Science.gov

Sample records for cerebral asymmetries complementary

  1. Cognitive Deficits and Cerebral Asymmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Dirk J.

    1982-01-01

    Research concerning cerebral asymmetry and its effect on scholastic achievement, reading disabilities, learning disabilities, and linguistic competence is reviewed in an exploration of brain hemisphere-specific etiologies of dyslexia. (CJ)

  2. Cerebral Asymmetries and Reading Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirozzolo, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are historical developments regarding the concepts of cerebral localization, and analyzed are implications of current research on the role of the cerebral hemispheres in reading disorders. (CL)

  3. The evolution and genetics of cerebral asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Corballis, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Handedness and cerebral asymmetry are commonly assumed to be uniquely human, and even defining characteristics of our species. This is increasingly refuted by the evidence of behavioural asymmetries in non-human species. Although complex manual skill and language are indeed unique to our species and are represented asymmetrically in the brain, some non-human asymmetries appear to be precursors, and others are shared between humans and non-humans. In all behavioural and cerebral asymmetries so far investigated, a minority of individuals reverse or negate the dominant asymmetry, suggesting that such asymmetries are best understood in the context of the overriding bilateral symmetry of the brain and body, and a trade-off between the relative advantages and disadvantages of symmetry and asymmetry. Genetic models of handedness, for example, typically postulate a gene with two alleles, one disposing towards right-handedness and the other imposing no directional influence. There is as yet no convincing evidence as to the location of this putative gene, suggesting that several genes may be involved, or that the gene may be monomorphic with variations due to environmental or epigenetic influences. Nevertheless, it is suggested that, in behavioural, neurological and evolutionary terms, it may be more profitable to examine the degree rather than the direction of asymmetry. PMID:19064358

  4. Arterial tree asymmetry reduces cerebral pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Vrselja, Zvonimir; Brkic, Hrvoje; Curic, Goran

    2015-11-01

    With each heartbeat, pressure wave (PW) propagates from aorta toward periphery. In cerebral circulation, at the level of circle of Willis (CW), four arteries and four PWs converge. Since the interference is an elemental property of the wave, PWs interfere at the level of CW. We hypothesize that the asymmetry of brain-supplying arteries (that join to form CW) creates phase difference between the four PWs that interfere at the level of CW and reduce downstream cerebral pulsatility. To best of our knowledge, the data about the sequence of PWs' arrival into the cerebral circulation is lacking. Evident imperfect bilateral symmetry of the vessels results with different path length of brain-supplying arteries, hence, PWs should arrive into the head at different times. The probabilistic calculation shows that asynchronous arrival is more probable than synchronous. The importance of PWs for the cerebral circulation is highlighted by the observation that barotrauma protection mechanisms are more influenced by the crest of PW (pulse pressure) than by the mean arterial pressure. In addition, an increased arterial pulsatility is associated with several brain pathologies. We created simple computational models of four converging arteries and found that asynchronous arrival of the PWs results with lower maximum pressure, slower rate of pressure amplification and lower downstream pulsatility. In analogy, the asynchronous arrival of the pressure waves into the cerebral circulation should decrease blood flow pulsatility and lower transmission of kinetic energy on arterial wall. We conclude that asynchronous arrival of PWs into the cerebral circulation influences cerebral hemodynamics and represents a physiological necessity. PMID:26277658

  5. Cerebral blood flow asymmetries in headache-free migraineurs

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.R.; Welch, K.M.; Ewing, J.R.; Joseph, R.; D'Andrea, G.

    1987-11-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) asymmetries were studied in controls and patients with common and classic/complicated migraine using /sup 133/Xe inhalation with 8 homologously situated external collimators over each cerebral hemisphere. Migraine patients as a group more frequently had posterior rCBF asymmetries than controls (p less than 0.03). Although there were no differences in the number of anterior rCBF asymmetries, migraine patients had 2 or more asymmetric probe pairs more often than controls (p less than 0.02). The posterior rCBF asymmetries, consistent with the site of activation of many migraine attacks, may be related to more labile control of the cerebral circulation.

  6. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liptak, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    The optimal practice of medicine includes integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research. This article reviews nine treatment modalities used for children who have cerebral palsy (CP), including hyperbaric oxygen, the Adeli Suit, patterning, electrical stimulation, conductive education,…

  7. Complementary and alternative therapies for cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Liptak, Gregory S

    2005-01-01

    The optimal practice of medicine includes integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research. This article reviews nine treatment modalities used for children who have cerebral palsy (CP), including hyperbaric oxygen, the Adeli Suit, patterning, electrical stimulation, conductive education, equine-assisted therapy, craniosacral therapy, Feldenkrais therapy, and acupuncture. Unfortunately, these modalities have different degrees of published evidence to support or refute their effectiveness. Uncontrolled and controlled trials of hippotherapy have shown beneficial effects on body structures and functioning. Studies of acupuncture are promising, but more studies are required before specific recommendations can be made. Most studies of patterning have been negative and its use cannot be recommended. However, for the other interventions, such as hyperbaric oxygen, more evidence is required before recommendations can be made. The individual with CP and his or her family have a right to full disclosure of all possible treatment options and whatever knowledge currently is available regarding these therapies. PMID:15977320

  8. Complementary Hemispheric Asymmetries in Object Naming and Recognition: A Voxel-Based Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acres, K.; Taylor, K. I.; Moss, H. E.; Stamatakis, E. A.; Tyler, L. K.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscientific research proposes complementary hemispheric asymmetries in naming and recognising visual objects, with a left temporal lobe advantage for object naming and a right temporal lobe advantage for object recognition. Specifically, it has been proposed that the left inferior temporal lobe plays a mediational role linking…

  9. Music-induced changes in functional cerebral asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Markus; Hodgetts, Sophie; Eerola, Tuomas

    2016-04-01

    After decades of research, it remains unclear whether emotion lateralization occurs because one hemisphere is dominant for processing the emotional content of the stimuli, or whether emotional stimuli activate lateralised networks associated with the subjective emotional experience. By using emotion-induction procedures, we investigated the effect of listening to happy and sad music on three well-established lateralization tasks. In a prestudy, Mozart's piano sonata (K. 448) and Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata were rated as the most happy and sad excerpts, respectively. Participants listened to either one emotional excerpt, or sat in silence before completing an emotional chimeric faces task (Experiment 1), visual line bisection task (Experiment 2) and a dichotic listening task (Experiment 3 and 4). Listening to happy music resulted in a reduced right hemispheric bias in facial emotion recognition (Experiment 1) and visuospatial attention (Experiment 2) and increased left hemispheric bias in language lateralization (Experiments 3 and 4). Although Experiments 1-3 revealed an increased positive emotional state after listening to happy music, mediation analyses revealed that the effect on hemispheric asymmetries was not mediated by music-induced emotional changes. The direct effect of music listening on lateralization was investigated in Experiment 4 in which tempo of the happy excerpt was manipulated by controlling for other acoustic features. However, the results of Experiment 4 made it rather unlikely that tempo is the critical cue accounting for the effects. We conclude that listening to music can affect functional cerebral asymmetries in well-established emotional and cognitive laterality tasks, independent of music-induced changes in the emotion state. PMID:26970942

  10. The effect of caffeine on cerebral asymmetry in rats.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, M; Segarceanu, A; Negutu, M; Ghita, I; Fulga, I; Coman, O A

    2015-01-01

    the frequency range of 0.5-4 Hz. The higher dose of caffeine modified the percentage of alpha 1, alpha2, beta, delta and theta2 waves compared to the control group. The group that received 150 mg caffeine/ kg.b.w. recorded a reversal in the cerebral asymmetry of rats in the 1.7-13.9 Hz, 15-19 Hz and 21-25 Hz frequency ranges. PMID:26664474

  11. The effect of caffeine on cerebral asymmetry in rats

    PubMed Central

    Voiculescu, M; Segarceanu, A; Negutu, M; Ghita, I; Fulga, I; Coman, OA

    2015-01-01

    the frequency range of 0.5-4 Hz. The higher dose of caffeine modified the percentage of alpha 1, alpha2, beta, delta and theta2 waves compared to the control group. The group that received 150 mg caffeine/ kg.b.w. recorded a reversal in the cerebral asymmetry of rats in the 1.7-13.9 Hz, 15-19 Hz and 21-25 Hz frequency ranges. PMID:26664474

  12. Menstrual cycle-related changes of functional cerebral asymmetries in fine motor coordination.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Ulrike; Hausmann, Markus

    2012-06-01

    Fluctuating sex hormone levels during the menstrual cycle have been shown to affect functional cerebral asymmetries in cognitive domains. These effects seem to result from the neuromodulatory properties of sex hormones and their metabolites on interhemispheric processing. The present study was carried out to investigate whether functional cerebral asymmetries in fine motor coordination as reflected by manual asymmetries are also susceptible to natural sex hormonal variations during the menstrual cycle. Sixteen right-handed women with a regular menstrual cycle performed a finger tapping paradigm consisting of two conditions (simple, sequential) during the low hormone menstrual phase and the high estrogen and progesterone luteal phase. To validate the luteal phase, saliva levels of free progesterone (P) were analysed using chemiluminescence assays. As expected, normally cycling women showed a substantial decrease in manual asymmetries in a more demanding sequential tapping condition involving four fingers compared with simple (repetitive) finger tapping. This reduction in the degree of dominant (right) hand manual asymmetries was evident during the luteal phase. During the menstrual phase, however, manual asymmetries were even reversed in direction, indicating a slight advantage in favour of the non-dominant (left) hand. These findings suggest that functional cerebral asymmetries in fine motor coordination are affected by sex hormonal changes during the menstrual cycle, probably via hormonal modulations of interhemispheric interaction. PMID:22387299

  13. The Influence of Sex Hormones on Functional Cerebral Asymmetries in Postmenopausal Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Ulrike; Erdmann, Gisela

    2008-01-01

    Studies investigating changes in functional cerebral asymmetries (FCAs) with hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle in young women have led to controversial hypotheses about an influence of estrogen (E) and/or progesterone (P) on FCAs. Based on methodical, but also on principal problems in deriving conclusions about hormone effects from…

  14. Menstrual Cycle-Related Changes of Functional Cerebral Asymmetries in Fine Motor Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Ulrike; Hausmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuating sex hormone levels during the menstrual cycle have been shown to affect functional cerebral asymmetries in cognitive domains. These effects seem to result from the neuromodulatory properties of sex hormones and their metabolites on interhemispheric processing. The present study was carried out to investigate whether functional cerebral…

  15. Magical ideation, creativity, handedness, and cerebral asymmetries: a combined behavioural and fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Badzakova-Trajkov, Gjurgjica; Häberling, Isabelle S; Corballis, Michael C

    2011-08-01

    Magical ideation has been shown to be related to measures of hand preference, in which those with mixed handedness exhibit higher levels of magical ideation than those with either consistent left- or right-handedness. It is unclear whether the relation between magical ideation and hand preference is the result of a bias in questionnaire-taking behaviour or of some neuropsychological concomitant of cerebral specialization. We sought to replicate this finding and further investigate how magical ideation is related to other measures of laterality, including handedness based on finger-tapping performance, and cerebral asymmetries for language, spatial judgment, and face processing as revealed by fMRI. Creative achievement was also assessed by questionnaire and correlated with magical ideation and the other measures. Magical ideation and creativity were positively correlated, and both were negatively correlated with absolute hand preference but not with hand performance or with any of the cerebral asymmetries being assessed. The results do not support the notion that the observed association between magical ideation, creativity and hand preference has a neuropsychological explanation based on reduced cerebral lateralization. PMID:21722656

  16. Cerebral asymmetry for language: Comparing production with comprehension.

    PubMed

    Häberling, Isabelle S; Steinemann, Anita; Corballis, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Although left-hemispheric damage can impair both the production and comprehension of language, it has been claimed that comprehension is more bilaterally represented than is production. A variant of this theme is based on the theory that different aspects of language are processed by a dorsal stream, responsible for mapping words to articulation, and a ventral stream for processing input for meaning. Some have claimed that the dorsal stream is left-hemispheric, while the ventral stream is bilaterally organized. We used fMRI to record activation while left- and right-handed participants performed covert word-generation task and judged whether word pairs were synonyms. Regions of interest were Broca's area as part of the dorsal stream and the superior and middle temporal gyri as part of the ventral stream. Laterality indices showed equal left-hemispheric lateralization in Broca's area for word generation and both Broca's area and temporal lobe for the synonym judgments. Handedness influenced laterality equally in each area and task, with right-handers showing stronger left-hemispheric dominance than left-handers. Although our findings provide no evidence that asymmetry is more pronounced for production than for comprehension, correlations between the tasks and regions of interest support the view that lateralization in the temporal lobe depends on feedback influences from frontal regions. PMID:26548403

  17. Age-dependence of sensorimotor and cerebral electroencephalographic asymmetry in rats subjected to unilateral cerebrovascular stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The human population mostly affected by stroke is more than 65 years old. This study was designed to meet the recommendation that models of cerebral ischemia in aged animals are more relevant to the clinical setting than young animal models. Until now the majority of the pre-clinical studies examining age effects on stroke outcomes have used rats of old age. Considering the increasing incidence of stroke among younger than old human population, new translational approaches in animal models are needed to match the rejuvenation of stroke. A better knowledge of alterations in stroke outcomes in middle-aged rats has important preventive and management implications providing clues for future investigations on effects of various neuroprotective and neurorestorative drugs against cerebrovascular accidents that may occur before late senescence. Methods We evaluated the impact of transient focal ischemia, induced by intracerebral unilateral infusion of endothelin-1 (Et-1) near the middle cerebral artery of conscious rats, on volume of brain damage and asymmetry in behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) output measures in middle-aged (11–12 month-old) rats. Results We did not find any age-dependent difference in the volume of ischemic brain damage three days after Et-1 infusion. However, age was an important determinant of neurological and EEG outcomes after stroke. Middle-aged ischemic rats had more impaired somatosensory functions of the contralateral part of the body than young ischemic rats and thus, had greater left-right reflex/sensorimotor asymmetry. Interhemispheric EEG asymmetry was more evident in middle-aged than in young ischemic rats, and this could tentatively explain the behavioral asymmetry. Conclusions With a multiparametric approach, we have validated the endothelin model of ischemia in middle-aged rats. The results provide clues for future studies on mechanisms underlying plasticity after brain damage and motivate investigations of

  18. Asymmetry of cerebral gray and white matter and structural volumes in relation to sex hormones and chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Ivanka

    2014-01-01

    Whilst many studies show sex differences in cerebral asymmetry, their mechanisms are still unknown. This report describes the potential impact of sex hormones and sex chromosomes by comparing MR data from 39 male and 47 female controls and 33 men with an extra X-chromosome (47,XXY). Methods: Regional asymmetry in gray and white matter volumes (GMV and WMV) was calculated using voxel based moprhometry (SPM5), by contrasting the unflipped and flipped individual GMV and WMV images. In addition, structural volumes were calculated for the thalamus, caudate, putamen, amygdala, and hippocampus, using the FreeSurfer software. Effects of plasma testosterone and estrogen on the GMV and WMV, as well on the right/left ratios of the subcortical volumes were tested by multi-regression analysis. Results: All three groups showed a leftward asymmetry in the motor cortex and the planum temporale, and a rightward asymmetry of the middle occipital cortex. Both asymmetries were more pronounced in 46,XY males than 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and were positively correlated with testosterone levels. There was also a rightward asymmetry of the vermis and leftward GMV asymmetry in the cerebellar hemispheres in all groups. Notably, cerebellar asymmetries were larger in 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, but were not related to sex hormone levels. No asymmetry differences between 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and no overall effects of brain size were detected. Conclusion: The asymmetry in the planum temporale area and the occipital cortex seem related to processes associated with testosterone, whereas the observed cerebellar asymmetries suggest a link with X-chromosome escapee genes. Sex differences in cerebral asymmetry are moderated by sex hormones and X-chromosome genes, in a regionally differentiated manner. PMID:25505869

  19. Atypically rightward cerebral asymmetry in male adults with autism stratifies individuals with and without language delay.

    PubMed

    Floris, Dorothea L; Lai, Meng-Chuan; Auer, Tibor; Lombardo, Michael V; Ecker, Christine; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Wheelwright, Sally J; Bullmore, Edward T; Murphy, Declan G M; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Suckling, John

    2016-01-01

    In humans, both language and fine motor skills are associated with left-hemisphere specialization, whereas visuospatial skills are associated with right-hemisphere specialization. Individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) show a profile of deficits and strengths that involves these lateralized cognitive functions. Here we test the hypothesis that regions implicated in these functions are atypically rightward lateralized in individuals with ASC and, that such atypicality is associated with functional performance. Participants included 67 male, right-handed adults with ASC and 69 age- and IQ-matched neurotypical males. We assessed group differences in structural asymmetries in cortical regions of interest with voxel-based analysis of grey matter volumes, followed by correlational analyses with measures of language, motor and visuospatial skills. We found stronger rightward lateralization within the inferior parietal lobule and reduced leftward lateralization extending along the auditory cortex comprising the planum temporale, Heschl's gyrus, posterior supramarginal gyrus, and parietal operculum, which was more pronounced in ASC individuals with delayed language onset compared to those without. Planned correlational analyses showed that for individuals with ASC, reduced leftward asymmetry in the auditory region was associated with more childhood social reciprocity difficulties. We conclude that atypical cerebral structural asymmetry is a potential candidate neurophenotype of ASC. PMID:26493275

  20. Atypically rightward cerebral asymmetry in male adults with autism stratifies individuals with and without language delay

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Meng‐Chuan; Auer, Tibor; Lombardo, Michael V.; Ecker, Christine; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Wheelwright, Sally J.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Murphy, Declan G.M.; Baron‐Cohen, Simon; Suckling, John

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In humans, both language and fine motor skills are associated with left‐hemisphere specialization, whereas visuospatial skills are associated with right‐hemisphere specialization. Individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) show a profile of deficits and strengths that involves these lateralized cognitive functions. Here we test the hypothesis that regions implicated in these functions are atypically rightward lateralized in individuals with ASC and, that such atypicality is associated with functional performance. Participants included 67 male, right‐handed adults with ASC and 69 age‐ and IQ‐matched neurotypical males. We assessed group differences in structural asymmetries in cortical regions of interest with voxel‐based analysis of grey matter volumes, followed by correlational analyses with measures of language, motor and visuospatial skills. We found stronger rightward lateralization within the inferior parietal lobule and reduced leftward lateralization extending along the auditory cortex comprising the planum temporale, Heschl's gyrus, posterior supramarginal gyrus, and parietal operculum, which was more pronounced in ASC individuals with delayed language onset compared to those without. Planned correlational analyses showed that for individuals with ASC, reduced leftward asymmetry in the auditory region was associated with more childhood social reciprocity difficulties. We conclude that atypical cerebral structural asymmetry is a potential candidate neurophenotype of ASC. Hum Brain Mapp 37:230–253, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26493275

  1. Cerebral Asymmetry of fMRI-BOLD Responses to Visual Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hougaard, Anders; Jensen, Bettina Hagström; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Rostrup, Egill; Hoffmann, Michael B.; Ashina, Messoud

    2015-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetry of a wide range of functions is a hallmark of the human brain. The visual system has traditionally been thought of as symmetrically distributed in the brain, but a growing body of evidence has challenged this view. Some highly specific visual tasks have been shown to depend on hemispheric specialization. However, the possible lateralization of cerebral responses to a simple checkerboard visual stimulation has not been a focus of previous studies. To investigate this, we performed two sessions of blood-oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 54 healthy subjects during stimulation with a black and white checkerboard visual stimulus. While carefully excluding possible non-physiological causes of left-to-right bias, we compared the activation of the left and the right cerebral hemispheres and related this to grey matter volume, handedness, age, gender, ocular dominance, interocular difference in visual acuity, as well as line-bisection performance. We found a general lateralization of cerebral activation towards the right hemisphere of early visual cortical areas and areas of higher-level visual processing, involved in visuospatial attention, especially in top-down (i.e., goal-oriented) attentional processing. This right hemisphere lateralization was partly, but not completely, explained by an increased grey matter volume in the right hemisphere of the early visual areas. Difference in activation of the superior parietal lobule was correlated with subject age, suggesting a shift towards the left hemisphere with increasing age. Our findings suggest a right-hemispheric dominance of these areas, which could lend support to the generally observed leftward visual attentional bias and to the left hemifield advantage for some visual perception tasks. PMID:25985078

  2. Conception season and cerebral asymmetries among American baseball players: implications for the seasonal birth effect in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Marzullo, Giovanni; Fraser, Frank Clarke

    2009-05-30

    People with schizophrenia and children born with neural tube defects both tend to be conceived most often in May-June, about a month before the summer solstice, and least often in November-December, a month before the winter solstice. Such timings, coupled with evidence of cerebral asymmetry deficits in schizophrenia, and evidence that asymmetry development and neural tube closure represent concurrent fourth-embryonic-week processes both sensitive to oxidant stress, led us to the hypothesis that pro-oxidant sunlight actions capable of affecting the mother's blood could result in a peri-June peak of inhibition and a peri-December peak of facilitation of both processes. Here, using birth and hand preference data from baseball statistics, we tested the hypothesis's prediction that, as a group representing minimal cerebral lateralization, left-handed players would show the same conception rhythm as that observed in the above disorders. We found that not only strict left-handers (those both batting and throwing left) were most often conceived in May-June but that also strict right-handers and other players denoting more extreme levels of cerebral lateralization were most often conceived in November-December. PMID:19395089

  3. Significant proteins affecting cerebral vasospasm using complementary ICPMS and MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Easter, Renee N; Barry, Colin G; Pyne-Geithman, Gail; Caruso, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) following subarachnoid hemorrhagic stroke affects more than one million people each year. The etiology and prevention of CV is currently of great interest to researchers in various fields of medical science. More recently, the idea that selenium could be playing a major role in the onset of cerebral vasospasm has come into the spotlight. This study focused on using newly established metallomics techniques in order to explore the proteome associated with CV and if selenium might affect the discovered proteins. Size exclusion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, along with LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF were both essential in determining protein identifications in three different sample types; a control (normal, healthy patient, CSF control), SAH stroke patients (no vasospasm, CSF C) and SAH CV patients (CSF V). The results of this study, although preliminary, indicate the current methods are applicable and warrant further application to these clinically important targets. PMID:21976047

  4. Cerebral Asymmetry and the Development of Infantile Autism. Report No. 64.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackstock, Edward G.

    The notion that autistic children process information predominantly by strategies of the right cerebral hemisphere from birth, and unless unusual events occur, continue to be right hemisphere processors throughout their life, is examined. Evidence that suggests that cerebral dominance may be present at birth in normal humans, and that for normal…

  5. Magnitude of Cerebral Asymmetry at Rest: Covariation with Baseline Cardiovascular Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Paul S.; Harrison, David W.

    2006-01-01

    The cerebral regulation of cardiovascular functioning varies along both a lateral and a longitudinal axis. The parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems are lateralized to the left and right cerebral hemispheres, respectively. Further, the frontal lobes are known to be inhibitory in nature, whereas the temporal lobes are excitatory. However,…

  6. A surface-based analysis of hemispheric asymmetries and folding of cerebral cortex in term-born human infants

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jason; Dierker, Donna; Neil, Jeffrey; Inder, Terrie; Knutsen, Andrew; Harwell, John; Coalson, Timothy; Van Essen, David

    2010-01-01

    We have established a population average surface based atlas of human cerebral cortex at term gestation and used it to compare infant and adult cortical shape characteristics. Accurate cortical surface reconstructions for each hemisphere of 12 healthy term gestation infants were generated from structural magnetic resonance imaging data using a novel segmentation algorithm. Each surface was inflated, flattened, mapped to a standard spherical configuration, and registered to a target atlas sphere that reflected shape characteristics of all 24 contributing hemispheres using landmark constrained surface registration. Population average maps of sulcal depth, depth variability, 3-dimensional positional variability, and hemispheric depth asymmetry were generated and compared to previously established maps of adult cortex. We found that cortical structure in term infants is similar to the adult in many respects, including the pattern of individual variability and the presence of statistically significant structural asymmetries in lateral temporal cortex, including the planum temporale and superior temporal sulcus. These results indicate that several features of cortical shape are minimally influenced by the postnatal environment. PMID:20147553

  7. Atypical lateralization of language predicts cerebral asymmetries in parietal gesture representations

    PubMed Central

    Króliczak, Gregory; Piper, Brian J.; Frey, Scott H.

    2011-01-01

    Humans typically show left-hemisphere dominance both for language and manual gestures. If this reflects a dependence of these behaviors on a common cerebral specialization, then healthy left-handers with atypical organization of language should show a similar pattern for gesture. Consistent with this hypothesis, we report fMRI data indicating that sinistrals (5/15) with bilateral, or right-lateralized, language representations in inferior frontal cortex exhibit a similar atypical pattern in inferior parietal representations of familiar gestures. PMID:21382390

  8. A possible relationship between Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and female sex steroid-related modulation of functional cerebral asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Drača, S

    2015-03-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (Tc) is a transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, with symptoms and signs of acute myocardial infarction. Tc syndrome, which occurs predominantly in postmenopausal women, is characterized by increase of sympathetic activity. Studies on the gender-specific differences in sympatho-vagal regulation and functional cerebral asymmetry (FCA) imply that female pattern of dominance is characterized by the left hemisphere, which is believed to have parasympathetic predominance, whereas male pattern indicates dominance of the right hemisphere, which is believed to have sympathetic predominance. Fluctuating levels of female sex steroids are supposed to change FCA, modulating transcallosal inter-hemispheric inhibition across the menstrual cycle. The findings suggest that FCA is enhanced during the low steroid phase (menstrual phase), whereas, during high estrogen and/or progesterone phases (follicular and luteal phase) FCA is reduced. This theory is in line with concept of decreased magnitude of inter-hemispheric cortical lateralization in premenopausal women compared to men and postmenopausal women. Therefore, if postmenopausal women are more lateralized for a variety of cerebral functions, they have less balanced equilibrium between the right-sided sympathetic and left-sided parasympathetic predominance. Decrease of endogenous female sex steroid levels in postmenopausal women leads to reduced influence of estrogens to the left hemisphere, which is believed to have parasympathetic predominance. If both of these mechanisms result in sympatho-vagal imbalance, increasing sympathetic system activity in postmenopausal women, it seems reasonable why postmenopausal women became more susceptible to sympathetically-mediated syndromes such as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:25618443

  9. Quantifying cerebral asymmetries for language in dextrals and adextrals with random-effects meta analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carey, David P.; Johnstone, Leah T.

    2014-01-01

    Speech and language-related functions tend to depend on the left hemisphere more than the right in most right-handed (dextral) participants. This relationship is less clear in non-right handed (adextral) people, resulting in surprisingly polarized opinion on whether or not they are as lateralized as right handers. The present analysis investigates this issue by largely ignoring methodological differences between the different neuroscientific approaches to language lateralization, as well as discrepancies in how dextral and adextral participants were recruited or defined. Here we evaluate the tendency for dextrals to be more left hemisphere dominant than adextrals, using random effects meta analyses. In spite of several limitations, including sample size (in the adextrals in particular), missing details on proportions of groups who show directional effects in many experiments, and so on, the different paradigms all point to proportionally increased left hemispheric dominance in the dextrals. These results are analyzed in light of the theoretical importance of these subtle differences for understanding the cognitive neuroscience of language, as well as the unusual asymmetry in most adextrals. PMID:25408673

  10. Mapping Longitudinal Hemispheric Structural Asymmetries of the Human Cerebral Cortex From Birth to 2 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Nie, Jingxin; Wang, Li; Shi, Feng; Lyall, Amanda E.; Lin, Weili; Gilmore, John H.; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Mapping cortical hemispheric asymmetries in infants would increase our understanding of the origins and developmental trajectories of hemispheric asymmetries. We analyze longitudinal cortical hemispheric asymmetries in 73 healthy subjects at birth, 1, and 2 years of age using surface-based morphometry of magnetic resonance images with a specific focus on the vertex position, sulcal depth, mean curvature, and local surface area. Prominent cortical asymmetries are found around the peri-Sylvian region and superior temporal sulcus (STS) at birth that evolve modestly from birth to 2 years of age. Sexual dimorphisms of cortical asymmetries are present at birth, with males having the larger magnitudes and sizes of the clusters of asymmetries than females that persist from birth to 2 years of age. The left supramarginal gyrus (SMG) is significantly posterior to the right SMG, and the maximum position difference increases from 10.2 mm for males (6.9 mm for females) at birth to 12.0 mm for males (8.4 mm for females) by 2 years of age. The right STS and parieto-occipital sulcus are significantly larger and deeper than those in the left hemisphere, and the left planum temporale is significantly larger and deeper than that in the right hemisphere at all 3 ages. Our results indicate that early hemispheric structural asymmetries are inherent and gender related. PMID:23307634

  11. Regional cerebral function and blood flow: complementary single photon emission computed tomography of the brain using xenon-133 and [123I]iodoamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Simon, T R; Devous, M D; Paulman, R G; Gregory, R; Homan, R W; Judd, C; Triebel, J G; Matthiesen, S; Raese, J D; Bonte, F J

    1989-01-01

    Regional cerebral function and blood flow can be imaged using isopropyl[123I]iodoamphetamine (IMP), or 133Xe (DSPECT), respectively. Both of these essentially non-invasive, quantitative, methods are suitable for many nuclear medicine laboratories. This study assessed the in vivo information about intracerebral disease provided by IMP and DSPECT techniques to determine the optimal diagnostic use of these modalities. Single photon emission computed tomograms of 53 subjects were acquired using similar displays for IMP and DSPECT data. Lobar tracer distributions were graded by three experienced observers and analyzed using a kappa statistic to eliminate chance agreements. Overall, both IMP and DSPECT had similar patterns. However, while similar, one or the other technique often displayed abnormalities not present on both. Although technical factors may account for some differences between the modalities, a case of arteriovenous malformation proves that discordant findings can result directly from tracer localization properties. Thus at least some discordances provide truly complementary diagnostic information lacking in either single study taken alone. PMID:2785513

  12. Complementary medicine.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2003-03-01

    Complementary medicine has become an important subject for rheumatologists, not least because many patients try complementary treatments. Recent clinical trials yield promising results. In particular, evidence suggests that several herbal medicines and dietary supplements can alleviate the pain of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Clearly, rigorous testing of complementary treatments is possible, and considering their popularity, should be encouraged. PMID:12598804

  13. Complementary medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, D; Stroud, P; Fyfe, A

    1998-01-01

    The widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine techniques, often explored by patients without discussion with their primary care physician, is seen as a request from patients for care as well as cure. In this article, we discuss the reasons for the growth of and interest in complementary and alternative medicine in an era of rapidly advancing medical technology. There is, for instance, evidence of the efficacy of supportive techniques such as group psychotherapy in improving adjustment and increasing survival time of cancer patients. We describe current and developing complementary medicine programs as well as opportunities for integration of some complementary techniques into standard medical care. PMID:9584661

  14. Complementary Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... someone living with PD, this section focuses on herbs, vitamins and supplements. If you are considering complementary ... product recommendations regarding such products. Key Points Most herbs and supplements have not been rigorously studied as ...

  15. Complementary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.

    2009-02-19

    In this lecture, it is emphasized that sufficient resolution of scientific issues for a fusion energy reactor can be given by complementary studies. Key scientific issues for a fusion energy reactor and ITER addressed by a complementary study in the Large Helical Device (LHD) are discussed. It should be noted that ITER is definitely a necessary condition but not a sufficient condition. Helical systems including stellarators and heliotrons are defined as alternative concepts. These approaches also aim at a fusion energy reactor based on their own concept and simultaneously benefit progress in tokamaks, more specifically ITER itself. The exact science to manage a 3-D geometry has been being developed in helical systems. A physical model with much accuracy and breadth will demonstrate its applicability to ITER. Topics to validate ''complementary'' approaches such as 3-D equilibrium, interchange MHD mode, control of radial electric field and structure formation, dynamics of a magnetic island, density limit and edge plasmas are discussed. Complementary is not Supplementary. ITER is complementary to development of a helical fusion energy reactor as well. Complementary approaches transcend existing disciplinary horizons and enable big challenges.

  16. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  17. Cerebral blood flow velocity in two patients with neonatal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Nishimaki, S; Seki, K; Yokota, S

    2001-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured in the middle cerebral artery of two patients who exhibited unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction during the neonatal period. Doppler studies demonstrated increases in cerebral blood flow velocity but decreases in the resistance index on the affected side of the middle cerebral artery in the neonate who developed hemiplegia with cystic encephalomalacia, although the neonate with normal neurologic outcome exhibited symmetric cerebral blood flow velocity and resistance index. The asymmetry in cerebral blood flow velocity measurements of both middle cerebral arteries may be useful to evaluate the severity of brain damage and predict the neurodevelopmental prognosis of unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction. PMID:11377112

  18. Commentary on Annett, Yeo et al., Klar, Saugstad and Orr: cerebral asymmetry, language and psychosis--the case for a Homo sapiens-specific sex-linked gene for brain growth.

    PubMed

    Crow, T J

    1999-10-19

    Annett, Yeo et al. and Klar have each proposed theories that relate the genetics of cerebral lateralization to predisposition to psychosis. These theories are considered in relation to the central paradox that psychosis is associated with a substantial biological disadvantage. Annett's heterozygote advantage hypothesis critically identified lateralization as a major determinant of ability, but it appears that what is inherited is degrees (as suggested by Yeo et al.) rather than (or as well as) direction of lateralization. Relative hand skill has been shown (Crow, T.J., Crow, L.R., Done, D.J., Leask, S.J., 1998. Relative hand skill predicts academic ability: global deficits at the point of hemispheric indecision. Neuropsychologia 36, 1275-1282.) to be a powerful predictor (interacting with sex) of academic ability but the greatest region of vulnerability (that includes reading disability and predisposition to psychosis) is close to the point of equal hand skill ('hemispheric indecision'). In contrast with Annett's single locus, Yeo's polygenic and Klar's strand-segregation hypotheses, each of which postulates an autosomal locus or loci, the hypothesis of a single gene for asymmetry located in a sex-specific region of homology on both X and Y chromosomes can account for sex differences, as observed in age of onset, and premorbid precursors of psychosis, as well as differences in the general population in relation to degrees of hand skill, verbal ability and cerebral asymmetry. The evolutionarily recent transposition to, and subsequent paracentric inversion in, the Y chromosome short arm of a 4-Mb block from Xq21.3 (the proximal long arm of the X) are candidates for speciation events in the lineage that led to Homo sapiens. A gene associated with a range of variation (that may be due to a high mutation site, or perhaps to epigenetic modification) on the Y that overlaps with, but differs quantitatively from, that on the X may explain the sex differences associated with

  19. Brain Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannazzi, Marie

    1975-01-01

    Describes two activities dealing with cerebral dominance as a complement to a study of the nervous system which has students taking part in simple research oriented experiments, collecting data and interpreting results. (BR)

  20. Hemispheric asymmetry of visual scene processing in the human brain: evidence from repetition priming and intrinsic activity.

    PubMed

    Stevens, W Dale; Kahn, Itamar; Wig, Gagan S; Schacter, Daniel L

    2012-08-01

    Asymmetrical specialization of cognitive processes across the cerebral hemispheres is a hallmark of healthy brain development and an important evolutionary trait underlying higher cognition in humans. While previous research, including studies of priming, divided visual field presentation, and split-brain patients, demonstrates a general pattern of right/left asymmetry of form-specific versus form-abstract visual processing, little is known about brain organization underlying this dissociation. Here, using repetition priming of complex visual scenes and high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we demonstrate asymmetrical form specificity of visual processing between the right and left hemispheres within a region known to be critical for processing of visual spatial scenes (parahippocampal place area [PPA]). Next, we use resting-state functional connectivity MRI analyses to demonstrate that this functional asymmetry is associated with differential intrinsic activity correlations of the right versus left PPA with regions critically involved in perceptual versus conceptual processing, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the PPA comprises lateralized subregions across the cerebral hemispheres that are engaged in functionally dissociable yet complementary components of visual scene analysis. Furthermore, this functional asymmetry is associated with differential intrinsic functional connectivity of the PPA with distinct brain areas known to mediate dissociable cognitive processes. PMID:21968568

  1. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  2. Complementary and Other Interventions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of ADHD Complementary and Other Interventions Coaching Neurofeedback (EEG Biofeedback) Fish Oil Supplements and ADHD Carrying Your ... and Other Interventions Complementary and Other Interventions Coaching Neurofeedback (EEG Biofeedback) Fish Oil Supplements and ADHD Complementary and ...

  3. Semantic Asymmetries Are Modulated by Phonological Asymmetries: Evidence from the Disambiguation of Homophonic versus Heterophonic Homographs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peleg, Orna; Eviatar, Zohar

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated cerebral asymmetries in accessing multiple meanings of two types of homographs: homophonic homographs (e.g., "bank") and heterophonic homographs (e.g., "tear"). Participants read homographs preceded by either a biasing or a non-biasing sentential context and performed a lexical decision on lateralized targets…

  4. Cerebral Hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  5. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Teens > Complementary and Alternative Medicine Print ... replacement. continue How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  6. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  7. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ... types of care, it is called integrative medicine. Alternative medicine is used instead of mainstream medical care. The ...

  8. Arterial Spin Labeling Measurements of Cerebral Perfusion Territories in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Renata F.; Paiva, Fernando F.; Kang, Byeong-Teck; Henning, Erica C.; Nascimento, George C.; Tannús, Alberto; De Araújo, Dráulio B.; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    Collateral circulation, defined as the supplementary vascular network that maintains cerebral blood flow (CBF) when the main vessels fail, constitutes one important defense mechanism of the brain against ischemic stroke. In the present study, continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) was used to quantify CBF and obtain perfusion territory maps of the major cerebral arteries in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and their normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) controls. Results show that both WKY and SHR have complementary, yet significantly asymmetric perfusion territories. Right or left dominances were observed in territories of the anterior (ACA), middle and posterior cerebral arteries, and the thalamic artery. Magnetic resonance angiography showed that some of the asymmetries were correlated with variations of the ACA. The leptomeningeal circulation perfusing the outer layers of the cortex was observed as well. Significant and permanent changes in perfusion territories were obtained after temporary occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery in both SHR and WKY, regardless of their particular dominance. However, animals with right dominance presented a larger volume change of the left perfusion territory (23 ± 9%) than animals with left dominance (7 ± 5%, P < 0.002). The data suggest that animals with contralesional dominance primarily safeguard local CBF values with small changes in contralesional perfusion territory, while animals with ipsilesional dominance show a reversal of dominance and a substantial increase in contralesional perfusion territory. These findings show the usefulness of CASL to probe the collateral circulation. PMID:24323754

  9. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  10. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... movement problems a child has. What is spastic CP? Spastic means tight or stiff muscles, or muscles ...

  11. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  12. Cerebral palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that can involve brain and nervous system functions, such as movement, ... and thinking. There are several different types of cerebral palsy, including spastic, dyskinetic, ataxic, hypotonic, and mixed.

  13. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Palsy Information Page Clinical Trials Trial of Erythropoietin Neuroprotection ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Palsy? The term cerebral palsy refers to a group ...

  14. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Information Page Synonym(s): Aneurysm, Brain Aneurysm Condensed from ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Aneurysms? A cerebral aneurysm is a weak or thin ...

  15. Hemispheric Asymmetries and Cognitive Flexibility: An ERP and sLORETA Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Gunturkun, Onur; Beste, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Although functional cerebral asymmetries (FCAs) affect all cognitive domains, their modulation of the efficacy of specific executive functions is largely unexplored. In the present study, we used a lateralized version of the task switching paradigm to investigate the relevance of hemispheric asymmetries for cognitive control processes. Words were…

  16. Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Sandra M; Briscoe, Jessica; Cross, Raymond K

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a complex, chronic, multifactorial inflammatory disorder of the digestive tract. Standard therapies include immunosuppressive and biological treatments, but there is increasing interest in the potential benefit of complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Given the high prevalence of use of complementary and alternative medicine among inflammatory bowel disease patients, gastroenterologists must remain knowledgeable regarding the risks and benefits of these treatment options. This article reviews the updated scientific data on the use of biologically based complementary and alternative therapies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27057686

  17. Altered volume and hemispheric asymmetry of the superficial cortical layers in the schizophrenia planum temporale

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, John F.; Rosoklija, Gorazd; Mancevski, Branislav; Mann, J. John; Dwork, Andrew J.; Javitt, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo structural MRI studies in schizophrenia auditory cerebral cortex have reported smaller volumes, and less consistently have reported altered hemispheric asymmetry of volumes. We used autopsy brains from 19 schizophrenia and 18 nonpsychiatric male subjects to measure the volume asymmetry of the planum temporal (PT). We then used the most recently autopsied 11 schizophrenia and 10 non-psychiatric brains to measure the widths and fractional volumes of the upper (I–III) and lower (IV–VI) layers. Measurements of whole PT gray matter volumes did not show significant changes in schizophrenia. Nevertheless, laminar volume measurements revealed that the upper layers of the PT comprise a smaller fraction of the total cortex in schizophrenia than in nonpsychiatric brains. Subdivision of the PT showed that this change was especially prominent caudally, beyond Heschl’s gyrus, whereas similar but less pronounced changes were found in the rostral PT and Heschl’s gyrus. Complementary measures of laminar widths showed that the altered fractional volume in the caudal left PT was due mainly to about 8% thinner upper layers. However, the caudal right PT had a different profile, with thicker lower layers and comparatively unchanged upper layers. Thus, in the present study, laminar measurements provided a more sensitive method to detect changes than measurement of whole PT volumes. Besides findings in schizophrenia, our cortical width measurements also revealed normal hemispheric asymmetries consistent with previous reports. In schizophrenia, the thinner upper layers of the caudal PT suggest disrupted cortico-cortical processing, possibly affecting the multisensory integration and phonetic processing of this region. PMID:19656176

  18. Age-Related Differences in Bilateral Asymmetry in Cycling Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ting; Jensen, Jody L.

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral asymmetry, a form of limb laterality in the context of moving two limbs, emerges in childhood. Children and adults show lateral preference in tasks that involve the upper and lower limbs. The importance of research in limb laterality is the insight it could provide about lateralized functions of the cerebral hemispheres. Analyzing…

  19. Preschoolers' Mental Rotation: Sex Differences in Hemispheric Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Nicola; Jansen, Petra; Heil, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Mental rotation performance has been found to produce one of the largest sex differences in cognition accompanied by sex differences in functional cerebral asymmetry. Although sex differences in mental rotation performance can be reliably demonstrated as early as age 5 years old, that is, long before puberty, no data exist as to whether…

  20. Complementary and Integrative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly • Supplement is free of harmful contents like pesticides and heavy metals (such as lead, arsenic or ... 1-888-644-6226 http://nccam.nih.gov Natural Medicines Information on complementary therapies http://naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch. ...

