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Sample records for cerebral metabolic features

  1. Chronic ketosis and cerebral metabolism.

    PubMed

    DeVivo, D C; Leckie, M P; Ferrendelli, J S; McDougal, D B

    1978-04-01

    The effects of chronic ketosis on cerebral metabolism were determined in adult rats maintained on a high-fat diet for approximately three weeks and compared to a control group of animals. The fat-fed rats had statistically significantly lower blood glucose concentrations and higher blood beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate concentrations; higher brain concentrations of bound glucose, glucose 6-phosphate, pyruvate, lactate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, alanine, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP); lower brain concentrations of fructose 1,6-diphosphate, aspartate, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), creatine, cyclic nucleotides, succinyl coenzyme A (CoA), acid-insoluble CoA, and total CoA; and similar brain concentrations of glucose, malate, calculated oxaloacetate, glutamate, glutamine, adenosine monophosphate, phosphocreatine, reduced CoA, acetyl CoA, sodium, potassium, chloride, and water content. The metabolite data in the chronically ketotic rats demonstrate an increase in the cerebral energy reserve and energy charge. These data also suggest negative modification of the enzymes phosphofructokinase, pyruvic dehydrogenase, and alpha-ketoglutaric dehydrogenase; positive modification of glycogen synthase; and possible augmentation of the hexose transport system. There was no demonstrable difference in brain pH, water content, or electrolytes in the two groups of animals. We speculate that the increased brain ATP/ADP ratio is central to most, if not all, the observed metabolic perturbations and may account for the increased neuronal stability that accompanies chronic ketosis. PMID:666275

  2. Cerebral Lactate Metabolism After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Patet, Camille; Suys, Tamarah; Carteron, Laurent; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral energy dysfunction has emerged as an important determinant of prognosis following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A number of studies using cerebral microdialysis, positron emission tomography, and jugular bulb oximetry to explore cerebral metabolism in patients with TBI have demonstrated a critical decrease in the availability of the main energy substrate of brain cells (i.e., glucose). Energy dysfunction induces adaptations of cerebral metabolism that include the utilization of alternative energy resources that the brain constitutively has, such as lactate. Two decades of experimental and human investigations have convincingly shown that lactate stands as a major actor of cerebral metabolism. Glutamate-induced activation of glycolysis stimulates lactate production from glucose in astrocytes, with subsequent lactate transfer to neurons (astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle). Lactate is not only used as an extra energy substrate but also acts as a signaling molecule and regulator of systemic and brain glucose use in the cerebral circulation. In animal models of brain injury (e.g., TBI, stroke), supplementation with exogenous lactate exerts significant neuroprotection. Here, we summarize the main clinical studies showing the pivotal role of lactate and cerebral lactate metabolism after TBI. We also review pilot interventional studies that examined exogenous lactate supplementation in patients with TBI and found hypertonic lactate infusions had several beneficial properties on the injured brain, including decrease of brain edema, improvement of neuroenergetics via a "cerebral glucose-sparing effect," and increase of cerebral blood flow. Hypertonic lactate represents a promising area of therapeutic investigation; however, larger studies are needed to further examine mechanisms of action and impact on outcome. PMID:26898683

  3. Cerebral metabolic adaptation and ketone metabolism after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Mayumi L

    2010-01-01

    The developing central nervous system has the capacity to metabolize ketone bodies. It was once accepted that on weaning, the ‘post-weaned/adult’ brain was limited solely to glucose metabolism. However, increasing evidence from conditions of inadequate glucose availability or increased energy demands has shown that the adult brain is not static in its fuel options. The objective of this review is to summarize the body of literature specifically regarding cerebral ketone metabolism at different ages, under conditions of starvation and after various pathologic conditions. The evidence presented supports the following findings: (1) there is an inverse relationship between age and the brain’s capacity for ketone metabolism that continues well after weaning; (2) neuroprotective potentials of ketone administration have been shown for neurodegenerative conditions, epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, and traumatic brain injury; and (3) there is an age-related therapeutic potential for ketone as an alternative substrate. The concept of cerebral metabolic adaptation under various physiologic and pathologic conditions is not new, but it has taken the contribution of numerous studies over many years to break the previously accepted dogma of cerebral metabolism. Our emerging understanding of cerebral metabolism is far more complex than could have been imagined. It is clear that in addition to glucose, other substrates must be considered along with fuel interactions, metabolic challenges, and cerebral maturation. PMID:17684514

  4. Cerebral glucose metabolism in Wernicke's, Broca's, and conduction aphasia

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Kempler, D.; Jackson, C.; Hanson, W.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral glucose metabolism was evaluated in patients with either Wernicke's (N = 7), Broca's (N = 11), or conduction (N = 10) aphasia using /sup 18/F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose with positron emission tomography. The three aphasic syndromes differed in the degree of left-to-right frontal metabolic asymmetry, with Broca's aphasia showing severe asymmetry and Wernicke's aphasia mild-to-moderate metabolic asymmetry, while patients with conduction aphasia were metabolically symmetric. On the other hand, the three syndromes showed the same degree of metabolic decline in the left temporal region. The parietal region appeared to separate conduction aphasia from both Broca's and Wernicke's aphasias. Common aphasic features in the three syndromes appear to be due to common changes in the temporal region, while unique features were associated with frontal and parietal metabolic differences.

  5. Hemodynamic and metabolic effects of cerebral revascularization.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, R; Tyler, J L; Mohr, G; Meyer, E; Diksic, M; Yamamoto, L; Taylor, L; Gauthier, S; Hakim, A

    1987-04-01

    Pre- and postoperative positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in six patients undergoing extracranial to intracranial bypass procedures for the treatment of symptomatic extracranial carotid occlusion. The six patients were all men, aged 52 to 68 years. Their symptoms included transient ischemic attacks (five cases), amaurosis fugax (two cases), and completed stroke with good recovery (one case). Positron emission tomography was performed within 4 weeks prior to surgery and between 3 to 6 months postoperatively, using oxygen-15-labeled CO, O2, and CO2 and fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral metabolic rates for oxygen and glucose (CMRO2 and CMRGlu), and the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were measured in both hemispheres. Preoperatively, compared to five elderly control subjects, patients had increased CBV, a decreased CBF/CBV ratio, and decreased CMRO2, indicating reduced cerebral perfusion pressure and depressed oxygen metabolism. The CBF was decreased in only one patient who had bilateral carotid occlusions; the OEF, CMRGlu, and CMRO2/CMRGlu and CMRGlu/CBF ratios were not significantly different from control measurements. All bypasses were patent and all patients were asymptomatic following surgery. Postoperative PET revealed decreased CBV and an increased CBF/CBV ratio, indicating improved hemodynamic function and oxygen hypometabolism. This was associated with increased CMRO2 in two patients in whom the postoperative OEF was also increased. The CMRGlu and CMRGlu/CBF ratio were increased in five patients. Changes in CBF and the CMRO2/CMRGlu ratio were variable. One patient with preoperative progressive mental deterioration, documented by serial neuropsychological testing and decreasing CBF and CMRO2, had improved postoperative CBF and CMRO2 concomitant with improved neuropsychological functioning. It is concluded that symptomatic carotid occlusion is associated with altered

  6. Patterns of human local cerebral glucose metabolism during epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    Ictal patterns of local cerebral metabolic rate have been studied in epileptic patients by positron computed tomography with /sup 18/F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Partial seizures were associated with activation of anatomic structures unique to each patient studied. Ictal increases and decreases in local cerebral metabolism were observed. Scans performed during generalized convulsions induced by electroshock demonstrated a diffuse ictal increase and postictal decrease in cerebral metabolism. Petit mal absences were associated with a diffuse increase in cerebral metabolic rate. The ictal fluorodeoxyglucose patterns obtained from patients do not resemble autoradiographic patterns obtained from common experimental animal models of epilepsy.

  7. Mapping of cerebral oxidative metabolism with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, Eric A.; Beesam, R. Shashank; Elliott, Mark A.; Reddy, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    Using a T1ρ MRI based indirect detection method, we demonstrate the detection of cerebral oxidative metabolism and its modulation by administration of the mitochondrial uncoupling agent 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) in a large animal model with minimum utilization of gas. The study was performed by inhalation in swine during imaging on clinical MRI scanners. Metabolic changes in swine were determined by two methods. First, in a series of animals, increased metabolism caused by DNP injection was measured by exhaled gas analysis. The average whole-body metabolic increase in seven swine was 11.9%+/-2.5% per mg/kg, stable over three hours. Secondly, hemispheric brain measurements of oxygen consumption stimulated by DNP injection were made in five swine using T1ρ MRI following administration of gas. Metabolism was calculated from the change in the T1ρ weighted MRI signal due to H217O generated from inhalation before and after doubling of metabolism by DNP. These results were confirmed by direct oxygen-17 MR spectroscopy, a gold standard for in vivo H217O measurement. Overall, this work underscores the ability of indirect oxygen-17 imaging to detect oxygen metabolism in an animal model with a lung capacity comparable to the human with minimal utilization of expensive gas. Given the demonstrated high efficiency in use of and the proven feasibility of performing such measurements on standard clinical MRI scanners, this work enables the adaption of this technique for human studies dealing with a broad array of metabolic derangements. PMID:20547874

  8. PET Quantification of Cerebral Oxygen Metabolism in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Temma, Takashi; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Iida, Hidehiro

    2014-01-01

    Understanding cerebral oxygen metabolism is of great importance in both clinical diagnosis and animal experiments because oxygen is a fundamental source of brain energy and supports brain functional activities. Since small animals such as rats are widely used to study various diseases including cerebral ischemia, cerebrovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases, the development of a noninvasive in vivo measurement method of cerebral oxygen metabolic parameters such as oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) as well as cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) has been a priority. Although positron emission tomography (PET) with 15O labeled gas tracers has been recognized as a powerful way to evaluate cerebral oxygen metabolism in humans, this method could not be applied to rats due to technical problems and there were no reports of PET measurement of cerebral oxygen metabolism in rats until an 15O-O2 injection method was developed a decade ago. Herein, we introduce an intravenous administration method using two types of injectable 15O-O2 and an 15O-O2 gas inhalation method through an airway placed in the trachea, which enables oxygen metabolism measurements in rats. PMID:25202714

  9. Similarities of cerebral glucose metabolism in Alzheimer's and Parkinsonian dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.; Metter, E.J.; Benson, D.F.; Ashford, J.W.; Riege, W.H.; Fujikawa, D.G.; Markham, C.H.; Maltese, A.

    1985-05-01

    In the dementia of probable Alzheimer's Disease (AD), there is a decrease in the metabolic ratio of parietal cortex/caudate-thalamus which relates measures in the most and in the least severely affected locations. Since some demented patients with Parkinson's Disease (PDD) are known to share pathological and neurochemical features with AD patients, the authors evaluated if the distribution of cerebral hypometabolism in PDD and AD were the same. Local cerebral metabolic rates were determined using the FDG method and positron tomography in subjects with AD (N=23), and PDD (N=7), multiple infarct dementia (MID)(N=6), and controls (N=10). In MID, the mean par/caudthal ratio was normal (0.79 +- 0.9, N=6). In AD and PDD patients, this ratio correlated negatively with both the severity (r=-0.624, rho=0.001) and duration (r=-0.657, rho=0.001) of dementia. The ratio was markedly decreased in subjects with mild to severe dementia (0.46 +- 0.09, N=21) and with dementia duration greater than two years (0.44 +- 0.08, N=18), but the ratio was also significantly decreased in patients with less advanced disease, i.e., when dementia was only questionable (0.64 +- 0.14, N=9) (t=2.27, rho<0.037) and when duration was two years or less (0.62 +- 0.13, N=12)(t=2.88, rho<0.009). This similarity of hypometabolism in AD and PDD is additional evidence that a common mechanism may operate in both disorders. The par/caud-thal metabolic ratio may be an index useful in the differential diagnosis of early dementia.

  10. Hypothermia reduces cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in newborn pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Busija, D.W.; Leffler, C.W. )

    1987-10-01

    The authors examined effects of hypothermia on cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in anesthetized, newborn pigs (1-4 days old). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined with 15-{mu}m radioactive microspheres. Regional CBF ranged from 44 to 66 ml{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}, and cerebral metabolic rate was 1.94 {plus minus} 0.23 ml O{sub 2}{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1} during normothermia (39{degree}C). Reduction of rectal temperature to 34-35{degree}C decreased CBF and cerebral metabolic rate 40-50%. In another group of piglets, they examined responsiveness of the cerebral circulation to arterial hypercapnia during hypothermia. Although absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic CBF were reduced by hypothermia and absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic cerebrovascular resistance were increased, the percentage changes from control in these variables during hypercapnia were similar during normothermia and hypothermia. In another group of animals that were maintained normothermic and exposed to two episodes of hypercapnia, there was no attenuation of cerebrovascular dilation during the second episode. They conclude that hypothermia reduces CBF secondarily to a decrease in cerebral metabolic rate and that percent dilator responsiveness to arterial hypercapnia is unaltered when body temperature is reduced.

  11. Multimodal optical imaging system for in vivo investigation of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Gorczynska, Iwona; Fujimoto, James G; Boas, David A; Sakadžić, Sava

    2015-12-01

    Improving our understanding of brain function requires novel tools to observe multiple physiological parameters with high resolution in vivo. We have developed a multimodal imaging system for investigating multiple facets of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in small animals. The system was custom designed and features multiple optical imaging capabilities, including 2-photon and confocal lifetime microscopy, optical coherence tomography, laser speckle imaging, and optical intrinsic signal imaging. Here, we provide details of the system's design and present in vivo observations of multiple metrics of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism, including oxygen partial pressure, microvascular blood flow, and NADH autofluorescence. PMID:26713212

  12. Multimodal optical imaging system for in vivo investigation of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Gorczynska, Iwona; Fujimoto, James G.; Boas, David A.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2015-01-01

    Improving our understanding of brain function requires novel tools to observe multiple physiological parameters with high resolution in vivo. We have developed a multimodal imaging system for investigating multiple facets of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in small animals. The system was custom designed and features multiple optical imaging capabilities, including 2-photon and confocal lifetime microscopy, optical coherence tomography, laser speckle imaging, and optical intrinsic signal imaging. Here, we provide details of the system’s design and present in vivo observations of multiple metrics of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism, including oxygen partial pressure, microvascular blood flow, and NADH autofluorescence. PMID:26713212

  13. Decoding Alzheimer's disease from perturbed cerebral glucose metabolism: implications for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhichun; Zhong, Chunjiu

    2013-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related devastating neurodegenerative disorder, which severely impacts on the global economic development and healthcare system. Though AD has been studied for more than 100 years since 1906, the exact cause(s) and pathogenic mechanism(s) remain to be clarified. Also, the efficient disease-modifying treatment and ideal diagnostic method for AD are unavailable. Perturbed cerebral glucose metabolism, an invariant pathophysiological feature of AD, may be a critical contributor to the pathogenesis of this disease. In this review, we firstly discussed the features of cerebral glucose metabolism in physiological and pathological conditions. Then, we further reviewed the contribution of glucose transportation abnormality and intracellular glucose catabolism dysfunction in AD pathophysiology, and proposed a hypothesis that multiple pathogenic cascades induced by impaired cerebral glucose metabolism could result in neuronal degeneration and consequently cognitive deficits in AD patients. Among these pathogenic processes, altered functional status of thiamine metabolism and brain insulin resistance are highly emphasized and characterized as major pathogenic mechanisms. Finally, considering the fact that AD patients exhibit cerebral glucose hypometabolism possibly due to impairments of insulin signaling and altered thiamine metabolism, we also discuss some potential possibilities to uncover diagnostic biomarkers for AD from abnormal glucose metabolism and to develop drugs targeting at repairing insulin signaling impairment and correcting thiamine metabolism abnormality. We conclude that glucose metabolism abnormality plays a critical role in AD pathophysiological alterations through the induction of multiple pathogenic factors such as oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and so forth. To clarify the causes, pathogeneses and consequences of cerebral hypometabolism in AD will help break the bottleneck of current AD study in finding

  14. Clinical Features of Liver Cancer with Cerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiuhong; Chen, Li; Zeng, Jinsheng; Huang, Gelun; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral hemorrhage is common in patients with cancer, but the clinical features and pathogenesis of liver cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage are not well known. Material/Methods Liver cancer patients who developed cerebral hemorrhage were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2003 and December 2014. We retrospectively analyzed clinical presentations, results of laboratory tests, and imaging examinations. The clinical features and pathogenesis were summarized. Results Among 11133 patients with liver cancer, 9 patients (0.08%), including 3 females and 6 males met the inclusion criteria. The age range was 48–73 years and the average age was 61.67±8.97 years. Five patients did not have traditional hemorrhage risk factors and 4s had the risk factors; however, all had developed hepatocellular carcinoma, and 3 had developed metastasis. All 9 patients showed elevated tumor markers: an increased AFP level was detected in 6 patients, coagulation dysfunctions in 8 patients, and abnormal liver functions in 6 patients. Five patients had developed cerebral hemorrhagic lesions in the lobes of their brains, while hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia occurred in 3 patients and in the brainstem in only 1 patient. Four patients had clear consciousness, while 5 patients were in coma and showed poor prognosis. Conclusions Patients who have liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage usually lack traditional risk factors of cerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage is often detected in the lobes of the brain. Coagulation dysfunctions might be the main pathogenesis of liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27209058

  15. Clinical Features of Liver Cancer with Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuhong; Chen, Li; Zeng, Jinsheng; Huang, Gelun; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cerebral hemorrhage is common in patients with cancer, but the clinical features and pathogenesis of liver cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage are not well known. MATERIAL AND METHODS Liver cancer patients who developed cerebral hemorrhage were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2003 and December 2014. We retrospectively analyzed clinical presentations, results of laboratory tests, and imaging examinations. The clinical features and pathogenesis were summarized. RESULTS Among 11133 patients with liver cancer, 9 patients (0.08%), including 3 females and 6 males met the inclusion criteria. The age range was 48-73 years and the average age was 61.67±8.97 years. Five patients did not have traditional hemorrhage risk factors and 4s had the risk factors; however, all had developed hepatocellular carcinoma, and 3 had developed metastasis. All 9 patients showed elevated tumor markers: an increased AFP level was detected in 6 patients, coagulation dysfunctions in 8 patients, and abnormal liver functions in 6 patients. Five patients had developed cerebral hemorrhagic lesions in the lobes of their brains, while hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia occurred in 3 patients and in the brainstem in only 1 patient. Four patients had clear consciousness, while 5 patients were in coma and showed poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS Patients who have liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage usually lack traditional risk factors of cerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage is often detected in the lobes of the brain. Coagulation dysfunctions might be the main pathogenesis of liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27209058

  16. Sleep slow-wave activity regulates cerebral glycolytic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wisor, Jonathan P; Rempe, Michael J; Schmidt, Michelle A; Moore, Michele E; Clegern, William C

    2013-08-01

    Non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) onset is characterized by a reduction in cerebral metabolism and an increase in slow waves, 1-4-Hz oscillations between relatively depolarized and hyperpolarized states in the cerebral cortex. The metabolic consequences of slow-wave activity (SWA) at the cellular level remain uncertain. We sought to determine whether SWA modulates the rate of glycolysis within the cerebral cortex. The real-time measurement of lactate concentration in the mouse cerebral cortex demonstrates that it increases during enforced wakefulness. In spontaneous sleep/wake cycles, lactate concentration builds during wakefulness and rapid eye movement sleep and declines during NREMS. The rate at which lactate concentration declines during NREMS is proportional to the magnitude of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity at frequencies of <10 Hz. The induction of 1-Hz oscillations, but not 10-Hz oscillations, in the electroencephalogram by optogenetic stimulation of cortical pyramidal cells during wakefulness triggers a decline in lactate concentration. We conclude that cerebral SWA promotes a decline in the rate of glycolysis in the cerebral cortex. These results demonstrate a cellular energetic function for sleep SWA, which may contribute to its restorative effects on brain function. PMID:22767634

  17. Cerebral Metabolic Profiling of Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest with and Without Antegrade Selective Cerebral Perfusion: Evidence from Nontargeted Tissue Metabolomics in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Li-Hua; Liu, Jin-Ping; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shu-Bin; Ji, Bing-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antegrade selective cerebral perfusion (ASCP) is regarded to perform cerebral protection during the thoracic aorta surgery as an adjunctive technique to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA). However, brain metabolism profile after ASCP has not been systematically investigated by metabolomics technology. Methods: To clarify the metabolomics profiling of ASCP, 12 New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned into 60 min DHCA with (DHCA+ASCP [DA] group, n = 6) and without (DHCA [D] group, n = 6) ASCP according to the random number table. ASCP was conducted by cannulation on the right subclavian artery and cross-clamping of the innominate artery. Rabbits were sacrificed 60 min after weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass. The metabolic features of the cerebral cortex were analyzed by a nontargeted metabolic profiling strategy based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Variable importance projection values exceeding 1.0 were selected as potentially changed metabolites, and then Student's t-test was applied to test for statistical significance between the two groups. Results: Metabolic profiling of brain was distinctive significantly between the two groups (Q2Y = 0.88 for partial least squares-DA model). In comparing to group D, 62 definable metabolites were varied significantly after ASCP, which were mainly related to amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and lipid metabolism. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis revealed that metabolic pathways after DHCA with ASCP were mainly involved in the activated glycolytic pathway, subdued anaerobic metabolism, and oxidative stress. In addition, L-kynurenine (P = 0.0019), 5-methoxyindole-3-acetic acid (P = 0.0499), and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (P = 0.0495) in tryptophan metabolism pathways were decreased, and citrulline (P = 0.0158) in urea cycle was increased in group DA comparing to group D. Conclusions: The present study applied metabolomics analysis to identify the cerebral

  18. An Evidence-Based Review of Related Metabolites and Metabolic Network Research on Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengting; Tang, Liying; Liu, Xin; Fang, Jing; Zhan, Hao; Wu, Hongwei; Yang, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, metabolomics analyses have been widely applied to cerebral ischemia research. This paper introduces the latest proceedings of metabolomics research on cerebral ischemia. The main techniques, models, animals, and biomarkers of cerebral ischemia will be discussed. With analysis help from the MBRole website and the KEGG database, the altered metabolites in rat cerebral ischemia were used for metabolic pathway enrichment analyses. Our results identify the main metabolic pathways that are related to cerebral ischemia and further construct a metabolic network. These results will provide useful information for elucidating the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia, as well as the discovery of cerebral ischemia biomarkers. PMID:27274780

  19. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as presenting feature of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ennaifer, R; Moussa, A; Mouelhi, L; Salem, M; Bouzaidi, S; Debbeche, R; Trabelsi, S; Najjar, T

    2009-01-01

    Thrombosis is a well recognized complication of inflammatory bowel disease that occurs in 1.3 to 6.4% of patients, however, cerebral vascular involvement is unusual. We present the case of a 16-year-old female in whom cerebral venous thrombosis was the presenting symptom of an active ulcerative pancolitis. Thrombophilia screen (plasma levels of proteins C and S, antithrombin, antibeta2-glycoprotein, lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies, activated protein C resistance, homocystein level antinuclear antibodies) was negative. The patient was successfully treated with anticoagulant therapy, phenobarbital and sulfasalazine. Cerebral venous thrombosis is an exceptional presenting feature of ulcerative colitis. Disease activity may play a major role in the occurrence of thrombosis. PMID:19902870

  20. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow in human cerebral ischemic infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Lenzi, G.L.; Frackowiak, R.S.; Jones, T.

    1982-09-01

    Fifteen patients with acute cerebral hemispheric infarcts have been studied with positron emission tomography and the /sup 15/O steady-state inhalation technique. Thirteen follow-up studies were also performed. The values of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO/sub 2/), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction ration (OER) have been calculated for the infarcted regions, their borders, the symmetrical regions in contralateral cerebral hemispheres, and the cerebellar hemispheres. This study demonstrates that in the completed stroke there are thresholds for regional CMRO/sub 2/ and regional CBF below which the general clinical outcome of the patients is usually poor. The ischaemic lesions invariably produce an uncoupling between the greatly decreased metabolic demand and the less affected blood supply, with very frequent instances of relative hyperperfusion. Remote effects of the hemispheric infarcts have been demonstrated, such as crossed cerebellar diaschisis and contralateral transhemispheric depression. The level of consciousness correlates with oxygen uptake and blood flow both in the posterior fossa and in the contralateral cerebral hemispheres. The follow-up studies of individual patients underline the high variability of metabolism-to-flow balance during the acute phase of the illness, and stress the need for more studies focused on repeated assessments of homogeneous patient populations.

  1. Metabolic myopathies: clinical features and diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Smith, Edward C; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2011-05-01

    The rheumatologist is frequently called on to evaluate patients with complaints of myalgia, muscle cramps, and fatigue. The evaluation of these patients presents a diagnostic challenge given the nonspecific and intermittent nature of their complaints, often leading to inappropriate diagnostic testing. When these symptoms are associated with physical exertion, a metabolic myopathy should be suspected Although inflammatory myopathies may present with similar features, such a pattern should prompt a thorough evaluation for an underlying metabolic myopathy. This review discusses the most common causes of metabolic myopathies and reviews the current diagnostic options available to the clinician. PMID:21444020

  2. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-04-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated.

  3. Computerized system for measuring cerebral metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    McGlone, J.S.; Hibbard, L.S.; Hawkins, R.A.; Kasturi, R.

    1987-09-01

    A computerized stereotactic measurement system for evaluating rat brain metabolism was developed to utilize the large amount of data generated by quantitative autoradiography. Conventional methods of measurement only analyze a small percent of these data because these methods are limited by instrument design and the subjectiveness of the investigator. However, a computerized system allows digital images to be analyzed by placing data at their appropriate three-dimensional stereotactic coordinates. The system automatically registers experimental data to a standard three-dimensional image using alignment, scaling, and matching operations. Metabolic activity in different neuronal structures is then measured by generating digital masks and superimposing them on to experimental data. Several experimental data sets were evaluated and it was noticed that the structures measured by the computerized system, had in general, lower metabolic activity than manual measurements had indicated. This was expected because the computerized system measured the structure over its volume while the manual readings were taken from the most active metabolic area of a particular structure.

  4. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with alcoholic Korsakoff's syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.M.; Parker, E.S.; Clark, C.M.; Martin, P.R.; George, D.T.; Weingartner, H.; Sokoloff, L.; Ebert, M.H.; Mishkin, M.

    1985-05-01

    Seven alcoholic male subjects diagnosed as having Korsakoff's syndrome and eight age-matched male normal volunteers were studied with /sup 18/F 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2/sup 18/FDG). All subjects were examined at rest with eyes covered in a quiet, darkened room. Serial plasma samples were obtained following injection of 4 to 5 mCi of 2/sup 18/FDG. Tomographic slices spaced at 10mm axial increments were obtained (in-plane resolution = 1.75 cm, axial resolution = 1.78 cm). Four planes were selected from each subject, and a total of 46 regions of interest were sampled and glucose metabolic rates for each region calculated. The mean glucose metalbolic rate for the 46 regions in the Korsakoff subjects was significantly lower than that in the normal controls (5.17 +- .43 versus 6.6 +- 1.31). A Q-component analysis, which examined each subject's regional rates relative to his mean rate, revealed two distinct patterns in the Korsakoff group. Glucose metabolism was significantly reduced in 37 of the 46 regions sampled. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism in a nondemented group of subjects has not previously been reported. The reduction in cortical metabolism may be the result of damage to sub-cortical projecting systems. The differing patterns of cerebral metabolism in Korsakoff's syndrome suggests subgroups with differing neuropathology. Regions implicated in memory function, medial temporal, thalamic and medial prefrontal were among the regions reduced in metabolism.

  5. Determination of patterns of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in normal aging and dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, A.; Chawluk, J.; Hurtig, H.; Dann, R.; Rosen, M.; Kushner, M.; Silver, F.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (rCMRGlc) were measured using 18F-FDG and positron emission tomography (PET) in 14 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (age=64), 9 elderly controls (age=61), and 9 young controls (age=28). PET studies were performed without sensory stimulation or deprivation. Metabolic rates in individual brain regions were determined using an atlas overlay. Relative metabolic rates (rCMRGl c/global CMRGlc) were determined for all subjects. Comparison of young and elderly controls demonstrated significant decreases in frontal metabolism (rho<0.005) and right inferior parietal (IP) metabolism (rho<0.02) with normal aging. Patients with mild-moderate AD (NMAD) (n=8) when compared to age-matched controls, showed further reduction in right IP metabolism (rho<0.02). SAD patients also demonstrated metabolic decrements in left hemisphere language areas (rho<0.01). This latter finding is consistent with language disturbance observed late in the course of the disease. Out data reveal progressive changes in patterns of cerebral glucose utilization with aging and demential with reflect salient clinical features of these processes.

  6. Metabolic profiling reveals key metabolic features of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Catchpole, Gareth; Platzer, Alexander; Weikert, Cornelia; Kempkensteffen, Carsten; Johannsen, Manfred; Krause, Hans; Jung, Klaus; Miller, Kurt; Willmitzer, Lothar; Selbig, Joachim; Weikert, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Recent evidence suggests that metabolic changes play a pivotal role in the biology of cancer and in particular renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Here, a global metabolite profiling approach was applied to characterize the metabolite pool of RCC and normal renal tissue. Advanced decision tree models were applied to characterize the metabolic signature of RCC and to explore features of metastasized tumours. The findings were validated in a second independent dataset. Vitamin E derivates and metabolites of glucose, fatty acid, and inositol phosphate metabolism determined the metabolic profile of RCC. α-tocopherol, hippuric acid, myoinositol, fructose-1-phosphate and glucose-1-phosphate contributed most to the tumour/normal discrimination and all showed pronounced concentration changes in RCC. The identified metabolic profile was characterized by a low recognition error of only 5% for tumour versus normal samples. Data on metastasized tumours suggested a key role for metabolic pathways involving arachidonic acid, free fatty acids, proline, uracil and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results illustrate the potential of mass spectroscopy based metabolomics in conjunction with sophisticated data analysis methods to uncover the metabolic phenotype of cancer. Differentially regulated metabolites, such as vitamin E compounds, hippuric acid and myoinositol, provide leads for the characterization of novel pathways in RCC. PMID:19845817

  7. PET measurements of cerebral metabolism corrected for CSF contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Chawluk, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.J.; Hurtig, H.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Reivich, M.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-three subjects have been studied with PET and anatomic imaging (proton-NMR and/or CT) in order to determine the effect of cerebral atrophy on calculations of metabolic rates. Subgroups of neurologic disease investigated include stroke, brain tumor, epilepsy, psychosis, and dementia. Anatomic images were digitized through a Vidicon camera and analyzed volumetrically. Relative areas for ventricles, sulci, and brain tissue were calculated. Preliminary analysis suggests that ventricular volumes as determined by NMR and CT are similar, while sulcal volumes are larger on NMR scans. Metabolic rates (18F-FDG) were calculated before and after correction for CSF spaces, with initial focus upon dementia and normal aging. Correction for atrophy led to a greater increase (%) in global metabolic rates in demented individuals (18.2 +- 5.3) compared to elderly controls (8.3 +- 3.0,p < .05). A trend towards significantly lower glucose metabolism in demented subjects before CSF correction was not seen following correction for atrophy. These data suggest that volumetric analysis of NMR images may more accurately reflect the degree of cerebral atrophy, since NMR does not suffer from beam hardening artifact due to bone-parenchyma juxtapositions. Furthermore, appropriate correction for CSF spaces should be employed if current resolution PET scanners are to accurately measure residual brain tissue metabolism in various pathological states.

  8. Frontiers in optical imaging of cerebral blood flow and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Devor, Anna; Sakadžić, Sava; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Nizar, Krystal; Saisan, Payam A; Tian, Peifang; Dale, Anders M; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Boas, David A

    2012-01-01

    In vivo optical imaging of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism did not exist 50 years ago. While point optical fluorescence and absorption measurements of cellular metabolism and hemoglobin concentrations had already been introduced by then, point blood flow measurements appeared only 40 years ago. The advent of digital cameras has significantly advanced two-dimensional optical imaging of neuronal, metabolic, vascular, and hemodynamic signals. More recently, advanced laser sources have enabled a variety of novel three-dimensional high-spatial-resolution imaging approaches. Combined, as we discuss here, these methods are permitting a multifaceted investigation of the local regulation of CBF and metabolism with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Through multimodal combination of these optical techniques with genetic methods of encoding optical reporter and actuator proteins, the future is bright for solving the mysteries of neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling and translating them to clinical utility. PMID:22252238

  9. Reproducibility of cerebral glucose metabolic measurements in resting human subjects.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, E J; Brodie, J D; Wolf, A P; Christman, D R; Laska, E; Meissner, M

    1988-08-01

    Positron emission tomography with 11C-2-deoxyglucose was used to determine the test-retest variability of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in 22 young normal right-handed men scanned twice in a 24-h period under baseline (resting) conditions. To assess the effects of scan order and time of day on variability, 12 subjects were scanned in the morning and afternoon of the same day (a.m.-p.m.) and 10 in the reverse order (p.m.-a.m.) with a night in between. The effect of anxiety on metabolism was also assessed. Seventy-three percent of the total subject group showed changes in whole brain metabolism from the first to the second measurement of 10% or less, with comparable changes in various cortical and subcortical regions. When a scaling factor was used to equate the whole brain metabolism in the two scans for each individual, the resulting average regional changes for each group were no more than 1%. This suggests that the proportion of the whole brain metabolism utilized regionally is stable in a group of subjects over time. Both groups of subjects had lower morning than afternoon metabolism, but the differences were slight in the p.m.-a.m. group. One measure of anxiety (pulse at run 1) was correlated with run 1 metabolism and with the percentage of change from run 1 to run 2. No significant run 2 correlations were observed. This is the first study to measure test-retest variability in cerebral glucose metabolism in a large sample of young normal subjects. It demonstrates that the deoxyglucose method yields low intrasubject variability and high stability over a 24-h period. PMID:3260593

  10. Cerebral glucose metabolism in the course of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, M.; Herholz, K.; Pawlik, G.; Szelies, B.; Juergens, R.H.; Heiss, W.D.

    1989-01-01

    Regional cerebral glucose metabolism was studied in a 15-year-old boy with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis before and after therapy with human interferon beta, using positron emission tomography of fluorine 18-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose. At first examination, metabolism was symmetrically decreased in the thalamus, cerebellum, and all cortical areas except prerolandic motor cortex, but increased in lentiform nucleus. A computed tomographic scan was normal. Six months later, bilateral focal necrosis centered in the previously hypermetabolic putamen was demonstrated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The caudate nucleus and the superoposterior part of the putamen were spared, still showing increased metabolism. Corresponding with some clinical improvement, cortical glucose consumption rates had returned to a normal level.

  11. Effect of anxiety on cortical cerebral blood flow and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, R.C.; Gur, R.E.; Resnick, S.M.; Skolnick, B.E.; Alavi, A.; Reivich, M.

    1987-04-01

    The relation between anxiety and cortical activity was compared in two samples of normal volunteers. One group was studied with the noninvasive xenon-133 inhalation technique for measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the other with positron emission tomography (PET) using /sup 18/Flurodeoxyglucose (/sup 18/FDG) for measuring cerebral metabolic rates (CMR) for glucose. The inhalation technique produced less anxiety than the PET procedure, and for low anxiety subjects, there was a linear increase in CBF with anxiety. For higher anxiety subjects, however, there was a linear decrease in CBF with increased anxiety. The PET group manifested a linear decrease in CMR with increased anxiety. The results indicate that anxiety can have systematic effects on cortical activity, and this should be taken into consideration when comparing data from different procedures. They also suggest a physiologic explanation of a fundamental behavioral law that stipulates a curvilinear, inverted-U relationship between anxiety and performance.

  12. CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM IN ANXIETY AND ANXIETY DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Roy J.

    1994-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are some of the commonest psychiatric disorders and anxiety commonly co-exists with other psychiatric conditions. Anxiety can also be a normal emotion. Thus, study of the neurobiological effects of anxiety is of considerable significance. In the normal brain, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism (CMR) serve as indices of brain function. CBF/CMR research is expected to provide new insight into alterations in brain function in anxiety disorders and other psychiatric disorders. Possible associations between stress I anxiety I panic and cerebral ischemia I stroke give additional significance to the effects of anxiety on CBF. With the advent of non-invasive techniques, study of CBF/CMR in anxiety disorders became easier. A large numbers of research reports are available on the effects of stress, anxiety and panic on CBF/CMR in normals and anxiety disorder patients. This article reviews the available human research on this topic. PMID:21743685

  13. Cerebral glucose metabolic abnormality in patients with congenital scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Weon Wook; Suh, Kuen Tak; Kim, Jeung Il; Ku, Ja Gyung; Lee, Hong Seok; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, In-Ju; Kim, Yong-Ki; Lee, Jung Sub

    2008-07-01

    A possible association between congenital scoliosis and low mental status has been recognized, but there are no reports describing the mental status or cerebral metabolism in patients with congenital scoliosis in detail. We investigated the mental status using a mini-mental status exam as well as the cerebral glucose metabolism using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography in 12 patients with congenital scoliosis and compared them with those of 14 age-matched patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The mean mini-mental status exam score in the congenital scoliosis group was significantly lower than that in the adolescent idiopathic scoliosis group. Group analysis found that various brain areas of patients with congenital scoliosis showed glucose hypometabolisms in the left prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 10), right orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11), left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 9), left anterior cingulate gyrus (Brodmann area 24) and pulvinar of the left thalamus. From this study, we could find the metabolic abnormalities of brain in patients with congenital scoliosis and suggest the possible role of voxel-based analysis of brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. PMID:18446384

  14. Serotonin modulation of cerebral glucose metabolism: sex and age effects.

    PubMed

    Munro, Cynthia A; Workman, Clifford I; Kramer, Elisse; Hermann, Carol; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Chaly, Thomas; Eidelberg, David; Smith, Gwenn S

    2012-11-01

    The serotonin system is implicated in a variety of psychiatric disorders whose clinical presentation and response to treatment differ between males and females, as well as with aging. However, human neurobiological studies are limited. Sex differences in the cerebral metabolic response to an increase in serotonin concentrations were measured, as well as the effect of aging, in men compared to women. Thirty-three normal healthy individuals (14 men/19 women, age range 20-79 years) underwent two resting positron emission tomography studies with the radiotracer [18F]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ([(18)F]-FDG) after placebo and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, citalopram) infusions on two separate days. Results indicated that women demonstrated widespread areas of increased cortical glucose metabolism with fewer areas of decrease in metabolism in response to citalopram. Men, in contrast, demonstrated several regions of decreased cortical metabolism, but no regions of increased metabolism. Age was associated with greater increases in women and greater decreases in men in most brain regions. These results support prior studies indicating that serotonin function differs in men and women across the lifespan. Future studies aimed at characterizing the influences of age and sex on the serotonin system in patients with psychiatric disorders are needed to elucidate the relationship between sex and age differences in brain chemistry and associated differences in symptom presentation and treatment response. PMID:22836227

  15. Cerebral metabolism of glucose in benign hereditary chorea

    SciTech Connect

    Suchowersky, O.; Hayden, M.R.; Martin, W.R.; Stoessl, A.J.; Hildebrand, A.M.; Pate, B.D.

