tribal probate code regarding the distribution and descent of trust...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROBATE TRIBAL PROBATE CODES Approval of Tribal Probate Codes § 18.104 May a tribe include provisions...

  15. 25 CFR 18.104 - May a tribe include provisions in its tribal probate code regarding the distribution and descent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...a tribe include provisions in its tribal probate code regarding the distribution and descent of trust...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROBATE TRIBAL PROBATE CODES Approval of Tribal Probate Codes § 18.104 May a tribe include provisions...

  16. 25 CFR 18.104 - May a tribe include provisions in its tribal probate code regarding the distribution and descent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...a tribe include provisions in its tribal probate code regarding the distribution and descent of trust...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROBATE TRIBAL PROBATE CODES Approval of Tribal Probate Codes § 18.104 May a tribe include provisions...

  17. Performance Evaluation of a Lower Limb Exoskeleton for Stair Ascent and Descent with Paraplegia*

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Ryan J.; Quintero, Hugo A.; Goldfarb, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a powered lower limb exoskeleton to aid paraplegic individuals in stair ascent and descent. A brief description of the exoskeleton hardware is provided along with an explanation of the control methodology implemented to allow stair ascent and descent. Tests were performed with a paraplegic individual (T10 complete injury level) and data is presented from multiple trials, including the hip and knee joint torque and power required to perform this functionality. Joint torque and power requirements are summarized, including peak hip and knee joint torque requirements of 0.75 Nm/kg and 0.87 Nm/kg, respectively, and peak hip and knee joint power requirements of approximately 0.65 W/kg and 0.85 W/kg, respectively. PMID:23366287

  18. The descent of ant: field-measured performance of gliding ants.

    PubMed

    Munk, Yonatan; Yanoviak, Stephen P; Koehl, M A R; Dudley, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Gliding ants avoid predatory attacks and potentially mortal consequences of dislodgement from rainforest canopy substrates by directing their aerial descent towards nearby tree trunks. The ecologically relevant measure of performance for gliding ants is the ratio of net horizontal to vertical distance traveled over the course of a gliding trajectory, or glide index. To study variation in glide index, we measured three-dimensional trajectories of Cephalotes atratus ants gliding in natural rainforest habitats. We determined that righting phase duration, glide angle, and path directness all significantly influence variation in glide index. Unsuccessful landing attempts result in the ant bouncing off its target and being forced to make a second landing attempt. Our results indicate that ants are not passive gliders and that they exert active control over the aerodynamic forces they experience during their descent, despite their apparent lack of specialized control surfaces. PMID:25788722

  19. Post2 End-to-End Descent and Landing Simulation for ALHAT Design Analysis Cycle 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jody L.; Striepe, Scott A.; Maddock, Robert W.; Johnson, Andrew E.; Paschall, Stephen C., II

    2010-01-01

    The ALHAT project is an agency-level program involving NASA centers, academia, and industry, with a primary goal to develop a safe, autonomous, precision-landing system for robotic and crew-piloted lunar and planetary descent vehicles. POST2 is used as the 6DOF descent and landing trajectory simulation for determining integrated system performance of ALHAT landing-system models and lunar environment models. This paper presents updates in the development of the ALHAT POST2 simulation, as well as preliminary system performance analysis for ALDAC-2 used for the testing and assessment of ALHAT system models. The ALDAC-2 POST2 Monte Carlo simulation results have been generated and focus on HRN model performance with the fully integrated system, as well performance improvements of AGNC and TSAR model since the previous design analysis cycle

  20. Assessment of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Davis, J. L.; Shidner, Jeremy D.

    2013-01-01

    On August 5, 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, successfully landed inside Gale Crater. This landing was only the seventh successful landing and fourth rover to be delivered to Mars. Weighing nearly one metric ton, Curiosity is the largest and most complex rover ever sent to investigate another planet. Safely landing such a large payload required an innovative Entry, Descent, and Landing system, which included the first guided entry at Mars, the largest supersonic parachute ever flown at Mars, and a novel and untested Sky Crane landing system. A complete, end-to-end, six degree-of-freedom, multi-body computer simulation of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing sequence was developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. In-flight data gathered during the successful landing is compared to pre-flight statistical distributions, predicted by the simulation. These comparisons provide insight into both the accuracy of the simulation and the overall performance of the vehicle.