  1. Footwear Decreases Gait Asymmetry during Running

    PubMed Central

    Hoerzer, Stefan; Federolf, Peter A.; Maurer, Christian; Baltich, Jennifer; Nigg, Benno M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on elderly people has suggested that footwear may improve neuromuscular control of motion. If footwear does in fact improve neuromuscular control, then such an influence might already be present in young, healthy adults. A feature that is often used to assess neuromuscular control of motion is the level of gait asymmetry. The objectives of the study were (a) to develop a comprehensive asymmetry index (CAI) that is capable of detecting gait asymmetry changes caused by external boundary conditions such as footwear, and (b) to use the CAI to investigate whether footwear influences gait asymmetry during running in a healthy, young cohort. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected for both legs of 15 subjects performing five barefoot and five shod over-ground running trials. Thirty continuous gait variables including ground reaction forces and variables of the hip, knee, and ankle joints were computed for each leg. For each individual, the differences between the variables for the right and left leg were calculated. Using this data, a principal component analysis was conducted to obtain the CAI. This study had two main outcomes. First, a sensitivity analysis suggested that the CAI had an improved sensitivity for detecting changes in gait asymmetry caused by external boundary conditions. The CAI may, therefore, have important clinical applications such as monitoring the progress of neuromuscular diseases (e.g. stroke or cerebral palsy). Second, the mean CAI for shod running (131.2 ± 48.5; mean ± standard deviation) was significantly lower (p = 0.041) than the CAI for barefoot running (155.7 ± 39.5). This finding suggests that in healthy, young adults gait asymmetry is reduced when running in shoes compared to running barefoot, which may be a result of improved neuromuscular control caused by changes in the afferent sensory feedback. PMID:26488484

  2. Fluctuating Asymmetry and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    The general factor of mental ability ("g") may reflect general biological fitness. If so, "g"-loaded measures such as Raven's progressive matrices should be related to morphological measures of fitness such as fluctuating asymmetry (FA: left-right asymmetry of a set of typically left-right symmetrical body traits such as finger lengths). This…

  3. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Wimalasundera, Neil; Stevenson, Valerie L

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral palsy has always been known as a disorder of movement and posture resulting from a non-progressive injury to the developing brain; however, more recent definitions allow clinicians to appreciate more than just the movement disorder. Accurate classification of cerebral palsy into distribution, motor type and functional level has advanced research. It also facilitates appropriate targeting of interventions to functional level and more accurate prognosis prediction. The prevalence of cerebral palsy remains fairly static at 2-3 per 1000 live births but there have been some changes in trends for specific causal groups. Interventions for cerebral palsy have historically been medical and physically focused, often with limited evidence to support their efficacy. The use of more appropriate outcome measures encompassing quality of life and participation is helping to deliver treatments which are more meaningful for people with cerebral palsy and their carers. PMID:26837375

  4. Mutually Exclusive, Complementary, or . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloemer, Cathy G.

    2016-01-01

    Whether students are beginning their study of probability or are well into it, distinctions between complementary sets and mutually exclusive sets can be confusing. Cathy Schloemer writes in this article that for years she used typical classroom examples but was not happy with the student engagement or the level of understanding they produced.…

  5. Complementary Coffee Cups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banchoff, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    What may have been the birth of a new calculus problem took place when the author noticed that two coffee cups, one convex and one concave, fit nicely together, and he wondered which held more coffee. The fact that their volumes were about equal led to the topic of this article: complementary surfaces of revolution with equal volumes.

  6. The pesky power asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Jeong, Donghui; Kamionkowski, Marc; Chluba, Jens

    2013-06-01

    Physical models for the hemispherical power asymmetry in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) reported by the Planck Collaboration must satisfy CMB constraints to the homogeneity of the Universe and quasar constraints to power asymmetries. We survey a variety of models for the power asymmetry and show that consistent models include a modulated scale-dependent isocurvature contribution to the matter power spectrum or a modulation of the reionization optical depth, gravitational-wave amplitude, or scalar spectral index. We propose further tests to distinguish between the different scenarios.

  7. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging. PMID:27188686

  8. Complementary and alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Filshie, Jacqueline; Rubens, Carolyn N J

    2006-03-01

    Thirty years ago, the integration of complementary medicine into cancer care almost was dismissed as quackery. Today, a whole range of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) techniques have been integrated into the management of cancer, which are often of benefit to patients, when conventional treatment is deemed to have failed or caused intolerable side effects. Health care workers need to inquire about the use of CAM in their patients routinely in a sensitive and nonjudgmental way, and may need to advise patients to stop certain therapies. Yet in advanced cancer, a sensible balance needs to be struck between fear about adverse effects and interactions and the importance of making the remaining weeks/days/months as comfortable and enjoyable as possible. PMID:16487897

  9. Complementary medicine for depression.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, Karen; Rampes, Hagen; Richardson, Janet

    2006-11-01

    Surveys have demonstrated that complementary medicine use for depression is widespread, although patterns of use vary. A series of systematic reviews provide a summary of the current evidence for acupuncture, aromatherapy and massage, homeopathy, meditation, reflexology, herbal medicine, yoga, and several dietary supplements and relaxation techniques. The quantity and quality of individual studies vary widely, but research interest in complementary therapies is increasing, particularly in herbal and nutritional products. Major questions are still to be answered with respect to the effectiveness and appropriate role of these therapies in the management of depression. Areas for further research and some of the potential challenges to research design are discussed. Finally, several ongoing developments in information provision on this topic are highlighted. PMID:17144787

  10. Alternative/complementary therapies.

    PubMed

    Freeman, J W; Landis, J

    1997-02-01

    The national trends and our regional experience of the utilization of complementary therapies suggest that a significant number of our patients will continue to employ remedies that are outside the mainstream of what has been defined as conventional Western medicine. The data obtained from our survey is very consistent with the national survey published in 1993. Indeed the national interest in alternative/complementary therapies seems to be growing. A recent newspaper article from Minneapolis noted that Allina, one of Minnesota's largest hospital and HMO systems, found, in a 1995 survey, that two-thirds of surveyed households had a least one member who had used some type of alternative or holistic care over the prior two year period. Certainly continued study of the safety and efficacy of alternative/complementary therapies is warranted. This work is being done on many fronts, including the Office of Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health. A most important aspect of such investigations is to improve the understanding of why patients choose these unconventional remedies. For many patients, the answer is simple. They believe these alternative treatments work. For such patients, alternative therapies may constitute a practical way to move from the sterile "high tech" realm of traditional medicine to a more intimate, "high touch" intervention offered by non-physicians. In the end, physicians' most pressing mandate is "to be of use" to patients in their struggles with illness, disability, and impending death. None of us have all the answers, and the studies alluded to in this essay suggest that a significant segment of the population yearns for interventions that have been traditionally outside the practice of most physicians and nurses. The data from our survey corroborates the high utilization rate of alternative/complementary therapies, regionally and is consistent with national data. Our challenge, as caregivers, is to appropriately respond to the

  11. Cerebral hemiatrophy: a clinicopathological report of two cases with a contribution to pathogenesis and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vosskämper, M; Schachenmayr, W

    1990-01-01

    "Cerebral hemiatrophy" describes a condition of different etiologies that is characterized by a marked asymmetry of cerebral hemispheres. Case reports of two different forms of cerebral hemiatrophy are presented. In the first case perinatal asphyxia led to severe white matter lesions with predominance on the left side and marked asymmetry of the pyramidal tracts. Symptoms were present immediately after birth ("primary cerebral hemiatrophy"). The second case displayed postictal cerebral hemiatrophy with a widespread loss of cortical neurons of the entire left hemisphere. The disease process started at the age of two years after a widely normal early development ("secondary cerebral hemiatrophy"). A modified classification of cerebral hemiatrophy is presented, and concepts of pathogenesis and differential diagnosis are discussed. PMID:2125535

  12. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a ... ability to move and maintain balance and posture. CP is the most common motor disability in childhood. ...

  13. Cerebral Arteriosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral arteriosclerosis is the result of thickening and hardening of the walls of the arteries in the ... cause an ischemic stroke. When the thickening and hardening is uneven, arterial walls can develop bulges (called ...

  14. Cerebral angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral angiography is done in the hospital or radiology center. You lie on an x-ray table. ... be done in preparation for medical treatment (interventional radiology procedures) by way of certain blood vessels. What ...

  15. Children and Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ewsichek What’s the Bottom Line? How much do we know about complementary health approaches for children? We ... about their effects and safety. 1 What do we know about the effectiveness of complementary health approaches ...

  16. A Note on Complementary Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... manipulation, and acupuncture are types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) currently being used by millions of Americans. ... conventional care. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), part of NIH since 1999, funds and ...

  17. Cancer and Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... Legislation Advisory Council Job Opportunities All About NCCIH Health Topics A-Z # A B C D E ... from NCI at www.cancer.gov . About Complementary Health Approaches Complementary health approaches are a group of ...

  18. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  19. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  20. Asymmetry through time dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantzaris, Alexander V.; Higham, Desmond J.

    2016-03-01

    Given a single network of interactions, asymmetry arises when the links are directed. For example, if protein A upregulates protein B and protein B upregulates protein C, then (in the absence of any further relationships between them) A may affect C but not vice versa. This type of imbalance is reflected in the associated adjacency matrix, which will lack symmetry. A different type of imbalance can arise when interactions appear and disappear over time. If A meets B today and B meets C tomorrow, then (in the absence of any further relationships between them) A may pass a message or disease to C, but not vice versa. Hence, even when each interaction is a two-way exchange, the effect of time ordering can introduce asymmetry. This observation is very closely related to the fact that matrix multiplication is not commutative. In this work, we describe a method that has been designed to reveal asymmetry in static networks and show how it may be combined with a measure that summarizes the potential information flow between nodes in the temporal case. This results in a new method that quantifies the asymmetry arising through time ordering. We show by example that the new tool can be used to visualize and quantify the amount of asymmetry caused by the arrow of time.

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine in developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kelly A; Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Developmental disabilities (DD) are defined as a diverse group of severe chronic conditions due to mental and/or physical impairments. Individuals with developmental disabilities have difficulty with major life activities including language, mobility, and learning. Developmental disabilities can begin anytime during development--from prenatal up to 22 years of age, and the disability usually lasts throughout a person's lifetime. Autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are common conditions falling within the definition of developmental disabilities. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is becoming increasingly utilized in the general population for treatment of everything from the common cold to complex and chronic medical conditions. This article reviews the prevalence of different types of CAM used for various developmental disabilities. PMID:16391450

  2. Nuclear asymmetry enthalpy

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L. G.

    2011-07-15

    Recent work has sought to extract the asymmetry energy at very low density from observables in heavy-ion collisions. The logic employed starts from the assumption that the fragment yields are determined by a minimization of the Helmholtz free energy. As volume is in reality unconstrained, nor can a single freeze-out volume be expected, the physical relevance of the Helmholtz free energy must be questioned. If, for example, the identical logic were used, but the Gibbs free energy was the more relevant quantity to minimize, it would be the asymmetry enthalpy that would be extracted. The purpose of this report is to provide one measure of the difference between the asymmetry energy and enthalpy.

  3. Atypical Cerebral Lateralisation in Adults with Compensated Developmental Dyslexia Demonstrated Using Functional Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illingworth, Sarah; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2009-01-01

    Functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound (fTCD) is a relatively new and non-invasive technique that assesses cerebral lateralisation through measurements of blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries. In this study fTCD was used to compare functional asymmetry during a word generation task between a group of 30 dyslexic adults and a…

  4. Electroweak asymmetries from SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Bellodi, G.

    2002-06-01

    We present a summary of the results on electroweak asymmetries performed by the SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Most of these results are final and are based, unless otherwise stated, on the full 1993-1998 data set of approximately 550,000 hadronic decays of Z{sup 0} bosons, produced with an average electron beam polarization of 73%.

  5. TRANSVERSITY SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    SciTech Connect

    BOER,D.

    2001-04-27

    The theoretical aspects of two leading twist transversity single spin asymmetries, one arising from the Collins effect and one from the interference fragmentation functions, are reviewed. Issues of factorization, evolution and Sudakov factors for the relevant observables are discussed. These theoretical considerations pinpoint the most realistic scenarios towards measurements of transversity.

  6. Chemical doping and electron-hole conduction asymmetry in graphene devices.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Damon B; Golizadeh-Mojarad, Roksana; Perebeinos, Vasili; Lin, Yu-Ming; Tulevski, George S; Tsang, James C; Avouris, Phaedon

    2009-01-01

    We investigate poly(ethylene imine) and diazonium salts as stable, complementary dopants on graphene. Transport in graphene devices doped with these molecules exhibits asymmetry in electron and hole conductance. The conductance of one carrier is preserved, while the conductance of the other carrier decreases. Simulations based on nonequilibrium Green's function formalism suggest that the origin of this asymmetry is imbalanced carrier injection from the graphene electrodes caused by misalignment of the electrode and channel neutrality points. PMID:19102701

  7. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2009-01-01

    The complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) is designed to eliminate the major dark current sources in the superlattice infrared detector. The concept can also be applied to bulk semiconductor- based infrared detectors. CBIRD uses two different types of specially designed barriers: an electron barrier that blocks electrons but not holes, and a hole barrier that blocks holes but not electrons. The CBIRD structure consists of an n-contact, a hole barrier, an absorber, an electron barrier, and a p-contact. The barriers are placed at the contact-absorber junctions where, in a conventional p-i-n detector structure, there normally are depletion regions that produce generation-recombination (GR) dark currents due to Shockley-Read- Hall (SRH) processes. The wider-bandgap complementary barriers suppress G-R dark current. The barriers also block diffusion dark currents generated in the diffusion wings in the neutral regions. In addition, the wider gap barriers serve to reduce tunneling dark currents. In the case of a superlattice-based absorber, the superlattice itself can be designed to suppress dark currents due to Auger processes. At the same time, the barriers actually help to enhance the collection of photo-generated carriers by deflecting the photo-carriers that are diffusing in the wrong direction (i.e., away from collectors) and redirecting them toward the collecting contacts. The contact layers are made from materials with narrower bandgaps than the barriers. This allows good ohmic contacts to be made, resulting in lower contact resistances. Previously, THALES Research and Technology (France) demonstrated detectors with bulk InAsSb (specifically InAs0.91Sb0.09) absorber lattice-matched to GaSb substrates. The absorber is surrounded by two wider bandgap layers designed to minimize impedance to photocurrent flow. The wide bandgap materials also serve as contacts. The cutoff wavelength of the InAsSb absorber is fixed. CBIRD may be considered as a modified

  8. Diagnosis and complementary examinations.

    PubMed

    Menghini, Moreno; Duncan, Jacque L

    2014-01-01

    Development of neuroprotective therapies requires an understanding of the mechanisms of retinal degeneration and a way to monitor response to treatment. With the increasing availability of genetic testing, precise characterization of the retinal degeneration phenotype is essential. This chapter covers standard and innovative diagnostic techniques and complementary examinations needed for the evaluation and treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. It aims to provide an overview of functional and structural diagnostic tools for the evaluation of retinal degenerative diseases, but is not intended as a comprehensive reference. Subjective assessment of visual function includes psychophysical tests, such as perimetry and microperimetry. Electrophysiology tests, such as the electroretinogram and electro-oculogram, are crucial in the assessment of retinal degenerative diseases and provide an objective assessment of global photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelial cell function. Retinal structural measures are correlated with measures of retinal function to characterize the disease phenotype, including fundus photography using color, near-infrared, and autofluorescence imaging. Ocular perfusion can be assessed using fluorescein, indocyanine green, and noninvasive angiography. Optical coherence tomography provides information about retinal structure. Resolution of all images of retinal structure can be improved using adaptive optics, which permits visualization of individual photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells in the macula. PMID:24732761

  9. Cerebral specialization. [greater performance efficiency for certain mental abilities or processes by one cerebral hemisphere over another

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robin D.; Hopkins, William D.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of greater performance efficiency for certain mental abilities or processes in one cerebral hemisphere rather than the other is referred to as 'cerebral lateralization'. The experimental paradigm for lateralization research involves the study of patients with one damaged hemisphere, which prevents their performance of a certain task or function; this approach, however, presents many difficulties in extrapolating to brain function in normal patients. Attention is presently given to gender differences in lateralization, cerebral asymmetries in other species, and the evolutionary bases of hemispheric specialization.

  10. [Integrating complementary medicines into care].

    PubMed

    Graz, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    More and more research is being carried out into complementary medicines. It is no longer possible to say that these treatments have no scientific basis, as for some, their efficacy has been proven by clinical studies. Health services must move beyond ideological arguments and integrate safe and cost-effective complementary medicines. PMID:27063880

  11. Lunar asymmetry and palaeomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1980-10-01

    A model is proposed for the early lunar evolution which accounts for the compositional asymmetry between the nearside and farside of the moon and the natural remanent magnetism of lunar rocks. According to the model, the preferred gravitational energy state consisted of an asymmetric accumulation of a liquid iron alloy (Fe-Ni and a small amount of sulfur) which displaces upwards the cold primordial undifferentiated core. The resulting depth asymmetry of the outer partially molten zone leads eventually to the subcrustal accumulation of light magnesium-rich pyroxenes and olivine, preferentially in one hemisphere, sufficient to explain the offset and also indirectly providing a possible explanation for the nearside concentration of KREEP and mass basalt. Slow downward migration of iron releases gravitational energy sufficient for convection and dynamo generation in an iron layer for about a billion years.

  12. Cerebral Dominance and Childhood Learning Disorders: Theoretical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Raymond S.

    1981-01-01

    An examination of Orton's early hypothesis of inconsistent cerebral dominance for linguistically disabled children in light of some 50 years of research is provided. Although a hypothesis based on data from nonintrusive measures of functional asymmetry with learning impaired children is postulated, caution in this area is suggested. (Author/AL)

  13. A Justifiable Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Brudney, Daniel; Siegler, Mark

    2015-01-01

    It is a clinician's cliché that a physician only challenges a patient's capacity to make a treatment decision if that decision is not what the physician wants. Agreement is proof of decisional capacity; disagreement is proof or at least evidence of capacity's absence. It is assumed that this asymmetry cannot be justified, that the asymmetry must be a form of physicians' paternalism. Instead what is at issue when patient and physician disagree are usually two laudable impulses. The first is physicians' commitment to patients' well-being: physicians have a professional obligation as well as, ideally, a personal commitment to take care of patients--to do their best to bring about a positive medical outcome. The second impulse is common to much of human life, namely, the urge to find and to understand the source of our disagreements with one another. In this article we argue that, jointly, these impulses justify the asymmetry with regard to examining patients' capacity. PMID:26132055

  14. Hidden asymmetry of ice.

    PubMed

    Kirov, Mikhail V

    2014-11-26

    Ice is a very complex and fundamentally important solid. In the present article, we review a new property of the hydrogen-bonded network in ice structures: an explicit nonequivalence of some antipodal configurations with the opposite direction of all hydrogen bonds (H-bonds). This asymmetry is most pronounced for the structures with considerable deviation of the H-bond network from the tetrahedral coordination. That is why we have investigated in detail four-coordinated ice nanostructures with no outer "dangling" hydrogen atoms, namely, ice bilayers and ice nanotubes consisting of stacked n-membered rings. The reason for this H-bonding asymmetry is a fundamental nonequivalence of the arrangements of water molecules in some antipodal configurations with the opposite direction of all H-bonds. For these configurations, the overall pictures of deviations of the hydrogen bonds from linearity are qualitatively different. We consider the reversal of all H-bonds as an additional nongeometric operation of symmetry, more precisely antisymmetry. It is not easy to find the explicit breaking of the symmetry of hydrogen bonding (H-symmetry) in the variety of all configurations. Therefore, this asymmetry may be named hidden. PMID:24905908

  15. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information About ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  16. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is a cerebral aneurysm? A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial ...

  17. The Role of Hemispheral Asymmetry and Regional Activity of Quantitative EEG in Children with Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozge, Aynur; Toros, Fevziye; Comelekoglu, Ulku

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the role of delayed cerebral maturation, hemisphere asymmetry and regional differences in children with stuttering and healthy controls during resting state and hyperventilation, using conventional EEG techniques and quantitative EEG (QEEG) analysis. This cross-sectional case control study included 26 children with stuttering and…

  18. Psychological Correlates of Handedness and Corpus Callosum Asymmetry in Autism: The Left Hemisphere Dysfunction Theory Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floris, Dorothea L.; Chura, Lindsay R.; Holt, Rosemary J.; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Spencer, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Rightward cerebral lateralization has been suggested to be involved in the neuropathology of autism spectrum conditions. We investigated functional and neuroanatomical asymmetry, in terms of handedness and corpus callosum measurements in male adolescents with autism, their unaffected siblings and controls, and their associations with executive…

  19. Alternative and Complementary Cancer Treatments.

    PubMed

    Cassileth

    1996-01-01

    Alternative and complementary therapies differ importantly, and the distinction between the two is crucial for clinical oncologists. "Alternative" or unproven therapies are treatments used independent of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. They can be dangerous directly and also by delaying patients' receipt of mainstream care. In contrast, complementary therapies typically are adjuncts to mainstream medicine. They can provide symptom control and noninvasive palliation with minimal side effects, improve patients' well-being and enhance cancer medicine. Complementary therapies represent a desired addition and balance to technologically sophisticated cancer care. PMID:10387984

  20. Cerebral Asymmetries in Sleep-Dependent Processes of Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peigneux, Philippe; Schmitz, Remy; Willems, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    Preference for previously seen, unfamiliar objects reflects a memory bias on affective judgment, known as the "mere exposure effect" (MEE). Here, we investigated the effect of time, post-exposure sleep, and the brain hemisphere solicited on preference generalization toward objects viewed in different perspectives. When presented in the right…

  1. Facial asymmetry: a current review

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme; Gribel, Bruno Frazão; Freitas, Maria Perpétua Mota

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The term "asymmetry" is used to make reference to dissimilarity between homologous elements, altering the balance between structures. Facial asymmetry is common in the overall population and is often presented subclinically. Nevertheless, on occasion, significant facial asymmetry results not only in functional, but also esthetic issues. Under these conditions, its etiology should be carefully investigated in order to achieve an adequate treatment plan. Facial asymmetry assessment comprises patient's first interview, extra- as well as intraoral clinical examination, and supplementary imaging examination. Subsequent asymmetry treatment depends on patient's age, the etiology of the condition and on the degree of disharmony, and might include from asymmetrical orthodontic mechanics to orthognathic surgery. Thus, the present study aims at addressing important aspects to be considered by the orthodontist reaching an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan of facial asymmetry, in addition to reporting treatment of some patients carriers of such challenging disharmony. PMID:26691977

  2. Effect of acetazolamide on cerebral blood flow in subacute and chronic cerebrovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hojer-Pedersen, E.

    1987-09-01

    Acetazolamide increases cerebral blood flow. The generalized and regional changes in blood flow after administration of acetazolamide were evaluated by the xenon-133 inhalation technique in a series of patients with subacute or chronic focal cerebral ischemia. Acetazolamide augmented interhemispheric asymmetry of cerebral blood flow in patients with unilateral occlusion of major cerebral arteries, whereas no significant side-to-side asymmetry was evident in patients with minor arterial lesions. Low flow areas in relation to computed tomography-verified infarcts tended to be larger after administration of acetazolamide. Hyperfrontality was present at rest and during stimulation with acetazolamide. A decline of cerebral blood flow with advancing age was greater in patients than in normal controls. The vasodilator response to acetazolamide did not change with age.

  3. Cancer and Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... practices of different groups of patients. What the Science Says About the Safety and Side Effects of ... whether or not it’s cancer-related. What the Science Says About the Effectiveness of Complementary Health Approaches ...

  4. Paying for Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... use complementary health approaches, but the type of health insurance they have affects their decisions to use these ... more pronounced among those who did not have health insurance. For those who had health insurance, coverage for ...

  5. A Note on Complementary Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Photo: iStock Herbal supplements, meditation, chiropractic manipulation, and acupuncture are types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) ... effective. For example, NCCAM studies have shown that: Acupuncture can provide pain relief and improve function for ...

  6. Cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Postels, Douglas G; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-01-01

    Malaria, the most significant parasitic disease of man, kills approximately one million people per year. Half of these deaths occur in those with cerebral malaria (CM). The World Health Organization (WHO) defines CM as an otherwise unexplained coma in a patient with malarial parasitemia. Worldwide, CM occurs primarily in African children and Asian adults, with the vast majority (greater than 90%) of cases occurring in children 5 years old or younger in sub-Saharan Africa. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex and involves infected erythrocyte sequestration, cerebral inflammation, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. A recently characterized malarial retinopathy is visual evidence of Plasmodium falciparum's pathophysiological processes occurring in the affected patient. Treatment consists of supportive care and antimalarial administration. Thus far, adjuvant therapies have not been shown to improve mortality rates or neurological outcomes in children with CM. For those who survive CM, residual neurological abnormalities are common. Epilepsy, cognitive impairment, behavioral disorders, and gross neurological deficits which include motor, sensory, and language impairments are frequent sequelae. Primary prevention strategies, including bed nets, vaccine development, and chemoprophylaxis, are in varied states of development and implementation. Continuing efforts to find successful primary prevention options and strategies to decrease neurological sequelae are needed. PMID:23829902

  7. Complementary and Alternative Methods and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Saved Articles » My ACS » Complementary and Alternative Methods and Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( En español ) ... with cancer here. What are complementary and alternative methods? How are complementary methods used to manage cancer? ...

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Patients Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is ... based on scientific evidence from research studies. Complementary medicine refers to treatments that are used with standard ...

  9. (Bessel-) weighted asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Musch, Alexey Prokudin

    2011-11-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering experiments allow us to probe the motion of quarks inside the proton in terms of so-called transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMD PDFs), but the information is convoluted with fragmentation functions (TMD FFs) and soft factors. It has long been known that weighting the measured event counts with powers of the hadron momentum before forming angular asymmetries de-convolutes TMD PDFs and TMD FFs in an elegant way, but this also entails an undesirable sensitivity to high momentum contributions. Using Bessel functions as weights, we find a natural generalization of weighted asymmetries that preserves the de-convolution property and features soft-factor cancellation, yet allows us to be less sensitive to high transverse momenta. The formalism also relates to TMD quantities studied in lattice QCD. We briefly show preliminary lattice results from an exploratory calculation of the Boer-Mulders shift using lattices generated by the MILC and LHP collaborations at a pion mass of 500 MeV.

  10. Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... 000 this month to find cures. Loading... Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies SHARE: Print Glossary ...

  11. Facial asymmetry in ocular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Khorrami Nejad, Masoud; Askarizadeh, Farshad; Pour, Fatemeh Farahbakhsh; Ranjbar Pazooki, Mahsa; Moeinitabar, Mohamad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Torticollis can arise from nonocular (usually musculoskeletal) and ocular conditions. Some facial asymmetries are correlated with a history of early onset ocular torticollis supported by the presence of torticollis on reviewing childhood photographs. When present in an adult, this type of facial asymmetry with an origin of ocular torticollis should help to confirm the chronicity of the defect and prevent unnecessary neurologic evaluation in patients with an uncertain history. Assessment of facial asymmetry consists of a patient history, physical examination, and medical imaging. Medical imaging and facial morphometry are helpful for objective diagnosis and measurement of the facial asymmetry, as well as for treatment planning. The facial asymmetry in congenital superior oblique palsy is typically manifested by midfacial hemihypoplasia on the side opposite the palsied muscle, with deviation of the nose and mouth toward the hypoplastic side. Correcting torticollis through strabismus surgery before a critical developmental age may prevent the development of irreversible facial asymmetry. Mild facial asymmetry associated with congenital torticollis has been reported to resolve with continued growth after early surgery, but if asymmetry is severe or is not treated in the appropriate time, it might remain even with continued growth after surgery. PMID:27239567

  12. Lepton forward-backward asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, R. ); DELPHI Collaboration,

    1992-02-01

    Results of Forward-Backward Asymmetries with Leptons measured at [ital Z][sup 0] energies are presented. Details of the analysis by the DELPHI Collaboration are given together with the most recent values of the peak Asymmetries for electrons, muons, and taus obtained by ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL Collaborations at LEP.

  13. Asymmetry In Biphase Data Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien M.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents analysis of some effects of asymmetry in Manchester (biphase) binary data signal transmitted by phase modulation of sinusoidal carrier signal. Report extends analysis described in article, "Effects of Asymmetry of NRZ Data Signals on Performance" (NPO-18261), to include case where data biphase-modulated directly on residual carrier.

  14. [Cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Malagón Valdez, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The term cerebral palsy (CP), is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the non-evolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations. PMID:18422084

  15. Measurements of W Charge Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Holzbauer, J. L.

    2015-10-06

    We discuss W boson and lepton charge asymmetry measurements from W decays in the electron channel, which were made using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of RunII data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The electron charge asymmetry is presented as a function of pseudo-rapidity out to |$\\eta$| $\\le$ 3.2, in five symmetric and asymmetric kinematic bins of electron transverse momentum and the missing transverse energy of the event. We also give the W charge asymmetry as a function of W boson rapidity. The asymmetries are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. These charge asymmetry measurements will allow more accurate determinations of the proton parton distribution functions and are the most precise to date.

  16. Mammalian cadherins DCHS1-FAT4 affect functional cerebral architecture.

    PubMed

    Beste, Christian; Ocklenburg, Sebastian; von der Hagen, Maja; Di Donato, Nataliya

    2016-06-01

    Cortical development is a complex process where a multitude of factors, including cadherins, plays an important role and where disruptions are known to have far reaching effects in neural development and cortical patterning. Cadherins play a central role in structural left-right differentiation during brain and body development, but their effect on a functional level remains elusive. We addressed this question by examining functional cerebral asymmetries in a patient with Van Maldergem Syndrome (VMS) (MIM#601390), which is caused by mutations in DCHS1-FAT4 cadherins, using a dichotic listening task. Using neurophysiological (EEG) data, we show that when key regulators during mammalian cerebral cortical development are disrupted due to DCHS1-FAT4 mutations, functional cerebral asymmetries are stronger. Basic perceptual processing of biaurally presented auditory stimuli was unaffected. This suggests that the strength and emergence of functional cerebral asymmetries is a direct function of proliferation and differentiation of neuronal stem cells. Moreover, these results support the recent assumption that the molecular mechanisms establishing early left-right differentiation are an important factor in the ontogenesis of functional lateralization. PMID:25930014

  17. Quantifying asymmetry: ratios and alternatives.

    PubMed

    Franks, Erin M; Cabo, Luis L

    2014-08-01

    Traditionally, the study of metric skeletal asymmetry has relied largely on univariate analyses, utilizing ratio transformations when the goal is comparing asymmetries in skeletal elements or populations of dissimilar dimensions. Under this approach, raw asymmetries are divided by a size marker, such as a bilateral average, in an attempt to produce size-free asymmetry indices. Henceforth, this will be referred to as "controlling for size" (see Smith: Curr Anthropol 46 (2005) 249-273). Ratios obtained in this manner often require further transformations to interpret the meaning and sources of asymmetry. This model frequently ignores the fundamental assumption of ratios: the relationship between the variables entered in the ratio must be isometric. Violations of this assumption can obscure existing asymmetries and render spurious results. In this study, we examined the performance of the classic indices in detecting and portraying the asymmetry patterns in four human appendicular bones and explored potential methodological alternatives. Examination of the ratio model revealed that it does not fulfill its intended goals in the bones examined, as the numerator and denominator are independent in all cases. The ratios also introduced strong biases in the comparisons between different elements and variables, generating spurious asymmetry patterns. Multivariate analyses strongly suggest that any transformation to control for overall size or variable range must be conducted before, rather than after, calculating the asymmetries. A combination of exploratory multivariate techniques, such as Principal Components Analysis, and confirmatory linear methods, such as regression and analysis of covariance, appear as a promising and powerful alternative to the use of ratios. PMID:24842694

  18. Cerebral lateralization in simultaneous interpretation.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, F; Gran, L; Basso, G; Bava, A

    1990-07-01

    Cerebral asymmetries for L1 (Italian), L2 (English), and L3 (French, German, Spanish, or Russian) were studied, by using a verbal-manual interference paradigm, in a group of Italian right-handed polyglot female students at the Scuola Superiore di Lingue Moderne per Interpreti e Traduttori (SSLM-School for Interpreters and Translators) of the University of Trieste and in a control group of right-handed monolingual female students at the Medical School of the University of Trieste. In an automatic speech production task no significant cerebral lateralization was found for the mother tongue (L1) either in the interpreting students or in the control group; the interpreting students were not significantly lateralized for the third language (L3), while weak left hemispheric lateralization was shown for L2. A significantly higher degree of verbal-manual interference was found for L1 than for L2 and L3. A significantly higher disruption rate occurred in the meaning-based mode of simultaneous interpretation (from L2 into L1 and vice versa) than in the word-for-word mode (from L2 into L1 and vice versa). No significant overall or hemispheric differences were found during simultaneous interpretation from L1 into L2 or from L2 into L1. PMID:2207622

  19. Baryon asymmetry and split SUSY

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Shinta

    2005-12-02

    It is one of the greatest mysteries that the baryon asymmetry in our universe is so small. It is argued that it may originate from some profound physics beyond the standard model. We investigate the Affleck-Dine baryogenesis in split supersymmetry, and find that the smallness of the baryon asymmetry is directly related to the hierarchy between the supersymmetry breaking squark/slepton masses and the weak scale. Put simply, the baryon asymmetry is small because of the split mass spectrum. LHC may prove or falsify our scenario.

  20. [Complementary therapy in palliative medicine].

    PubMed

    Hübner, J; Stoll, C

    2011-01-01

    Even in the palliative context complementary therapy has a high value for patients and their relatives. In contrast to the methods of conventional medicine naturopathy as a holistic system has positive meanings for patients and their family. Complementary medicine in the palliative setting can be used as a supportive therapy in carefully selected cases. Doctors and patients should be careful regarding effect and side effects and should make sure that supportive therapy is given adequately and in effective doses. Complementary therapy should not be used in order to avoid the question of life and death. An adequate approach to the topic is mandatory, which acknowledges the needs of patients but also looks for their safety. Patients following alternative therapies sometimes neglect helpful therapeutic options. Carefully providing information on these therapies is mandatory. Physicians should avoid losing patients' confidence in their competence and attention in their final course of disease. Also in palliative medicine a sensitive approach to the topic of complementary medicine is mandatory, which accounts for the eligible wishes of patients and their relatives but puts the patients safety first. PMID:21181106

  1. Complementary Colours for a Physicist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babic, Vitomir; Cepic, Mojca

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple experiment which enables splitting incident light into two different modes, each having a colour exactly complementary to the other. A brief historical development of colour theories and differences in a physicist's point of view with respect to an artist's one is discussed. An experimental system for producing…

  2. Structural asymmetry of the insula is linked to the lateralization of gesture and language.

    PubMed

    Biduła, Szymon P; Króliczak, Gregory

    2015-05-01

    The control of gesture is one of the most left-lateralized functions, and the insular cortex is one of the most left-biased structures in the human brain. Therefore, we investigated whether structural asymmetries of the insula are linked to the organization of functional activity during gesture planning. We reconstructed and parcellated the insular cortex of 27 participants. First, we tested 15 strongly left-handed individuals because of a higher incidence of atypical organization of functions such as gesture and language in such a population. The inter-hemispheric structural asymmetries were compared with the lateralization of activity for gesture in the supramarginal gyrus (the hotspot of signal increase regardless of the gesturing hand) and Broca's area (the hotspot of signal increase for language production). The more pronounced leftward structural asymmetries were accompanied by greater left-hemisphere dominance for both of the studied functions. Conversely, an atypical, bilateral or rightward functional shift of gesture and language was accompanied by an attenuated leftward asymmetry of the insula. These significant relationships were driven primarily by differences in surface area. Subsequently, by adding 12 right-handed individuals to these analyses we demonstrated that the observed significant associations are generalizable to the population. These results provide the first demonstration of the relationships between structural inter-hemispheric differences of the insula and the cerebral specialization for gesture. They also corroborate the link between insular asymmetries and language lateralization. As such, these outcomes are relevant to the common cerebral specialization for gesture and language. PMID:25858359

  3. CMB maximum temperature asymmetry axis: Alignment with other cosmic asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariano, Antonio; Perivolaropoulos, Leandros

    2013-02-01

    We use a global pixel-based estimator to identify the axis of the residual Maximum Temperature Asymmetry (MTA) (after the dipole subtraction) of the WMAP seven-year Internal Linear Combination (ILC) cosmic microwave background temperature sky map. The estimator is based on considering the temperature differences between opposite pixels in the sky at various angular resolutions (4°-15°) and selecting the axis that maximizes this difference. We consider three large-scale HEALPix resolutions: Nside=16(3.7°), Nside=8(7.3°) and Nside=4(14.7°). We compare the direction and magnitude of this asymmetry with three other cosmic asymmetry axes (α dipole, dark energy dipole and dark flow) and find that the four asymmetry axes are abnormally close to each other. We compare the observed MTA axis with the corresponding MTA axes of 104 Gaussian isotropic simulated ILC maps (based on ΛCDM). The fraction of simulated ILC maps that reproduce the observed magnitude of the MTA asymmetry and alignment with the observed α dipole is in the range of 0.1%-0.5% (depending on the resolution chosen for the cosmic microwave background map). The corresponding magnitude+alignment probabilities with the other two asymmetry axes (dark energy dipole and dark flow) are at the level of about 1%. We propose Extended Topological Quintessence as a physical model qualitatively consistent with this coincidence of directions.

  4. [Dreams and interhemispheric asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Korabel'nikova, E A; Golubev, V L

    2001-01-01

    The dreams of 103 children and adolescents, aged 10-17 years, have been studied. The test group included 78 patients with neurotic disorders; control one consisted of 25 healthy subjects. Dream features, which were common for those with preferentially left asymmetry profile both in patients as well as in healthy subjects, were: less expressed novelty factor and frequent appearance of rare phenomena, such as "déjà vu in wakefulness", reality, "mixed" (overlapped) dreams, prolonged dreams in repeat sleep, frequent changes of personages and scenes of action. Left-hander dream peculiarities, being detected only in neurotic patients but not in healthy subjects, emerged as lucid phenomena deficit, "dream in dreams" and "dream reminiscence in dream" syndrome, which have been found only in left-handers. Right and left hemispheres seem to contribute in different ways to a dream formation. In authors believe that the left hemisphere seems to provide dream origin while the right hemisphere provides dream vividness, figurativeness and affective activation level. PMID:11811128

  5. Hemispheric Asymmetries: The Comparative View

    PubMed Central

    Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Güntürkün, Onur

    2012-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetries play an important role in almost all cognitive functions. For more than a century, they were considered to be uniquely human but now an increasing number of findings in all vertebrate classes make it likely that we inherited our asymmetries from common ancestors. Thus, studying animal models could provide unique insights into the mechanisms of lateralization. We outline three such avenues of research by providing an overview of experiments on left–right differences in the connectivity of sensory systems, the embryonic determinants of brain asymmetries, and the genetics of lateralization. All these lines of studies could provide a wealth of insights into our own asymmetries that should and will be exploited by future analyses. PMID:22303295

  6. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of UCP blog for the latest updates. United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  7. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a neurological condition in which proteins called amyloid build up on the walls of the arteries ... The cause of cerebral amyloid angiopathy is unknown. Sometimes, it ... Persons with this condition have deposits of amyloid protein ...

  8. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Additional Content Medical News Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations By James E. Wilberger, MD, Derrick A. Dupre, ... a direct, strong blow to the head. Cerebral lacerations are tears in brain tissue, caused by a ...

  9. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  10. Selling Complementary Patents: Experimental Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, David J; Santore, Rudy; McKee, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Production requiring licensing groups of complementary patents implements a coordination game among patent holders, who can price patents by choosing among combinations of fixed and royalty fees. Summed across patents, these fees become the total producer cost of the package of patents. Royalties, because they function as excise taxes, add to marginal costs, resulting in higher prices and reduced quantities of the downstream product and lower payoffs to the patent holders. Using fixed fees eliminates this inefficiency but yields a more complex coordination game in which there are multiple equilibria, which are very fragile in that small mistakes can lead the downstream firm to not license the technology, resulting in inefficient outcomes. We report on a laboratory market investigation of the efficiency effects of coordinated pricing of patents in a patent pool. We find that pool-like pricing agreements can yield fewer coordination failures in the pricing of complementary patents.

  11. A Drosophila complementary DNA resource

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Gerald M.; Hong, Ling; Brokstein, Peter; Evans-Holm, Martha; Frise, Erwin; Stapleton, Mark; Harvey, Damon A.

    2000-03-24

    Collections of nonredundant, full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) clones for each of the model organisms and humans will be important resources for studies of gene structure and function. We describe a general strategy for producing such collections and its implementation, which so far has generated a set of cDNAs corresponding to over 40% of the genes in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

  12. Shared Pattern of Endocranial Shape Asymmetries among Great Apes, Anatomically Modern Humans, and Fossil Hominins

    PubMed Central

    Balzeau, Antoine; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Anatomical asymmetries of the human brain are a topic of major interest because of their link with handedness and cognitive functions. Their emergence and occurrence have been extensively explored in human fossil records to document the evolution of brain capacities and behaviour. We quantified for the first time antero-posterior endocranial shape asymmetries in large samples of great apes, modern humans and fossil hominins through analysis of “virtual” 3D models of skull and endocranial cavity and we statistically test for departures from symmetry. Once based on continuous variables, we show that the analysis of these brain asymmetries gives original results that build upon previous analysis based on discrete traits. In particular, it emerges that the degree of petalial asymmetries differs between great apes and hominins without modification of their pattern. We indeed demonstrate the presence of shape asymmetries in great apes, with a pattern similar to modern humans but with a lower variation and a lower degree of fluctuating asymmetry. More importantly, variations in the position of the frontal and occipital poles on the right and left hemispheres would be expected to show some degree of antisymmetry when population distribution is considered, but the observed pattern of variation among the samples is related to fluctuating asymmetry for most of the components of the petalias. Moreover, the presence of a common pattern of significant directional asymmetry for two components of the petalias in hominids implicates that the observed traits were probably inherited from the last common ancestor of extant African great apes and Homo sapiens. These results also have important implications for the possible relationships between endocranial shape asymmetries and functional capacities in hominins. It emphasizes the uncoupling between lateralized activities, some of them well probably distinctive to Homo, and large-scale cerebral lateralization itself, which is not

  13. Sulcal variability, stereological measurement and asymmetry of Broca's area on MR images

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Simon Sean; Highley, John Robin; Garcia-Finana, Marta; Sluming, Vanessa; Rezaie, Roozbeh; Roberts, Neil

    2007-01-01

    the shape of the posterior Sylvian fissure as a unilateral right or left upward oblique termination was always associated with leftward or rightward volume asymmetry respectively (P < 0.01). There was no relationship between volume asymmetries of the anterior and posterior speech regions. Our findings illustrate the extent of morphological variability of the anterior speech region and demonstrate the difficulties encountered when determining volumetric asymmetries of the inferior frontal gyrus, particularly when sulci are discontinuous, absent or bifid. When the intrasulcal grey matter of this region is exhaustively sampled according to strict anatomical landmarks, the volume of the pars opercularis is leftward asymmetrical. This manuscript illustrates the importance of simultaneous consideration of brain morphology and morphometry in studies of cerebral asymmetry. PMID:17727624

  14. Sulcal variability, stereological measurement and asymmetry of Broca's area on MR images.

    PubMed

    Keller, Simon Sean; Highley, John Robin; Garcia-Finana, Marta; Sluming, Vanessa; Rezaie, Roozbeh; Roberts, Neil

    2007-10-01

    the shape of the posterior Sylvian fissure as a unilateral right or left upward oblique termination was always associated with leftward or rightward volume asymmetry respectively (P < 0.01). There was no relationship between volume asymmetries of the anterior and posterior speech regions. Our findings illustrate the extent of morphological variability of the anterior speech region and demonstrate the difficulties encountered when determining volumetric asymmetries of the inferior frontal gyrus, particularly when sulci are discontinuous, absent or bifid. When the intrasulcal grey matter of this region is exhaustively sampled according to strict anatomical landmarks, the volume of the pars opercularis is leftward asymmetrical. This manuscript illustrates the importance of simultaneous consideration of brain morphology and morphometry in studies of cerebral asymmetry. PMID:17727624

  15. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapies by the Families of Children with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickel, Robert E.; Gerlach, Elizabeth King

    2001-01-01

    This article presents a model for communication among providers and families of children with disabilities about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). It discusses treatments for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and cerebral palsy, including the Feingold diet, herbal treatments, CranioSacral therapy, therapeutic…

  16. 6 Tips: IBS and Complementary Health Practices

    MedlinePlus

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z 6 Tips: IBS and Complementary Health Practices Share: As ... a complementary health practice for IBS, here are 6 tips: Hypnotherapy (hypnosis). This practice involves the power ...

  17. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Complementary Health Practices

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vision/Thinkstock What's the Bottom Line? What do we know about the effectiveness of complementary health approaches ... t draw conclusions about their effectiveness. What do we know about the safety of complementary health approaches ...