    1986-01-01

    Benign hereditary chorea (BHC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by chorea of early onset with little or no progression. There is marked clinical variability in this disease with some subjects having onset in infancy and others with onset in early adulthood. In contrast to Huntington's disease (HD), there is no dementia. Computed tomography is normal in all subjects with no evidence of caudate nucleus atrophy. We present the results of positron emission tomography using YF-2-fluorodeoxyglucose on three patients with this disorder from two families. Cerebral glucose metabolism in one patient was decreased in the caudate nucleus, as previously reported in HD. The other two persons from a second family showed a relative decrease in metabolic rates of glucose in the caudate when compared with the thalamus. It appears that caudate hypometabolism is not specific for HD. These findings suggest that the caudate nucleus may play a significant role in the pathophysiology of some persons with BHC.

  16. Effects of CDP-choline on neurologic deficits and cerebral glucose metabolism in a rat model of cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kakihana, M.; Fukuda, N.; Suno, M.; Nagaoka, A.

    1988-02-01

    The effects of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on neurologic deficits and cerebral glucose metabolism were studied in a rat model of transient cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia was induced by occluding both common carotid arteries for 20 or 30 minutes 24 hours after the vertebral arteries were permanently occluded by electrocautery. CDP-choline was administered intraperitoneally twice daily for 4 days after reestablishing carotid blood flow. CDP-choline at two dosages (50 and 250 mg/kg) shortened the time required for recovery of spontaneous motor activity in a dose-related manner; recovery time was measured early after reperfusion. Neurologic signs were observed for 10 days. High-dose CDP-choline improved neurologic signs in the rats within 20-30 minutes of ischemia. When cerebral glucose metabolism was assessed on Day 4, increases in the levels of glucose and pyruvate were accompanied by decreases in the synthesis of labeled acetylcholine from uniformly labeled (/sup 14/C)glucose measured in the cerebral cortex of rats with 30 minutes of ischemia. High-dose CDP-choline also attenuated changes in these variables. CDP-(1,2-/sup 14/C)choline injected intravenously 10 minutes after reperfusion was used for membrane lipid biosynthesis. These results indicate that CDP-choline has beneficial effects on brain dysfunction induced by cerebral ischemia, which may be due in part to the restorative effects of CDP-choline on disturbed cerebral glucose metabolism, probably by stimulating phospholipid biosynthesis.

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism in patients with transient global amnesia: a positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, K; Sadoshima, S; Ishitsuka, T; Kusuda, K; Kuwabara, Y; Ichiya, Y; Fujishima, M

    1989-01-01

    In four patients who experienced transient global amnesia (TGA), clinical features and neuroradiological findings including positron emission tomography (PET) were studied within three months of the episodes, and compared with those in seven cases with cerebral transient ischaemic attacks (TIA). None of TGA patients had a previous history or significant risk factors for the cerebrovascular diseases. Their electroencephalogram, brain CT and angiogram for the head and neck were almost normal. PET study showed better preserved cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in each area of the brain in patients with TGA compared with those with TIA in whom focal reductions of flow and metabolism were evident. These observations suggest that TGA is caused by reversible circulatory and/or metabolic disturbance, of which mechanism might be different from that in TIA. Images PMID:2786552

  18. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate - a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Mark B; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik Bw

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% ([Formula: see text]), glutamate increased by 4.7% ([Formula: see text]) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p[Formula: see text]). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  19. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate – a magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik BW

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% (p<10-6), glutamate increased by 4.7% (p<10-4) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p<10-3). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  20. Age differences in intercorrelations between regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, B.; Duara, R.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1986-01-01

    Patterns of cerebral metabolic intercorrelations were compared in the resting state in 15 healthy young men (ages 20 to 32 years) and 15 healthy elderly men (ages 64 to 83 years). Controlling for whole-brain glucose metabolism, partial correlation coefficients were determined between pairs of regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose determined by positron emission tomography using (18F)fluorodeoxyglucose and obtained in 59 brain regions. Compared with the young men, the elderly men had fewer statistically significant correlations, with the most notable reductions observed between the parietal lobe regions, and between the parietal and frontal lobe regions. These results suggest that cerebral functional interactions are reduced in healthy elderly men.

  1. Fourth case of cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular, skeletal syndrome (CODAS), description of new features and molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Marlin, S; Ducou Le Pointe, H; Le Merrer, M; Portnoi, M F; Chantot, S; Jonard, L; Mantel-Guiochon, A; Siffroi, J P; Garabedian, E N; Denoyelle, F

    2010-06-01

    Cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular, skeletal syndrome (CODAS, OMIM 600373) is a very rare congenital malformation syndrome. This clinical entity is highly distinctive and associates mental retardation, cataract, enamel abnormalities, malformations of the helix, epiphyseal and vertebral malformations, and characteristic dysmorphic features. Since 1991, only three affected children have been reported. The etiology and pattern of inheritance of CODAS syndrome still remain unknown. We describe a new sporadic case presenting with all the characteristic features of CODAS syndrome associated with previously unreported malformations of the heart, larynx, and liver. All investigations such as karyotype, metabolic screening and array CGH were normal. PMID:20503327

  2. Stability of cerebral metabolism and substrate availability in humans during hypoxia and hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Philip N; Shaw, Andrew D; Smith, Kurt J; Willie, Christopher K; Ikeda, Keita; Graham, Joseph; Macleod, David B

    2014-05-01

    Characterization of the influence of oxygen availability on brain metabolism is an essential step toward a better understanding of brain energy homoeostasis and has obvious clinical implications. However, how brain metabolism depends on oxygen availability has not been clearly examined in humans. We therefore assessed the influence of oxygen on CBF (cerebral blood flow) and CMRO2 (cerebral metabolic rates for oxygen) and carbohydrates. PaO2 (arterial partial pressure of oxygen) was decreased for 15 min to ~60, ~44 and ~35 mmHg [to target a SaO2 (arterial oxygen saturation) of 90, 80 and 70% respectively], and elevated to ~320 and ~430 mmHg. Isocapnia was maintained during each trial. At the end of each stage, arterial-jugular venous differences and volumetric CBF were measured to directly calculate cerebral metabolic rates. During progressive hypoxaemia, elevations in CBF were correlated with the reductions in both SaO2 (R2=0.54, P<0.05) and CaO2 (arterial oxygen content) (R2=0.57, P<0.05). Despite markedly reduced CaO2, cerebral oxygen delivery was maintained by increased CBF. Cerebral metabolic rates for oxygen, glucose and lactate remained unaltered during progressive hypoxia. Consequently, cerebral glucose delivery was in excess of that required, and net lactate efflux increased slightly in severe hypoxia, as reflected by a small increase in jugular venous lactate. Progressive hyperoxia did not alter CBF, CaO2, substrate delivery or cerebral metabolism. In conclusion, marked elevations in CBF with progressive hypoxaemia and related reductions in CaO2 resulted in a well-maintained cerebral oxygen delivery. As such, cerebral metabolism is still supported almost exclusively by carbohydrate oxidation during severe levels of hypoxaemia. PMID:24117382

  3. Sporadic Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Pathophysiology, Neuroimaging Features, and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Boulouis, Gregoire; Charidimou, Andreas; Greenberg, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    Sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a small vessel disorder defined pathologically by progressive amyloid deposition in the walls of cortical and leptomeningeal vessels resulting from disruption of a complex balance between production, circulation, and clearance of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the brain. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a major cause of lobar symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, transient focal neurologic episodes, and a key contributor to vascular cognitive impairment. The mechanisms and consequences of amyloid-β deposition at the pathological level and its neuroimaging manifestations, clinical consequences, and implications for patient care are addressed in this review. PMID:27214698

  4. Perioperative cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with single-ventricle physiology

    PubMed Central

    Dehaes, Mathieu; Cheng, Henry H.; Buckley, Erin M.; Lin, Pei-Yi; Ferradal, Silvina; Williams, Kathryn; Vyas, Rutvi; Hagan, Katherine; Wigmore, Daniel; McDavitt, Erica; Soul, Janet S.; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Newburger, Jane W.; Ellen Grant, P.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) patients are at risk for neurodevelopmental delay. The etiology of these delays is unclear, but abnormal prenatal cerebral maturation and postoperative hemodynamic instability likely play a role. A better understanding of these factors is needed to improve neurodevelopmental outcome. In this study, we used bedside frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy (FDNIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to assess cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with single-ventricle (SV) CHD undergoing surgery and compared them to controls. Our goals were 1) to compare cerebral hemodynamics between unanesthetized SV and healthy neonates, and 2) to determine if FDNIRS-DCS could detect alterations in cerebral hemodynamics beyond cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2). Eleven SV neonates were recruited and compared to 13 controls. Preoperatively, SV patients showed decreased cerebral blood flow (CBFi), cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i) and SO2; and increased oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) compared to controls. Compared to preoperative values, unstable postoperative SV patients had decreased CMRO2i and CBFi, which returned to baseline when stable. However, SO2 showed no difference between unstable and stable states. Preoperative SV neonates are flow-limited and show signs of impaired cerebral development compared to controls. FDNIRS-DCS shows potential to improve assessment of cerebral development and postoperative hemodynamics compared to SO2 alone. PMID:26713191

  5. Metabolic Features of Cancer Treatment Resistance.

    PubMed

    Viale, Andrea; Draetta, Giulio F

    2016-01-01

    A major barrier to achieving durable remission and a definitive cure in oncology patients is the emergence of tumor resistance, a common outcome of different disease types, and independent from the therapeutic approach undertaken. In recent years, subpopulations of slow-cycling cells endowed with enhanced tumorigenic potential and multidrug resistance have been isolated in different tumors, and mounting experimental evidence suggests these resistant cells are responsible for tumor relapse. An in-depth metabolic characterization of resistant tumor stem cells revealed that they rely more on mitochondrial respiration and less on glycolysis than other tumor cells, a finding that challenges the assumption that tumors have a primarily glycolytic metabolism and defective mitochondria. The demonstration of a metabolic program in resistant tumorigenic cells that may be present in the majority of tumors has important therapeutic implications and is a critical consideration as we address the challenge of identifying new vulnerabilities that might be exploited therapeutically. PMID:27557537

  6. Cerebral circulatory and metabolic effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine in anesthetized baboons.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, M A; MacKenzie, E T

    1977-01-01

    1. The cerebral circulatory effects of the intracarotid administration of 5-hydroxytryptamine were examined in anaesthetized baboons. Cerebral blood flow was measured by the intracarotid 133Xe technique, cerebral O2 consumption and glucose uptake were measured as indices of brain metabolism and electrocortical activity was continuously monitored. 2. Despite a marked reduction in the calibre of the internal carotid artery (assessed angiographically), the intracarotid infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine 0-1 microgram/kg. min did not effect any significant changes in cerebral blood flow, O2 consumption or glucose uptake. 3. Following transient osmotic disruption of the blood-brain barrier with the intracarotid infusion of hypertonic urea, the same dose of 5-hydroxytryptamine effected a marked reduction in cerebral blood flow from 51 +/- 2 to 36 +/- 2 ml./100 g. min (mean +/- S.E.; P less than 0-01). Both indices of cerebral metabolism were reduced significantly and the e.e.g. showed a more pronounced suppression-burst pattern. 4. We postulate that the cerebral circulatory responses to 5-hydroxytryptamine are dependent upon the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and the predominant effect of the intravascular administration of 5-hydroxytryptamine is on cortical activity or metabolism, rather than on cerebrovascular smooth muscle. Images Plate 1 PMID:411921

  7. Metabolic brain imaging correlated with clinical features of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.; Chawluk, J.; Powlis, W.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Nineteen adults with brain tumors have been studied with positron emission tomography utilizing FDG. Fourteen had biopsy proven cerebral malignant glioma, one each had meningioma, hemangiopericytoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), two had unbiopsied lesions, and one patient had an area of biopsy proven radiation necrosis. Three different patterns of glucose metabolism are observed: marked increase in metabolism at the site of the known tumor in (10 high grade gliomas and the PNET), lower than normal metabolism at the tumor (in 1 grade II glioma, 3 grade III gliomas, 2 unbiopsied low density nonenhancing lesions, and the meningioma), no abnormality (1 enhancing glioma, the hemangiopericytoma and the radiation necrosis.) The metabolic rate of the tumor or the surrounding brain did not appear to be correlated with the history of previous irradiation or chemotherapy. Decreased metabolism was frequently observed in the rest of the affected hemisphere and in the contralateral cerebellum. Tumors of high grade or with enhancing CT characteristics were more likely to show increased metabolism. Among the patients with proven gliomas, survival after PETT scan tended to be longer for those with low metabolic activity tumors than for those with highly active tumors. The authors conclude that PETT may help to predict the malignant potential of tumors, and may add useful clinical information to the CT scan.

  8. The impact of age on cerebral perfusion, oxygenation and metabolism during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Braz, Igor D; Fisher, James P

    2016-08-15

    Age is one of the most important risk factors for dementia and stroke. Examination of the cerebral circulatory responses to acute exercise in the elderly may help to pinpoint the mechanisms by which exercise training can reduce the risk of brain diseases, inform the optimization of exercise training programmes and assist with the identification of age-related alterations in cerebral vascular function. During low-to-moderate intensity dynamic exercise, enhanced neuronal activity is accompanied by cerebral perfusion increases of ∼10-30%. Beyond ∼60-70% maximal oxygen uptake, cerebral metabolism remains elevated but perfusion in the anterior portion of the circulation returns towards baseline, substantively because of a hyperventilation-mediated reduction in the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (P aC O2) and cerebral vasoconstriction. Cerebral perfusion is lower in older individuals, both at rest and during incremental dynamic exercise. Nevertheless, the increase in the estimated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen and the arterial-internal jugular venous differences for glucose and lactate are similar in young and older individuals exercising at the same relative exercise intensities. Correction for the age-related reduction in P aC O2 during exercise by the provision of supplementary CO2 is suggested to remove ∼50% of the difference in cerebral perfusion between young and older individuals. A multitude of candidates could account for the remaining difference, including cerebral atrophy, and enhanced vasoconstrictor and blunted vasodilatory pathways. In summary, age-related reductions in cerebral perfusion during exercise are partly associated with a lower P aC O2 in exercising older individuals; nevertheless the cerebral extraction of glucose, lactate and oxygen appear to be preserved. PMID:26435295

  9. Impact of Nutrition on Cerebral Circulation and Cognition in the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mellendijk, Laura; Wiesmann, Maximilian; Kiliaan, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS), defined as the clustering of abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia, appears to be driving the global epidemics cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Nutrition has a major impact on MetS and plays an important role in the prevention, development, and treatment of its features. Structural and functional alterations in the vasculature, associated with MetS, might form the link between MetS and the increased risk of developing CVD and T2DM. Not only does the peripheral vasculature seem to be affected, but the syndrome has a profound impact on the cerebral circulation and thence brain structure as well. Furthermore, strong associations are shown with stroke, cognitive impairment, and dementia. In this review the impact of nutrition on the individual components of MetS, the effects of MetS on peripheral and cerebral vasculature, and its consequences for brain structure and function will be discussed. PMID:26580647

  10. Cerebral oxygen metabolism in neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy during and after therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Dehaes, Mathieu; Aggarwal, Alpna; Lin, Pei-Yi; Rosa Fortuno, C; Fenoglio, Angela; Roche-Labarbe, Nadège; Soul, Janet S; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Grant, P Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) are associated with complex changes of blood flow and metabolism. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is effective in reducing the extent of brain injury, but it remains uncertain how TH affects cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism. Ten neonates undergoing TH for HIE and seventeen healthy controls were recruited from the NICU and the well baby nursery, respectively. A combination of frequency domain near infrared spectroscopy (FDNIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) systems was used to non-invasively measure cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic variables at the bedside. Results showed that cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i) and CBF indices (CBFi) in neonates with HIE during TH were significantly lower than post-TH and age-matched control values. Also, cerebral blood volume (CBV) and hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) were significantly higher in neonates with HIE during TH compared with age-matched control neonates. Post-TH CBV was significantly decreased compared with values during TH whereas SO2 remained unchanged after the therapy. Thus, FDNIRS–DCS can provide information complimentary to SO2 and can assess individual cerebral metabolic responses to TH. Combined FDNIRS–DCS parameters improve the understanding of the underlying physiology and have the potential to serve as bedside biomarkers of treatment response and optimization. PMID:24064492

  11. Metabolic Pattern of the Acute Phase of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in a Novel Porcine Model: Studies with Cerebral Microdialysis with High Temporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Christoffer; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Hillered, Lars; Engström, Elisabeth Ronne

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may produce cerebral ischemia and systemic responses including stress. To study immediate cerebral and systemic changes in response to aneurysm rupture, animal models are needed. Objective To study early cerebral energy changes in an animal model. Methods Experimental SAH was induced in 11 pigs by autologous blood injection to the anterior skull base, with simultaneous control of intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Intracerebral microdialysis was used to monitor concentrations of glucose, pyruvate and lactate. Results In nine of the pigs, a pattern of transient ischemia was produced, with a dramatic reduction of cerebral perfusion pressure soon after blood injection, associated with a quick glucose and pyruvate decrease. This was followed by a lactate increase and a delayed pyruvate increase, producing a marked but short elevation of the lactate/pyruvate ratio. Glucose, pyruvate, lactate and lactate/pyruvate ratio thereafter returned toward baseline. The two remaining pigs had a more severe metabolic reaction with glucose and pyruvate rapidly decreasing to undetectable levels while lactate increased and remained elevated, suggesting persisting ischemia. Conclusion The animal model simulates the conditions of SAH not only by deposition of blood in the basal cisterns, but also creating the transient global ischemic impact of aneurysmal SAH. The metabolic cerebral changes suggest immediate transient substrate failure followed by hypermetabolism of glucose upon reperfusion. The model has features that resemble spontaneous bleeding, and is suitable for future research of the early cerebral and systemic responses to SAH that are difficult to study in humans. PMID:24940881

  12. Metabolic features of chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naviaux, Robert K; Naviaux, Jane C; Li, Kefeng; Bright, A Taylor; Alaynick, William A; Wang, Lin; Baxter, Asha; Nathan, Neil; Anderson, Wayne; Gordon, Eric

    2016-09-13

    More than 2 million people in the United States have myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). We performed targeted, broad-spectrum metabolomics to gain insights into the biology of CFS. We studied a total of 84 subjects using these methods. Forty-five subjects (n = 22 men and 23 women) met diagnostic criteria for ME/CFS by Institute of Medicine, Canadian, and Fukuda criteria. Thirty-nine subjects (n = 18 men and 21 women) were age- and sex-matched normal controls. Males with CFS were 53 (±2.8) y old (mean ± SEM; range, 21-67 y). Females were 52 (±2.5) y old (range, 20-67 y). The Karnofsky performance scores were 62 (±3.2) for males and 54 (±3.3) for females. We targeted 612 metabolites in plasma from 63 biochemical pathways by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization, and tandem mass spectrometry in a single-injection method. Patients with CFS showed abnormalities in 20 metabolic pathways. Eighty percent of the diagnostic metabolites were decreased, consistent with a hypometabolic syndrome. Pathway abnormalities included sphingolipid, phospholipid, purine, cholesterol, microbiome, pyrroline-5-carboxylate, riboflavin, branch chain amino acid, peroxisomal, and mitochondrial metabolism. Area under the receiver operator characteristic curve analysis showed diagnostic accuracies of 94% [95% confidence interval (CI), 84-100%] in males using eight metabolites and 96% (95% CI, 86-100%) in females using 13 metabolites. Our data show that despite the heterogeneity of factors leading to CFS, the cellular metabolic response in patients was homogeneous, statistically robust, and chemically similar to the evolutionarily conserved persistence response to environmental stress known as dauer. PMID:27573827

  13. Unique metabolic features of stem cells, cardiomyocytes, and their progenitors.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, John Antonydas; Doss, Michael Xavier; Hengstler, Jan Georg; Cadenas, Cristina; Hescheler, Jürgen; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2014-04-11

    Recently, growing attention has been directed toward stem cell metabolism, with the key observation that the plasticity of stem cells also reflects the plasticity of their energy substrate metabolism. There seems to be a clear link between the self-renewal state of stem cells, in which cells proliferate without differentiation, and the activity of specific metabolic pathways. Differentiation is accompanied by a shift from anaerobic glycolysis to mitochondrial respiration. This metabolic switch of differentiating stem cells is required to cover the energy demands of the different organ-specific cell types. Among other metabolic signatures, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism is most prominent in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells, whereas the fatty acid metabolic signature is unique in cardiomyocytes derived from embryonic stem cells. Identifying the specific metabolic pathways involved in pluripotency and differentiation is critical for further progress in the field of developmental biology and regenerative medicine. The recently generated knowledge on metabolic key processes may help to generate mature stem cell-derived somatic cells for therapeutic applications without the requirement of genetic manipulation. In the present review, the literature about metabolic features of stem cells and their cardiovascular cell derivatives as well as the specific metabolic gene signatures differentiating between stem and differentiated cells are summarized and discussed. PMID:24723659

  14. Defective autophagy is a key feature of cerebral cavernous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Saverio; Corricelli, Mariangela; Trapani, Eliana; Bravi, Luca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Delle Monache, Simona; Ferroni, Letizia; Patergnani, Simone; Missiroli, Sonia; Goitre, Luca; Trabalzini, Lorenza; Rimessi, Alessandro; Giorgi, Carlotta; Zavan, Barbara; Cassoni, Paola; Dejana, Elisabetta; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a major cerebrovascular disease affecting approximately 0.3–0.5% of the population and is characterized by enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhages. Cerebral cavernous malformation is a genetic disease that may arise sporadically or be inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Causative loss-of-function mutations have been identified in three genes, KRIT1 (CCM1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and PDCD10 (CCM3), which occur in both sporadic and familial forms. Autophagy is a bulk degradation process that maintains intracellular homeostasis and that plays essential quality control functions within the cell. Indeed, several studies have identified the association between dysregulated autophagy and different human diseases. Here, we show that the ablation of the KRIT1 gene strongly suppresses autophagy, leading to the aberrant accumulation of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, defective quality control systems, and increased intracellular stress. KRIT1 loss-of-function activates the mTOR-ULK1 pathway, which is a master regulator of autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors rescues some of the mole-cular and cellular phenotypes associated with CCM. Insufficient autophagy is also evident in CCM2-silenced human endothelial cells and in both cells and tissues from an endothelial-specific CCM3-knockout mouse model, as well as in human CCM lesions. Furthermore, defective autophagy is highly correlated to endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial event that contributes to CCM progression. Taken together, our data point to a key role for defective autophagy in CCM disease pathogenesis, thus providing a novel framework for the development of new pharmacological strategies to prevent or reverse adverse clinical outcomes of CCM lesions. PMID:26417067

  15. Myogenic and metabolic feedback in cerebral autoregulation: Putative involvement of arachidonic acid-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ronan M G

    2016-07-01

    The present paper presents a mechanistic model of cerebral autoregulation, in which the dual effects of the arachidonic acid metabolites 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) on vascular smooth muscle mediate the cerebrovascular adjustments to a change in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). 20-HETE signalling in vascular smooth muscle mediates myogenic feedback to changes in vessel wall stretch, which may be modulated by metabolic feedback through EETs released from astrocytes and endothelial cells in response to changes in brain tissue oxygen tension. The metabolic feedback pathway is much faster than 20-HETE-dependent myogenic feedback, and the former thus initiates the cerebral autoregulatory response, while myogenic feedback comprises a relatively slower mechanism that functions to set the basal cerebrovascular tone. Therefore, assessments of dynamic cerebral autoregulation, which may provide information on the response time of the cerebrovasculature, may specifically be used to yield information on metabolic feedback mechanisms, while data based on assessments of static cerebral autoregulation represent the integrated functionality of myogenic and metabolic feedback. PMID:27241246

  16. Persistence of cerebral metabolic abnormalities in chronic schizophrenia as determined by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wolkin, A.; Jaeger, J.; Brodie, J.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.; Rotrosen, J.; Gomez-Mont, F.; Cancro, R.

    1985-05-01

    Local cerebral metabolic rates were determined by positron emission tomography and the deoxyglucose method in a group of 10 chronic schizophrenic subjects before and after somatic treatment and in eight normal subjects. Before treatment, schizophrenic subjects had markedly lower absolute metabolic activity than did normal controls in both frontal and temporal regions and a trend toward relative hyperactivity in the basal ganglia area. After treatment, their metabolic rates approached those seen in normal subjects in nearly all regions except frontal. Persistence of diminished frontal metabolism was manifested as significant relative hypofrontality. These findings suggest specific loci of aberrant cerebral functioning in chronic schizophrenia and the utility of positron emission tomography in characterizing these abnormalities.

  17. Program for PET image alignment: Effects on calculated differences in cerebral metabolic rates for glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.L.; London, E.D.; Links, J.M.; Cascella, N.G. )

    1990-12-01

    A program was developed to align positron emission tomography images from multiple studies on the same subject. The program allowed alignment of two images with a fineness of one-tenth the width of a pixel. The indications and effects of misalignment were assessed in eight subjects from a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover study on the effects of cocaine on regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose. Visual examination of a difference image provided a sensitive and accurate tool for assessing image alignment. Image alignment within 2.8 mm was essential to reduce variability of measured cerebral metabolic rates for glucose. Misalignment by this amount introduced errors on the order of 20% in the computed metabolic rate for glucose. These errors propagate to the difference between metabolic rates for a subject measured in basal versus perturbed states.

  18. Pyruvate treatment attenuates cerebral metabolic depression and neuronal loss after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Moro, Nobuhiro; Ghavim, Sima S; Harris, Neil G; Hovda, David A; Sutton, Richard L

    2016-07-01

    Experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) is known to produce an acute increase in cerebral glucose utilization, followed rapidly by a generalized cerebral metabolic depression. The current studies determined effects of single or multiple treatments with sodium pyruvate (SP; 1000mg/kg, i.p.) or ethyl pyruvate (EP; 40mg/kg, i.p.) on cerebral glucose metabolism and neuronal injury in rats with unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. In Experiment 1 a single treatment was given immediately after CCI. SP significantly improved glucose metabolism in 3 of 13 brain regions while EP improved metabolism in 7 regions compared to saline-treated controls at 24h post-injury. Both SP and EP produced equivalent and significant reductions in dead/dying neurons in cortex and hippocampus at 24h post-CCI. In Experiment 2 SP or EP were administered immediately (time 0) and at 1, 3 and 6h post-CCI. Multiple SP treatments also significantly attenuated TBI-induced reductions in cerebral glucose metabolism (in 4 brain regions) 24h post-CCI, as did multiple injections of EP (in 4 regions). The four pyruvate treatments produced significant neuroprotection in cortex and hippocampus 1day after CCI, similar to that found with a single SP or EP treatment. Thus, early administration of pyruvate compounds enhanced cerebral glucose metabolism and neuronal survival, with 40mg/kg of EP being as effective as 1000mg/kg of SP, and multiple treatments within 6h of injury did not improve upon outcomes seen following a single treatment. PMID:27059390

  19. The collective therapeutic potential of cerebral ketone metabolism in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Mayumi L.; Matsumoto, Joyce H.

    2014-01-01

    The postinjury period of glucose metabolic depression is accompanied by adenosine triphosphate decreases, increased flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway, free radical production, activation of poly-ADP ribose polymerase via DNA damage, and inhibition of glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase (a key glycolytic enzyme) via depletion of the cytosolic NAD pool. Under these post-brain injury conditions of impaired glycolytic metabolism, glucose becomes a less favorable energy substrate. Ketone bodies are the only known natural alternative substrate to glucose for cerebral energy metabolism. While it has been demonstrated that other fuels (pyruvate, lactate, and acetyl-L-carnitine) can be metabolized by the brain, ketones are the only endogenous fuel that can contribute significantly to cerebral metabolism. Preclinical studies employing both pre- and postinjury implementation of the ketogenic diet have demonstrated improved structural and functional outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI) models, mild TBI/concussion models, and spinal cord injury. Further clinical studies are required to determine the optimal method to induce cerebral ketone metabolism in the postinjury brain, and to validate the neuroprotective benefits of ketogenic therapy in humans. PMID:24721741

  20. Cerebral glucose metabolism in corticobasal degeneration comparison with progressive supranuclear palsy using statistical mapping analysis.

    PubMed

    Juh, Rahyeong; Pae, Chi-Un; Kim, Tae-Suk; Lee, Chang-Uk; Choe, Boyoung; Suh, Taesuk

    This study measured the cerebral glucose metabolism in patients suffering from corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The aim was to determine if there is a different metabolic pattern using (18)F-labeled 2-deoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). The regional cerebral glucose metabolism was examined in 8 patients diagnosed clinically with CBD (mean age 69.6 +/- 7.8 years; male/female: 5/3), 8 patients with probable PSP (mean age 67.8 +/- 4.5 years; male/female: 4/4) and 22 healthy controls. The regional cerebral glucose metabolism between the three groups was compared using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) with a voxel-by-voxel approach (p < 0.001, 200-voxel level). Compared with the normal controls, asymmetry in the regional glucose metabolism was observed in the parietal, frontal and cingulate in the CBD patients. In the PSP patients, the glucose metabolism was lower in the orbitofrontal, middle frontal, cingulate, thalamus and mid-brain than their age matched normal controls. A comparison of the two patient groups demonstrated relative hypometabolism in the thalamus, the mid-brain in the PSP patients and the parietal lobe in CBD patients. These results suggest that when making a differential diagnosis of CBD and PSP, voxel-based analysis of the (18)F-FDG PET images using a SPM might be a useful tool in clinical examinations. PMID:15936506

  1. [Protein metabolism in the cerebral hemispheres during the emotional-algesic stress].

    PubMed

    Yakushev, V S; Davydov, V V; Bushueva, V V; Skurygin, V P; Krisanova, N V

    1985-01-01

    Emotional-algesic stress causes essential changes in the protein metabolism of cerebral hemispheres. These changes may be of great importance for the functioning of the brain and cause the disturbances of the higher nervous activity when the organism is influenced by the emotional stress factors. PMID:4039861

  2. Brain Size and Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rate in Nonspecific Retardation and Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haier, Richard J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Brain size and cerebral glucose metabolic rate were determined for 10 individuals with mild mental retardation (MR), 7 individuals with Down syndrome (DS), and 10 matched controls. MR and DS groups both had brain volumes of about 80% compared to controls, with variance greatest within the MR group. (SLD)

  3. [Regional vasoactive and metabolic therapy of patients with severe cranio-cerebral traumas].

    PubMed

    Lapshin, V N; Shakh, B N; Teplov, V M; Smirnov, D B

    2012-01-01

    In patients with severe cranio-cerebral traumas an investigation was performed of the efficiency of using vasoactive therapy in complex treatment directed to earlier recovery of the microcirculatory blood flow and aerobic metabolism in ischemic parts of the brain. PMID:22880433

  4. Mechanisms of murine cerebral malaria: Multimodal imaging of altered cerebral metabolism and protein oxidation at hemorrhage sites

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Mark J.; Aitken, Jade B.; El-Assaad, Fatima; McQuillan, James A.; Carter, Elizabeth A.; Ball, Helen J.; Tobin, Mark J.; Paterson, David; de Jonge, Martin D.; Siegele, Rainer; Cohen, David D.; Vogt, Stefan; Grau, Georges E.; Hunt, Nicholas H.; Lay, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Using a multimodal biospectroscopic approach, we settle several long-standing controversies over the molecular mechanisms that lead to brain damage in cerebral malaria, which is a major health concern in developing countries because of high levels of mortality and permanent brain damage. Our results provide the first conclusive evidence that important components of the pathology of cerebral malaria include peroxidative stress and protein oxidation within cerebellar gray matter, which are colocalized with elevated nonheme iron at the site of microhemorrhage. Such information could not be obtained previously from routine imaging methods, such as electron microscopy, fluorescence, and optical microscopy in combination with immunocytochemistry, or from bulk assays, where the level of spatial information is restricted to the minimum size of tissue that can be dissected. We describe the novel combination of chemical probe–free, multimodal imaging to quantify molecular markers of disturbed energy metabolism and peroxidative stress, which were used to provide new insights into understanding the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria. In addition to these mechanistic insights, the approach described acts as a template for the future use of multimodal biospectroscopy for understanding the molecular processes involved in a range of clinically important acute and chronic (neurodegenerative) brain diseases to improve treatment strategies. PMID:26824064

  5. Mechanisms of murine cerebral malaria: Multimodal imaging of altered cerebral metabolism and protein oxidation at hemorrhage sites.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Mark J; Aitken, Jade B; El-Assaad, Fatima; McQuillan, James A; Carter, Elizabeth A; Ball, Helen J; Tobin, Mark J; Paterson, David; de Jonge, Martin D; Siegele, Rainer; Cohen, David D; Vogt, Stefan; Grau, Georges E; Hunt, Nicholas H; Lay, Peter A

    2015-12-01

    Using a multimodal biospectroscopic approach, we settle several long-standing controversies over the molecular mechanisms that lead to brain damage in cerebral malaria, which is a major health concern in developing countries because of high levels of mortality and permanent brain damage. Our results provide the first conclusive evidence that important components of the pathology of cerebral malaria include peroxidative stress and protein oxidation within cerebellar gray matter, which are colocalized with elevated nonheme iron at the site of microhemorrhage. Such information could not be obtained previously from routine imaging methods, such as electron microscopy, fluorescence, and optical microscopy in combination with immunocytochemistry, or from bulk assays, where the level of spatial information is restricted to the minimum size of tissue that can be dissected. We describe the novel combination of chemical probe-free, multimodal imaging to quantify molecular markers of disturbed energy metabolism and peroxidative stress, which were used to provide new insights into understanding the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria. In addition to these mechanistic insights, the approach described acts as a template for the future use of multimodal biospectroscopy for understanding the molecular processes involved in a range of clinically important acute and chronic (neurodegenerative) brain diseases to improve treatment strategies. PMID:26824064

  6. Resting cerebral metabolism correlates with skin conductance and functional brain activation during fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Zeidan, Mohamed A; Pitman, Roger K; Milad, Mohammed R

    2012-02-01

    We investigated whether resting brain metabolism can be used to predict autonomic and neuronal responses during fear conditioning in 20 healthy humans. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was measured via positron emission tomography at rest. During conditioning, autonomic responses were measured via skin conductance, and blood oxygen level dependent signal was measured via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Resting dorsal anterior cingulate metabolism positively predicted differentially conditioned skin conductance responses. Midbrain and insula resting metabolism negatively predicted midbrain and insula functional reactivity, while dorsal anterior cingulate resting metabolism positively predicted midbrain functional reactivity. We conclude that resting metabolism in limbic areas can predict some aspects of psychophysiological and neuronal reactivity during fear learning. PMID:22207247

  7. Resting cerebral metabolism correlates with skin conductance and functional brain activation during fear conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Zeidan, Mohamed A.; Pitman, Roger K; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether resting brain metabolism can be used to predict autonomic and neuronal responses during fear conditioning in 20 healthy humans. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was measured via positron emission tomography at rest. During conditioning, autonomic responses were measured via skin conductance, and blood oxygen level dependent signal was measured via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Resting dorsal anterior cingulate metabolism positively predicted differentially conditioned skin conductance responses. Midbrain and insula resting metabolism negatively predicted midbrain and insula functional reactivity, while dorsal anterior cingulate resting metabolism positively predicted midbrain functional reactivity. We conclude that resting metabolism in limbic areas can predict some aspects of psychophysiological and neuronal reactivity during fear learning. PMID:22207247

  8. Differentiating cerebral lymphomas and GBMs featuring luminance distribution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Toshihiko; Chen, Tsuhan; Hirai, Toshinori; Murakami, Ryuji

    2013-02-01

    Differentiating lymphomas and glioblastoma multiformes (GBMs) is important for proper treatment planning. A number of works have been proposed but there are still some problems. For example, many works depend on thresholding a single feature value, which is susceptible to noise. Non-typical cases that do not get along with such simple thresholding can be found easily. In other cases, experienced observers are required to extract the feature values or to provide some interactions to the system, which is costly. Even if experts are involved, inter-observer variance becomes another problem. In addition, most of the works use only one or a few slice(s) because 3D tumor segmentation is difficult and time-consuming. In this paper, we propose a tumor classification system that analyzes the luminance distribution of the whole tumor region. The 3D MRIs are segmented within a few tens of seconds by using our fast 3D segmentation algorithm. Then, the luminance histogram of the whole tumor region is generated. The typical cases are classified by the histogram range thresholding and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) thresholding. The non-typical cases are learned and classified by a support vector machine (SVM). Most of the processing elements are semi-automatic except for the ADC value extraction. Therefore, even novice users can use the system easily and get almost the same results as experts. The experiments were conducted using 40 MRI datasets (20 lymphomas and 20 GBMs) with non-typical cases. The classification accuracy of the proposed method was 91.1% without the ADC thresholding and 95.4% with the ADC thresholding. On the other hand, the baseline method, the conventional ADC thresholding, yielded only 67.5% accuracy.

  9. Regional Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Novelty Seeking and Antisocial Personality: A Positron Emission Tomography Study.