  1. Preliminary Assessment of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.

    2013-01-01

    On August 5, 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, successfully landed inside Gale Crater. This landing was only the seventh successful landing and fourth rover to be delivered to Mars. Weighing nearly one metric ton, Curiosity is the largest and most complex rover ever sent to investigate another planet. Safely landing such a large payload required an innovative Entry, Descent, and Landing system, which included the first guided entry at Mars, the largest supersonic parachute ever flown at Mars, and a novel and untested Sky Crane landing system. A complete, end-to-end, six degree-of-freedom, multibody computer simulation of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing sequence was developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. In-flight data gathered during the successful landing is compared to pre-flight statistical distributions, predicted by the simulation. These comparisons provide insight into both the accuracy of the simulation and the overall performance of the vehicle.

  2. On the efficiency of a randomized mirror descent algorithm in online optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasnikov, A. V.; Nesterov, Yu. E.; Spokoiny, V. G.

    2015-04-01

    A randomized online version of the mirror descent method is proposed. It differs from the existing versions by the randomization method. Randomization is performed at the stage of the projection of a subgradient of the function being optimized onto the unit simplex rather than at the stage of the computation of a subgradient, which is common practice. As a result, a componentwise subgradient descent with a randomly chosen component is obtained, which admits an online interpretation. This observation, for example, has made it possible to uniformly interpret results on weighting expert decisions and propose the most efficient method for searching for an equilibrium in a zero-sum two-person matrix game with sparse matrix.

  3. Cultural Beliefs Underlying Medication Adherence in People of Chinese Descent in the United States.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lan; Acharya, Lalatendu

    2016-05-01

    This article examines the meanings, practices, and cultural beliefs underlying medication adherence in people of Chinese descent living in the United States. The narratives were analyzed using interpretive phenomenology, resulting in the following themes that influenced the communication and behaviors around medication adherence of the participants: (a) cultural concepts of yin yang balance and "qi," (b) understandings of Western and Chinese medicine's efficacy profiles, (c) importance of family and social support, and (d) level of acculturation. This article discusses the influence of these themes on medication adherence and proposes that health communication campaigns, interventions, and doctor-patient communication about increasing medication adherence with people of Chinese descent should engage these understandings. PMID:26422467

  4. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis Study: Phase 2 Report on Exploration Feed-Forward Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer Ciancolo, Alicia M.; Davis, Jody L.; Engelund, Walter C.; Komar, D. R.; Queen, Eric M.; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Way, David W.; Zang, Thomas A.; Murch, Jeff G.; Krizan, Shawn A.; Olds, Aaron D.; Powell, Richard W.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Kinney, Daivd J.; McGuire, M. Kathleen; Arnold, James O.; Covington, M. Alan; Sostaric, Ronald R.; Zumwalt, Carlie H.; Llama, Eduardo G.

    2011-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and human-scale missions. Year 1 of the study focused on technologies required for Exploration-class missions to land payloads of 10 to 50 t. Inflatable decelerators, rigid aeroshell and supersonic retro-propulsion emerged as the top candidate technologies. In Year 2 of the study, low TRL technologies identified in Year 1, inflatables aeroshells and supersonic retropropulsion, were combined to create a demonstration precursor robotic mission. This part of the EDL-SA Year 2 effort, called Exploration Feed Forward (EFF), took much of the systems analysis simulation and component model development from Year 1 to the next level of detail.

  5. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis: Exploration Feed Forward Internal Peer Review Slide Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer Cianciolo, Alicia M. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and human-scale missions. Year 1 of the study focused on technologies required for Exploration-class missions to land payloads of 10 to 50 mt. Inflatable decelerators, rigid aeroshell and supersonic retro-propulsion emerged as the top candidate technologies. In Year 2 of the study, low TRL technologies identified in Year 1, inflatables aeroshells and supersonic retropropulsion, were combined to create a demonstration precursor robotic mission. This part of the EDL-SA Year 2 effort, called Exploration Feed Forward (EFF), took much of the systems analysis simulation and component model development from Year 1 to the next level of detail.

  6. A Bayesian Framework for Landing Site Selection During Autonomous Spacecraft Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrano, Navid

    2006-01-01

    The success of a landed space exploration mission depends largely on the final landing site. Factors influencing site selection include safety, fuel-consumption, and scientific return. This paper addresses the problem of selecting the best available landing site based on these factors in real-time during autonomous spacecraft descent onto a planetary surface. The problem is modeled probabilistically using Bayesian Networks (BNs). BNs provide a means of representing the causal relationships between variables that impact the quality of a landing site. The final landing site is determined via probabilistic reasoning based on terrain safety derived from on-board sensors, available fuel based on spacecraft descent dynamics, and regions of interest defined by mission scientists.