  18. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Human Brain Anatomical Network Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Ni; Liu, Yaou; Duan, Yunyun; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-01-01

    The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. However, few studies have investigated the hemispheric asymmetries of the human brain from the perspective of the network model, and little is known about the asymmetries of the connection patterns of brain regions, which may reflect the functional integration and interaction between different regions. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 72 right-handed healthy adult subjects. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and subcortical regions using deterministic tractography. To investigate the hemispheric asymmetries of the brain, statistical analyses were performed to reveal the brain regions with significant differences between bilateral topological properties, such as degree of connectivity, characteristic path length, and betweenness centrality. Furthermore, local structural connections were also investigated to examine the local asymmetries of some specific white matter tracts. From the perspective of both the global and local connection patterns, we identified the brain regions with hemispheric asymmetries. Combined with the previous studies, we suggested that the topological asymmetries in the anatomical network may reflect the functional lateralization of the human brain. PMID:26539535

  19. Cerebral glucose metabolism in Wernicke's, Broca's, and conduction aphasia

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Kempler, D.; Jackson, C.; Hanson, W.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral glucose metabolism was evaluated in patients with either Wernicke's (N = 7), Broca's (N = 11), or conduction (N = 10) aphasia using /sup 18/F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose with positron emission tomography. The three aphasic syndromes differed in the degree of left-to-right frontal metabolic asymmetry, with Broca's aphasia showing severe asymmetry and Wernicke's aphasia mild-to-moderate metabolic asymmetry, while patients with conduction aphasia were metabolically symmetric. On the other hand, the three syndromes showed the same degree of metabolic decline in the left temporal region. The parietal region appeared to separate conduction aphasia from both Broca's and Wernicke's aphasias. Common aphasic features in the three syndromes appear to be due to common changes in the temporal region, while unique features were associated with frontal and parietal metabolic differences.

  20. Expected dipole asymmetry in CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namjoo, M. H.; Abolhasani, A. A.; Assadullahi, H.; Baghram, S.; Firouzjahi, H.; Wands, D.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the hemispherical asymmetry predicted in cosmic microwave background polarization when there is an asymmetry in temperature anisotropies due to primordial perturbations. We consider the cases of asymmetries due to adiabatic and isocurvature modes, and tensor perturbations. We show that the asymmetry in the TE, EE and/or BB correlations can be substantially larger than those in the TT power spectrum in certain cases. The relative asymmetry in the different cross-correlations, as well as the angular scale dependence, can in principle distinguish between different origins for the asymmetry.

  1. Sivers Asymmetry with QCD Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarria, Miguel G.; Idilbi, Ahmad; Kang, Zhong-Bo; Vitev, Ivan

    2015-02-01

    We analyze the Sivers asymmetry in both Drell-Yan (DY) production and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS), while considering properly defined transverse momentum dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions and their QCD evolution. After finding a universal non-perturbative spin-independent Sudakov factor that can describe reasonably well the world's data of SIDIS, DY lepton pair and W/Z production in unpolarized scatterings, we perform a global fitting of all the experimental data on the Sivers asymmetry in SIDIS from HERMES, COMPASS and Jefferson Lab. Then we make predictions for the asymmetry in DY lepton pair and W boson production, which could be compared to the future experimental data in order to test the sign change of the Sivers function.

  2. Geometric asymmetry driven Janus micromotors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a "coconut" micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors. PMID:25122607

  3. Complementary feeding patterns in India.

    PubMed

    Kuriyan, R; Kurpad, A V

    2012-10-01

    There are far too many children in the world who suffer from under-nutrition and growth faltering, with life time consequences such as reduced work capacity, increased infections, impaired intellectual performance and an increased risk of non communicable diseases later in life. These changes occur early in life, and consequently, complementary feeding has been receiving increased attention in the international nutrition community. In India, common problems relate not only to insufficient breastfeeding, but also to detrimental feeding practices. Only about 20% of children aged 6-23 months were fed according to the three recommended Infant and Child Feeding practices. The most common types of solid or semi-solid foods fed to both breastfeeding and non-breastfeeding children under 3 years of age were foods made from grains and roots. These complementary feeding practices were found to be significantly associated with poor socioeconomic status, undesirable socio-cultural beliefs, maternal illiteracy, and ignorance. Although many initiatives have been carried out in India to promote Infant and Young Child Feeding, the progress in reducing the number of undernourished children in India over the last decade has been slow and modest. Equally, with the growing evidence and interest in the role of infant nutrition in the development of over nutrition and non-communicable disease, it is important to plan appropriate complementary feeding interventions that result in optimal growth. Contact opportunities with parents, specifically mothers, must be used for counseling through multiple communication channels such as local media, in order to constantly educate the population with consistent and simple messages on child feeding. PMID:22748607

  4. Complementary colours for a physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babič, Vitomir; Čepič, Mojca

    2009-07-01

    This paper reports on a simple experiment which enables splitting incident light into two different modes, each having a colour exactly complementary to the other. A brief historical development of colour theories and differences in a physicist's point of view with respect to an artist's one is discussed. An experimental system for producing colours and their physically exact complements using cellophane is presented. The origin of the colours lies in the transmission of polarized light through the birefringent cellophane, and therefore the optics of birefringent materials is briefly presented. A set-up which will be described in the following can be used in a laboratory experiment at an undergraduate level.

  5. [Etiology of cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Jaisle, F

    1996-01-01

    The "perinatal asphyxia" is regarded to be one of the causes of cerebral palsy, though in the very most of the children with cerebral palsy there is found no hypoxia during labour. It should be mentioned, that the definition of "perinatal" and "asphyxia" neither are unic nor concret. And also there is no correlation between nonreassuring fetal heart rate patterns and acidosis in fetal blood with the incidence of cerebral palsy. Numerous studies in pregnant animals failed in proving an acute intrapartal hypoxia to be the origin of the cerebral palsy. Myers (1975) describes four patterns of anatomic brain damage after different injuries. Only his so called oligo-acidotic hypoxia, which is protracted and lasts over a longer time is leading to brain injury, which can be regarded in analogy to the injury of children with cerebral palsy. Summarising the update publications about the causes of cerebral palsy and the studies in pregnant animals there is no evidence that hypoxia during labour may be the cause of cerebral palsy. There is a great probability of a pre(and post-)natal origin of brain injury (for instance a periventricular leucomalacia found after birth) which leads to cerebral palsy. Short after labour signs of a so called "asphyxia" may occur in addition to this preexisting injury and misrepresent the cause of cerebral palsy. Finally the prepartal injury may cause both: Cerebral palsy and hypoxia. PMID:9035826

  6. [Reactions of patients to complementary medicine].

    PubMed

    Bar-Cohen, B; DeKeyser, F; Wagner, N

    2000-10-01

    350 patients attending 11 large out-patient clinics completed questionnaires evaluating attitudes to, and experience with complementary medicine. 129 (36%) respondents reported using complementary medicine. 14% of them used complementary medicine for the current medical problem for which they were attending the clinic. Pain was the most common medical problem for which complementary medicine was used, followed by respiratory problems and cancer. Common therapeutic modalities used were acupuncture, homeopathy, nutrition and herbal medicine. Women, the secular as opposed to the religious, and those with higher education were more apt to use complementary medicine. No differences were found in age, national origin, length of living in Israel, and diet (vegetarian, natural foods or regular diet) between those who used complementary medicine and those who did not. No relationship was found between the use of complementary medicine and perceived poor health status, locus of control, or satisfaction with the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:11062966

  7. Reconceptualizing Cerebral Dominance: Implications for Reading- and Learning-Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hynd, George W.; Obrzut, John E.

    1981-01-01

    Recent research employing more direct measures of central functional asymmetry suggests that a reconceptualization of the notion of cerebral dominance may be in order. A rationale for this reconceptualization is provided and the implications for children with learning disorders is discussed. (Author)

  8. Control of Angular Momentum during Walking in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Kaat, Desloovere; Duysens, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Children with hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (CP) walk with marked asymmetries. For instance, we have recently shown that they have less arm swing on the affected side, and more arm swing at the unaffected side. Such an increase in arm swing at the unaffected side may be aimed at controlling total body angular momentum about the vertical axis,…

  9. Hemiparesis post cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Taiaa, Oumkaltoum; Amil, Touriya; Darbi, Abdelatif

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is one of the most serious complications in the Plasmodium falciparum infection. In endemic areas, the cerebral malaria interested mainly children. The occurrence in adults is very rare and most interested adult traveling in tropical zones. This case report describes a motor deficit post cerebral malaria in a young adult traveling in malaria endemic area. This complication has been reported especially in children and seems very rare in adults. PMID:25995798

  10. Hemispheric Asymmetries and Cognitive Attributes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federico, Pat-Anthony

    Visual, auditory, and bimodal event-related potentials were recorded from 50 males, and lateral asymmetry indices were derived. Eleven psychometric tests of different cognitive attributes were also administered to them. This area of research has been labeled aptitude-treatment-interaction (ATI). The emphasis of ATI research is on identification of…

  11. A Global Gait Asymmetry Index.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Silvia; Resende, Renan A; Clansey, Adam C; Deluzio, Kevin J; Selbie, W Scott; Veloso, António P

    2016-04-01

    High levels of gait asymmetry are associated with many pathologies. Our long-term goal is to improve gait symmetry through real-time biofeedback of a symmetry index. Symmetry is often reported as a single metric or a collective signature of multiple discrete measures. While this is useful for assessment, incorporating multiple feedback metrics presents too much information for most subjects to use as visual feedback for gait retraining. The aim of this article was to develop a global gait asymmetry (GGA) score that could be used as a biofeedback metric for gait retraining and to test the effectiveness of the GGA for classifying artificially-induced asymmetry. Eighteen participants (11 males; age 26.9 y [SD = 7.7]; height 1.8 m [SD = 0.1]; body mass 72.7 kg [SD = 8.9]) walked on a treadmill in 3 symmetry conditions, induced by wearing custom-made sandals: a symmetric condition (identical sandals) and 2 asymmetric conditions (different sandals). The GGA score was calculated, based on several joint angles, and compared between conditions. Significant differences were found among all conditions (P < .001), meaning that the GGA score is sensitive to different levels of asymmetry, and may be useful for rehabilitation and assessment. PMID:26502455

  12. From symmetry to asymmetry: Phylogenetic patterns of asymmetry variation in animals and their evolutionary significance

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, A. Richard

    1996-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of asymmetry variation offer a powerful tool for exploring the interplay between ontogeny and evolution because (i) conspicuous asymmetries exist in many higher metazoans with widely varying modes of development, (ii) patterns of bilateral variation within species may identify genetically and environmentally triggered asymmetries, and (iii) asymmetries arising at different times during development may be more sensitive to internal cytoplasmic inhomogeneities compared to external environmental stimuli. Using four broadly comparable asymmetry states (symmetry, antisymmetry, dextral, and sinistral), and two stages at which asymmetry appears developmentally (larval and postlarval), I evaluated relations between ontogenetic and phylogenetic patterns of asymmetry variation. Among 140 inferred phylogenetic transitions between asymmetry states, recorded from 11 classes in five phyla, directional asymmetry (dextral or sinistral) evolved directly from symmetrical ancestors proportionally more frequently among larval asymmetries. In contrast, antisymmetry, either as an end state or as a transitional stage preceding directional asymmetry, was confined primarily to postlarval asymmetries. The ontogenetic origin of asymmetry thus significantly influences its subsequent evolution. Furthermore, because antisymmetry typically signals an environmentally triggered asymmetry, the phylogenetic transition from antisymmetry to directional asymmetry suggests that many cases of laterally fixed asymmetries evolved via genetic assimilation. PMID:8962039

  13. Visual function and perinatal focal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Mercuri, E; Atkinson, J; Braddick, O; Anker, S; Nokes, L; Cowan, F; Rutherford, M; Pennock, J; Dubowitz, L

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the visual function of infants with perinatal cerebral infarction in whom the site and size of the lesion has been determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Twelve infants with cerebral infarction on MRI were studied with a battery of tests specifically designed to evaluate visual function in infancy. This included tests: for visual attention (fixation shifts); of cerebral asymmetry (optokinetic nystagmus, visual fields); for assessment of acuity (forced choice preferential looking); and neurophysiological measures of vision (phase reversal and orientation reversal visual evoked potential). RESULTS: A considerable incidence of abnormalities on at least one of the tests for visual function used was observed. The presence or severity of visual abnormalities could not always be predicted by the site and extent of the lesion seen on imaging. CONCLUSIONS: Early focal lesions affecting the visual pathway can, to some extent, be compensated for by the immature developing brain. These data suggest that all the infants presenting with focal lesions need to be investigated with a detailed assessment of various aspects of vision. Images PMID:8949687

  14. W asymmetries at CDF and D0

    SciTech Connect

    Schellman, H.

    2010-08-01

    We present recent W and charged lepton asymmetry measurements from the CDF and D0 experiments. Theoretical predictions agree with the CDF W asymmetry, measured using a new matrix element technique. These theoretical predictions are less consistent with the latest lepton asymmetry measurements from D0 and CDF, especially for high charged lepton transverse momentum.

  15. Multiple complementary gas distribution assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Tuoh-Bin; Melnik, Yuriy; Pang, Lily L; Tuncel, Eda; Nguyen, Son T; Chen, Lu

    2016-04-05

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a first gas distribution assembly that includes a first gas passage for introducing a first process gas into a second gas passage that introduces the first process gas into a processing chamber and a second gas distribution assembly that includes a third gas passage for introducing a second process gas into a fourth gas passage that introduces the second process gas into the processing chamber. The first and second gas distribution assemblies are each adapted to be coupled to at least one chamber wall of the processing chamber. The first gas passage is shaped as a first ring positioned within the processing chamber above the second gas passage that is shaped as a second ring positioned within the processing chamber. The gas distribution assemblies may be designed to have complementary characteristic radial film growth rate profiles.

  16. Superlens from complementary anisotropic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. X.; Tam, H. L.; Wang, F. Y.; Cheah, K. W.

    2007-12-01

    Metamaterials with isotropic property have been shown to possess novel optical properties such as a negative refractive index that can be used to design a superlens. Recently, it was shown that metamaterials with anisotropic property can translate the high-frequency wave vector k values from evanescence to propagating. However, electromagnetic waves traveling in single-layer anisotropic metamaterial produce diverging waves of different spatial frequency. In this work, it is shown that, using bilayer metamaterials that have complementary anisotropic property, the diverging waves are recombined to produce a subwavelength image, i.e., a superlens device can be designed. The simulation further shows that the design can be achieved using a metal/oxide multilayer, and a resolution of 30 nm can be easily obtained in the optical frequency range.

  17. Geometric asymmetry driven Janus micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors.The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional SEM images, data analysis, Videos S

  18. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  19. Hemisphere asymmetry in parasympathetic control of the heart.

    PubMed

    Wittling, W; Block, A; Genzel, S; Schweiger, E

    1998-05-01

    Hemisphere asymmetry in the control of parasympathetic outflow to the sino-atrial node of the heart was studied in healthy human subjects using lateralized film presentation for selective sensory stimulation of the hemispheres and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability as a measure of vagal tone. There was a clear and consistent left hemisphere predominance in the control of parasympathetic modulation of cardiac activity which cannot be attributed to differences in emotional processing. Supplementing previous findings of our research group, the present study indicates that control of autonomic cardiac activity at the level of the cerebral cortex seems to be characterized by a division of responsibility between both hemispheres, sympathetic activity being mainly controlled by the right hemisphere and parasympathetic activity being under the left hemisphere's main control. PMID:9699952

  20. Neurophysiological origin of human brain asymmetry for speech and language

    PubMed Central

    Morillon, Benjamin; Lehongre, Katia; Frackowiak, Richard S. J.; Ducorps, Antoine; Kleinschmidt, Andreas; Poeppel, David; Giraud, Anne-Lise

    2010-01-01

    The physiological basis of human cerebral asymmetry for language remains mysterious. We have used simultaneous physiological and anatomical measurements to investigate the issue. Concentrating on neural oscillatory activity in speech-specific frequency bands and exploring interactions between gestural (motor) and auditory-evoked activity, we find, in the absence of language-related processing, that left auditory, somatosensory, articulatory motor, and inferior parietal cortices show specific, lateralized, speech-related physiological properties. With the addition of ecologically valid audiovisual stimulation, activity in auditory cortex synchronizes with left-dominant input from the motor cortex at frequencies corresponding to syllabic, but not phonemic, speech rhythms. Our results support theories of language lateralization that posit a major role for intrinsic, hardwired perceptuomotor processing in syllabic parsing and are compatible both with the evolutionary view that speech arose from a combination of syllable-sized vocalizations and meaningful hand gestures and with developmental observations suggesting phonemic analysis is a developmentally acquired process. PMID:20956297

  1. Motor Asymmetry in Elite Fencers

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Selcuk; Sainburg, Robert L.; Kirazci, Sadettin; Przybyla, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that asymmetrical patterns of hand preference are updated and modified by current sensorimotor conditions. We now examine whether participation in long-term training in the upper extremity sport fencing might modify arm selection and performance asymmetries. Eight fencers and eight non-fencers performed reaching movements under three experimental conditions: (1) non-choice right; (2) non-choice left; and (3) choice, either right or left arm as selected by subject. The non-choice conditions allowed assessment of potential interlimb differences in movement performance, while the choice condition allowed assessment of the frequency and pattern of arm selection across subject groups. Our findings showed that the athlete groups showed substantially greater symmetry in both our performance and selection measures. These findings suggest that arm selection and performance asymmetries can be altered by intense long-term practice. PMID:25494618

  2. Nanocrystal Bioassembly: Asymmetry, Proximity, and Enzymatic Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Claridge, Shelley A.

    2008-05-01

    Research at the interface between biomolecules and inorganic nanocrystals has resulted in a great number of new discoveries. In part this arises from the synergistic duality of the system: biomolecules may act as self-assembly agents for organizing inorganic nanocrystals into functional materials; alternatively, nanocrystals may act as microscopic or spectroscopic labels for elucidating the behavior of complex biomolecular systems. However, success in either of these functions relies heavily uponthe ability to control the conjugation and assembly processes.In the work presented here, we first design a branched DNA scaffold which allows hybridization of DNA-nanocrystal monoconjugates to form discrete assemblies. Importantly, the asymmetry of the branched scaffold allows the formation of asymmetric2assemblies of nanocrystals. In the context of a self-assembled device, this can be considered a step toward the ability to engineer functionally distinct inputs and outputs.Next we develop an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography purification method which allows large gold nanocrystals attached to single strands of very short DNA to be purified. When two such complementary conjugates are hybridized, the large nanocrystals are brought into close proximity, allowing their plasmon resonances to couple. Such plasmon-coupled constructs are of interest both as optical interconnects for nanoscale devices and as `plasmon ruler? biomolecular probes.We then present an enzymatic ligation strategy for creating multi-nanoparticle building blocks for self-assembly. In constructing a nanoscale device, such a strategy would allow pre-assembly and purification of components; these constructs can also act as multi-label probes of single-stranded DNA conformational dynamics. Finally we demonstrate a simple proof-of-concept of a nanoparticle analog of the polymerase chain reaction.

  3. Cardiolipin asymmetry, oxidation and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Valerian E.; Chu, Charleen T.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Cheikhi, Amin; Bayir, Hülya

    2014-01-01

    Cardiolipins (CLs) are ancient and unusual dimeric phospholipids localized in the plasma membrane of bacteria and in the inner mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotes. In mitochondria, two types of asymmetries – trans-membrane and molecular - are essential determinants of CL functions. In this review, we describe CL-based signaling mitochondrial pathways realized via modulation of trans-membrane asymmetry and leading to externalization and peroxidation of CLs in mitophagy and apoptosis, respectively. We discuss possible mechanisms of CL translocations from the inner leaflet of the inner to the outer leaflet of the outer mitochondrial membranes. We present redox reaction mechanisms of cytochrome c-catalyzed CL peroxidation as a required stage in the execution of apoptosis as well as a possible source of lipid mediators. We also emphasize the significance of CL-related metabolic pathways as new targets for drug discovery. Finally, a remarkable diversity of polyunsaturated CL species and their oxidation products have evolved in eukaryotes vs. prokaryotes. This diversity - associated with CL molecular asymmetry - is presented as the basis for mitochondrial communications language. PMID:24300280

  4. Binary complementary white LED illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John K.

    2001-12-01

    For widespread adoption in general-purpose illumination applications, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) must reliably produce a substantial amount of white light at a reasonable cost. While several white LED technologies appear capable of meeting the implicit technical requirements for illumination, their high purchase price (relative to traditional light sources) has heretofore impeded their market advancement. Binary complementary white (BCW) LED illuminators, first introduced commercially in late 1997, appear to offer great potential for addressing the commercial and technical demands of general-purpose illumination applications. Many properties of BCW LED systems derive from AlInGaP LED chips, the source of up to 80% of the luminous flux projected from BCW devices. This configuration yields a number of benefits, relative to other white LED approaches, including high luminous efficacy, low cost per lumen, and high luminous flux per discrete component. This document describes BCW illumination systems in detail, beginning with a review of generic LED attributes, basic illumination requirements and applied photometric and colorimetric techniques.

  5. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Special Section CAM Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... low back pain. True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, ...

  6. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Special Section CAM Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... for low back pain. True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, ...

  7. Lean Mass Asymmetry Influences Force and Power Asymmetry During Jumping in Collegiate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David R.; Sanfilippo, Jennifer L.; Binkley, Neil; Heiderscheit, Bryan C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to: (1) examine how asymmetry in lower extremity lean mass influenced force and power asymmetry during jumping, (2) determine how power and force asymmetry affected jump height, and (3) report normative values in collegiate athletes. Force and power were assessed from each limb using bilateral force plates during a countermovement jump in 167 Division 1 athletes (mass=85.7±20.3kg, age=20.0±1.2years, 103M/64F). Lean mass of the pelvis, thigh, and shank was assessed via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Percent asymmetry was calculated for lean mass at each region (pelvis, thigh, and shank) as well as force and power. Forward stepwise regressions were performed to determine the influence of lean mass asymmetry on force and power asymmetry. Thigh and shank lean mass asymmetry explained 20% of the variance in force asymmetry (R2=0.20, P<0.001), while lean mass asymmetry of the pelvis, thigh and shank explained 25% of the variance in power asymmetry (R2=0.25, P<0.001). Jump height was compared across level of force and power asymmetry (P>0.05) and greater than 10% asymmetry in power tended to decrease performance (effect size>1.0). Ninety-five percent of this population (2.5th to 97.5th percentile) displayed force asymmetry between −11.8 to 16.8% and a power asymmetry between −9.9 to 11.5%. A small percentage (<4%) of these athletes displayed more than 15% asymmetry between limbs. These results demonstrate that lean mass asymmetry in the lower extremity is at least partially responsible for asymmetries in force and power. However, a large percentage remains unexplained by lean mass asymmetry. PMID:24402449

  8. Structural asymmetry of the insula is linked to the lateralization of gesture and language

    PubMed Central

    Biduła, Szymon P; Króliczak, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The control of gesture is one of the most left-lateralized functions, and the insular cortex is one of the most left-biased structures in the human brain. Therefore, we investigated whether structural asymmetries of the insula are linked to the organization of functional activity during gesture planning. We reconstructed and parcellated the insular cortex of 27 participants. First, we tested 15 strongly left-handed individuals because of a higher incidence of atypical organization of functions such as gesture and language in such a population. The inter-hemispheric structural asymmetries were compared with the lateralization of activity for gesture in the supramarginal gyrus (the hotspot of signal increase regardless of the gesturing hand) and Broca’s area (the hotspot of signal increase for language production). The more pronounced leftward structural asymmetries were accompanied by greater left-hemisphere dominance for both of the studied functions. Conversely, an atypical, bilateral or rightward functional shift of gesture and language was accompanied by an attenuated leftward asymmetry of the insula. These significant relationships were driven primarily by differences in surface area. Subsequently, by adding 12 right-handed individuals to these analyses we demonstrated that the observed significant associations are generalizable to the population. These results provide the first demonstration of the relationships between structural inter-hemispheric differences of the insula and the cerebral specialization for gesture. They also corroborate the link between insular asymmetries and language lateralization. As such, these outcomes are relevant to the common cerebral specialization for gesture and language. PMID:25858359

  9. Hemispheric asymmetry in spatial attention across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Markus

    2005-01-01

    Functional cerebral asymmetries (FCAs) are known to fluctuate across the menstrual cycle. The mechanisms of these sex hormonal modulations are poorly understood. It has been suggested that gonadal steroid hormones might suppress or specifically activate one hemisphere. However, recent studies suggest that high levels of gonadal steroid hormones reduce FCAs by its modulating effects on cortico-cortical transmission. To investigate the activating effects of gonadal steroid hormones on the interhemispheric interaction, a visual line-bisection task was administered to normally cycling women during menses and the midluteal cycle phase as well as to similar-aged healthy men. The results replicate previous findings of a sex difference in line-bisection as a function of hand-use and show that the hand-use effect fluctuates across the menstrual cycle. High levels of estradiol during the midluteal phase were related to a decrease of the hand-use effect. It is concluded that cycle-related fluctuations in levels of gonadal steroid hormones affect hemispheric asymmetry of spatial attention, presumably by interhemispheric spreading of neuronal activation. PMID:16009238

  10. Adequacy of family foods for complementary feeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The WHO recommends that complementary foods be introduced to all infants at age 6 mo and that breastfeeding be continued until age 18–24 mo. Beginning at age 6 mo, complementary foods should be pureed, mashed, or semisolid, but by age 12 mo the child should be able to eat solid foods that are consum...

  11. Ethics of complementary medicine: practical issues

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Edzard

    2009-01-01

    Complementary medicine is popular, yet ethical issues are rarely discussed. Misleading information, informed consent, publishing, and confidentiality are discussed in the light of medical ethics. The message that emerges is that, in complementary medicine, ethical issues are neglected and violated on a daily basis. PMID:19567001

  12. Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Practices

    MedlinePlus

    ... Audio) NCCIH Clinical Digest A monthly newsletter with evidence-based information on complementary and integrative practices and a ... review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2012;2012:863905. Dodin S, ...

  13. Complementary and alternative therapies for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Steyer, Terrence E; Ables, Adrienne

    2009-06-01

    Although many complementary therapies are promoted for the treatment of obesity, few are truly therapeutic. Evidence suggests that food containing diacylglycerol oil, acupuncture, and hypnosis are the only evidence-based complementary therapies for the treatment of obesity, and, at best, these should be used as adjuvants to the more conventional therapies of calorie restriction and exercise. PMID:19501250

  14. Asymmetry within and around the human planum temporale is sexually dimorphic and influenced by genes involved in steroid hormone receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe, Tulio; Zwiers, Marcel P; Wittfeld, Katharina; Teumer, Alexander; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hoogman, Martine; Hagoort, Peter; Fernandez, Guillen; Buitelaar, Jan; van Bokhoven, Hans; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E; Grabe, Hans J; Francks, Clyde

    2015-01-01

    The genetic determinants of cerebral asymmetries are unknown. Sex differences in asymmetry of the planum temporale (PT), that overlaps Wernicke's classical language area, have been inconsistently reported. Meta-analysis of previous studies has suggested that publication bias established this sex difference in the literature. Using probabilistic definitions of cortical regions we screened over the cerebral cortex for sexual dimorphisms of asymmetry in 2337 healthy subjects, and found the PT to show the strongest sex-linked asymmetry of all regions, which was supported by two further datasets, and also by analysis with the FreeSurfer package that performs automated parcellation of cerebral cortical regions. We performed a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) meta-analysis of PT asymmetry in a pooled sample of 3095 subjects, followed by a candidate-driven approach which measured a significant enrichment of association in genes of the 'steroid hormone receptor activity' and 'steroid metabolic process' pathways. Variants in the genes and pathways identified may affect the role of the PT in language cognition. PMID:25239853

  15. Increased morphological asymmetry, evolvability and plasticity in human brain evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Robles, Aida; Hopkins, William D.; Sherwood, Chet C.

    2013-01-01

    The study of hominin brain evolution relies mostly on evaluation of the endocranial morphology of fossil skulls. However, only some general features of external brain morphology are evident from endocasts, and many anatomical details can be difficult or impossible to examine. In this study, we use geometric morphometric techniques to evaluate inter- and intraspecific differences in cerebral morphology in a sample of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging scans of chimpanzees and humans, with special emphasis on the study of asymmetric variation. Our study reveals that chimpanzee–human differences in cerebral morphology are mainly symmetric; by contrast, there is continuity in asymmetric variation between species, with humans showing an increased range of variation. Moreover, asymmetric variation does not appear to be the result of allometric scaling at intraspecific levels, whereas symmetric changes exhibit very slight allometric effects within each species. Our results emphasize two key properties of brain evolution in the hominine clade: first, evolution of chimpanzee and human brains (and probably their last common ancestor and related species) is not strongly morphologically constrained, thus making their brains highly evolvable and responsive to selective pressures; second, chimpanzee and, especially, human brains show high levels of fluctuating asymmetry indicative of pronounced developmental plasticity. We infer that these two characteristics can have a role in human cognitive evolution. PMID:23615289

  16. Reciprocal organization of the cerebral hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    McGilchrist, Iain

    2010-01-01

    The cerebral hemispheres are anatomically and neurophysiologically asymmetrical. The evolutionary basis for these differences remains uncertain. There are, however, highly consistent differences between the hemispheres, evident in reptiles, birds, and mammals, as well as in humans, in the nature of the attention each applies to the environment. This permits the simultaneous application of precisely focused, but narrow, attention, needed for grasping food or prey, with broad, open, and uncommitted attention, needed to watch out for predators and to interpret the intentions of conspecifics. These different modes of attention can account for a very wide range of repeated observations relating to hemisphere specialization, and suggest that hemisphere differences lie not in discrete functional domains as such, but distinct modes of functioning within any one domain. These modes of attention are mutually incompatible, and their application depends on inhibitory transmission in the corpus callosum. There is also an asymmetry of interaction between the hemispheres at the phenomenological level. PMID:21319495

  17. Dentofacial Asymmetries: Challenging Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Manish; Agrawal, Jiwan Asha; Nanjannawar, Lalita; Fulari, Sangamesh; Kagi, Vishwal

    2015-01-01

    Dentofacial asymmetry is quite common and when sufficiently severe can require surgical orthodontic intervention. Asymmetries can be classified according to the structures involved into skeletal, dental and functional. In diagnosing asymmetries, a thorough clinical examination and radiographic survey are essential to determine the extent of soft tissue, skeletal, dental and functional involvement. Dental asymmetries, as well as a variety of functional deviations, can be managed orthodontically, whereas significant structural facial asymmetries require a comprehensive orthodontic and orthognathic management. With less severe dental, skeletal and soft tissue deviations the advisability of treatment should be carefully considered. The following article also contains a case report highlighting the importance of proper diagnosis in treatment plan for management of dentofacial asymmetry. PMID:26229387

  18. Dentofacial Asymmetries: Challenging Diagnosis and Treatment Planning.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Manish; Agrawal, Jiwan Asha; Nanjannawar, Lalita; Fulari, Sangamesh; Kagi, Vishwal

    2015-07-01

    Dentofacial asymmetry is quite common and when sufficiently severe can require surgical orthodontic intervention. Asymmetries can be classified according to the structures involved into skeletal, dental and functional. In diagnosing asymmetries, a thorough clinical examination and radiographic survey are essential to determine the extent of soft tissue, skeletal, dental and functional involvement. Dental asymmetries, as well as a variety of functional deviations, can be managed orthodontically, whereas significant structural facial asymmetries require a comprehensive orthodontic and orthognathic management. With less severe dental, skeletal and soft tissue deviations the advisability of treatment should be carefully considered. The following article also contains a case report highlighting the importance of proper diagnosis in treatment plan for management of dentofacial asymmetry. PMID:26229387

  19. Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like transmission in side-coupled complementary split-ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yinghui; Yan, Lianshan; Pan, Wei; Luo, Bin; Wen, Kunhua; Guo, Zhen; Luo, Xiangang

    2012-10-22

    We investigate a plasmonic waveguide system based on side-coupled complementary split-ring resonators (CSRR), which exhibits electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like transmission. LC resonance model is utilized to explain the electromagnetic responses of CSRR, which is verified by simulation results of finite difference time domain method. The electromagnetic responses of CSRR can be flexible handled by changing the asymmetry degree of the structure and the width of the metallic baffles. Cascaded CSRRs also have been studied to obtain EIT-like transmission at visible and near-infrared region, simultaneously. PMID:23187197

  20. Complementary chiral metasurface with strong broadband optical activity and enhanced transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Yan-Peng; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Dong, Xian-Zi E-mail: xmduan@mail.ipc.ac.cn; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Li, Jing; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming E-mail: xmduan@mail.ipc.ac.cn

    2014-01-06

    We present the design and realization of ultra-thin chiral metasurfaces with giant broadband optical activity in the infrared wavelength. The chiral metasurfaces consisting of periodic hole arrays of complementary asymmetric split ring resonators are fabricated by femtosecond laser two-photon polymerization. Enhanced transmission with strong polarization conversion up to 97% is observed owing to the chiral surface plasmons resulting from mirror symmetry broken. The dependence of optical activity on the degree of structural asymmetry is investigated. This simple planar metasurface is expected to be useful for designing ultra-thin active devices and tailoring the polarization behavior of complex metallic nanostructures.

  1. WIMP abundance and lepton (flavour) asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Stuke, Maik; Schwarz, Dominik J.; Starkman, Glenn E-mail: dschwarz@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2012-03-01

    We investigate how large lepton asymmetries affect the evolution of the early universe at times before big bang nucleosynthesis and in particular how they influence the relic density of WIMP dark matter. In comparison to the standard calculation of the relic WIMP abundance we find a decrease, depending on the lepton flavour asymmetry. We find an effect of up to 20 per cent for lepton flavour asymmetries l{sub f} = O(0.1)

  2. Smallness of baryon asymmetry from split supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Shinta; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2005-06-15

    The smallness of the baryon asymmetry in our universe is one of the greatest mysteries and may originate from some profound physics beyond the standard model. We investigate the Affleck-Dine baryogenesis in split supersymmetry, and find that the smallness of the baryon asymmetry is directly related to the hierarchy between the supersymmetry breaking squark/slepton masses and the weak scale. Put simply, the baryon asymmetry is small because of the split mass spectrum.

  3. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... al. Course of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation. Neurology. 2007;68:1411-1416. PMID: 17452586 www.ncbi. ...

  4. A generalized complementary relationship between actual and potential evaporation defined by a reference surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, Milad; Roderick, Michael L.; Or, Dani

    2016-01-01

    The definition of potential evaporation remains widely debated despite its centrality for hydrologic and climatic models. We employed an analytical pore-scale representation of evaporation from terrestrial surfaces to define potential evaporation using a hypothetical steady state reference temperature that is common to both air and evaporating surface. The feedback between drying land surfaces and overlaying air properties, central in the Bouchet (1963) complementary relationship, is implicitly incorporated in the hypothetical steady state where the sensible heat flux vanishes and the available energy is consumed by evaporation. Evaporation rates predicted based on the steady state reference temperature hypothesis were in good agreement with class A pan evaporation measurements suggesting that evaporation from pans occurs with negligible sensible heat flux. The model facilitates a new generalization of the asymmetric complementary relationship with the asymmetry parameter b analytically predicted for a wide range of meteorological conditions with initial tests yielding good agreement between measured and predicted actual evaporation.

  5. Rehabilitation in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most frequent physical disability of childhood onset. Over the past four decades, prevalence has remained remarkably constant at 2 to 3 per 1,000 live births in industrialized countries. In this article I concentrate on the rehabilitation and outcome of patients with cerebral palsy. The epidemiologic, pathogenetic, and diagnostic aspects are highlighted briefly as they pertain to the planning and implementation of the rehabilitation process. PMID:1866952

  6. Complementary Therapy Use Among Older Rural Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shreffler-Grant, Jean; Weinert, Clarann; Nichols, Elizabeth; Ide, Bette

    2006-01-01

    Objective Explore use, cost, and satisfaction with the quality and effectiveness of complementary therapy among older rural adults. Design Descriptive survey. Sample A random sample of 325 older adults from rural communities throughout Montana and North Dakota. Measurements Participants were interviewed by telephone. Results Only 57 participants (17.5%) had used complementary providers and most sought this care for chronic problems, heard about providers through word-of-mouth information, and were satisfied with the care. A total of 35.7% (116) used self-directed complementary practices and most used these practices for health promotion, heard about them through informal sources, and found them to be at least somewhat helpful. Of the 325 participants, 45.2% (147) used some form of complementary care, e.g., providers, self-directed practices, or both. Participants used as much complementary care as is found in national studies. Most spent relatively little out-of-pocket for complementary care. Conclusions Understanding the health care choices that older rural residents make, including complementary health care, is paramount for a comprehensive approach to meeting their health care needs. PMID:16150013

  7. Complementary and alternative medicine for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, S; Knorr, C; Geiger, H; Flachenecker, P

    2008-09-01

    We analyzed characteristics, motivation, and effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine in a large sample of people with multiple sclerosis. A 53-item survey was mailed to the members of the German Multiple Sclerosis Society, chapter of Baden-Wuerttemberg. Surveys of 1573 patients (48.5 +/- 11.7 years, 74% women, duration of illness 18.1 +/- 10.5 years) were analyzed. In comparison with conventional medicine, more patients displayed a positive attitude toward complementary and alternative medicine (44% vs 38%, P < 0.05), with 70% reporting lifetime use of at least one method. Among a wide variety of complementary and alternative medicine, diet modification (41%), Omega-3 fatty acids (37%), removal of amalgam fillings (28%), vitamins E (28%), B (36%), and C (28%), homeopathy (26%), and selenium (24%) were cited most frequently. Most respondents (69%) were satisfied with the effects of complementary and alternative medicine. Use of complementary and alternative medicine was associated with religiosity, functional independence, female sex, white-collar job, and higher education (P < 0.05). Compared with conventional therapies, complementary and alternative medicine rarely showed unwanted side effects (9% vs 59%, P < 0.00001). A total of 52% stated that the initial consultation with their physician lasted less than 15 min. To conclude, main reasons for the use of complementary and alternative medicine include the high rate of side effects and low levels of satisfaction with conventional treatments and brief patients/physicians contacts. PMID:18632773

  8. Gravitational asymmetries in gaseous disks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junqueira, S.; Combes, F.

    1997-12-01

    The authors report preliminary results of self-gravitating simulations of spiral galaxies modeled by two components, stellar and gaseous disks. One of the objectives of this work is to study asymmetries in the distribution of the gas, features observed for a number of spiral galaxies. The gas disk is simulated by the Beam-Scheme method, where the gas is considered as a fluid. The results suggest that very concentrated galactic disks can be unstable to the one-armed (m = 1) spiral perturbation, which may explain the asymmetric patterns observed in isolated galaxies.

  9. UV Observations of Hemispheric Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, R. K.; Paxton, L. J.; Wolven, B. C.; Zhang, Y.; Romeo, G.

    2015-12-01

    Asymmetry in the auroral patterns can be an important diagnostic for understanding the dynamics of solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system (e.g., Newel and Meng, 1998; Fillingrim et al., 2005). Molecular nitrogen emission in the UV Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands can be used to determine energy flux and electron mean energy (Sotirelis, et al, 2013) and thereby Hall and Pederson integrated conductances (Gjerloev, et al., 2014). UV imagery provided by the 4 SSUSI instruments on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16-F19 spacecraft provide two dimensional maps of this emission at different local times. Often there are near simultaneous observations of both poles by some combination of the satellites. (see figure 1) The SSUSI auroral data products are well suited to this study, as they have the following features.: - dayglow has been subtracted on dayside aurora - electron energy flux and mean energy are pre-calculated - individual arcs have been identified through image processing. In order to intercompare data from multiple satellites, we must first ensure that the instrument calibrations are consistent. In this work we show that the instruments are consistently calibrated, and that results generated from the SSUSI data products can be trusted. Several examples of storm time asymmetries captured by the SSUSI instruments will be discussed. Fillingim, M. O., G. K. Parks, H. U. Frey, T. J. Immel, and S. B. Mende (2005), Hemispheric asymmetry of the afternoon electron aurora, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L03113, doi:10.1029/2004GL021635. Gjerloev, J., Schaefer, R., Paxton, L, and Zhang, Y. (2014), A comprehensive empirical model of the ionospheric conductivity derived from SSUSI/GUVI, SuperMAG and SuperDARN data, SM51G-4339, Fall 2014 AGU meeting, San Francisco. Newell, P. T., and C.-I. Meng (1988), Hemispherical asymmetry in cusp precipitation near solstices, J. Geophys. Res., 93(A4), 2643-2648, doi:10.1029/JA093iA04p02643

  10. Jet vectoring through nozzle asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Chris; Rosakis, Alexandros; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we explored the functionality of a tri-leaflet anal valve of a dragonfly larva. We saw that the dragonfly larva is capable of controlling the three leaflets independently to asymmetrically open the nozzle. Such control resulted in vectoring of the jet in various directions. To further understand the effect of asymmetric nozzle orifice, we tested jet flow through circular asymmetric nozzles. We report the relationship between nozzle asymmetry and redirecting of the jet at various Reynolds numbers. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  11. Quantum speed limits, coherence, and asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvian, Iman; Spekkens, Robert W.; Zanardi, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    The resource theory of asymmetry is a framework for classifying and quantifying the symmetry-breaking properties of both states and operations relative to a given symmetry. In the special case where the symmetry is the set of translations generated by a fixed observable, asymmetry can be interpreted as coherence relative to the observable eigenbasis, and the resource theory of asymmetry provides a framework to study this notion of coherence. We here show that this notion of coherence naturally arises in the context of quantum speed limits. Indeed, the very concept of speed of evolution, i.e., the inverse of the minimum time it takes the system to evolve to another (partially) distinguishable state, is a measure of asymmetry relative to the time translations generated by the system Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the celebrated Mandelstam-Tamm and Margolus-Levitin speed limits can be interpreted as upper bounds on this measure of asymmetry by functions which are themselves measures of asymmetry in the special case of pure states. Using measures of asymmetry that are not restricted to pure states, such as the Wigner-Yanase skew information, we obtain extensions of the Mandelstam-Tamm bound which are significantly tighter in the case of mixed states. We also clarify some confusions in the literature about coherence and asymmetry, and show that measures of coherence are a proper subset of measures of asymmetry.

  12. On perturbative azimuthal asymmetry at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaeian, A. H.

    2008-10-13

    We investigate the azimuthal asymmetry of partons and photons produced at the initial stage of nuclear collisions at the RHIC energy originating from quark-nucleus collisions. In our approach, the azimuthal asymmetry results from the correlation between color dipole orientation and impact parameter of the collision. The asymmetry is sensitive to the rapid variation of the nuclear density at the nuclear periphery. We either introduce the color-dipole orientation into the improved Born approximation, or model the dipole partial amplitude which satisfies available DIS data. We conclude that the azimuthal asymmetry coming from these mechanisms can be sizable.

  13. Dimensional and discrete dental trait asymmetry relationships.

    PubMed

    Mayhall, J T; Saunders, S R

    1986-03-01

    Inuit (Eskimos) from the Foxe Basin region of the Northwest Territories, Canada, were studied to ascertain the amount of dimensional and morphological asymmetry in their dentitions. The results indicate that dimensional asymmetry does not appear to be greater on either the maxillary or mandibular teeth. Both types of asymmetry show partial conformity to the model of tooth fields with an increasing amount of asymmetry as one goes distally in each tooth group. The morphological asymmetry exception, the mandibular incisors, follows Dahlberg's "Field Concept." Rank-order correlations between the amount of dimensional asymmetry and morphological asymmetry reveal no detectable patterns. There appear to be no associations between the presence or absence of morphological asymmetry and the size of the tooth. This lack of association might be explained by differences in developmental timing of tooth dimensions and morphological traits; however, such a hypothesis requires experimental testing. In this population and those for which published results are available, it is practically impossible to overcome the "noise" level and test recent hypotheses regarding random dental asymmetry. PMID:3706516

  14. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  15. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Background Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. Objectives To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. Search methods We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. Selection criteria We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Data collection and analysis Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. Main results We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four

  16. Complementary medicine: where is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Ernst, Edzard

    2003-08-01

    Herbal medicines have been submitted to systematic reviews more frequently than any other complementary therapy, and it is here where the most positive evidence can be found. There is not much research into potential serious risks of complementary medicine. Possible risks range from the toxicity of herbs to vertebral artery dissection or nerve damage after chiropractic manipulation. Currently the Cochrane Library contains 34 systematic reviews of complementary medicine: 20 of herbal medicines, 7 of acupuncture, 3 of homeopathy, 2 of manual therapies, and 2 of other forms. PMID:12899818

  17. Single-pixel complementary compressive sampling spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ruo-Ming; Liu, Xue-Feng; Yao, Xu-Ri; Yu, Wen-Kai; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2016-05-01

    A new type of compressive spectroscopy technique employing a complementary sampling strategy is reported. In a single sequence of spectral compressive sampling, positive and negative measurements are performed, in which sensing matrices with a complementary relationship are used. The restricted isometry property condition necessary for accurate recovery of compressive sampling theory is satisfied mathematically. Compared with the conventional single-pixel spectroscopy technique, the complementary compressive sampling strategy can achieve spectral recovery of considerably higher quality within a shorter sampling time. We also investigate the influence of the sampling ratio and integration time on the recovery quality.