    PubMed

    Park, So Hyeon; Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2016-08-01

    Novelty seeking (NS) and antisocial personality (ASP) are commonly exhibited by those who suffer from addictions, such as substance abuse. NS has been suggested to be a fundamental aspect of ASP. To investigate the neurobiological substrate of NS and ASP, we tested the relationship between regional cerebral glucose metabolism and the level of NS, determining the differences between individuals with and without ASP. Seventy-two healthy adults (43 males, mean age±SD=38.8±16.6 years, range=20~70 years; 29 females, 44.2±20.1 years, range=19~72 years) underwent resting-state brain positron emission tomography (PET) 40 minutes after (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) injection. Within 10 days of the FDG PET study, participants completed Cloninger's 240-item Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) to determine NS scores. Participants with and without ASP were grouped according to their TCI profiles. Statistical parametric mapping analysis was performed using the FDG PET and TCI profile data. NS scores positively correlated with metabolism in the left anterior cingulate gyrus and the insula on both sides of the brain and negatively correlated with metabolism in the right pallidum and putamen. Participants with ASP showed differences in cerebral glucose metabolism across various cortical and subcortical regions, mainly in the frontal and prefrontal areas. These data demonstrate altered regional cerebral glucose metabolism in individuals with NS and ASP and inform our understanding of the neurobiological substrates of problematic behaviors and personality disorders. PMID:27574485

  10. Regional Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Novelty Seeking and Antisocial Personality: A Positron Emission Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Hyeon; Park, Hyun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Novelty seeking (NS) and antisocial personality (ASP) are commonly exhibited by those who suffer from addictions, such as substance abuse. NS has been suggested to be a fundamental aspect of ASP. To investigate the neurobiological substrate of NS and ASP, we tested the relationship between regional cerebral glucose metabolism and the level of NS, determining the differences between individuals with and without ASP. Seventy-two healthy adults (43 males, mean age±SD=38.8±16.6 years, range=20~70 years; 29 females, 44.2±20.1 years, range=19~72 years) underwent resting-state brain positron emission tomography (PET) 40 minutes after 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) injection. Within 10 days of the FDG PET study, participants completed Cloninger's 240-item Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) to determine NS scores. Participants with and without ASP were grouped according to their TCI profiles. Statistical parametric mapping analysis was performed using the FDG PET and TCI profile data. NS scores positively correlated with metabolism in the left anterior cingulate gyrus and the insula on both sides of the brain and negatively correlated with metabolism in the right pallidum and putamen. Participants with ASP showed differences in cerebral glucose metabolism across various cortical and subcortical regions, mainly in the frontal and prefrontal areas. These data demonstrate altered regional cerebral glucose metabolism in individuals with NS and ASP and inform our understanding of the neurobiological substrates of problematic behaviors and personality disorders. PMID:27574485

  11. APP metabolism regulates tau proteostasis in human cerebral cortex neurons.

    PubMed

    Moore, Steven; Evans, Lewis D B; Andersson, Therese; Portelius, Erik; Smith, James; Dias, Tatyana B; Saurat, Nathalie; McGlade, Amelia; Kirwan, Peter; Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik; Livesey, Frederick J

    2015-05-01

    Accumulation of Aβ peptide fragments of the APP protein and neurofibrillary tangles of the microtubule-associated protein tau are the cellular hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate the relationship between APP metabolism and tau protein levels and phosphorylation, we studied human-stem-cell-derived forebrain neurons with genetic forms of AD, all of which increase the release of pathogenic Aβ peptides. We identified marked increases in intracellular tau in genetic forms of AD that either mutated APP or increased its dosage, suggesting that APP metabolism is coupled to changes in tau proteostasis. Manipulating APP metabolism by β-secretase and γ-secretase inhibition, as well as γ-secretase modulation, results in specific increases and decreases in tau protein levels. These data demonstrate that APP metabolism regulates tau proteostasis and suggest that the relationship between APP processing and tau is not mediated solely through extracellular Aβ signaling to neurons. PMID:25921538

  12. Effects of nicotine on regional cerebral glucose metabolism in awake resting tobacco smokers.

    PubMed

    Domino, E F; Minoshima, S; Guthrie, S K; Ohl, L; Ni, L; Koeppe, R A; Cross, D J; Zubieta, J

    2000-01-01

    Eleven healthy tobacco smoking adult male volunteers of mixed race were tobacco abstinent overnight for this study. In each subject, positron emission tomographic images of regional cerebral metabolism of glucose with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose were obtained in two conditions in the morning on different days: about 3min after approximately 1-2mg of nasal nicotine spray and after an equivalent volume of an active placebo spray of oleoresin of pepper in a random counterbalanced design. A Siemens/CTI 931/08-12 scanner with the capability of 15 horizontal brain slices was used. The images were further converted into a standard uniform brain format in which the mean data of all 11 subjects were obtained. Images were analysed in stereotactic coordinates using pixel-wise t statistics and a smoothed Gaussian model. Peak plasma nicotine levels varied three-fold and the areas under the curve(0-30min) varied seven-fold among the individual subjects. Nicotine caused a small overall reduction in global cerebral metabolism of glucose but, when the data were normalized, several brain regions showed relative increases in activity. Cerebral structures specifically activated by nicotine (nicotine minus pepper, Z score >4.0) included: left inferior frontal gyrus, left posterior cingulate gyrus and right thalamus. The visual cortex, including the right and left cuneus and left lateral occipito-temporal gyrus fusiformis, also showed an increase in regional cerebral metabolism of glucose with Z scores >3. 6. Structures with a decrease in regional cerebral metabolism of glucose (pepper minus nicotine) were the left insula and right inferior occipital gyrus, with Z scores >3.5. Especially important is the fact that the thalamus is activated by nicotine. This is consistent with the high density of nicotinic cholinoceptors in that brain region. However, not all brain regions affected by nicotine are known to have many nicotinic cholinoceptors. The results are discussed in relation to the

  13. Non-invasive optical measurement of cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics in infants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Roche-Labarbe, Nadege; Dehaes, Mathieu; Carp, Stefan; Fenoglio, Angela; Barbieri, Beniamino; Hagan, Katherine; Grant, P Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal brain injury remains a significant cause of infant mortality and morbidity, but there is not yet an effective bedside tool that can accurately screen for brain injury, monitor injury evolution, or assess response to therapy. The energy used by neurons is derived largely from tissue oxidative metabolism, and neural hyperactivity and cell death are reflected by corresponding changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO₂). Thus, measures of CMRO₂ are reflective of neuronal viability and provide critical diagnostic information, making CMRO₂ an ideal target for bedside measurement of brain health. Brain-imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) yield measures of cerebral glucose and oxygen metabolism, but these techniques require the administration of radionucleotides, so they are used in only the most acute cases. Continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CWNIRS) provides non-invasive and non-ionizing radiation measures of hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO₂) as a surrogate for cerebral oxygen consumption. However, SO₂ is less than ideal as a surrogate for cerebral oxygen metabolism as it is influenced by both oxygen delivery and consumption. Furthermore, measurements of SO₂ are not sensitive enough to detect brain injury hours after the insult, because oxygen consumption and delivery reach equilibrium after acute transients. We investigated the possibility of using more sophisticated NIRS optical methods to quantify cerebral oxygen metabolism at the bedside in healthy and brain-injured newborns. More specifically, we combined the frequency-domain NIRS (FDNIRS) measure of SO2 with the diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measure of blood flow index (CBFi) to yield an index of CMRO₂ (CMRO₂i). With the combined FDNIRS/DCS system we are able to quantify cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics. This represents an improvement over CWNIRS for detecting brain health, brain

  14. Non-invasive Optical Measurement of Cerebral Metabolism and Hemodynamics in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Roche-Labarbe, Nadege; Dehaes, Mathieu; Carp, Stefan; Fenoglio, Angela; Barbieri, Beniamino; Hagan, Katherine; Grant, P. Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal brain injury remains a significant cause of infant mortality and morbidity, but there is not yet an effective bedside tool that can accurately screen for brain injury, monitor injury evolution, or assess response to therapy. The energy used by neurons is derived largely from tissue oxidative metabolism, and neural hyperactivity and cell death are reflected by corresponding changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2). Thus, measures of CMRO2 are reflective of neuronal viability and provide critical diagnostic information, making CMRO2 an ideal target for bedside measurement of brain health. Brain-imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) yield measures of cerebral glucose and oxygen metabolism, but these techniques require the administration of radionucleotides, so they are used in only the most acute cases. Continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CWNIRS) provides non-invasive and non-ionizing radiation measures of hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) as a surrogate for cerebral oxygen consumption. However, SO2 is less than ideal as a surrogate for cerebral oxygen metabolism as it is influenced by both oxygen delivery and consumption. Furthermore, measurements of SO2 are not sensitive enough to detect brain injury hours after the insult 1,2, because oxygen consumption and delivery reach equilibrium after acute transients3. We investigated the possibility of using more sophisticated NIRS optical methods to quantify cerebral oxygen metabolism at the bedside in healthy and brain-injured newborns. More specifically, we combined the frequency-domain NIRS (FDNIRS) measure of SO2 with the diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measure of blood flow index (CBFi) to yield an index of CMRO2 (CMRO2i) 4,5. With the combined FDNIRS/DCS system we are able to quantify cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics. This represents an improvement over CWNIRS for detecting brain health, brain development

  15. Low Cerebral Glucose Metabolism: A Potential Predictor for the Severity of Vascular Parkinsonism and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunqi; Wei, Xiaobo; Liu, Xu; Liao, Jinchi; Lin, Jiaping; Zhu, Cansheng; Meng, Xiaochun; Xie, Dongsi; Chao, Dongman; Fenoy, Albert J; Cheng, Muhua; Tang, Beisha; Zhang, Zhuohua; Xia, Ying; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    This study explored the association between cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRGlc) and the severity of Vascular Parkinsonism (VP) and Parkinson's disease (PD). A cross-sectional study was performed to compare CMRGlc in normal subjects vs. VP and PD patients. Twelve normal subjects, 22 VP, and 11 PD patients were evaluated with the H&Y and MMSE, and underwent 18F-FDG measurements. Pearson's correlations were used to identify potential associations between the severity of VP/PD and CMRGlc. A pronounced reduction of CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen was detected in patients with VP and PD when compared with normal subjects. The VP patients displayed a slight CMRGlc decrease in the caudate putamen and frontal lobe in comparison with PD patients. These decreases in CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen were significantly correlated with the VP patients' H&Y, UPDRS II, UPDRS III, MMSE, cardiovascular, and attention/memory scores. Similarly, significant correlations were observed in patients with PD. This is the first clinical study finding strong evidence for an association between low cerebral glucose metabolism and the severity of VP and PD. Our findings suggest that these changes in glucose metabolism in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen may underlie the pathophysiological mechanisms of VP and PD. As the scramble to find imaging biomarkers or predictors of the disease intensifies, a better understanding of the roles of cerebral glucose metabolism may give us insight into the pathogenesis of VP and PD. PMID:26618044

  16. Cerebral glucose metabolism in childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Swedo, S.E.; Schapiro, M.B.; Grady, C.L.; Cheslow, D.L.; Leonard, H.L.; Kumar, A.; Friedland, R.; Rapoport, S.I.; Rapoport, J.L.

    1989-06-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in 18 adults with childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and in age- and sex-matched controls using positron emission tomography and fludeoxyglucose F 18. Both groups were scanned during rest, with reduced auditory and visual stimulation. The group with OCD showed an increased glucose metabolism in the left orbital frontal, right sensorimotor, and bilateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate regions as compared with controls. Ratios of regional activity to mean cortical gray matter metabolism were increased for the right prefrontal and left anterior cingulate regions in the group with OCD as a whole. Correlations between glucose metabolism and clinical assessment measures showed a significant relationship between metabolic activity and both state and trait measurements of OCD and anxiety as well as the response to clomipramine hydrochloride therapy. These results are consistent with the suggestion that OCD may result from a functional disturbance in the frontal-limbic-basal ganglia system.

  17. Effects of diazepam on cerebral metabolism and mood in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    de Wit, H; Metz, J; Wagner, N; Cooper, M

    1991-08-01

    The effects of diazepam on regional cerebral metabolism were examined in eight healthy volunteers using positron emission tomography with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose as the tracer. Each subject was tested three times, at 1-week intervals, with placebo, a low oral dose of diazepam (0.07 mg/kg), and a moderate dose of diazepam (0.14 mg/kg). Subjects completed mood questionnaires before and at regular intervals after taking the drug, and performed a vigilance task during the 60-minute period of tracer uptake. The effects of the drug on cerebral metabolism were examined alone and in relation to the subjective and behavioral effects of the drug. Both doses of diazepam decreased global (whole brain) metabolic rate but did not affect specific regions differentially. Subjects experienced sedative like effects during all three scans (placebo as well as drug). Compared to placebo, both doses of diazepam decreased anxiety, and neither dose produced significant impairment of task performance. Neither the subjective nor behavioral drug effects were correlated with the changes in metabolic rate. Thus, diazepam decreased whole brain metabolic rate at doses that produced only modest subjective or behavioral effects. The changes in metabolic rate were not clearly related to other observable drug effects. PMID:1930609

  18. Effects of Treatment for Tobacco Dependence on Resting Cerebral Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Matthew R; Mandelkern, Mark A; Shoptaw, Stephen; Shulenberger, Stephanie; Baker, Stephanie K; Abrams, Anna L; Xia, Catherine; London, Edythe D; Brody, Arthur L

    2010-01-01

    While bupropion HCl and practical group counseling (PGC) are commonly used treatments for tobacco dependence, the effects of these treatments on brain function are not well established. For this study, 54 tobacco-dependent cigarette smokers underwent resting 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose–positron emission tomography (FDG–PET) scanning before and after 8 weeks of treatment with bupropion HCl, PGC, or pill placebo. Using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 2), changes in cerebral glucose metabolism from before to after treatment were compared between treatment groups and correlations were determined between amount of daily cigarette usage and cerebral glucose metabolism. Compared with placebo, the two active treatments (bupropion HCl and PGC) had reductions in glucose metabolism in the posterior cingulate gyrus. Further analysis suggested that PGC had a greater effect than bupropion HCl on glucose metabolism in this region. We also found positive correlations between daily cigarette use and glucose metabolism in the left occipital gyrus and parietal–temporal junction. There were no significant negative correlations between daily cigarette use and glucose metabolism. Our findings suggest that bupropion HCl and PGC reduce neural activity much as the performance of a goal-oriented task does in the default mode network of the brain, including the posterior cingulate gyrus. Thus, this study supports the theory that active treatments for tobacco dependence move the brain into a more goal-oriented state. PMID:19865076

  19. Adiponectin: an adipokine with protective features against metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Maryam; Movahedian, Ahmad; Baranchi, Mostafa; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) as a collection of obesity-associated disorders is associated with inflammation, oxidative stress, pro-thrombotic state, elevated risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Adiponectin is one of the most abundant peptide hormones derived from adipose tissue. This protein plays a major role in glucose and lipid metabolism and prevents development of vascular changes. Anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects are the other features of adiponectin. Hypoadiponectinemia is associated with hypertension and pro-thrombotic state. In this review, we discuss the crucial role of adiponectin in prevention of metabolic syndrome considering its effects on the components of this syndrome. Pharmacological interventions and lifestyle modification may increase plasma adiponectin level or tissue sensitivity which seems to be a promising target for prevention and therapeutic approaches of MetS and related diseases. PMID:26124928

  20. Anxiety and cerebral cortical metabolism in normal persons.

    PubMed

    Giordani, B; Boivin, M J; Berent, S; Betley, A T; Koeppe, R A; Rothley, J M; Modell, J G; Hichwa, R D; Kuhl, D E

    1990-04-01

    The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was administered to 43 normal volunteers immediately before and after a positron emission tomography (PET) procedure with [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG). High trait-anxious individuals had significantly higher state (situational) anxiety associated with the PET scan procedure than did low trait-anxious persons. State anxiety decreased significantly for all respondents following the PET scan procedure. No significant relationships between global or regional cortical metabolic rates and state anxiety were observed. The direct cortical metabolic effects of heightened anxiety in the scan setting, should they exist, are likely obscured in the normal variance of the 18F-FDG method. PMID:2367610

  1. Metabolic Response of the Cerebral Cortex Following Gentle Sleep Deprivation and Modafinil Administration

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Jean-Marie; Tobler, Irene; Kopp, Caroline; Morgenthaler, Florence; Borbély, Alexander A.; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: The main energy reserve of the brain is glycogen, which is almost exclusively localized in astrocytes. We previously reported that cerebral expression of certain genes related to glycogen metabolism changed following instrumental sleep deprivation in mice. Here, we extended our investigations to another set of genes related to glycogen and glucose metabolism. We also compared the effect of instrumentally and pharmacologically induced prolonged wakefulness, followed (or not) by 3 hours of sleep recovery, on the expression of genes related to brain energy metabolism. Design: Sleep deprivation for 6–7 hours. Setting: Animal sleep research laboratory. Participants: Adults OF1 mice. Interventions: Wakefulness was maintained by “gentle sleep deprivation” method (GSD) or by administration of the wakefulness-promoting drug modafinil (MOD) (200 mg/kg i.p.). Measurements and Results: Levels of mRNAs encoding proteins related to energy metabolism were measured by quantitative real-time PCR in the cerebral cortex. The mRNAs encoding protein targeting to glycogen (PTG) and the glial glucose transporter were significantly increased following both procedures used to prolong wakefulness. Glycogenin mRNA levels were increased only after GSD, while neuronal glucose transporter mRNA only after MOD. These effects were reversed after sleep recovery. A significant enhancement of glycogen synthase activity without any changes in glycogen levels was observed in both conditions. Conclusions: These results indicate the existence of a metabolic adaptation of astrocytes aimed at maintaining brain energy homeostasis during the sleep-wake cycle. Citation: Petit, JM; Tobler I; Kopp C; Morgenthaler F; Borbély AA; Magistretti PJ. Metabolic response of the cerebral cortex following gentle sleep deprivation and modafinil administration. SLEEP 2010;33(7):901–908. PMID:20614850

  2. SUPPLY AND DEMAND IN CEREBRAL ENERGY METABOLISM: THE ROLE OF NUTRIENT TRANSPORTERS

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Ian A.; Carruthers, Anthony; Vannucci, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    Glucose is the obligate energetic fuel for the mammalian brain and most studies of cerebral energy metabolism assume that the vast majority of cerebral glucose utilization fuels neuronal activity via oxidative metabolism, both in the basal and activated state. Glucose transporter proteins (GLUTs) deliver glucose from the circulation to the brain: GLUT1 in the microvascular endothelial cells of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and glia; GLUT3 in neurons. Lactate, the glycolytic product of glucose metabolism, is transported into and out of neural cells by the monocarboxylate transporters: MCT1 in the BBB and astrocytes and MCT2 in neurons. The proposal of the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis (Pellerin and Magistretti, 1994) suggested that astrocytes play the primary role in cerebral glucose utilization and generate lactate for neuronal energetics, especially during activation. Since the identification of the GLUTs and MCTs in brain, much has been learned about their transport properties, i.e. capacity and affinity for substrate, which must be considered in any model of cerebral glucose uptake and utilization. Using concentrations and kinetic parameters of GLUT1 and GLUT3 in BBB endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons, along with the corresponding kinetic properties of the monocarboxylate transporters, we have successfully modeled brain glucose and lactate levels as well as lactate transients in response to neuronal stimulation. Simulations based on these parameters suggest that glucose readily diffuses through the basal lamina and interstitium to neurons, which are primarily responsible for glucose uptake, metabolism, and the generation of the lactate transients observed upon neuronal activation. PMID:17579656

  3. The brain at work: a cerebral metabolic manifestation of central fatigue?

    PubMed

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Secher, Niels H

    2007-11-15

    Central fatigue refers to circumstances in which strength appears to be limited by the ability of the central nervous system to recruit motoneurons. Central fatigue manifests when the effort to contract skeletal muscles is intense and, thus, is aggravated when exercise is performed under stress, whereas it becomes attenuated following training. Central fatigue has not been explained, but the cerebral metabolic response to intense exercise, as to other modalities of cerebral activation, is a reduction in its "metabolic ratio" (MR), i.e., the brain's uptake of oxygen relative to that of carbohydrate. At rest the MR is close to 6 but during intense whole-body exercise it decreases to less than 3, with the uptake of lactate becoming as important as that of glucose. It remains debated what underlies this apparent inability of the brain to oxidize the carbohydrate taken up, but it may approach approximately 10 mmol glucose equivalents. In the case of exercise, a concomitant uptake of ammonium for formation of amino acids may account for only approximately 10% of this "extra" carbohydrate taken up. Also, accumulation of intermediates in metabolic pathways and compartmentalization of metabolism between astrocytes and neurons are avenues that have to be explored. Depletion of glycogen stores and subsequent supercompensation during periods of low neuronal activity may not only play a role but also link brain metabolism to its function. PMID:17394258

  4. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate in human sleep assessed by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Wu, J.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N.; Bunney, W.E. Jr. ); Gillin, J.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was measured during nighttime sleep in 36 normal volunteers using positron emission tomography and fluorine-18-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG). In comparison to waking controls, subjects given FDG during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep showed about a 23% reduction in metabolic rate across the entire brain. This decrease was greater for the frontal than temporal or occipital lobes, and greater for basal ganglia and thalamus than cortex. Subjects in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep tended to have higher cortical metabolic rates than walking subjects. The cingulate gyrus was the only cortical structure to show a significant increase in glucose metabolic rate in REM sleep in comparison to waking. The basal ganglia were relatively more active on the right in REM sleep and symmetrical in NREM sleep.

  5. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-05-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions.

  6. Ozone autohemotherapy induces long-term cerebral metabolic changes in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Molinari, F; Simonetti, V; Franzini, M; Pandolfi, S; Vaiano, F; Valdenassi, L; Liboni, W

    2014-01-01

    Ozone autohemotherapy is an emerging therapeutic technique that is gaining increasing importance in treating neurological disorders. A validated and standard methodology to assess the effect of such therapy on brain metabolism and circulation is however still lacking. We used a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system to monitor the cerebral metabolism and a transcranial Doppler (TCD) to monitor the blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries. Fifty-four subjects (32 neurological patients and 22 controls) were tested before, during, and after ozone autohemotherapy. We monitored the concentration changes in the level of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin, and in the level of the Cytochrome-c-oxidase (CYT-c). As a primary endpoint of the work, we showed the changes in the brain metabolism and circulation of the entire population. The concentration of oxygenated haemoglobin increased after the reinjection of the ozoned blood and remained higher than the beginning for another 1.5 hours. The concentration of the deoxygenated haemoglobin decreased during the therapy and the CYT-c concentration markedly increased about 1 hour after the reinjection. No significant changes were observed on the blood flow velocity. As secondary endpoint, we compared the NIRS metabolic pattern of 20 remitting-relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) patients against 20 controls. We showed that by using only 7 NIRS variables it was possible to characterize the metabolic brain pattern of the two groups of subjects. The MS subjects showed a marked increase of the CYT-c activity and concentration about 40 minutes after the end of the autohemotherapy, possibly revealing a reduction of the chronic oxidative stress level typical of MS sufferers. From a technical point of view, this preliminary study showed that NIRS could be useful to show the effects of ozone autohemotherapy at cerebral level, in a long-term monitoring. The clinical result of this study is the quantitative measurement of the

  7. Propofol Compared to Isoflurane Inhibits Mitochondrial Metabolism in Immature Swine Cerebral Cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Atkinson, D. B.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Morgan, Phil G.; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-08

    Anesthetics used in infants and children are implicated in development of neurocognitive disorders. Although propofol induces neuroapoptosis in developing brain, the underlying mechanisms require elucidation and may have an energetic basis. We studied substrate utilization in an immature swine model anesthetized with either propofol or isoflurane for 4 hours. Piglets were infused with 13-Carbon labeled glucose and leucine in the common carotid artery in order to assess citric acid cycle (CAC) metabolism in the parietal cortex. The anesthetics produced similar systemic hemodynamics and cerebral oxygen saturation by near-infrared-spectroscopy. Compared to isoflurane, propofol depleted ATP and glycogen stores. Propofol also decreased pools of the CAC intermediates, citrate and α-ketoglutarate, while markedly increasing succinate along with decreasing mitochondrial complex II activity. Propofol also inhibited acetyl-CoA entry into the CAC through pyruvate dehydrogenase, while promoting glycolytic flux with marked accumulation of lactate. Although oxygen supply appeared similar between the anesthetic groups, propofol yielded a metabolic phenotype which resembled a hypoxic state. Propofol impairs substrate flux through the CAC in the immature cerebral cortex. These impairments occurred without systemic metabolic perturbations which typically accompany propofol infusion syndrome. These metabolic abnormalities may play a role in neurotoxity observed with propofol in the vulnerable immature brain.

  8. Cerebral circulation, metabolism, and blood-brain barrier of rats in hypocapnic hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, T.; Krieglstein, J.

    1987-03-01

    The effects of hypoxic hypoxia on physiological variables, cerebral circulation, cerebral metabolism, and blood-brain barrier were investigated in conscious, spontaneously breathing rats by exposing them to an atmosphere containing 7% O/sub 2/. Hypoxia affected a marked hypotension, hypocapnia and alkalosis. Cortical tissue high-energy phosphates and glucose content were not affected by hypoxia, glucose 6-phosphate lactate, and pyruvate levels were significantly increased. Blood-brain barrier permeability, regional brain glucose content and lumped constant were not changed by hypoxia. Local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) rose by 40-70% of control values in gray matter and by 80-90% in white matter. Under hypoxia, columns of increased and decreased LCGU and were detectable in cortical gray matter. Color-coded (/sup 14/C)2-deoxy-D-glucose autoradiograms of rat brain are shown. Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) increased by 50-90% in gray matter and by up to 180% in white matter. Coupling between LCGU and LCBF in hypoxia remained unchanged. The data suggests a stimulation of glycolysis, increased glucose transport into the cell, and increased hexokinase activity. The physiological response of gray and white matter to hypoxia obviously differs. Uncoupling of the relation between LCGU and LCBF does not occur.

  9. Genetic variants in lipid metabolism are independently associated with multiple features of the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Our objective was to find single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), within transcriptional pathways of glucose and lipid metabolism, which are related to multiple features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Methods 373 SNPs were measured in 3575 subjects of the Doetinchem cohort. Prevalence of MetS features, i.e. hyperglycemia, abdominal obesity, decreased HDL-cholesterol levels and hypertension, were measured twice in 6 years. Associations between the SNPs and the individual MetS features were analyzed by log-linear models. For SNPs related to multiple MetS features (P < 0.01), we investigated whether these associations were independent of each other. Results Two SNPs, CETP Ile405Val and APOE Cys112Arg, were associated with both the prevalence of low HDL-cholesterol level (Ile405Val P = < .0001; Cys112Arg P = 0.001) and with the prevalence of abdominal obesity (Ile405Val P = 0.007; Cys112Arg P = 0.007). For both SNPs, the association with HDL-cholesterol was partly independent of the association with abdominal obesity and vice versa. Conclusion Two SNPs, mainly known for their role in lipid metabolism, were associated with two MetS features i.e., low HDL-cholesterol concentration, as well as, independent of this association, abdominal obesity. These SNPs may help to explain why low HDL-cholesterol levels and abdominal obesity frequently co-occur. PMID:21767357

  10. Effect of desipramine and fluoxetine on energy metabolism of cerebral mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Ferrari, Federica; Gorini, Antonella; Brunello, Nicoletta; Tascedda, Fabio

    2016-08-25

    Brain bioenergetic abnormalities in mood disorders were detected by neuroimaging in vivo studies in humans. Because of the increasing importance of mitochondrial pathogenetic hypothesis of Depression, in this study the effects of sub-chronic treatment (21days) with desipramine (15mg/kg) and fluoxetine (10mg/kg) were evaluated on brain energy metabolism. On mitochondria in vivo located in neuronal soma (somatic) and on mitochondria of synapses (synaptic), the catalytic activities of regulatory enzymes of mitochondrial energy-yielding metabolic pathways were assayed. Antidepressants in vivo treatment modified the activities of selected enzymes of different mitochondria, leading to metabolic modifications in the energy metabolism of brain cortex: (a) the enhancement of cytochrome oxidase activity on somatic mitochondria; (b) the decrease of malate, succinate dehydrogenase and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase activities of synaptic mitochondria; (c) the selective effect of fluoxetine on enzymes related to glutamate metabolism. These results overcome the conflicting data so far obtained with antidepressants on brain energy metabolism, because the enzymatic analyses were made on mitochondria with diversified neuronal in vivo localization, i.e. on somatic and synaptic. This research is the first investigation on the pharmacodynamics of antidepressants studied at subcellular level, in the perspective of (i) assessing the role of energy metabolism of cerebral mitochondria in animal models of mood disorders, and (ii) highlighting new therapeutical strategies for antidepressants targeting brain bioenergetics. PMID:27268280

  11. Constancy and trade-offs in the neuroanatomical and metabolic design of the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Karbowski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian brains span about four orders of magnitude in cortical volume and have to operate in different environments that require diverse behavioral skills. Despite these geometric and behavioral diversities, the examination of cerebral cortex across species reveals that it contains a substantial number of conserved characteristics that are associated with neuroanatomy and metabolism, i.e., with neuronal connectivity and function. Some of these cortical constants or invariants have been known for a long time but not sufficiently appreciated, and others were only recently discovered. The focus of this review is to present the cortical invariants and discuss their role in the efficient information processing. Global conservation in neuroanatomy and metabolism, as well as their correlated regional and developmental variability suggest that these two parallel systems are mutually coupled. It is argued that energetic constraint on cortical organization can be strong if cerebral blood supplied is either below or above a certain level, and it is rather soft otherwise. Moreover, because maximization or minimization of parameters associated with cortical connectivity, function and cost often leads to conflicts in design, it is argued that the architecture of the cerebral cortex is a result of structural and functional compromises. PMID:24574975

  12. Neuronal and astrocytic interactions modulate brain endothelial properties during metabolic stresses of in vitro cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Neurovascular and gliovascular interactions significantly affect endothelial phenotype. Physiologically, brain endothelium attains several of its properties by its intimate association with neurons and astrocytes. However, during cerebrovascular pathologies such as cerebral ischemia, the uncoupling of neurovascular and gliovascular units can result in several phenotypical changes in brain endothelium. The role of neurovascular and gliovascular uncoupling in modulating brain endothelial properties during cerebral ischemia is not clear. Specifically, the roles of metabolic stresses involved in cerebral ischemia, including aglycemia, hypoxia and combined aglycemia and hypoxia (oxygen glucose deprivation and re-oxygenation, OGDR) in modulating neurovascular and gliovascular interactions are not known. The complex intimate interactions in neurovascular and gliovascular units are highly difficult to recapitulate in vitro. However, in the present study, we used a 3D co-culture model of brain endothelium with neurons and astrocytes in vitro reflecting an intimate neurovascular and gliovascular interactions in vivo. While the cellular signaling interactions in neurovascular and gliovascular units in vivo are much more complex than the 3D co-culture models in vitro, we were still able to observe several important phenotypical changes in brain endothelial properties by metabolically stressed neurons and astrocytes including changes in barrier, lymphocyte adhesive properties, endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression and in vitro angiogenic potential. PMID:24438487

  13. Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) assessed by combined Doppler and spectroscopic OCT

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Shau Poh; Merkle, Conrad W.; Leahy, Conor; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2015-01-01

    A method of measuring cortical oxygen metabolism in the mouse brain that uses independent quantitative measurements of three key parameters: cerebral blood flow (CBF), arteriovenous oxygen extraction (OE), and hemoglobin concentration ([HbT]) is presented. Measurements were performed using a single visible light spectral/Fourier domain OCT microscope, with Doppler and spectroscopic capabilities, through a thinned-skull cranial window in the mouse brain. Baseline metabolic measurements in mice are shown to be consistent with literature values. Oxygen consumption, as measured by this method, did not change substantially during minor changes either in the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) or in the fraction of inspired carbon dioxide (FiCO2), in spite of larger variations in oxygen saturations. This set of experiments supports, but does not prove, the validity of the proposed method of measuring brain oxygen metabolism. PMID:26504644

  14. Effect of brovincamine on cerebral circulation and metabolism in internal carotid artery occlusion examined by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Fukuyama, H; Yonekura, Y; Konishi, J

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of brovincamine on the circulatory and metabolic state in the brain ischemia with internal carotid artery occlusion accompanying the 'misery perfusion syndrome'. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were measured by PET before and after intravenous loading of brovincamine. Brovincamine increased CBF and decreased OEF significantly on the occluded side of the hemisphere. CMRO2 did not show any remarkable changes upon brovincamine administration. It was concluded that brovincamine might be useful for increasing the hemodynamic reserve, but did not affect the metabolic state immediately after its administration. PMID:1490496

  15. Patients with type 1 diabetes exhibit altered cerebral metabolism during hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Kim C.C.; Tack, Cees J.; Heerschap, Arend; van der Graaf, Marinette; de Galan, Bastiaan E.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) experience, on average, 2 to 3 hypoglycemic episodes per week. This study investigated the effect of hypoglycemia on cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with uncomplicated T1DM. For this purpose, hyperinsulinemic euglycemic and hypoglycemic glucose clamps were performed on separate days, using [1-13C]glucose infusion to increase plasma 13C enrichment. In vivo brain 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to measure the time course of 13C label incorporation into different metabolites and to calculate the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux (VTCA) by a one-compartment metabolic model. We found that cerebral glucose metabolism, as reflected by the VTCA, was not significantly different comparing euglycemic and hypoglycemic conditions in patients with T1DM. However, the VTCA was inversely related to the HbA1C and was, under hypoglycemic conditions, approximately 45% higher than that in a previously investigated group of healthy subjects. These data suggest that the brains of patients with T1DM are better able to endure moderate hypoglycemia than those of subjects without diabetes. PMID:23298837

  16. 13C-labelled microdialysis studies of cerebral metabolism in TBI patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Keri L.H.; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Gallagher, Clare N.; Grice, Peter; Howe, Duncan J.; Mason, Andrew; Timofeev, Ivan; Helmy, Adel; Murphy, Michael P.; Menon, David K.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Sutherland, Garnette R.; Pickard, John D.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Human brain chemistry is incompletely understood and better methodologies are needed. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes metabolic perturbations, one result of which includes increased brain lactate levels. Attention has largely focussed on glycolysis, whereby glucose is converted to pyruvate and lactate, and is proposed to act as an energy source by feeding into neurons’ tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, generating ATP. Also reportedly upregulated by TBI is the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) that does not generate ATP but produces various molecules that are putatively neuroprotective, antioxidant and reparative, in addition to lactate among the end products. We have developed a novel combination of 13C-labelled cerebral microdialysis both to deliver 13C-labelled substrates into brains of TBI patients and recover the 13C-labelled metabolites, with high-resolution 13C NMR analysis of the microdialysates. This methodology has enabled us to achieve the first direct demonstration in humans that the brain can utilise lactate via the TCA cycle. We are currently using this methodology to make the first direct comparison of glycolysis and the PPP in human brain. In this article, we consider the application of 13C-labelled cerebral microdialysis for studying brain energy metabolism in patients. We set this methodology within the context of metabolic pathways in the brain, and 13C research modalities addressing them. PMID:24361470

  17. Role of the Sphingosine Metabolism Pathway on Neurons against Experimental Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yu; Suzuki, Hidenori; Altay, Orhan; Rolland, William; Zhang, John H

    2013-01-01

    Although there is evidence that sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1P1) activation occurs following experimental brain injury, there is little information about its metabolic pathway in cerebral ischemia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the sphingosine metabolic pathway including S1P1, sphingosine kinases 1 (SphK1), and 2 (SphK2) in transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Fifty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were used to asses temporal profiles of S1P1, SphK1 and 2 on neurons in infarct and periinfarct cortices at pre-infarct state, 6, and 24 hours after MCAO. The animals were then treated with vehicle and 0.25mg/kg FTY720, which is an agonist of S1P receptors, and evaluated regarding neurological function, infarct volume, and S1P1 expression on neurons at 24 hours after MCAO. The expressions of S1P1, SphK1, and SphK2 were significantly decreased after MCAO. Labeling of all markers were reduced in the infarct cortex but remained present in the periinfarct cortex, and some were found to be on neurons. Significant improvements of neurological function and brain injury were observed in the FTY720 group compared with the vehicle and untreated groups, although S1P1 expression on neurons was reduced in the FTY720 group compared with the vehicle group. We demonstrated that S1P1, SphK1, and SphK2 were downregulated in the infarct cortex, whereas they were preserved in the periinfarct cortex where FTY720 reduced neuronal injury possibly via S1P1 activation. Our findings suggest that activation of the sphingosine metabolic pathway may be neuroprotective in cerebral ischemia. PMID:24187597

  18. New insights into coupling and uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the brain.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Poornima; Chopp, Michael; Chen, Jieli

    2016-06-30

    The brain has high metabolic and energy needs and requires continuous cerebral blood flow (CBF), which is facilitated by a tight coupling between neuronal activity, CBF, and metabolism. Upon neuronal activation, there is an increase in energy demand, which is then met by a hemodynamic response that increases CBF. Such regional CBF increase in response to neuronal activation is observed using neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. The mechanisms and mediators (eg, nitric oxide, astrocytes, and ion channels) that regulate CBF-metabolism coupling have been extensively studied. The neurovascular unit is a conceptual model encompassing the anatomical and metabolic interactions between the neurons, vascular components, and glial cells in the brain. It is compromised under disease states such as stroke, diabetes, hypertension, dementias, and with aging, all of which trigger a cascade of inflammatory responses that exacerbate brain damage. Hence, tight regulation and maintenance of neurovascular coupling is central for brain homeostasis. This review article also discusses the waste clearance pathways in the brain such as the glymphatic system. The glymphatic system is a functional waste clearance pathway that removes metabolic wastes and neurotoxins from the brain along paravascular channels. Disruption of the glymphatic system burdens the brain with accumulating waste and has been reported in aging as well as several neurological diseases. PMID:27374823

  19. New insights into coupling and uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Venkat, Poornima; Chopp, Michael; Chen, Jieli

    2016-01-01

    The brain has high metabolic and energy needs and requires continuous cerebral blood flow (CBF), which is facilitated by a tight coupling between neuronal activity, CBF, and metabolism. Upon neuronal activation, there is an increase in energy demand, which is then met by a hemodynamic response that increases CBF. Such regional CBF increase in response to neuronal activation is observed using neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. The mechanisms and mediators (eg, nitric oxide, astrocytes, and ion channels) that regulate CBF-metabolism coupling have been extensively studied. The neurovascular unit is a conceptual model encompassing the anatomical and metabolic interactions between the neurons, vascular components, and glial cells in the brain. It is compromised under disease states such as stroke, diabetes, hypertension, dementias, and with aging, all of which trigger a cascade of inflammatory responses that exacerbate brain damage. Hence, tight regulation and maintenance of neurovascular coupling is central for brain homeostasis. This review article also discusses the waste clearance pathways in the brain such as the glymphatic system. The glymphatic system is a functional waste clearance pathway that removes metabolic wastes and neurotoxins from the brain along paravascular channels. Disruption of the glymphatic system burdens the brain with accumulating waste and has been reported in aging as well as several neurological diseases. PMID:27374823

  20. Effect of acute ammonia intoxication on cerebral metabolism in rats with portacaval shunts.

    PubMed Central

    Hindfelt, B; Plum, F; Duffy, T E

    1977-01-01

    Rats were made chronically hyperammonemic by portal-systemic shunting and, 8 wk later, were subjected to acute ammonia intoxication by the intraperitoneal injection of 5.2 mmol/kg of ammonium acetate. In free-ranging animals, ammonia treatment induced a brief period of precoma (10-15 min) that progressed into deep, anesthetic coma lasting for several hours and was associated with a high mortality. In paralyzed, artificially ventilated animals that were lightly anesthetized with nitrous oxide, acute ammonia intoxication caused major disturbances of cerebral carbohydrate, amino acid, and energy metabolism that correlated in time with the change in functional state. At 10 min after injection (precoma), the concentrations of most glycolytic intermediates were increased, as was the lactate/pyruvate ratio. Citrate declined, despite a twofold rise in pyruvate, suggesting that the conversion of pyruvate to citrate had been impaired. Concentrations of phosphocreatine, and of the putative neurotransmitters, glutamate and aspartate, declined during precoma, but the concentrations of the adenine nucleotides in the cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum, and brain stem remained within normal limits. At 60 min after injection (coma), ATP declined in all regions of brain; the reduction in total high-energy phosphates was most notable in the brain stem. The findings indicate that cerebral dysfunction in chronic, relapsing ammonia intoxication is not due to primary energy failure. Rather, it is suggested that ammonia-induced depletion of glutamic and aspartic acids, and inhibition of the malate-asparate hydrogen shuttle are the dominant neurochemical lesions. PMID:838855

  1. Metabolic syndrome impairs reactivity and wall mechanics of cerebral resistance arteries in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Steven D; DeVallance, Evan; d'Audiffret, Alexandre C; Frisbee, Stephanie J; Tabone, Lawrence E; Shrader, Carl D; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Chantler, Paul D

    2015-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent in the North American population and is associated with increased risk for development of cerebrovascular disease. This study determined the structural and functional changes in the middle cerebral arteries (MCA) during the progression of MetS and the effects of chronic pharmacological interventions on mitigating vascular alterations in obese Zucker rats (OZR), a translationally relevant model of MetS. The reactivity and wall mechanics of ex vivo pressurized MCA from lean Zucker rats (LZR) and OZR were determined at 7-8, 12-13, and 16-17 wk of age under control conditions and following chronic treatment with pharmacological agents targeting specific systemic pathologies. With increasing age, control OZR demonstrated reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired dilator (acetylcholine) reactivity, elevated myogenic properties, structural narrowing, and wall stiffening compared with LZR. Antihypertensive therapy (e.g., captopril or hydralazine) starting at 7-8 wk of age blunted the progression of arterial stiffening compared with OZR controls, while treatments that reduced inflammation and oxidative stress (e.g., atorvastatin, rosiglitazone, and captopril) improved NO bioavailability and vascular reactivity compared with OZR controls and had mixed effects on structural remodeling. These data identify specific functional and structural cerebral adaptations that limit cerebrovascular blood flow in MetS patients, contributing to increased risk of cognitive decline, cerebral hypoperfusion, and ischemic stroke; however, these pathological adaptations could potentially be blunted if treated early in the progression of MetS. PMID:26475592

  2. Changes in Cerebral Oxidative Metabolism during Neonatal Seizures Following Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhabrata; Bale, Gemma; Mathieson, Sean; Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Meek, Judith; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Robertson, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common following hypoxic–ischemic brain injury in newborn infants. Prolonged or recurrent seizures have been shown to exacerbate neuronal damage in the developing brain; however, the precise mechanism is not fully understood. Cytochrome-c-oxidase is responsible for more than 90% of ATP production inside mitochondria. Using a novel broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system, we measured the concentration changes in the oxidation state of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase (Δ[oxCCO]) and hemodynamics during recurrent neonatal seizures following hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy in a newborn infant. A rapid increase in Δ[oxCCO] was noted at the onset of seizures along with a rise in the baseline of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood volume fell just prior to the seizure onset but recovered rapidly during seizures. Δ[oxCCO] during seizures correlated with changes in mean electroencephalogram voltage indicating an increase in neuronal activation and energy demand. The progressive decline in the Δ[oxCCO] baseline during seizures suggests a progressive decrease of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. PMID:27559538

  3. Changes in Cerebral Oxidative Metabolism during Neonatal Seizures Following Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Subhabrata; Bale, Gemma; Mathieson, Sean; Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Meek, Judith; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Robertson, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common following hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in newborn infants. Prolonged or recurrent seizures have been shown to exacerbate neuronal damage in the developing brain; however, the precise mechanism is not fully understood. Cytochrome-c-oxidase is responsible for more than 90% of ATP production inside mitochondria. Using a novel broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system, we measured the concentration changes in the oxidation state of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase (Δ[oxCCO]) and hemodynamics during recurrent neonatal seizures following hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in a newborn infant. A rapid increase in Δ[oxCCO] was noted at the onset of seizures along with a rise in the baseline of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood volume fell just prior to the seizure onset but recovered rapidly during seizures. Δ[oxCCO] during seizures correlated with changes in mean electroencephalogram voltage indicating an increase in neuronal activation and energy demand. The progressive decline in the Δ[oxCCO] baseline during seizures suggests a progressive decrease of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. PMID:27559538

  4. Sequential metabolic changes in rat brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion: A 2-deoxyglucose study

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, K.; Sharp, F.R.; Simon, R.P. )

    1989-12-01

    The distribution and time course of altered cerebral metabolism following permanent focal ischemia was studied in rat using the 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) technique. Increased 2DG uptake preceded decreased 2DG uptake and infarction in the caudate putamen and cortex. Decreased 2DG uptake without infarction was observed for 72 h in thalamus and for 24 h in hippocampus (areas remote from the ischemic zones). This study supports the concept of cell excitation as a pathophysiologic process in permanent focal ischemia. The time course of increased metabolism may demarcate the time window of opportunity for the previously demonstrated attenuation of stroke size with inhibition of cell excitation by pharmacologic blockade of excitatory amino acid neurotransmission.