  7. Entry, Descent, and Landing Aerothermodynamics: NASA Langley Experimental Capabilities and Contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Berger, Karen T.; Berry, Scott A.; Bruckmann, Gregory J.; Buck, Gregory M.; DiFulvio, Michael; Horvath, Thomas J.; Liechty, Derek S.; Merski, N. Ronald; Murphy, Kelly J.; Rufer, Shann J.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A review is presented of recent research, development, testing and evaluation activities related to entry, descent and landing that have been conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. An overview of the test facilities, model development and fabrication capabilities, and instrumentation and measurement techniques employed in this work is provided. Contributions to hypersonic/supersonic flight and planetary exploration programs are detailed, as are fundamental research and development activities.

  8. STS-35 Pilot Gardner with descent checklist on OV-102's forward flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Pilot Guy S. Gardner, wearing his launch and entry suit (LES), reviews descent checklist while at the pilots station on the forward flight deck of Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. Crewmembers are conducting procedures related to the final stages of the mission and the landing sequence. Silhouetted in forward windows W4 and W5 are the head up display (HUD), flight mirror assembly, and a drinking water bag with straw.

  9. Strong refraction near the Venus surface - Effects observed by descent probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    The telemetry signals from Pioneer Venus probes indicated the strong downward refraction of radio waves. As the probes descended, the strength of the direct signal decreased because of absorption and refractive defocusing. During the last 30 km of descent there was a second measured component in addition to the direct signal. Strong atmospheric reaction is important in strengthening echoes that are scattered toward the earth. Such surface-reflected signals are good indicators of horizontal winds.

  10. [Radiation sterilization of units of a Mars descent module--a miniature meteorological station].

    PubMed

    Paramonov, D V; Trofimov, V I; Aleksashkin, S N; Khamidullina, N M; Novikova, N D; Deshevaia, E A; Polikarpov, N A

    2010-01-01

    Subject of the test was a procedure of electron sterilization of Mars descent module units. As a result, data on distribution of absorbed dose field across the surface and by the entire volume of the mockup of a miniature meteorological station (MMS) were obtained In addition, electron sterilization technology was developed and the range of absorbed dose from electron radiation that will sterilize reliably packaged MMS hardware were defined in the interval from 30 to 40 kGy. PMID:20799653

  11. Flying Schedule-Matching Descents to Explore Flight Crews' Perceptions of Their Load and Task Feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lynne Hazel; Sharma, Shivanjli; Lozito, Sharon; Kaneshige, John; Hayashi, Miwa; Dulchinos, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies have investigated the development and use of ground-based (controller) tools to manage and schedule traffic in future terminal airspace. No studies have investigated the impacts that such tools (and concepts) could have on the flight-deck. To begin to redress the balance, an exploratory study investigated the procedures and actions of ten Boeing-747-400 crews as they flew eight continuous descent approaches in the Los Angeles terminal airspace, with the descents being controlled using speed alone. Although the study was exploratory in nature, four variables were manipulated: speed changes, route constraints, clearance phraseology, and winds. Despite flying the same scenarios with the same events and timing, there was at least a 50 second difference in the time it took crews to fly the approaches. This variation is the product of a number of factors but highlights potential difficulties for scheduling tools that would have to accommodate this amount of natural variation in descent times. The primary focus of this paper is the potential impact of ground scheduling tools on the flight crews performance and procedures. Crews reported "moderate to low" workload, on average; however, short periods of intense and high workload were observed. The non-flying pilot often reported a higher level of workload than the flying-pilot, which may be due to their increased interaction with the Flight Management Computer, when using the aircraft automation to assist with managing the descent clearances. It is concluded that ground-side tools and automation may have a larger impact on the current-day flight-deck than was assumed and that studies investigating this impact should continue in parallel with controller support tool development.

  12. Apollo experience report: Mission planning for lunar module descent and ascent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, F. V.

    1972-01-01

    The premission planning, the real-time situation, and the postflight analysis for the Apollo 11 lunar descent and ascent are described. A comparison between premission planning and actual results is included. A navigation correction capability, developed from Apollo 11 postflight analysis was used successfully on Apollo 12 to provide the first pinpoint landing. An experience summary, which illustrates typical problems encountered by the mission planners, is also included.

  13. Biological effects of fuel and exhaust components from spacecraft descent engines employing hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehwalt, M. E.; Woeller, F. H.; Oyama, V. I.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of the products of the Viking terminal descent engine fuel upon possible extraterrestrial life at the Martian landing site is examined. The effects of the engine exhaust, the hydrazine fuel, and the breakdown products of the latter on terrestrial microorganisms have been studied. The results indicate that the gaseous exhaust products would probably not be hazardous to microorganisms, but that liquid hydrazine would be lethal.