  18. Cerebral blood flow response pattern during balloon test occlusion of the internal carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, J.P.; Yonas, H.; Jungreis, C.

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate the risk of temporary or permanent internal carotid artery occlusion. In 156 patients intraarterial balloon test occlusion in combination with a stable xenon-enhanced CT cerebral blood flow study was performed before radiologic or surgical treatment. All 156 patients passed the clinical balloon test occlusion and underwent a xenon study in combination with a second balloon test. Quantitative flow data were analyzed for absolute changes as well as changes in symmetry. Fourteen patients exhibited reduced flow values between 20 and 30 mL/100 g per minute, an absolute decrease in flow, and significant asymmetry in the middle cerebral artery territory during balloon test occlusion. These patients would be considered at high risk for cerebral infarction if internal carotid artery occlusion were to be performed. With one exception they belonged to a group (class I) of 61 patients who showed bilateral or ipsilateral flow decrease and significant asymmetry with lower flow on the side of occlusion. The other 95 patients, who showed a variety of cerebral blood flow response patterns including ipsilateral or bilateral flow increase, were at moderate (class II) or low (class III) stroke risk. In contrast to these findings, exclusively qualitative flow analysis failed to identify the patients at high risk: a threshold with an asymmetry index of 10% revealed only 16% specificity whereas an asymmetry index of 45% showed only 61% sensitivity for detection of low flow areas (<30 mL/100 g per minute). For achieving a minimal hemodynamic related-stroke rate associated with permanent clinical internal carotid artery occlusion we suggest integration of a thorough analysis of quantitative cerebral blood flow data before and during balloon test occlusion. 68 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Whistled Turkish alters language asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Güntürkün, Onur; Güntürkün, Monika; Hahn, Constanze

    2015-08-17

    Whistled languages represent an experiment of nature to test the widely accepted view that language comprehension is to some extent governed by the left hemisphere in a rather input-invariant manner. Indeed, left-hemisphere superiority has been reported for atonal and tonal languages, click consonants, writing and sign languages. The right hemisphere is specialized to encode acoustic properties like spectral cues, pitch, and melodic lines and plays a role for prosodic communicative cues. Would left hemisphere language superiority change when subjects had to encode a language that is constituted by acoustic properties for which the right hemisphere is specialized? Whistled Turkish uses the full lexical and syntactic information of vocal Turkish, and transforms this into whistles to transport complex conversations with constrained whistled articulations over long distances. We tested the comprehension of vocally vs. whistled identical lexical information in native whistle-speaking people of mountainous Northeast Turkey. We discovered that whistled language comprehension relies on symmetric hemispheric contributions, associated with a decrease of left and a relative increase of right hemispheric encoding mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that a language that places high demands on right-hemisphere typical acoustical encoding creates a radical change in language asymmetries. Thus, language asymmetry patterns are in an important way shaped by the physical properties of the lexical input. PMID:26294179

  20. Asymmetry in the epithalamus of vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    L. CONCHA, MIGUEL; W. WILSON, STEPHEN

    2001-01-01

    The epithalamus is a major subdivision of the diencephalon constituted by the habenular nuclei and pineal complex. Structural asymmetries in this region are widespread amongst vertebrates and involve differences in size, neuronal organisation, neurochemistry and connectivity. In species that possess a photoreceptive parapineal organ, this structure projects asymmetrically to the left habenula, and in teleosts it is also situated on the left side of the brain. Asymmetries in size between the left and right sides of the habenula are often associated with asymmetries in neuronal organisation, although these two types of asymmetry follow different evolutionary courses. While the former is more conspicuous in fishes (with the exception of teleosts), asymmetries in neuronal organisation are more robust in amphibia and reptiles. Connectivity of the parapineal organ with the left habenula is not always coupled with asymmetries in habenular size and/or neuronal organisation suggesting that, at least in some species, assignment of parapineal and habenular asymmetries may be independent events. The evolutionary origins of epithalamic structures are uncertain but asymmetry in this region is likely to have existed at the origin of the vertebrate, perhaps even the chordate, lineage. In at least some extant vertebrate species, epithalamic asymmetries are established early in development, suggesting a genetic regulation of asymmetry. In some cases, epigenetic factors such as hormones also influence the development of sexually dimorphic habenular asymmetries. Although the genetic and developmental mechanisms by which neuroanatomical asymmetries are established remain obscure, some clues regarding the mechanisms underlying laterality decisions have recently come from studies in zebrafish. The Nodal signalling pathway regulates laterality by biasing an otherwise stochastic laterality decision to the left side of the epithalamus. This genetic mechanism ensures a consistency of

  1. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    Variation in electron density can have significant effect on GNSS signals in terms of propagation delay. Ionospheric scintillation can be caused by rapid change of such delay, specifically, when they last for a longer period of time. Ionospheric irregularities that account for scintillation may vary significantly in spatial range and drift with the background plasma at speeds of 45 to 130 m/sec. These patchy irregularities may occur several times during night, e.g. in equatorial region, with the patches move through the ray paths of the GNSS satellite signals. These irregularities are often characterized as either ‘large scale’ (which can be as large as several hundred km in East-West direction and many times that in the North-South direction) or ‘small scale’ (which can be as small as 1m). These small scale irregularities are regarded as the main cause of scintillation [1,2]. In normal solar activity conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is not much disturbed. However, during severe magnetic storms, the aurora oval extends towards the equator and the equator anomaly region may stretched towards poles extending the scintillation phenomena more typically associated with those regions into mid-latitudes. In such stormy conditions, the predicted TEC may deviate largely from the true value of the TEC both at low and mid-latitudes due to which GNSS applications may be strongly degraded. This work is an attempt to analyze ionospheric scintillation (S4 index) using ionospheric asymmetry index [3]. The asymmetry index is based on trans-ionospheric propagation between GPS and LEO satellites in a radio occultation (RO) scenario, using background ionospheric data provided by MIDAS [4]. We attempted to simulate one of the recent geomagnetic storms (NOAA scale G4) occurred over low/mid-latitudes. The storm started on 26 September 2011 at UT 18:00 and lasted until early hours of 27 September 2011. The scintillation data for the storm was taken from an ionospheric

  2. IBD and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Go Back Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Email Print + Share Crohn’s disease and ulcerative ... Energy Medicine, and Biologically-Based Practices. Mind-Body Medicine Mind-body medicine is a set of interventions ...

  3. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... About NCCIH NCCIH At a Glance Mission and Vision Organizational Structure Director's ... Integrative Health Health All Health Topics from A-Z Research-based info from acupuncture to zinc. Complementary, Alternative, ...

  4. Complementary therapies for depression: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E; Rand, J I; Stevinson, C

    1998-11-01

    Depression is one of the most common reasons for using complementary and alternative therapies. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the evidence available on the treatment of depression with complementary therapies. Systematic literature searches were performed using several databases, reference list searching, and inquiry to colleagues. Data extraction followed a predefined protocol. The amount of rigorous scientific data to support the efficacy of complementary therapies in the treatment of depression is extremely limited. The areas with the most evidence for beneficial effects are exercise, herbal therapy (Hypericum perforatum), and, to a lesser extent, acupuncture and relaxation therapies. There is a need for further research involving randomized controlled trials into the efficacy of complementary and alternative therapies in the treatment of depression. PMID:9819072

  5. Alternative (Complementary) Therapies for HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... For example, some people combine yoga with meditation. Physical (body) therapies Physical, or body, therapies include such activities as ... with specific health problems. Complementary therapies can include physical therapies (such as yoga and acupuncture), relaxation techniques (such ...

  6. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Chronic Constipation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic constipation, an ancient disease, is prevalent, and costly in the general population. Complementary and alternative therapies are frequently used for constipation. This review introduces various methods of complementary and alternative therapies, including acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, and herbal medicine. Efficacy, safety, influence factors, sham control design, and mechanisms of these therapies are discussed and evaluated. Acupuncture or electroacupuncture was found to be most commonly used for constipation among these complementary and alternative therapies, followed by herbal medicine. Although only a small number of clinical studies are flawless, our review of the literature seems to suggest that acupuncture or electroacupuncture and herbal medicine are effective in treating constipation, whereas findings on massage and moxibustion are inconclusive. More well-designed clinical trials are needed to improve and prove the efficacy of the complementary and alternative therapies for constipation; mechanistic studies that would lead to wide spread use and improvement of the methods are also discussed in this review. PMID:26064163

  7. Complementary and Alternative Treatment for Allergic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Juan; Grine, Kristen

    2016-09-01

    This article explains the proposed pathophysiology, evidence of efficacy, and adverse effects of several complementary and alternative medicine modalities, for the treatment of allergic conditions, such as traditional Chinese medicine formula, herbal treatments, acupuncture, and homeopathy. PMID:27545740

  8. 4 Tips: Asthma and Complementary Health Practices

    MedlinePlus

    ... U V W X Y Z 4 Tips: Asthma and Complementary Health Practices Share: Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects people ... cure, most people are able to control their asthma with conventional therapies and by avoiding the substances ...

  9. Detraditionalisation, gender and alternative and complementary medicines.

    PubMed

    Sointu, Eeva

    2011-03-01

    This article is premised on the importance of locating the appeal and meaning of alternative and complementary medicines in the context of gendered identities. I argue that the discourse of wellbeing--captured in many alternative and complementary health practices--is congruent with culturally prevalent ideals of self-fulfilling, authentic, unique and self-responsible subjectivity. The discourse of wellbeing places the self at the centre, thus providing a contrast with traditional ideas of other-directed and caring femininity. As such, involvement in alternative and complementary medicines is entwined with a negotiation of shifting femininities in detraditionalising societies. Simultaneously, many alternative and complementary health practices readily tap into and reproduce traditional representations of caring femininity. It is through an emphasis on emotional honesty and intimacy that the discourse of wellbeing also captures a challenge to traditional ideas of masculinity. Expectations and experiences relating to gender add a further level of complexity to the meaningfulness and therapeutic value of alternative and complementary medicines and underlie the gender difference in the utilisation of holistic health practices. I draw on data from a qualitative study with 44, primarily white, middle-class users and practitioners of varied alternative and complementary medicines in the UK. PMID:21251021

  10. ERP evidence for hemispheric asymmetries in exemplar-specific explicit memory access.

    PubMed

    Küper, Kristina; Zimmer, Hubert D

    2015-11-01

    The right cerebral hemisphere (RH) appears to be more effective in representing visual objects as distinct exemplars than the left hemisphere (LH) which is presumably biased towards coding objects at the level of abstract prototypes. As of yet, relatively little is known about the role that asymmetries in exemplar-specificity play at the level of explicit memory retrieval. In the present study, we addressed this issue by examining hemispheric asymmetries in the putative event-related potential (ERP) correlates of familiarity (FN400) and recollection (LPC). In an incidental study phase, pictures of familiar objects were presented centrally. At test, participants performed a memory inclusion task on identical repetitions and different exemplars of study items as well as new items which were presented in only one visual hemifield using the divided visual field technique. With respect to familiarity, we observed exemplar-specific FN400 old/new effects that were more pronounced for identical repetitions than different exemplars, irrespective of the hemisphere governing initial stimulus processing. In contrast, LPC old/new effects were subject to some hemispheric asymmetries indicating that exemplar-specific recollection was more extensive in the RH than in the LH. This further corroborates the idea that hemispheric asymmetries should not be generalized but need to be distinguished not only in different domains but also at different levels of processing. PMID:26279112

  11. Nasal Septal Deviation and Facial Skeletal Asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Christopher; Holton, Nathan; Miller, Steven; Yokley, Todd; Marshall, Steven; Srinivasan, Sreedevi; Southard, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    During ontogeny, the nasal septum exerts a morphogenetic influence on the surrounding facial skeleton. While the influence of the septum is well established in long snouted animal models, its role in human facial growth is less clear. If the septum is a facial growth center in humans, we would predict that deviated septal growth would be associated with facial skeletal asymmetries. Using computed tomographic (CT) scans of n = 55 adult subjects, the purpose of this study was to test whether there is a correlation between septal deviation and facial asymmetries using three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometric techniques. We calculated deviation as a percentage of septal volume relative to the volume of a modeled non-deviated septum. We then recorded skeletal landmarks representing the nasal, palatal, and lateral facial regions. Landmark data were superimposed using Procrustes analysis. First, we examined the correlation between nasal septal deviation and the overall magnitude of asymmetry. Next, we assessed whether there was a relationship between nasal septal deviation and more localized aspects of asymmetry using multivariate regression analysis. Our results indicate that while there was no correlation between septal deviation and the overall magnitude of asymmetry, septal deviation was associated with asymmetry primarily in the nasal floor and the palatal region. Septal deviation was unassociated with asymmetries in the lateral facial skeleton. Though we did not test the causal relationship between nasal septal deviation and facial asymmetry, our results suggest that the nasal septum may have an influence on patterns of adult facial form. PMID:26677010

  12. Determining Asymmetry Of A Weld Puddle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutow, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Sensing-and-data-processing subsystem provides information of asymmetry of weld puddle with respect to original midplane of joint. Shape of puddle inferred from surface-temperature distribution. Part of welding-control system which enables system to correct for asymmetry.

  13. Asymmetry and Performance: Toward a Neurodevelopmental Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, David B.; Barth, Joan M.; Merrill, Edward C.

    2008-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetry implies the existence of developmental influences that affect one hemisphere more than the other. However, those influences are poorly understood. One simple view is that asymmetry may exist because of a relationship between a mental process' degree of lateralization and how well it functions. Data scaling issues have largely…

  14. Visual Search Asymmetry with Uncertain Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiki, Jun; Koike, Takahiko; Takahashi, Kohske; Inoue, Tomoko

    2005-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of search asymmetry is still unknown. Many computational models postulate top-down selection of target-defining features as a crucial factor. This feature selection account implies, and other theories implicitly assume, that predefined target identity is necessary for search asymmetry. The authors tested the validity of…

  15. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Donate Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) WHAT IS A THYROID NODULE? The term ... type of evaluation. WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  16. Is Complementary and Alternative Therapy Effective for Women in the Climacteric Period?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Young; Ryu, Aeli

    2015-01-01

    Vasomotor symptoms start about 2 years prior to menopause in women who are approaching menopause, and early menopause symptoms appear including emotional disturbance and anxiety, followed by physical changes such as vaginal dryness, urinary incontinence and skin wrinkles. As time progresses, osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, and dementia occur consecutively. Hormone therapy is primarily considered for the relief of menopause symptoms in postmenopausal women. However, as hormone replacement has emerged as a therapy that increases the potential risk of thrombosis, cerebral infarction and breast cancer, complementary and alternative medicine has drawn much attention. This study aimed to examine the types and effects of evidence-based complementary and alternative therapies that are currently used. PMID:26046035

  17. Anatomic Brain Asymmetry in Vervet Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Fears, Scott C.; Scheibel, Kevin; Abaryan, Zvart; Lee, Chris; Service, Susan K.; Jorgensen, Matthew J.; Fairbanks, Lynn A.; Cantor, Rita M.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Woods, Roger P.

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetry is a prominent feature of human brains with important functional consequences. Many asymmetric traits show population bias, but little is known about the genetic and environmental sources contributing to inter-individual variance. Anatomic asymmetry has been observed in Old World monkeys, but the evidence for the direction and extent of asymmetry is equivocal and only one study has estimated the genetic contributions to inter-individual variance. In this study we characterize a range of qualitative and quantitative asymmetry measures in structural brain MRIs acquired from an extended pedigree of Old World vervet monkeys (n = 357), and implement variance component methods to estimate the proportion of trait variance attributable to genetic and environmental sources. Four of six asymmetry measures show pedigree-level bias and one of the traits has a significant heritability estimate of about 30%. We also found that environmental variables more significantly influence the width of the right compared to the left prefrontal lobe. PMID:22205941

  18. Vasospasm in Cerebral Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhut, Michael

    2014-01-01

    All forms of cerebral inflammation as found in bacterial meningitis, cerebral malaria, brain injury, and subarachnoid haemorrhage have been associated with vasospasm of cerebral arteries and arterioles. Vasospasm has been associated with permanent neurological deficits and death in subarachnoid haemorrhage and bacterial meningitis. Increased levels of interleukin-1 may be involved in vasospasm through calcium dependent and independent activation of the myosin light chain kinase and release of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1. Another key factor in the pathogenesis of cerebral arterial vasospasm may be the reduced bioavailability of the vasodilator nitric oxide. Therapeutic trials in vasospasm related to inflammation in subarachnoid haemorrhage in humans showed a reduction of vasospasm through calcium antagonists, endothelin receptor antagonists, statins, and plasminogen activators. Combination of therapeutic modalities addressing calcium dependent and independent vasospasm, the underlying inflammation, and depletion of nitric oxide simultaneously merit further study in all conditions with cerebral inflammation in double blind randomised placebo controlled trials. Auxiliary treatment with these agents may be able to reduce ischemic brain injury associated with neurological deficits and increased mortality. PMID:25610703

  19. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Allroggen, H.; Abbott, R.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a challenging condition because of its variability of clinical symptoms and signs. It is very often unrecognised at initial presentation. All age groups can be affected. Large sinuses such as the superior sagittal sinus are most frequently involved. Extensive collateral circulation within the cerebral venous system allows for a significant degree of compensation in the early stages of thrombus formation. Systemic inflammatory diseases and inherited as well as acquired coagulation disorders are frequent causes, although in up to 30% of cases no underlying cause can be identified. The oral contraceptive pill appears to be an important additional risk factor. The spectrum of clinical presentations ranges from headache with papilloedema to focal deficit, seizures and coma. Magnetic resonance imaging with venography is the investigation of choice; computed tomography alone will miss a significant number of cases. It has now been conclusively shown that intravenous heparin is the first-line treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis because of its efficacy, safety and feasability. Local thrombolysis may be indicated in cases of deterioration, despite adequate heparinisation. This should be followed by oral anticoagulation for 3-6 months. The prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is generally favourable. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.


Keywords: cerebral venous sinus thrombosis PMID:10622773

  20. Early-light embryonic stimulation suggests a second route, via gene activation, to cerebral lateralization in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Chiandetti, Cinzia; Galliussi, Jessica; Andrew, Richard J.; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors determine the asymmetrical position of vertebrate embryos allowing asymmetric environmental stimulation to shape cerebral lateralization. In birds, late-light stimulation, just before hatching, on the right optic nerve triggers anatomical and functional cerebral asymmetries. However, some brain asymmetries develop in absence of embryonic light stimulation. Furthermore, early-light action affects lateralization in the transparent zebrafish embryos before their visual system is functional. Here we investigated whether another pathway intervenes in establishing brain specialization. We exposed chicks' embryos to light before their visual system was formed. We observed that such early stimulation modulates cerebral lateralization in a comparable vein of late-light stimulation on active retinal cells. Our results show that, in a higher vertebrate brain, a second route, likely affecting the genetic expression of photosensitive regions, acts before the development of a functional visual system. More than one sensitive period seems thus available to light stimulation to trigger brain lateralization. PMID:24048072

  1. Evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow in patient with atypical senile dementia with asymmetrical calcification.

    PubMed

    Shoyama, Masaru; Ukai, Satoshi; Shinosaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    We report an 83-year-old woman with atypical senile dementia with Fahr-type calcification. Brain computed tomography demonstrated asymmetrical calcification predominant in the basal ganglia on the right side and pronounced diffuse cortical atrophy in the frontotemporal areas. The patient was clinically diagnosed with diffuse neurofibrillary tangles with calcification. Brain single photon emission computed tomography findings revealed that cerebral blood flow was reduced on the right side, as compared with the left side, in widespread areas. Hemispheric asymmetry in both calcification and cerebral blood flow suggests a relationship between calcification and vascular changes. PMID:25737312

  2. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2016-05-01

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping Atotal fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of 197Au+27Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  3. Collins Asymmetry at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-01-17

    We study the Collins effect in the azimuthal asymmetricdistribution of hadrons inside a high energy jet in the single transversepolarized proton proton scattering. From the detailed analysis ofone-gluon and two-gluon exchange diagrams contributions, the Collinsfunction is found the same as that in the semi-inclusive deep inelasticscattering and e+e- annihilations. The eikonal propagators in thesediagrams do not contribute to the phase needed for the Collins-typesingle spin asymmetry, and the universality is derived as a result of theWard identity. We argue that this conclusion depends on the momentum flowof the exchanged gluon and the kinematic constraints in the fragmentationprocess, and is generic and model-independent.

  4. Hemisphere Asymmetry of Response to Pharmacologic Treatment in an Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Ihara, Masafumi; Carare, Roxana O; Garbis, Spiros D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hemisphere asymmetry of response to pharmacologic treatment in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model using cilostazol as a chemical stimulus. Eight-month-old mice were assigned to vehicle or cilostazol treatment for three months and hemispheres were analyzed using quantitative proteomics. Bioinformatics interpretation showed that following treatment, aggregation of blood platelets significantly decreased in the right hemisphere whereas neurodegeneration significantly decreased and synaptic transmission increased in the left hemisphere only. Our study provides novel evidence on cerebral laterality of pharmacologic activity, with important implications in deciphering regional pharmacodynamic effects of existing drugs thus uncovering novel hemisphere-specific therapeutic targets. PMID:26836196

  5. Cerebral palsy: the whys and hows.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, Charlie

    2012-08-01

    The descriptive term of cerebral palsy encompasses the largest group of childhood movement disorders. Severity and pattern of clinical involvement varies widely dependent on the area of the central nervous system compromised. A multidisciplinary team approach is vital for all the aspects of management to improve function and minimise disability. From a medical viewpoint, there are two pronged approaches. First a focus on developmental and clinical comorbidities such as communication, behaviour, epilepsy, feeding problems, gastro-oesophageal reflux and infections; and second on specifics of muscle tone, motor control and posture. With regards to the latter, there is an increasing number of available treatments including oral antispasticity and antidystonic medications, injectable botulinum toxin, multilevel orthopaedic and neurosurgical options and a variety of complementary and alternative therapies. PMID:22868578

  6. Neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Namura, Shobu; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Liu, Jialing; Yenari, Midori A.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia, a focal or global insufficiency of blood flow to the brain, can arise through multiple mechanisms, including thrombosis and arterial hemorrhage. Ischemia is a major driver of stroke, one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the general etiology of cerebral ischemia and stroke has been known for some time, the conditions have only recently been considered treatable. This report describes current research in this field seeking to fully understand the pathomechanisms underlying stroke; to characterize the brain’s intrinsic injury, survival, and repair mechanisms; to identify putative drug targets as well as cell-based therapies; and to optimize the delivery of therapeutic agents to the damaged cerebral tissue. PMID:23488559

  7. Fish otolith asymmetry: morphometry and modeling.

    PubMed

    Lychakov, D V; Rebane, Y T; Lombarte, A; Fuiman, L A; Takabayashi, A

    2006-09-01

    Mathematical modeling suggests that relatively large values of otolith mass asymmetry in fishes can alter acoustic functionality and may be responsible for abnormal fish behavior when subjected to weightlessness during parabolic or space flight [D.V. Lychakov, Y.T. Rebane, Otolith mass asymmetry in 18 species of fish and pigeon, J. Grav. Physiol. 11 (3) (2004) 17-34; D.V. Lychakov, Y.T. Rebane, Fish otolith mass asymmetry: morphometry and influence on acoustic functionality, Hear. Res. 201 (2005) 55-69]. The results of morphometric studies of otolith mass asymmetry suppose that the absolute value and the sign of the otolith mass asymmetry can change many times during the growth of individual fish within the range +/-20% [D.V. Lychakov, Y.T. Rebane, Otolith mass asymmetry in 18 species of fish and pigeon, J. Grav. Physiol. 11 (3) (2004) 17-34; D.V. Lychakov, Y.T. Rebane, Fish otolith mass asymmetry: morphometry and influence on acoustic functionality, Hear. Res. 201 (2005) 55-69]. This implies that the adverse effects of otolith asymmetry on acoustic and vestibular functionality could change during the lifetime of an individual fish. The aims of the present article were to examine the nature of otolith mass asymmetry fluctuation and to quantify otolith mass asymmetry in a large number of teleost fishes to verify our previous measurements. A dimensionless measure of otolith mass asymmetry, chi, was calculated as the difference between the masses of the right and left paired otoliths divided by average otolith mass. Saccular otolith mass asymmetry was studied in 59 Mediterranean teleost species (395 otolith pairs), 14 Black Sea teleost species (42 otolith pairs), red drum (196 otolith pairs) and guppy (30 otolith pairs). Utricular otolith mass asymmetry was studied in carp (103 otolith pairs) and goldfish (45 otolith pairs). In accordance with our previous results the value of chi did not depend on fish size (length or mass), systematic or ecological position of the

  8. SU(2) Flavor Asymmetry of the Proton Sea in Chiral Effective Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenney, J. R.; Sato, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, W.; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2016-07-01

    We refine the computation of the d¯ - ū flavor asymmetry in the proton sea with a complementary effort to reveal the dynamics of pion exchange in high-energy processes. In particular, we discuss the efficacy of pion exchange models to simultaneously describe leading neutron electroproduction at HERA along with the d¯ - ū flavor asymmetry in the proton. A detailed {χ2} analysis of the ZEUS and H1 data, when combined with constraints on the pion flux from Drell-Yan data, allows regions of applicability of one-pion exchange to be delineated. Based on the fit results, we also address a possible estimate for leading proton structure functions in upcoming tagged deep-inelastic scattering experiments at Jefferson Lab on the deuteron with forward protons.

  9. Black-white asymmetry in visual perception.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhong-Lin; Sperling, George

    2012-01-01

    With eleven different types of stimuli that exercise a wide gamut of spatial and temporal visual processes, negative perturbations from mean luminance are found to be typically 25% more effective visually than positive perturbations of the same magnitude (range 8-67%). In Experiment 12, the magnitude of the black-white asymmetry is shown to be a saturating function of stimulus contrast. Experiment 13 shows black-white asymmetry primarily involves a nonlinearity in the visual representation of decrements. Black-white asymmetry in early visual processing produces even-harmonic distortion frequencies in all ordinary stimuli and in illusions such as the perceived asymmetry of optically perfect sine wave gratings. In stimuli intended to stimulate exclusively second-order processing in which motion or shape are defined not by luminance differences but by differences in texture contrast, the black-white asymmetry typically generates artifactual luminance (first-order) motion and shape components. Because black-white asymmetry pervades psychophysical and neurophysiological procedures that utilize spatial or temporal variations of luminance, it frequently needs to be considered in the design and evaluation of experiments that involve visual stimuli. Simple procedures to compensate for black-white asymmetry are proposed. PMID:22984221

  10. Black–white asymmetry in visual perception

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhong-Lin; Sperling, George

    2012-01-01

    With eleven different types of stimuli that exercise a wide gamut of spatial and temporal visual processes, negative perturbations from mean luminance are found to be typically 25% more effective visually than positive perturbations of the same magnitude (range 8–67%). In Experiment 12, the magnitude of the black–white asymmetry is shown to be a saturating function of stimulus contrast. Experiment 13 shows black–white asymmetry primarily involves a nonlinearity in the visual representation of decrements. Black–white asymmetry in early visual processing produces even-harmonic distortion frequencies in all ordinary stimuli and in illusions such as the perceived asymmetry of optically perfect sine wave gratings. In stimuli intended to stimulate exclusively second-order processing in which motion or shape are defined not by luminance differences but by differences in texture contrast, the black–white asymmetry typically generates artifactual luminance (first-order) motion and shape components. Because black–white asymmetry pervades psychophysical and neurophysiological procedures that utilize spatial or temporal variations of luminance, it frequently needs to be considered in the design and evaluation of experiments that involve visual stimuli. Simple procedures to compensate for black–white asymmetry are proposed. PMID:22984221

  11. Relic Density of Neutrinos with Primordial Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, Sergio; Pinto, Teguayco; Raffelt, Georg G.

    2009-06-19

    We study flavor oscillations in the early Universe, assuming primordial neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries. Including collisions and pair processes in the kinetic equations, we not only estimate the degree of flavor equilibration, but for the first time also kinetic equilibration among neutrinos and with the ambient plasma. Typically, the restrictive big-bang nucleosynthesis bound on the nu{sub e}nu{sub e} asymmetry indeed applies to all flavors as claimed in the previous literature, but fine-tuned initial asymmetries always allow for a large surviving neutrino excess radiation that may show up in precision cosmological data.

  12. QCD coherence and the top quark asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skands, Peter; Webber, Bryan; Winter, Jan

    2012-07-01

    Coherent QCD radiation in the hadroproduction of top quark pairs leads to a forward-backward asymmetry that grows more negative with increasing transverse momentum of the pair. This feature is present in Monte Carlo event generators with coherent parton showering, even though the production process is treated at leading order and has no intrinsic asymmetry before showering. In addition, depending on the treatment of recoils, showering can produce a positive contribution to the inclusive asymmetry. We explain the origin of these features, compare them in fixed-order calculations and the H erwig++, P ythia and S herpa event generators, and discuss their implications.

  13. Relic density of neutrinos with primordial asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Sergio; Pinto, Teguayco; Raffelt, Georg G

    2009-06-19

    We study flavor oscillations in the early Universe, assuming primordial neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries. Including collisions and pair processes in the kinetic equations, we not only estimate the degree of flavor equilibration, but for the first time also kinetic equilibration among neutrinos and with the ambient plasma. Typically, the restrictive big-bang nucleosynthesis bound on the nu_{e}nu[over]_{e} asymmetry indeed applies to all flavors as claimed in the previous literature, but fine-tuned initial asymmetries always allow for a large surviving neutrino excess radiation that may show up in precision cosmological data. PMID:19658994

  14. Management of Asymmetry After Breast Reduction.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Onelio

    2016-04-01

    Breast reduction surgery has achieved one of the highest patient satisfaction rates among plastic surgery procedures. Most of the complications encountered are usually minor and related to wound healing. Revision surgery to address these problems is common and usually consists of scar revisions. Postoperative breast asymmetry of a mild degree is also common; however, postoperative asymmetry severe enough to warrant surgical revision is a rare event, occurring in less than 1% of cases. Postmammaplasty revision surgery needs to be individualized. The asymmetry could be the result of nipple malposition or it could consist of a volume or shape discrepancy between the breast mounds. PMID:27012796

  15. [Legal implications of complementary and alternative therapies].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Karl Otto

    2008-01-01

    Complementary therapies require a differentiated treatment by all the legal fields involved. First, this refers to medical malpractice law dealing with the question of medical indication, its interaction with "classical" medicine and the need for extensive patient information on the potential ineffectiveness of the--partly very expensive--complementary therapies. Second, it also refers to the legal specifications of the medical profession as well as health insurance law. The question is whether the expenses of an alternative therapy are borne by the statutory or private health insurance and whether it is justified to try a complementary therapy when faced with an incurable disease. In the following the range of legal aspects shall be illuminated on the basis of the relevant jurisdiction. PMID:19213454

  16. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  17. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    PubMed Central

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  18. Arithmetic, mutually unbiased bases and complementary observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppeard, M. D.

    2010-02-01

    Complementary observables in quantum mechanics may be viewed as Frobenius structures in a dagger monoidal category, such as the category of finite dimensional Hilbert spaces over the complex numbers. On the other hand, their properties crucially depend on the discrete Fourier transform and its associated quantum torus, requiring only the finite fields that underlie mutually unbiased bases. In axiomatic topos theory, the complex numbers are difficult to describe and should not be invoked unnecessarily. This paper surveys some fundamentals of quantum arithmetic using finite field complementary observables, with a view considering more general axiom systems.

  19. Complementary therapies for cancer-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie R; Yeung, K Simon

    2004-01-01

    Relief of cancer-related symptoms is essential in the supportive and palliative care of cancer patients. Complementary therapies such as acupuncture, mind-body techniques, and massage therapy can help when conventional treatment does not bring satisfactory relief or causes undesirable side effects. Controlled clinical trials show that acupuncture and hypnotherapy can reduce pain and nausea. Meditation, relaxation therapy, music therapy, and massage mitigate anxiety and distress. Pilot studies suggest that complementary therapies may treat xerostomia, hot flashes, and fatigue. Botanicals or dietary supplements are popular but often problematic. Concurrent use of herbal products with mainstream medical treatment should be discouraged. PMID:15524070

  20. Complementary Variational Theorems for inhomogeneous superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, T. C.

    1997-03-01

    Complementary variational theorems are derived for an inhomogeneous London (local) superconductor in which both the magnetic permeability μ(r) and the London penetration length λ_L(r) vary randomly in space (T.C. Choy, Physical Review B (1997) (to appear)). An essential feature is the close coupling between magnetic and supercurrent polarisation effects, developed self-consistently in this work. Using these theorems and a suitable ansatz for the single particle polarisabilities, we obtained complementary bounds for a composite superconductor near Tc and T=0^circ K. Our results may be important for the empirical study of systems containing magnetic (normal) and superconducting mixtures, including the high Tc oxide superconductors.

  1. 7 CFR 3406.9 - Complementary project proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Complementary project proposals. Institutions may submit proposals that are complementary in nature as defined in § 3406.2. Such complementary project proposals may be submitted by the same or by different... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Complementary project proposals. 3406.9 Section...

  2. 7 CFR 3406.9 - Complementary project proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Complementary project proposals. Institutions may submit proposals that are complementary in nature as defined in § 3406.2. Such complementary project proposals may be submitted by the same or by different... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Complementary project proposals. 3406.9 Section...

  3. 7 CFR 3406.9 - Complementary project proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Complementary project proposals. Institutions may submit proposals that are complementary in nature as defined in § 3406.2. Such complementary project proposals may be submitted by the same or by different... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Complementary project proposals. 3406.9 Section...

  4. 7 CFR 3406.9 - Complementary project proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PROGRAM Program Description § 3406.9 Complementary project proposals. Institutions may submit proposals that are complementary in nature as defined in § 3406.2. Such complementary project proposals may be... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Complementary project proposals. 3406.9 Section...

  5. 7 CFR 3405.8 - Complementary project proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Program Description § 3405.8 Complementary project proposals. Institutions may submit proposals that are complementary in nature as defined in § 3405.2(g). Such complementary project proposals may be submitted by the... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Complementary project proposals. 3405.8 Section...

  6. 7 CFR 3406.9 - Complementary project proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Complementary project proposals. Institutions may submit proposals that are complementary in nature as defined in § 3406.2. Such complementary project proposals may be submitted by the same or by different... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Complementary project proposals. 3406.9 Section...

  7. 15 CFR 784.6 - Post complementary access activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Post complementary access activities... COMPLEMENTARY ACCESS § 784.6 Post complementary access activities. Upon receiving the IAEA's final report on.... BIS also will send locations a post complementary access letter detailing the issues that...

  8. 15 CFR 784.6 - Post complementary access activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Post complementary access activities... COMPLEMENTARY ACCESS § 784.6 Post complementary access activities. Upon receiving the IAEA's final report on.... BIS also will send locations a post complementary access letter detailing the issues that...

  9. 15 CFR 784.6 - Post complementary access activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Post complementary access activities... COMPLEMENTARY ACCESS § 784.6 Post complementary access activities. Upon receiving the IAEA's final report on.... BIS also will send locations a post complementary access letter detailing the issues that...

  10. Cerebral White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Smith, Eric E.; Eichler, Florian S.; Filley, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of the cerebral white matter (WM) result in focal neurobehavioral syndromes, neuropsychiatric phenomena, and dementia. The cerebral WM contains fiber pathways that convey axons linking cerebral cortical areas with each other and with subcortical structures, facilitating the distributed neural circuits that subserve sensorimotor function, intellect, and emotion. Recent neuroanatomical investigations reveal that these neural circuits are topographically linked by five groupings of fiber tracts emanating from every neocortical area: (1) cortico-cortical association fibers; (2) corticostriatal fibers; (3) commissural fibers; and cortico-subcortical pathways to (4) thalamus and (5) pontocerebellar system, brain stem, and/or spinal cord. Lesions of association fibers prevent communication between cortical areas engaged in different domains of behavior. Lesions of subcortical structures or projection/striatal fibers disrupt the contribution of subcortical nodes to behavior. Disconnection syndromes thus result from lesions of the cerebral cortex, subcortical structures, and WM tracts that link the nodes that make up the distributed circuits. The nature and the severity of the clinical manifestations of WM lesions are determined, in large part, by the location of the pathology: discrete neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms result from focal WM lesions, whereas cognitive impairment across multiple domains—WM dementia—occurs in the setting of diffuse WM disease. We present a detailed review of the conditions affecting WM that produce these neurobehavioral syndromes, and consider the pathophysiology, clinical effects, and broad significance of the effects of aging and vascular compromise on cerebral WM, in an attempt to help further the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of these disorders. PMID:18990132

  11. Position as a cause of deformity in children with cerebral palsy (1976).

    PubMed

    Scrutton, David

    2008-06-01

    Deformities in the child with cerebral palsy have been ascribed to muscle imbalance (Sharrard 1961) and increased tone (Pollock 1959) or to the type of cerebral palsy (Bobath and Bobath 1975). As far as we know, the position in which the child is nursed, especially during the first year of life, has not been considered as a cause of deformity. It is generally agreed that position in the postnatal period can be a cause of deformity in the normal baby. Paine (1961) suggested that plagiocephaly was caused by postnatal head posture, and Hay (1971) found that plagiocephaly was present in 10 percent of normal babies. Scott (1956) reported that infants commonly had lateral curvatures of the spine which could be seen on x-rays but not on clinical examination, all of which had resolved by the age of two years. Other asymmetries associated with plagiocephaly are unilateral fisting, asymmetrical groin creases, apparent shortening of one lower limb and asymmetry of gait (Robson 1968). We accept the asymmetrical deformities of plagiocephaly, unilateral bat ear, facial and thoracic asymmetry, pelvic obliquity and apparent shortening of one leg--some or all of which may be present in normal babies--as forming the 'squint' baby syndrome. Because asymmetrical deformities also occur in children with cerebral palsy, we thought it worthwhile to compare the pattern of deformity in a group of 'quint' but otherwise normal babies with a group of cerebralpalsied children with asymmetrical deformities to see if there is any relationship. PMID:18489454

  12. Pars triangularis asymmetry and language dominance.

    PubMed Central

    Foundas, A L; Leonard, C M; Gilmore, R L; Fennell, E B; Heilman, K M

    1996-01-01

    The pars triangular is a portion of Broca's area. The convolutions that form the inferior and caudal extent of the pars triangularis include the anterior horizontal and anterior ascending rami of the sylvian fissure, respectively. To learn if there are anatomic asymmetries of the pars triangularis, these convolutions were measured on volumetric magnetic resonance imaging scans of 11 patients who had undergone selective hemispheric anesthesia (Wada testing) to determine hemispheric speech and language lateralization. Of the 10 patients with language lateralized to the left hemisphere, 9 had a leftward asymmetry of the pars triangularis. The 1 patient with language lateralized to the right hemisphere had a significant rightward asymmetry of the pars triangularis. Our data suggest that asymmetries of the pars triangularis may be related to speech-language lateralization. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8570622

  13. What’s Left in Asymmetry?

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Sherry

    2008-01-01

    Left-right patterning is a fascinating problem of morphogenesis, linking evolutionary and cellular signaling mechanisms across many levels of organization. In the last 15 years, enormous progress has been made in elucidating the molecular details of this process in embryos of several model species. While many outside the field seem to believe that the fundamental aspects of this pathway are now solved, workers on asymmetry are faced with considerable uncertainties over the details of specific mechanisms, a lack of conceptual unity of mechanisms across phyla, and important questions that are not being pursued in any of the popular model systems. Here, we suggest that data from clinical syndromes, cryptic asymmetries, and bilateral gynandromorphs, while not figuring prominently in the mainstream work on LR asymmetry, point to crucial and fundamental gaps of knowledge about asymmetry. We identify 12 big questions that provide exciting opportunities for fundamental new advances in this field. PMID:18488999

  14. Symmetry and asymmetry in the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2005-10-01

    Structural and functional asymmetry in the human brain and nervous system is reviewed in a historical perspective, focusing on the pioneering work of Broca, Wernicke, Sperry, and Geschwind. Structural and functional asymmetry is exemplified from work done in our laboratory on auditory laterality using an empirical procedure called dichotic listening. This also involves different ways of validating the dichotic listening procedure against both invasive and non-invasive techniques, including PET and fMRI blood flow recordings. A major argument is that the human brain shows a substantial interaction between structurally, or "bottom-up" asymmetry and cognitively, or "top-down" modulation, through a focus of attention to the right or left side in auditory space. These results open up a more dynamic and interactive view of functional brain asymmetry than the traditional static view that the brain is lateralized, or asymmetric, only for specific stimuli and stimulus properties.

  15. Di-hadron asymmetry and interplay between transversity induced asymmetries in hadron leptoproduction at COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbrizzai, Giulio

    2016-02-01

    New results on the transverse spin azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive DIS reactions extracted by the COMPASS Collaboration from the data collected with a transversely polarised proton target are presented. A noticeable similarity between the Collins asymmetry and the dihadron asymmetry, already been observed and reported, triggered a more deep investigation on the angular correlations and the relevant kinematical variables. The resulting phenomenological analysis of the transversity induced asymmetries, presented in this talk, allows to establish quantitative relationships, providing strong indication that the underlying fragmentation mechanisms are all driven by a common physical process.

  16. Baryon asymmetry, inflation and squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Bambah, Bindu A. . E-mail: bbsp@uohyd.ernet.in; Chaitanya, K.V.S. Shiv; Mukku, C.

    2007-04-15

    We use the general formalism of squeezed rotated states to calculate baryon asymmetry in the wake of inflation through parametric amplification. We base our analysis on a B and CP violating Lagrangian in an isotropically expanding universe. The B and CP violating terms originate from the coupling of complex fields with non-zero baryon number to a complex background inflaton field. We show that a differential amplification of particle and antiparticle modes gives rise to baryon asymmetry.

  17. Case report: treatment of dental asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, A; Melsen, B

    1995-01-01

    The treatment of dental asymmetries often comprises several treatment alternatives. This case report describes the treatment alternatives for an asymmetry generated secondary to surgical removal of an odontoma that included the germ of the lower left lateral incisor. The opening of the space was chosen based on the patient's wish. The asymmetrical biomechanical force system used for the correction of the midline is presented as free-body diagram. PMID:7486238

  18. Bottom production asymmetries at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Norrbin, E.; Vogt, R.

    1999-01-01

    We present results on bottom hadron production asymmetries at the LHC within both the Lund string fragmentation model and the intrinsic bottom model. The main aspects of the models are summarized and specific predictions for pp collisions at 14 TeV are given. Asymmetries are found to be very small at central rapidities increasing to a few percent at forward rapidities. At very large rapidities intrinsic production could dominate but this region is probably out of reach of any experiment.

  19. Ozone Therapy on Cerebral Blood Flow: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Ozone therapy is currently being used in the treatment of ischemic disorders, but the underlying mechanisms that result in successful treatment are not well known. This study assesses the effect of ozone therapy on the blood flow in the middle cerebral and common carotid arteries. Seven subjects were recruited for the therapy that was performed by transfusing ozone-enriched autologous blood on 3 alternate days over 1 week. Blood flow quantification in the common carotid artery (n = 14) was performed using color Doppler. Systolic and diastolic velocities in the middle cerebral artery (n = 14) were estimated using transcranial Doppler. Ultrasound assessments were conducted at the following three time points: 1) basal (before ozone therapy), 2) after session #3 and 3) 1 week after session #3. The common carotid blood flow had increased by 75% in relation to the baseline after session #3 (P < 0.001) and by 29% 1 week later (P = 0.039). In the middle cerebral artery, the systolic velocity had increased by 22% after session #3 (P = 0.001) and by 15% 1 week later (P = 0.035), whereas the diastolic velocity had increased by 33% after session #3 (P < 0.001) and by 18% 1 week later (P = 0.023). This preliminary Doppler study supports the clinical experience of achieving improvement by using ozone therapy in peripheral ischemic syndromes. Its potential use as a complementary treatment in cerebral low perfusion syndromes merits further clinical evaluation. PMID:15841265

  20. Niche engineering reveals complementary resource use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greater resource use by diverse communities might result from species occupying different, complementary niches. Niche partitioning is difficult to directly demonstrate, however, because differences among species in the resources they use are often difficult to separate from other species-specific t...

