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Sample records for cerebral arteries qualitative

  1. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms. PMID:25698610

  2. Bilateral posterior cerebral artery infarction.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Davinia; Murphy, Sinead M; Hennessey, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with short-term memory impairment and a homonymous left inferior quadrantanopia secondary to simultaneous bilateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territory infarction. As in more than a quarter of cases of PCA infarction, no aetiological cause was identified. Unlike the transient nature of symptoms in some cases following unilateral infarction, his deficits persisted on 2-month follow-up. PMID:22798298

  3. Blood flow distribution in cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Zarrinkoob, Laleh; Ambarki, Khalid; Wåhlin, Anders; Birgander, Richard; Eklund, Anders; Malm, Jan

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution phase–contrast magnetic resonance imaging can now assess flow in proximal and distal cerebral arteries. The aim of this study was to describe how total cerebral blood flow (tCBF) is distributed into the vascular tree with regard to age, sex and anatomic variations. Forty-nine healthy young (mean 25 years) and 45 elderly (mean 71 years) individuals were included. Blood flow rate (BFR) in 21 intra- and extracerebral arteries was measured. Total cerebral blood flow was defined as BFR in the internal carotid plus vertebral arteries and mean cerebral perfusion as tCBF/brain volume. Carotid/vertebral distribution was 72%/28% and was not related to age, sex, or brain volume. Total cerebral blood flow (717±123 mL/min) was distributed to each side as follows: middle cerebral artery (MCA), 21% distal MCA, 6% anterior cerebral artery (ACA), 12%, distal ACA, 4% ophthalmic artery, 2% posterior cerebral artery (PCA), 8% and 20% to basilar artery. Deviating distributions were observed in subjects with ‘fetal' PCA. Blood flow rate in cerebral arteries decreased with increasing age (P<0.05) but not in extracerebral arteries. Mean cerebral perfusion was higher in women (women: 61±8; men: 55±6 mL/min/100 mL, P<0.001). The study describes a new method to outline the flow profile of the cerebral vascular tree, including reference values, and should be used for grading the collateral flow system. PMID:25564234

  4. Arterial tree asymmetry reduces cerebral pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Vrselja, Zvonimir; Brkic, Hrvoje; Curic, Goran

    2015-11-01

    With each heartbeat, pressure wave (PW) propagates from aorta toward periphery. In cerebral circulation, at the level of circle of Willis (CW), four arteries and four PWs converge. Since the interference is an elemental property of the wave, PWs interfere at the level of CW. We hypothesize that the asymmetry of brain-supplying arteries (that join to form CW) creates phase difference between the four PWs that interfere at the level of CW and reduce downstream cerebral pulsatility. To best of our knowledge, the data about the sequence of PWs' arrival into the cerebral circulation is lacking. Evident imperfect bilateral symmetry of the vessels results with different path length of brain-supplying arteries, hence, PWs should arrive into the head at different times. The probabilistic calculation shows that asynchronous arrival is more probable than synchronous. The importance of PWs for the cerebral circulation is highlighted by the observation that barotrauma protection mechanisms are more influenced by the crest of PW (pulse pressure) than by the mean arterial pressure. In addition, an increased arterial pulsatility is associated with several brain pathologies. We created simple computational models of four converging arteries and found that asynchronous arrival of the PWs results with lower maximum pressure, slower rate of pressure amplification and lower downstream pulsatility. In analogy, the asynchronous arrival of the pressure waves into the cerebral circulation should decrease blood flow pulsatility and lower transmission of kinetic energy on arterial wall. We conclude that asynchronous arrival of PWs into the cerebral circulation influences cerebral hemodynamics and represents a physiological necessity. PMID:26277658

  5. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2016-08-01

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit. PMID:26122324

  6. Cerebral autoregulation with changes in arterial and cerebral venous pressure

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, R.W.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of cerebral venous pressure (Pcv) elevation on cerebral autoregulation has been incompletely studied. The authors compared the effect of decreased cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) by elevated Pcv and decreased arterial pressure (Pa) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a canine modified bypass model. CPP of 80, 70, 60, 50, 40 and 30 mmHg were produced by decreasing Pa with intracranial pressure (ICP) and Pcv maintained at 0 mmHg (group 1, n = 5), or by elevating Pcv as Pa was maintained at 80 mmHg (group 2, n = 5. CBF was measured using radiolabeled microspheres, and CMRO/sub 2/ = CBF times arterial-sagittal sinus O/sub 2/ content difference. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) = CPP/CBF. In group 1 CBF (ml/100 gm/min) was unchanged from control (36 +/- 4) as CPP was decreased from 80 to 40 mmHg. As CPP was decreased to 30 mmHg, CBF decreased to 28 +/- 1. CVR (mmHg/ml/min/100 gm) was 2.3 +/- 0.3 and progressively decreased to 1.0 +/- 0.1 at CPP of 30 mmHg. In group 2 CBF was 34 +/- 3 and was unchanged as CPP decreased to 50 mmHg. At CPP of 40 and 30 mmHg CBF decreased to 25 +/- 3 and 22 +/- 2 respectively. Control CRV was 2.4 +/- 0.2 and progressively decreased to 1.4 +/- 0.1 as CPP decreased to 30 mmHg. CMRO/sub 2/ was unchanged from control in both groups. Thus, CBF is maintained to low CPP regardless of whether vascular transmural pressure was decreased (decrease Pa) or increased (increased Pcv) demonstrating that the myogenic mechanism of autoregulation may be unimportant in normoxic dogs.

  7. Anterior cerebral artery territory infarctions presenting with ascending tetraparesis.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kensho; Hamada, Eri; Okuda, Bungo

    2004-01-01

    We describe a patient with ascending tetraparesis following stroke. The patient presented initially with spastic paraparesis which acutely evolved to tetraparesis with abulia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed acute infarctions in the bilateral medial frontal regions but not in the brainstem or spinal cord. Multiple infarctions in the anterior cerebral artery territory appeared to originate from artery to artery embolism. The present case provides distinct clinical features of anterior cerebral artery syndrome which mimic myelopathy or brainstem lesions. PMID:17903956

  8. [Patient with innominate artery steal accompanied with cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kenji; Takahashi, Wakoh; Takizawa, Shunya; Kanabuchi, Kazuo; Takagi, Shigeharu

    2007-10-01

    A 49-year-old man suddenly suffered left hemiplegia, and was brought to our hospital by ambulance at the beginning of August, 2006. He had a history of hypertension, and had received replacement of a synthetic graft in the ascending aorta and aortic arch with innominate artery for dissecting aneurysm in the aorta 2 years before. On diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images obtained after admission, cerebral infarction was detected at the right corona radiata, and MR angiography (MRA) showed obstruction of the right middle cerebral artery. He was given intravenous tissue-plasminogen activator (t-PA) a few hours after arrival, and his hemiplegia was improved on the following day. At 11 days after onset, recanalization of the right middle cerebral artery was seen by MRA. On Doppler ultrasonographic examination, obstruction and thrombus in the innominate artery were observed. Retrograde flow of the right vertebral artery was demonstrated by both pulse-Doppler ultrasonography and velocity-coded color MRA. This patient is a rare example of innominate artery steal and ischemic cerebrovascular disease with obstruction of the innominate artery. Cerebral infarction in this patient might have developed via artery-to-artery embolism, with the thrombus in the innominate artery, rather than through a hemodynamic mechanism with innominate artery steal. PMID:18095497

  9. Dietary cholesterol protects against alcohol-induced cerebral artery constriction

    PubMed Central

    Bukiya, Anna; Dopico, Alex; Leffler, Charles; Fedinec, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Background Binge drinking represents the major form of excessive alcohol (EtOH) consumption in the US. Episodic (such as binge) drinking results in blood alcohol levels (BAL) of 18–80 mM, and leads to alcohol-induced cerebral artery constriction (AICAC). AICAC was shown to arise from EtOH-induced inhibition of large-conductance, calcium/voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels in the vascular smooth muscle. Factors that modulate BK channel-mediated AICAC remain largely unknown. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on high-cholesterol (2% of cholesterol) diet for 18–23 weeks. Their littermates were placed on control iso-caloric diet. AICAC was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro, by means of pial arteriole diameter monitoring through a closed cranial window and diameter measurements of isolated, pressurized cerebral arteries. Cholesterol level in the cerebral artery tissue was manipulated by methyl-β-cyclodextrin to reverse dietary-induced accumulation of cholesterol. BK channel surface presence on the plasma membrane of cerebral artery myocytes was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. BK channel function in pressurized cerebral artery was assessed using selective BK channel blocker paxilline. Results Within 5 minutes of 50 mM EtOH injection into carotid artery in vivo, arteriole diameter decreased by 20% in control group. Pial arteriole constriction was significantly reduced in rats on high-cholesterol diet, resulting in only 10% reduction of diameter. BAL in both groups, however, remained the same. Significant reduction of AICAC in group on high-cholesterol diet compared to control was also observed after middle cerebral artery dissection and in vitro pressurization at 60 mmHg, this reduction remaining after endothelium removal. Cholesterol level in de-endothelialized cerebral arteries was significantly increased in rats on high-cholesterol diet. Removal of excessive cholesterol content restored AICAC to the level, observed in cerebral arteries of

  10. Variant course of bilateral anterior cerebral artery in semilobar holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Pendharkar, Hima; Venkateshappa, Bhaskar Madivala; Prasad, Chandrajit

    2015-12-01

    We report an unusual case of semilobar holoprosencephaly with variant course of bilateral anterior cerebral arteries (ACA) in a 1-year-old child. This is a very rare arterial variant, given that holoprosencephalic brains are usually associated with azygous ACAs. PMID:26027553

  11. Evidence for Cerebral Hemodynamic Measurement-based Therapy in Symptomatic Major Cerebral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    YAMAUCHI, Hiroshi

    In patients with atherosclerotic internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery occlusive disease, chronic reduction in cerebral perfusion pressure (chronic hemodynamic compromise) increases the risk of ischemic stroke and can be detected by directly measuring hemodynamic parameters. However, strategies for selecting treatments based on hemodynamic measurements have not been clearly established. Bypass surgery has been proven to improve hemodynamic compromise. However, the benefit of bypass surgery for reducing the stroke risk in patients with hemodynamic compromise is controversial. The results of the two randomized controlled trials were inconsistent. Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, and antihypertensive therapy provides general benefit to patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic major cerebral artery disease. However, the benefit of strict control of blood pressure for reducing the stroke risk in patients with hemodynamic compromise is a matter of debate. The results of the two observational studies were different. We must establish strategies for selecting treatments based on hemodynamic measurements in atherosclerotic major cerebral artery disease. PMID:26041631

  12. [Large distal anterior cerebral artery aneurysm associated with azygos anterior cerebral artery: case report].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Kawamata, T; Matsumoto, H; Kunii, N; Matsumoto, K

    1998-10-01

    A 51-year-old woman presented with a distal anterior cerebral artery aneurysm (DACAA) manifesting as severe headache and monoparesis of the left lower limb. Computed tomography revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the interhemispheric fissure, bilateral sylvian fissures, and basal cistern, and a hematoma in the supracallosal region. Angiography showed a large aneurysm (23 x 18 mm) located on the distal end of the azygos anterior cerebral artery (azygos ACA) at the supracallosal portion. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the hematoma as a mixed intensity mass, compressing the corpus callosum downward, and the aneurysm as a flow void anterior to the hematoma. Unilateral frontoparietal parasagittal craniotomy was performed with a horse-shoe shaped incision. The aneurysm was clipped via the interhemispheric approach, and the hematoma was aspirated. Postoperative angiography showed disappearance of the aneurysm and intact azygos ACA. The patient was discharged with mild monoparesis, paresthesia of the left lower limb and diagnostic dyspraxia. DACAA almost always arises at or near the genu of the corpus callosum and is often associated with vascular anomaly. In the literature, 22 of 26 cases of large and giant DACAA were located at or near the genu, but only 3 cases, including ours, in the supracallosal area. 11 cases were associated with azygos ACA. Therefore, hemodynamic stress caused by vascular anomaly may be involved in the formation of large or giant DACAA in contrast with cases of normal DACAA. PMID:9789300

  13. Correlation of CT cerebral vascular territories with function. 3. Middle cerebral artery

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.A.; Hayman, L.A.; Hinck, V.C.

    1984-05-01

    Schematic displays are presented of the cerebral territories supplied by branches of the middle cerebral artery as they would appear on axial and coronal computed tomographic (CT) scan sections. Companion diagrams of regional cortical function and a discussion of the fiber tracts are provided to simplify correlation of clinical deficits with coronal and axial CT abnormalities.

  14. Quantitative cerebral perfusion assessment using microscope-integrated analysis of intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence angiography versus positron emission tomography in superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shinya; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Tanabe, Jun; Moroi, Junta; Suzuki, Akifumi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative qualitative indocyanine green (ICG) angiography has been used in cerebrovascular surgery. Hyperperfusion may lead to neurological complications after superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate intraoperative cerebral perfusion using microscope-integrated dynamic ICG fluorescence analysis, and to assess whether this value predicts hyperperfusion syndrome (HPS) after STA-MCA anastomosis. Methods: Ten patients undergoing STA-MCA anastomosis due to unilateral major cerebral artery occlusive disease were included. Ten patients with normal cerebral perfusion served as controls. The ICG transit curve from six regions of interest (ROIs) on the cortex, corresponding to ROIs on positron emission tomography (PET) study, was recorded. Maximum intensity (IMAX), cerebral blood flow index (CBFi), rise time (RT), and time to peak (TTP) were evaluated. Results: RT/TTP, but not IMAX or CBFi, could differentiate between control and study subjects. RT/TTP correlated (|r| = 0.534-0.807; P < 0.01) with mean transit time (MTT)/MTT ratio in the ipsilateral to contralateral hemisphere by PET study. Bland–Altman analysis showed a wide limit of agreement between RT and MTT and between TTP and MTT. The ratio of RT before and after bypass procedures was significantly lower in patients with postoperative HPS than in patients without postoperative HPS (0.60 ± 0.032 and 0.80 ± 0.056, respectively; P = 0.017). The ratio of TTP was also significantly lower in patients with postoperative HPS than in patients without postoperative HPS (0.64 ± 0.081 and 0.85 ± 0.095, respectively; P = 0.017). Conclusions: Time-dependent intraoperative parameters from the ICG transit curve provide quantitative information regarding cerebral circulation time with quality and utility comparable to information obtained by PET. These parameters may help predict the occurrence of postoperative HPS. PMID

  15. Endovascular parent artery occlusion of proximal posterior cerebral artery aneurysms: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Hidenori; Tanoue, Shunsuke; Teranishi, Kosuke; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Senshu; Magami, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Munetaka; Arai, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    We report two cases of proximal posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms treated with endovascular parent artery occlusion (PAO) with coils. In both cases, selective injection from the 4 F distal access catheter clearly showed the perforating arteries arising from the PCA. Case No 1, a 49-year-old woman, was successfully treated with preservation of a paramedian artery. Case No 2, a 54-year-old woman, was treated in the same manner. The patient underwent extensive thalamic infarction after the procedure because of paramedian artery occlusion. Endovascular PAO with coils is feasible for proximal PCA aneurysms; however, preservation of perforating arteries arising from the PCA is mandatory. PMID:25969452

  16. Involuntary masturbation and hemiballismus after bilateral anterior cerebral artery infarction.

    PubMed

    Bejot, Yannick; Caillier, Marie; Osseby, Guy-Victor; Didi, Roy; Ben Salem, Douraied; Moreau, Thibault; Giroud, Maurice

    2008-02-01

    Ischemia of the areas supplied by the anterior cerebral artery is relatively uncommon. In addition, combined hemiballismus and masturbation have rarely been reported in patients with cerebrovascular disease. We describe herein a 62-year-old right-handed man simultaneously exhibiting right side hemiballismus and involuntary masturbation with the left hand after bilateral infarction of the anterior cerebral artery territory. Right side hemiballismus was related to the disruption of afferent fibers from the left frontal lobe to the left subthalamic nucleus. Involuntary masturbation using the left hand was exclusively linked to a callosal type of alien hand syndrome secondary to infarction of the right side of the anterior corpus callosum. After 2 weeks, these abnormal behaviours were completely extinguished. This report stresses the wide diversity of clinical manifestations observed after infarction of the anterior cerebral artery territory. PMID:17961914

  17. Association between changes in weight and cerebral arteries in rats.

    PubMed

    Divani, Afshin A; Patel, Ankur; Fredrickson, Vance L; Siljander, Blake; Vazquez, Gabriela

    2010-06-01

    The objective of the study was to gain a better understanding of brain artery diameters and anatomical variations for precise modification of cerebral blood supply in ischemic stroke models. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 35) were used for the experiment. Rats were perfused and resin replicas of cerebral arteries were created using a corrosion casting technique. Resin replicas were measured and analyzed for correlation of vessel lumen with animal sex and weight. A strong correlation between root of aorta diameter and weight was observed (p < 0.0001). We also observed a significant correlation between weight, internal carotid arteries, right external carotid artery, and pterygopalatine arteries. For the common carotid artery, a significant difference between the left and right branches was observed even though there was no association with weight. There was no significant association observed between animal sex and vessel size independent of weight. A better knowledge of vessel lumen in relation to animal sex and weight is essential for adequate blockage of an intracranial artery to induce cerebral ischemia in a rat model of stroke. This study provides a viable reference for choice of rat size in relation to the size of embolic agents such as filaments, microwires, or in vitro thrombus used in ischemic stroke experiments. PMID:24323492

  18. MATHEMATICAL MODELS OF CEREBRAL HEMODYNAMICS FOR DETECTION OF VASOSPASM IN MAJOR CEREBRAL ARTERIES

    PubMed Central

    Cattivelli, Federico S.; Sayed, Ali H.; Hu, Xiao; Lee, Darrin; Vespa, Paul

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cerebral vasospasm is a typical complication occurring after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, which may lead to delayed cerebral ischemia and death. The standard method to detect vasospasm is angiography, which is an invasive procedure. Monitoring of vasospasm is typically performed by measuring Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity (CBFV) in the major cerebral arteries and calculating the Lindegaard Index. State estimation techniques rely on mathematical models to estimate arterial radii based on available measurements. Mathematical models of cerebral hemodynamics have been proposed by Ursino and Di Giammarco in 1991, and vasospasm was modeled by Lodi and Ursino in 1999. We propose two new models. Model 1 is a more general version of Ursino’s 1991 model that includes the effects of vasospasm, and Model 2 is a simplified version of Model 1. We use Model 1 to generate Intracranial Pressure (ICP) and CBFV signals for different vasospasm conditions, where CBFV is measured at the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Then we use Model 2 to estimate the states of Model 1, from which we readily obtain estimates of the arterial radii. Simulations show that Model 2 is capable of providing good estimates for the radius of the MCA, allowing the detection of the vasospasm. PMID:19388290

  19. Intra-arterial thrombolysis of embolic proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion from presumed atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Bekavac, I; Hanna, J P; Wallace, R C; Powers, J; Ratliff, N B; Furlan, A J

    1997-08-01

    The role of thrombolysis in brain ischemia in patients with atrial myxoma is unknown. A patient with acute brain ischemia and previously undiagnosed atrial myxoma recanalized an occluded middle cerebral artery with intra-arterial thrombolysis. Arterial occlusion from presumed myxoma may be amenable to fibrinolysis. Angiography before treatment in patients with atrial myxoma excludes a myxomatous pseudoaneurysm and permits site-specific thrombolytic instillment. PMID:9270611

  20. Urinary kallidinogenase for the treatment of cerebral arterial stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liandong; Zhao, Ying; Wan, Qi; Zhang, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Aim Urinary kallidinogenase (UK) has shown promise in improving cerebral perfusion. This study aimed to examine how UK affects cognitive status and serum levels of amyloid betas (Aβs) 1-40 and 1-42 in patients with cerebral arterial stenosis. Methods Ninety patients with cerebral arterial stenosis were enrolled, of whom 45 patients received UK + conventional treatment (UK group), and 45 patients received conventional treatment alone as control group. Cognitive status and Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 serum levels were determined before treatment and at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after treatment. Results At 4 weeks after treatment, cognitive status in patients treated with UK clearly improved accompanied by Aβ1-40 serum levels decreasing while there was no change of Aβ1-42. Cognitive status in patients receiving UK continued to improve, Aβ1-40 serum levels declined further as well as Aβ1-42 serum levels began to decrease dramatically at 8 weeks after treatment. Conclusion UK could improve cognitive status and decrease both Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 serum levels to prevent ischemic cerebral injury, which represents a good option for patients with cerebral arterial stenosis. PMID:26508834

  1. Cerebral arterial air embolism in a child after intraosseous infusion

    PubMed Central

    Knoester, H.; Maes, A.; van der Wal, A. C.; Kubat, B.

    2008-01-01

    Cerebral arterial air embolism (CAAE) has been reported as a rare complication of medical intervention. There has been one reported case of CAAE after the use of an intraosseous infusion (IO) system. We report on a case of CAAE after tibial IO infusion in a 7-month-old girl during resuscitation. PMID:18247071

  2. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of duplicated middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Walter; Nazario, Conny; Ingar, Jaime; Huertas, Erasmo; Limay, Antonio; Castillo, Walter

    2010-01-01

    We report a fetus scanned by color Doppler ultrasound at 37 weeks for suspicion of growth restriction with an extremely rare variation of duplicated middle cerebral artery. Three-dimensional color power Doppler and tomographic ultrasound imaging enhanced our incidental finding. PMID:20523030

  3. Cerebral blood flow response pattern during balloon test occlusion of the internal carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, J.P.; Yonas, H.; Jungreis, C.

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate the risk of temporary or permanent internal carotid artery occlusion. In 156 patients intraarterial balloon test occlusion in combination with a stable xenon-enhanced CT cerebral blood flow study was performed before radiologic or surgical treatment. All 156 patients passed the clinical balloon test occlusion and underwent a xenon study in combination with a second balloon test. Quantitative flow data were analyzed for absolute changes as well as changes in symmetry. Fourteen patients exhibited reduced flow values between 20 and 30 mL/100 g per minute, an absolute decrease in flow, and significant asymmetry in the middle cerebral artery territory during balloon test occlusion. These patients would be considered at high risk for cerebral infarction if internal carotid artery occlusion were to be performed. With one exception they belonged to a group (class I) of 61 patients who showed bilateral or ipsilateral flow decrease and significant asymmetry with lower flow on the side of occlusion. The other 95 patients, who showed a variety of cerebral blood flow response patterns including ipsilateral or bilateral flow increase, were at moderate (class II) or low (class III) stroke risk. In contrast to these findings, exclusively qualitative flow analysis failed to identify the patients at high risk: a threshold with an asymmetry index of 10% revealed only 16% specificity whereas an asymmetry index of 45% showed only 61% sensitivity for detection of low flow areas (<30 mL/100 g per minute). For achieving a minimal hemodynamic related-stroke rate associated with permanent clinical internal carotid artery occlusion we suggest integration of a thorough analysis of quantitative cerebral blood flow data before and during balloon test occlusion. 68 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Is Vasomotion in Cerebral Arteries Impaired in Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Farkas, Eszter; Martin, Chris; Venneri, Annalena; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2015-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence supports the hypothesis of a vascular component in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebral hypoperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction have been indicated as key elements of this pathway. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a cerebrovascular disorder, frequent in AD, characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in cerebral blood vessel walls. CAA is associated with loss of vascular integrity, resulting in impaired regulation of cerebral circulation, and increased susceptibility to cerebral ischemia, microhemorrhages, and white matter damage. Vasomotion- the spontaneous rhythmic modulation of arterial diameter, typically observed in arteries/arterioles in various vascular beds including the brain- is thought to participate in tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery regulation. Vasomotion is impaired in adverse conditions such as hypoperfusion and hypoxia. The perivascular and glymphatic pathways of Aβ clearance are thought to be driven by the systolic pulse. Vasomotion produces diameter changes of comparable amplitude, however at lower rates, and could contribute to these mechanisms of Aβ clearance. In spite of potential clinical interest, studies addressing cerebral vasomotion in the context of AD/CAA are limited. This study reviews the current literature on vasomotion, and hypothesizes potential paths implicating impaired cerebral vasomotion in AD/CAA. Aβ and oxidative stress cause vascular tone dysregulation through direct effects on vascular cells, and indirect effects mediated by impaired neurovascular coupling. Vascular tone dysregulation is further aggravated by cholinergic deficit and results in depressed cerebrovascular reactivity and (possibly) impaired vasomotion, aggravating regional hypoperfusion and promoting further Aβ and oxidative stress accumulation. PMID:25720414

  5. Giant Serpentine Aneurysm of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Joo; Kwun, Byung Duk; Kim, Chang Jin

    2010-01-01

    Giant serpentine aneurysms are rare and have distinct angiographic findings. The rarity, large size, complex anatomy and hemodynamic characteristics of giant serpentine aneurysms make treatment difficult. We report a case of a giant serpentine aneurysm of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) that presented as headache. Treatment involved a superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA bypass followed by aneurysm resection. The patient was discharged without neurological deficits, and early and late follow-up angiography disclosed successful removal of the aneurysm and a patent bypass graft. We conclude that STA-MCA bypass and aneurysm excision is a successful treatment method for a giant serpentine aneurysm. PMID:20856671

  6. Middle cerebral artery infarct following multiple bee stings.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Stalin; Muthu, Vivekanandan; Singh, Ajai P; Rajendran, Rajarajan; George, Robin

    2012-02-01

    Neurologic events following bee stings are very rare. We report a 59-year-old man who became drowsy with slurred speech following multiple bee stings. In the hospital, he was found to have left-sided hemplegia, seventh cranial nerve palsy, and left conjugate gaze palsy. Further investigation revealed dyslipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and a middle cerebral artery territory infarct. His limb weakness and speech improved before his discharge from the hospital. PMID:20702115

  7. Acute confusional states with right middle cerebral artery infarctions.

    PubMed Central

    Mesulam, M M; Waxman, S G; Geschwind, N; Sabin, T D

    1976-01-01

    Three patients presenting predominantly with acute confusional states (ACS) are shown to have infarctions in the distribution of the right middle cerebral artery. It is suggested that the main deficit in ACS is in the function of selective attention. On the basis of cortical connections of homologous areas in the monkey brain, it is argued that this deficit arises from lesions in convergence areas for association cortex. Images PMID:1255216

  8. [Geometry and algebra of branches of the middle cerebral artery].

    PubMed

    Blinkov, S M

    1986-01-01

    A classification of the cortical branches of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) is suggested by means of which each branch in any hemisphere can be qualified and identified in any variant of MCA branching. The principle of the classification consists in grouping the branches into arteries and trunks of the second, third, etc. order. Branches supplying blood to a certain sector of the lateral surface of the hemisphere are designated arteries. Their number and zone of branching are constant. Branches giving rise to 2 and more arteries are named trunks. Branching of the trunks, the number of trunks of the second, third, etc. order, and the site and type of origin of the arteries are extremely variable. Each trunk can be designated by a formula stating its order and the name of the artery supplied by this trunk. The arrangement of the MCA branches on the surface of the gyri and deep in the sulci, represented on the map of the lateral surface of the hemisphere, is designated conditionally as geometry of MCA branches. The order of branching of the trunks and the type of origin of the arteries, represented on abstract maps of the lateral surface of the hemisphere, are designated conditionally as algebra of the MCA branches. The variability of the geometry and algebra of the MCA branches must be taken into consideration in operations for extra-intracranial microanastomosis and in endovasal intervention on the MCA. PMID:3811741

  9. Early middle cerebral artery stenosis following stent-assisted thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Akpınar, Süha

    2015-01-01

    Stent-assisted thrombectomy (SAT) is an extensively used endovascular treatment method for stroke in which the thrombectomy stents come into direct contact with the vascular intimal surface and entrap the thrombus causing the arterial occlusion. Although there are a few studies that demonstrate that the vessel wall changes in the arteries where stroke intervention is performed, we observed progressive stenosis in early follow-up imaging studies in a case. We present a middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke patient who had four repetitive stent passes during SAT and developed distal MCA stenosis 2 months after SAT at the control magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Inclusion of early follow-up MRA studies would be helpful in defining the silent vascular changes in patients who have undergone repetitive SAT. PMID:26015531

  10. An Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysm at the Origin of the Duplicated Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Seong; Park, Hyun; Han, Jong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    A variety of cerebral vascular anomalies are widely applied, however anomalies of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) are relatively infrequent. The duplicated MCA (DMCA) is a MCA anomaly. Aneurysm arising from the origin of the DMCA is rare. Cerebral angiography in a 61-year-old female demonstrated a small (about 3 mm) saccular aneurysm located at the origin of the DMCA in the anterior direction. Considering the unusual location, the lesion was treated, regardless of the size. Aneurysmal characteristics of a broad neck and small size limited the endovascular approach, necessitating open surgery. Her postoperative course was uneventful and postoperative angiography showed complete obliteration of the aneurysm. The patient was discharged without neurologic deficit. PMID:26523256

  11. Original Research: Sickle cell anemia and pediatric strokes: Computational fluid dynamics analysis in the middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Christian P; Veneziani, Alessandro; Ware, Russell E; Platt, Manu O

    2016-04-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) have a high incidence of strokes, and transcranial Doppler (TCD) identifies at-risk patients by measuring blood velocities in large intracerebral arteries; time-averaged mean velocities greater than 200 cm/s confer high stroke risk and warrant therapeutic intervention with blood transfusions. Our objective was to use computational fluid dynamics to alter fluid and artery wall properties, to simulate scenarios causative of significantly elevated arterial blood velocities. Two-dimensional simulations were created and increasing percent stenoses were created in silico, with their locations varied among middle cerebral artery (MCA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and anterior cerebral artery (ACA). Stenoses placed in the MCA, ICA, or ACA generated local increases in velocity, but not sufficient to reach magnitudes > 200 cm/s, even up to 75% stenosis. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the MCA, ICA, and ACA from children with SCA were generated from magnetic resonance angiograms. Using finite element method, blood flow was simulated with realistic velocity waveforms to the ICA inlet. Three-dimensional reconstructions revealed an uneven, internal arterial wall surface in children with SCA and higher mean velocities in the MCA up to 145 cm/s compared to non-SCA reconstructions. There were also greater areas of flow recirculation and larger regions of low wall shear stress. Taken together, these bumps on the internal wall of the cerebral arteries could create local flow disturbances that, in aggregate, could elevate blood velocities in SCA. Identifying cellular causes of these microstructures as adhered blood cells or luminal narrowing due to endothelial hyperplasia induced by disturbed flow would provide new targets to treat children with SCA. The preliminary qualitative results provided here point out the critical role of 3D reconstruction of patient-specific vascular geometries and provide qualitative insight to complex

  12. Stent-assisted coil embolization for anterior cerebral artery dissection presented with cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Mitsuhiro; Hattori, Itaro; Sasaki, Makoto; Ishimori, Hisatsugu; Nemoto, Akihiro; Hikita, Chiyoe; Sato, Junko; Fukuta, Shinya; Morimoto, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Compared to those found in the vertebrobasilar system, intracranial dissection in the anterior circulation is relatively rare, especially in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). Moreover, only several cases of ACA dissection that underwent endovascular treatment have been reported. Here we present a rare case of gradually developing ACA dissecting aneurysm causing cerebral infarction, successfully treated by stent-assisted coil embolization. Case Description: A 36-year-old man was admitted with sudden right hemiparesis. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed cerebral infarction in the left ACA territory, and MR angiography showed segmental stenosis at the A2 portion of the left ACA. Three-dimensional digital subtraction angiogram showed segmental dilatation and stenosis at the left A2 portion. We diagnosed ACA dissection causing acute cerebral infarction and treated the patient conservatively. Five months after the onset, the dissecting artery at the left A2 portion formed a gradually dilating aneurysm, suggesting increased risk for aneurysmal rupture. We attempted endovascular treatment entailing coil embolization of an aneurysm while preserving the left A2 with stent assistance. The patient remained neurologically stable 6 months after the procedure. Conclusions: Although there are few reported cases of ACA dissection where endovascular treatment was attempted, we consider stent-assisted embolization for gradually developing ACA dissecting aneurysm as an alternative method to prevent bleeding and recurrent infarction. PMID:26677416

  13. Cerebral blood flow velocity declines before arterial pressure in patients with orthostatic vasovagal presyncope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dan, Dan; Hoag, Jeffrey B.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.; Wood, Mark A.; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Gilligan, David M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied hemodynamic changes leading to orthostatic vasovagal presyncope to determine whether changes of cerebral artery blood flow velocity precede or follow reductions of arterial pressure. BACKGROUND: Some evidence suggests that disordered cerebral autoregulation contributes to the occurrence of orthostatic vasovagal syncope. We studied cerebral hemodynamics with transcranial Doppler recordings, and we closely examined the temporal sequence of changes of cerebral artery blood flow velocity and systemic arterial pressure in 15 patients who did or did not faint during passive 70 degrees head-up tilt. METHODS: We recorded photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, RR intervals (electrocardiogram) and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocities (mean, total, mean/RR interval; Gosling's pulsatility index; and cerebrovascular resistance [mean cerebral velocity/mean arterial pressure, MAP]). RESULTS: Eight men developed presyncope, and six men and one woman did not. Presyncopal patients reported light-headedness, diaphoresis, or a sensation of fatigue 155 s (range: 25 to 414 s) before any cerebral or systemic hemodynamic change. Average cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) changes (defined by an iterative linear regression algorithm) began 67 s (range: 9 to 198 s) before reductions of MAP. Cerebral and systemic hemodynamic measurements remained constant in nonsyncopal patients. CONCLUSIONS: Presyncopal symptoms and CBFV changes precede arterial pressure reductions in patients with orthostatic vasovagal syncope. Therefore, changes of cerebrovascular regulation may contribute to the occurrence of vasovagal reactions.

  14. Rehabilitation Needs of People with Cerebral Palsy: a qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    sharifi, Azam; Kamali, Mohammad; Chabok, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cerebral palsy (CP) describes a group of disorders regarding the development of movement and posture, which causes limitations in activity. In fact, it is attributed to non-progressive disturbances that occur during brain development in fetus or infant. CP disorders may accompany by speech, auditory, visual abnormality, seizure, learning disorder, mental retardation and etc. Due to the variation in disorders and ultimately the needs that are made in the wake of the diseases, understanding the needs of these patients is essential. Methods: This research was a qualitative study, with phenomenology method and sampling was purposeful. The participants were 17 cerebral palsy people (6 female and 11 male, with aged 15 to 43). Data were collected by deep interview with open-end questions and analyzed by collaizi method. Results: During the interview sessions, notes and ideas were classified and assorted, so that, the rehabilitation needs of people with CP were understood according to the statements of participants. The results of this study were placed in four domains, 3 themes and 22 subthemes. The domains included social, emotional needs, economic, and therapeutic needs. Conclusion: The requirements studies in this research were particularly introduced by patients with CP. People in the society, who might have contact with these patients, are responsible to help them to overcome their problems and disabilities. PMID:25250261

  15. [Musical hallucinosis following infarction of the right middle cerebral artery].

    PubMed

    Augustin, J; Guegan-Massardier, E; Levillain, D; Lemarchand, M; Mihout, B; Hannequin, D

    2001-03-01

    A 44-year-old woman demonstrated a musical hallucinosis four months after a massive infarction in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery. This musical hallucinosis consisting of familiar tunes, was continuous and perceived by both ears. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, middle and late auditory evoked potentials suggested that right Heschl's gyrus and associative areas were imparied. Audiometry demonstrated a low right transmission deafness. The hallucinosis was persistent for seven months and stopped just after hemorrhage of the right ear. This case gives the opportunity to review the different mechanisms responsible for musical hallucinosis. PMID:11319490

  16. Percutaneous Angioplasty of the Sole Patent Cerebral Artery in Two Patients with Takayasu’s Aortoarteritis

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Kiron; Adhyapak, Srilakshmi M.

    2016-01-01

    We report two female patients with Takayasu’s aortoarteritis, who presented with symptoms of cerebral ischemia due to critical stenosis of the sole patent cerebral artery. Both had occlusion of both vertebral arteries and one carotid artery with critical stenosis of the other carotid artery and presented with hemiparesis contralateral to the patent but stenosed cerebral artery. They also had transient ischemic attacks attributable to the culprit vessel. In the first patient, balloon angioplasty alone was not successful, and hence, a self-expanding stent was deployed in the right common carotid artery. In the second patient, successful balloon angioplasty was performed for the left common carotid artery. Distal protection devices were not used, and neither patient experienced any periprocedural neurological event. Clinical follow-up at six months revealed no significant cerebral events. PMID:27042151

  17. Middle cerebral artery alterations in a rat chronic hypoperfusion model

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Martín, Ana; Jiménez-Altayó, Francesc; Dantas, Ana P.; Caracuel, Laura; Planas, Anna M.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CHP) induces microvascular changes that could contribute to the progression of vascular cognitive impairment and dementia in the aging brain. This study aimed to analyze the effects of CHP on structural, mechanical, and myogenic properties of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) after bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) in adult male Wistar rats. Sham animals underwent a similar surgical procedure without carotid artery (CA) ligation. After 15 days of occlusion, MCA and CA were dissected and MCA structural, mechanical, and myogenic properties were assessed by pressure myography. Collagen I/III expression was determined by immunofluorescence in MCA and CA and by Western blot in CA. mRNA levels for 1A1, 1A2, and 3A1 collagen subunits were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR in CA. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-13) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein expression were determined in CA by Western blot. BCCAO diminished cross-sectional area, wall thickness, and wall-to-lumen ratio. Nevertheless, whereas wall stress was increased, stiffness was not modified and myogenic response was diminished. Hypoperfusion triggered HIF-1α expression. Collagen I/III protein expression diminished in MCA and CA after BCCAO, despite increased mRNA levels for 1A1 and 3A1 collagen subunits. Therefore, the reduced collagen expression might be due to proteolytic degradation, since the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-9 increased in the CA. These data suggest that BCCAO induces hypotrophic remodeling by a mechanism that involves a reduction of collagen I/III in association with increased MMP-1 and MMP-9 and that decreases myogenic tone in major arteries supplying the brain. PMID:22096118

  18. Cerebral arterial occlusion and intracranial venous thrombosis in a woman taking oral contraceptives.

    PubMed Central

    Montón, F.; Rebollo, M.; Quintana, F.; Berciano, J.