  14. Transcranial cerebellar direct current stimulation and transcutaneous spinal cord direct current stimulation as innovative tools for neuroscientists

    PubMed Central

    Priori, Alberto; Ciocca, Matteo; Parazzini, Marta; Vergari, Maurizio; Ferrucci, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Two neuromodulatory techniques based on applying direct current (DC) non-invasively through the skin, transcranial cerebellar direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcutaneous spinal DCS, can induce prolonged functional changes consistent with a direct influence on the human cerebellum and spinal cord. In this article we review the major experimental works on cerebellar tDCS and on spinal tDCS, and their preliminary clinical applications. Cerebellar tDCS modulates cerebellar motor cortical inhibition, gait adaptation, motor behaviour, and cognition (learning, language, memory, attention). Spinal tDCS influences the ascending and descending spinal pathways, and spinal reflex excitability. In the anaesthetised mouse, DC stimulation applied under the skin along the entire spinal cord may affect GABAergic and glutamatergic systems. Preliminary clinical studies in patients with cerebellar disorders, and in animals and patients with spinal cord injuries, have reported beneficial effects. Overall the available data show that cerebellar tDCS and spinal tDCS are two novel approaches for inducing prolonged functional changes and neuroplasticity in the human cerebellum and spinal cord, and both are new tools for experimental and clinical neuroscientists. PMID:24907311

  15. Consensus Paper: Roles of the Cerebellum in Motor Control—The Diversity of Ideas on Cerebellar Involvement in Movement

    PubMed Central

    Bower, James M.; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Delgado-García, José M.; da Guarda, Suzete Nascimento Farias; Gerwig, Marcus; Habas, Christophe; Hagura, Nobuhiro; Ivry, Richard B.; Mariën, Peter; Molinari, Marco; Naito, Eiichi; Nowak, Dennis A.; Ben Taib, Nordeyn Oulad; Pelisson, Denis; Tesche, Claudia D.; Tilikete, Caroline; Timmann, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in developing models of cerebellar function in sensorimotor control, as well as in identifying key problems that are the focus of current investigation. In this consensus paper, we discuss the literature on the role of the cerebellar circuitry in motor control, bringing together a range of different viewpoints. The following topics are covered: oculomotor control, classical conditioning (evidence in animals and in humans), cerebellar control of motor speech, control of grip forces, control of voluntary limb movements, timing, sensorimotor synchronization, control of corticomotor excitability, control of movement-related sensory data acquisition, cerebro-cerebellar interaction in visuokinesthetic perception of hand movement, functional neuroimaging studies, and magnetoencephalographic mapping of cortico-cerebellar dynamics. While the field has yet to reach a consensus on the precise role played by the cerebellum in movement control, the literature has witnessed the emergence of broad proposals that address cerebellar function at multiple levels of analysis. This paper highlights the diversity of current opinion, providing a framework for debate and discussion on the role of this quintessential vertebrate structure. PMID:22161499

  16. CNS development under altered gravity: cerebellar glial and neuronal protein expression in rat neonates exposed to hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguon, K.; Li, G-H; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    The future of space exploration depends on a solid understanding of the developmental process under microgravity, specifically in relation to the central nervous system (CNS). We have previously employed a hypergravity paradigm to assess the impact of altered gravity on the developing rat cerebellum. The present study addresses the molecular mechanisms involved in the cerebellar response to hypergravity. Specifically, the study focuses on the expression of selected glial and neuronal cerebellar proteins in rat neonates exposed to hypergravity (1.5 G) from embryonic day (E)11 to postnatal day (P)6 or P9 (the time of maximal cerebellar changes) comparing them against their expression in rat neonates developing under normal gravity. Proteins were analyzed by quantitative Western blots of cerebellar homogenates; RNA analysis was performed in the same samples using quantitative PCR. Densitometric analysis of Western blots suggested a reduction in glial (glial acidic protein, GFAP) and neuronal (neuronal cell adhesion molecule, NCAM-L1, synaptophysin) proteins, but the changes in individual cerebellar proteins in hypergravity-exposed neonates appeared both age- and gender-specific. RNA analysis suggested a reduction in GFAP and synaptophysin mRNAs on P6. These data suggest that exposure to hypergravity may interfere with the expression of selected cerebellar proteins. These changes in protein expression may be involved in mediating the effect of hypergravity on the developing rat cerebellum. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of treadmill exercise training on cerebellar estrogen and estrogen receptors, serum estrogen, and motor coordination performance of ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Rauf, Saidah; Soejono, Sri Kadarsih; Partadiredja, Ginus