  1. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roizen, Nancy J.

    2005-01-01

    In their role as committed advocates, parents of children with Down syndrome have always sought alternative therapies, mainly to enhance cognitive function but also to improve their appearance. Nutritional supplements have been the most frequent type of complementary and alternative therapy used. Cell therapy, plastic surgery, hormonal therapy,…

  2. Thinking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Free Copy This booklet covers: What complementary and alternative medicine is (CAM) is and why people use it The different types of CAM (mind-body methods, biologically based practices, body-based practices, energy medicine, and whole medical systems. How to talk ...

  3. Complementary Schools, Past, Present and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Wei

    2006-01-01

    Complementary schools for immigrant and ethnic minority children in the UK have been an important socio-political, educational movement in the country for nearly half a century. They have made a major impact on the lives of thousands of children of different ethnic backgrounds, attracted public debates vis-a-vis the government's involvement in…

  4. Polish Complementary Schools in Iceland and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zielinska, Malgorzata; Kowzan, Piotr; Ragnarsdóttir, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, the opening of labour markets has spurred a considerable number of Poles to emigrate e.g. to Iceland and England. Families with school age children have had the challenge of adapting to foreign environments and school systems. Polish complementary schools have played an important, albeit ambivalent, role in this process. Through focus…

  5. Experimental Tests on the Lifetime Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhi-Qiang; Ni, Guang-Jiong

    The experimental test problem of the left-right polarization-dependent lifetime asymmetry is discussed. It shows that the existing experiments cannot demonstrate the lifetime asymmetry to be right or wrong after analyzing the measurements on the neutron, the muon and the tau lifetime, as well as the g-2 experiment. However, it is pointed out emphatically that the SLD and the E158 experiments, the measurements of the left-right integrated cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by e+e- collisions and by electron-electron Møller scattering, can indirectly demonstrate the lifetime asymmetry. In order to directly demonstrate the lifetime asymmetry, we propose some possible experiments on the decays of polarized muons. The precise measurement of the lifetime asymmetry could have important significance for building a muon collider, also in cosmology and astrophysics. It would provide a sensitive test of the standard model in particle physics and allow for exploration of the possible V+A interactions.

  6. Asymmetries observed in Saturn's magnetopause geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilkington, N. M.; Achilleos, N.; Arridge, C. S.; Guio, P.; Masters, A.; Ray, L. C.; Sergis, N.; Thomsen, M. F.; Coates, A. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    For over 10 years, the Cassini spacecraft has patrolled Saturn's magnetosphere and observed its magnetopause boundary over a wide range of prevailing solar wind and interior plasma conditions. We now have data that enable us to resolve a significant dawn-dusk asymmetry and find that the magnetosphere extends farther from the planet on the dawnside of the planet by 7 ± 1%. In addition, an opposing dawn-dusk asymmetry in the suprathermal plasma pressure adjacent to the magnetopause has been observed. This probably acts to reduce the size asymmetry and may explain the discrepancy between the degree of asymmetry found here and a similar asymmetry found by Kivelson and Jia (2014) using MHD simulations. Finally, these observations sample a wide range of season, allowing the "intrinsic" polar flattening (14 ± 1%) caused by the magnetodisc to be separated from the seasonally induced north-south asymmetry in the magnetopause shape found theoretically (5 ± 1% when the planet's magnetic dipole is tilted away from the Sun by 10-17°).

  7. Broca's area: nomenclature, anatomy, typology and asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Keller, Simon S; Crow, Timothy; Foundas, Anne; Amunts, Katrin; Roberts, Neil

    2009-04-01

    In this review, we (i) describe the nomenclature of Broca's area and show how the circumscribed definition of Broca's area is disassociated from Broca's aphasia, (ii) describe in detail how the gross anatomy of Broca's area varies between people, and how the definitions vary between studies, (iii) attempt to reconcile the findings of structural asymmetry of Broca's area with the differences in methodological approaches, (iv) consider the functional significance of cytoarchitectonic definitions of Broca's area, and (v) critically elucidate the significance of circumscribed regions of cortex for language lateralisation and language development. Contrary to what has previously been reported in the literature, asymmetry of Broca's area has not been reproducibly demonstrated, particularly on a gross morphological level. This may be due to major inconsistencies in methodology (including different anatomical boundaries, measurement techniques and samples studied) or that the sulcal contours defining Broca's area are so naturally variable between people making a standard definition difficult. Cytoarchitectonic analyses more often than not report leftward asymmetry of some component of area 44 and/or area 45. If a structural asymmetry of Broca's area does exist, it is variable, which differs from that of the functional asymmetry of language, which is more consistent. One reason for this might be that the link between cellular architecture, connectivity and language function still remains to be elucidated. There is currently no convincing explanation to associate asymmetry of Broca's area with the lateralisation of language. PMID:19155059

  8. Cryptic asymmetry: unreliable signals mask asymmetric performance of crayfish weapons.

    PubMed

    Angilletta, Michael J; Wilson, Robbie S

    2012-08-23

    Animals commonly use their limbs as signals and weapons during territorial aggression. Asymmetries of limb performance that do not relate to asymmetries of limb size (cryptic asymmetry) could substantially affect disputes, but this phenomenon has not been considered beyond primates. We investigated cryptic asymmetry in male crayfish (Cherax dispar), which commonly use unreliable signals of strength during aggression. Although the strength of a chela can vary by an order of magnitude for a given size, we found repeatable asymmetries of strength that were only weakly related to asymmetries of size. Size-adjusted strength of chelae and the asymmetry of strength between chelae were highly repeatable between environmental conditions, suggesting that asymmetries of strength stemmed from variation in capacity rather than motivation. Cryptic asymmetry adds another dimension of uncertainty during conflict between animals, which could influence the evolution of unreliable signals and morphological asymmetry. PMID:22417793

  9. Cryptic asymmetry: unreliable signals mask asymmetric performance of crayfish weapons

    PubMed Central

    Angilletta, Michael J.; Wilson, Robbie S.

    2012-01-01

    Animals commonly use their limbs as signals and weapons during territorial aggression. Asymmetries of limb performance that do not relate to asymmetries of limb size (cryptic asymmetry) could substantially affect disputes, but this phenomenon has not been considered beyond primates. We investigated cryptic asymmetry in male crayfish (Cherax dispar), which commonly use unreliable signals of strength during aggression. Although the strength of a chela can vary by an order of magnitude for a given size, we found repeatable asymmetries of strength that were only weakly related to asymmetries of size. Size-adjusted strength of chelae and the asymmetry of strength between chelae were highly repeatable between environmental conditions, suggesting that asymmetries of strength stemmed from variation in capacity rather than motivation. Cryptic asymmetry adds another dimension of uncertainty during conflict between animals, which could influence the evolution of unreliable signals and morphological asymmetry. PMID:22417793

  10. Noninvasive measurement of cerebral oxygen saturation and cerebral phronetal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengli; Zhang, Aiyu; Xu, Min; Jin, Taiyi

    1998-08-01

    Using the Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), the noninvasive measurement of cerebral oxygen concentration can be achieved in vivo based on the Lambert-Beer Law. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of studying higher brain functions through combining cerebral oxygen saturation and cerebral function measurement. Event-related experiments are introduced to measure the cerebral phronetal function. Time domain curves show sight differences among these experiment results. However, with the aid of DFT, experiment data of all five human volunteers show the frequency near 20 Hz or 40 Hz is evoked depending on the difficulty of the mental tasks. The results demonstrate the feasibility of cerebral functions study by means of cerebral oxygen saturation measurement analyzed in the frequency domain.

  11. Genetics of Cerebral Vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Ladner, Travis R.; Zuckerman, Scott L.; Mocco, J

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) is a major source of morbidity and mortality in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). It is thought that an inflammatory cascade initiated by extravasated blood products precipitates CV, disrupting vascular smooth muscle cell function of major cerebral arteries, leading to vasoconstriction. Mechanisms of CV and modes of therapy are an active area of research. Understanding the genetic basis of CV holds promise for the recognition and treatment for this devastating neurovascular event. In our review, we summarize the most recent research involving key areas within the genetics and vasospasm discussion: (1) Prognostic role of genetics—risk stratification based on gene sequencing, biomarkers, and polymorphisms; (2) Signaling pathways—pinpointing key inflammatory molecules responsible for downstream cellular signaling and altering these mediators to provide therapeutic benefit; and (3) Gene therapy and gene delivery—using viral vectors or novel protein delivery methods to overexpress protective genes in the vasospasm cascade. PMID:23691311

  12. Phenylpropanolamine and cerebral hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, J.R.; LeBlanc, H.J.

    1985-05-01

    Computerized tomography, carotid angiograms, and arteriography were used to diagnose several cases of cerebral hemorrhage following the use of phenylpropanolamine. The angiographic picture in one of the three cases was similar to that previously described in association with amphetamine abuse and pseudoephedrine overdose, both substances being chemically and pharmacologically similar to phenylpropanolamine. The study suggests that the arterial change responsible for symptoms may be due to spasm rather than arteriopathy. 14 references, 5 figures.

  13. Cerebral dysgenesis. An overview.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, G B; Sheth, R D; Bodensteiner, J B

    1994-11-01

    A significant portion of patients with neurodevelopmental abnormalities (mental retardation, learning disabilities, and so forth) have no definable cause for these problems. Mounting evidence suggests a substantial number of these idiopathic conditions have subtle abnormalities of brain development (cerebral dysgenesis) as the inherent pathophysiologic event. In this article the authors summarize normal and abnormal brain development, the diagnostic approach to idiopathic neurodevelopmental anomalies, and the new molecular genetic insights into the underlying causes of brain malformations. PMID:7845342

  14. What provides cerebral reserve?

    PubMed

    Staff, Roger T; Murray, Alison D; Deary, Ian J; Whalley, Lawrence J

    2004-05-01

    The cerebral reserve hypothesis is a heuristic concept used to explain apparent protection from the onset of cerebral disease and/or cognitive decline in old age. A significant obstacle when investigating the reserve hypothesis is the absence of baseline data with which to compare current cognitive status. We tested the influence of three hypothesized proxies of reserve (education, head size and occupational attainment [OCC]) in 92 volunteers born in 1921, whose cognitive function was measured at age 11 and 79 years, and who underwent brain MRI. The association between each proxy and old age cognitive function was tested, adjusting for variance contributed by childhood mental ability and detrimental age-related pathological changes measured using MRI. The results showed that education and OCC, but not total intracranial volume (TICV), contribute to cerebral reserve and help retain cognitive function in old age. Education was found to contribute between 5 and 6% of the variance found in old age memory function but was found to have no significant association with reasoning abilities. OCC was found to contribute around 5% of the variance found in old age memory function and between 6 and 8% of the variance found in old age reasoning abilities. We conclude that the intellectual challenges experienced during life, such as education and occupation, accumulate reserve and allow cognitive function to be maintained in old age. PMID:15047587

  15. [Insomnia and cerebral hypoperfusion].

    PubMed

    Káposzta, Zoltán; Rácz, Klára

    2007-11-18

    Insomnia is defined as difficulty with the initiation, maintenance, duration, or quality of sleep that results in the impairment of daytime functioning, despite adequate opportunity and circumstances for sleep. In most countries approximately every third inhabitant has insomnia. Insomnia can be classified as primary and secondary. The pathogenesis of primary insomnia is unknown, but available evidence suggests a state of hyperarousal. Insomnia secondary to other causes is more common than primary insomnia. Cerebral hypoperfusion can be the cause of insomnia in some cases. In such patients the cerebral blood flow should be improved using parenteral vascular therapy. If insomnia persists despite treatment, then therapy for primary insomnia should be instituted using benzodiazepine-receptor agonists such as Zolpidem, Zopiclone, or Zaleplon. In those cases Midazolam cannot be used for the treatment of insomnia due to its marked negative effect on cerebral blood flow. In Hungary there is a need to organize multidisciplinary Insomnia Clinics because insomnia is more than a disease, it is a public health problem in this century. PMID:17988972

  16. Cerebral oxygenation and hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Anthony R.; Morrison, Shawnda A.; Ainslie, Philip N.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia is associated with marked reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Increased distribution of cardiac output to the periphery, increases in alveolar ventilation and resultant hypocapnia each contribute to the fall in CBF during passive hyperthermia; however, their relative contribution remains a point of contention, and probably depends on the experimental condition (e.g., posture and degree of hyperthermia). The hyperthermia-induced hyperventilatory response reduces arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2) causing cerebral vasoconstriction and subsequent reductions in flow. During supine passive hyperthermia, the majority of recent data indicate that reductions in PaCO2 may be the primary, if not sole, culprit for reduced CBF. On the other hand, during more dynamic conditions (e.g., hemorrhage or orthostatic challenges), an inability to appropriately decrease peripheral vascular conductance presents a condition whereby adequate cerebral perfusion pressure may be compromised secondary to reductions in systemic blood pressure. Although studies have reported maintenance of pre-frontal cortex oxygenation (assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy) during exercise and severe heat stress, the influence of cutaneous blood flow is known to contaminate this measure. This review discusses the governing mechanisms associated with changes in CBF and oxygenation during moderate to severe (i.e., 1.0°C to 2.0°C increase in body core temperature) levels of hyperthermia. Future research directions are provided. PMID:24624095

  17. Lateral bias of agonistic responses to mirror images and morphological asymmetry in the Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens).

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yuichi; Hori, Michio; Myint, Omar; Kohda, Masanori

    2010-03-17

    Behavioural laterality (e.g., during social interactions) is often observed at the individual level in lower vertebrates such as fish, whereas population-level laterality is observed in many higher vertebrates. Population-level laterality can be explained mainly by internal factors (e.g., cerebral lateralization), whereas little is known about the behavioural mechanisms underlying individual-level laterality. Recently, it was revealed that many fish have asymmetrical body morphology, but the relationship between asymmetric morphology and social behaviours has been rarely examined. Here we report the relationship between lateralized eye use during aggressive displays (e.g., body posture) of male Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens, toward their own mirror image and morphological asymmetry. Of 25 males, five exhibited significantly more leftward eye use during left displays, and eight males exhibited predominantly rightward eye use during right displays. Morphological measurement results for the craniovertebral angle and opercular area showed that the craniovertebral angle and opercular area displayed antisymmetry and fluctuating asymmetry, respectively. We found that lateralized eye use during agonistic responses by each fish was associated with the craniovertebral angle, but not with operculum size; lefties (left-curved body) showed mainly left eye use (during left-side displays), and righties (right-curved body) demonstrated the opposite. We suggest that antisymmetric morphologies, such as head incline, are potentially useful for studying the association between cerebral lateralization and individual laterality of behavioural responses. Further, we propose that in fish, morphological asymmetry is related to laterality in various behaviours. PMID:19922744

  18. Asymmetries of amyloid-β burden and neuronal dysfunction are positively correlated in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Frings, Lars; Hellwig, Sabine; Spehl, Timo S; Bormann, Tobias; Buchert, Ralph; Vach, Werner; Minkova, Lora; Heimbach, Bernhard; Klöppel, Stefan; Meyer, Philipp T

    2015-10-01

    Clinical Alzheimer's disease affects both cerebral hemispheres to a similar degree in clinically typical cases. However, in atypical variants like logopenic progressive aphasia, neurodegeneration often presents asymmetrically. Yet, no in vivo imaging study has investigated whether lateralized neurodegeneration corresponds to lateralized amyloid-β burden. Therefore, using combined (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, we explored whether asymmetric amyloid-β deposition in Alzheimer's disease is associated with asymmetric hypometabolism and clinical symptoms. From our database of patients who underwent positron emission tomography with both (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (n = 132), we included all amyloid-positive patients with prodromal or mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (n = 69). The relationship between (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B binding potential and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake was assessed in atlas-based regions of interest covering the entire cerebral cortex. Lateralizations of amyloid-β and hypometabolism were tested for associations with each other and with type and severity of cognitive symptoms. Positive correlations between asymmetries of Pittsburgh compound B binding potential and hypometabolism were detected in 6 of 25 regions (angular gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, superior parietal gyrus, inferior and middle temporal gyrus), i.e. hypometabolism was more pronounced on the side of greater amyloid-β deposition (range: r = 0.41 to 0.53, all P < 0.001). Stronger leftward asymmetry of amyloid-β deposition was associated with more severe language impairment (P < 0.05), and stronger rightward asymmetry with more severe visuospatial impairment (at trend level, P = 0.073). Similarly, patients with predominance of language deficits showed more left-lateralized amyloid-β burden and hypometabolism than patients with predominant visuospatial impairment

  19. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Stroke What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Jun 13,2014 About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis ... to view an animation What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a weak area in a ...

  20. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  1. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  2. Complementary and alternative medicine. Considering the alternatives.

    PubMed

    Weber, D O

    1998-01-01

    Therapies variously described as alternative, complementary, or unconventional because they lie outside the realm of scientific medicine practiced by graduates of orthodox U.S. medical schools are gaining mainstream respectability despite many questions about their efficacy and safety. Depending on definitions, surveys indicate that fewer than 10 percent to nearly 40 percent of Americans supplement or substitute for conventional health care with alternative systems of medical practice. Spending for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) nationwide has been estimated at up to $14 billion a year. Establishment of an Office of Alternative Medicine in the National Institutes of Health in 1992 has heartened advocates of CAM, increased interest and government funding for research into unorthodox therapies, and lent credibility to CAM modalities. Embracing marginal therapies may represent an opportunity for physicians and health systems to reduce inappropriate consumption, offer a wider range of choices to patients, and profit from a lucrative market. PMID:10351720

  3. Complementary or alternative therapies for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Edzard

    2006-02-01

    Complementary or alternative therapies for osteoarthritis are commonly used and therefore it is important that health-care providers and patients are aware of the evidence for or against these approaches. In this article, the best available evidence is reviewed. The results suggest that, for several treatments, the risk-benefit profile is encouraging: acupuncture, several herbal medicines and capsaicin cream. For other therapies the evidence is weak or contradictory: homeopathy, magnet therapy, tai chi, leech therapy, music therapy, yoga, imagery and therapeutic touch. Many other treatments have not been scientifically tested. It is concluded that some complementary or alternative therapies have generated sufficiently promising results to warrant further investigation in large-scale, definitive, randomized clinical trials. PMID:16932660

  4. [Complementary care approaches, towards more humanity].

    PubMed

    Svandra, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Modern medicine, with its cutting-edge technology, questions the notions of dehumanisation, over-medicalisation, the relationship to care. It seems to be aimed more at the disease than the patient. Complementary care approaches, which also encompass conventional medicine, guide and support the patient. Today, they have a role in giving back to the patient a feeling of being present in the world and testify to different approaches. PMID:27063876

  5. Complementary lattice arrays for coded aperture imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jie; Noshad, Mohammad; Tarokh, Vahid

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we consider complementary lattice arrays in order to enable a broader range of designs for coded aperture imaging systems. We provide a general framework and methods that generate richer and more flexible designs than existing ones. Besides this, we review and interpret the state-of-the-art uniformly redundant arrays (URA) designs, broaden the related concepts, and further propose some new design methods.

  6. Complementary arsenic speciation methods: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nearing, Michelle M.; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J.

    2014-09-01

    The toxicity of arsenic greatly depends on its chemical form and oxidation state (speciation) and therefore accurate determination of arsenic speciation is a crucial step in understanding its chemistry and potential risk. High performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) is the most common analysis used for arsenic speciation but it has two major limitations: it relies on an extraction step (usually from a solid sample) that can be incomplete or alter the arsenic compounds; and it provides no structural information, relying on matching sample peaks to standard peaks. The use of additional analytical methods in a complementary manner introduces the ability to address these disadvantages. The use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with HPLC-ICP-MS can be used to identify compounds not extracted for HPLC-ICP-MS and provide minimal processing steps for solid state analysis that may help preserve labile compounds such as those containing arsenicsbnd sulfur bonds, which can degrade under chromatographic conditions. On the other hand, HPLC-ICP-MS is essential in confirming organoarsenic compounds with similar white line energies seen by using XAS, and identifying trace arsenic compounds that are too low to be detected by XAS. The complementary use of electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with HPLC-ICP-MS provides confirmation of arsenic compounds identified during the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis, identification of unknown compounds observed during the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis and further resolves HPLC-ICP-MS by identifying co-eluting compounds. In the complementary use of HPLC-ICP-MS and ESI-MS, HPLC-ICP-MS helps to focus the ESI-MS selection of ions. Numerous studies have shown that the information obtained from HPLC-ICP-MS analysis can be greatly enhanced by complementary approaches.

  7. Toroidal current asymmetry in tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-10-15

    It was discovered on JET that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal asymmetry of the toroidal plasma current I{sub ϕ}. It was found that the toroidal current asymmetry was proportional to the vertical current moment asymmetry with positive sign for an upward vertical displacement event (VDE) and negative sign for a downward VDE. It was observed that greater displacement leads to greater measured I{sub ϕ} asymmetry. Here, it is shown that this is essentially a kinematic effect produced by a VDE interacting with three dimensional MHD perturbations. The relation of toroidal current asymmetry and vertical current moment is calculated analytically and is verified by numerical simulations. It is shown analytically that the toroidal variation of the toroidal plasma current is accompanied by an equal and opposite variation of the toroidal current flowing in a thin wall surrounding the plasma. These currents are connected by 3D halo current, which is π/2 radians out of phase with the n = 1 toroidal current variations.

  8. Measurement of Collins asymmetry at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Xiao-Rui

    2016-02-01

    In this talk, I present the recent measurement of the Collins fragmentation function based on a set of 62 pb-1 e+e- annihilation data at √s = 3.65 GeV collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII storage rings. In this work, the azimuthal asymmetries of two charged pions in the inclusive process e+e- → ππX are explored. These asymmetries can be attributed to the Collins fragmentation function, which describes the behavior of a hadron produced from a transversely polarized quark. The corresponding four-momentum transfer of the virtual photon, Q2, is close to the energy scale of the existing semi-inclusive DIS experimental data. We observe a nonzero asymmetry, which increases with increasing pion momentum and also indicates a larger spin-dependent Collins effect than at higher energy scale. The dependence of the asymmetry on the transverse momentum of hadrons to the reference axis is also investigated. The measured asymmetries are important inputs for the global analysis of extracting the quark transversity distribution inside the nucleon, and are valuable to explore the energy evolution of the spin-dependent fragmentation function.

  9. Quantum asymmetry between time and space

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An asymmetry exists between time and space in the sense that physical systems inevitably evolve over time, whereas there is no corresponding ubiquitous translation over space. The asymmetry, which is presumed to be elemental, is represented by equations of motion and conservation laws that operate differently over time and space. If, however, the asymmetry was found to be due to deeper causes, this conventional view of time evolution would need reworking. Here we show, using a sum-over-paths formalism, that a violation of time reversal (T) symmetry might be such a cause. If T symmetry is obeyed, then the formalism treats time and space symmetrically such that states of matter are localized both in space and in time. In this case, equations of motion and conservation laws are undefined or inapplicable. However, if T symmetry is violated, then the same sum over paths formalism yields states that are localized in space and distributed without bound over time, creating an asymmetry between time and space. Moreover, the states satisfy an equation of motion (the Schrödinger equation) and conservation laws apply. This suggests that the time–space asymmetry is not elemental as currently presumed, and that T violation may have a deep connection with time evolution. PMID:26997899

  10. Asymmetry of the Brain: Development and Implications.

    PubMed

    Duboc, Véronique; Dufourcq, Pascale; Blader, Patrick; Roussigné, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Although the left and right hemispheres of our brains develop with a high degree of symmetry at both the anatomical and functional levels, it has become clear that subtle structural differences exist between the two sides and that each is dominant in processing specific cognitive tasks. As the result of evolutionary conservation or convergence, lateralization of the brain is found in both vertebrates and invertebrates, suggesting that it provides significant fitness for animal life. This widespread feature of hemispheric specialization has allowed the emergence of model systems to study its development and, in some cases, to link anatomical asymmetries to brain function and behavior. Here, we present some of what is known about brain asymmetry in humans and model organisms as well as what is known about the impact of environmental and genetic factors on brain asymmetry development. We specifically highlight the progress made in understanding the development of epithalamic asymmetries in zebrafish and how this model provides an exciting opportunity to address brain asymmetry at different levels of complexity. PMID:26442849

  11. Least Asymmetry Centering Method and Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lust, Nate B.; Britt, Daniel; Harrington, Joseph; Nymeyer, Sarah; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Ross, Emily L.; Bowman, William; Fraine, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    The interpretation of astronomical photometry, astrometry, and orbit determination data depends on accurately and consistently identifying the center of the target object's photometric point spread function in the presence of noise. We introduce a new technique, called least asymmetry, which is designed to find the point about which the distribution is most symmetric. This technique, in addition to the commonly used techniques Gaussian fitting and center of light, was tested against synthetic datasets under realistic ranges of noise and photometric gain. With subpixel accuracy, we compare the determined centers to the known centers and evaluate each method against the simulated conditions. We find that in most cases center of light performs the worst, while Gaussian fitting and least asymmetry are alternately better under different circumstances. Using a real point response function with "reasonable signal-to-noise," we find that least asymmetry provides the most accurate center estimates, and Gaussian centering is the most precise. The least asymmetry routine implemented in the Python Programming Language can be found at https://github.com/natelust/least_asymmetry.

  12. Experimental Study of Single Spin Asymmetries and TMDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Single Spin Asymmetries and Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) distribution study has been one of the main focuses of hadron physics in recent years. The initial exploratory Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic-Scattering (SIDIS) experiments with transversely polarized proton and deuteron targets from HERMES and COMPASS attracted great attention and lead to very active efforts in both experiments and theory. A SIDIS experiment on the neutron with a polarized 3He target was performed at JLab. Recently published results as well as new preliminary results are shown. Precision TMD experiments are planned at JLab after the 12 GeV energy upgrade. Three approved experiments with a new SoLID spectrometer on both the proton and neutron will provide high precision TMD data in the valence quark region. In the long-term future, an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) as proposed in US (MEIC@JLab and E-RHIC@BNL) will provide precision TMD data of the gluons and the sea. A new opportunity just emerged in China that a low-energy EIC (1st stage EIC@HIAF) may provide precision TMD data in the sea quark region, complementary to the proposed EIC in US.

  13. Asymmetry between pushing and pulling for crawling cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recho, Pierre; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2013-02-01

    Eukaryotic cells possess motility mechanisms allowing them not only to self-propel but also to exert forces on obstacles (to push) and to carry cargoes (to pull). To study the inherent asymmetry between active pushing and pulling we model a crawling acto-myosin cell extract as a one-dimensional layer of active gel subjected to external forces. We show that pushing is controlled by protrusion and that the macroscopic signature of the protrusion dominated motility mechanism is concavity of the force-velocity relation. In contrast, pulling is driven by protrusion only at small values of the pulling force and it is replaced by contraction when the pulling force is sufficiently large. This leads to more complex convex-concave structure of the force-velocity relation; in particular, competition between protrusion and contraction can produce negative mobility in a biologically relevant range. The model illustrates active readjustment of the force generating machinery in response to changes in the dipole structure of external forces. The possibility of switching between complementary active mechanisms implies that if necessary “pushers” can replace “pullers” and vice versa.

  14. First results from the Bulge Asymmetries and Dynamic Evolution survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlstrom, Ylva; Sjouwerman, Lorant; Rich, Robert Michael; Claussen, Mark J.; Morris, Mark; BAaDE Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the Bulge Asymmetries and Dynamic Evolution (BAaDE) project is to undertake the largest ever survey of red giant SiO maser sources (~20,000) in the bulge and inner Galaxy. This survey will provide a confusion-free, extinction-free, densely sampled set of point-masses in the regions of the Galaxy that are not reachable with optical surveys (concentrated along 0°Complementary near-infrared spectroscopy will be performed for a subsample of the stars, and higher resolution VLBA observations will be used to determine proper motions, parallaxes and orbit families for a subset of sources. Here we will describe the project aims and report on the first results.

  15. Probing lepton asymmetry with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: oyamayo@post.kek.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry ξ{sub ν}=μ{sub ν}/T{sub ν} in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on ξ{sub ν} in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

  16. Longitudinal asymmetries of the coronal line intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xanthakis, J.; Petropoulos, B.; Tritakis, V. P.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Marmatsuri, L.

    The analysis of the daily measurements of the coronal green line intensity which have been collected by the Pic-du-Midi Observatory during the period 1944-1974 has led to some very interesting results. The main finding of this analysis is a permanent longitudinal asymmetry of the green line intensity which has been determined all along the data record. In an effort to make this asymmetry certain E-W intensity differences very close to the solar equator where the rotation rate for coronal features is equal to 25.35 days on the average are examined. When these data are examined every 25 days, namely data which almost correspond to the same points of the solar disk, it confirms the above mentioned longitudinal asymmetry.

  17. Sagittal otolith morphogenesis asymmetry in marine fishes.

    PubMed

    Mille, T; Mahe, K; Villanueva, M C; De Pontual, H; Ernande, B

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated and compared asymmetry in sagittal otolith shape and length between left and right inner ears in four roundfish and four flatfish species of commercial interest. For each species, the effects of ontogenetic changes (individual age and total body length), sexual dimorphism (individual sex) and the otolith's location on the right or left side of the head, on the shape and length of paired otoliths (between 143 and 702 pairs according to species) were evaluated. Ontogenetic changes in otolith shape and length were observed for all species. Sexual dimorphism, either in otolith shape and length or in their ontogenetic changes, was detected for half of the species, be they round or flat. Significant directional asymmetry in otolith shape and length was detected in one roundfish species each, but its inconsistency across species and its small average amplitude (6·17% for shape and 1·99% for length) suggested that it has barely any biological relevance. Significant directional asymmetry in otolith shape and length was found for all flatfish species except otolith length for one species. Its average amplitude varied between 2·06 and 17·50% for shape and between 0·00 and 11·83% for length and increased significantly throughout ontogeny for two species, one dextral and one sinistral. The longer (length) and rounder otolith (shape) appeared to be always on the blind side whatever the species. These results suggest differential biomineralization between the blind and ocular inner ears in flatfish species that could result from perturbations of the proximal-distal gradient of otolith precursors in the endolymph and the otolith position relative to the geometry of the saccular epithelium due to body morphology asymmetry and lateralized behaviour. The fact that asymmetry never exceeded 18% even at the individual level suggests an evolutionary canalization of otolith shape symmetry to avoid negative effects on fish hearing and balance. Technically

  18. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Time to Talk

    MedlinePlus

    ... with your health care providers any complementary and alternative medicines you take or are thinking about starting. Photo: ... and older use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). But less than one-third who use ...

  19. High Cholesterol and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Cholesterol and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says Share: February 2013 Dietary Supplements Red Yeast ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  20. Complementary Health Approaches for Chronic Pain: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complementary Health Approaches for Chronic Pain: What the Science Says Share: September 2014 Clinical Guidelines, Scientific Literature, ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  1. Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says Share: February 2016 © Thinkstock Clinical Guidelines, Scientific ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  2. Complementary Health Approaches for Smoking Cessation: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complementary Health Approaches for Smoking Cessation: What the Science Says Share: January 2014 Mindfulness Meditation Mindfulness meditation ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  3. Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches : What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches: What the Science Says Share: April 2014 Clinical Guidelines, Scientific Literature, ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  4. Weight Loss and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control and Complementary and Integrative Approaches: What the Science Says Share: January 2015 Clinical Guidelines, Scientific Literature, ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  5. Particle-antiparticle asymmetries from annihilations.

    PubMed

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F; Petraki, Kalliopi; Volkas, Raymond R

    2014-10-31

    An extensively studied mechanism to create particle-antiparticle asymmetries is the out-of-equilibrium and CP violating decay of a heavy particle. We, instead, examine how asymmetries can arise purely from 2→2 annihilations rather than from the usual 1→2 decays and inverse decays. We review the general conditions on the reaction rates that arise from S-matrix unitarity and CPT invariance, and show how these are implemented in the context of a simple toy model. We formulate the Boltzmann equations for this model, and present an example solution. PMID:25396359

  6. Single hadron transverse spin asymmetries from COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Bradamante, Franco

    2007-06-13

    Transverse spin physics is an important part of the scientific programme of the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The analysis of the data taken with the target polarized orthogonally to the 160 GeV/c muon beam momentum has allowed to measure for the first time the Collins and Sivers asymmetries of the deuteron. Both for the positive and the negative hadrons produced in semi-inclusive DIS the measured asymmetries are small and, within errors, compatible with zero. New results for {pi}{+-} ans K{+-} are presented here.

  7. Oligodendrogenesis after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruilan; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle of adult rodent brain generate oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) that disperse throughout the corpus callosum and striatum where some of OPCs differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes. Studies in animal models of stroke demonstrate that cerebral ischemia induces oligodendrogenesis during brain repair processes. This article will review evidence of stroke-induced proliferation and differentiation of OPCs that are either resident in white matter or are derived from SVZ neural progenitor cells and of therapies that amplify endogenous oligodendrogenesis in ischemic brain. PMID:24194700

  8. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  9. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. PMID:16391455

  10. Cerebral pathology post heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Peteghem, S Van; Pauw, M De

    2015-04-01

    Cerebral pathology is frequently encountered post heart transplantation with a cumulative incidence of about 80% after 15 years. A broad spectrum of disease entities is reported, from minor abnormalities to life-threatening diseases. Although cerebral infections and malignancies are rare in this patient population, they have a high mortality rate. Since 1991, 171 orthotopic heart transplantations were performed at the Ghent University Hospital with a 10-year survival rate of 75%. Severe cerebral complications occurred in 10 patients, with epilepsy in 2 patients, cerebrovascular accidents in 4 patients, cerebral infections in 3 patients and a cerebral malignancy in 1 patient, resulting in a fatal outcome in 7 patients. We present four of these cases. PMID:25292206

  11. 7 CFR 3405.8 - Complementary project proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... project proposals. Institutions may submit proposals that are complementary in nature as defined in § 3405.2(g). Such complementary project proposals may be submitted by the same or by different eligible... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Complementary project proposals. 3405.8 Section...

  12. 7 CFR 3405.8 - Complementary project proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... project proposals. Institutions may submit proposals that are complementary in nature as defined in § 3405.2(g). Such complementary project proposals may be submitted by the same or by different eligible... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Complementary project proposals. 3405.8 Section...

  13. 7 CFR 3405.8 - Complementary project proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... project proposals. Institutions may submit proposals that are complementary in nature as defined in § 3405.2(g). Such complementary project proposals may be submitted by the same or by different eligible... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Complementary project proposals. 3405.8 Section...

  14. 7 CFR 3405.8 - Complementary project proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... project proposals. Institutions may submit proposals that are complementary in nature as defined in § 3405.2(g). Such complementary project proposals may be submitted by the same or by different eligible... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Complementary project proposals. 3405.8 Section...

  15. Predictors of College Students' Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chng, Chwee Lye; Neill, Kweethai; Fogle, Peggy

    2003-01-01

    This study assessed the use of complementary and alternative medicine among college students (N=913), the relationships between health locus of control with use of complementary and alternative medicine, and health local of control with attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine and what predicts their use. A majority (66%, n-913) of…

  16. Extraction of complementary from non-complementary DNA sequences through phase separation and centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, Taiquitha; McPherson, Dacia; Zhu, Chenhui; Moran, Mark; Walba, Dave; Zanchetta, Giuliano; Bellini, Tommaso; Clark, Noel

    2008-03-01

    Double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is known to form lyotropic liquid crystal (LC) phases, nematic and then columnar with increasing DNA concentration in water. Single stranded (DNA) does not form liquid crystal phases. We study the phase separation of both long (900bp) and short (6-20bp) DNA. In the mixture solution of a self complementary sequences (scDNA) and non complementary sequences (nscDNA), the scDNA forms DNA double helices and hence forms LC phases while the nscDNA stays in the isotropic phase, the LC appearing in the form of phase separated droplets. We report results of the use of centrifugation to produce complete spatial segregation of complementary and noncomplementary DNA, based on their different LC-formation tendencies.

  17. Cerebral cartography and connectomics

    PubMed Central

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. PMID:25823870

  18. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  19. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-10-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  20. [Noradrenaline and cerebral aging].

    PubMed

    Jouvet, M; Albarede, J L; Lubin, S; Meyrignac, C

    1991-01-01

    The central functions of norepinephrine (NE) are a recent discovery: regulation of alertness and of the wakefulness-sleep cycle, maintenance of attention, memory and learning, cerebral plasticity and neuro-protection. The anatomical, histological, biochemical and physiological properties of the central noradrenergic system: extreme capacity for ramification and arborization; slow conduction, non-myelinized axons with extrasynaptic varicosities producing and releasing NE; frequency of co-transmission phenomena, and; neuromodulation with fiber effect responsible for improvement in the signal over background noise ratio and selection of significant stimuli form a true interface between the outside world and the central nervous system, notably for the neocortex in the context of the cognitive treatment of information. This central noradrenergic system is involved in the neurophysiology and the clinical features of cerebral aging (ideation-motor and cognitive function slowing down, loss of behavioral adjustment), neuro-degenerative disorders (SDAT, Parkinson's disease), certain aspects of depression and less obvious conditions (head injuries, sequelae of cerebrovascular accidents, sub-cortical dementia). The recent development of medications improving alertness (adrafinil, modafinil) with a pure central action and specifically noradrenergic, may contribute to an improvement in these multifactorial disorders. PMID:1864252

  1. The Perils of Complementary Alternative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bayme, Michael J.; Geftler, Alex; Netz, Uri; Kirshtein, Boris; Glazer, Yair; Atias, Shahar; Perry, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    More than 11,000 articles lauding alternative medicine appear in the PubMed database, but there are only a few articles describing the complications of such care. Two patients suffering from complications of alternative medicine were treated in our hospital: one patient developed necrotizing fasciitis after acupuncture, and the second developed an epidural hematoma after chiropractic manipulation. These complications serve as a clarion call to the Israeli Health Ministry, as well as to health ministries around the world, to include complementary medicine under its inspection and legislative authority. PMID:25120919

  2. Reciprocal invisibility cloak based on complementary media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. J.; Huang, M.; Yang, C. F.; Yu, J.

    2011-02-01

    The first invisibility cloak was proposed by Pendry et al. [Science 312, 1780 (2006)]. But the object enclosed in this original cloak is "blind", that is, it cannot see the outside world, since no electromagnetic waves can reach within the cloaked space. Based on the concept of complementary media, we propose a reciprocal invisibility cloak, in which the hidden object can see the outside world, but its presence cannot be detected by electromagnetic wave. The performance of the cloak has been verified by full-wave simulations.

  3. Reveal quantum correlation in complementary bases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shengjun; Ma, Zhihao; Chen, Zhihua; Yu, Sixia

    2014-01-01

    An essential feature of genuine quantum correlation is the simultaneous existence of correlation in complementary bases. We reveal this feature of quantum correlation by defining measures based on invariance under a basis change. For a bipartite quantum state, the classical correlation is the maximal correlation present in a certain optimum basis, while the quantum correlation is characterized as a series of residual correlations in the mutually unbiased bases. Compared with other approaches to quantify quantum correlation, our approach gives information-theoretical measures that directly reflect the essential feature of quantum correlation. PMID:24503595

  4. Complementary and alternative medicine for neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Kline, Karen L

    2002-02-01

    The use of complementary and alternative veterinary medicine in treating neurologic disorders has increased in popularity in response to advances in human alternative and integrative therapies. Neurolocalization of lesions to the brain, spinal cord, and neuromuscular systems is discussed, as well as the diagnostics and therapeutics used to treat such disorders. Emphasis is placed on integrative and alternative treatments for such neurologic diseases as seizures, cerebrovascular accidents, canine cognitive disorder, meningitis, intervertebral disc disease, fibrocartilagenous embolism, degenerative myelopathy, and myopathies. Thorough physical and neurologic examinations, establishment of a correct diagnosis, and integrative therapeutics are aimed at improving the overall quality of life of the veterinary patient. PMID:11890124

  5. Complementary and Alternative Therapies in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Bedlack, Richard S.; Joyce, Nanette; Carter, Gregory T.; Pagononi, Sabrina; Karam, Chafic

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Given the severity of their illness and lack of effective disease modifying agents, it is not surprising that most patients with ALS consider trying complementary and alternative therapies. Some of the most commonly considered alternative therapies include special diets, nutritional supplements, cannabis, acupuncture, chelation and energy healing. This chapter reviews these in detail. We also describe 3 models by which physicians may frame discussions about alternative therapies: paternalism, autonomy and shared decision making. Finally, we review a program called ALSUntangled which using shared shared decision making to review alternative therapies for ALS. PMID:26515629

  6. Complementary therapy for induction of labour.

    PubMed

    Weston, Michelle; Grabowska, Christine

    2013-09-01

    Midwives at West Middlesex hospital (WMUH) offer complementary therapies as part of antenatal care. Aromatherapy and reflex zone therapy (also known as 'reflexology', a system of using touch on areas of the feet that stimulate parts of the body) are offered to induce spontaneous labour for women with low risk pregnancies once post dates, reducing the need for medical induction of labour (IOL) and intervention and reducing the cost to the NHS. This paper discusses how this service was implemented and developed, and the audit results and feedback from women and midwives. PMID:24163924

  7. CP and charge asymmetries at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Morello, Michael; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2007-11-01

    We present CDF results on the branching fractions and time-integrated direct CP asymmetries for B0 and B0s decay modes into pairs of charmless charged hadrons (pions or kaons). We report also the first observation of B0s->DsK mode and the measurement of its branching fraction.

  8. Measuring Asymmetry in Insect-Plant Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Cláudia P. T.; de Almeida, Adriana M.; Corso, Gilberto

    2011-03-01

    In this work we focus on interaction networks between insects and plants and in the characterization of insect plant asymmetry, an important issue in coevolution and evolutionary biology. We analyze in particular the asymmetry in the interaction matrix of animals (herbivorous insects) and plants (food resource for the insects). Instead of driving our attention to the interaction matrix itself we derive two networks associated to the bipartite network: the animal network, D1, and the plant network, D2. These networks are constructed according to the following recipe: two animal species are linked once if they interact with the same plant. In a similar way, in the plant network, two plants are linked if they interact with the same animal. To explore the asymmetry between D2 and D1 we test for a set of 23 networks from the ecologic literature networks: the difference in size, ΔL, clustering coefficient difference, ΔC, and mean connectivity difference, Δ. We used a nonparametric statistical test to check the differences in ΔL, ΔC and Δ. Our results indicate that ΔL and Δ show a significative asymmetry.

  9. Auxin asymmetry during gravitropism by tomato hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, M. A.; Pickard, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropic asymmetry of auxin was observed in hypocotyls of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) soon after horizontal placement: the ratio of apically supplied [3H]IAA collected from the lower sides to that from the upper sides was about 1.4 between 5 and 10 minutes. This was adequately early to account for the beginning of curvature. The auxin asymmetry ratio rose to about 2.5 between 20 and 25 minutes, and to 3.5 during the main phase of curvature. This compares reasonably well with the roughly 3.9 ratio for elongation on the lower side to elongation on the upper side that is the basis for the curvature. These data extend evidence that the Went-Cholodny theory for the mediation of tropisms is valid for dicot stems. Also consistent with the theory, an auxin asymmetry ratio of 2.5 was observed when wrong-way gravitropic curvature developed following application of a high level of auxin. In addition to reversing the asymmetry of elongation, the large supplement of auxin resulted in lower net elongation. Previous data established that ethylene is not involved in this decrease of growth as a function of increasing level of auxin.