  5. The effect of LLLT on bone metabolism in children with severe cerebral palsy (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: It is said that the average frequency of bone fracture in hospitalized children with severe cerebral palsy (unable to remain seated) is 1% (0.2 to 2.0%). Cerebral palsy patients' bones are known to be vulnerable to fracture, and refractory bone atrophy may be observed. However, the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on bone density or bone metabolism has not been fully investigated. In recent years, tests for bone density or bone metabolism markers have become available. Material and methods: In this study, we evaluated changes in bone density and bone metabolism markers in 4 children with severe cerebral palsy who underwent LLLT for an average of 22 days. Results: B-ALP, a marker of ossification, increased 1 month after the start of irradiation in 3 of the 4 subjects and returned to a level close to the pre-irradiation level 2 months after the start of irradiation. In the remaining subjects in whom B-ALP failed to increase, B-ALP had been low before irradiation. Urinary N-terminal telopeptide (NTx) levels, a marker of bone resorption, decreased in 3 of the 4 subjects after the start of irradiation and remained low even 10 months later. Serum NTx levels tended to decrease in 3 of the 4 subjects. The levels of serum NTx/Crea, Deoxy-Pyridinoline (DPd) and DPd/Crea (DPd/Crea) also decreased in 3 of the 4 subjects. Transient decreases in intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were observed in all 4 cases. Changes were particularly apparent in 2 cases: one with high NTx levels, which showed enhanced bone resorption, and one with high PTH levels, probably due to a vitamin D (VitD) deficiency. Although the metacarpal bone density measured by DIP was found to be lower than in normal children, there were no changes due to LLLT. Conclusion: These results suggest that LLLT has a positive influence on bone metabolism in that it temporarily increases bone formation and suppresses bone resorption while also tending to improve secondary

  6. Oxidative metabolic activity of cerebral cortex after fluid-percussion head injury in the cat.

    PubMed

    Duckrow, R B; LaManna, J C; Rosenthal, M; Levasseur, J E; Patterson, J L

    1981-05-01

    To assess the metabolic and vascular effects of head trauma, fluid-percussion pressure waves were transmitted to the brains of anesthetized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated cats. Changes in the redox state of cytochrome a,a3, and relative local blood volume were measured in situ by dual-wavelength reflection spectrophotometry of the cortical surface viewed through an acrylic cranial window implanted within the closed skull. Initial fluid-percussion impacts of 0.5 to 2.8 atm peak pressure produced consistent transient oxidation of cytochrome a,a3 and increases of cortical blood volume. These changes occurred despite the presence of transient posttraumatic hypotension i some cases. Also, impact-induced alterations of vascular tone occurred, independent of the presence or absence of transient hypertension in the posttraumatic period. These data demonstrate that hypoxia does not play a role in the immediate posttraumatic period in cerebral cortex, and are consistent with the idea that after injury there is increased cortical energy conservation. These data also support the concept that head trauma alters the relationship of metabolism and cerebral circulation in the period immediately after injury. PMID:7229699

  7. Cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment alters cerebral metabolism in dopaminergic reward regions. Bromocriptine enhances recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Clow, D.W.; Hammer, R.P. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    2-(14C)deoxyglucose autoradiography was used to determine local cerebral glucose utilization (lCGU) in rats following chronic cocaine treatment and subsequent abstinence. lCGU was examined in 43 discrete brain regions in animals which had received daily injections of cocaine for 14 days (10 mg/kg) followed by 3 days of saline or bromocriptine (10 mg/kg) treatment. Cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment significantly reduced lCGU in several regions including mesocorticolimbic structures such as ventral tegmental area, medial prefrontal cortex, and nucleus accumbens (NAc). Within the NAc, however, only the rostral pole showed significant reduction. In contrast, when bromocriptine treatment accompanied abstinence, lCGU was no longer reduced in mesocorticolimbic and most other regions, implying that metabolic recovery was enhanced by bromocriptine treatment during early abstinence following chronic cocaine treatment. These data suggest that cerebral metabolism is decreased during cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment in critical brain regions, and that this alteration can be prevented by treatment with direct-acting dopamine agonists such as bromocriptine.

  8. Multichannel optical brain imaging to separate cerebral vascular, tissue metabolic, and neuronal effects of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hugang; Luo, Zhongchi; Yuan, Zhijia; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Characterization of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation metabolic changes, as well neuronal function is of great importance to study of brain functions and the relevant brain disorders such as drug addiction. Compared with other neuroimaging modalities, optical imaging techniques have the potential for high spatiotemporal resolution and dissection of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobing oxygenation and intracellular Ca ([Ca2+]i), which serves as markers of vascular function, tissue metabolism and neuronal activity, respectively. Recently, we developed a multiwavelength imaging system and integrated it into a surgical microscope. Three LEDs of λ1=530nm, λ2=570nm and λ3=630nm were used for exciting [Ca2+]i fluorescence labeled by Rhod2 (AM) and sensitizing total hemoglobin (i.e., CBV), and deoxygenated-hemoglobin, whereas one LD of λ1=830nm was used for laser speckle imaging to form a CBF mapping of the brain. These light sources were time-sharing for illumination on the brain and synchronized with the exposure of CCD camera for multichannel images of the brain. Our animal studies indicated that this optical approach enabled simultaneous mapping of cocaine-induced changes in CBF, CBV and oxygenated- and deoxygenated hemoglobin as well as [Ca2+]i in the cortical brain. Its high spatiotemporal resolution (30μm, 10Hz) and large field of view (4x5 mm2) are advanced as a neuroimaging tool for brain functional study.

  9. To clarify features of photoplethysmography in monitoring balanced anesthesia, compared with Cerebral State Index

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lieliang; Xu, Lei; Zhu, Juan; Gao, Yujie; Luo, Zhonghua; Wang, Hongyu; Zhu, Zhongliang; Yu, Yi; Shi, Hongwei; Bao, Hongguang

    2014-01-01

    Background Although photoplethysmography and cerebral state index (CSI) have been used as indices in monitoring vital signs perioperatively, there are only a few reports comparing the performance of photoplethysmography with CSI in monitoring anaesthesia depth. The aim of the present study was to clarify features of photoplethysmography in monitoring balanced general anesthesia compared with CSI. Material/Methods Forty-five patients undergoing elective operation under general anaesthesia were enrolled in this study. Anaesthesia was induced with target-controlled infusion propofol. The photoplethysmogram, CSI, Modified Observer’s Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale (MOAAS), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were continuously monitored and recorded. Finger photoplethysmogram amplitude (PPGA) and pulse beat interval (PBI) were calculated off-line. Results For the period of time from pre-induction to pre-intubation, the coefficient of correlation between MOAAS and CSI was higher than those between MOAAS and PPGA, PBI, and MAP. CSI showed higher prediction probabilities (Pk) to differentiate the levels of MOAAS than did PPGA, PBI, and MAP. PPGA, PBI, and MAP values showed significant differences between before and after intubation, as well as pre- and post-incision (P<0.05), but no significant changes in cerebral state index (P>0.05). Conclusions The present study shows that photoplethysmography-derived parameters appear to be more suitable in monitoring the nociceptive component of balanced general anesthesia, while CSI performs well in detecting the sedation or hypnotic component of balanced general anesthesia. PMID:24662222

  10. Ovine middle cerebral artery characterization and quantification of ultrastructure and other features: changes with development.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravi; Henderson, David A; Chu, Nina; Longo, Lawrence D

    2012-02-15

    Regulation of tone, blood pressure, and blood flow in the cerebral vasculature is of vital importance, particularly in the developing infant. We tested the hypothesis that, in addition to accretion of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in cell layers with vessel thickening, significant changes in smooth muscle structure, as well as phenotype, extracellular matrix, and membrane proteins, in the media of cerebral arteries (CAs) during the course of late fetal development account for associated changes in contractility. Using transmission electron, confocal, wide-field epifluorescence, and light microscopy, we examined the structure and ultrastructure of CAs. Also, we utilized wire myography, Western immunoblotting, and real-time quantitative PCR to examine several other features of these arteries. We compared the main branch ovine middle CAs of 95- and 140-gestational day (GD) fetuses with those of adults (n = 5 for each experimental group). We observed a graded increase in phenylephrine- and KCl-induced contractile responses with development. Structurally, lumen diameter, media thickness, and media cross-sectional area increased dramatically from one age group to the next. With maturation, the cross-sectional profiles of CA SMCs changed from flattened bands in the 95-GD fetus to irregular ovoid-shaped fascicles in the 140-GD fetus and adult. We also observed a change in the type of collagen, specific integrin molecules, and several other parameters of SMC morphology with maturation. Ovine CAs at 95 GD appeared morphologically immature and poorly equipped to respond to major hemodynamic adjustments with maturation. PMID:22116510

  11. Cerebral glucose metabolic patterns in Alzheimer's disease. Effect of gender and age at dementia onset

    SciTech Connect

    Small, G.W.; Kuhl, D.E.; Riege, W.H.; Fujikawa, D.G.; Ashford, J.W.; Metter, E.J.; Mazziotta, J.C.

    1989-06-01

    No previous study of Alzheimer's disease has, to our knowledge, assessed the effect of both age at dementia onset and gender on cerebral glucose metabolic patterns. To this end, we used positron emission tomography (fludeoxyglucose F 18 method) to study 24 patients with clinical diagnoses of probable Alzheimer's disease. Comparisons of the 13 patients with early-onset dementia (less than 65 years of age) with the 11 patients with late-onset dementia (greater than 65 years of age) revealed significantly lower left parietal metabolic ratios (left posterior parietal region divided by the hemispheric average) in the early-onset group. The metabolic ratio of posterior parietal cortex divided by the relatively disease-stable average of caudate and thalamus also separated patients with early-onset dementia from those with late-onset dementia, but not men from women. Further comparisons between sexes showed that, in all brain regions studied, the 9 postmenopausal women had higher nonweighted mean metabolic rates than the 15 men from the same age group, with hemispheric sex differences of 9% on the right and 7% on the left. These results demonstrate decreased parietal ratios in early-onset dementia of Alzheimer's disease, independent of a gender effect.

  12. Positron computed tomography studies of cerebral metabolic responses to complex motor tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Mazziotta, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Human motor system organization was explored in 8 right-handed male subjects using /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose and positron computed tomography to measure cerebral glucose metabolism. Five subjects had triple studies (eyes closed) including: control (hold pen in right hand without moving), normal size writing (subject repeatedly writes name) and large (10-15 X normal) name writing. In these studies normal and large size writing had a similar distribution of metabolic responses when compared to control studies. Activations (percent change from control) were in the range of 12-20% and occurred in the striatum bilaterally > contralateral Rolandic cortex > contralateral thalamus. No significant activations were observed in the ipsilateral thalamus, Rolandic cortex or cerebellum (supplementary motor cortex was not examined). The magnitude of the metabolic response in the striatum was greater with the large versus normal sized writing. This differential response may be due to an increased number and topographic distribution of neurons responding with the same average activity between tasks or an increase in the functional activity of the same neuronal population between the two tasks (present spatial resolution inadequate to differentiate). When subjects (N=3) performed novel sequential finger movements, the maximal metabolic response was in the contralateral Rolandic cortex > striatum. Such studies provide a means of exploring human motor system organization, motor learning and provide a basis for examining patients with motor system disorders.

  13. Dehydration accelerates reductions in cerebral blood flow during prolonged exercise in the heat without compromising brain metabolism.

    PubMed

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Llodio, Iñaki; Garcia, Benjamin; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2015-11-01

    Dehydration hastens the decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during incremental exercise, whereas the cerebral metabolic rate for O2 (CMRO2 ) is preserved. It remains unknown whether CMRO2 is also maintained during prolonged exercise in the heat and whether an eventual decline in CBF is coupled to fatigue. Two studies were undertaken. In study 1, 10 male cyclists cycled in the heat for ∼2 h with (control) and without fluid replacement (dehydration) while internal and external carotid artery blood flow and core and blood temperature were obtained. Arterial and internal jugular venous blood samples were assessed with dehydration to evaluate CMRO2 . In study 2, in 8 male subjects, middle cerebral artery blood velocity was measured during prolonged exercise to exhaustion in both dehydrated and euhydrated states. After a rise at the onset of exercise, internal carotid artery flow declined to baseline with progressive dehydration (P < 0.05). However, cerebral metabolism remained stable through enhanced O2 and glucose extraction (P < 0.05). External carotid artery flow increased for 1 h but declined before exhaustion. Fluid ingestion maintained cerebral and extracranial perfusion throughout nonfatiguing exercise. During exhaustive exercise, however, euhydration delayed but did not prevent the decline in cerebral perfusion. In conclusion, during prolonged exercise in the heat, dehydration accelerates the decline in CBF without affecting CMRO2 and also restricts extracranial perfusion. Thus, fatigue is related to a reduction in CBF and extracranial perfusion rather than CMRO2 . PMID:26371170

  14. Metabolic, cardiorespiratory, and neuromuscular fitness performance in children with cerebral palsy: A comparison with healthy youth.

    PubMed

    García, Claudia Cardona; Alcocer-Gamboa, Alberto; Ruiz, Margarita Pérez; Caballero, Ignacio Martínez; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan; Saiz, Beatriz Moral; Lorenzo, Teresa Martín; Lara, Sergio Lerma

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess metabolic, cardiorespiratory, and neuromuscular fitness parameters in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and to compare these findings with typically developing children. 40 children with CP (21 males, 19 females; mean age, 11.0±3.3 yr; range, 6.5-17.1 yr; Gross Motor Function Classification System levels 1 or 2) and 40 healthy, age- and sex-matched children completed a test battery that consisted of 8 tests and 28 measures that assessed cardio-respiratory fitness, energy expenditure, anaerobic endurance, muscle strength, agility, stability and flexibility. Children with CP had significantly lower performance (P<0.05) on most cardiorespiratory and metabolic tests than those of healthy children, Differences in neuromuscular measures of muscular strength, speed, agility, anaerobic endurance, and flexibility between groups were most apparent. Grouped differences in cardiorespiratory variables revealed a 25% difference in performance, whereas grouped differences in metabolic and neuromuscular measures were 43% and 60%, respectively. The physical fitness of contemporary children with CP is significantly less than healthy, age-matched children. Significant differences in neuromuscular measures between groups can aid in the identification of specific fitness abilities in need of improvement in this population. PMID:27162775

  15. System-wide assembly of pathways and modules hierarchically reveal metabolic mechanism of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Guo, Zhili; Zhang, Liangxiao; Zhang, Yingying; Chen, Yinying; Nan, Jingyi; Zhao, Buchang; Xiao, Hongbin; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Yongyan

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between cerebral ischemia and metabolic disorders is poorly understood, which is partly due to the lack of comparative fusing data for larger complete systems and to the complexity of metabolic cascade reactions. Based on the fusing maps of comprehensive serum metabolome, fatty acid and amino acid profiling, we identified 35 potential metabolic biomarkers for ischemic stroke. Our analyses revealed 8 significantly altered pathways by MetPA (Metabolomics Pathway Analysis, impact score >0.10) and 15 significantly rewired modules in a complex ischemic network using the Markov clustering (MCL) method; all of these pathways became more homologous as the number of overlapping nodes was increased. We then detected 24 extensive pathways based on the total modular nodes from the network analysis, 12 of which were new discovery pathways. We provided a new perspective from the viewpoint of abnormal metabolites for the overall study of ischemic stroke as well as a new method to simplify the network analysis by selecting the more closely connected edges and nodes to build a module map of stroke. PMID:26621314

  16. Cerebral Metabolic Differences Associated with Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengtao; Wu, Ping; Guo, Sisi; Liu, Zhenyang; Wang, Yixuan; Wang, Ying; Ding, Zhengtong; Wu, Jianjun; Zuo, Chuantao; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize cerebral glucose metabolism associated with different cognitive states in Parkinson’s disease (PD) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Methods Three groups of patients were recruited in this study including PD patients with dementia (PDD; n = 10), with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI; n = 20), and with no cognitive impairment (PD-NC; n = 30). The groups were matched for age, sex, education, disease duration, motor disability, levodopa equivalent dose and Geriatric Depression Rating Scale (GDS) score. All subjects underwent a FDG-PET study. Maps of regional metabolism in the three groups were compared using statistical parametric mapping (SPM5). Results PD-MCI patients exhibited limited areas of hypometabolism in the frontal, temporal and parahippocampal gyrus compared with the PD-NC patients (p < 0.01). PDD patients had bilateral areas of hypometabolism in the frontal and posterior parietal-occipital lobes compared with PD-MCI patients (p < 0.01), and exhibited greater metabolic reductions in comparison with PD-NC patients (p < 0.01). Conclusions Compared with PD-NC patients, hypometabolism was much higher in the PDD patients than in PD-MCI patients, mainly in the posterior cortical areas. The result might suggest an association between posterior cortical hypometabolism and more severe cognitive impairment. PD-MCI might be important for early targeted therapeutic intervention and disease modification. PMID:27064684

  17. Metabolic, cardiorespiratory, and neuromuscular fitness performance in children with cerebral palsy: A comparison with healthy youth

    PubMed Central

    García, Claudia Cardona; Alcocer-Gamboa, Alberto; Ruiz, Margarita Pérez; Caballero, Ignacio Martínez; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan; Saiz, Beatriz Moral; Lorenzo, Teresa Martín; Lara, Sergio Lerma

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess metabolic, cardiorespiratory, and neuromuscular fitness parameters in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and to compare these findings with typically developing children. 40 children with CP (21 males, 19 females; mean age, 11.0±3.3 yr; range, 6.5–17.1 yr; Gross Motor Function Classification System levels 1 or 2) and 40 healthy, age- and sex-matched children completed a test battery that consisted of 8 tests and 28 measures that assessed cardio-respiratory fitness, energy expenditure, anaerobic endurance, muscle strength, agility, stability and flexibility. Children with CP had significantly lower performance (P<0.05) on most cardiorespiratory and metabolic tests than those of healthy children, Differences in neuromuscular measures of muscular strength, speed, agility, anaerobic endurance, and flexibility between groups were most apparent. Grouped differences in cardiorespiratory variables revealed a 25% difference in performance, whereas grouped differences in metabolic and neuromuscular measures were 43% and 60%, respectively. The physical fitness of contemporary children with CP is significantly less than healthy, age-matched children. Significant differences in neuromuscular measures between groups can aid in the identification of specific fitness abilities in need of improvement in this population. PMID:27162775

  18. Regional cerebral energy metabolism during intravenous anesthesia with etomidate, ketamine or thiopental

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Regional brain glucose utilization (rCMRglc) was measured in rats during steady-state levels of intravenous anesthesia to determine if alterations in brain function due to anesthesia could provide information on the mechanisms of anesthesia. Intravenous anesthetics from three different chemical classes were studied: etomidate, ketamine and thiopental. All rCMRglc experiments were conducted in freely moving rats in isolation chambers, with the use of (6-/sup 14/C) glucose and guantitative autoradiography. Etomidate caused a rostral-to-caudal gradient of depression of rCMRglc. The four doses of etomidate did not differ in their effects on energy metabolism. Sub-anesthetic (5 mg kg/sup -1/) and anesthetic (30 mg kg /sup -1/) doses of ketamine produced markedly different patterns of behavior. Brain energy metabolism during the sub-anesthetic dose was stimulated in most regions, while the anesthetic dose selectively stimulated the hippocampus, leaving most brain regions unaffected. Thiopental produced a dose-dependent reduction of rCMRglc in all gray matter regions. No brain region was selectively affected. Comparison of the drug-specific alterations of cerebral energy metabolism suggests these anesthetics do not act through a common mechanism. The hypothesis that each acts by binding to specific cell membrane receptors is consistent with these observations.

  19. Combined administration of hyperbaric oxygen and hydroxocobalamin improves cerebral metabolism after acute cyanide poisoning in rats.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M B; Olsen, N V; Hyldegaard, O

    2013-11-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) or intravenous hydroxocobalamin (OHCob) both abolish cyanide (CN)-induced surges in interstitial brain lactate and glucose concentrations. HBOT has been shown to induce a delayed increase in whole blood CN concentrations, whereas OHCob may act as an intravascular CN scavenger. Additionally, HBOT may prevent respiratory distress and restore blood pressure during CN intoxication, an effect not seen with OHCob administration. In this report, we evaluated the combined effects of HBOT and OHCob on interstitial lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations as well as lactate-to-pyruvate ratio in rat brain by means of microdialysis during acute CN poisoning. Anesthetized rats were allocated to three groups: 1) vehicle (1.2 ml isotonic NaCl intra-arterially); 2) potassium CN (5.4 mg/kg intra-arterially); 3) potassium CN, OHCob (100 mg/kg intra-arterially) and subsequent HBOT (284 kPa in 90 min). OHCob and HBOT significantly attenuated the acute surges in interstitial cerebral lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations compared with the intoxicated rats given no treatment. Furthermore, the combined treatment resulted in consistent low lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations, as well as in low lactate-to-pyruvate ratios compared with CN intoxicated controls. In rats receiving OHCob and HBOT, respiration improved and cyanosis disappeared, with subsequent stabilization of mean arterial blood pressure. The present findings indicate that a combined administration of OHCob and HBOT has a beneficial and persistent effect on the cerebral metabolism during CN intoxication. PMID:23970528

  20. Developmental trajectories of cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism at baseline and during working memory tasks.

    PubMed

    Jog, Mayank A; Yan, Lirong; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; LeClair, Holly; Elashoff, David; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-07-01

    The neurobiological interpretation of developmental BOLD fMRI findings remains difficult due to the confounding issues of potentially varied baseline of brain function and varied strength of neurovascular coupling across age groups. The central theme of the present research is to study the development of brain function and neuronal activity through in vivo assessments of cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) both at baseline and during the performance of a working memory task in a cohort of typically developing children aged 7 to 18years. Using a suite of 4 emerging MRI technologies including MR blood oximetry, phase-contrast MRI, pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) perfusion MRI and concurrent CBF/BOLD fMRI, we found: 1) At baseline, both global CBF and CMRO2 showed an age related decline while global OEF was stable across the age group; 2) During the working memory task, neither BOLD nor CBF responses showed significant variations with age in the activated fronto-parietal brain regions. Nevertheless, detailed voxel-wise analyses revealed sub-regions within the activated fronto-parietal regions that show significant decline of fractional CMRO2 responses with age. These findings suggest that the brain may become more "energy efficient" with age during development. PMID:27103136

  1. Optical measurement of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with congenital heart defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durduran, Turgut; Zhou, Chao; Buckley, Erin M.; Kim, Meeri N.; Yu, Guoqiang; Choe, Regine; Gaynor, J. William; Spray, Thomas L.; Durning, Suzanne M.; Mason, Stefanie E.; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Putt, Mary E.; Wang, Jiongjiong; Greenberg, Joel H.; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Licht, Daniel J.

    2010-05-01

    We employ a hybrid diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) monitor for neonates with congenital heart disease (n=33). The NIRS-DCS device measured changes during hypercapnia of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentrations; cerebral blood flow (rCBFDCS); and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO2). Concurrent measurements with arterial spin-labeled magnetic resonance imaging (rCBFASL-MRI, n=12) cross-validate rCBFDCS against rCBFASL-MRI, showing good agreement (R=0.7, p=0.01). The study demonstrates use of NIRS-DCS on a critically ill neonatal population, and the results indicate that the optical technology is a promising clinical method for monitoring this population.

  2. Secondary muscle pathology and metabolic dysregulation in adults with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Paul M.; Hurvitz, Edward A.; Burant, Charles F.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is caused by an insult to or malformation of the developing brain which affects motor control centers and causes alterations in growth, development, and overall health throughout the life span. In addition to the disruption in development caused by the primary neurological insult, CP is associated with exaggerated sedentary behaviors and a hallmark accelerated progression of muscle pathology compared with typically developing children and adults. Factors such as excess adipose tissue deposition and altered partitioning, insulin resistance, and chronic inflammation may increase the severity of muscle pathology throughout adulthood and lead to cardiometabolic disease risk and/or early mortality. We describe a model of exaggerated health risk represented in adults with CP and discuss the mechanisms and secondary consequences associated with chronic sedentary behavior, obesity, aging, and muscle spasticity. Moreover, we highlight novel evidence that implicates aberrant inflammation in CP as a potential mechanism linking both metabolic and cognitive dysregulation in a cyclical pattern. PMID:22912367

  3. 3-D phantom to simulate cerebral blood flow and metabolic images for PET

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.J.; Cutler, P.D.; Digby, W.M.; Mazziotta, J.C. . Nuclear Medicine Lab.)

    1990-04-01

    A 3-dimensional brain phantom has been developed to simulate the activity distributions found in the human brain in the cerebral blood flow and metabolism studies currently employed in PET. The phantom has a single contiguous chamber and utilizes thin layers of lucite to provide apparent relative concentrations of 5, 1 and 0 for gray matter, white matter and ventricles, respectively, in the brain. The phantom and an ideal image set were created from the same set of data. Thus, the user has a basis for comparing measured images with an ideal image set which enables the user to make quantitative evaluation of the errors in PET studies with a data set similar to that obtained in patient studies.

  4. Metabolic, enzymatic and gene involvement in cerebral glucose dysmetabolism after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Amorini, Angela Maria; Lazzarino, Giacomo; Di Pietro, Valentina; Signoretti, Stefano; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Belli, Antonio; Tavazzi, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the metabolic, enzymatic and gene changes causing cerebral glucose dysmetabolism following graded diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI) were evaluated. TBI was induced in rats by dropping 450g from 1 (mild TBI; mTBI) or 2m height (severe TBI; sTBI). After 6, 12, 24, 48, and 120h gene expressions and enzymatic activities of glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) enzymes, and levels of lactate, ATP, ADP, ATP/ADP (indexing mitochondrial phosphorylating capacity), NADP(+), NADPH and GSH were determined in whole brain extracts (n=9 rats at each time for both TBI levels). Sham-operated animals (n=9) were used as controls. Results demonstrated that mTBI caused a late increase (48-120h post injury) of glycolytic gene expression and enzymatic activities, concomitantly with mitochondrial functional recovery (ATP and ATP/ADP normalization). No changes in lactate and PPP genes and enzymes, were accompanied by transient decrease in GSH, NADP(+), NADPH and NADPH/NADP(+). Animals following sTBI showed early increase (6-24h post injury) of glycolytic gene expression and enzymatic activities, occurring during mitochondrial malfunctioning (50% decrease in ATP and ATP/ADP). Higher lactate and lower GSH, NADP(+), NADPH, NADPH/NADP(+) than controls were recorded at anytime post injury (p<0.01). Both TBI levels caused metabolic and gene changes affecting glucose metabolism. Following mTBI, increased glucose flux through glycolysis is coupled to mitochondrial glucose oxidation. "True" hyperglycolysis occurs only after sTBI, where metabolic changes, caused by depressed mitochondrial phosphorylating capacity, act on genes causing net glycolytic flux increase uncoupled from mitochondrial glucose oxidation. PMID:26844378

  5. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in children with severe head injuries. Part 2: Cerebrovascular resistance and its determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, P M; Matthews, D S; Eyre, J A

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that in children with severe head injuries the cerebral circulation does not respond appropriately to normal physiological control mechanisms, making children more susceptible than adults to low cerebrovascular resistance, increased cerebral blood flow (cerebral hyperaemia), and raised intracranial pressure. To investigate this issue, 122 serial measurements of cerebrovascular resistance in 17 children with severe head injuries have been performed and related to cerebral perfusion pressure, arterial CO2 (PaCO2), arterial oxygen content (AO2), and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). Cerebrovascular resistance values (mean (SD) 1.54 (0.61) mm Hg.ml-1.100 g.min) were normal or raised in most cases; 71 values (58%) were within the normal range, 39 (32%) above the upper limit, and only 12 (10%) below the lower limit. There was a significant correlation between cerebral perfusion pressure and cerebrovascular resistance (r = 0.32, p = 0.0003), suggesting preservation of pressure autoregulation. This correlation was absent in four of the five children who died or survived with severe handicap. Analysis by multilevel modelling indicated that, as in normal subjects, CMRO2, CPP, AO2, PaCO2, and cerebrovenous pH were important independent determinants of cerebrovascular resistance. The results indicate that normal cerebrovascular reactivity is often preserved in children with severe head injuries but may be impaired in the most severely injured patients. PMID:7876844

  6. MRI-based methods for quantification of the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Zachary B; Detre, John A; Wehrli, Felix W

    2016-07-01

    The brain depends almost entirely on oxidative metabolism to meet its significant energy requirements. As such, the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) represents a key measure of brain function. Quantification of CMRO2 has helped elucidate brain functional physiology and holds potential as a clinical tool for evaluating neurological disorders including stroke, brain tumors, Alzheimer's disease, and obstructive sleep apnea. In recent years, a variety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based CMRO2 quantification methods have emerged. Unlike positron emission tomography - the current "gold standard" for measurement and mapping of CMRO2 - MRI is non-invasive, relatively inexpensive, and ubiquitously available in modern medical centers. All MRI-based CMRO2 methods are based on modeling the effect of paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin on the magnetic resonance signal. The various methods can be classified in terms of the MRI contrast mechanism used to quantify CMRO2: T2*, T2', T2, or magnetic susceptibility. This review article provides an overview of MRI-based CMRO2 quantification techniques. After a brief historical discussion motivating the need for improved CMRO2 methodology, current state-of-the-art MRI-based methods are critically appraised in terms of their respective tradeoffs between spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and robustness, all of critical importance given the spatially heterogeneous and temporally dynamic nature of brain energy requirements. PMID:27089912

  7. Altered cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in patients with liver disease and minimal encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, A.H.; Yap, E.W.; Rhoades, H.M.; Wong, W.H. )

    1991-03-01

    We measured CBF and the CMRglc in normal controls and in patients with severe liver disease and evidence for minimal hepatic encephalopathy using positron emission tomography. Regions were defined in frontal, temporal, parietal, and visual cortex; the thalamus; the caudate; the cerebellum; and the white matter along with a whole-slice value obtained at the level of the thalamus. There was no difference in whole-slice CBF and CMRglc values. Individual regional values were normalized to the whole-slice value and subjected to a two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. When normalized CBF and CMRglc values for regions were compared between groups, significant differences were demonstrated (F = 5.650, p = 0.00014 and F = 4.58, p = 0.0073, respectively). These pattern differences were due to higher CBF and CMRglc in the cerebellum, thalamus, and caudate in patients and lower values in the cortex. Standardized coefficients extracted from a discriminant function analysis permitted correct group assignment for 95.5% of the CBF studies and for 92.9% of the CMRglc studies. The similarity of the altered pattern of cerebral metabolism and flow in our patients to that seen in rats subjected to portacaval shunts or ammonia infusions suggests that this toxin may alter flow and metabolism and that this, in turn, causes the clinical expression of encephalopathy.

  8. The effect of the excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist dizocilipine maleate (MK-801) on hemispheric cerebral blood flow and metabolism in dogs: modification by prior complete cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Perkins, W J; Lanier, W L; Karlsson, B R; Milde, J H; Michenfelder, J D

    1989-09-25

    The effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist dizociplipine maleate (MK-801) on cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2), intracranial pressure and systemic variables was examined in 6 normal dogs (Group I). In 6 additional dogs (Group II), the effects of a prior 11 min episode of complete cerebral ischemia on the response to dizocilipine was studied. CBF was measured with a sagittal sinus outflow technique and CMRO2 was calculated as the product of CBF and the arterial to sagittal sinus O2 content difference. Dizocilipine was administered as a 150 micrograms/kg i.v. bolus followed by a 75 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 infusion for 90 min. Plasma dizocilipine levels were greater than 25 ng/ml for the duration of the infusion. The CSF levels were approximately half the plasma levels. Five minutes after initiation of dizocilipine treatment, Group I dogs experienced a 63% increase in heart rate (P less than 0.01) and an 8% decrease in the mean arterial blood pressure (P less than 0.05). Over the same time interval. CBF increased by 85% (P less than 0.01) and intracranial pressure nearly doubled (P less than 0.05). In addition, dizocilipine treatment in all Group I animals resulted in EEG quasiperiodic bursts of delta-waves and polyspikes on a background of beta-activity. With the exception of the intracranial pressure, the above changes in systemic and cerebral variables persisted for the duration of the drug infusion. Intracranial pressure was no longer significantly elevated after 80 min of drug infusion. Hemispheric CMRO2 was unchanged by dizocilipine in Group I dogs. There was a decrease in the cortical glucose level at the end of the study, but no significant change in phosphocreatine, ATP, lactate, or energy charge when compared with 6 laboratory normals. An identical dose of dizocilipine administered after an 11 min episode of complete cerebral ischemia resulted in no significant changes in either cerebral or systemic

  9. Sexual dimorphisms in swimming behavior, cerebral metabolic activity and adrenoceptors in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Ampatzis, Konstantinos; Dermon, Catherine R

    2016-10-01

    Sexually dimorphic behaviors and brain sex differences, not only restricted to reproduction, are considered to be evolutionary preserved. Specifically, anxiety related behavioral repertoire is suggested to exhibit sex-specific characteristics in rodents and primates. The present study investigated whether behavioral responses to novelty, have sex-specific characteristics in the neurogenetic model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio), lacking chromosomal sex determination. For this, aspects of anxiety-like behavior (including reduced exploration, increased freezing behavior and erratic movement) of male and female adult zebrafish were tested in a novel tank paradigm and after habituation. Male and female zebrafish showed significant differences in their swimming activity in response to novelty, with females showing less anxiety spending more time in the upper tank level. When fish have habituated, regional cerebral glucose uptake, an index of neuronal activity, and brain adrenoceptors' (ARs) expression (α2-ARs and β-ARs) were determined using in vivo 2-[(14)C]-deoxyglucose methodology and in vitro neurotransmitter receptors quantitative autoradiography, respectively. Intriguingly, females exhibited higher glucose utilization than males in hypothalamic brain areas. Adrenoceptor's expression pattern was dimorphic in zebrafish telencephalic, preoptic, hypothalamic nuclei, central gray, and cerebellum, similarly to birds and mammals. Specifically, the lateral zone of dorsal telencephalon (Dl), an area related to spatial cognition, homologous to the mammalian hippocampus, showed higher α2-AR densities in females. In contrast, male cerebellum included higher densities of β-ARs in comparison to female. Taken together, our data demonstrate a well-defined sex discriminant cerebral metabolic activity and ARs' pattern in zebrafish, possibly contributing to male-female differences in the swimming behavior. PMID:27363927

  10. Cerebral metabolism following traumatic brain injury: new discoveries with implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, George A.; Martin, Neil A.