    1984-01-01

    Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus are reported in a 30-year-old woman taking oral contraceptives (OC). The coexistence of arterial and venous cerebral pathology as a complication of OC use has only been previously reported in one case. The pathogenesis of this rare association is briefly discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6462985

  19. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine constrict cerebral arteries by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Madden, J A; Konkol, R J; Keller, P A; Alvarez, T A

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to determine possible mechanisms underlying the vasoconstrictor activity of cocaine and its principal metabolite, benzoylecgonine (BE) in cat isolated cerebral arteries. The arteries constricted significantly in response to single doses of cocaine, BE and norepinephrine (NE; (P < 0.05). After 6-OHDA treatment to remove adrenergic nerve endings, NE-induced constrictions were essentially unchanged from those before treatment. Denervated arteries exposed to cocaine dilated significantly (P < 0.05) but those exposed to BE constricted as much as before denervation. Following exposure to prazosin and yohimbine, arterial constrictions to NE and cocaine were significantly reduced from control (P < 0.05) but the BE-induced constriction was unchanged. Ryanodine eliminated the cocaine-induced contraction (P < 0.05) whereas verapamil eliminated the BE response (P < 0.05). These data suggest that while cocaine's vasoconstrictor action may be significantly mediated through adrenergic transmission, BE may act through a mechanism involving calcium (Ca2+) channels. Cocaine levels peak and decline in the body more rapidly than BE levels which can remain detectable for days. This study suggests there may also be different pharmacological mechanisms as well as temporal differences underlying the vasoreactivity of these two substances. Our findings may have implications for pharmacological management of cocaine-induced toxic vascular events. PMID:7869849

  20. Hemicraniectomy for massive middle cerebral artery infarction: a review.

    PubMed

    Manawadu, Dulka; Quateen, Ahmed; Findlay, J Max

    2008-11-01

    Hemicraniectomy and opening underlying dura mater permits the expansion of infarcted, swollen brain outwards, reversing dangerous intracranial pressure elevations and the risk of fatal transtentorial temporal lobe or diencephalic herniation. Recently published randomized controlled trials have proven this procedure a powerful life-saving measure in the setting of malignant middle cerebral artery infarction and allayed concerns that a reduction in mortality is accompanied by an unacceptable increase in patients suffering severe neurological impairments. Appropriate patients are relatively young, in the first five decades of life, suffering infarction of a majority of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory in either hemisphere, and decompression should be performed prior to progression to coma or two dilated, fixed pupils. Lethargy combined with midline shift and uncal herniation on neuroimaging is an appropriate trigger to consider and discuss surgical intervention. Families and, when possible, patients themselves, should be informed of the certainty of at least moderate to mild permanent deficits, and the possibility of worse. To be successful decompression must be extensive, targeting a bone flap measuring 14 cm from front to back, and extending 1 to 2 cm lateral to the midline sagittal suture to the floor of the middle cranial fossa at the level of the coronal suture. An augmentation duraplasty is mandatory. PMID:19235437

  1. Cerebral blood flow during orthostasis: role of arterial CO2.

    PubMed

    Serrador, J M; Hughson, R L; Kowalchuk, J M; Bondar, R L; Gelb, A W

    2006-04-01

    Reductions in end-tidal Pco(2) (Pet(CO(2))) during upright posture have been suggested to be the result of hyperventilation and the cause of decreases in cerebral blood flow (CBF). The goal of this study was to determine whether decreases in Pet(CO(2)) reflected decreases in arterial Pco(2) (Pa(CO(2))) and their relation to increases in alveolar ventilation (Va) and decreases in CBF. Fifteen healthy subjects (10 women and 5 men) were subjected to a 10-min head-up tilt (HUT) protocol. Pa(CO(2)), Va, and cerebral flow velocity (CFV) in the middle and anterior cerebral arteries were examined. In 12 subjects who completed the protocol, reductions in Pet(CO(2)) and Pa(CO(2)) (-1.7 +/- 0.5 and -1.1 +/- 0.4 mmHg, P < 0.05) during minute 1 of HUT were associated with a significant increase in Va (+0.7 +/- 0.3 l/min, P < 0.05). However, further decreases in Pa(CO(2)) (-0.5 +/- 0.5 mmHg, P < 0.05), from minute 1 to the last minute of HUT, occurred even though Va did not change significantly (-0.2 +/- 0.3 l/min, P = not significant). Similarly, CFV in the middle and anterior cerebral arteries decreased (-7 +/- 2 and -8 +/- 2%, P < 0.05) from minute 1 to the last minute of HUT, despite minimal changes in Pa(CO(2)). These data suggest that decreases in Pet(CO(2)) and Pa(CO(2)) during upright posture are not solely due to increased Va but could be due to ventilation-perfusion mismatch or a redistribution of CO(2) stores. Furthermore, the reduction in Pa(CO(2)) did not fully explain the decrease in CFV throughout HUT. These data suggest that factors in addition to a reduction in Pa(CO(2)) play a role in the CBF response to orthostatic stress. PMID:16306163

  2. Cerebral Hyperperfusion after Revascularization Inhibits Development of Cerebral Ischemic Lesions Due to Artery-to-Artery Emboli during Carotid Exposure in Endarterectomy for Patients with Preoperative Cerebral Hemodynamic Insufficiency: Revisiting the “Impaired Clearance of Emboli” Concept

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Kentaro; Matsumoto, Yoshiyasu; Oikawa, Kohki; Nomura, Jun-ichi; Shimada, Yasuyoshi; Fujiwara, Shunrou; Terasaki, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Yoshida, Kenji; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether cerebral hyperperfusion after revascularization inhibits development of cerebral ischemic lesions due to artery-to-artery emboli during exposure of the carotid arteries in carotid endarterectomy (CEA). In patients undergoing CEA for internal carotid artery stenosis (≥70%), cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) before and immediately after CEA. Microembolic signals (MES) were identified using transcranial Doppler during carotid exposure. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) was performed within 24 h after surgery. Of 32 patients with a combination of reduced cerebrovascular reactivity to acetazolamide on preoperative brain perfusion SPECT and MES during carotid exposure, 14 (44%) showed cerebral hyperperfusion (defined as postoperative CBF increase ≥100% compared with preoperative values), and 16 (50%) developed DWI-characterized postoperative cerebral ischemic lesions. Postoperative cerebral hyperperfusion was significantly associated with the absence of DWI-characterized postoperative cerebral ischemic lesions (95% confidence interval, 0.001–0.179; p = 0.0009). These data suggest that cerebral hyperperfusion after revascularization inhibits development of cerebral ischemic lesions due to artery-to-artery emboli during carotid exposure in CEA, supporting the “impaired clearance of emboli” concept. Blood pressure elevation following carotid declamping would be effective when embolism not accompanied by cerebral hyperperfusion occurs during CEA. PMID:27527146

  3. Role of calcium in the constriction of isolated cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wendling, W.W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium entry blockers (CEB) have been used in the experimental treatment or prevention of many cerebrovascular disorders including stroke, post-ischemic hypoperfusion after cardiac arrest, cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage, and migraine headache. However, the mechanism of action of these drugs on the cerebral circulation is poorly understood. This study examined the effects of calcium antagonists, Ca/sup 2 +/-deficient solutions, and vasocostrictors on cerebrovascular tone and /sup 45/Ca fluxes, to determine the role of calcium in cerebral arterial constriction. A Scatchard plot of /sup 45/Ca binding to BMCA showed that Ca/sup 2 +/ was bound at either low or high affinity binding sties. The four vasoconstrictors (potassium, serotonin, PGF/sub 2 ..cap alpha../, or SQ-26,655) each increased low affinity /sup 45/Ca uptake into BMCA. The results demonstrate that: (1) Potassium and serotonin constrict BMCA mainly by promoting Ca/sup 2 +/ influx through CEB-sensitive channels; (2) PGF/sub 2 ..cap alpha../ and SQ-26,655 constrict BMCA in part by promoting Ca/sup 2 +/ influx through CEB-sensitive channels, and in part by releasing Ca/sup 2 +/ from depletable internal stores; (3) The major action of CEB on BMCA is to block vasoconstrictor-induced Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake through both potential-operated (K/sup +/-stimulated) and receptor-operated channels.

  4. Anatomic variations of anterior cerebral artery cortical branches.

    PubMed

    Stefani, M A; Schneider, F L; Marrone, A C; Severino, A G; Jackowski, A P; Wallace, M C

    2000-01-01

    The anterior cerebral artery (ACA) is a major vessel responsible for the blood supply to the interhemispheric region. The ACA segment after the anterior communicating artery (AComA) origin is called the distal ACA and has central and cortical branches. The cortical branches are distributed in the different regions of the orbital and medial part of the brain. The objects of this study are the anatomical variations found in the distal ACA. In 76 hemispheres the ACA distal branches were injected with latex and dissected under microscope magnification. Vessel diameters and distances between vessel origins and anterior communicating artery were recorded and analyzed. Microsurgical dissection was carried out to demonstrate anatomic variations of these vessels. Average diameter of ACA at origin was 2.61 +/- 0.34 mm and average diameter of cortical branches diameter ranged from 0.79 +/- 0.27 mm to 1.84 +/- 0.3 mm. Distances between vessel origin and AComA ranged from 7.68 +/- 3.91 mm (orbitofrontal) to 112.6 +/- 11.63 mm (inferior internal parietal). This study found anatomical variations: a single (azygos) ACA was present in one case and three in three cases. Crossing branches of the distal ACA to the contralateral hemisphere were present in 26% of the cases. In some cases a single ACA may supply the posterior hemispheric region through crossing branches. This calls attention to potential bilateral brain infarcts due to a single unilateral ACA occlusion. PMID:10873213

  5. Iatrogenic Dural Arteriovenous Fistula after Superficial Temporal Artery to Middle Cerebral Artery Anastomosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seng-Won; Shim, Jae-Hyon; Rho, Seung-Jin; Choi, Hak-Ki; Park, Hwa-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are uncommon, representing only 10% to 15% of all intracranial AVFs. Here we present the case of a patient with cerebral infarction who experienced a dural AVF after craniotomy for superficial temporal artery (STA) to middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass surgery. A 48-year-old man presented with dysarthria and right side hemiparesis. A brain magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed multiple acute infarctions and severe stenosis of the left MCA. Therefore, STA-MCA bypass surgery was performed. A follow-up angiography performed 2 weeks after the surgery showed an abnormal vascular channel from the left middle meningeal artery (MMA) to the middle meningeal vein (MMV) just anterior to the border of the craniotomy margin. This fistula originated from a screw used for cranial fixation. The screw injured the MMA and MMV, and this resulted in the formation of a fistula. The fistula was successfully treated with transarterial embolization. Surgeons should be careful when fixing bones with screws and plates as fistulas can develop if vessels are injured. PMID:27169083

  6. Posterior cerebral artery stroke presenting as alexia without agraphia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhawna; Handa, Rahul; Prakash, Swayam; Nagpal, Kadam; Bhana, Indu; Gupta, Pankaj Kumar; Kumar, Sunil; Sisodiya, Mahendra Singh

    2014-12-01

    Alexia without agraphia (pure alexia) was the first of the disconnection syndromes to be described by Dejerine who reported a patient of alexia without agraphia secondary to an embolic occipital lobe infarct. We herein report a 55-year-old man who presented with alexia without agraphia with magnetic resonance imaging suggestive of left posterior cerebral artery infarct involving left occipital lobe and splenium of corpus callosum. Alexia without agraphia is a relatively uncommon clinical condition, which should always be thought in a patient presenting with difficulty in reading with normal visual acuity. Ophthalmologists should also be aware of this disconnection syndrome as many patients initially take their advice due to predominant visual complaints. Early diagnosis and treatment of this condition help in ensuring the patient and attendants about nonprogressive nature of the disease and may prevent further episodes of stroke. PMID:24935413

  7. Bilateral anterior cerebral artery aneurysm due to mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Kasliwal, Manish K; Reddy, Vemuru Sunil K; Sinha, Sumit; Sharma, Bhawani S; Das, Prasenjit; Suri, Vaishali

    2009-01-01

    True mycotic aneurysms are extremely rare cerebrovascular lesions with a dismal prognosis. They mostly follow fungal meningitis or septicaemia and herald their presence with the development of subarachnoid haemorrhage. The authors report an extremely rare occurrence of bilateral anterior cerebral artery aneurysms caused by mucormycosis. The infection was diagnosed after investigation of prolonged fever following transsphenoidal surgery. The aneurysm was diagnosed after a subarachnoid haemorrhage and the patient finally died. The present case highlights an atypical presentation of fungal infection that can perplex the best of clinicians and thus delay diagnosis. As subarachnoid haemorrhage due to true mycotic aneurysmal rupture is uniformly associated with a fatal outcome, the authors speculate that a high index of suspicion should be maintained when a neurosurgical patient is predisposed to fungal infection. This approach, combined with the empirical institution of antifungal drugs, provides the only chance of survival. PMID:19013802

  8. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Arterial Stiffness: Tsunami Effect in the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Saji, Naoki; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel diseases, including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, pose a risk for cerebrovascular disease, cognitive impairment, and the geriatric syndrome via effects on arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological, and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness in cerebral small vessel diseases remain unclear. Summary Arterial stiffness can be assessed using various indicators such as the ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, cardio-ankle vascular index, and augmentation index. Arterial stiffness is independently associated with all components of cerebral small vessel disease including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, although there are some methodological differences between the various surrogate markers. Evidence of arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. Further, vascular narrowing due to atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness due to lipohyalinosis can accelerate the pulse waves. This hemodynamic stress, pulsatile pressure, or blood pressure variability can cause a ‘tsunami effect’ towards the cerebral parenchyma and lead to cerebral small vessel disease. Previous studies have shown that silent lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are strongly associated with arterial stiffness. However, the association between microbleeds and arterial stiffness remains controversial, as there are two vessel mechanisms related to microbleeds: cerebral amyloid angiopathy and hypertensive small vessel disease. Key Messages Cerebral small vessel disease with associated arterial stiffness is a risk factor for silent cerebral lesions, stroke, and cognitive impairment. Improvement of the living environment, management of risk factors, and innovation and development of novel drugs that improve arterial stiffness may suppress the progression of cerebral small vessel disease, and may reduce

  9. Dynamics of enhanced mitochondrial respiration in female compared with male rat cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V; Busija, David W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial respiration has never been directly examined in intact cerebral arteries. We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial energetics of large cerebral arteries ex vivo are sex dependent. The Seahorse XFe24 analyzer was used to examine mitochondrial respiration in isolated cerebral arteries from adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. We examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial respiration under basal conditions, using N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and following pharmacological challenge using diazoxide (DZ), and also determined levels of mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial proteins using Western blot, and vascular diameter responses to DZ. The components of mitochondrial respiration including basal respiration, ATP production, proton leak, maximal respiration, and spare respiratory capacity were elevated in females compared with males, but increased in both male and female arteries in the presence of the NOS inhibitor. Although acute DZ treatment had little effect on mitochondrial respiration of male arteries, it decreased the respiration in female arteries. Levels of mitochondrial proteins in Complexes I-V and the voltage-dependent anion channel protein were elevated in female compared with male cerebral arteries. The DZ-induced vasodilation was greater in females than in males. Our findings show that substantial sex differences in mitochondrial respiratory dynamics exist in large cerebral arteries and may provide the mechanistic basis for observations that the female cerebral vasculature is more adaptable after injury. PMID:26276815

  10. Effect of natriuretic peptides on cerebral artery blood flow in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Song; Goetze, Jens P; Jeppesen, Jørgen L; Burnett, John C; Olesen, Jes; Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Ashina, Messoud

    2015-12-01

    The natriuretic peptides (NPs), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), have vasoactive functions that concern humans and most animals, but their specific effects on cerebral circulation are poorly understood. We therefore examined the responsiveness of cerebral arteries to different doses of the natriuretic peptides in animals and humans. We conducted a dose-response experiment in guinea pigs (in vitro) and a double-blind, three-way cross-over study in healthy volunteers (in vivo). In the animal experiment, we administered cumulative doses of NPs to pre-contracted segments of cerebral arteries. In the main study, six healthy volunteers were randomly allocated to receive two intravenous doses of ANP, BNP or CNP, respectively, over 20 min on three separate study days. We recorded blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (VMCA) by transcranial Doppler. In addition, we measured temporal and radial artery diameters, headache response and plasma concentrations of the NPs. In guinea pigs, ANP and BNP but not CNP showed significant dose-dependent relaxation of cerebral arteries. In healthy humans, NP infusion had no effect on mean VMCA, and we found no difference in hemodynamic responses between the NPs. Furthermore, natriuretic peptides did not affect temporal and radial artery diameters or induce headache. In conclusion, natriuretic peptides in physiological and pharmacological doses do not affect blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery or dilate extracerebral arteries in healthy volunteers. PMID:26417835

  11. Cerebral Hemodynamics and Vascular Reactivity in Mild and Severe Ischemic Rodent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jeongeun; Jo, Areum; Kang, Bok-Man; Lee, Sohee; Bang, Oh Young; Heo, Chaejeong; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Lee, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia can cause decreased cerebral neurovascular coupling, leading to a failure in the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow. This study aims to investigate the effect of varying degrees of ischemia on cerebral hemodynamic reactivity using in vivo real-time optical imaging. We utilized direct cortical stimulation to elicit hyper-excitable neuronal activation, which leads to induced hemodynamic changes in both the normal and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) ischemic stroke groups. Hemodynamic measurements from optical imaging accurately predict the severity of occlusion in mild and severe MCAO animals. There is neither an increase in cerebral blood volume nor in vessel reactivity in the ipsilateral hemisphere (I.H) of animals with severe MCAO. The pial artery in the contralateral hemisphere (C.H) of the severe MCAO group reacted more slowly than both hemispheres in the normal and mild MCAO groups. In addition, the arterial reactivity of the I.H in the mild MCAO animals was faster than the normal animals. Furthermore, artery reactivity is tightly correlated with histological and behavioral results in the MCAO ischemic group. Thus, in vivo optical imaging may offer a simple and useful tool to assess the degree of ischemia and to understand how cerebral hemodynamics and vascular reactivity are affected by ischemia. PMID:27358581

  12. Early CT findings of acute cerebral infarction in the middle cerebral artery territory.

    PubMed

    Ying, K S; Pang, K K; Huang, J K; Lin, J C

    1992-04-01

    For an early and definitive diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction by computed tomography (CT), we retrospectively analyzed the initial CT findings of 14 patients with proven acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction within 4 hours after stroke onset. The following results were obtained: (a) abnormal CT findings could be recognized quite early in 13 patients (92.9%), (b) the most common and earliest finding was loss of defination of the gray-white interface at the lateral margins of the insula. This sign was recognized in 12 patients (85.7%) and could be detected as early as 1 hour after stroke onset, (c) the next common finding was narrowing or blurring of the Sylvian fissure in 10 patients (71.4%) and could be detected 1.5 hours after stroke onset, (d) an obscured outline or partial disappearance of the lentiform nucleus was recognized in 7 patients (50%) and could be detected 1.5 hours after stroke onset, (e) effacement of the cerebral sulci was found in 6 patients (42.9%) and could be detected 2.5 hours after stroke onset, (f) increased density in MCA or its major branches was not seen in our patients. PMID:1318145

  13. Gene expression profiling in the human middle cerebral artery after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Vikman, P; Edvinsson, L

    2006-12-01

    We have investigated the gene expression in human middle cerebral artery (MCA) after ischemia. Ischemic stroke affects the perfusion in the affected area and experimental cerebral ischemia results in upregulation of vasopressor receptors in the MCA leading to the ischemic area. We obtained human MCA samples distributing to the ischemic area, 7-10 days post-stroke. The gene expression was examined with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microarray, proteins were studied with immunohistochemistry. We investigated genes previously shown to be upregulated in animal models of cerebral ischemia (e.g. ET(A), ET(B), AT1, AT2, and 5-HT(2A/1B/1D)). Their mRNA expression was increased compared with controls, consistent with findings in experimental stroke. Immunohistochemistry showed upregulation of the receptors localized on the smooth muscle cells. The gene expression was profiled with microarray and seven genes chosen for further investigation with real-time PCR; ELK3, LY64, Metallothionin IG, POU3F4, Actin alpha2, RhoA and smoothelin. Six of these were regulated the same way when confirming array expression with real-time PCR. Gene expression studies in the human MCA leading to the ischemic region is similar to that seen after MCA occlusion in rats. We found new genes that support the dynamic changes that occur in the MCA distributing to the ischemic region. PMID:17116215

  14. Computed tomography of cerebral infarction along the distribution of the basal perforating arteries. Part II. Thalamic arterial group

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Goto, K.; Fukasawa, H.; Kawata, Y.; Uemura, K.; Yaguchi, K.

    1985-04-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) manifestations of cerebral infarction along the distribution of the basal perforating arteries were reviewed and correlated with cerebral angiography. Infarcts in the territories of perforators were demonstrated individually based on knowledge of their three-dimensional distribution as shown by microangiography of cadavers. In Part II of the study, the posterior areas supplied by the thalamic arteries were examined. Infarcts in the area supplied by the thalamotuberal arteries involved the anterior pole of the thalamus; those in the area of the thalamoperforate arteries involved the medial portion of the thalamus, along the lateral wall of the third ventricle; those in the area of the thalamogeniculate arteries involved the posterolateral portion of the thalamus; and those in the area of the choroidal arteries of the lateral ventricle involved the most posterolateral and dorsolateral portions of the thalamus. Clinical and neuroradiological correlations are discussed.

  15. Numerical analysis of hemodynamics in spastic middle cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Wang, Qingfeng; Wang, Qingyuan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Zheng, Tinghui

    2016-11-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CVS) is the most common serious complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among the many factors that are associated with the pathogenesis of CVS, hemodynamics plays an important role in the initiation and development of CVS. Numerical simulation was carried out to obtain the flow patterns and wall shear stress (WSS) distribution in spastic middle cerebral arteries. The blood was assumed to be incompressible, laminar, homogenous, Newtonian, and steady. Our simulations reveal that flow velocity and WSS level increase at the stenosis segment of the spastic vessels, but further downstream of stenosis, the WSS significantly decreases along the inner wall, and flow circulation and stagnation are observed. The hydrodynamic resistance increases with the increase of vessel spasm. Moreover, the change of flow field and hydrodynamic forces are not linearly proportional to the spasm level, and the rapid change of hemodynamic parameters is observed as the spasm is more than 50%. Accordingly, in the view of hemodynamic physiology, vessels with less than 30% stenosis are capable of self-restoration towards normal conditions. However, vessels with more than 50% stenosis may eventually lose their capacity to adapt to differing physiologic conditions due to the extreme non-physilogic hemodynamic environment, and the immediate expansion of the vessel lumen might be needed to minimize serious and non-reversible effects. PMID:26942314

  16. Continuous Intra-Arterial Nimodipine for the Treatment of Cerebral Vasospasm

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Thomas E.; Dichgans, Martin; Straube, Andreas; Birnbaum, Tobias; Mueller-Schunk, Stephanie; Hamann, Gerhard F.; Schulte-Altedorneburg, Gernot

    2008-11-15

    Two patients with refractory symptomatic cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were treated by continuous intra-arterial nimodipine infusion via a catheter placed in the internal carotid artery or vertebral artery for 3 and 12 days, respectively. Recovery of the neurological deficits, normalization of MR perfusion, a decrease in the elevated mean flow velocity measured by transcranial duplex sonography, and angiographic recanalization were observed. Continuous intra-arterial nimodipine might be a treatment option in severe refractory vasospasm following SAH.

  17. Superficial temporal artery to proximal posterior cerebral artery bypass through the anterior temporal approach

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Tsuboi, Toshiyuki; Noda, Kosumo; Oda, Junpei; Miyata, Shiro; Ota, Nakao; Yoshikane, Tsutomu; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Background: The superficial temporal artery (STA) to proximal posterior cerebral artery (PCA) (P2 segment) bypass is one of the most difficult procedures to perform because the proximal PCA is located deep and high within the ambient cistern. STA to proximal PCA bypass is usually performed through a subtemporal approach or posterior transpetrosal approach, and rarely through a transsylvian approach. The aim of this study was to describe the operative technique of STA to proximal PCA bypass through a modified transsylvian approach (anterior temporal approach). Methods: STA to proximal PCA bypass was performed through an anterior temporal approach in three patients with intracranial aneurysm. We describe the details of the surgical technique. Results: The STA was successfully anastomosed to the proximal PCA in all cases. One patient suffered hemiparesis and aphasia due to infarction in the anterior thalamoperforating artery territory. Conclusions: STA to proximal PCA bypass can be performed through an anterior temporal approach in selected patients. We recommend that every precaution, including complete hemostasis, placement of cellulose sponges beneath the recipient artery to elevate the site of the anastomosis, and placement of a continuous drainage tube at the bottom of the operative field to avoid blood contamination during the anastomosis, should be taken to shorten the temporary occlusion time. PMID:26097774

  18. Cerebral Arterial Variations Associated with Moyamoya Disease Diagnosed by MR Angiography.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2014-12-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare progressive cerebrovascular steno-occlusive disease associated with different variations of the cerebral arteries. We evaluated the types and prevalence of such variations among patients with moyamoya disease. In our institution during the past seven years, we diagnosed 72 patients (24 male, 48 female; aged 6 to 75 years, mean, 42 years) with moyamoya disease by magnetic resonance (MR) angiography using either a 3-Tesla or one of two 1.5-T imagers and a standard time-of-flight technique without contrast media. An experienced neuroradiologist retrospectively reviewed the images. There were 15 cerebral arterial variations in 13 of 72 patients with moyamoya disease (18.1%), including four basilar artery fenestrations, three ophthalmic arteries arising from the middle meningeal artery, two intracranial vertebral artery fenestrations, two persistent first cervical intersegmental arteries, two persistent trigeminal arteries, one extracranial origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and one persistent stapedial artery. Although our number of patients was small, moyamoya disease was frequently associated with variations of the cerebral arteries, especially fenestrations in the vertebrobasilar system and persistent trigeminal artery. PMID:25489893

  19. Complete occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ben; Kim, Dong Hyun; Hong, Young Jin; Son, Byong Kwan; Lim, Myung Kwan; Choe, Yon Ho

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 5-year-old girl who developed left hemiparesis and left facial palsy, 6 days after the initiation of fever and respiratory symptoms due to pneumonia. Chest radiography, conducted upon admission, showed pneumonic infiltration and pleural effusion in the left lung field. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed acute ischemic infarction in the right middle cerebral artery territory. Brain magnetic resonance angiography and transfemoral cerebral angiography revealed complete occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was identified by a 4-fold increase in IgG antibodies to M. pneumoniae between acute and convalescent sera by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fibrinogen and D-dimer levels were elevated, while laboratory exams in order to identify other predisposing factors of pediatric stroke were all negative. This is the first reported pediatric case in English literature of a M. pneumoniae-associated cerebral infarction involving complete occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. PMID:27186223

  20. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Curtis R; Hanna, Mina; Behnke, Bradley J; Stabley, John N; McCullough, Danielle J; Davis, Robert T; Ghosh, Payal; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Muller-Delp, Judy M; Delp, Michael D

    2013-06-01

    Evidence indicates that cerebral blood flow is both increased and diminished in astronauts on return to Earth. Data from ground-based animal models simulating the effects of microgravity have shown that decrements in cerebral perfusion are associated with enhanced vasoconstriction and structural remodeling of cerebral arteries. Based on these results, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 13 d of spaceflight [Space Transportation System (STS)-135 shuttle mission] enhances myogenic vasoconstriction, increases medial wall thickness, and elicits no change in the mechanical properties of mouse cerebral arteries. Basilar and posterior communicating arteries (PCAs) were isolated from 9-wk-old female C57BL/6 mice for in vitro vascular and mechanical testing. Contrary to that hypothesized, myogenic vasoconstrictor responses were lower and vascular distensibility greater in arteries from spaceflight group (SF) mice (n=7) relative to ground-based control group (GC) mice (n=12). Basilar artery maximal diameter was greater in SF mice (SF: 236±9 μm and GC: 215±5 μm) with no difference in medial wall thickness (SF: 12.4±1.6 μm; GC: 12.2±1.2 μm). Stiffness of the PCA, as characterized via nanoindentation, was lower in SF mice (SF: 3.4±0.3 N/m; GC: 5.4±0.8 N/m). Collectively, spaceflight-induced reductions in myogenic vasoconstriction and stiffness and increases in maximal diameter of cerebral arteries signify that elevations in brain blood flow may occur during spaceflight. Such changes in cerebral vascular control of perfusion could contribute to increases in intracranial pressure and an associated impairment of visual acuity in astronauts during spaceflight. PMID:23457215

  1. Efficacy and Safety Evaluation on Arterial Thrombolysis in Treating Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    Shen, Baozhong; Liu, Qingan; Gu, Yingli; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Zhuobo

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intra-arterial thrombolysis in treating acute cerebral infarction and further discuss the indications of acute cerebral infarction treatment, in order to enhance the therapeutic effects of arterial thrombolysis. The data of 164 patients with acute cerebral infarction who accepted intra-arterial thrombolysis treatment by using rt-PA or reteplase between 2009 and 2014 at the Department of Neurology of our hospital, were collected, including patients' medical history, characteristics of the onset procedure, intervals between onset and intra-arterial thrombolysis, bleeding or death, and the changing process of patient's main neurologic function after the treatment. The neurological functions including muscle strength, speech, and level of consciousness were chosen for evaluation. Through a review of cerebral angiography, we collected the digital subtraction angiography (DSA) morphological changes of blood vessels before and after arterial thrombolysis to evaluate whether those blood vessels had been reperfused. Thereafter, we analyzed and statistically processed above-mentioned data. The mean time of arterial thrombolysis was 5.7 h. DSA results were as follows: 22 patients had complete internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion; 49 patients middle cerebral artery's (MCA's) Ml or M2 segment occlusion; 6 patients anterior cerebral artery (ACA) occlusion; 58 patients reperfusion after thrombolysis, and the recanalization rate was 76 %. Based on vertebral-basilar artery (VBA) system, 18 patients had complete occlusion, 11 patients had reperfusion after thrombolysis, and the recanalization rate was 61 %. A total of 63 patients had severe stenosis, and they had significantly improved after thrombolysis. The clinical symptoms of patients were improved: 79 out of 164 patients with paralysis had partially recovered their limb muscle strength after operation, while 33 patients had completely recovered, and

  2. Anterior communicating artery aneurysm associated with an infraoptic course of anterior cerebral artery and rare variant of the persistent trigeminal artery: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Turkoglu, Erhan; Arat, Anıl; Patel, Nirav; Kertmen, Hayri; Başkaya, Mustafa K

    2011-05-01

    Infraoptic course of the precommunicating segment of the anterior cerebral artery (A1) is a rare anomaly. Furthermore, the presence of this anomaly associated with persistent trigeminal artery variant has been reported in the literature only once. We present a patient who had infraoptic course of A1 associated with an ipsilateral persistent trigeminal artery variant arising from the right internal carotid artery with no apparent connection to the basilar artery. The persistent trigeminal artery variant supplied to the right posteroinferior cerebellar artery territory. The patient also had hypoplastic left vertebral artery, superior cerebellar arteries originating from posterior cerebellar arteries bilaterally, and a bilobed aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery. The aneurysm was clipped and the infraoptic course was verified during the surgery. The post-operative course was uneventful and a follow-up arteriogram on the 7th postoperative day revealed successful obliteration of the aneurysm. We reviewed the literature with respect to presentation, associated vascular anomalies, imaging, associated cerebral aneurysms and other cerebral abnormalities, and treatment of the associated aneurysms. A discussion of the embryogenesis of this rare anomaly is also provided. PMID:21269759

  3. Endothelial dysfunction of cerebral and major arteries during chronic obstructive disease.

    PubMed

    Geltser, B I; Brodskaya, T A; Kotelnikov, V N; Agafonova, I G; Lukyanov, P A

    2007-12-01

    Vasomotor activity of the major and cerebral arteries was studied in mice with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Regional differences were revealed in the endothelium-dependent response of arteries. The development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was associated with a paradoxical response of the dilatational component of vasoregulation against the background of increased constrictive influences of the vascular endothelium in the major and cerebral vessels. PMID:18856197

  4. Beneficial effects of lifelong caloric restriction on endothelial function are greater in conduit arteries compared to cerebral resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ashley E; Henson, Grant D; Reihl, Kelly D; Nielson, Elizabeth I; Morgan, R Garrett; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Donato, Anthony J

    2014-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction occurs in conduit and cerebral resistance arteries with advancing age. Lifelong caloric restriction (CR) can prevent the onset of age-related dysfunction in many tissues, but its effects on cerebral resistance artery function, as compared with conduit artery function, have not been determined. We measured endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) in the carotid artery and middle cerebral artery (MCA) from young (5-7 months), old ad libitum fed (AL, 29-32 months), and old lifelong CR (CR, 40 % CR, 29-32 months) B6D2F1 mice. Compared with young, EDD for old AL was 24 % lower in the carotid and 47 % lower in the MCA (p < 0.05). For old CR, EDD was not different from young in the carotid artery (p > 0.05), but was 25 % lower than young in the MCA (p < 0.05). EDD was not different between groups after NO synthase inhibition with N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester in the carotid artery or MCA. Superoxide production by the carotid artery and MCA was greater in old AL compared with young and old CR (p < 0.05). In the carotid, incubation with the superoxide scavenger TEMPOL improved EDD for old AL (p > 0.05), with no effect in young or old CR (p > 0.05). In the MCA, incubation with TEMPOL or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin augmented EDD in old AL (p < 0.05), but reduced EDD in young and old CR (p < 0.05). Thus, age-related endothelial dysfunction is prevented by lifelong CR completely in conduit arteries, but only partially in cerebral resistance arteries. These benefits of lifelong CR on EDD result from lower oxidative stress and greater NO bioavailability. PMID:24065292

  5. Subdural hematoma caused by rupture of a posterior cerebral artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhou; Tan, Qiang; Li, Lin; Chen, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Subdural hematoma (SDH) caused by rupture of a cerebral aneurysm is rare and is usually associated with delayed diagnosis and treatment. We present a patient of a posterior cerebral artery aneurysm presenting as subacute SDH. The incidence, mechanisms and treatment of this condition are discussed. PMID:27094528

  6. Accumulation of intimal platelets in cerebral arteries following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Haining, J.L.; Clower, B.R.; Honma, Y.; Smith, R.R.

    1988-07-01

    From 2 hours to 23 days following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage, the accumulation of indium-111-labeled platelets on the intimal surface of the middle cerebral artery was studied in 23 cats. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced by transorbital rupture of the right middle cerebral artery. Of the 23 cats, 17 exhibited right middle cerebral artery/left middle cerebral artery radioactivity ratios of greater than 1.25. When these results were compared with those of 12 control cats, 0.001 less than p less than 0.005 (chi2 test). Thus, the results from the control and experimental groups are significantly different and indicate early (after 2 hours) preferential accumulation of intimal platelets in the ruptured right middle cerebral artery compared with the unruptured left middle cerebral artery and new platelet deposition continuing for up to 23 days. However, the experimental group did not reveal a clear pattern for platelet accumulation following subarachnoid hemorrhage. There was no simple correlation between the magnitude of the radioactivity ratios and the time after hemorrhage when the cats were killed although the ratios for 2 hours to 7 days seemed greater than those for 8 to 23 days. Assuming the pivotal role of platelets in the angiopathy of subarachnoid hemorrhage, the administration of antiplatelet agents as soon as possible following its occurrence may be of value.

  7. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Curtis R.; Hanna, Mina; Behnke, Bradley J.; Stabley, John N.; McCullough, Danielle J.; Davis, Robert T.; Ghosh, Payal; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Muller-Delp, Judy M.; Delp, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence indicates that cerebral blood flow is both increased and diminished in astronauts on return to Earth. Data from ground-based animal models simulating the effects of microgravity have shown that decrements in cerebral perfusion are associated with enhanced vasoconstriction and structural remodeling of cerebral arteries. Based on these results, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 13 d of spaceflight [Space Transportation System (STS)-135 shuttle mission] enhances myogenic vasoconstriction, increases medial wall thickness, and elicits no change in the mechanical properties of mouse cerebral arteries. Basilar and posterior communicating arteries (PCAs) were isolated from 9-wk-old female C57BL/6 mice for in vitro vascular and mechanical testing. Contrary to that hypothesized, myogenic vasoconstrictor responses were lower and vascular distensibility greater in arteries from spaceflight group (SF) mice (n=7) relative to ground-based control group (GC) mice (n=12). Basilar artery maximal diameter was greater in SF mice (SF: 236±9 μm and GC: 215±5 μm) with no difference in medial wall thickness (SF: 12.4±1.6 μm; GC: 12.2±1.2 μm). Stiffness of the PCA, as characterized via nanoindentation, was lower in SF mice (SF: 3.4±0.3 N/m; GC: 5.4±0.8 N/m). Collectively, spaceflight-induced reductions in myogenic vasoconstriction and stiffness and increases in maximal diameter of cerebral arteries signify that elevations in brain blood flow may occur during spaceflight. Such changes in cerebral vascular control of perfusion could contribute to increases in intracranial pressure and an associated impairment of visual acuity in astronauts during spaceflight.—Taylor, C. R., Hanna, M., Behnke, B. J., Stabley, J. N., McCullough, D. J., Davis III, R. T., Ghosh, P., Papadopoulos, A., Muller-Delp, J. M., Delp, M. D. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated

  8. [Relationship between Doppler velocimetry at middle cerebral artery and umbilical artery and status of newborn].

    PubMed

    Skotnicki, M Z; Urban, J

    2000-04-01

    Aim of investigations was qualification of account between Doppler parameters in estimation of fetal state. Investigations one passed on 30 fetuses and newborn children in pregnancies brought. Doppler parameters one priced at use of sonographic device Toshiba SSH 140 A/G and searchers of type convex about working frequency 3.75 MHz. Following Doppler flow blood parameters were analyzed: maximum blood speed (V1) average blood speed (V2) and minimum blood speed (V3), systolic/diastolic ratio (S/D), resistance index (RI), pulsatile index (PI) and proper flow in umbilical cord vein (MF) in following dishes of feto-placental circulation: middle cerebral artery (MCA) and umbilical cord artery (UA). Acid-base equilibrium and gasometry of blood in umbilical cord dishes one marked at use of device Ciba-Corning 278 Blood Gas System and parameters of oxygenation of blood at use of device Ciba-Corning 270 CO-OXIMETER. At new-born children one priced pH-metry (pH) and gasometry (pO2, pCO2, BAA) in blood umbilical cord arterial and venous were measured. The newborn children were estimated by Apgar score. There were following essential statistical correlations between Doppler parameters of fetal blood flow and with parameters of acid-base equilibrium of new-born child: 1/ between V2 and V3 in UA and with supply of rules (BAA) in UV (p = 0.027; p = 0.009) and UA (p = 0.035; p = 0.003) and venous pH (p = 0.022; p = 0.009); 2/ between RI in UA and BAA in UV (p = 0.006) and UA (p = 0.010); 3/ between PI in UA and BAA in UV (p < 0.0001) and UA (p < 0.0001) and pH venous (p < 0.0001). We can conclude that Doppler investigations only by measure of parameters of blood flow in middle cerebral artery and umbilical artery in expectation of state of birth new-born child priced across parameters of acid-base equilibrium and Apgar score are not very useful, however they are helpful. PMID:10860275

  9. [Craniectomy in space-occupying middle cerebral artery infarcts].

    PubMed

    Schwab, S; Rieke, K; Krieger, D; Hund, E; Aschoff, A; von Kummer, R; Hacke, W

    1995-06-01

    Space occupying supratentorial ischemic stroke has a high mortality. The benefit of decompressive surgery in these patients is still matter of debate. In a prospective study we performed craniectomy in 37 patients with acute middle cerebral artery infarction and progressive deterioration under conservative antiedematous therapy. Twenty-one patients treated conservatively during the same period served as control group. All survivors were reexamined between one to two years after surgical decompression. In addition, neuropsychological tests were performed, including an Aachener Aphasie Test (AAT) in those patients with infarction of speech-dominant hemisphere. Clinical evaluation was graded using the Barthel index (BI). Mortality rate in the operated group was 37%. Twenty-three patients survived acute stroke and were reexamined. Despite complete hemispheric infarction, no patient suffered from complete hemiplegia or was permanently wheel chair bound. In speech dominant hemispheric infarction (n = 8) only mild to moderate aphasia could be detected. Mean BI was 64. Mortality rate in the conservatively treated group was 76%. The clinical outcome following craniectomy for the treatment of severe ischemic hemispheric infarction is unexpectedly good. Therefore, decompressive surgery should be considered in cases of space-occupying hemispheric infarctions and conservatively uncontrollable intracranial pressure. PMID:7543659

  10. Atrial Fibrillation, Congestive Heart Failure, and the Middle Cerebral Artery.

    PubMed

    Ameriso, S F; Sager, P; Fisher, M

    1992-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure are risk factors for ischemic stroke usually attributed to cardiac embolism. To define potential alternative mechanisms, patients with atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure were investigated by transcranial Doppler. Middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocities were analyzed in neurologically asymptomatic patients with nonvalvular (n = 10) and valvular (n = 13) atrial fibrillation, patients in normal sinus rhythm with congestive heart failure (n = 13), and control subjects (n = 11). Compared to patients in sinus rhythm with congestive heart failure and to control subjects, patients in both atrial fibrillation groups had significantly greater beat-to-beat variation in peak, mean, and diastolic velocities and in pulsatility index. Peak, mean, and diastolic MCA velocities in patients with atrial fibrillation and those with congestive heart failure were significantly less than those in control subjects. Patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation had a higher pulsatility index compared to each of the other three groups. These findings demonstrate substantial nonemboligenic alterations of the intracranial circulation associated with atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure, and also provide an intracranial hemodynamic profile that may distinguish valvular from nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. PMID:27309151

  11. Contribution of the vertebral artery to cerebral circulation in the rat snake Elaphe obsoleta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zippel, K. C.; Lillywhite, H. B.; Mladinich, C. R.; Hargens, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Blood supplying the brain in vertebrates is carried primarily by the carotid vasculature. In most mammals, cerebral blood flow is supplemented by the vertebral arteries, which anastomose with the carotids at the base of the brain. In other tetrapods, cerebral blood is generally believed to be supplied exclusively by the carotid vasculature, and the vertebral arteries are usually described as disappearing into the dorsal musculature between the heart and head. There have been several reports of a vertebral artery connection with the cephalic vasculature in snakes. We measured regional blood flows using fluorescently labeled microspheres and demonstrated that the vertebral artery contributes a small but significant fraction of cerebral blood flow (approximately 13% of total) in the rat snake Elaphe obsoleta. Vascular casts of the anterior vessels revealed that the vertebral artery connection is indirect, through multiple anastomoses with the inferior spinal artery, which connects with the carotid vasculature near the base of the skull. Using digital subtraction angiography, fluoroscopy, and direct observations of flow in isolated vessels, we confirmed that blood in the inferior spinal artery flows craniad from a point anterior to the vertebral artery connections. Such collateral blood supply could potentially contribute to the maintenance of cerebral circulation during circumstances when craniad blood flow is compromised, e.g., during the gravitational stress of climbing.

  12. Cerebral Infarction Caused by a Tortuous Subclavian Artery: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Eun Hye; Yu, Hyun-Jeung; Choi, Soung Sil; Rhim, Jong Kook; Kwon, Kye Won; Roh, Sook Young

    2014-01-01

    Tortuous arteries are common clinical observation. Although mild tortuosity is asymptomatic, severe tortuosity can lead to ischemic attack in several organs. With advances in imaging technology, an increasing number of tortuous vessels have been detected. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of acute cerebral infarction due to tortuous subclavian artery and to review the literature. PMID:24644532

  13. Cerebral Arterial Time Constant Recorded from the MCA and PICA in Normal Subjects.

    PubMed

    Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Czosnyka, Marek; Poplawska, Karolina; Reinhard, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral arterial time constant (τ) estimates how quickly the cerebral arterial bed distal to the point of insonation is filled with arterial blood following a cardiac contraction. It is not known how τ behaves in different vascular territories in the brain. We therefore investigated the differences in τ of two cerebral arteries: the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and the middle cerebral artery (MCA).Transcranial Doppler cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the PICA and left MCA along with Finapres arterial blood pressure (ABP) were simultaneously recorded in 35 young healthy volunteers. τ was estimated using mathematical transformations of pulse waveforms of ABP and the CBFV of the MCA and the PICA. Since τ is independent from the vessel radius, its comparison in different cerebral arteries was feasible. Mean ABP was 76.1 ± 9.6 mmHg. The CBFV of the MCA was higher than that of the PICA (59.7 ± 7.7 vs. 41.0 ± 4.5 cm/s; p < 0.000001). τ of the PICA was shorter than that of the MCA (0.15 ± 0.03 vs. 0.18 ± 0.03 s; p < 0.000001). The MCA-supplied vascular bed has a longer distal average length, measured from the place of insonation up to the small arterioles, than the PICA-supplied vascular bed. Therefore, a longer time is needed to fill it with arterial blood volume. This study thus confirms the physiological validity of the τ concept. PMID:27165908

  14. Ophthalmic artery originating from the anterior cerebral artery: anatomo-radiological study, histological analysis, and literature review.

    PubMed

    Belotti, Francesco; Ferrari, Marco; Doglietto, Francesco; Cocchi, Marco Angelo; Lancini, Davide; Buffoli, Barbara; Nicolai, Piero; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Maroldi, Roberto; Tschabitscher, Manfred; Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio

    2016-07-01

    The ophthalmic artery has an anomalous origin in 2-3 % of cases and rarely arises from the anterior cerebral artery. Herein, we provide the first anatomical, radiological, and histological description of such an anomalous origin, together with a literature review. During the anatomical dissection of an 81-year-old Caucasian male, the absence of the right ophthalmic artery in its usual location was evident from an endonasal transsphenoidal perspective. The specimen was then studied in detail, through multiple dissections, corrosion casting, high-resolution CT, and histological analysis. The English literature on anomalous origins of the ophthalmic artery was reviewed, together with reported associated pathologies. Anatomo-radiological analysis documented that the right ophthalmic artery arose from the inferior surface of A1 tract of the anterior cerebral artery (A1) and passed over the optic nerve in its subarachnoid tract. A meningo-ophthalmic artery was evident on the same side and reached the orbit through the superior orbital fissure. Histological examination of both internal carotid artery (ICA) walls documented a significantly decreased thickness of the tunica media and adventitia on the side of the anomalous ophthalmic artery, with a significantly different content of collagen types I and III. The literature review documented an association of aneurysms and anomalous ophthalmic arteries. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first anatomical report that includes a radiological and arterial wall analysis of a persistent ventral ophthalmic artery. The latter provides histological data that support the clinical evidence of a higher association of aneurysms with anomalous origins of the ophthalmic artery. PMID:27048359

  15. Relationship of 133Xe cerebral blood flow to middle cerebral arterial flow velocity in men at rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. M.; Skolnick, B. E.; Gelfand, R.; Farber, R. E.; Stierheim, M.; Stevens, W. C.; Beck, G. Jr; Lambertsen, C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by 133Xe clearance simultaneously with the velocity of blood flow through the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) over a wide range of arterial PCO2 in eight normal men. Average arterial PCO2, which was varied by giving 4% and 6% CO2 in O2 and by controlled hyperventilation on O2, ranged from 25.3 to 49.9 mm Hg. Corresponding average values of global CBF15 were 27.2 and 65.0 ml 100 g min-1, respectively, whereas MCA blood-flow velocity ranged from 42.8 to 94.2 cm/s. The relationship of CBF to MCA blood-flow velocity over the imposed range of arterial PCO2 was described analytically by a parabola with the equation: CBF = 22.8 - 0.17 x velocity + 0.006 x velocity2 The observed data indicate that MCA blood-flow velocity is a useful index of CBF response to change in arterial PCO2 during O2 breathing at rest. With respect to baseline values measured while breathing 100% O2 spontaneously, percent changes in velocity were significantly smaller than corresponding percent changes in CBF at increased levels of arterial PCO2 and larger than CBF changes at the lower arterial PCO2. These observed relative changes are consistent with MCA vasodilation at the site of measurement during exposure to progressive hypercapnia and also during extreme hyperventilation hypocapnia.

  16. Effects of superior cervical ganglionectomy on alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in dog cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, M.; Tsukahara, T.; Taniguchi, T.; Usui, H.

    1986-03-01

    Norepinephrine (NE)- and clonidine-induced contractions of dog cerebral arteries were attenuated by yohimbine but not affected by prazosin. There was no detectable /sup 3/H-prazosin binding site in the cerebral arteries. On the other hand, /sup 3/H-yohimbine binding studies revealed the presence of two binding sites with high and low affinities in the cerebral arteries. After superior cervical ganglionectomy, NE- and clonidine-induced contractions of the denervated cerebral arteries were not altered compared with the control arteries. The binding study revealed that there was low affinity /sup 3/H-yohimbine binding sites, whereas high affinity sites were not detectable. These results suggest that there are two different NE binding sites in alpha 2 adrenergic receptors, and that the high affinity sites are presynaptically located and low affinity sites are postsynaptic. It is also suggested that NE-induced contractions are mediated by postsynaptic low affinity sites of alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in the dog cerebral arteries.

  17. Sympathetic innervation and excitability of arterioles originating from the rat middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, C E; Hirst, G D; Silverberg, G D; van Helden, D F

    1986-01-01

    The densities of the adrenergic innervation of the internal carotid and middle cerebral arteries and their extracerebral branches have been determined using fluorescence histochemistry. The density of the nerve plexus on the internal carotid artery was greater than that of the middle cerebral artery. The density of the plexus on the middle cerebral artery decreased with increasing distance from its origin. The density and the peripheral extent of the nerve fibre plexus on the arterioles arising from the carotid artery were greater than those arising from the middle cerebral artery. On any arteriole the density of innervation decreased with increasing distance from its origin. The passive electrical properties of proximal and distal middle cerebral arteriolar segments were compared. Both proximal and distal arteriolar segments had similar resistances and time constants in the order of 100 M omega and 250 ms respectively. Small regenerative responses could be elicited in all proximal middle cerebral arteriolar segments but only in a proportion of corresponding distal segments. The addition of external tetraethylammonium ions (TEA) provided much larger regenerative responses. Action potentials in proximal middle cerebral arteriolar segments had larger peak amplitudes and faster rise times than those of corresponding distal segments. Distal carotid arteriolar segments had similar voltage-dependent excitability as proximal segments of middle cerebral arterioles but generated less inward current for a given voltage step. There was a direct correlation between the density of innervation and the voltage-dependent excitability of arteriolar smooth muscle cells. The possibility that the presence of nerves is correlated with the density of calcium channels is discussed. Images PLATE 2 PLATE 1 PMID:3701653

  18. Endovascular glue embolization of dissecting aneurysm of type-3 accessory middle cerebral artery: A contralateral approach.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Rajsrinivas; Goel, Gaurav; Gupta, Vipul; Narang, Karanjit Singh; Anand, Saurabh; Jha, Ajaya Nand

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are rare with a reported prevalence of 0.5-4.6%. Likewise, anomalous arterial patterns are uncommon in the cerebral circulation. Recognition of these variations and knowledge of vascular territory forms the key to managing pathological conditions associated with these anomalous vessels. Ruptured dissecting aneurysm of type-3 accessory middle cerebral artery (aMCA) has not been reported in the pediatric age group. In addition to type-3 aMCA, the child in this case report had an ipsilateral type-1 aMCA with cortical supply. We describe the patterns of accessory MCA and their vascular territory, state the perplexity involved in deciding the best management strategy, and describe the technical approach we undertook to catheterize this small caliber recurrent artery (type-3 aMCA) originating at an acute angle from the anterior cerebral artery. PMID:26508091

  19. Quantitative comparison of cerebral artery development in metatherians and monotremes with non-human eutherians.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-03-01

    A quantitative comparison of the internal diameters of cerebral feeder arteries (internal carotid and vertebral) and the aorta in developing non-human eutherians, metatherians and monotremes has been made, with the aim of determining if there are differences in cerebral arterial flow between the three infraclasses of mammals such as might reflect differences in metabolism of the developing brain. There were no significant differences between eutherians and metatherians in the internal radius of the aorta or the thickness of the aortic wall, but aortic internal radius was significantly smaller in developing monotremes than therians at the < 10 mm body length range. Aortic thickness in the developing monotremes also rose at a slower rate relative to body length than in metatherians or eutherians. The sums of the internal calibres of the internal carotid and vertebral arteries were significantly lower in metatherians as a group and monotremes compared with non-human eutherians at body lengths up to 20 mm and in metatherians at > 20 mm body length. The internal calibre of the internal carotids relative to the sum of all cerebral feeder arteries was also significantly lower in monotremes at < 10 mm body length compared with eutherians. It was noted that dasyurids differed from other metatherians in several measures of cerebral arterial calibre and aortic internal calibre. The findings suggest that: (i) both aortic outflow and cerebral arterial inflow may be lower in developing monotremes than in therians, particularly at small body size (< 20 mm); (ii) cerebral inflow may be lower in some developing metatherians than non-human eutherians; and (iii) dasyurids have unusual features of cerebral arteries possibly related to the extreme immaturity and small size at which they are born. The findings have implications for nutritional sourcing of the developing brain in the three infraclasses of mammals. PMID:26644330

  20. Greater impairments in cerebral artery compared with skeletal muscle feed artery endothelial function in a mouse model of increased large artery stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ashley E; Henson, Grant D; Reihl, Kelly D; Morgan, R Garrett; Dobson, Parker S; Nielson, Elizabeth I; Ling, Jing; Mecham, Robert P; Li, Dean Y; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Donato, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Advancing age as well as diseases such as diabetes are characterized by both increased large artery stiffness and impaired peripheral artery function. It has been hypothesized that greater large artery stiffness causes peripheral artery dysfunction; however, a cause-and-effect relationship has not previously been established. We used elastin heterozygote mice (Eln+/–) as a model of increased large artery stiffness without co-morbidities unrelated to the large artery properties. Aortic stiffness, measured by pulse wave velocity, was ∼35% greater in Eln+/– mice than in wild-type (Eln+/+) mice (P = 0.04). Endothelium-dependent dilatation (EDD), assessed by the maximal dilatation to acetylcholine, was ∼40% lower in Eln+/– than Eln+/+ mice in the middle cerebral artery (MCA, P < 0.001), but was similar between groups in the gastrocnemius feed arteries (GFA, P = 0.79). In the MCA, EDD did not differ between groups after incubation with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (P > 0.05), indicating that lower NO bioavailability contributed to the impaired EDD in Eln+/– mice. Superoxide production and content of the oxidative stress marker nitrotyrosine was higher in MCAs from Eln+/− compared with Eln+/+ mice (P < 0.05). In the MCA, after incubation with the superoxide scavenger TEMPOL, maximal EDD improved by ∼65% in Eln+/– (P = 0.002), but was unchanged in Eln+/+ mice (P = 0.17). These results indicate that greater large artery stiffness has a more profound effect on endothelial function in cerebral arteries compared with skeletal muscle feed arteries. Greater large artery stiffness can cause cerebral artery endothelial dysfunction by reducing NO bioavailability and increasing oxidative stress. PMID:25627876

  1. Male-Female Differences in Upregulation of Vasoconstrictor Responses in Human Cerebral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Ahnstedt, Hilda; Cao, Lei; Krause, Diana N.; Warfvinge, Karin; Säveland, Hans; Nilsson, Ola G.; Edvinsson, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Male-female differences may significantly impact stroke prevention and treatment in men and women, however underlying mechanisms for sexual dimorphism in stroke are not understood. We previously found in males that cerebral ischemia upregulates contractile receptors in cerebral arteries, which is associated with lower blood flow. The present study investigates if cerebral arteries from men and women differ in cerebrovascular receptor upregulation. Experimental approach Freshly obtained human cerebral arteries were placed in organ culture, an established model for studying receptor upregulation. 5-hydroxtryptamine type 1B (5-HT1B), angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) and endothelin-1 type A and B (ETA and ETB) receptors were evaluated using wire myograph for contractile responses, real-time PCR for mRNA and immunohistochemistry for receptor expression. Key results Vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II and endothelin-1 was markedly lower in cultured cerebral arteries from women as compared to men. ETB receptor-mediated contraction occurred in male but not female arteries. Interestingly, there were similar upregulation in mRNA and expression of 5-HT1B, AT1, and ETB receptors and in local expression of Ang II after organ culture. Conclusions and Implications In spite of receptor upregulation after organ culture in both sexes, cerebral arteries from women were significantly less responsive to vasoconstrictors angiotensin II and endothelin-1 as compared to arteries from men. This suggests receptor coupling and/or signal transduction mechanisms involved in cerebrovascular contractility may be suppressed in females. This is the first study to demonstrate sex differences in the vascular function of human brain arteries. PMID:23658641

  2. Microvasculature of the human cerebral white matter: arteries of the deep white matter.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Hiroko; Akima, Michio; Hatori, Tsutomu; Nagayama, Tadashi; Zhang, Zean; Ihara, Fumie

    2003-06-01

    The vascular architecture of the human cerebral deep white matter was studied using soft X-ray and diaphanized specimens, achieved by intra-arterial injection of barium and vascular stain respectively, and also by electron microscopic examination of the corrosion cast of arteries in normal adult brains. The deep white matter arteries passed through the cerebral cortex with a few branches to the cortex and ran straight through the white matter. The arteries concentrated ventriculopetally to the white matter around the lateral ventricle. Anastomoses were noted around the ventricular wall at the terminals of the deep white matter arteries. No centrifugal branches irrigating the periventricular white matter from the lenticulo-striate arteries were observed in the present study. The presence of anastomoses among the terminal branches of deep white matter arteries protects against ischemic change or infarction in this area from an occlusion of a single deep white matter artery. This may lead to development of terminal zone infarction from ischemia or vascular diseases, affecting multiple deep white matter arteries. The subcortical and deep white matter arteries had thick adventitial sheaths and large adventitial spaces in the white matter but not in the cortex. The presence or absence of the adventitial space is regarded as another characteristic difference between the arteries in the white matter and cortex. This difference may influence pathological changes in vascular lesions in these respective areas. PMID:12777099

  3. Endovascular treatments for posterior cerebral artery aneurysms and vascular insufficiency of fetal-type circulation after parent artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hideaki; Kato, Noriyuki; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Hosoo, Hisayuki; Yamazaki, Tomosato; Yasuda, Susumu; Matsumura, Akira

    2016-10-01

    We present a retrospective analysis of endovascular treatments for posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms and discuss the susceptibility of a fetal-type PCA to vascular insufficiency after parent artery occlusion. Among 1207 aneurysms treated with endovascular therapy between March 1997 and March 2013 in our institution, 10 patients (0.8%) presented PCA aneurysms. The principal strategy was to employ selective coil embolization for the aneurysm. However, in certain cases of fusiform or dissecting aneurysms, we performed parent artery occlusion with coils. Clinical and radiological data were collected from hospital charts and evaluated retrospectively. The mean age was 52.7±15.6years (range, 12-65years). Five patients (50%) were admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage, and one patient presented with slowly developing paralysis. The remaining four patients were diagnosed incidentally. Five patients underwent selective coil embolization, and five patients underwent parent artery occlusion. All endovascular therapies were successfully performed. However, two patients in the parent artery occlusion group suffered cerebral infarction, and both patients exhibited a fetal-type PCA. The remaining three patients in the parent artery occlusion group exhibited an adult-type PCA and did not suffer a cerebral infarction. Endovascular treatment with either selective coil embolization or parent artery occlusion is safe and effective as the long as the anatomical type of the PCA is considered. Patients with a fetal-type PCA may develop vascular insufficiency upon parent artery occlusion. Neurosurgeons should attempt to preserve the parent artery using a flow-diverting stent or stent-assisted technique for a fetal-type PCA aneurysm. PMID:27523585

  4. Internal Maxillary Artery-Middle Cerebral Artery Bypass: Infratemporal Approach for Subcranial-Intracranial (SC-IC) Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Nossek, Erez; Costantino, Peter D.; Eisenberg, Mark; Dehdashti, Amir R.; Setton, Avi; Chalif, David J.; Ortiz, Rafael A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Internal maxillary artery (IMax)–middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass has been recently described as an alternative to cervical extracranial-intracranial bypass. This technique uses a “keyhole” craniectomy in the temporal fossa that requires a technically challenging end-to-side anastomosis. OBJECTIVE: To describe a lateral subtemporal craniectomy of the middle cranial fossa floor to facilitate wide exposure of the IMax to facilitate bypass. METHODS: Orbitozygomatic osteotomy is used followed by frontotemporal craniotomy and subsequently laterotemporal fossa craniectomy, reaching its medial border at a virtual line connecting the foramen rotundum and foramen ovale. The IMax was identified by using established anatomic landmarks, neuronavigation, and micro Doppler probe (Mizuho Inc. Tokyo, Japan). Additionally, we studied the approach in a cadaveric specimen in preparation for microsurgical bypass. RESULTS: There were 4 cases in which the technique was used. One bypass was performed for flow augmentation in a hypoperfused hemisphere. The other 3 were performed as part of treatment paradigms for giant middle cerebral artery aneurysms. Vein grafts were used in all patients. The proximal anastomosis was performed in an end-to-side fashion in 1 patient and end-to-end in 3 patients. Intraoperative graft flow measured with the Transonic flow probe ranged from 20 to 60 mL/min. Postoperative angiography demonstrated good filling of the graft with robust distal flow in all cases. All patients tolerated the procedure well. CONCLUSION: IMax to middle cerebral artery subcranial-intracranial bypass is safe and efficacious. The laterotemporal fossa craniectomy technique resulted in reliable identification and wide exposure of the IMax, facilitating the proximal anastomosis. ABBREVIATIONS: EC-IC, extracranial-intracranial IMax, internal maxillary artery MCA, middle cerebral artery SC-IC, subcranial-intracranial STA, superficial temporal artery PMID:24618804

  5. Cerebral Angiographic Findings of Cosmetic Facial Filler-related Ophthalmic and Retinal Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic facial filler-related ophthalmic artery occlusion is rare but is a devastating complication, while the exact pathophysiology is still elusive. Cerebral angiography provides more detailed information on blood flow of ophthalmic artery as well as surrounding orbital area which cannot be covered by fundus fluorescein angiography. This study aimed to evaluate cerebral angiographic features of cosmetic facial filler-related ophthalmic artery occlusion patients. We retrospectively reviewed cerebral angiography of 7 patients (4 hyaluronic acid [HA] and 3 autologous fat-injected cases) showing ophthalmic artery and its branches occlusion after cosmetic facial filler injections, and underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis. On selective ophthalmic artery angiograms, all fat-injected patients showed a large filling defect on the proximal ophthalmic artery, whereas the HA-injected patients showed occlusion of the distal branches of the ophthalmic artery. Three HA-injected patients revealed diminished distal runoff of the internal maxillary and facial arteries, which clinically corresponded with skin necrosis. However, all fat-injected patients and one HA-injected patient who were immediately treated with subcutaneous hyaluronidase injection showed preserved distal runoff of the internal maxillary and facial arteries and mild skin problems. The size difference between injected materials seems to be associated with different angiographic findings. Autologous fat is more prone to obstruct proximal part of ophthalmic artery, whereas HA obstructs distal branches. In addition, hydrophilic and volume-expansion property of HA might exacerbate blood flow on injected area, which is also related to skin necrosis. Intra-arterial thrombolysis has a limited role in reconstituting blood flow or regaining vision in cosmetic facial filler-associated ophthalmic artery occlusions. PMID:26713062

  6. Monofilament intraluminal middle cerebral artery occlusion in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Clark, W M; Lessov, N S; Dixon, M P; Eckenstein, F

    1997-12-01

    The rat middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model with an intraluminal filament is well characterized with a two hour period of occlusion in widespread use. The recent availability of transgenic animals has led to an interest in adapting the MCA model in the mouse. To date the model has not been well characterized in the mouse. We performed the present study to compare different durations of MCA occlusion and to validate new functional assessments in this model. The MCA occlusion model (5-0 filament) was used. Swiss-Webster mice, 24-44 g, were randomly assigned to four groups: one hour of occlusion; two hours of occlusion; three hours of occlusion; or permanent occlusion. At 48 hours post-ischemia, the animals were rated on three neurologic function scales, and then the brains were removed for lesion size determination. Overall, there was a significant difference in lesion volume (p < 0.001) between the groups. In the permanent group of mice, the average lesion volume was 78.41 +/- 17.47 mm (n = 12); two and three hours of ischemia produced 51.29 +/- 29.82 mm3 (n = 11) and 54.85 mm3 (n = 13), respectively, significantly different than the one hour group 14.84 +/- 31.34 mm3 (n = 11). All three functional scoring systems found significant overall differences between the four groups with our detailed General and Focal scores producing more robust between group treatment differences and showing correlation coefficients of r = 0.766 and r = 0.788, respectively to infarct volume. The MCA filament occlusion model can be successfully adapted in the mouse with either two or three hour occlusions producing reliable infarcts. New functional scoring systems unique to the mouse appear to add additional information. PMID:9427967

  7. Failure of the Pipeline Embolization Device in Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms Associated with a Fetal Posterior Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Zanaty, Mario; Chalouhi, Nohra; Starke, Robert M.; Jabbour, Pascal; Ryken, Katherine O.; Bulsara, Ketan R.; Hasan, David

    2016-01-01

    The pipeline embolization device has emerged as an important endovascular option. This is in part due to safety, efficacy, and possibly the ability to shorten the operative time considerably. With this new technology, some limitations are emerging as experience accumulates. We report three cases of posterior communicating (PCOM) artery aneurysms associated with fetal posterior cerebral artery where pipeline embolization was unsuccessful in obliterating the aneurysms. PCOM artery aneurysms associated with a fetal PCA should be managed either by microsurgical clipping or coiling when feasible. PMID:27069709

  8. Relative changes of cerebral arterial and venous blood volumes during increased cerebral blood flow: implications for BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Lee, S P; Duong, T Q; Yang, G; Iadecola, C; Kim, S G

    2001-05-01

    Measurement of cerebral arterial and venous blood volumes during increased cerebral blood flow can provide important information regarding hemodynamic regulation under normal, pathological, and neuronally active conditions. In particular, the change in venous blood volume induced by neural activity is one critical component of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal because BOLD contrast is dependent only on venous blood, not arterial blood. Thus, relative venous and arterial blood volume (rCBV) and cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in alpha-chlorolase-anesthetized rats under hypercapnia were measured by novel diffusion-weighted (19)F NMR following an i.v. administration of intravascular tracer, perfluorocarbons, and continuous arterial spin labeling methods, respectively. The relationship between rCBF and total rCBV during hypercapnia was rCBV(total) = rCBF(0.40), which is consistent with previous PET measurement in monkeys. This relationship can be linearized in a CBF range of 50-130 ml/100 g/min as DeltarCBV(total)/ DeltarCBF = 0.31 where DeltarCBV and DeltarCBF represent rCBV and rCBF changes. The average arterial volume fraction was 0.25 at a basal condition with CBF of approximately 60 ml/100 g/min and increased up to 0.4 during hypercapnia. The change in venous rCBV was 2-fold smaller than that of total rCBV (DeltarCBV(vein)/DeltarCBF = 0.15), while the arterial rCBV change was 2.5 times larger than that of total rCBV (DeltarCBV(artery)/DeltarCBF = 0.79). These NMR results were confirmed by vessel diameter measurements with in vivo videomicroscopy. The absolute venous blood volume change contributes up to 36% of the total blood volume change during hypercapnia. Our findings provide a quantitative physiological model of BOLD contrast. PMID:11323805

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibition attenuates middle cerebral artery remodeling but increases cerebral ischemic damage in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Girgla, Saavia S.; Moreno, Guillermo; McClain, Jonathon L.; Dorrance, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension causes vascular inflammation evidenced by an increase in perivascular macrophages and proinflammatory cytokines in the arterial wall. Perivascular macrophage depletion reduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression in cerebral arteries of hypertensive rats and attenuated inward remodeling, suggesting that TNF-α might play a role in the remodeling process. We hypothesized that TNF-α inhibition would improve middle cerebral artery (MCA) structure and reduce damage after cerebral ischemia in hypertensive rats. Six-week-old male stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) were treated with the TNF-α inhibitor etanercept (ETN; 1.25 mg·kg−1·day−1 ip daily) or PBS (equivolume) for 6 wk. The myogenic tone generation, postischemic dilation, and passive structure of MCAs were assessed by pressure myography. Cerebral ischemia was induced by MCA occlusion (MCAO). Myogenic tone was unchanged, but MCAs from SHRSP + ETN had larger passive lumen diameter and reduced wall thickness and wall-to-lumen ratio. Cerebral infarct size was increased in SHRSP + ETN after transient MCAO, despite an improvement in dilation of nonischemic MCA. The increase in infarct size was linked to a reduction in the number of microglia in the infarct core and upregulation of markers of classical macrophage/microglia polarization. There was no difference in infarct size after permanent MCAO or when untreated SHRSP subjected to transient MCAO were given ETN at reperfusion. Our data suggests that TNF-α inhibition attenuates hypertensive MCA remodeling but exacerbates cerebral damage following ischemia/reperfusion injury likely due to inhibition of the innate immune response of the brain. PMID:25015967

  10. Focal cerebral ischaemia in the rat: 2. Regional cerebral blood flow determined by (14C)iodoantipyrine autoradiography following middle cerebral artery occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, A.; Graham, D.I.; McCulloch, J.; Teasdale, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    Local cerebral blood flow has been measured by quantitative autoradiography, employing (14C)iodoantipyrine as tracer, in rats killed half an hour after occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. The results were compared with pattern of local cerebral blood flow (CBF) in sham-operated rats and with neuropathological findings. In every animal there was a profound reduction (to 13% of control levels)in blood flow in the neocortex previously by the occluded artery. The level of blood flow in the areas in which ischaemic brain damage occurred was 0.24 +/- 0.03 ml g-1 min-1 (mean +/- SEM). this level of CBF is considerably greater than that reported following a similar surgical procedure in cats and primates. Moderate reductions in blood flow were also seen outside the territory of the occluded artery and in parts of the opposite hemisphere. Absolute increases in blood flow (hyperaemia) were seen only in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus ipsilateral to the occlusion. It is of the middle cerebral artery are reflections of alterations in neuronal function and metabolic activity secondary to the ischaemic lesion.

  11. A case of ruptured infectious anterior cerebral artery aneurysm treated by interposition graft bypass using the superficial temporal artery

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Takatsugu; Endo, Hidenori; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Fujimura, Miki; Endo, Toshiki; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Mika; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Background: To describe the application of an interposition graft bypass using superficial temporal artery (STA) for the treatment of a ruptured anterior cerebral artery (ACA) infectious aneurysm. Case Description: A 30-year-old male suffered from severe headache with high fever. The patient's diagnosis was ruptured infectious ACA aneurysm at the A3 segment with a maximum diameter of 4.5 mm, caused by infectious endocarditis. The patient was initially treated with high-dose intravenous antibiotics. Follow-up digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed that the fusiform aneurysm had enlarged to a maximum diameter of 14.0 mm. A left paracentral artery, supplying the motor area of the left lower extremity, originated from the body of this aneurysm. Because the angiographic findings suggested a risk of recurrent bleeding, the patient underwent open surgery. Interposition graft bypass using the STA was performed to reconstruct the left A3 segment in an end-to-side manner (left proximal callosomarginal artery – STA graft – left distal pericallosal artery). Then, the origin of the left paracentral artery was cut and anastomosed to the STA graft in an end-to-side manner. The affected parent artery was trapped, and the aneurysm was resected. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed no ischemic or hemorrhagic complications, and postoperative DSA revealed the patency of the interposition graft. Pathological diagnosis of the resected aneurysm revealed features corresponding to infectious cerebral aneurysm. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged without any neurological deficits. Conclusion: In the treatment of infectious cerebral aneurysms, revascularization should be considered when the affected artery supplies the eloquent area. Interposition graft bypass using the STA is one of the options for revascularization surgery for the treatment of infectious ACA aneurysms. PMID:26862444

  12. Predicting Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome Following Superficial Temporal Artery to Middle Cerebral Artery Bypass based on Intraoperative Perfusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Defeng; Zhu, Fengping; Fung, Ka Ming; Zhu, Wei; Luo, Yishan; Chu, Winnie Chiu Wing; Tong Mok, Vincent Chung; Wu, Jinsong; Shi, Lin; Ahuja, Anil T.; Mao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease leads to the formation of stenosis in the cerebrovasculature. A superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) bypass is an effective treatment for the disease, yet it is usually associated with postoperative cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS). This study aimed to evaluate cerebral hemodynamic changes immediately after surgery and assess whether a semiquantitative analysis of an intraoperative magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted image (PWI) is useful for predicting postoperative CHS. Fourteen patients who underwent the STA-MCA bypass surgery were included in this study. An atlas-based registration method was employed for studying hemodynamics in different cerebral regions. Pre- versus intraoperative and group-wise comparisons were conducted to evaluate the hemodynamic changes. A postoperative increase in relative cerebral blood flow (CBF) at the terminal MCA territory (P = 0.035) and drop in relative mean-time-transit at the central MCA territory (P = 0.012) were observed in all patients. However, a significant raise in the increasing ratio of relative-CBF at the terminal MCA territory was only found in CHS patients (P = 0.023). The cerebrovascular changes of the patients after revascularization treatment were confirmed. Intraoperative PWI might be helpful in predicting the change in relative-CBF at MCA terminal territory which might indicate a risk of CHS. PMID:26365751

  13. The Usefulness of External Marking in Stenting for Ml Segment of Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Y.S.; Kim, S.Y.; Yoon, S.H.; Cho, K.H.; Ahn, Y.H.; Cho, K.G.

    2002-01-01

    Summary In intracranial stenting procedures, especially for a focal stenosis on the M1 portion of the middle cerebral artery, the anatomical configuration of the middle cerebral artery is changed with the advance of a rigid stent catheter. Therefore, the location of the stenotic portion where the stent is supposed to be deployed, according to pre-measurements on the roadmapping image, could be changed to some degrees. To prevent this error, we put a 30 gauge needle with cap at the orbital rim on the same preliminary vertical line of the distal end of the stenotic portion where the distal end of the stent is supposed to be deployed and the stent deployment is performed under guidance of the external marking on the fluoroscopic image not under roadmapping image. We report our experience of successful elective stenting of middle cerebral artery stenosis using the aid of external marking. PMID:20594530

  14. PET evaluation of cerebral blood flow reactivity in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, H.M.; Brass, L.; Rich, D.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to use acetazolamide (AZ) enhanced O-15 water PET to evaluate cerebral perfusion reserve in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. We hypothesized that impaired vasoreactivity would be associated with symptomatic disease and a higher likelihood of future ischemic events. Twenty-two patients with significant (>75%) carotid artery occlusion underwent cerebral blood flow imaging at baseline and following AZ infusion. Paired O-15 data sets were coregistered and globally normalized. Regions of interest were drawn on baseline blood flow images and superimposed upon (AZ - baseline) difference images to derive a % change in regional blood flow after AZ administration. The results showed a significant difference in cerebral perfusion reserve between symptomatic (n=19) and asymptomatic (n=3) carotid artery disease.

  15. [Stent-assisted mechanical removal of tromboembolism after embolization of middle cerebral artery aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Falkowski, Aleksander; Rać, Monika; Sagan, Leszek; Kojder, Ireneusz

    2012-01-01

    Thrombotic occlusion of the middle cerebral artery's branch occurred just after embolization of a nonruptured cerebral aneurysm. Bail-out stent-assisted mechanical thrombectomy of the clot was performed. DSA revealed normal vessel patency at the end of the procedure. There were no adverse events related to this thrombectomy, and the patient recovered from the embolization with minor neurologic deficit. There was no neurologic deficit after 90 days follow-up. PMID:23276015

  16. Development of functional in vivo imaging of cerebral lenticulostriate artery using novel synchrotron radiation angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaojie; Miao, Peng; Mu, Zhihao; Jiang, Zhen; Lu, Yifan; Guan, Yongjing; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    The lenticulostriate artery plays a vital role in the onset and development of cerebral ischemia. However, current imaging techniques cannot assess the in vivo functioning of small arteries such as the lenticulostriate artery in the brain of rats. Here, we report a novel method to achieve a high resolution multi-functional imaging of the cerebrovascular system using synchrotron radiation angiography, which is based on spatio-temporal analysis of contrast density in the arterial cross section. This method provides a unique tool for studying the sub-cortical vascular elasticity after cerebral ischemia in rats. Using this technique, we demonstrated that the vascular elasticity of the lenticulostriate artery decreased from day 1 to day 7 after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats and recovered from day 7 to day 28 compared to the controls (p < 0.001), which paralleled with brain edema formation and inversely correlated with blood flow velocity (p < 0.05). Our results demonstrated that the change of vascular elasticity was related to the levels of brain edema and the velocity of focal blood flow, suggesting that reducing brain edema is important for the improvement of the function of the lenticulostriate artery in the ischemic brain.

  17. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W; Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from "energy drinks") continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40-70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  18. A Lumped Parameter Method to Calculate the Effect of Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion on Anterior Cerebral Artery Pressure Waveform

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, M.; Navidbakhsh, M.; Razmkon, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Numerical modeling of biological structures would be very helpful tool to analyze hundreds of human body phenomena and also diseases diagnosis. One physiologic phenomenon is blood circulatory system and heart hemodynamic performance that can be simulated by utilizing lumped method. In this study, we can predict hemodynamic behavior of one artery of circulatory system (anterior cerebral artery) when disease such as internal carotid artery occlusion is occurred. Method Pressure-flow simulation is one the leading common approaches for modeling of circulatory system behavior and forecasts of hemodynamic in numerous physiological conditions. In this paper, by using lumped model (electrical analogy), CV system is simulated in MATLAB software (SIMULINK environment). Results The performance of healthy blood circulation and heart is modeled and the obtained results used for further analyses. The stenosis of internal carotid artery at different rates was, then, induced in the circuit and the effects are studied. In stenosis cases, the effects of internal carotid artery occlusion on  left anterior cerebral artery pressure waveform are investigated. Conclusion The findings of this study may have implications not only for understanding the behavior of human biological system at healthy condition but also for diagnosis of diseases in circulatory and cardiovascular system of human body. PMID:27026953

  19. Cerebral Arteries Extraction using Level Set Segmentation and Adaptive Tracing for CT Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yong; Zhou Xiaobo; Srinivasan, Ranga; Wong, Stephen T. C.; Young, Geoff

    2007-11-02

    We propose an approach for extracting cerebral arteries from partial Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA). The challenges of extracting cerebral arteries from CTA come from the fact that arteries are usually surrounded by bones and veins in the lower portion of a CTA volume. There exists strong intensity-value overlap between vessels and surrounding objects. Besides, it is inappropriate to assume the 2D cross sections of arteries are circle or ellipse, especially for abnormal vessels. The navigation of the arteries could change suddenly in the 3D space. In this paper, a method based on level set segmentation is proposed to target this challenging problem. For the lower portion of a CTA volume, we use geodesic active contour method to detect cross section of arteries in the 2D space. The medial axis of the artery is obtained by adaptively tracking along its navigation path. This is done by finding the minimal cross section from cutting the arteries under different angles in the 3D spherical space. This method is highly automated, with minimum user input of providing only the starting point and initial navigation direction of the arteries of interests.

  20. Partial Aortic Occlusion and Cerebral Venous Steal: Venous Effects of Arterial Manipulation in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pranevicius, Osvaldas; Pranevicius, Mindaugas; Liebeskind, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke therapy emphasizes early arterial clot lysis or removal. Partial aortic occlusion has recently emerged as an alternative hemodynamic approach to augment cerebral perfusion in acute ischemic stroke. The exact mechanism of cerebral flow augmentation with partial aortic occlusion remains unclear and may involve more than simple diversion of arterial blood flow from the lower body to cerebral collateral circulation. The cerebral venous steal hypothesis suggests that even a small increase in tissue pressure in the ischemic area will divert blood flow to surrounding regions with lesser tissue pressures. This may cause no-reflow (absence of flow after restoration of arterial patency) in the ischemic core and “luxury perfusion” in the surrounding regions. Such maldistribution may be reversed with increased venous pressure titrated to avoid changes in intracranial pressure. We propose that partial aortic occlusion enhances perfusion in the brain by offsetting cerebral venous steal. Partial aortic occlusion redistributes blood volume into the upper part of the body, manifest by an increase in central venous pressure. Increased venous pressure recruits the collapsed vascular network and, by eliminating cerebral venous steal, corrects perifocal perfusion maldistribution, analogous to positive end expiratory pressure recruitment of collapsed airways to decrease ventilation/perfusion mismatch in the lungs. PMID:21441149

  1. Aneurysms of the P2P Segment of Posterior Cerebral Artery: Case Report and Surgical Steps.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Paulo; Gatto, Luana; Neves, Maick; Martins, Carlos; Nakasone, Fabio; Isolan, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The posterior cerebral artery (PCA) is divided into 4 segments: precommunicating segment (P1), postcommunicating segment (P2), quadrigeminal segment (P3), and calcarine segment (P4). Small aneurysms are more prevalent than large aneurysms in patients with ruptured aneurysms. P2 and P3 aneurysms are usually managed by the subtemporal approach. This is a case report of rupture saccular aneurysm of posterior cerebral artery on P2P segment. The authors show the surgical steps of these rare aneurysms with an illustrative case. PMID:25548571

  2. Aneurysms of the P2P Segment of Posterior Cerebral Artery: Case Report and Surgical Steps

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Neves, Maick; Martins, Carlos; Nakasone, Fabio; Isolan, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The posterior cerebral artery (PCA) is divided into 4 segments: precommunicating segment (P1), postcommunicating segment (P2), quadrigeminal segment (P3), and calcarine segment (P4). Small aneurysms are more prevalent than large aneurysms in patients with ruptured aneurysms. P2 and P3 aneurysms are usually managed by the subtemporal approach. This is a case report of rupture saccular aneurysm of posterior cerebral artery on P2P segment. The authors show the surgical steps of these rare aneurysms with an illustrative case. PMID:25548571

  3. Cerebral aspergillosis in a diabetic patient leading to cerebral artery occlusion and ischemic stroke: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Shafi, Neelofer; Periakaruppan, Ramayee; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Groth, John; Testai, Fernando D

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is a rare and highly fatal hematogenous infection most commonly found in immune compromised patients. From the onset of neurologic symptoms, the median reported rate of survival is between 5 and 9 days. Compounded with increased hemorrhagic risks and the lack of specificity in both clinical presentation and traditional imaging, a fast and noninvasive method of definitive diagnosis is necessary if there is to be any hope for positive outcomes. We describe the case of a 50-year-old female diabetic with a history of otitis media, an uncharacterized inflammatory nasopharyngeal process, and prior ischemic strokes who presented with a new cerebral infarction in the setting of an angioinvasive fungal infection of the large cerebral arteries. We also present a literature review of aspergillosis detection and treatment in hopes that future cases will be diagnosed in a timely manner and more patients may be saved. PMID:25444026

  4. Cerebral artery dilatation maintains cerebral oxygenation at extreme altitude and in acute hypoxia—an ultrasound and MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mark H; Edsell, Mark E G; Davagnanam, Indran; Hirani, Shashivadan P; Martin, Dan S; Levett, Denny Z H; Thornton, John S; Golay, Xavier; Strycharczuk, Lisa; Newman, Stanton P; Montgomery, Hugh E; Grocott, Mike P W; Imray, Christopher H E

    2011-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler is a widely used noninvasive technique for assessing cerebral artery blood flow. All previous high altitude studies assessing cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the field that have used Doppler to measure arterial blood velocity have assumed vessel diameter to not alter. Here, we report two studies that demonstrate this is not the case. First, we report the highest recorded study of CBF (7,950 m on Everest) and demonstrate that above 5,300 m, middle cerebral artery (MCA) diameter increases (n=24 at 5,300 m, 14 at 6,400 m, and 5 at 7,950 m). Mean MCA diameter at sea level was 5.30 mm, at 5,300 m was 5.23 mm, at 6,400 m was 6.66 mm, and at 7,950 m was 9.34 mm (P<0.001 for change between 5,300 and 7,950 m). The dilatation at 7,950 m reversed with oxygen. Second, we confirm this dilatation by demonstrating the same effect (and correlating it with ultrasound) during hypoxia (FiO2=12% for 3 hours) in a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging study at sea level (n=7). From these results, we conclude that it cannot be assumed that cerebral artery diameter is constant, especially during alterations of inspired oxygen partial pressure, and that transcranial 2D ultrasound is a technique that can be used at the bedside or in the remote setting to assess MCA caliber. PMID:21654697

  5. Endovascular stenting of symptomatic innominate artery stenosis under distal balloon protection of the internal carotid and vertebral artery for cerebral protection: a technical case report.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Kajihara, Yosuke; Mukada, Kazutoshi; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2013-02-01

    The use of cerebral protection devices in endovascular treatment for innominate artery (IA) stenosis is not well established. We describe a novel technique for cerebral protection during endovascular stenting of symptomatic IA stenosis. An 82-year-old man presented with acutely scattered brain infarction by artery-to-artery embolism due to IA stenosis. Endovascular treatment for symptomatic IA stenosis was planned to prevent recurrent attacks. Endovascular stenting for IA stenosis via the right femoral artery approach was performed under simultaneous distal balloon protection of the right internal carotid artery (ICA) and vertebral artery (VA) via the right brachial artery approach. Successful treatment of symptomatic IA stenosis was achieved with no complications. The technique with simultaneous distal balloon protection of the ICA and VA provided excellent cerebral protection in stenting of IA stenosis. PMID:23263481

  6. A simple technique for morphological measurement of cerebral arterial circle variations using public domain software (Osiris).

    PubMed

    Ansari, Saeed; Dadmehr, Majid; Eftekhar, Behzad; McConnell, Douglas J; Ganji, Sarah; Azari, Hassan; Kamali-Ardakani, Shahab; Hoh, Brian L; Mocco, J

    2011-12-01

    This article describes a straightforward method to measure the dimensions and identify morphological variations in the cerebral arterial circle using the general-purpose software program Osiris. This user-friendly and portable program displays, manipulates, and analyzes medical digital images, and it has the capability to determine morphometric properties of selected blood vessels (or other anatomical structures) in humans and animals. To ascertain morphometric variations in the cerebral arterial circle, 132 brains of recently deceased fetuses, infants, and adults were dissected. The dissection procedure was first digitized, and then the dimensions were measured with Osiris software. Measurements of each vessel's length and external diameters were used to identify and classify morphological variations in the cerebral arterial circle. The most commonly observed anatomical variations were uni- and bilateral hypoplasia of the posterior communicating artery. This study demonstrates that public domain software can be used to measure and classify cerebral arterial circle vessels. This method could be extended to examine other anatomical regions or to study other animals. Additionally, knowledge of variations within the circle could be applied clinically to enhance diagnostic and treatment specificity. PMID:22254161

  7. Arterial Spin Labeling Measurements of Cerebral Perfusion Territories in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Renata F.; Paiva, Fernando F.; Kang, Byeong-Teck; Henning, Erica C.; Nascimento, George C.; Tannús, Alberto; De Araújo, Dráulio B.; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    Collateral circulation, defined as the supplementary vascular network that maintains cerebral blood flow (CBF) when the main vessels fail, constitutes one important defense mechanism of the brain against ischemic stroke. In the present study, continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) was used to quantify CBF and obtain perfusion territory maps of the major cerebral arteries in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and their normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) controls. Results show that both WKY and SHR have complementary, yet significantly asymmetric perfusion territories. Right or left dominances were observed in territories of the anterior (ACA), middle and posterior cerebral arteries, and the thalamic artery. Magnetic resonance angiography showed that some of the asymmetries were correlated with variations of the ACA. The leptomeningeal circulation perfusing the outer layers of the cortex was observed as well. Significant and permanent changes in perfusion territories were obtained after temporary occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery in both SHR and WKY, regardless of their particular dominance. However, animals with right dominance presented a larger volume change of the left perfusion territory (23 ± 9%) than animals with left dominance (7 ± 5%, P < 0.002). The data suggest that animals with contralesional dominance primarily safeguard local CBF values with small changes in contralesional perfusion territory, while animals with ipsilesional dominance show a reversal of dominance and a substantial increase in contralesional perfusion territory. These findings show the usefulness of CASL to probe the collateral circulation. PMID:24323754

  8. Cerebral arterial bolus arrival time is prolonged in multiple sclerosis and associated with disability

    PubMed Central

    Paling, David; Thade Petersen, Esben; Tozer, Daniel J; Altmann, Daniel R; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia AM; Kapoor, Raju; Miller, David H; Golay, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the overall cerebral hemodynamics have been reported in multiple sclerosis (MS); however, their cause and significance is unknown. While potential venous causes have been examined, arterial causes have not. In this study, a multiple delay time arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging sequence at 3T was used to quantify the arterial hemodynamic parameter bolus arrival time (BAT) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and deep gray matter in 33 controls and 35 patients with relapsing–remitting MS. Bolus arrival time was prolonged in MS in NAWM (1.0±0.2 versus 0.9±0.2 seconds, P=0.031) and deep gray matter (0.90±0.18 versus 0.80±0.14 seconds, P=0.001) and CBF was increased in NAWM (14±4 versus 10±2 mL/100 g/min, P=0.001). Prolonged BAT in NAWM (P=0.042) and deep gray matter (P=0.01) were associated with higher expanded disability status score. This study demonstrates alteration in cerebral arterial hemodynamics in MS. One possible cause may be widespread inflammation. Bolus arrival time was longer in patients with greater disability independent of atrophy and T2 lesion load, suggesting alterations in cerebral arterial hemodynamics may be a marker of clinically relevant pathology. PMID:24045400

  9. Coincidental cerebral venous thrombosis and subarachnoid haemorrhage related to ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Claudia; Baumgartner, Annette; Mader, Irina; Rijntjes, Michel; Meckel, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) are rare cerebrovascular pathologies. Here, we report the extremely rare coincidental presentation of both entities and discuss the likely relationship in aetiology and their optimal management. A female patient presented with headache and progressive neurological deficits. Cranial computed tomography and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed dural venous sinus thrombosis, left-sided frontal and parietal infarcts, and left middle and anterior cerebral artery stenosis. In addition, left hemispheric subarachnoid haemosiderosis was seen on MRI. Following standard anticoagulation therapy for CVT, she represented with acute SAH. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm and left middle cerebral artery/anterior cerebral artery vasospasms that were responsive to intra-arterial nimodipine. The latter were already present on the previous MRI, and had most likely prevented the detection of the aneurysm initially. The aneurysm was successfully coil embolised, and the patient improved clinically. Despite this case being an extremely rare coincidence, a ruptured aneurysm should be excluded in the presence of CVT and non-sulcal SAH. A careful consideration of treatment of both pathologies is required, since anticoagulation may have a potentially negative impact on aneurysmal bleeding. PMID:27188326

  10. A PLCγ1-Dependent, Force-Sensitive Signaling Network in the Myogenic Constriction of Cerebral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Albert L.; Yang, Ying; Sullivan, Michelle N.; Sanders, Lindsey; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Hill-Eubanks, David C.; Nelson, Mark T.; Earley, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining constant blood flow in the face of fluctuations in blood pressure is a critical autoregulatory feature of cerebral arteries. An increase in pressure within the artery lumen causes the vessel to constrict through depolarization and contraction of the encircling smooth muscle cells. This pressure-sensing mechanism involves activation of two types of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels: TRPC6 and TRPM4. We provide evidence that the activation of the γ1 isoform of phospholipase C (PLCγ1) is critical for pressure sensing in cerebral arteries. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), generated by PLCγ1 in response to pressure, sensitized IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) to Ca2+ influx mediated by the mechanosensitive TRPC6 channel, synergistically increasing IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release to activate TRPM4 currents, leading to smooth muscle depolarization and constriction of isolated cerebral arteries. Proximity ligation assays demonstrated colocalization of PLCγ1 and TRPC6 with TRPM4, suggesting the presence of a force-sensitive, local signaling network comprising PLCγ1, TRPC6, TRPM4, and IP3Rs. Src tyrosine kinase activity was necessary for stretch-induced TRPM4 activation and myogenic constriction, consistent with the ability of Src to activate PLCγ isoforms. We conclude that contraction of cerebral artery smooth muscle cells requires the integration of pressure-sensing signaling pathways and their convergence on IP3Rs, which mediate localized Ca2+-dependent depolarization through the activation of TRPM4. PMID:24866019

  11. Binding of /sup 3/H-acetylcholine to cholinergic receptors in bovine cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shimohama, S.; Tsukahara, T.; Taniguchi, T.; Fujiwara, M.

    1985-11-18

    Cholinergic receptor sites in bovine cerebral arteries were analyzed using radioligand binding techniques with the cholinergic agonist, /sup 3/H-acetylcholine (ACh), as the ligand. Specific binding of /sup 3/H-ACh to membrane preparations of bovine cerebral arteries was saturable, of two binding sites, with dissociation constant (K/sub D/) values of 0.32 and 23.7 nM, and maximum binding capacity (Bmax) values of 67 and 252 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Specific binding of /sup 3/H-ACh was displaced effectively by muscarinic cholinergic agents and less effectively by nicotinic cholinergic agents. IC/sub 50/ values of cholinergic drugs for /sup 3/H-ACh binding were as follows: atropine, 38.5 nM; ACh, 59.8 nM; oxotremorine, 293 nM; scopolamine 474 nM; carbamylcholine, 990 nM. IC/sub 50/ values of nicotinic cholinergic agents such as nicotine, cytisine and ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin exceeded 50 ..mu..M. Choline acetyltransferase activity was 1.09 nmol/mg protein/hour in the cerebral arteries. These findings suggest that the cholinergic nerves innervate the bovine cerebral arteries and that there are at least two classes of ACh binding sites of different affinities on muscarinic reporters in these arteries. 18 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Noninvasive testing of cerebral perfusion reserve prior to coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, R.L.; Lagreze, H.L.; Berkoff, H.A.; Turnipseed, W.D.; Hanson, J.M.; Sunderland, J.J.; Nickles, R.J.; Rowe, B.R.

    1988-05-01

    Cerebral perfusion reserve testing using fluorine-18-fluoromethane and positron emission tomographic brain scanning to define cerebral blood flow abnormalities was performed in 5 patients being considered for combined coronary and carotid reconstructive surgery. Blood flow testing during normocapnia and following hypercapnia was utilized in these patients to determine the hemodynamic significance of known extracranial carotid artery occlusive lesions. Reserve diminution in 2 of these patients prompted combined surgery, whereas normal reserve values in the other 3 prompted coronary surgery alone. Results obtained in this preliminary series show how preoperative noninvasive testing of cerebral perfusion reserve adds to the diagnostic evaluation of patients with widespread vascular disease.

  13. Ruptured cerebral aneurysm associated with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery variant

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Yu; Ohmori, Yuki; Kawano, Takayuki; Kai, Yutaka; Morioka, Motohiro; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Primitive trigeminal artery variants (PTAVs) are one of the rare persistent fetal anastomoses between the carotid and vertebrobasilar circulations. They originate from the internal carotid artery and join one of the cerebellar arteries instead of the basilar artery. Case Description: We present an 82-year-old woman with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured aneurysm originating at a PTAV. Three-dimensional computed tomography angiogram and cerebral angiography revealed bilateral PTAV and two aneurysms originating at the left PTAV. The proximal and distal aneurysms were saccular and fusiform, respectively. She underwent surgical treatment and her postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusion: Our case demonstrates that extremely rare cerebral aneurysms associated with PTAV can be addressed successfully by surgical intervention. PMID:22059121

  14. The Hemodynamic Effects of Blood Flow-Arterial Wall Interaction on Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Marie

    2005-11-01

    Mechanical stresses such as wall shear induced by blood flow play an important role on cardiovascular diseases and cerebral disorders like arterioscleroses and cerebral aneurysm. In order to obtain a better understanding of mechanism of formation, growth, and rupture of cerebral aneurysm, this paper focuses on investigation of cerebral hemodynamics and its effects on aneurismal wall. The paper mainly consists of three parts. Since it is important to obtain the detailed information on the hemodynamic properties in the cerebral circulatory system, the first part discusses a large-scale hemodynamic simulation of the Cerebral Arterial Circle of Willis. The second part presents the simulation and in-vitro experiment of cerebral aneurysm with the consideration of blood flow-arterial wall interaction. Both simulations in the first and the second parts are conducted in a patient specific manner using medical images and also include modeling of boundary conditions to emulate realistic hemodynamic conditions. The present mathematical model, however, includes only macroscopic mechanical functions. Therefore, in the third part, the paper touches upon on future prospects in modeling of microscopic functions such as the effects of endothelial cells and multi physics functions such as physiological effects.

  15. Role of dual-specificity protein phosphatase-5 in modulating the myogenic response in rat cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Wickramasekera, Nadi T.; Gebremedhin, Debebe; Carver, Koryn A.; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Ramchandran, Ramani; Schuett, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the role of the dual-specificity protein phosphatase-5 (DUSP-5) in the pressure-induced myogenic responses of organ-cultured cerebral arterial segments. In these studies, we initially compared freshly isolated and organ-cultured cerebral arterial segments with respect to responses to step increases in intravascular pressure, vasodilator and vasoconstrictor stimuli, activities of the large-conductance arterial Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) single-channel current, and stable protein expression of DUSP-5 enzyme. The results demonstrate maintained pressure-dependent myogenic vasoconstriction, DUSP-5 protein expression, endothelium-dependent and -independent dilations, agonist-induced constriction, and unitary KCa channel conductance in organ-cultured cerebral arterial segments similar to that in freshly isolated cerebral arteries. Furthermore, using a permeabilization transfection technique in organ-cultured cerebral arterial segments, gene-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) induced knockdown of DUSP-5 mRNA and protein, which were associated with enhanced pressure-dependent cerebral arterial myogenic constriction and increased phosphorylation of PKC-βII. In addition, siRNA knockdown of DUSP-5 reduced levels of phosphorylated ROCK and ERK1 with no change in the level of phosphorylated ERK2. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation significantly attenuated pressure-induced myogenic constriction in cerebral arteries. The findings within the present studies illustrate that DUSP-5, native in cerebral arterial muscle cells, appears to regulate signaling of pressure-dependent myogenic cerebral arterial constriction, which is crucial for the maintenance of constant cerebral blood flow to the brain. PMID:23172031

  16. Increased Arterial Diameters in the Posterior Cerebral Circulation in Men with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Homola, György A.; Guerrero González, Hans; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Solymosi, László; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    A high load of white matter lesions and enlarged basilar arteries have been shown in selected patients with Fabry disease, a disorder associated with an increased stroke risk. We studied a large cohort of patients with Fabry disease to differentially investigate white matter lesion load and cerebral artery diameters. We retrospectively analyzed cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 87 consecutive Fabry patients, 20 patients with ischemic stroke, and 36 controls. We determined the white matter lesion load applying the Fazekas score on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences and measured the diameters of cerebral arteries on 3D-reconstructions of the time-of-flight-MR-angiography scans. Data of different Fabry patient subgroups (males – females; normal – impaired renal function) were compared with data of patients with stroke and controls. A history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks was present in 4/30 males (13%) and 5/57 (9%) females with Fabry disease, all in the anterior circulation. Only one man with Fabry disease showed confluent cerebral white matter lesions in the Fazekas score assessment (1%). Male Fabry patients had a larger basilar artery (p<0.01) and posterior cerebral artery diameter (p<0.05) compared to male controls. This was independent of disease severity as measured by renal function and did not lead to changes in arterial blood flow properties. A basilar artery diameter of >3.2 mm distinguished between men with Fabry disease and controls (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 86%, p<0.001), but not from stroke patients. Enlarged arterial diameters of the posterior circulation are present only in men with Fabry disease independent of disease severity. PMID:24475221

  17. False-negative indocyanine green videoangiography among complex unruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysms: the importance of further aneurysm inspection.

    PubMed

    Kulwin, Charles; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2014-10-01

    Successful surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms requires complete occlusion of the aneurysm lumen while maintaining patency of the adjacent branching and perforating arteries. Intraoperative flow assessment allows aneurysm clip repositioning in the event these requirements are not met, avoiding the risk of postoperative rehemorrhage or infarction. A number of modalities have been proposed for primarily intraoperative qualitative blood flow assessment, including microdoppler ultrasonography, intraoperative digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and more recently noninvasive fluorescent angiography including indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent imaging. Puncture of the aneurysm dome to exclude aneurysm sac filling may also assess the efficacy of clip placement. Although a high concordance between ICG and DSA has been reported, there remains an important subset of aneurysms for which negative ICG study may erroneously suggest aneurysm occlusion. A high-risk situation for such a false-negative study is an atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm in which vessel wall plaque interferes with the ICG signal. Furthermore, a decreased flow within the aneurysm may not allow enough emission light for detection under the current technology. In this report, we describe our experience with cases of MCA aneurysms with false-negative ICG-VA studies requiring clip adjustment for optimal surgical treatment and discuss two illustrative cases of MCA aneurysms with intraoperative fluorescence studies that were falsely negative, requiring puncture of the aneurysm to correctly identify incomplete aneurysm occlusion. PMID:24552255

  18. Epilepsy in Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy Due to Perinatal Arterial Ischaemic Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanigasinghe, Jithangi; Reid, Susan M.; Mackay, Mark T.; Reddihough, Dinah S.; Harvey, A. Simon; Freeman, Jeremy L.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the frequency, risk factors, manifestations, and outcome of epilepsy in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) due to perinatal arterial ischaemic stroke (AIS). Method: The study group comprised 63 participants (41 males, 22 females) from a population-based CP register whose brain imaging showed…

  19. Substantial Reduction of Parenchymal Cerebral Blood Flow in Mice with Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yorito; Enmi, Jun-Ichiro; Iguchi, Satoshi; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Iida, Hidehiro; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) mouse model, which replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and white matter ischemic lesions, is considered to model some aspects of vascular cognitive impairment. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in the brain surface post-BCAS have been demonstrated by laser speckle flowmetry, but CBF levels in the brain parenchyma remain unknown. Adult C57BL/6J male mice were subjected to BCAS using external microcoils. Brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was conducted to visualize the intracranial main arteries while arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to measure cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF levels before and after BCAS. Brain MRA showed anterior circulation flow was substantially decreased until 14 days post-BCAS, which gradually but incompletely recovered over the following 14 days, with probable growth of collaterals from the posterior cerebral artery. ASL showed that cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF remained decreased at approximately 50% of the baseline level during 1 and 14 days post-BCAS, recovering to approximately 70% at day 28. CBF levels in the parenchyma were lower than the cortical superficial region in the BCAS model and remained decreased without recovery during the first 2 weeks post-BCAS. These results suggest that the BCAS model reliably replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:27535801

  20. Stent-assisted mechanical recanalization for symptomatic subacute or chronic middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Ma, Ji; Li, Teng-Fei; Zhu, Ming; Han, Xin-Wei; Shui, Shao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and short-term effects of treating patients with subacute or chronic middle cerebral artery (M1) occlusion by stent-assisted mechanical recanalization. Six patients with cerebral arteries occlusion underwent surgery. Six cerebral arteries occlusion in 5 patients were successfully recanalized. On postoperative day 1, four patients’ symptoms were relieved and two patients’ symptoms were exacerbated, of which one was significantly improved after 3 days, the other one’s symptoms were recovered to preoperative levels in 2 weeks. No patients died after surgery. No stroke or transient ischemic attack occurred. The average follow-up of was 4.2 months, no worsening of condition, recurrence or death occurred. The results indicate that for patients with subacute or chronic middle cerebral artery (M1) occlusion, mechanical recanalization was technically feasible under the premise of strict case screening. Mechanical recanalization is able to improve ischemic symptoms and promote dysfunction restoration. But its long-term effect remains to be evaluated by further large samples, long-term follow-up studies. PMID:26885148

  1. Aneurysm of azygos anterior cerebral artery: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Ghanta, Rajesh Kumar; Kesanakurthy, Murthy V. S. N.; Vemuri, Varaprasad N.

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of azygos anterior cerebral artery (ACA) are rare with very few cases reported in medical literature. We report here two cases of aneurysm of azygos ACA among 105 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. The two aneurysms were successfully clipped by using the bifrontal basal interhemispheric approach. PMID:27366270

  2. A protocol for characterizing the impact of collateral flow after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    DeFazio, R. Anthony; Levy, Sean; Morales, Carmen L.; Levy, Rebecca V.; Dave, Kunjan R.; Lin, Hung W.; Abaffy, Tatjana; Watson, Brant D.; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.; Ohanna, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    I. SUMMARY In humans and in animal models of stroke, collateral blood flow between territories of the major pial arteries has a profound impact on cortical infarct size. However, there is a gap in our understanding of the genetic determinants of collateral formation and flow, as well as the signaling pathways and neurovascular interactions regulating this flow. Previous studies have demonstrated that collateral flow between branches of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and the middle cerebral artery (MCA) can protect mouse cortex from infarction after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Because the number and diameter of collaterals varies among mouse strains and after transgenic manipulations, a combination of methods is required to control for these variations. Here, we report an inexpensive approach to characterizing the cerebrovascular anatomy, and in vivo monitoring of cerebral blood flow as well. Further, we introduce a new, minimally invasive method for the occlusion of distal MCA branches. These methods will permit a new generation of studies on the mechanisms regulating collateral remodeling and cortical blood flow after stroke. PMID:21593993

  3. Substantial Reduction of Parenchymal Cerebral Blood Flow in Mice with Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Yorito; Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Iguchi, Satoshi; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Iida, Hidehiro; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) mouse model, which replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and white matter ischemic lesions, is considered to model some aspects of vascular cognitive impairment. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in the brain surface post-BCAS have been demonstrated by laser speckle flowmetry, but CBF levels in the brain parenchyma remain unknown. Adult C57BL/6J male mice were subjected to BCAS using external microcoils. Brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was conducted to visualize the intracranial main arteries while arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to measure cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF levels before and after BCAS. Brain MRA showed anterior circulation flow was substantially decreased until 14 days post-BCAS, which gradually but incompletely recovered over the following 14 days, with probable growth of collaterals from the posterior cerebral artery. ASL showed that cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF remained decreased at approximately 50% of the baseline level during 1 and 14 days post-BCAS, recovering to approximately 70% at day 28. CBF levels in the parenchyma were lower than the cortical superficial region in the BCAS model and remained decreased without recovery during the first 2 weeks post-BCAS. These results suggest that the BCAS model reliably replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:27535801

  4. Serum response factor and myocardin mediate arterial hypercontractility and cerebral blood flow dysregulation in Alzheimer's phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Nienwen; Bell, Robert D.; Deane, Rashid; Streb, Jeffrey W.; Chen, Jiyuan; Brooks, Andrew; Van Nostrand, William; Miano, Joseph M.; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral angiopathy contributes to cognitive decline and dementia in Alzheimer's disease (AD) through cerebral blood flow (CBF) reductions and dysregulation. We report vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in small pial and intracerebral arteries, which are critical for CBF regulation, express in AD high levels of serum response factor (SRF) and myocardin (MYOCD), two interacting transcription factors that orchestrate a VSMC-differentiated phenotype. Consistent with this finding, AD VSMC overexpressed several SRF-MYOCD-regulated contractile proteins and exhibited a hypercontractile phenotype. MYOCD overexpression in control human cerebral VSMC induced an AD-like hypercontractile phenotype and diminished both endothelial-dependent and -independent relaxation in the mouse aorta ex vivo. In contrast, silencing SRF normalized contractile protein content and reversed a hypercontractile phenotype in AD VSMC. MYOCD in vivo gene transfer to mouse pial arteries increased contractile protein content and diminished CBF responses produced by brain activation in wild-type mice and in two AD models, the Dutch/Iowa/Swedish triple mutant human amyloid β-peptide (Aβ)-precursor protein (APP)- expressing mice and APPsw+/− mice. Silencing Srf had the opposite effect. Expression of SRF did not change in VSMC subjected to Alzheimer's neurotoxin, Aβ. Thus, SRF-MYOCD overexpression in small cerebral arteries appears to initiate independently of Aβ a pathogenic pathway mediating arterial hypercontractility and CBF dysregulation, which are associated with Alzheimer's dementia. PMID:17215356

  5. Eugenol dilates rat cerebral arteries by inhibiting smooth muscle cell voltage-dependent calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Leal-Cardoso, Jose Henrique; Jaggar, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Plants high in eugenol, a phenylpropanoid compound, are used as folk medicines to alleviate diseases including hypertension. Eugenol has been demonstrated to relax conduit and ear arteries and reduce systemic blood pressure, but mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we studied eugenol regulation of resistance-size cerebral arteries that control regional brain blood pressure and flow and investigated mechanisms involved. We demonstrate that eugenol dilates arteries constricted by either pressure or membrane depolarization (60 mM K+) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experiments performed using patch-clamp electrophysiology demonstrated that eugenol inhibited voltage-dependent calcium (Ca2+) currents, when using Ba2+ as a charge carrier, in isolated cerebral artery smooth muscle cells. Eugenol inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents involved pore block, a hyperpolarizing shift ( ~−10 mV) in voltage-dependent inactivation, an increase in the proportion of steady-state inactivating current, and acceleration of inactivaiton rate. In summary, our data indicate that eugenol dilates cerebral arteries via multi-modal inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. PMID:24921632

  6. A study of microemboli monitoring of atherosclerotic thrombotic cerebral infarction and artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, D J; Zhuang, A X; Zeng, Q H; Jiang, Y L; Jiang, J D; Feng, S Q; Zhang, Y; Huang, H M; Nie, H X; Liu, L

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between the recurrence and prognosis of patients with acute middle cerebral artery infarction, atherosclerotic brain infarction, and the existence of microemboli. We continuously enrolled patients with acute atherosclerotic thrombotic cerebral infarction artery stenosis. We performed transcranial Doppler color ultrasound micro emboli monitoring, color Doppler ultrasound carotid artery tests, intracranial and carotid artery magnetic resonance angiography, impairment evaluation of nerve function, and registration of stroke recurrence and stroke mortality. Of the 49 patients enrolled in the study, 123 main arteries presented atherosclerotic stenosis or formed plaques, and 33 patients had symptomatic stenosis. Patients with symptomatic stenosis have a higher incidence of microemboli than patients with asymptomatic stenosis (P = 0.009). The microembolus-positive rate increased in patients with unstable plaques (P = 0.001). Patients who were microembolus-negative were more likely to show a neural function deficient NIHSS (National Institutes of Stroke Scale) score improvement than patients who were microembolus-positive at one week (P = 0.026). However, we found no significant difference between mRS (modified rankin scale) score (P = 0.319), relapse, and death (P = 0.179). The rate of microembolus-positivity increased in patients with atherosclerotic thrombotic cerebral infarction and unstable plaques. Patients who were microembolus-negative were more likely to show an improvement of neural function deficiency than patients with microembolus-positivity at one week (P = 0.026). PMID:25177953

  7. Instability of the Middle Cerebral Artery Blood Flow in Response to CO2

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Rosemary E.; Duffin, James; Fisher, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The middle cerebral artery supplies long end-artery branches to perfuse the deep white matter and shorter peripheral branches to perfuse cortical and subcortical tissues. A generalized vasodilatory stimulus such as carbon dioxide not only results in an increase in flow to these various tissue beds but also redistribution among them. We employed a fast step increase in carbon dioxide to detect the dynamics of the cerebral blood flow response. Methodology/Principal Findings The study was approved by the Research Ethics Board of the University Health Network at the University of Toronto. We used transcranial ultrasound to measure the time course of middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity in 28 healthy adults. Normoxic, isoxic step increases in arterial carbon dioxide tension of 10 mmHg from both hypocapnic and normocapnic baselines were produced using a new prospective targeting system that enabled a more rapid step change than has been previously achievable. In most of the 28 subjects the responses at both carbon dioxide ranges were characterised by more complex responses than a single exponential rise. Most responses were characterised by a fast initial response which then declined rapidly to a nadir, followed by a slower secondary response, with some showing oscillations before stabilising. Conclusions/Significance A rapid step increase in carbon dioxide tension is capable of inducing instability in the cerebral blood flow control system. These dynamic aspects of the cerebral blood flow responses to rapid changes in carbon dioxide must be taken into account when using transcranial blood flow velocity in a single artery segment to measure cerebrovascular reactivity. PMID:23936248

  8. Development affects in vitro vascular tone and calcium sensitivity in ovine cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Greg G; Osol, George J; Longo, Lawrence D

    2004-01-01

    We have shown recently that development from neonatal to adult life affects cerebrovascular tone of mouse cerebral arteries through endothelium-derived vasodilatory mechanisms. The current study tested the hypothesis that development from fetal to adult life affects cerebral artery vascular smooth muscle (VSM) [Ca2+]i sensitivity and tone through a mechanism partially dependent upon endothelium-dependent signalling. In pressurized resistance sized cerebral arteries (∼150 μm) from preterm (95 ± 2 days gestation (95 d)) and near-term (140 ± 2 days gestation (140 d)) fetuses, and non-pregnant adults, we measured vascular diameter (μm) and [Ca2+]i (nm) as a function of intravascular pressure. We repeated these studies in the presence of inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS; with l-NAME), cyclo-oxygenase (COX; with indomethacin) and endothelium removal (E–). Cerebrovasculature tone (E+) was greater in arteries from 95 d fetuses and adults compared to 140 d sheep. Ca2+ sensitivity was similar in 95 d fetuses and adults, but much lower in 140 d fetuses. Removal of endothelium resulted in a reduction in lumen diameter as a function of pressure (greater tone) in all treatment groups. [Ca2+]i sensitivity differences among groups were magnified after E–. NOS inhibition decreased diameter as a function of pressure in each age group, with a significant increase in [Ca2+]i to pressure ratio only in the 140 d fetuses. Indomethacin increased tone and increased [Ca2+]i in the 140 d fetuses, but not the other age groups. Development from near-term to adulthood uncovered an interaction between NOS- and COX-sensitive substances that functioned to modulate artery diameter but not [Ca2+]i. This study suggests that development is associated with significant alterations in cerebral vascular smooth muscle (VSM), endothelium, NOS and COX responses to intravascular pressure. We speculate that these changes have important implications in the regulation of cerebral blood flow in

  9. CaV1.2/CaV3.x channels mediate divergent vasomotor responses in human cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Harraz, Osama F; Visser, Frank; Brett, Suzanne E; Goldman, Daniel; Zechariah, Anil; Hashad, Ahmed M; Menon, Bijoy K; Watson, Tim; Starreveld, Yves; Welsh, Donald G

    2015-05-01

    The regulation of arterial tone is critical in the spatial and temporal control of cerebral blood flow. Voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV) channels are key regulators of excitation-contraction coupling in arterial smooth muscle, and thereby of arterial tone. Although L- and T-type CaV channels have been identified in rodent smooth muscle, little is known about the expression and function of specific CaV subtypes in human arteries. Here, we determined which CaV subtypes are present in human cerebral arteries and defined their roles in determining arterial tone. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis, respectively, identified mRNA and protein for L- and T-type channels in smooth muscle of cerebral arteries harvested from patients undergoing resection surgery. Analogous to rodents, CaV1.2 (L-type) and CaV3.2 (T-type) α1 subunits were expressed in human cerebral arterial smooth muscle; intriguingly, the CaV3.1 (T-type) subtype present in rodents was replaced with a different T-type isoform, CaV3.3, in humans. Using established pharmacological and electrophysiological tools, we separated and characterized the unique profiles of Ca(2+) channel subtypes. Pressurized vessel myography identified a key role for CaV1.2 and CaV3.3 channels in mediating cerebral arterial constriction, with the former and latter predominating at higher and lower intraluminal pressures, respectively. In contrast, CaV3.2 antagonized arterial tone through downstream regulation of the large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel. Computational analysis indicated that each Ca(2+) channel subtype will uniquely contribute to the dynamic regulation of cerebral blood flow. In conclusion, this study documents the expression of three distinct Ca(2+) channel subtypes in human cerebral arteries and further shows how they act together to orchestrate arterial tone. PMID:25918359

  10. Massive Hemorrhage from Internal Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm Successfully Treated by Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with Assessment of Regional Cerebral Oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Kakizawa, Hideaki Toyota, Naoyuki; Hieda, Masashi; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Tachikake, Toshihiro; Horiguchi, Jun; Ito, Katsuhide

    2005-05-15

    A 54-year-old male presented with intermittent massive hemorrhage from recurrent oropharyngeal cancer. The angiogram showed the encasements at the main trunk of the left internal carotid artery (ICA) and external carotid artery (ECA). Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) of the ECA with gelatin sponge particles and microcoils was performed. However, hemorrhage recurred several hours after the initial TAE. The second angiogram showed a large pseudoaneurysm of the ICA developing at the encasement on the initial angiogram. As a simple neurologic test, regional cerebral oxygenation (rSO{sub 2}) was assessed with and without manual compression of the common carotid artery (CCA). With compression of the left CCA, the rSO{sub 2} did not change. We therefore performed isolation of the pseudoaneurysm. We embolized proximally and distally to the ICA pseudoaneurysm with microcoils and the pseudoaneurysm disappeared. No major complications occurred and no massive hemorrhage recurred until death from the cancer. TAE was an effective treatment for massive hemorrhage caused by tumor invasion to ICA. Assessment of rSO{sub 2} was a simple and useful neurologic test predicting the cerebral blood flow to prevent complications of TAE.

  11. Characteristics of time-varying intracranial pressure on blood flow through cerebral artery: A fluid-structure interaction approach.

    PubMed

    Syed, Hasson; Unnikrishnan, Vinu U; Olcmen, Semih

    2016-02-01

    Elevated intracranial pressure is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in severe head injuries. Wall shear stresses in the artery can be affected by increased intracranial pressures and may lead to the formation of cerebral aneurysms. Earlier research on cerebral arteries and aneurysms involves using constant mean intracranial pressure values. Recent advancements in intracranial pressure monitoring techniques have led to measurement of the intracranial pressure waveform. By incorporating a time-varying intracranial pressure waveform in place of constant intracranial pressures in the analysis of cerebral arteries helps in understanding their effects on arterial deformation and wall shear stress. To date, such a robust computational study on the effect of increasing intracranial pressures on the cerebral arterial wall has not been attempted to the best of our knowledge. In this work, fully coupled fluid-structure interaction simulations are carried out to investigate the effect of the variation in intracranial pressure waveforms on the cerebral arterial wall. Three different time-varying intracranial pressure waveforms and three constant intracranial pressure profiles acting on the cerebral arterial wall are analyzed and compared with specified inlet velocity and outlet pressure conditions. It has been found that the arterial wall experiences deformation depending on the time-varying intracranial pressure waveforms, while the wall shear stress changes at peak systole for all the intracranial pressure profiles. PMID:26701867

  12. An unusual variant of the callosomarginal artery from the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Jun; Kashimura, Hiroshi; Takeda, Masaru; Aso, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although the anatomy of the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) is highly variable, a callosomarginal artery (CMA) arising from the A1 segment of the ACA is rare. Case Description: A 27-year-old man presented with severe headache and was admitted to our hospital. Initial computed tomography (CT) showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cistern. Three-dimensional CT angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm arising from the left internal carotid bifurcation and showed an anomalous cortical branch originating from the left A1 segment of the ACA. The anomalous artery was interpreted as a CMA. Conclusions: Recognizing this variant preoperatively could be helpful in preventing complications of surgery. Careful follow-up studies are necessary in the present case to monitor the development of another aneurysm at the junction between the left CMA and the left A1 segment of the ACA. PMID:27313967

  13. Feline cerebral veins and arteries: comparison of autonomic innervation and vasomotor responses

    PubMed Central

    Edvinsson, Lars; McCulloch, James; Uddman, Rolf

    1982-01-01

    1. The innervation of feline cerebral (pial) vessels by nerve fibres containing noradrenaline, substance P or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) has been examined using the Falck—Hillarp histo-fluorescence method and immunohistochemical techniques. Cerebral veins were shown to be innervated by nerve fibres containing noradrenaline, substance P or VIP. Nerve fibres containing noradrenaline were the most numerous, while fibres containing substance P were observed least frequently in both types of vessel. For each putative neurotransmitter, the density of the innervation of the cerebral veins was less than that of cerebral arteries. 2. The vasomotor responses of individual pial arteries and veins on the convexity of the cerebral cortex to perivascular micro-injection of noradrenaline, substance P and VIP were examined in twenty-five cats anaesthetized with α-chloralose. 3. The perivascular micro-application of noradrenaline resulted in pronounced dose-dependent reductions in the diameter of pial veins (maximum calibre reduction: 32±3% noradrenaline 10-5 M) and arteries (22±3% noradrenaline 10-5 M). Pial veins were more sensitive to noradrenaline than were pial arteries tested under similar conditions. The reductions in the diameter of cerebral veins and arteries resulting from the administration of noradrenaline could be attenuated by the concomitant micro-application of phentolamine (10-6 M). 4. The perivascular micro-application of substance P effected significant dose-dependent increases in the calibre of pial veins (maximum calibre increase: 16±4% substance P 10-7 M) which were of a similar magnitude to those observed in pial arteries in response to this peptide (21±4% substance P 10-6 M). 5. The perivascular micro-application of VIP resulted in small increases in the calibre of pial veins (maximum calibre increase: 9±2% VIP 10-8 M) which were proportionately smaller than those observed in pial arteries in response to this peptide (23±5% VIP 10-7 M

  14. Duplicated middle cerebral artery arising from the origin of the hyperplastic anterior choroidal artery that mimicked aneurysm on routine MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Ito, Sayaka; Kurita, Hiroki; Tanaka, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of duplicated right middle cerebral artery that arose from the origin of the right hyperplastic anterior choroidal artery diagnosed by magnetic resonance angiography. To our knowledge, this is the first case of such a variation reported with magnetic resonance angiographic images. The internal carotid artery-hyperplastic anterior choroidal artery-duplicated middle cerebral artery junction was dilated and mimicking aneurysm. Partial maximum intensity projection images and volume-rendering images showed that it was not a saccular aneurysm but an infundibular dilatation. Careful observation of magnetic resonance angiographic images including its source images is important for detecting rare arterial variations. To identify an anomalous artery on magnetic resonance angiography, creation of partial maximum intensity projection images and volume-rendering images is valuable. PMID:26915899

  15. Substance P-induced relaxation and hyperpolarization in human cerebral arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, J.; Zygmunt, P. M.; Brandt, L.; Högestätt, E. D.

    1995-01-01

    1. Vascular effects of substance P were studied in human isolated pial arteries removed from 14 patients undergoing cerebral cortical resection. 2. Substance P induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in the presence of indomethacin. No relaxation was seen in arteries where the endothelium had been removed. 3. N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 0.3 mM) abolished the relaxation in arteries from six patients. The relaxation was only partially inhibited in the remaining eight patients, the reduction of the maximum relaxation being less than 50% in each patient. 4. The L-NOARG-resistant relaxation was abolished when the external K+ concentration was raised above 30 mM. 5. Substance P caused a smooth muscle hyperpolarization (in the presence of L-NOARG and indomethacin), but only when the artery showed an L-NOARG-resistant relaxation. 6. The results indicate that nitric oxide is an important mediator of endothelium-dependent relaxation in human cerebral arteries. Furthermore, another endothelium-dependent pathway, causing hyperpolarization and vasodilatation, was identified in arteries from more than half the population of patients. PMID:7582516

  16. Cerebral blood flow response to changes in arterial carbon dioxide tension during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass in children

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, F.H.; Ungerleider, R.M.; Quill, T.J.; Baldwin, B.; White, W.D.; Reves, J.G.; Greeley, W.J. )

    1991-04-01

    We examined the relationship of changes in partial pressure of carbon dioxide on cerebral blood flow responsiveness in 20 pediatric patients undergoing hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass. Cerebral blood flow was measured during steady-state hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with the use of xenon 133 clearance methodology at two different arterial carbon dioxide tensions. During these measurements there was no significant change in mean arterial pressure, nasopharyngeal temperature, pump flow rate, or hematocrit value. Cerebral blood flow was found to be significantly greater at higher arterial carbon dioxide tensions (p less than 0.01), so that for every millimeter of mercury rise in arterial carbon dioxide tension there was a 1.2 ml.100 gm-1.min-1 increase in cerebral blood flow. Two factors, deep hypothermia (18 degrees to 22 degrees C) and reduced age (less than 1 year), diminished the effect carbon dioxide had on cerebral blood flow responsiveness but did not eliminate it. We conclude that cerebral blood flow remains responsive to changes in arterial carbon dioxide tension during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass in infants and children; that is, increasing arterial carbon dioxide tension will independently increase cerebral blood flow.

  17. Lack of specific (/sup 3/H) prazosin binding sites in dog and rabbit cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Ferron, P.M.; Banner, W. Jr.; Duckles, S.P.

    1984-11-19

    In order to explore the characteristics of alpha adrenergic receptors on cerebrovascular smooth muscle, specific binding sites for the alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic ligand, (/sup 3/H) prazosin, were studied in blood vessel homogenates. No specific (/sup 3/H) prazosin binding was found in either rabbit or dog cerebral arteries, but specific binding was demonstrated in the rabbit saphenous and ear arteries. In the ear artery /sup 3/H-prazosin binding was saturable with a K/sub d/ of 0.51 +/- 0.20 nM and a Bmax of 89 +/- 29 fmoles/mg protein. To confirm the adequacy of our membrane preparation, homogenates of both dog and rabbit cerebral arteries showed saturable specific binding with two different ligands: one for muscarinic receptors, (/sup 3/H)(-) quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and one for alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic receptors, (/sup 3/H) yohimbine. The results of these studies demonstrate a lack of alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptors on cerebral blood vessels, confirming functional studies showing only a weak contractile response to norepinephrine. 29 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Is Vasomotion in Cerebral Arteries Impaired in Alzheimer’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Farkas, Eszter; Martin, Chris; Venneri, Annalena; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A substantial body of evidence supports the hypothesis of a vascular component in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Cerebral hypoperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction have been indicated as key elements of this pathway. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a cerebrovascular disorder, frequent in AD, characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in cerebral blood vessel walls. CAA is associated with loss of vascular integrity, resulting in impaired regulation of cerebral circulation, and increased susceptibility to cerebral ischemia, microhemorrhages, and white matter damage. Vasomotion— the spontaneous rhythmic modulation of arterial diameter, typically observed in arteries/arterioles in various vascular beds including the brain— is thought to participate in tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery regulation. Vasomotion is impaired in adverse conditions such as hypoperfusion and hypoxia. The perivascular and glymphatic pathways of Aβ clearance are thought to be driven by the systolic pulse. Vasomotion produces diameter changes of comparable amplitude, however at lower rates, and could contribute to these mechanisms of Aβ clearance. In spite of potential clinical interest, studies addressing cerebral vasomotion in the context of AD/CAA are limited. This study reviews the current literature on vasomotion, and hypothesizes potential paths implicating impaired cerebral vasomotion in AD/CAA. Aβ and oxidative stress cause vascular tone dysregulation through direct effects on vascular cells, and indirect effects mediated by impaired neurovascular coupling. Vascular tone dysregulation is further aggravated by cholinergic deficit and results in depressed cerebrovascular reactivity and (possibly) impaired vasomotion, aggravating regional hypoperfusion and promoting further Aβ and oxidative stress accumulation. PMID:25720414

  19. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with multivessel cervical artery dissections and a double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Nouh, Amre; Ruland, Sean; Schneck, Michael J; Pasquale, David; Biller, José

    2014-02-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) has been associated with exposure to vasoactive substances and few reports with cervical arterial dissections (CADs). We evaluated a 32-year-old woman with history of depression, migraines without aura, and cannabis use who presented with a thunderclap headache unresponsive to triptans. She was found to have bilateral occipital infarcts, bilateral extracranial vertebral artery dissections, bilateral internal carotid artery dissecting aneurysms, and extensive distal multifocal segmental narrowing of the anterior and posterior intracranial circulation with a "sausage on a string-like appearance" suggestive of RCVS. Subsequently, she was found to have a distal thrombus of the basilar artery, was anticoagulated, and discharged home with no residual deficits. We highlight the potential association of CADs and RCVS. The association of RCVS and a double aortic arch has not been previously reported. PMID:24103665

  20. Complete Oculomotor Nerve Palsy Caused by Direct Compression of the Posterior Cerebral Artery.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Shin Kyoung; Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Na, Sang-Jun

    2015-07-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy frequently occurs because of external compression by an internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm and diabetes mellitus. In addition, pontine infarction, cavernous sinus tumors, demyelinating disease, and autoimmune disorder are well-known causes of oculomotor nerve palsy. However, cases of complete oculomotor nerve palsy by neurovascular conflicts presented with a sudden onset of clinical symptoms are extremely rare. We experienced a rare case of complete oculomotor nerve palsy because of direct vascular compression of the oculomotor nerve by the posterior cerebral artery. PMID:25939862

  1. Tau pathology-dependent remodelling of cerebral arteries precedes Alzheimer's disease-related microvascular cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Merlini, Mario; Wanner, Debora; Nitsch, Roger M

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterised by pathologic cerebrovascular remodelling. Whether this occurs already before disease onset, as may be indicated by early Braak tau-related cerebral hypoperfusion and blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment found in previous studies, remains unknown. Therefore, we systematically quantified Braak tau stage- and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA)-dependent alterations in the alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen, and elastin content of leptomeningeal arterioles, small arteries, and medium-sized arteries surrounding the gyrus frontalis medialis (GFM) and hippocampus (HIPP), including the sulci, of 17 clinically and pathologically diagnosed AD subjects (Braak stage IV-VI) and 28 non-demented control subjects (Braak stage I-IV). GFM and HIPP paraffin sections were stained for general collagen and elastin with the Verhoeff-van Gieson stain; α-SMA and CAA/amyloid β (Aβ) were detected using immunohistochemistry. Significant arterial elastin degradation was observed from Braak stage III onward and correlated with Braak tau pathology (ρ = 0.909, 95 % CI 0.370 to 0.990, p < 0.05). This was accompanied by an increase in neutrophil elastase expression by α-SMA-positive cells in the vessel wall. Small and medium-sized arteries exhibited significant CAA-independent α-SMA loss starting between Braak stage I and II-III, along with accumulation of phosphorylated paired helical filament (PHF) tau in the perivascular space of intraparenchymal vessels. α-SMA remained at the decreased level throughout the later Braak stages. In contrast, arterioles exhibited significant α-SMA loss only at Braak stage V and VI/in AD subjects, which was CAA-dependent/correlated with CAA burden (ρ = -0.422, 95 % CI -0.557 to -0.265, p < 0.0001). Collagen content was only significantly changed in small arteries. Our data indicate that vessel wall remodelling of leptomeningeal arteries is an early-onset, Braak tau pathology-dependent process

  2. ATP transport in saccular cerebral aneurysms at arterial bends.

    PubMed

    Imai, Yohsuke; Sato, Kodai; Ishikawa, Takuji; Comerford, Andrew; David, Tim; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2010-03-01

    ATP acts as an extracellular signaling molecule in purinergic signaling that regulates vascular tone. ATP binds purinergic P2 nucleotide receptors on endothelial cells. Understanding the mass transport of ATP to endothelial cells by blood flow is thus important to predict functional changes in aneurysmal walls. While some clinical observations indicate a difference of wall pathology between ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, no study has focused on the mass transport in aneurysms. We investigated the characteristics of ATP concentration at aneurysmal wall using a numerical model of ATP transport in aneurysms formed at arterial bends. The magnitude of ATP concentration at the aneurysmal wall was significantly smaller than that at the arterial wall. In particular, significantly low concentration was predicted at the proximal side of the aneurysmal sac. A strong correlation was revealed between the inflow flux at the aneurysmal neck and the resultant concentration at the aneurysmal wall. PMID:20012692

  3. Unusual vascular events in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Fisher, C M

    1986-02-01

    There is an unusual type of vascular episode in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery which remains relatively unknown. Ten cases are presented in which a posterior cerebral artery deficit developed suddenly in dramatic fashion with headache, visual symptoms, sensory and motor deficits and signs of third nerve involvement. Nine of the patients were female and one was male. Seven were under the age of 33. In all instances there was a permanent neurologic sequela, usually a hemianopia. A similar case was described in 1901. The nature of the underlying process remains obscure, but the evidence favors accompanied migraine in which a particularly severe attack results in permanent damage. The term "catastrophic migraine" is suggested. PMID:3955450

  4. Monotherapy with stenting in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) after middle cerebral artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Puri, Ajit S; Gounis, Matthew J; Massari, Francesco; Howk, Mary; Weaver, John; Wakhloo, Ajay K

    2016-04-01

    Isolated middle cerebral artery dissection is a rare clinical entity, with descriptions limited to a few case reports and case series. Symptomatic dissection in the anterior circulation can present as an ischemic stroke in a young population; however, it is rarely associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe a young patient who presented with acute headache from a subarachnoid hemorrhage that was ultimately determined to be due to a vascular dissection in the middle cerebral artery. The initial angiogram showed vascular irregularities in this area with stenosis. Repeat imaging 4 days after presentation identified a pseudoaneurysm proximal to the stenosis. The patient was successfully treated with a self-expanding nitinol stent and followed up with serial angiography during postoperative recovery in the hospital; additional angiograms were performed approximately 1 and 6 months after treatment. Serial angiograms demonstrated incremental healing of the dissection. The patient was discharged and remains neurologically intact at the 6-month follow-up. PMID:25854687

  5. Apoptosis, paraptosis, necrosis, and cell regeneration in posttraumatic cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Danaila, L; Popescu, I; Pais, V; Riga, D; Riga, S; Pais, E

    2013-01-01

    This study is to understand the nature and functional significance of the activated cell death programs and rehabilitation signs during late vascular changes after brain injury. We used light and transmission electron microscopy to describe changes of cells within the vascular endothelium and tunica media of the cortical arteries four weeks after craniocerebral traumatism. Within tunica media of the posttraumatic damaged artery, apoptotic and paraptotic phenotypes were identified as well as some early ultrastructural signs of smooth muscle cells regeneration, these cell highlighting a remarkable degree of plasticity. Surprisingly, some endothelial cells showed an extensive rough endoplasmic reticulum development, whereas other endothelial cells showed typical necrosis. In conclusion, two groups of suicidal cells apoptotic and paraptotic cells were encountered in the same lesional vascular wall after neurotrauma, showing also signs of cell regeneration. The pathophysiologic significance of the coexisting double cell death programs and cell regeneration seems to be in relation with late cell survival, after arterial damage when some cells disappear and other cells try to survive undergoing reversible injury. PMID:23790779

  6. EP4 prostanoid receptor-mediated vasodilatation of human middle cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Richard J; Murdoch, Colin E; Ali, Mozam; Purbrick, Stuart; Ravid, Rivka; Baxter, Gordon S; Tilford, Nick; Sheldrick, Robert L G; Clark, Kenneth L; Coleman, Robert A

    2004-01-01

    Dilatation of the cerebral vasculature is recognised to be involved in the pathophysiology of migraine. Furthermore, elevated levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) occur in the blood, plasma and saliva of migraineurs during an attack, suggestive of a contributory role. In the present study, we have characterised the prostanoid receptors involved in the relaxation and contraction of human middle cerebral arteries in vitro. In the presence of indomethacin (3 μM) and the TP receptor antagonist GR32191 (1 μM), PGE2 was found to relax phenylephrine precontracted cerebral arterial rings in a concentration-dependent manner (mean pEC50 8.0±0.1, n=5). Establishment of a rank order of potency using the EP4>EP2 agonist 11-deoxy PGE1, and the EP2>EP4 agonist PGE1-OH (mean pEC50 of 7.6±0.1 (n=6) and 6.4±0.1 (n=4), respectively), suggested the presence of functional EP4 receptors. Furthermore, the selective EP2 receptor agonist butaprost at concentrations <1 μM failed to relax the tissues. Blockade of EP4 receptors with the EP4 receptor antagonists AH23848 and EP4A caused significant rightward displacements in PGE2 concentration–response curves, exhibiting pA2 and pKB values of 5.7±0.1, n=3, and 8.4, n=3, respectively. The IP receptor agonists iloprost and cicaprost relaxed phenylephrine precontracted cerebral arterial rings (mean pEC50 values 8.3±0.1 (n=4) and 8.1±0.1 (n=9), respectively). In contrast, the DP and FP receptor agonists PGD2 and PGF2α failed to cause appreciable relaxation or contraction at concentrations of up to 30 μM. In the absence of phenylephrine contraction and GR32191, the TP receptor agonist U46619 caused concentration-dependent contraction of cerebral artery (mean pEC50 7.4±0.3, n=3). These data demonstrate the presence of prostanoid EP4 receptors mediating PGE2 vasodilatation of human middle cerebral artery. IP receptors mediating relaxation and TP receptors mediating contraction were also functionally demonstrated. PMID:14744815

  7. Concurrent Ruptured Pseudoaneurysm of the Internal Carotid Artery and Cerebral Infarction as an Initial Manifestation of Polycythemia Vera

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyu-Sun; Ryu, Je-Il; Oh, Young-Ha

    2015-01-01

    The most common neurologic manifestations of polycythemia vera (PV) are cerebral infarction and transient ischemic attacks, while cerebral hemorrhage or intracranial dissection has been rarely associated with PV. Here we report the first case of a 59-year-old patient with intracranial supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection causing cerebral infarction and concomitant subarachnoid hemorrhage due to pseudoaneurysm rupture as clinical onset of PV. This case report discusses the possible mechanism and treatment of this extremely rare condition. PMID:26361530

  8. Localized TRPA1 channel Ca2+ signals stimulated by reactive oxygen species promote cerebral artery dilation

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Michelle N.; Gonzales, Albert L.; Pires, Paulo W.; Bruhl, Allison; Leo, M. Dennis; Li, Wencheng; Oulidi, Agathe; Boop, Frederick A.; Feng, Yumei; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Welsh, Donald G.; Earley, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can have divergent effects in cerebral and peripheral circulations. We found that Ca2+-permeable transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels were present and colocalized with NADPH (reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase 2 (NOX2), a major source of ROS, in the endothelium of cerebral arteries but not in other vascular beds. We recorded and characterized ROS-triggered Ca2+ signals representing Ca2+ influx through single TRPA1 channels, which we called “TRPA1 sparklets.” TRPA1 sparklet activity was low under basal conditions but was stimulated by NOX-generated ROS. Ca2+ entry during a single TRPA1 sparklet was twice that of a TRPV4 sparklet and ~200 times that of an L-type Ca2+ channel sparklet. TRPA1 sparklets representing the simultaneous opening of two TRPA1 channels were more common in endothelial cells than in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing TRPA1. The NOX-induced TRPA1 sparklets activated intermediate-conductance, Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels, resulting in smooth muscle hyperpolarization and vasodilation. NOX-induced activation of TRPA1 sparklets and vasodilation required generation of hydrogen peroxide and lipid-peroxidizing hydroxyl radicals as intermediates. 4-Hydroxy-nonenal, a metabolite of lipid peroxidation, also increased TRPA1 sparklet frequency and dilated cerebral arteries. These data suggest that in the cerebral circulation, lipid peroxidation metabolites generated by ROS activate Ca2+ influx through TRPA1 channels in the endothelium of cerebral arteries to cause dilation. PMID:25564678

  9. Perivascular Expression and Potent Vasoconstrictor Effect of Dynorphin A in Cerebral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Ruisanchez, Éva; Cselenyák, Attila; Papp, Rege Sugárka; Németh, Tamás; Káldi, Krisztina; Sándor, Péter; Benyó, Zoltán

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous literary data indicate that dynorphin A (DYN-A) has a significant impact on cerebral circulation, especially under pathophysiological conditions, but its potential direct influence on the tone of cerebral vessels is obscure. The aim of the present study was threefold: 1) to clarify if DYN-A is present in cerebral vessels, 2) to determine if it exerts any direct effect on cerebrovascular tone, and if so, 3) to analyze the role of κ-opiate receptors in mediating the effect. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the expression of DYN-A in perivascular nerves of rat pial arteries as well as in both rat and human intraparenchymal vessels of the cerebral cortex. In isolated rat basilar and middle cerebral arteries (BAs and MCAs) DYN-A (1–13) and DYN-A (1–17) but not DYN-A (1–8) or dynorphin B (DYN-B) induced strong vasoconstriction in micromolar concentrations. The maximal effects, compared to a reference contraction induced by 124 mM K+, were 115±6% and 104±10% in BAs and 113±3% and 125±9% in MCAs for 10 µM of DYN-A (1–13) and DYN-A (1–17), respectively. The vasoconstrictor effects of DYN-A (1–13) could be inhibited but not abolished by both the κ-opiate receptor antagonist nor-Binaltorphimine dihydrochloride (NORBI) and blockade of Gi/o-protein mediated signaling by pertussis toxin. Finally, des-Tyr1 DYN-A (2–13), which reportedly fails to activate κ-opiate receptors, induced vasoconstriction of 45±11% in BAs and 50±5% in MCAs at 10 µM, which effects were resistant to NORBI. Conclusion/Significance DYN-A is present in rat and human cerebral perivascular nerves and induces sustained contraction of rat cerebral arteries. This vasoconstrictor effect is only partly mediated by κ-opiate receptors and heterotrimeric Gi/o-proteins. To our knowledge our present findings are the first to indicate that DYN-A has a direct cerebral vasoconstrictor effect and that a dynorphin-induced vascular action may be

  10. Apixaban Inhibits Cerebral Microembolic Signals Derived from Carotid Arterial Thrombosis in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xueping; Wu, Weizhen; Chu, Lin; Gutstein, David E; Seiffert, Dietmar; Wang, Xinkang

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral microembolic signal (MES) is an independent predictor of stroke risk and prognosis. The objective of this study is to assess the effects of apixaban, as a representative of the novel oral anticoagulant class, on a rabbit model of cerebral MES. A clinical transcranial Doppler ultrasound instrument was used to assess MESs in the middle cerebral artery in a 30% FeCl3-induced carotid arterial thrombosis model in male New Zealand White rabbits. Ascending doses of apixaban were evaluated as monotherapy and in combination with aspirin on both arterial thrombosis and MES. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses were also evaluated. The effective dose for 50% inhibition (ED50) of thrombus formation for monotherapy was 0.04 mg/kg per hour apixaban, i.v. (0.03 μM plasma exposure) for the integrated blood flow, 0.13 mg/kg per hour apixaban (0.10 μM plasma exposure) for thrombus weight, and 0.03 mg/kg per hour apixaban (0.02 μM plasma exposure) for MES. Dual treatment with aspirin (5 mg/kg, PO) and apixaban (0.015 mg/kg per hour, i.v.) resulted in a significant reduction in cerebral MES (P < 0.05) compared with monotherapy with either agent. Pharmacokinetic analysis of apixaban and pharmacodynamic assays using activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) for apixaban- and arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation for aspirin were used to confirm the exposure-response relationships. In summary, our study demonstrates that apixaban in a concentration-dependent manner inhibits both arterial thrombosis and MES, suggesting a potential association between factor Xa (FXa) blockade and the reduction in MES in patients at risk of ischemic stroke. PMID:27384071

  11. Cerebral arterial gas embolism after pre-flight ingestion of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Smedley, Ben L; Gault, Alan; Gawthrope, Ian C

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) is a feared complication of ambient depressurisation and can also be a complication of hydrogen peroxide ingestion. We present an unusual case of CAGE in a 57-year-old woman exposed to both of these risk factors. We describe her subsequent successful treatment with hyperbaric oxygen, despite a 72-hour delay in initial presentation and diagnosis, and discuss the safety of aero-medical transfer following hydrogen peroxide ingestions. PMID:27335000

  12. Aortic emboli show surprising size dependent predilection for cerebral arteries: Results from computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Ian; Schwartz, Robert; Shadden, Shawn

    2012-11-01

    Cardiac emboli can have devastating consequences if they enter the cerebral circulation, and are the most common cause of embolic stroke. Little is known about relationships of embolic origin/density/size to cerebral events; as these relationships are difficult to observe. To better understand stoke risk from cardiac and aortic emboli, we developed a computational model to track emboli from the heart to the brain. Patient-specific models of the human aorta and arteries to the brain were derived from CT angiography from 10 MHIF patients. Blood flow was modeled by the Navier-Stokes equations using pulsatile inflow at the aortic valve, and physiologic Windkessel models at the outlets. Particulate was injected at the aortic valve and tracked using modified Maxey-Riley equations with a wall collision model. Results demonstrate aortic emboli that entered the cerebral circulation through the carotid or vertebral arteries were localized to specific locations of the proximal aorta. The percentage of released particles embolic to the brain markedly increased with particle size from 0 to ~1-1.5 mm in all patients. Larger particulate became less likely to traverse the cerebral vessels. These findings are consistent with sparse literature based on transesophageal echo measurements. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation, award number 1157041.

  13. Fully distributed absolute blood flow velocity measurement for middle cerebral arteries using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Li; Zhu, Jiang; Hancock, Aneeka M.; Dai, Cuixia; Zhang, Xuping; Frostig, Ron D.; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is considered one of the most promising functional imaging modalities for neuro biology research and has demonstrated the ability to quantify cerebral blood flow velocity at a high accuracy. However, the measurement of total absolute blood flow velocity (BFV) of major cerebral arteries is still a difficult problem since it is related to vessel geometry. In this paper, we present a volumetric vessel reconstruction approach that is capable of measuring the absolute BFV distributed along the entire middle cerebral artery (MCA) within a large field-of-view. The Doppler angle at each point of the MCA, representing the vessel geometry, is derived analytically by localizing the artery from pure DOCT images through vessel segmentation and skeletonization. Our approach could achieve automatic quantification of the fully distributed absolute BFV across different vessel branches. Experiments on rodents using swept-source optical coherence tomography showed that our approach was able to reveal the consequences of permanent MCA occlusion with absolute BFV measurement. PMID:26977365

  14. Fully distributed absolute blood flow velocity measurement for middle cerebral arteries using Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Qi, Li; Zhu, Jiang; Hancock, Aneeka M; Dai, Cuixia; Zhang, Xuping; Frostig, Ron D; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-02-01

    Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is considered one of the most promising functional imaging modalities for neuro biology research and has demonstrated the ability to quantify cerebral blood flow velocity at a high accuracy. However, the measurement of total absolute blood flow velocity (BFV) of major cerebral arteries is still a difficult problem since it is related to vessel geometry. In this paper, we present a volumetric vessel reconstruction approach that is capable of measuring the absolute BFV distributed along the entire middle cerebral artery (MCA) within a large field-of-view. The Doppler angle at each point of the MCA, representing the vessel geometry, is derived analytically by localizing the artery from pure DOCT images through vessel segmentation and skeletonization. Our approach could achieve automatic quantification of the fully distributed absolute BFV across different vessel branches. Experiments on rodents using swept-source optical coherence tomography showed that our approach was able to reveal the consequences of permanent MCA occlusion with absolute BFV measurement. PMID:26977365

  15. Selective accumulation of aluminum in cerebral arteries in Alzheimer's disease (AD).

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Surjyadipta; Zhao, Yuhai; Hill, James M; Culicchia, Frank; Kruck, Theodore P A; Percy, Maire E; Pogue, Aileen I; Walton, J R; Lukiw, Walter J

    2013-09-01

    Once biologically available aluminum bypasses gastrointestinal and blood-brain barriers, this environmentally-abundant neurotoxin has an exceedingly high affinity for the large pyramidal neurons of the human brain hippocampus. This same anatomical region of the brain is also targeted by the earliest evidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. The mechanism for the selective targeting and transport of aluminum into the hippocampus of the human brain is not well understood. In an effort to improve our understanding of a pathological aluminum entry system into the brain, this study examined the aluminum content of 8 arteries that supply blood to the hippocampus, including the aorta and several cerebral arteries. In contrast to age-matched controls, in AD patients we found a gradient of increasing aluminum concentration from the aorta to the posterior cerebral artery that supplies blood to the hippocampus. Primary cultures of human brain endothelial cells were found to have an extremely high affinity for aluminum when compared to other types of brain cells. Together, these results suggest for the first time that endothelial cells that line the cerebral vasculature may have biochemical attributes conducive to binding and targeting aluminum to selective anatomical regions of the brain, such as the hippocampus, with potential downstream pro-inflammatory and pathogenic consequences. PMID:23764827

  16. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Stimulates Production of Prostacyclin in Cerebral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Anantha Vijay R.; Smith, Leslie A.; Katusic, Zvonimir S.

    2009-01-01

    Background The role of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and its receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), in control of cerebral circulation is poorly understood. The present study was designed to investigate the cerebral vascular effects of BDNF in vivo. Methods Replication incompetent adenovirus encoding either rat BDNF (AdBDNF) or green fluorescent protein (AdGFP) was injected intracisternally into rabbits. Forty eight hours later, animals were euthanized. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of BDNF were measured by ELISA, vasomotor function of isolated basilar arteries was studied in organ chambers, protein expression in the basilar arteries was studied by Western blotting, prostanoid levels measured by ELISA and cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Results The levels of BDNF in the CSF were significantly elevated in AdBDNF-treated rabbits as compared to AdGFP-treated rabbits (37 ± 5 ng/ml vs. 0.006 ± 0.003 ng/ml, respectively, P<0.05, n=14). Western blotting studies revealed that in basilar arteries AdBDNF increased protein expression of prostacyclin (PGI2) synthase, while expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated (Ser 1177) eNOS remained unchanged. During incubation with arachidonic acid (1 μmol/L), PGI2 production and levels of cyclic AMP were significantly elevated only in AdBDNF-treated rabbit basilar arteries (P<0.05, n=6). Relaxations to acetylcholine (10−9 to 10−5 mol/L) and arachidonic acid (10−9 to 10−5 mol/L) were significantly potentiated in basilar arteries from rabbits injected with AdBDNF. Potentiation of relaxations to acetylcholine in AdBDNF-treated basilar arteries was inhibited by the non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (10−5 mol/l, P<0.05, n=6) and constitutive phospholipase A2 inhibitor, AACOCF3 (2 × 10−5 mol/L, P<0.05, n=5). Conclusion Our results demonstrate that in cerebral arteries, BDNF

  17. Tirofiban combined with urokinase selective intra-arterial thrombolysis for the treatment of middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    FENG, LEI; LIU, JUN; LIU, YUNZHEN; CHEN, JIAN; SU, CHUNHAI; LV, CHUANFENG; WEI, YUZHEN

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to establish a model of embolic stroke in rabbits and to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intra-arterially administered tirofiban combined with urokinase thrombolysis. The middle cerebral artery occlusion model (MCAO) of embolic stroke was established in New Zealand rabbits via an autologous clot. The model rabbits were allocated at random into four groups: Tirofiban group (T group), urokinase group (UK group), tirofiban and urokinase group (T + UK group) and the control group (C group). The recanalization rate, relative-apparent diffusion coefficient (rADC) and neurological function deficit score (NFDS) values were compared among the four groups. The recanalization rate, rADC and NFDS values were improved in the T + UK group compared with the other groups. In summary, the intra-arterial administration of tirofiban combined with urokinase thrombolysis was a more effective intervention in an MCAO model compared with intra-arterial urokinase alone, and may promote reperfusion and reduce infarct volume. PMID:26998029

  18. Triptan-induced contractile (5-HT1B receptor) responses in human cerebral and coronary arteries: relationship to clinical effect.

    PubMed

    Edvinsson, Lars; Uddman, Erik; Wackenfors, Angelica; Davenport, Anthony; Longmore, Jenny; Malmsjö, Malin

    2005-09-01

    Triptans are agonists at 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D (where 5-HT is 5-hydroxytryptamine; serotonin) receptors and cause vasoconstriction of isolated blood vessels. The aim of the present study was to determine vasoconstrictor potency (EC50) of triptans in human coronary and cerebral arteries and to examine whether there was any relationship with the maximal plasma concentrations (Cmax; nM) of the drugs achieved following oral administration of clinically relevant doses to man using values reported in the literature. We also examined the expression of 5-HT1B receptors in atherosclerotic and normal coronary arteries. The vasocontractile responses to sumatriptan, rizatriptan or eletriptan were characterized by in vitro pharmacology. The ratio of Cmax/EC50 was calculated. 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors were visualized by immunohistochemical techniques in coronary arteries. Sumatriptan, rizatriptan and eletriptan were powerful vasoconstrictors in cerebral artery. The rank order of agonist potency was eletriptan=rizatriptan=sumatriptan. In the coronary artery, the triptans were weaker vasoconstrictors. The rank order of potency was similar. In cerebral artery the ratio of Cmax/EC50 was not significantly different from unity, indicating a relationship between these two parameters. In general for the coronary artery, the ratios were significantly less than unity, indicating no direct relationship. Immunohistochemistry showed expression of 5-HT1B receptors in the medial layer, but did not reveal any obvious difference in 5-HT1B receptor expression between normal and atherosclerotic coronary arteries. The results support the notion that triptans are selective vasoconstrictors of cerebral arteries over coronary arteries and that there is a relationship between vasoconstrictor potency in cerebral arteries and clinically relevant plasma levels. PMID:15853772

  19. H2S induces vasoconstriction of rat cerebral arteries via cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Lei; Mi, Yan-Ni; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2015-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), traditionally known for its toxic effects, is now involved in regulating vascular tone. Here we investigated the vasoconstrictive effect of H2S on cerebral artery and the underlying mechanism. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H2S, concentration-dependently induced vasoconstriction on basilar artery, which was enhanced in the presence of isoprenaline, a β-adrenoceptor agonist or forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator. Administration of NaHS attenuated the vasorelaxant effects of isoprenaline or forskolin. Meanwhile, the NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was diminished in the presence of 8B-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, but was not affected by Bay K-8644, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel agonist. These results could be explained by the revised effects of NaHS on isoprenaline-induced cAMP elevation and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity. Additionally, NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was enhanced by removing the endothelium or in the presence of L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. L-NAME only partially attenuated the effect of NaHS which was given together with forskolin on the pre-contracted artery. In conclusion, H2S induces vasoconstriction of cerebral artery via, at least in part, cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway. PMID:26524654

  20. Multiple cerebral artery occlusion due to non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis: an autopsy case report.