  10. Exploring handedness asymmetries in the Simon effect.

    PubMed

    Seibold, Julia C; Chen, Jing; Proctor, Robert W

    2016-02-01

    Spatially corresponding stimulus-response pairings usually produce shorter reaction times (RTs) than do non-corresponding pairings, even when the spatial dimension of the stimulus is irrelevant to the task. This "Simon effect" for visual stimuli and manual responses is often larger for the stimulus location on the side to which the person's dominant hand is operating. The present study aimed at replicating and examining the nature of this asymmetry. To determine whether the Simon effect asymmetry is a function of the hand distinction or of conceptual spatial codes, performance with left and right manual key-presses was compared to that with vocal responses "left" and "right." Whether the asymmetric Simon effect pattern is restricted to spatial stimuli was tested by comparing effects obtained with left and right located squares to those found with the centered words Left and Right. The asymmetry was only replicated for the spatial stimulus-manual response Simon task, for which a second experiment showed similar results when the hands and response box were not visible during task performance. The analysis revealed a general dominant-hand RT advantage that similarly adds to both corresponding and non-corresponding trials and is rather independent from the Simon effect. This advantage yields an apparent asymmetry when the data are analyzed as a function of correspondence for each stimulus location because the corresponding and non-corresponding RTs that are compared come from different hands. PMID:26676871

  11. Parallel Processing in Visual Search Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dosher, Barbara Anne; Han, Songmei; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2004-01-01

    The difficulty of visual search may depend on assignment of the same visual elements as targets and distractors-search asymmetry. Easy C-in-O searches and difficult O-in-C searches are often associated with parallel and serial search, respectively. Here, the time course of visual search was measured for both tasks with speed-accuracy methods. The…

  12. Neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2008-01-22

    Using a simple model for nuclear GPDs, we study the role of the neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS observables. As an example, we use the beam-spin asymmetry $A_{LU}^A$ measured in coherent and incoherent DVCS on a wide range of nuclear targets in the HERMES and JLab kinematics. We find that at small values of the momentum transfer $t$, $A_{LU}^A$ is dominated by the coherent-enriched contribution, which enhances $A_{LU}^A$ compared to the free proton asymmetry $A_{LU}^p$, $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=1.8-2.2$. At large values of $t$, the nuclear asymmetry is dominated by the incoherent contribution and $A_{LU}^A/(\\phi)A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=0.66-0.74$. The deviation of $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)$ from unity at large $t$ is a result of the neutron contribution, which gives a possibility to constain neutron GPDs in incoherent nuclear DVCS. A similar trend is expected for other DVCS asymmetries.

  13. Infant Frontal Asymmetry Predicts Child Emotional Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Licata, Maria; Paulus, Markus; Kühn-Popp, Nina; Meinhardt, Jorg; Sodian, Beate

    2015-01-01

    While factors influencing maternal emotional availability (EA) have been well investigated, little is known about the development of child EA. The present longitudinal study investigated the role of frontal brain asymmetry in young children with regard to child EA (child responsiveness and involvement) in mother-child interaction in a sample of 28…

  14. Search Asymmetry, Sustained Attention, and Response Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Hugh; Russell, Paul N.; Helton, William S.

    2011-01-01

    In the present experiment, we used search asymmetry to test whether the sustained attention to response task is a better measure of response inhibition or sustained attention. Participants performed feature present and feature absent target detection tasks using either a sustained attention to response task (SART; high Go low No-Go) or a…

  15. The Energy of Substituted Ethanes. Asymmetry Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Lionel; Hoffmann, Roald; Otto, Peter

    1973-01-01

    The leading terms in the energy of a general substituted ethane are derived in explicit form as a function of the torsional angle θ, the substituent electronegativities, and their mutual overlaps. The energy is found to be the sum of all four overlaps between pairs of asymmetry orbitals, and satisfies the requisite symmetry properties. PMID:16592060

  16. Sources of Local Time Asymmetries in Magnetodiscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, C. S.; Kane, M.; Sergis, N.; Khurana, K. K.; Jackman, C. M.

    2015-04-01

    The rapidly rotating magnetospheres at Jupiter and Saturn contain a near-equatorial thin current sheet over most local times known as the magnetodisc, resembling a wrapped-up magnetotail. The Pioneer, Voyager, Ulysses, Galileo, Cassini and New Horizons spacecraft at Jupiter and Saturn have provided extensive datasets from which to observationally identify local time asymmetries in these magnetodiscs. Imaging in the infrared and ultraviolet from ground- and space-based instruments have also revealed the presence of local time asymmetries in the aurora which therefore must map to local time asymmetries in the magnetosphere. Asymmetries are found in (i) the configuration of the magnetic field and magnetospheric currents, where a thicker disc is found in the noon and dusk sectors; (ii) plasma flows where the plasma flow has local time-dependent radial components; (iii) a thicker plasma sheet in the dusk sector. Many of these features are also reproduced in global MHD simulations. Several models have been developed to interpret these various observations and typically fall into two groups: ones which invoke coupling with the solar wind (via reconnection or viscous processes) and ones which invoke internal rotational processes operating inside an asymmetrical external boundary. In this paper we review these observational in situ findings, review the models which seek to explain them, and highlight open questions and directions for future work.

  17. Phonological and Phonetic Asymmetries of Cw Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Yunju

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates the relationship between the phonological distribution of Cw combinations, and the acoustic/perceptual distinctiveness between syllables with plain C onsets and with Cw combination onsets. Distributional asymmetries of Cw combinations discussed in this thesis include the avoidance of Cw combinations in the labial consonant…

  18. On the nature of the baryon asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Whether the baryon asymmetry in the universe is a locally varying or universally fixed number is examined with focus on the existence of a possible matter antimatter domain structure in the universe arising from a GUT with spontaneous CP symmetry breaking. Theoretical considerations and observational data and astrophysical tests relating to this fundamental question are reviewed.

  19. The Cost of Action Miscues: Hemispheric Asymmetries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenal, Brian V.; Hinze, Stephan; Heilman, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behaviors require preparation and when necessary inhibition or alteration of actions. The right hemisphere has been posited to be dominant for preparatory motor activation. This experiment was designed to learn if there are hemispheric asymmetries in the control of altered plans of actions. Cues, both valid and invalid, which indicate the…

  20. Niche engineering reveals complementary resource use.

    PubMed

    Gable, Jacob T; Crowder, David W; Northfield, Tobin D; Steffan, Shawn A; Snyder, William E

    2012-09-01

    Greater resource use by diverse communities might result from species occupying complementary niches. Demonstrating niche complementarity among species is challenging, however, due to the difficulty in relating differences between species in particular traits to their use of complementary resources. Here, we overcame this obstacle by exploiting plastic foraging behavior in a community of predatory insects common on Brassica oleracea plants in Washington, USA. These predators complemented one another by partitioning foraging space, with some species foraging primarily along leaf edges and others at leaf centers. We hypothesized that emergent biodiversity effects would occur when predators partitioned foraging space on leaves, but not when spatial complementarity was dampened. Indeed, on intact leaves, edge- and center-foraging predators combined to kill more prey than any single predator species could by itself. These emergent diversity effects, however, disappeared on plants damaged by the caterpillar Plutella xylostella. Caterpillar chew-holes brought edge habitats to the center of leaves, so that all predator species could attack aphids anywhere on plants. With spatial niche differences diminished, there were no benefits of predator diversity; the most voracious single predator species killed the most aphids. Thus, caterpillar herbivory determined whether multi-predator-species effects reflected complementarity or species' individual impacts. Our study provides direct evidence for a causative relationship between niche differentiation and increased resource consumption by diverse communities, as revealed by ecological engineers that homogenize the foraging environment. PMID:23094370

  1. Visual attention modulates the asymmetric influence of each cerebral hemisphere on spatial perception.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meijian; Wang, Xiuhai; Xue, Lingyan; Huang, Dan; Chen, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Although the allocation of brain functions across the two cerebral hemispheres has aroused public interest over the past century, asymmetric interhemispheric cooperation under attentional modulation has been scarcely investigated. An example of interhemispheric cooperation is visual spatial perception. During this process, visual information from each hemisphere is integrated because each half of the visual field predominantly projects to the contralateral visual cortex. Both egocentric and allocentric coordinates can be employed for visual spatial representation, but they activate different areas in primate cerebral hemispheres. Recent studies have determined that egocentric representation affects the reaction time of allocentric perception; furthermore, this influence is asymmetric between the two visual hemifields. The egocentric-allocentric incompatibility effect and its asymmetry between the two hemispheres can produce this phenomenon. Using an allocentric position judgment task, we found that this incompatibility effect was reduced, and its asymmetry was eliminated on an attentional task rather than a neutral task. Visual attention might activate cortical areas that process conflicting information, such as the anterior cingulate cortex, and balance the asymmetry between the two hemispheres. Attention may enhance and balance this interhemispheric cooperation because this imbalance may also be caused by the asymmetric cooperation of each hemisphere in spatial perception. PMID:26758349

  2. Visual attention modulates the asymmetric influence of each cerebral hemisphere on spatial perception

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meijian; Wang, Xiuhai; Xue, Lingyan; Huang, Dan; Chen, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Although the allocation of brain functions across the two cerebral hemispheres has aroused public interest over the past century, asymmetric interhemispheric cooperation under attentional modulation has been scarcely investigated. An example of interhemispheric cooperation is visual spatial perception. During this process, visual information from each hemisphere is integrated because each half of the visual field predominantly projects to the contralateral visual cortex. Both egocentric and allocentric coordinates can be employed for visual spatial representation, but they activate different areas in primate cerebral hemispheres. Recent studies have determined that egocentric representation affects the reaction time of allocentric perception; furthermore, this influence is asymmetric between the two visual hemifields. The egocentric-allocentric incompatibility effect and its asymmetry between the two hemispheres can produce this phenomenon. Using an allocentric position judgment task, we found that this incompatibility effect was reduced, and its asymmetry was eliminated on an attentional task rather than a neutral task. Visual attention might activate cortical areas that process conflicting information, such as the anterior cingulate cortex, and balance the asymmetry between the two hemispheres. Attention may enhance and balance this interhemispheric cooperation because this imbalance may also be caused by the asymmetric cooperation of each hemisphere in spatial perception. PMID:26758349

  3. Cerebral metabolism and perfusion in MR-negative individuals with refractory focal epilepsy assessed by simultaneous acquisition of (18)F-FDG PET and arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Boscolo Galazzo, Ilaria; Mattoli, Maria Vittoria; Pizzini, Francesca Benedetta; De Vita, Enrico; Barnes, Anna; Duncan, John S; Jäger, Hans Rolf; Golay, Xavier; Bomanji, Jamshed B; Koepp, Matthias; Groves, Ashley M; Fraioli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The major challenge in pre-surgical epileptic patient evaluation is the correct identification of the seizure onset area, especially in MR-negative patients. In this study, we aimed to: (1) assess the concordance between perfusion, from ASL, and metabolism, from (18)F-FDG, acquired simultaneously on PET/MR; (2) verify the utility of a statistical approach as supportive diagnostic tool for clinical readers. Secondarily, we compared (18)F-FDG PET data from the hybrid PET/MR system with those acquired with PET/CT, with the purpose of validate the reliability of (18)F-FDG PET/MR data. Twenty patients with refractory focal epilepsy, negative MR and a defined electro-clinical diagnosis underwent PET/MR, immediately followed by PET/CT. Standardized uptake value ratio (SUVr) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps were calculated for PET/CT-PET/MR and ASL, respectively. For all techniques, z-score of the asymmetry index (zAI) was applied for depicting significant Right/Left differences. SUVr and CBF images were firstly visually assessed by two neuroimaging readers, who then re-assessed them considering zAI for reaching a final diagnosis. High agreement between (18)F-FDG PET/MR and ASL was found, showing hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in the same hemisphere in 18/20 patients, while the remaining were normal. They were completely concordant in 14/18, concordant in at least one lobe in the remaining. zAI maps improved readers' confidence in 12/20 and 15/20 patients for (18)F-FDG PET/MR and ASL, respectively. (18)F-FDG PET/CT-PET/MR showed high agreement, especially when zAI was considered. The simultaneous metabolism-perfusion acquisition provides excellent concordance on focus lateralisation and good concordance on localisation, determining useful complementary information. PMID:27222796

  4. 15 CFR 784.1 - Complementary access: General information on the purpose of complementary access, affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... following purposes. (1) Declared uranium hard-rock mines and ore beneficiation plants. Complementary access... nuclear related activities at reportable uranium hard-rock mines and ore beneficiation plants (see § 783.1... required forms to BIS (see the Supplemental Information Report requirements in § 783.1(d) of the APR)....

  5. 15 CFR 784.1 - Complementary access: General information on the purpose of complementary access, affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... following purposes. (1) Declared uranium hard-rock mines and ore beneficiation plants. Complementary access... nuclear related activities at reportable uranium hard-rock mines and ore beneficiation plants (see § 783.1... required forms to BIS (see the Supplemental Information Report requirements in § 783.1(d) of the APR)....

  6. 15 CFR 784.1 - Complementary access: General information on the purpose of complementary access, affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... following purposes. (1) Declared uranium hard-rock mines and ore beneficiation plants. Complementary access... nuclear related activities at reportable uranium hard-rock mines and ore beneficiation plants (see § 783.1... required forms to BIS (see the Supplemental Information Report requirements in § 783.1(d) of the APR)....

  7. 15 CFR 784.1 - Complementary access: General information on the purpose of complementary access, affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... following purposes. (1) Declared uranium hard-rock mines and ore beneficiation plants. Complementary access... nuclear related activities at reportable uranium hard-rock mines and ore beneficiation plants (see § 783.1... required forms to BIS (see the Supplemental Information Report requirements in § 783.1(d) of the APR)....

  8. 15 CFR 784.1 - Complementary access: General information on the purpose of complementary access, affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... following purposes. (1) Declared uranium hard-rock mines and ore beneficiation plants. Complementary access... nuclear related activities at reportable uranium hard-rock mines and ore beneficiation plants (see § 783.1... required to submit reports to BIS pursuant to § 783.1(a)(1), (a)(2), or (b) of the APR), and...

  9. Cerebral venous angiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.; Gilmor, R.L.; Richmond, B.

    1984-04-01

    Several unusual cases of cerebral venous angiomas as well as some characteristic cases are reported. The characteristic angiographic feature is that of a collection of dilated medullary veins draining into a single large draining vein, which appears first in the early venous phase and persists into the late venous phase of the arteriogram. Computed tomography (CT) was abnormal in 12/13 cases. The draining vein was the most common abnormality identified on CT. Coronal and sagittal reconstruction may be helpful in demonstrating the draining vein. A case of large twin venous angiomas, a case of hemorrhage from a venous angioma, and a case of a venous angioma with an incidentally associated glioblastoma are presented.

  10. Differences in cerebral cortical anatomy of left- and right-handers.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe, Tulio; Willems, Roel M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Arias Vasquez, Alejandro; Hoogman, Martine; Hagoort, Peter; Fernandez, Guillen; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde

    2014-01-01

    The left and right sides of the human brain are specialized for different kinds of information processing, and much of our cognition is lateralized to an extent toward one side or the other. Handedness is a reflection of nervous system lateralization. Roughly ten percent of people are mixed- or left-handed, and they show an elevated rate of reductions or reversals of some cerebral functional asymmetries compared to right-handers. Brain anatomical correlates of left-handedness have also been suggested. However, the relationships of left-handedness to brain structure and function remain far from clear. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of cortical surface area differences between 106 left-handed subjects and 1960 right-handed subjects, measured using an automated method of regional parcellation (FreeSurfer, Destrieux atlas). This is the largest study sample that has so far been used in relation to this issue. No individual cortical region showed an association with left-handedness that survived statistical correction for multiple testing, although there was a nominally significant association with the surface area of a previously implicated region: the left precentral sulcus. Identifying brain structural correlates of handedness may prove useful for genetic studies of cerebral asymmetries, as well as providing new avenues for the study of relations between handedness, cerebral lateralization and cognition. PMID:24734025

  11. Magical Ideation, Creativity, Handedness, and Cerebral Asymmetries: A Combined Behavioural and fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badzakova-Trajkov, Gjurgjica; Haberling, Isabelle S.; Corballis, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Magical ideation has been shown to be related to measures of hand preference, in which those with mixed handedness exhibit higher levels of magical ideation than those with either consistent left- or right-handedness. It is unclear whether the relation between magical ideation and hand preference is the result of a bias in questionnaire-taking…

  12. Cerebral Asymmetries in the Processing of Tachistoscopic Information as a Function of Sex, Handedness, and Instructions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iaccino, James F.; Sowa, Stephen J.

    A study examined the effects of sex, handedness, and instructions in the processing of verbal and spatial information presented tachistoscopically. Subjects, 48 volunteers from Illinois Benedictine College, were evenly distributed in terms of sex and handedness, and were further divided into two subgroups based on whether visual field attendance…

  13. Functional cerebral asymmetries and cognitive abilities in musicians, painters, and controls.

    PubMed

    Hassler, M

    1990-05-01

    The relative participation of left- and right-hemisphere functions in verbal and spatial processing with musical composers, instrumentalists, painters, and non-musicians from student and junior high school populations was investigated. Hemispheric lateralization was related to the outcome of tests measuring spatial orientation, spatial visualization, tactile-visual discrimination, and verbal fluency. The relationship between lateral dominance and cognitive variables was influenced by sex and musical talents and the ability to paint. Males, irrespective of talents, were lateralized stronger than females. These sex differences were due to nonmusicians, only. Male and female composers, instrumentalists, and painters did not differ in language lateralization. Female left-handers showed a marked tendency for reversed language lateralization; left-handed males did not. PMID:2346636

  14. Cerebral Asymmetries in Early Orthographic and Phonological Reading Processes: Evidence from Backward Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halderman, Laura K.; Chiarello, Christine

    2005-01-01

    A lateralized backward masking paradigm was used to examine hemisphere differences in orthographic and phonological processes at an early time course of word recognition. Targets (e.g., bowl) were presented and backward masked by either pseudohomophones of the target word (orthographically and phonologically similar, e.g., BOAL), orthographically…

  15. Intelligence-related differences in the asymmetry of spontaneous cerebral activity.

    PubMed

    Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Tatti, Elisa; Rossi, Simone; Serino, Vinicio; Rossi, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests the spontaneous BOLD signal synchronization of corresponding interhemispheric, homotopic regions as a stable trait of human brain physiology, with emerging differences in such organization being also related to some pathological conditions. To understand whether such brain functional symmetries play a role into higher-order cognitive functioning, here we correlated the functional homotopy profiles of 119 healthy subjects with their intelligence level. Counterintuitively, reduced homotopic connectivity in above average-IQ versus average-IQ subjects was observed, with significant reductions in visual and somatosensory cortices, supplementary motor area, rolandic operculum, and middle temporal gyrus, possibly suggesting that a downgrading of interhemispheric talk at rest could be associated with higher cognitive functioning. These regions also showed an increased spontaneous synchrony with medial structures located in ipsi- and contralateral hemispheres, with such pattern being mostly detectable for regions placed in the left hemisphere. The interactions with age and gender have been also tested, with different patterns for subjects above and below 25 years old and less homotopic connectivity in the prefrontal cortex and posterior midline regions in female participants with higher IQ scores. These findings support prior evidence suggesting a functional role for homotopic connectivity in human cognitive expression, promoting the reduction of synchrony between primary sensory regions as a predictor of higher intelligence levels. PMID:26059228

  16. Cerebral Asymmetry for Verbal and Nonverbal Sounds in Normal Literate and Illiterate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargha-Khadem, F.; And Others

    A preliminary experiment was conducted to explore the effects of illiteracy on hemispheric specialization. Groups of literate and illiterate Iranian children were tested on three dichotic tapes consisting of monosyllabic animal names, double-digit numbers, and nonverbal environmental sounds. All children were also tested for handedness and for…

  17. Hemispace asymmetries and laterality effects in arm positioning.

    PubMed

    Imanaka, K; Abernethy, B; Yamauchi, M; Funase, K; Nishihira, Y

    1995-12-01

    Hemispace asymmetries and laterality effects were examined on an arm positioning reproduction task. Sixteen male subjects were asked to reproduce both abductive and adductive positioning movements with the left or right arm within either the left or the right hemispace. Hemispace was manipulated using a 90 degrees head-rotation paradigm. A left hemispace advantage in positioning accuracy was predicted for both left and right arm movements on the grounds that the perceptual-motor control of positioning movements made in left hemispace is primarily mediated by the right hemisphere which is known to be advantageous for tasks which are spatial in nature (Heilman, Bowers, & Watson, 1984). No arm laterality effects were predicted to occur because the proximal musculature involved in the control of arm movements is innervated from both contralateral and ipsilateral cerebral hemispheres (Brinkman & Kuypers, 1973). Results showed that the predicted left hemispace advantage was evident for the right arm on the positioning variability measure alone, whereas it was absent for all other possible conditions on all error measures. Laterality (arm) effects were absent as predicted. The experiment also demonstrated a greater degradation of reproduction performance under the "crossed" arm-hemispace conditions than under the "uncrossed" conditions. A plausible explanation for the uncrossed advantage for the task is that under normal conditions, a single hemisphere is primarily responsible for both controlling the contralateral arm and directing attention to the contralateral hemispace, and consequently potential interhemispheric interference is minimized. A clear response bias effect in movement reproduction was also evident as a function of the direction of concurrent arm movement and head rotation. Arm movements made in the same direction as head rotation were systematically undershot in reproduction to a much greater degree than arm movements made in the opposite direction to head

  18. Three-dimensional assessment of facial asymmetry: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Akhil, Gopi; Senthil Kumar, Kullampalayam Palanisamy; Raja, Subramani; Janardhanan, Kumaresan

    2015-01-01

    For patients with facial asymmetry, complete and precise diagnosis, and surgical treatments to correct the underlying cause of the asymmetry are significant. Conventional diagnostic radiographs (submento-vertex projections, posteroanterior radiography) have limitations in asymmetry diagnosis due to two-dimensional assessments of three-dimensional (3D) images. The advent of 3D images has greatly reduced the magnification and projection errors that are common in conventional radiographs making it as a precise diagnostic aid for assessment of facial asymmetry. Thus, this article attempts to review the newly introduced 3D tools in the diagnosis of more complex facial asymmetries. PMID:26538893

  19. Alpha Asymmetry in Infants at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gabard-Durnam, Laurel; Tierney, Adrienne L.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Nelson, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    An emerging focus of research on autism spectrum disorder (ASD) targets the identification of early-developing ASD endophenotypes using infant siblings of affected children. One potential neural endophenotype is resting frontal electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha asymmetry, a metric of hemispheric organization. Here, we examined the development of frontal EEG alpha asymmetry in ASD high-risk and low-risk infant populations. Our findings demonstrate that low and high-risk infants show different patterns of alpha asymmetry at 6 months of age and opposite growth trajectories in asymmetry over the following 12 months. These results support the candidacy of alpha asymmetry as an early neural ASD endophenotype. PMID:23989937

  20. Musculoskeletal conditions and complementary/alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2004-08-01

    Complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions. It is, therefore, essential to define CAM's value for such indications. This chapter summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for back pain, fibromyalgia, neck pain, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massage, supplements. None of the treatments in question is totally devoid of risks. By and large the data are not compelling, not least due to their paucity and methodological limitations. It is, therefore, concluded that our research efforts must be directed towards defining which form of CAM generates more good than harm for which condition. PMID:15301985

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bowling, Allen C

    2010-10-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is used by one-half to three-fourths of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Despite this widespread use, CAM may not be discussed in the course of a conventional medical visit. When considered in the context of MS, CAM therapies have a wide range of risk-benefit profiles. Some CAM therapies, such as acupuncture, cranberry, vitamin D, tai chi, and yoga, are low risk and possibly beneficial. Other CAM therapies, such as immune-stimulating supplements, bee venom, and hyperbaric oxygen, are ineffective, dangerous, or unstudied. Providing access to information about the risks and benefits of CAM therapies may increase the quality of care that is provided to patients with MS. PMID:22810599

  2. Ultra-stable oscillator with complementary transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A high frequency oscillator, having both good short and long term stability, is formed by including a piezoelectric crystal in the base circuit of a first bi-polar transistor circuit, the bi-polar transistor itself operated below its transitional frequency and having its emitter load chosen so that the input impedance, looking into the base thereof, exhibits a negative resistance in parallel with a capacitive reactance. Combined with this basic circuit is an auxiliary, complementary, second bi-polar transistor circuit of the same form with the piezoelectric crystal being common to both circuits. By this configuration small changes in quiescent current are substantially cancelled by opposite variations in the second bi-polar transistor circuit, thereby achieving from the oscillator a signal having its frequency of oscillation stable over long time periods as well as short time periods.

  3. Complementary and alternative therapies for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roizen, Nancy J

    2005-01-01

    In their role as committed advocates, parents of children with Down syndrome have always sought alternative therapies, mainly to enhance cognitive function but also to improve their appearance. Nutritional supplements have been the most frequent type of complementary and alternative therapy used. Cell therapy, plastic surgery, hormonal therapy, and a host of other therapies such as massage therapy have been used. There is a lack of well-designed scientific studies on the use of alternative therapies in individuals with Down syndrome. Antioxidants hold theoretical promise for treatment of the cognitive, immune, malignancy, and premature aging problems associated with Down syndrome. Medications for treatment of Alzheimer's disease may also result in benefit for the population of individuals with Down syndrome. PMID:15977315

  4. Threefold Complementary Approach to Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Gunter

    2013-12-27

    A complementary approach, derived from (a) higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, (b) light-front quantization and (c) the invariance properties of the full conformal group in one dimension leads to a nonperturbative relativistic light-front wave equation which incorporates essential spectroscopic and dynamical features of hadron physics. The fundamental conformal symmetry of the classical QCD Lagrangian in the limit of massless quarks is encoded in the resulting effective theory. The mass scale for confinement emerges from the isomorphism between the conformal group andSO(2,1). This scale appears in the light-front Hamiltonian by mapping to the evolution operator in the formalism of de Alfaro, Fubini and Furlan, which retains the conformal invariance of the action. Remarkably, the specific form of the confinement interaction and the corresponding modification of AdS space are uniquely determined in this procedure.

  5. Cerebral Laterality and Verbal Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Jay L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Research suggests that we process information by way of two distinct and functionally separate coding systems. Their location, somewhat dependent on cerebral laterality, varies in right- and left-handed persons. Tests this dual coding model. (Editor/RK)

  6. Predictions of the poloidal asymmetries and transport frequencies in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, C. Lee, S. G.; Terzolo, L.; Stacey, W. M.

    2014-01-15

    The extended neoclassical rotation theory formulated in Miller flux surface geometry enables unprecedented neoclassical calculations of the poloidal asymmetries in density, rotation velocities, electrostatic potential along the flux surfaces, and of the inertial (Reynolds stress) and gyroviscous transport frequencies, which are strong functions of these asymmetries. This paper presents such calculations of the poloidal asymmetries and non-negligible inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies in two KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) [Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 094006 (2011)] Neutral Beam Injection H-mode discharges. The in-out asymmetries in the velocities are an order of magnitude larger than their up-down asymmetries. The magnitudes of the predicted inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies depend on the magnitudes of the density and velocity asymmetries. The neoclassically predicted density asymmetries are shown to correspond with the reported measurements in tokamaks and the predicted carbon toroidal velocities agree very well with the measurements in KSTAR.

  7. [Complementary medicine--Jewish medical ethics].

    PubMed

    Katz, Yisrae; Schiff, Elad

    2011-08-01

    In Israel, as in the Western world, the use of different methods of complementary and alternative medicine ICAM) is spreading. CAM raises ethical questions of concern to healthcare providers and to the public: Can physicians recommend a treatment that has no scientific evidence? Should the government include such therapies in the health budget? Can complementary therapists receive protection against lawsuits if their treatment is recognized? The purpose of this article is to present a Jewish perspective on these issues. The fundamental sources that deal with the subject are based on the approach of rabbinic authorities toward unproven medicine, as expressed in the "Mishnah" and "Talmud" (200-500 C.E). The great Jewish scholar who discusses the subject in detail is Maimonides (1135-1204), who defines what "medicine" is and claims that medicine has to rely on reason or experience. Contemporary Jewish commentators present their position based on the interpretation of Maimonides' texts. In this article we claim that treatments can be divided into four groups, each group having a different halachic status: (1) Treatment that might be dangerous--should not be used. (2) Treatment that is safe--can be used, but has no other special status. (3) Treatment recognized by alternative therapists--has consequences for the observant Jew, such as laws of Kashrut and Shabbat. (4) Treatment that was tested and proven using modern medical methods has public significance--the therapist is entitled to legal defense if he made a reasonable mistake; the government can consider funding such treatment using public money. This article presents the Jewish halachic sources upon which we propose an ethical-practical approach to CAM. PMID:21939123

  8. Hemispheric asymmetries in perceived depth revealed through a radial line bisection task.

    PubMed

    Szpak, Ancrêt; Thomas, Nicole A; Nicholls, Michael E R

    2016-03-01

    Research suggests that the left cerebral hemisphere is predisposed for processing stimuli in 'near' space, whereas the right hemisphere is specialised for processing stimuli in 'far' space. This hypothesis was tested directly by asking 25 undergraduates to carry out a landmark radial line bisection task. To test the effect of hemispheric differences in processing, the lines were placed to the left, right or centre within the transverse plane. Consistent with predictions, lines in all three conditions were bisected distal to the true centre. More importantly, there was an asymmetry whereby the distal bias was stronger for lines presented in the left hemispace compared to the right hemispace. The results demonstrate that the perception of depth is affected by left/right placement along the lateral axis and highlight the cognitive/neural interplay between the radial and lateral axes. PMID:26645309

  9. Single spin asymmetries in electroproduction at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Harut Avakian; Latifa Elouadrhiri

    2004-06-02

    We present measurements of spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive processes in hard scattering kinematics using a 5.7 GeV electron beam and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at JLab. Scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons of an unpolarized liquid-hydrogen and off a polarized NH{sub 3} targets was studied over a wide range of kinematics. Non-zero single-beam and single-target spin asymmetries have been observed in semi-inclusive pion production in hard-scattering kinematics (Q{sup 2} > 1.2 GeV{sup 2}, W{sup 4} > 4 GeV{sup 2}). Systematic studies of factorization of x and z dependences have been done for different spin-dependent and spin-independent observables. No significant x/z dependence has been observed within statistical uncertainties, which is consistent with factorization of hard scattering and fragmentation processes.

  10. QCD evolution of the Sivers asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarria, Miguel G.; Idilbi, Ahmad; Kang, Zhong-Bo; Vitev, Ivan

    2014-04-01

    We study the QCD evolution of the Sivers effect in both semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and Drell-Yan production (DY). We pay close attention to the nonperturbative spin-independent Sudakov factor in the evolution formalism and find a universal form which can describe reasonably well the experimental data on the transverse momentum distributions in SIDIS, DY lepton pair and W/Z production. With this Sudakov factor at hand, we perform a global fitting of all the experimental data on the Sivers asymmetry in SIDIS from HERMES, COMPASS and Jefferson Lab. We then make predictions for the Sivers asymmetry in DY lepton pair and W production that can be compared to the future experimental measurements to test the sign change of the Sivers functions between SIDIS and DY processes and constrain the sea quark Sivers functions.

  11. Scrotal asymmetry, varicocoele and the Riace Bronzes.

    PubMed

    Bonafini, B; Pozzilli, P

    2012-04-01

    In 1972, a pair of remarkably attractive Greek statues, later named Riace Bronzes, were found along the Mediterranean coast in the province of Reggio Calabria, Italy. We analyse the Riace Bronzes in the context of previous research on scrotal asymmetry in Greek statues. By examining their testis, one can define a more exact time of their dating by placing them beside previous observations of scrotal asymmetry, and possibly by taking a pathological condition, varicocoele, as an influencing factor in determining the appearance of the testis. In statue A of the Riace Bronzes, the left testicle is remarkably lower compared with the right one; it also appears as it looks when under physical examination varicocoele is suspected. Being located on the left testicle (as in 90% of cases) and by sight, we feel sufficiently confident to affirm that varicocoele might be diagnosed. PMID:22288773

  12. GDH Integral on the Proton from Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Yelena Prok

    2004-05-01

    Inclusive double spin electron asymmetries have been measured by scattering polarized electrons off the solid polarized {sup 15}NH{sub 3} target in Hall B of Jefferson Lab in 2000-2001. The virtual photon asymmetry A{sub 1} (x), the longitudinal spin structure function, g{sub 1} (x, Q{sup 2}), and the first moment, {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p}, have been evaluated for a kinematic range of 0.05 {ge} Q{sup 2} {ge} 4.5 GeV{sup 2}. The extracted results complement the existing data in the resonance region, extending it to lower and higher Q{sup 2} regions. The results are important in the study of Q{sup 2} evolution of nucleon structure from the hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom.

  13. Asymmetry Effects in Viscoresistive Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebaldi, C.; Grasso, D.; Hastie, R. J.

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection from an asymmetric unreconnected equilibrium is investigated in a viscoresistive plasma via numerical simulations. The instability threshold of the standard stability parameter, Δ', increases with the asymmetry parameter, in a way similar to the effect of increasing viscosity. Also the topology of the velocity field changes significantly, the four-vortex structure typical of the tearing instability evolves into two-vortex structure, with strong increase of the velocity shear across the high magnetic shear rational surface.

  14. Reverse Schottky-asymmetry spin current detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuan; Appelbaum, Ian

    2010-10-01

    By reversing the Schottky barrier-height asymmetry in hot-electron semiconductor-metal-semiconductor ballistic spin filtering spin detectors, we have achieved the following: (1) demonstration of >50% spin polarization in silicon, resulting from the increase of detection efficiency by elimination of the ferromagnet/silicon interface on the transport channel detector contact and (2) evidence of spin transport at temperatures as high as 260 K, enabled by an increase in detector Schottky barrier height.

  15. Mandibular asymmetry and the fourth dimension.

    PubMed

    Kaban, Leonard B

    2009-03-01

    This paper represents more than 30 years of discussion and collaboration with Drs Joseph Murray and John Mulliken in an attempt to understand growth patterns over time (ie, fourth dimension) in patients with hemifacial microsomia (HFM). This is essential for the development of rational treatment protocols for children and adults with jaw asymmetry. Traditionally, HFM was thought of as a unilateral deformity, but it was recognized that 20% to 30% of patients had bilateral abnormalities. However, early descriptions of skeletal correction addressed almost exclusively lengthening of the short (affected) side of the face. Based on longitudinal clinical observations of unoperated HFM patients, we hypothesized that abnormal mandibular growth is the earliest skeletal manifestation and that restricted growth of the mandible plays a pivotal role in progressive distortion of both the ipsilateral and contralateral facial skeleton. This hypothesis explains the progressive nature of the asymmetry in patients with HFM and provides the rationale for surgical lengthening of the mandible in children to prevent end-stage deformity. During the past 30 years, we have learned that this phenomenon of progressive distortion of the adjacent and contralateral facial skeleton occurs with other asymmetric mandibular undergrowth (tumor resection, radiation therapy, or posttraumatic defects) and overgrowth (mandibular condylar hyperplasia) conditions. In this paper, I describe the progression of deformity with time in patients with mandibular asymmetry as a result of undergrowth and overgrowth. Understanding these concepts is critical for the development of rational treatment protocols for adults with end-stage asymmetry and for children to minimize secondary deformity. PMID:19182686

  16. Inflationary power asymmetry from primordial domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Jazayeri, Sadra; Akrami, Yashar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Solomon, Adam R.; Wang, Yi E-mail: yashar.akrami@astro.uio.no E-mail: a.r.solomon@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    We study the asymmetric primordial fluctuations in a model of inflation in which translational invariance is broken by a domain wall. We calculate the corrections to the power spectrum of curvature perturbations; they are anisotropic and contain dipole, quadrupole, and higher multipoles with non-trivial scale-dependent amplitudes. Inspired by observations of these multipole asymmetries in terms of two-point correlations and variance in real space, we demonstrate that this model can explain the observed anomalous power asymmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky, including its characteristic feature that the dipole dominates over higher multipoles. We test the viability of the model and place approximate constraints on its parameters by using observational values of dipole, quadrupole, and octopole amplitudes of the asymmetry measured by a local-variance estimator. We find that a configuration of the model in which the CMB sphere does not intersect the domain wall during inflation provides a good fit to the data. We further derive analytic expressions for the corrections to the CMB temperature covariance matrix, or angular power spectra, which can be used in future statistical analysis of the model in spherical harmonic space.

  17. Nodal signalling determines biradial asymmetry in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Schmidt, Heiko A; Kuhn, Anne; Höger, Stefanie K; Kocagöz, Yigit; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Ozbek, Suat; Holstein, Thomas W

    2014-11-01

    In bilaterians, three orthogonal body axes define the animal form, with distinct anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral and left-right asymmetries. The key signalling factors are Wnt family proteins for the anterior-posterior axis, Bmp family proteins for the dorsal-ventral axis and Nodal for the left-right axis. Cnidarians, the sister group to bilaterians, are characterized by one oral-aboral body axis, which exhibits a distinct biradiality of unknown molecular nature. Here we analysed the biradial growth pattern in the radially symmetrical cnidarian polyp Hydra, and we report evidence of Nodal in a pre-bilaterian clade. We identified a Nodal-related gene (Ndr) in Hydra magnipapillata, and this gene is essential for setting up an axial asymmetry along the main body axis. This asymmetry defines a lateral signalling centre, inducing a new body axis of a budding polyp orthogonal to the mother polyp's axis. Ndr is expressed exclusively in the lateral bud anlage and induces Pitx, which encodes an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor that functions downstream of Nodal. Reminiscent of its function in vertebrates, Nodal acts downstream of β-Catenin signalling. Our data support an evolutionary scenario in which a 'core-signalling cassette' consisting of β-Catenin, Nodal and Pitx pre-dated the cnidarian-bilaterian split. We presume that this cassette was co-opted for various modes of axial patterning: for example, for lateral branching in cnidarians and left-right patterning in bilaterians. PMID:25156256

  18. Some extensions of the concept of complementary electromagnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, B. D.; Nesic, A.

    1985-04-01

    Extensions of Booker's concept of complementary electromagnetic structures to some cases of inhomogeneous media are presented. Consideration is given to planar antennas and their complement/duals, in the presence of pairs of arbitrarily shaped dielectric and/or magnetic bodies of arbitrary complex permittivity and permeability, positioned symmetrically with respect to the antenna plane. It is shown that a simple correspondence exists between electromagnetic fields in complementary/dual systems. The extension of the concept of complementary structures to transmission lines with transversally inhomogeneous media is discussed and a number of new exact relations between quasi-static parameters of complementary coplanar transmission lines are derived.

  19. Current concepts of optimal cerebral perfusion pressure in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Sandhu, Kavita; Bhagat, Hemant; Durga, Padmaja; Chawla, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) consists of varied pathophysiological consequences and alteration of intracranial dynamics, reduction of the cerebral blood flow and oxygenation. In the past decade more emphasis has been directed towards optimizing cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) in patients who have suffered TBI. Injured brain may show signs of ischemia if CPP remains below 50 mmHg and raising the CPP above 60 mmHg may avoid cerebral oxygen desaturation. Though CPP above 70 mmHg is influential in achieving an improved patient outcome, maintenance of CPP higher than 70 mmHg was associated with greater risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The target CPP has been laid within 50-70 mmHg. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism are heterogeneous after TBI and with regional temporal differences in the requirement for CPP. Brain monitoring techniques such as jugular venous oximetry, monitoring of brain tissue oxygen tension (PbrO2), and cerebral microdialysis provide complementary and specific information that permits the selection of the optimal CPP. This review highlights the rationale for use CPP directed therapies and neuromonitoring to identify optimal CPP of head injured patients. The article also reviews the evidence provided by various clinical trials regarding optimal CPP and their application in the management of head injured patients. PMID:25190937

  20. New human-specific brain landmark: the depth asymmetry of superior temporal sulcus.

    PubMed

    Leroy, François; Cai, Qing; Bogart, Stephanie L; Dubois, Jessica; Coulon, Olivier; Monzalvo, Karla; Fischer, Clara; Glasel, Hervé; Van der Haegen, Lise; Bénézit, Audrey; Lin, Ching-Po; Kennedy, David N; Ihara, Aya S; Hertz-Pannier, Lucie; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Poupon, Cyril; Brysbaert, Marc; Roberts, Neil; Hopkins, William D; Mangin, Jean-François; Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine

    2015-01-27

    Identifying potentially unique features of the human cerebral cortex is a first step to understanding how evolution has shaped the brain in our species. By analyzing MR images obtained from 177 humans and 73 chimpanzees, we observed a human-specific asymmetry in the superior temporal sulcus at the heart of the communication regions and which we have named the "superior temporal asymmetrical pit" (STAP). This 45-mm-long segment ventral to Heschl's gyrus is deeper in the right hemisphere than in the left in 95% of typical human subjects, from infanthood till adulthood, and is present, irrespective of handedness, language lateralization, and sex although it is greater in males than in females. The STAP also is seen in several groups of atypical subjects including persons with situs inversus, autistic spectrum disorder, Turner syndrome, and corpus callosum agenesis. It is explained in part by the larger number of sulcal interruptions in the left than in the right hemisphere. Its early presence in the infants of this study as well as in fetuses and premature infants suggests a strong genetic influence. Because this asymmetry is barely visible in chimpanzees, we recommend the STAP region during midgestation as an important phenotype to investigate asymmetrical variations of gene expression among the primate lineage. This genetic target may provide important insights regarding the evolution of the crucial cognitive abilities sustained by this sulcus in our species, namely communication and social cognition. PMID:25583500

  1. [Plasma osmolarity and cerebral volume].

    PubMed

    Boulard, G

    2001-02-01

    Under normal physiological conditions, the osmolarity of extracellular fluids (ECFs) and natremia are controlled by two regulatory mechanisms modulating the water balance and sodium outflow from information collected by the osmoreceptors and baroreceptors, respectively. As well, under normal physiological conditions, water and electrolytes of brain ECFs are secreted by the endothelial cells of brain capillaries. Furthermore, isotonicity is present on both sides of the blood-brain barrier. In the event of systemic osmolarity disorders, water transport subject to osmosis laws occurs at the level of the blood-brain barrier. In the case of plasmatic hyperosmolarity cerebral dehydration is observed, while cerebral edema occurs in the contrary case. However, plasmatic osmolarity disorders have less effect on the cerebral volume when their introduction is slow. Experimentation in acute conditions shows that measured variations of the cerebral water content are lower than calculated variations, thus suggesting the existence of an adaptive mechanism, that is, the cerebral osmoregulation which limits the variation of the volume of brain cells by modulating their osmoactive molecule content. These osmoactive molecules are, on the one hand, the electrolytes, which are early and rapidly mobilized, and, on the other hand, the organic osmoles (amino acids, etc.), whose secretion is slower and delayed. This phenomenon should be taken into account in the treatment of osmolarity disorders. Thus, the related-risk of treatment for natremia disorders is therapeutic reversal of the osmotic gradient at the level of the blood-brain barrier. This reversal, which corresponds to a second osmotic stress, requires the implementation of a new procedure of cerebral osmoregulation in the opposite direction of the preceding one. As successive osmotic stresses decrease the effectiveness of brain osmoregulation, the risk for cerebral dehydration and pontine myelinolysis increases when the treatment

  2. Heterogeneity in the physicochemical properties of deoxycholate-solubilized benzodiazepine receptors from calf cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Sherman-Gold, R; Dudai, Y

    1983-07-01

    The hydrodynamic behaviour of benzodiazepine receptors solubilized by deoxycholate from calf cerebral cortex reveals two molecular forms. The Stokes radii are 46.5 A and 67.2 A, and the sedimentation coefficients are 10.9 S and 14.6 S. The calculated apparent molecular weights and frictional ratios suggest either two nearly globular proteins of ca. 200K and 400K daltons each, or two ca. 300K daltons proteins which differ significantly in their degree of asymmetry. The benzodiazepine binding site is located on ca. 51K daltons component(s) in both forms. PMID:6312347

  3. Cerebral influence on postural effects of cerebellar vermal zonal lesions or eighth nerve section in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Chambers, W W; Liu, C N

    1978-01-01

    In monkeys, cerebellar vermal cortical or fastigial nuclear lesion resulted in no significant postural asymmetry. Combined decerebration (but not bulbar pyramid section) and unilateral vermal cortical or fastigial nuclear lesion gave marked ipsilateral hyperextension and contralateral hyperflexion of limbs. Unilateral eighth nerve section resulted in only ipsilateral head tilt but combined unilateral eighth nerve section and decerebration or bilateral or contralateral cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 lesion gave also ipsilateral flexion and contralateral extension of limbs. Cervical deafferentation or postbrachial spinal cord transection did not alter these results. This study indicates a powerful cerebral influence on postural effects of cerebellar vermal zonal lesion or eighth nerve section in monkeys. Possible mechanisms mediating these effects in monkeys as compared to cats were discussed. PMID:107730

  4. Shielded silicon gate complementary MOS integrated circuit.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H. C.; Halsor, J. L.; Hayes, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    An electrostatic shield for complementary MOS integrated circuits was developed to minimize the adverse effects of stray electric fields created by the potentials in the metal interconnections. The process is compatible with silicon gate technology. N-doped polycrystalline silicon was used for all the gates and the shield. The effectiveness of the shield was demonstrated by constructing a special field plate over certain transistors. The threshold voltages obtained on an oriented silicon substrate ranged from 1.5 to 3 V for either channel. Integrated inverters performed satisfactorily from 3 to 15 V, limited at the low end by the threshold voltages and at the high end by the drain breakdown voltage of the n-channel transistors. The stability of the new structure with an n-doped silicon gate as measured by the shift in C-V curve under 200 C plus or minus 20 V temperature-bias conditions was better than conventional aluminum gate or p-doped silicon gate devices, presumably due to the doping of gate oxide with phosphorous.