    2015-01-01

    Because it is the product of glycolysis and main substrate for mitochondrial respiration, lactate is the central metabolic intermediate in cerebral energy substrate delivery. Our recent studies on healthy controls and patients following traumatic brain injury (TBI) using [6,6-2H2]glucose and [3-13C]lactate, along with cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial-venous (jugular bulb) difference measurements for oxygen, metabolite levels, isotopic enrichments and 13CO2 show a massive and previously unrecognized mobilization of lactate from corporeal (muscle, skin, and other) glycogen reserves in TBI patients who were studied 5.7 ± 2.2 days after injury at which time brain oxygen consumption and glucose uptake (CMRO2 and CMRgluc, respectively) were depressed. By tracking the incorporation of the 13C from lactate tracer we found that gluconeogenesis (GNG) from lactate accounted for 67.1 ± 6.9%, of whole-body glucose appearance rate (Ra) in TBI, which was compared to 15.2 ± 2.8% (mean ± SD, respectively) in healthy, well-nourished controls. Standard of care treatment of TBI patients in state-of-the-art facilities by talented and dedicated heath care professionals reveals presence of a catabolic Body Energy State (BES). Results are interpreted to mean that additional nutritive support is required to fuel the body and brain following TBI. Use of a diagnostic to monitor BES to provide health care professionals with actionable data in providing nutritive formulations to fuel the body and brain and achieve exquisite glycemic control are discussed. In particular, the advantages of using inorganic and organic lactate salts, esters and other compounds are examined. To date, several investigations on brain-injured patients with intact hepatic and renal functions show that compared to dextrose + insulin treatment, exogenous lactate infusion results in normal glycemia. PMID:25709562

  11. Impacts of small arteriovenous malformations (AVM) on regional cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R.S.; Yeh, S.H.; Chu, L.S.

    1994-05-01

    This study assessed the effects of small AVMs (<3 cm) on the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) by Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT and on the glucose metabolism (rCGlcM) by [F-18]-FDG PET. Seven AVM patients (pts) were studied. All AVMs were confirmed by cerebral angiography and CT/MR scans. Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT and [F-18]-PDG PET images were interpreted visually to detect the changes of rCBF and rCGlcM. All pts except one brain stem AVM had defects in the regions of nidi on HMPAO and FDG images. FDG PET disclosed low rCGlcM in surrounding areas of AVMs in 6 pts, while HMPAO SPECT detected only 4 cases. One AVM had increased rCBF surrounding the nidus despite of decreased rCGlcM in the same region. Five pts had abnormal rCGlcM over ipsilateral remote cortex but only one had corresponding abnormal rCBF. Contralateral cortical hypofunction was noted in 3 pts by FDG PET but none by HMPAO SPECT. Cross cerebellar diaschisis was found in 2 AVMs by FDG PET and only one by HMPAO SPECT. All regions with abnormal HMPAO uptake did not look as discernibly as seen on the FDG PET scan. CT/MR scans detected the nidi of AVMs of all pts and old hemorrhage in one pt. In conclusion, either HMPAO SPECT or FDG PET is sensitive to detect the functional abnormalities in the region of nidus of small AVM and the surrounding brain tissue. FDG PET is better than HMPAO SPECT to detect functional changes in the remote cortex and diaschisis.

  12. A novel Bayesian approach to accounting for uncertainty in fMRI-derived estimates of cerebral oxygen metabolism fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Simon, Aaron B; Dubowitz, David J; Blockley, Nicholas P; Buxton, Richard B

    2016-04-01

    Calibrated blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging is a multimodal functional MRI technique designed to estimate changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism from measured changes in cerebral blood flow and the BOLD signal. This technique addresses fundamental ambiguities associated with quantitative BOLD signal analysis; however, its dependence on biophysical modeling creates uncertainty in the resulting oxygen metabolism estimates. In this work, we developed a Bayesian approach to estimating the oxygen metabolism response to a neural stimulus and used it to examine the uncertainty that arises in calibrated BOLD estimation due to the presence of unmeasured model parameters. We applied our approach to estimate the CMRO2 response to a visual task using the traditional hypercapnia calibration experiment as well as to estimate the metabolic response to both a visual task and hypercapnia using the measurement of baseline apparent R2' as a calibration technique. Further, in order to examine the effects of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) signal contamination on the measurement of apparent R2', we examined the effects of measuring this parameter with and without CSF-nulling. We found that the two calibration techniques provided consistent estimates of the metabolic response on average, with a median R2'-based estimate of the metabolic response to CO2 of 1.4%, and R2'- and hypercapnia-calibrated estimates of the visual response of 27% and 24%, respectively. However, these estimates were sensitive to different sources of estimation uncertainty. The R2'-calibrated estimate was highly sensitive to CSF contamination and to uncertainty in unmeasured model parameters describing flow-volume coupling, capillary bed characteristics, and the iso-susceptibility saturation of blood. The hypercapnia-calibrated estimate was relatively insensitive to these parameters but highly sensitive to the assumed metabolic response to CO2. PMID:26790354

  13. Cerebral Glioma Grading Using Bayesian Network with Features Extracted from Multiple Modalities of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huiting; Liu, Renyuan; Zhang, Xin; Li, Ming; Yang, Yongbo; Yan, Jing; Niu, Fengnan; Tian, Chuanshuai; Wang, Kun; Yu, Haiping; Chen, Weibo; Wan, Suiren; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Many modalities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been confirmed to be of great diagnostic value in glioma grading. Contrast enhanced T1-weighted imaging allows the recognition of blood-brain barrier breakdown. Perfusion weighted imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging enable the quantitative measurement of perfusion parameters and metabolic alterations respectively. These modalities can potentially improve the grading process in glioma if combined properly. In this study, Bayesian Network, which is a powerful and flexible method for probabilistic analysis under uncertainty, is used to combine features extracted from contrast enhanced T1-weighted imaging, perfusion weighted imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging. The networks were constructed using K2 algorithm along with manual determination and distribution parameters learned using maximum likelihood estimation. The grading performance was evaluated in a leave-one-out analysis, achieving an overall grading accuracy of 92.86% and an area under the curve of 0.9577 in the receiver operating characteristic analysis given all available features observed in the total 56 patients. Results and discussions show that Bayesian Network is promising in combining features from multiple modalities of MRI for improved grading performance. PMID:27077923

  14. Descriptive data on cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors in ambulatory and non-ambulatory adults with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    McPhee, P.G.; Gorter, J.W.; Cotie, L.M.; Timmons, B.W.; Bentley, T.; MacDonald, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Forty-two participants with cerebral palsy were recruited for a study examining traditional and novel indicators of cardiovascular risk (McPhee et al., 2015 [1]). Data pertaining to the prevalence of obesity, smoking, hypertension, and metabolic risk are provided. These data are presented along with the scoring methods used in evaluation of the study participants. Percentages are included for comparative purposes with the existing literature. PMID:26759816

  15. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism and increased brain capillary permeability following high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: a positron emission tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, P.C.; Dhawan, V.; Strother, S.C.; Sidtis, J.J.; Evans, A.C.; Allen, J.C.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Regional glucose metabolic rate constants and blood-to-brain transport of rubidium were estimated using positron emission tomography in an adolescent patient with a brain tumor, before and after chemotherapy with intravenous high-dose methotrexate. Widespread depression of cerebral glucose metabolism was apparent 24 hours after drug administration, which may reflect reduced glucose phosphorylation, and the influx rate constant for /sup 82/Rb was increased, indicating a drug-induced alteration in blood-brain barrier function. Associated changes in neuropsychological performance, electroencephalogram, and plasma amino acid concentration were identified in the absence of evidence of systemic methotrexate toxicity, suggesting primary methotrexate neurotoxicity.

  16. Cognitive reserve impacts on inter-individual variability in resting-state cerebral metabolism in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Bastin, Christine; Yakushev, Igor; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Eustache, Francis; Landeau, Brigitte; Scheurich, Armin; Feyers, Dorothée; Collette, Fabienne; Chételat, Gael; Salmon, Eric

    2012-11-01

    There is a great deal of heterogeneity in the impact of aging on cognition and cerebral functioning. One potential factor contributing to individual differences among the elderly is the cognitive reserve, which designates the partial protection from the deleterious effects of aging that lifetime experience provides. Neuroimaging studies examining task-related activation in elderly people suggested that cognitive reserve takes the form of more efficient use of brain networks and/or greater ability to recruit alternative networks to compensate for age-related cerebral changes. In this exploratory multi-center study, we examined the relationships between cognitive reserve, as measured by education and verbal intelligence, and cerebral metabolism at rest (FDG-PET) in a sample of 74 healthy older participants. Higher degree of education and verbal intelligence was associated with less metabolic activity in the right posterior temporoparietal cortex and the left anterior intraparietal sulcus. Functional connectivity analyses of resting-state fMRI images in a subset of 41 participants indicated that these regions belong to the default mode network and the dorsal attention network respectively. Lower metabolism in the temporoparietal cortex was also associated with better memory abilities. The findings provide evidence for an inverse relationship between cognitive reserve and resting-state activity in key regions of two functional networks respectively involved in internal mentation and goal-directed attention. PMID:22796505

  17. Cerebral Blood Flow and Glucose Metabolism Measured With Positron Emission Tomography Are Decreased in Human Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    van Golen, Larissa W.; Huisman, Marc C.; Ijzerman, Richard G.; Hoetjes, Nikie J.; Schwarte, Lothar A.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Diamant, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Subclinical systemic microvascular dysfunction exists in asymptomatic patients with type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that microangiopathy, resulting from long-standing systemic hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, may be generalized to the brain, resulting in changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism in these patients. We performed dynamic [15O]H2O and [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose brain positron emission tomography scans to measure CBF and cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRglu), respectively, in 30 type 1 diabetic patients and 12 age-matched healthy controls after an overnight fast. Regions of interest were automatically delineated on coregistered magnetic resonance images and full kinetic analysis was performed. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were higher in patients versus controls. Total gray matter CBF was 9%, whereas CMRglu was 21% lower in type 1 diabetic subjects versus control subjects. We conclude that at real-life fasting glucose and insulin levels, type 1 diabetes is associated with decreased resting cerebral glucose metabolism, which is only partially explained by the decreased CBF. These findings suggest that mechanisms other than generalized microangiopathy account for the altered CMRglu observed in well-controlled type 1 diabetes. PMID:23530004

  18. Cerebral metabolic rates for glucose in mood disorders. Studies with positron emission tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose F 18

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.R. Jr.; Phelps, M.E.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Schwartz, J.M.; Gerner, R.H.; Selin, C.E.; Sumida, R.M.

    1985-05-01

    Cerebral metabolic rates for glucose were examined in patients with unipolar depression (N = 11), bipolar depression (N = 5), mania (N = 5), bipolar mixed states (N = 3), and in normal controls (N = 9) using positron emission tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose F 18. All subjects were studied supine under ambient room conditions with eyes open. Bipolar depressed and mixed patients had supratentorial whole brain glucose metabolic rates that were significantly lower than those of the other comparison groups. The whole brain metabolic rates for patients with bipolar depression increased going from depression or a mixed state to a euthymic or manic state. Patients with unipolar depression showed a significantly lower ratio of the metabolic rate of the caudate nucleus, divided by that of the hemisphere as a whole, when compared with normal controls and patients with bipolar depression.

  19. Brain magnetic resonance imaging in suspected extrapyramidal cerebral palsy: observations in distinguishing genetic-metabolic from acquired causes.

    PubMed

    Hoon, A H; Reinhardt, E M; Kelley, R I; Breiter, S N; Morton, D H; Naidu, S B; Johnston, M V

    1997-08-01

    Experienced clinicians recognize that some children who appear to have static cerebral palsy (CP) actually have underlying genetic-metabolic disorders. We report a series of patients with motor disorders seen in children with extrapyramidal CP in whom brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities provided important diagnostic clues in distinguishing genetic-metabolic disorders from other causes. One cause of static extrapyramidal CP, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy at the end of a term gestation, produces a characteristic pattern of hyperintense signal and atrophy in the putamen and thalamus. Other signal abnormalities and atrophy in the putamen, globus pallidus, or caudate can point to genetic-metabolic diseases, including disorders of mitochondrial and organic acid metabolism. Progress in understanding and treating genetic diseases of the developing brain makes it essential to diagnose disorders that masquerade as static CP. Brain magnetic resonance imaging is a useful diagnostic tool in the initial evaluation of children who appear to have CP. PMID:9290610

  20. Early life stress affects cerebral glucose metabolism in adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Parr, Lisa A; Boudreau, Matthew; Hecht, Erin; Winslow, James T; Nemeroff, Charles B; Sánchez, Mar M

    2012-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for anxiety, mood disorders and alterations in stress responses. Less is known about the long-term neurobiological impact of ELS. We used [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) to assess neural responses to a moderate stress test in adult monkeys that experienced ELS as infants. Both groups of monkeys showed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis stress-induced activations and cardiac arousal in response to the stressor. A whole brain analysis detected significantly greater regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) in superior temporal sulcus, putamen, thalamus, and inferotemporal cortex of ELS animals compared to controls. Region of interest (ROI) analyses performed in areas identified as vulnerable to ELS showed greater activity in the orbitofrontal cortex of ELS compared to control monkeys, but greater hippocampal activity in the control compared to ELS monkeys. Together, these results suggest hyperactivity in emotional and sensory processing regions of adult monkeys with ELS, and greater activity in stress-regulatory areas in the controls. Despite these neural responses, no group differences were detected in neuroendocrine, autonomic or behavioral responses, except for a trend towards increased stillness in the ELS monkeys. Together, these data suggest hypervigilance in the ELS monkeys in the absence of immediate danger. PMID:22682736

  1. Cerebral metabolic rate of glucose computed by Bayes regression of deoxyglucose PET scans

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.D.; Links, J.M.; Huang, S.C.; Douglass, K.H.; Wong, D.F.; Frost, J.J.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (LCMRG) is currently measured using a PET scan of deoxyglucose at 40-60 min postinjection and computed using assumed mean normal rate constants. While the method is accurate in normal tissue, another study showed that for ischemic regions the use of mean normal rate constants underestimated LCMRG by 50%. The authors used computer simulation to study the use of Bayes Regression, a useful method for combining prior information with patient data to estimate the patient's LCMRG. Prior information (means and variances of rate constants in the population) is combined with the patient's data with weighting factors determined by the variances of the rate constants in the population and the noise in the data. The authors simulated noisy data from both a normal and an ischemic population. Each simulation was based on different randomly-selected rate constants from the parent population. They compared the current method with Bayes Regression in each of 100 simulated experiments in each of 3 cases: (1) normal patient, normal prior; (2) ischemic patient, ischemic prior; (3) ischemic patient, normal prior. In patients with ischemic, Bayes Regression appears to provide truer estimates of LCMRG.

  2. Studying cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism using simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler ultrasound: a hyperventilation and caffeine study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runze; Brugniaux, Julien; Dhaliwal, Harinder; Beaudin, Andrew E; Eliasziw, Misha; Poulin, Marc J; Dunn, Jeff F

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed psycho-stimulants in the world, yet little is known about its effects on brain oxygenation and metabolism. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized cross-over study design, we combined transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to study caffeine's effect on middle cerebral artery peak blood flow velocity (Vp), brain tissue oxygenation (StO2), total hemoglobin (tHb), and cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) in five subjects. Hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia served as a control to verify the sensitivity of our measurements. During hypocapnia (∼16 mmHg below resting values), Vp decreased by 40.0 ± 2.4% (95% CI, P < 0.001), while StO2 and tHb decreased by 2.9 ± 0.3% and 2.6 ± 0.4%, respectively (P = 0.003 and P = 0.002, respectively). CMRO2, calculated using the Fick equation, was reduced by 29.3 ± 9% compared to the isocapnic-euoxia baseline (P < 0.001). In the pharmacological experiments, there was a significant decrease in Vp, StO2, and tHb after ingestion of 200 mg of caffeine compared with placebo. There was no significant difference in CMRO2 between caffeine and placebo. Both showed a CMRO2 decline compared to baseline showing the importance of a placebo control. In conclusion, this study showed that profound hypocapnia impairs cerebral oxidative metabolism. We provide new insight into the effects of caffeine on cerebral hemodynamics. Moreover, this study showed that multimodal NIRS/TCD is an excellent tool for studying brain hemodynamic responses to pharmacological interventions and physiological challenges. PMID:25907789

  3. Adaptation of cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow and modulation of neurovascular coupling with prolonged stimulation in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Farshad; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged visual stimulation results in neurophysiologic and hemodynamic adaptation. However, the hemodynamic adaptation appears to be small compared to neural adaptation. It is not clear how the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) is affected by adaptation. We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and CMRO2 change in responses to peripheral stimulation either continuously, or intermittently (on/off cycles). A linear system’s response to the continuous input should be equal to the sum of the original response to the intermittent input and a version of that response shifted by half a cycle. The CMRO2 response showed a large non-linearity consistent with adaptation, the CBF response adapted to a lesser degree, and the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response was nearly linear. The metabolic response was coupled with a larger flow in the continuous condition than in the intermittent condition. Our results suggest that contrast adaptation improves energy economy of visual processing. However BOLD modulations may not accurately represent the underlying metabolic nonlinearity due to modulation of the coupling of blood flow and oxygen metabolism changes. PMID:23732885

  4. Comparison of cerebral regional glucose metabolic relationships in resting and auditory stimulated states

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Riege, W.H.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    FDG positron computed tomography has demonstrated strong correlations between high frontal and occipital glucose metabolism in normal resting subjects, which varied by age and were lost in Huntington's and Parkinson's Diseases. The studies raised the question whether the findings may be explained by anatomic and not metabolic factors. An approach to the issue was to examine subjects scanned under two states, where functional and not anatomic features would account for relationship differences. Seventeen subjects were identified who had scans under resting and auditory stimulated states. Measurements were taken from 12 brain regions and were expressed as percentage of mean metabolism. A principal components analysis of the resting state demonstrated 3 components (73% of variance), while the stimulated states showed 4 (79% of variance). The first resting factor related frontal, right posterior inferior frontal and superior temporal regions, while in the stimulated, the frontal associated with the occipital. The second resting factor related both angular gyri and posterior temporal, while the third related left posterior inferior frontal, superior temporal and right occipital. With stimulation both factors were replaced by three others. The change in the first factor and its presence in other subject groups points to a functional relationship between the regions. Comparison to previous studies suggest the frontal-occipital association may involve aspects of attention. The variability in other factors was similar to loose correlations noted in normal studies and may reflect the differential response to several tasks.

  5. Reduced cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in extremely preterm neonates with low-grade germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Hagan, Katherine; Fenoglio, Angela; Grant, P. Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2016-01-01

    Low-grade germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH) is the most common complication in extremely premature neonates. The occurrence of GM-IVH is highly associated with hemodynamic instability in the premature brain, yet the long-term impact of low-grade GM-IVH on cerebral blood flow and neuronal health have not been fully investigated. We used an innovative combination of frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (FDNIRS-DCS) to measure cerebral oxygen saturation (SO2) and an index of cerebral blood flow (CBFi) at the infant’s bedside and compute an index of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i). We enrolled twenty extremely low gestational age (ELGA) neonates (seven with low-grade GM-IVH) and monitored them weekly until they reached full-term equivalent age. During their hospital stay, we observed consistently lower CBFi and CMRO2i in ELGA neonates with low-grade GM-IVH compared to neonates without hemorrhages. Furthermore, lower CBFi and CMRO2i in the former group persists even after the resolution of the hemorrhage. In contrast, SO2 does not differ between groups. Thus, CBFi and CMRO2i may have better sensitivity than SO2 in detecting GM-IVH-related effects on infant brain development. FDNIRS-DCS methods may have clinical benefit for monitoring the evolution of GM-IVH, evaluating treatment response, and potentially predicting neurodevelopmental outcome. PMID:27181339

  6. Reduced cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in extremely preterm neonates with low-grade germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Hagan, Katherine; Fenoglio, Angela; Grant, P. Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2016-05-01

    Low-grade germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH) is the most common complication in extremely premature neonates. The occurrence of GM-IVH is highly associated with hemodynamic instability in the premature brain, yet the long-term impact of low-grade GM-IVH on cerebral blood flow and neuronal health have not been fully investigated. We used an innovative combination of frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (FDNIRS-DCS) to measure cerebral oxygen saturation (SO2) and an index of cerebral blood flow (CBFi) at the infant’s bedside and compute an index of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i). We enrolled twenty extremely low gestational age (ELGA) neonates (seven with low-grade GM-IVH) and monitored them weekly until they reached full-term equivalent age. During their hospital stay, we observed consistently lower CBFi and CMRO2i in ELGA neonates with low-grade GM-IVH compared to neonates without hemorrhages. Furthermore, lower CBFi and CMRO2i in the former group persists even after the resolution of the hemorrhage. In contrast, SO2 does not differ between groups. Thus, CBFi and CMRO2i may have better sensitivity than SO2 in detecting GM-IVH-related effects on infant brain development. FDNIRS-DCS methods may have clinical benefit for monitoring the evolution of GM-IVH, evaluating treatment response, and potentially predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

  7. Reduced cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in extremely preterm neonates with low-grade germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Hagan, Katherine; Fenoglio, Angela; Grant, P Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2016-01-01

    Low-grade germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH) is the most common complication in extremely premature neonates. The occurrence of GM-IVH is highly associated with hemodynamic instability in the premature brain, yet the long-term impact of low-grade GM-IVH on cerebral blood flow and neuronal health have not been fully investigated. We used an innovative combination of frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (FDNIRS-DCS) to measure cerebral oxygen saturation (SO2) and an index of cerebral blood flow (CBFi) at the infant's bedside and compute an index of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i). We enrolled twenty extremely low gestational age (ELGA) neonates (seven with low-grade GM-IVH) and monitored them weekly until they reached full-term equivalent age. During their hospital stay, we observed consistently lower CBFi and CMRO2i in ELGA neonates with low-grade GM-IVH compared to neonates without hemorrhages. Furthermore, lower CBFi and CMRO2i in the former group persists even after the resolution of the hemorrhage. In contrast, SO2 does not differ between groups. Thus, CBFi and CMRO2i may have better sensitivity than SO2 in detecting GM-IVH-related effects on infant brain development. FDNIRS-DCS methods may have clinical benefit for monitoring the evolution of GM-IVH, evaluating treatment response, and potentially predicting neurodevelopmental outcome. PMID:27181339

  8. Cerebral metabolic disturbances in the brain during acute liver failure: from hyperammonemia to energy failure and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Ott, Peter; Clemmesen, Otto; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2005-07-01

    Several observations suggest that patients with fulminant hepatic failure may suffer from disturbances in cerebral metabolism that can be related to elevated levels of arterial ammonia. One effect of ammonia is the inhibition of the rate limiting TCA cycle enzyme alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (alphaKGDH) and possibly also pyruvate dehydrogenase, but this has been regarded to be of no quantitative importance. However, recent studies justify a revision of this point of view. Based on published data, the following sequence of events is proposed. Inhibition of alphaKGDH both enhances the detoxification of ammonia by formation of glutamine from alpha-ketoglutarate and reduces the rate of NADH and oxidative ATP production in astrocytic mitochondria. In the astrocytic cytosol this will lead to formation of lactate even in the presence of sufficient oxygen supply. Since the aspartate-malate shuttle is compromised, there is a risk of depletion of mitochondrial NADH and ATP unless compensatory mechanisms are recruited. One likely compensatory mechanism is the use of amino acids for energy production. Branched chain amino acids, like isoleucine and valine can supply carbon skeletons that bypass the alphaKGDH inhibition and maintain TCA cycle activity. Large-scale consumption of certain amino acids can only be maintained by cerebral proteolysis, as has been observed in these patients. This hypothesis provides a link between hyperammonemia, ammonia detoxification by glutamine production, cerebral lactate production, and cerebral catabolic proteolysis in patients with FHF. PMID:15921824

  9. Quantifying the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2013-02-01

    Preterm infants are highly susceptible to ischemic brain injury; consequently, continuous bedside monitoring to detect ischemia before irreversible damage occurs would improve patient outcome. In addition to monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF), assessing the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) would be beneficial considering that metabolic thresholds can be used to evaluate tissue viability. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that changes in absolute CMRO2 could be measured by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) with time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS). Absolute CBF was determined using bolus-tracking TR-NIRS to calibrate the DCS measurements. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation (SvO2) was determined by multiwavelength TR-NIRS measurements, the accuracy of which was assessed by directly measuring the oxygenation of sagittal sinus blood. In eight newborn piglets, CMRO2 was manipulated by varying the anesthetics and by injecting sodium cyanide. No significant differences were found between the two sets of SvO2 measurements obtained by TR-NIRS or sagittal sinus blood samples and the corresponding CMRO2 measurements. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean CMRO2 difference of 0.0268±0.8340 mL O2/100 g/min between the two techniques over a range from 0.3 to 4 mL O2/100 g/min.

  10. Low Cerebral Glucose Metabolism: A Potential Predictor for the Severity of Vascular Parkinsonism and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunqi; Wei, Xiaobo; Liu, Xu; Liao, Jinchi; Lin, Jiaping; Zhu, Cansheng; Meng, Xiaochun; Xie, Dongsi; Chao, Dongman; Fenoy, Albert J; Cheng, Muhua; Tang, Beisha; Zhang, Zhuohua; Xia, Ying; Wang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the association between cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRGlc) and the severity of Vascular Parkinsonism (VP) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). A cross-sectional study was performed to compare CMRGlc in normal subjects vs. VP and PD patients. Twelve normal subjects, 22 VP, and 11 PD patients were evaluated with the H&Y and MMSE, and underwent 18F-FDG measurements. Pearson’s correlations were used to identify potential associations between the severity of VP/PD and CMRGlc. A pronounced reduction of CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen was detected in patients with VP and PD when compared with normal subjects. The VP patients displayed a slight CMRGlc decrease in the caudate putamen and frontal lobe in comparison with PD patients. These decreases in CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen were significantly correlated with the VP patients’ H&Y, UPDRS II, UPDRS III, MMSE, cardiovascular, and attention/memory scores. Similarly, significant correlations were observed in patients with PD. This is the first clinical study finding strong evidence for an association between low cerebral glucose metabolism and the severity of VP and PD. Our findings suggest that these changes in glucose metabolism in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen may underlie the pathophysiological mechanisms of VP and PD. As the scramble to find imaging biomarkers or predictors of the disease intensifies, a better understanding of the roles of cerebral glucose metabolism may give us insight into the pathogenesis of VP and PD. PMID:26618044

  11. Alteration of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism in healthy subjects by glucose loading.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kenji; Wagatsuma, Kei; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Ishii, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    High plasma glucose (PG) levels can reduce fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ((18) F-FDG) uptake, especially in the Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related regions. This fact is supported by studies showing that the resting-state activity in diabetes can be altered in the default mode network (DMN)-related regions, which considerably overlap with the AD-related regions. In order to expand the current knowledge, we aimed to investigate the relationship between increasing PG levels and the regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (CMRglc ) as a direct index of brain activity. We performed dynamic (18) F-FDG positron emission tomography with arterial blood sampling once each in the fasting and glucose-loading conditions on 12 young, healthy volunteers without cognitive impairment or insulin resistance. The absolute CMRglc values were calculated for the volume-of-interest (VOI) analysis, and normalized CMRglc maps were generated for the voxelwise analysis. The normalized measurement is known to have smaller intersubject variability than the absolute measurement, and may, thus, lead to greater statistical power. In VOI analysis, no regional difference in the CMRglc was found between the two conditions. In exploratory voxelwise analysis, however, significant clusters were identified in the precuneus, posterior cingulate, lateral parietotemporal, and medial prefrontal regions where the CMRglc decreased upon glucose loading (P < 0.05, corrected). These regions include the representative components of both the DMN and AD pathology. Taken together with the previous knowledge on the relationships between the DMN, AD, and diabetes, it may be inferred that glucose loading induces hypometabolism in the AD-related and DMN-related regions. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2823-2832, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061859

  12. Can the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen be estimated with near-infrared spectroscopy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boas, D. A.; Strangman, G.; Culver, J. P.; Hoge, R. D.; Jasdzewski, G.; Poldrack, R. A.; Rosen, B. R.; Mandeville, J. B.

    2003-08-01

    We have measured the changes in oxy-haemoglobin and deoxy-haemoglobin in the adult human brain during a brief finger tapping exercise using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) can be estimated from these NIRS data provided certain model assumptions. The change in CMRO2 is related to changes in the total haemoglobin concentration, deoxy-haemoglobin concentration and blood flow. As NIRS does not provide a measure of dynamic changes in blood flow during brain activation, we relied on a Windkessel model that relates dynamic blood volume and flow changes, which has been used previously for estimating CMRO2 from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Because of the partial volume effect we are unable to quantify the absolute changes in the local brain haemoglobin concentrations with NIRS and thus are unable to obtain an estimate of the absolute CMRO2 change. An absolute estimate is also confounded by uncertainty in the flow-volume relationship. However, the ratio of the flow change to the CMRO2 change is relatively insensitive to these uncertainties. For the finger tapping task, we estimate a most probable flow-consumption ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 in agreement with previous findings presented in the literature, although we cannot exclude the possibility that there is no CMRO2 change. The large range in the ratio arises from the large number of model parameters that must be estimated from the data. A more precise estimate of the flow-consumption ratio will require better estimates of the model parameters or flow information, as can be provided by combining NIRS with fMRI.

  13. Effect of ethanol on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism (CMRO2) in conscious sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Krasney, J.A.; Zubkov, B.; Iwamoto, J. )

    1991-03-11

    A moderate dose of ethanol severely depresses CBF and CMRO2 in the awake sheep fetus. However, the effects of ethanol on CBF and CMRO2 in the adult are unclear. The same dose of ethanol was infused for 2 hr in 5 ewes instrumented with aortic, left ventricular and sagittal sinus catheters. Ethanol caused ataxia accompanied by early modest and variable increases of total and regional CBF and CMRO2, followed by later modest and variable decreases of total and regional CBF (cerebellum) and CMRO2. Ethanol caused a cerebral transcapillary fluid shift as indicated by significant increases of the arterial-cerebral venous differences for hematocrit and hemoglobin. Brain wet-dry ratios increased by 10% above control levels. However, cerebral venous pressures were unchanged. The authors conclude that the adult cerebral response to ethanol differs quantitatively from that of the fetus. The functional significance of the cerebral fluid shift is unclear.

  14. Specific features of glycogen metabolism in the liver.

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, M; Keppens, S; Stalmans, W

    1998-01-01

    Although the general pathways of glycogen synthesis and glycogenolysis are identical in all tissues, the enzymes involved are uniquely adapted to the specific role of glycogen in different cell types. In liver, where glycogen is stored as a reserve of glucose for extrahepatic tissues, the glycogen-metabolizing enzymes have properties that enable the liver to act as a sensor of blood glucose and to store or mobilize glycogen according to the peripheral needs. The prime effector of hepatic glycogen deposition is glucose, which blocks glycogenolysis and promotes glycogen synthesis in various ways. Other glycogenic stimuli for the liver are insulin, glucocorticoids, parasympathetic (vagus) nerve impulses and gluconeogenic precursors such as fructose and amino acids. The phosphorolysis of glycogen is mainly mediated by glucagon and by the orthosympathetic neurotransmitters noradrenaline and ATP. Many glycogenolytic stimuli, e.g. adenosine, nucleotides and NO, also act indirectly, via secretion of eicosanoids from non-parenchymal cells. Effectors often initiate glycogenolysis cooperatively through different mechanisms. PMID:9806880

  15. [Deep hypotension induced by sodium nitroprusside in neurosurgery. II.--Cerebral hemodynamic effects and metabolic rate of oxygen (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pinaud, M; Souron, R; Gazeau, M F; Lajat, Y; Chatal, J F; Nicolas, F

    1979-01-01

    The cerebral hemodynamic effects of sodium nitroprusside (S. N.) have been the object of animal studies mainly. During the only human study performed, the drop in mean arterial pressure (MAP) is limited to 67 mm Hg. The study of the evolution of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in cases of more severe hypotension (MAP less than 45 mm Hg) seems of some interest. The study was composed of the measurement of the CBF using Xenon 133 and the calculation of cerebral vascular resistances (CVR) as well as cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). Eleven patients with an average age of 37 years underwent surgery for cerebral aneurism 10 to 15 days after the inaugural hemorrhagic accident, under narconeuroleptanalgesia and stable ventilatory conditions. They are divided into 2 groups: Group I, 9 patients with normal levels of consciousness; Group II, 2 patients either agitated or obnubilated. The study is composed of 3 successive measures: (1) (T0) during stable anesthesia just prior to hypotension; (2) (T1) after 5 minutes of hypotension (MAP = 40 +/- 7 MM Hg); (3) (T2) 20 minutes after having stopped S. N. infusion. For the 9 patients in Group I, CBF remains unchanged at T1, the CVR decreases (p less than 0.001) and CMRO2 decreases (p less than 0.05). At T2 all of these parameters return to T0 values. The postoperative clinical evolution is favorable and uncomplicated. For the 2 patients in Group II the CBF, initially higher, falls from 20 to 30 p. cent at T1 with a drastic reduction in CMRO2. Despite the improvement of these parameters at T2, a prolonged postoperative coma is observed. This study suggests that CBF and CMRO2 are important parameters to monitor during controlled severe hypotension. Decrease in MAP must be less than 50 p. cent of control value and time-limited. PMID:484888

  16. Metabolic Cycles in Yeast Share Features Conserved among Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Causton, Helen C; Feeney, Kevin A; Ziegler, Christine A; O'Neill, John S

    2015-04-20

    Cell-autonomous circadian rhythms allow organisms to temporally orchestrate their internal state to anticipate and/or resonate with the external environment. Although ∼24-hr periodicity is observed across aerobic eukaryotes, the central mechanism has been hard to dissect because few simple models exist, and known clock proteins are not conserved across phylogenetic kingdoms. In contrast, contributions to circadian rhythmicity made by a handful of post-translational mechanisms, such as phosphorylation of clock proteins by casein kinase 1 (CK1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), appear conserved among phyla. These kinases have many other essential cellular functions and are better conserved in their contribution to timekeeping than any of the clock proteins they phosphorylate. Rhythmic oscillations in cellular redox state are another universal feature of circadian timekeeping, e.g., over-oxidation cycles of abundant peroxiredoxin proteins. Here, we use comparative chronobiology to distinguish fundamental clock mechanisms from species and/or tissue-specific adaptations and thereby identify features shared between circadian rhythms in mammalian cells and non-circadian temperature-compensated respiratory oscillations in budding yeast. We find that both types of oscillations are coupled with the cell division cycle, exhibit period determination by CK1 and GSK3, and have peroxiredoxin over-oxidation cycles. We also explore how peroxiredoxins contribute to YROs. Our data point to common mechanisms underlying both YROs and circadian rhythms and suggest two interpretations: either certain biochemical systems are simply permissive for cellular oscillations (with frequencies from hours to days) or this commonality arose via divergence from an ancestral cellular clock. PMID:25866393

  17. Metabolic Cycles in Yeast Share Features Conserved among Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Causton, Helen C.; Feeney, Kevin A.; Ziegler, Christine A.; O’Neill, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell-autonomous circadian rhythms allow organisms to temporally orchestrate their internal state to anticipate and/or resonate with the external environment [1, 2]. Although ∼24-hr periodicity is observed across aerobic eukaryotes, the central mechanism has been hard to dissect because few simple models exist, and known clock proteins are not conserved across phylogenetic kingdoms [1, 3, 4]. In contrast, contributions to circadian rhythmicity made by a handful of post-translational mechanisms, such as phosphorylation of clock proteins by casein kinase 1 (CK1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), appear conserved among phyla [3, 5]. These kinases have many other essential cellular functions and are better conserved in their contribution to timekeeping than any of the clock proteins they phosphorylate [6]. Rhythmic oscillations in cellular redox state are another universal feature of circadian timekeeping, e.g., over-oxidation cycles of abundant peroxiredoxin proteins [7–9]. Here, we use comparative chronobiology to distinguish fundamental clock mechanisms from species and/or tissue-specific adaptations and thereby identify features shared between circadian rhythms in mammalian cells and non-circadian temperature-compensated respiratory oscillations in budding yeast [10]. We find that both types of oscillations are coupled with the cell division cycle, exhibit period determination by CK1 and GSK3, and have peroxiredoxin over-oxidation cycles. We also explore how peroxiredoxins contribute to YROs. Our data point to common mechanisms underlying both YROs and circadian rhythms and suggest two interpretations: either certain biochemical systems are simply permissive for cellular oscillations (with frequencies from hours to days) or this commonality arose via divergence from an ancestral cellular clock. PMID:25866393

  18. Coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism is conserved for chromatic and luminance stimuli in human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Leontiev, Oleg; Buracas, Giedrius T; Liang, Christine; Ances, Beau M; Perthen, Joanna E; Shmuel, Amir; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-03-01

    The ratio of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) during brain activation is a critical determinant of the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Cytochrome oxidase (CO), a key component of oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria, is non-uniformly distributed in visual area V1 in distinct blob and interblob regions, suggesting significant spatial variation in the capacity for oxygen metabolism. The goal of this study was to test whether CBF/CMRO(2) coupling differed when these subpopulations of neurons were preferentially stimulated, using chromatic and luminance stimuli to preferentially stimulate either the blob or interblob regions. A dual-echo spiral arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique was used to measure CBF and BOLD responses simultaneously in 7 healthy human subjects. When the stimulus contrast levels were adjusted to evoke similar CBF responses (mean 65.4% ± 19.0% and 64.6% ± 19.9%, respectively for chromatic and luminance contrast), the BOLD responses were remarkably similar (1.57% ± 0.39% and 1.59% ± 0.35%) for both types of stimuli. We conclude that CBF-CMRO(2) coupling is conserved for the chromatic and luminance stimuli used, suggesting a consistent coupling for blob and inter-blob neuronal populations despite the difference in CO concentration. PMID:23238435

  19. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in the rat: cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism during the late phase of cerebral vasospasm

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado, T.J.; Arbab, M.A.; Diemer, N.H.; Svendgaard, N.A.