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The present study aims at examining the motor coordination performance, serum and cerebellar estrogen, as well as ER? levels, of ovariectomized rats (as menopausal model) following regular exercise. Materials and Methods: Ten female Sprague Dawley rats aged 12 weeks old were randomly divided into two groups; all of which underwent ovariectomy. The first group was treated with regular exercise of moderate intensity, in which the rats were trained to run on a treadmill for 60 min per day for 12 weeks. The second group served as control. Rotarod test was carried out before and after exercise treatment. All rats were euthanized thereafter, and blood and cerebellums of the rats were collected. The serum and cerebellar estrogen as well as cerebellar ER? levels were measured using ELISA assays. Results: The number of falls in the rotarod task of the exercise group was significantly lower than that of control group. The cerebellar estrogen level of the exercise group was significantly higher than that of control group. Accordingly, there was a significantly negative correlation between the number of falls and cerebellar estrogen level in the exercise group. Conclusion: The present study shows that a lengthy period of regular exercise improves the cerebellar estrogen level and motor coordination performance in ovariectomized rats. PMID:26221482

  18. Rapid Generation of Optimal Asteroid Powered Descent Trajectories Via Convex Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin; Lu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Mission proposals that land on asteroids are becoming popular. However, in order to have a successful mission the spacecraft must reliably and softly land at the intended landing site. The problem under investigation is how to design a fuel-optimal powered descent trajectory that can be quickly computed on-board the spacecraft, without interaction from ground control. An optimal trajectory designed immediately prior to the descent burn has many advantages. These advantages include the ability to use the actual vehicle starting state as the initial condition in the trajectory design and the ease of updating the landing target site if the original landing site is no longer viable. For long trajectories, the trajectory can be updated periodically by a redesign of the optimal trajectory based on current vehicle conditions to improve the guidance performance. One of the key drivers for being completely autonomous is the infrequent and delayed communication between ground control and the vehicle. Challenges that arise from designing an asteroid powered descent trajectory include complicated nonlinear gravity fields, small rotating bodies and low thrust vehicles.

  19. Flight-Deck Strategies and Outcomes When Flying Schedule-Matching Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneshige, John T.; Sharma, Shivanjli; Martin Lynne; Lozito, Sandra; Dulchinos, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies at NASA Ames Research Center have investigated the development and use of ground-based (air traffic controller) tools to manage and schedule air traffic in future terminal airspace. An exploratory study was undertaken to investigate the impacts that such tools (and concepts) could have on the flight-deck. Ten Boeing 747-400 crews flew eight optimized profile descents in the Los Angeles terminal airspace, while receiving scripted current day and futuristic speed clearances, to ascertain their ability to fly schedulematching descents without prior training. Although the study was exploratory in nature, four variables were manipulated: route constraints, winds, speed changes, and clearance phraseology. Despite flying the same scenarios with the same events and timing, there were significant differences in the time it took crews to fly the approaches. This variation is the product of a number of factors but highlights potential difficulties for scheduling tools that would have to accommodate this amount of natural variation in descent times. The focus of this paper is the examination of the crews' aircraft management strategies and outcomes. This includes potentially problematic human-automation interaction issues that may negatively impact arrival times, speed and altitude constraint compliance, and energy management efficiency.

  20. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Trajectory and Atmosphere Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Kutty, Prasad; Schoenenberer, Mark; Shidner, Jeremy D.

    2013-01-01

    On August 5th 2012, The Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle successfully entered Mars atmosphere and landed the Curiosity rover on its surface. A Kalman filter approach has been implemented to reconstruct the entry, descent, and landing trajectory based on all available data. The data sources considered in the Kalman filtering approach include the inertial measurement unit accelerations and angular rates, the terrain descent sensor, the measured landing site, orbit determination solutions for the initial conditions, and a new set of instrumentation for planetary entry reconstruction consisting of forebody pressure sensors, known as the Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System. These pressure measurements are unique for planetary entry, descent, and landing reconstruction as they enable a reconstruction of the freestream atmospheric conditions without any prior assumptions being made on the vehicle aerodynamics. Moreover, the processing of these pressure measurements in the Kalman filter approach enables the identification of atmospheric winds, which has not been accomplished in past planetary entry reconstructions. This separation of atmosphere and aerodynamics allows for aerodynamic model reconciliation and uncertainty quantification, which directly impacts future missions. This paper describes the mathematical formulation of the Kalman filtering approach, a summary of data sources and preprocessing activities, and results of the reconstruction.