  5. Complementary and conventional medicine: a concept map

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Carol M; Kroesen, Kendall; Trochim, William M; Bell, Iris R

    2004-01-01

    Background Despite the substantive literature from survey research that has accumulated on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the United States and elsewhere, very little research has been done to assess conceptual domains that CAM and conventional providers would emphasize in CAM survey studies. The objective of this study is to describe and interpret the results of concept mapping with conventional and CAM practitioners from a variety of backgrounds on the topic of CAM. Methods Concept mapping, including free sorts, ratings, and multidimensional scaling was used to organize conceptual domains relevant to CAM into a visual "cluster map." The panel consisted of CAM providers, conventional providers, and university faculty, and was convened to help formulate conceptual domains to guide the development of a CAM survey for use with United States military veterans. Results Eight conceptual clusters were identified: 1) Self-assessment, Self-care, and Quality of Life; 2) Health Status, Health Behaviors; 3) Self-assessment of Health; 4) Practical/Economic/ Environmental Concerns; 5) Needs Assessment; 6) CAM vs. Conventional Medicine; 7) Knowledge of CAM; and 8) Experience with CAM. The clusters suggest panelists saw interactions between CAM and conventional medicine as a critical component of the current medical landscape. Conclusions Concept mapping provided insight into how CAM and conventional providers view the domain of health care, and was shown to be a useful tool in the formulation of CAM-related conceptual domains. PMID:15018623

  6. Complementary resistive switches for passive nanocrossbar memories.

    PubMed

    Linn, Eike; Rosezin, Roland; Kügeler, Carsten; Waser, Rainer

    2010-05-01

    On the road towards higher memory density and computer performance, a significant improvement in energy efficiency constitutes the dominant goal in future information technology. Passive crossbar arrays of memristive elements were suggested a decade ago as non-volatile random access memories (RAM) and can also be used for reconfigurable logic circuits. As such they represent an interesting alternative to the conventional von Neumann based computer chip architectures. Crossbar architectures hold the promise of a significant reduction in energy consumption because of their ultimate scaling potential and because they allow for a local fusion of logic and memory, thus avoiding energy consumption by data transfer on the chip. However, the expected paradigm change has not yet taken place because the general problem of selecting a designated cell within a passive crossbar array without interference from sneak-path currents through neighbouring cells has not yet been solved satisfactorily. Here we introduce a complementary resistive switch. It consists of two antiserial memristive elements and allows for the construction of large passive crossbar arrays by solving the sneak path problem in combination with a drastic reduction of the power consumption. PMID:20400954

  7. Complementary and alternative medical therapies in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Sarac, Aysegul Jale; Gur, Ali

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the studies that have been performed evaluating complementary or alternative medical (CAM) therapies for efficacy and some adverse events fibromyalgia (FM). There is no permanent cure for FM; therefore, adequate symptom control should be goal of treatment. Clinicians can choose from a variety of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic modalities. Unfortunately, controlled studies of most current treatments have failed to demonstrate sustained, clinically significant responses. CAM has gained increasing popularity, particularly among individuals with FM for which traditional medicine has generally been ineffective. Some herbal and nutritional supplements (magnesium, S- adenosylmethionine) and massage therapy have the best evidence for effectiveness with FM. Other CAM therapies such as chlorella, biofeedback, relaxation have either been evaluated in only one randomised controlled trials (RCT) with positive results, in multiple RCTs with mixed results (magnet therapies) or have positive results from studies with methodological flaws (homeopathy, botanical oils, balneotherapy, anthocyanidins and dietary modifications). Another CAM therapy such as chiropractic care has neither well-designed studies nor positive results and is not currently recommended for FM treatment. Once CAM therapies have been better evaluated for safety and long-term efficacy in randomised, placebo-controlled trials, they may prove to be beneficial in treatments for FM. It would then be important to assess studies assessing cost-benefit analyses comparing conventional therapies and CAM. PMID:16454724

  8. Risk, pregnancy and complementary and alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mary

    2010-05-01

    Since the 1990's sociologists such as Giddens and Beck have highlighted the complexities of contemporary western societies in relation to risk. The "risk society" is one in which the advantages of scientific and technological developments are overshadowed with risks and dangers: leading to a world dominated by anxiety and uncertainty. Although a complex set of interrelated phenomena the risk society can be summarised under three main changes: including globalisation, scepticism about expert knowledge, Thompson: 27 and the degree of autonomy individuals have in our detraditionalised society to determine their own life choices (Beck: 13). The discourses of the "risk society" inevitably impact on women during pregnancy and the potential influence this discourse may have in relation to healthcare choices, particularly in the field of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are explored. In this paper it is argued that the apparently growing use of CAM during pregnancy and childbirth could be interpreted as a response by women to these discourses, that decisions made with regard to CAM may signify a desire for personal fulfilment and a need for autonomy and active participation in healthcare during pregnancy and childbirth. PMID:20347843

  9. Complementary therapies: the appeal to general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, H L

    2000-07-17

    Pragmatism--among consumers seeking a cure and among general practitioners seeking clinical results and more patients--is not a complete explanation for the burgeoning of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Western societies. Instead, this growth is substantially a result of pervasive and rapid social change, alternatively termed 'globalisation' and 'postmodernisation'. Globalisation and postmodernisation are creating a new social reality, of which a prominent characteristic is the proliferation of consumer choice. GPs are enmeshed in this social change and subject to the trend to greater choice--both their patients' and their own. On the one hand, GPs are reacting to social change as "economic pragmatists", responding to consumers' increasing demand for CAM. On the other hand, GPs themselves are acting as agents of social change by acknowledging the limitations of orthodox biomedical treatments and promoting CAM as part of their service delivery. Lack of scientific validation of CAM has not prevented GPs' use of such therapies. The phrase "clinical legitimacy" can be seen as a trump card that overrides "scientific legitimacy". It is the shibboleth of a postmodern movement among GPs towards healing and the "art" of medicine, as opposed to the "science" of medicine per se. PMID:10937039

  10. [The situation of complementary medicine in Germany].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Henning

    2013-01-01

    With the amendment of the German Medicinal Products Act in 1976 and the inclusion of naturopathy and homeopathy into the German Medical Licensure Act from 1988, the German government set up a comparatively favorable framework for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). But no comprehensive integration into the academic operating systems followed, because the universities as well as the legislative body seemed to have no further interest in CAM. Therefore, research projects in the field and suitable professorships had and still have to be financed by third-party funds. Notwithstanding the success of several CAM-projects, no sustainable development could be established: When the third-party funding runs off and the protagonists retire the institutional structures are supposed to vanish as well. Although the public demand for CAM is high in Germany, the administration detached homeopathy as a compulsory subject from the German Medical Licensure Act in 2002 and restricted severely the refunding of naturopathic medicines by the statutory health insurance in 2004. Moreover, the trend for CAM bashing takes root in the media. Unfortunately the CAM scene does not close ranks and is incapable to implement fundamental data collection processes into daily clinical routine: A wide range of data could justify further efforts to the government as well as to the scientific community. To say something positive, it must be mentioned that the scientific standard of CAM research is high for the most part and that third-party funded projects deliver remarkable results ever and on. PMID:23727765

  11. Complementary Electromagnetic Non-Destructive Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Gui Yun; Wilson, John; Morozov, Maxim

    2011-06-01

    The use of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) for defect detection and failure prediction in structures and specimens is widespread in energy industries, aimed at ageing power plants and pipelines, material degradation, fatigue and radiation damage, etc. At present there are no suitable electromagnetic NDE methods for the measurement and characterization of material degradation, in irradiated samples in particular, which is very important and timely for the nuclear power industry in the UK. This paper reports recent developments in the field of electromagnetic (EM) NDE at Newcastle University, including pulsed eddy current (PEC), pulsed magnetic flux leakage (PMFL), magnetic Barkhausen emission (MBE) and magneto-acoustic emission (MAE). As different EM methods have different strengths, an integrative EM framework is introduced. Case studies through the second round robin tests organized by the Universal Network for Magnetic Non-Destructive Evaluation (UNMNDE), representing eighteen leading research groups worldwide in the area of electromagnetic NDE, are reported. Twelve samples with different ageing times and rolling reduction ratios were tested using different magnetic methods among the UNMNDE members. Based on the studies, the complementary characteristics of electromagnetic techniques for NDE are discussed.

  12. Complementary and alternative health care in Israel

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The paper explores the patterns of coexistence of alternative/complementary health care (CAM) and conventional medicine in Israel in the cultural, political, and social contexts of the society. The data are drawn from over ten years of sociological research on CAM in Israel, which included observation, survey research, and over one hundred in-depth interviews with a variety of CAM practitioners - many with bio-medical credentials - and with policy makers in the major medical institutions. The analysis considers the reasons for CAM use, number of practitioners, the frequency of CAM use and some of its correlates, and how CAM is regulated. The structure of the relationship between the conventional health care system and CAM is discussed in the public sector, which provides two-thirds of CAM services, and in the private sector, which provides about one-third. The history of the development of these structures and some of the dilemmas of their operation are discussed. A number of policy issues are considered against this background: regulation and licensing, CAM in primary care, reimbursement for CAM treatment, and the inclusion of CAM in education and training for the health professions. PMID:22913721

  13. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) Contact Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the CBIRD detector is enhanced by using new device contacting methods that have been developed. The detector structure features a narrow gap adsorber sandwiched between a pair of complementary, unipolar barriers that are, in turn, surrounded by contact layers. In this innovation, the contact adjacent to the hole barrier is doped n-type, while the contact adjacent to the electron barrier is doped p-type. The contact layers can have wider bandgaps than the adsorber layer, so long as good electrical contacts are made to them. If good electrical contacts are made to either (or both) of the barriers, then one could contact the barrier(s) directly, obviating the need for additional contact layers. Both the left and right contacts can be doped either n-type or ptype. Having an n-type contact layer next to the electron barrier creates a second p-n junction (the first being the one between the hole barrier and the adsorber) over which applied bias could drop. This reduces the voltage drop over the adsorber, thereby reducing dark current generation in the adsorber region.

  14. [Alternative and complementary therapies in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, S; Leweling, H; Meinck, H-M

    2005-08-01

    Most MS patients use unconventional therapies, usually as complementary measures in addition to the conventional treatment. Only a few adequate clinical trials exist in this field. By definition, the efficacy of these therapies is unproven. Moreover, the possible risks are also largely unknown. Some therapies rely on rational pathophysiological considerations, other must be regarded as potentially harmful. The influence of diet on MS is unproven. Possibly, unsaturated fatty acids are beneficial. However, a few randomized trials yielded inconclusive results. Long-term supplementation of Vitamin D is associated with a decreased MS incidence. There is, however, insufficient evidence for an influence of Vitamin D on the course of the disease. Because of the high prevalence of osteoporosis in MS patients, prophylaxis with Vitamin D and Calcium is widely accepted. The effects of various minerals, selenium, antioxidant compounds, fish oil or vitamins remain speculative. Many patients use cannabis to alleviate spasticity and pain. Small series indicated positive effects, but randomized trials were negative for spasticity. However, many patients report subjective improvement under cannabis even if their objective parameters remain unchanged. Hyperbaric oxygenation was the subject of several small studies with heterogeneous results which, overall, do not support its use. Generally, physical therapies are perceived as an established therapy for MS. Short-term effects are probable, whereas the possible favourable long-term effects are unclear. PMID:16052439

  15. Complementary compressive imaging for the telescopic system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Kai; Liu, Xue-Feng; Yao, Xu-Ri; Wang, Chao; Zhai, Yun; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Conventional single-pixel cameras recover images only from the data recorded in one arm of the digital micromirror device, with the light reflected to the other direction not to be collected. Actually, the sampling in these two reflection orientations is correlated with each other, in view of which we propose a sampling concept of complementary compressive imaging, for the first time to our knowledge. We use this method in a telescopic system and acquire images of a target at about 2.0 km range with 20 cm resolution, with the variance of the noise decreasing by half. The influence of the sampling rate and the integration time of photomultiplier tubes on the image quality is also investigated experimentally. It is evident that this technique has advantages of large field of view over a long distance, high-resolution, high imaging speed, high-quality imaging capabilities, and needs fewer measurements in total than any single-arm sampling, thus can be used to improve the performance of all compressive imaging schemes and opens up possibilities for new applications in the remote-sensing area. PMID:25060569

  16. Fusing complementary images for pavement cracking measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ming; Zhao, Zuyun; Yao, Xun; Xu, Bugao

    2015-02-01

    Cracking is a major pavement distress that jeopardizes road serviceability and traffic safety. Automated pavement distress survey (APDS) systems have been developed using digital imaging technology to replace human surveys for more timely and accurate inspections. Most APDS systems require special lighting devices to illuminate pavements and prevent shadows of roadside objects that distort cracks in the image. Most artificial lighting devices are laser based, and are either hazardous to unprotected people or require dedicated power supplies on the vehicle. This study was aimed to develop a new imaging system that can scan pavement surface at highway speed and determine the level of severity of pavement cracking without using any artificial lighting. The new system consists of dual line-scan cameras that are installed side by side to scan the same pavement area as the vehicle moves. Cameras are controlled with different exposure settings so that both sunlit and shadowed areas can be visible in two separate images. The paired images contain complementary details useful for reconstructing an image in which the shadows are eliminated. This paper intends to present (1) the design of the dual line-scan camera system, (2) a new calibration method for line-scan cameras to rectify and register paired images, (3) a customized image-fusion algorithm that merges the multi-exposure images into one shadow-free image for crack detection, and (4) the results of the field tests on a selected road over a long period.

  17. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure.

  18. Cerebral oximetry and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Skhirtladze-Dworschak, Keso; Dworschak, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Cerebral oximetry is a Food and Drug Administration-approved technology that allows monitoring of brain oxygen saturation in accessible superficial brain cortex regions, which are amongst the most vulnerable in regard to ischemic or hypoxic injury. Since most oxygen in the area of interest is located in the venous compartment, the determined regional brain oxygen saturation approximately reflects the local balance between oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption. Major systemic alterations in blood oxygen content and oxygen delivery will be accompanied by corresponding changes in regional brain saturation. This systematic review, which is based on a Medline search, focuses on the characteristic changes in regional cerebral oxygen saturation that occur, when global oxygen supply to the brain ceases. It further highlights the potential application of cerebral oximetry in the management of cardiac arrest victims, the predictability of clinical outcome after global cerebral ischemia, and it also indicates possible potentials for the management of cerebral reperfusion after having instituted return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:23782549

  19. Structural Asymmetry of Anterior Insula: Behavioral Correlates and Individual Differences

    PubMed Central

    Chiarello, Christine; Vazquez, David; Felton, Adam; Leonard, Christiana M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated behavioral correlates of structural asymmetry of the insula, and traditional perisylvian language regions, in a large sample of young adults (N=200). The findings indicated 1) reliable leftward surface area asymmetry of the anterior insula, 2) association of this asymmetry with divided visual field lateralization of visual word recognition, and 3) modulation of the correlation of structural and linguistic asymmetry by consistency of hand preference. Although leftward asymmetry of cortical surface area was observed for the anterior insula, pars opercularis and triangularis, and planum temporale, only the anterior insula asymmetry was associated with lateralized word recognition. We interpret these findings within the context of recent structural and functional findings about the human insula. We suggest that leftward structural lateralization of earlier developing insular cortex may bootstrap asymmetrical functional lateralization even if the insula is only a minor component of the adult language network. PMID:23681069

  20. Hemispheric asymmetry in cerebrovascular reactivity of the human primary motor cortex: an in vivo study at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Driver, Ian D; Andoh, Jamila; Blockley, Nicholas P; Francis, Susan T; Gowland, Penny A; Paus, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    Current functional MRI (fMRI) approaches assess underlying neuronal activity through monitoring the related local variations in cerebral blood oxygenation, blood volume and blood flow. This vascular response is likely to vary across brain regions and across individuals, depending on the composition of the local vascular bed and on the vascular capacity to dilate. The most widely used technique uses the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal, which arises from a complex combination of all of these factors. The model of handedness provides a case where one brain region (dominant motor cortex) is known to have a stronger BOLD response over another (non-dominant motor cortex) during hand motor task performance. We predict that this is accompanied by a higher vascular reactivity in the dominant motor cortex, when compared with the non-dominant motor cortex. Precise measurement of end-tidal CO2 and a novel sinusoidal CO2 respiratory challenge were combined with the high sensitivity and finer spatial resolution available for fMRI at 7 T to measure BOLD cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in eight healthy male participants. BOLD CVR was compared between the left (dominant) and right (non-dominant) primary motor cortices of right-handed adults. Hemispheric asymmetry in vascular reactivity was predicted and observed in the primary motor cortex (left CVR = 0.60 ± 0.15%/mm Hg; right CVR = 0.47 ± 0.08%/mm Hg; left CVR > right CVR, P = 0.04), the first reported evidence of such a vascular difference. These findings demonstrate a cerebral vascular asymmetry between the left and right primary motor cortex. The origin of this asymmetry largely arises from the contribution of large draining veins. This work has implications for future motor laterality studies that use BOLD, and it is also suggestive of a vascular plasticity in the human primary motor cortex. PMID:25788020

  1. Cerebral palsy and aging

    PubMed Central

    Haak, Peterson; Lenski, Madeleine; Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Li, Min; Paneth, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP), the most common major disabling motor disorder of childhood, is frequently thought of as a condition that affects only children. Deaths in children with CP, never common, have in recent years become very rare, unless the child is very severely and multiply disabled. Thus, virtually all children assigned the diagnosis of CP will survive into adulthood. Attention to the adult with CP has been sparse, and the evolution of the motor disorder as the individual moves through adolescence, young adulthood, middle age, and old age is not well understood. Nor do we know what happens to other functional domains, such as communication and eating behavior, in adults with CP. Although the brain injury that initially causes CP by definition does not progressively worsen through the lifetime, the effects of CP manifest differently throughout the life span. The aging process must inevitably interact with the motor disorder, but we lack systematic, large-scale follow-up studies of children with CP into adulthood and through adulthood with thorough assessments performed over time. In this paper we summarize what is known of the epidemiology of CP throughout the life span, beginning with mortality and life expectancy, then survey what is known of functioning, ability, and quality of life of adults with CP. We conclude by describing a framework for future research on CP and aging that is built around the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and suggest specific tools and approaches for conducting that research in a sound manner. PMID:19740206

  2. ICT, complementary investment, and firm performance in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Linlin; Ding, Juan; Fan, Maoqing

    2011-12-01

    Using China firm data about ICT, we provide some insight into the link between ICT, productivity and complementary investment. The results show that the contribution of ICT capital deepening is raised when firms combine ICT use and some complementary investment (human capital, innovation and organization change).

  3. Psychosocial Determinants of the Early Introduction of Complementary Foods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatone-Tokuda, Fabiola; Dubois, Lise; Girard, Manon

    2009-01-01

    Infant feeding guidelines recommend exclusive breast-feeding to the age of 6 months; complementary foods should not be introduced before this age. This study examined parent and infant psychosocial determinants of the early introduction of complementary foods. Analyses were conducted on a representative sample of children born in Quebec (Canada)…

  4. Complementary and Integrative Medicine - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Complementary and Integrative Medicine URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Complementary and Integrative Medicine - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  5. Complementary and Integrative Medicine - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Complementary and Integrative Medicine URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Complementary and Integrative Medicine - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  6. Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM)

    Cancer.gov

    The Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) is an office of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis. OCCAM is responsible for NCI’s research agenda in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as it relates to cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and symptom management.

  7. Status of Neutron Beta Decay Asymmetry Studies from the UCNA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David, II

    2013-04-01

    The UCNA experiment measures the neutron β decay asymmetry parameter A(E) using bottled polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN). UCN are produced from a pulsed spallation solid deuterium source coupled to the 800 MeV proton beam at LANSCE. The UCN spin states are selected via a 7 T polarizing field and an adiabatic fast passage spin flipper. The polarized UCN are then transported to a 1 T 2x2π spectrometer where the emitted electrons are measured. In the Standard Model, the leading order value of A(E), A0, is a function of the axial-vector to vector coupling ratio λ≡gA/gV, providing complementary data to the physics probed by measurements of the neutron lifetime τn. When taken together with τn, measurements of the beta decay asymmetry permit a nuclear structure independent determination of the CKM matrix element Vud. This talk presents an overview of the UCNA experiment, the status of the analysis of our 2011 dataset, the work performed in 2012 and the path forward.

  8. CPT violation and particle-antiparticle asymmetry in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2010-04-15

    General features of generation of the cosmological charge asymmetry in CPT noninvariant world are discussed. If the effects of CPT violationmanifest themselves only inmass differences of particles and antiparticles, the baryon asymmetry of the Universe hardly can be explained solely by breaking of CPT invariance. However, CPT noninvariant theories may lead to a new effect of distorting the usual equilibrium distributions. If this takes place, CPT violation may explain the baryon asymmetry of the Universe.

  9. Asymmetries in the HD 141569 circumstellar disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouillet, D.; Lagrange, A. M.; Augereau, J. C.; Ménard, F.

    2001-06-01

    We present HST/STIS coronagraphic observations of the disk around HD 141569. The data, with a spatial resolution and signal to noise higher than those previously obtained with HST/NICMOS2 allow a more detailed insight in the system. They reveal a very structured system, in which two ring-like structures at distances =~ 200 and 325 AU from the star are the most prominent features. The region between 125 and 175 AU is clearly devoid of material. An arc-like structure is also detected at about 250 AU, as well as a diffuse extended emission, both on the North side of the disk. The system appears to be highly asymmetrical, both with respect to its major and minor axes. Surprisingly, the brightness asymmetry with respect to both axes in the inner and outer parts of the disk is reversed. Possible explanations to the asymmetries include anisotropic scattering and/or non axisymmetrical distribution of the dust within the system. It is shown that anisotropic scattering cannot alone be responsible for all observed asymmetries. It is concluded that HD 141569 disk is non axi-symmetrical. Eventhough no detailed modeling is given in this observational paper, it is probable that the sculpting and brightness properties of the disk are due to the gravitational perturbation of a massive body. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract No. NAS5-26555.

  10. Hemispheric asymmetries of the Venus plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.; Dyadechkin, S.

    2013-07-01

    We study the Venus-solar wind interaction and the hemispheric asymmetries of the Venus plasma environment in the global HYB-Venus hybrid simulation. We concentrate especially on the role of the flow-aligned interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) component (i.e., the Parker spiral angle or the IMF cone angle) and analyze the dawn-dusk and Esw asymmetries between four magnetic quadrants around Venus. Using the simulation model, we study two upstream condition cases in detail: the perpendicular IMF to the solar wind flow case and the nominal Parker spiral case (dominant flow-aligned IMF component). Several differences and similarities were found in these two simulation runs. Common features of the Venus plasma environment between the two cases include asymmetric magnetic barrier and tail lobes and asymmetric planetary ion escape in the direction of the solar wind convection electric field. Further, protons of planetary origin and of solar wind origin were found to follow similar velocity patterns in the Venus plasma wake in both cases. The differences when the IMF flow-aligned component is dominating compared to the perpendicular IMF case, the so-called (magnetic) dawn-dusk asymmetries, include the parallel bow shock and the foreshock region, the asymmetric magnetic barrier, the asymmetric tail current system, and the asymmetric central tail current sheet. Further, the escaping planetary H+ and O+ ion fluxes are concentrated more on the hemisphere of the parallel bow shock. When interpreting in situ plasma and magnetic observations from Venus, the features of at least these two basic IMF configurations should be considered.

  11. Cerebritis: an unusual complication of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Mainak; Simes, David C; Prabha, Ramesh D

    2009-01-01

    Cerebritis is part of a continuum of brain infection and is difficult to diagnose. Cerebritis caused by Klebsiella in immunocompetent adults without predisposing factors such as neurosurgery or penetrating brain injury has not been reported before. We report a case of Klebsiella cerebritis in an adult patient with a proven extracranial focus of infection. We suggest considering cerebritis as a differential diagnosis for altered level of consciousness in patients of severe sepsis, even if an extracranial source of infection is proven. PMID:19881180

  12. Cerebritis: An unusual complication of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Mainak; Simes1, David C.; Prabha1, Ramesh D.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebritis is part of a continuum of brain infection and is difficult to diagnose. Cerebritis caused by Klebsiella in immunocompetent adults without predisposing factors such as neurosurgery or penetrating brain injury has not been reported before. We report a case of Klebsiella cerebritis in an adult patient with a proven extracranial focus of infection. We suggest considering cerebritis as a differential diagnosis for altered level of consciousness in patients of severe sepsis, even if an extracranial source of infection is proven. PMID:19881180

  13. Multiple infected cerebral hydatid cysts.

    PubMed

    Gana, R; Skhissi, M; Maaqili, R; Bellakhdar, F

    2008-05-01

    We report an unusual patient with multiple infected cerebral hydatid cysts. A 20-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of headache and progressive left-sided hempiparesis. A cerebral CT scan showed a large and heterogeneous parieto-occipital lesion. During surgery an infected hydatid cyst was discovered with multiple daughter vesicles. Post-operatively the patient was treated with albendazol, cefotaxime and metronidazole. The clinical course was good with total recovery of the hemiparesis. A follow-up CT scan showed persistence of some small deep-seated cysts. Multiple infected cerebral hydatid cyst is uncommon and can be confused with other cystic brain lesions. The aim of surgery is to remove the cyst unruptured and this should be followed by antihelminthic and antibiotic treatment in order to avoid recurrences. PMID:18342511

  14. Oculoauriculovertebral spectrum and cerebral anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Schrander-Stumpel, C T; de Die-Smulders, C E; Hennekam, R C; Fryns, J P; Bouckaert, P X; Brouwer, O F; da Costa, J J; Lommen, E J; Maaswinkel-Mooy, P D

    1992-01-01

    We report on three Dutch children with a clinical diagnosis of oculoauriculovertebral spectrum (OAVS) and hydrocephalus. The clinical features are compared to 15 published cases of OAVS and hydrocephalus. Several other cerebral abnormalities were present in the whole group. About half of the cases had cleft lip/palate, anophthalmia/microphthalmia, or a cardiac defect. Mental retardation was found in five of the surviving 11 patients and early death occurred in one-third. We compared the cases with OAVS and hydrocephalus with published reports of OAVS and other cerebral anomalies and found no significant clinical differences. However, the clinical characteristics were clearly more severely expressed than generally found in patients with OAVS. Children with OAVS and more severe clinical features, especially anophthalmia/microphthalmia and cleft lip/palate, seem to be at an increased risk for cerebral malformations and for mental retardation. Images PMID:1583660

  15. Titan's stratospheric temperature asymmetry: a radiative origin?

    PubMed

    Bézard, B; Coustenis, A; McKay, C P

    1995-02-01

    During the 1981 Voyager encounter, Titan's stratosphere exhibited a large thermal asymmetry, with high northern latitudes being colder than comparable southern latitudes. Given the short radiative time constant, this asymmetry would not be expected at the season of the Voyager observations (spring equinox), if the infrared and solar opacity sources were distributed symmetrically. We have investigated the radiative budget of Titan's stratosphere, using two selections of Voyager IRIS spectra recorded at symmetric northern and southern latitudes. In the region 0.1-1 mbar, temperatures are 7 K colder at 50 degrees N than at 53 degrees S and the difference reaches approximately 13 K at 5 mbar. On the other hand, the northern region is strongly enriched in nitriles and hydrocarbons, and the haze optical depth derived from the continuum emission between 8 and 15 micrometers is twice as large as in the south. Cooling rate profiles have been computed at the two locations, using the gas and haze abundances derived from the IRIS measurements. We find that, despite lower temperatures, the cooling rate profiles in the pressure range 0.15-5 mbar are 20 to 40% larger in the north than in the south, because of the enhanced concentrations of infrared radiators. Because the northern hemisphere appears darker than the southern one in the Voyager images, enhanced solar heating is also expected to take place at 50 degrees N. Solar heating rate profiles have been calculated, with two different assumptions on the origin of the hemispheric asymmetry. In the most likely case where it results from a variation in the absorbance of the haze material, the heating rates are found to be 12-15% larger at the northern location than at the southern one, a smaller increase than that in the cooling rates. If the lower albedo in the north results from an increase in the particle number density, a 55 to 75% difference is found for the pressure range 0.15-5 mbar, thus larger than that calculated for the

  16. Poloidal Asymmetries in Edge Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Investigations of the poloidal structure within edge transport barriers on Alcator C-Mod using novel impurity measurements are presented, revealing large poloidal variations of parameters within a flux surface in the H-mode pedestal region, and significantly reduced poloidal variation in L-mode or I-mode pedestals. These measurements provide complete sets of impurity density, temperature, flow velocity, and electrostatic potential at both the low- and high-field side midplane, utilizing the Gas Puff-CXRS technique. Uncertainties in magnetic equilibrium reconstructions require assumptions to be made in order to properly align the LFS/HFS profiles. In H-mode plasmas, if profiles are aligned assuming impurity temperature is constant on a flux surface, large potential asymmetries would result (eΔΦ /Te ~ 0 . 6). If instead total pressure is assumed constant on a flux-surface, then the measured potential asymmetry is significantly reduced, but large in-out asymmetries result in the impurity temperature (>1.7x). This shows that impurity temperature and potential can not both be flux functions in the pedestal region. In both alignment cases, large asymmetries in impurity density (>6x) are present in H-mode plasmas. In I-mode plasmas, which lack an electron density pedestal but do have a temperature pedestal, the poloidal variation of impurity temperature is weaker (~1.3x) and the impurity density nearly symmetric between the LFS and HFS. These measurements indicate that the sharp gradients in the pedestal region, particularly of main ion density, have a significant effect on the poloidal and radial distribution of impurities, which could have important implications for the prediction of impurity contamination in future fusion reactors such as ITER. Estimates of particle and heat transport timescales suggest that the radial and parallel transport timescales are of the same order in the pedestal region of C-Mod, supporting the idea that two-dimensional transport effects

  17. Top Quark Production Asymmetries AFBt and AFBl

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Yu, Jiang-Hao; Zhang, Hao

    2012-02-14

    A large forward-backward asymmetry is seen in both the top quark rapidity distribution AFBt and in the rapidity distribution of charged leptons AFBl from top quarks produced at the Tevatron. We study the kinematic and dynamic aspects of the relationship of the two observables arising from the spin correlation between the charged lepton and the top quark with different polarization states. We emphasize the value of both measurements, and we conclude that a new physics model which produces more right-handed than left-handed top quarks is favored by the present data.

  18. Charge asymmetry in charmed-meson photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhnoy, A. V. Likhoded, A. K.

    2006-01-15

    Within the perturbative-recombination model, the charge asymmetries in the D*{sup +}-D*{sup -}, D*{sup 0}-D*{sup 0}, and D{sup +}{sub s}-D{sup -}{sub s} yields are estimated under the kinematical conditions of the COMPASS experiment. Corrections that arise owing to the mass of a light quark in a charmed meson are taken into account. The yield of D{sup +}{sub s} mesons is predicted to be large in relation to the yield of D{sup -}{sub s} mesons.

  19. Asymmetry in ferroelectric polymer laminate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, B.A.; Scheinbeim, J.I.; Su, Ji

    1996-10-01

    Studies of the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of composite bilaminates of poly(vinylidene fluoride) and nylon 11 films have shown that the properties of the bilaminates cannot be understood solely in terms of the properties of the individual components. Further, the properties of films which are polarized with the positive voltage on the nylon 11 side are different from those having the positive voltage on the poly(vinylidene fluoride) side. This asymmetry is interpreted as resulting from a region of space charge trapped at the interface between the two layers.

  20. Scale-dependent CMB asymmetry from primordial configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Lin, Chia-Min; Matsuda, Tomohiro E-mail: lin@chuo-u.ac.jp

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate that a topological defect can explain the hemispherical power asymmetry of the CMB. The first point is that a defect configuration, which already exists prior to inflation, can source asymmetry of the CMB. The second point is that modulation mechanisms, such as the curvaton and other modulation mechanisms, can explain scale-dependence of the asymmetry. Using a simple analysis of the δ N formalism, we show models in which scale-dependent hemispherical power asymmetry is explained by primordial configuration of a defect.

  1. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Zahra Alsadat; Namjooyan, Forough; Khanifar, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Background: A systemic skeletal disease is characterized by low bone mass and micro-architectural deterioration with a consequent increase in bone fragility and susceptibility to fracture. Asia has the highest increment in the elderly population; therefore, osteoporotic fracture should be a noticeable health issue. The incidence rate of hip fractures in Asia could rise to 45% by the year 2050. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a group of various medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered as part of formal medicine. CAMs have been described as “diagnosis, treatment, and/or prevention which complements mainstream medicine as a holistic, subjective and various natural approaches to medical problems by contributing to a common whole, satisfying claims not met by orthodoxy, or diversifying the conceptual frameworks of medicine”. Methods: Peer-reviewed publications were identified through a search in Scopus, Science Direct, Cochrane, PubMed, and Google scholar using keywords “osteopenia”, “osteoporosis”, “menopause”, “CAM”, “phytoestrogens”, “phytotherapy” and “herbal medicine”. The search was completed in July 2015 and was limited to articles published in English. Relevant articles were identified based on the expertise and clinical experience of the authors. Results: We categorized our results in different classifications including: lifestyle modifications (cigarette, alcohol, exercise and food regimen), supportive cares (intake supplements including vitamin D, C and K), treatments synthetic (routine and newer options for hormone replacement and none hormonal therapies) and natural options (different types of CAM including herbal medicines, yoga and chiropractic). Conclusion: Established osteoporosis is difficult to treat because bone density has fallen below the fracture threshold and trabecular elements may have been lost. Antiresorptive agents can be used to prevent further

  2. Complementary Therapies and Medicines and Reproductive Medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caroline A; Armour, Mike; Ee, Carolyn

    2016-03-01

    Complementary therapies and medicines are a broad and diverse range of treatments, and are frequently used by women and their partners during the preconception period to assist with infertility, and to address pregnancy-related conditions. Despite frequent use, the evidence examining the efficacy, effectiveness, and safety for many modalities is lacking, with variable study quality. In this article, we provide an overview of research evidence with the aim of examining the evidence to inform clinical practice. During the preconception period, there is mixed evidence for acupuncture to improve ovulation, or increase pregnancy rates. Acupuncture may improve sperm quality, but there is insufficient evidence to determine whether this results in improved pregnancy and live birth rates. Acupuncture can be described as a low-risk intervention. Chinese and Western herbal medicines may increase pregnancy rates; however, study quality is low. The evaluation of efficacy, effectiveness, and safety during the first trimester of pregnancy has most commonly reported on herbs, supplements, and practices such as acupuncture. There is high-quality evidence reporting the benefits of herbal medicines and acupuncture to treat nausea in pregnancy. The benefit from ginger to manage symptoms of nausea in early pregnancy is incorporated in national clinical guidelines, and vitamin B6 is recommended as a first-line treatment for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. The safety of ginger and vitamin B6 is considered to be well established, and is based on epidemiological studies. Acupuncture has been shown to reduce back pain and improve function for women in early pregnancy. There is little evidence to support the use of cranberries in pregnancy for prevention of urinary tract infections, and chiropractic treatment for back pain. Overall the numbers of studies are small and of low quality, although the modalities appear to be low risk of harm. PMID:26866600

  3. Behaviour Problems Amongst Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswin, Maureen

    Based on 6 years of work with cerebral palsied children, the thesis considers types and causes of cerebral palsy, the life pattern of the child with cerebral palsy from early years to adolescence, and the effect of the handicapped child on his parents and family. Literature on behavior disorders is reviewed, and kinds of behavior problems are…

  4. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  5. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  6. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  7. Inflammation, Cerebral Vasospasm, and Evolving Theories of Delayed Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Kevin R.; Zuckerman, Scott L.; Mocco, J

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CVS) is a potentially lethal complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Recently, the symptomatic presentation of CVS has been termed delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), occurring as early as 3-4 days after the sentinel bleed. For the past 5-6 decades, scientific research has promulgated the theory that cerebral vasospasm plays a primary role in the pathology of DCI and subsequently delayed ischemic neurological decline (DIND). Approximately 70% of patients develop CVS after aSAH with 50% long-term morbidity rates. The exact etiology of CVS is unknown; however, a well-described theory involves an antecedent inflammatory cascade with alterations of intracellular calcium dynamics and nitric oxide fluxes, though the intricacies of this inflammatory theory are currently unknown. Consequently, there have been few advances in the clinical treatment of this patient cohort, and morbidity remains high. Identification of intermediaries in the inflammatory cascade can provide insight into newer clinical interventions in the prevention and management of cerebral vasospasm and will hopefully prevent neurological decline. In this review, we discuss current theories implicating the inflammatory cascade in the development of CVS and potential treatment targets. PMID:24058736

  8. Radiosurgery for cerebral cavernomas.

    PubMed

    Nagy, G; Kemeny, A A

    2015-09-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of cerebral cavernomas (CCMs) remains controversial. However, during the last decade the increasing knowledge on natural history and numerous publications from SRS centers using modern treatment protocols has been changing the initial resistance of the neurosurgical community. Unfortunately, the quality of publications on CCM SRS remains heterogeneous. Controversies arise from the lack of control groups, the different definition of hemorrhage, heterogeneous patient populations, and poor definition of treatment protocols. The key for proper interpretation of results is the understanding of the natural history of CCMs, which is varied both according to anatomical location and the presence or absence of previous hemorrhage. Hemispheric lesions appear to be more benign with lower annual bleed rate and risk of persisting disability, whereas those found in the thalamus, basal ganglia and brainstem typically have higher rebleed risk resulting in higher cumulative morbidity following subsequent hemorrhages. However, we are still unable at presentation to predict the future behavior of an individual lesion. In the present paper we critically review and analyze the modern SRS literature on CCMs. The expanding number of available data with current treatment protocols strongly supports the initial intuition that SRS is an effective treatment alternative for deep-seated CCMs with multiple hemorrhages reducing pretreatment annual rebleed rates from 32% pre-treatment to 1.5% within 2 years after treatment (N.=197). Moreover, it appears to stabilize lesions with no more than one bleed, and it is also effective for CCMs causing therapy resistant epilepsy especially if applied within 3 years after presentation. In modern SRS series the rate of persisting adverse radiation effects is low, resulting only in mild morbidity even in deep-seated lesions (4.16%, N.=376), and morbidity caused by post-treatment hemorrhages is also

  9. Single transverse spin asymmetry of forward neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Iván; Soffer, J.

    2011-12-01

    We calculate the single transverse spin asymmetry AN(t), for inclusive neutron production in pp collisions at forward rapidities relative to the polarized proton in the energy range of RHIC. Absorptive corrections to the pion pole generate a relative phase between the spin-flip and nonflip amplitudes, leading to a transverse spin asymmetry which is found to be far too small to explain the magnitude of AN observed in the PHENIX experiment. A larger contribution, which does not vanish at high energies, comes from the interference of pion and a1-Reggeon exchanges. The unnatural parity of a1 guarantees a substantial phase shift, although the magnitude is strongly suppressed by the smallness of diffractive πp→a1p cross section. We replace the Regge a1 pole by the Regge cut corresponding to the πρ exchange in the 1+S state. The production of such a state, which we treat as an effective pole a, forms a narrow peak in the 3π invariant mass distribution in diffractive πp interactions. The cross section is large, so one can assume that this state saturates the spectral function of the axial current and we can determine its coupling to nucleons via the partially conserved axial-vector-current constraint Goldberger-Treiman relation and the second Weinberg sum rule. The numerical results of the parameter-free calculation of AN are in excellent agreement with the PHENIX data.

  10. Cholesterol Asymmetry in Synaptic Plasma Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wood, W. Gibson; Igbavboa, Urule; Müller, Walter E.; Eckert, Gunter P.

    2010-01-01

    Lipids are essential for the structural and functional integrity of membranes. Membrane lipids are not randomly distributed but are localized in different domains. A common characteristic of these membrane domains is their association with cholesterol. Lipid rafts and caveolae are examples of cholesterol enriched domains, which have attracted keen interest. However, two other important cholesterol domains are the exofacial and cytofacial leaflets of the plasma membrane. The two leaflets that make up the bilayer differ in their fluidity, electrical charge, lipid distribution, and active sites of certain proteins. The synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) cytofacial leaflet contains over 85% of the total SPM cholesterol as compared with the exofacial leaflet. This asymmetric distribution of cholesterol is not fixed or immobile but can be modified by different conditions in vivo: 1) chronic ethanol consumption; 2) statins; 3) aging; and 4) apoE isoform. Several potential candidates have been proposed as mechanisms involved in regulation of SPM cholesterol asymmetry: apoE, low-density-lipoprotein receptor, sterol carrier protein-2, fatty acid binding proteins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, p-glycoprotein and caveolin-1. This review examines cholesterol asymmetry in SPM, potential mechanisms of regulation and impact on membrane structure and function. PMID:21214553

  11. Westward drift, rift asymmetry and continental uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, C.; Carminati, E.; Bonatti, E.

    2003-04-01

    Although not predicted by classic plate tectonics theory, the topography of ocean ridges and rifts show a distinct asymmetry, when depth is plotted both vs. distance from the ridge and square root of the age of the oceanic crust. The eastern sides of the East Pacific Rise, of the mid Atlantic ridge, of the NW Indian ridge are in average more elevated than the conjugate flank to the west and eastern sides show slower subsidence rates. A similar asymmetry can be observed across the Red Sea and Baikal rifts. We suggest that depleted and lighter asthenosphere generated by partial melting below the ocean ridges shifts 'eastward' relative to the lithosphere, determining a density deficit below the eastern flank. The 'eastward' migration of the lighter Atlantic asthenosphere under the African continent, could eventually have contributed to the anomalous post-rift uplift of Africa and explain the anomalously higher topography of Africa with respect to other continents. This model suggests that the 'westward' drift of the lithosphere relative to the underlying mantle might be a global phenomenon and not just a mean delay.

  12. Underlying Asymmetry with Particle-Size Segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajjar, Parmesh; van der Vaart, Kasper; Epely-Chauvin, Gael; Andreini, Nicolas; Gray, Nico; Ancey, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Granular media have a natural tendency to self-organise when sheared, with different sized constituents counter-intuitively separating from each other. Not only does the segregation produce a rich diversity of beautiful patterns, but it can also have serious implications in both industrial and geophysical environments. Despite the universal importance, the individual particle dynamics during segregation are still poorly understand, with such an analysis proving to be difficult with conventional techniques such as binning and sidewall observation. This talk will present results of recent experiments that studied particle scale segregation dynamics during oscillatory shear. Refractive index matched scanning allowed examination of the interior of the flow, where it was observed that large and small particles have an underlying asymmetry that is dependant on the local particle concentration. Small particles were seen to segregate faster through regions of many large particles, whilst large particles rise slower through regions of many small particles. The asymmetry is quantified on both bulk and particle length scales, and is shown to have good agreement with a continuum model that uses a cubic segregation flux.