    1986-10-01

    A double-isotope technique for the simultaneous measurement of CBF and CMRglu was applied to a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model in the rat. Cisternal injection of 0.07 ml blood caused a rather uniform 20% reduction in CBF together with an increase in glucose utilization of 30% during the late phase of vasospasm. In one-third of the SAH animals, there were focal areas where the flow was lowered to 30% of the control values and the glucose uptake increased to approximately 250% of control. We suggest that blood in the subarachnoid space via a neural mechanism induces the global flow and metabolic changes, and that the foci are caused by vasospasm superimposed on the global flow and metabolic changes. In the double-isotope autoradiographic technique, (/sup 14/C)iodoantipyrine and (/sup 3/H)deoxyglucose were used for CBF and CMRglu measurements, respectively, in the same animal. In half of the sections, the (/sup 14/C)iodoantipyrine was extracted using 2,2-dimethoxypropane before the section was placed on a /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-sensitive film. The other sections were placed on x-ray film with an emulsion insensitive to /sup 3/H. The validity of the double-isotope method was tested by comparing the data with those obtained in animals receiving a single isotope. The CBF and metabolic values obtained in the two groups were similar.

  20. Anatomical features of the vertebral artery for transbrachial direct cannulation of a guiding catheter to perform coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms in the posterior cerebral circulation

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Yuichi; Tanno, Yuhei; Kasakura, Shigen; Aoyagi, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Background Transbrachial approach is an alternative technique for coil embolization of posterior circulation aneurysms. The purpose of our study was to investigate the anatomical features of the vertebral artery (VA) for transbrachial direct VA cannulation of a guiding catheter (GC) to perform coil embolization of posterior circulation aneurysms. Methods Included in retrospective analysis were patients who underwent transbrachial coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms in the posterior cerebral circulation by direct VA cannulation of a GC from 2007 to 2013. Investigated were patient characteristics, preoperative sizes of aneurysms, aneurysms location, the angle formed by the target VA and the subclavian artery (AVS), and the VA diameter at the level of the fourth cervical vertebral body (VAD) in the side of the transbrachial access route. Results Thirty-one patients with 32 aneurysms met our criteria. The locations of aneurysms were the VA (n = 16), basilar artery (BA) tip (n = 10), BA trunk (n = 3), BA superior cerebellar artery (n = 1), BA anterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 1), and VA posterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 1). The right brachial artery was punctured in 27 cases with 28 aneurysms as transbrachial direct cannulation of a GC, and left was in 4 cases with 4 aneurysms. The average AVS, ranging from 45° to 95°, was 77°, and the average VAD, ranging from 3.18 to 4.45 mm, was 3.97 mm. Conclusion For transbrachial direct cannulation of a GC, it seems required that the AVS is about 45° or more and the VAD is about 3.18 mm or more. PMID:25964434

  1. Computer-aided classification of Alzheimer's disease based on support vector machine with combination of cerebral image features in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongkreangkrai, C.; Vichianin, Y.; Tocharoenchai, C.; Arimura, H.; Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2016-03-01

    Several studies have differentiated Alzheimer's disease (AD) using cerebral image features derived from MR brain images. In this study, we were interested in combining hippocampus and amygdala volumes and entorhinal cortex thickness to improve the performance of AD differentiation. Thus, our objective was to investigate the useful features obtained from MRI for classification of AD patients using support vector machine (SVM). T1-weighted MR brain images of 100 AD patients and 100 normal subjects were processed using FreeSurfer software to measure hippocampus and amygdala volumes and entorhinal cortex thicknesses in both brain hemispheres. Relative volumes of hippocampus and amygdala were calculated to correct variation in individual head size. SVM was employed with five combinations of features (H: hippocampus relative volumes, A: amygdala relative volumes, E: entorhinal cortex thicknesses, HA: hippocampus and amygdala relative volumes and ALL: all features). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the method. AUC values of five combinations were 0.8575 (H), 0.8374 (A), 0.8422 (E), 0.8631 (HA) and 0.8906 (ALL). Although “ALL” provided the highest AUC, there were no statistically significant differences among them except for “A” feature. Our results showed that all suggested features may be feasible for computer-aided classification of AD patients.

  2. "Relevance vector machine" consciousness classifier applied to cerebral metabolism of vegetative and locked-in patients.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christophe L; Bruno, Marie-Aurelie; Maquet, Pierre; Boly, Mélanie; Noirhomme, Quentin; Schnakers, Caroline; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Bonjean, Maxime; Hustinx, Roland; Moonen, Gustave; Luxen, André; Laureys, Steven

    2011-05-15

    The vegetative state is a devastating condition where patients awaken from their coma (i.e., open their eyes) but fail to show any behavioural sign of conscious awareness. Locked-in syndrome patients also awaken from their coma and are unable to show any motor response to command (except for small eye movements or blinks) but recover full conscious awareness of self and environment. Bedside evaluation of residual cognitive function in coma survivors often is difficult because motor responses may be very limited or inconsistent. We here aimed to disentangle vegetative from "locked-in" patients by an automatic procedure based on machine learning using fluorodeoxyglucose PET data obtained in 37 healthy controls and in 13 patients in a vegetative state. Next, the trained machine was tested on brain scans obtained in 8 patients with locked-in syndrome. We used a sparse probabilistic Bayesian learning framework called "relevance vector machine" (RVM) to classify the scans. The trained RVM classifier, applied on an input scan, returns a probability value (p-value) of being in one class or the other, here being "conscious" or not. Training on the control and vegetative state groups was assessed with a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure, leading to 100% classification accuracy. When applied on the locked-in patients, all scans were classified as "conscious" with a mean p-value of .95 (min .85). In conclusion, even with this relatively limited data set, we could train a classifier distinguishing between normal consciousness (i.e., wakeful conscious awareness) and the vegetative state (i.e., wakeful unawareness). Cross-validation also indicated that the clinical classification and the one predicted by the automatic RVM classifier were in accordance. Moreover, when applied on a third group of "locked-in" consciously aware patients, they all had a strong probability of being similar to the normal controls, as expected. Therefore, RVM classification of cerebral metabolic

  3. A CAD system for cerebral glioma based on texture features in DT-MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nunzio, G.; Pastore, G.; Donativi, M.; Castellano, A.; Falini, A.

    2011-08-01

    Tumor cells in cerebral glioma invade the surrounding tissues preferentially along white-matter tracts, spreading beyond the abnormal area seen on conventional MR images. Diffusion Tensor Imaging can reveal large peritumoral abnormalities in gliomas, which are not apparent on MRI.Our aim was to characterize pathological vs. healthy tissue in DTI datasets by 3D statistical Texture Analysis, developing an automatic segmentation technique (CAD, Computer Assisted Detection) for cerebral glioma based on a supervised classifier (an artificial neural network). A Matlab GUI (Graphical User Interface) was created to help the physician in the assisted diagnosis process and to optimize interactivity with the segmentation system, especially for patient follow-up during chemotherapy, and for preoperative assessment of tumor extension. Preliminary tissue classification results were obtained for the p map (the calculated area under the ROC curve, AUC, was 0.96) and the FA map (AUC=0.98). Test images were automatically segmented by tissue classification; manual and automatic segmentations were compared, showing good concordance.

  4. Bidirectional Relationships and Disconnects between NAFLD and Features of the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, Patrick; Byrne, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a wide spectrum of liver disease from simple steatosis, to steatohepatitis, (both with and without liver fibrosis), cirrhosis and end-stage liver failure. NAFLD also increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and both HCC and end stage liver disease may markedly increase risk of liver-related mortality. NAFLD is increasing in prevalence and is presently the second most frequent indication for liver transplantation. As NAFLD is frequently associated with insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and hyperglycaemia, NAFLD is often considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. There is growing evidence that this relationship between NAFLD and metabolic syndrome is bidirectional, in that NAFLD can predispose to metabolic syndrome features, which can in turn exacerbate NAFLD or increase the risk of its development in those without a pre-existing diagnosis. Although the relationship between NAFLD and metabolic syndrome is frequently bidirectional, recently there has been much interest in genotype/phenotype relationships where there is a disconnect between the liver disease and metabolic syndrome features. Such potential examples of genotypes that are associated with a dissociation between liver disease and metabolic syndrome are patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein-3 (PNPLA3) (I148M) and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 protein (TM6SF2) (E167K) genotypes. This review will explore the bidirectional relationship between metabolic syndrome and NAFLD, and will also discuss recent insights from studies of PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 genotypes that may give insight into how and why metabolic syndrome features and liver disease are linked in NAFLD. PMID:26978356

  5. Resting cerebral glucose metabolism and perfusion patterns in women with posttraumatic stress disorder related to sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Young; Chung, Young-Ki; Kim, Bom Sahn; Lee, Su Jin; Yoon, Joon-Kee; An, Young-Sil

    2012-03-31

    In the literature, numerous trials using neuroimaging techniques have investigated brain function in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the contrasting results showed that improvements, including in the study design, were required to reach consistent and convincing conclusions. This study evaluated the functional neuroimaging pattern of resting cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in patients with PTSD related to sexual assault. Twelve patients were enrolled for both brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) investigations. All data were analyzed with statistical parametric mapping 2 (SPM2). The PTSD patients showed significant relative decreases in perfusion in the left hippocampus and in the basal ganglia compared with the control group. The PTSD group also had significantly lower cerebral glucosemetabolic activity in the left hippocampus and the superior temporal and precentral gyri than in the control group. These specific patterns of perfusion and glucose metabolism may be closely related to various neurophysiologic symptoms of PTSD. PMID:22464826

  6. Modifications of the expression of genes involved in cerebral cholesterol metabolism in the rat following chronic ingestion of depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    Racine, Radjini; Gueguen, Yann; Gourmelon, Patrick; Veyssiere, Georges; Souidi, Maâmar

    2009-06-01

    Depleted uranium results from the enrichment of natural uranium for energetic purpose. Its potential dispersion in the environment would set human populations at risk of being contaminated through ingestion. Uranium can build up in the brain and induce behavior disorders. As a major constituent of the myelin sheath, cholesterol is essential to brain function, and several neurological pathologies result from a disruption of cholesterol metabolism. To assess the effect of a chronic contamination with depleted uranium on cerebral cholesterol metabolism, rats were exposed to depleted uranium for 9 months through drinking water at 40 mg/l. The study focuses on gene expression. Cholesterol-catabolizing enzyme CYP46A1 displayed a 39% increase of its messenger RNA (mRNA) level. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutamyl CoA synthase gene expression rose from 91%. Concerning cholesterol transport, mRNA levels of scavenger receptor-B1 and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter A1 increased by 34% and that of apolipoprotein E by 75%. Concerning regulation, gene expression of nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma increased by 46% and 36% respectively, whereas that of retinoid-X-receptor decreased by 29%. In conclusion, a chronic internal contamination with depleted uranium does not affect the health status of rats but induces molecular changes in the dynamic equilibrium of the cerebral cholesterol pool. PMID:18792811

  7. Optically based quantification of absolute cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution in rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Sakadžić, Sava; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Measuring oxygen delivery in brain tissue is important for identifying the pathophysiological changes associated with brain injury and various diseases such as cancer, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. We have developed a multi-modal imaging system for minimally invasive measurement of cerebral oxygenation and blood flow in small animals with high spatial resolution. The system allows for simultaneous measurement of blood flow using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) using either confocal or multiphoton phosphorescence lifetime imaging with exogenous porphyrin-based dyes sensitive to dissolved oxygen. Here we present the changes in pO2 and blood flow in superficial cortical vessels of Sprague Dawley rats in response to conditions such as hypoxia, hyperoxia, and functional stimulation. pO2 measurements display considerable heterogeneity over distances that cannot be resolved with more widely used oxygen-monitoring techniques such as BOLD-fMRI. Large increases in blood flow are observed in response to functional stimulation and hypoxia. Our system allows for quantification of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution, providing a better understanding of metabolic dynamics during functional stimulation and under various neuropathologies. Ultimately, better insight into the underlying mechanisms of neuropathologies will facilitate the development of improved therapeutic strategies to minimize damage to brain tissue.

  8. The value of anthropometric indices for identifying women with features of metabolic syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BMI is a widely used anthropometric measure for identifying CVD and metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk. Two new anthropometric indices are A Body Shape Index (ABSI) and Body Roundness Index (BRI) that may provide better correlations to features of MetS. Methods: Subject data were obtained from 91 over...

  9. Post-traumatic hypoxia exacerbates neurological deficit, neuroinflammation and cerebral metabolism in rats with diffuse traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The combination of diffuse brain injury with a hypoxic insult is associated with poor outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury. In this study, we investigated the impact of post-traumatic hypoxia in amplifying secondary brain damage using a rat model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Rats were examined for behavioral and sensorimotor deficits, increased brain production of inflammatory cytokines, formation of cerebral edema, changes in brain metabolism and enlargement of the lateral ventricles. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to diffuse TAI using the Marmarou impact-acceleration model. Subsequently, rats underwent a 30-minute period of hypoxic (12% O2/88% N2) or normoxic (22% O2/78% N2) ventilation. Hypoxia-only and sham surgery groups (without TAI) received 30 minutes of hypoxic or normoxic ventilation, respectively. The parameters examined included: 1) behavioural and sensorimotor deficit using the Rotarod, beam walk and adhesive tape removal tests, and voluntary open field exploration behavior; 2) formation of cerebral edema by the wet-dry tissue weight ratio method; 3) enlargement of the lateral ventricles; 4) production of inflammatory cytokines; and 5) real-time brain metabolite changes as assessed by microdialysis technique. Results TAI rats showed significant deficits in sensorimotor function, and developed substantial edema and ventricular enlargement when compared to shams. The additional hypoxic insult significantly exacerbated behavioural deficits and the cortical production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β and TNF but did not further enhance edema. TAI and particularly TAI+Hx rats experienced a substantial metabolic depression with respect to glucose, lactate, and glutamate levels. Conclusion Altogether, aggravated behavioural deficits observed in rats with diffuse TAI combined with hypoxia may be induced by enhanced neuroinflammation, and a prolonged period of metabolic dysfunction. PMID

  10. Non-invasive measurement of cerebral oxygen metabolism in the mouse brain by ultra-high field (17)O MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weina; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Vollmers, Manda L; Colonna, Emily T; Adriany, Gregor; Tramm, Brandon; Dubinsky, Janet M; Öz, Gülin

    2013-12-01

    To assess cerebral energetics in transgenic mouse models of neurologic disease, a robust, efficient, and practical method for quantification of cerebral oxygen consumption is needed. (17)O magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been validated to measure cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in the rat brain; however, mice present unique challenges because of their small size. We show that CMRO2 measurements with (17)O MRS in the mouse brain are highly reproducible using 16.4 Tesla and a newly designed oxygen delivery system. The method can be utilized to measure mitochondrial function in mice quickly and repeatedly, without oral intubation, and has numerous potential applications to study cerebral energetics. PMID:24064490

  11. Non-invasive measurement of cerebral oxygen metabolism in the mouse brain by ultra-high field 17O MR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Weina; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Vollmers, Manda L; Colonna, Emily T; Adriany, Gregor; Tramm, Brandon; Dubinsky, Janet M; Öz, Gülin

    2013-01-01

    To assess cerebral energetics in transgenic mouse models of neurologic disease, a robust, efficient, and practical method for quantification of cerebral oxygen consumption is needed. 17O magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been validated to measure cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in the rat brain; however, mice present unique challenges because of their small size. We show that CMRO2 measurements with 17O MRS in the mouse brain are highly reproducible using 16.4 Tesla and a newly designed oxygen delivery system. The method can be utilized to measure mitochondrial function in mice quickly and repeatedly, without oral intubation, and has numerous potential applications to study cerebral energetics. PMID:24064490

  12. Compartmentalized Cerebral Metabolism of [1,6-13C]Glucose Determined by in vivo 13C NMR Spectroscopy at 14.1 T

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, João M. N.; Lanz, Bernard; Gruetter, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral metabolism is compartmentalized between neurons and glia. Although glial glycolysis is thought to largely sustain the energetic requirements of neurotransmission while oxidative metabolism takes place mainly in neurons, this hypothesis is matter of debate. The compartmentalization of cerebral metabolic fluxes can be determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy upon infusion of 13C-enriched compounds, especially glucose. Rats under light α-chloralose anesthesia were infused with [1,6-13C]glucose and 13C enrichment in the brain metabolites was measured by 13C NMR spectroscopy with high sensitivity and spectral resolution at 14.1 T. This allowed determining 13C enrichment curves of amino acid carbons with high reproducibility and to reliably estimate cerebral metabolic fluxes (mean error of 8%). We further found that TCA cycle intermediates are not required for flux determination in mathematical models of brain metabolism. Neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle rate (VTCA) and neurotransmission rate (VNT) were 0.45 ± 0.01 and 0.11 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min, respectively. Glial VTCA was found to be 38 ± 3% of total cerebral oxidative metabolism, accounting for more than half of neuronal oxidative metabolism. Furthermore, glial anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation rate (VPC) was 0.069 ± 0.004 μmol/g/min, i.e., 25 ± 1% of the glial TCA cycle rate. These results support a role of glial cells as active partners of neurons during synaptic transmission beyond glycolytic metabolism. PMID:21713114

  13. Characterization of the interaction between local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose and acid-base index in ischemic rat brain employing a double-isotope methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, K.E.H.

    1988-01-01

    The association between increases in cerebral glucose metabolism and the development of acidosis is largely inferential, based on reports linking hyperglycemia with poor neurological outcome, lactate accumulation, and the severity of acidosis. We measured local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (lCMRglc) and an index of brain pH-the acid-base index (ABI)-concurrently and characterized their interaction in a model of focal cerebral ischemia in rats in a double-label autoradiographic study, using ({sup 14}C)2-deoxyglucose and ({sup 14}C)dimethyloxazolidinedione. Computer-assisted digitization and analysis permitted the simultaneous quantification of the two variables on a pixel-by-pixel basis in the same brain slices.

  14. Functional essentiality from topology features in metabolic networks: a case study in yeast.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Colosimo, Alfredo; Giuliani, Alessandro; Farina, Lorenzo

    2005-08-29

    The relation between the position of mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network and their lethality is the subject of this work. We represent the topology of the network by a directed graph: nodes are metabolites and arcs represent the reactions; a mutation corresponds to the removal of all the arcs referring to the deleted enzyme. Using publicly available knock-out data, we show that lethality corresponds to the lack of alternative paths in the perturbed network linking the nodes affected by the enzyme deletion. Such feature is at the basis of the recently recognized importance of 'marginal' arcs of metabolic networks. PMID:16095595

  15. Hypertension Is a Key Feature of the Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects Aging with HIV.

    PubMed

    Martin-Iguacel, Raquel; Negredo, Eugènia; Peck, Robert; Friis-Møller, Nina

    2016-06-01

    With widespread and effective antiretroviral therapy, the life expectancy in the HIV population has dramatically improved over the last two decades. Consequently, as patients are aging with HIV, other age-related comorbidities, such as metabolic disturbances and cardiovascular disease (CVD), have emerged as important causes of morbidity and mortality. An overrepresentation of traditional cardiovascular risk factors (RF), toxicities associated with long exposure to antiretroviral therapy, together with residual chronic inflammation and immune activation associated with HIV infection are thought to predispose to these metabolic complications and to the excess risk of CVD observed in the HIV population. The metabolic syndrome (MS) represents a clustering of RF for CVD that includes abdominal obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Hypertension is a prevalent feature of the MS in HIV, in particular in the aging population, and constitutes an important RF for CVD. Physicians should screen their patients for metabolic and cardiovascular risk at the regular visits to reduce MS and the associated CVD risk among people aging with HIV, since many of RF are under-diagnosed and under-treated conditions. Interventions to reduce these RF can include lifestyle changes and pharmacological interventions such as antihypertensive and lipid-lowering therapy, and treatment of glucose metabolism disturbances. Changes in antiretroviral therapy to more metabolic neutral antiretroviral drugs may also be considered. PMID:27131801

  16. Michaelis-Menten constraints improved cerebral glucose metabolism and regional lumped constant measurements with ( sup 18 F)fluorodeoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, H.; Evans, A.C.; Gjedde, A. )

    1990-03-01

    In the three-compartment model of transfer of native glucose and (18F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) into brain, both transport across the blood-brain barrier and phosphorylation by hexokinase can be described by the Michaelis-Menten equation. This permits the use of fixed transport (tau = K*1/K1) and phosphorylation (psi = k*3/k3) ratios and a common partition volume (Ve = K1/k2) for tracer and glucose. By substituting transfer constants of FDG for those of glucose, using tau and psi, the lumped constant was determined directly by positron tomography. The same constraints also eliminated k*2 and k*3 from the model, thus limiting the parameters to K* (equivalent to K*1k*3/(k*2 + k*3)), K*1, and the cerebral vascular volume (Vo). In six healthy elderly men (aged 61 +/- 5 years), time-activity records of cerebral cortical regions were analyzed with tau = 1.1 and psi = 0.3. The results were compared with those of the conventional FDG method. At 20 min, the goodness of fit by the new equation was as good as that of the conventional method at 45 min. The estimates obtained by the constrained method had stable coefficients of variation. After 20 min, regional differences between the estimates were independent of time, although we observed steady decreases of K* and (k*3). The decrease strongly suggested dephosphorylation of FDG-6-phosphate, particularly after 20 min. All estimates of variables with the constrained method were more accurate than those of the conventional method, including the cerebral glucose metabolic rate itself, as well as physiologically more meaningful, particularly with respect to k*2 and k*3.

  17. Relation of EEG alpha background to cognitive fuction, brain atrophy, and cerebral metabolism in Down's syndrome. Age-specific changes

    SciTech Connect

    Devinsky, O.; Sato, S.; Conwit, R.A.; Schapiro, M.B. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied 19 young adults (19 to 37 years old) and 9 older patients (42 to 66 years old) with Down's syndrome (DS) and a control group of 13 healthy adults (22 to 38 years old) to investigate the relation of electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha background to cognitive function and cerebral metabolism. Four of the older patients with DS had a history of mental deterioration, disorientation, and memory loss and were demented. Patients and control subjects had EEGs, psychometric testing, quantitative computed tomography, and positron emission tomography with fludeoxyglucose F 18. A blinded reader classified the EEGs into two groups--those with normal alpha background or those with abnormal background. All the control subjects, the 13 young adult patients with DS, and the 5 older patients with DS had normal EEG backgrounds. In comparison with the age-matched patients with DS with normal alpha background, older patients with DS with decreased alpha background had dementia, fewer visuospatial skills, decreased attention span, larger third ventricles, and a global decrease in cerebral glucose utilization with parietal hypometabolism. In the young patients with DS, the EEG background did not correlate with psychometric or positron emission tomographic findings, but the third ventricles were significantly larger in those with abnormal EEG background. The young patients with DS, with or without normal EEG background, had positron emission tomographic findings similar to those of the control subjects. The mechanism underlying the abnormal EEG background may be the neuropathologic changes of Alzheimer's disease in older patients with DS and may be cerebral immaturity in younger patients with DS.

  18. Decrease in cerebral metabolic rate of glucose after high-dose methotrexate in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsu, K.; Takada, G.; Uemura, K.; Shishido, F.; Kanno, I. )

    1990-09-01

    We measured changes in the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRGlu) using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography for the assessment of neurotoxicity in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia treated with high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) therapy. We studied 8 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (mean age: 9.6 years) treated with HD-MTX (200 mg/kg or 2,000 mg/M2) therapy. CMRGlu after HD-MTX therapy was most reduced (40%) in the patient who had central nervous system leukemia and was treated with the largest total doses of both intrathecal MTX (IT-MTX) and HD-MTX. CMRGlu in the whole brain after HD-MTX therapy was reduced by an average of 21% (P less than 0.05). The reductions of CMRGlu in 8 patients were correlated with total doses of both IT-MTX (r = 0.717; P less than 0.05) and systemic HD-MTX (r = 0.784; P less than 0.05). CMRGlu of the cerebral cortex, especially the frontal and occipital cortex, was reduced more noticeably than that of the basal ganglia and white matter. We suggest that the measurement of changes in rCMRGlu after HD-MTX therapy is useful for detecting accumulated MTX neurotoxicity.

  19. Marked Elevation in Plasma Osteoprotegerin Constitutes an Early and Consistent Feature of Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    O’Regan, Niamh; Moxon, Chris; Gegenbauer, Kristina; O’Sullivan, Jamie M.; Chion, Alain; Smith, Owen P.; Preston, Roger J. S.; Brophy, Teresa M.; Craig, Alister G.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Adherence of infected erythrocytes to vascular endothelium causes acute endothelial cell (EC) activation during Plasmodium falciparum infection. Consequently, proteins stored in Weibel-Palade (WP) bodies within EC are secreted into the plasma. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) binds to VWF and consequently is stored within WP bodies. Given the critical role of EC activation in the pathogenesis of severe malaria, we investigated plasma OPG levels in children with P. falciparum malaria. At presentation, plasma OPG levels were significantly elevated in children with cerebral malaria (CM) compared to healthy controls (means 16.0 vs 0.8 ng/ml; p<0.01). Importantly, OPG levels were also significantly higher in children with CM who had a fatal outcome, compared to children with CM who survived. Finally, in children with CM, plasma OPG levels correlated with other established prognostic indices (including plasma lactate levels and peripheral parasite density). To further investigate the relationship between severe malaria and OPG, we utilised a murine model of experimental CM in which C57BL/6J mice were infected with P. berghei ANKA. Interestingly, plasma OPG levels were increased 4.6 fold within 24 hours following P. berghei inoculation. This early marked elevation in OPG levels was observed before any objective clinical signs were apparent, and preceded the development of peripheral blood parasitaemia. As the mice became increasingly unwell, plasma OPG levels progressively increased. Collectively, these data suggest that OPG constitutes a novel biomarker with prognostic significance in patients with severe malaria. In addition, further studies are required to determine whether OPG plays a role in modulating malaria pathogenesis. PMID:26766771

  20. [Ten-years records of organic arsenic (diphenylarsinic acid) poisoning: epidemiology, clinical feature, metabolism, and toxicity].

    PubMed

    Ishi, Kazuhiro; Tamaoka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We report here the symptoms of diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) poisoning recorded over 10 years since the DPAA contamination of the potable well water was first detected in the Kamisu City, Ibaraki Prefecture, in 2003. The poisoning symptoms associated with the cerebellum and brainstem included nystagmus, tremors, myoclonus, and cerebellar ataxia as well as the symptoms associated with the temporal and occipital lobes such as memory impairment, sleep disorder, and visual disturbance. Some of the affected children exhibited mental retardation. Moreover, reduced blood flow and reduced glucose metabolism in the cerebella, brainstem, and temporal and occipital lobes persisted for several years among the DPAA-exposed persons. Based on the animal studies for DPAA intoxication, the target organs for the DPAA toxicity were determined to be the central nervous system (CNS), liver, and biliary system. In particular, DPAA tends to persist in the brain for a long time, resulting in long-term impacts on the brain. The cerebral blood flow and brain glucose metabolism, which can be measured by positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), respectively, are useful objective clinical markers to determine the effect of DPAA on CNS. We believe that continuous monitoring of the DPAA-exposed people may promote the effect of carcinogen and accelerate brain aging. PMID:25585431

  1. Association of cerebral metabolic activity changes with vagus nerve stimulation antidepressant response in treatment-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Charles R.; Chibnall, John T.; Gebara, Marie Anne; Price, Joseph L.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Mintun, Mark A.; (Bud) Craig, A.D.; Cornell, Martha E.; Perantie, Dana C.; Giuffra, Luis A.; Bucholz, Richard D.; Sheline, Yvette I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has antidepressant effects in treatment resistant major depression (TRMD); these effects are poorly understood. This trial examines associations of subacute (3 months) and chronic (12 months) VNS with cerebral metabolism in TRMD. Objective 17Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography was used to examine associations between 12-month antidepressant VNS response and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRGlu) changes at 3 and 12 months. Methods Thirteen TRMD patients received 12 months of VNS. Depression assessments (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS]) and PET scans were obtained at baseline (pre-VNS) and 3/12 months. CMRGlu was assessed in eight a priori selected brain regions (bilateral anterior insular [AIC], orbitofrontal [OFC], dorsolateral prefrontal [DLPFC], and anterior cingulate cortices [ACC]). Regional CMRGlu changes over time were studied in VNS responders (decreased 12 month HDRS by ≥50%) and nonresponders. Results A significant trend (decreased 3 month CMRGlu) in the right DLPFC was observed over time in VNS responders (n = 9; P = 0.006). An exploratory whole brain analysis (Puncorrected = 0.005) demonstrated decreased 3 month right rostral cingulate and DLPFC CMRGlu, and increased 12 month left ventral tegmental CMRGlu in responders. Conclusions/Limitations VNS response may involve gradual (months in duration) brain adaptations. Early on, this process may involve decreased right-sided DLPFC/cingulate cortical activity; longer term effects (12 months) may lead to brainstem dopaminergic activation. Study limitations included: a) a small VNS nonresponders sample (N = 4), which limited conclusions about nonresponder CMRGlu changes; b) no control group; and, c) patients maintained their psychotropic medications. PMID:23485649

  2. Cerebral glutamine metabolism under hyperammonemia determined in vivo by localized 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cudalbu, Cristina; Lanz, Bernard; Duarte, João MN; Morgenthaler, Florence D; Pilloud, Yves; Mlynárik, Vladimir; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Brain glutamine synthetase (GS) is an integral part of the glutamate–glutamine cycle and occurs in the glial compartment. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) allows noninvasive measurements of the concentrations and synthesis rates of metabolites. 15N MRS is an alternative approach to 13C MRS. Incorporation of labeled 15N from ammonia in cerebral glutamine allows to measure several metabolic reactions related to nitrogen metabolism, including the glutamate–glutamine cycle. To measure 15N incorporation into the position 5N of glutamine and position 2N of glutamate and glutamine, we developed a novel 15N pulse sequence to simultaneously detect, for the first time, [5-15N]Gln and [2-15N]Gln+Glu in vivo in the rat brain. In addition, we also measured for the first time in the same experiment localized 1H spectra for a direct measurement of the net glutamine accumulation. Mathematical modeling of 1H and 15N MRS data allowed to reduce the number of assumptions and provided reliable determination of GS (0.30±0.050 μmol/g per minute), apparent neurotransmission (0.26±0.030 μmol/g per minute), glutamate dehydrogenase (0.029±0.002 μmol/g per minute), and net glutamine accumulation (0.033±0.001 μmol/g per minute). These results showed an increase of GS and net glutamine accumulation under hyperammonemia, supporting the concept of their implication in cerebral ammonia detoxification. PMID:22167234

  3. Region-specific cerebral metabolic alterations in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats: an in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Huang, Mingming; Gao, Lifeng; Lei, Hao

    2015-11-01

    Clinical and experimental in vivo (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) studies have demonstrated that type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with cerebral metabolic abnormalities. However, less is known whether T1DM induces different metabolic disturbances in different brain regions. In this study, in vivo (1)H-MRS was used to measure metabolic alterations in the visual cortex, striatum, and hippocampus of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced uncontrolled T1DM rats at 4 days and 4 weeks after induction. It was observed that altered neuronal metabolism occurred in STZ-treated rats as early as 4 days after induction. At 4 weeks, T1DM-related metabolic disturbances were clearly region specific. The diabetic visual cortex had more or less normal-appearing metabolic profile; while the striatum and hippocampus showed similar abnormalities in neuronal metabolism involving N-acetyl aspartate and glutamate; but only the hippocampus exhibited significant changes in glial markers such as taurine and myo-inositol. It is concluded that cerebral metabolic perturbations in STZ-induced T1DM rats are region specific at 4 weeks after induction, perhaps as a manifestation of varied vulnerability among the brain regions to sustained hyperglycemia. PMID:26036938

  4. Cerebral metabolism and blood brain transport: toxicity of organophosphorus compounds. Report No. 3 (Annual) 15 April 1984-30 September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Drewes, L.R.; Singh, A.K.

    1987-04-01

    The acute neurotoxicity of the organophosphorus (OP) compounds, soman and sarin was investigated using the isolated, perfused canine brain preparation. This experimental model allows a comprehensive study of the metabolic (biochemical) and physiological (vascular and electrical) responses to neurotoxicants because extra-cerebral tissues and influences are absent, and blood and tissue samples are readily collected for quantitative biochemical analyses. The specific aims of this project period were to investigate OP-induced alterations in 1)neurotransmitter (acetylcholine (ACh), amino acids, biogenic amines) metabolism; 2) cellular morphology and subcellular structures (light and electron microscopy); 3) vascular integrity (blood-brain interface damage)l and 4) regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRG) and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). The data indicate that inhibition of acetylcholinesterase results in elevation of ACh and choline (Ch). The Ch is largely intracellular, does not originate from blood Ch, is not produced by de novo synthesis, and is probably formed from Ch-containing lipids by lipase activity which may be activated by a receptor-mediated mechanism. The enzymes involved in ACh/Ch/Ch-lipid metabolism and their regulation are putative targets for OP agents and potential sites for therapeutic intervention. It is recommended that investigations be pursued to define clearly the metabolic pathways of this key neurotransmitter.

  5. Cerebral metabolic changes in a depression-like rat model of chronic forced swimming studied by ex vivo high resolution 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Xia; Wang, Yaqiang; Gao, Hongchang; Pan, Wen-Ju; Xiang, Yun; Huang, Mingming; Lei, Hao

    2008-11-01

    Many previous in vivo (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies have shown that patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are associated with perturbations of cerebral metabolism of neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, we investigated the changes of cerebral metabolism in a depression-like rat model of chronic forced swimming stress (CFSS). The aims are to further understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying CFSS treatment, and to further establish the face and predictive validity of the CFSS model. The results showed that, relative to control, the CFSS rats had significantly reduced Glu, taurine and glutamate + glutamine (Glx) levels in the PFC, and significantly reduced N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) level, Glu level and Glu/GABA ratio in the hippocampus. Taking together, these results suggest that CFSS treatment can induce region-specific changes in the metabolism of Glu. The CFSS model might be used to study antidepressants specifically targeting the central glutamatergic system. PMID:18473166

  6. Post-hypoxic hypoperfusion is associated with suppression of cerebral metabolism and increased tissue oxygenation in near-term fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, E C; Bennet, L; Hunter, C J; Power, G C; Gunn, A J

    2006-01-01

    Secondary cerebral hypoperfusion is common following perinatal hypoxia–ischaemia. However, it remains unclear whether this represents a true failure to provide sufficient oxygen and nutrients to tissues, or whether it is simply a consequence of reduced cerebral metabolic demand. We therefore examined the hypothesis that cerebral oxygenation would be reduced during hypoperfusion after severe asphyxia, and further, that the greater neural injury associated with blockade of the adenosine A1 receptor during the insult would be associated with greater hypoperfusion and deoxygenation. Sixteen near-term fetal sheep received either vehicle or 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) for 1 h, followed by 10 min of severe asphyxia induced by complete occlusion of the umbilical cord. Infusions were discontinued at the end of the occlusion and data were analysed for the following 8 h. A transient, secondary fall in carotid artery blood flow and laser Doppler flow was seen from approximately 1–4 h after occlusion (P < 0.001), with no significant differences between vehicle and DPCPX. Changes in laser Doppler blood flow were highly correlated with carotid blood flow (r2 = 0.81, P < 0.001). Cortical metabolism was suppressed, reaching a nadir 1 h after occlusion and then resolving. Cortical tissue PO2 was significantly increased at 1, 2 and 3 h after occlusion compared to baseline, and inversely correlated with carotid blood flow (r2 = 0.69, P < 0.001). In conclusion, contrary to our initial hypothesis, delayed posthypoxic hypoperfusion was associated with suppression of cerebral metabolism and increased tissue PO2, and was not significantly affected by preceding adenosine A1 blockade. These data suggest that posthypoxic hypoperfusion is actively mediated and reflects suppressed cerebral metabolism. PMID:16484307

  7. Relationship Between Cerebral Oxygenation and Metabolism During Rewarming in Newborn Infants After Therapeutic Hypothermia Following Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Subhabrata; Bale, Gemma; Meek, Judith; Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Robertson, Nicola J; Tachtsidis, Ilias

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) has become a standard of care following hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). After TH, body temperature is brought back to 37 °C over 14 h. Lactate/N-acetylasperatate (Lac/NAA) peak area ratio on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) is the best available outcome biomarker following HIE. We hypothesized that broadband near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measured changes in the oxidation state of cytochrome-c-oxidase concentration (Δ[oxCCO]) and cerebral hemodynamics during rewarming would relate to Lac/NAA. Broadband NIRS and systemic data were collected during rewarming from 14 infants following HIE over a mean period of 12.5 h. (1)H MRS was performed on day 5-9. Heart rate increased by 20/min during rewarming while blood pressure and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) remained stable. The relationship between mitochondrial metabolism and oxygenation (measured as Δ[oxCCO] and Δ[HbD], respectively) was calculated by linear regression analysis. This was reviewed in three groups: Lac/NAA values <0.5, 0.5-1, >1. Mean regression coefficient (r (2)) values in these groups were 0.41 (±0.27), 0.22 (±0.21) and 0.01, respectively. The relationship between mitochondrial metabolism and oxygenation became impaired with rising Lac/NAA. Cardiovascular parameters remained stable during rewarming. PMID:27526150

  8. Effects of Antioxidant Supplements (BioPQQ™) on Cerebral Blood Flow and Oxygen Metabolism in the Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahiko; Murayama, Yuta; Hu, Lizhen; Ikemoto, Kazuto; Uetake, Tatsuo; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a quinone compound originally identified in methanol-utilizing bacteria and is a cofactor for redox enzymes. At the Meeting of the International Society on Oxygen Transport to Tissue (ISOTT) 2014, we reported that PQQ disodium salt (BioPQQ™) improved cognitive function in humans, as assessed by the Stroop test. However, the physiological mechanism of PQQ remains unclear. In the present study, we measured regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolism in prefrontal cortex (PFC), before and after administration of PQQ, using time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (tNIRS). A total of 20 healthy subjects between 50 and 70 years of age were administered BioPQQ™ (20 mg) or placebo orally once daily for 12 weeks. Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and absolute tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) in the bilateral PFC were evaluated under resting conditions using tNIRS. We found that baseline concentrations of hemoglobin and total hemoglobin in the right PFC significantly increased after administration of PQQ (p < 0.05). In addition, decreases in SO2 level in the PFC were more pronounced in the PQQ group than in the placebo group (p < 0.05). These results suggest that PQQ causes increased activity in the right PFC associated with increases in rCBF and oxygen metabolism, resulting in enhanced cognitive function. PMID:27526146

  9. Blast Overpressure Waves Induce Transient Anxiety and Regional Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Delayed Hyperarousal in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Hibah O.; Gonzalez, Larry P.; Tompkins, Paul; Lerner, Megan; Brackett, Daniel J.; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological alterations, anxiety, and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI), and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25,000–30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined, following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p < 0.05; n = 8–11). Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p < 0.05; n = 4–6) and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p < 0.05; n = 5–6). PMID:26136722

  10. Blast Overpressure Waves Induce Transient Anxiety and Regional Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Delayed Hyperarousal in Rats.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Hibah O; Gonzalez, Larry P; Tompkins, Paul; Lerner, Megan; Brackett, Daniel J; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    Physiological alterations, anxiety, and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI), and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25,000-30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined, following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p < 0.05; n = 8-11). Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p < 0.05; n = 4-6) and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p < 0.05; n = 5-6). PMID:26136722

  11. Greater left cerebral hemispheric metabolism in bulimia assessed by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.C.; Hagman, J.; Buchsbaum, M.S.; Blinder, B.; Derrfler, M.; Tai, W.Y.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N. )

    1990-03-01

    Eight women with bulimia and eight age- and sex-matched normal control subjects were studied with positron emission tomography using (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as a tracer of brain metabolic rate. Subjects performed a visual vigilance task during FDG uptake. In control subjects, the metabolic rate was higher in the right hemisphere than in the left, but patients with bulimia did not have this normal asymmetry. Lower metabolic rates in the basal ganglia, found in studies of depressed subjects, and higher rates in the basal ganglia, reported in a study of anorexia nervosa, were not found. This is consistent with the suggestion that bulimia is a diagnostic grouping distinct from these disorders.

  12. Effects of dietary polyphenols on metabolic syndrome features in humans: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Amiot, M J; Riva, C; Vinet, A

    2016-07-01

    Dietary polyphenols constitute a large family of bioactive substances potential beneficial effect on metabolic syndrome (MetS). This review summarizes the results of clinical studies on patients with MetS involving the chronic supplementation of a polyphenol-rich diet, foods, extracts or with single phenolics on the features of MetS (obesity, dyslipidemia, blood pressure and glycaemia) and associated complications (oxidative stress and inflammation). Polyphenols were shown to be efficient, especially at higher doses, and there were no specific foods or extracts able to alleviate all the features of MetS. Green tea, however, significantly reduced body mass index and waist circumference and improved lipid metabolism. Cocoa supplementation reduced blood pressure and blood glucose. Soy isoflavones, citrus products, hesperidin and quercetin improved lipid metabolism, whereas cinnamon reduced blood glucose. In numerous clinical studies, antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects were not significant after polyphenol supplementation in patients with MetS. However, some trials pointed towards an improvement of endothelial function in patients supplemented with cocoa, anthocyanin-rich berries, hesperidin or resveratrol. Therefore, diets rich in polyphenols, such as the Mediterranean diet, which promote the consumption of diverse polyphenol-rich products could be an effective nutritional strategy to improve the health of patients with MetS. © 2016 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity. PMID:27079631

  13. Lowered circulating aspartate is a metabolic feature of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhou, Bingsen; Zhao, Aihua; Qiu, Yunping; Zhao, Xueqing; Garmire, Lana; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Yu, Herbert; Yen, Yun; Jia, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Distinct metabolic transformation is essential for cancer cells to sustain a high rate of proliferation and resist cell death signals. Such a metabolic transformation results in unique cellular metabolic phenotypes that are often reflected by distinct metabolite signatures in tumor tissues as well as circulating blood. Using a metabolomics platform, we find that breast cancer is associated with significantly (p = 6.27E-13) lowered plasma aspartate levels in a training group comprising 35 breast cancer patients and 35 controls. The result was validated with 103 plasma samples and 183 serum samples of two groups of primary breast cancer patients. Such a lowered aspartate level is specific to breast cancer as it has shown 0% sensitivity in serum from gastric (n = 114) and colorectal (n = 101) cancer patients. There was a significantly higher level of aspartate in breast cancer tissues (n = 20) than in adjacent non-tumor tissues, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line than in MCF-10A cell lines, suggesting that the depleted level of aspartate in blood of breast cancer patients is due to increased tumor aspartate utilization. Together, these findings suggest that lowed circulating aspartate is a key metabolic feature of human breast cancer. PMID:26452258

  14. Stability of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in the normal brain measured by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, J.L.; Strother, S.C.; Zatorre, R.J.; Alivisatos, B.; Worsley, K.J.; Diksic, M.; Yamamoto, Y.L.

    1988-05-01

    Cerebral glucose utilization (LCMRGI) was measured using the (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose method with PET in two groups of ten healthy young volunteers, each scanned in a resting state under different methodological conditions. In addition, five subjects had a second scan within 48 hr. Mean hemispheric values averaged 45.8 +/- 3.3 mumol/100 g/min in the right cerebral hemisphere and 47.0 +/- 3.7 mumol/100 g/min in the left hemisphere. A four-way analysis of variance (group, sex, region, hemisphere) was carried out on the results using three different methods of data manipulation: (a) the raw values of glucose utilization, (b) LCMRGI values normalized by the mean hemispheric gray matter LCMRGI value, and (c) log transformed LCMRGI values. For all analysis techniques, significantly higher LCMRGI values were consistently seen in the left mid and posterior temporal area and caudate nucleus relative to the right, and in the right occipital region relative to the left. The coefficient of variation of intrasubject regional differences (9.9%) was significantly smaller than the coefficient of variation for regions between subjects (16.5%). No differences were noted between the sexes and no effect of repeat procedures was seen in subjects having multiple scans. In addition, inter-regional LCMRGI correlations were examined both in values from the 20 normal subjects, as well as in a set of hypothetical abnormal values. Results were compared with those reported from other PET centers; despite certain methodological differences, the intersubject and inter-regional variation of LCMRGI is fairly constant.

  15. Intelligence and Changes in Regional Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rate Following Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haier, Richard J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study of eight normal right-handed men demonstrates widespread significant decreases in brain glucose metabolic rate (GMR) following learning a complex computer task, a computer game. Correlations between magnitude of GMR change and intelligence scores are also demonstrated. (SLD)

  16. In vivo imaging of hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in acute focal cerebral ischemic rats with laser speckle imaging and functional photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Xiaoquan; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2012-08-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease. The changes in cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism associated with stroke play an important role in pathophysiology study. But the changes were difficult to describe with a single imaging modality. Here the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and oxygen saturation (SO2) were yielded with laser speckle imaging (LSI) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) during and after 3-h acute focal ischemic rats. These hemodynamic measures were further synthesized to deduce the changes in oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The results indicate that all the hemodynamics except CBV had rapid declines within 40-min occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO). CBV in arteries and veins first increased to the maximum value of 112.42±36.69% and 130.58±31.01% by 15 min MCAO; then all the hemodynamics had a persistent reduction with small fluctuations during the ischemic. When ischemia lasted for 3 h, CBF in arteries, veins decreased to 17±14.65%, 24.52±20.66%, respectively, CBV dropped to 62±18.56% and 59±18.48%. And the absolute SO2 decreased by 40.52±22.42% and 54.24±11.77%. After 180-min MCAO, the changes in hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism were also quantified. The study suggested that combining LSI and PAM provides an attractive approach for stroke detection in small animal studies.

  17. Autoradiographic determination of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism in conscious rats after fluid resuscitation from haemorrhage with a haemoglobin-based oxygen carrier.

    PubMed

    Waschke, K F; Albrecht, D M; van Ackern, K; Kuschinsky, W

    1994-10-01

    The effects of resuscitation fluids on the brain have been investigated in previous studies by global measurements of cerebral blood flow and metabolism. In this study we have examined the effects of a novel haemoglobin-based oxygen carrier on local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) after resuscitation from a volume-controlled haemorrhage of 30 min (3.0 ml/100 g body weight) with ultrapurified, polymerized, bovine haemoglobin (UPBHB). LCBF and LCGU were measured in 34 brain structures of conscious rats 2 h after resuscitation using quantitative iodo(14C)antipyrine and 2-(14C)-deoxy-D-glucose methods. The data were compared with a control group without haemorrhage and fluid resuscitation. In the haemorrhage group, LCBF increased after resuscitation by 12-56% in the different brain structures (mean 36%). LCGU changed less (0 to +18%, mean +9%). In the control group there was a close relationship between LCGU and LCBF (r = 0.95). After fluid resuscitation the relationship was preserved (r = 0.95), although it was reset at a higher ratio of LCBF to LCGU (P < 0.05). We conclude that fluid resuscitation of a 30 min volume-controlled haemorrhage using the haemoglobin-based oxygen carrier, UPBHB, induced a moderate degree of heterogeneity in the resulting changes of LCGU and LCBF. Local disturbances of cerebral blood flow or metabolism were not observed. PMID:7999496

  18. The change in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture: a possible marker to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao-Tao; Hong, Qing-Xiong; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Some reports have demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for patients who suffer from intractable anorexia nervosa. However, the nature of DBS may not be viewed as a standard clinical treatment option for anorexia nervosa because of the unpredictable outcome before DBS. Just like DBS in the brain, electroacupuncture at acupoints is also efficient in treating refractory anorexia nervosa. Some neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET) had revealed that both DBS and electroacupuncture at acupoints with electrical stimulation are related to the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism. Therefore, we hypothesize that the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture might be useful to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa. PMID:26770596

  19. The change in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture: a possible marker to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao-Tao; Hong, Qing-Xiong; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Some reports have demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for patients who suffer from intractable anorexia nervosa. However, the nature of DBS may not be viewed as a standard clinical treatment option for anorexia nervosa because of the unpredictable outcome before DBS. Just like DBS in the brain, electroacupuncture at acupoints is also efficient in treating refractory anorexia nervosa. Some neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET) had revealed that both DBS and electroacupuncture at acupoints with electrical stimulation are related to the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism. Therefore, we hypothesize that the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture might be useful to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa. PMID:26770596

  20. Direct neuronal glucose uptake heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu; Kang, Hongyi; Sanggaard, Simon; Haswell, John Douglas R; Sun, Wei; Goldman, Siri; Blekot, Solomiya; Nielsen, Michael; Takano, Takahiro; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-01-01

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using 2-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover, hexokinase, which catalyze the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identifies the neuron as the principal locus of glucose uptake as visualized by functional brain imaging. PMID:25904018

  1. Positron emission tomographic scan investigations of Huntington's disease: cerebral metabolic correlates of cognitive function

    SciTech Connect

    Berent, S.; Giordani, B.; Lehtinen, S.; Markel, D.; Penney, J.B.; Buchtel, H.A.; Starosta-Rubinstein, S.; Hichwa, R.; Young, A.B.

    1988-06-01

    Fifteen drug-free patients with early to mid-stage Huntington's disease (HD) were evaluated with positron emission tomographic (PET) scans of /sup 18/F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake and quantitative measures of neurological function, learning, memory, and general intelligence. In comparison with a group of normal volunteers, the HD patients showed lower metabolism in both caudate (p less than 0.001) and putamen (p less than 0.001) on PET scans. A significant and positive relationship was found between neuropsychological measures of verbal learning and memory and caudate metabolism in the patient group but not in the normal group. Visual-spatial learning did not reflect a similar pattern, but performance intelligence quotient was positively related to both caudate and putamen metabolism in the HD group. Vocabulary level was unrelated to either brain structure. Discussion focuses on these and other observed brain-behavior relationships and on the implications of these findings for general behaviors such as those involved in coping and adaptation.

  2. Changes in cerebral metabolism in patients with a minimally conscious state responding to zolpidem

    PubMed Central

    Chatelle, Camille; Thibaut, Aurore; Gosseries, Olivia; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Demertzi, Athena; Bernard, Claire; Hustinx, Roland; Tshibanda, Luaba; Bahri, Mohamed A.; Laureys, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Background: Zolpidem, a short-acting non-benzodiazepine GABA agonist hypnotic, has been shown to induce paradoxical responses in some patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC), leading to recovery of arousal and cognitive abilities. We here assessed zolpidem-induced changes in regional brain metabolism in three patients with known zolpidem response in chronic post-anoxic minimally conscious state (MCS). Methods: [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and standardized clinical assessments using the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised were performed after administration of 10 mg zolpidem or placebo in a randomized double blind 2-day protocol. PET data preprocessing and comparison with a healthy age-matched control group were performed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM8). Results: Behaviorally, all patients recovered functional communication after administration of zolpidem (i.e., emergence from the MCS). FDG-PET showed increased metabolism in dorsolateral prefrontal and mesiofrontal cortices after zolpidem but not after placebo administration. Conclusion: Our data show a metabolic activation of prefrontal areas, corroborating the proposed mesocircuit hypothesis to explain the paradoxical effect of zolpidem observed in some patients with DOC. It also suggests the key role of the prefrontal cortices in the recovery of functional communication and object use in hypoxic patients with chronic MCS. PMID:25520636

  3. Multi-parametric imaging of cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic response followed by ischemic injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Dziennis, Suzan; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-02-01

    We use rodent parietal cortex as a model system and utilize a synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle imaging (SDW-LSCI) technique to explore the hemodynamic response of infarct and penumbra to a brain injury (middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model). The SDW-LSCI system is able to take snapshots rapidly (maximum 500 Hz) over the entire brain surface, providing key information about the hemodynamic response, in terms of which it may be used to elucidate evolution of penumbra region from onsite to 90 min of MCAO. Changes in flow are quantified as to the flow experiencing physical occlusions of the MCA normalized to that of baseline. Furthermore, the system is capable of providing information as to the changes of the concentration of oxygenated, (HbO) deoxygenated (Hb), and total hemoglobin (HbT) in the cortex based on the spectral characteristics of HbO and Hb. We observe that the oxygenation variations in the four regions are detectable and distinct. Combining the useful information, four regions of interest (ROI), infarct, penumbra, reduced flow and contralateral portions in the brain upon ischemic injury may be differentiated. Implications of our results are discussed with respect to current understanding of the mechanisms underlying MCAO. We anticipate that SDW-LSCI holds promise for rapid and large field of view localization of ischemic injury.

  4. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging. PMID:27188686

  5. Simultaneous double-isotope autoradiographic measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolic rate and acid-base status in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, A H; Peek, K E; Berridge, M; Bogue, L; Yap, E

    1987-03-01

    We developed a double-isotope autoradiographic method for the simultaneous measurement of the local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG) and index of regional acid-base status (rABI) in single brain slices using [2-14C]deoxy-D-glucose (DG) and 5,5-dimethyl-[2-14C]oxazolidine-2,4,dione (DMO). After iv isotope administration, paper chromatography separates plasma DMO from DG activity using a methanol-methylene chloride solvent system. Initial tissue autoradiograms depict regional DMO plus DG and DG metabolite distribution. After 14 days in a well-ventilated hood, 97.5 +/- 0.5% of all DMO is lost from tissue sections by sublimation, and a second autoradiogram depicts DG plus DG metabolite distribution. Retention of brain lipids does not alter beta-particle self-absorption, avoiding problems associated with isotope extraction with solvents. Autoradiograms are digitized and converted to isotope-content images. The second autoradiogram is used for 1CMRG computation. After subtracting the second regional isotope-content value from the first, the DMO content is obtained and used to compute rABI. Application of this method to normal animals yields expected values for 1CMRG and rABI. This method is amenable to whole-slice digitization and creation of functional images of 1CMRG and ABI followed by pixel-by-pixel correlations of the two variables, making this a potentially valuable tool for the investigation of the relationships between glucose metabolism and brain acid-base balance. PMID:3505334

  6. Identifying core features of adaptive metabolic mechanisms for chronic heat stress attenuation contributing to systems robustness.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jenny; Weber, Katrin; Klemp, Elisabeth; Winters, Gidon; Franssen, Susanne U; Wienpahl, Isabell; Huylmans, Ann-Kathrin; Zecher, Karsten; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Weber, Andreas P M

    2012-05-01

    The contribution of metabolism to heat stress may play a significant role in defining robustness and recovery of systems; either by providing the energy and metabolites required for cellular homeostasis, or through the generation of protective osmolytes. However, the mechanisms by which heat stress attenuation could be adapted through metabolic processes as a stabilizing strategy against thermal stress are still largely unclear. We address this issue through metabolomic and transcriptomic profiles for populations along a thermal cline where two seagrass species, Zostera marina and Zostera noltii, were found in close proximity. Significant changes captured by these profile comparisons could be detected, with a larger response magnitude observed in northern populations to heat stress. Sucrose, fructose, and myo-inositol were identified to be the most responsive of the 29 analyzed organic metabolites. Many key enzymes in the Calvin cycle, glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways also showed significant differential expression. The reported comparison suggests that adaptive mechanisms are involved through metabolic pathways to dampen the impacts of heat stress, and interactions between the metabolome and proteome should be further investigated in systems biology to understand robust design features against abiotic stress. PMID:22402787

  7. Comparison of cerebral glucose metabolic rates measured with fluorodeoxyglucose and glucose labeled in the 1, 2, 3-4, and 6 positions using double label quantitative digital autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, J.L.; Ackermann, R.F.

    1988-08-01

    We compared local cerebral glucose metabolic rates (LCMRglu) that were determined with (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and (/sup 14/C)glucose labeled in the 1, 2, 3-4, and 6 positions. Double label digital autoradiography was used with published kinetic models to determine LCMRglu for FDG and glucose in the same animals. Glucose showed metabolic rate dependent underestimation of LCMRglu compared to FDG, which worsened with increasing experimental times. The least underestimation occurred with glucose labeled in the 6 position at 6 min, reaching 10% in areas of high metabolism. Labeling in the 1 position, the 2 position and the 3-4 position caused progressively worse underestimation at all times. In addition, some structures showed differences not directly related to metabolic rate, indicating regional variations in relationships between individual kinetic constants of FDG and glucose.

  8. Regional cerebral metabolic alterations in dementia of the Alzheimer type: positron emission tomography with (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Budinger, T.F.; Ganz, E.; Yano, Y.; Mathis, C.A.; Koss, B.; Ober, B.A.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1983-08-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common cause of dementia in adults. Despite recent advances in our understanding of its anatomy and chemistry, we remain largely ignorant of its pathogenesis, physiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Dynamic positron emission tomography using (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was performed on the Donner 280-crystal ring in 10 subjects with dementia of the Alzheimer type and six healthy age-matched controls. Ratios comparing mean counts per resolution element in frontal, temporoparietal, and entire cortex regions in brain sections 10 mm thick obtained 40-70 min following FDG injection showed relatively less FDG uptake in the temporoparietal cortex bilaterally in all the Alzheimer subjects (p less than 0.01). Left-right alterations were less prominent than the anteroposterior changes. This diminished uptake was due to lowered rates of FDG use and suggests that the metabolic effects of Alzheimer disease are most concentrated in the temporoparietal cortex. Positron emission tomography is a most powerful tool for the noninvasive in vivo assessment of cerebral pathophysiology in dementia.

  9. Selective alterations in cerebral metabolism within the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system produced by acute cocaine administration in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Porrino, L.J.; Domer, F.R.; Crane, A.M.; Sokoloff, L.

    1988-05-01

    The 2-(/sup 14/C)deoxyglucose method was used to examine the effects of acute intravenous administration of cocaine on local cerebral glucose utilization in rats. These effects were correlated with the effects of cocaine on locomotor activity assessed simultaneously in the same animals. At the lowest dose of cocaine, 0.5 mg/kg (1.47 mumol/kg), alterations in glucose utilization were restricted to the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Metabolic activity at 1.0 mg/kg (2.9 mumol/kg) was altered in these structures, but in the substantia nigra reticulata and lateral habenula as well. The selectivity of cocaine's effects at low doses demonstrates the particular sensitivity of these structures to cocaine's actions in the brain. In contrast, 5.0 mg/kg (14.7 mumol/kg) produced widespread changes in glucose utilization, particularly in the extrapyramidal system. Only this dose significantly increased locomotor activity above levels in vehicle-treated controls. Rates of glucose utilization were positively correlated with locomotor activity in the globus pallidus, substantia nigra reticulata, and subthalamic nucleus, and negatively correlated in the lateral habenula.

  10. Noninvasive quantification of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in rats using (18)F-FDG PET and standard input function.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yuki; Ihara, Naoki; Teramoto, Noboru; Kunimi, Masako; Honda, Manabu; Kato, Koichi; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of arterial input function (AIF) for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) studies is technically challenging. The present study aimed to develop a method based on a standard arterial input function (SIF) to estimate input function without blood sampling. We performed (18)F-fluolodeoxyglucose studies accompanied by continuous blood sampling for measurement of AIF in 11 rats. Standard arterial input function was calculated by averaging AIFs from eight anesthetized rats, after normalization with body mass (BM) and injected dose (ID). Then, the individual input function was estimated using two types of SIF: (1) SIF calibrated by the individual's BM and ID (estimated individual input function, EIF(NS)) and (2) SIF calibrated by a single blood sampling as proposed previously (EIF(1S)). No significant differences in area under the curve (AUC) or cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRGlc) were found across the AIF-, EIF(NS)-, and EIF(1S)-based methods using repeated measures analysis of variance. In the correlation analysis, AUC or CMRGlc derived from EIF(NS) was highly correlated with those derived from AIF and EIF(1S). Preliminary comparison between AIF and EIF(NS) in three awake rats supported an idea that the method might be applicable to behaving animals. The present study suggests that EIF(NS) method might serve as a noninvasive substitute for individual AIF measurement. PMID:25966947

  11. [Glutamate metabolism in cerebral cortex obtained from chronic hepatic failure rats].

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Matsumoto, H; Kikuchi, S; Yachi, A

    1986-09-01

    The present investigation was carried out in order to elucidate the amino acid metabolism in hepatic failure with particular emphasis placed on glutamate. For this purpose, chronic hepatic failure models were produced in adult male Wistar rats by successive carbontetrachloride injection (0.20 ml/100 g. B. W., twice/week) for 13 weeks. They were confirmed to develop chemical changes compartible with hepatic failure, showing markedly elevated serum levels of NH3, GOT and ALP. Animals were killed by decapitation during fasting and the brains were removed immediately. After the parietal cortical slices were incubated for 45 min at 37 degrees C together with L-(U-14C) glutamate in O2-saturated Gey's balanced salt solution, they were homogenized in 75% ethanol and deproteinized with water saturated chloroform. The radioactivities of liberated CO2, glutamate and its metabolites (glutamine, aspartate and GABA) obtained from the slices were measured. The amount of radioactivity recovered from CO2, glutamine and aspartate revealed a significant increase (p less than 0.001), while that of glutamate and GABA remained unchanged. The main source of the CO2 is believed to originate from TCA cycle rather than the decarboxylation of glutamate to form GABA, and glutamate forms glutamine when it fixes ammonia. Furthermore, glutamate is converted into aspartate via TCA cycle when the carbon was labeled. Therefore, the results indicate that in chronic hepatic failure brains glutamate metabolism is enhanced through TCA cycle as well as ammonia fixation mechanism. PMID:3790365

  12. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of cerebral glycogen metabolism in animals and humans

    PubMed Central

    Khowaja, Ameer; Choi, In-Young; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Öz, Gülin

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen serves as an important energy reservoir in the human body. Despite the abundance of glycogen in the liver and skeletal muscles, its concentration in the brain is relatively low, hence its significance has been questioned. A major challenge in studying brain glycogen metabolism has been the lack of availability of non-invasive techniques for quantification of brain glycogen in vivo. Invasive methods for brain glycogen quantification such as post mortem extraction following high energy microwave irradiation are not applicable in the human brain. With the advent of 13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), it has been possible to measure brain glycogen concentrations and turnover in physiological conditions, as well as under the influence of stressors such as hypoglycemia and visual stimulation. This review presents an overview of the principles of the 13C MRS methodology and its applications in both animals and humans to further our understanding of glycogen metabolism under normal physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as hypoglycemia unawareness. PMID:24676563

  13. Application of the ''bootstrap'' technique to understanding cerebral interregional metabolic relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Riege, W.H.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    The authors' previous studies using (F18)-flourodeoxyglucose with positron computed tomography examined region to region metabolic correlations in (1) normal subjects, (2) normal elderly versus younger individuals, and (3) Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's Diseases. Variations in the correlation matrices suggested differences in how brain regions function together. An alternative explanation was that the distribution of each matrix was not distinctly different, and the observations represented variations from the same distribution. To examine this tissue, the authors focused on the observation of differences in the total number of reliable correlations (i.e. correlations with r representing a p .01 uncorrected for the number of correlations) between the groups. For example in Parkinson Disease a total of 12 reliable correlations were found, as compared to 34 in Alzheimer's Disease. Four groups were compared including normal elderly, normal young, Alzheimer and Parkinson's Diseases. For each group, random samples were drawn from the studied subjects, and correlation matrices were calculated from the new samples. 508 matrices were calculated for the two normal groups, and 1016 were calculated for the Alzheimer's and Parkinson's groups. The total number of reliable correlations were counted for each matrix and the distribution of these counts were examined. Distinct differences were found in the mean, median and mode for each group. In particular, Parkinson's Disease peaked the earliest of the four groups, while Alzheimer's peaked the latest. The findings demonstrated that the metabolic data for each group were derived from different populations.

  14. Preoperative differences of cerebral metabolism relate to the outcome of cochlear implants in congenitally deaf children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo Jeong; Kang, Eunjoo; Oh, Seung-Ha; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Chong-Sun

    2005-05-01

    In congenitally deaf children, chronological age is generally accepted as a critical factor that affects successful rehabilitation following cochlear implantation (CI). However, a wide variance among patients is known to exist regardless of the age at CI [Sarant, J.Z., Blamey, P.J., Dowell, R.C., Clark, G.M., Gibson, W.P., 2001. Variation in speech perception scores among children with cochlear implants. Ear Hear. 22, 18-28]. In a previous study, we reported that prelingually deaf children in the age range 5-7 years at implantation showed greatest outcome variability [Oh S.H., Kim C.S., Kang E.J., Lee D.S., Lee H.J., Chang S.O., Ahn S.H., Hwang C.H., Park H.J., Koo J.W., 2003. Speech perception after cochlear implantation over a 4-year time period. Acta Otolaryngol. 123, 148-153]. Eleven children who underwent CI between the age of 5 and 7 1/2 years were subdivided into a good (above 65%: GOOD) and a poor (below 45%: POOR) group based on the performance in a speech perception test given 2 years after CI. The preoperative (18)F-FDG-PET (F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) images were compared between the two groups in order to examine if regional glucose metabolic difference preexisted before the CI surgery. In the GOOD group, metabolic activity was greater in diverse fronto-parietal regions compared to the POOR group. In the POOR group, the regions related to the ventral visual pathway showed greater metabolic activity relative to the GOOD group. These findings suggest that the deaf children who had developed greater executive and visuospatial functions subserved by the prefrontal and parietal cortices might be successful in auditory language learning after CI. On the contrary, greater dependency on the visual function subserved by the occipito-temporal region due to auditory deprivation may interfere with acquisition of auditory language after CI. PMID:15855024

  15. Dose-Dependent Effects of Radiation Therapy on Cerebral Blood Flow, Metabolism, and Neurocognitive Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Carol A. Zhou Sumin; Raynor, Renee; Tisch, Andrea; Light, Kim; Shafman, Timothy; Kirkpatrick, John; Turkington, Timothy; Hollis, Donna; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: A prospective study was performed to formally relate dose-dependent radiologically defined changes in normal brain induced by radiotherapy (RT) to neurocognitive dysfunction in subjects with primary brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Adult patients receiving three-dimensional RT for central nervous system (CNS) tumors were enrolled. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning and neuropsychological testing were performed before RT and 3 weeks and 6 months after treatment. Analyses were performed for correlations between changes in 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG)-PET (metabolism), {sup 15}O-PET (relative blood flow), regional radiation dose, follow-up time, and neuropsychological test scores. Results: Eleven subjects were enrolled and 6 completed follow-up studies. The PET data showed reduced FDG uptake, with average decreases of 2-6% in regions of the brain receiving greater than 40 Gy at 3 weeks' and 6 months' follow-up. The {sup 15}O-H{sub 2}O PET showed increases (<10%) at 3 weeks in relative regional blood flow in brain receiving greater than 30 Gy, but less at the 6-month follow-up studies. There were significant correlations between decreases in FDG uptake and increased scores from the Symptom Checklist-90-R, with an average increase in T score of 2 (p < 0.0001). The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test showed a significant correlation of decreased FDG uptake with increased errors and perseveration in test performance, with an average decrease in T score of 11 (p = 0.037). Conclusions: A dose-dependent response of CNS tissue was detected using FDG PET in this small number of patients. Decreases in CNS metabolism correlated with decreased performance on neuropsychological tests for problem solving, cognitive flexibility, and global measures of psychopathology. Additional research is needed to verify and define these findings.

  16. Imaging the time-integrated cerebral metabolic activity with subcellular resolution through nanometer-scale detection of biosynthetic products deriving from (13)C-glucose.

    PubMed

    Takado, Yuhei; Knott, Graham; Humbel, Bruno M; Masoodi, Mojgan; Escrig, Stéphane; Meibom, Anders; Comment, Arnaud

    2015-11-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the brain but also an important source of building blocks for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Little is known about the use of glucose for biosynthesis in tissues at the cellular level. We demonstrate that local cerebral metabolic activity can be mapped in mouse brain tissue by quantitatively imaging the biosynthetic products deriving from [U-(13)C]glucose metabolism using a combination of in situ electron microscopy and secondary ion mass-spectroscopy (NanoSIMS). Images of the (13)C-label incorporated into cerebral ultrastructure with ca. 100 nm resolution allowed us to determine the timescale on which the metabolic products of glucose are incorporated into different cells, their sub-compartments and organelles. These were mapped in astrocytes and neurons in the different layers of the motor cortex. We see evidence for high metabolic activity in neurons via the nucleus (13)C enrichment. We observe that in all the major cell compartments, such as e.g. nucleus and Golgi apparatus, neurons incorporate substantially higher concentrations of (13)C-label than astrocytes. PMID:26409162

  17. Local cerebral metabolic effects of L-dopa therapy in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced parkinsonism in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Porrino, L J; Burns, R S; Crane, A M; Palombo, E; Kopin, I J; Sokoloff, L

    1987-08-01

    The quantitative 2-deoxy[14C]glucose autoradiographic method was used to map the distribution of alterations in local cerebral glucose utilization that accompanies clinically effective chronic L-dopa therapy of rhesus monkeys made parkinsonian by the administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). This pattern of changes was compared to the effects of a similar treatment regimen in normal monkeys. L-Dopa (100 mg with 10 mg carbidopa) was administered orally to normal and parkinsonian monkeys 3 times daily for 60-120 days prior to measurement of local cerebral glucose utilization. In parkinsonian monkeys treated with L-dopa, signs and symptoms of parkinsonism were controlled or suppressed, and widespread increases in glucose utilization were seen throughout the brain. Cerebral metabolic activity was increased both in areas rich in dopaminergic receptors, such as the caudate and putamen, and in nondopaminergic areas involved in motor functions. In many structures the rates of glucose utilization in L-dopa-treated parkinsonian monkeys were increased to levels that far exceeded rates measured in normal monkeys. In sharp contrast, similar treatment with L-dopa in normal monkeys had little if any effect on local cerebral glucose utilization. L-Dopa, then, appears to have an action in animals with selective lesions of the substantia nigra pars compacta produced by MPTP that is distinctly different from its effects in the normal monkey. PMID:3497401

  18. Local cerebral metabolic effects of L-dopa therapy in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced parkinsonism in monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Porrino, L.J.; Burns, R.S.; Crane, A.M.; Palombo, E.; Kopin, I.J.; Sokoloff, L.

    1987-08-01

    The quantitative 2-deoxy(/sup 14/C) glucose autoradiographic method was used to map the distribution of alterations in local cerebral glucose utilization that accompanies clinically effective chronic L-dopa therapy of rhesus monkeys made parkinsonian by the administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). This pattern of changes was compared to the effects of a similar treatment regimen in normal monkeys. L-Dopa was administered orally to normal and parkinsonian monkeys 3 times daily for 60-120 days prior to measurement of local cerebral glucose utilization. In parkinsonian monkeys treated with L-dopa, signs and symptoms of parkinsonism were controlled or suppressed, and widespread increases in glucose utilization were seen throughout the brain. Cerebral metabolic activity was increased both in areas rich in dopaminergic receptors, such as the caudate and putamen, and in nondopaminergic areas involved in motor functions. In many structures the rates of glucose utilization in L-dopa-treated parkinsonian monkeys were increased to levels that far exceeded rates measured in normal monkeys. In sharp contrast, similar treatment with L-dopa in normal monkeys had little if any effect on local cerebral glucose utilization. L-Dopa, then, appears to have an action in animals with selective lesions of the substantia nigra pars compacta produced by MPTP that is distinctly different from its effects in the normal monkey.

  19. Amyloid-β peptide absence in short term effects on kinase activity of energy metabolism in mice hippocampus and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ianiski, Francine R; Rech, Virginia C; Nishihira, Vivian S K; Alves, Catiane B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Luchese, Cristiane

    2016-07-11

    Considering that Alzheimer's disease is a prevalent neurodegenerative disease worldwide, we investigated the activities of three key kinases: creatine kinase, pyruvate kinase and adenylate kinase in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease model. Male adult Swiss mice received amyloid-β or saline. One day after, mice were treated with blank nanocapsules (17 ml/kg) or meloxicam-loaded nanocapsules (5 mg/kg) or free meloxicam (5 mg/kg). Treatments were performed on alternating days, until the end of the experimental protocol. In the fourteenth day, kinases activities were performed. Amyloid-β did not change the kinases activity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of mice. However, free meloxicam decrease the creatine kinase activity in mitochondrial-rich fraction in the group induced by amyloid-β, but for the cytosolic fraction, it has raised in the activity of pyruvate kinase activity in cerebral cortex. Further, meloxicam-loaded nanocapsules administration reduced adenylate kinase activity in the hippocampus of mice injected by amyloid-β. In conclusion we observed absence in short-term effects in kinases activities of energy metabolism in mice hippocampus and cerebral cortex using amyloid-β peptide model. These findings established the foundation to further study the kinases in phosphoryltransfer network changes observed in the brains of patients post-mortem with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27411072

  20. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism is normal in young adults with Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schapiro, M.B.; Grady, C.L.; Kumar, A.; Herscovitch, P.; Haxby, J.V.; Moore, A.M.; White, B.; Friedland, R.P.; Rapoport, S.I. )

    1990-03-01

    Regional CMRglc (rCMRglc) values were measured with ({sup 18}F)2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET), using a Scanditronix PC-1024-7B scanner, in 14 healthy, noninstitutionalized subjects with trisomy 21 (Down syndrome; DS) (mean age 30.0 years, range 25-38 years) and in 13 sex-matched, healthy volunteers (mean age 29.5 years, range 22-38 years). In the DS group, mean mental age on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test was 7.8 years and dementia was not present. Resting rCMRglc was determined with eyes covered and ears occluded in a quiet, darkened room. Global gray CMRglc equaled 8.76 +/- 0.76 mg/100 g/min (mean +/- SD) in the DS group as compared with 8.74 +/- 1.19 mg/100 g/min in the control group (p greater than 0.05). Gray matter regional measurements also did not differ between groups. The ratio of rCMRglc to global CMRglc, calculated to reduce the variance associated with absolute rCMRglc, and right/left ratios did not show any consistent differences. These results show that healthy young DS adults do not have alterations in regional or global brain glucose metabolism, as measured with 18FDG and PET, prior to an age at which the neuropathological changes in Alzheimer disease are reported to occur.

  1. Metabolic disorders with clinical and radiologic features of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Michael H.; Tartaglia, M. Carmela; Forner, Sven A.; Wong, Katherine K.; Kuo, Amy; Johnson, David Y.; Colacurcio, Valerie; Andrews, Bret D.; Miller, Bruce L.; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Two patients with metabolic disorders presented with clinical and radiologic features suggestive of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Case 1 was a 50-year-old man with rapid decline in cognitive, behavioral, and motor function following new-onset seizures. MRI was read as consistent with CJD, and he was referred for a treatment trial, but it was determined that he recently experienced rapid correction of hyponatremia resulting in extrapontine myelinolysis. Case 2 was a 66-year-old woman with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus who was found unconscious after a suspected insulin overdose. Examination showed altered mental status and neuroimaging was remarkable for cortical/striatal hyperintensities suggestive of sCJD. On autopsy, she had hypoglycemic/hypoxic nerve cell loss. Although characteristic MRI findings have high sensitivity and specificity for sCJD, potentially reversible metabolic disorders sometimes present rapidly and can resemble sCJD both clinically and radiologically. These cases highlight the importance of establishing a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with suspected sCJD. PMID:26137419

  2. The genome of Pelobacter carbinolicus reveals surprising metabolic capabilities and physiological features

    SciTech Connect

    Aklujkar, Muktak; Haveman, Shelley; DiDonatoJr., Raymond; Chertkov, Olga; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Brown, Peter; Lovley, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Background: The bacterium Pelobacter carbinolicus is able to grow by fermentation, syntrophic hydrogen/formate transfer, or electron transfer to sulfur from short-chain alcohols, hydrogen or formate; it does not oxidize acetate and is not known to ferment any sugars or grow autotrophically. The genome of P. carbinolicus was sequenced in order to understand its metabolic capabilities and physiological features in comparison with its relatives, acetate-oxidizing Geobacter species. Results: Pathways were predicted for catabolism of known substrates: 2,3-butanediol, acetoin, glycerol, 1,2-ethanediol, ethanolamine, choline and ethanol. Multiple isozymes of 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, ATP synthase and [FeFe]-hydrogenase were differentiated and assigned roles according to their structural properties and genomic contexts. The absence of asparagine synthetase and the presence of a mutant tRNA for asparagine encoded among RNA-active enzymes suggest that P. carbinolicus may make asparaginyl-tRNA in a novel way. Catabolic glutamate dehydrogenases were discovered, implying that the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle can function catabolically. A phosphotransferase system for uptake of sugars was discovered, along with enzymes that function in 2,3-butanediol production. Pyruvate: ferredoxin/flavodoxin oxidoreductase was identified as a potential bottleneck in both the supply of oxaloacetate for oxidation of acetate by the TCA cycle and the connection of glycolysis to production of ethanol. The P. carbinolicus genome was found to encode autotransporters and various appendages, including three proteins with similarity to the geopilin of electroconductive nanowires. Conclusions: Several surprising metabolic capabilities and physiological features were predicted from the genome of P. carbinolicus, suggesting that it is more versatile than anticipated.

  3. Correlation Between Cerebral Atrophy and Texture Features in Alzheimer-type Dementia Brains: A 3-Year Follow-up MRI Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Naoki; Takeuchi, Hiroshi

    We assessed relationships between six texture features and changes in atrophy of the cerebral parenchyma, the hippocampus, and the parahippocampal gyrus in the Alzheimer-type dementia (ATD) brain to determine whether or not the features reflect cerebral atrophy in ATD patients. The subjects of this study were 10 ATD patients, and underwent an magnetic resonanse imaging test of the head annually for at least 3 consecutive years. They consisted of three men and seven women, with a mean age of 71.4 ± 6.7 years. The results of study, the mean run length nonuniformity (RLN), angular second moment (ASM), and contrast (CON) increased with time, whereas the mean gray level nonuniformity (GLN), run percentage (RPC), and entropy (ENT) decreased with time. There was a statistically significant correlation between brain-intracranial area ratio (BIR) and GLN (p = 0.039), between BIR and ASM (p = 0.011), and between BIR and ENT (p = 0.023) as well as between parahippocampal-intracranial area ratio and GLN (p = 0.049). These results indicate that the six texture features were shown to reflect gray matter atrophy associated with ATD and to change with the progress of the disease. Although the course of ATD can be followed up by measuring a hippocampal area or volume and determining a decrease in the area or volume, texture features should be a more effective instrument for identifying the progress of ATD.

  4. Cerebral Glucose Metabolism is Associated with Verbal but not Visual Memory Performance in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gardener, Samantha L; Sohrabi, Hamid R; Shen, Kai-Kai; Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R; Weinborn, Michael; Bates, Kristyn A; Shah, Tejal; Foster, Jonathan K; Lenzo, Nat; Salvado, Olivier; Laske, Christoph; Laws, Simon M; Taddei, Kevin; Verdile, Giuseppe; Martins, Ralph N

    2016-03-31

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease (AD) sufferers show region-specific reductions in cerebral glucose metabolism, as measured by [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET). We investigated preclinical disease stage by cross-sectionally examining the association between global cognition, verbal and visual memory, and 18F-FDG PET standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) in 43 healthy control individuals, subsequently focusing on differences between subjective memory complainers and non-memory complainers. The 18F-FDG PET regions of interest investigated include the hippocampus, amygdala, posterior cingulate, superior parietal, entorhinal cortices, frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and inferior parietal region. In the cohort as a whole, verbal logical memory immediate recall was positively associated with 18F-FDG PET SUVR in both the left hippocampus and right amygdala. There were no associations observed between global cognition, delayed recall in logical memory, or visual reproduction and 18F-FDG PET SUVR. Following stratification of the cohort into subjective memory complainers and non-complainers, verbal logical memory immediate recall was positively associated with 18F-FDG PET SUVR in the right amygdala in those with subjective memory complaints. There were no significant associations observed in non-memory complainers between 18F-FDG PET SUVR in regions of interest and cognitive performance. We observed subjective memory complaint-specific associations between 18F-FDG PET SUVR and immediate verbal memory performance in our cohort, however found no associations between delayed recall of verbal memory performance or visual memory performance. It is here argued that the neural mechanisms underlying verbal and visual memory performance may in fact differ in their pathways, and the characteristic reduction of 18F-FDG PET SUVR observed in this and previous studies likely reflects the pathophysiological changes in specific

  5. Melancholic depression prediction by identifying representative features in metabolic and microarray profiles with missing values.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhi; Yang, Tao; Liu, Yashu; Li, Qingyang; Narayan, Vaibhav A; Wittenberg, Gayle; Ye, Jieping

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that melancholic depression, one major subtype of depression, is closely associated with the concentration of some metabolites and biological functions of certain genes and pathways. Meanwhile, recent advances in biotechnologies have allowed us to collect a large amount of genomic data, e.g., metabolites and microarray gene expression. With such a huge amount of information available, one approach that can give us new insights into the understanding of the fundamental biology underlying melancholic depression is to build disease status prediction models using classification or regression methods. However, the existence of strong empirical correlations, e.g., those exhibited by genes sharing the same biological pathway in microarray profiles, tremendously limits the performance of these methods. Furthermore, the occurrence of missing values which are ubiquitous in biomedical applications further complicates the problem. In this paper, we hypothesize that the problem of missing values might in some way benefit from the correlation between the variables and propose a method to learn a compressed set of representative features through an adapted version of sparse coding which is capable of identifying correlated variables and addressing the issue of missing values simultaneously. An efficient algorithm is also developed to solve the proposed formulation. We apply the proposed method on metabolic and microarray profiles collected from a group of subjects consisting of both patients with melancholic depression and healthy controls. Results show that the proposed method can not only produce meaningful clusters of variables but also generate a set of representative features that achieve superior classification performance over those generated by traditional clustering and data imputation techniques. In particular, on both datasets, we found that in comparison with the competing algorithms, the representative features learned by the proposed

  6. MELANCHOLIC DEPRESSION PREDICTION BY IDENTIFYING REPRESENTATIVE FEATURES IN METABOLIC AND MICROARRAY PROFILES WITH MISSING VALUES

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Zhi; Yang, Tao; Liu, Yashu; Lin, Binbin; Li, Qingyang; Narayan, Vaibhav A; Wittenberg, Gayle; Ye, Jieping

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that melancholic depression, one major subtype of depression, is closely associated with the concentration of some metabolites and biological functions of certain genes and pathways. Meanwhile, recent advances in biotechnologies have allowed us to collect a large amount of genomic data, e.g., metabolites and microarray gene expression. With such a huge amount of information available, one approach that can give us new insights into the understanding of the fundamental biology underlying melancholic depression is to build disease status prediction models using classification or regression methods. However, the existence of strong empirical correlations, e.g., those exhibited by genes sharing the same biological pathway in microarray profiles, tremendously limits the performance of these methods. Furthermore, the occurrence of missing values which are ubiquitous in biomedical applications further complicates the problem. In this paper, we hypothesize that the problem of missing values might in some way benefit from the correlation between the variables and propose a method to learn a compressed set of representative features through an adapted version of sparse coding which is capable of identifying correlated variables and addressing the issue of missing values simultaneously. An efficient algorithm is also developed to solve the proposed formulation. We apply the proposed method on metabolic and microarray profiles collected from a group of subjects consisting of both patients with melancholic depression and healthy controls. Results show that the proposed method can not only produce meaningful clusters of variables but also generate a set of representative features that achieve superior classification performance over those generated by traditional clustering and data imputation techniques. In particular, on both datasets, we found that in comparison with the competing algorithms, the representative features learned by the proposed

  7. Adult-onset hypothyroidism and the cerebral metabolism of (1,2-13C2) acetate as detected by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Chapa, F; Künnecke, B; Calvo, R; Escobar del Rey, F; Morreale de Escobar, G; Cerdán, S

    1995-01-01

    The effects of adult-onset hypothyroidism on the metabolic compartmentation of the cerebral tricarboxylic acid cycle and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt have been investigated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Rats thyroidectomized as adults and age-matched controls were infused in the right jugular vein with unlabeled or (1,2-13C2) acetate solutions for 60 min. At the end of the infusion, the brains were frozen in situ and perchloric acid extracts were prepared and analyzed by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and reverse-phase HPLC. Thyroidectomized animals showed a decrease in the incorporation of 13C from (1,2-13C2) acetate in cerebral metabolites and an increase in the concentrations of unlabeled glutamate and GABA. Computer-assisted interpretation of the 13C multiplets observed for the carbons of glutamate, glutamine, and GABA indicated that adult-onset hypothyroidism produced 1) a decrease in the contribution of infused (1,2-13C2) acetate to the glial tricarboxylic acid cycle; 2) an increase in the contribution of unlabeled acetyl-CoA to the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle; and 3) impairments in the exchange of glutamate, glutamine, and GABA between the neuronal and glial compartments. Despite the fact that the adult brain has often been considered metabolically unresponsive to thyroid hormone status, present results show metabolic alterations in the neuronal and glial compartments that are reversible with substitution therapy. PMID:7828544

  8. Inborn errors of metabolism with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria as discriminative feature: proper classification and nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Wortmann, Saskia B; Duran, Marinus; Anikster, Yair; Barth, Peter G; Sperl, Wolfgang; Zschocke, Johannes; Morava, Eva; Wevers, Ron A

    2013-11-01

    Increased urinary 3-methylglutaconic acid excretion is a relatively common finding in metabolic disorders, especially in mitochondrial disorders. In most cases 3-methylglutaconic acid is only slightly elevated and accompanied by other (disease specific) metabolites. There is, however, a group of disorders with significantly and consistently increased 3-methylglutaconic acid excretion, where the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria is a hallmark of the phenotype and the key to diagnosis. Until now these disorders were labelled by roman numbers (I-V) in the order of discovery regardless of pathomechanism. Especially, the so called "unspecified" 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type IV has been ever growing, leading to biochemical and clinical diagnostic confusion. Therefore, we propose the following pathomechanism based classification and a simplified diagnostic flow chart for these "inborn errors of metabolism with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria as discriminative feature". One should distinguish between "primary 3-methylglutaconic aciduria" formerly known as type I (3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency, AUH defect) due to defective leucine catabolism and the--currently known--three groups of "secondary 3-methylglutaconic aciduria". The latter should be further classified and named by their defective protein or the historical name as follows: i) defective phospholipid remodelling (TAZ defect or Barth syndrome, SERAC1 defect or MEGDEL syndrome) and ii) mitochondrial membrane associated disorders (OPA3 defect or Costeff syndrome, DNAJC19 defect or DCMA syndrome, TMEM70 defect). The remaining patients with significant and consistent 3-methylglutaconic aciduria in whom the above mentioned syndromes have been excluded, should be referred to as "not otherwise specified (NOS) 3-MGA-uria" until elucidation of the underlying pathomechanism enables proper (possibly extended) classification. PMID:23296368

  9. The influence of intravenous laser irradiation of blood on some metabolic and functional parameters in intact rabbits and experimental cerebral ischaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipurenko, N.; Vasilevskaya, L.; Musienko, J.; Maslova, G.

    2007-07-01

    It has been studied the intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB) influence with helium-neon laser (HNL) of 630 nm wavelength on some of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and antioxidant system (AOS) findings, aside-base status (ABS) and blood oxygen transport (BOT), state of dermal microhaemodynamics (MGD) in the intact rabbits and after modeling of local ischemia of brain (LIB). Depending on conditions of organism functioning (norm or brain ischaemia) ILIB has resulted in stimulating or normalizing effects on the whole metabolic and microhaemocirculation processes which had been studied during our investigation. It is discussed the mechanisms of pathogenetic directivity of ILIB influence in cerebral ischaemia

  10. Estimation of the regional cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption with proton detected 17O MRI during precision 17O2 inhalation in swine

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, Eric A.; Beesam, R. Shashank; Baumgardner, James E.; Borthakur, Arijitt; Witschey, Walter R.; Reddy, Ravinder

    2009-01-01

    Despite the importance of metabolic disturbances in many diseases, there are currently no clinically used methods for the detection of oxidative metabolism in vivo. To address this deficiency, 17O MRI techniques are scaled from small animals to swine as a large animal model of human inhalation and circulation. The hemispheric cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) is estimated in swine by detection of metabolically produced H217O by rapid T1ρ-weighted proton magnetic resonance imaging on a 1.5 Tesla clinical scanner. The 17O is delivered as oxygen gas by a custom, minimal-loss, precision-delivery breathing circuit and converted to H217O by oxidative metabolism. A model for gas arterial input is presented for the deeply breathing large animal. The arterial input function for recirculation of metabolic water is measured by arterial blood sampling and high field 17O spectroscopy. It is found that minimal metabolic water “wash-in” occurs before 60 seconds. A high temporal resolution pulse sequence is employed to measure CMRO2 during those 60 seconds after delivery begins. Only about one tidal volume of 17O enriched oxygen gas is used per measurement. Proton measurements of signal change due to metabolically produced water are correlated with 17O in vivo spectroscopy. Using these techniques, the hemispheric CMRO2 in swine is estimated to be 1.23 ± 0.26 μmol/g/min, consistent with existing literature values. All of the technology used to perform these CMRO2 estimates can easily be adapted to clinical MR scanners, and it is hoped that this work will lead to future studies of human disease. PMID:19428508

  11. Use of 2-deoxy-D(1-/sup 11/C)glucose for the determination of local cerebral glucose metabolism in humans: variation within and between subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.; Wolf, A.; Greenberg, J.H.; Fowler, J.; Christman, D.; MacGregor, R.; Jones, S.C.; London, J.; Shiue, C.; Yonekura, Y.

    1982-09-01

    The deoxyglucose technique for the measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolism (LCMRgl) has been widely applied in animals utilizing /sup 14/C-deoxyglucose and in humans employing /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose. Repeat studies in humans over a relatively brief period of time have not been possible because of the 110-min half-life of /sup 18/F. With the synthesis of /sup 11/C-deoxyglucose it has now become possible to utilize this short-lived (20 min) tracer for the measurement of LCMRgl and to determine its variability within subjects over a 2-h period. The kinetic rate constants for /sup 11/C-deoxyglucose were determined for gray and white matter and found to be very similar to those for /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose, suggesting that these two analogues of glucose have similar affinities for the facilitated transport system and are similar substrates for hexokinase in the brain. The coefficient of variation of repeated measurements of LCMRgl in a series of six normal subjects was 5.5% to 8.7% for various gray matter structures and 9.7% and 14.0% for white matter structures. The pattern of cerebral metabolic rates is relatively constant in a given individual when the conditions of the study are unchanged. The ability to make repeat measurements in the same subject reduces the variance due to between-subject differences, allowing smaller changes in LCMRgl to be detected with confidence.

  12. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  13. Control of the cerebral circulation and metabolism by the rostral ventrolateral medulla: Possible role in the cerebrovascular response to hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Neurons within the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVL) corresponding to the location of adrenaline neurons of the C1 group (C1 area) maintain resting levels of arterial pressure (AP) and mediate the reflex cardiovascular responses to baro- and chemoreceptor activation and cerebral ischemia. The author therefore sought to determine whether neurons in the C1 area: (a) modulate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and/or cerebral glucose utilization (rCGU), (b) participate in the maintenance of resting levels of CBF and CGU, and (c) mediate the CBF response to hypoxia. Rats were anesthetized, paralyzed and ventilated. The RVL was stimulated electrically or chemically, with kainic acid; lesions were placed electrolytically. rCBF was measured using 14-C-iodoantipyrine and rCGU with {sup 14}C-2-deoxyglucose in 11 dissected brain regions.

  14. Features of an altered AMPK metabolic pathway in Gilbert’s Syndrome, and its role in metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Mölzer, Christine; Wallner, Marlies; Kern, Carina; Tosevska, Anela; Schwarz, Ursula; Zadnikar, Rene; Doberer, Daniel; Marculescu, Rodrig; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Energy metabolism, involving the ATP-dependent AMPK-PgC-Ppar pathway impacts metabolic health immensely, in that its impairment can lead to obesity, giving rise to disease. Based on observations that individuals with Gilbert’s syndrome (GS; UGT1A1*28 promoter mutation) are generally lighter, leaner and healthier than controls, specific inter-group differences in the AMPK pathway regulation were explored. Therefore, a case-control study involving 120 fasted, healthy, age- and gender matched subjects with/without GS, was conducted. By utilising intra-cellular flow cytometry (next to assessing AMPKα1 gene expression), levels of functioning proteins (phospho-AMPK α1/α2, PgC 1 α, Ppar α and γ) were measured in PBMCs (peripheral blood mononucleated cells). In GS individuals, rates of phospho-AMPK α1/α2, -Ppar α/γ and of PgC 1α were significantly higher, attesting to a boosted fasting response in this condition. In line with this finding, AMPKα1 gene expression was equal between the groups, possibly stressing the post-translational importance of boosted fasting effects in GS. In reflection of an apparently improved health status, GS individuals had significantly lower BMI, glucose, insulin, C-peptide and triglyceride levels. Herewith, we propose a new theory to explain why individuals having GS are leaner and healthier, and are therefore less likely to contract metabolic diseases or die prematurely thereof. PMID:27444220

  15. PEG-induced osmotic stress in Mentha x piperita L.: Structural features and metabolic responses.

    PubMed

    Búfalo, Jennifer; Rodrigues, Tatiane Maria; de Almeida, Luiz Fernando Rolim; Tozin, Luiz Ricardo Dos Santos; Marques, Marcia Ortiz Mayo; Boaro, Carmen Silvia Fernandes

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated whether osmotic stress induced by the exposure of peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.) to moderate and severe stress for short periods of time changes the plant's physiological parameters, leaf anatomy and ultrastructure and essential oil. Plants were exposed to two levels of polyethyleneglycol (50 g L(-1) and 100 g L(-1) of PEG) in a hydroponic experiment. The plants exposed to 50 g L(-1) maintained metabolic functions similar to those of the control group (0 g L(-1)) without changes in gas exchange or structural characteristics. The increase in antioxidant enzyme activity reduced the presence of free radicals and protected membranes, including chloroplasts and mitochondria. In contrast, the osmotic stress caused by 100 g L(-1) of PEG inhibited leaf gas exchange, reduced the essential oil content and changed the oil composition, including a decrease in menthone and an increase in menthofuran. These plants also showed an increase in peroxidase activity, but this increase was not sufficient to decrease the lipid peroxidation level responsible for damaging the membranes of organelles. Morphological changes were correlated with the evaluated physiological features: plants exposed to 100 g L(-1) of PEG showed areas with collapsed cells, increases in mesophyll thickness and the area of the intercellular space, cuticle shrinkage, morphological changes in plastids, and lysis of mitochondria. In summary, our results revealed that PEG-induced osmotic stress in M. x piperita depends on the intensity level of the osmotic stress applied; severe osmotic stress changed the structural characteristics, caused damage at the cellular level, and reduced the essential oil content and quality. PMID:27107175

  16. Specific gut microbiota features and metabolic markers in postmenopausal women with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Brahe, L K; Le Chatelier, E; Prifti, E; Pons, N; Kennedy, S; Hansen, T; Pedersen, O; Astrup, A; Ehrlich, S D; Larsen, L H

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gut microbial gene richness and specific bacterial species are associated with metabolic risk markers in humans, but the impact of host physiology and dietary habits on the link between the gut microbiota and metabolic markers remain unclear. The objective of this study was to identify gut metagenomic markers associated with estimates of insulin resistance, lipid metabolism and inflammation in obesity, and to explore whether the associations between metagenomic and metabolic markers persisted after adjustment for body fat, age and habitual dietary intake. Methods: Faecal DNA from 53 women with obesity was analysed through quantitative metagenomic sequencing and analysis, and a systematic search was performed for bacterial genes associated with estimates of insulin resistance, inflammation and lipid metabolism. Subsequently, the correlations between metagenomic species and metabolic markers were tested by linear regression models, with and without covariate adjustment. Results: One hundred and fourteen metagenomic species correlated with metabolic markers (P<0.001) including Akkermansia muciniphila, Bilophila wadsworthia, Bifidobacterium longum and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, but also species not previously associated with metabolic markers including Bacteroides faecis and Dorea longicatena. The majority of the identified correlations between bacterial species and metabolic markers persisted after adjustment for differences in body fat, age and dietary macronutrient composition; however, the negative correlation with insulin resistance observed for B. longum and F. prausnitzii appeared to be modified by the intake of dietary fibre and fat, respectively. Conclusions: This study shows that several gut bacterial species are linked to metabolic risk markers in obesity, also after adjustment for potential confounders, such as long-term diet composition. The study supports the use of gut metagenomic markers for metabolic disease prediction and warrants

  17. Chromium picolinate does not improve key features of metabolic syndrome in obese nondiabetic adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of chromium-containing dietary supplements is widespread among patients with type 2 diabetes as a means of improving glucose metabolism. However, chromium’s role as a potential therapy for patients at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, specifically those with metabolic syndrome, is n...

  18. Cerebral, cerebellar, and colobomatous anomalies in three related males: Sex-linked inheritance in a newly recognized syndrome with features overlapping with Joubert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kroes, Hester Y; Nievelstein, Rutger-Jan A J; Barth, Peter G; Nikkels, Peter G J; Bergmann, Carsten; Gooskens, Rob H J M; Visser, Gepke; van Amstel, Hans-Kristian Ploos; Beemer, Frits A

    2005-06-15

    We present a so far unrecognized X-linked mental retardation syndrome with features overlapping with Joubert syndrome (JBS). Two brothers showed hypotonia, mental retardation, ocular abnormalities with impaired vision and colobomas and a breathing pattern compatible with JBS. Neuroimaging revealed cerebellar vermis hypoplasia and ventriculomegaly. A tentative diagnosis of JBS was made, and autosomal recessive inheritance considered most likely. In a subsequent pregnancy that occurred after artificial donor insemination, ultrasound in the 22nd week revealed a Dandy-Walker malformation and hydrocephaly. At autopsy at 34 weeks of gestation, the male infant showed cerebellar vermis aplasia and abnormalities of the brainstem and cerebral cortex. He was considered to have the same disorder as his two half-brothers. This renders the pedigree highly suggestive of X-linked inheritance. The clinical symptoms of this syndrome resemble JBS. However, the absence of the molar tooth sign and the X-linked inheritance do not support JBS. We propose the name X-linked cerebral-cerebellar-coloboma syndrome to distinguish the two disorders. Differentiation of the two disorders is especially important in genetic counseling, where artificial donor insemination may be considered as a means of reducing the recurrence risk, or when female relatives of the patient are concerned. PMID:15887274

  19. Neuron-Specific Enolase Is Correlated to Compromised Cerebral Metabolism in Patients Suffering from Acute Bacterial Meningitis; An Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bartek, Jiri; Thelin, Eric Peter; Ghatan, Per Hamid; Glimaker, Martin; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients suffering from acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) with a decreased level of consciousness have been shown to have an improved clinical outcome if treated with an intracranial pressure (ICP) guided therapy. By using intracranial microdialysis (MD) to monitor cerebral metabolism in combination with serum samples of biomarkers indicating brain tissue injury, S100B and Neuron Specific Enolase (NSE), additional information might be provided. The aim of this study was to evaluate biomarkers in serum and MD parameters in patients with ABM. Methods From a prior study on patients (n = 52) with a confirmed ABM and impaired consciousness (GCS ≤ 9, or GCS = 10 combined with lumbar spinal opening pressure > 400 mmH2O), a subgroup of patients (n = 21) monitored with intracerebral MD and biomarkers was included in the present study. All patients were treated in the NICU with intracranial pressure (ICP) guided therapy. Serum biomarkers were obtained at admission and every 12 hours. The MD parameters glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol were analyzed. Outcome was assessed at 12–55 months after discharge from hospital. Mann-Whitney U-Test and Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test were applied. Results The included patients had a mean GCS of 8 (range, 3–10) on admission and increased ICP (>20 mmHg) was observed in 62% (n = 13/21) of the patients. Patients with a lactate:pyruvate ratio (LPR) >40 (n = 9/21, 43%) had significantly higher peak levels of serum NSE (p = 0.03), with similar, although non-significant observations made in patients with high levels of glycerol (>500 μmol/L, p = 0.11) and those with a metabolic crisis (Glucose <0.8 mmol/L, LPR >25, p = 0.09). No associations between serum S100B and MD parameters were found. Furthermore, median MD glucose levels decreased significantly between day 1 (0–24h) and day 3 (48–72h) after admission to the NICU (p = 0.0001). No correlation between MD parameters or biomarkers and outcome was found

  20. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  1. Triheptanoin for glucose transporter type I deficiency (G1D): Modulation of human ictogenesis, cerebral metabolic rate and cognitive indices by a food supplement

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Juan M.; Liu, Peiying; Mao, Deng; Kelly, Dorothy; Hernandez, Ana; Sheng, Min; Good, Levi B.; Ma, Qian; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Zhang, Xuchen; Park, Jason Y.; Hynan, Linda S.; Stavinoha, Peter; Roe, Charles R.; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective G1D is commonly associated with electrographic spike-wave and - less-noticeably – with absence seizures. The G1D syndrome has long been attributed to energy (i.e., ATP-synthetic) failure, as have experimental, toxic-rodent epilepsies to impaired brain metabolism and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate depletion. Indeed, a (seldom-acknowledged) function of glucose and other substrates is the generation of brain TCAs via carbon-donor reactions collectively named anaplerosis. However, TCAs are preserved in murine G1D. This renders inferences about energy failure premature and suggests a different hypothesis, also grounded on our findings, that consumption of alternate TCA precursors is stimulated, potentially detracting from other functions. Second, common ketogenic diets can ameliorate G1D seizures, but lead to a therapeutically-counterintuitive reduction in blood glucose available to the brain, and they can prove ineffective in 1/3 of cases. While developing G1D treatments, all of this motivated us to: a) uphold (rather than attenuate) the residual brain glucose flux that all G1D patients possess; and b) stimulate the TCA cycle, including anaplerosis. Therefore, we tested the medium-chain triglyceride triheptanoin, a widely-used medical food supplement that can fulfill both of these metabolic roles. The rationale is that ketone bodies derived from ketogenic diets are not anaplerotic, in contrast with triheptanoin metabolites, as we have shown in the G1D mouse brain. Design We supplemented the regular diet of a case series of G1D patients with food-grade triheptanoin. First we confirmed that, despite their frequent electroencephalographic (EEG) presence as spike-waves, most seizures are rarely visible, such that perceptions by patients or others are inadequate for treatment evaluation. Thus, we used EEG, quantitative neuropsychological, blood analytical, and MRI cerebral metabolic rate measurements as main outcomes. Setting Academic and

  2. Influence of age upon the cerebral metabolic changes induced by acute hypoxia on the synaptosomes from dog brain.

    PubMed

    Benzi, G; Arrigoni, E; Agnoli, A; Raimondo, S; Fulle, D; Pastoris, O; Curti, D; Villa, R F

    1982-01-01

    The synaptosomal fraction obtained from the motor area of the cerebral cortex of normocapnic, normoxic or hypoxic "young adult," "mature" and "senescent" beagle dogs is incubated and analyzed for : ATP, ADP, AMP, creatine phosphate, pyruvate and lactate. The data are compared with those obtained from the whole controlateral cortical motor area, by the surface freezing technique. After hypoxic hypoxia /15 min; PaO2 = 17-19 mm Hg), the metabolite contents and ratios are differently affected by ageing when the evaluations are performed in the incubated synaptosomal preparation or in the controlateral whole cerebral tissue. In fact, ageing does not affect so much the cerebral changes that occur in the overall energetic state during the hypoxic assault in vivo, but rather those that the synaptosomes remember the tend to reverse during the subsequent incubation in vitro. The protective action of several drugs on the synaptosomal phosphorylation state is tested. Phenobarbital shows a quite broad, age-independent spectrum of action. (-)Eburnamonine and dihydroergocristine exhibits a more limited, age-dependent effectiveness, but are devoid of anesthetic action. Papaverine proves unable to affect the tested biochemical parameters. PMID:6807702

  3. Regional cerebral metabolic patterns demonstrate the role of anterior forebrain mesocircuit dysfunction in the severely injured brain

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, Esteban A.; Beattie, Bradley J.; Broft, Allegra; Laureys, Steven; Schiff, Nicholas D.

    2014-01-01

    Although disorders of consciousness (DOCs) demonstrate widely varying clinical presentations and patterns of structural injury, global down-regulation and bilateral reductions in metabolism of the thalamus and frontoparietal network are consistent findings. We test the hypothesis that global reductions of background synaptic activity in DOCs will associate with changes in the pattern of metabolic activity in the central thalamus and globus pallidus. We compared 32 [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PETs obtained from severely brain-injured patients (BIs) and 10 normal volunteers (NVs). We defined components of the anterior forebrain mesocircuit on high-resolution T1-MRI (ventral, associative, and sensorimotor striatum; globus pallidus; central thalamus and noncentral thalamus). Metabolic profiles for BI and NV demonstrated distinct changes in the pattern of uptake: ventral and association striatum (but not sensorimotor) were significantly reduced relative to global mean uptake after BI; a relative increase in globus pallidus metabolism was evident in BI subjects who also showed a relative reduction of metabolism in the central thalamus. The reversal of globus pallidus and central thalamus profiles across BIs and NVs supports the mesocircuit hypothesis that broad functional (or anatomic) deafferentation may combine to reduce central thalamus activity and release globus pallidus activity in DOCs. In addition, BI subjects showed broad frontoparietal metabolic down-regulation consistent with prior studies supporting the link between central thalamic/pallidal metabolism and down-regulation of the frontoparietal network. Recovery of left hemisphere frontoparietal metabolic activity was further associated with command following. PMID:24733913

  4. Regional cerebral metabolic patterns demonstrate the role of anterior forebrain mesocircuit dysfunction in the severely injured brain.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Esteban A; Beattie, Bradley J; Broft, Allegra; Laureys, Steven; Schiff, Nicholas D

    2014-04-29

    Although disorders of consciousness (DOCs) demonstrate widely varying clinical presentations and patterns of structural injury, global down-regulation and bilateral reductions in metabolism of the thalamus and frontoparietal network are consistent findings. We test the hypothesis that global reductions of background synaptic activity in DOCs will associate with changes in the pattern of metabolic activity in the central thalamus and globus pallidus. We compared 32 [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose PETs obtained from severely brain-injured patients (BIs) and 10 normal volunteers (NVs). We defined components of the anterior forebrain mesocircuit on high-resolution T1-MRI (ventral, associative, and sensorimotor striatum; globus pallidus; central thalamus and noncentral thalamus). Metabolic profiles for BI and NV demonstrated distinct changes in the pattern of uptake: ventral and association striatum (but not sensorimotor) were significantly reduced relative to global mean uptake after BI; a relative increase in globus pallidus metabolism was evident in BI subjects who also showed a relative reduction of metabolism in the central thalamus. The reversal of globus pallidus and central thalamus profiles across BIs and NVs supports the mesocircuit hypothesis that broad functional (or anatomic) deafferentation may combine to reduce central thalamus activity and release globus pallidus activity in DOCs. In addition, BI subjects showed broad frontoparietal metabolic down-regulation consistent with prior studies supporting the link between central thalamic/pallidal metabolism and down-regulation of the frontoparietal network. Recovery of left hemisphere frontoparietal metabolic activity was further associated with command following. PMID:24733913

  5. Inhibition of glutamine metabolism counteracts pancreatic cancer stem cell features and sensitizes cells to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Bing; Yu, Min; Zhou, Quanbo; Lin, Qing; Gao, Wenchao; Ye, Huilin; Zhou, Jiajia; Li, Zhihua; Liu, Yimin; Chen, Rufu

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells utilize a novel non-canonical pathway of glutamine metabolism that is essential for tumor growth and redox balance. Inhibition of this metabolic pathway in PDAC can potentially synergize with therapies that increase intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as radiation. Here, we evaluated the dependence of pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) on this non-canonical glutamine metabolism pathway and researched whether inhibiting this pathway can enhance radiosensitivity of PCSCs. We showed that glutamine deprivation significantly inhibited self-renewal, decreased expression of stemness-related genes, increased intracellular ROS, and induced apoptosis in PCSCs. These effects were countered by oxaloacetate, but not α-ketoglutarate. Knockdown of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase dramatically impaired PCSCs properties, while glutamate dehydrogenase knockdown had a limited effect, suggesting a dependence of PCSCs on non-canonical glutamine metabolism. Additionally, glutamine deprivation significantly increased radiation-induced ROS and sensitized PCSCs to fractionated radiation. Moreover, transaminase inhibitors effectively enhanced ROS generation, promoted radiation sensitivity, and attenuated tumor growth in nude mice following radiation exposure. Our findings reveal that inhibiting the non-canonical pathway of glutamine metabolism enhances the PCSC radiosensitivity and may be an effective adjunct in cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26439804

  6. Inhibition of glutamine metabolism counteracts pancreatic cancer stem cell features and sensitizes cells to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Doudou; Fu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Ruiwan; Zhao, Xiaohui; Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Bing; Yu, Min; Zhou, Quanbo; Lin, Qing; Gao, Wenchao; Ye, Huilin; Zhou, Jiajia; Li, Zhihua; Liu, Yimin; Chen, Rufu

    2015-10-13

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells utilize a novel non-canonical pathway of glutamine metabolism that is essential for tumor growth and redox balance. Inhibition of this metabolic pathway in PDAC can potentially synergize with therapies that increase intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as radiation. Here, we evaluated the dependence of pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) on this non-canonical glutamine metabolism pathway and researched whether inhibiting this pathway can enhance radiosensitivity of PCSCs. We showed that glutamine deprivation significantly inhibited self-renewal, decreased expression of stemness-related genes, increased intracellular ROS, and induced apoptosis in PCSCs. These effects were countered by oxaloacetate, but not α-ketoglutarate. Knockdown of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase dramatically impaired PCSCs properties, while glutamate dehydrogenase knockdown had a limited effect, suggesting a dependence of PCSCs on non-canonical glutamine metabolism. Additionally, glutamine deprivation significantly increased radiation-induced ROS and sensitized PCSCs to fractionated radiation. Moreover, transaminase inhibitors effectively enhanced ROS generation, promoted radiation sensitivity, and attenuated tumor growth in nude mice following radiation exposure. Our findings reveal that inhibiting the non-canonical pathway of glutamine metabolism enhances the PCSC radiosensitivity and may be an effective adjunct in cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26439804

  7. Cerebral Vascular Injury in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Kimbra; Amyot, Franck; Haber, Margalit; Pronger, Angela; Bogoslovsky, Tanya; Moore, Carol; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic cerebral vascular injury (TCVI) is a very frequent, if not universal, feature after traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is likely responsible, at least in part, for functional deficits and TBI-related chronic disability. Because there are multiple pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies that promote vascular health, TCVI is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention after TBI. The cerebral microvasculature is a component of the neurovascular unit (NVU) coupling neuronal metabolism with local cerebral blood flow. The NVU participates in the pathogenesis of TBI, either directly from physical trauma or as part of the cascade of secondary injury that occurs after TBI. Pathologically, there is extensive cerebral microvascular injury in humans and experimental animal, identified with either conventional light microscopy or ultrastructural examination. It is seen in acute and chronic TBI, and even described in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Non-invasive, physiologic measures of cerebral microvascular function show dysfunction after TBI in humans and experimental animal models of TBI. These include imaging sequences (MRI-ASL), Transcranial Doppler (TCD), and Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS). Understanding the pathophysiology of TCVI, a relatively under-studied component of TBI, has promise for the development of novel therapies for TBI. PMID:26048614

  8. Metabolic features of Protochlamydia amoebophila elementary bodies--a link between activity and infectivity in Chlamydiae.

    PubMed

    Sixt, Barbara S; Siegl, Alexander; Müller, Constanze; Watzka, Margarete; Wultsch, Anna; Tziotis, Dimitrios; Montanaro, Jacqueline; Richter, Andreas; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Horn, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The Chlamydiae are a highly successful group of obligate intracellular bacteria, whose members are remarkably diverse, ranging from major pathogens of humans and animals to symbionts of ubiquitous protozoa. While their infective developmental stage, the elementary body (EB), has long been accepted to be completely metabolically inert, it has recently been shown to sustain some activities, including uptake of amino acids and protein biosynthesis. In the current study, we performed an in-depth characterization of the metabolic capabilities of EBs of the amoeba symbiont Protochlamydia amoebophila. A combined metabolomics approach, including fluorescence microscopy-based assays, isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), ion cyclotron resonance Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ICR/FT-MS), and ultra-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) was conducted, with a particular focus on the central carbon metabolism. In addition, the effect of nutrient deprivation on chlamydial infectivity was analyzed. Our investigations revealed that host-free P. amoebophila EBs maintain respiratory activity and metabolize D-glucose, including substrate uptake as well as host-free synthesis of labeled metabolites and release of labeled CO2 from (13)C-labeled D-glucose. The pentose phosphate pathway was identified as major route of D-glucose catabolism and host-independent activity of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was observed. Our data strongly suggest anabolic reactions in P. amoebophila EBs and demonstrate that under the applied conditions D-glucose availability is essential to sustain metabolic activity. Replacement of this substrate by L-glucose, a non-metabolizable sugar, led to a rapid decline in the number of infectious particles. Likewise, infectivity of Chlamydia trachomatis, a major human pathogen, also declined more rapidly in the absence of nutrients. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that D-glucose is utilized by P. amoebophila EBs and provide

  9. Metabolic Features of Protochlamydia amoebophila Elementary Bodies – A Link between Activity and Infectivity in Chlamydiae

    PubMed Central

    Watzka, Margarete; Wultsch, Anna; Tziotis, Dimitrios; Montanaro, Jacqueline; Richter, Andreas; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Horn, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The Chlamydiae are a highly successful group of obligate intracellular bacteria, whose members are remarkably diverse, ranging from major pathogens of humans and animals to symbionts of ubiquitous protozoa. While their infective developmental stage, the elementary body (EB), has long been accepted to be completely metabolically inert, it has recently been shown to sustain some activities, including uptake of amino acids and protein biosynthesis. In the current study, we performed an in-depth characterization of the metabolic capabilities of EBs of the amoeba symbiont Protochlamydia amoebophila. A combined metabolomics approach, including fluorescence microscopy-based assays, isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), ion cyclotron resonance Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ICR/FT-MS), and ultra-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) was conducted, with a particular focus on the central carbon metabolism. In addition, the effect of nutrient deprivation on chlamydial infectivity was analyzed. Our investigations revealed that host-free P. amoebophila EBs maintain respiratory activity and metabolize D-glucose, including substrate uptake as well as host-free synthesis of labeled metabolites and release of labeled CO2 from 13C-labeled D-glucose. The pentose phosphate pathway was identified as major route of D-glucose catabolism and host-independent activity of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was observed. Our data strongly suggest anabolic reactions in P. amoebophila EBs and demonstrate that under the applied conditions D-glucose availability is essential to sustain metabolic activity. Replacement of this substrate by L-glucose, a non-metabolizable sugar, led to a rapid decline in the number of infectious particles. Likewise, infectivity of Chlamydia trachomatis, a major human pathogen, also declined more rapidly in the absence of nutrients. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that D-glucose is utilized by P. amoebophila EBs and provide

  10. Cerebral Hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...