    PubMed

    Nagakane, Yoshinari; Takezawa, Hidesato; Katsura, Kanade; Yamamoto, Yasumasa

    2016-03-30

    A 60-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of vertigo and repeated vomiting, which suddenly occurred 25 hours before admission. Neurologic examination revealed Wallenberg syndrome on the left side, and brain MRI showed acute infarcts in the left lateral medulla as well as in the left internal carotid artery (ICA) territory. MR angiography did not depict the left vertebral artery (VA) and the left ICA. Despite antithrombotic treatment, he developed bulbar palsy, and then, brain herniation due to infarct growth in the left middle cerebral artery territory. He died on day 9. Histopathlogical examination found verruca involving the mitral leaflet, which was consistent with non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE). Atherosclerosis was also found in the systemic arteries, and there was sclerotic stenosis with calcification at the portion of piercing dulla matter in the left VA and at the cavernous segment of the left ICA. Because the cerebral emboli in the narrowed lumen presented a histologic appearance similar to that of the verruca, the diagnosis of brain embolism due to NBTE was confirmed. PMID:26960272

  1. Protective effects of allicin against ischemic stroke in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Benping; Li, Feng; Zhao, Weijiang; Li, Jiebing; Li, Qingsong; Wang, Weizhi

    2015-09-01

    Allicin, a molecule predominantly responsible for the pungent odor and the antibiotic function of garlic, exhibits various pharmacological activities and has been suggested to be beneficial in the treatment of various disorders. The present study aimed to elucidate the effect of allicin in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Rats were subjected to 1.5 h of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), followed by 24 h of reperfusion. Rats were randomly assigned to the sham surgery group, the MCAO group and the MCAO + allicin group. Neurological score, cerebral infarct size, brain water content, neuronal apoptosis, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were measured. The results suggested that allicin reduced cerebral infarction area, brain water content, neuronal apoptosis, TNF‑α levels and MPO activity in the serum. The results of the present study indicated that allicin protects the brain from cerebral I/R injury, which may be ascribed to its anti‑apoptotic and anti‑inflammatory effects. PMID:26045182

  2. Cerebral autoregulation and brain networks in occlusive processes of the internal carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Avirame, Keren; Lesemann, Anne; List, Jonathan; Witte, Anja Veronica; Schreiber, Stephan Joachim; Flöel, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Patients with unilateral occlusive processes of the internal carotid artery (ICA) show subtle cognitive deficits. Decline in cerebral autoregulation and in functional and structural integrity of brain networks have previously been reported in the affected hemisphere (AH). However, the association between cerebral autoregulation, brain networks, and cognition remains to be elucidated. Fourteen neurologically asymptomatic patients (65±11 years) with either ICA occlusion or high-grade ICA stenosis and 11 age-matched healthy controls (HC) (67±6 years) received neuropsychologic testing, transcranial Doppler sonography to assess cerebral autoregulation using vasomotor reactivity (VMR), and magnetic resonance imaging to probe white matter microstructure and resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC). Patients performed worse on memory and executive tasks when compared with controls. Vasomotor reactivity, white matter microstructure, and RSFC were lower in the AH of the patients when compared with the unaffected hemisphere and with controls. Lower VMR of the AH was associated with several ipsilateral clusters of lower white matter microstructure and lower bilateral RSFC in patients. No correlations were found between VMR and cognitive scores. In sum, impaired cerebral autoregulation was associated with reduced structural and functional connectivity in cerebral networks, indicating possible mechanisms by which severe unilateral occlusive processes of the ICA lead to cognitive decline. PMID:25388676

  3. Carvacrol Exerts Neuroprotective Effects Via Suppression of the Inflammatory Response in Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenlan; Hua, Cong; Pan, Xiaoqiang; Fu, Xijia; Wu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that inflammation plays an important role in cerebral ischemia. Carvacrol, a monoterpenic phenol, is naturally occurring in various plants belonging to the family Lamiaceae and exerts protective effects in a mice model of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by reducing infarct volume and decreasing the expression of cleaved caspase-3. However, the anti-inflammatory mechanisms by which carvacrol protect the brain have yet to be fully elucidated. We investigated the effects of carvacrol on inflammatory reaction and inflammatory mediators in middle cerebral artery occlusion rats. The results of the present study showed that carvacrol inhibited the levels of inflammatory cytokines and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, as well as the expression of iNOS and COX-2. It also increased SOD activity and decreased MDA level in ischemic cortical tissues. In addition, carvacrol treatment suppressed the ischemia/reperfusion-induced increase in the protein expression of nuclear NF-kB p65. In conclusion, we have shown that carvacrol inhibits the inflammatory response via inhibition of the NF-kB signaling pathway in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Therefore, carvacrol may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of cerebral ischemia injury. PMID:27324156

  4. Effects of GSM 900 MHz on middle cerebral artery blood flow assessed by transcranial Doppler sonography.

    PubMed

    Ghosn, Rania; Thuróczy, György; Loos, Nathalie; Brenet-Dufour, Valérie; Liabeuf, Sophie; de Seze, René; Selmaoui, Brahim

    2012-12-01

    Mobile phone use has increased worldwide but its possible effects on the brain remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of acute exposure to a radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF EMF) generated by a mobile phone operating in the Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) 900 MHz on cerebral blood flow. Twenty-nine volunteers attended two experimental sessions: a sham exposure session and a real exposure session in a cross-over double-blind study in which a mobile phone was positioned on the left side of the head. In one session, the mobile phone was operated without RF radiation (sham phone) and in the other study it was operated with RF radiation (real phone) for 20 min. Thus, each subject served as its own control. Middle cerebral artery blood flow was monitored noninvasively by transcranial Doppler sonography to measure middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity. Pulsatility index and resistance index were also evaluated. A voluntary breath holding physiological test was carried out as a positive control for testing cerebral vasoreactivity. Hemodynamic variables were recorded and analyzed before, during and after mobile phone exposure. No significant changes were detected in studied variables in middle cerebral arteries during sham or real exposure. In the exposed side the cerebral blood flow velocity, the pulsatility index and the resistance index during sham and real exposure were respectively: [61.9 ± 1.3, 61.7 ± 1.3 cm/s (P = 0.89)]; [0.93 ± 0.03, 0.90 ± 0.02 (P = 0.84)] and [0.58 ± 0.01, 0.58 ± 0.01 (P = 0.96)] at baseline; and [60.6 ± 1.3, 62 ± 1.6 cm/s (P = 0.40)]; [0.91 ± 0.03, 0.87 ± 0.03 (P = 0.97)]; [0.57 ± 0.01, 0.56 ± 0.01 (P = 0.82)] after 20 min of exposure. Twenty minutes of RF exposure to a mobile phone does not seem to affect the cerebral circulation. PMID:23106209

  5. Effect of subarachnoid hemorrhage on contractile responses and noradrenaline release evoked in cat cerebral arteries by histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Lobato, R.D.; Marin, J.; Salaices, M.; Rico, M.L.; Sanchez, C.F.

    1981-10-01

    This study analyzes the changes induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on the contractile responses and the noradrenaline release evoked in cat cerebral arteries by histamine. The dose-dependent vasoconstriction induced by histamine on the cerebral arteries of normal cats was significantly reduced by diphenhydramine and phentolamine. When SAH was produced 3 and 7 days before the experiment, the histamine-induced vasoconstriction also decreased. Thereafter, a tendency to normalization in the contractile vascular responses was observed such that in 15 days after the hemorrhage it was not significantly different from that found in controls animals. The decrease in the contractile responses to histamine provoked by SAH was similar to that seen after pretreatment with intracisternal injections of 6-hydroxydopamine. The amount of radioactivity released by histamine following preincubation with /sup 3/H-noradrenaline from the cerebral arteries of cats exposed to SAH 3, 7, and 15 days before the experiment was significantly reduced when compared with controls. Moreover, the basal level of tritium release and the radioactivity retained at the end of the experiment were also decreased after SAH. Results indicate histamine releases noradrenaline from cat cerebral arteries, and SAH produce a transient denervation of the perivascular adrenergic nerve endings, which explained by the impairment of the indirect adrenergic mechanism involved in the overall contractile response elicited by this amine in cerebral arteries. Histamine does not seem to play a significant role in the production of the cerebral vasospasm occurring after SAH.

  6. Patient-specific computer modeling of blood flow in cerebral arteries with aneurysm and stent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Schjodt, Kathleen; Puntel, Anthony; Kostov, Nikolay; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2012-12-01

    We present the special arterial fluid mechanics techniques we have developed for patient-specific computer modeling of blood flow in cerebral arteries with aneurysm and stent. These techniques are used in conjunction with the core computational technique, which is the space-time version of the variational multiscale (VMS) method and is called "DST/SST-VMST." The special techniques include using NURBS for the spatial representation of the surface over which the stent mesh is built, mesh generation techniques for both the finite- and zero-thickness representations of the stent, techniques for generating refined layers of mesh near the arterial and stent surfaces, and models for representing double stent. We compute the unsteady flow patterns in the aneurysm and investigate how those patterns are influenced by the presence of single and double stents. We also compare the flow patterns obtained with the finite- and zero-thickness representations of the stent.

  7. Sudden cerebral infarction after interventional vertebral artery embolism for vertebral artery injury during removal of C1-C2 pedicle screw fixation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Liu, Hao; Ma, Litai; Zeng, Jiancheng; Song, Yueming; Xie, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral artery injury (VAI) is a rare but serious complication of cervical spine surgery. Instrumented posterior surgery of the upper cervical spine places the vertebral artery at the highest risk of injury. However, VAI during removal of cervical internal fixation is really rare and unexpected. We present a case of 52-year-old male patient who suffered VAI during removal of C1-C2 pedicle screw fixation. An interventional vertebral artery embolism was performed and the patient suffered a sudden cerebral infarction one day after interventional vertebral artery embolism. From this case, removal of upper cervical pedicle screws of malposition is not recommended if it is not really necessary for some other reasons. Interventional vertebral artery embolism is an effective and less invasive procedure than open ligation surgery in the treatment of haemorrhage resulted from VAI but potential risk of cerebral infarction should not be ignored. PMID:26629224

  8. Measurement of Absolute Arterial Cerebral Blood Volume in Human Brain Without Using a Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jun; Qin, Qin; Pekar, James J.; van Zijl, Peter C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Arterial cerebral blood volume (CBVa) is a vital indicator of tissue perfusion and vascular reactivity. We extended the recently developed inflow vascular-space-occupancy (iVASO) MRI technique, which uses spatially selective inversion to suppress the signal from blood flowing into a slice, with a control scan to measure absolute CBVa using CSF for signal normalization. Images were acquired at multiple blood nulling times to account for the heterogeneity of arterial transit times across the brain, from which both CBVa and arterial transit times were quantified. Arteriolar CBVa was determined separately by incorporating velocity-dependent bipolar crusher gradients. Gray matter CBVa values (n = 11) were 2.04 ± 0.27 and 0.76 ± 0.17 ml blood/100 ml tissue without and with crusher gradients (b = 1.8 s/mm2), respectively. Arterial transit times were 671 ± 43 and 785 ± 69 ms, respectively. The arterial origin of the signal was validated by measuring its T2, which was within arterial range. The proposed approach does not require exogenous contrast agent administration, and provides a noninvasive alternative to existing blood volume techniques for mapping absolute CBVa in studies of brain physiology and neurovascular diseases. PMID:21608057

  9. Influence of muscle metaboreceptor stimulation on middle cerebral artery blood velocity in humans.

    PubMed

    Braz, Igor D; Scott, Clare; Simpson, Lydia L; Springham, Emma L; Tan, Beverly W L; Balanos, George M; Fisher, James P

    2014-11-01

    Regional anaesthesia to attenuate skeletal muscle afferent feedback abolishes the exercise-induced increase in middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean). However, such exercise-related increases in cerebral perfusion are not preserved during post exercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI) where the activation of metabolically sensitive muscle afferents is isolated. We tested the hypothesis that a hyperventilation-mediated decrease in the arterial partial pressure of CO2, hence cerebral vasoconstriction, masks the influence of muscle metaboreceptor stimulation on MCA Vmean during PEMI. Ten healthy men (20 ± 1 years old) performed two trials of fatiguing isometric hand-grip exercise followed by PEMI, in control conditions and with end-tidal CO2 (P ET ,CO2) clamped at ∼1 mmHg above the resting partial pressure. In the control trial, P ET ,CO2 decreased from rest during hand-grip exercise and PEMI, while MCA Vmean was unchanged from rest. By design, P ET ,CO2 remained unchanged from rest throughout the clamp trial, while MCA Vmean increased during hand-grip (+10.6 ±1.8 cm s(-1)) and PEMI (+9.2 ± 1.6 cm s(-1); P < 0.05 versus rest and control trial). Increases in minute ventilation and mean arterial pressure during hand-grip and PEMI were not different in the control and P ET ,CO2 clamp trials (P > 0.05). These findings indicate that metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents play an important role in the regional increase in cerebral perfusion observed in exercise, but that influence can be masked by a decrease in P ET ,CO2 when they are activated in isolation during PEMI. PMID:25217497

  10. Efficacy of Solitaire™ Stent Arterial Embolectomy in Treating Acute Cardiogenic Cerebral Embolism in 17 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Maolin; He, Wenqin; Dai, Weizheng; Ye, Yingan; Ruan, Zhifang; Wang, Shuanghu; Xie, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    Background Thrombolysis with rtPA is the only accepted drug therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Since acute cerebral stroke is so pervasive, newly developed recanalization methods have the potential for wide-ranging impacts on patient health and safety. We explored the efficacy and safety of Solitaire stent arterial embolectomy in the treatment of acute cardiogenic cerebral embolism. Material/Methods Between October 2012 and June 2015, 17 patients underwent Solitaire stent arterial embolectomy, either alone or in combination with rtPA intravenous thrombolysis, to treat acute cardiogenic cerebral embolism. Sheath placement time, vascular recanalization time, number of embolectomy attempts, and IV rtPA dose and time were recorded. Success and safety of the recanalization procedure, as well as clinical outcomes, were assessed. These results were compared to 16 control patients who were treated using only rtPA IV thrombolysis. Results Full recanalization of the occluded arteries was achieved in 15 (88.2%) of the Solitaire stent patients. NIH Stroke Scale scores of embolectomy patients improved by an average of 12.59±8.24 points between admission and discharge, compared to 5.56±5.96 in the control group (P<0.05). Glasgow Coma Score improvement between admission and discharge was also significantly higher in the embolectomy group (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, high perfusion encephalopathy, incidence of hernia, or mortality between the 2 groups (P>0.05). Conclusions Solitaire stent embolectomy is a safe and effective alternative to simple venous thrombolytic therapy, and it can significantly improve short-term neurological function and long-term prognosis in acute cardiogenic cerebral embolism. PMID:27090916

  11. Calibrated MRI to evaluate cerebral hemodynamics in patients with an internal carotid artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    De Vis, Jill B; Petersen, Esben T; Bhogal, Alex; Hartkamp, Nolan S; Klijn, Catharina JM; Kappelle, L J; Hendrikse, J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether calibrated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can identify regional variances in cerebral hemodynamics caused by vascular disease. For this, arterial spin labeling (ASL)/blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI was performed in 11 patients (65±7 years) and 14 controls (66±4 years). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), ASL cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), BOLD CVR, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) were evaluated. The CBF was 34±5 and 36±11 mL/100 g per minute in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory of the patients and the controls. Arterial spin labeling CVR was 44±20 and 53±10% per 10 mm Hg ▵EtCO2 in patients and controls. The BOLD CVR was lower in the patients compared with the controls (1.3±0.8 versus 2.2±0.4% per 10 mm Hg ▵EtCO2, P<0.01). The OEF was 41±8% and 38±6%, and the CMRO2 was 116±39 and 111±40 μmol/100 g per minute in the patients and the controls. The BOLD CVR was lower in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral MCA territory of the patients (1.2±0.6 versus 1.6±0.5% per 10 mmHg ▵EtCO2, P<0.01). Analysis was hampered in three patients due to delayed arrival time. Thus, regional hemodynamic impairment was identified with calibrated MRI. Delayed arrival artifacts limited the interpretation of the images in some patients. PMID:25712500

  12. Acute middle cerebral artery occlusion: reappraisal of the role of endovascular revascularization.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E

    2013-02-01

    Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was the first successful stroke therapy in acute ischaemic stroke, after innumerable failed attempts at neuroprotection and neurorestoration. However, intravenous tissue type plasminogen activator has been shown to be effective in recanalizing middle cerebral artery occlusions in only about one-third of cases. The natural history of untreated acute middle cerebral artery occlusion is poor, leading to long-term disability in >70% and mortality in 20%. Recanalization alone is not the name of the game. Only timely, very rapid recanalization, achieved within minutes or at most a few hours after stroke has occurred, before irreversible brain damage develops, is effective. Is intravenous tissue type plasminogen activator the best available option we have for these patients? With recently introduced stent-based thrombectomy devices, neurointerventionalists have achieved complete recanalization rates of more than 90% in middle cerebral artery and 'T' occlusions, with a mean procedural recanalization time of less than one-hour and negligible complication rates. More than 80% of patients less than 80 years of age who were treated within eight-hours after stroke onset in our centre achieved a modified Rankin score of 0-2 at three-month follow-up. The site of arterial occlusion is a factor driving the choice between a standard intravenous tissue type plasminogen activator protocol and an alternative intervention such as intravenous and/or mechanical thrombolysis to achieve early recanalization. The role of intravenous tissue type plasminogen activator must be redefined in major occlusions, and the indications for endovascular therapy must also be reappraised. PMID:23336262

  13. A rare association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula with venous aneurysm and contralateral flow-related middle cerebral artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Harle, Robin A

    2013-01-01

    The association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) and ipsilateral flow related aneurysm has infrequently been reported. We describe a male patient who presented with an acute haemorrhagic stroke and was found to have a large right fronto-parietal intra-parenchymal haemorrhage from the ruptured Borden type II DAVF in addition to a large venous aneurysm and a flow related intraosseous aneurysm of the contralateral middle meningeal artery (MMA) all clearly delineated by CT and DSA. He underwent emergency stereotactic evacuation of the intraparenchymal haemorrhage and successful surgical treatment of all the vascular lesions at the same time with residual neurological deficit. To our knowledge, this is the first such reported case. We discuss the challenging surgical treatment, emphasising the role of CT/DSA in management, and provide a literature review. PMID:24051149

  14. A rare association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula with venous aneurysm and contralateral flow-related middle cerebral artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Harle, Robin A

    2013-01-01

    The association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) and ipsilateral flow related aneurysm has infrequently been reported. We describe a male patient who presented with an acute haemorrhagic stroke and was found to have a large right fronto-parietal intra-parenchymal haemorrhage from the ruptured Borden type II DAVF in addition to a large venous aneurysm and a flow related intraosseous aneurysm of the contralateral middle meningeal artery (MMA) all clearly delineated by CT and DSA. He underwent emergency stereotactic evacuation of the intraparenchymal haemorrhage and successful surgical treatment of all the vascular lesions at the same time with residual neurological deficit. To our knowledge, this is the first such reported case. We discuss the challenging surgical treatment, emphasising the role of CT/DSA in management, and provide a literature review. PMID:24051149

  15. Pulsed arterial spin labeling effectively and dynamically observes changes in cerebral blood flow after mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shu-ping; Li, Yi-ning; Liu, Jun; Wang, Zhi-yuan; Zhang, Zi-shu; Zhou, Shun-ke; Tao, Fang-xu; Zhang, Zhi-xue

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow is strongly associated with brain function, and is the main symptom and diagnostic basis for a variety of encephalopathies. However, changes in cerebral blood flow after mild traumatic brain injury remain poorly understood. This study sought to observe changes in cerebral blood flow in different regions after mild traumatic brain injury using pulsed arterial spin labeling. Our results demonstrate maximal cerebral blood flow in gray matter and minimal in the white matter of patients with mild traumatic brain injury. At the acute and subacute stages, cerebral blood flow was reduced in the occipital lobe, parietal lobe, central region, subcutaneous region, and frontal lobe. Cerebral blood flow was restored at the chronic stage. At the acute, subacute, and chronic stages, changes in cerebral blood flow were not apparent in the insula. Cerebral blood flow in the temporal lobe and limbic lobe diminished at the acute and subacute stages, but was restored at the chronic stage. These findings suggest that pulsed arterial spin labeling can precisely measure cerebral blood flow in various brain regions, and may play a reference role in evaluating a patient's condition and judging prognosis after traumatic brain injury. PMID:27073378

  16. Transneuronal Degeneration of Thalamic Nuclei following Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Postinfarction transneuronal degeneration refers to secondary neuronal death that occurs within a few days to weeks following the disruption of input or output to synapsed neurons sustaining ischemic insults. The thalamus receives its blood supply from the posterior circulation; however, infarctions of the middle cerebral arterial may cause secondary transneuronal degeneration in the thalamus. In this study, we presented the areas of ischemia and associated transneuronal degeneration following MCAo in a rat model. Materials and Methods. Eighteen 12-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive middle cerebral artery occlusion surgery for 1, 7, and 14 days. Cerebral atrophy was assessed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium hydrochloride staining. Postural reflex and open field tests were performed prior to animal sacrifice to assess the effects of occlusion on behavior. Results. Myelin loss was observed at the lesion site following ischemia. Gliosis was also observed in thalamic regions 14 days following occlusion. Differential degrees of increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression were observed at each stage of infarction. Increases in myelin basic protein levels were also observed in the 14-day group. Conclusion. The present rat model of ischemia provides evidence of transneuronal degeneration within the first 14 days of occlusion. The observed changes in protein expression may be associated with self-repair mechanisms in the damaged brain. PMID:27597962

  17. A completely thrombosed, nongiant middle cerebral artery aneurysm mimicking an intra-axial neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Eckardt, Gerald; Gelsomino, Michael; Shabani, Saman; Brown, W. Douglas; Mueller, Wade; Pollock, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Few reports exist regarding thrombosed aneurysms where the initial work up was concerning for a neoplasm. To date, no published reports exist regarding a nongiant thrombosed middle cerebral artery aneurysm, where the primary workup and treatment plan was directed toward a preliminary diagnosis of intra-axial neoplasm. Case Description: We report a 43-year-old female who presented with a generalized tonic-clonic seizure attributed to a lesion along the right superior temporal gyrus. The lesion enhanced on initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, as well as on follow-up MRI. Subsequent vascular studies and metastatic work up were negative. A craniotomy with image guidance was performed and an intraoperative diagnosis was made of a thrombosed aneurysm along a branch of the middle cerebral artery. The aneurysm was trapped and resected as there was no significant flow from the branch as seen on the prior cerebral angiogram. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. Conclusion: Completely thrombosed, nongiant aneurysms can mimic an intra-axial neoplasm. Typical imaging features for thrombosed aneurysms may be missed, especially if the aneurysms are small, where imaging characteristics of the intraluminal contents is more difficult to appreciate. Although imaging may be consistent with a neoplastic lesion, there should be suspicion for a potential underlying aneurysm. PMID:26425396

  18. Multiple Cerebral Infarctions due to Unilateral Traumatic Vertebral Artery Dissection after Cervical Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang-Youl; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of multiple symptomatic cerebral infarctions from a traumatic vertebral artery dissection (VAD) after cervical fractures. A 73-year-old man was admitted with stuporous mentality and left hemiparesis after a motor-vehicle accident. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan at admission showed a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage on the left parietal lobe. A cervical CT scan showed left lateral mass fractures on C2, C5, and C6, involving the transverse foramen. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed loss of signal void on the left vertebral artery. Neck CT angiography showed left VAD starting at the C5 level. Brain MRI revealed acute, multiple cerebral infarctions involving the pons, midbrain, thalamus, corpus callosum, and parietal and frontal lobes on diffusion weighted images. The patient was treated conservatively at the intensive care unit in the acute stage to prevent extent of stroke. Aspirin was started for antiplatelet therapy in the chronic stage. The possibility of symptomatic cerebral infarctions due to traumatic VAD following cervical fracture should be considered. PMID:27182500

  19. Metabolic syndrome impairs reactivity and wall mechanics of cerebral resistance arteries in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Steven D; DeVallance, Evan; d'Audiffret, Alexandre C; Frisbee, Stephanie J; Tabone, Lawrence E; Shrader, Carl D; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Chantler, Paul D

    2015-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent in the North American population and is associated with increased risk for development of cerebrovascular disease. This study determined the structural and functional changes in the middle cerebral arteries (MCA) during the progression of MetS and the effects of chronic pharmacological interventions on mitigating vascular alterations in obese Zucker rats (OZR), a translationally relevant model of MetS. The reactivity and wall mechanics of ex vivo pressurized MCA from lean Zucker rats (LZR) and OZR were determined at 7-8, 12-13, and 16-17 wk of age under control conditions and following chronic treatment with pharmacological agents targeting specific systemic pathologies. With increasing age, control OZR demonstrated reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired dilator (acetylcholine) reactivity, elevated myogenic properties, structural narrowing, and wall stiffening compared with LZR. Antihypertensive therapy (e.g., captopril or hydralazine) starting at 7-8 wk of age blunted the progression of arterial stiffening compared with OZR controls, while treatments that reduced inflammation and oxidative stress (e.g., atorvastatin, rosiglitazone, and captopril) improved NO bioavailability and vascular reactivity compared with OZR controls and had mixed effects on structural remodeling. These data identify specific functional and structural cerebral adaptations that limit cerebrovascular blood flow in MetS patients, contributing to increased risk of cognitive decline, cerebral hypoperfusion, and ischemic stroke; however, these pathological adaptations could potentially be blunted if treated early in the progression of MetS. PMID:26475592

  20. Transneuronal Degeneration of Thalamic Nuclei following Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jen; Cherng, Juin-Hong; Wang, Ding-Han; Yu, Shu-Ping; Liou, Nien-Hsien; Hsu, Ming-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Postinfarction transneuronal degeneration refers to secondary neuronal death that occurs within a few days to weeks following the disruption of input or output to synapsed neurons sustaining ischemic insults. The thalamus receives its blood supply from the posterior circulation; however, infarctions of the middle cerebral arterial may cause secondary transneuronal degeneration in the thalamus. In this study, we presented the areas of ischemia and associated transneuronal degeneration following MCAo in a rat model. Materials and Methods. Eighteen 12-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive middle cerebral artery occlusion surgery for 1, 7, and 14 days. Cerebral atrophy was assessed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium hydrochloride staining. Postural reflex and open field tests were performed prior to animal sacrifice to assess the effects of occlusion on behavior. Results. Myelin loss was observed at the lesion site following ischemia. Gliosis was also observed in thalamic regions 14 days following occlusion. Differential degrees of increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression were observed at each stage of infarction. Increases in myelin basic protein levels were also observed in the 14-day group. Conclusion. The present rat model of ischemia provides evidence of transneuronal degeneration within the first 14 days of occlusion. The observed changes in protein expression may be associated with self-repair mechanisms in the damaged brain. PMID:27597962

  1. Endovascular Stenting under Cardiac and Cerebral Protection for Subclavian Steal after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Due to Right Subclavian Artery Origin Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Okazaki, Takahito; Ichinose, Nobuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2015-03-01

    Coronary-subclavian steal (CSS) can occur after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using the internal thoracic artery (ITA). Subclavian artery (SA) stenosis proximal to the ITA graft causes CSS. We describe a technique for cardiac and cerebral protection during endovascular stenting for CSS due to right SA origin stenosis after CABG. A 64-year-old man with a history of CABG using the right ITA presented with exertional right arm claudication. Angiogram showed a CSS and retrograde blood flow in the right vertebral artery (VA) due to severe stenosis of the right SA origin. Endovascular treatment of the right SA stenosis was planned. For cardiac and cerebral protection, distal balloon protection by inflating a 5.2-F occlusion balloon catheter in the SA proximal to the origin of the right VA and ITA through the right brachial artery approach and distal filter protection of the right internal carotid artery (ICA) through the left femoral artery (FA) approach were performed. Endovascular stenting for SA stenosis from the right FA approach was performed under cardiac and cerebral protection by filter-protection of the ICA and balloon-protection of the VA and ITA. Successful treatment of SA severe stenosis was achieved with no complications. PMID:25874182

  2. Endovascular Stenting under Cardiac and Cerebral Protection for Subclavian Steal after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Due to Right Subclavian Artery Origin Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kiura, Yoshihiro; Okazaki, Takahito; Ichinose, Nobuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Coronary-subclavian steal (CSS) can occur after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using the internal thoracic artery (ITA). Subclavian artery (SA) stenosis proximal to the ITA graft causes CSS. We describe a technique for cardiac and cerebral protection during endovascular stenting for CSS due to right SA origin stenosis after CABG. A 64-year-old man with a history of CABG using the right ITA presented with exertional right arm claudication. Angiogram showed a CSS and retrograde blood flow in the right vertebral artery (VA) due to severe stenosis of the right SA origin. Endovascular treatment of the right SA stenosis was planned. For cardiac and cerebral protection, distal balloon protection by inflating a 5.2-F occlusion balloon catheter in the SA proximal to the origin of the right VA and ITA through the right brachial artery approach and distal filter protection of the right internal carotid artery (ICA) through the left femoral artery (FA) approach were performed. Endovascular stenting for SA stenosis from the right FA approach was performed under cardiac and cerebral protection by filter-protection of the ICA and balloon-protection of the VA and ITA. Successful treatment of SA severe stenosis was achieved with no complications. PMID:25874182

  3. In vivo stimulatory effect of erythropoietin on endothelial nitric oxide synthase in cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Anantha Vijay R; Smith, Leslie A; Nath, Karl A; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2006-08-01

    The discovery of tissue protective effects of erythropoietin has stimulated significant interest in erythropoietin (Epo) as a novel therapeutic approach to vascular protection. The present study was designed to determine the cerebral vascular effects of recombinant Epo in vivo. Recombinant adenoviral vectors (10(9) plaque-forming units/animal) encoding genes for human erythropoietin (AdEpo) and beta-galactosidase (AdLacZ) were injected into the cisterna magna of rabbits. After 48 h, basilar arteries were harvested for analysis of vasomotor function, Western blotting, and measurement of cGMP levels. Gene transfer of AdEpo increased the expressions of recombinant Epo and its receptor in the basilar arteries. Arteries exposed to recombinant Epo demonstrated attenuation of contractile responses to histamine (10(-9) to 10(-5) mol/l) (P < 0.05, n = 5). Endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine (10(-9) to 10(-5) mol/l) were significantly augmented (P < 0.05, n = 5), whereas endothelium-independent relaxations to a nitric oxide (NO) donor 2-(N,N-diethylamino)diazenolate-2-oxide sodium salt remained unchanged in AdEpo-transduced basilar arteries. Transduction with AdEpo increased the protein expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated the S1177 form of the enzyme. Basal levels of cGMP were significantly elevated in arteries transduced with AdEpo consistent with increased NO production. Our studies suggest that in cerebral circulation, Epo enhances endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. This effect could play an important role in the vascular protective effect of Epo. PMID:16565320

  4. Congenital Absence of Internal Carotid Artery with Rare Type of Intercavernous Anastamosis and Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Alurkar, Anand; Oak, Sagar; Kori, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Congenital absence of Internal Carotid Artery (ICA) is a rare anomaly seen in <0.01% of the population. Various collateral circulations develop in these cases to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion. High incidence of aneurysms is reported in these cases. Complete evaluation is required to detect other abnormalities usually seen in these patients. We report a case of congenital absence of right ICA in a 39-year-old female who presented with Subarachnoid Haemorrhage (SAH) and had a Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysm (MCA). The right MCA got supply from the intercavernous communication from the left internal carotid artery. Skull base Computed Tomogram (CT) confirmed the congenital absence of right ICA. She underwent successful surgical clipping for the aneurysm. The high incidence of aneurysms, collateral circulations, embryological development and postulated mechanisms of this anomaly were discussed. The exact aetiology behind the absence of ICA remains unclear. It is important to differentiate this condition from acquired stenosis/occlusion due to atherosclerosis and carotid dissection. Recognising the anomaly is important and gains even more significance during surgical planning in cases of direct aneurysm clipping, carotid endarterectomy and transphenoidal surgeries. PMID:27190916

  5. Summary of Research Adaptions of Visceral and Cerebral Resistance Arteries to Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The proposed studies were designed address the effects of simulated microgravity on vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell function in resistance arteries isolated from visceral tissues (spleen, mesentery and kidneys) and cerebrum. Alterations in vascular function induced by microgravity are particularly relevant to the problems of orthostatic intolerance and reduced exercise capacity experienced by astronauts upon re-entry into the earth's gravitational field. Decrements in contractile function or enhanced vasodilatory responsiveness of peripheral resistance arteries could lead to decreased peripheral resistance and orthostatic hypotension. Alternatively, augmentation of contractile function in cerebral resistance arteries could lead to increased cerebral vascular resistance and diminished perfusion of the brain. The Specific Aims and hypotheses were proposed in this grant. Following each of the Specific Aims, progress toward addressing that specific aim is presented. With the exception of Specific Aim VI (see aim for details), all aims have been experimentally addressed as proposed. The final six months of the granting period will be used for manuscript preparation; manuscripts in preparation will contain results from Specific Aims I-IV. Results from Specific Aims V and VI have been published.

  6. Calcium antagonistic vasodilator mechanisms of brovincamine fumarate studied in canine cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Morimoto, K; Ishii, K; Nakayama, K

    1994-07-01

    In order to elucidate the major mechanism of cerebral vasodilator action of brovincamine fumarate (CAS 57475-17-9) the present study was performed comparing its effects with those of d-cis-diltiazem in the isolated canine basilar artery. Brovincamine possessed a wide spectrum of inhibitory actions on the contractions of the artery produced by various spasmogens and mechanical stretch. Brovincamine was 3 to 40 times less potent than d-cis-diltiazem in the inhibitory actions. Simultaneous recordings of intracellular Ca2+ concentration and mechanical activity showed that brovincamine and d-cis-diltiazem decreased both parameters augmented by high KCl in a concentration-dependent and parallel manner. Both brovincamine and d-cis-diltiazem shifted parallel to the right the concentration-response curves for CaCl2-induced contraction of the artery constructed in the Ca(2+)-free depolarizing medium. Furthermore, Schild regression of the curves was linear with a slope of unity, indicating apparently a competitive antagonism between Ca2+ channel function/Ca2+ and brovincamine or d-cis-diltiazem. The results suggest that the cerebral vasodilator effect of brovincamine is mainly attributable to the inhibition of Ca2+ influx through the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, supporting the reported clinical benefits of this drug in the treatment of cerebrovascular disorders. PMID:7945512

  7. Cerebral Artery Alpha-1 AR Subtypes: High Altitude Long-Term Acclimatization Responses

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Ravi; Goyal, Dipali; Chu, Nina; Van Wickle, Jonathan; Longo, Lawrence D.

    2014-01-01

    In response to hypoxia and other stress, the sympathetic (adrenergic) nervous system regulates arterial contractility and blood flow, partly through differential activities of the alpha1 (α1) - adrenergic receptor (AR) subtypes (α1A-, α1B-, and α1D-AR). Thus, we tested the hypothesis that with acclimatization to long-term hypoxia (LTH), contractility of middle cerebral arteries (MCA) is regulated by changes in expression and activation of the specific α1-AR subtypes. We conducted experiments in MCA from adult normoxic sheep maintained near sea level (300 m) and those exposed to LTH (110 days at 3801 m). Following acclimatization to LTH, ovine MCA showed a 20% reduction (n = 5; P<0.05) in the maximum tension achieved by 10−5 M phenylephrine (PHE). LTH-acclimatized cerebral arteries also demonstrated a statistically significant (P<0.05) inhibition of PHE-induced contractility in the presence of specific α1-AR subtype antagonists. Importantly, compared to normoxic vessels, there was significantly greater (P<0.05) α1B-AR subtype mRNA and protein levels in LTH acclimatized MCA. Also, our results demonstrate that extracellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2)-mediated negative feedback regulation of PHE-induced contractility is modulated by α1B-AR subtype. Overall, in ovine MCA, LTH produces profound effects on α1-AR subtype expression and function. PMID:25393740

  8. Coil herniation following intra-arterial verapamil infusion for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Stephanie H; Grandhi, Ramesh; Deibert, Christopher P; Jovin, Tudor G; Gardner, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Complications associated with intra-arterial infusion of vasodilator agents for the treatment of vasospasm associated with a ruptured cerebral aneurysm are extremely rare. We present the case of a patient who developed left lower extremity monoplegia following intra-arterial infusion of verapamil for treatment of diffuse cerebral vasospasm, 6 days after initially undergoing treatment of a ruptured right A1-2 junction aneurysm. A repeat angiogram following this intra-arterial vasodilator treatment demonstrated a coil loop which had herniated into the right A2 artery. Herein, we describe a previously unreported complication which occurred following intra-arterial pharmacologic vasospasm treatment, review the existing literature, and suggest potential causes and treatment options. PMID:25934655

  9. Intraoperative laser speckle contrast imaging improves the stability of rodent middle cerebral artery occlusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lu; Li, Yao; Li, Hangdao; Lu, Hongyang; Tong, Shanbao

    2015-09-01

    Rodent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model is commonly used in stroke research. Creating a stable infarct volume has always been challenging for technicians due to the variances of animal anatomy and surgical operations. The depth of filament suture advancement strongly influences the infarct volume as well. We investigated the cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in the affected cortex using laser speckle contrast imaging when advancing suture during MCAO surgery. The relative CBF drop area (CBF50, i.e., the percentage area with CBF less than 50% of the baseline) showed an increase from 20.9% to 69.1% when the insertion depth increased from 1.6 to 1.8 cm. Using the real-time CBF50 marker to guide suture insertion during the surgery, our animal experiments showed that intraoperative CBF-guided surgery could significantly improve the stability of MCAO with a more consistent infarct volume and less mortality.

  10. Types of Azygos Distal Anterior Cerebral Artery Branching Patterns: Relevance in Aneurysmal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Mathuriya, Suresh N

    2016-01-01

    Azygos distal anterior cerebral artery (Az.DACA) is a rare anatomical variant. This variant has been found to be associated with aneurysms in a significant proportion of patients. We present two cases of Az.DACA aneurysms associated with this anatomical variant with different branching patterns and the corresponding technical difficulties in clipping such aneurysms. Aneurysms associated with Az.DACA present unique technical challenges in proportion to the number of branches arising near the neck and should be managed at high volume centres with the best of facilities. PMID:27563507

  11. Types of Azygos Distal Anterior Cerebral Artery Branching Patterns: Relevance in Aneurysmal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harnarayan; Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Mathuriya, Suresh N

    2016-01-01

    Azygos distal anterior cerebral artery (Az.DACA) is a rare anatomical variant. This variant has been found to be associated with aneurysms in a significant proportion of patients. We present two cases of Az.DACA aneurysms associated with this anatomical variant with different branching patterns and the corresponding technical difficulties in clipping such aneurysms. Aneurysms associated with Az.DACA present unique technical challenges in proportion to the number of branches arising near the neck and should be managed at high volume centres with the best of facilities. PMID:27563507

  12. Progressive Deconstruction of a Distal Posterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysm Using Competitive Flow Diversion.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew K; Tan, Lee A; Lopes, Demetrius K; Moftakhar, Roham

    2016-03-01

    Progressive deconstruction is an endovascular technique for aneurysm treatment that utilizes flow diverting stents to promote progressive thrombosis by diverting blood flow away from the aneurysm's parent vessel. While the aneurysm thromboses, collateral blood vessels develop over time to avoid infarction that can often accompany acute parent vessel occlusion. We report a 37-year-old woman with a left distal posterior cerebral artery aneurysm that was successfully treated with this strategy. The concept and rationale of progressive deconstruction are discussed in detail. PMID:26958413

  13. Case Report: Traumatic anterior cerebral artery aneurysm in a 4-year old child

    PubMed Central

    Munakomi, Sunil; Tamrakar, Karuna; Chaudhary, Pramod; Bhattarai, Binod; Cherian, Iype

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic intracranial aneurysm in the proximal part of the anterior cerebral artery in the pediatric population has not been documented so far. Here we report the case of a 4 year-old child who developed a pseudo-aneurysm after minor head trauma and was managed successfully with trapping of the aneurysm. A ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was placed as the child became dependent on extraventricular drain during the post-operative period. The patient made excellent recovery in neurological status within 1 month of post-operative clinical follow up.

  14. Ipsilateral hemiparesis and contralateral lower limb paresis caused by anterior cerebral artery territory infarct.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongfeng; Liu, Lan

    2016-07-01

    Ipsilateral hemiparesis is rare after a supratentorial stroke, and the role of reorganization in the motor areas of unaffected hemisphere is important for the rehabilitation of the stroke patients. In this study, we present a patient who had a subclinical remote infarct in the right pons developed ipsilateral hemiparesis and contralateral lower limb paresis caused by a new infarct in the left anterior cerebral artery territory. Our case suggests that the motor areas of the unaffected hemisphere might be reorganized after stroke, which is important for the rehabilitation of stroke patients. PMID:27356659

  15. Twin-reversed arterial perfusion sequence associated with decreased fetal cerebral vascular impedance

    PubMed Central

    Peyvandi, S.; Feldstein, V. A.; Hirose, S.; Rand, L.; Brook, M. M.; Moon-Grady, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Twin-reversed arterial perfusion (TRAP) sequence affects 1% of monochorionic twin pregnancies and is caused by abnormal vascular connections between a pump twin and an acardiac mass. The effects of abnormal vascular connections on cerebral vasculature in the pump twin are unknown. We hypothesize that abnormal cerebral vascular impedance, as assessed by the pulsatility index (PI), is present in pump twins and that fetal intervention alters cerebral impedance. Methods Fetal echocardiograms performed between 2010 and 2013 in pregnancies diagnosed with TRAP (n = 19), recorded at presentation, and uncomplicated monochorionic twin pregnancies (controls, n = 18; 36 fetuses) were analyzed. In all subjects, the middle cerebral artery (MCA)-PI, combined cardiac output (CCO) and cardiothoracic ratio were calculated, and the values for cases and controls were compared. Results The mean gestational age at the time of echocardiography was 20 weeks in both groups. MCA-PI was lower in TRAP cases than in controls (1.55 (95%CI, 1.47–1.64) vs 1.74 (95% CI, 1.65–1.82), respectively; P = 0.004). CCO in TRAP cases was mildly elevated for gestational age (199.7 (95% CI, 138.4–261.1) mL/min) compared with that of controls (131.4 (95% CI, 102.2–160.7) mL/min). In six TRAP cases with a second echocardiogram available, the mean MCA-PI increased after intervention, from 1.5 (95%CI, 1.3–1.7) to 1.8 (95% CI, 1.4–2.2). Conclusions TRAP pump twins have lower cerebral vascular impedance than do controls, suggestive of a brain-sparing effect. MCA-PI appeared to increase in a small group of pump twins after intervention. These findings suggest a fetal cerebral autoregulatory response to a high cardiac output state that begins to change after fetal intervention. The long-termimplications for neurodevelopmental outcome warrant further study. PMID:25157457

  16. Mirror Image Distal Anterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysms Treated with Coil Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Enesi, E.; Rroji, A.; Demneri, M.; Vreto, G.; Petrela, M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mirror image aneurysms of the distal anterior cerebral arteries (DACA) are rare. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of two patients with mirror image DACA aneurysms treated successfully with coil embolization. The association of aneurysms with anatomic variants has been extensively reported. We may speculate that the remnants of the failed regression of the supreme anterior communicating artery could lead to an increase in stress across their territorial bifurcation, leading to the development of mirror image DACA aneurysms. We found the endovascular treatment of mirror image DACA aneurysms to be feasible and effective. If possible, we suggest the treatment of both aneurysms in one procedure. PMID:23472723

  17. A case of anterior cerebral artery dissection caused by scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Takuya; Kato, Yuji; Ohe, Yasuko; Deguchi, Ichiro; Maruyama, Hajime; Hayashi, Takeshi; Tanahashi, Norio

    2014-08-01

    A 51-year-old man was admitted with right hemiparesis during scuba diving, without headache. Brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging depicted high-intensity areas in the left superior frontal and cingulate gyri on diffusion-weighted imaging. Dissection of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) was detected using axial MR angiography and 3-dimensional MR cisternography. Dissection of the ACA during and after scuba diving has not been reported before. Dissection of the arteries should be included in the differential diagnosis when neurologic symptoms occur both during and after scuba diving, even if the patient does not experience headache. Furthermore, the combination of MR cisternography and MR angiography is useful to detect ACA dissection. PMID:24784014

  18. TRANSITION TO COLLATERAL FLOW AFTER ARTERIAL OCCLUSION PREDISPOSES TO CEREBRAL VENOUS STEAL

    PubMed Central

    Pranevicius, Osvaldas; Pranevicius, Mindaugas; Pranevicius, Henrikas; Liebeskind, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Stroke related tissue pressure increase in the core (Pcore) and penumbra (Ppen) determines regional cerebral perfusion pressure (rCPP) defined as a difference between local inflow pressure (Pi) and venous (Pv) or tissue pressure, whichever is higher. We previously showed that venous pressure reduction below the Pcore causes blood flow diversion - cerebral venous steal. Now we investigated how transition to collateral circulation after complete arterial occlusion affects rCPP distribution. Methods We modified two parallel Starling resistor model to simulate transition to collateral inflow after complete main stem occlusion. We decreased Pv from the arterial pressure (Pa) to zero, and investigated how arterial and venous pressure elevation augments rCPP. Results When core pressure exceeded venous (Pcore>Pv), rCPP=Pi−Pcore. Venous pressure (Pv) decrease from Pa to Pcore caused smaller Pi to drop augmenting rCPP. Further drop of Pv to Ppen decreased rCPP in the core but augmented rCPP in penumbra. After transition to collateral circulation, lowering Pv below Ppen further decreased rCPP and collaterals themselves became pathway for steal. Venous pressure level at which rCPP in the core becomes zero we termed the “point of no reflow” (PONR). Transition from direct to collateral circulation resulted in decreased Pi, decreased rCPP, and a shift of PONR to higher venous loading values. Arterial pressure augmentation increased rCPP, but only after venous pressure exceeded PONR. Conclusion In the presence of tissue pressure gradients, transition to collateral flow predisposes to venous steal (collateral failure) which may be reversed by venous pressure augmentation. PMID:22246692

  19. Effect of tromethamine (THAM) on infarct volume following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Kiening, K L; Schneider, G H; Unterberg, A W; Lanksch, W R

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the influence on tromethamine (THAM) on ischemic volume induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats. 14 male Sprague Dawley rats underwent left sided permanent MCAO by electro coagulation. Animals were treated either by 3-M THAM given intravenously in a single dosage of 0.6 mmol/kg body weight (THAM group: n = 7) 10 min following MCAO and again 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 hours later or by NaCl 0.9% (placebo group: n = 7) in the same mode. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was monitored for 30 min post MCAO and arterial blood gases were taken 10 min after the first injection. The extent of ischemia volume was assessed by planimetry of coronal sections stained with triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride (TTC) and with hematoxilin/eosin (HE). Tests for significance were accomplished by ANOVA on ranks. A difference of p < 0.05 was considered significant. The THAM group showed an insignificant decrease in MABP 1 min after injection (THAM: 75 +/- 11 mmHg, placebo: 86 +/- 10 mmHg). Arterial pH was significantly different (THAM: 7.46 +/- 0.04; placebo: 7.32 +/- 0.03). In TTC staining, the ischemia volume--given in absolute values and percentage of the total left volume--was significantly reduced in the THAM group (THAM: 43.9 +/- 8.3 mm3/7.0 +/- 1.3%; placebo: 95.2 +/- 13.8 mm3/14.2 +/- 2.0%). In HE staining, the reduction of ischemia, volume did not reach statistical significance (THAM: 49.1 +/- 9.9 mm3/9.6 +/- 1.8%; placebo: 66.3 +/- 14.5 mm3/13.1 +/- 2.8%). Based on these results, a moderate neuroprotective effect of THAM in experimental cerebral infarction could be demonstrated. PMID:9416318

  20. The relationship between carotid artery colour Doppler finding and cerebral oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Ardakani, Mohammad Sobhan; Heidari, Manouchehr; Moghaddam, Reza Nafisi; Haddadzadeh, Mahdi; Moshtaghion, Hossein; Rahimianfar, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background: In some cases, permanent reduction in cerebral functioning affects a high percentage of patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery. We studied the relationship between the results of preoperative bilateral carotid artery colour Doppler sonography and regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2) during coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Materials and Methods: This study was a cross-sectional analytical study conducted with 96 candidates for off-pump CABG. This study determined the percentage of the correlation of rSO2 with demographic information, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, myocardial infraction (MI), and smoking, and also provided information on the presence and type of plaque, intima-media thickness (IMT), and percentage of stenosis of carotid artery detected through colour Doppler sonography. Data were analyzed by the t-test, the Chi-square test, and simple linear regression. Results: In this study, the mean value of rSO2 increased after intubation compared to the mean before intubation, the difference being statistically significant (P = 0.005). A comparison of the mean rSO2 of the right side of the brain and the percentage of right carotid obstruction (stenosis of less than 50% vs. stenosis with a range of 50-69%) revealed that the mean rSO2 at the time of the partial-clamp between carotid stenosis less than 50% and carotid stenosis with a range of 50-69% was statistically significant (P = 0.043). Conclusions: There is no statistically significant correlation between rSO2 and percentage of carotid artery stenosis less than 70%. It is advised that rSO2 and carotid stenosis of greater than 70% be studied in future. PMID:26015916

  1. Microcatheter Looping Facilitates Access to Both the Acutely Angled Parent Artery and Cerebral Aneurysms for Effective Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong-Hui; Ye, Jian-Ya; Su, Xian-Hui; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Dong-Liang; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Er-Wei; Han, Yong-Feng; Yang, Song-Tao; Gao, Bu-Lang

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aneurysms with an acutely angled parent artery are difficult to access for coiling. This study aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of microcatheter looping for embolization of cerebral aneurysms with access difficulty. Ten patients (male:female=5:5) with cerebral aneurysms treated with the microcatheter looping technique were analyzed retrospectively. The parent artery formed an acute angle with the major artery in five aneurysms. The microcatheter was looped into a “α” loop for treatment in the anterior temporal artery aneurysm and a “U” loop in the remaining nine aneurysms. All ten aneurysms were successfully treated with the microcatheter looping technique. The microcatheter tip was successfully navigated into the aneurysm sac and remained stable throughout the embolization process. All aneurysms were occluded with total occlusion in five and near-total occlusion in five, and the parent artery remained patent in all cases. No complications occurred peri-procedurally. The Glasgow Outcome Scale was 5 in all patients before discharge. Follow-up angiography six to 12 months later revealed a good occlusion status of the aneurysms. The microcatheter looping technique is effective when the conventional embolization technique fails to treat cerebral aneurysms with difficult access especially when the parent artery forming an acute angle with the major artery exacerbates difficult access to the aneurysms. PMID:25496676

  2. The contribution of arterial blood gases in cerebral blood flow regulation and fuel utilization in man at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Willie, Christopher K; MacLeod, David B; Smith, Kurt J; Lewis, Nia C; Foster, Glen E; Ikeda, Keita; Hoiland, Ryan L; Ainslie, Philip N

    2015-05-01

    The effects of partial acclimatization to high altitude (HA; 5,050 m) on cerebral metabolism and cerebrovascular function have not been characterized. We hypothesized (1) increased cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) at HA; and (2) that CO2 would affect cerebral metabolism more than hypoxia. PaO2 and PaCO2 were manipulated at sea level (SL) to simulate HA exposure, and at HA, SL blood gases were simulated; CVR was assessed at both altitudes. Arterial-jugular venous differences were measured to calculate cerebral metabolic rates and cerebral blood flow (CBF). We observed that (1) partial acclimatization yields a steeper CO2-H(+) relation in both arterial and jugular venous blood; yet (2) CVR did not change, despite (3) mean arterial pressure (MAP)-CO2 reactivity being doubled at HA, thus indicating effective cerebral autoregulation. (4) At SL hypoxia increased CBF, and restoration of oxygen at HA reduced CBF, but neither had any effect on cerebral metabolism. Acclimatization resets the cerebrovasculature to chronic hypocapnia. PMID:25690474

  3. Cav1.2 splice variant with exon 9* is critical for regulation of cerebral artery diameter

    PubMed Central

    Nystoriak, Matthew A.; Murakami, Kentaro; Penar, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) are essential for numerous processes in the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Alternative splicing modulates proteomic composition of Cav1.2 to generate functional variation between channel isoforms. Here, we describe expression and function of Cav1.2 channels containing alternatively spliced exon 9* in cerebral artery myocytes. RT-PCR showed expression of Cav1.2 splice variants both containing (α1C9/9*/10) and lacking (α1C9/10) exon 9* in intact rabbit and human cerebral arteries. With the use of laser capture microdissection and RT-PCR, expression of mRNA for both α1C9/9*/10 and α1C9/10 was demonstrated in isolated cerebral artery myocytes. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed significantly greater α1C9/9*/10 expression relative to α1C9/10 in intact rabbit cerebral arteries compared with cardiac tissue and cerebral cortex. To demonstrate a functional role for α1C9/9*/10, smooth muscle of intact cerebral arteries was treated with antisense oligonucleotides targeting α1C9/9*/10 (α1C9/9*/10-AS) or exon 9 (α1C-AS), expressed in all Cav1.2 splice variants, by reversible permeabilization and organ cultured for 1–4 days. Treatment with α1C9/9*/10-AS reduced maximal constriction induced by elevated extracellular K+ ([K+]o) by ∼75% compared with α1C9/9*/10-sense-treated arteries. Maximal constriction in response to the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin and [K+]o EC50 values were not altered by antisense treatment. Decreases in maximal [K+]o-induced constriction were similar between α1C9/9*/10-AS and α1C-AS groups (22.7 ± 9% and 25.6 ± 4% constriction, respectively). We conclude that although cerebral artery myocytes express both α1C9/9*/10 and α1C9/10 VDCC splice variants, α1C9/9*/10 is functionally dominant in the control of cerebral artery diameter. PMID:19717733

  4. [Hemodynamic and methabolic aspects of sodium nitroprusside pharmacodynamics during buccal administration in patients with arterial hypertension of cerebral ischemic genesis].

    PubMed

    Vizir, V A; Kechin, I L; Fedorova, E P

    2006-01-01

    The authors presented in the article efficiency of new formulation of Natrium Nitroprusodum used buccaly in patients with cerebral-ischemic form of arterial hypertention and stage II hypertention. It has been shown both in an acute experiment and after monothrerapy having been used. The medication proved to have positive effect on brachiocephalic vessel blood flow indices in patients of both groups using pulse doplergraphy. The use of Natrium Nitroprussidum used buccaly in patients with cerebral-ischemic form of arterial hypertention and hyportensive disease differentiates in terms of indices characterising the formation, transport and utilisation of energetic products, products of POL and antioxidant ferments. PMID:16689085

  5. Spaceflight on the Bion-M1 biosatellite alters cerebral artery vasomotor and mechanical properties in mice.

    PubMed

    Sofronova, Svetlana I; Tarasova, Olga S; Gaynullina, Dina; Borzykh, Anna A; Behnke, Bradley J; Stabley, John N; McCullough, Danielle J; Maraj, Joshua J; Hanna, Mina; Muller-Delp, Judy M; Vinogradova, Olga L; Delp, Michael D

    2015-04-01

    Conditions during spaceflight, such as the loss of the head-to-foot gravity vector, are thought to potentially alter cerebral blood flow and vascular resistance. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of long-term spaceflight on the functional, mechanical, and structural properties of cerebral arteries. Male C57BL/6N mice were flown 30 days in a Bion-M1 biosatellite. Basilar arteries isolated from spaceflight (SF) (n = 6), habitat control (HC) (n = 6), and vivarium control (VC) (n = 16) mice were used for in vitro functional and mechanical testing and histological structural analysis. The results demonstrate that vasoconstriction elicited through a voltage-gated Ca(2+) mechanism (30-80 mM KCl) and thromboxane A2 receptors (10(-8) - 3 × 10(-5) M U46619) are lower in cerebral arteries from SF mice. Inhibition of Rho-kinase activity (1 μM Y27632) abolished group differences in U46619-evoked contractions. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation elicited by acetylcholine (10 μM, 2 μM U46619 preconstriction) was virtually absent in cerebral arteries from SF mice. The pressure-diameter relation was lower in arteries from SF mice relative to that in HC mice, which was not related to differences in the extracellular matrix protein elastin or collagen content or the elastin/collagen ratio in the basilar arteries. Diameter, medial wall thickness, and medial cross-sectional area of unpressurized basilar arteries were not different among groups. These results suggest that the microgravity-induced attenuation of both vasoconstrictor and vasodilator properties may limit the range of vascular control of cerebral perfusion or impair the distribution of brain blood flow during periods of stress. PMID:25593287

  6. Spaceflight on the Bion-M1 biosatellite alters cerebral artery vasomotor and mechanical properties in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sofronova, Svetlana I.; Tarasova, Olga S.; Gaynullina, Dina; Borzykh, Anna A.; Behnke, Bradley J.; Stabley, John N.; McCullough, Danielle J.; Maraj, Joshua J.; Hanna, Mina; Muller-Delp, Judy M.; Vinogradova, Olga L.

    2015-01-01

    Conditions during spaceflight, such as the loss of the head-to-foot gravity vector, are thought to potentially alter cerebral blood flow and vascular resistance. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of long-term spaceflight on the functional, mechanical, and structural properties of cerebral arteries. Male C57BL/6N mice were flown 30 days in a Bion-M1 biosatellite. Basilar arteries isolated from spaceflight (SF) (n = 6), habitat control (HC) (n = 6), and vivarium control (VC) (n = 16) mice were used for in vitro functional and mechanical testing and histological structural analysis. The results demonstrate that vasoconstriction elicited through a voltage-gated Ca2+ mechanism (30–80 mM KCl) and thromboxane A2 receptors (10−8 − 3 × 10−5 M U46619) are lower in cerebral arteries from SF mice. Inhibition of Rho-kinase activity (1 μM Y27632) abolished group differences in U46619-evoked contractions. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation elicited by acetylcholine (10 μM, 2 μM U46619 preconstriction) was virtually absent in cerebral arteries from SF mice. The pressure-diameter relation was lower in arteries from SF mice relative to that in HC mice, which was not related to differences in the extracellular matrix protein elastin or collagen content or the elastin/collagen ratio in the basilar arteries. Diameter, medial wall thickness, and medial cross-sectional area of unpressurized basilar arteries were not different among groups. These results suggest that the microgravity-induced attenuation of both vasoconstrictor and vasodilator properties may limit the range of vascular control of cerebral perfusion or impair the distribution of brain blood flow during periods of stress. PMID:25593287

  7. Redox Signaling via Oxidative Inactivation of PTEN Modulates Pressure-Dependent Myogenic Tone in Rat Middle Cerebral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Gebremedhin, Debebe; Terashvili, Maia; Wickramasekera, Nadi; Zhang, David X.; Rau, Nicole; Miura, Hiroto; Harder, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the level of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and roles of inactivation of the phosphatase PTEN and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in response to an increase in intramural pressure-induced myogenic cerebral arterial constriction. Step increases in intraluminal pressure of cannulated cerebral arteries induced myogenic constriction and concomitant formation of superoxide (O2.−) and its dismutation product hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as determined by fluorescent HPLC analysis, microscopic analysis of intensity of dihydroethidium fluorescence and attenuation of pressure-induced myogenic constriction by pretreatment with the ROS scavenger 4,hydroxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine1-oxyl (tempol) or Mito-tempol or MitoQ in the presence or absence of PEG-catalase. An increase in intraluminal pressure induced oxidation of PTEN and activation of Akt. Pharmacological inhibition of endogenous PTEN activity potentiated pressure-dependent myogenic constriction and caused a reduction in NPo of a 238 pS arterial KCa channel current and an increase in [Ca2+]i level in freshly isolated cerebral arterial muscle cells (CAMCs), responses that were attenuated by Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. These findings demonstrate an increase in intraluminal pressure induced increase in ROS production triggered redox-sensitive signaling mechanism emanating from the cross-talk between oxidative inactivation of PTEN and activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway that involves in the regulation of pressure-dependent myogenic cerebral arterial constriction. PMID:23861911

  8. Fluid-structure interaction simulations of cerebral arteries modeled by isotropic and anisotropic constitutive laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricerri, Paolo; Dedè, Luca; Deparis, Simone; Quarteroni, Alfio; Robertson, Anne M.; Sequeira, Adélia

    2015-03-01

    This paper considers numerical simulations of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems in hemodynamics for idealized geometries of healthy cerebral arteries modeled by both nonlinear isotropic and anisotropic material constitutive laws. In particular, it focuses on an anisotropic model initially proposed for cerebral arteries to characterize the activation of collagen fibers at finite strains. In the current work, this constitutive model is implemented for the first time in the context of an FSI formulation. In this framework, we investigate the influence of the material model on the numerical results and, in the case of the anisotropic laws, the importance of the collagen fibers on the overall mechanical behavior of the tissue. With this aim, we compare our numerical results by analyzing fluid dynamic indicators, vessel wall displacement, Von Mises stress, and deformations of the collagen fibers. Specifically, for an anisotropic model with collagen fiber recruitment at finite strains, we highlight the progressive activation and deactivation processes of the fibrous component of the tissue throughout the wall thickness during the cardiac cycle. The inclusion of collagen recruitment is found to have a substantial impact on the intramural stress, which will in turn impact the biological response of the intramural cells. Hence, the methodology presented here will be particularly useful for studies of mechanobiological processes in the healthy and diseased vascular wall.

  9. Penetrating intracranial nail-gun injury to the middle cerebral artery: A successful primary repair

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Albert M.; Yuh, Sung-Joo; Hurlbert, R. John; Mitha, Alim P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Penetrating nail-gun injuries to the head are rare, however, the incidence has been gradually rising over the last decade. While there is a large volume of case reports in the literature, there are only a few incidences of cerebrovascular injury. We present a case of a patient with a nail-gun injury to the brain, which compromised the cerebral vasculature. In this article, we present the case, incidence, pathology, and a brief literature review of penetrating nail-gun injuries to highlight the principles of management pertaining to penetration of cerebrovascular structures. Case Description: A 26-year-old male presented with a penetrating nail-gun injury to his head. There were no neurological deficits. Initial imaging revealed that the nail had penetrated the cranium and suggested the vasculature to be intact. However, due to the proximity of the nail to the circle of Willis the operative approach was tailored in anticipation of a vascular injury. Intraoperatively removal of the foreign body demonstrated a laceration to the M1 branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), which was successfully repaired. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a vascular arterial injury to the MCA from a nail-gun injury. It is imperative to have a high clinical suspicion for cerebrovascular compromise in penetrating nail-gun injuries even when conventional imaging suggests otherwise. PMID:26500798

  10. Ovine middle cerebral artery characterization and quantification of ultrastructure and other features: changes with development.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravi; Henderson, David A; Chu, Nina; Longo, Lawrence D

    2012-02-15

    Regulation of tone, blood pressure, and blood flow in the cerebral vasculature is of vital importance, particularly in the developing infant. We tested the hypothesis that, in addition to accretion of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in cell layers with vessel thickening, significant changes in smooth muscle structure, as well as phenotype, extracellular matrix, and membrane proteins, in the media of cerebral arteries (CAs) during the course of late fetal development account for associated changes in contractility. Using transmission electron, confocal, wide-field epifluorescence, and light microscopy, we examined the structure and ultrastructure of CAs. Also, we utilized wire myography, Western immunoblotting, and real-time quantitative PCR to examine several other features of these arteries. We compared the main branch ovine middle CAs of 95- and 140-gestational day (GD) fetuses with those of adults (n = 5 for each experimental group). We observed a graded increase in phenylephrine- and KCl-induced contractile responses with development. Structurally, lumen diameter, media thickness, and media cross-sectional area increased dramatically from one age group to the next. With maturation, the cross-sectional profiles of CA SMCs changed from flattened bands in the 95-GD fetus to irregular ovoid-shaped fascicles in the 140-GD fetus and adult. We also observed a change in the type of collagen, specific integrin molecules, and several other parameters of SMC morphology with maturation. Ovine CAs at 95 GD appeared morphologically immature and poorly equipped to respond to major hemodynamic adjustments with maturation. PMID:22116510

  11. Association of Dysphagia With Supratentorial Lesions in Patients With Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the supratentorial area associated with poststroke dysphagia, we assessed the diffusion tensor images (DTI) in subacute stroke patients with supratentorial lesions. Methods We included 31 patients with a first episode of infarction in the middle cerebral artery territory. Each subject underwent brain DTI as well as a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and patients divided were into the dysphagia and non-dysphagia groups. Clinical dysphagia scale (CDS) scores were compared between the two groups. The corticospinal tract volume (TV), fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated for 11 regions of interest in the supratentorial area—primary motor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, supplementary motor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, parieto-occipital cortex, insular cortex, posterior limb of the internal capsule, thalamus, and basal ganglia (putamen and caudate nucleus). DTI parameters were compared between the two groups. Results Among the 31 subjects, 17 were diagnosed with dysphagia by VFSS. Mean TVs were similar across the two groups. Significant inter-group differences were observed in two DTI values: the FA value in the contra-lesional primary motor cortex and the ADC value in the bilateral posterior limbs of the internal capsule (all p<0.05). Conclusion The FA value in the primary motor cortex on the contra-lesional side and the ADC value in the bilateral PLIC can be associated with dysphagia in middle cerebral artery stroke. PMID:27606270

  12. Arterial Spin Labeling of Cerebral Perfusion Territories Using a Separate Labeling Coil

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Fernando F.; Tannús, Alberto; Talagala, S. Lalith; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To obtain cerebral perfusion territories of the left, the right and the posterior circulation in humans with high SNR and robust delineation. Materials and Methods CASL was implemented using a dedicated RF coil, positioned over the neck, to label the major cerebral feeding arteries in humans. Selective labeling was achieved by flow-driven adiabatic fast passage and by tilting the longitudinal labeling gradient about the Y-axis by θ=±60°. Results Mean CBF values in gray and white matter were 74±13 ml·100g−1·min−1 and 14±13 ml·100g−1·min−1, respectively (N=14). There were no signal differences between left and right hemispheres when θ=0° (P>0.19), indicating efficient labeling of both hemispheres. When θ=+60°, the signal in GM on the left hemisphere, 0.07±0.06%, was 92% lower than on the right hemisphere, 0.85±0.30% (P<10−9), while for θ=−60°, the signal in the right hemisphere, 0.16±0.13%, was 82% lower than on the contralateral side, 0.89±0.22% (P<10−10). Similar attenuations were obtained in white matter. Conclusions Clear delineation of the left and right cerebral perfusion territories was obtained, allowing discrimination of the anterior and posterior circulation in each hemisphere. PMID:18425844

  13. Hypertension and cerebral vasoreactivity: a continuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Ihab; Zhao, Peng; Alsop, David; Novak, Vera

    2010-11-01

    Hypertension is associated with microvascular and macrovascular brain injury but its direct influence on the cerebral circulation is not fully clear. Our objective was to investigate the association of hypertension with global and regional cerebral vasoreactivity to CO(2) using continuous arterial spin labeling MRI, independent of stroke and white matter hyperintensities. Participants (n=62; mean age: 66.7±1.0 years, 55% women, 84% white, 65% hypertension, 47% stroke) underwent arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI during normal breathing, 5% CO(2) rebreathing, and hyperventilation, as well as 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Vasoreactivity was the slope of the regression between cerebral perfusion and end-tidal CO(2). White matter hyperintensity volumes were quantified. Nighttime dipping was calculated as the percentage decline in nighttime/daytime blood pressure. After accounting for stroke and white matter hyperintensity volume, hypertensive participants had lower global vasoreactivity (1.11±0.13 versus 0.43±0.1 mL/100 g per minute per millimeter of mercury; P=0.0012). Regionally, this was significant in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. Higher mean systolic blood pressure was associated with lower vasoreactivity (decreased by 0.11 U/10-mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure; P=0.04), but nighttime dipping was not (P=0.2). The magnitude of decrease in vasoreactivity in hypertension without stroke was comparable to the magnitude of decrease in vasoreactivity in stroke without hypertension. Hypertension has a direct negative effect on the cerebrovascular circulation independent of white matter hyperintensities and stroke that is comparable to that seen with stroke. Because lower vasoreactivity is associated with poor outcomes, studies of the impact of antihypertensive on vasoreactivity are important. PMID:20876450

  14. [An infected partially thrombosed giant aneurysm of the azygos anterior cerebral artery].

    PubMed

    Mishima, K; Watanabe, T; Sasaki, T; Saito, I; Takakura, K

    1990-05-01

    The authors report a case of partially thrombosed giant aneurysm which was secondarily infected with purulent meningitis. The relationship between the infection of the aneurysm, the rapid growth of the aneurysm and the development of severe cerebral edema was discussed. A 53 year-old man was admitted on September 1, 1986, with a diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. On his admission, his body temperature was 39 degrees C, and he showed mental confusion but no neurological deficits. Laboratory data revealed signs of infection in white blood cell count, CRP, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Computerized tomographic (CT) scan and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed a massive round mass with perifocal edema measuring 40mm in the maximum diameter in the left paramedian frontal region. T1 weighted MR image also showed the presence of pus accumulation in the left ventricle. Cerebral angiography demonstrated a giant aneurysm at the distal portion of the azygos anterior cerebral artery, and irregular narrowing of both the supraclinoid segment of the carotid artery and its main branches indicating arteritis due to purulent meningitis. The patient was treated with ventricular drainage and administration of antibiotics. Culture of the purulent CSF was negative. The patient's lab data, CSF finding and neurological status improved progressively. However, follow-up CT scan and angiogram a month later showed enlargement of the aneurysm, dilatation of the patent lumen and perifocal edema. On October 8, the patient suddenly became comatose with anisocoria. A CT scan showed massive edema with marked midline shift. Emergency bifrontal craniotomy was carried out, and clipping was completed after removal of the thrombosed portion of the aneurysm, and thromboendarterectomy of the aneurysmal neck.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2385324

  15. Executive dysfunction associated with stroke in the posterior cerebral artery territory.

    PubMed

    Park, Key-Chung; Yoon, Sung-Sang; Rhee, Hak-Young

    2011-02-01

    Cognitive decline following posterior cerebral artery infarction (PCAI) is associated with lesions in the occipital lobe that extend into the parahippocampus or the splenium. We investigated patterns of neuropsychological deficits, including those causing executive dysfunction, associated with isolated lesions of the occipital lobe and with extensive lesions of the occipital lobe that extended into the splenium or the posterior ventral temporal lobes including the parahippocampus and fusiform gyrus. Eleven patients with unilateral PCAI involving the cerebral cortex and one patient with an occipital hemorrhage were selected for inclusion in this study. The mean age of the patients was 68.50 ± 7.94 years and their mean level of education was 8.58 ± 4.12 years. Four patients had isolated occipital lobe lesions and eight had lesions in either the splenium or the posterior ventral temporal lobe in addition to the occipital lobe. Whereas three of four patients with isolated occipital lobe lesions had left-sided lesions, only three of the eight patients with extended occipital lesions had left-sided lesions. The patients underwent a standardized battery of neuropsychological tests. The patients with occipital injuries in addition to splenial or posterior ventral temporal lobe injuries demonstrated performance decline across diverse cognitive domains, including memory (eight of eight), visuospatial function (eight of eight), executive function (seven of eight), language-related function (four of eight) and attention (one of eight). In contrast, memory impairment (three of four patients) was the only area in which patients with isolated occipital lobe lesions demonstrated decline in performance. Our findings suggest that strokes in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery are frequently associated with executive dysfunction. Injuries involving the splenium or posterior ventral temporal lobe in addition to the occipital lobe lead to more diverse neuropsychological

  16. [A Case of Ruptured Peripheral Cerebral Aneurysm at Abnormal Vessels Associated with Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis:Similarity to Moyamoya Disease].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hajime; Kohno, Kanehisa; Tanaka, Hideo; Fukumoto, Shinya; Ichikawa, Haruhisa; Onoue, Shinji; Fumoto, Noriyuki; Ozaki, Saya; Maeda, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of ruptured peripheral cerebral aneurysm at abnormal vessels associated with severe stenosis at the middle cerebral artery (MCA). A 66-year-old woman was admitted at our hospital with headache on foot. Computed tomography (CT) showed intracerebral hemorrhage in the left fronto-basal area. Three-dimensional-CT and conventional angiogram revealed abnormal vessels, which were similar to those seen in moyamoya disease, with a small enhancement close to the hematoma. On day 11, subsequent cerebral angiogram demonstrated an aneurysm at the peripheral portion of an abnormal vessel arising from the left A2. On day 17, soon after the diagnosis of the ruptured aneurysm was made (while still at the subacute stage), we operated on the aneurysm. Superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA anastomosis was also performed to preserve cerebral blood flow and reduce hemodynamic stress. Several days after the operation, she had transient aphasia due to hyperperfusion of the MCA territory, but eventually recovered with no neurological deficit at discharge. Follow-up study revealed revascularization from the branches of the external carotid artery as well as the STA. On admission, we initially thought that this patient had abnormal vessels associated with arteriosclerotic MCA stenosis. However, the postoperative clinical course as well as the histopathological specimens of both the abnormal artery with the aneurysm and the STA revealed similar findings to those of moyamoya disease. Although this case did not satisfy the criteria for moyamoya disease, it is conceivable that a single arterial occlusive lesion associated with moyamoya-like vessels might develop in the same mechanism with that of moyamoya disease. PMID:27056872

  17. Feasibility of Quantifying Arterial Cerebral Blood Volume Using Multiphase Alternate Ascending/Descending Directional Navigation (ALADDIN).

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Arterial cerebral blood volume (aCBV) is associated with many physiologic and pathologic conditions. Recently, multiphase balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) readout was introduced to measure labeled blood signals in the arterial compartment, based on the fact that signal difference between labeled and unlabeled blood decreases with the number of RF pulses that is affected by blood velocity. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of a new 2D inter-slice bSSFP-based arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique termed, alternate ascending/descending directional navigation (ALADDIN), to quantify aCBV using multiphase acquisition in six healthy subjects. A new kinetic model considering bSSFP RF perturbations was proposed to describe the multiphase data and thus to quantify aCBV. Since the inter-slice time delay (TD) and gap affected the distribution of labeled blood spins in the arterial and tissue compartments, we performed the experiments with two TDs (0 and 500 ms) and two gaps (300% and 450% of slice thickness) to evaluate their roles in quantifying aCBV. Comparison studies using our technique and an existing method termed arterial volume using arterial spin tagging (AVAST) were also separately performed in five subjects. At 300% gap or 500-ms TD, significant tissue perfusion signals were demonstrated, while tissue perfusion signals were minimized and arterial signals were maximized at 450% gap and 0-ms TD. ALADDIN has an advantage of visualizing bi-directional flow effects (ascending/descending) in a single experiment. Labeling efficiency (α) of inter-slice blood flow effects could be measured in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) (20.8±3.7%.) and was used for aCBV quantification. As a result of fitting to the proposed model, aCBV values in gray matter (1.4-2.3 mL/100 mL) were in good agreement with those from literature. Our technique showed high correlation with AVAST, especially when arterial signals were accentuated (i.e., when TD = 0 ms) (r = 0

  18. Feasibility of Quantifying Arterial Cerebral Blood Volume Using Multiphase Alternate Ascending/Descending Directional Navigation (ALADDIN)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Arterial cerebral blood volume (aCBV) is associated with many physiologic and pathologic conditions. Recently, multiphase balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) readout was introduced to measure labeled blood signals in the arterial compartment, based on the fact that signal difference between labeled and unlabeled blood decreases with the number of RF pulses that is affected by blood velocity. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of a new 2D inter-slice bSSFP-based arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique termed, alternate ascending/descending directional navigation (ALADDIN), to quantify aCBV using multiphase acquisition in six healthy subjects. A new kinetic model considering bSSFP RF perturbations was proposed to describe the multiphase data and thus to quantify aCBV. Since the inter-slice time delay (TD) and gap affected the distribution of labeled blood spins in the arterial and tissue compartments, we performed the experiments with two TDs (0 and 500 ms) and two gaps (300% and 450% of slice thickness) to evaluate their roles in quantifying aCBV. Comparison studies using our technique and an existing method termed arterial volume using arterial spin tagging (AVAST) were also separately performed in five subjects. At 300% gap or 500-ms TD, significant tissue perfusion signals were demonstrated, while tissue perfusion signals were minimized and arterial signals were maximized at 450% gap and 0-ms TD. ALADDIN has an advantage of visualizing bi-directional flow effects (ascending/descending) in a single experiment. Labeling efficiency (α) of inter-slice blood flow effects could be measured in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) (20.8±3.7%.) and was used for aCBV quantification. As a result of fitting to the proposed model, aCBV values in gray matter (1.4–2.3 mL/100 mL) were in good agreement with those from literature. Our technique showed high correlation with AVAST, especially when arterial signals were accentuated (i.e., when TD = 0 ms) (r = 0

  19. Clinicians’ Contributions to the Development of Coronary Artery Stents: A Qualitative Study of Transformative Device Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Kesselheim, Aaron S.; Xu, Shuai; Avorn, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical device innovation remains poorly understood, and policymakers disagree over how to incentivize early development. We sought to elucidate the components of transformative health care innovation by conducting an in-depth case study of development of a key medical device: coronary artery stents. Methods and Findings We conducted semi-structured interviews with the innovators whose work contributed to the development of coronary artery stents who we identified based on a review of the regulatory, patent, and medical literature. Semi-structured interviews with each participant covered the interviewee’s personal involvement in coronary artery stent development, the roles of institutions and other individuals in the development process, the interplay of funding and intellectual property in the interviewee’s contribution, and finally reflections on lessons arising from the experience. Transcripts were analyzed using standard coding techniques and the constant comparative method of qualitative data analysis. Conclusions We found that the first coronary artery stents emerged from three teams: Julio Palmaz and Richard Schatz, Cesare Gianturco and Gary Roubin, and Ulrich Sigwart. First, these individual physician-inventors saw the need for coronary artery stents in their clinical practice. In response, they developed prototypes with the support of academic medical centers leading to early validation studies. Larger companies entered afterwards with engineering support. Patents became paramount once the technology diffused. The case of coronary stents suggests that innovation policy should focus on supporting early physician-inventors at academic centers. PMID:24533133

  20. [Ruptured distal anterior cerebral artery aneurysm and diagnostic dyspraxia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Wada, M; Kajikawa, H; Fujii, S; Yamamura, K; Kajikawa, M

    1995-04-01

    A case of ruptured distal anterior cerebral artery aneurysm presenting with diagnostic dyspraxia is presented. A 54-year-old female was referred to our hospital with the complaint of sudden onset of headache followed by disturbance of consciousness. CT and MRI revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage with hematomas in the interhemispheric fissure and the supracallosal area, and CAG revealed a left-sided callosomarginal artery aneurysm. During and after hospitalization, she showed diagnostic dyspraxia characterized by behavior of both her hands opposite to what might be expected e.g. when she tried to pick up a bowl, both her hands moved forward and held it at once; she wiped her head and face with toilet paper after urination. At times her hands behaved in opposite ways. For example, while folding cloths, her right hand tended to fold them while the left hand tended to unfold them; when she put on a sweater, as the right hand put it on, the left hand took it off; when she put her shirt into her trousers, one hand pushed it in while the other hand pulled it out. This unusual behavior was considered to be caused by the impairment of the corpus callosum due to compression by the hematoma. It disappeared gradually over a period of one year. Involuntary motor behavior of the left hand while the right hand is in voluntary action is known as diagnostic dyspraxia. Although this symptom has rarely been reported so far in cases of ruptured distal anterior cerebral artery, it may become noticed more frequently through careful observation. PMID:7739777

  1. [Medullary venous malformation with azygos anterior cerebral artery aneurysm: a case report].

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Kobayashi, S; Sigemori, M; Watanabe, M; Kuramoto, S

    1987-03-01

    A case of medullary venous malformation with azygos anterior cerebral artery aneurysm is reported, which was associated with the leptomenigeal angiomatosis on the cortex of the right frontal lobe. A 62-year-old female was admitted to the Kurume University Hospital on June 21, 1985, because of a convulsive seizure. On admission, neurological and general examinations, except for slightly liver function disorder, was no abnormality. Plain CT scan showed the cortical atrophy and two small high-density areas in the right frontal lobe. Enhanced CT scan showed a high-density area in the genu of the corpus callosum. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), on T2 weighted image, showed a high signal intensity area in the right paraventricular deep white matter and the right frontal region. A right internal carotid angiogram in the venous phase showed numerous enlarged medullary veins in the deep frontal region, converging into a single large draining vein that empties into the basal vein of Rosenthal. An azygos anterior cerebral artery was visualized on the right and left carotid angiograms. The aneurysm was situated at the distal end of the azygos artery. Twenty eight days after admission, a right frontal cranioplastic craniotomy was performed. During operation, the surface of the right frontal lobe was covered by fine, vascular networks, which was reddish brown. A right frontal lobectomy, including venous malformation and vascular networks, was performed. The aneurysm was clipped via an interhemispheric approach. Histologically, the malformation vessels had spread into the subarachnoid space.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3600991

  2. Impact of Coexisting Coronary Artery Disease on the Occurrence of Cerebral Ischemic Lesions after Carotid Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuo-Lun; Chang, Yeu-Jhy; Chang, Chien-Hung; Chang, Ting-Yu; Liu, Chi-Hung; Hsieh, I-Chang; Wong, Ho-Fai; Wai, Yau-Yau; Chen, Yu-Wei; Yip, Bak-Sau; Lee, Tsong-Hai

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) may coexist with extracranial carotid artery stenosis (ECAS), but the influence of CAD on procedure-related complications after carotid artery stenting (CAS) has not been well investigated. The study aimed to determine the impact of CAD on the occurrence of peri-CAS cerebral ischemic lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) scanning. Methods Coronary angiography was performed within six months before CAS. DWI scanning was repetitively done within 1 week before and after CAS. Clinical outcome measures were stroke, angina, myocardial infarction and death within 30 days. Results Among 126 patients (69.5±9.0 years) recruited for unilateral protected CAS, 33 (26%) patients had peri-CAS DWI-positive lesions. CAD was noted in 79% (26 in 33) and 48% (45 in 93) of patients with and without peri-CAS DWI-positive lesions (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.6–10.0; P = .0018), and the number of concomitant CAD on coronary angiography was positively correlated with the risk for peri-CAS DWI-positive lesions (P = .0032). In patients with no CAD (n = 55), asymptomatic CAD (n = 41) and symptomatic CAD (n = 30), the occurrence rates of peri-CAS DWI-positive lesions were 13%, 41% and 30% (P = .0048), and the peri-CAS stroke rates were 2%, 7% and 0% (P = .2120). Conclusions The severity of morphological CAD and the presence of either symptomatic or asymptomatic CAD are associated with the occurrence of peri-CAS cerebral ischemic lesions. PMID:24732408

  3. Indications and Outcomes of Prophylactic and Therapeutic Extracranial-to-intracranial Arterial Bypass for Cerebral Revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Gazyakan, Emre; Lee, Ching-Yi; Wu, Chieh-Tsai; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Craft, Randall; Henry, Steven L.; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Extracranial-to-intracranial (EC-IC) arterial bypass is a technically demanding procedure used to treat complex cerebral artery diseases. The indications, proper surgical techniques, and outcomes of this procedure have been under debate over the recent decades. Methods: Between January 2004 and December 2012, 28 patients, including patients with cerebral artery occlusion, intracranial aneurysm, cranial base tumor, and Moyamoya disease, underwent EC-IC bypass. Patients’ records were retrospectively reviewed for demography, indications, complications, high-flow versus low-flow bypass, patency rate of bypass, and neurological outcome. The patients were sorted into prophylactic (n = 16) and therapeutic (n = 12) groups based on the preoperative presentation of their neurological symptoms. Follow-up evaluation was performed at a mean of 32.7 ± 24.3 months. Results: The overall patency rate of bypass was 100%, the postoperative stroke rate was zero, and the surgical complication rate was 14.3%. There was no significant difference in the bypass patency rate between the 2 groups or between the high-flow and low-flow bypass patients. Patients who underwent prophylactic bypass had minimal surgical and total complications (P = 0.03 and P < 0.01, respectively) and a better neurological outcome. Surgical complications were more common in patients who underwent therapeutic bypass (25%). Conclusions: The collaboration of neurosurgeons and plastic surgeons in performing EC-IC bypass can result in excellent outcomes with a high bypass patency rate and few complications, particularly for prophylactic EC-IC bypass. PMID:25973350

  4. Systematization, description, and territory of the caudal cerebral artery in surface of the brain of the ostrich (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Nazer, Manoel; Campos, Rui

    2014-08-01

    Brain specimens from 30 ostriches were injected with red-dyed latex via the internal carotid arteries, and the caudal cerebral arteries and their branches were systematically described. On the right side, the caudal cerebral artery was double-, triple-, quadruple-, and single-branched in 73.5%, 23.3%, 3.3%, and 3.3% of cases, respectively; on the left side, it was double-, triple-, quadruple-, and single-branched in 76.7%, 20%, 3.3%, and 3.3% of cases, respectively. The dorsal tectal mesencephalic artery appeared as a single vessel in 96.7% of cases, emerging as a collateral branch of the caudal cerebral artery. The dorsal mesencephalic tectal artery originated from the right dorsal cerebellar artery in 40% of cases and from the left side in 63.3% of cases. On the right side, there were four and three medial occipital hemispheric branches in 46.7% and 20% of cases, respectively; on the left side, there were four and three branches in 30% and 26.7% of cases. On the right side, the pineal artery was double-, single-, triple-, and quadruple-branched in 50%, 23.3%, 20%, and 6.7% of cases, respectively; on the left side, this artery was double-, single-, triple-, and quadruple-branched in 50%, 23.3%, 16.7%, and 10% of cases, respectively. The diencephalic artery was on the right side in 43.3% of cases and on the left side in 56.7% of cases. The interhemispheric artery was on the right side in 56.7% of cases and on the left side in 43.3% of cases; four, three, two, five, and one dorsal hemispheric trunks branched off of the interhemispheric artery in 40%, 40%, 10%, 6.7%, and 26.7% of cases, respectively. The caudal cerebral artery was classified as Type I in 56.7% of cases (subtype IA in 33.3% of cases and IB in 23.3% of cases), Type II in 40% of cases (subtype IIA in 20% of cases and IIB in 20% of cases), and Type III in 3.3% of cases. PMID:24890607

  5. Estrogen synthesis in the central nucleus of the amygdala following middle cerebral artery occlusion: role in modulating neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Saleh, T M; Connell, B J; Legge, C; Cribb, A E

    2005-01-01

    Stroke-induced lesions of the insular cortex in the brain have been linked to autonomic dysfunction (sympathoexcitation) leading to arrhythmogenesis and sudden cardiac death. In experimental models, systemic estrogen administration in male rats has been shown to reduce stroke-induced cell death in the insular cortex as well as prevent sympathoexcitation. The central nucleus of the amygdala has been postulated to mediate sympathoexcitatory output from the insular cortex. We therefore set out to determine if endogenous estrogen levels within the central nucleus of the amygdala are altered following stroke and if microinjection of estrogen into the central nucleus of the amygdala modulates autonomic tone. Plasma estrogen concentrations were not altered by middle cerebral artery occlusion (22.86+/-0.14 pg/ml vs. 21.24+/-0.33 pg/ml; P>0.05). In contrast, estrogen concentrations in the central nucleus of the amygdala increased significantly following middle cerebral artery occlusion (from 20.83+/-0.54 pg/ml to 76.67+/-1.59 pg/ml; P<0.05). Local infusion of an aromatase inhibitor, letrozole, into the central nucleus of the amygdala at the time of middle cerebral artery occlusion prevented the increase in estrogen concentration suggesting that this increase was dependent on aromatization from testosterone. Furthermore, bilateral microinjection of estrogen (0.5 microM in 200 nl) directly into the central nucleus of the amygdala significantly decreased arterial pressure and sympathetic tone and increased baroreflex sensitivity, and these effects were enhanced following co-injection with either an N-methyl-D-aspartate or non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist. Taken together, the results suggest that middle cerebral artery occlusion resulted in synthesis of estrogen within the central nucleus of the amygdala and that this enhanced estrogen level may act to attenuate overstimulation of central nucleus of the amygdala neurons to prevent middle cerebral artery occlusion

  6. Acid-sensing ion channel 1 and nitric oxide synthase are in adjacent layers in the wall of rat and human cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Hsien; Jin, Jingwen; Nashelsky, Marcus B.; Talman, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular acidification activates a family of proteins known as acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). One ASIC subtype, ASIC type 1 (ASIC1), may play an important role in synaptic plasticity, memory, fear conditioning and ischemic brain injury. ASIC1 is found primarily in neurons, but one report showed its expression in isolated mouse cerebrovascular cells. In this study, we sought to determine if ASIC1 is present in intact rat and human major cerebral arteries. A potential physiological significance of such a finding is suggested by studies showing that nitric oxide (NO), which acts as a powerful vasodilator, may modulate proton-gated currents in cultured cells expressing ASIC1s. Because both constitutive NO synthesizing enzymes, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS), are expressed in cerebral arteries we also studied the anatomical relationship between ASIC1 and nNOS or eNOS in both rat and human cerebral arteries. Western blot analysis demonstrated ASIC1 in cerebral arteries from both species. Immunofluorescent histochemistry and confocal microscopy also showed that ASIC1-immunoreactivity (IR), colocalized with the smooth muscle marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA), was present in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA), middle cerebral artery (MCA), posterior cerebral artery (PCA) and basilar artery (BA) of rat and human. Expression of ASIC1 in cerebral arteries is consistent with a role for ASIC1 in modulating cerebrovascular tone both in rat and human. Potential interactions between smooth muscle ASIC1 and nNOS or eNOS were supported by the presence of nNOS-IR in the neighboring adventitial layer and the presence of nNOS-IR and eNOS-IR in the adjacent endothelial layer of the cerebral arteries. PMID:25462386

  7. A Rare Case of Streptococcus alactolyticus Infective Endocarditis Complicated by Septic Emboli and Mycotic Left Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Railsback, Jaclyn

    2016-01-01

    To date, S. alactolyticus endocarditis complicated by middle cerebral artery aneurysm has not been reported. We describe the case of a 65-year-old female with a history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction presenting with confusion and a apical holosystolic murmur. Angiography of the brain identified new bilobed left middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Serial blood cultures grew S. alactolyticus, and aortic and mitral valve vegetation were discovered on transesophageal echocardiography. The patient was treated with antimicrobial therapy, mitral and aortic valve replacements, and microsurgical clipping of cerebral aneurysm. This case serves to highlight the pathogenicity of a sparsely described bacterium belonging to the heterogenous S. bovis complex. PMID:27525136

  8. A Rare Case of Streptococcus alactolyticus Infective Endocarditis Complicated by Septic Emboli and Mycotic Left Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Patricia; Railsback, Jaclyn; Gleason, James Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    To date, S. alactolyticus endocarditis complicated by middle cerebral artery aneurysm has not been reported. We describe the case of a 65-year-old female with a history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction presenting with confusion and a apical holosystolic murmur. Angiography of the brain identified new bilobed left middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Serial blood cultures grew S. alactolyticus, and aortic and mitral valve vegetation were discovered on transesophageal echocardiography. The patient was treated with antimicrobial therapy, mitral and aortic valve replacements, and microsurgical clipping of cerebral aneurysm. This case serves to highlight the pathogenicity of a sparsely described bacterium belonging to the heterogenous S. bovis complex. PMID:27525136

  9. The contribution of arterial blood gases in cerebral blood flow regulation and fuel utilization in man at high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Christopher K; MacLeod, David B; Smith, Kurt J; Lewis, Nia C; Foster, Glen E; Ikeda, Keita; Hoiland, Ryan L; Ainslie, Philip N

    2015-01-01

    The effects of partial acclimatization to high altitude (HA; 5,050 m) on cerebral metabolism and cerebrovascular function have not been characterized. We hypothesized (1) increased cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) at HA; and (2) that CO2 would affect cerebral metabolism more than hypoxia. PaO2 and PaCO2 were manipulated at sea level (SL) to simulate HA exposure, and at HA, SL blood gases were simulated; CVR was assessed at both altitudes. Arterial–jugular venous differences were measured to calculate cerebral metabolic rates and cerebral blood flow (CBF). We observed that (1) partial acclimatization yields a steeper CO2-H+ relation in both arterial and jugular venous blood; yet (2) CVR did not change, despite (3) mean arterial pressure (MAP)-CO2 reactivity being doubled at HA, thus indicating effective cerebral autoregulation. (4) At SL hypoxia increased CBF, and restoration of oxygen at HA reduced CBF, but neither had any effect on cerebral metabolism. Acclimatization resets the cerebrovasculature to chronic hypocapnia. PMID:25690474

  10. Quantitative agreement between [(15) O]H2 O PET and model free QUASAR MRI-derived cerebral blood flow and arterial blood volume.

    PubMed

    Heijtel, D F R; Petersen, E T; Mutsaerts, H J M M; Bakker, E; Schober, P; Stevens, M F; van Berckel, B N M; Majoie, C B L M; Booij, J; van Osch, M J P; van Bavel, E T; Boellaard, R; Lammertsma, A A; Nederveen, A J

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether there was an agreement between quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial cerebral blood volume (CBVA) measurements by [(15) O]H2 O positron emission tomography (PET) and model-free QUASAR MRI. Twelve healthy subjects were scanned within a week in separate MRI and PET imaging sessions, after which quantitative and qualitative agreement between both modalities was assessed for gray matter, white matter and whole brain region of interests (ROI). The correlation between CBF measurements obtained with both modalities was moderate to high (r(2) : 0.28-0.60, P < 0.05), although QUASAR significantly underestimated CBF by 30% (P < 0.001). CBVA was moderately correlated (r(2) : 0.28-0.43, P < 0.05), with QUASAR yielding values that were only 27% of the [(15) O]H2 O-derived values (P < 0.001). Group-wise voxel statistics identified minor areas with significant contrast differences between [(15) O]H2 O PET and QUASAR MRI, indicating similar qualitative CBVA and CBF information by both modalities. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate that QUASAR MRI and [(15) O]H2 O PET provide similar CBF and CBVA information, but with systematic quantitative discrepancies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26876426

  11. Spatial mapping of dynamic cerebral autoregulation by multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy in high-grade carotid artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, Matthias; Schumacher, F. Konrad; Rutsch, Sebastian; Oeinck, Maximilian; Timmer, Jens; Mader, Irina; Schelter, Björn; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaller, Christoph P.

    2014-09-01

    The exact spatial distribution of impaired cerebral autoregulation in carotid artery disease is unknown. In this pilot study, we present a new approach of multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy (mcNIRS) for noninvasive spatial mapping of dynamic autoregulation in carotid artery disease. In 15 patients with unilateral severe carotid artery stenosis or occlusion, cortical hemodynamics in the bilateral frontal cortex were assessed from changes in oxyhemoglobin concentration using 52-channel NIRS (spatial resolution ˜2 cm). Dynamic autoregulation was graded by the phase shift between respiratory-induced 0.1 Hz oscillations of blood pressure and oxyhemoglobin. Ten of 15 patients showed regular phase values in the expected (patho) physiological range. Five patients had clearly outlying irregular phase values mostly due to artifacts. In patients with a regular phase pattern, a significant side-to-side difference of dynamic autoregulation was observed for the cortical border zone area between the middle and anterior cerebral artery (p<0.05). In conclusion, dynamic cerebral autoregulation can be spatially assessed from slow hemodynamic oscillations with mcNIRS. In high-grade carotid artery disease, cortical dynamic autoregulation is affected mostly in the vascular border zone. Spatial mapping of dynamic autoregulation may serve as a powerful tool for identifying brain regions at specific risks for hemodynamic infarction.

  12. [Study on the methods for establishing virtual three-dimensional models of cerebral arteries with the three-dimensional moulding software].

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Xie, Xiaodong; Wang, Chaohua

    2007-12-01

    This study was conducted to establish the methods of virtual three-dimensional cerebral arteries models by use of three-dimensional moulding software. The virtual models of the cerebral arteries were established using the three-dimensional moulding software of 3D Studio MAX R3 with 46 cases of normal cerebral DSA image as the original. The results showed there was similarity in appearance between the virtual cerebral arteries and DSA image. This is of benefit to understanding the vascular three-dimensional spatial relation in visual sense. Several models of different variant anatomy could be easily established on the copy files of the virtual cerebral arteries model. The virtual model could help learners to create and increase the three-dimensional space concept of arteries and aneurysms in clinical teaching. The results indicated that the virtual three-dimensional cerebral arteries models could display the three-dimensional spatial relation of the cerebral arterial system distinctly, and could serve as a morphologic foundation in the researches on vascular disease. PMID:18232470

  13. Autonomic and myocardial changes in middle cerebral artery occlusion: stroke models in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cechetto, D F; Wilson, J X; Smith, K E; Wolski, D; Silver, M D; Hachinski, V C

    1989-11-20

    Stroke models in larger animals such as the cat, dog and monkey are becoming increasingly more expensive and less readily available. However, the rat is an excellent model for focal cerebral ischemia. Rats are readily available, inexpensive and their neuroanatomy and brain function have been studied extensively. Increases in plasma catecholamines and myocardial damage have been observed in clinical stroke. We examined autonomic and myocardial changes in two rat stroke models. In one model only the middle cerebral artery was occluded (MCAO) while the other model involved occlusion of both the MCA and the common carotid artery (MCAO/CCAO). Arterial blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously in 25 male rats (326-430 g) that underwent one of the following procedures: (1) MCAO only; (2) MCAO/CCAO; (3) CCAO only; and (4) sham occlusions (SHAM). Arterial blood samples (0.5 ml) for radioenzymatic assay of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) were taken twice before the occlusions and at 90 and 180 min after the occlusions. The animals were perfused at the end of the experiment and the heart removed and examined histologically. Tetrazolium salts were reacted with oxidative enzymes to delineate the region of inadequate perfusion. The mean blood pressure and pulse pressure of the SHAM, MCAO/CCAO and CCAO groups significantly declined from initial values (from an average of 78 to 53 mm Hg) during the course of the experiment. However, the mean blood pressure and pulse pressure of the MCAO rats did not change during the experiment, so that the final mean blood pressure and pulse pressure were significantly higher than in the other 3 groups. The levels of both NE and E increased significantly (NE, 1443 +/- 285.9 to 4095 +/- 929 pg/ml; E, 2402 +/- 623 to 3741 +/- 1166 pg/ml) following occlusion in the MCAO group only while the other 3 groups did not change. Four of 6 hearts in the MCAO group were abnormal, showing evidence of subendocardial hemorrhage, ischemic

  14. Endovascular Therapeutic Occlusion of the Posterior Cerebral Artery: An Option for Ruptured Giant Aneurysm in a Child.

    PubMed

    Demartini, Zeferino; Matos, Luiz Afonso Dias; Dos Santos, Marcio Luis Tostes; Cardoso-Demartini, Adriane de Andre

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population is low, and surgical clipping remains a good long-term treatment option. However, posterior circulation aneurysms are even more complex to manage in children than in adults. We report a case of a giant aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery in a 10-year-old boy presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Endovascular treatment with platinum coils was performed with total occlusion of the aneurysm and the affected arterial segment without complications. The patient achieved good recovery, and a late control angiogram confirmed exclusion of the aneurysm. Occurrence of special features of cerebral aneurysm in children, in comparison to adults, is also described. Parent artery sacrifice is an effective therapeutic option, but long-term follow-up is necessary to avoid recurrence and rebleeding. PMID:26974558

  15. Simultaneous automatic arteries-veins separation and cerebral blood flow imaging with single-wavelength laser speckle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Nengyun; Qiu, Jianjun; Li, Pengcheng; Sun, Xiaoli; Yin, Cui; Luo, Weihua; Chen, Shangbin; Luo, Qingming

    2011-08-01

    Automatic separation of arteries and veins in optical cerebral cortex images is important in clinical practice and preclinical study. In this paper, a simple but effective automatic artery-vein separation method which utilizes single-wavelength coherent illumination is presented. This method is based on the relative temporal minimum reflectance analysis of laser speckle images. The validation is demonstrated with both theoretic simulations and experimental results applied to the rat cortex. Moreover, this method can be combined with laser speckle contrast analysis so that the artery-vein separation and blood flow imaging can be simultaneously obtained using the same raw laser speckle images data to enable more accurate analysis of changes of cerebral blood flow within different tissue compartments during functional activation, disease dynamic, and neurosurgery, which may broaden the applications of laser speckle imaging in biology and medicine.

  16. Anatomical features of the vertebral artery for transbrachial direct cannulation of a guiding catheter to perform coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms in the posterior cerebral circulation

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Yuichi; Tanno, Yuhei; Kasakura, Shigen; Aoyagi, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Background Transbrachial approach is an alternative technique for coil embolization of posterior circulation aneurysms. The purpose of our study was to investigate the anatomical features of the vertebral artery (VA) for transbrachial direct VA cannulation of a guiding catheter (GC) to perform coil embolization of posterior circulation aneurysms. Methods Included in retrospective analysis were patients who underwent transbrachial coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms in the posterior cerebral circulation by direct VA cannulation of a GC from 2007 to 2013. Investigated were patient characteristics, preoperative sizes of aneurysms, aneurysms location, the angle formed by the target VA and the subclavian artery (AVS), and the VA diameter at the level of the fourth cervical vertebral body (VAD) in the side of the transbrachial access route. Results Thirty-one patients with 32 aneurysms met our criteria. The locations of aneurysms were the VA (n = 16), basilar artery (BA) tip (n = 10), BA trunk (n = 3), BA superior cerebellar artery (n = 1), BA anterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 1), and VA posterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 1). The right brachial artery was punctured in 27 cases with 28 aneurysms as transbrachial direct cannulation of a GC, and left was in 4 cases with 4 aneurysms. The average AVS, ranging from 45° to 95°, was 77°, and the average VAD, ranging from 3.18 to 4.45 mm, was 3.97 mm. Conclusion For transbrachial direct cannulation of a GC, it seems required that the AVS is about 45° or more and the VAD is about 3.18 mm or more. PMID:25964434

  17. Where are We Now with Decompressive Hemicraniectomy for Malignant Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction?

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeong-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the best medical treatment, large hemispheric infarction, resulting from acute occlusion of either the internal carotid or the proximal middle cerebral artery with insufficient collateral blood flow is associated with a high case fatality rate of approximately 60%. Thus, a decompressive hemicraniectomy is considered a life-saving procedure for this devastating disease. Findings of three recent randomized, controlled clinical trials and their meta-analysis showed that early surgical decompression not only reduced the number of case fatalities but also increased the incidence of favorable outcomes. The authors review the pathophysiology, historical background in previous studies, operative timing, surgical technique and clinical outcomes of surgical decompression for malignant hemispheric infarction. PMID:23844349

  18. "Alien hand" and loss of bimanual coordination after dominant anterior cerebral artery territory infarction.

    PubMed Central

    McNabb, A W; Carroll, W M; Mastaglia, F L

    1988-01-01

    Three patients with dominant anterior cerebral artery territory infarction demonstrated a severe disturbance of upper limb motor control with impaired bimanual coordination, the "alien hand" sign, and intermanual conflict, in addition to signs of callosal interruption and a transcortical motor aphasia. Recordings of movement-related potentials in one patient showed an attenuated Bereitschaftspotential and a greater asymmetry of the NS' component of the premotor negativity with left finger than with right finger movement. The impairment of bimanual motor control and associated abnormal motor behaviour of the right hand in these cases are postulated to be due to involvement of the supplementary motor area and related areas of the medial frontal cortex. Images PMID:3346686

  19. Contralateral diaphragmatic palsy after subcortical middle cerebral artery infarction without capsular involvement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Ni; Chen, Po-Nien; Lai, Chiou-Lian; Liou, Li-Min

    2011-06-01

    Diaphragmatic palsy after acute stroke is a novel clinical entity and may result in a high incidence of respiratory dysfunction and pneumonia, which especially cause greater morbidity and mortality. Generally, internal capsule and complete middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarctions are major risk-factors for developing diaphragmatic palsy. Herein, we present a case with contralateral diaphragmatic palsy after a subcortical MCA infarction without capsular involvement. Dyspnea occurred after stroke, while a chest X-ray and CT study disclosed an elevated right hemidiaphragm without significant infiltration or patch of pneumonia. A phrenic nerve conduction study showed bilateral mild prolonged onset-latency without any significant right-left difference. This suggested a lesion causing diaphragmatic palsy was not in the phrenic nerve itself, but could possibly originate from an above central location (subcortical MCA infarction). We also discussed the role of transcranial magnetic stimulation study in the survey of central pathway and demonstrated diaphragmatic palsy-related orthopnea. PMID:21365293

  20. Waffle Y technique: pCONus for tandem bifurcation aneurysms of the middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Mpotsaris, Anastasios; Henkes, Hans; Weber, Werner

    2014-12-01

    Broad based bifurcation aneurysms are challenging. Various endovascular techniques aim at stabilizing the coil package in the aneurysm. Among these, the waffle cone technique provides a viable alternative to Y stenting in selected cases, incorporating a less complex delivery, and the reduced inherent risk of a single stenting procedure compared with the use of two stents in Y configuration. Unlike conventional stents, the distal end of the new pCONus device opens like a blossoming flower inside of the aneurysm to facilitate the waffle cone technique. In a case with tandem unruptured broad based middle cerebral artery bifurcation aneurysms, the complex anatomical challenge was resolved by a unique combination of both techniques: two pCONus deployed in Y configuration, offering stable neck coverage for coiling both aneurysms. The angiographic results with complete occlusion of both aneurysms and the uneventful clinical course at 90 days with continued daily administration of dual antiplatelet therapy are encouraging. PMID:24362966

  1. [Effects of electromagnetic fields on tonicity of cerebral vessels and arterial pressure].

    PubMed

    Razumov, A N; Bobrovnitskiĭ, I P; Kolesnikova, I V; Kasparov, E V; Anan'in, N N; El'chininov, N V; Gallinger, V E; Mineeva, E N

    2006-01-01

    Investigations performed by the authors show that normalization of the mechanisms of vegetative regulation of arterial pressure and cerebral vessels tonicity in young patients with sympathico-tonic vegetative dystonia can be achieved by combined use of constant magnetic field (magnetic induction 60 mTl, penetration 10 mm, area 1.5 cm2) and monochromatic electromagnetic wave (length 0.47 mcm, frequency 6 x 10(14) Hz, penetration 1.5 mm and light spot 7 mm) which are directed to a biologically active point C7 shen-men from both sides simultaneously for 3 min, at 11 a.m. to 13 p.m. once a day, for 10 days. PMID:16752814

  2. Waffle Y technique: pCONus for tandem bifurcation aneurysms of the middle cerebral artery

    PubMed Central

    Mpotsaris, Anastasios; Henkes, Hans; Weber, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Broad based bifurcation aneurysms are challenging. Various endovascular techniques aim at stabilizing the coil package in the aneurysm. Among these, the waffle cone technique provides a viable alternative to Y stenting in selected cases, incorporating a less complex delivery, and the reduced inherent risk of a single stenting procedure compared with the use of two stents in Y configuration. Unlike conventional stents, the distal end of the new pCONus device opens like a blossoming flower inside of the aneurysm to facilitate the waffle cone technique. In a case with tandem unruptured broad based middle cerebral artery bifurcation aneurysms, the complex anatomical challenge was resolved by a unique combination of both techniques: two pCONus deployed in Y configuration, offering stable neck coverage for coiling both aneurysms. The angiographic results with complete occlusion of both aneurysms and the uneventful clinical course at 90 days with continued daily administration of dual antiplatelet therapy are encouraging. PMID:24347446

  3. The Effect of Hemorheologic Factors on Middle Cerebral Artery Blood Flow Velocity in Young Individuals.

    PubMed

    Ameriso, S F; Meiselman, H J; Saraj, A; Fisher, M

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the effect of hemorheologic factors on middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity in 55 healthy individuals aged 18 to 30 years demonstrated an inverse association between mean MCA blood flow velocity and hematocrit (r = -0.27, p < 0.05). This association was largely explained by the effect of whole-blood viscosity. Neither fibrinogen concentration nor plasma viscosity were significantly associated with MCA blood flow velocity in this group; this lack of a fibrinogen association is in contrast to results previously obtained in elderly individuals where an inverse association was observed. These findings thus demonstrate age-dependent differences in the relationship between fibrinogen and MCA blood flow velocity. PMID:27308856

  4. The influence of hyperoxia on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and cerebral blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (CBFVMCA) in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kolbitsch, Christian; Lorenz, Ingo H; Hörmann, Christoph; Hinteregger, Martin; Löckinger, Alexander; Moser, Patrizia L; Kremser, Christian; Schocke, Michael; Felber, Stephan; Pfeiffer, Karl P; Benzer, Arnulf

    2002-09-01

    Conflicting results reported on the effects of hyperoxia on cerebral hemodynamics have been attributed mainly to methodical and species differences. In the present study contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion measurement was used to analyze the influence of hyperoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 1.0) on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in awake, normoventilating volunteers (n = 19). Furthermore, the experiment was repeated in 20 volunteers for transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) measurement of cerebral blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (CBFV(MCA)). When compared to normoxia (FiO2 = 0.21), hyperoxia heterogeneously influenced rCBV (4.95 +/- 0.02 to 12.87 +/- 0.08 mL/100g (FiO2 = 0.21) vs. 4.50 +/- 0.02 to 13.09 +/- 0.09 mL/100g (FiO2 = 1.0). In contrast, hyperoxia diminished rCBF in all regions (68.08 +/- 0.38 to 199.58 +/- 1.58 mL/100g/min (FiO2 = 0.21) vs. 58.63 +/- 0.32 to 175.16 +/- 1.51 mL/100g/min (FiO2 = 1.0)) except in parietal and left frontal gray matter. CBFV(MCA) remained unchanged regardless of the inspired oxygen fraction (62 +/- 9 cm/s (FiO2 = 0.21) vs. 64 +/- 8 cm/s (FiO2 = 1.0)). Finding CBFV(MCA) unchanged during hyperoxia is consistent with the present study's unchanged rCBF in parietal and left frontal gray matter. In these fronto-parietal regions predominantly fed by the middle cerebral artery, the vasoconstrictor effect of oxygen was probably counteracted by increased perfusion of foci of neuronal activity controlling general behavior and arousal. PMID:12413599

  5. Screen-imaging guidance using a modified portable video macroscope for middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xingbao; Luo, Junli; Liu, Yun; Chen, Guolong; Liu, Song; Ruan, Qiangjin; Deng, Xunding; Wang, Dianchun; Fan, Quanshui; Pan, Xinghua

    2012-04-25

    The use of operating microscopes is limited by the focal length. Surgeons using these instruments cannot simultaneously view and access the surgical field and must choose one or the other. The longer focal length (more than 1 000 mm) of an operating telescope permits a position away from the operating field, above the surgeon and out of the field of view. This gives the telescope an advantage over an operating microscope. We developed a telescopic system using screen-imaging guidance and a modified portable video macroscope constructed from a Computar MLH-10 × macro lens, a DFK-21AU04 USB CCD Camera and a Dell laptop computer as monitor screen. This system was used to establish a middle cerebral artery occlusion model in rats. Results showed that magnification of the modified portable video macroscope was appropriate (5-20 ×) even though the Computar MLH-10 × macro lens was placed 800 mm away from the operating field rather than at the specified working distance of 152.4 mm with a zoom of 1-40 ×. The screen-imaging telescopic technique was clear, life-like, stereoscopic and matched the actual operation. Screen-imaging guidance led to an accurate, smooth, minimally invasive and comparatively easy surgical procedure. Success rate of the model establishment evaluated by neurological function using the modified neurological score system was 74.07%. There was no significant difference in model establishment time, sensorimotor deficit and infarct volume percentage. Our findings indicate that the telescopic lens is effective in the screen surgical operation mode referred to as "long distance observation and short distance operation" and that screen-imaging guidance using an modified portable video macroscope can be utilized for the establishment of a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and micro-neurosurgery. PMID:25722675

  6. NADPH oxidase 4 attenuates cerebral artery changes during the progression of Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Onetti, Yara; Meirelles, Thayna; Dantas, Ana P; Schröder, Katrin; Vila, Elisabet; Egea, Gustavo; Jiménez-Altayó, Francesc

    2016-05-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a connective tissue disorder that is often associated with the fibrillin-1 (Fbn1) gene mutation and characterized by cardiovascular alterations, predominantly ascending aortic aneurysms. Although neurovascular complications are uncommon in MFS, the improvement in Marfan patients' life expectancy is revealing other secondary alterations, potentially including neurovascular disorders. However, little is known about small-vessel pathophysiology in MFS. MFS is associated with hyperactivated transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling, which among numerous other downstream effectors, induces the NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) isoform of NADPH oxidase, a strong enzymatic source of H2O2 We hypothesized that MFS induces middle cerebral artery (MCA) alterations and that Nox4 contributes to them. MCA properties from 3-, 6-, or 9-mo-old Marfan (Fbn1(C1039G/+)) mice were compared with those from age/sex-matched wild-type littermates. At 6 mo, Marfan compared with wild-type mice developed higher MCA wall/lumen (wild-type: 0.081 ± 0.004; Marfan: 0.093 ± 0.002; 60 mmHg; P < 0.05), coupled with increased reactive oxygen species production, TGF-β, and Nox4 expression. However, wall stiffness and myogenic autoregulation did not change. To investigate the influence of Nox4 on cerebrovascular properties, we generated Marfan mice with Nox4 deficiency (Nox4(-/-)). Strikingly, Nox4 deletion in Marfan mice aggravated MCA wall thickening (cross-sectional area; Marfan: 6,660 ± 363 μm(2); Marfan Nox4(-/-): 8,795 ± 824 μm(2); 60 mmHg; P < 0.05), accompanied by decreased TGF-β expression and increased collagen deposition and Nox1 expression. These findings provide the first evidence that Nox4 mitigates cerebral artery structural changes in a murine model of MFS. PMID:26945079

  7. Comparison of BMSs with SES for Symptomatic Intracranial Disease of the Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yue Xuanye; Yin Qin; Xi Gangming; Zhu Wusheng; Xu Gelin; Zhang Renliang; Zhou Zhiming; Ma Minmin; Jin Guangfu; Liu Xinfeng

    2011-02-15

    This study was designed to compare the clinical and angiographic outcomes of patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery stenosis treated with balloon-mounted stents (BMS) and self-expandable Wingspan system (SES). We reviewed the 69 consecutive stent placement procedures for symptomatic atherosclerotic stenosis ({>=}70) in M1 segment of middle cerebral artery in 67 patients in 3 years. According to the stent types, the patients were classed as BMS and SES groups. The demographic characteristics, conventional risk factors of ischemic stroke, degree of stenosis, periprocedural complications, stent types, and clinical and angiographic outcomes were analyzed. There were 39 patients in the BMS group and 28 patients in the SES group. The demographic characteristics, conventional risk factors, and periprocedural complications were similar but different in residual stenosis after stenting in both groups (5.9% {+-} 9.9% vs. 14.4% {+-} 14.6%; P = 0.01). For the overall cohort, the rate of stroke or death and restenosis was 10.9% (7/66) and 24.5% (14/57), respectively. The frequency of restenosis was higher in the SES group than in the BMS group (log-rank, P = 0.04; crude hazard ratio = 3.03; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-9.15; P = 0.049; and adjusted hazard ratio = 3.61; 95% CI, 1.06-12.27; P = 0.04); however, there was no difference in clinical outcomes (log-rank, P = 0.51; crude hazard ratio = 1.66; 95% CI, 0.36-7.61; P = 0.51; and adjusted hazard ratio = 0.59; 95% CI, 0.04-7.89; P = 0.69). The corrected degree of restenosis was higher in the SES than the BMS group. The prevalence of restenosis was higher in the SES than the BMS group, but the perioperative complications and follow-up clinical outcomes had no significant difference.

  8. Arterial input function and gray matter cerebral blood volume measurements in children

    PubMed Central

    Withey, Stephanie B.; Novak, Jan; MacPherson, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate how arterial input functions (AIFs) vary with age in children and compare the use of individual and population AIFs for calculating gray matter CBV values. Quantitative measures of cerebral blood volume (CBV) using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) require measurement of an AIF. AIFs are affected by numerous factors including patient age. Few data presenting AIFs in the pediatric population exists. Materials and Methods Twenty‐two previously treated pediatric brain tumor patients (mean age, 6.3 years; range, 2.0–15.3 years) underwent DSC‐MRI scans on a 3T MRI scanner over 36 visits. AIFs were measured in the middle cerebral artery. A functional form of an adult population AIF was fitted to each AIF to obtain parameters reflecting AIF shape. The relationship between parameters and age was assessed. Correlations between gray matter CBV values calculated using the resulting population and individual patient AIFs were explored. Results There was a large variation in individual patient AIFs but correlations between AIF shape and age were observed. The center (r = 0.596, P < 0.001) and width of the first‐pass peak (r = 0.441, P = 0.007) were found to correlate significantly with age. Intrapatient coefficients of variation were significantly lower than interpatient values for all parameters (P < 0.001). Differences in CBV values calculated with an overall population and age‐specific population AIF compared to those calculated with individual AIFs were 31.3% and 31.0%, respectively. Conclusion Parameters describing AIF shape correlate with patient age in line with expected changes in cardiac output. In pediatric DSC‐MRI studies individual patient AIFs are recommended. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;43:981–989 PMID:26514288

  9. Effect of Premature Ventricular Contractions on Middle Cerebral Artery Blood Flow Velocity.

    PubMed

    Ameriso, S F; Fisher, M; Sager, P

    1991-08-01

    The effect of premature ventricular contractions on blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery was studied by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography in 1 0 patients. Velocity during three ectopic beats for each patient was lower than that during the preceding and the following beat in every recording. The decrease in peak velocity was 30.7 ± 12.4% and 37.1 ± 13.3% (mean ± standard deviation) compared to the preceding and following beat, respectively. This variation was significantly larger (p < 0.0001) than the spontaneous change observed during sinus rhythm, 2. 7 ± 2.2% in patients with premature ventricular contractions and 3.5 ± 3.2% in control subjects. Similar results were obtained for both mean and diastolic blood flow velocities. Systolic-diastolic ratios were similar for premature ventricular contractions, beats preceding or following premature ventricular contractions, and sinus rhythm beats. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound appears to be an excellent technique for analyzing the effects of cardiac arrhythmias on the cerebral circulation. PMID:27311107

  10. Detection of impaired cerebral autoregulation improves by increasing arterial blood pressure variability

    PubMed Central

    Katsogridakis, Emmanuel; Bush, Glen; Fan, Lingke; Birch, Anthony A; Simpson, David M; Allen, Robert; Potter, John F; Panerai, Ronney B

    2013-01-01

    Although the assessment of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) based on measurements of spontaneous fluctuations in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) is a convenient and much used method, there remains uncertainty about its reliability. We tested the effects of increasing ABP variability, provoked by a modification of the thigh cuff method, on the ability of the autoregulation index to discriminate between normal and impaired CA, using hypercapnia as a surrogate for dynamic CA impairment. In 30 healthy volunteers, ABP (Finapres) and CBF velocity (CBFV, transcranial Doppler) were recorded at rest and during 5% CO2 breathing, with and without pseudo-random sequence inflation and deflation of bilateral thigh cuffs. The application of thigh cuffs increased ABP and CBFV variabilities and was not associated with a distortion of the CBFV step response estimates for both normocapnic and hypercapnic conditions (P=0.59 and P=0.96, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity of CA impairment detection were improved with the thigh cuff method, with the area under the receiver–operator curve increasing from 0.746 to 0.859 (P=0.031). We conclude that the new method is a safe, efficient, and appealing alternative to currently existing assessment methods for the investigation of the status of CA. PMID:23232946