  13. Fish otolith mass asymmetry: morphometry and influence on acoustic functionality.

    PubMed

    Lychakov, D V; Rebane, Y T

    2005-03-01

    The role of the fish otolith mass asymmetry in acoustic functionality is studied. The saccular, lagenar and utricular otoliths are weighted in two species of the Black Sea rays, 15 species of the Black Sea teleost fish and guppy fish. The dimensionless otolith mass asymmetry chi is calculated as ratio of the difference between masses of the right and left paired otoliths to average otolith mass. In the most fish studied the otolith mass asymmetry is within the range of -0.2 < chi < +0.2 (< 20%). We do not find specific fish species with extremely large or extremely small otolith asymmetry. The large otoliths do not belong solely to any particular side, left or right. The heavier otoliths of different otolithic organs can be located in different labyrinths. No relationship has been found between the magnitude of the otolith mass asymmetry and the length (mass, age) of the animal. The suggested fluctuation model of the otolith growth can interpret these results. The model supposes that the otolith growth rate varies slightly hither and thither during lifetime of the individual fish. Therefore, the sign of the relative otolith mass asymmetry can change several times in the process of the individual fish growth but within the range outlined above. Mathematical modeling shows that acoustic functionality (sensitivity, temporal processing, sound localization) of the fish can be disturbed by the otolith mass asymmetry. But this is valid only for the fish with largest otolith masses, characteristic of the bottom and littoral fish, and with highest otolith asymmetry. For most fish the values of otolith mass asymmetry is well below critical values. Thus, the most fish get around the troubles related to the otolith mass asymmetry. We suggest that a specific physicochemical mechanism of the paired otolith growth that maintains the otolith mass asymmetry at the lowest possible level should exist. However, the principle and details of this mechanism are still far from being

  14. Responsive complementary feeding in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Moore, Anna C; Akhter, Sadika; Aboud, Frances E

    2006-04-01

    reinforcing her forceful behaviour. Thus, the responsive feeding framework, once operationalized, has the potential to identify specific behaviours that support or impede mother-child interaction during complementary feeding. PMID:16223552

  15. An Evidence-Based Course in Complementary Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of an evidence-based course in complementary medicines on the attitudes, knowledge, and professional practice behavior of undergraduate pharmacy students. Design. A required 12-week evidence-based complementary medicine course was designed and introduced into the third-year undergraduate pharmacy curriculum. The course included a combination of traditional lectures, interactive tutorial sessions, and a range of formal assessments. Assessment. Pre- and post-course survey instruments were administered to assess changes in students’ attitudes, perceptions, knowledge, and the likelihood they would recommend the use of complementary medicines in a pharmacy practice environment. Conclusion. Completion of a required evidence-based complementary medicines course resulted in a positive change in pharmacy students’ perceptions of the value of various complementary medicines as well as in their willingness to recommend them, and provided students with the required knowledge to make patient-centered recommendations for use of complementary medicines in a professional pharmacy practice setting. These findings support the need for greater evidence-based complementary medicine education within pharmacy curricula to meet consumer demand and to align with pharmacists’ professional responsibilities. PMID:23275665

  16. Cerebral ischemia during surgery: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi-Bin; Meng, Lingzhong; Gelb, Adrian W; Lee, Roger; Huang, Wen-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral ischemia is the pathophysiological condition in which the oxygenated cerebral blood flow is less than what is needed to meet cerebral metabolic demand. It is one of the most debilitating complications in the perioperative period and has serious clinical sequelae. The monitoring and prevention of intraoperative cerebral ischemia are crucial because an anesthetized patient in the operating room cannot be neurologically assessed. In this paper, we provide an overview of the definition, etiology, risk factors, and prevention of cerebral ischemia during surgery.

  17. Caffeine induced changes in cerebral circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1985-09-01

    While the caffeine induced cerebral vasoconstriction is well documented, the effects of oral ingestion of the drug in a dose range comparable to the quantities in which it is usually consumed and the intensity and duration of the associated reduction in cerebral circulation are unknown. Cerebral blood flow was measured via the TTXenon inhalation technique before and thirty and ninety minutes after the oral administration of 250 mg of caffeine or a placebo, under double-blind conditions. Caffeine ingestion was found to be associated with significant reductions in cerebral perfusion thirty and ninety minutes later. The placebo group showed no differences between the three sets of cerebral blood flow values.

  18. [Cerebral ischemia in young adults].

    PubMed

    Berlit, P; Endemann, B; Vetter, P

    1991-08-01

    An overview is given over etiology and prognosis of cerebral ischemias until the age of 40. In a time period of 19 years, 168 patients were diagnosed with cerebral ischemia until the age of 40 (91 females, 77 males). The most frequent etiology is premature atherosclerosis in patients with vascular risk factors (up to 50%). Cardiogenic embolism is responsible for 1 to 34% of the cases: cardiac valve diseases and endocarditis being the most frequent sources. In 2 to 19% a vasculitis is diagnosed. While infectious arteritis is especially frequent in countries of the third world, immunovasculitides are common in Europe and the USA. Noninflammatory vasculopathies include spontaneous or traumatic dissection, fibromuscular dysplasia and vascular malformations. A migrainous stroke is especially frequent in female smokers with intake of oral contraceptives. During pregnancy both sinus thrombosis and arterial ischemia occur. Hematologic causes for ischemia are polycythemia, thrombocytosis and genetic diseases (sickle cell anemia, AT3-deficiency). Cerebral ischemia may occur in connection with the ingestion of ergot-derivates. The prognosis of cerebral ischemia in young adults is better than in older stroke-patients. PMID:1937340

  19. Innervation of the cerebral vasculature.

    PubMed

    Duckles, S P

    1983-01-01

    With the development of specific antibodies to vasoactive peptides and application of immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay methods, knowledge of vascular innervation has grown rapidly. In the cerebral circulation, four possible neurotransmitters are present: norepinephrine, acetylcholine, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and substance P. There is a dense adrenergic innervation of cerebral arteries, but contractile responses to nerve stimulation or circulating catecholamines are relatively small both in vitro and in vivo. Recent studies using radioligand binding techniques indicate a lack of specific 3H-prazosin binding in cerebral arteries, in contrast to other vascular beds. Thus a lack of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in cerebral arteries may account for weak responsiveness to sympathetic stimulation. Both VIP and acetylcholine may be vasodilator neurotransmitters, but blockade of cholinergic responses does not alter neurogenic vasodilation. The lack of specific VIP antagonists hampers efforts to explore this system more fully. Substance P-containing nerves are affected by capsaicin, supporting the hypothesis that these are primary sensory afferents, perhaps mediating pain. Future work in this area may focus on defining the pathways of these nerves and exploring the role of co-transmitters and possible interactions between nerves. With this basic information, experiments can be designed to elucidate more clearly the functional roles these nerves play. PMID:6210001

  20. Neuropathology of Acquired Cerebral Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1987-01-01

    To help educators understand the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of cerebral injury, the neuropathology of traumatic brain injury and the main neuropathological features resulting from trauma-related brain damage are reviewed. A glossary with definitions of 37 neurological terms is appended. (Author/DB)

  1. Investigating cerebral oedema using poroelasticity.

    PubMed

    Vardakis, John C; Chou, Dean; Tully, Brett J; Hung, Chang C; Lee, Tsong H; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral oedema can be classified as the tangible swelling produced by expansion of the interstitial fluid volume. Hydrocephalus can be succinctly described as the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the brain which ultimately leads to oedema within specific sites of parenchymal tissue. Using hydrocephalus as a test bed, one is able to account for the necessary mechanisms involved in the interaction between oedema formation and cerebral fluid production, transport and drainage. The current state of knowledge about integrative cerebral dynamics and transport phenomena indicates that poroelastic theory may provide a suitable framework to better understand various diseases. In this work, Multiple-Network Poroelastic Theory (MPET) is used to develop a novel spatio-temporal model of fluid regulation and tissue displacement within the various scales of the cerebral environment. The model is applied through two formats, a one-dimensional finite difference - Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupling framework, as well as a two-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) formulation. These are used to investigate the role of endoscopic fourth ventriculostomy in alleviating oedema formation due to fourth ventricle outlet obstruction (1D coupled model) in addition to observing the capability of the FEM template in capturing important characteristics allied to oedema formation, like for instance in the periventricular region (2D model). PMID:26749338

  2. Conceptual and Data-based Investigation of Genetic Influences and Brain Asymmetry: A Twin Study of Multiple Structural Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Eyler, Lisa T.; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Panizzon, Matthew S.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Neale, Michael C.; Chen, Chi-Hua; Jak, Amy; Franz, Carol E.; Lyons, Michael J.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Spoon, Kelly M.; Fischl, Bruce; Dale, Anders M.; Kremen, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Right–left regional cerebral differences are a feature of the human brain linked to functional abilities, aging, and neuro-developmental and mental disorders. The role of genetic factors in structural asymmetry has been incompletely studied. We analyzed data from 515 individuals (130 monozygotic twin pairs, 97 dizygotic pairs, and 61 unpaired twins) from the Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging to answer three questions about genetic determinants of brain structural asymmetry: First, does the magnitude of heritability differ for homologous regions in each hemisphere? Despite adequate power to detect regional differences, heritability estimates were not significantly larger in one hemisphere versus the other, except left > right inferior lateral ventricle heritability. Second, do different genetic factors influence left and right hemisphere size in homologous regions? Inter-hemispheric genetic correlations were high and significant; in only two subcortical regions (pallidum and accumbens) did the estimate statistically differ from 1.0. Thus, there was little evidence for different genetic influences on left and right hemisphere regions. Third, to what extent do genetic factors influence variability in left–right size differences? There was no evidence that variation in asymmetry (i.e., the size difference) of left and right homologous regions was genetically determined, except in pallidum and accumbens. Our findings suggest that genetic factors do not play a significant role in determining individual variation in the degree of regional cortical size asymmetries measured with MRI, although they may do so for volume of some subcortical structures. Despite varying interpretations of existing left–right, we view the present results as consistent with previous findings. PMID:24283492

  3. Moral injury: A new challenge for complementary and alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Kopacz, Marek S; Connery, April L; Bishop, Todd M; Bryan, Craig J; Drescher, Kent D; Currier, Joseph M; Pigeon, Wilfred R

    2016-02-01

    Moral injury represents an emerging clinical construct recognized as a source of morbidity in current and former military personnel. Finding effective ways to support those affected by moral injury remains a challenge for both biomedical and complementary and alternative medicine. This paper introduces the concept of moral injury and suggests two complementary and alternative medicine, pastoral care and mindfulness, which may prove useful in supporting military personnel thought to be dealing with moral injury. Research strategies for developing an evidence-base for applying these, and other, complementary and alternative medicine modalities to moral injury are discussed. PMID:26860798

  4. On interference suppression using complementary filters in DS-SSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bong Woon; Essman, Joseph E.

    An alternate interference suppression method used in conjunction with direct-sequence spread-spectrum systems (DS-SSS) is proposed. It consists of a complementary filter and reference loop using a scalar filter in the Walsh-Hadamard domain. Analytical expressions for chip-error probability (Pe) in the reference loop are given, and the performance of the complementary filter is compared with that of the other suppression filters via a simulation. The results show that the complementary filter is superior to the other filters when Pe is less than 0.25.

  5. Unipolar Complementary Circuits Using Double Electron Layer Tunneling Tansistors

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.

    1998-10-19

    We demonstrate unipolar complementary circuits consisting of a pair of resonant tunneling transistors based on the gate control of 2D-2D interlayer tunneling, where a single transistor - in addition to exhibiting a welldefined negative-differential-resistance can be operated with either positive or negative transconductance. Details of the device operation are analyzed in terms of the quantum capacitance effect and band-bending in a double quantum well structure, and show good agreement with experiment. Application of resonant tunneling complementary logic is discussed by demonstrating complementary static random access memory using two devices connected in series.

  6. Fluctuating Asymmetry and General Intelligence: No Genetic or Phenotypic Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; Segal, Nancy L.; Bouchard, Thomas J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) is the non-pathological left-right asymmetry of body traits that are usually left-right symmetrical, such as eye breadths and elbow to wrist lengths in humans, but which can be affected by developmental stressors. It is generally considered throughout biology to be an indicator of developmental instability and thus of…

  7. Hemispheric Asymmetry in the Efficiency of Attentional Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asanowicz, Dariusz; Marzecova, Anna; Jaskowski, Piotr; Wolski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Despite the fact that hemispheric asymmetry of attention has been widely studied, a clear picture of this complex phenomenon is still lacking. The aim of the present study was to provide an efficient and reliable measurement of potential hemispheric asymmetries of three attentional networks, i.e. alerting, orienting and executive attention.…

  8. Robustness of asymmetry and coherence of quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piani, Marco; Cianciaruso, Marco; Bromley, Thomas R.; Napoli, Carmine; Johnston, Nathaniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-04-01

    Quantum states may exhibit asymmetry with respect to the action of a given group. Such an asymmetry of states can be considered a resource in applications such as quantum metrology, and it is a concept that encompasses quantum coherence as a special case. We introduce explicitly and study the robustness of asymmetry, a quantifier of asymmetry of states that we prove to have many attractive properties, including efficient numerical computability via semidefinite programming and an operational interpretation in a channel discrimination context. We also introduce the notion of asymmetry witnesses, whose measurement in a laboratory detects the presence of asymmetry. We prove that properly constrained asymmetry witnesses provide lower bounds to the robustness of asymmetry, which is shown to be a directly measurable quantity itself. We then focus our attention on coherence witnesses and the robustness of coherence, for which we prove a number of additional results; these include an analysis of its specific relevance in phase discrimination and quantum metrology, an analytical calculation of its value for a relevant class of quantum states, and tight bounds that relate it to another previously defined coherence monotone.

  9. A Hemispheric Asymmetry for the Unconscious Perception of Emotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Stephen D.; Bulman-Fleming, M. Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that hemispheric asymmetries for conscious visual perception do not lead to asymmetries for unconscious visual perception. These studies utilized emotionally neutral items as stimuli. The current research utilized both emotionally negative and neutral stimuli to assess hemispheric differences for conscious and…

  10. Effects Of Asymmetry Of NRZ Data Signals On Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien M.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents theoretical analysis of effects of asymmetry in binary non-return-to-zero (NRZ) data signals upon performance of radiotelemetry system. Simple mathematical model predicting overall degradation of bit signal-to-noise ratio of telemetry system derived. Shows degradation increases with asymmetry.

  11. Disentangling the Relationship between Hemispheric Asymmetry and Cognitive Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirnstein, Marco; Leask, Stuart; Rose, Jonas; Hausmann, Markus

    2010-01-01

    It is widely believed that advantages of hemispheric asymmetries originated in better cognitive processing, hence it is often implied that the relationship between hemispheric asymmetry and cognitive performance is linearly positive: the higher the degree of lateralization in a specific cognitive domain, the better the performance in a…

  12. Asymmetries of Knowledge and Epistemic Change in Social Gaming Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piirainen-Marsh, Arja; Tainio, Liisa

    2014-01-01

    While a growing number of studies investigate the role of knowledge and interactional management of knowledge asymmetries in conversation analysis, the epistemic organization of multilingual and second language interactions is still largely unexplored. This article addresses this issue by investigating how knowledge asymmetries and changing…

  13. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Wafai, Linah; Zayegh, Aladin; Woulfe, John; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Begg, Rezaul

    2015-01-01

    Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual's quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies) support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3) and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies. PMID:26295239

  14. Asymmetries for the Visual Expression and Perception of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Michael E. R.; Searle, Dara A.

    2006-01-01

    This study explored asymmetries for movement, expression and perception of visual speech. Sixteen dextral models were videoed as they articulated: "bat," "cat," "fat," and "sat." Measurements revealed that the right side of the mouth was opened wider and for a longer period than the left. The asymmetry was accentuated at the beginning and ends of…

  15. Information Asymmetries as Trade Barriers: ISO 9000 Increases International Commerce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potoski, Matthew; Prakash, Aseem

    2009-01-01

    Spatial, cultural, and linguistic barriers create information asymmetries between buyers and sellers that impede international trade. The International Organization for Standardization's ISO 9000 program is designed to reduce these information asymmetries by providing assurance about the product quality of firms that receive its certification.…

  16. Unvail the Mysterious of the Single Spin Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2010-01-05

    Single transverse-spin asymmetry in high energy hadronic reaction has been greatly investigated from both experiment and theory sides in the last few years. In this talk, I will summarize some recent theoretical developments, which, in my opinion, help to unvail the mysterious of the single spin asymmetry.

  17. On reducing information asymmetry in U.S. health care.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Oswald A J; Kesavan, Ram; Bernacchi, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Information asymmetry is a significant issue facing the U.S. health care system. In this article, we investigate some methods of reducing this asymmetry. We trace the information asymmetry using the "wicked problem" of the health care distribution system. An information asymmetry reduction method requiring joint responsibilities among health care stakeholders is developed. It is argued that information asymmetry is a contributor to enormous health care inflation. Hence, any reduction in such asymmetry will reduce health care costs. Concepts from both signaling and corrective justice theories are integrated in this article to help reduce the information asymmetry that exists in the U.S. health care system. Getting health care costs in line with other "advanced" nations, is the long-term solution to the wicked problem that currently exists in the U.S. health care system. There is an immediate need for a centralized health care database with adequate provisions for individual privacy. Both processes as well as an outcome-based control system are essential for reducing information asymmetries in the U.S. health care system. PMID:24308415

  18. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Wafai, Linah; Zayegh, Aladin; Woulfe, John; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Begg, Rezaul

    2015-01-01

    Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual’s quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies) support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3) and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies. PMID:26295239

  19. Observations of Wind Asymmetries in Atlantic Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, E.; Davis, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Most major cities are located on coastlines, vulnerable to the direct impacts of tropical cyclones. Therefore, it is critical to understand and improve prediction of these storms in order to make communities more resilient. Though hurricane warning systems have improved in recent years, these warnings are insufficient, because they fail to account for an indication of tropical cyclone wind asymmetry, or the radial extent of maximum winds in different locations within the cyclone. This study explored the wind asymmetry (defined by magnitude and orientation) among 337 Atlantic tropical cyclones from 1988-2012, utilizing the National Hurricane Center's (NHC) Extended Best Track Dataset (EBT) and Statistical Hurricane Intensity Prediction Scheme (SHIPS). Asymmetry was defined as the magnitude of the largest difference in the radius of gale-force wind across opposing quadrants, normalized by the average of the four wind radii. The asymmetry orientation pointed along the axis of maximum asymmetry toward the quadrant with the greater gale radius. Relationships between wind asymmetry and various storm characteristics such as geographical location, storm life cycle, intensity, size, storm motion, and vertical wind shear were examined. The magnitude of asymmetry increased in higher latitudes and along coastlines, particularly in smaller storms. Asymmetry was higher at the beginning of a storm's life, possibly owing to a less well-organized structure, and higher at the end of a storm's life, coinciding with an increase in vertical wind shear and translation speed. Results from this study may allow for improved tropical cyclone forecasts and warnings to help protect seaside communities.

  20. 15 CFR 784.4 - Notification, duration and frequency of complementary access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... carried out during complementary access; (D) The time and date that complementary access is expected to... PROTOCOL REGULATIONS COMPLEMENTARY ACCESS § 784.4 Notification, duration and frequency of complementary... the Additional Protocol, the IAEA shall notify the United States Government of a complementary...

  1. 15 CFR 784.4 - Notification, duration and frequency of complementary access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... carried out during complementary access; (D) The time and date that complementary access is expected to... PROTOCOL REGULATIONS COMPLEMENTARY ACCESS § 784.4 Notification, duration and frequency of complementary... the Additional Protocol, the IAEA shall notify the United States Government of a complementary...

  2. 15 CFR 784.4 - Notification, duration and frequency of complementary access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... carried out during complementary access; (D) The time and date that complementary access is expected to... PROTOCOL REGULATIONS COMPLEMENTARY ACCESS § 784.4 Notification, duration and frequency of complementary... the Additional Protocol, the IAEA shall notify the United States Government of a complementary...

  3. 15 CFR 784.4 - Notification, duration and frequency of complementary access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... carried out during complementary access; (D) The time and date that complementary access is expected to... PROTOCOL REGULATIONS COMPLEMENTARY ACCESS § 784.4 Notification, duration and frequency of complementary... the Additional Protocol, the IAEA shall notify the United States Government of a complementary...

  4. 15 CFR 784.4 - Notification, duration and frequency of complementary access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of complementary access. 784.4 Section 784.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... PROTOCOL REGULATIONS COMPLEMENTARY ACCESS § 784.4 Notification, duration and frequency of complementary access. (a) Complementary access notification. Complementary access will be provided only upon...

  5. Transverse single-spin asymmetries: Challenges and recent progress

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schafer, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc; Vogelsang, Werner; Zhou, Jian

    2014-11-25

    In this study, transverse single-spin asymmetries are among the most intriguing observables in hadronic physics. Though such asymmetries were already measured for the first time about four decades ago, their origin is still under debate. Here we consider transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering, in nucleon–nucleon scattering, and in inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering. It is argued that, according to recent work, the single-spin asymmetries for those three processes may be simultaneously described in perturbative QCD, where the re-scattering of the active partons plays a crucial role. A comparison of single-spin asymmetries in different reactions can also shed light on themore » universality of transverse momentum dependent parton correlation functions. In particular, we discuss what existing data may tell us about the predicted process dependence of the Sivers function.« less

  6. Transverse single-spin asymmetries: Challenges and recent progress

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schafer, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc; Vogelsang, Werner; Zhou, Jian

    2014-11-25

    In this study, transverse single-spin asymmetries are among the most intriguing observables in hadronic physics. Though such asymmetries were already measured for the first time about four decades ago, their origin is still under debate. Here we consider transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering, in nucleon–nucleon scattering, and in inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering. It is argued that, according to recent work, the single-spin asymmetries for those three processes may be simultaneously described in perturbative QCD, where the re-scattering of the active partons plays a crucial role. A comparison of single-spin asymmetries in different reactions can also shed light on the universality of transverse momentum dependent parton correlation functions. In particular, we discuss what existing data may tell us about the predicted process dependence of the Sivers function.

  7. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orbaker, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; et. al.

    2011-12-12

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the t{bar t} forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2 {+-} 3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6 {+-} 6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2 {+-} 4.0)%. The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.

  8. Extrapolation technique pitfalls in asymmetry measurements at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colletti, Katrina; Hong, Ziqing; Toback, David; Wilson, Jonathan S.

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetry measurements are common in collider experiments and can sensitively probe particle properties. Typically, data can only be measured in a finite region covered by the detector, so an extrapolation from the visible asymmetry to the inclusive asymmetry is necessary. Often a constant multiplicative factor is advantageous for the extrapolation and this factor can be readily determined using simulation methods. However, there is a potential, avoidable pitfall involved in the determination of this factor when the asymmetry in the simulated data sample is small. We find that to obtain a reliable estimate of the extrapolation factor, the number of simulated events required rises as the inverse square of the simulated asymmetry; this can mean that an unexpectedly large sample size is required when determining the extrapolation factor.

  9. Tidal asymmetry in estuaries with mixed semidiurnal/diurnal tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidzieko, Nicholas J.

    2010-08-01

    Tidal asymmetry in estuaries with mixed, mainly semidiurnal tides arises from both the interaction of principal tides and the higher harmonics generated by distortions within the estuary. The duration asymmetry in rise and fall of water level caused by principal tides on the west coast of the continental United States is ebb-dominant, and so the tide entering estuaries is also ebb-dominant, prior to any internal distortions within the estuary. The interaction of higher harmonics with principal constituents either augments or cancels the duration asymmetry in the principal tides. In estuaries where tidal elevation and velocity phase are near quadrature (90° out of phase), the duration asymmetry in tidal elevation leads to asymmetries in tidal current magnitude. Asymmetry can be conveniently quantified in terms of the sample skewness, γ1, the normalized third sample moment about the mean. An analytic approximation to the skewness shows that traditional metrics of asymmetry, namely the ratio of constituent amplitudes and the relative constituent phase difference, arise from calculating the third sample moment. Observations from three California estuaries of different morphologies are presented as an illustration of how skewness can be used to quantify asymmetry in real systems. As in semidiurnal systems, morphology is a good predictor of whether higher harmonics engender ebb-dominance or flood-dominance, however asymmetry imposed by principal tides at the mouth must first be overcome and so there is a spatial evolution in the total asymmetry. Quantifying observations via skewness should be considered in addition to traditional metrics in estuaries with mixed tides.

  10. Facial asymmetry and genetic ancestry in Latin American admixed populations.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Cintas, Celia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio Cesar; Ramallo, Virginia; Castillo, Lucia; Farrera, Arodi; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, Williams; Fuentes, Macarena; Everardo, Paola; de Avila, Francisco; Gomez-Valdés, Jorge; Hünemeier, Tábita; Gibbon, Shara; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Rosique, Javier; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; González-José, Rolando

    2015-05-01

    Fluctuating and directional asymmetry are aspects of morphological variation widely used to infer environmental and genetic factors affecting facial phenotypes. However, the genetic basis and environmental determinants of both asymmetry types is far from being completely known. The analysis of facial asymmetries in admixed individuals can be of help to characterize the impact of a genome's heterozygosity on the developmental basis of both fluctuating and directional asymmetries. Here we characterize the association between genetic ancestry and individual asymmetry on a sample of Latin-American admixed populations. To do so, three-dimensional (3D) facial shape attributes were explored on a sample of 4,104 volunteers aged between 18 and 85 years. Individual ancestry and heterozygosity was estimated using more than 730,000 genome-wide markers. Multivariate techniques applied to geometric morphometric data were used to evaluate the magnitude and significance of directional and fluctuating asymmetry (FA), as well as correlations and multiple regressions aimed to estimate the relationship between facial FA scores and heterozygosity and a set of covariates. Results indicate that directional and FA are both significant, the former being the strongest expression of asymmetry in this sample. In addition, our analyses suggest that there are some specific patterns of facial asymmetries characterizing the different ancestry groups. Finally, we find that more heterozygous individuals exhibit lower levels of asymmetry. Our results highlight the importance of including ancestry-admixture estimators, especially when the analyses are aimed to compare levels of asymmetries on groups differing on socioeconomic levels, as a proxy to estimate developmental noise. PMID:25582401

  11. Have complementary therapies demonstrated effectiveness in rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Llanio Comella, Nagore; Fernández Matilla, Meritxell; Castellano Cuesta, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has improved thanks to the use of highly effective drugs. However, patients usually require long term therapy, which is not free of side effects. Therefore RA patients often demand complementary medicine, they seek additional sources of relief and/or less side effects. In fact 30-60% of rheumatic patients use some form of complementary medicine. Therefore, from conventional medicine, if we want to optimally treat our patients facilitating communication with them we must know the most commonly used complementary medicines. The aim of this review is to assess, based on published scientific research, what complementary therapies commonly used by patients with RA are effective and safe. PMID:26711840

  12. 49 CFR 37.131 - Service criteria for complementary paratransit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) A personal care attendant shall not be charged for complementary paratransit service. (4) The entity... entity's request for an undue financial burden waiver under §§ 37.151-37.155 of this part....

  13. The Challenge of Educating Physicians about Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konefal, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that most physicians are not prepared to respond knowledgeably about complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) modalities and suggests incorporating systematic presentation of CAM information into the curricula of medical schools. (EV)

  14. Introducing Complementary/Alternative Strategies in a Baccalaureate Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepa, Carole Anne; Russell, Cynthia Ann

    2000-01-01

    An undergraduate nursing course explores healing strategies based on mind-body-spirit connections. It examines research on the efficacy of these alternative/complementary methods and their health care policy implications. (SK)

  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Treatments and Pediatric Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Joseph M.; Walter, Garry; Soh, Nerissa

    2008-01-01

    Children and adolescents often use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments outside their indications, particularly to lose weight. Some of the herbal remedies and dietary supplements that may of relevance for psychopharmacological practice are discussed with respect to CAM treatments.

  16. Use of Complementary Therapies for Health Promotion Among Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Nguyen, Ha T; Sandberg, Joanne C; Neiberg, Rebecca H; Altizer, Kathryn P; Bell, Ronny A; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Lang, Wei; Quandt, Sara A

    2015-08-01

    This article describes the types of complementary therapies used by older adults for health promotion, and delineates the predisposing, enabling, and need factors associated with their use. One-hundred ninety-five African American and White participants (age 65+) completed a baseline interview and up to six sets of three daily follow-up interviews at monthly intervals. Complementary therapies for health promotion included home remedies, specific foods or beverages, herbs, supplements, vitamins, over-the-counter (OTC) medicine, prayer, exercise, and being active. Although gender, ethnicity, education, and trust in doctors were associated with the use of complementary therapies for health promotion, health information seeking was the predisposing factor most often associated. The enabling factors were also associated with their use. Health information seeking, which reflects a wellness lifestyle, had the most consistent associations with complementary therapy use for health promotion. This health self-management for health promotion may have positive effects on future medical expenditures. PMID:24652893

  17. The initiation of complementary feeding among Qom indigenous people

    PubMed Central

    Irene Olmedo, Sofía; Valeggia, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    As of six months of life, breastfeeding no longer covers an infant’s energy or micronutrient needs, so appropriate complementary feeding should be provided. The objective of this study was to assess the time and adequacy for introducing complementary feeding in a Qom/Toba population and analyze the sociocultural concepts of families regarding complementary feeding. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected by participant observation and semistructured surveys administered to mothers of 0–2 year old infants. Qom breastfeed their infants long term and on demand. Most infants have an adequate nutritional status and start complementary feeding at around 6 months old as per the local health center and international standards. However, mostly due to socioeconomic factors, foods chosen to complement breastfeeding have a relatively scarce nutritional value. PMID:24862808

  18. Use of complementary and alternative therapies in children.

    PubMed

    Woolf, A D; Gardiner, P

    2010-02-01

    The use of complementary and alternative therapies in children has recently shown explosive growth, despite little scientific evidence of benefit, a need for better regulatory oversight, and continuing gaps in the knowledge and attitudes of pediatric health professionals. PMID:20107449

  19. On the matter-antimatter asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, W. A.

    2015-08-01

    Although the big bang should have produced equal amounts of matter and antimatter, there is evidence that the universe does not contain significant amounts of antimatter. The usual explanations for this matter-antimatter asymmetry involve finding causes for Sakharov’s three conditions to be satisfied. However, if the composite photon theory is correct, antimatter galaxies should appear to us as dark matter, neither emitting light (that we can detect) or reflecting ordinary light. Thus the presence of antimatter galaxies may be harder to detect than previously thought. The large clumps of dark matter that have been observed by weak gravitation lensing could be clusters of antimatter galaxies. “Dark photons,” that are hypothesized to cause self-interactions between dark matter particles, are identified as antiphotons in the composite photon theory. The possibility of a patchwork universe, that had been previously excluded, is also re-examined.

  20. Z Boson Asymmetry Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, B.

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry (A_fb) in dilepton pair decays of Z bosons produced in ppbar collisions using the full Tevatron dataset. The CDF experiment extracts a value for the effective weak mixing angle parameter sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} of 0.2315 +/- 0.0010 from the A_fb distribution of dimuon events in 9.2 fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity. From dielectron events in 9.7 fb^{-1} of data, the D0 experiment finds sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} = 0.23106 +/- 0.00053, the world's most precise measurement of sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} from hadron colliders and with light quark couplings.

  1. Leptophilic dark matter from the lepton asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Timothy; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2010-03-12

    We present a model of weak scale dark matter (DM) where the thermal DM density is set by the lepton asymmetry due to the presence of higher dimension lepton violating operators. In these models there is generically a separation between the annihilation cross section responsible for the relic abundance (through lepton violating operators) and the annihilation cross section that is relevant for the indirect detection of DM (through lepton preserving operators). This implies a perceived boost in the annihilation cross section in the Galaxy today relative to that derived for canonical thermal freeze-out, giving a natural explanation for the observed cosmic ray electron and positron excesses, without resorting to a Sommerfeld enhancement. These models motivate continued searches for DM with apparently nonthermal annihilation cross sections. The DM may also play a role in radiatively generating Majorana neutrino masses. PMID:20366412

  2. Single-Spin Asymmetries at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, Harutyun

    2003-05-01

    Single spin asymmetries (SSA) are crucial tools in the study of the spin structure of hadrons in pion electroproduction, since they are directly related to some hot topics,including transverse polarization distribution functions, fragmentation of polarized quarks and generalized parton distribution functions. At low beam energies, when the virtual photon has a relatively large angle with respect to the initial spin direction, the measured single-target spin-dependent sin φ moment in the cross section for the longitudinally polarized target contain contributions from the target spin components, both longitudinal and transverse with respect to the photon direction.This contribution presents preliminary results from Jefferson Lab's CLAS detector on beam and target SSA in pion azimuthal distributions in one particle inclusive electroproduction in the DIS regime (Q2 > 1GeV 2,W > 2GeV ) off a polarized NH3 target.

  3. Single Spin Asymmetry in Charmonium Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbole, Rohini M.; Kaushik, Abhiram; Misra, Anuradha; Rawoot, Vaibhav

    2015-09-01

    We present estimates of single spin asymmetry (SSA) in the electroproduction of taking into account the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) evolution of the gluon Sivers function and using Color Evaporation Model of charmonium production. We estimate SSA for JLab, HERMES, COMPASS and eRHIC energies using recent parameters for the quark Sivers functions which are fitted using an evolution kernel in which the perturbative part is resummed up to next-to-leading logarithms accuracy. We find that these SSAs are much smaller as compared to our first estimates obtained using DGLAP evolution but are comparable to our estimates obtained using TMD evolution where we had used approximate analytical solution of the TMD evolution equation for the purpose.

  4. Single transverse-spin asymmetry in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Yuji

    2014-09-01

    So far large single transverse-spin asymmetries (SSA) have been observed in many high-energy processes such as semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and proton-proton collisions. Since the conventional parton model and perturbative QCD can not accomodate such large SSAs, the framework for QCD hard processes had to be extended to understand the mechanism of SSA. In this extended frameworks of QCD, intrinsic transverse momentum of partons and the multi-parton (quark-gluon and pure-gluonic) correlations in the hadrons, which were absent in the conventional framework, play a crucial role to cause SSAs, and well-defined formulation of these effects has been a big challenge for QCD theorists. Study on these effects has greatly promoted our understanding on QCD dynamics and hadron structure. In this talk, I will present an overview on these theoretical activity, emphasizing the important role of the Drell-Yan process.

  5. Dark Atoms: Asymmetry and Direct Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, David E.; Krnjaic, Gordan Z.; Rehermann, Keith R.; Wells, Christopher M.

    2011-10-01

    We present a simple UV completion of Atomic Dark Matter (aDM) in which heavy right-handed neutrinos decay to induce both dark and lepton number densities. This model addresses several outstanding cosmological problems: the matter/anti-matter asymmetry, the dark matter abundance, the number of light degrees of freedom in the early universe, and the smoothing of small-scale structure. Additionally, this realization of aDM may reconcile the CoGeNT excess with recently published null results and predicts a signal in the CRESST Oxygen band. We also find that, due to unscreened long-range interactions, the residual un recombined dark ions settle into a diffuse isothermal halo.

  6. Time-reversal asymmetry in financial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. F.; Chen, T. T.; Zheng, B.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the large-fluctuation dynamics in financial markets, based on the minute-to-minute and daily data of the Chinese Indices and the German DAX. The dynamic relaxation both before and after the large fluctuations is characterized by a power law, and the exponents p± usually vary with the strength of the large fluctuations. The large-fluctuation dynamics is time-reversal symmetric at the time scale in minutes, while asymmetric at the daily time scale. Careful analysis reveals that the time-reversal asymmetry is mainly induced by external forces. It is also the external forces which drive the financial system to a non-stationary state. Different characteristics of the Chinese and German stock markets are uncovered.

  7. Asymmetries in the Io plasma torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1994-01-01

    Using Ulysses radio wave data taken during the 1992 Jupiter encounter, we conclude that there are significant large and small spatial scale azimuthal asymmetries at high latitudes in the Io plasma torus. During a period of time near perijove when the spacecraft motion was predominantly in the azimuthal direction and was relatively fixed in both latitude and radial distance, inferred electron densities depart significantly from the common assumption of longitudinal symmetry. Specifically, electron plasma concentrations near 0 deg system III longitude (and 0400 LT) are greater than those near 180 deg (and 0000 LT). Superposed on this large-scale variation are regularly spaced density depletions, 30-50% in magnitude, and having a spatial periodicity of about 17 deg. Some of these depletions may drive various known radio and plasma wave sources by means of large B parallel electric potentials. The observations are compared with recent models and with the in-situ Voyager observations.

  8. Quantifying asymmetry of quantum states using entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloui, Borzu

    2013-03-01

    For open systems, symmetric dynamics do not always lead to conservation laws. We show that, for a dynamic symmetry associated with a compact Lie group, one can derive new selection rules from entanglement theory. These selection rules apply to both closed and open systems as well as reversible and irreversible time evolutions. Our approach is based on an embedding of the system's Hilbert space into a tensor product of two Hilbert spaces allowing for the symmetric dynamics to be simulated with local operations. The entanglement of the embedded states determines which transformations are forbidden because of the symmetry. In fact, every bipartite entanglement monotone can be used to quantify the asymmetry of the initial states. Moreover, where the dynamics is reversible, each of these monotones becomes a new conserved quantity. This research has been supported by the Institute for Quantum Information Science (IQIS) at the University of Calgary, Alberta Innovates, NSERC, General Dynamics Canada, and MITACS.

  9. A Micro-Silicon Chip for in Vivo Cerebral Imprint in Monkey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Access to cerebral tissue is essential to better understand the molecular mechanisms associated with neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we present, for the first time, a new tool designed to obtain molecular and cellular cerebral imprints in the striatum of anesthetized monkeys. The imprint is obtained during a spatially controlled interaction of a chemically modified micro-silicon chip with the brain tissue. Scanning electron and immunofluorescence microscopies showed homogeneous capture of cerebral tissue. Nano-liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS) analysis of proteins harvested on the chip allowed the identification of 1158 different species of proteins. The gene expression profiles of mRNA extracted from the imprint tool showed great similarity to those obtained via the gold standard approach, which is based on post-mortem sections of the same nucleus. Functional analysis of the harvested molecules confirmed the spatially controlled capture of striatal proteins implicated in dopaminergic regulation. Finally, the behavioral monitoring and histological results establish the safety of obtaining repeated cerebral imprints in striatal regions. These results demonstrate the ability of our imprint tool to explore the molecular content of deep brain regions in vivo. They open the way to the molecular exploration of brain in animal models of neurological diseases and will provide complementary information to current data mainly restricted to post-mortem samples. PMID:23509975

  10. Extended life testing evaluation of complementary MOS integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosnan, T. E.

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of the extended life testing evaluation of complementary MOS integrated circuits was twofold: (1) To ascertain the long life capability of complementary MOS devices. (2) To assess the objectivity and reliability of various accelerated life test methods as an indication or prediction tool. In addition, the determination of a suitable life test sequence for these devices was of importance. Conclusions reached based on the parts tested and the test results obtained was that the devices were not acceptable.

  11. Complementary Hand Responses Occur in Both Peri- and Extrapersonal Space.

    PubMed

    Faber, Tim W; van Elk, Michiel; Jonas, Kai J

    2016-01-01

    Human beings have a strong tendency to imitate. Evidence from motor priming paradigms suggests that people automatically tend to imitate observed actions such as hand gestures by performing mirror-congruent movements (e.g., lifting one's right finger upon observing a left finger movement; from a mirror perspective). Many observed actions however, do not require mirror-congruent responses but afford complementary (fitting) responses instead (e.g., handing over a cup; shaking hands). Crucially, whereas mirror-congruent responses don't require physical interaction with another person, complementary actions often do. Given that most experiments studying motor priming have used stimuli devoid of contextual information, this space or interaction-dependency of complementary responses has not yet been assessed. To address this issue, we let participants perform a task in which they had to mirror or complement a hand gesture (fist or open hand) performed by an actor depicted either within or outside of reach. In three studies, we observed faster reaction times and less response errors for complementary relative to mirrored hand movements in response to open hand gestures (i.e., 'hand-shaking') irrespective of the perceived interpersonal distance of the actor. This complementary effect could not be accounted for by a low-level spatial cueing effect. These results demonstrate that humans have a strong and automatic tendency to respond by performing complementary actions. In addition, our findings underline the limitations of manipulations of space in modulating effects of motor priming and the perception of affordances. PMID:27120470

  12. Cerebral autoregulation with changes in arterial and cerebral venous pressure

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, R.W.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of cerebral venous pressure (Pcv) elevation on cerebral autoregulation has been incompletely studied. The authors compared the effect of decreased cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) by elevated Pcv and decreased arterial pressure (Pa) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a canine modified bypass model. CPP of 80, 70, 60, 50, 40 and 30 mmHg were produced by decreasing Pa with intracranial pressure (ICP) and Pcv maintained at 0 mmHg (group 1, n = 5), or by elevating Pcv as Pa was maintained at 80 mmHg (group 2, n = 5. CBF was measured using radiolabeled microspheres, and CMRO/sub 2/ = CBF times arterial-sagittal sinus O/sub 2/ content difference. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) = CPP/CBF. In group 1 CBF (ml/100 gm/min) was unchanged from control (36 +/- 4) as CPP was decreased from 80 to 40 mmHg. As CPP was decreased to 30 mmHg, CBF decreased to 28 +/- 1. CVR (mmHg/ml/min/100 gm) was 2.3 +/- 0.3 and progressively decreased to 1.0 +/- 0.1 at CPP of 30 mmHg. In group 2 CBF was 34 +/- 3 and was unchanged as CPP decreased to 50 mmHg. At CPP of 40 and 30 mmHg CBF decreased to 25 +/- 3 and 22 +/- 2 respectively. Control CRV was 2.4 +/- 0.2 and progressively decreased to 1.4 +/- 0.1 as CPP decreased to 30 mmHg. CMRO/sub 2/ was unchanged from control in both groups. Thus, CBF is maintained to low CPP regardless of whether vascular transmural pressure was decreased (decrease Pa) or increased (increased Pcv) demonstrating that the myogenic mechanism of autoregulation may be unimportant in normoxic dogs.

  13. What's new in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    JONES, M H

    1953-11-01

    Among new researches bearing on cerebral palsy are the growth of brain cells in tissue cultures for experimentation; the use of polysaccharides to prevent the formation of a glial barrier to nerve growth after injury; observation of changes in reactions of neurons at various stages of development; the finding of hypernatremia and hyperchloremia in lesions of the frontal lobe and the thalamus; stimulation of cerebral blood flow by injection of sodium bicarbonate and retardation with ammonium chloride; and studies of serial sections of brains of palsied children who died. Study of development in the early months of life has made possible the detection of significant abnormalities in behavior early in life. Loss of hearing may be tested in very young children by measuring minute variations in electrical resistance of the skin upon auditory stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. Conditions which have been described as having been confused with cerebral palsy are dislocation of a cervical vertebra, hereditary spastic paraplegia, transverse myelopathy, injury to the spinal cord or cauda equina by anomalous growths of the spine, and also encephalitis and meningitis. Sedation has proved a valuable adjunct to electroencephalographic study of cerebral palsy. Better criteria for abnormality in the young child should be determined and the application of them more clearly standardized. Simple exercises are useful for early training of palsied children to stimulate development. "Crossed laterality"-the dominant eye being contralateral to the preferred hand-has been counteracted by special training with great success in eliminating emotional and behavior problems and accelerating development.Recent studies indicate that only 50 per cent of cerebral palsy patients have normal or better intelligence. Subluxation of the hip joint, a common deformity associated with cerebral palsy, can sometimes be corrected by operation if detected at an early stage. Radical ablation of

  14. Towards the prediction of actual evaporation from terrestrial surfaces using analytical complementary relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, Dani; Aminzadeh, Milad; Roderick, Michael L.

    2016-04-01

    Notwithstanding the centrality of potential evaporation (PE) in hydrologic and climate models, its definition and proper use remain widely debated. We propose a mechanistic, pore-based model for evaporation and energy partitioning over drying porous surfaces to define PE for a hypothetical steady-state reference surface temperature. Feedback between drying land surface and overlaying air properties is considered in the hypothetical steady-state with a vanishing sensible heat flux and diversion of available energy to evaporation. Surprisingly, the resulting steady-state PE tracks class A pan evaporation data very closely suggesting that pan evaporation occurs with negligible sensible heat flux (in agreement with summer observations). The new PE enables analytical derivation of asymmetric complementary relationship (CR) between potential and actual evaporation for a wide range of conditions in good agreement with measured actual evaporation. The derivations provide new insights into the origins of asymmetry in the CR linked to input weather data and evolution of the temperature of drying surfaces across scales. The analytical CR could offer physically-based estimates of regional scale actual evaporation during surface drying for a wide range of present and future external inputs that may resolve future energy partitioning patterns and issues related to droughts.

  15. 76 FR 35227 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Review, National Center for Complementary, and Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite...

  16. 76 FR 59707 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis...

  17. 77 FR 52751 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: August 23, 2012. Jennifer...

  18. 75 FR 26260 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) ] Dated: May 4, 2010....

  19. 78 FR 21381 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and Alternative...

  20. 77 FR 24971 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... . Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis...