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Sample records for cerebral vascular diseases

  1. Retinal vascular changes are a marker for cerebral vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk. PMID:26008809

  2. [Neurourological signs of chronic cerebral vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Shvarts, P G; Dutov, V V; Kadykov, A S; Shvedkov, V V; Popov, S V; Plotnikov, A N

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of urination, along with motor and cognitive disorders, are characteristic of different forms of chronic cerebral vascular diseases (CCVD). Irritation symptoms are more frequent in subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE) and multi infarct hypertonic encephalopathy (MIHE). Overactive urine bladder syndrome (OUBS) caused by neurogenic detrusive hyperactivity manifests itself in frequent urination, nocturia and imperative enuresis and thus decreases quality of life and results in disability of patents with CCVD. At the same time, the character of symptoms points indirectly to the localization of lacunar infarction or the extent of severity of leukoareosis. It is the most frequent form of disorders of urination in the first years of disease that significantly aggravates its course and needs timed diagnosis and pharmacological treatment. Competitive antagonists of muscarinic receptors M2, M3 subtypes are the most effective drugs for treatment of OUBS comorbid to CCVD. PMID:23994932

  3. [Gastric emptying in elderly patients with cerebral vascular diseases and the effect of trimebutine].

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Kobatake, K; Haruma, K; Yamanaka, H; Fujimura, J; Yoshihara, M; Sumii, K; Kajiyama, G

    1993-01-01

    The authors investigated gastric emptying in 18 elderly patients with cerebral vascular diseases using the acetaminophen method. Subjects were divided into 2 groups according to their levels of daily activity. One group consisted of 10 comatose patients (71-92 years old), the other consisted of 8 patients (74-95 years old) who could walk by themselves. We also investigated gastric emptying in 6 comatose patients (38-83 years old) because of other diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and in 11 elder controls (75-95 years old). In elderly controls, the acetaminophen concentration at 45 minutes was 9.08 +/- 1.71 micrograms/ml. In comatose patients due to cerebral vascular diseases, the concentration was 3.89 +/- 1.60 micrograms/ml, which showed significantly delayed gastric emptying (p < 0.05). In patients with cerebral vascular diseases who could walk, the concentration was 6.51 +/- 0.99 micrograms/ml. In comatose patients by another diseases, the concentration was 5.82 +/- 1.13 micrograms/ml. We suspected that delayed gastric emptying is related to the comatose state. Trimebutine significantly (p < 0.01) improved gastric emptying in comatose patients with cerebral vascular diseases. PMID:8474227

  4. Post-mortem assessment of hypoperfusion of cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Taya; Miners, Scott; Love, Seth

    2015-04-01

    Perfusion is reduced in the cerebral neocortex in Alzheimer's disease. We have explored some of the mechanisms, by measurement of perfusion-sensitive and disease-related proteins in post-mortem tissue from Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and age-matched control brains. To distinguish physiological from pathological reduction in perfusion (i.e. reduction exceeding the decline in metabolic demand), we measured the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein induced under conditions of tissue hypoxia through the actions of hypoxia-inducible factors, and the myelin associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 (MAG:PLP1) ratio, which declines in chronically hypoperfused brain tissue. To evaluate possible mechanisms of hypoperfusion, we also measured the levels of amyloid-β40, amyloid-β42, von Willebrand factor (VWF; a measure of microvascular density) and the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin 1 (EDN1); we assayed the activity of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE), which catalyses the production of another potent vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II; and we scored the severity of arteriolosclerotic small vessel disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and determined the Braak tangle stage. VEGF was markedly increased in frontal and parahippocampal cortex in Alzheimer's disease but only slightly and not significantly in vascular dementia. In frontal cortex the MAG:PLP1 ratio was significantly reduced in Alzheimer's disease and even more so in vascular dementia. VEGF but not MAG:PLP1 increased with Alzheimer's disease severity, as measured by Braak tangle stage, and correlated with amyloid-β42 and amyloid-β42: amyloid-β40 but not amyloid-β40. Although MAG:PLP1 tended to be lowest in cortex from patients with severe small vessel disease or cerebral amyloid angiopathy, neither VEGF nor MAG:PLP1 correlated significantly with the severity of structural vascular pathology (small vessel disease, cerebral amyloid angiopathy or VWF

  5. Novel imaging techniques in cerebral small vessel diseases and vascular cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Gargi; Wilson, Duncan; Jäger, Hans R; Werring, David J

    2016-05-01

    Dementia is a global growing concern, affecting over 35 million people with a global economic impact of over $604 billion US. With an ageing population the number of people affected is expected double over the next two decades. Vascular cognitive impairment can be caused by various types of cerebrovascular disease, including cortical and subcortical infarcts, and the more diffuse white matter injury due to cerebral small vessel disease. Although this type of cognitive impairment is usually considered the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, there is increasing recognition of the vascular contribution to neurodegeneration, with both pathologies frequently coexisting. The aim of this review is to highlight the recent advances in the understanding of vascular cognitive impairment, with a focus on small vessel diseases of the brain. We discuss recently identified small vessel imaging markers that have been associated with cognitive impairment, namely cerebral microbleeds, enlarged perivascular spaces, cortical superficial siderosis, and microinfarcts. We will also consider quantitative techniques including diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance perfusion imaging with arterial spin labelling, functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. As well as potentially shedding light on the mechanism by which cerebral small vessel diseases cause dementia, these novel imaging biomarkers are also of increasing relevance given their ability to guide diagnosis and reflect disease progression, which may in the future be useful for therapeutic interventions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26687324

  6. Microvascular lesions by estrogen-induced ID3: its implications in cerebral & cardiorenal vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jayanta K.; Felty, Quentin

    2014-01-01

    Severe symptoms of cerebral and cardiorenal vascular diseases can be triggered when cerebral, coronary, or glomerular arterioles grow inappropriately as a result of abnormal cell proliferation. The risk factor(s) and molecular mechanisms responsible for microvascular lesion formation are largely unknown. Although controversial, both animal and epidemiological studies have shown that estrogen increases the risk of stroke which may be due to microvascular lesions. Since microvascular diseases are characterized by excessive vessel growth, it is plausible that estrogen-induced neovascularization contributes to the growth of microvascular lesions. We present evidence for how ID3 overexpression in endothelial cells contributes to the development of an estrogen-induced neovascular phenotype with an additional focus on Pyk2 kinase. Our data showed that ID3 overexpression increased neovascularization, cell migration, and spheroid growth of human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells, hCMEC/D3. ID3 overexpressing cells showed significant estrogen-induced G2/M phase transition. Estrogen treatment increased both ID3 phosphorylation and total protein that was inhibited by tamoxifen; and Pyk2 mediated estrogen-induced ID3 mRNA expression. These findings suggest that Pyk2 signals ID3 expression and ID3 is necessary for estrogen-induced neovascularization in hCMEC/D3 cells. A better understanding of how microvascular lesions depend on ID3 may open new avenues for prevention and treatment of neurological diseases. PMID:25129100

  7. Low Cerebral Glucose Metabolism: A Potential Predictor for the Severity of Vascular Parkinsonism and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunqi; Wei, Xiaobo; Liu, Xu; Liao, Jinchi; Lin, Jiaping; Zhu, Cansheng; Meng, Xiaochun; Xie, Dongsi; Chao, Dongman; Fenoy, Albert J; Cheng, Muhua; Tang, Beisha; Zhang, Zhuohua; Xia, Ying; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    This study explored the association between cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRGlc) and the severity of Vascular Parkinsonism (VP) and Parkinson's disease (PD). A cross-sectional study was performed to compare CMRGlc in normal subjects vs. VP and PD patients. Twelve normal subjects, 22 VP, and 11 PD patients were evaluated with the H&Y and MMSE, and underwent 18F-FDG measurements. Pearson's correlations were used to identify potential associations between the severity of VP/PD and CMRGlc. A pronounced reduction of CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen was detected in patients with VP and PD when compared with normal subjects. The VP patients displayed a slight CMRGlc decrease in the caudate putamen and frontal lobe in comparison with PD patients. These decreases in CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen were significantly correlated with the VP patients' H&Y, UPDRS II, UPDRS III, MMSE, cardiovascular, and attention/memory scores. Similarly, significant correlations were observed in patients with PD. This is the first clinical study finding strong evidence for an association between low cerebral glucose metabolism and the severity of VP and PD. Our findings suggest that these changes in glucose metabolism in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen may underlie the pathophysiological mechanisms of VP and PD. As the scramble to find imaging biomarkers or predictors of the disease intensifies, a better understanding of the roles of cerebral glucose metabolism may give us insight into the pathogenesis of VP and PD. PMID:26618044

  8. Increased cerebral vascular reactivity in the tau expressing rTg4510 mouse: evidence against the role of tau pathology to impair vascular health in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jack A; Holmes, Holly E; O'Callaghan, James M; Colgan, Niall; Ismail, Ozama; Fisher, Elizabeth MC; Siow, Bernard; Murray, Tracey K; Schwarz, Adam J; O'Neill, Michael J; Collins, Emily C; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities are a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Imaging of cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) is a powerful tool to investigate vascular health in clinical populations although the cause of reduced CVR in AD patients is not fully understood. We investigated the specific role of tau pathology in CVR derangement in AD using the rTg4510 mouse model. We observed an increase in CVR in cortical regions with tau pathology. These data suggest that tau pathology alone does not produce the clinically observed decreases in CVR and implicates amyloid pathology as the dominant etiology of impaired CVR in AD patients. PMID:25515210

  9. Increased cerebral vascular reactivity in the tau expressing rTg4510 mouse: evidence against the role of tau pathology to impair vascular health in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jack A; Holmes, Holly E; O'Callaghan, James M; Colgan, Niall; Ismail, Ozama; Fisher, Elizabeth Mc; Siow, Bernard; Murray, Tracey K; Schwarz, Adam J; O'Neill, Michael J; Collins, Emily C; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2015-03-01

    Vascular abnormalities are a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Imaging of cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) is a powerful tool to investigate vascular health in clinical populations although the cause of reduced CVR in AD patients is not fully understood. We investigated the specific role of tau pathology in CVR derangement in AD using the rTg4510 mouse model. We observed an increase in CVR in cortical regions with tau pathology. These data suggest that tau pathology alone does not produce the clinically observed decreases in CVR and implicates amyloid pathology as the dominant etiology of impaired CVR in AD patients. PMID:25515210

  10. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol Smoking Obesity Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  11. The relationship between dental disease and cerebral vascular accident in elderly United States veterans.

    PubMed

    Loesche, W J; Schork, A; Terpenning, M S; Chen, Y M; Kerr, C; Dominguez, B L

    1998-07-01

    We report here information obtained from a cross-sectional study of 401 veterans, who were at least 60 years of age, which showed that several dental/oral conditions can be significantly associated with the diagnosis of a cerebral vascular accident (CVA), when included in a multivariate logistic regression model with and without many of the known risk factors for a CVA. The dental findings relative to the prevalence of dental caries and periodontal disease were not distinctly different between the subjects with and without a CVA in the bivariate analysis. A higher stimulated salivary flow was negatively associated with a CVA in the multivariate models. The plaque index and oral hygiene habits relating to brushing, flossing, and frequency of having teeth cleaned by a dentist/hygienist were significantly associated with a CVA in the bivariate analysis. Among these oral hygiene parameters, *needing help in brushing one's teeth" and the reported annual visit to the dentist/hygienist for teeth cleaning remained significant in the multivariate models involving the dependent-living subjects. The need for help in brushing one's teeth could reflect the fact that many subjects had reduced manual dexterity as a result of the CVA and required this extra care. However, the finding that those dependent-living individuals who reported that they did not have their teeth cleaned at least once a year were 4.76 times more likely to have had a CVA, suggests that a pattern of oral neglect might be associated with developing a CVA. The implications of this in terms of an intervention strategy for CVA warrants further consideration. However, caution is recommended because the data were obtained from a convenience sampling of older veterans and may not be generalizable to other populations. PMID:9722700

  12. beta-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease is found in cerebral and spinal cord vascular malformations.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, M. N.; Merz, P.; Bennett-Gray, J.; Menezes, A. H.; Goeken, J. A.; Schelper, R. L.; Wisniewski, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    Congo/Red deposition with birefringence to polarized light was demonstrated focally in cerebrovascular malformations removed surgically from 4 older patients (ages 85, 74, 74, and 63), and in a spinal cord vascular malformation in a 76-year-old patient. Lesser degrees of Congophilic change were observed in cerebrovascular malformations screened from 4 of 10 patients between the ages of 30 and 59. No Congophilic change was seen in 10 cerebrovascular malformations removed from patients under 30 years of age. Congophilic areas in all cases decorated with W-2 and 85/45 polyclonal antibodies raised to peptide sequences of cerebrovascular beta-amyloid and beta-amyloid of senile plaques from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the amyloid in these vascular malformations is immunologically related to beta-amyloid protein. This finding provides another indication that vascular beta-amyloid deposition is not specific for Alzheimer's disease and suggests that an existing abnormality of vessels may be a predisposing factor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2A Figure 2B Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3293463

  13. Buflomedil. A review of its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and therapeutic efficacy in peripheral and cerebral vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Clissold, S P; Lynch, S; Sorkin, E M

    1987-05-01

    Buflomedil hydrochloride is a vasoactive drug with a variety of pharmacodynamic properties. Importantly, it seems to improve nutritional blood flow in ischaemic tissue of patients with peripheral and/or cerebral vascular disease by a combination of pharmacological effects: inhibition of alpha-adrenoceptors, inhibition of platelet aggregation, improved erythrocyte deformability, nonspecific and weak calcium antagonistic effects, and oxygen sparing activity. Therapeutic trials with buflomedil in patients with peripheral vascular diseases have shown that it increases walking distances in those with intermittent claudication and heals trophic lesions and reduces rest pain in many patients with more severe vasculopathies. In open clinical trials a good to very good clinical response was achieved in 57 to 87% of those treated. In comparative studies buflomedil 600 mg/day orally was shown to be significantly superior to placebo and comparable in efficacy to pentoxifylline (oxpentifylline) and naftidrofuryl. In patients with symptoms presumed to be due to cerebrovascular insufficiencies and elderly patients with senile dementia, buflomedil 450 to 600 mg/day alleviated symptoms associated with impairment of cognitive and psychometric function and was significantly superior to placebo and slightly more effective than drugs such as cinnarizine, flunarizine and co-dergocrine mesylate. Overall, buflomedil at dosages of up to 600 mg/day has been very well tolerated and discontinuation of therapy has rarely been necessary. Thus, buflomedil would seem to be a useful adjunct to conservative treatment in patients with mild-to-moderate peripheral vascular disease and/or cerebrovascular insufficiency, and well worth a try in patients with more severe peripheral disease unable to undergo surgery. However, a few well-designed long term studies are needed to fully define its overall place in therapy. PMID:3297620

  14. Low Cerebral Glucose Metabolism: A Potential Predictor for the Severity of Vascular Parkinsonism and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunqi; Wei, Xiaobo; Liu, Xu; Liao, Jinchi; Lin, Jiaping; Zhu, Cansheng; Meng, Xiaochun; Xie, Dongsi; Chao, Dongman; Fenoy, Albert J; Cheng, Muhua; Tang, Beisha; Zhang, Zhuohua; Xia, Ying; Wang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the association between cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRGlc) and the severity of Vascular Parkinsonism (VP) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). A cross-sectional study was performed to compare CMRGlc in normal subjects vs. VP and PD patients. Twelve normal subjects, 22 VP, and 11 PD patients were evaluated with the H&Y and MMSE, and underwent 18F-FDG measurements. Pearson’s correlations were used to identify potential associations between the severity of VP/PD and CMRGlc. A pronounced reduction of CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen was detected in patients with VP and PD when compared with normal subjects. The VP patients displayed a slight CMRGlc decrease in the caudate putamen and frontal lobe in comparison with PD patients. These decreases in CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen were significantly correlated with the VP patients’ H&Y, UPDRS II, UPDRS III, MMSE, cardiovascular, and attention/memory scores. Similarly, significant correlations were observed in patients with PD. This is the first clinical study finding strong evidence for an association between low cerebral glucose metabolism and the severity of VP and PD. Our findings suggest that these changes in glucose metabolism in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen may underlie the pathophysiological mechanisms of VP and PD. As the scramble to find imaging biomarkers or predictors of the disease intensifies, a better understanding of the roles of cerebral glucose metabolism may give us insight into the pathogenesis of VP and PD. PMID:26618044

  15. Vitamin D status and vascular dementia due to cerebral small vessel disease in the elderly Asian Indian population.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Puttachandra; Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Supriya, Manjunath; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Prasad, Chandrajit; Christopher, Rita

    2015-12-15

    Vitamin D plays vital roles in human health and recent studies have shown its beneficial effect on brain functioning. The present study was designed to evaluate the association of vitamin D with vascular dementia (VaD) due to cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) in Asian Indian population. 140 VaD patients aged ≥ 60 years with neuroimaging evidence of SVD, and 132 age and gender-matched controls, were investigated. Vitamin D status was estimated by measuring serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D. Logistic regression model revealed that deficient levels of vitamin D (<12 ng/ml) were associated with 2.2-fold increase in odds of VaD after adjustment with covariates. Hypertension was independently associated with 11.3-fold increased odds of VaD. In hypertensives with vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency (12-20 ng/ml), the odds were increased to 31.6-fold and 14.4-fold, respectively. However, in hypertensives with vitamin D sufficiency (>20 ng/ml), the odds of VaD were increased by 3.8-fold only. Pearson correlation showed that serum vitamin D was inversely associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (r=-0.401 and -0.411, p<0.01, respectively) in vitamin D-deficient subjects. Since the combined presence of hypertension and vitamin D deficiency increases the probability of developing VaD, screening for vitamin D status in addition to regular monitoring of blood pressure, could reduce the risk of VaD associated with cerebral SVD in the elderly Asian Indian subjects. PMID:26671097

  16. Vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Amlie-Lefond, Catherine; Shaw, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The child presenting with possible sentinel transient ischemic event or stroke requires prompt diagnosis so that strategies to limit injury and prevent recurrent stroke can be instituted. Cerebral arteriopathy is a potent risk factor for arterial ischemic stroke in childhood. Though acute imaging study in the setting of possible stroke is often a head computed tomography, when possible magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended as the first-line study as confirmation and imaging evaluation of ischemic stroke will typically require MRI. The MRI scanning approach should include diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) early in the sequence order, since normal DWI excludes acute infarct with rare exception. In most cases, arterial imaging with time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is warranted. Dedicated MRA may not be possible in the acute setting, but should be pursued as promptly as possible, particularly in the child with findings and history suggestive of arteriopathy, given the high risk of recurrent stroke in these children. MRA can overestimate the degree of arterial compromise due to complex/turbulent flow, and be insensitive to subtle vessel irregularity due to resolution and complex flow. In cases with high imaging suspicion for dissection despite normal MRA findings, catheter angiogram is indicated. A thoughtful, stepwise approach to arterial neuroimaging is critical to optimize diagnosis, treatment, and primary and secondary prevention of childhood stroke. PMID:27430463

  17. Retinal vascular image analysis as a potential screening tool for cerebrovascular disease: a rationale based on homology between cerebral and retinal microvasculatures

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Niall; Aslam, Tariq; MacGillivray, Thomas; Pattie, Alison; Deary, Ian J; Dhillon, Baljean

    2005-01-01

    The retinal and cerebral microvasculatures share many morphological and physiological properties. Assessment of the cerebral microvasculature requires highly specialized and expensive techniques. The potential for using non-invasive clinical assessment of the retinal microvasculature as a marker of the state of the cerebrovasculature offers clear advantages, owing to the ease with which the retinal vasculature can be directly visualized in vivo and photographed due to its essential two-dimensional nature. The use of retinal digital image analysis is becoming increasingly common, and offers new techniques to analyse different aspects of retinal vascular topography, including retinal vascular widths, geometrical attributes at vessel bifurcations and vessel tracking. Being predominantly automated and objective, these techniques offer an exciting opportunity to study the potential to identify retinal microvascular abnormalities as markers of cerebrovascular pathology. In this review, we describe the anatomical and physiological homology between the retinal and cerebral microvasculatures. We review the evidence that retinal microvascular changes occur in cerebrovascular disease and review current retinal image analysis tools that may allow us to use different aspects of the retinal microvasculature as potential markers for the state of the cerebral microvasculature. PMID:15817102

  18. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  19. Sleep Apnea, Sleep Duration and Brain MRI Markers of Cerebral Vascular Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC)

    PubMed Central

    Lutsey, Pamela L.; Norby, Faye L.; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Mosley, Thomas; MacLehose, Richard F.; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Shahar, Eyal; Jack, Clifford R.; Alonso, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Background A growing body of literature has suggested that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and habitual short sleep duration are linked to poor cognitive function. Neuroimaging studies may provide insight into this relation. Objective We tested the hypotheses that OSA and habitual short sleep duration, measured at ages 54–73 years, would be associated with adverse brain morphology at ages 67–89 years. Methods Included in this analysis are 312 ARIC study participants who underwent in-home overnight polysomnography in 1996–1998 and brain MRI scans about 15 years later (2012–2013). Sleep apnea was quantified by the apnea-hypopnea index and categorized as moderate/severe (≥15.0 events/hour), mild (5.0–14.9 events/hour), or normal (<5.0 events/hour). Habitual sleep duration was categorized, in hours, as <7, 7 to <8, ≥8. MRI outcomes included number of infarcts (total, subcortical, and cortical) and white matter hyperintensity (WMH) and Alzheimer’s disease signature region volumes. Multivariable adjusted logistic and linear regression models were used. All models incorporated inverse probability weighting, to adjust for potential selection bias. Results At the time of the sleep study participants were 61.7 (SD: 5.0) years old and 54% female; 19% had moderate/severe sleep apnea. MRI imaging took place 14.8 (SD: 1.0) years later, when participants were 76.5 (SD: 5.2) years old. In multivariable models which accounted for body mass index, neither OSA nor abnormal sleep duration were statistically significantly associated with odds of cerebral infarcts, WMH brain volumes or regional brain volumes. Conclusions In this community-based sample, mid-life OSA and habitually short sleep duration were not associated with later-life cerebral markers of vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. However, selection bias may have influenced our results and the modest sample size led to relatively imprecise associations. PMID:27415826

  20. Progressive cerebral vascular degeneration with mitochondrial encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Longo, Nicola; Schrijver, Iris; Vogel, Hannes; Pique, Lynn M; Cowan, Tina M; Pasquali, Marzia; Steinberg, Gary K; Hedlund, Gary L; Ernst, Sharon L; Gallagher, Renata C; Enns, Gregory M

    2008-02-01

    MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) is a maternally inherited disorder characterized by recurrent cerebral infarctions that do not conform to discreet vascular territories. Here we report on a patient who presented at 7 years of age with loss of consciousness and severe metabolic acidosis following vomiting and dehydration. She developed progressive sensorineural hearing loss, myopathy, ptosis, short stature, and mild developmental delays after normal early development. Biochemical testing identified metabolites characteristic of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency (hexanoylglycine and suberylglycine), but also severe lactic acidemia (10-25 mM) and, in urine, excess of lactic acid, intermediates of the citric cycle, and marked ketonuria, suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. She progressed rapidly to develop temporary cortical blindness. Brain imaging indicated generalized atrophy, more marked on the left side, in addition to white matter alterations consistent with a mitochondrial disorder. Magnetic resonance angiography indicated occlusion of the left cerebral artery with development of collateral circulation (Moyamoya syndrome). This process worsened over time to involve the other side of the brain. A muscle biopsy indicated the presence of numerous ragged red fibers. Molecular testing confirmed compound heterozygosity for the common mutation in the MCAD gene (985A>G) and a second pathogenic mutation (233T>C). MtDNA testing indicated that the muscle was almost homoplasmic for the 3243A>T mutation in tRNALeu, with a lower mutant load (about 50% heteroplasmy) in blood and skin fibroblasts. These results indicate that mitochondrial disorders may be associated with severe vascular disease resulting in Moyamoya syndrome. The contribution of the concomitant MCAD deficiency to the development of the phenotype in this case is unclear. PMID:18203188

  1. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  2. Cerebral Vascular Injury in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Kimbra; Amyot, Franck; Haber, Margalit; Pronger, Angela; Bogoslovsky, Tanya; Moore, Carol; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic cerebral vascular injury (TCVI) is a very frequent, if not universal, feature after traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is likely responsible, at least in part, for functional deficits and TBI-related chronic disability. Because there are multiple pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies that promote vascular health, TCVI is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention after TBI. The cerebral microvasculature is a component of the neurovascular unit (NVU) coupling neuronal metabolism with local cerebral blood flow. The NVU participates in the pathogenesis of TBI, either directly from physical trauma or as part of the cascade of secondary injury that occurs after TBI. Pathologically, there is extensive cerebral microvascular injury in humans and experimental animal, identified with either conventional light microscopy or ultrastructural examination. It is seen in acute and chronic TBI, and even described in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Non-invasive, physiologic measures of cerebral microvascular function show dysfunction after TBI in humans and experimental animal models of TBI. These include imaging sequences (MRI-ASL), Transcranial Doppler (TCD), and Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS). Understanding the pathophysiology of TCVI, a relatively under-studied component of TBI, has promise for the development of novel therapies for TBI. PMID:26048614

  3. Erythropoietin and cerebral vascular protection: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Anantha Vijay R; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2006-11-01

    Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a major clinical problem causing cerebral ischemia and infarction. The pathogenesis of vasospasm is related to a number of pathological processes including endothelial damage and alterations in vasomotor function leading to narrowing of arterial diameter and a subsequent decrease in cerebral blood flow. Discovery of the tissue protective effects of erythropoietin (EPO) stimulated the search for therapeutic application of EPO for the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular disease. Recent studies have identified the role of EPO in vascular protection mediated by the preservation of endothelial cell integrity and stimulation of angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss the EPO-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase and its contribution to the prevention of cerebral vasospasm. PMID:17049112

  4. [Cerebral vascular accidents in anticoagulant therapy].

    PubMed

    Woimant, F; Lecoz, P; Rajzbaum, G; Haguenau, M; Pépin, B

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-three patients hospitalized as they presented with cerebral vascular lesions during anticoagulant therapy (25 intracerebral hemorrhages, 7 subdural hematoma, and one ischemia lesion). Frequency of intra-cerebral hemorrhages along with anticoagulant therapy was about 11 p. 100, this of subdural hematoma ranged from 12 to 38 p. 100. Intra-cerebral hemorrhages failed to show any peculiar topography and volume was variable. A predisposing factor thus existed in about 50 p. 100 of cases: high blood pressure or arterial aneurysm. Previous cranial traumatism was only demonstrated in 48 p. 100 patients presenting with a subdural hematoma. Prognosis as for these intracranial hemorrhages might be compared to this of hemorrhagic lesions appearing under other etiologic conditions. Ischemia lesion was secondary to a severe thrombopenia to heparin. PMID:3813286

  5. Women and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Patient information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Women and Vascular Disease Early Warning Symptom for ... major public health issue, the Society of Interventional Radiology recommends greater screening efforts by the medical community ...

  6. Rho kinase as a target for cerebral vascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Sellers, James R; McKerracher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel pharmaceutical treatments for disorders of the cerebral vasculature is a serious unmet medical need. These vascular disorders are typified by a disruption in the delicate Rho signaling equilibrium within the blood vessel wall. In particular, Rho kinase overactivation in the smooth muscle and endothelial layers of the vessel wall results in cytoskeletal modifications that lead to reduced vascular integrity and abnormal vascular growth. Rho kinase is thus a promising target for the treatment of cerebral vascular disorders. Indeed, preclinical studies indicate that Rho kinase inhibition may reduce the formation/growth/rupture of both intracranial aneurysms and cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:26062400

  7. Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by 3D ASL in Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: A Marker for Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yawen; Cao, Wenwei; Ding, Weina; Wang, Yao; Han, Xu; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Qun; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal reductions in cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been identified in subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the pattern of CBF reduction in relation with the degree of cognitive impairment. CBF measured with three-dimensional (3D) Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) helps detect functional changes in subjects with SVCI. We aimed to compare CBF maps in subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) subjects with and without cognitive impairment and to detect the relationship of the regions of CBF reduction in the brain with the degree of cognitive impairment according to the z-score. A total of 53 subjects with SVCI and 23 matched SIVD subjects without cognitive impairment (controls), underwent a whole-brain 3D ASL MRI in the resting state. Regional CBF (rCBF) was compared voxel wise by using an analysis of variance design in a statistical parametric mapping program, with patient age and sex as covariates. Correlations were calculated between the rCBF value in the whole brain and the z-score in the 53 subjects with SVCI. Compared with the control subjects, SVCI group demonstrated diffuse decreased CBF in the brain. Significant positive correlations were determined in the rCBF values in the left hippocampus, left superior temporal pole gyrus, right superior frontal orbital lobe, right medial frontal orbital lobe, right middle temporal lobe, left thalamus and right insula with the z-scores in SVCI group. The noninvasively quantified resting CBF demonstrated altered CBF distributions in the SVCI brain. The deficit brain perfusions in the temporal and frontal lobe, hippocampus, thalamus and insula was related to the degree of cognitive impairment. Its relationship to cognition indicates the clinical relevance of this functional marker. Thus, our results provide further evidence for the mechanisms underlying the cognitive deficit in patients with SVCI.

  8. Pediatric neuroradiology: Cerebral and cranial diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Diebler, C.; Dulac, O.

    1987-01-01

    In this book, a neuroradiologist and a neuropediatrician have combined forces to provide the widest possible knowledge in investigating cranial and cerebral disorders in infancy and childhood. Based on more than 20,000 pediatric CT examinations, with a follow-up time often exceeding ten years, the book aims to bridge interdisciplinary gaps and help radiologists, pediatricians and neurosurgeons solve the various problems of pediatric neuroradiology that frequently confront them. For each disease, the etiology, clinical manifestation, pathological lesions and radiological presentations are discussed, supported by extensive illustrations. Malformative, vascular, traumatic, tumoral, infectious and metabolic diseases are reviewed. Miscellaneous conditions presenting particular symptoms or syndromes are also studied, such as hydrocephalus and neurological complications of leukemia. Contents: Cerebral and cranial malformations; neurocutaneous syndromes; inherited metabolic diseases; infectious diseases - vascular disorders; intracranial tumors; cranial trauma - miscellaneous and subject index.

  9. Cerebral angiography, blood flow and vascular reactivity in progressive hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunxia; Shen, Qiang; Huang, Shiliang; Li, Wei; Muir, Eric R.; Long, Justin; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hypertension alters cerebral vascular morphology, cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular reactivity, increasing susceptibility to neurological disorders. This study evaluated: i) the lumen diameters of major cerebral and downstream arteries using magnetic resonance angiography, and ii) basal CBF, and iii) cerebrovascular reactivity to hypercapnia of multiple brain regions using arterial-spin-labeling technique in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) at different stages. Comparisons were made with age-matched normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. In 10-week SHR, lumen diameter started to reduce, basal CBF, and hypercapnic CBF response were higher from elevated arterial blood pressure, but there was no evidence of stenosis, compared to age-matched WKY. In 20-week SHR, lumen diameter remained reduced, CBF returned toward normal from vasoconstriction, hypercapnic CBF response reversed and became smaller, but without apparent stenosis. In 40-week SHR, lumen diameter remained reduced and basal CBF further decreased, resulting in larger differences compared to WKY. There was significant stenosis in main supplying cerebral vessels. Hypercapnic CBF response further decreased, with some animals showing negative hypercapnic CBF responses in some brain regions, indicative of compromised cerebrovascular reserve. The territory with negative hypercapnia CBF responses corresponded with the severity of stenosis in arteries that supplied those territories. We also found enlargement of downstream vessels and formation of collateral vessels as compensatory responses to vasoconstriction upstream vessels. The middle cerebral and azygos arteries were amongst the most susceptible to hypertension-induced changes. Multimodal MRI provides clinically relevant data that might be useful to characterize disease pathogenesis, stage disease progression, and monitor treatment effects in hypertension. PMID:25731987

  10. Pulmonary vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mélot, C; Naeije, R

    2011-04-01

    Diseases of the pulmonary vasculature are a cause of increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and pulmonary arterial hypertension or decreased PVR in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations on hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, portal hypertension, or cavopulmonary anastomosis. All these conditions are associated with a decrease in both arterial PO2 and PCO2. Gas exchange in pulmonary vascular diseases with increased PVR is characterized by a shift of ventilation and perfusion to high ventilation-perfusion ratios, a mild to moderate increase in perfusion to low ventilation-perfusion ratios, and an increased physiologic dead space. Hypoxemia in these patients is essentially explained by altered ventilation-perfusion matching amplified by a decreased mixed venous PO2 caused by a low cardiac output. Hypocapnia is accounted for by hyperventilation, which is essentially related to an increased chemosensitivity. A cardiac shunt on a patent foramen ovale may be a cause of severe hypoxemia in a proportion of patients with pulmonary hypertension and an increase in right atrial pressure. Gas exchange in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations is characterized by variable degree of pulmonary shunting and/or diffusion-perfusion imbalance. Hypocapnia is caused by an increased ventilation in relation to an increased pulmonary blood flow with direct peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation by shunted mixed venous blood flow. PMID:23737196

  11. Are MPNs vascular diseases?

    PubMed

    Finazzi, Guido; De Stefano, Valerio; Barbui, Tiziano

    2013-12-01

    A high risk of arterial and venous thrombosis is the hallmark of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), particularly polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET). Clinical aspects, pathogenesis and management of thrombosis in MPN resemble those of other paradigmatic vascular diseases. The occurrence of venous thrombosis in atypical sites, such as the splanchnic district, and the involvement of plasmatic prothrombotic factors, including an acquired resistance to activated protein C, both link MPN to inherited thrombophilia. Anticoagulants are the drugs of choice for these complications. The pathogenic role of leukocytes and inflammation, and the high mortality rate from arterial occlusions are common features of MPN and atherosclerosis. The efficacy and safety of aspirin in reducing deaths and major thrombosis in PV have been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. Finally, the Virchow's triad of impaired blood cells, endothelium and blood flow is shared both by MPN and thrombosis in solid cancer. Phlebotomy and myelosuppressive agents are the current therapeutic options for correcting these abnormalities and reducing thrombosis in this special vascular disease represented by MPN. PMID:24037420

  12. Supravalvular aortic stenosis associated to infectious endocarditis and cerebral vascular disease in a patient with Williams-Beuren Syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Rubens Figueroa, Jesús; Marhx, Alfonso; López Terrazas, Javier; Palacios Macedo, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by: (a) typical facial features; (b) psychomotor retardation with a specific neurocognitive profile; (c) cardiovascular condition and (d) likely transient hypocalcemia in infancy. The objective of this study was to describe the clinic evolution and diagnosis of patient with this syndrome that was associated with endocarditis caused by Streptococcus parasanguis in the ascending aorta and an aneurism located in the fronto-temporal area, which produced a parenchymal hematoma in the left lobe, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was treated with ceftriaxone and dicloxacillin. Then we proceeded to correct the aneurysm and perform vegetation resection in aortic arteries with supravalvular aortic stenosis correction. The evolution after one year has been favorable and is currently without neurologic sequelae. A 5-year-old male patient presented a diagnosis of supravalvular aortic stenosis. After cardiac catheterization was performed, he presented a fever and right side paresis. The echocardiogram showed multiple vegetations in the ascendant aortic arch and the supraortic arteries. The blood cultures reported S. parasanguis. The magnetic resonance showed a subarachnoid hemorrhage with an aneurysm and a hematoma. PMID:25882107

  13. Autophagy in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ryter, Stefan W; Lee, Seon-Jin; Smith, Akaya; Choi, Augustine M K

    2010-02-01

    Autophagy, or "self eating," refers to a regulated cellular process for the lysosomal-dependent turnover of organelles and proteins. During starvation or nutrient deficiency, autophagy promotes survival through the replenishment of metabolic precursors derived from the degradation of endogenous cellular components. Autophagy represents a general homeostatic and inducible adaptive response to environmental stress, including endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypoxia, oxidative stress, and exposure to pharmaceuticals and xenobiotics. Whereas elevated autophagy can be observed in dying cells, the functional relationships between autophagy and programmed cell death pathways remain incompletely understood. Preclinical studies have identified autophagy as a process that can be activated during vascular disorders, including ischemia-reperfusion injury of the heart and other organs, cardiomyopathy, myocardial injury, and atherosclerosis. The functional significance of autophagy in human cardiovascular disease pathogenesis remains incompletely understood, and potentially involves both adaptive and maladaptive outcomes, depending on model system. Although relatively few studies have been performed in the lung, our recent studies also implicate a role for autophagy in chronic lung disease. Manipulation of the signaling pathways that regulate autophagy could potentially provide a novel therapeutic strategy in the prevention or treatment of human disease. PMID:20160147

  14. Passive immunotherapy targeting amyloid-β reduces cerebral amyloid angiopathy and improves vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Bales, Kelly R; O'Neill, Sharon M; Pozdnyakov, Nikolay; Pan, Feng; Caouette, David; Pi, YeQing; Wood, Kathleen M; Volfson, Dmitri; Cirrito, John R; Han, Byung-Hee; Johnson, Andrew W; Zipfel, Gregory J; Samad, Tarek A

    2016-02-01

    Prominent cerebral amyloid angiopathy is often observed in the brains of elderly individuals and is almost universally found in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is characterized by accumulation of the shorter amyloid-β isoform(s) (predominantly amyloid-β40) in the walls of leptomeningeal and cortical arterioles and is likely a contributory factor to vascular dysfunction leading to stroke and dementia in the elderly. We used transgenic mice with prominent cerebral amyloid angiopathy to investigate the ability of ponezumab, an anti-amyloid-β40 selective antibody, to attenuate amyloid-β accrual in cerebral vessels and to acutely restore vascular reactivity. Chronic administration of ponezumab to transgenic mice led to a significant reduction in amyloid and amyloid-β accumulation both in leptomeningeal and brain vessels when measured by intravital multiphoton imaging and immunohistochemistry. By enriching for cerebral vascular elements, we also measured a significant reduction in the levels of soluble amyloid-β biochemically. We hypothesized that the reduction in vascular amyloid-β40 after ponezumab administration may reflect the ability of ponezumab to mobilize an interstitial fluid pool of amyloid-β40 in brain. Acutely, ponezumab triggered a significant and transient increase in interstitial fluid amyloid-β40 levels in old plaque-bearing transgenic mice but not in young animals. We also measured a beneficial effect on vascular reactivity following acute administration of ponezumab, even in vessels where there was a severe cerebral amyloid angiopathy burden. Taken together, the beneficial effects ponezumab administration has on reducing the rate of cerebral amyloid angiopathy deposition and restoring cerebral vascular health favours a mechanism that involves rapid removal and/or neutralization of amyloid-β species that may otherwise be detrimental to normal vessel function. PMID:26493635

  15. Pediatric Stroke: The Importance of Cerebral Arteriopathy and Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Beslow, Lauren A.; Jordan, Lori C.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of neurologic morbidity in childhood. Population-based estimates of the annual incidence of childhood stroke range from 2 to 13 per 100,000 children. This article will review recent literature on both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke in children with a focus on cerebral arteriopathy and vascular malformations as stroke risk factors. Additional risk factors include congenital heart disease, sickle cell disease, and hematologic abnormalities among others. Outcomes are variable and are related to the severity of presentation, associated illnesses, and other factors. More than half of children who have had a stroke have long-term neurological sequelae. Five-year recurrence risk is estimated to be 5–19%. Children with cerebrovascular abnormalities are at the highest risk of recurrence (66% at 5 years for ischemic stroke in one study). Furthermore, cerebral arteriopathy including arterial dissection may account for up to 80% of childhood stroke in otherwise healthy children. In many cases, evaluation and treatment of pediatric stroke is not evidence-based, and regional and geographic variations in practice patterns exist. Multicenter cohort studies and ultimately dedicated pediatric clinical trials will be essential to establish comprehensive evidence-based guidelines for pediatric stroke care. PMID:20625743

  16. Demographic Features and Neuropsychological Correlates in a Cohort of 200 Patients with Vascular Cognitive Decline Due to Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Issac, Thomas Gregor; Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Rajeswaran, Jamuna; Christopher, Rita; Philip, Mariamma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia and is potentially reversible. Small vessel disease (SVD) closely mimics degenerative dementia in view of its sub-acute onset and progressive course. Therefore, unlike large vessel disease, Hachinski Ischemic scale score may not always reflect vascular cognitive decline resulting in diagnostic and therapeutic confusions. Therefore, there is a need for detailed neuropsychological assessment for various cognitive domains for early identification of vascular cognitive decline as it carries a very good long term prognosis for cognitive morbidity, unlike degenerative dementias. Patients and Methods: This prospective study involves thorough domain based neuropsychological assessment of patients with a radiological diagnosis of SVD involving the following parameters-digit forward and backward, category fluency, color trails, stick test, logical memory test, and bender gestalt test. Magnetic resonance imaging scans done using 3-tesla machines and SVD graded using Fazekas visual scale. Results: The mean Hachinskis score was less sensitive for differentiating vascular dementia from degenerative dementia. However, the domain based neuropsychological scores were highly sensitive showing statistically significant impairment in all 6 domains tested and compared with Fazekas 1-3 grades in imaging. Discussion and Conclusion: This study aimed at establishing an early diagnosis of vascular mild cognitive impairment using domain wise neuropsychological testing and correlating it with radiological scores. Hachinskis score is more sensitive for large vessel disease in view of acute onset and step-like progression as against steady progression in SVD. However, domain-wise testing was highly sensitive in identifying early cognitive impairment in patients with SVD, and early therapeutic interventions are highly rewarding. PMID:27114624

  17. BMP signaling in vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Pardali, Evangelia; Sánchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; ten Dijke, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family that signal via type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors and intracellular Smad transcription factors. BMPs are multifunctional regulators of development and tissue homeostasis and they were initially characterized as inducers of bone regeneration. Genetic studies in humans and mice showed that perturbations in BMP signaling lead to various diseases, such as skeletal diseases, vascular diseases and cancer. Mutations in BMP type II receptor and BMP type I receptor/activin receptor-like kinase 1 have been linked to pulmonary arterial hypertension and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, respectively. BMPs have also been implicated in promoting vascular calcification and tumor angiogenesis. In this review we discuss the role of BMP signaling in vascular diseases and the value of BMP signaling as a vascular disease marker or a therapeutic target. PMID:22710160

  18. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  19. Peripheral Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Center Back to previous page En español Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy ... blockage including peripheral artery disease or PAD Aortic aneurysms Buerger's Disease Raynaud's Phenomenon Disease of the veins ...

  20. Interactive effects of vascular risk burden and advanced age on cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Bangen, Katherine J.; Nation, Daniel A.; Clark, Lindsay R.; Harmell, Alexandrea L.; Wierenga, Christina E.; Dev, Sheena I.; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Zlatar, Zvinka Z.; Salmon, David P.; Liu, Thomas T.; Bondi, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular risk factors and cerebral blood flow (CBF) reduction have been linked to increased risk of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD); however the possible moderating effects of age and vascular risk burden on CBF in late life remain understudied. We examined the relationships among elevated vascular risk burden, age, CBF, and cognition. Seventy-one non-demented older adults completed an arterial spin labeling MR scan, neuropsychological assessment, and medical history interview. Relationships among vascular risk burden, age, and CBF were examined in a priori regions of interest (ROIs) previously implicated in aging and AD. Interaction effects indicated that, among older adults with elevated vascular risk burden (i.e., multiple vascular risk factors), advancing age was significantly associated with reduced cortical CBF whereas there was no such relationship for those with low vascular risk burden (i.e., no or one vascular risk factor). This pattern was observed in cortical ROIs including medial temporal (hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, uncus), inferior parietal (supramarginal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, angular gyrus), and frontal (anterior cingulate, middle frontal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus) cortices. Furthermore, among those with elevated vascular risk, reduced CBF was associated with poorer cognitive performance. Such findings suggest that older adults with elevated vascular risk burden may be particularly vulnerable to cognitive change as a function of CBF reductions. Findings support the use of CBF as a potential biomarker in preclinical AD and suggest that vascular risk burden and regionally-specific CBF changes may contribute to differential age-related cognitive declines. PMID:25071567

  1. Is Vasomotion in Cerebral Arteries Impaired in Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Farkas, Eszter; Martin, Chris; Venneri, Annalena; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2015-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence supports the hypothesis of a vascular component in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebral hypoperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction have been indicated as key elements of this pathway. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a cerebrovascular disorder, frequent in AD, characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in cerebral blood vessel walls. CAA is associated with loss of vascular integrity, resulting in impaired regulation of cerebral circulation, and increased susceptibility to cerebral ischemia, microhemorrhages, and white matter damage. Vasomotion- the spontaneous rhythmic modulation of arterial diameter, typically observed in arteries/arterioles in various vascular beds including the brain- is thought to participate in tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery regulation. Vasomotion is impaired in adverse conditions such as hypoperfusion and hypoxia. The perivascular and glymphatic pathways of Aβ clearance are thought to be driven by the systolic pulse. Vasomotion produces diameter changes of comparable amplitude, however at lower rates, and could contribute to these mechanisms of Aβ clearance. In spite of potential clinical interest, studies addressing cerebral vasomotion in the context of AD/CAA are limited. This study reviews the current literature on vasomotion, and hypothesizes potential paths implicating impaired cerebral vasomotion in AD/CAA. Aβ and oxidative stress cause vascular tone dysregulation through direct effects on vascular cells, and indirect effects mediated by impaired neurovascular coupling. Vascular tone dysregulation is further aggravated by cholinergic deficit and results in depressed cerebrovascular reactivity and (possibly) impaired vasomotion, aggravating regional hypoperfusion and promoting further Aβ and oxidative stress accumulation. PMID:25720414

  2. Role of Mitochondria in Cerebral Vascular Function: Energy Production, Cellular Protection, and Regulation of Vascular Tone.

    PubMed

    Busija, David W; Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria not only produce energy in the form of ATP to support the activities of cells comprising the neurovascular unit, but mitochondrial events, such as depolarization and/or ROS release, also initiate signaling events which protect the endothelium and neurons against lethal stresses via pre-/postconditioning as well as promote changes in cerebral vascular tone. Mitochondrial depolarization in vascular smooth muscle (VSM), via pharmacological activation of the ATP-dependent potassium channels on the inner mitochondrial membrane (mitoKATP channels), leads to vasorelaxation through generation of calcium sparks by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and subsequent downstream signaling mechanisms. Increased release of ROS by mitochondria has similar effects. Relaxation of VSM can also be indirectly achieved via actions of nitric oxide (NO) and other vasoactive agents produced by endothelium, perivascular and parenchymal nerves, and astroglia following mitochondrial activation. Additionally, NO production following mitochondrial activation is involved in neuronal preconditioning. Cerebral arteries from female rats have greater mitochondrial mass and respiration and enhanced cerebral arterial dilation to mitochondrial activators. Preexisting chronic conditions such as insulin resistance and/or diabetes impair mitoKATP channel relaxation of cerebral arteries and preconditioning. Surprisingly, mitoKATP channel function after transient ischemia appears to be retained in the endothelium of large cerebral arteries despite generalized cerebral vascular dysfunction. Thus, mitochondrial mechanisms may represent the elusive signaling link between metabolic rate and blood flow as well as mediators of vascular change according to physiological status. Mitochondrial mechanisms are an important, but underutilized target for improving vascular function and decreasing brain injury in stroke patients. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1529-1548, 2016. PMID:27347901

  3. [Visual fields defects in cerebral hemorrhagic vascular accident].

    PubMed

    Nenciu, A; Stefan, C; Cucea, R; Neacşu, Alina; Balaş, Mihaela; Muşat, Alina; Dachin, Luminiţa; Sîrbu, Carmen

    2003-01-01

    Interpretation of the fields of vision forms a key part of ophthalmic and neurologic examinations. The homonymous hemianopa is a hallmark of a retrochiasmal lesion. Postchiasmal lesions that interrupt the visual pathway may have multiple causes which the circulatory disturbances is one of the most important. The authors present the case of a woman who has an isolated homonymous hemianopa produced by a vascular accident of occipital lobe, dwell upon the only manifestation of the cerebral acute hemorrhagic vascular accident was represented by an visual field defect. PMID:12974025

  4. Cerebral vascular reactivity on return from the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuj, Kathryn; Greaves, Danielle; Shoemaker, Kevin; Blaber, Andrew; Hughson, Richard L.

    Returning from spaceflight, astronauts experience a high incidence of orthostatic intolerance and syncope. Longer duration space flight may result in greater adaptations to microgravity which could increase the post-flight incidence of syncope. CCISS (Cardiovascular and Cerebovascular Control on return from the International Space Station) is an ongoing project designed to help determine adaptations that occur during spaceflight which may contribute to orthostatic intolerance. One component of this project involves looking at cerebral vascular responses before and after long duration spaceflight. As a known vasodilator, carbon dioxide (CO2) has been frequently used to assess changes in cerebral vascular reactivity. In this experiment, end tidal PCO2 was manipulated through changes in respired air. Two breaths of a 10% CO2 gas mixture were administered at 1-min intervals resulting in an increase in end tidal PCO2 . Throughout the testing, cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was determined using transcranial Doppler ultrasound. The cerebral resistance index (RI) was calculated from the Doppler wave form using the equation; RI=(CBFVsystolic-CBFVdiastolic)/CBFVsystolic. Changes in this index have been shown to reflect changes in cerebral vascular resistance. Peak responses to the CO2 stimulus were determined and compared to baseline measures taken at the beginning of the testing. Cerebral blood flow velocity increased and RI decreased with the two breaths of CO2. Preliminary data show a 36.0% increase in CBFV and a 9.0% decrease in RI pre-flight. Post flight, the response to CO2 appears to change showing a potentially blunted decrease in resistance (6.8%) and a smaller increase in CBFV (22.8%). Long term spaceflight may result in cerebrovascular changes which could decrease the vasodilatory capacity of cerebral resistance vessels. Further investigations in the CCISS project will reveal the interactive role of CO2 and arterial blood pressure on maintenance of brain

  5. Monitoring cerebral oxygenation in a pediatric patient undergoing surgery for vascular ring.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Reena K; Motta, Pablo; Horibe, Mayumi; Mossad, Emad

    2006-02-01

    Regional cerebral oxygenation can be monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Inadequacy of collateral cerebral circulation and regional cerebral ischemia during cardiac and vascular surgery may be detected by the use of NIRS monitoring. We report a 2-year-old child who underwent surgical repair of vascular ring and subclavian reimplantation, where use of NIRS helped in early detection and timely intervention to prevent prolonged cerebral ischemia. PMID:16430416

  6. Pregnancy and vascular liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, Julien; Durand, François; de Raucourt, Emmanuelle; Ceccaldi, Pierre-François; Plessier, Aurélie; Valla, Dominique; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-03-01

    Vascular disorders of the liver frequently affect women of childbearing age. Pregnancy and the postpartum are prothrombotic states. Pregnancy seems to be a trigger for Budd-Chiari syndrome in patients with an underlying prothrombotic disorder. Whether pregnancy is a risk factor for other vascular liver disorders is unknown. In women with a known vascular liver disorder and a desire for pregnancy, stabilisation of the liver disease, including the use of a portal decompressive procedure when indicated, should be reached prior to conception. The presence of esophageal varices should be screened and adequate prophylaxis of bleeding applied in a manner similar to what is recommended for patients with cirrhosis. Most women likely benefit from anticoagulation during pregnancy and the postpartum. Labor and delivery are best managed by a multidisciplinary team with experience in this situation. Assisted vaginal delivery is the preferred mode of delivery. Although the risk of miscarriage and premature birth is heightened, current management of these diseases makes it very likely to see the birth of a live baby when pregnancy reaches 20 weeks of gestation. PMID:25941432

  7. Pregnancy and Vascular Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Julien; Durand, François; de Raucourt, Emmanuelle; Ceccaldi, Pierre-François; Plessier, Aurélie; Valla, Dominique; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disorders of the liver frequently affect women of childbearing age. Pregnancy and the postpartum are prothrombotic states. Pregnancy seems to be a trigger for Budd–Chiari syndrome in patients with an underlying prothrombotic disorder. Whether pregnancy is a risk factor for other vascular liver disorders is unknown. In women with a known vascular liver disorder and a desire for pregnancy, stabilisation of the liver disease, including the use of a portal decompressive procedure when indicated, should be reached prior to conception. The presence of esophageal varices should be screened and adequate prophylaxis of bleeding applied in a manner similar to what is recommended for patients with cirrhosis. Most women likely benefit from anticoagulation during pregnancy and the postpartum. Labor and delivery are best managed by a multidisciplinary team with experience in this situation. Assisted vaginal delivery is the preferred mode of delivery. Although the risk of miscarriage and premature birth is heightened, current management of these diseases makes it very likely to see the birth of a live baby when pregnancy reaches 20 weeks of gestation. PMID:25941432

  8. Prognostic Impact of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease on Stroke Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom Joon

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), which includes white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), silent brain infarction (SBI), and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), develops in a conjunction of cumulated injuries to cerebral microvascular beds, increased permeability of blood-brain barriers, and chronic oligemia. SVD is easily detected by routine neuroimaging modalities such as brain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Research has revealed that the presence of SVD markers may increase the risk of future vascular events as well as deteriorate functional recovery and neurocognitive trajectories after stroke, and such an association could also be applied to hemorrhagic stroke survivors. Currently, the specific mechanistic processes leading to the development and manifestation of SVD risk factors are unknown, and further studies with novel methodological tools are warranted. In this review, recent studies regarding the prognostic impact of WMHs, SBI, and CMBs on stroke survivors and briefly summarize the pathophysiological concepts underlying the manifestation of cerebral SVD. PMID:26060797

  9. Periodontal disease, race, and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Desvarieux, M

    2001-07-01

    Recently, a number of studies have rekindled the possible hypothesis that oral health has repercussions beyond the oral cavity and is associated with systemic diseases. Interestingly, it is a return to an old theory that chronic infections and inflammation played a crucial role in atherosclerosis. This larger theory was advocated by French physicians, among others, at the beginning of the 20th century. In this article, we will review the epidemiologic evidence pointing to a possible association between oral health and vascular diseases and examine the role of race/ethnicity in the interpretation of this association. PMID:11913250

  10. Nox2 Deficiency Prevents Hypertension-Induced Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertrophy in Cerebral Arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu-Lung; Baumbach, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in many hypertension-related vascular diseases in the brain, including stroke and dementia. Thus, we examined the role of genetic deficiency of NADPH oxidase subunit Nox2 in the function and structure of cerebral arterioles during hypertension. Arterial pressure was increased in right-sided cerebral arterioles with transverse aortic banding for 4 weeks in 8-week-old wild-type (WT) and Nox2-deficient (-/y) mice. Mice were given NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10 mg/kg) or vehicle to drink. We measured the reactivity in cerebral arterioles through open cranial window in anesthetized mice and wall cross-sectional area and superoxide levels ex vivo. Aortic constriction increased systolic and pulse pressures in right-sided carotid arteries in all groups of mice. Ethidium fluorescence showed increased superoxide in right-sided cerebral arterioles in WT, but not in Nox2-/y mice. Dilation to acetylcholine, but not sodium nitroprusside, was reduced, and cross-sectional areas were increased in the right-sided arterioles in WT, but were unchanged in Nox2-/y mice. L-NAME reduced dilation to acetylcholine but did not result in hypertrophy in right-sided arterioles of Nox2-/y  mice. In conclusion, hypertension-induced superoxide production derived from Nox2-containing NADPH oxidase promotes hypertrophy and causes endothelial dysfunction in cerebral arterioles, possibly involving interaction with nitric oxide. PMID:23573415

  11. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Arterial Stiffness: Tsunami Effect in the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Saji, Naoki; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel diseases, including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, pose a risk for cerebrovascular disease, cognitive impairment, and the geriatric syndrome via effects on arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological, and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness in cerebral small vessel diseases remain unclear. Summary Arterial stiffness can be assessed using various indicators such as the ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, cardio-ankle vascular index, and augmentation index. Arterial stiffness is independently associated with all components of cerebral small vessel disease including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, although there are some methodological differences between the various surrogate markers. Evidence of arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. Further, vascular narrowing due to atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness due to lipohyalinosis can accelerate the pulse waves. This hemodynamic stress, pulsatile pressure, or blood pressure variability can cause a ‘tsunami effect’ towards the cerebral parenchyma and lead to cerebral small vessel disease. Previous studies have shown that silent lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are strongly associated with arterial stiffness. However, the association between microbleeds and arterial stiffness remains controversial, as there are two vessel mechanisms related to microbleeds: cerebral amyloid angiopathy and hypertensive small vessel disease. Key Messages Cerebral small vessel disease with associated arterial stiffness is a risk factor for silent cerebral lesions, stroke, and cognitive impairment. Improvement of the living environment, management of risk factors, and innovation and development of novel drugs that improve arterial stiffness may suppress the progression of cerebral small vessel disease, and may reduce

  12. The accessible cerebral vascular proteome in a mouse model of cerebral β-amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Roesli, Christoph; Fugmann, Tim; Borgia, Beatrice; Schliemann, Christoph; Neri, Dario; Jucker, Mathias

    2011-04-01

    Assessing protein changes in the cerebral vasculature of brain disorders may increase our understanding of disease pathogenesis and facilitate diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. By combining perfusion of mice with a charged reactive biotin derivative and subsequent quantification of the biotinylated proteins, the proteome accessible from the vasculature in an APPPS1 transgenic mouse model of cerebral β-amyloidosis was identified and compared to that in non-transgenic control mice. Our results provide proof-of-concept of this technology for the identification of new targets for antibody-based therapy or pharmacodelivery, and for neuroimaging in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21262399

  13. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease. PMID:26442438

  14. Mechanisms underlying sporadic cerebral small vessel disease: insights from neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, JM; Smith, C; Dichgans, M

    2013-01-01

    The term “cerebral small vessel disease” (SVD) describes a range of neuroimaging, pathological and associated clinical features. The latter range from none, to discrete focal neurological symptoms (stroke), to insidious global neurological dysfunction and dementia. The public health burden is considerable. The pathogenesis is largely unknown. Although associated with vascular risk factors, and generally considered to result from an intrinsic cerebral arteriolar occlusive disease, the pathological processes leading to the arteriolar disease, how these result in brain disease, how SVD lesions contribute to neurological or cognitive symptoms and the relationship to risk factors, have been the subject of much speculation. Pathology often reflects end-stage disease making determination of the earliest stages difficult. Neuroimaging provides considerable insights: the small vessels are not easily seen themselves, but the effects of their malfunction on the brain can be tracked on detailed brain imaging. We review the growing evidence for the most likely mechanisms. PMID:23602162

  15. Neuropathological diagnosis of vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia with implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kalaria, Raj N

    2016-05-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is recognised as a neurocognitive disorder, which is explained by numerous vascular causes in the general absence of other pathologies. The heterogeneity of cerebrovascular disease makes it challenging to elucidate the neuropathological substrates and mechanisms of VaD as well as vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Consensus and accurate diagnosis of VaD relies on wide-ranging clinical, neuropsychometric and neuroimaging measures with subsequent pathological confirmation. Pathological diagnosis of suspected clinical VaD requires adequate postmortem brain sampling and rigorous assessment methods to identify important substrates. Factors that define the subtypes of VaD include the nature and extent of vascular pathologies, degree of involvement of extra and intracranial vessels and the anatomical location of tissue changes. Atherosclerotic and cardioembolic diseases appear the most common substrates of vascular brain injury or infarction. Small vessel disease characterised by arteriolosclerosis and lacunar infarcts also causes cortical and subcortical microinfarcts, which appear to be the most robust substrates of cognitive impairment. Diffuse WM changes with loss of myelin and axonal abnormalities are common to almost all subtypes of VaD. Medial temporal lobe and hippocampal atrophy accompanied by variable hippocampal sclerosis are also features of VaD as they are of Alzheimer's disease. Recent observations suggest that there is a vascular basis for neuronal atrophy in both the temporal and frontal lobes in VaD that is entirely independent of any Alzheimer pathology. Further knowledge on specific neuronal and dendro-synaptic changes in key regions resulting in executive dysfunction and other cognitive deficits, which define VCI and VaD, needs to be gathered. Hereditary arteriopathies such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy or CADASIL have provided insights into the mechanisms of

  16. Endothelial dysfunction of cerebral and major arteries during chronic obstructive disease.

    PubMed

    Geltser, B I; Brodskaya, T A; Kotelnikov, V N; Agafonova, I G; Lukyanov, P A

    2007-12-01

    Vasomotor activity of the major and cerebral arteries was studied in mice with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Regional differences were revealed in the endothelium-dependent response of arteries. The development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was associated with a paradoxical response of the dilatational component of vasoregulation against the background of increased constrictive influences of the vascular endothelium in the major and cerebral vessels. PMID:18856197

  17. Differentiation of Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells Contributes to Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wang, Aijun; Yuan, Falei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Bo; Chu, Julia S.; Helms, Jill A.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the de-differentiation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from contractile to proliferative/synthetic phenotype has an important role during vascular remodeling and diseases. Here we provide evidence that challenges this theory. We identify a new type of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) in blood vessel wall. MVSCs express markers including Sox17, Sox10 and S100β, are cloneable, have telomerase activity, and can differentiate into neural cells and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like cells that subsequently differentiate into SMCs. On the other hand, we use lineage tracing with smooth muscle myosin heavy chain as a marker to show that MVSCs and proliferative or synthetic SMCs do not arise from the de-differentiation of mature SMCs. Upon vascular injuries, MVSCs, instead of SMCs, become proliferative, and MVSCs can differentiate into SMCs and chondrogenic cells, thus contributing to vascular remodeling and neointimal hyperplasia. These findings support a new hypothesis that the differentiation of MVSCs, rather than the de-differentiation of SMCs, contributes to vascular remodeling and diseases. PMID:22673902

  18. Fatal coccidioidomycosis in collagen vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W M; Gall, E P

    1983-02-01

    Ten patients who died from coccidioidomycosis in Arizona from 1968 to 1975 had underlying collagen vascular diseases: 4 with rheumatoid arthritis, 4 with systemic lupus erythematosus, and 2 with dermatomyositis. All 10 patients had been treated with corticosteroids; 2 were taking cytotoxic drugs. Collagen vascular diseases and the use of corticosteroids and cytotoxic drugs may be associated with the depression of cell-mediated immunity. The potential for opportunistic coccidioidomycosis should be noted when corticosteroids and cytotoxic drugs are used for treating collagen vascular disease in patients residing in or coming from areas where coccidioidomycosis is endemic. PMID:6842490

  19. Plasma β-amyloid in Alzheimer's disease and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Janelidze, Shorena; Stomrud, Erik; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Westen, Danielle; Jeromin, Andreas; Song, Linan; Hanlon, David; Tan Hehir, Cristina A; Baker, David; Blennow, Kaj; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of amyloid biomarkers in clinical practice would be accelerated if such biomarkers could be measured in blood. We analyzed plasma levels of Aβ42 and Aβ40 in a cohort of 719 individuals (the Swedish BioFINDER study), including patients with subjective cognitive decline (SCD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia and cognitively healthy elderly, using a ultrasensitive immunoassay (Simoa platform). There were weak positive correlations between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels for both Aβ42 and Aβ40, and negative correlations between plasma Aβ42 and neocortical amyloid deposition (measured with PET). Plasma levels of Aβ42 and Aβ40 were reduced in AD dementia compared with all other diagnostic groups. However, during the preclinical or prodromal AD stages (i.e. in amyloid positive controls, SCD and MCI) plasma concentration of Aβ42 was just moderately decreased whereas Aβ40 levels were unchanged. Higher plasma (but not CSF) levels of Aβ were associated with white matter lesions, cerebral microbleeds, hypertension, diabetes and ischemic heart disease. In summary, plasma Aβ is overtly decreased during the dementia stage of AD indicating that prominent changes in Aβ metabolism occur later in the periphery compared to the brain. Further, increased levels of Aβ in plasma are associated with vascular disease. PMID:27241045

  20. How to Prevent Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  1. Stereotactic microresection of small cerebral vascular malformations (SCVM).

    PubMed

    Lerch, K D; Schaefer, D; Palleske, H

    1994-01-01

    Between 1988-1993 we performed CT-stereotactic guided microsurgical resection as a one-session-procedure in 46 patients bearing small (< 30 mm) cerebral vascular malformations (SCVM). The location of the SCVM was deep subcortical in 38 patients, temporal medio- basal in 3 and brainstem in 5. The surgical technique intended to minimise invasiveness by reducing the operative approach to a size less than the diameter of the lesion concerned. The mean diameter of our SCVM's was 20 mm ranging from 10 to 30 mm. Histologically we found 23 arteriovenous malformations, 22 cavernous malformations and 1 capillary telangiectasia (capillary malformation). Clinical symptomatology consisted mainly of seizures, (progressive) neurological deficit and (minute) acute intracerebral bleeding. The SCVMs could be demonstrated by contrast-enhanced CT as well as by MRI. 15 of the AVM's revealed as angiographically occult. Complete microsurgical resection of the SCVM was accomplished in all cases with a surgical morbidity of 6.5% and no operative mortality. In 14 patients, most of them with initial acute intracerebral haemorrhage, the pronounced focal neurological deficit improved. During the follow-up period (1/2-5 years) no rebleeding occurred. As far as epileptic seizures were concerned 13 patients became seizure-free without anticonvulsants and 11 patients seizure-free with anticonvulsant, in the remaining 4 patients seizures were reduced in frequency. PMID:7725939

  2. Current pathophysiological concepts in cerebral small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Rincon, Fred; Wright, Clinton B.

    2014-01-01

    The association between cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) – in the form of white matter lesions, infarctions, and hemorrhages – with vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), has mostly been deduced from observational studies. Pathological conditions affecting the small vessels of the brain and leading to SVD have suggested plausible molecular mechanisms involved in vascular damage and their impact on brain function. However, much still needs to be clarified in understanding the pathophysiology of VCI, the role of neurodegenerative processes such as Alzheimer’s disease, and the impact of aging itself. In addition, both genetic predispositions and environmental exposures may potentiate the development of SVD and interact with normal aging to impact cognitive function and require further study. Advances in technology, in the analysis of genetic and epigenetic data, neuroimaging such as magnetic resonance imaging, and new biomarkers will help to clarify the complex factors leading to SVD and the expression of VCI. PMID:24715862

  3. Inflammatory Cytokines in Vascular Dysfunction and Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Alexander H.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2009-01-01

    The vascular inflammatory response involves complex interaction between inflammatory cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages), endothelial cells (ECs), vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and extracellular matrix (ECM). Vascular injury is associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules by ECs and recruitment of inflammatory cells, growth factors, and cytokines, with consequent effects on ECs, VSMCs and ECM. Cytokines include tumor necrosis factors, interleukins, lymphokines, monokines, interferons, colony stimulating factors, and transforming growth factors. Cytokines are produced by macrophages, T cells and monocytes, as well as platelets, ECs and VSMCs. Circulating cytokines interact with specific receptors on various cell types and activate JAK-STAT, NF-κB, and Smad signaling pathways leading to an inflammatory response involving cell adhesion, permeability and apoptosis. Cytokines also interact with mitochondria to increasie the production of reactive oxygen species. Cytokine-induced activation of these pathways in ECs modifies the production/activity of vasodilatory mediators such as nitric oxide, prostacyclin, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, and bradykinin, as well as vasoconstrictive mediators such as endothelin and angiotensin II. Cytokines interact with VSMCs to activate Ca2+, protein kinase C, Rho-Kinase, and MAPK pathways, which promote cell growth and migration, and VSM reactivity. Cytokines also interact with integrins and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and modify ECM composition. Persistent increases in cytokines are associated with vascular dysfunction and vascular disease such as atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm, varicose veins and hypertension. Genetic and pharmacological tools to decrease the production of cytokines or to diminish their effects using cytokine antagonists could provide new approaches in the management of inflammatory vascular disease. PMID:19413999

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea and vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Lanfranchi, Paola; Somers, Virend A

    2001-01-01

    There is emerging evidence linking obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to vascular disease, including hypertension. This relationship may be independent of co-morbidity, such as obesity. Even apparently healthy OSA patients have evidence of subtle functional vascular abnormalities that are known to occur in patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis. Untreated OSA may possibly contribute to the initiation and/or progression of pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in hypertension, heart failure, cardiac ischemia and stroke. This brief commentary will examine the evidence and mechanisms linking OSA to vascular disease. PMID:11737928

  5. Vascular diseases: aortitis, aortic aneurysms, and vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Ladich, Elena; Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Romero, Maria E; Virmani, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the aorta broadly include noninfectious and infectious aortitis, periaortitis, atherosclerosis, and inflammatory atherosclerotic aneurysms. Aortitis is uncommon but is increasingly recognized as an important cause of aortic aneurysms and dissections. Abdominal (AAA) and thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) have different pathologies and etiologies. AAAs are the most common type of aortic aneurysm, and the vast majority of these are atherosclerotic. The causes of TAA vary depending on the site of involvement, but medial degeneration is a common pathologic substrate, regardless of etiology, and genetic influences play a prominent role in TAA expression. Standardized classification schemes for inflammatory and degenerative diseases of the aorta have only recently been added to the pathology literature. A brief overview of the new histopathologic classifications for aortic inflammatory and degenerative diseases has recently been published by the Society for Cardiovascular Pathology and the Association for European Cardiovascular Pathology as a consensus document on the surgical pathology of the aorta. Vascular calcification is a highly regulated biologic process, and the mechanisms leading to vascular calcification are under investigation. Calcification may occur in the intima (atherosclerotic) or in the media secondary to metabolic disease. Rarely, vascular calcification may be associated with genetic disorders. PMID:27526100

  6. [Vascular diseases in CKD-MBD].

    PubMed

    Shioi, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Vascular calcification is an important component of CKD-MBD and occurs in association with vascular lesions of CKD-MBD such as atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. Atherosclerotic intimal calcification and medial calcification contribute to the development and progression of cardiovascular disease. Epidemiological data suggest that it is not atherothrombotic disease but myocardal disease including left ventricular hypertrophy with fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction which is the principal cause of cardiovascular death in CKD. Arteriosclerosis is characterized by thickening and calcification of the medial arterial layer. Medial calcification results in increased arterial stiffness and contributes to the development of myocardial disease. Therefore, it is important to develop novel therapeutics for medial calcification. PMID:27230844

  7. Cerebral Whipple's disease. Diagnosis by brain biopsy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L; Diamond, I

    1980-10-01

    Whipple's disease, a multisystem chronic granulomatous disease treatable by antibiotics, usually presents clinically with gastrointestinal or joint symptoms. Usually, the diagnosis is substantiated by small intestinal biopsy. This shows diastase-resistant periodic-acid-Schiff-(PAS)-positive inclusions in the cytoplasm of macrophages within the lamina propria. By electron microscopy, this PAS-positive material consists of 1.5 X 0.2-mum bacilli and fine fibrillar material within macrophage phagolysosomes. Rarely, Whipple's disease presents clinically as a primary neurologic disease without gastrointestinal symptoms. Because untreated cerebral Whipple's disease usually progresses rapidly to death, it is imperative to establish the diagnosis promptly. This report describes a case of cerebral Whipple's disease without gastrointestinal symptoms that was diagnosed early by light-and electron-microscopic study of brain biopsy material. PMID:6158859

  8. Vascular Function in Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hisatsugu; Washida, Kazuo; Kowa, Hisatomo; Kanda, Fumio; Toda, Tatsushi

    2016-08-01

    We investigated vascular functioning in patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of either Alzheimer's disease (AD) or vascular dementia (VaD) and examined a possible relationship between vascular function and cognitive status. Twenty-seven patients with AD, 23 patients with VaD, and 26 healthy control patients underwent measurements of flow-mediated dilation (FMD), ankle-brachial index (ABI), cardioankle vascular index (CAVI), and intima-media thickness (IMT). The FMD was significantly lower in patients with AD or VaD compared to controls. There were no significant differences in ABI, CAVI, or IMT among the 3 groups. A significant correlation was found between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and FMD. Furthermore, a multiple regression analysis revealed that FMD was significantly predicted by MMSE scores. These results suggest that endothelial involvement plays a role in AD pathogenesis, and FMD may be more sensitive than other surrogate methods (ABI, CAVI, and IMT) for detecting early-stage atherosclerosis and/or cognitive decline. PMID:27284205

  9. Structure and vascular function of MEKK3–cerebral cavernous malformations 2 complex

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Oriana S.; Deng, Hanqiang; Liu, Dou; Zhang, Ya; Wei, Rong; Deng, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Louvi, Angeliki; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.; Su, Bing

    2015-08-03

    Cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2) loss is associated with the familial form of CCM disease. The protein kinase MEKK3 (MAP3K3) is essential for embryonic angiogenesis in mice and interacts physically with CCM2, but how this interaction is mediated and its relevance to cerebral vasculature are unknown. Here we report that Mekk3 plays an intrinsic role in embryonic vascular development. Inducible endothelial Mekk3 knockout in neonatal mice is lethal due to multiple intracranial haemorrhages and brain blood vessels leakage. We discover direct interaction between CCM2 harmonin homology domain (HHD) and the N terminus of MEKK3, and determine a 2.35 Å cocrystal structure. We find Mekk3 deficiency impairs neurovascular integrity, which is partially dependent on Rho–ROCK signalling, and that disruption of MEKK3:CCM2 interaction leads to similar neurovascular leakage. We conclude that CCM2:MEKK3-mediated regulation of Rho signalling is required for maintenance of neurovascular integrity, unravelling a mechanism by which CCM2 loss leads to disease.

  10. Structure and vascular function of MEKK3-cerebral cavernous malformations 2 complex.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Oriana S; Deng, Hanqiang; Liu, Dou; Zhang, Ya; Wei, Rong; Deng, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Louvi, Angeliki; Turk, Benjamin E; Boggon, Titus J; Su, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2) loss is associated with the familial form of CCM disease. The protein kinase MEKK3 (MAP3K3) is essential for embryonic angiogenesis in mice and interacts physically with CCM2, but how this interaction is mediated and its relevance to cerebral vasculature are unknown. Here we report that Mekk3 plays an intrinsic role in embryonic vascular development. Inducible endothelial Mekk3 knockout in neonatal mice is lethal due to multiple intracranial haemorrhages and brain blood vessels leakage. We discover direct interaction between CCM2 harmonin homology domain (HHD) and the N terminus of MEKK3, and determine a 2.35 Å cocrystal structure. We find Mekk3 deficiency impairs neurovascular integrity, which is partially dependent on Rho-ROCK signalling, and that disruption of MEKK3:CCM2 interaction leads to similar neurovascular leakage. We conclude that CCM2:MEKK3-mediated regulation of Rho signalling is required for maintenance of neurovascular integrity, unravelling a mechanism by which CCM2 loss leads to disease. PMID:26235885

  11. Structure and vascular function of MEKK3–cerebral cavernous malformations 2 complex

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Oriana S.; Deng, Hanqiang; Liu, Dou; Zhang, Ya; Wei, Rong; Deng, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Louvi, Angeliki; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.; Su, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2) loss is associated with the familial form of CCM disease. The protein kinase MEKK3 (MAP3K3) is essential for embryonic angiogenesis in mice and interacts physically with CCM2, but how this interaction is mediated and its relevance to cerebral vasculature are unknown. Here we report that Mekk3 plays an intrinsic role in embryonic vascular development. Inducible endothelial Mekk3 knockout in neonatal mice is lethal due to multiple intracranial haemorrhages and brain blood vessels leakage. We discover direct interaction between CCM2 harmonin homology domain (HHD) and the N terminus of MEKK3, and determine a 2.35 Å cocrystal structure. We find Mekk3 deficiency impairs neurovascular integrity, which is partially dependent on Rho–ROCK signalling, and that disruption of MEKK3:CCM2 interaction leads to similar neurovascular leakage. We conclude that CCM2:MEKK3-mediated regulation of Rho signalling is required for maintenance of neurovascular integrity, unravelling a mechanism by which CCM2 loss leads to disease. PMID:26235885

  12. Noninvasive blood flow tests in vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, O. K.; Cole, C. W.

    1993-01-01

    Noninvasive testing is now routine for assessing vascular conditions. Many noninvasive tests are available for obtaining physiologic and anatomic information that is both precise and reproducible. This paper discusses noninvasive testing with plethysmography, Doppler ultrasonography, and duplex scanning for carotid artery occlusive disease, deep venous thrombosis, and peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8268746

  13. Tobacco and vascular disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tobacco use and exposure may cause an acceleration of coronary artery disease and peptic ulcer disease. It is also linked to reproductive disturbances, esophageal reflux, hypertension, fetal illness and death, and ...

  14. Is Vasomotion in Cerebral Arteries Impaired in Alzheimer’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Farkas, Eszter; Martin, Chris; Venneri, Annalena; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A substantial body of evidence supports the hypothesis of a vascular component in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Cerebral hypoperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction have been indicated as key elements of this pathway. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a cerebrovascular disorder, frequent in AD, characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in cerebral blood vessel walls. CAA is associated with loss of vascular integrity, resulting in impaired regulation of cerebral circulation, and increased susceptibility to cerebral ischemia, microhemorrhages, and white matter damage. Vasomotion— the spontaneous rhythmic modulation of arterial diameter, typically observed in arteries/arterioles in various vascular beds including the brain— is thought to participate in tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery regulation. Vasomotion is impaired in adverse conditions such as hypoperfusion and hypoxia. The perivascular and glymphatic pathways of Aβ clearance are thought to be driven by the systolic pulse. Vasomotion produces diameter changes of comparable amplitude, however at lower rates, and could contribute to these mechanisms of Aβ clearance. In spite of potential clinical interest, studies addressing cerebral vasomotion in the context of AD/CAA are limited. This study reviews the current literature on vasomotion, and hypothesizes potential paths implicating impaired cerebral vasomotion in AD/CAA. Aβ and oxidative stress cause vascular tone dysregulation through direct effects on vascular cells, and indirect effects mediated by impaired neurovascular coupling. Vascular tone dysregulation is further aggravated by cholinergic deficit and results in depressed cerebrovascular reactivity and (possibly) impaired vasomotion, aggravating regional hypoperfusion and promoting further Aβ and oxidative stress accumulation. PMID:25720414

  15. Nanoengineering of therapeutics for retinal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gahlaut, Nivriti; Suarez, Sandra; Uddin, Md Imam; Gordon, Andrew Y; Evans, Stephanie M; Jayagopal, Ashwath

    2015-09-01

    Retinal vascular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, neovascular age related macular degeneration, and retinal vein occlusion, are leading causes of blindness in the Western world. These diseases share several common disease mechanisms, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, hypoxia, and inflammation, which provide opportunities for common therapeutic strategies. Treatment of these diseases using laser therapy, anti-VEGF injections, and/or steroids has significantly improved clinical outcomes. However, these strategies do not address the underlying root causes of pathology, and may have deleterious side effects. Furthermore, many patients continue to progress toward legal blindness despite receiving regular therapy. Nanomedicine, the engineering of therapeutics at the 1-100 nm scale, is a promising approach for improving clinical management of retinal vascular diseases. Nanomedicine-based technologies have the potential to revolutionize the treatment of ophthalmology, through enabling sustained release of drugs over several months, reducing side effects due to specific targeting of dysfunctional cells, and interfacing with currently "undruggable" targets. We will discuss emerging nanomedicine-based applications for the treatment of complications associated with retinal vascular diseases, including angiogenesis and inflammation. PMID:26022642

  16. Semaphorin3A elevates vascular permeability and contributes to cerebral ischemia-induced brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sheng Tao; Nilchi, Ladan; Li, Xuesheng; Gangaraju, Sandhya; Jiang, Susan X.; Aylsworth, Amy; Monette, Robert; Slinn, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) increased significantly in mouse brain following cerebral ischemia. However, the role of Sema3A in stroke brain remains unknown. Our aim was to determine wether Sema3A functions as a vascular permeability factor and contributes to ischemic brain damage. Recombinant Sema3A injected intradermally to mouse skin, or stereotactically into the cerebral cortex, caused dose- and time-dependent increases in vascular permeability, with a degree comparable to that caused by injection of a known vascular permeability factor vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGF). Application of Sema3A to cultured endothelial cells caused disorganization of F-actin stress fibre bundles and increased endothelial monolayer permeability, confirming Sema3A as a permeability factor. Sema3A-mediated F-actin changes in endothelial cells were through binding to the neuropilin2/VEGFR1 receptor complex, which in turn directly activates Mical2, a F-actin modulator. Down-regulation of Mical2, using specific siRNA, alleviated Sema3A-induced F-actin disorganization, cellular morphology changes and endothelial permeability. Importantly, ablation of Sema3A expression, cerebrovascular permeability and brain damage were significantly reduced in response to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) and in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia/haemorrhagic transformation. Together, these studies demonstrated that Sema3A is a key mediator of cerebrovascular permeability and contributes to brain damage caused by cerebral ischemia. PMID:25601765

  17. Markers of cerebral small vessel disease and severity of depression in the general population.

    PubMed

    Direk, Nese; Perez, Heidi Saavedra; Akoudad, Saloua; Verhaaren, Benjamin F J; Niessen, Wiro J; Hofman, Albert; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M Arfan; Tiemeier, Henning

    2016-07-30

    The vascular depression hypothesis postulates that cerebral small vessel disease can cause or exacerbate depression in elderly persons. Numerous studies explored the association of imaging markers of cerebral small vessel disease including white matter lesions (WMLs) and lacunar infarcts with depressive symptoms or disorders. However, cerebral microbleeds have not been tested in depression. In the current study, we aimed to explore the association of WMLs, lacunar infarcts and cerebral microbleeds with depression continuum in a large population-based sample, the Rotterdam Study. Study population consisted of 3799 participants (aged 45 or over) free of dementia. WML volumes, lacunar infarcts and cerebral microbleeds were measured with brain magnetic resonance imaging. Depressive symptoms, depressive disorders and co-morbid anxiety disorders were assessed with validated questionnaires and clinical interview. WML volumes and lacunar infarcts were associated with depressive symptoms and disorders. Cerebral microbleeds, especially in deep or infratentorial brain regions, were related to depressive disorders only. Our results indicate that WMLs and lacunar infarcts might be non-specific vascular lesions seen in depressive symptoms and disorders. Association of cerebral microbleeds with more severe forms of depression may indicate impaired brain iron homeostasis or minor episodes of cerebrovascular extraversion, which may play a role in depression etiology. PMID:27254084

  18. Serelaxin: A Novel Therapeutic for Vascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Leo, Chen Huei; Jelinic, Maria; Ng, Hooi Hooi; Tare, Marianne; Parry, Laura J

    2016-06-01

    Vascular dysfunction is an important hallmark of cardiovascular disease. It is characterized by increased sensitivity to vasoconstrictors, decreases in the endothelium-derived vasodilators nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin (PGI2), and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH). Serelaxin (recombinant human relaxin) has gained considerable attention as a new vasoactive drug, largely through its beneficial therapeutic effects in acute heart failure. In this review we first describe the contribution of endogenous relaxin to vascular homeostasis. We then provide a comprehensive overview of the novel mechanisms of serelaxin action in blood vessels that differentiate it from other vasodilator drugs and explain how this peptide could be used more widely as a therapeutic to alleviate vascular dysfunction in several cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27130518

  19. Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in patients of Dutch origin is related to Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    van Duinen, S.G.; Castano, E.M.; Prelli, F.; Bots, G.T.A.B.; Luyendijk, W.; Frangione, B.

    1987-08-01

    Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in Dutch patients is an autosomal dominant form of vascular amyloidosis restricted to the leptomeninges and cerebral cortex. Clinically the disease is characterized by cerebral hemorrhages leading to an early death. Immunohistochemical studies of five patients revealed that the vascular amyloid deposits reacted intensely with an antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide homologous to the Alzheimer disease-related ..beta..-protein. Silver stain-positive, senile plaque-like structures were also labeled by the antiserum, yet these lesions lacked the dense amyloid cores present in typical plaques of Alzheimer disease. No neurofibrillary tangles were present. Amyloid fibrils were purified from the leptomeningeal vessels of one patient who clinically had no signs of dementia. The protein had a molecular weight of approx. 4000 and its partial amino acid sequence to position 21 showed homology to the ..beta..-protein of Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome. These results suggest that hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of Dutch origin is pathogenetically related to Alzheimer disease and support the concept that the initial amyloid deposition in this disorder occurs in the vessel walls before damaging the brain parenchyma. Thus, deposition of ..beta..-protein in brain tissue seems to be related to a spectrum of diseases involving vascular syndromes, progressive dementia, or both.

  20. Inhibition of cerebral vascular inflammation by brain endothelium-targeted oligodeoxynucleotide complex.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Al-Waili, Daniah; Hassan, Aishlin; Fan, Guo-Chang; Xin, Mei; Hao, Jiukuan

    2016-08-01

    The present study generated a novel DNA complex to specifically target endothelial NF-κB to inhibit cerebral vascular inflammation. This DNA complex (GS24-NFκB) contains a DNA decoy which inhibits NF-κB activity, and a DNA aptamer (GS-24), a ligand of transferrin receptor (TfR), which allows for targeted delivery of the DNA decoy into cells. The results indicate that GS24-NFκB was successfully delivered into a murine brain-derived endothelial cell line, bEND5, and inhibited inflammatory responses induced by tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) or oxygen-glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R) via down-regulation of the nuclear NF-κB subunit, p65, as well as its downstream inflammatory cytokines, inter-cellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1). The inhibitory effect of the GS24-NFκB was demonstrated by a significant reduction in TNF-α or OGD/R induced monocyte adhesion to the bEND5 cells after GS24-NFκB treatment. Intravenous (i.v.) injection of GS24-'NFκB (15mg/kg) was able to inhibit the levels of phoseph-p65 and VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells in a mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory model in vivo. In conclusion, our approach using DNA nanotechnology for DNA decoy delivery could potentially be utilized for inhibition of inflammation in ischemic stroke and other neuro-inflammatory diseases affecting cerebral vasculature. PMID:27132231

  1. Cerebral Hemodynamics and Vascular Reactivity in Mild and Severe Ischemic Rodent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jeongeun; Jo, Areum; Kang, Bok-Man; Lee, Sohee; Bang, Oh Young; Heo, Chaejeong; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Lee, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia can cause decreased cerebral neurovascular coupling, leading to a failure in the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow. This study aims to investigate the effect of varying degrees of ischemia on cerebral hemodynamic reactivity using in vivo real-time optical imaging. We utilized direct cortical stimulation to elicit hyper-excitable neuronal activation, which leads to induced hemodynamic changes in both the normal and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) ischemic stroke groups. Hemodynamic measurements from optical imaging accurately predict the severity of occlusion in mild and severe MCAO animals. There is neither an increase in cerebral blood volume nor in vessel reactivity in the ipsilateral hemisphere (I.H) of animals with severe MCAO. The pial artery in the contralateral hemisphere (C.H) of the severe MCAO group reacted more slowly than both hemispheres in the normal and mild MCAO groups. In addition, the arterial reactivity of the I.H in the mild MCAO animals was faster than the normal animals. Furthermore, artery reactivity is tightly correlated with histological and behavioral results in the MCAO ischemic group. Thus, in vivo optical imaging may offer a simple and useful tool to assess the degree of ischemia and to understand how cerebral hemodynamics and vascular reactivity are affected by ischemia. PMID:27358581

  2. Pain management in patients with vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Seretny, M; Colvin, L A

    2016-09-01

    Vascular disease covers a wide range of conditions, including arterial, venous, and lymphatic disorders, with many of these being more common in the elderly. As the population ages, the incidence of vascular disease will increase, with a consequent increase in the requirement to manage both acute and chronic pain in this patient population. Pain management can be complex, as there are often multiple co-morbidities to be considered. An understanding of the underlying pain mechanisms is helpful in the logical direction of treatment, particularly in chronic pain states, such as phantom limb pain or complex regional pain syndrome. Acute pain management for vascular surgery presents a number of challenges, including coexisting anticoagulant medication, that may preclude the use of regional techniques. Within the limited evidence base, there is a suggestion that epidural analgesia provides better pain relief and reduced respiratory complications after major vascular surgery. For carotid endarterectomy, there is again some evidence supporting the use of local anaesthetic analgesia, either by infiltration or by superficial cervical plexus block. Chronic pain in vascular disease includes post-amputation pain, for which well-known risk factors include high pain levels before amputation and in the immediate postoperative period, emphasizing the importance of good pain control in the perioperative period. Complex regional pain syndrome is another challenging chronic pain syndrome with a wide variety of treatment options available, with the strongest evidence being for physical therapies. Further research is required to gain a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in pain associated with vascular disease and the best analgesic approaches to manage it. PMID:27566812

  3. Vascular Growth in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Anja Bondke; Buschmann, Ivo R.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular growth forms the first functional organ system during development, and continues into adult life, wherein it is often associated with disease states. Genetically determined vasculogenesis produces a primary vascular plexus during ontogenesis. Angiogenesis, occurring, e.g., in response to metabolic stress within hypoxic tissues, enhances tissue capillarization. Arteriogenesis denotes the adaptive outgrowth of pre-existent collateral arteries to bypass arterial stenoses in response to hemodynamic changes. It has been debated whether vasculogenesis occurs in the adult, and whether or not circulating progenitor cells structurally contribute to vessel regeneration. Secondly, the major determinants of vascular growth – genetic predisposition, metabolic factors (hypoxia), and hemodynamics – cannot be assigned in a mutually exclusive fashion to vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, and arteriogenesis, respectively; rather, mechanisms overlap. Lastly, all three mechanisms of vessel growth seem to contribute to physiological embryogenesis as well as adult adaptive vascularization as occurs in tumors or to circumvent arterial stenosis. Thus, much conceptual and terminological confusion has been created, while therapies targeting neovascularization have yielded promising results in the lab, but failed randomized studies when taken to the bedside. Therefore, this review article aims at providing an exact definition of the mechanisms of vascular growth and their contribution to embryonic development as well as adult adaptive revascularization. We have been looking for potential reasons for why clinical trials have failed, how vitally the application of appropriate methods of measuring and assessment influences study outcomes, and how relevant, e.g., results gained in models of vascular occlusive disease may be for antineoplastic strategies, advocating a reverse bedside-to-bench approach, which may hopefully yield successful approaches to therapeutically targeting vascular

  4. Mitochondria in vascular health and disease.

    PubMed

    Dromparis, Peter; Michelakis, Evangelos D

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryote's mitochondrial network is perhaps the cell's most sophisticated and dynamic responsive sensing system. Integrating metabolic, oxygen, or danger signals with inputs from other organelles, as well as local and systemic signals, mitochondria have a profound impact on vascular function in both health and disease. This review highlights recently discovered aspects of mitochondrial function (oxygen sensing, inflammation, autophagy, and apoptosis) and discusses their role in diseases of both systemic and pulmonary vessels. We also emphasize the role of mitochondria as therapeutic targets for vascular disease. We highlight the intriguing similarities of mitochondria-driven molecular mechanisms in terms of both pathogenesis and therapies in very diverse diseases, such as atherosclerosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cancer, to support the foundation of a new field in medicine: mitochondrial medicine. PMID:23157555

  5. Study of the Dynamics of Transcephalic Cerebral Impedance Data during Cardio-Vascular Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atefi, S. R.; Seoane, F.; Lindecrantz, K.

    2013-04-01

    Postoperative neurological deficits are one of the risks associated with cardio vascular surgery, necessitating development of new techniques for cerebral monitoring. In this study an experimental observation regarding the dynamics of transcephalic Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with and without extracorporeal circulation (ECC) was conducted to investigate the potential use of electrical Bioimpedance for cerebral monitoring in cardio vascular surgery. Tetrapolar transcephalic EBI measurements at single frequency of 50 kHz were recorded prior to and during cardio vascular surgery. The obtained results show that the transcephalic impedance decreases in both groups of patients as operation starts, however slight differences in these two groups were also observed with the cerebral impedance reduction in patients having no ECC being less common and not as pronounced as in the ECC group. Changes in the cerebral impedance were in agreement with changes of haematocrit and temperature. The origin of EBI changes is still unexplained however these results encourage us to continue investigating the application of electrical bioimpedance cerebral monitoring clinically.

  6. [Novel mechanism for retinal vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Suzuma, Kiyoshi

    2015-03-01

    I. A new therapeutic target for diabetic retinopathy. Recent reports state that succinate may be an independent retinal angiogenic factor. We evaluated concentrations in vitreous from proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), and found that succinate increased significantly in PDR. Interestingly, levels of succinate from bevacizumab-pre-injected PDR were normal, suggesting that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) had a positive feedback mechanism for succinate since succinate was previously reported to induce VEGF. II. A new understanding of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). We evaluated retinal blood flow velocity with laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG) made in Japan, and found that cases in which both macular edema and retinal blood flow velocity improved after anti-VEGF therapy had better prognosis. In ischemic CRVO at final visit, mean retinal blood velocity was less than 50% of fellow eyes after 1st anti-VEGF therapy, suggesting that those cases might have poor prognosis. LSFG is useful for evaluation and decision in CRVO treatment. III. From exploration for mechanism in retinal vascular diseases to re-vascularization therapy. The standard treatment for retinal non-perfusion area is scatter laser photocoagulation, which is both invasive of the peripheral retina and may prove destructive. Re-vascularization is an ideal strategy for treatment of retinal non-perfusion area. To develop a new methods for re-vascularization in retinal non-perfusion area, we have designed experiments using a retina without vasculature differentiated from induced pluripotent stem(iPS) cells. PMID:25854111

  7. [Cerebral hemodynamics and statokinetic functions in patients with vertebral basilar vascular insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Butko, D Iu

    2004-01-01

    One hundred and forty-eight patients, aged 29-59 years, with vertebral basilar vascular insufficiency were studied before, during and after betaserc treatment in a dose 48 mg/day during 3 weeks. Along with neurological examination, cerebral dopplerography and computer stabilography methods were used. The main clinical appearances of cerebrovascular pathology of vertebrobasilar system were as follows: vertigo (93.2%), asthenia syndrome (91.2%), autonomic vascular disorders (63.5%) and stato-coordinative disturbances, the latter were represented primarily by disturbances of equilibrium system functions (83.8%). Cerebral dopplerography and computer stabilography were found to be reliable methods for patients with chronic insufficiency of cerebral blood circulation in vertebral basilar area. Drug betaserc (betahystine hydrochloride) effectively stops statokinetic disturbances in patients with discirculatory encelopathy in vertebral basilar area. PMID:15847325

  8. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  9. Mesoglycan: Clinical Evidences for Use in Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tufano, Antonella; Arturo, Claudia; Cimino, Ernesto; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Di Capua, Mirko; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Vascular glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are essential components of the endothelium and vessel wall and have been shown to be involved in several biologic functions. Mesoglycan, a natural GAG preparation, is a polysaccharide complex rich in sulphur radicals with strong negative electric charge. It is extracted from porcine intestinal mucosa and is composed of heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, electrophoretically slow-moving heparin, and variable and minimal quantities of chondroitin sulfate. Data on antithrombotic and profibrinolytic activities of the drug show that mesoglycan, although not indicated in the treatment of acute arterial or venous thrombosis because of the low antithrombotic effect, may be useful in the management of vascular diseases, when combined with antithrombotics in the case of disease of cerebral vasculature, and with antithrombotics and vasodilator drugs in the case of chronic peripheral arterial disease. The protective effect of mesoglycan in patients with venous thrombosis and the absence of side effects, support the use of GAG in patients with chronic venous insufficiency and persistent venous ulcers, in association with compression therapy (zinc bandages, multiple layer bandages, etc.), elastic compression stockings, and local care, and in the prevention of recurrences in patients with previous DVT following the standard course of oral anticoagulation treatment. PMID:21152191

  10. Correlation of CT cerebral vascular territories with function. 3. Middle cerebral artery

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.A.; Hayman, L.A.; Hinck, V.C.

    1984-05-01

    Schematic displays are presented of the cerebral territories supplied by branches of the middle cerebral artery as they would appear on axial and coronal computed tomographic (CT) scan sections. Companion diagrams of regional cortical function and a discussion of the fiber tracts are provided to simplify correlation of clinical deficits with coronal and axial CT abnormalities.

  11. Cerebral vascular effects of loading dose of dexmedetomidine: A Transcranial Color Doppler study

    PubMed Central

    Arulvelan, Appavoo; Manikandan, Sethuraman; Easwer, Hari Venkat; Krishnakumar, Kesavapisharady

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dexmedetomidine has been widely used in critical care settings because of its property of maintaining stable hemodynamics and inducing conscious sedation. The use of dexmedetomidine is in increasing trend particularly in patients with neurological disorders. Very few studies have focused on the cerebral hemodynamic effects of dexmedetomidine. This study is aimed to address this issue. Methods: Thirty patients without any intracranial pathology were included in this study. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity obtained from transcranial color Doppler was used to assess the cerebral hemodynamic indices. Mean flow velocity (mFV), pulsatility index (PI), cerebral vascular resistant index (CVRi), estimated cerebral perfusion pressure (eCPP), and zero flow pressure (ZFP) were calculated bilaterally at baseline and after infusion of injection Dexmedetomidine 1 mcg/Kg over 10 min. Results: Twenty-six patients completed the study protocol. After administration of loading dose of dexmedetomidine, mFV and eCPP values were significantly decreased in both hemispheres (P < 0.05); PI, CVRi, and ZFP values showed significant increase (P < 0.05) after dexmedetomidine infusion. Conclusion: Increase in PI, CVRi, and ZFP suggests that there is a possibility of an increase in distal cerebral vascular resistance (CVR) with loading dose of dexmedetomidine. Decrease in mFV and eCPP along with an increase in CVR may lead to a decrease in cerebral perfusion. This effect can be exaggerated in patients with preexisting neurological illness. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of dexmedetomidine on various other pathological conditions involving brain like traumatic brain injury and vascular malformations. PMID:26955211

  12. A rare combination of atypical cerebral vascular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Koleilat, Issam; Eidt, John

    2015-10-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with neurologic deficits consistent with a cerebrovascular accident. Her workup demonstrated the simultaneous occurrence of three uncommon cerebrovascular congenital anomalies in a single patient: (1) persistent trigeminal artery, (2) persistent fetal origin of the posterior cerebral artery and (3) bilateral occurrence of the vertebral arteries terminating in the posterior inferior cerebellar arteries. These persistent fetal cerebrovascular anatomic variants are reviewed and the clinical relevance discussed. PMID:25414171

  13. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, vascular tone and autoregulation of cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Brayden, Joseph E; Earley, Scott; Nelson, Mark T; Reading, Stacey

    2008-09-01

    Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily are present in vascular smooth muscle cells and play important roles in the regulation of vascular contractility. The TRPC3 and TRPC6 channels are activated by stimulation of several excitatory receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells. Activation of these channels leads to myocyte depolarization, which stimulates Ca2+ entry via voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCC), leading to vasoconstriction. The TRPV4 channels in arterial myocytes are activated by epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, and activation of the channels enhances Ca2+ spark and transient Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel activity, thereby hyperpolarizing and relaxing vascular smooth muscle cells. The TRPC6 and TRPM4 channels are activated by mechanical stimulation of cerebral artery myocytes. Subsequent depolarization and activation of VDCC Ca2+ entry is directly linked to the development of myogenic tone in vitro and to autoregulation of cerebral blood flow in vivo. These findings imply a fundamental importance of TRP channels in the regulation of vascular smooth muscle tone and suggest that TRP channels could be important targets for drug therapy under conditions in which vascular contractility is disturbed (e.g. hypertension, stroke, vasospasm). PMID:18215190

  14. [Wounds in vascular and metabolic diseases].

    PubMed

    Leskovec, Nada Kecelj; Huljev, Dubravko; Matoh, Marijetka

    2012-10-01

    There are many causes of leg ulcer development; however, vascular etiology is most commonly involved. Venous or lymphatic causes underlay 80% and arterial or arteriovenous causes 20%-25% of cases. Over years, the prevalence of arteriovenous ulcers has increased due to the increased prevalence of peripheral arterial disease. Concerning metabolic reasons, diabetes is the most common underlying disease leading to ulcer formation, whereas calciphylaxis is a very rare one. In addition to the general principles of local ulcer therapy, additional therapy treating the cause of ulcer is necessary. Therapy of leg ulcers is manly interdisciplinary and should include a dermatologist, surgeon, internal medicine specialist, radiologist, general practitioner. PMID:23193829

  15. Vascular amyloidosis impairs the gliovascular unit in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kimbrough, Ian F; Robel, Stefanie; Roberson, Erik D; Sontheimer, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Reduced cerebral blood flow impairs cognitive function and ultimately causes irreparable damage to brain tissue. The gliovascular unit, composed of neural and vascular cells, assures sufficient blood supply to active brain regions. Astrocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells, and pericytes are important players within the gliovascular unit modulating vessel diameters. While the importance of the gliovascular unit and the signals involved in regulating local blood flow to match neuronal activity is now well recognized, surprisingly little is known about this interface in disease. Alzheimer's disease is associated with reduced cerebral blood flow. Here, we studied how the gliovascular unit is affected in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, using a combination of ex vivo and in vivo imaging approaches. We specifically labelled vascular amyloid in living mice using the dye methoxy-XO4. We elicited vessel responses ex vivo using either pharmacological stimuli or cell-specific calcium uncaging in vascular smooth muscle cells or astrocytes. Multi-photon in vivo imaging through a cranial window allowed us to complement our ex vivo data in the presence of blood flow after label-free optical activation of vascular smooth muscle cells in the intact brain. We found that vascular amyloid deposits separated astrocyte end-feet from the endothelial vessel wall. High-resolution 3D images demonstrated that vascular amyloid developed in ring-like structures around the vessel circumference, essentially forming a rigid cast. Where vascular amyloid was present, stimulation of astrocytes or vascular smooth muscle cells via ex vivo Ca(2+) uncaging or in vivo optical activation produced only poor vascular responses. Strikingly, vessel segments that were unaffected by vascular amyloid responded to the same extent as vessels from age-matched control animals. We conclude that while astrocytes can still release vasoactive substances, vascular amyloid deposits render blood vessels rigid and

  16. The Association of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Cerebral Gray Matter Volume Is Independent of Retinal Vascular Architecture and Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Moran, C.; Tapp, R. J.; Hughes, A. D.; Magnussen, C. G.; Blizzard, L.; Phan, T. G.; Beare, R.; Witt, N.; Venn, A.; Münch, G.; Amaratunge, B. C.; Srikanth, V.

    2016-01-01

    It is uncertain whether small vessel disease underlies the relationship between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and brain atrophy. We aimed to study whether retinal vascular architecture, as a proxy for cerebral small vessel disease, may modify or mediate the associations of T2DM with brain volumes. In this cross-sectional study using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans and retinal photographs in 451 people with and without T2DM, we measured brain volumes, geometric measures of retinal vascular architecture, clinical retinopathy, and MRI cerebrovascular lesions. There were 270 people with (mean age 67.3 years) and 181 without T2DM (mean age 72.9 years). T2DM was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.008). T2DM was associated with greater arteriolar diameter (p = 0.03) and optimality ratio (p = 0.04), but these associations were attenuated by adjustments for age and sex. Only optimality ratio was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.03). The inclusion of retinal measures in regression models did not attenuate the association of T2DM with gray matter volume. The association of T2DM with lower gray matter volume was independent of retinal vascular architecture and clinical retinopathy. Retinal vascular measures or retinopathy may not be sufficiently sensitive to confirm a microvascular basis for T2DM-related brain atrophy. PMID:27314049

  17. The Association of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Cerebral Gray Matter Volume Is Independent of Retinal Vascular Architecture and Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Moran, C; Tapp, R J; Hughes, A D; Magnussen, C G; Blizzard, L; Phan, T G; Beare, R; Witt, N; Venn, A; Münch, G; Amaratunge, B C; Srikanth, V

    2016-01-01

    It is uncertain whether small vessel disease underlies the relationship between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and brain atrophy. We aimed to study whether retinal vascular architecture, as a proxy for cerebral small vessel disease, may modify or mediate the associations of T2DM with brain volumes. In this cross-sectional study using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans and retinal photographs in 451 people with and without T2DM, we measured brain volumes, geometric measures of retinal vascular architecture, clinical retinopathy, and MRI cerebrovascular lesions. There were 270 people with (mean age 67.3 years) and 181 without T2DM (mean age 72.9 years). T2DM was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.008). T2DM was associated with greater arteriolar diameter (p = 0.03) and optimality ratio (p = 0.04), but these associations were attenuated by adjustments for age and sex. Only optimality ratio was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.03). The inclusion of retinal measures in regression models did not attenuate the association of T2DM with gray matter volume. The association of T2DM with lower gray matter volume was independent of retinal vascular architecture and clinical retinopathy. Retinal vascular measures or retinopathy may not be sufficiently sensitive to confirm a microvascular basis for T2DM-related brain atrophy. PMID:27314049

  18. Influence of Vascular Variant of the Posterior Cerebral Artery (PCA) on Cerebral Blood Flow, Vascular Response to CO2 and Static Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Emmert, Kirsten; Zöller, Daniela; Preti, Maria Giulia; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; Haller, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The fetal origin of the posterior cerebral artery (fPCA) is a frequent vascular variant in 11–29% of the population. For the fPCA, blood flow in the PCA originates from the anterior instead of the posterior circulation. We tested whether this blood supply variant impacts the cerebral blood flow assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL), cerebrovascular reserve as well as resting-state static functional connectivity (sFC) in the sense of a systematic confound. Methods The study included 385 healthy, elderly subjects (mean age: 74.18 years [range: 68.9–90.4]; 243 female). Participants were classified into normal vascular supply (n = 296, 76.88%), right fetal origin (n = 23, 5.97%), left fetal origin (n = 16, 4.16%), bilateral fetal origin (n = 4, 1.04%), and intermediate (n = 46, 11.95%, excluded from further analysis) groups. ASL-derived relative cerebral blood flow (relCBF) maps and cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) maps derived from a CO2 challenge with blocks of 7% CO2 were compared. Additionally, sFC between 90 regions of interest (ROIs) was compared between the groups. Results CVR was significantly reduced in subjects with ipsilateral fPCA, most prominently in the temporal lobe. ASL yielded a non-significant trend towards reduced relCBF in bilateral posterior watershed areas. In contrast, conventional atlas-based sFC did not differ between groups. Conclusions In conclusion, fPCA presence may bias the assessment of cerebrovascular reserve by reducing the response to CO2. In contrast, its effect on ASL-assessed baseline perfusion was marginal. Moreover, fPCA presence did not systematically impact resting-state sFC. Taken together, this data implies that perfusion variables should take into account the vascularization patterns. PMID:27532633

  19. TNF-α induces phenotypic modulation in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for cerebral aneurysm pathology.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad S; Starke, Robert M; Jabbour, Pascal M; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Owens, Gary K; Koch, Walter J; Greig, Nigel H; Dumont, Aaron S

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic modulation in the cerebral circulation or pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) has been associated with aneurysms, but potential mechanisms are unclear. Cultured rat cerebral SMCs overexpressing myocardin induced expression of key SMC contractile genes (SM-α-actin, SM-22α, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain), while dominant-negative cells suppressed expression. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment inhibited this contractile phenotype and induced pro-inflammatory/matrix-remodeling genes (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, matrix metalloproteinase-3, matrix metalloproteinase-9, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-1 beta). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased expression of KLF4, a known regulator of SMC differentiation. Kruppel-like transcription factor 4 (KLF4) small interfering RNA abrogated TNF-α activation of inflammatory genes and suppression of contractile genes. These mechanisms were confirmed in vivo after exposure of rat carotid arteries to TNF-α and early on in a model of cerebral aneurysm formation. Treatment with the synthesized TNF-α inhibitor 3,6-dithiothalidomide reversed pathologic vessel wall alterations after induced hypertension and hemodynamic stress. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in vivo and in vitro demonstrated that TNF-α promotes epigenetic changes through KLF4-dependent alterations in promoter regions of myocardin, SMCs, and inflammatory genes. In conclusion, TNF-α induces phenotypic modulation of cerebral SMCs through myocardin and KLF4-regulated pathways. These results demonstrate a novel role for TNF-α in promoting a pro-inflammatory/matrix-remodeling phenotype, which has important implications for the mechanisms behind intracranial aneurysm formation. PMID:23860374

  20. Small white matter lesion detection in cerebral small vessel disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoorian, Mohsen; Karssemeijer, Nico; van Uden, Inge; de Leeuw, Frank E.; Heskes, Tom; Marchiori, Elena; Platel, Bram

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common finding on magnetic resonance images of elderly people. White matter lesions (WML) are important markers for not only the small vessel disease, but also neuro-degenerative diseases including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Volumetric measurements such as the "total lesion load", have been studied and related to these diseases. With respect to SVD we conjecture that small lesions are important, as they have been observed to grow over time and they form the majority of lesions in number. To study these small lesions they need to be annotated, which is a complex and time-consuming task. Existing (semi) automatic methods have been aimed at volumetric measurements and large lesions, and are not suitable for the detection of small lesions. In this research we established a supervised voxel classification CAD system, optimized and trained to exclusively detect small WMLs. To achieve this, several preprocessing steps were taken, which included a robust standardization of subject intensities to reduce inter-subject intensity variability as much as possible. A number of features that were found to be well identifying small lesions were calculated including multimodal intensities, tissue probabilities, several features for accurate location description, a number of second order derivative features as well as multi-scale annular filter for blobness detection. Only small lesions were used to learn the target concept via Adaboost using random forests as its basic classifiers. Finally the results were evaluated using Free-response receiver operating characteristic.

  1. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2016-08-01

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit. PMID:26122324

  2. Determination of Vascular Reactivity of Middle Cerebral Arteries from Stroke and Spinal Cord Injury Animal Models Using Pressure Myography.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Mohammad A; Eid, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    Stroke and other neurovascular derangements are main causes of global death. They, along with spinal cord injuries, are responsible for being the principal cause of disability due to neurological and cognitive problems. These problems then lead to a burden on scarce financial resources and societal care facilities as well as have a profound effect on patients' families. The mechanism of action in these debilitating diseases is complex and unclear. An important component of these problems arises from derangement of blood vessels, such as blockage due to clotting/embolism, endothelial dysfunction, and overreactivity to contractile agents, as well as alteration in endothelial permeability. Moreover, the cerebro-vasculature (large vessels and arterioles) is involved in regulating blood flow by facilitating auto-regulatory processes. Moreover, the anterior (middle cerebral artery and the surrounding region) and posterior (basilar artery and its immediate locality) regions of the brain play a significant role in triggering the pathological progression of ischemic stroke particularly due to inflammatory activity and oxidative stress. Interestingly, modifiable and non-modifiable cardiovascular risk factors are responsible for driving ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and spinal cord injury. There are different stroke animal models to examine the pathophysiology of middle cerebral and basilar arteries. In this context, arterial myography offers an opportunity to determine the etiology of vascular dysfunction in these diseases. Herein, we describe the technique of pressure myography to examine the reactivity of cerebral vessels to contractile and vasodilator agents and a prelude to stroke and spinal cord injury. PMID:27604741

  3. Occludin is overexpressed in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Romanitan, Mihaela Oana; Popescu, Bogdan O; Winblad, Bengt; Bajenaru, Ovidiu Alexandru; Bogdanovic, Nenad

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The tight junctions (TJs) are key players in the control of blood-brain barrier (BBB) properties, the most complex TJs in the vascular system being found in the endothelial cells of brain capillaries. One of the main TJs proteins is occludin, which anchors plasma membranes of neighbour cells and is present in large amounts in the brain endothelia. Previous studies demonstrated that disruption of BBB in various pathological situations associates with changes in occludin expression, and this change could be responsible for malfunction of BBB. Therefore in this study, applying an immunohistochemical approach, we decided to explore the occludin expression in frontal cortex (FC) and basal ganglia in ageing control, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VD) brains, as far as all these pathologies associate microangiopathy and disruption of BBB. Strikingly, we found selected neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes expressing occludin, in all cases studied. To estimate the number of occludin-expressing neurons, we applied a stereological approach with random systematic sampling and the unbiased optical fractionator method. We report here a significant increase in ratio of occludin-expressing neurons in FC and basal ganglia regions in both AD and VD as compared to ageing controls. Within the cerebral cortex, occludin was selectively expressed by pyramidal neurons, which are the ones responsible for cognitive processes and affected by AD pathology. Our findings could be important in unravelling new pathogenic pathways in dementia disorders and new functions of occludin and TJs. PMID:17635647

  4. Development affects in vitro vascular tone and calcium sensitivity in ovine cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Greg G; Osol, George J; Longo, Lawrence D

    2004-01-01

    We have shown recently that development from neonatal to adult life affects cerebrovascular tone of mouse cerebral arteries through endothelium-derived vasodilatory mechanisms. The current study tested the hypothesis that development from fetal to adult life affects cerebral artery vascular smooth muscle (VSM) [Ca2+]i sensitivity and tone through a mechanism partially dependent upon endothelium-dependent signalling. In pressurized resistance sized cerebral arteries (∼150 μm) from preterm (95 ± 2 days gestation (95 d)) and near-term (140 ± 2 days gestation (140 d)) fetuses, and non-pregnant adults, we measured vascular diameter (μm) and [Ca2+]i (nm) as a function of intravascular pressure. We repeated these studies in the presence of inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS; with l-NAME), cyclo-oxygenase (COX; with indomethacin) and endothelium removal (E–). Cerebrovasculature tone (E+) was greater in arteries from 95 d fetuses and adults compared to 140 d sheep. Ca2+ sensitivity was similar in 95 d fetuses and adults, but much lower in 140 d fetuses. Removal of endothelium resulted in a reduction in lumen diameter as a function of pressure (greater tone) in all treatment groups. [Ca2+]i sensitivity differences among groups were magnified after E–. NOS inhibition decreased diameter as a function of pressure in each age group, with a significant increase in [Ca2+]i to pressure ratio only in the 140 d fetuses. Indomethacin increased tone and increased [Ca2+]i in the 140 d fetuses, but not the other age groups. Development from near-term to adulthood uncovered an interaction between NOS- and COX-sensitive substances that functioned to modulate artery diameter but not [Ca2+]i. This study suggests that development is associated with significant alterations in cerebral vascular smooth muscle (VSM), endothelium, NOS and COX responses to intravascular pressure. We speculate that these changes have important implications in the regulation of cerebral blood flow in

  5. Atherosclerotic vascular disease in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Matthew H.; Mandl, Lisa A.; Costenbader, Karen; Fox, Ervin; Karlson, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    In the United States, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disproportionately affects African Americans. It has become a chronic disease with long-term morbidity including chronic renal disease, osteoporosis, cataracts, psychosocial impairment, and importantly, atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD). The latter (myocardial infarction, angina, peripheral vascular disease and stroke) are strikingly accelerated, occurring in subjects who are predominantly premenopausal women at an age when ASVD is rare or unusual. Although much is known about the biology, risk factors, and the prevention of atherosclerosis in normal individuals, little work has been done in SLE. In fact, ASVD in people with SLE may be a different disease. Approximately 1.5% of SLE patients per year will have a myocardial infarction or equivalent; about 0.5% of SLE patients per year will have a stroke. The risk factors for ASVD in SLE are based on small, retrospective, single center studies. These suggest that the risk factors known for the general population (i.e., smoking, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, high LDL cholesterol, etc.) are also observed in SLE. The best study of risk factors shows that even accounting for the known factors, SLE and/or its treatment (glucocorticoids) is by far the most important. Our current management of cardiovascular risk factors in SLE patients with ASVD is substandard and our adherence to national guidelines for prevention is substandard. It is not known whether improving either will prevent these disastrous outcomes. Very little is known about the risk factors in African Americans with SLE, although there is data to suggest that they may not be identical to those seen in Caucasian populations. The study of the best and most effective means to prevent ASVD in SLE and in African Americans with SLE and in African Americans with SLE should be a major priority. PMID:12392045

  6. [Retinal vascular diseases reflecting generalized vascular alterations. What can be mutually learnt?].

    PubMed

    Feltgen, N; Franko Zeitz, P

    2014-01-01

    Retinal vascular diseases are mostly caused by systemic vascular diseases. In some cases the systemic disease is already known but in other patients ocular anomalies often provide the first indications of a systemic disease. Treating patients with vascular fundus diseases requires close cooperation between ophthalmologists and specialists in other fields and deciding which routine and specialized diagnostic examinations are necessary in light of the potential risk factors involved requires interdisciplinary communication. This article aims to provide an overview of the most important vascular retinal diseases and which examinations are required to ensure an accurate diagnosis. The retinal vascular diseases with the highest frequency or clinical relevance are hypertensive retinopathy, diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion and retinal artery occlusion. PMID:24448809

  7. The vascular phenotype in Pseudoxanthoma elasticum and related disorders: contribution of a genetic disease to the understanding of vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Lefthériotis, Georges; Omarjee, Loukman; Saux, Olivier Le; Henrion, Daniel; Abraham, Pierre; Prunier, Fabrice; Willoteaux, Serge; Martin, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a complex and dynamic process occurring in various physiological conditions such as aging and exercise or in acquired metabolic disorders like diabetes or chronic renal insufficiency. Arterial calcifications are also observed in several genetic diseases revealing the important role of unbalanced or defective anti- or pro-calcifying factors. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is an inherited disease (OMIM 264800) characterized by elastic fiber fragmentation and calcification in various soft conjunctive tissues including the skin, eyes, and arterial media. The PXE disease results from mutations in the ABCC6 gene, encoding an ATP-binding cassette transporter primarily expressed in the liver, kidneys suggesting that it is a prototypic metabolic soft-tissue calcifying disease of genetic origin. The clinical expression of the PXE arterial disease is characterized by an increased risk for coronary (myocardial infarction), cerebral (aneurysm and stroke), and lower limb peripheral artery disease. However, the structural and functional changes in the arterial wall induced by PXE are still unexplained. The use of a recombinant mouse model inactivated for the Abcc6 gene is an important tool for the understanding of the PXE pathophysiology although the vascular impact in this model remains limited to date. Overlapping of the PXE phenotype with other inherited calcifying diseases could bring important informations to our comprehension of the PXE disease. PMID:23408347

  8. Pulmonary Vascular Complications of Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jason S.; Fallon, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension are two pulmonary vascular complications of liver disease. The pathophysiology underlying each disorder is distinct, but patients with either condition may be limited by dyspnea. A careful evaluation of concomitant symptoms, the physical examination, pulmonary function testing and arterial blood gas analysis, and echocardiographic, imaging, and hemodynamic studies is crucial to establishing (and distinguishing) these diagnoses. Our understanding of the pathobiology, natural history, and treatment of these disorders has advanced considerably over the past decade; however, the presence of either still increases the risk of morbidity and mortality in patients with underlying liver disease. There is no effective medical treatment for hepatopulmonary syndrome. Although liver transplantation can resolve hepatopulmonary syndrome, there appears to be worse survival even with transplantation. Liver transplantation poses a very high risk of death in those with significant portopulmonary hypertension, where targeted medical therapies may improve functional status and allow successful transplantation in a small number of select patients. PMID:23155142

  9. Twin-reversed arterial perfusion sequence associated with decreased fetal cerebral vascular impedance

    PubMed Central

    Peyvandi, S.; Feldstein, V. A.; Hirose, S.; Rand, L.; Brook, M. M.; Moon-Grady, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Twin-reversed arterial perfusion (TRAP) sequence affects 1% of monochorionic twin pregnancies and is caused by abnormal vascular connections between a pump twin and an acardiac mass. The effects of abnormal vascular connections on cerebral vasculature in the pump twin are unknown. We hypothesize that abnormal cerebral vascular impedance, as assessed by the pulsatility index (PI), is present in pump twins and that fetal intervention alters cerebral impedance. Methods Fetal echocardiograms performed between 2010 and 2013 in pregnancies diagnosed with TRAP (n = 19), recorded at presentation, and uncomplicated monochorionic twin pregnancies (controls, n = 18; 36 fetuses) were analyzed. In all subjects, the middle cerebral artery (MCA)-PI, combined cardiac output (CCO) and cardiothoracic ratio were calculated, and the values for cases and controls were compared. Results The mean gestational age at the time of echocardiography was 20 weeks in both groups. MCA-PI was lower in TRAP cases than in controls (1.55 (95%CI, 1.47–1.64) vs 1.74 (95% CI, 1.65–1.82), respectively; P = 0.004). CCO in TRAP cases was mildly elevated for gestational age (199.7 (95% CI, 138.4–261.1) mL/min) compared with that of controls (131.4 (95% CI, 102.2–160.7) mL/min). In six TRAP cases with a second echocardiogram available, the mean MCA-PI increased after intervention, from 1.5 (95%CI, 1.3–1.7) to 1.8 (95% CI, 1.4–2.2). Conclusions TRAP pump twins have lower cerebral vascular impedance than do controls, suggestive of a brain-sparing effect. MCA-PI appeared to increase in a small group of pump twins after intervention. These findings suggest a fetal cerebral autoregulatory response to a high cardiac output state that begins to change after fetal intervention. The long-termimplications for neurodevelopmental outcome warrant further study. PMID:25157457

  10. Cerebral cortex structure in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Nopoulos, Peggy C; Aylward, Elizabeth H; Ross, Christopher A; Johnson, Hans J; Magnotta, Vincent A; Juhl, Andrew R; Pierson, Ronald K; Mills, James; Langbehn, Douglas R; Paulsen, Jane S

    2010-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies of subjects who are gene-expanded for Huntington Disease, but not yet diagnosed (termed prodromal HD), report that the cortex is "spared," despite the decrement in striatal and cerebral white-matter volume. Measurement of whole-cortex volume can mask more subtle, but potentially clinically relevant regional changes in volume, thinning, or surface area. The current study addressed this limitation by evaluating cortical morphology of 523 prodromal HD subjects. Participants included 693 individuals enrolled in the PREDICT-HD protocol. Of these participants, 523 carried the HD gene mutation (prodromal HD group); the remaining 170 were non gene-expanded and served as the comparison group. Based on age and CAG repeat length, gene-expanded subjects were categorized as "Far from onset," "Midway to onset," "Near onset," and "already diagnosed." MRI scans were processed using FreeSurfer. Cortical volume, thickness, and surface area were not significantly different between the Far from onset group and controls. However, beginning in the Midway to onset group, the cortex showed significant volume decrement, affecting most the posterior and superior cerebral regions. This pattern progressed when evaluating the groups further into the disease process. Areas that remained mostly unaffected included ventral and medial regions of the frontal and temporal cortex. Morphologic changes were mostly in thinning as surface area did not substantially change in most regions. Early in the course of HD, the cortex shows changes that are manifest as cortical thinning and are most robust in the posterior and superior regions of the cerebrum. PMID:20688164

  11. Cerebral Cortex Structure in Prodromal Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nopoulos, Peggy C.; Aylward, Elizabeth H.; Ross, Christopher A.; Johnson, Hans J.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Juhl, Andrew R.; Pierson, Ronald K.; Mills, James; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of subjects who are gene-expanded for Huntington Disease, but not yet diagnosed (termed prodromal HD), report that the cortex is “spared,” despite the decrement in striatal and cerebral white-matter volume. Measurement of whole-cortex volume can mask more subtle, but potentially clinically relevant regional changes in volume, thinning, or surface area. The current study addressed this limitation by evaluating cortical morphology of 523 prodromal HD subjects. Participants included 693 individuals enrolled in the PREDICT-HD protocol. Of these participants, 523 carried the HD gene mutation (prodromal HD group); the remaining 170 were non gene-expanded and served as the comparison group. Based on age and CAG repeat length, gene-expanded subjects were categorized as “Far from onset,” “Midway to onset,” “Near onset,” and “already diagnosed.” MRI scans were processed using FreeSurfer. Cortical volume, thickness, and surface area were not significantly different between the Far from onset group and controls. However, beginning in the Midway to onset group, the cortex showed significant volume decrement, affecting most the posterior and superior cerebral regions. This pattern progressed when evaluating the groups further into the disease process. Areas that remained mostly unaffected included ventral and medial regions of the frontal and temporal cortex. Morphologic changes were mostly in thinning as surface area did not substantially change in most regions. Early in the course of HD, the cortex shows changes that are manifest as cortical thinning and are most robust in the posterior and superior regions of the cerebrum. PMID:20688164

  12. Clinical Decision Support for Vascular Disease in Community Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Keshavjee, K; Holbrook, AM; Lau, E; Esporlas-Jewer, I; Troyan, S

    2006-01-01

    The COMPETE III Vascular Disease Tracker (C3VT) is a personalized, Web-based, clinical decision support tool that provides patients and physicians access to a patient’s 16 individual vascular risk markers, specific advice for each marker and links to best practices in vascular disease management. It utilizes the chronic care model1 so that physicians can better manage patients with chronic diseases. Over 1100 patients have been enrolled into the COMPETE III study to date.

  13. Treatment for cerebral small vessel disease: effect of relaxin on the function and structure of cerebral parenchymal arterioles during hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu-Lung; Sweet, Julie G.; Cipolla, Marilyn J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of hypertension on the function and structure of cerebral parenchymal arterioles (PAs), a major target of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), and determined whether relaxin is a treatment for SVD during hypertension. PAs were isolated from 18-wk-old female normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs), and SHRs treated with human relaxin 2 for 14 d (4 μg/h; n=8/group) and studied using a pressurized arteriograph system. Hypertension reduced PA inner diameter (58±3 vs. 49±3 μm at 60 mmHg in WKY rats, P<0.05), suggesting inward remodeling that was reversed by relaxin (56±4 μm, P<0.05). Relaxin also increased PA distensibility in SHRs (34±2 vs. 10±2% in SHRs, P<0.05). Relaxin was detected in cerebrospinal fluid (110±30 pg/ml) after systemic administration, suggesting that it crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Relaxin receptors (RXFP1/2) were not detected in cerebral vasculature, but relaxin increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) expression in brain cortex. Inhibition of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase (axitinib, 4 mg/kg/d, 14 d) had no effect on increased distensibility with relaxin, but caused outward hypertrophic remodeling of PAs from SHRs. These results suggest that relaxin crosses the BBB and activates MMP-2 in brain cortex, which may interact with PAs to increase distensibility. VEGF appears to be involved in remodeling of PAs, but not relaxin-induced increased distensibility.—Chan, S.-L., Sweet, J. G., Cipolla, M. J. Treatment for cerebral small vessel disease: effect of relaxin on the function and structure of cerebral parenchymal arterioles during hypertension. PMID:23783073

  14. Vascular Growth Factors and Glomerular Disease.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Christina S; Jeansson, Marie; Quaggin, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    The glomerulus is a highly specialized microvascular bed that filters blood to form primary urinary filtrate. It contains four cell types: fenestrated endothelial cells, specialized vascular support cells termed podocytes, perivascular mesangial cells, and parietal epithelial cells. Glomerular cell-cell communication is critical for the development and maintenance of the glomerular filtration barrier. VEGF, ANGPT, EGF, SEMA3A, TGF-β, and CXCL12 signal in paracrine fashions between the podocytes, endothelium, and mesangium associated with the glomerular capillary bed to maintain filtration barrier function. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of these signaling pathways in the development and maintenance of the glomerulus and the progression of disease. PMID:26863327

  15. Direct immunofluorescence testing in the diagnosis of immunobullous disease, collagen vascular disease, and vascular injury syndromes.

    PubMed

    Magro, Cynthia M; Roberts-Barnes, Jennifer; Crowson, A Neil

    2012-10-01

    Direct and indirect immunofluorescence (IF) plays a role in the evaluation of immunobullous diseases and their mimics, and in the investigation of vascular injury syndromes and autoimmune connective tissue disease (CTD). IF mapping may be an important adjunct in the assessment of congenital epidermolysis bullosa syndromes and in Alport disease, in which antibodies are directed at certain components of the basement membrane zone to assay for their deficiency. In many cases of immunobullous and autoimmune CTDs, correlation with direct IF results is useful and often decisive in lesional evaluation and thus in patient management. PMID:23021058

  16. Uric Acid, Hyperuricemia and Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ming; Yang, Fan; Yang, Irene; Yin, Ying; Luo, Jin Jun; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Uric acid is the product of purine metabolism. It is known that hyperuricemia, defined as high levels of blood uric acid, is the major etiological factor of gout. A number of epidemiological reports have increasingly linked hyperuricemia with cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Studies highlighting the pathogenic mechanisms of uric acid point to an inflammatory response as the primary mechanism for inducing gout and possibly contributing to uric acid's vascular effects. Monosodium urate (MSU) crystals induce an inflammatory reaction, which are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These TLRs then activate NALP3 inflammasome. MSU also triggers neutrophil activation and further produces immune mediators, which lead to a proinflammatory response. In addition, soluble uric acid can also mediate the generation of free radicals and function as a pro-oxidant. This review summarizes the epidemiological studies of hyperuricemia and cardiovascular disease, takes a brief look at hyperuricemia and its role in neurological diseases, and highlights the studies of the advanced pathological mechanisms of uric acid and inflammation. PMID:22201767

  17. Improving Outcomes for Pulmonary Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Ivan M.; Blaisdell, Carol J.; Abman, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of improving lung health through lung disease research, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a workshop of multidisciplinary experts for the following purpose: (1) to review the current scientific knowledge underlying the basis for treatment of adults and children with pulmonary vascular diseases (PVDs); (2) to identify gaps, barriers, and emerging scientific opportunities in translational PVD research and the means to capitalize on these opportunities; (3) to prioritize new research directions that would be expected to affect the clinical course of PVDs; and (4) to make recommendations to the NHLBI on how to fill identified gaps in adult and pediatric PVD clinical research. Workshop participants reviewed experiences from previous PVD clinical trials and ongoing clinical research networks with other lung disorders, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic obstructive lung disease, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as well. Bioinformatics experts discussed strategies for applying cutting-edge health information technology to clinical studies. Participants in the workshop considered approaches in the following broad concept areas: (1) improved phenotyping to identify potential subjects for appropriate PVD clinical studies; (2) identification of potential new end points for assessing key outcomes and developing better-designed PVD clinical trials; and (3) the establishment of priorities for specific clinical research needed to advance care of patients with various subsets of PVDs from childhood through adulthood. This report provides a summary of the objectives and recommendations to the NHLBI concentrating on clinical research efforts that are needed to better diagnose and treat PVDs. PMID:22335936

  18. Propofol effect on cerebral oxygenation in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Thilo; Schubert, Stephan; Ewert, Peter; Stiller, Brigitte; Nagdyman, Nicole; Berger, Felix

    2015-03-01

    Propofol is a short-acting, intravenously administered hypnotic agent which is used in procedural sedation in children. Propofol is known to decrease systemic vascular resistance, arterial blood pressure and can lead to desaturations and decreased systemic perfusion in children with cardiac shunting. This may result in a reduction in cerebral blood flow and oxygenation. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can monitor cerebral tissue oxygenation in the frontal neocortex. The objective of our study was to measure the changes in cerebral oxygen and blood supply after Propofol infusion in children with congenital heart disease. Propofol infusion may reduce cerebral oxygenation in children with congenital heart disease. The study group consisted of 32 children (f:m = 18:14), with median age of 49 (5-112) months and median weight of 15 (5-34) kg. We performed NIRS derived continuous measurement of cerebral oxygenation and cardiac output using Electrical velocimetry for 5 min before and after sedation with Propofol (1-2 mg/kg i.v.) for cardiac catheterization. Simultaneously, non-invasive arterial blood pressure and transcutaneous oxygen saturation were measured. Propofol sedation led to a significant decrease in mean arterial pressure (79 ± 16 vs. 67 ± 12 mmHg) (p = 0.01) and cardiac index (3.2 ± 0.8 vs. 2.9 ± 0.6 ml/min/m(2)) (p = 0.03). In contrast, cerebral tissue oxygenation index, increased significantly from 57 ± 11 to 59 ± 10 % (p < 0.05). Sedation with Propofol increased cerebral tissue oxygenation despite a decrease in cardiac index and arterial blood pressure. This may be caused by a decreased oxygen consumption of the sedated brain with intact cerebral auto-regulation. PMID:25311762

  19. Evidence for Cerebral Hemodynamic Measurement-based Therapy in Symptomatic Major Cerebral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    YAMAUCHI, Hiroshi

    In patients with atherosclerotic internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery occlusive disease, chronic reduction in cerebral perfusion pressure (chronic hemodynamic compromise) increases the risk of ischemic stroke and can be detected by directly measuring hemodynamic parameters. However, strategies for selecting treatments based on hemodynamic measurements have not been clearly established. Bypass surgery has been proven to improve hemodynamic compromise. However, the benefit of bypass surgery for reducing the stroke risk in patients with hemodynamic compromise is controversial. The results of the two randomized controlled trials were inconsistent. Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, and antihypertensive therapy provides general benefit to patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic major cerebral artery disease. However, the benefit of strict control of blood pressure for reducing the stroke risk in patients with hemodynamic compromise is a matter of debate. The results of the two observational studies were different. We must establish strategies for selecting treatments based on hemodynamic measurements in atherosclerotic major cerebral artery disease. PMID:26041631

  20. OBESITY INCREASES BLOOD PRESSURE, CEREBRAL VASCULAR REMODELING, AND SEVERITY OF STROKE IN THE ZUCKER RAT

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, Jessica M.; Mintz, James D.; Dalton, Brian; Stepp, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for stroke, but the mechanisms by which obesity increases stroke risk are unknown. Because microvascular architecture contributes to the outcome of stroke, we hypothesized that middle cerebral arteries (MCA) from obese Zucker rats (OZR) undergo inward remodeling and develop increased myogenic tone compared to lean Zucker rats (LZR). We further hypothesized that OZR have an increased infarct following cerebral ischemia and that changes in vascular structure and function correlate with the development of hypertension in OZR. Blood pressure was measured by telemetery in LZR and OZR from 6 to 17 weeks of age. Vessel structure and function were assessed in isolated MCAs. Stroke damage was assessed after ischemia was induced for 60 minutes followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. While mean arterial pressure (MAP) was similar between young rats (6–8 weeks old), MAP was higher in adult (14–17 weeks old) OZR than LZR. MCAs from OZR had a smaller lumen diameter and increased myogenic vasoconstriction compared to those from LZR. Following ischemia, infarction was 58% larger in OZR than LZR. Prior to the development of hypertension, MCA myogenic reactity and lumen diameter as well as infarct size were similar between young LZR and OZR. Our results indicate that the MCAs of OZR undergo structural remodeling and that these rats have greater cerebral injury following cerebral ischemia. These cerebrovascular changes correlate with the development of hypertension and suggest that the increased blood pressure may be the major determinant for stroke risk in obese individuals. PMID:19104000

  1. Unusual vascular events in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Fisher, C M

    1986-02-01

    There is an unusual type of vascular episode in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery which remains relatively unknown. Ten cases are presented in which a posterior cerebral artery deficit developed suddenly in dramatic fashion with headache, visual symptoms, sensory and motor deficits and signs of third nerve involvement. Nine of the patients were female and one was male. Seven were under the age of 33. In all instances there was a permanent neurologic sequela, usually a hemianopia. A similar case was described in 1901. The nature of the underlying process remains obscure, but the evidence favors accompanied migraine in which a particularly severe attack results in permanent damage. The term "catastrophic migraine" is suggested. PMID:3955450

  2. Decreased expression of transient receptor potential channels in cerebral vascular tissue from patients after hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Suess, Olaf; Liu, Ying; Tepel, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Recent data indicate that transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels play an important role in hypertension. Now, we tested the hypothesis that TRP expression is altered in human cerebral vascular tissue in patients who had experienced hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC5, TRPC6, TRPM4, TRPM6, and TRPM7 channels were detected in cerebral vascular tissue by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Control cerebral vascular tissue was obtained from normotensive patients who underwent neurosurgical operation because of brain tumor. To examine a possible relation between the expression of TRP expression and hypoxic conditions caused by the intracerebral bleeding, we examined the expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1a (HIF1a). Transcripts of TRPC3, TRPC5, TRPM6, and HIF1a were significantly reduced in cerebral vascular tissue from patients after hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage compared to controls. TRPC3 mRNA correlated well with the expression of HIF1a mRNA (r(2) = 0.59; p = 0.01). TRPC3 expression is associated with hypertension and hypoxic conditions in human cerebral vascular tissue. PMID:21957871

  3. Stabiliztin of VEGFR2 Signaling by Cerebral Cavernous Malformation 3 is Critical for Vascular Development

    SciTech Connect

    Y He; H Zhang; L Yu; M Gunel; T Boggon; H Chen; W Min

    2011-12-31

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are human vascular malformations caused by mutations in three genes of unknown function: CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3. CCM3, also known as PDCD10 (programmed cell death 10), was initially identified as a messenger RNA whose abundance was induced by apoptotic stimuli in vitro. However, the in vivo function of CCM3 has not been determined. Here, we describe mice with a deletion of the CCM3 gene either ubiquitously or specifically in the vascular endothelium, smooth muscle cells, or neurons. Mice with global or endothelial cell-specific deletion of CCM3 exhibited defects in embryonic angiogenesis and died at an early embryonic stage. CCM3 deletion reduced vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling in embryos and endothelial cells. In response to VEGF stimulation, CCM3 was recruited to and stabilized VEGFR2, and the carboxyl-terminal domain of CCM3 was required for the stabilization of VEGFR2. Indeed, the CCM3 mutants found in human patients lacking the carboxyl-terminal domain were labile and were unable to stabilize and activate VEGFR2. These results demonstrate that CCM3 promotes VEGFR2 signaling during vascular development.

  4. Glutamatergic and central cholinergic dysfunction in the CA1, CA2 and CA3 fields on spatial learning and memory in chronic cerebral ischemia-Induced vascular dementia of rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanjing; Gou, Zengmei; Du, Yifeng; Fan, Yongjun; Liang, Lizhen; Yan, Yongxing; Lin, Ping; Jin, Mudan; Du, Yifenf

    2016-05-01

    Chronic cerebral ischemia (CCI) is associated with cognitive decline in aging, vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Substantial evidence has shown that chronic cerebral ischemia may cause cognitive impairment, but the underlying neurobiological mechanism is poorly understood so far. In the present study, we used a rat model of chronic cerebral ischemia by permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) to investigate the alterations of glutamatergic and central cholinergic dysfunction, and their causal relationship with the cognitive deficits induced by chronic cerebral ischemia. We found that BCCAO rats exhibited spatial learning and memory impairments dysfunction 3 month after BCCAO. Meanwhile, vGluT levels as well as glutamatergic and central cholinergic positive neurons in the hippocampus CA1-3 field significantly decreased. The protection of glutamergic and cholinergic neurons or regulating glutamate and central cholinergic levels in hippocampal subregion may have beneficial effects on cognitive impairments associated with the possible mechanism in CCI-induced vascular dementia. PMID:27040427

  5. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Penn, J.S.; Madan, A.; Caldwell, R.B.; Bartoli, M.; Caldwell, R.W.; Hartnett, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Collectively, angiogenic ocular conditions represent the leading cause of irreversible vision loss in developed countries. In the U.S., for example, retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration are the principal causes of blindness in the infant, working age and elderly populations, respectively. Evidence suggests that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a 40 kDa dimeric glycoprotein, promotes angiogenesis in each of these conditions, making it a highly significant therapeutic target. However, VEGF is pleiotropic, affecting a broad spectrum of endothelial, neuronal and glial behaviors, and confounding the validity of anti-VEGF strategies, particularly under chronic disease conditions. In fact, among other functions VEGF can influence cell proliferation, cell migration, proteolysis, cell survival and vessel permeability in a wide variety of biological contexts. This article will describe the roles played by VEGF in the pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. The potential disadvantages of inhibiting VEGF will be discussed, as will the rationales for targeting other VEGF-related modulators of angiogenesis. PMID:18653375

  6. Delivery of Polymeric Nanoparticles to Target Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Edward; Kandimalla, Karunyna

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in nanotechnology have paved the way for the early detection, prevention and treatment of various diseases such as vascular disorders and cancer. These advances have provided novel approaches or modalities of incorporating or adsorbing therapeutic, biosensor and targeting agents into/on nanoparticles. With significant progress, nanomedicine for vascular therapy has shown significant advantages over traditional medicine because of its ability to selectively target the disease site and reduce adverse side effects. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to vascular endothelial cells or the vascular wall provides an effective and more efficient way for early detection and/or treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis and Cerebrovascular Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA). Clinical applications of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers in areas such as vascular graft, implantable drug delivery, stent devices and tissue engineering scaffolds have advanced the candidature of polymers as potential nano-carriers for vascular-targeted delivery of diagnostic agents and drugs. This review focuses on the basic aspects of the vasculature and its associated diseases and relates them to polymeric nanoparticle-based strategies for targeting therapeutic agents to diseased vascular site. PMID:26069867

  7. Vascular Risk Factors and Cognition in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Andrea; Turrone, Rosanna; Liepelt-Scarfone, Inga; Bianchi, Marta; Poli, Loris; Borroni, Barbara; Alberici, Antonella; Premi, Enrico; Formenti, Anna; Bigni, Barbara; Cosseddu, Maura; Cottini, Elisabetta; Berg, Daniela; Padovani, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    Vascular risk factors have been associated with cognitive deficits and incident dementia in the general population, but their role on cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD) is still unclear. The present study addresses the single and cumulative effect of vascular risk factors on cognition in PD patients, taking clinical confounders into account. Standardized neuropsychological assessment was performed in 238 consecutive PD patients. We evaluated the association of single and cumulative vascular risk factors (smoking, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and heart disease), with the diagnosis of PD normal cognition (PDNC, n = 94), mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI, n = 111), and dementia (PDD, n = 33). The association between single neuropsychological tests and vascular risk factors was evaluated with covariance analyses adjusted for age at onset, educational levels, gender, disease duration, and motor performance. Age, educational levels, disease duration, and motor function were significantly different between PDNC, PD-MCI, and PDD. Heart disease was the only vascular factor significantly more prevalent in PDD compared with PDNC in adjusted analyses. Performance of tests assessing executive and attention functions were significantly worse in patients with hypertension, heart disease, and/or diabetes (p <  0.05). Heart disease is associated with dementia in PD, suggesting a potential window of intervention. Vascular risk factors act especially on attention and executive functions in PD. Vascular risk stratification may be useful in order to identify PD patients with a greater risk of developing dementia. These findings need to be verified in longitudinal studies. PMID:26890741

  8. Comparison of cerebral vascular reactivity measures obtained using breath-holding and CO2 inhalation.

    PubMed

    Tancredi, Felipe B; Hoge, Richard D

    2013-07-01

    Stimulation of cerebral vasculature using hypercapnia has been widely used to study cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR), which can be expressed as the quantitative change in cerebral blood flow (CBF) per mm Hg change in end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PETCO2). We investigate whether different respiratory manipulations, with arterial spin labeling used to measure CBF, lead to consistent measures of CVR. The approaches included: (1) an automated system delivering variable concentrations of inspired CO2 for prospective targeting of PETCO2, (2) administration of a fixed concentration of CO2 leading to subject-dependent changes in PETCO2, (3) a breath-hold (BH) paradigm with physiologic modeling of CO2 accumulation, and (4) a maneuver combining breath-hold and hyperventilation. When CVR was expressed as the percent change in CBF per mm Hg change in PETCO2, methods 1 to 3 gave consistent results. The CVR values using method 4 were significantly lower. When CVR was expressed in terms of the absolute change in CBF (mL/100 g per minute per mm Hg), greater discrepancies became apparent: methods 2 and 3 gave lower absolute CVR values compared with method 1, and the value obtained with method 4 was dramatically lower. Our findings indicate that care must be taken to ensure that CVR is measured over the linear range of the CBF-CO2 dose-response curve, avoiding hypocapnic conditions. PMID:23571282

  9. Significance of Cerebral Blood Flow Analysis in the Acute Stage after Revascularization Surgery for Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    FUJIMURA, Miki; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a chronic, occlusive cerebrovascular disease with unknown etiology characterized by steno-occlusive changes at the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery, either bilaterally or unilaterally, and an abnormal vascular network at the base of the brain. Surgical revascularization such as extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass is the preferred procedure for moyamoya disease. Despite the favorable long-term outcome, cerebral infarction and hyperperfusion syndrome are potential complications of this procedure, which can lead to neurological deterioration in the acute stage. In light of the similar clinical presentations between perioperative ischemia and hyperperfusion, it is essential to attempt a prompt cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement in the acute stage after EC-IC bypass for moyamoya disease to differentiate these distinct pathologies, because the management of cerebral ischemia and hyperperfusion is contradictory to each other. Routine CBF analysis by single-photon emission computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging not only facilitated a safer perioperative management but also provided important information about dynamic pathology of the hemodynamic conversion in the acute stage after revascularization surgery for moyamoya disease. We represent the current status of CBF analysis during the perioperative period of revascularization surgery for moyamoya disease, and sought to discuss its significance and efficacy to avoid surgical complications. PMID:26369873

  10. Vascular lesions in mixed dementia, vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular disease: the Kurihara Project.

    PubMed

    Meguro, Kenichi; Tanaka, Naofumi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kei; Satoh, Masayuki

    2012-11-15

    The concept and diagnosis for mixed dementia is not simple, since it is difficult to identify the type and regions of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) responsible for causing dementia. An investigation is needed to confirm the presence of mixed dementia, those who met the criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and those for vascular dementia (VaD). According to the community-based stroke, dementia, and bed-confinement prevention in Kurihara, northern Japan (Kurihara Project), the prevalence of dementia and dementing diseases was surveyed in 2008-2010. Five hundred and ninety people finally agreed to participate (47.0%), and 73 (12.4%) people were diagnosed with dementia according to the DSM-IV. Using MRI, intensive evaluations on CVDs were performed for the 49 dementia patients associated with CVDs (mixed dementia, VaD, and AD with CVD). For the mixed dementia group, all had left subcortical strategic CVDs. These included the caudate head and thalamus. For the VaD group, all patients had at least cortical CVDs or subcortical strategic CVDs. The AD with CVD group had non-strategic CVDs in cortical, subcortical, or other areas in 5 or 6 patients each. Two extreme concepts regarding CVD and dementia are possible. One is that there is no concept for mixed dementia or VaD. An alternative is that the vascular factor should be considered as primary. Our data showed an importance of cortical and subcortical "strategic" areas, the latter included thalamus and caudate head. PMID:22871542

  11. Inapparent pulmonary vascular disease in an ex-heroin user

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli Incalzi, R.; Ludovico Maini, C.; Giuliano Bonetti, M.; Campioni, P.; Pistelli, R.; Fuso, L.

    1986-04-01

    A severe pulmonary vascular derangement, usually reported in drug addicts, was diagnosed in a 28-year-old asymptomatic ex-heroin user by means of fortuitously performed pulmonary perfusion imaging. Neither physical findings nor pulmonary function tests, aroused suspicion of the diagnosis. A search for asymptomatic pulmonary vascular disease probably should be undertaken in drug addicts.

  12. Systemic Atheromatosis Influence on Retinal Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    ŞTEFĂNESCU, A.; SAS, T.; BĂTĂIOSU, C.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical study on a group of 48 patients over 3 months: 27 patients were recruited from ophtalmology and 21 recruited from cardiology, 25 % of these patients coming for routine check. Patients were investigated by ophthalmic, cardiologic examination, imaging and laboratory tests. The study demonstrated the need for interdisciplinary consultation for patients with vascular complaints in carotid territory and a close correlation between the vascular pathology and ophthalmology at this level. PMID:25729610

  13. Accelerated Vascular Aging as a Paradigm for Hypertensive Vascular Disease: Prevention and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias; Husmann, Marc; Meyer, Matthias R

    2016-05-01

    Aging is considered the most important nonmodifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death after age 28 years. Because of demographic changes the world population is expected to increase to 9 billion by the year 2050 and up to 12 billion by 2100, with several-fold increases among those 65 years of age and older. Healthy aging and prevention of aging-related diseases and associated health costs have become part of political agendas of governments around the world. Atherosclerotic vascular burden increases with age; accordingly, patients with progeria (premature aging) syndromes die from myocardial infarctions or stroke as teenagers or young adults. The incidence and prevalence of arterial hypertension also increases with age. Arterial hypertension-like diabetes and chronic renal failure-shares numerous pathologies and underlying mechanisms with the vascular aging process. In this article, we review how arterial hypertension resembles premature vascular aging, including the mechanisms by which arterial hypertension (as well as other risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, or chronic renal failure) accelerates the vascular aging process. We will also address the importance of cardiovascular risk factor control-including antihypertensive therapy-as a powerful intervention to interfere with premature vascular aging to reduce the age-associated prevalence of diseases such as myocardial infarction, heart failure, hypertensive nephropathy, and vascular dementia due to cerebrovascular disease. Finally, we will discuss the implementation of endothelial therapy, which aims at active patient participation to improve primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27118295

  14. Acute Chagas Disease Induces Cerebral Microvasculopathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nisimura, Lindice Mitie; Estato, Vanessa; de Souza, Elen Mello; Reis, Patricia A.; Lessa, Marcos Adriano; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Pereira, Mirian Claudia de Souza; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is the main clinical form of Chagas disease (CD); however, cerebral manifestations, such as meningoencephalitis, ischemic stroke and cognitive impairment, can also occur. The aim of the present study was to investigate functional microvascular alterations and oxidative stress in the brain of mice in acute CD. Acute CD was induced in Swiss Webster mice (SWM) with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Cerebral functional capillary density (the number of spontaneously perfused capillaries), leukocyte rolling and adhesion and the microvascular endothelial-dependent response were analyzed over a period of fifteen days using intravital video-microscopy. We also evaluated cerebral oxidative stress with the thiobarbituric acid reactive species TBARS method. Compared with the non-infected group, acute CD significantly induced cerebral functional microvascular alterations, including (i) functional capillary rarefaction, (ii) increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion, (iii) the formation of microvascular platelet-leukocyte aggregates, and (iv) alteration of the endothelial response to acetylcholine. Moreover, cerebral oxidative stress increased in infected animals. We concluded that acute CD in mice induced cerebral microvasculopathy, characterized by a reduced incidence of perfused capillaries, a high number of microvascular platelet-leukocyte aggregates, a marked increase in leukocyte-endothelium interactions and brain arteriolar endothelial dysfunction associated with oxidative stress. These results suggest the involvement of cerebral microcirculation alterations in the neurological manifestations of CD. PMID:25010691

  15. Role of amyloid peptides in vascular dysfunction and platelet dysregulation in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Canobbio, Ilaria; Abubaker, Aisha Alsheikh; Visconte, Caterina; Torti, Mauro; Pula, Giordano

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative cause of dementia in the elderly. AD is accompanied by the accumulation of amyloid peptides in the brain parenchyma and in the cerebral vessels. The sporadic form of AD accounts for about 95% of all cases. It is characterized by a late onset, typically after the age of 65, with a complex and still poorly understood aetiology. Several observations point towards a central role of cerebrovascular dysfunction in the onset of sporadic AD (SAD). According to the “vascular hypothesis”, AD may be initiated by vascular dysfunctions that precede and promote the neurodegenerative process. In accordance to this, AD patients show increased hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke risks. It is now clear that multiple bidirectional connections exist between AD and cerebrovascular disease, and in this new scenario, the effect of amyloid peptides on vascular cells and blood platelets appear to be central to AD. In this review, we analyze the effect of amyloid peptides on vascular function and platelet activation and its contribution to the cerebrovascular pathology associated with AD and the progression of this disease. PMID:25784858

  16. Vascular variant of prion protein cerebral amyloidosis with tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles: the phenotype of the stop codon 145 mutation in PRNP.

    PubMed Central

    Ghetti, B; Piccardo, P; Spillantini, M G; Ichimiya, Y; Porro, M; Perini, F; Kitamoto, T; Tateishi, J; Seiler, C; Frangione, B; Bugiani, O; Giaccone, G; Prelli, F; Goedert, M; Dlouhy, S R; Tagliavini, F

    1996-01-01

    Deposition of PrP amyloid in cerebral vessels in conjunction with neurofibrillary lesions is the neuropathologic hallmark of the dementia associated with a stop mutation at codon 145 of PRNP, the gene encoding the prion protein (PrP). In this disorder, the vascular amyloid in tissue sections and the approximately 7.5-kDa fragment extracted from amyloid are labeled by antibodies to epitopes located in the PrP sequence including amino acids 90-147. Amyloid-laden vessels are also labeled by antibodies against the C terminus, suggesting that PrP from the normal allele is involved in the pathologic process. Abundant neurofibrillary lesions are present in the cerebral gray matter. They are composed of paired helical filaments, are labeled with antibodies that recognize multiple phosphorylation sites in tau protein, and are similar to those observed in Alzheimer disease. A PrP cerebral amyloid angiopathy has not been reported in diseases caused by PRNP mutations or in human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies; we propose to name this phenotype PrP cerebral amyloid angiopathy (PrP-CAA). Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8570627

  17. Oscillation of Angiogenesis and Vascular Dropout in Progressive Human Vascular Disease. [Vascular Pattern as Useful Read-Out of Complex Molecular Signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    When analyzed by VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software, vascular patterns provide useful integrative read-outs of complex, interacting molecular signaling pathways. Using VESGEN, we recently discovered and published our innovative, surprising findings that angiogenesis oscillated with vascular dropout throughout progression of diabetic retinopathy, a blinding vascular disease. Our findings provide a potential paradigm shift in the current prevailing view on progression and treatment of this disease, and a new early-stage window of regenerative therapeutic opportunities. The findings also suggest that angiogenesis may oscillate with vascular disease in a homeostatic-like manner during early stages of other inflammatory progressive diseases such as cancer and coronary vascular disease.

  18. Clinical imaging of vascular disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan A; Covic, Adrian; London, Gerard; Vervloet, Marc; Goldsmith, David; Gorriz, Jose Luis; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    Arterial wall calcification, once considered an incidental finding, is now known to be a consistent and strong predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. It is also commonly encountered in radiologic examinations as an incidental finding. Forthcoming bench, translational, and clinical data seek to establish this and pre-calcification changes as surrogate imaging biomarkers for noninvasive prognostication and treatment follow-up. Emerging paradigms seek to establish vascular calcification as a surrogate marker of disease. Imaging of pre-calcification and decalcification events may prove more important than imaging of the calcification itself. Data-driven approaches to screening will be necessary to limit radiation exposure and prevent over-utilization of expensive imaging techniques. PMID:26898824

  19. Autophagy: an emerging therapeutic target in vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vindis, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular catabolic process responsible for the destruction of long-lived proteins and organelles via lysosome-dependent pathway. This process is of great importance in maintaining cellular homeostasis, and deregulated autophagy has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide range of diseases. A growing body of evidence suggests that autophagy can be activated in vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis. Autophagy occurs under basal conditions and mediates homeostatic functions in cells but in the setting of pathological states up-regulated autophagy can exert both protective and detrimental functions. Therefore, the precise role of autophagy and its relationship with the progression of the disease need to be clarified. This review highlights recent findings regarding autophagy activity in vascular cells and its potential contribution to vascular disorders with a focus on atherogenesis. Finally, whether the manipulation of autophagy represents a new therapeutic approach to treat or prevent vascular diseases is also discussed. PMID:25537552

  20. Elevated Plasma Homocysteine Level in Vascular Dementia Reflects the Vascular Disease Process

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Karin; Gustafson, Lars; Hultberg, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with vascular dementia (VaD) exhibit particularly elevated levels of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) compared to patients with other psychogeriatric diseases. Methods We investigated the main determinants (age, renal impairment, cobalamin/folate status and presence of extracerebral vascular disease) of plasma tHcy in 525 patients with VaD. Furthermore, 270 patients with depression were used as a reference group to reveal the potential specificity of elevated plasma tHcy in patients with VaD. Results Elevated plasma tHcy levels in patients with VaD could only partly be attributed to cobalamin/folate deficiency or renal impairment. Plasma tHcy might also be related to the vascular disease process since patients with depression and vascular disease exhibited similar plasma tHcy levels to patients with VaD. Conclusion Our findings suggest that elevated plasma tHcy might be a sensitive marker for the vascular disease process in patients with VaD and that the level also is a reflection of changes in the other main determinants of plasma tHcy. PMID:23569455

  1. [Cerebral arteriovenous malformations: value of the non invasive vascular imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Leclerc, X; Gauvrit, J Y; Trystram, D; Reyns, N; Pruvo, J P; Meder, J F

    2004-12-01

    Imaging evaluation of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) requires selective visualization of the different compartments of the malformation in order to select the therapeutic management. Conventional angiography remains the reference to analyze intracranial vessel conspicuity but non-invasive methods constitute an excellent alternative. Among these techniques, CT angiography is rarely used because of the need to inject iodinated contrast material and because of irradiation. MR angiography provides useful information and can be performed using several techniques: time of flight with or without contrast material injection, phase contrast, three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo acquisition after contrast material injection and, more recently, MR digital subtraction angiography. The purpose of this review article is to summarize the different non-invasive techniques for vascular imaging and to analyze the usefulness of these techniques for the assessment of brain AVMs. PMID:15687950

  2. Factors Determining Cognitive Dysfunction in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Vinod; Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Christopher, Rita; Rajeswaran, Jamuna; Prasad, Chandrajit; Subasree, Ramakrishnan; Issac, Thomas Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Vascular dementia consists of cognitive and functional impairment due to cerebrovascular brain injury. With reference to small vessel disease (SVD), even though the radiological evidence of SVD is present in a large number of persons above the age of 80 years, less than one-third of the people progress to dementia. Hence, if those factors are identified, we may be able to formulate strategies to protect that percentage of patients who progress to dementia. In this study, we have analyzed some genetic and nongenetic factors in patients with and without a cognitive impairment in the presence of radiological SVD. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and ten patients who satisfied the criteria for the study were included. All medical comorbidities, demographic factors, substance abuse, etc., were documented and neuropsychological evaluation done. In addition, the genetic testing was done for the polymorphisms of TT, TC, and CC alleles of CYP11B2 based on the literature evidence of the association of CYP11B2 polymorphism and hypertension. Results: This prospective hospital-based study revealed a significant relationship among hypertension, hyperhomocysteinemia, and severity of white matter changes but other comorbidities did not correlate. No significant correlation was seen between cognitive dysfunction and severity of white matter changes or genotypes TT, TC, and CC. However, TC genotype was more common in male hypertensives. Even though hypertension and hyperhomocysteinemia were associated with leukoaraiosis, none of the factors studied trigger conversion of these radiological changes to clinical cognitive impairment. Discussion and Conclusion: Severity of cerebral white matter changes seems to correlate with hypertension and hyperhomocysteinemia, however, none of the co-morbidities studied including the three polymorphisms of CYP11B2, that is, TT, TC, and CC seem to determine the conversion of leukoaraiosis to dementia. PMID:27011404

  3. Multichannel optical brain imaging to separate cerebral vascular, tissue metabolic, and neuronal effects of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hugang; Luo, Zhongchi; Yuan, Zhijia; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Characterization of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation metabolic changes, as well neuronal function is of great importance to study of brain functions and the relevant brain disorders such as drug addiction. Compared with other neuroimaging modalities, optical imaging techniques have the potential for high spatiotemporal resolution and dissection of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobing oxygenation and intracellular Ca ([Ca2+]i), which serves as markers of vascular function, tissue metabolism and neuronal activity, respectively. Recently, we developed a multiwavelength imaging system and integrated it into a surgical microscope. Three LEDs of λ1=530nm, λ2=570nm and λ3=630nm were used for exciting [Ca2+]i fluorescence labeled by Rhod2 (AM) and sensitizing total hemoglobin (i.e., CBV), and deoxygenated-hemoglobin, whereas one LD of λ1=830nm was used for laser speckle imaging to form a CBF mapping of the brain. These light sources were time-sharing for illumination on the brain and synchronized with the exposure of CCD camera for multichannel images of the brain. Our animal studies indicated that this optical approach enabled simultaneous mapping of cocaine-induced changes in CBF, CBV and oxygenated- and deoxygenated hemoglobin as well as [Ca2+]i in the cortical brain. Its high spatiotemporal resolution (30μm, 10Hz) and large field of view (4x5 mm2) are advanced as a neuroimaging tool for brain functional study.

  4. NERVE ENDINGS AND VASCULAR SUPPLY IN SEMITENDINOSUS TENDON OF CEREBRAL PALSY CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Grzegorzewski, Andrzej; Synder, Marek; Modrzewski, Tadeusz; Drobniewski, Marek; Polguj, Michał; Sibiński, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the distribution of SP (substance P) and S-100 peptide immunoreactivity, as well as the vascular supply of tissues commonly used as grafts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. A second aim was to compare the above mentioned distribution in the semitendinosus muscle tendons of cerebral palsy (CP) patients with the semitendinosus muscle tendons and patellar tendons of patients without CP. Methods: The first group consisted of 14 children with cerebral palsy with a mean age of 11.7 years old. At the time of hamstring lengthening operation, a sample of semitendinosus muscle was taken for analysis. The second group comprised 20 patients treated for isolated ACL rupture of the knee (mean age 32 years old). Group three comprised ten patients in the mean age of 14.3 years old treated for recurrent lateral patellar dislocation, and from whom a sample of patellar tendon was obtained. Results: No statistically significant differences were demonstrated with regard to the amount of immunopositive nerve fibers expressing SP or S-100 in all 3 groups of patients. A significant difference was noted in the number of blood vessels between the adult and child semitendinosus muscles, but not between the semitendinosus muscles and patellar tendon of children. Conclusion: The number of nociceptors as well as proprioceptive fibers is similar in patients with CP and patients from a neurologically healthy population. Level of Evidence IV, Cases Series. PMID:26981034

  5. Hypoxia-Induced Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Precedes Neovascularization after Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Hugo J. H.; Bernaudin, Myriam; Bellail, Anita; Schoch, Heike; Euler, Monika; Petit, Edwige; Risau, Werner

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hypoxia induces angiogenesis and thereby may counteract the detrimental neurological effects associated with stroke. Forty-eight to seventy-two hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion we found a strong increase in the number of newly formed vessels at the border of the infarction. Using the hypoxia marker nitroimidazole EF5, we detected hypoxic cells in the ischemic border of the neocortex. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is the main regulator of angiogenesis and is inducible by hypoxia, was strongly up-regulated in the ischemic border, at times between 6 and 24 hours after occlusion. In addition, both VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) were up-regulated at the border after 48 hours and later in the ischemic core. Finally, the two transcription factors, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and HIF-2, known to be involved in the regulation of VEGF and VEGFR gene expression, were increased in the ischemic border after 72 hours, suggesting a regulatory function for these factors. These results strongly suggest that the VEGF/VEGFR system, induced by hypoxia, leads to the growth of new vessels after cerebral ischemia. Exogenous support of this natural protective mechanism might lead to enhanced survival after stroke. PMID:10702412

  6. Plasma β-amyloid in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Janelidze, Shorena; Stomrud, Erik; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Westen, Danielle; Jeromin, Andreas; Song, Linan; Hanlon, David; Tan Hehir, Cristina A.; Baker, David; Blennow, Kaj; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of amyloid biomarkers in clinical practice would be accelerated if such biomarkers could be measured in blood. We analyzed plasma levels of Aβ42 and Aβ40 in a cohort of 719 individuals (the Swedish BioFINDER study), including patients with subjective cognitive decline (SCD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and cognitively healthy elderly, using a ultrasensitive immunoassay (Simoa platform). There were weak positive correlations between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels for both Aβ42 and Aβ40, and negative correlations between plasma Aβ42 and neocortical amyloid deposition (measured with PET). Plasma levels of Aβ42 and Aβ40 were reduced in AD dementia compared with all other diagnostic groups. However, during the preclinical or prodromal AD stages (i.e. in amyloid positive controls, SCD and MCI) plasma concentration of Aβ42 was just moderately decreased whereas Aβ40 levels were unchanged. Higher plasma (but not CSF) levels of Aβ were associated with white matter lesions, cerebral microbleeds, hypertension, diabetes and ischemic heart disease. In summary, plasma Aβ is overtly decreased during the dementia stage of AD indicating that prominent changes in Aβ metabolism occur later in the periphery compared to the brain. Further, increased levels of Aβ in plasma are associated with vascular disease. PMID:27241045

  7. Perivascular fat, AMP-activated protein kinase and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Almabrouk, T A M; Ewart, M A; Salt, I P; Kennedy, S

    2014-01-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) is an active endocrine and paracrine organ that modulates vascular function, with implications for the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Adipocytes and stromal cells contained within PVAT produce mediators (adipokines, cytokines, reactive oxygen species and gaseous compounds) with a range of paracrine effects modulating vascular smooth muscle cell contraction, proliferation and migration. However, the modulatory effect of PVAT on the vascular system in diseases, such as obesity, hypertension and atherosclerosis, remains poorly characterized. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates adipocyte metabolism, adipose biology and vascular function, and hence may be a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the vascular complications associated with obesity and T2DM. The role of AMPK in PVAT or the actions of PVAT have yet to be established, however. Activation of AMPK by pharmacological agents, such as metformin and thiazolidinediones, may modulate the activity of PVAT surrounding blood vessels and thereby contribute to their beneficial effect in cardiometabolic diseases. This review will provide a current perspective on how PVAT may influence vascular function via AMPK. We will also attempt to demonstrate how modulating AMPK activity using pharmacological agents could be exploited therapeutically to treat cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:24490856

  8. Central vestibular disease in a blue and gold macaw (Ara ararauna) with cerebral infarction and hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Grosset, Claire; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Keating, M Kelly; Gaffney, Patricia M; Lowenstine, Linda; Zwingenberger, Allison; Young, Alex C; Vernau, Karen M; Sokoloff, Amberly M; Hawkins, Michelle G

    2014-06-01

    A 24-year-old female blue and gold macaw (Ara ararauna) was presented for an acute onset of left head tilt. On examination, the macaw was dehydrated and had a 120-degree left head tilt, decreased proprioception of the left pelvic limb, and intermittent vertical nystagmus. Results of hematologic testing and biochemical analysis revealed severe leukocytosis with lymphopenia and heterophilia and a high uric acid concentration. Radiographs showed bilateral intertarsal joint osteoarthritis and a healed ulnar fracture. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed focal T2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery hyperintense lesions in the right cerebral hemisphere and in the midbrain. The midbrain lesion showed susceptibility artifact on the T2* sequence, suggesting hemorrhage. In the T2* sequence, iron accumulation (as seen with hemorrhage) distorts the magnetic signal, resulting in the production of a susceptibility artifact, which can then be visualized as a region of hypointensity. The bird was hospitalized but died despite intensive care. Necropsy revealed multiple cerebral vascular lesions including an acute cerebral infarct, a ruptured midbrain aneurysm, and multifocal systemic atherosclerosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a cerebral aneurysm in a bird. This report correlates the clinical presentation, imaging, and histopathologic findings in a macaw with central vestibular disease and demonstrates how advanced imaging techniques can identify hemorrhagic lesions through the T2* sequence. PMID:25115042

  9. Neuroprotective Effects of Agomelatine and Vinpocetine Against Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Induced Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Surbhi; Singh, Prabhat; Sharma, Brij Mohan; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) has been considered as a critical cause for the development of cognitive decline and dementia of vascular origin. Melatonin receptors have been reported to be beneficial in improving memory deterioration. Phosphodiesterase-1 (PDE1) enzyme offers protection against cognitive impairments and cerebrovascular disorders. Aim of this study is to explore the role of agomelatine (a dual MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptor agonist) and vinpocetine (selective PDE1 inhibitor) in CCH induced vascular dementia (VaD). Two vessel occlusion (2VO) or bilateral common carotid arteries ligation method was performed to initiate a phase of chronic hypoperfusion in mice. 2VO animals have shown significant cognitive deficits (Morris water maze), cholinergic dysfunction (increased acetyl cholinesterase -AChE) activity alongwith increased brain oxidative stress (decreased brain catalase, glutathione, as well as superoxide dismutase with an increase in malondialdehyde levels), and significant increase in brain infarct size (2,3,5- triphenylterazolium chloride-TTC staining). Treatment of agomelatine and vinpocetine reduced CCH induced learning and memory deficits and limited cholinergic dysfunction, oxidative stress, and tissue damage, suggesting that agomelatine and vinpocetine may provide benefits in CCH induced VaD. PMID:26036976

  10. Treatment for cerebral small vessel disease: effect of relaxin on the function and structure of cerebral parenchymal arterioles during hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Siu-Lung; Sweet, Julie G; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the effect of hypertension on the function and structure of cerebral parenchymal arterioles (PAs), a major target of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), and determined whether relaxin is a treatment for SVD during hypertension. PAs were isolated from 18-wk-old female normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs), and SHRs treated with human relaxin 2 for 14 d (4 μg/h; n=8/group) and studied using a pressurized arteriograph system. Hypertension reduced PA inner diameter (58±3 vs. 49±3 μm at 60 mmHg in WKY rats, P<0.05), suggesting inward remodeling that was reversed by relaxin (56±4 μm, P<0.05). Relaxin also increased PA distensibility in SHRs (34±2 vs. 10±2% in SHRs, P<0.05). Relaxin was detected in cerebrospinal fluid (110±30 pg/ml) after systemic administration, suggesting that it crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Relaxin receptors (RXFP1/2) were not detected in cerebral vasculature, but relaxin increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) expression in brain cortex. Inhibition of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase (axitinib, 4 mg/kg/d, 14 d) had no effect on increased distensibility with relaxin, but caused outward hypertrophic remodeling of PAs from SHRs. These results suggest that relaxin crosses the BBB and activates MMP-2 in brain cortex, which may interact with PAs to increase distensibility. VEGF appears to be involved in remodeling of PAs, but not relaxin-induced increased distensibility. PMID:23783073

  11. Modulatory effects of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) in hypobaric hypoxia induced cerebral vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Jayamurthy; Suryakumar, Geetha; Shukla, Dhananjay; Malhotra, Anand Swaroop; Kasiganesan, Harinath; Kumar, Ratan; Sawhney, Ramesh Chand; Chami, Arumughan

    2008-11-25

    Cerebral edema caused by vascular leakage is a major problem in various injuries of the CNS, such as stroke, head injury and high-altitude illness. A common feature of all these disorders is the fact that they are associated with tissue hypoxia. Hypoxia has been suggested to be a major pathogenic factor for the induction of vascular leakage in the brain. The objective of the present study was to evaluate potential of seabuckthorn (SBT) (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) seed oil in curtailing hypoxia induced transvascular fluid leakage in brain of hypoxia-exposed rats. Exposure of animals to hypobaric hypoxia (9144 m, 5h) caused a significant increase in the transvascular leakage studied by measuring water content and leakage of sodium fluorescein dye in the brain. Hypoxic stress also significantly enhanced the oxidative stress markers such as free radicals and malondialdehyde and it accompanied with decreased levels of antioxidants such as glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Pretreatment of animals with SBT seed oil significantly restricted the hypoxia induced increase in fluorescein dye leakage suggesting protection against hypoxia induced transvascular leakage in the brain. Hypoxia induced increase in the levels of free radicals and malondialdehyde were significantly lowered after SBT pretreatment. The SBT seed oil pretreatment also resulted in the significantly improved hypoxic tolerance as evidenced by increased hypoxic gasping time and survival time and decreased plasma catecholamine levels, as compared to hypoxic animals. These observations suggest that SBT seed oil possesses significant hypoxia protection activity and curtailed hypoxia induced enhanced vascular leakage in the brain. PMID:18824077

  12. [Pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of sporadic cerebral small vessel disease].

    PubMed

    Staszewski, Jacek; Piusińska-Macoch, Renata; Skrobowska, Ewa; Pawlik, Rafał; Brodacki, Bogdan; Stępień, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Sporadic small vessel disease (sSVD) is one of the most common vascular disease of the central nervous system (CNS). It is the main cause of lacunar stokes, hemorrhages to deep brain regions and chronic CNS diseases such as vascular parkinsonism and dementia. Beside a high and growing incidence of sSVD especially in the elderly population, the knowledge of ethiopathogenesis and optimal treatment of sSVD have not been established. The article summarizes different clinical manifestations (acute and chronic) as well as heterogenous radiologic changes found in CNS neuroimaging. PMID:26802696

  13. miRNAs: roles and clinical applications in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jamaluddin, Md Saha; Weakley, Sarah M; Zhang, Lidong; Kougias, Panagiotis; Lin, Peter H; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2011-01-01

    miRNAs are small, endogenously expressed noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression, mainly at the post-transcriptional level, via degradation or translational inhibition of their target mRNAs. Functionally, an individual miRNA can regulate the expression of multiple target genes. The study of miRNAs is rapidly growing and recent studies have revealed a significant role of miRNAs in vascular biology and disease. Many miRNAs are highly expressed in the vasculature, and their expression is dysregulated in diseased vessels. Several miRNAs have been found to be critical modulators of vascular pathologies, such as atherosclerosis, lipoprotein metabolism, inflammation, arterial remodeling, angiogenesis, smooth muscle cell regeneration, hypertension, apoptosis, neointimal hyperplasia and signal transduction pathways. Thus, miRNAs may serve as novel biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for vascular disease. This article summarizes the current studies related to the disease correlations and functional roles of miRNAs in the vascular system and discusses the potential applications of miRNAs in vascular disease. PMID:21171923

  14. miRNAs: roles and clinical applications in vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Jamaluddin, Md Saha; Weakley, Sarah M; Zhang, Lidong; Kougias, Panagiotis; Lin, Peter H; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2011-01-01

    miRNAs are small, endogenously expressed noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression, mainly at the post-transcriptional level, via degradation or translational inhibition of their target mRNAs. Functionally, an individual miRNA can regulate the expression of multiple target genes. The study of miRNAs is rapidly growing and recent studies have revealed a significant role of miRNAs in vascular biology and disease. Many miRNAs are highly expressed in the vasculature, and their expression is dysregulated in diseased vessels. Several miRNAs have been found to be critical modulators of vascular pathologies, such as atherosclerosis, lipoprotein metabolism, inflammation, arterial remodeling, angiogenesis, smooth muscle cell regeneration, hypertension, apoptosis, neointimal hyperplasia and signal transduction pathways. Thus, miRNAs may serve as novel biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for vascular disease. This article summarizes the current studies related to the disease correlations and functional roles of miRNAs in the vascular system and discusses the potential applications of miRNAs in vascular disease. PMID:21171923

  15. Optical measures of changes in cerebral vascular tone during voluntary breath holding and a Sternberg memory task.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chin Hong; Low, Kathy A; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Fletcher, Mark A; Maclin, Edward L; Chiarelli, Antonio M; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2016-07-01

    The human cerebral vasculature responds to changes in blood pressure and demands for oxygenation via cerebral autoregulation. Changes in cerebrovascular tone (vasoconstriction and vasodilation) also mediate the changes in blood flow measured by the BOLD fMRI signal. This cerebrovascular reactivity is known to vary with age. In two experiments, we demonstrate that cerebral pulse parameters measured using optical imaging can quantify changes in cerebral vascular tone, both globally and locally. In experiment 1, 51 older adults (age range=55-87) performed a voluntary breath-holding task while cerebral pulse amplitude measures were taken. We found significant pulse amplitude variations across breath-holding periods, indicating vasodilation during, and vasoconstriction after breath holding. The breath-holding index (BHI), a measure of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) was derived and found to correlate with age. BHI was also correlated with performance in the Modified Mini-Mental Status Examination, even after controlling for age and education. In experiment 2, the same participants performed a Sternberg task, and changes in regional pulse amplitude between high (set-size 6) and low (set-size 2) task loads were compared. Only task-related areas in the fronto-parietal network (FPN) showed significant reduction in pulse amplitude, indicating vasodilation. Non-task-related areas such as the somatosensory and auditory cortices did not show such reductions. Taken together, these experiments suggest that optical pulse parameters can index changes in brain vascular tone both globally and locally, using both physiological and cognitive load manipulations. PMID:27235126

  16. Effects of acetazolamide on the micro- and macro-vascular cerebral hemodynamics: a diffuse optical and transcranial doppler ultrasound study

    PubMed Central

    Zirak, Peyman; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Durduran, Turgut

    2010-01-01

    Acetazolamide (ACZ) was used to stimulate the cerebral vasculature on ten healthy volunteers to assess the cerebral vasomotor reactivity (CVR). We have combined near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and transcranial Doppler (TCD) technologies to non-invasively assess CVR in real-time by measuring oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations, using NIRS, local cerebral blood flow (CBF), using DCS, and blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the middle cerebral artery, using TCD. Robust and persistent increases in oxy-hemoglobin concentration, CBF and CBFV were observed. A significant agreement was found between macro-vascular (TCD) and micro-vascular (DCS) hemodynamics, between the NIRS and TCD data, and also within NIRS and DCS results. The relative cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen, rCMRO2, was also determined, and no significant change was observed. Our results showed that the combined diffuse optics-ultrasound technique is viable to follow (CVR) and rCMRO2 changes in adults, continuously, at the bed-side and in real time. PMID:21258561

  17. Effect of certain cerebral hemispheric diseases on dreaming.

    PubMed

    Epstein, A W

    1979-02-01

    Dreaming may be altered by cerebral hemispheric disease. A woman who sustained a probable left posterior cerebral artery thrombosis, with right homonymous hemianopsia and alexia, had virtual cessation of dreaming for at least 9 months. Four individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy experienced recurrent painful (frightening) dreams, which in two patients showed features identical to seizures. Sleep recordings showed abnormalities in all four, including rhythmic temporal epileptiform activity during REM sleep. Lesions in parieto-occipital loci may interfere with production of the visual imagery required for dreaming (negative symptom in the Jacksonian sense) while epileptic activity in temporal loci may produce painful repetitive dream imagery (positive symptom). PMID:217457

  18. Estrogen, vascular estrogen receptor and hormone therapy in postmenopausal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-12-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject's age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  19. Estrogen, Vascular Estrogen Receptor and Hormone Therapy in Postmenopausal Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject’s age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  20. Unusual cerebral vascular prion protein amyloid distribution in scrapie-infected transgenic mice expressing anchorless prion protein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In some prion diseases, misfolded aggregated protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres) is found in brain as amyloid, which can cause cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Small diffusible precursors of PrPres amyloid might flow with brain interstitial fluid (ISF), possibly accounting for the perivascular and intravascular distribution of PrPres amyloid. We previously reported that PrPres amyloid in scrapie-infected transgenic mice appeared to delay clearance of microinjected brain ISF tracer molecules. Results Here we studied distribution of PrPres amyloid on capillaries, arteries and veins to test whether vascular specificity of PrPres corresponded to distribution of ISF tracer molecules. To distinguish PrPres-positive arteries from veins and capillaries, scrapie-infected mouse brains were studied by immunodetection of alpha smooth muscle actin. ISF was studied using fluorescein-labeled ovalbumin microinjected into brain as a tracer. In infected preclinical or clinical mice, PrPres was found mostly on capillaries (73-78%). Lower levels were found on arteries (11-14%) and veins (11-13%). Compared to PrPres, ISF tracer was found at higher levels on capillaries (96-97%), and the remaining tracer was found at a skewed ratio of 4 to 1 on arteries and veins respectively. Conclusions PrPres association with blood vessels suggested that ISF flow might transport diffusible PrPres precursor molecules to perivascular sites. However, the different vascular specificity of PrPres and ISF tracer indicated that ISF flow did not alone control PrPres dissemination. Possibly blood vessel basement membrane (BM) components, such as glucosaminoglycans, might concentrate small PrPres aggregates and serve as scaffolds for PrP conversion on multiple vessel types. PMID:24252347

  1. Applications of Doppler ultrasound in clinical vascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, R. W.; Hokanson, D. E.; Sumner, D. S.; Strandness, D. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound has become the most useful and versatile noninvasive technique for objective evaluation of clinical vascular disease. Commercially available continuous-wave instruments provide qualitative and quantitative assessment of venous and arterial disease. Pulsed Doppler ultrasound was developed to provide longitudinal and transverse cross-sectional images of the arterial lumen with a resolution approaching that of conventional X-ray techniques. Application of Doppler ultrasound in venous, peripheral arterial, and cerebrovascular diseases is reviewed.

  2. [Thinking and Problems of Peripheral Vascular Disease Research].

    PubMed

    Shang De-jun

    2016-01-01

    It is necessary to study further syndrome differentiation based treatment of peripheral vascular disease. In order to improve the clinical effect and reduce the rate of amputation, early diagnosis and early intervention are important. Meanwhile, treatment of Chinese medicine should be combined with necessary surgical intervention. It should be important to supplement some details about blood stasis syndrome and activating blood and dissolving stasis therapy of peripheral vascular disease. The application of various Chinese medicine external therapies should not be ignored, especially promoting granulation and wound healing therapy. PMID:26955670

  3. The utility of digital subtraction arteriography in peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Kubal, W S; Crummy, A B; Turnipseed, W D

    1983-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA), whether used in conjunction with intravenous or intraarterial injection techniques, has an established role in evaluation of peripheral vascular disease. Use of DSA can reduce the time, cost, and patient discomfort of the standard arteriographic study. While it is limited by field size and patient cooperation in some instances, the utility of noninvasive imaging using intravenous DSA and the added anatomic detail of intraarterial DSA for roadmapping and delineation of small distal vessels provide the basis for future integration of standard arteriographic and DSA methods in assessment of peripheral vascular disease. PMID:6228296

  4. Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia including Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Heather M; Corriveau, Roderick A; Craft, Suzanne; Faber, James E; Greenberg, Steven M; Knopman, David; Lamb, Bruce T; Montine, Thomas J; Nedergaard, Maiken; Schaffer, Chris B; Schneider, Julie A; Wellington, Cheryl; Wilcock, Donna M; Zipfel, Gregory J; Zlokovic, Berislav; Bain, Lisa J; Bosetti, Francesca; Galis, Zorina S; Koroshetz, Walter; Carrillo, Maria C

    2015-06-01

    Scientific evidence continues to demonstrate the linkage of vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia such as Alzheimer's disease. In December, 2013, the Alzheimer's Association, with scientific input from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute from the National Institutes of Health, convened scientific experts to discuss the research gaps in our understanding of how vascular factors contribute to Alzheimer's disease and related dementia. This manuscript summarizes the meeting and the resultant discussion, including an outline of next steps needed to move this area of research forward. PMID:25510382

  5. Diabetic Retinopathy: Vascular and Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Semeraro, F.; Cancarini, A.; dell'Omo, R.; Rezzola, S.; Romano, M. R.; Costagliola, C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of visual impairment in the working-age population of the Western world. The pathogenesis of DR is complex and several vascular, inflammatory, and neuronal mechanisms are involved. Inflammation mediates structural and molecular alterations associated with DR. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways associated with DR are not completely characterized. Previous studies indicate that tissue hypoxia and dysregulation of immune responses associated with diabetes mellitus can induce increased expression of numerous vitreous mediators responsible for DR development. Thus, analysis of vitreous humor obtained from diabetic patients has made it possible to identify some of the mediators (cytokines, chemokines, and other factors) responsible for DR pathogenesis. Further studies are needed to better understand the relationship between inflammation and DR. Herein the main vitreous-related factors triggering the occurrence of retinal complication in diabetes are highlighted. PMID:26137497

  6. Cerebral vascular malformations: Time-resolved CT angiography compared to DSA

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Cheemun; Chakraborty, Santanu; dos Santos, Marlise P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to prospectively test the hypothesis that time-resolved CT angiography (TRCTA) on a Toshiba 320-slice CT scanner enables the same characterization of cerebral vascular malformation (CVM) including arteriovenous malformation (AVM), dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF), pial arteriovenous fistula (PAVF) and developmental venous anomaly (DVA) compared to digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Materials and methods Eighteen (eight males, 10 females) consecutive patients (11 AVM, four DAVF, one PAVF, and two DVA) underwent 19 TRCTA (Aquillion one, Toshiba) for suspected CVM diagnosed on routine CT or MRI. One patient with a dural AVF underwent TRCTA and DSA twice before and after treatment. Of the 18 patients, 13 were followed with DSA (Artis, Siemens) within two months of TRCTA. Twenty-three sequential volume acquisitions of the whole head were acquired after injection of 50 ml contrast at the rate of 4 ml/sec. Two patients with DVA did not undergo DSA. Two TRCTA were not assessed because of technical problems. TRCTAs were independently reviewed by two neuroradiologists and DSA by two other neuroradiologists and graded according to the Spetzler-Martin classification, Borden classification, overall diagnostic quality, and level of confidence. Weighted kappa coefficients (k) were calculated to compare reader’s assessment of DSA vs TRCTA. Results There was excellent (k = 0.83 and 1) to good (k = 0.56, 0.61, 0.65 and 0.67) agreement between the different possible pairs of neuroradiologists for the assessment of vascular malformations. Conclusion TRCTA may be a sufficient noninvasive substitute for conventional DSA in certain clinical situations. PMID:26246101

  7. Management of retinal vascular diseases: a patient-centric approach

    PubMed Central

    Brand, C S

    2012-01-01

    Retinal vascular diseases are a leading cause of blindness in the Western world. Advancement in the clinical management of these diseases has been fast-paced, with new treatments becoming available as well as license extensions of existing treatments. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in certain retinal vascular diseases, including wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic macular oedema (DMO), and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Treatment of wet AMD and visual impairment due to either DMO or macular oedema secondary to RVO with an anti-VEGF on an as needed basis, rather than a fixed schedule, allows an individualised treatment approach; providing treatment when patients are most likely to benefit from it, while minimising the number of unnecessary intravitreal injections. Thus, an individualised treatment regimen reduces the chances of over-treatment and under-treatment, optimising both the risk/benefit profile of the treatment and the efficient use of NHS resource. Streamlining of treatment for patients with wet AMD and visual impairment due to either DMO or macular oedema secondary to RVO, by using one treatment with similar posology across all three diseases, may help to minimise burden of clinic capacity and complexity and hence optimise patient outcomes. Informed treatment decisions and efficient clinic throughput are important for optimal patient outcomes in the fast-changing field of retinal vascular diseases. PMID:22495396

  8. [Molecular diagnosis of collagen vascular diseases and vasculitides].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, K; Hertl, M; Sitaru, C

    2016-01-01

    Collagen vascular diseases and vasculitides comprise various diseases, which may affect virtually every organ system. Therefore, their diagnosis and management is often an interdisciplinary challenge. Because of the heterogeneous symptoms, these diseases have significant overlap, which interferes with the clinical diagnosis and may require additional investigation. Therefore, a rational and comprehensive diagnostic work-up should be performed at the initial presentation before initiation of therapy. The detection of antinuclear (ANA) or anticell antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy on Hep2 cells is used to screen for autoantibodies in collagen vascular diseases. The molecular specificity of autoantibodies should be further characterized using immunoassays with recombinant or purified protein. When systemic autoimmune disease is suspected, the function of the frequently affected organs should be evaluated. The immunopathological findings should always be interpreted in the context of clinical, histological, and imaging data. The detection of autoantibodies is helpful for the initial diagnosis, provides prognostic information, may indicate involvement of organs or systems and some parameters may also be used for disease monitoring. The clinical significance of autoantibodies is emphasized by the fact that their detection constitutes diagnostic criteria for most collagen vascular diseases and several vasculitides. The screening for ANCA may be performed using immunoassays with recombinant myeloperoxidase and proteinase 3 or by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy on granulocytes. In this article, the current diagnostic tools and their relevance for the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic autoimmune diseases with primary skin involvement are reviewed. PMID:26650868

  9. Depressive behavior and vascular dysfunction: a link between clinical depression and vascular disease?

    PubMed Central

    d'Audiffret, Alexandre C.; Frisbee, Stephanie J.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Goodwill, Adam G.; Isingrini, Elsa

    2010-01-01

    As chronic stress and depression have become recognized as significant risk factors for peripheral vascular disease in patients with no prior history of vasculopathy, we interrogated this relationship utilizing an established mouse model of chronic stress/depressive symptoms from behavioral research. Male mice were exposed to 8 wk of unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS; e.g., wet bedding, predator sound/smell, random disruption of light/dark cycle), with indexes of depressive behavior (coat status, grooming, and mobility) becoming exacerbated vs. controls. In vascular rings, constrictor (phenylephrine) and endothelium-independent dilator (sodium nitroprusside) responses were not different between groups, although endothelium-dependent dilation (methacholine) was attenuated with UCMS. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition was without effect in UCMS but nearly abolished reactivity in controls, while cyclooxygenase inhibition blunted dilation in both. Combined blockade abolished reactivity in controls, although a significant dilation remained in UCMS that was abolished by catalase. Arterial NO production was attenuated by UCMS, although H2O2 production was increased. UCMS mice demonstrated an increased, although variable, insulin resistance and inflammation. However, while UCMS-induced vascular impairments were consistent, the predictive power of aggregate plasma levels of insulin, TNF-α, IL-1β, and C-reactive peptide were limited. However, when separated into tertiles with regard to vascular outcomes, insulin resistance and hypertension were predictive of the most severe vascular impairments. Taken together, these data suggest that aggregate insulin resistance, inflammation, and hypertension in UCMS mice are not robust predictors of vascular dysfunction, suggesting that unidentified mechanisms may be superior predictors of poor vascular outcomes in this model. PMID:20167667

  10. Targeting Cellular Antioxidant Enzymes for Treating Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong Hoon; Kang, Sang Won

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerotic vascular dysfunction is a chronic inflammatory process that spreads from the fatty streak and foam cells through lesion progression. Therefore, its early diagnosis and prevention is unfeasible. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Intracellular redox status is tightly regulated by oxidant and antioxidant systems. Imbalance in these systems causes oxidative or reductive stress which triggers cellular damage or aberrant signaling, and leads to dysregulation. Paradoxically, large clinical trials have shown that non-specific ROS scavenging by antioxidant vitamins is ineffective or sometimes harmful. ROS production can be locally regulated by cellular antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases, catalase, glutathione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins. Therapeutic approach targeting these antioxidant enzymes might prove beneficial for prevention of ROS-related atherosclerotic vascular disease. Conversely, the development of specific antioxidant enzyme-mimetics could contribute to the clinical effectiveness. PMID:24009865

  11. Extracellular matrix synthesis in vascular disease: hypertension, and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ponticos, Markella; Smith, Barbara D.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) within the vascular network provides both a structural and regulatory role. The ECM is a dynamic composite of multiple proteins that form structures connecting cells within the network. Blood vessels are distended by blood pressure and, therefore, require ECM components with elasticity yet with enough tensile strength to resist rupture. The ECM is involved in conducting mechanical signals to cells. Most importantly, ECM regulates cellular function through chemical signaling by controlling activation and bioavailability of the growth factors. Cells respond to ECM by remodeling their microenvironment which becomes dysregulated in vascular diseases such hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis. This review examines the cellular and ECM components of vessels, with specific emphasis on the regulation of collagen type I and implications in vascular disease. PMID:24474961

  12. Contribution of neuroimaging to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo; Pascual, Belén

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to review, summarize and analyze recent findings relevant to the contribution of neuroimaging to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). Computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide accurate demonstration of the location and rate of progression of atrophic changes affecting the brain in AD and the different types of vascular lesions observed in mixed dementias and in pure VaD. Quantification of cortical thickness allows early diagnosis and rate of progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. White matter involvement can also be quantified with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional methods including fMRI, functional connectivity, and MR spectroscopy (MRS). Isotope-based techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) allow measurement of regional cerebral glucose metabolism using (18)F-2-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). Cerebral blood flow can be measured using PET with H(2)(15)O or with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) with technetium ((99m)Tc-HMPAO) or, more recently, arterial spin label (ASL) imaging. There are isotope markers for amyloid-beta ((11)O-PIB, (18)F-florbetapir), tau ((18)FDDNP) and activated microglia ((11)C-PK11195). Neuroimaging markers are particularly useful at the early symptomatic and preclinical asymptomatic phases of AD, as well as serving as endpoints in clinical trials. PMID:23142262

  13. Smoking: A risk factor for vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Phyllis; Flanagan, Patty

    2016-09-01

    Smoking in the United States includes at least 16% of the adults, 24% of high school students, nearly 8% of middle school students and is more prevalent in men than women; however, a decline in smoking has been documented in recent years. Cardiovascular disease continues to be a leading cause of death. Smoking is identified as a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease, carotid disease, and peripheral artery disease with peripheral artery disease documented in 5%-10% of all Americans. Smoking is also a significant risk factor in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm in 7% of men aged 65-75 years with a smoking history. Toxic chemicals found in tobacco smoke are reported at 7,357 chemical compounds including the addictive chemical of nicotine. A substantial number of large studies and well-known trials have identified an increase in proinflammatory cells and cellular processes in the smoker diagnosed with atherosclerosis and in the mechanism attributed to abdominal aortic aneurysm development. The cost of smoking to health care is significant, and smoking cessation can demonstrate benefits to health improvement and the cost of health care. PMID:27568314

  14. Non-invasive functional imaging of Cerebral Blood Volume with Vascular-Space-Occupancy (VASO) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hanzhang; Hua, Jun; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) based on changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV) can directly probe vasodilatation and vasoconstriction during brain activation or physiologic challenges, and can provide important insights into the mechanism of Blood-Oxygenation-Level-Dependent (BOLD) signal changes. At present, the most widely used CBV fMRI technique in humans is called Vascular-Space-Occupancy (VASO) MRI and this article provides a technical review of this method. VASO MRI utilizes T1 differences between blood and tissue to distinguish these two compartments within a voxel and uses blood-nulling inversion recovery sequence to yield an MR signal proportional to 1-CBV. As such, vasodilatation will result in a VASO signal decrease and vasoconstriction will have the reverse effect. The VASO technique can be performed dynamically with a temporal resolution comparable to several other fMRI methods such as BOLD or Arterial-Spin-Labeling (ASL), and is particularly powerful when conducted in conjunction with these complementary techniques. The pulse sequence and imaging parameters of VASO can be optimized such that the signal change is predominantly of CBV origin, but careful considerations should be taken to minimize other contributions, such as those from the BOLD effect, CBF, and CSF. Sensitivity of the VASO technique remains to be the primary disadvantage when compared to BOLD, but this technique is increasingly demonstrating utility in neuroscientific and clinical applications. PMID:23355392

  15. Language Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lempinen, Maire; And Others

    A study of 21 patients with Alzheimer's Disease and 25 with vascular dementia, the two most common forms of dementia, investigated language impairments in the dementia syndrome to see if analysis of language disturbances is helpful in differential diagnosis. Diagnostic assessment included a neurological examination, detailed medical history,…

  16. Vascular Factors and Cognitive Dysfunction in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pachalska, Maria; Bidzan, Leszek; Bidzan, Mariola; Góral-Półrola, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to assess the influence of vascular factors on the degree of intensity and rate of progression of cognitive disorders in the course of Alzheimer Disease (AD). Material/Methods The research group consisted of 39 persons, all of whom were diagnosed with AD according to the NINCDS/ADRDA criteria. We divided these patients into 2 subgroups, based on the vascular factors measured by the modified Hachinski Ischemic Scale (Ha-mod): group A, without the vascular component (HA-mod score of 0–1 point), and group B, with the vascular component (a score over 1 point). Cognitive functions were evaluated at baseline and again 2 years later, using the Cognitive Part of the Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-cog). Results We found that the patients from subgroup B, with the stronger vascular component, demonstrated the highest intensity of cognitive disorders at baseline, both in terms of the overall ADAS-cog score, and in the subscores for ideational praxis, orientation, spoken language ability, comprehension of spoken language, and word-finding difficulty in spontaneous speech. Another variable which was connected with the intensity of dementia was age. After 2 years, however, the rate of progression of cognitive disorders was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Conclusions The severity of vascular factors correlates directly with the intensity of cognitive disturbances. At the 2-year follow-up examination, however, no correlation was observed in the research group between greater vascular involvement and more rapid progression of cognitive disorders, as measured by the ADAS-cog scale. PMID:26561951

  17. Evidence of endothelial dysfunction in the development of Alzheimer’s disease: Is Alzheimer’s a vascular disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Rory J; Soiza, Roy L

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remains unclear. The emerging view is that cerebrovascular dysfunction is a feature not only of cerebrovascular diseases, such as stroke, but also of neurodegenerative conditions, such as AD. In AD, there is impaired structure and function of cerebral blood vessels and cells in the neurovascular unit. These effects are mediated by vascular oxidative stress. Injury to the neurovascular unit alters cerebral blood flow regulation, depletes vascular reserves, disrupts the blood-brain barrier and reduces the brain’s repair capacity. Such injury can exacerbate the cognitive dysfunction exerted by incident ischemia and coexisting neurodegeneration. This article summarises data regarding cardiovascular risk factors, vascular abnormalities and brain endothelial damage in AD. In view of accumulating evidence of vascular pathology in AD, we also review the literature (MEDLINE, EMBASE) for clinical evidence of impaired endothelial function in AD. A total of 15 articles investigating endothelial dysfunction in AD were identified. 10 of these articles showed impaired endothelial function in AD patients. The current literature suggests endothelial dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of AD. This aspect of AD pathology is particularly interesting in view of its potential for therapeutic intervention. Future research on endothelial function in AD should concentrate on population-based analysis and combine multiple methods to evaluate endothelial function. PMID:24224133

  18. The Importance of Thrombin in Cerebral Injury and Disease.

    PubMed

    Krenzlin, Harald; Lorenz, Viola; Danckwardt, Sven; Kempski, Oliver; Alessandri, Beat

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that prothrombin and its active derivative thrombin are expressed locally in the central nervous system. So far, little is known about the physiological and pathophysiological functions exerted by thrombin in the human brain. Extra-hepatic prothrombin expression has been identified in neuronal cells and astrocytes via mRNA measurement. The actual amount of brain derived prothrombin is expected to be 1% or less compared to that in the liver. The role in brain injury depends upon its concentration, as higher amounts cause neuroinflammation and apoptosis, while lower concentrations might even be cytoprotective. Its involvement in numerous diseases like Alzheimer's, multiple sclerosis, cerebral ischemia and haemorrhage is becoming increasingly clear. This review focuses on elucidation of the cerebral thrombin expression, local generation and its role in injury and disease of the central nervous system. PMID:26761005

  19. The Importance of Thrombin in Cerebral Injury and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Krenzlin, Harald; Lorenz, Viola; Danckwardt, Sven; Kempski, Oliver; Alessandri, Beat

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that prothrombin and its active derivative thrombin are expressed locally in the central nervous system. So far, little is known about the physiological and pathophysiological functions exerted by thrombin in the human brain. Extra-hepatic prothrombin expression has been identified in neuronal cells and astrocytes via mRNA measurement. The actual amount of brain derived prothrombin is expected to be 1% or less compared to that in the liver. The role in brain injury depends upon its concentration, as higher amounts cause neuroinflammation and apoptosis, while lower concentrations might even be cytoprotective. Its involvement in numerous diseases like Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, cerebral ischemia and haemorrhage is becoming increasingly clear. This review focuses on elucidation of the cerebral thrombin expression, local generation and its role in injury and disease of the central nervous system. PMID:26761005

  20. Cerebrovascular dysfunction and microcirculation rarefaction precede white matter lesions in a mouse genetic model of cerebral ischemic small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Joutel, Anne; Monet-Leprêtre, Marie; Gosele, Claudia; Baron-Menguy, Céline; Hammes, Annette; Schmidt, Sabine; Lemaire-Carrette, Barbara; Domenga, Valérie; Schedl, Andreas; Lacombe, Pierre; Hubner, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic small vessel disease (SVD) is the leading cause of vascular dementia and a major contributor to stroke in humans. Dominant mutations in NOTCH3 cause cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a genetic archetype of cerebral ischemic SVD. Progress toward understanding the pathogenesis of this disease and developing effective therapies has been hampered by the lack of a good animal model. Here, we report the development of a mouse model for CADASIL via the introduction of a CADASIL-causing Notch3 point mutation into a large P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC). In vivo expression of the mutated PAC transgene in the mouse reproduced the endogenous Notch3 expression pattern and main pathological features of CADASIL, including Notch3 extracellular domain aggregates and granular osmiophilic material (GOM) deposits in brain vessels, progressive white matter damage, and reduced cerebral blood flow. Mutant mice displayed attenuated myogenic responses and reduced caliber of brain arteries as well as impaired cerebrovascular autoregulation and functional hyperemia. Further, we identified a substantial reduction of white matter capillary density. These neuropathological changes occurred in the absence of either histologically detectable alterations in cerebral artery structure or blood-brain barrier breakdown. These studies provide in vivo evidence for cerebrovascular dysfunction and microcirculatory failure as key contributors to hypoperfusion and white matter damage in this genetic model of ischemic SVD. PMID:20071773

  1. Silent brain infarction in the presence of systemic vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Slark, Julia; Bentley, Paul; Sharma, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic brain ischaemic in the presence of vascular disease in other arterial territories. Design Studies up to January 2011 were identified through comprehensive search strategies. Arcsine transformation for meta-analysis was used to calculate the standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Setting A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. Participants For each study, the proportion of patients positive for SBI in the presence of other systemic vascular disease was extracted and analyzed. Main outcome measures Using a random-effects model, a pooled effect estimate interpreted as a percentage prevalence of disease was calculated. Results SBI in the presence of acute ischaemic stroke was found in 23% (SMD 0.99; P < 0.001; 95% CI 0.88–1.10); a 35% prevalence was found in patients with coronary artery disease (SMD 1.26; P < 0.001; 95% CI 0.95–1.58); and a 14% prevalence in patients with peripheral artery disease (SMD 0.48; P < 0.002; 95% CI 0.42–0.54), although the data-set in the latter is smaller. Conclusions Patients with systemic vascular disease are at an increased risk of silent brain infarction. PMID:24175060

  2. Vascular involvement of the central nervous system and systemic diseases: etiologies and MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, Simone; Faria, Andréia Vasconcellos; Zanardi, Verônica A; Fernandes, Sandra R; Costallat, Lilian Tereza Lavras; Cendes, Fernando

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to review magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with vascular involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) associated with systemic diseases. We reviewed the MRI findings in clinically suspected cases of vascular involvement of the CNS associated with systemic diseases. Vascular CNS involvement was considered in the presence of characteristic clinical, MRI and/or MR angiography findings. In order to be included in the study, patients needed to have a complete clinical and laboratory investigation and a follow-up of a minimum of 6 months. Twenty-four patients (17 women and 7 men), with mean age of 29.5 years had diagnosis of CNS vasculitis and were included. The clinical presentation was variable, but the most common complaints were headache in 18, focal deficits in 9, disturbances of consciousness in 9, and seizures in 8 patients. Underlying causes for CNS vasculitis were identified in all patients and included systemic lupus erythematosus in eight, tuberculosis in three, bacterial meningitis in three, Takayasu arteritis in two, polyarteritis nodosa in two, syphilis in two, drug abuse in two, yellow fever in one and varicella in one patient. Nonspecific high intensity T2WI/FLAIR lesions in white matter were the most common finding, present in ten patients. Eight patients had infarctions in large cerebral arteries territory, associated or not with high intensity T2WI/FLAIR small foci. Vascular involvement of the CNS can be found in a great variety of systemic diseases, including rheumatologic, infectious and drug abuse. Clinical findings are unspecific and MRI/MRA may help to establish the correct diagnosis. PMID:18651146

  3. Pulmonary vascular disease in a rabbit a high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Donald; Williams, David; Rios-Datenz, Jaime; Gosney, John

    1990-03-01

    A male weanling rabbit of the New Zealand White strain, born and living at an altitude of 3800 m in La Paz, Bolivia, developed right ventricular hypertrophy. This was found to be associated with growth of vascular smooth muscle cells in the intima of pulmonary arterioles, and contrasted with muscularization of the walls of pulmonary arterioles, without extension into the intima, found in a healthy, high-altitude control rabbit of the same strain. A low-altitude control showed no such muscularization. It is concluded that alveolar hypoxia, acting directly or through an intermediate agent, is a growth factor for vascular smooth muscle cells in pulmonary arterioles. This is the first report of pulmonary vascular disease due to high altitude in rabbits.

  4. Information entropy-based fitting of the disease trajectory of brain ischemia-induced vascular cognitive impairment★

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Huo, Ju; Zhao, Ying; Tian, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the disease trajectory of vascular cognitive impairment using the entropy of information in a neural network mathematical simulation based on the free radical and excitatory amino acids theories. Glutamate, malondialdehyde, and inducible nitric oxide synthase content was significantly elevated, but acetylcholine, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and constitutive nitric oxide synthase content was significantly decreased in our vascular cognitive impairment model. The fitting curves for each factor were obtained using Matlab software. Nineteen, 30 and 49 days post ischemia were the main output time frames of the influence of these seven factors. Our results demonstrated that vascular cognitive impairment involves multiple factors. These factors include excitatory amino acid toxicity and nitric oxide toxicity. These toxicities disrupt the dynamic equilibrium of the production and removal of oxygen free radicals after cerebral ischemia, reducing the ability to clear oxygen free radicals and worsening brain injury. PMID:25745466

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor: a neurovascular target in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Lange, Christian; Storkebaum, Erik; de Almodóvar, Carmen Ruiz; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Brain function critically relies on blood vessels to supply oxygen and nutrients, to establish a barrier for neurotoxic substances, and to clear waste products. The archetypal vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, arose in evolution as a signal affecting neural cells, but was later co-opted by blood vessels to regulate vascular function. Consequently, VEGF represents an attractive target to modulate brain function at the neurovascular interface. On the one hand, VEGF is neuroprotective, through direct effects on neural cells and their progenitors and indirect effects on brain perfusion. In accordance, preclinical studies show beneficial effects of VEGF administration in neurodegenerative diseases, peripheral neuropathies and epilepsy. On the other hand, pathologically elevated VEGF levels enhance vessel permeability and leakage, and disrupt blood-brain barrier integrity, as in demyelinating diseases, for which blockade of VEGF may be beneficial. Here, we summarize current knowledge on the role and therapeutic potential of VEGF in neurological diseases. PMID:27364743

  6. Vascular health late after Kawasaki disease: implications for accelerated atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yiu-Fai

    2014-11-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD), an acute vasculitis that primarily affects young children, is the most common acquired paediatric cardiovascular disease in developed countries. While sequelae of arterial inflammation in the acute phase of KD are well documented, its late effects on vascular health are increasingly unveiled. Late vascular dysfunction is characterized by structural alterations and functional impairment in term of arterial stiffening and endothelial dysfunction and shown to involve both coronary and systemic arteries. Further evidence suggests that continuous low grade inflammation and ongoing active remodeling of coronary arterial lesions occur late after acute illness and may play a role in structural and functional alterations of the arteries. Potential importance of genetic modulation on vascular health late after KD is implicated by associations between mannose binding lectin and inflammatory gene polymorphisms with severity of peripheral arterial stiffening and carotid intima-media thickening. The changes in cholesterol and lipoproteins levels late after KD further appear similar to those proposed to be atherogenic. While data on adverse vascular health are less controversial in patients with persistent or regressed coronary arterial aneurysms, data appear conflicting in individuals with no coronary arterial involvements or only transient coronary ectasia. Notwithstanding, concerns have been raised with regard to predisposition of KD in childhood to accelerated atherosclerosis in adulthood. Until further evidence-based data are available, however, it remains important to assess and monitor cardiovascular risk factors and to promote cardiovascular health in children with a history of KD in the long term. PMID:25550701

  7. Extracellular vesicles as mediators of vascular inflammation in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Helmke, Alexandra; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2016-03-01

    Vascular inflammation is a common cause of renal impairment and a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients with kidney disease. Current studies consistently show an increase of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in acute vasculitis and in patients with atherosclerosis. Recent research has elucidated mechanisms that mediate vascular wall leukocyte accumulation and differentiation. This review addresses the role of EVs in this process. Part one of this review addresses functional roles of EVs in renal vasculitis. Most published data address anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis and indicate that the number of EVs, mostly of platelet origin, is increased in active disease. EVs generated from neutrophils by activation by ANCA can contribute to vessel damage. While EVs are also elevated in other types of autoimmune vasculitis with renal involvement such as systemic lupus erythematodes, functional consequences beyond intravascular thrombosis remain to be established. In typical hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to infection with shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, EV numbers are elevated and contribute to toxin distribution into the vascular wall. Part two addresses mechanisms how EVs modulate vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, a process that is aggravated in uremia. Elevated numbers of circulating endothelial EVs were associated with atherosclerotic complications in a number of studies in patients with and without kidney disease. Uremic endothelial EVs are defective in induction of vascular relaxation. Neutrophil adhesion and transmigration and intravascular thrombus formation are critically modulated by EVs, a process that is amenable to therapeutic interventions. EVs can enhance monocyte adhesion to the endothelium and modulate macrophage differentiation and cytokine production with major influence on the local inflammatory milieu in the plaque. They significantly influence lipid phagocytosis and antigen presentation by

  8. Extracellular vesicles as mediators of vascular inflammation in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Helmke, Alexandra; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2016-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is a common cause of renal impairment and a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients with kidney disease. Current studies consistently show an increase of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in acute vasculitis and in patients with atherosclerosis. Recent research has elucidated mechanisms that mediate vascular wall leukocyte accumulation and differentiation. This review addresses the role of EVs in this process. Part one of this review addresses functional roles of EVs in renal vasculitis. Most published data address anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis and indicate that the number of EVs, mostly of platelet origin, is increased in active disease. EVs generated from neutrophils by activation by ANCA can contribute to vessel damage. While EVs are also elevated in other types of autoimmune vasculitis with renal involvement such as systemic lupus erythematodes, functional consequences beyond intravascular thrombosis remain to be established. In typical hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to infection with shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, EV numbers are elevated and contribute to toxin distribution into the vascular wall. Part two addresses mechanisms how EVs modulate vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, a process that is aggravated in uremia. Elevated numbers of circulating endothelial EVs were associated with atherosclerotic complications in a number of studies in patients with and without kidney disease. Uremic endothelial EVs are defective in induction of vascular relaxation. Neutrophil adhesion and transmigration and intravascular thrombus formation are critically modulated by EVs, a process that is amenable to therapeutic interventions. EVs can enhance monocyte adhesion to the endothelium and modulate macrophage differentiation and cytokine production with major influence on the local inflammatory milieu in the plaque. They significantly influence lipid phagocytosis and antigen presentation by

  9. Effect of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy on Brain Iron, Copper, and Zinc in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schrag, Matthew; Crofton, Andrew; Zabel, Matthew; Jiffry, Arshad; Kirsch, David; Dickson, April; Mao, Xiao Wen; Vinters, Harry V.; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Kirsch, Wolff

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a vascular lesion associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) present in up to 95% of AD patients and produces MRI-detectable microbleeds in many of these patients. It is possible that CAA-related microbleeding is a source of pathological iron in the AD brain. Because the homeostasis of copper, iron, and zinc are so intimately linked, we determined whether CAA contributes to changes in the brain levels of these metals. We obtained brain tissue from AD patients with severe CAA to compare to AD patients without evidence of vascular amyloid-β. Patients with severe CAA had significantly higher non-heme iron levels. Histologically, iron was deposited in the walls of large CAA-affected vessels. Zinc levels were significantly elevated in grey matter in both the CAA and non-CAA AD tissue, but no vascular staining was noted in CAA cases. Copper levels were decreased in both CAA and non-CAA AD tissues and copper was found to be prominently deposited on the vasculature in CAA. Together, these findings demonstrate that CAA is a significant variable affecting transition metals in AD. PMID:21187585

  10. Determinants of resting cerebral blood flow in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Bush, Adam M; Borzage, Matthew T; Choi, Soyoung; Václavů, Lena; Tamrazi, Benita; Nederveen, Aart J; Coates, Thomas D; Wood, John C

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is common in children with sickle cell disease and results from an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is increased in patients with sickle cell disease to compensate for their anemia, but adequacy of their oxygen delivery has not been systematically demonstrated. This study examined the physiological determinants of CBF in 37 patients with sickle cell disease, 38 ethnicity matched control subjects and 16 patients with anemia of non-sickle origin. Cerebral blood flow was measured using phase contrast MRI of the carotid and vertebral arteries. CBF increased inversely to oxygen content (r(2)  = 0.69, P < 0.0001). Brain oxygen delivery, the product of CBF and oxygen content, was normal in all groups. Brain composition, specifically the relative amounts of grey and white matter, was the next strongest CBF predictor, presumably by influencing cerebral metabolic rate. Grey matter/white matter ratio and CBF declined monotonically until the age of 25 in all subjects, consistent with known maturational changes in brain composition. Further CBF reductions were observed with age in subjects older than 35 years of age, likely reflecting microvascular aging. On multivariate regression, CBF was independent of disease state, hemoglobin S, hemoglobin F, reticulocyte count and cell free hemoglobin, suggesting that it is regulated similarly in patients and control subjects. In conclusion, sickle cell disease patients had sufficient oxygen delivery at rest, but accomplish this only by marked increases in their resting CBF, potentially limiting their ability to further augment flow in response to stress. Am. J. Hematol. 91:912-917, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27263497

  11. Changes in cerebral vascular reactivity and structure following prolonged exposure to high altitude in humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Glen E; Davies-Thompson, Jodie; Dominelli, Paolo B; Heran, Manraj K S; Donnelly, Joseph; duManoir, Gregory R; Ainslie, Philip N; Rauscher, Alexander; Sheel, A William

    2015-12-01

    Although high-altitude exposure can lead to neurocognitive impairment, even upon return to sea level, it remains unclear the extent to which brain volume and regional cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) are altered following high-altitude exposure. The purpose of this study was to simultaneously determine the effect of 3 weeks at 5050 m on: (1) structural brain alterations; and (2) regional CVR after returning to sea level for 1 week. Healthy human volunteers (n = 6) underwent baseline and follow-up structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at rest and during a CVR protocol (end-tidal PCO2 reduced by -10, -5 and increased by +5, +10, and +15 mmHg from baseline). CVR maps (% mmHg(-1)) were generated using BOLD MRI and brain volumes were estimated. Following return to sea level, whole-brain volume and gray matter volume was reduced by 0.4 ± 0.3% (P < 0.01) and 2.6 ± 1.0% (P < 0.001), respectively; white matter was unchanged. Global gray matter CVR and white matter CVR were unchanged following return to sea level, but CVR was selectively increased (P < 0.05) in the brainstem (+30 ± 12%), hippocampus (+12 ± 3%), and thalamus (+10 ± 3%). These changes were the result of improvement and/or reversal of negative CVR to positive CVR in these regions. Three weeks of high-altitude exposure is reflected in loss of gray matter volume and improvements in negative CVR. PMID:26660556

  12. Impact of inflammation on vascular disease in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Virdis, Agostino; Dell'Agnello, Umberto; Taddei, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    Low grade inflammation exerts a crucial pathogenic role in hypertension and cardiovascular disease. A large body of evidence indicates that innate and adaptive immune systems, and in particular T cells, are involved. A balance between T-effector lymphocytes and Treg lymphocytes represents a crucial regulatory mechanism that, when altered, favours blood pressure elevation and organ damage development. Of note, Treg lymphocytes exert important anti-inflammatory properties, whose activities guarantees vascular homeostasis and protects the vessel wall from the development of atherosclerosis. In humans, most of evidence ascertaining essential hypertension as a condition of chronic low-grade inflammatory status revealed a strict and independent association between CRP, TNF-α, IL-6 or adhesion molecules and vascular changes in essential hypertensive patients. Evidence of involvement of the immune system in vasculature from patients with hypertension or cardiovascular disease starts to appear in literature. Further investigation on immunity, including the role of T-lymphocytes, will help develop of new therapeutic targets that may improve outcomes in hypertension and cardiovascular disease and discover novel approaches in the treatment of hypertension and vascular disease. PMID:24846805

  13. [Mechanism of action of calcium antagonists in the treatment of vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, S

    1986-11-30

    The therapeutic effect of selective calcium entry blockers in the treatment of chronic occlusive diseases of peripheral and cerebral arteries is well documented. Experimental studies in acute cerebral ischaemia and cerebral infarction allow to anticipate positive results in clinical studies. The number of clinical studies so far available is to small for final assessment at the present time. PMID:2435066

  14. [Hyaline-vascular Multicentric Castleman's Disease in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Zapata-Bonilla, Sergio Armando; López Vargas, Roberto; Scherling-Ocampo, Aldo Alfonso; Morales Leyte, Ana Lilia; García Ilizaliturri, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    A previously healthy, immunocompetent 67-year-old female presented with a one-month history of general symptoms, weight loss, night fevers, and bilateral lower extremity edema. On admission she had severe anemia, acute kidney injury, and multiple lymphadenopathies. An excisional biopsy of one of the axillary lymphadenopathies confirmed hyaline-vascular Castleman's disease. This rare disease is a polyclonal lymphoproliferative disorder that affects the normal lymph node architecture. According to its location it can be divided in unicentric (localized) or multicentric disease; it can be further divided according to histopathology in hyaline-vascular or plasmatic cells variety. Clinical presentation relates more to histopathological variety than to centricity. Human herpes virus 8 is ubiquitous in this disease and, along with interleukin 6, plays an important role in pathogenesis and symptoms presentation. Surgery is the go-to treatment of localized disease, while systemic chemotherapy is the option in multicentric disease. Communication between the clinical and anatomopathological teams is crucial; lag in diagnosis can lead to futile investigations in search of other diseases and delay in treatment. PMID:26526479

  15. Myeloperoxidase and its contributory role in inflammatory vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lau, Denise; Baldus, Stephan

    2006-07-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme protein abundantly expressed in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), has long been viewed to function primarily as a bactericidal enzyme centrally linked to innate host defense. Recent observations now extend this perspective and suggest that MPO is profoundly involved in the regulation of cellular homeostasis and may play a central role in initiation and propagation of acute and chronic vascular inflammatory disease. For example, low levels of MPO-derived hypochlorous acid (HOCl) interfere with intracellular signaling events, MPO-dependent oxidation of lipoproteins modulates their affinity to macrophages and the vessel wall, MPO-mediated depletion of endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) impairs endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, and nitrotyrosine (NO(2)Tyr) formation by MPO sequestered into the vessel wall may affect matrix protein structure and function. Future studies are needed to further elucidate the significance of MPO in the development of acute and chronic vascular disease and to evaluate MPO as a potential target for treatment. PMID:16476484

  16. Vascular expression, activity and function of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 following cerebral ischaemia-reperfusion in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Katherine A; Brait, Vanessa H; Wang, Yutang; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Ball, Helen J; McKenzie, Gavin; De Silva, T Michael; Stocker, Roland; Sobey, Christopher G

    2011-05-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenases-1 (Ido1) and -2 initiate the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. In addition to the established immune regulatory effects of Ido1 and the ability of nitric oxide to regulate Ido1 activity, it is now also known that Ido1-mediated metabolism of tryptophan to kynurenine can modulate vascular tone. Ido activity is reportedly elevated in stroke patients and correlates with increased risk of death. Thus, the present goals were to test whether, following cerebral ischaemia, Ido activity and cerebrovascular Ido1 expression are altered and whether expression of Ido1 contributes to stroke outcome. Transient cerebral ischaemia was induced in wild-type and Ido1 gene-deficient (Ido1 (-/-)) mice. Mice were pre-treated with vehicle, the Ido1 inhibitor, 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (1-MT; 50 mg/kg i.p.) or the inducible nitric oxide synthase (Nos2) inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG, 100 mg/kg i.p.). At 24 h, neurological function, brain infarct size and swelling were assessed. In addition, Ido activity was estimated by plasma kynurenine and tryptophan, and Ido1 expression was examined in cerebral arterioles. Cerebral ischaemia-reperfusion in wild-type mice increased Ido activity and its expression in cerebral arterioles. Ido1 (-/-) and 1-MT-treated wild-type mice had lower Ido activity but similar post-stroke neurological function and similar total brain infarct volume and swelling, relative to control mice. Inhibition of Nos2 with AG also did not affect Ido activity or outcome following stroke. This study provides molecular and pharmacological evidence that the expression and the activity of Ido1 increase following stroke. However, such Ido1 expression does not appear to affect overall outcome following acute ischaemic stroke, and furthermore, a regulatory role of Nos2-derived nitric oxide on Ido activity following cerebral ischaemia-reperfusion appears unlikely. PMID:21359968

  17. Beta-protein deposition: a pathogenetic link between Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathies.

    PubMed

    Coria, F; Prelli, F; Castaño, E M; Larrondo-Lillo, M; Fernandez-Gonzalez, J; van Duinen, S G; Bots, G T; Luyendijk, W; Shelanski, M L; Frangione, B

    1988-10-25

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) refers to a group of hereditary (hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, HCHWA and sporadic (SCAA) disorders characterized by amyloid fibril deposition restricted to the leptomeningeal and cortical vasculature leading to recurrent hemorrhagic and/or ischemic accidents. On clinical and biochemical grounds, two forms of HCHWA can be distinguished. The amyloid subunit of the HCHWA of Icelandic origin is related to Cystatin C, while amyloid from patients of Dutch origin (HCHWA-D) is related to the beta-protein (or A4), the main component of vascular and plaque core amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome (DS) [corrected]. SCAA is an increasingly recognized cause of stroke in normotensive individual amounting to 5-10% of all cerebrovascular accidents. We now report the isolation and partial amino acid sequence of the amyloid subunit from a case of SCAA and a new case of HCHWA-D. The recognition that a heterogeneous group of diseases are linked by similar pathological and chemical features suggests that diversity of etiological factors may promote a common pathogenetic mechanism leading to amyloid-beta (A beta) deposition, and open new ways of research in AD and CAA as they are related to dementia and stroke. PMID:3058268

  18. Cerebral blood flow in sickle cell cerebrovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Huttenlocher, P.R.; Moohr, J.W.; Johns, L.; Brown, F.D.

    1984-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been studied by the xenon-133 (/sup 133/Xe) inhalation method in 16 children with suspected sickle cell cerebrovascular disease. Abnormalities consisting of decreases in total, hemispheral, or regional CBF were found in 17 of 26 studies. Eleven studies performed immediately after stroke, transient ischemic attack, or depression of state of alertness showed abnormalities. In addition to confirming regional cerebrovascular insufficiency in children with stroke due to major cerebral artery occlusion, the method detected diffuse decrease in CBF in children with stupor, coma, and seizures who had normal angiographic findings. In contrast, six of seven studies obtained after exchange transfusion or during maintenance on hypertransfusion therapy showed normal findings. The difference between results in patients with acute neurologic disturbances and those receiving transfusion therapy was statistically significant (P less than .005). The data indicate that the /sup 133/Xe method reliably demonstrates cerebrovascular impairment in sickle cell disease. They also suggest that CBF changes in patients with sickle cell disease can be reversed by exchange transfusion and by hypertransfusion therapy. The /sup 133/Xe CBF method may be useful for following up children with sickle cell disease who are at high risk for recurrent stroke.

  19. Role of homocysteine in age-related vascular and non-vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Parnetti, L; Bottiglieri, T; Lowenthal, D

    1997-08-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) may represent a metabolic link in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular diseases and old-age dementias. Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease and peripheral vascular disease, and is also associated with cerebrovascular disease; specifically, the risk of extracranial carotid atherosclerosis significantly increases in relation to Hcy levels. Hcy is a reliable marker of vitamin B12 deficiency, a common condition in the elderly which is known to induce neurological deficits including cognitive impairment; a high prevalence of folate deficiency has been reported in psychogeriatric patients suffering from depression and dementia. Both these vitamins occupy a key position in the remethylation and synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), a major methyl donor in CNS; therefore, deficiencies in either of these vitamins lead to a decrease in SAMe and increase in Hcy, which can be critical in the aging brain. Another pathogenetic mechanism linking high Hcy levels to reduced cognitive performances in the elderly might be represented by excitotoxicity, since hyperhomocysteinemia may lead to an excessive production of homocysteic acid and cysteine sulphinic acid, which act as endogenous agonists of NMDA receptors. Considering the reasonably high prevalence in the general population of a genetic predisposition to a thermolabile form of the enzyme 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), hyperhomocysteinemia can be seen as the result of multiple genetic and environmental factors leading to vascular and/or neurodegenerative disorders where age-related involutive phenomena represent a common pathogenetic ground. Systematic studies in different psychogeriatric conditions monitoring Hcy levels and clinical features before and after vitamin supplementation are therefore highly recommended. PMID:9359935

  20. Traumatic brain injury in vivo and in vitro contributes to cerebral vascular dysfunction through impaired gap junction communication between vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-Xiang; Mueller, Martin; Hawkins, Bridget E; Mathew, Babu P; Parsley, Margaret A; Vergara, Leoncio A; Hellmich, Helen L; Prough, Donald S; Dewitt, Douglas S

    2014-04-15

    Gap junctions (GJs) contribute to cerebral vasodilation, vasoconstriction, and, perhaps, to vascular compensatory mechanisms, such as autoregulation. To explore the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on vascular GJ communication, we assessed GJ coupling in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells subjected to rapid stretch injury (RSI) in vitro and VSM in middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) harvested from rats subjected to fluid percussion TBI in vivo. Intercellular communication was evaluated by measuring fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). In VSM cells in vitro, FRAP increased significantly (p<0.05 vs. sham RSI) after mild RSI, but decreased significantly (p<0.05 vs. sham RSI) after moderate or severe RSI. FRAP decreased significantly (p<0.05 vs. sham RSI) 30 min and 2 h, but increased significantly (p<0.05 vs. sham RSI) 24 h after RSI. In MCAs harvested from rats 30 min after moderate TBI in vivo, FRAP was reduced significantly (p<0.05), compared to MCAs from rats after sham TBI. In VSM cells in vitro, pretreatment with the peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) scavenger, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)prophyrinato iron[III], prevented RSI-induced reductions in FRAP. In isolated MCAs from rats treated with the ONOO(-) scavenger, penicillamine, GJ coupling was not impaired by fluid percussion TBI. In addition, penicillamine treatment improved vasodilatory responses to reduced intravascular pressure in MCAs harvested from rats subjected to moderate fluid percussion TBI. These results indicate that TBI reduced GJ coupling in VSM cells in vitro and in vivo through mechanisms related to generation of the potent oxidant, ONOO(-). PMID:24341563

  1. IR imaging of blood circulation of patients with vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin; Wade, Dwight R., Jr.; Kam, Jack

    2004-04-01

    We conducted a preliminary IR imaging study of blood circulation in patients with peripheral vascular diseases. Abnormal blood flow is common in older adults, especially those with elevated blood lipids, diabetes, hypertension, and a history of smoking. All of these conditions have a high prevalence in our population, often with more than one condition in the same individual. The differences in blood flow is revealed by temperature differences in areas of the extremities as well as other regions of the body. However, what is needed is an imaging technique that is relatively inexpensive and can reveal the blood flow in real time. The IR imaging can show detailed venous system and small tempearture changes associated with blood flow. Six patients with vascular diseases were tested in a clinic set up. Their legs and feet were imaged. We observed large temperature differences (cooling of more than 10° C) at the foot, especially toes. More valuable information were obtained from the temperature distribution maps. IR thermography is potentially a very valuable tool for medical application, especially for vascular diseases.

  2. Oxidative Stress and MicroRNAs in Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Magenta, Alessandra; Greco, Simona; Gaetano, Carlo; Martelli, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been demonstrated to play a causal role in different vascular diseases, such as hypertension, diabetic vasculopathy, hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Indeed, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is known to impair endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell functions, contributing to the development of cardiovascular diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNA molecules that modulate the stability and/or the translational efficiency of target messenger RNAs. They have been shown to be modulated in most biological processes, including in cellular responses to redox imbalance. In particular, miR-200 family members play a crucial role in oxidative-stress dependent endothelial dysfunction, as well as in cardiovascular complications of diabetes and obesity. In addition, different miRNAs, such as miR-210, have been demonstrated to play a key role in mitochondrial metabolism, therefore modulating ROS production and sensitivity. In this review, we will discuss miRNAs modulated by ROS or involved in ROS production, and implicated in vascular diseases in which redox imbalance has a pathogenetic role. PMID:23975169

  3. Putative mechanisms behind effects of spinal cord stimulation on vascular diseases: a review of experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mingyuan; Linderoth, Bengt; Foreman, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a widely used clinical technique to treat ischemic pain in peripheral, cardiac and cerebral vascular diseases. The use of this treatment advanced rapidly during the late 80's and 90's, particularly in Europe. Although the clinical benefits of SCS are clear and the success rate remains high, the mechanisms are not yet completely understood. SCS at lumbar spinal segments (L2-L3) produces vasodilation in the lower limbs and feet which is mediated by antidromic activation of sensory fibers and decreased sympathetic outflow. SCS at thoracic spinal segments (T1-T2) induces several benefits including pain relief, reduction in both frequency and severity of angina attacks, and reduced short-acting nitrate intake. The benefits to the heart are not likely due to an increase, or redistribution of local blood flow, rather, they are associated with SCS-induced myocardial protection and normalization of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system. At somewhat lower cervical levels (C3-C6), SCS induces increased blood flow in the upper extremities. SCS at the upper cervical spinal segments (C1-C2) increased cerebral blood flow, which is associated with a decrease in sympathetic activity, an increase in vasomotor center activity and a release of neurohumoral factors. This review will summarize the basic science studies that have contributed to our understanding about mechanisms through which SCS produces beneficial effects when used in the treatment of vascular diseases. Furthermore, this review will particularly focus on the antidromic mechanisms of SCS-induced vasodilation in the lower limbs and feet. PMID:18083639

  4. Crystal Structure of CCM3, a Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Protein Critical for Vascular Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, R; Zhang, H; He, Y; Ji, W; Min, W; Boggon, T

    2010-01-01

    CCM3 mutations are associated with cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), a disease affecting 0.1-0.5% of the human population. CCM3 (PDCD10, TFAR15) is thought to form a CCM complex with CCM1 and CCM2; however, the molecular basis for these interactions is not known. We have determined the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of CCM3. This structure shows an all {alpha}-helical protein containing two domains, an N-terminal dimerization domain with a fold not previously observed, and a C-terminal focal adhesion targeting (FAT)-homology domain. We show that CCM3 binds CCM2 via this FAT-homology domain and that mutation of a highly conserved FAK-like hydrophobic pocket (HP1) abrogates CCM3-CCM2 interaction. This CCM3 FAT-homology domain also interacts with paxillin LD motifs using the same surface, and partial CCM3 co-localization with paxillin in cells is lost on HP1 mutation. Disease-related CCM3 truncations affect the FAT-homology domain suggesting a role for the FAT-homology domain in the etiology of CCM.

  5. Crystal Structure of CCM3, a Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Protein Critical for Vascular Integrity*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Haifeng; He, Yun; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang; Boggon, Titus J.

    2010-01-01

    CCM3 mutations are associated with cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), a disease affecting 0.1–0.5% of the human population. CCM3 (PDCD10, TFAR15) is thought to form a CCM complex with CCM1 and CCM2; however, the molecular basis for these interactions is not known. We have determined the 2.5 Å crystal structure of CCM3. This structure shows an all α-helical protein containing two domains, an N-terminal dimerization domain with a fold not previously observed, and a C-terminal focal adhesion targeting (FAT)-homology domain. We show that CCM3 binds CCM2 via this FAT-homology domain and that mutation of a highly conserved FAK-like hydrophobic pocket (HP1) abrogates CCM3-CCM2 interaction. This CCM3 FAT-homology domain also interacts with paxillin LD motifs using the same surface, and partial CCM3 co-localization with paxillin in cells is lost on HP1 mutation. Disease-related CCM3 truncations affect the FAT-homology domain suggesting a role for the FAT-homology domain in the etiology of CCM. PMID:20489202

  6. Potential of optical microangiography to monitor cerebral blood perfusion and vascular plasticity following traumatic brain injury in mice in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yali; Alkayed, Nabil; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2009-07-01

    Optical microanglography (OMAG) is a recently developed imaging modality capable of volumetric imaging of dynamic blood perfusion, down to capillary level resolution, with an imaging depth up to 2.00 mm beneath the tissue surface. We report the use of OMAG to monitor the cerebral blood flow (CBF) over the cortex of mouse brain upon traumatic brain injury (TBI), with the cranium left intact, for a period of two weeks on the same animal. We show the ability of OMAG to repeatedly image 3-D cerebral vasculatures during pre- and post-traumatic phases, and to visualize the changes of regulated CBF and the vascular plasticity after TBI. The results indicate the potential of OMAG to explore the mechanism involved in the rehabilitation of TBI.

  7. Association between Bacterial Infection and Peripheral Vascular Disease: A Review.

    PubMed

    Budzyński, Jacek; Wiśniewska, Joanna; Ciecierski, Marek; Kędzia, Anna

    2016-03-01

    There are an increasing number of data showing a clinically important association between bacterial infection and peripheral artery disease (PAD). Bacteria suspected of being involved in PAD pathogenesis are: periodontal bacteria, gut microbiota, Helicobacter pylori, and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Infectious agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis via activation of a systemic or local host immunological response to contamination of extravascular tissues or the vascular wall, respectively. A systemic immunological reaction may damage vascular walls in the course of autoimmunological cross-reactions between anti-pathogen antibodies and host vascular antigens (immunological mimicry), pathogen burden mechanisms (nonspecific activation of inflammatory processes in the vascular wall), and neuroendocrine-immune cross-talk. Besides activating the inflammatory pathway, bacterial infection may trigger PAD progression or exacerbation by enhancement of platelet reactivity, by a stimulatory effect on von Willebrand factor binding, factor VIII, fibrinogen, P-selectin activation, disturbances in plasma lipids, increase in oxidative stress, and resistance to insulin. Local inflammatory host reaction and induction of atherosclerotic plaque progression and/or instability result mainly from atherosclerotic plaque colonization by microorganisms. Despite these premises, the role of bacterial infection in PAD pathogenesis should still be recognized as controversial, and randomized, controlled trials are required to evaluate the outcome of periodontal or gut bacteria modification (through diet, prebiotics, and probiotics) or eradication (using antibiotics) in hard and surrogate cardiovascular endpoints. PMID:26900306

  8. Relationship between retinal vascular occlusions and incident cerebrovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Wengen; Wang, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies investigating the role of retinal vascular occlusions, on cerebrovascular diseases (CVD) have been reported, but the results are still inconsistent. We therefore sought to evaluate the relationship between retinal vascular occlusions and CVD. We systematically searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and ScienceDirect databases through January 31, 2016 for studies evaluating the effect of retinal vascular occlusions on the risk of CVD. Data were abstracted using predefined criteria, and then pooled by RevMan 5.3 software. A total of 9 retrospective studies were included in this meta-analysis. When compared with individuals without retinal vascular occlusions, both individuals with retinal artery occlusion (RAO) (odds ratio [OR] = 2.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21–3.34; P = 0.005) and individuals with retinal vein occlusion (RVO) (OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.24–1.50; P < 0.00001) had higher risks of developing CVD. Additionally, both individuals with central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) (OR = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.12–3.56; P = 0.02) and branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO) (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.03–1.48; P = 0.04) were significantly associated with increased risk of CVD. Published literatures support both RVO and RAO are associated with increased risks of CVD. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27368050

  9. Central Pulsatile Pressure and Flow Relationship in the Time and Frequency Domain to Characterise Hydraulic Input to the Brain and Cerebral Vascular Impedance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Ok; O'Rourke, Michael F; Adji, Audrey; Avolio, Alberto P

    2016-01-01

    In the time domain, pulsatile flow and pressure can be characterised as the ratio of the late systolic boost of flow or pressure to the pulse amplitude so as to estimate the hydraulic input to the brain. While vascular impedance has been widely used to represent the load presented to the heart by the systemic circulation, it has not been applied to the cerebral circulation.We set out to study the relationship between the pressure and the flow augmentation index (AIx) in the time domain and to determine cerebral vascular impedance using aortic blood pressure and cerebral blood flow waveforms in the frequency domain. Twenty-four young subjects (aged 21-39 years) were recruited; aortic pressure was derived using SphygmoCor from radial pressure. Flow waveforms were recorded from the middle cerebral artery. In three subjects, we performed the Valsalva manoeuvre to investigate their response to physiological intervention. There was a linear relationship between flow and pressure AIx, and cerebral impedance values were similar to those estimated for low resistance vascular beds. Substantial change in pressure and flow wave contour was observed during the Valsalva manoeuvre; however, the relationship in both the time and the frequency domains were unchanged. This confirms that aortic pressure and cerebral flow waveform can be used to study cerebral impedance. PMID:27165927

  10. Chronic rapamycin restores brain vascular integrity and function through NO synthase activation and improves memory in symptomatic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Zheng, Wei; Halloran, Jonathan J; Burbank, Raquel R; Hussong, Stacy A; Hart, Matthew J; Javors, Martin; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Muir, Eric; Solano Fonseca, Rene; Strong, Randy; Richardson, Arlan G; Lechleiter, James D; Fox, Peter T; Galvan, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Vascular pathology is a major feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. We recently showed that chronic administration of the target-of-rapamycin (TOR) inhibitor rapamycin, which extends lifespan and delays aging, halts the progression of AD-like disease in transgenic human (h)APP mice modeling AD when administered before disease onset. Here we demonstrate that chronic reduction of TOR activity by rapamycin treatment started after disease onset restored cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain vascular density, reduced cerebral amyloid angiopathy and microhemorrhages, decreased amyloid burden, and improved cognitive function in symptomatic hAPP (AD) mice. Like acetylcholine (ACh), a potent vasodilator, acute rapamycin treatment induced the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) and NO release in brain endothelium. Administration of the NOS inhibitor L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester reversed vasodilation as well as the protective effects of rapamycin on CBF and vasculature integrity, indicating that rapamycin preserves vascular density and CBF in AD mouse brains through NOS activation. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic reduction of TOR activity by rapamycin blocked the progression of AD-like cognitive and histopathological deficits by preserving brain vascular integrity and function. Drugs that inhibit the TOR pathway may have promise as a therapy for AD and possibly for vascular dementias. PMID:23801246

  11. Topographic patterns of vascular disease: HOX proteins as determining factors?

    PubMed Central

    Visconti, Richard P; Awgulewitsch, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Steadily increasing evidence supports the idea that genetic diversities in the vascular bed are, in addition to hemodynamic influences, a major contributing factor in determining region-specific cardiovascular disease susceptibility. Members of the phylogenetically highly conserved Hox gene family of developmental regulators have to be viewed as prime candidates for determining these regional genetic differences in the vasculature. During embryonic patterning, the regionally distinct and precisely choreographed expression patterns of HOX transcription factors are essential for the correct specification of positional identities. Apparently, these topographic patterns are to some degree retained in certain adult tissues, including the circulatory system. While an understanding of the functional significance of these localized Hox activities in adult blood vessels is only beginning to emerge, an argument can be made for a role of Hox genes in the maintenance of vessel wall homeostasis and functional integrity on the one hand, and in regulating the development and progression of regionally restricted vascular pathologies, on the other. Initial functional studies in animal models, as well as data from clinical studies provide some level of support for this view. The data suggest that putative genetic regulatory networks of Hox-dependent cardiovascular disease processes include genes of diverse functional categories (extracellular matrix remodeling, transmembrane signaling, cell cycle control, inflammatory response, transcriptional control, etc.), as potential targets in both vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, as well as cell populations residing in the adventitia. PMID:26322165

  12. Sirtuins in vascular diseases: Emerging roles and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Nunzia; Vitiello, Milena; Casale, Rosario; Servillo, Luigi; Giovane, Alfonso; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa

    2015-07-01

    Silent information regulator-2 (Sir-2) proteins, or sirtuins, are a highly conserved protein family of histone deacetylases that promote longevity by mediating many of the beneficial effects of calorie restriction which extends life span and reduces the incidence of cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and diabetes. Here, we review the role of sirtuins (SIRT1-7) in vascular homeostasis and diseases by providing an update on the latest knowledge about their roles in endothelial damage and vascular repair mechanisms. Among all sirtuins, in the light of the numerous functions reported on SIRT1 in the vascular system, herein we discuss its roles not only in the control of endothelial cells (EC) functionality but also in other cell types beyond EC, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPC), smooth muscle cells (SMC), and immune cells. Furthermore, we also provide an update on the growing field of compounds under clinical evaluation for the modulation of SIRT1 which, at the state of the art, represents the most promising target for the development of novel drugs against CVD, especially when concomitant with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25766107

  13. The primary vascular dysregulation syndrome: implications for eye diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Vascular dysregulation refers to the regulation of blood flow that is not adapted to the needs of the respective tissue. We distinguish primary vascular dysregulation (PVD, formerly called vasospastic syndrome) and secondary vascular dysregulation (SVD). Subjects with PVD tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, increased pain sensitivity, prolonged sleep onset time, altered gene expression in the lymphocytes, signs of oxidative stress, slightly increased endothelin-1 plasma level, low body mass index and often diffuse and fluctuating visual field defects. Coldness, emotional or mechanical stress and starving can provoke symptoms. Virtually all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. In subjects with PVD, retinal vessels are stiffer and more irregular, and both neurovascular coupling and autoregulation capacity are reduced while retinal venous pressure is often increased. Subjects with PVD have increased risk for normal-tension glaucoma, optic nerve compartment syndrome, central serous choroidopathy, Susac syndrome, retinal artery and vein occlusions and anterior ischaemic neuropathy without atherosclerosis. Further characteristics are their weaker blood–brain and blood-retinal barriers and the higher prevalence of optic disc haemorrhages and activated astrocytes. Subjects with PVD tend to suffer more often from tinnitus, muscle cramps, migraine with aura and silent myocardial ischaemic and are at greater risk for altitude sickness. While the main cause of vascular dysregulation is vascular endotheliopathy, dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system is also involved. In contrast, SVD occurs in the context of other diseases such as multiple sclerosis, retrobulbar neuritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia and giant cell arteritis. Taking into consideration the high prevalence of PVD in the population and potentially linked pathologies, in the current article, the authors provide

  14. Understanding Vascular Diseases: Lessons From Premature Aging Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yuichi; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Motozawa, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei

    2016-05-01

    Early human mummies examined recently by computed tomography demonstrated a high prevalence of vascular calcification, a pathognomonic sign of atherosclerosis, which was correlated with estimated age at death. Early populations had little exposure to modern-day metabolic risk factors: these observations thus suggest that humans have an inherent age-dependent predisposition to atherosclerosis. Premature aging syndromes are extremely rare genetic disorders that exhibit clinical phenotypes resembling accelerated aging, including severe atherosclerosis, but those phenotypes are usually segmental. Controversy persists, therefore, regarding the extent to which the molecular mechanisms underlying premature aging syndromes overlap with those of physiological aging. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and Werner syndrome are well-characterized premature aging syndromes. HGPS is caused by gain-of-function mutations in the LMNA gene, which result in the accumulation of a mutant nuclear protein, called "progerin," at the nuclear rim. In contrast, loss-of-function mutations in Werner syndrome ATP-dependent helicase (WRN) lead to Werner syndrome. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which can differentiate into vascular cells to maintain vascular homeostasis in response to injury, are severely affected in these syndromes. Mechanistically, either aberrant expression of progerin or loss of WRN protein in MSCs alters heterochromatin structure, resulting in premature senescence and exhaustion of functional MSCs in premature aging syndromes. Surprisingly, vascular cells and MSCs in elderly healthy individuals have shown progerin expression and decreased expression levels of WRN, respectively. Studying these rare genetic disorders could thus provide valuable insights into age-related vascular diseases that occur in the general population. PMID:26948039

  15. Nitric Oxide Modulates Vascular Disease in the Remnant Kidney Model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Duk-Hee; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Feng, Lili; Johnson, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    A loss of the microvascular endothelium occurs in the remnant kidney model of renal disease and may play an important role in progression (Kang et al, J Am Soc Nephrol, 12:1434, 2001). Given that nitric oxide (NO) is a potent endothelial cell survival factor, we hypothesized that stimulating (with l-arginine) or blocking (with nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, (l-NAME)) NO synthesis could modulate the integrity of the microvasculature and hence affect progression of renal disease. Rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (RK) and then were randomized at 4 weeks to receive vehicle, l-NAME, or l-arginine for 4 weeks. Systolic blood pressure and renal function was measured, and tissues were collected at 8 weeks for histological and molecular analyses. The effect of modulation of NO on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and mouse medullary thick ascending limb tubular epithelial cells (mTAL) was also studied. Inhibition of NO with l-NAME was associated with more rapid progression compared to RK alone, with worse blood pressure, proteinuria, renal function, glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. The injury was also associated with more glomerular and peritubular capillary endothelial cell loss in association with an impaired endothelial proliferative response. Interestingly, the preglomerular endothelium remained intact or was occasionally hyperplastic, and this was associated with a pronounced proliferation of the vascular SMCs with de novo expression of VEGF. Cell culture studies confirmed a divergent effect of NO inhibition on VEGF expression, with inhibition of VEGF synthesis in mTAL cells and stimulation of VEGF in vascular SMC. In contrast to the effects of NO inhibition, stimulation of NO with l-arginine had minimal effects in this rat model of progressive renal disease. These studies confirm that blockade of NO synthesis accelerates progression of renal disease in the remnant kidney model, and

  16. Diffuse and uncontrolled vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in rapidly progressing pediatric moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, Amy J; Bhattacharjee, Meenakshi B; Regalado, Ellen S; Milewicz, Allen L; El-Hakam, Lisa M; Dauser, Robert C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2010-09-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare stroke syndrome of unknown etiology resulting from stenosis or occlusion of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) in association with an abnormal vascular network in the basal ganglia. Although the highest incidence of moyamoya disease is in pediatric patients, pathology reports have been primarily limited to adult samples and describe occlusive fibrocellular lesions in the intimae of affected arteries. We describe the case of a young girl with primary moyamoya disease who presented at 18 months of age with right hemiparesis following an ischemic stroke. Angiography showed stenosis of the distal left ICA, left middle cerebral artery, and right ICA. An emergent left-sided dural inversion was performed. Recurrent strokes and alternating hemiplegia necessitated a right dural inversion 6 months later. Nonetheless, her aggressive disease proved uniquely refractory to surgical revascularization, and she succumbed to recurrent strokes and neurological deterioration at 2.5 years of age. Pathological specimens revealed a striking bilateral occlusion of the anterior carotid circulation resulting from intimal proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Most strikingly, the ascending aorta and the superior mesenteric artery demonstrated similar intimal proliferation, along with SMC proliferation in the media. The systemic pathology involving multiple arteries in this extremely young child, the first case of its kind available for autopsy, suggests that globally uncontrolled SMC proliferation, in the absence of environmental risk factors and likely resulting from an underlying genetic alteration, may be a primary etiologic event leading to moyamoya disease. PMID:20809708

  17. Ultrasonographic modalities to assess vascular anatomy and disease.

    PubMed

    Rose, Steven C; Nelson, Thomas R

    2004-01-01

    Medical ultrasound (US) encompasses a family of imaging techniques linked by the use of high-frequency sound waves, typically 2.5-10 million cycles per second (MHz), to interrogate tissue. Although similar, each imaging technique has relatively distinct features and may provide unique information. This review is designed to provide vascular and interventional radiologists with an in-depth understanding of each US imaging technique and relevant physics principles to assist in optimizing the US examination so that the specific vascular anatomy and disease states in question can be comprehensively understood. This review will be limited to principles of transcutaneous US and will not include specific techniques for assessment of individual vessels (except for illustrative purposes) or methods to optimize US scan parameters. PMID:14709684

  18. STIM1 and Orai1: novel targets for vascular diseases?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Trebak, Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    The past five years have witnessed the discovery of the endoplasmic reticulum calcium (Ca(2+)) sensor STIM1 and the plasma membrane Ca(2+) channel Orai1 as the bona fide molecular components of the store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) current (I (CRAC)). It has been known for two decades that SOCE and I (CRAC) are required for lymphocyte activation as evidenced by severe immunodeficient phenotypes in patients lacking I (CRAC). In recent years however, studies have uncovered expression of STIM1 and Orai1 proteins in various tissues and described additional roles for these proteins in physiological functions and pathophysiological conditions. Here, we will summarize novel findings pertaining to the role of STIM1 and Orai1 in the vascular system and discuss their potential use as targets in the therapy of vascular disease. PMID:21786201

  19. Pulmonary vascular resistance in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, N J; Shinebourne, E A; Scallan, M J; Sopwith, T A; Denison, D M

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary and systemic blood flow and pulmonary vascular resistance were measured in 21 children with congenital heart disease. Blood flow was calculated by the direct Fick method, using measurements of metabolic gas exchange obtained by remote respiratory mass spectrometry. The observations showed that the administration of oxygen caused an appreciable fall in pulmonary vascular resistance in 16 of the 21 children studied and that this fall would not have been appreciated from a study of pulmonary arterial pressure alone as it was masked by a corresponding rise in blood flow. In 10 of 14 children, in whom superior vena caval blood was also sampled, the rise in flow was largely due to an increase in intracardiac left to right shunt. It was accompanied by widening of the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient, perhaps due to imperfect gas equilibration within the lung. PMID:6515594

  20. Optical Assessment of Vascular Disease Progression and Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, Joshua A.

    Vascular disease manifests itself in many different forms, including chronic ulcers which do not heal, impaired blood flow to the limbs, or damage to the natural reperfusion process. The current forms of assessing vascular disease are often subjective and provide incomplete knowledge about the tissue of interest. This work focused on developing non-invasive techniques to quantitatively evaluate three specific elements of vascular disease: diabetic ulcers, venous ulcers, and peripheral arterial disease. Diffuse Near Infrared Spectroscopy (DNIRS) was used to predict healing (82% positive predictive value) in diabetic ulcers after 4 weeks of assessment (sensitivity of 0.9 and specificity of 0.86; p<0.002), proving to be an alternative and superior method to wound size reduction alone (the current gold standard). A novel therapeutic ultrasound treatment for venous ulcers, using a low-frequency (20kHz), low intensity (<100mW/cm2 ISPTP), fully-wearable applicator, was assessed using DNIRS and Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS), wherein it was established that capillary flow changes over time in healing venous ulcers compared to wounds which do not heal (p<0.01). It was also determined that the ultrasound therapy was successful at improving wound outcomes, specifically the rate of wound closure per week (p<0.05 for wound size, p<0.01 for optical data). Finally, DNIRS and DCS were used in conjunction to assess the reactive hyperemic response in patients with suspected Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). It was found that the time between the release of cuff occlusion in the diseased limb and the first peak of reperfusion (flow mediated dilatation) correlated to PAD severity, with longer times (>30 seconds) belonging to patients with PAD (p<0.05). Additionally, it was discovered that the magnitude of the reperfusion did not relate to PAD, but rather to tobacco use. Patients who smoked had reduced hyperemic responses (p<0.02), whether or not they had PAD. Overall, this

  1. Stroke, Vascular Dementia, and Alzheimer's Disease: Molecular Links.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Murali; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is a brain disease that occurs when blood flow stops, resulting in reduced oxygen supply to neurons. Stroke occurs at any time and at any age, but increases after the age of 55. It is the second leading cause of death and the third leading cause of disability-adjusted, life-years. The pathophysiology of ischemic stroke is complex and recent molecular, cellular, and animal models and postmortem brain studies have revealed that multiple cellular changes have been implicated, including oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory responses, micro RNA alterations, and marked changes in brain proteins. These cellular changes provide new information for developing therapeutic strategies for ischemic stroke treatment. Research also revealed that stroke increases with a number of modifiable factors and most strokes can be prevented and/or controlled through pharmacological or surgical interventions and lifestyle changes. Ischemic stroke is the major risk factor for vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. This review summarizes the latest research findings on stroke, including causal factors and molecular links between stroke and vascular disease/Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27567871

  2. Immunosuppression Related to Collagen-Vascular Disease or Its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Carol Dukes

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-vascular diseases are associated with immune dysregulation and inflammation, leading to tissue destruction or compromise. Immunosuppression is more commonly associated with the drugs used to treat these disorders than with the diseases themselves. The newest agents being used to treat collagen-vascular diseases are the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors. U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved TNF-α inhibitors have differing effects on the immune system, reflecting their potency and mechanisms of action. They are particularly effective in breaking down granulomatous inflammation, which makes them effective treatment for sarcoidosis and Wegener's granulomatosis. This same property makes them likely to break down the host defense mechanism that normally contains pathogens such as mycobacteria and fungi in a dormant state, namely the physical and immunologic barrier formed by granulomas in the lung and elsewhere. The most common infection reported with the TNF-α inhibitors has been tuberculosis, which may manifest as pulmonary and/or extrapulmonary disease, with the latter being more common and severe than usual. Histoplasma capsulatum, Aspergillus, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Listeria monocytogenes have also been described in a number of cases, and their frequency is discussed. PMID:16322600

  3. Circulating calcium concentrations, vascular disease and mortality: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Reid, I R; Gamble, G D; Bolland, M J

    2016-06-01

    Associations between serum calcium and vascular disease have been reported, but the consistency of these findings is unknown. We conducted a systematic review to determine whether circulating calcium concentrations are associated with risks of cardiovascular disease and death in normocalcaemic populations. We conducted PubMed searches up to 18 December 2014 and scrutinized reference lists of papers. Eligible studies related serum calcium to mortality or cardiovascular events in humans. A follow-up of at least one year was required for longitudinal studies. Studies in populations selected on the basis of renal disease or abnormal serum calcium were excluded. Two investigators performed independent data extraction. The results were tabulated and, where possible, meta-analysed. Five of 11 studies reported a statistically significant positive association between serum calcium and mortality. Meta-analysis of eight of these studies showed a hazard ratio of death of 1.13 (1.09, 1.18) per standard deviation of serum calcium. Eight of 13 studies reported a statistically significant positive association between serum calcium and cardiovascular disease. Meta-analysis of eight studies showed a hazard ratio of cardiovascular disease of 1.08 (1.04, 1.13) per standard deviation of serum calcium. For two studies reporting odds ratios, the pooled odds ratio per standard deviation was 1.22 (1.11, 1.32). When hazard ratios adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors were meta-analysed, the pooled hazard ratio was 1.04 (1.01, 1.08). Other studies demonstrated associations between serum calcium and stroke and between serum calcium and direct measurements of arterial disease and calcification. These observational data indicate that serum calcium is associated with vascular disease and death, but they cannot determine causality. PMID:26749423

  4. Microalbuminuria is a risk factor for cerebral small vessel disease in community-based elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Wada, Manabu; Nagasawa, Hikaru; Kurita, Keiji; Koyama, Shingo; Arawaka, Shigeki; Kawanami, Toru; Tajima, Katsushi; Daimon, Makoto; Kato, Takeo

    2007-04-15

    Microalbuminuria (MA) is known as a marker for generalized vascular dysfunction. It occurs most commonly in the setting of diabetes and hypertension; however, its association with cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) in community-based elderly remains to be clarified. In this cross-sectional analysis, we evaluated the association between MA and cerebral SVD in total 651 community-based elderly subjects. We assessed cardiovascular risk factors by interviews and physical examinations, including an evaluation of urinary albumin creatinine ratio (UACR). All subjects underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and carotid ultrasonography. As endothelial markers, the serum levels of thrombomodulin (TM) and a tissue-type plasminogen activator/ plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex were also studied. The mean TM and UACR were higher in subjects with lacunar infarcts or with moderate white matter hyperintensities (mWMH) on MRI than in those without them. Additionally, the prevalence of lacunar infarcts or mWMH was higher in the highest tertile of UACR level than in the lowest or middle tertile. Furthermore, in logistic regression analysis, the elevation of logarithmically transformed UACR (log UACR) was associated with the higher likelihood for total lacunar infarcts (odds ratio [OR], 1.85 per one log UACR increase), multiple lacunar infarcts (OR, 1.89 per one log UACR increase), and mWMH (OR, 2.15 per one log UACR increase). The present study revealed that levels of urinary albumin are associated with cerebral SVD, independently of traditional cerebrovascular risk factors, in community-based elderly. PMID:17320908

  5. Regulation and involvement of matrix metalloproteinases in vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Amin, Matthew; Pushpakumar, Sathnur; Muradashvili, Nino; Kundu, Sourav; Tyagi, Suresh C; Sen, Utpal

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc dependent endopeptidases whose main function is to degrade and deposit structural proteins within the extracellular matrix (ECM). A dysregulation of MMPs is linked to vascular diseases. MMPs are classified into collagenases, gelatinases, membrane-type, metalloelastase, stromelysins, matrilysins, enamelysins, and unclassified subgroups. The production of MMPs is stimulated by factors such as oxidative stress, growth factors and inflammation which lead to its up- or down-regulation with subsequent ECM remodeling. Normally, excess activation of MMPs is controlled by their endogenous inhibitors, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). An imbalance of MMPs and TIMPs has been implicated in hypertension, atherosclerotic plaque formation and instability, aortic aneurysms and varicose vein wall remodeling. Also, recent evidence suggests epigenetic regulation of some MMPs in angiogenesis and atherosclerosis. Over the years, pharmacological inhibitors of MMPs have been used to modify or prevent the development of the disease with some success. In this review, we discuss recent advances in MMP biology, and their involvement in the manifestation of vascular disease. PMID:26709763

  6. [Hearing disorders in peripheral arterial vascular diseases. A contribution on hearing loss in the aged].

    PubMed

    Böhme, G

    1987-12-01

    Otologic-audiologic examination was carried out in 171 patients (aged between 37-86; average age 64) with confirmed internal angiologic peripheral arterial vascular disease. Additional findings were observed in 94 of these patients who revealed an obliteration of the internal carotid artery or cerebral ischaemic stroke. Diseases of the ear were excluded clinically and audiologically. The mean hearing loss shows a sensory-neural high-tone loss in the tone audiogram. The range of scatter increases proportionately to the increase in tone loss. If compared with the physiologic examination of geriatric patients, the total word comprehension and minimal discrimination loss in the speech audiogram point towards a pathologic impairment of hearing in old age. The total word comprehension amounts to 251.20% in the 51-60 age group, 250.40% in the persons 61-70 years of age, 180.96% for the 71-80 age group and 131.67% for those over 80 years of age. The minimal discrimination loss comprises 4.00% for the 51-60 age group, 4.19% for the 61-70 group, 21.35% for 71-80 age bracket and 35.62% for those over 80. On the strength of these findings, an arterial sclerotic vascular disease should be considered as one of the multifactorial genesis of hearing impairment in old age. Special attention should be focussed on decompensation of the total word comprehension and minimal discrimination loss before the age of eighty. This would contribute towards a differentiation of physiologic and pathologic hearing diseases in old age. PMID:3431312

  7. Endovascular treatments for posterior cerebral artery aneurysms and vascular insufficiency of fetal-type circulation after parent artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hideaki; Kato, Noriyuki; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Hosoo, Hisayuki; Yamazaki, Tomosato; Yasuda, Susumu; Matsumura, Akira

    2016-10-01

    We present a retrospective analysis of endovascular treatments for posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms and discuss the susceptibility of a fetal-type PCA to vascular insufficiency after parent artery occlusion. Among 1207 aneurysms treated with endovascular therapy between March 1997 and March 2013 in our institution, 10 patients (0.8%) presented PCA aneurysms. The principal strategy was to employ selective coil embolization for the aneurysm. However, in certain cases of fusiform or dissecting aneurysms, we performed parent artery occlusion with coils. Clinical and radiological data were collected from hospital charts and evaluated retrospectively. The mean age was 52.7±15.6years (range, 12-65years). Five patients (50%) were admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage, and one patient presented with slowly developing paralysis. The remaining four patients were diagnosed incidentally. Five patients underwent selective coil embolization, and five patients underwent parent artery occlusion. All endovascular therapies were successfully performed. However, two patients in the parent artery occlusion group suffered cerebral infarction, and both patients exhibited a fetal-type PCA. The remaining three patients in the parent artery occlusion group exhibited an adult-type PCA and did not suffer a cerebral infarction. Endovascular treatment with either selective coil embolization or parent artery occlusion is safe and effective as the long as the anatomical type of the PCA is considered. Patients with a fetal-type PCA may develop vascular insufficiency upon parent artery occlusion. Neurosurgeons should attempt to preserve the parent artery using a flow-diverting stent or stent-assisted technique for a fetal-type PCA aneurysm. PMID:27523585

  8. Spatial mapping of dynamic cerebral autoregulation by multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy in high-grade carotid artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, Matthias; Schumacher, F. Konrad; Rutsch, Sebastian; Oeinck, Maximilian; Timmer, Jens; Mader, Irina; Schelter, Björn; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaller, Christoph P.

    2014-09-01

    The exact spatial distribution of impaired cerebral autoregulation in carotid artery disease is unknown. In this pilot study, we present a new approach of multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy (mcNIRS) for noninvasive spatial mapping of dynamic autoregulation in carotid artery disease. In 15 patients with unilateral severe carotid artery stenosis or occlusion, cortical hemodynamics in the bilateral frontal cortex were assessed from changes in oxyhemoglobin concentration using 52-channel NIRS (spatial resolution ˜2 cm). Dynamic autoregulation was graded by the phase shift between respiratory-induced 0.1 Hz oscillations of blood pressure and oxyhemoglobin. Ten of 15 patients showed regular phase values in the expected (patho) physiological range. Five patients had clearly outlying irregular phase values mostly due to artifacts. In patients with a regular phase pattern, a significant side-to-side difference of dynamic autoregulation was observed for the cortical border zone area between the middle and anterior cerebral artery (p<0.05). In conclusion, dynamic cerebral autoregulation can be spatially assessed from slow hemodynamic oscillations with mcNIRS. In high-grade carotid artery disease, cortical dynamic autoregulation is affected mostly in the vascular border zone. Spatial mapping of dynamic autoregulation may serve as a powerful tool for identifying brain regions at specific risks for hemodynamic infarction.

  9. Prevention and Management of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Lacunar infarcts/lacunes, white matter hyperintensities (WMH), and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are considered various manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Since the exact mechanisms of these manifestations differ, their associated risk factors differ. High blood pressure is the most consistent risk factor for all of these manifestations. However, a "J curve" phenomenon in terms of blood pressure probably exists for WMH. The association between cholesterol levels and lacunar infarcts/lacunes or WMH was less consistent and sometimes conflicting; a low cholesterol level probably increases the risk of CMBs. Homocysteinemia appears to be associated with WMH. It is noteworthy that the risk factors profile may also differ between different lacunar patterns and CMBs located at different parts of the brain. Thrombolysis, antihypertensives, and statins are used to treat patients with symptomatic lacunar infarction, just as in those with other stroke subtypes. However, it should be remembered that bleeding risks increase in patients with extensive WMH and CMBs after thrombolysis therapy. According to the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes trial results, a blood pressure reduction to <130 mmHg is recommended in patients with symptomatic lacunar infarction. However, an excessive blood pressure decrease may induce cognitive decline in older patients with extensive WMH. Dual antiplatelet therapy (aspirin plus clopidogrel) should be avoided because of the excessive risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. Although no particular antiplatelet is recommended, drugs such as cilostazol or triflusal may have advantages for patients with SVD since they are associated with less frequent bleeding complications than aspirin. PMID:26060798

  10. Cancer linked to Alzheimer disease but not vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C M.; Fitzpatrick, A L.; Xiong, C; Sieh, W; Kuller, L; Miller, J P.; Williams, M M.; Kopan, R; Behrens, M I.; Morris, J C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether cancer is associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). Methods: Cox proportional hazards models were used to test associations between prevalent dementia and risk of future cancer hospitalization, and associations between prevalent cancer and risk of subsequent dementia. Participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study–Cognition Substudy, a prospective cohort study, aged 65 years or older (n = 3,020) were followed a mean of 5.4 years for dementia and 8.3 years for cancer. Results: The presence of any AD (pure AD + mixed AD/VaD; hazard ratio [HR] = 0.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.20–0.84) and pure AD (HR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.12–0.86) was associated with a reduced risk of future cancer hospitalization, adjusted for demographic factors, smoking, obesity, and physical activity. No significant associations were found between dementia at baseline and rate of cancer hospitalizations for participants with diagnoses of VaD. Prevalent cancer was associated with reduced risk of any AD (HR = 0.72; 95% CI = 0.52–0.997) and pure AD (HR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.36–0.90) among white subjects after adjustment for demographics, number of APOE ε4 alleles, hypertension, diabetes, and coronary heart disease; the opposite association was found among minorities, but the sample size was too small to provide stable estimates. No significant association was found between cancer and subsequent development of VaD. Conclusions: In white older adults, prevalent Alzheimer disease (AD) was longitudinally associated with a reduced risk of cancer, and a history of cancer was associated with a reduced risk of AD. Together with other work showing associations between cancer and Parkinson disease, these findings suggest the possibility that cancer is linked to neurodegeneration. GLOSSARY 3MSE = modified Mini-Mental State Examination; AD = Alzheimer disease; ADDTC = Alzheimer Disease Diagnostic and Treatment Centers; CHD = coronary heart

  11. Clusterin/Apolipoprotein J immunoreactivity is associated with white matter damage in cerebral small vessel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Craggs, Lucinda; Taylor, Julie; Slade, Janet Y.; Chen, Aiqing; Hagel, Christian; Kuhlenbaeumer, Gregor; Borjesson‐Hanson, Anne; Viitanen, Matti; Kalimo, Hannu; Deramecourt, Vincent; Oakley, Arthur E.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Brain clusterin is known to be associated with the amyloid‐β deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We assessed the distribution of clusterin immunoreactivity in cerebrovascular disorders, particularly focusing on white matter changes in small vessel diseases. Methods Post‐mortem brain tissues from the frontal or temporal lobes of a total of 70 subjects with various disorders including cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and AD were examined using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. We further used immunogold electron microscopy to study clusterin immunoreactivity in extracellular deposits in CADASIL. Results Immunostaining with clusterin antibodies revealed strong localization in arterioles and capillaries, besides cortical neurones. We found that clusterin immunostaining was significantly increased in the frontal white matter of CADASIL and pontine autosomal dominant microangiopathy and leukoencephalopathy subjects. In addition, clusterin immunostaining correlated with white matter pathology severity scores. Immunostaining in axons ranged from fine punctate deposits in single axons to larger confluent areas with numerous swollen axon bulbs, similar to that observed with known axon damage markers such as non‐phosphorylated neurofilament H and the amyloid precursor protein. Immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy experiments showed that whereas clusterin immunoreactivity was closely associated with vascular amyloid‐β in CAA, it was lacking within the granular osmiophilic material immunolabelled by NOTCH3 extracelluar domain aggregates found in CADASIL. Conclusions Our results suggest a wider role for clusterin associated with white matter damage in addition to its ability to chaperone proteins for clearance via the perivascular drainage pathways in several disease states. PMID:25940137

  12. Platelet-derived serotonin links vascular disease and tissue fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dees, Clara; Akhmetshina, Alfiya; Zerr, Pawel; Reich, Nicole; Palumbo, Katrin; Horn, Angelika; Jüngel, Astrid; Beyer, Christian; Krönke, Gerhard; Zwerina, Jochen; Reiter, Rudolf; Alenina, Natalia; Maroteaux, Luc; Gay, Steffen; Schett, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Vascular damage and platelet activation are associated with tissue remodeling in diseases such as systemic sclerosis, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this association have not been identified. In this study, we show that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) stored in platelets strongly induces extracellular matrix synthesis in interstitial fibroblasts via activation of 5-HT2B receptors (5-HT2B) in a transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)–dependent manner. Dermal fibrosis was reduced in 5-HT2B−/− mice using both inducible and genetic models of fibrosis. Pharmacologic inactivation of 5-HT2B also effectively prevented the onset of experimental fibrosis and ameliorated established fibrosis. Moreover, inhibition of platelet activation prevented fibrosis in different models of skin fibrosis. Consistently, mice deficient for TPH1, the rate-limiting enzyme for 5-HT production outside the central nervous system, showed reduced experimental skin fibrosis. These findings suggest that 5-HT/5-HT2B signaling links vascular damage and platelet activation to tissue remodeling and identify 5-HT2B as a novel therapeutic target to treat fibrotic diseases. PMID:21518801

  13. Correlates of hippocampal neuron number in Alzheimer's disease and ischemic vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Zarow, Chris; Vinters, Harry V; Ellis, William G; Weiner, Michael W; Mungas, Dan; White, Lon; Chui, Helena C

    2005-06-01

    The cornu ammonis 1 region of the hippocampus (CA1) sector of hippocampus is vulnerable to both Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type neurofibrillary degeneration and anoxia-ischemia. The objective of this article is to compare number and size of neurons in CA1 in AD versus ischemic vascular dementia. Unbiased stereological methods were used to estimate the number and volume of neurons in 28 autopsy-derived brain samples. For each case, the entire hippocampus from one cerebral hemisphere was sliced into 5mm slabs (5-7 slabs/case), cut into 50 microm sections, and stained with gallocyanine. Using the optical dissector, we systematically sampled the number and size of neurons throughout the extent of CA1 and CA2. The total number of neurons was significantly less in AD compared with ischemic vascular dementia (p < 0.02), but there was no significant difference in neuron size. The greatest loss of neurons was observed in two cases with combined AD and hippocampal sclerosis. Regardless of causative diagnosis, the number of CA1 neurons correlates with magnetic resonance imaging-derived hippocampal volume (r = 0.72; p < 0.001) and memory score (r = 0.62; p < 0.01). We conclude that although CA1 neuron loss is more consistently observed in AD than ischemic vascular dementia, severity of loss shows the expected correlation with structure and function across causative subtype. Reductions in magnetic resonance imaging-derived hippocampal volume reflect loss, rather than shrinkage, of CA1 neurons. PMID:15929035

  14. Correlates of Hippocampal Neuron Number in Alzheimer’s Disease and Ischemic Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zarow, Chris; Vinters, Harry V.; Ellis, William G.; Weiner, Michael W.; Mungas, Dan; White, Lon; Chui, Helena C.

    2007-01-01

    The cornu ammonis 1 region of the hippocampus (CA1) sector of hippocampus is vulnerable to both Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-type neurofibrillary degeneration and anoxia–ischemia. The objective of this article is to compare number and size of neurons in CA1 in AD versus ischemic vascular dementia. Unbiased stereological methods were used to estimate the number and volume of neurons in 28 autopsy-derived brain samples. For each case, the entire hippocampus from one cerebral hemisphere was sliced into 5mm slabs (5–7 slabs/case), cut into 50μm sections, and stained with gallocyanine. Using the optical dissector, we systematically sampled the number and size of neurons throughout the extent of CA1 and CA2. The total number of neurons was significantly less in AD compared with ischemic vascular dementia (p < 0.02), but there was no significant difference in neuron size. The greatest loss of neurons was observed in two cases with combined AD and hippocampal sclerosis. Regardless of causative diagnosis, the number of CA1 neurons correlates with magnetic resonance imaging–derived hippocampal volume (r = 0.72; p < 0.001) and memory score (r = 0.62; p < 0.01). We conclude that although CA1 neuron loss is more consistently observed in AD than ischemic vascular dementia, severity of loss shows the expected correlation with structure and function across causative subtype. Reductions in magnetic resonance imaging–derived hippocampal volume reflect loss, rather than shrinkage, of CA1 neurons. PMID:15929035

  15. One minute oxygen uptake in peripheral ischemic vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Auchincloss, J H; Meade, J W; Gilbert, R; Chamberlain, B E

    1980-01-01

    Six males, ages 31-58, with ischemic vascular disease of the lower extremities, underwent treadmill testing with measurement of oxygen uptake at 45-60 seconds of exercise (VO2-45-60) as the test score. Tests were performed at 41, 123 and 164 watts of power against gravity. Depressed values were found in five subjects with aortic, iliac or common femoral disease but normal values in a subject with narrowing of the left superficial femoral artery. Reconstructive surgery resulted in normal values in four subjects retested. In three of these a calculation was made of the increased volume of oxygen uptake during the first minute of exercise associated with postsurgical improvement. The average was 430 ml, a value high enough to suggest increased aerobic metabolism of exercising muscles. PMID:7362287

  16. Hypertension management in patients with vascular disease: An update.

    PubMed

    Kohlman-Trigoboff, Debra

    2016-09-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. About 80 million U.S. adults (33%) have HTN. Of these individuals, approximately 77% use antihypertensive medication, however, only 54% have controlled HTN. Studies have demonstrated that patients whose blood pressures are controlled achieve a minimum of 50% reduction in cardiovascular events compared to similar patients with poorly controlled blood pressure. This article will define HTN and its consequences. Diagnostic evaluation and evidence-based treatment guidelines for HTN to include lifestyle modifications and pharmacotherapy will be discussed. Finally, this article will examine why the treatment of HTN can prevent the development and reduce the progression of atherosclerosis in vascular disease. PMID:27568315

  17. Antiphospholipid Syndrome and Vascular Ischemic (Occlusive) Diseases: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is primarily considered to be an autoimmune pathological condition that is also referred to as "Hughes syndrome". It is characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis and pregnancy pathologies in the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies and/or lupus anticoagulant. APS can occur either as a primary disease or secondary to a connective tissue disorder, most frequently systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Damage to the nervous system is one of the most prominent clinical constellations of sequelae in APS and includes (i) arterial/venous thrombotic events, (ii) psychiatric features and (iii) other non-thrombotic neurological syndromes. In this overview we compare the most important vascular ischemic (occlusive) disturbances (VIOD) with neuro-psychiatric symptomatics, together with complete, updated classifications and hypotheses for the etio-pathogenesis of APS with underlying clinical and laboratory criteria for optimal diagnosis and disease management. PMID:18159581

  18. Cerebrolysin improves symptoms and delays progression in patients with Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Allegri, R F; Guekht, A

    2012-04-01

    Dementia is the result of various cerebral disorders, leading to an acquired loss of memory and impaired cognitive ability. The most common forms are Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). Neurotrophic factors are essential for the survival and differentiation of developing neurons and protecting them against damage under pathologic conditions. Cerebrolysin is a peptide preparation that mimics the pleiotropic effects of neurotrophic factors. Several clinical trials investigating the therapeutic efficacy of Cerebrolysin in AD and VaD have confirmed the proof of concept. The results of these trials have shown statistically significant and clinically relevant treatment effects of Cerebrolysin on cognitive, global and functional domains in mild to moderately severe stages of dementia. Doses of 10 and 30 mL were the most effective, but higher doses of up to 60 mL turned out to be most effective in improving neuropsychiatric symptoms, which become relevant at later stages of the disease. Combining treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors and Cerebrolysin indicated long-term synergistic treatment effects in mild to moderate AD. The efficacy of Cerebrolysin persisted for up to several months after treatment suggesting Cerebrolysin has not merely symptomatic benefits, but a disease-delaying potential. This paper reviews the clinical efficacy of Cerebrolysin in the treatment of dementia. Data were obtained from international, multicenter, randomized clinical trials performed in compliance with Good Clinical Practice and the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (1964) and subsequent revisions. PMID:22514793

  19. SPECT study of regional cerebral blood flow in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bonte, F.J.; Ross, E.D.; Chehabi, H.H.; Devous, M.D. Sr.

    1986-07-01

    A common cause of dementia in late midlife and old age is Alzheimer disease (AD), which affects more than one in 20 individuals over the age of 65. Past studies of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with AD here suggested blood flow abnormalities, but findings have differed. We have studied 37 patients diagnosed as having AD with inhalation and washout of /sup 133/Xe and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), obtaining evidence of abnormal rCBF patterns in 19. Flow reductions were most common in the temporoparietal regions and were occasionally found in the frontal areas. Investigators using positron-emission tomography (PET) have identified similar findings with respect to rCBF and regional oxygen, glucose, and protein metabolism. The SPECT determination of rCBF, which gives information similar to that provided by PET, may assume importance in the diagnosis of AD and in the differential diagnosis of the dementias.

  20. Enzymatic antioxidant system in vascular inflammation and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Lubrano, Valter; Balzan, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    In biological systems there is a balance between the production and neutralization of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This balance is maintained by the presence of natural antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase. The enhancement of lipid peroxidation or the decrease of antioxidant protection present in metabolic diseases or bad lifestyle can induce endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Clinical studies have shown that oxidative stress can increase ROS reducing the formation of antioxidant defences, especially in subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD). Some observation indicated that in the early stages of the disease there is a homeostatic up-regulation of the antioxidant enzyme system in response to increased free radicals to prevent vascular damage. As soon as free radicals get to chronically elevated levels, this compensation ceases. Therefore, SOD and the other enzymes may represent a good therapeutic target against ROS, but they are not useful markers for the diagnosis of CAD. In conclusion antioxidant enzymes are reduced in presence of metabolic disease and CAD. However the existence of genes that promote their enzymatic activity could contribute to create new drugs for the treatment of damage caused by metabolic diseases or lifestyle that increases the plasma ROS levels. PMID:26618108

  1. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Targeting Oxidative Stress as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy?

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, T. Michael; Miller, Alyson A.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a major contributor to stroke, and a leading cause of cognitive impairment and dementia. Despite the devastating effects of cerebral SVD, the pathogenesis of cerebral SVD is still not completely understood. Moreover, there are no specific pharmacological strategies for its prevention or treatment. Cerebral SVD is characterized by marked functional and structural abnormalities of the cerebral microcirculation. The clinical manifestations of these pathological changes include lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and cerebral microbleeds. The main purpose of this review is to discuss evidence implicating oxidative stress in the arteriopathy of both non-amyloid and amyloid (cerebral amyloid angiopathy) forms of cerebral SVD and its most important risk factors (hypertension and aging), as well as its contribution to cerebral SVD-related brain injury and cognitive impairment. We also highlight current evidence of the involvement of the NADPH oxidases in the development of oxidative stress, enzymes that are a major source of reactive oxygen species in the cerebral vasculature. Lastly, we discuss potential pharmacological strategies for oxidative stress in cerebral SVD, including some of the historical and emerging NADPH oxidase inhibitors. PMID:27014073

  2. Dietary vitamin K and therapeutic warfarin alter susceptibility to vascular calcification in experimental chronic kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), with vascular calcification (VC) being a key modifier of disease progression. A local regulator of vascular calcification is vitamin K. This gamma-glutamyl carboxylase substrate is an essential ...

  3. Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease: Pathogenesis and clinical implication

    PubMed Central

    Disthabanchong, Sinee

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vascular calcification (VC) is one of the independent risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular mortality in both the general population and CKD patients. Earlier evidence revealed substantially higher prevalence of VC in young adults on chronic hemodialysis compared to the general population in the same age range, indicating the influence of CKD-related risk factors on the development of VC. Pathogenesis of VC involves an active, highly organized cellular transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells to bone forming cells evidenced by the presence of bone matrix proteins in the calcified arterial wall. VC occurs in both the intima and the media of arterial wall with medial calcification being more prevalent in CKD. In addition to traditional cardiovascular risks, risk factors specific to CKD such as phosphate retention, excess of calcium, history of dialysis, active vitamin D therapy in high doses and deficiency of calcification inhibitors play important roles in promoting the development of VC. Non-contrast multi-slice computed tomography has often been used to detect coronary artery calcification. Simple plain radiographs of the lateral lumbar spine and pelvis can also detect VC in the abdominal aorta and femoral and iliac arteries. Currently, there is no specific therapy to reverse VC. Reduction of calcium load, lowering phosphate retention using non-calcium containing phosphate binders, and moderate doses of active vitamin D may attenuate progression. Parenteral sodium thiosulfate has also been shown to delay VC progression. PMID:24175241

  4. Model selection in magnetic resonance imaging measurements of vascular permeability: Gadomer in a 9L model of rat cerebral tumor.

    PubMed

    Ewing, James R; Brown, Stephen L; Lu, Mei; Panda, Swayamprava; Ding, Guangliang; Knight, Robert A; Cao, Yue; Jiang, Quan; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N; Churchman, Jamie L; Fenstermacher, Joseph D

    2006-03-01

    Vasculature in and around the cerebral tumor exhibits a wide range of permeabilities, from normal capillaries with essentially no blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage to a tumor vasculature that freely passes even such large molecules as albumin. In measuring BBB permeability by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), various contrast agents, sampling intervals, and contrast distribution models can be selected, each with its effect on the measurement's outcome. Using Gadomer, a large paramagnetic contrast agent, and MRI measures of T(1) over a 25-min period, BBB permeability was estimated in 15 Fischer rats with day-16 9L cerebral gliomas. Three vascular models were developed: (1) impermeable (normal BBB); (2) moderate influx (leakage without efflux); and (3) fast leakage with bidirectional exchange. For data analysis, these form nested models. Model 1 estimates only vascular plasma volume, v(D), Model 2 (the Patlak graphical approach) v(D) and the influx transfer constant K(i). Model 3 estimates v(D), K(i), and the reverse transfer constant, k(b), through which the extravascular distribution space, v(e), is calculated. For this contrast agent and experimental duration, Model 3 proved the best model, yielding the following central tumor means (+/-s.d.; n = 15): v(D) = 0.07 +/- 0.03 for K(i) = 0.0105 +/- 0.005 min(-1) and v(e) = 0.10 +/- 0.04. Model 2 K(i) estimates were approximately 30% of Model 3, but highly correlated (r = 0.80, P < 0.0003). Sizable inhomogeneity in v(D), K(i), and k(b) appeared within each tumor. We conclude that employing nested models enables accurate assessment of transfer constants among areas where BBB permeability, contrast agent distribution volumes, and signal-to-noise vary. PMID:16079791

  5. Preservation of Neurons of the Nucleus Basalis in Subcortical Ischemic Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, San; Zarow, Chris; Mack, Wendy J.; Zheng, Ling; Vinters, Harrry V.; Ellis, William G.; Lyness, Scott A.; Chui, Helena C.

    2014-01-01

    Object To compare loss of neurons in the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NB) in subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) to normal controls, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and cases with mixed AD/SIVD pathology. Design Autopsied cases drawn from a longitudinal observational study with SIVD, AD and normal aging. Subjects Pathologically defined SIVD (n = 16), AD (n = 20), mixed pathology (n = 10), and age- and education-matched normal control (n = 17) groups were studied. Main Outcome measures NB neuronal cell counts in each group and their correlation with the extent of MRI white matter lesions (WML) and Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scores closest to death. Results No significant loss of neurons was found in SIVD compared to age-matched controls in contrast to AD and mixed groups, where there was significant neuronal loss. A significant inverse correlation between NB neurons and CDR scores was found in AD, but not in the SIVD and mixed groups. NB cell counts were not correlated with either the extent of white matter lesions or cortical gray matter volume in SIVD or AD groups. Conclusions These findings inveigh against primary loss of cholinergic neurons in SIVD, but do not rule out the possibility of secondary cholinergic deficits due to disruptions of cholinergic projections to cerebral cortex. PMID:22393167

  6. Cerebral infarction in children with sickle cell disease: a concise overview.

    PubMed

    Musallam, Khaled M; Khoury, Ruby A; Abboud, Miguel R

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral infarction is a common complication in sickle cell disease. Both overt and silent infarcts evident on neuroimaging have been described. In this article we overview the current knowledge of cerebral infarction in this patient population and discuss recent updates on the role of preventive intervention. PMID:21967673

  7. The pathobiology of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer’s disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that links inextricably the well being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. PMID:24267647

  8. [Sleep quality in aged patients with peripheral vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Karina; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2008-03-01

    Peripheral vascular diseases (PVD) are prevalent among the elderly, and, due to their chronic character, result in poor quality of life and poor sleep quality. This study aimed at evaluating sleep quality of elderly people diagnosed with PVD who undergo clinical ambulatory treatment in a university hospital in Campinas, in the State of São Paulo. Subjects (n=50, aged 74 +/- 8 years old) answered the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and provided basic demographic data and PVD history (35 subjects had arterial blockage in lower limbs). Results showed that 34 subjects presented bad sleep quality; sleep length was 5.8 (+/- 2.3) hours, and, according to 23 subjects, night sleep was frequently disturbed by pain (thrice a week or more). Eighteen subjects took analgesics; four took sleep medicines. Findings may have important implications for nurses working with PVD patients, stressing the need to take into account consequences of PVD on sleep disturbances when planning their interventions. PMID:18450142

  9. Vascular aging: Chronic oxidative stress and impairment of redox signaling—consequences for vascular homeostasis and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bachschmid, Markus M.; Schildknecht, Stefan; Matsui, Reiko; Zee, Rebecca; Haeussler, Dagmar; Cohen, Richard A.; Pimental, David; van der Loo, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Characteristic morphological and molecular alterations such as vessel wall thickening and reduction of nitric oxide occur in the aging vasculature leading to the gradual loss of vascular homeostasis. Consequently, the risk of developing acute and chronic cardiovascular diseases increases with age. Current research of the underlying molecular mechanisms of endothelial function demonstrates a duality of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in contributing to vascular homeostasis or leading to detrimental effects when formed in excess. Furthermore, changes in function and redox status of vascular smooth muscle cells contribute to age-related vascular remodeling. The age-dependent increase in free radical formation causes deterioration of the nitric oxide signaling cascade, alters and activates prostaglandin metabolism, and promotes novel oxidative posttranslational protein modifications that interfere with vascular and cell signaling pathways. As a result, vascular dysfunction manifests. Compensatory mechanisms are initially activated to cope with age-induced oxidative stress, but become futile, which results in irreversible oxidative modifications of biological macromolecules. These findings support the ‘free radical theory of aging’ but also show that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are essential signaling molecules, regulating vascular homeostasis. PMID:22380696

  10. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of acute vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hoyte, Lisa C; Brooks, Keith J; Nagel, Simon; Akhtar, Asim; Chen, Ruoli; Mardiguian, Sylvie; McAteer, Martina A; Anthony, Daniel C; Choudhury, Robin P; Buchan, Alastair M; Sibson, Nicola R

    2010-06-01

    The pathogenesis of stroke is multifactorial, and inflammation is thought to have a critical function in lesion progression at early time points. Detection of inflammatory processes associated with cerebral ischemia would be greatly beneficial in both designing individual therapeutic strategies and monitoring outcome. We have recently developed a new approach to imaging components of the inflammatory response, namely endovascular adhesion molecule expression on the brain endothelium. In this study, we show specific imaging of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 expression in a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and a reduction in this inflammatory response, associated with improved behavioral outcome, as a result of preconditioning. The spatial extent of VCAM-1 expression is considerably greater than the detectable lesion using diffusion-weighted imaging (25% versus 3% total brain volume), which is generally taken to reflect the core of the lesion at early time points. Thus, VCAM-1 imaging seems to reveal both core and penumbral regions, and our data implicate VCAM-1 upregulation and associated inflammatory processes in the progression of penumbral tissue to infarction. Our findings indicate that such molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches could be important clinical tools for patient evaluation, acute monitoring of therapy, and design of specific treatment strategies. PMID:20087364

  11. Cerebral blood flow regulation in women across menstrual phase: differential contribution of cyclooxygenase to basal, hypoxic, and hypercapnic vascular tone.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, Garrett L; Harrell, John W; Aleckson, Benjamin P; LaPlante, Kaylie M; Crain, Meghan K; Schrage, William G

    2016-08-01

    In healthy young women, basal cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity may change across the menstrual cycle, but mechanisms remain untested. When compared with the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, we hypothesized women in late follicular phase would exhibit: 1) greater basal CBF, 2) greater hypercapnic increases in CBF, 3) greater hypoxic increases in CBF, and 4) increased cyclooxygenase (COX) signaling. We measured middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv, transcranial Doppler ultrasound) in 11 healthy women (23 ± 1 yr) during rest, hypoxia, and hypercapnia. Subjects completed four visits: two during the early follicular (∼day 3) and two during the late follicular (∼day 14) phases of the menstrual cycle, with and without COX inhibition (oral indomethacin). Isocapnic hypoxia elicited an SPO2 = 90% and SPO2 = 80% for 5 min each. Separately, hypercapnia increased end-tidal CO2 10 mmHg above baseline. Cerebral vascular conductance index (CVCi = MCAv/MABP·100, where MABP is mean arterial blood pressure) was calculated and a positive change reflected vasodilation (ΔCVCi). Basal CVCi was greater in the late follicular phase (P < 0.001). Indomethacin decreased basal CVCi (∼37%) and abolished the phase difference (P < 0.001). Hypoxic ΔCVCi was similar between phases and unaffected by indomethacin. Hypercapnic ΔCVCi was similar between phases, and indomethacin decreased hypercapnic ΔCVCi (∼68%; P < 0.001) similarly between phases. In summary, while neither hypercapnic nor hypoxic vasodilation is altered by menstrual phase, increased basal CBF in the late follicular phase is fully explained by a greater contribution of COX. These data provide new mechanistic insight into anterior CBF regulation across menstrual phases and contribute to our understanding of CBF regulation in women. PMID:27225949

  12. Economic evaluation of drugs in peripheral vascular disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Drummond, M; Davies, L

    1994-01-01

    Increased pressures on health-care budgets mean that governments require good value for money from the resources devoted to health care. In many countries, measures have been introduced to increase efficiency or to contain health-care costs. These include price controls, limitations on reimbursement of health technologies, budgetary reform in health-care institutions, and the encouragement of competition. Given this changing environment, it is important that drugs and other health technologies be shown to give good value for money. The methods of economic evaluation, such as cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis, can be used to assess the value of drugs and other health technologies. They have been widely applied. The economic evaluation of drugs in peripheral vascular disease and stroke would compare the cost of adding the drug with its benefits. These would include improvements in length and quality of life and the savings in treating vascular events that may be postponed, or lessened in intensity, by effective drug therapy. One study, following a clinical trial of naftidrofuryl in stroke, suggested that there would be significant reductions in costs through reductions in hospital stay if recovery was aided. Further research and a large multicenter trial are under way to confirm these findings. In peripheral artery disease there are no economic data collected alongside clinical trials. It is known, however, that the costs of leg ischemia can be significant. A study in the U.K. found that arterial construction would cost around pounds 7,750 per person (1989 prices) and amputation around pounds 11,000 per person.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7517476

  13. Pulse oximetry in the evaluation of peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jawahar, D; Rachamalla, H R; Rafalowski, A; Ilkhani, R; Bharathan, T; Anandarao, N

    1997-08-01

    The role of pulse oximetry in the evaluation of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) was investigated. In addition, the value of elevating the limb to improve the sensitivity of detection of PVD by the pulse oximeter was also determined. Pulse oximetry reading in the toes were obtained in 40 young, healthy volunteers and in 40 randomly selected patients referred to the vascular investigation laboratory over a period of two months. All 40 healthy volunteers had normal pulse oximetry readings. Normal pulse oximetry reading in the toes was defined as > 95% O2 Sat and +/-2 of finger pulse oximetry reading. In all 40 patients, pulse oximetry readings were either normal or not detected at all. Since there was no gradation in decrease in the pulse oximetry reading with severity of disease or with elevation of the patient's lower extremity, an absent or no reading was considered as an abnormal result from the test. The frequency of abnormal pulse oximetry readings increased significantly in groups with abnormal ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and also varied significantly with elevation of the patients' lower limbs. In patients with no PVD detected by Doppler (ABPI > 0.9), pulse oximetry readings were normal in all. However, in patients with moderate PVD (ABPI, 0.5-0.9), 84% of the patients' lower limbs had normal pulse oximetry readings and 16% had an abnormal reading at baseline level (flat). An additional 12% of the lower limbs in this group had an abnormal reading on elevation of the limb to 12 inches. In patients with severe PVD (ABPI < 0.5), 54% of the patients' lower limbs had an abnormal reading at baseline and an additional 23% had an abnormal reading at elevation of the limb to 12 inches. In conclusion, pulse oximetry was not a sensitive test for detecting early PVD. PMID:9269142

  14. Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction and Cerebral Small Vessel Disease (Arteriolosclerosis) in Brains of Older People

    PubMed Central

    Khoong, Cheryl H.L.; Poon, Wayne; Esiri, Margaret M.; Markus, Hugh S.; Hainsworth, Atticus H.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects brain tissue from potentially harmful plasma components. Small vessel disease ([SVD], arteriolosclerosis) is common in the brains of older people and is associated with lacunar infarcts, leukoaraiosis and vascular dementia. To determine whether plasma extravasation is associated with SVD, we immunolabeled the plasma proteins fibrinogen and IgG, which are assumed to reflect BBB dysfunction, in deep grey matter (anterior caudate-putamen, [DGM]) and deep subcortical white matter (DWM) in the brains of a well-characterized patient cohort with minimal Alzheimer disease pathology (Braak stage 0-II) (n = 84; age ≥65 years). Morphometric measures of fibrinogen labeling were compared between people with neuropathologically defined SVD and aged control subjects. Parenchymal cellular labeling with fibrinogen and IgG was detectable in DGM and DWM in many subjects (>70%). Quantitative measures of fibrinogen were not associated with SVD in DGM or DWM; SVD severity was correlated between DGM and DWM (p < 0.0001). Fibrinogen in DGM showed a modest association with a history of hypertension; DWM fibrinogen was associated with dementia and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (all p < 0.05). In DWM, SVD was associated with leukoaraiosis identified in life (p < 0.05), but fibrinogen was not. Our data suggest that in aged brains plasma extravasation and hence local BBB dysfunction is common but do not support an association with SVD. PMID:25289893

  15. EXCEPTIONAL AGGRESSIVENESS OF CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATION DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH PDCD10 MUTATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiz, Tania; Stockton, Rebecca A.; McDonald, David A.; Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Zhang, Lingjiao; Austin, Cecilia; Akers, Amy L.; Gallione, Carol J.; Rorrer, Autumn; Gunel, Murat; Min, Wang; De Souza, Jorge Marcondes; Lee, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The phenotypic manifestations of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) disease caused by rare PDCD10 mutations have not been systematically examined, and a mechanistic link to Rho kinase (ROCK) mediated hyperpermeability, a potential therapeutic target, has not been established. Methods We analyze PDCD10-siRNA treated endothelial cells for stress fibers, ROCK activity and permeability. ROCK activity is assessed in CCM lesions. Brain permeability and CCM lesion burden is quantified, and clinical manifestations are assessed in prospectively enrolled subjects with PDCD10 mutations. Results We determine that PDCD10 protein suppresses endothelial stress fibers, ROCK activity and permeability in vitro. Pdcd10 heterozygous mice have greater lesion burden than other Ccm genotypes. We demonstrate robust ROCK activity in murine and human CCM vasculature, and increased brain vascular permeability in humans with PDCD10 mutation. Clinical phenotype is exceptionally aggressive compared to the more common KRIT1 and CCM2 familial and sporadic CCM, with greater lesion burden and more frequent hemorrhages earlier in life. We first report other phenotypic features including scoliosis, cognitive disability and skin lesions, unrelated to lesion burden or bleeding. Conclusion These findings define a unique CCM disease with exceptional aggressiveness, and they inform preclinical therapeutic testing, clinical counseling and the design of trials. PMID:25122144

  16. Alcohol and cardiovascular disease--modulation of vascular cell function.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Paul A; Redmond, Eileen M

    2012-04-01

    Alcohol is a commonly used drug worldwide. Epidemiological studies have identified alcohol consumption as a factor that may either positively or negatively influence many diseases including cardiovascular disease, certain cancers and dementia. Often there seems to be a differential effect of various drinking patterns, with frequent moderate consumption of alcohol being salutary and binge drinking or chronic abuse being deleterious to one's health. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating the many effects of alcohol consumption is beginning to emerge, as well as a clearer picture as to whether these effects are due to the direct actions of alcohol itself, or caused in part by its metabolites, e.g., acetaldehyde, or by incidental components present in the alcoholic beverage (e.g., polyphenols in red wine). This review will discuss evidence to date as to how alcohol (ethanol) might affect atherosclerosis that underlies cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, and the putative mechanisms involved, focusing on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell effects. PMID:22606372

  17. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy for non-invasive, micro-vascular cerebral blood flow measurement

    PubMed Central

    Durduran, Turgut; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) uses the temporal fluctuations of near-infrared (NIR) light to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) non-invasively. Here, we provide a brief history of DCS applications in brain with an emphasis on the underlying physical ideas, common instrumentation and validation. Then we describe recent clinical research that employs DCS-measured CBF as a biomarker of patient well-being, and as an indicator of hemodynamic and metabolic response to functional stimuli. PMID:23770408

  18. Chronic supplementation of paeonol combined with danshensu for the improvement of vascular reactivity in the cerebral basilar artery of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Li, Ya-Ling; Li, Zi-Lin; Li, Hua; Zhou, Xuan-Xuan; Qiu, Peng-Cheng; Yang, Qian; Wang, Si-Wang

    2012-01-01

    One of the leading causes of death in the world is cerebrovascular disease. Numerous Chinese traditional medicines, such as Cortex Moutan (root bark of Paeonia suffruticosa Andrew) and Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae (root and rhizome of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge), protect against cerebrovascular diseases and exhibit anti-atherosclerotic effects. Traditional medicines have been routinely used for a long time in China. In addition, these two herbs are prescribed together in clinical practice. Therefore, the pharmacodynamic interactions between the active constituents of these two herbs, which are paeonol (Pae) and danshensu (DSS), should be particularly studied. The study of Pae and DSS can provide substantial foundations in understanding their mechanisms and empirical evidence to support clinical practice. This study investigated the effects and possible mechanisms of the pharmacodynamic interaction between Pae and DSS on cerebrovascular malfunctioning in diabetes. Experimental diabetes was induced in rats, which was then treated with Pae, DSS, and Pae + DSS for eight weeks. Afterward, cerebral arteries from all groups were isolated and equilibrated in an organ bath with Krebs buffer and ring tension. Effects of Pae, DSS, and Pae + DSS were observed on vessel relaxation with or without endothelium as well as on the basal tonus of vessels from normal and diabetic rats. Indexes about oxidative stress were also determined. We report that the cerebral arteries from diabetic rats show decreased vascular reactivity to acetylcholine (ACh) which was corrected in Pae, DSS, and Pae + DSS treated groups. Furthermore, phenylephrine (PE)-induced contraction response decreased in the treated groups. Phenylephrine and CaCl(2)-induced vasoconstrictions are partially inhibited in the three treated groups under Ca2+-free medium. Pre-incubated with tetraethylammonium, a non-selective K+ channel blocker, the antagonized relaxation responses increased in DSS and Pae + DSS treated diabetic

  19. Mechanical Injury Induces Brain Endothelial-Derived Microvesicle Release: Implications for Cerebral Vascular Injury during Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Allison M; Lutton, Evan M; Merkel, Steven F; Razmpour, Roshanak; Ramirez, Servio H

    2016-01-01

    . These results indicate that following TBI, the cerebral endothelium undergoes vascular remodeling through shedding of eMVs containing TJPs and endothelial markers. The detection of this shedding potentially allows for a novel methodology for real-time monitoring of cerebral vascular health (remodeling), BBB status and neuroinflammation following a TBI event. PMID:26973460

  20. Mechanical Injury Induces Brain Endothelial-Derived Microvesicle Release: Implications for Cerebral Vascular Injury during Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Allison M.; Lutton, Evan M.; Merkel, Steven F.; Razmpour, Roshanak; Ramirez, Servio H.

    2016-01-01

    . These results indicate that following TBI, the cerebral endothelium undergoes vascular remodeling through shedding of eMVs containing TJPs and endothelial markers. The detection of this shedding potentially allows for a novel methodology for real-time monitoring of cerebral vascular health (remodeling), BBB status and neuroinflammation following a TBI event. PMID:26973460

  1. Dicarbonyl proteome and genome damage in metabolic and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J

    2014-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is a potent protein-glycating agent. It is an arginine-directed glycating agent and often modifies functionally important sites in proteins. Glycation forms mainly MG-H1 [Nδ-(5-hydro-5-methyl-4-imidazolon-2-yl)ornithine] residues. MG-H1 content of proteins is quantified by stable isotopic dilution analysis-MS/MS and also by immunoblotting with specific monoclonal antibodies. Methylglyoxal-modified proteins undergo cellular proteolysis and release MG-H1 free adduct for excretion. MG-H1 residues have been found in proteins of animals, plants, bacteria, fungi and protoctista. MG-H1 is often the major advanced glycation end-product in proteins of tissues and body fluids, increasing in diabetes and associated vascular complications, renal failure, cirrhosis, Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Parkinson's disease and aging. Proteins susceptible to methylglyoxal modification with related functional impairment are called the DCP (dicarbonyl proteome). The DCP includes albumin, haemoglobin, transcription factors, mitochondrial proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, lens crystallins and others. DCP component proteins are linked to mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes and aging, oxidative stress, dyslipidaemia, cell detachment and anoikis and apoptosis. Methylglyoxal also modifies DNA where deoxyguanosine residues are modified to imidazopurinone MGdG {3-(2'-deoxyribosyl)-6,7-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-6/7-methylimidazo-[2,3-b]purine-9(8)one} isomers. MGdG was the major quantitative adduct detected in vivo. It was linked to frequency of DNA strand breaks and increased markedly during apoptosis induced by a cell-permeant glyoxalase I inhibitor. Glyoxalase I metabolizes >99% methylglyoxal and thereby protects the proteome and genome. Gene deletion of GLO1 is embryonically lethal and GLO1 silencing increases methylglyoxal concentration, MG-H1 and MGdG, premature aging and disease. Studies of methylglyoxal glycation have importance for human health, longevity and

  2. [Changes in cerebral circulation in patients with coronary heart disease during myocardial revascularizing operations under combined xenon anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Kozhevnikov, V A; Sandrikov, V A; Fedulova, S V; Guleshov, V A; Morozov, Iu A; Burov, N E; Buniatian, A A

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with coronary heart disease were examined in the preperfusion stage of myocardial revascularing operations under extracorporeal circulation. All the patients received combined anesthesia with xenon (Xe) as minimum flow anesthesia with flow of gases: oxygen, 0.4 l/min; Xe, 0.9 to 0.4 l/min. Cerebral circulation was investigated by transcranial Doppler study. The following parameters of the circulation: maximum systolic and diastolic blood flow velocities and pulsatile index were bilaterally estimated, by insonating the middle cerebral artery (MCA). When the concentration of Xe was as high as 50-60%, systolic and diastolic blood flow velocities along the MCA increase and the pulsatile index decreased. Opposite results were obtained 8 minutes after Xe feed was stopped. The findings provide evidence that Xe increases cerebral circulation and has a significant hypnotic effect. The increased systolic and diastolic blood flow velocities with the decreased peripheral resistance index in the MCA suggest that Xe diminishes peripheral vascular resistance in the pial arteries of the brain. PMID:17184056

  3. Systemic and Pulmonary Vascular Remodelling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Esquerre, Mariana; López-Sánchez, Marta; Escobar, Ignacio; Huertas, Daniel; Penín, Rosa; Molina-Molina, María; Manresa, Frederic; Dorca, Jordi; Santos, Salud

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is associated with subclinical systemic atherosclerosis and pulmonary vascular remodelling characterized by intimal hyperplasia and luminal narrowing. We aimed to determine differences in the intimal thickening of systemic and pulmonary arteries in COPD subjects and smokers. Secondary aims include comparisons with a non-smokers group; determining the clinical variables associated with systemic and pulmonary intimal thickening, and the correlations between systemic and pulmonary remodelling changes. Methods All consecutive subjects undergoing lung resection were included and divided into 3 groups: 1) COPD, 2) smokers, and 3) non-smokers. Sections of the 5th intercostal artery and muscular pulmonary arteries were measured by histo-morphometry. Four parameters of intimal thickening were evaluated: 1) percentage of intimal area (%IA), 2) percentage of luminal narrowing, 3) intimal thickness index, and 4) intima-to-media ratio. Results In the adjusted analysis, the systemic arteries of COPD subjects showed greater intimal thickening (%IA) than those of smokers (15.6±1.5% vs. 14.2±1.6%, p = 0.038). In the pulmonary arteries, significant differences were observed for %IA between the 2 groups (37.3±2.2% vs. 29.3±2.3%, p = 0.016). Among clinical factors, metabolic syndrome, gender and COPD status were associated with the systemic intimal thickening, while only COPD status was associated with pulmonary intimal thickening. A correlation between the %IA of the systemic and pulmonary arteries was observed (Spearman’s rho = 0.46, p = 0.008). Conclusions Greater intimal thickening in systemic and pulmonary arteries is observed in COPD patients than in smokers. There is a correlation between systemic and pulmonary vascular remodelling in the overall population. PMID:27046203

  4. Vascular system: role of nitric oxide in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Bian, Ka; Doursout, Marie-Françoise; Murad, Ferid

    2008-04-01

    In contrast with the short research history of the enzymatic synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), the introduction of nitrate-containing compounds for medicinal purposes marked its 150th anniversary in 1997. Glyceryl trinitrate (nitroglycerin) is the first compound of this category. On October 12, 1998, the Nobel Assembly awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology to scientists Robert Furchgott, Louis Ignarro, and Ferid Murad for their discoveries concerning NO as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. NO-mediated signaling is a recognized component in various physiologic processes (eg, smooth muscle relaxation, inhibition of platelet and leukocyte aggregation, attenuation of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, neurotransmission, and immune defense), to name only a few. NO has also been implicated in the pathology of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis, myocarditis, colitis, and nephritis and a large number of pathologic conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Some of these processes (eg, smooth muscle relaxation, platelet aggregation, and neurotransmission) require only a brief production of NO at low nanomolar concentrations and are dependent on the recruitment of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent signaling. Other processes are associated with direct interaction of NO or reactive nitrogen species derived from it with target proteins and requires a more sustained production of NO at higher concentrations but do not involve the cGMP pathway. PMID:18401228

  5. [Present and future in the management of venous vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Gavorník, Peter; Dukát, Andrej; Gašpar, Ľudovít; Gavorníková, Eva

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence and the incidence of chronic and acute venous vascular disease has been shown to be globally very high, in both industrialized and developing countries. Chronic venous diseases of lower extremities are being an integral part of the third millennium's deadly angiopandemy, at the present time. The rate of the most severe cases with advanced stage of venous failure is approximately twice as high in the population (2.1 %) as has been assumed so far. Among venoactive drugs (VAD), micronized purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF) of diosmin hesperidin remains the agent with the highest degree of recommendation and it also indicated to pharmacotherapeutical support of leg ulcer healing, along with sulodexide and pentoxifylline. Compressive sclerotherapy, liquid or foam, is a safe and effective invasive method to treat telangiectasias, reticular varicose veins and subcutaneous varicose veins. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) represent one of the therapeutic and preventive options of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and of venous thromboembolism (VTE) with a limitation in patients with malignant conditions and in pregnancy. The most effective is triple simultaneous pharmaco-kinezio-mechano-phlebothromboemboloprophylaxis. Superficial vein thromboses longer than 5 cm are indicated to anticoagulant therapy too. PMID:25813260

  6. Can vessel dimension explain tolerance toward fungal vascular wilt diseases in woody plants? Lessons from Dutch elm disease and esca disease in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Pouzoulet, Jérôme; Pivovaroff, Alexandria L.; Santiago, Louis S.; Rolshausen, Philippe E.

    2014-01-01

    This review illuminates key findings in our understanding of grapevine xylem resistance to fungal vascular wilt diseases. Grapevine (Vitis spp.) vascular diseases such as esca, botryosphaeria dieback, and eutypa dieback, are caused by a set of taxonomically unrelated ascomycete fungi. Fungal colonization of the vascular system leads to a decline of the plant host because of a loss of the xylem function and subsequent decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Fungal vascular pathogens use different colonization strategies to invade and kill their host. Vitis vinifera cultivars display different levels of tolerance toward vascular diseases caused by fungi, but the plant defense mechanisms underlying those observations have not been completely elucidated. In this review, we establish a parallel between two vascular diseases, grapevine esca disease and Dutch elm disease, and argue that the former should be viewed as a vascular wilt disease. Plant genotypes exhibit differences in xylem morphology and resistance to fungal pathogens causing vascular wilt diseases. We provide evidence that the susceptibility of three commercial V. vinifera cultivars to esca disease is correlated to large vessel diameter. Additionally, we explore how xylem morphological traits related to water transport are influenced by abiotic factors, and how these might impact host tolerance of vascular wilt fungi. Finally, we explore the utility of this concept for predicting which V. vinifera cultivars are most vulnerable of fungal vascular wilt diseases and propose new strategies for disease management. PMID:24971084

  7. Ultrafast Doppler reveals the mapping of cerebral vascular resistivity in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Demené, Charlie; Pernot, Mathieu; Biran, Valérie; Alison, Marianne; Fink, Mathias; Baud, Olivier; Tanter, Mickaël

    2014-01-01

    In vivo mapping of the full vasculature dynamics based on Ultrafast Doppler is showed noninvasively in the challenging case of the neonatal brain. Contrary to conventional pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler Ultrasound limited for >40 years to the estimation of vascular indices at a single location, the ultrafast frame rate (5,000 Hz) obtained using plane-wave transmissions leads to simultaneous estimation of full Doppler spectra in all pixels of wide field-of-view images within a single cardiac cycle and high sensitivity Doppler imaging. Consequently, 2D quantitative maps of the cerebro-vascular resistivity index (RI) are processed and found in agreement with local measurements obtained on large arteries of healthy neonates using conventional PW Doppler. Changes in 2D resistivity maps are monitored during recovery after therapeutic whole-body cooling of full-term neonates treated for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Arterial and venous vessels are unambiguously differentiated on the basis of their distinct hemodynamics. The high spatial (250 × 250 μm2) and temporal resolution (<1 ms) of Ultrafast Doppler imaging combined with deep tissue penetration enable precise quantitative mapping of deep brain vascular dynamics and RI, which is far beyond the capabilities of any other imaging modality. PMID:24667916

  8. Cerebral glucose utilization and blood flow in Huntington's Disease (HD)

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Wapenski, J.; Riege, W.; Baxter, L.R.

    1985-05-01

    Previous studies in the authors' Laboratory have been carried out on 13 patients symptomatic of HD (SHD) and 15 asymptomatic at-risk for HD (ARHD) with a ECAT II and identification of changes in caudate metabolism using an index technique. The authors report now studies of additional 28 subjects (11 SHD, 17 ARHD) studied drug free and compared to age/sex matched controls using the higher resolution NeuroECAT, FDG for glucose utilization (LCMRGlc) and 0-15 water for cerebral blood flow (CBF). Patients had neurological, psychiatric-tests, x-ray CT and were video taped to determine type, timing and amount of choreathetic movements during study. In SHD (disease duration 4.9 +- 2.7 yrs), significant decreases (30%) in LCMRGlc were found in striatum (SHD=19.3 +- 7.7, controls = 29.9 +- 5.8 ..mu.. moles/min/100g) despite no to moderate caudate atrophy on x-ray CT. Hemisphere and cortical CMRGlc were not significantly decreased. There was a significant correlation between disease duration and ratio of caudate to putamen (Cd/Put). Pattern of LCMRGlc and CBF matched in SHD. The caudate to hemisphere LCMRGlc ratio was not different between ARHD and controls except variance was about 4 times greater for ARHD (ARHD=1.21 +- 0.15, controls = 1.28 +- 0.04) indicating presence of subpopulations in ARHD group. Four ARHD subjects had a ratio of 1 Std. Dev. from mean of SHD (no normals had values in this range). The 2 ARHD subjects with lowest caudate LCMRGlc had Cd/Put ratios > 2 Std. Dev. from controls. Results show 1) LCMRGlc abnormalities in all SHD patients and subpopulations in ARHD, 2) metabolic alterations appear to begin in caudate and spread to putamen and that a Cd/Put value of 0.7 should be found at start of symptoms, and 3) cortex and thalamus are relatively spared in ARHD and early SHD.

  9. An Active Contour Model Based on Adaptive Threshold for Extraction of Cerebral Vascular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaxin; Zhao, Shifeng; Liu, Zifeng; Duan, Fuqing; Pan, Yutong

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vessel segmentation is essential and helpful for the clinical diagnosis and the related research. However, automatic segmentation of brain vessels remains challenging because of the variable vessel shape and high complex of vessel geometry. This study proposes a new active contour model (ACM) implemented by the level-set method for segmenting vessels from TOF-MRA data. The energy function of the new model, combining both region intensity and boundary information, is composed of two region terms, one boundary term and one penalty term. The global threshold representing the lower gray boundary of the target object by maximum intensity projection (MIP) is defined in the first-region term, and it is used to guide the segmentation of the thick vessels. In the second term, a dynamic intensity threshold is employed to extract the tiny vessels. The boundary term is used to drive the contours to evolve towards the boundaries with high gradients. The penalty term is used to avoid reinitialization of the level-set function. Experimental results on 10 clinical brain data sets demonstrate that our method is not only able to achieve better Dice Similarity Coefficient than the global threshold based method and localized hybrid level-set method but also able to extract whole cerebral vessel trees, including the thin vessels. PMID:27597878

  10. Remote effect of deep-seated vascular brain lesions on cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Attig, E.; Capon, A.; Demeurisse, G.; Verhas, M. )

    1990-11-01

    We measured regional cerebral blood flow using the xenon-133 inhalation method, at approximately 1 month after onset, in 60 stroke patients who had no evidence of major carotid artery stenosis or occlusion. Their single lesions (43 infarcts and 17 hematomas) were located in the capsulothalamolenticular region, sparing the cortex. Hemispheric mean cerebral blood flow was reduced on the side of the lesion in 25 patients and on both sides in 20. Regional hypoperfusion was observed in 46 patients (ipsilaterally in 34, bilaterally in 10, and contralaterally in two). Regional hypoperfusion was observed most frequently in the frontal lobe, particularly in the motor and premotor cortices of the prerolandic area. The 46 patients with regional hypoperfusion were compared with the 14 patients without regional hypoperfusion, considering the size and location of the lesion as well as the functional and analytic motor performances. As a rule, the lesion was slightly smaller and more posterior and the functional (p less than 0.001) and analytic (p less than 0.05) motor performances were significantly better in the 14 patients without regional hypoperfusion. Since the xenon-133 inhalation method examines cortical blood flow, we can attribute blood flow reductions resulting from deep-seated lesions to a functional depression akin to diaschisis. Interpretation of the clinical consequences and pathogenesis of this phenomenon requires further sequential and pathologic studies.

  11. An Active Contour Model Based on Adaptive Threshold for Extraction of Cerebral Vascular Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaxin; Zhao, Shifeng; Liu, Zifeng; Tian, Yun; Duan, Fuqing; Pan, Yutong

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vessel segmentation is essential and helpful for the clinical diagnosis and the related research. However, automatic segmentation of brain vessels remains challenging because of the variable vessel shape and high complex of vessel geometry. This study proposes a new active contour model (ACM) implemented by the level-set method for segmenting vessels from TOF-MRA data. The energy function of the new model, combining both region intensity and boundary information, is composed of two region terms, one boundary term and one penalty term. The global threshold representing the lower gray boundary of the target object by maximum intensity projection (MIP) is defined in the first-region term, and it is used to guide the segmentation of the thick vessels. In the second term, a dynamic intensity threshold is employed to extract the tiny vessels. The boundary term is used to drive the contours to evolve towards the boundaries with high gradients. The penalty term is used to avoid reinitialization of the level-set function. Experimental results on 10 clinical brain data sets demonstrate that our method is not only able to achieve better Dice Similarity Coefficient than the global threshold based method and localized hybrid level-set method but also able to extract whole cerebral vessel trees, including the thin vessels. PMID:27597878

  12. Equol increases cerebral blood flow in rats via activation of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Wang, Yan; Song, Zheng; Zhao, Li-Mei; Li, Gui-Rong; Deng, Xiu-Ling

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of equol on cerebral blood flow and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The regional cerebral blood flow in parietal lobe of rats was measured by using a laser Doppler flowmetry. Isolated cerebral basilar artery and mesenteric artery rings from rats were used for vascular reactivity measurement with a multi wire myography system. Outward K(+) current in smooth muscle cells of cerebral basilar artery, large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel current in BK-HEK 293 cells stably expressing both human α (hSlo)- and β1-subunits, and hSlo channel current in hSlo-HEK 293 cells expressing only the α-subunit of BK channels were recorded with whole cell patch-clamp technique. The results showed that equol significantly increased regional cerebral blood flow in rats, and produced a concentration-dependent but endothelium-independent relaxation in rat cerebral basilar arteries. Both paxilline and iberiotoxin, two selective BK channel blockers, significantly inhibited equol-induced vasodilation in cerebral arteries. Outward K(+) currents in smooth muscle cells of cerebral basilar artery were increased by equol and fully reversed by washout or blockade of BK channels with iberiotoxin. Equol remarkably enhanced human BK current in BK-HEK 293 cells, but not hSlo current in hSlo-HEK 293 cells, and the increase was completely abolished by co-application of paxilline. Our findings provide the first information that equol selectively stimulates BK channel current by acting on its β1 subunit, which may in turn contribute to the equol-mediated vasodilation and cerebral blood flow increase. PMID:26995303

  13. Cerebral small vessel disease: Capillary pathways to stroke and cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Engedal, Thorbjørn S; Moreton, Fiona; Hansen, Mikkel B; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Dalkara, Turgay; Markus, Hugh S; Muir, Keith W

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) gives rise to one in five strokes worldwide and constitutes a major source of cognitive decline in the elderly. SVD is known to occur in relation to hypertension, diabetes, smoking, radiation therapy and in a range of inherited and genetic disorders, autoimmune disorders, connective tissue disorders, and infections. Until recently, changes in capillary patency and blood viscosity have received little attention in the aetiopathogenesis of SVD and the high risk of subsequent stroke and cognitive decline. Capillary flow patterns were, however, recently shown to limit the extraction efficacy of oxygen in tissue and capillary dysfunction therefore proposed as a source of stroke-like symptoms and neurodegeneration, even in the absence of physical flow-limiting vascular pathology. In this review, we examine whether capillary flow disturbances may be a shared feature of conditions that represent risk factors for SVD. We then discuss aspects of capillary dysfunction that could be prevented or alleviated and therefore might be of general benefit to patients at risk of SVD, stroke or cognitive decline. PMID:26661176

  14. Mutation of the Alzheimer's Disease Amyloid Gene in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage, Dutch Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Efrat; Carman, Mark D.; Fernandez-Madrid, Ivan J.; Power, Michael D.; Lieberburg, Ivan; van Duinen, Sjoerd G.; Bots, Gerard Th. A. M.; Luyendijk, Willem; Frangione, Blas

    1990-06-01

    An amyloid protein that precipitates in the cerebral vessel walls of Dutch patients with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis is similar to the amyloid protein in vessel walls and senile plaques in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Cloning and sequencing of the two exons that encode the amyloid protein from two patients with this amyloidosis revealed a cytosine-to-guanine transversion, a mutation that caused a single amino acid substitution (glutamine instead of glutamic acid) at position 22 of the amyloid protein. The mutation may account for the deposition of this amyloid protein in the cerebral vessel walls of these patients, leading to cerebral hemorrhages and premature death.

  15. Vascular endothelial function of patients with stable coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Yang, Xinchun; Cai, Jun; Shi, Hui; Zhong, Guangzhen; Chi, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate vascular endothelial function and contributing factors in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. Methods: One hundred twenty six CHD outpatients were randomly recruited. Reactive hyperemia index (RHI) <1.67 indicates endothelial dysfunction. Correlation between RHI and different biochemical parameters was evaluated. Results: RHI in patients receiving statins treatment was significantly higher than patients without statins treatment (P<0.05). RHI in patients with more than 3 risk factors for CHD was also markedly lower than that in patients with ≤2 risk factors (P<0.05). Patients with lesions at several branches of coronary artery had a markedly lower RHI when compared with those with coronary lesions at a single branch (P<0.05). For patients without statins treatment, RHI increased significantly after statins treatment for 1 month (P=0.01). In patients with endothelial dysfunction, FBG, HbA1C, hs-CRP and Hcy were significantly higher than those in patients with normal endothelial function (P<0.05 for all). Smokers with CHD had a remarkably lower RHI when compared with non-smokers (P<0.05). Conclusions: Smoking, FBG, HbA1C, Hcy and hs-CRP are significantly associated with endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction is also related to the numbers of risk factors for CHD, degree of coronary lesions and statins. Statins treatment may significantly improve the endothelial function of CHD patients. PMID:26150839

  16. Links between ectopic fat and vascular disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soo; Meigs, James B

    2014-09-01

    The average of overweight individual can have differential fat depots in target organs or specific compartments of the body. This ectopic fat distribution may be more of a predictive factor for cardiovascular risk than obesity. Abdominal visceral obesity, a representative ectopic fat, is robustly associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk. Fat depots in the liver and muscle tissue cause adverse cardiometabolic risk by affecting glucose and lipid metabolism. Pericardial fat and perivascular fat affect coronary atherosclerosis, cardiac function, and hemodynamics. Fat around the neck is associated with systemic vascular resistance. Fat around the kidney may increase blood pressure and induce albuminuria. Fat accumulation in or around the pancreas alters glucose metabolism, conferring cardiovascular risk. Ectopic fat may act as an active endocrine and paracrine organ that releases various bioactive mediators that influence insulin resistance, glucose and lipid metabolism, coagulation, and inflammation, which all contribute to cardiovascular risk. Because both obese and apparently lean individuals can have ectopic fat, regional fat distribution may play an important role in the development of cardiovascular diseases in both nonobese and obese people. PMID:25035342

  17. Role of the Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cell in Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S.; Appukuttan, Binoy; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; Pan, Yuzhen; Stempel, Andrew J.; Chipps, Timothy J.; Benedetti, Eric E.; Zamora, David O.; Choi, Dongseok; David, Larry L.; Smith, Justine R.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal endothelial cells line the arborizing microvasculature that supplies and drains the neural retina. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of these endothelial cells are consistent with nutritional requirements and protection of a tissue critical to vision. On the one hand, the endothelium must ensure the supply of oxygen and other nutrients to the metabolically active retina, and allow access to circulating cells that maintain the vasculature or survey the retina for the presence of potential pathogens. On the other hand, the endothelium contributes to the blood-retinal barrier that protects the retina by excluding circulating molecular toxins, microorganisms, and pro-inflammatory leukocytes. Features required to fulfill these functions may also predispose to disease processes, such as retinal vascular leakage and neovascularization, and trafficking of microbes and inflammatory cells. Thus, the retinal endothelial cell is a key participant in retinal ischemic vasculopathies that include diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity, and retinal inflammation or infection, as occurs in posterior uveitis. Using gene expression and proteomic profiling, it has been possible to explore the molecular phenotype of the human retinal endothelial cell and contribute to understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases. In addition to providing support for the involvement of well-characterized endothelial molecules, profiling has the power to identify new players in retinal pathologies. Findings may have implications for the design of new biological therapies. Additional progress in this field is anticipated as other technologies, including epigenetic profiling methods, whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing, and metabolomics, are used to study the human retinal endothelial cell. PMID:22982179

  18. Endothelial dysfunction, vascular disease and stroke: the ARTICO study.

    PubMed

    Roquer, J; Segura, T; Serena, J; Castillo, J

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a fundamental step in the atherosclerotic disease process. Its presence is a risk factor for the development of clinical events, and may represent a marker of atherothrombotic burden. Also, endothelial dysfunction contributes to enhanced plaque vulnerability, may trigger plaque rupture, and favors thrombus formation. The assessment of endothelial vasomotion is a useful marker of atherosclerotic vascular disease. There are different methods to assess endothelial function: endothelium-dependent vasodilatation brachial flow-mediated dilation, cerebrovascular reactivity to L-arginine, and the determination of some biomarkers such as microalbuminuria, platelet function, and C-reactive protein. Endothelial dysfunction has been observed in stroke patients and has been related to stroke physiopathology, stroke subtypes, clinical severity and outcome. Resting ankle-brachial index (ABI) is also considered an indicator of generalized atherosclerosis, and a low ABI is associated with an increase in stroke incidence in the elderly. Despite all these data, there are no studies analyzing the predictive value of ABI for new cardiovascular events in patients after suffering an acute ischemic stroke. ARTICO is an ongoing prospective, observational, multicenter study being performed in 50 Spanish hospitals. The aim of the ARTICO study is to evaluate the prognostic value of a pathological ABI (

  19. Management of cerebral venous thrombosis in a patient with Lane-Hamilton syndrome and coeliac disease, epilepsy and cerebral calcification syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grover, Patrick J; Jayaram, Raja; Madder, Hilary

    2010-12-01

    We describe a case of cerebral venous thrombosis presenting in a patient with Lane-Hamilton syndrome and coeliac disease epilepsy cerebral calcification syndrome. This is a first reported occurrence of this combination. Delayed anticoagulation with early external ventricular drain insertion for life-threatening raised intracranial pressure resulted in a successful outcome. PMID:21070152

  20. Cerebral hemodynamics in patients with moyamoya disease. A study of regional cerebral blood flow by the /sup 133/Xe inhalation method

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, S.; Tanaka, R.; Ishii, R.; Tsuchida, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Arai, H.

    1985-05-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow was measured by the /sup 133/Xe inhalation method in 20 young patients with moyamoya disease and five young healthy volunteers. Most patients showed low values of mean hemispheric blood flow in both hemispheres. Regional cerebral blood flow was at a low value in the upper frontal region and at an almost average value in the posterotemporal and occipital regions, which was different from the ''hyperfrontal'' pattern in healthy volunteers. Regional cerebral blood flow was reduced evenly by hyperventilation. By 5% CO/sub 2/ inhalation, regional cerebral blood flow was increased in the temporooccipital regions and was nearly unchanged or decreased in the frontal region.

  1. Sex, Aging, and Preexisting Cerebral Ischemic Disease in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Acker, Michael A.; Bilello, Michel; Melhem, Elias R.; Stambrook, Elizabeth; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing cardiac surgery have a high frequency of preexisting cerebral ischemic lesions, the presence of which appears to predict cognitive sequelae. Patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis (AS) incur an exceptionally high risk for perioperative cerebral ischemia. The extreme risk in this subgroup may arise from the preexisting burden of cerebral ischemic disease. We tested the hypotheses that increasing age, female sex, coronary artery disease, and the severity of AS are predictive of the severity of preexisting cerebral ischemic lesions. Methods A total of 95 subjects were included in this study. Subjects were imaged on 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanners to obtain multimodal image sets which were used for the automatic segmentation of cerebral lesion volume. The dependence of lesion volume upon age, sex, coronary artery disease, and the severity of AS were tested. Results The results demonstrate a strong correlation between aging, female sex, and white matter and ischemia-like lesion volume in patients with aortic stenosis. Conclusions Women and those of advanced age presenting for aortic valve replacement for AS may incur a particularly high risk for postoperative neurologic sequelae due to an exceptional preexisting burden of cerebral ischemic disease. PMID:20868818

  2. Emerging translational approaches to target STAT3 signalling and its impact on vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Dutzmann, Jochen; Daniel, Jan-Marcus; Bauersachs, Johann; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Sedding, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic inflammation responses characterize the vascular remodelling processes in atherosclerosis, restenosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and angiogenesis. The functional and phenotypic changes in diverse vascular cell types are mediated by complex signalling cascades that initiate and control genetic reprogramming. The signalling molecule's signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays a key role in the initiation and continuation of these pathophysiological changes. This review highlights the pivotal involvement of STAT3 in pathological vascular remodelling processes and discusses potential translational therapies, which target STAT3 signalling, to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, current clinical trials using highly effective and selective inhibitors of STAT3 signalling for distinct diseases, such as myelofibrosis and rheumatoid arthritis, are discussed with regard to their vascular (side-) effects and their potential to pave the way for a direct use of these molecules for the prevention or treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:25784694

  3. Principal component analysis of indocyanine green fluorescence dynamics for diagnosis of vascular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jihye; An, Yuri; Lee, Jungsul; Choi, Chulhee

    2015-03-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG), a near-infrared fluorophore, has been used in visualization of vascular structure and non-invasive diagnosis of vascular disease. Although many imaging techniques have been developed, there are still limitations in diagnosis of vascular diseases. We have recently developed a minimally invasive diagnostics system based on ICG fluorescence imaging for sensitive detection of vascular insufficiency. In this study, we used principal component analysis (PCA) to examine ICG spatiotemporal profile and to obtain pathophysiological information from ICG dynamics. Here we demonstrated that principal components of ICG dynamics in both feet showed significant differences between normal control and diabetic patients with vascula complications. We extracted the PCA time courses of the first three components and found distinct pattern in diabetic patient. We propose that PCA of ICG dynamics reveal better classification performance compared to fluorescence intensity analysis. We anticipate that specific feature of spatiotemporal ICG dynamics can be useful in diagnosis of various vascular diseases.

  4. Thiazine Red(+) platelet inclusions in Cerebral Blood Vessels are first signs in an Alzheimer's Disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kniewallner, Kathrin M; Wenzel, Daniela; Humpel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Strong evidence shows an association between cerebral vascular diseases and Alzheimer´s disease (AD). In order to study the interaction of beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques with brain vessels, we crossbred an AD mouse model (overexpressing amyloid precursor protein with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations, APP_SweDI) with mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the flt-1/VEGFR1 promoter in vessels (GFP_FLT1). Our data show, that only very few Aβ plaques were seen in 4-months old mice, focused in the mammillary body and in the lateral septal nucleus. The number of plaques markedly increased with age being most prominent in 12-months old mice. Thiazine Red was used to verify the plaques. Several Thiazine Red(+) inclusions were found in GFP(+) vessels, but only in non-perfused 4-months old mice. These inclusions were verified by Resorufin stainings possibly representing cerebral amyloid angiopathy. The inclusions were also seen in non-crossbred APP_SweDI but not in wildtype and GFP_FLT1 mice. In order to characterize these inclusions Flow Cytometry (FACS) analysis demonstrated that platelets were specifically stained by Thiazine Red(+), more pronounced when aggregated. In conclusion, our data show that Thiazine Red(+) inclusions representing aggregated platelets are a first pathological sign in AD before plaque development and may become important therapeutic targets in early AD. PMID:27345467

  5. Modeling the Role of the Glymphatic Pathway and Cerebral Blood Vessel Properties in Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Baras, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, affecting over 10% population over the age of 65 years. Clinically, AD is described by the symptom set of short term memory loss and cognitive decline, changes in mentation and behavior, and eventually long-term memory deficit as the disease progresses. On imaging studies, significant atrophy with subsequent increase in ventricular volume have been observed. Pathology on post-mortem brain specimens demonstrates the classic findings of increased beta amyloid (Aβ) deposition and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) within affected neurons. Neuroinflammation, dysregulation of blood-brain barrier transport and clearance, deposition of Aβ in cerebral blood vessels, vascular risk factors such as atherosclerosis and diabetes, and the presence of the apolipoprotein E4 allele have all been identified as playing possible roles in AD pathogenesis. Recent research has demonstrated the importance of the glymphatic system in the clearance of Aβ from the brain via the perivascular space surrounding cerebral blood vessels. Given the variety of hypotheses that have been proposed for AD pathogenesis, an interconnected, multilayer model offers a unique opportunity to combine these ideas into a single unifying model. Results of this model demonstrate the importance of vessel stiffness and heart rate in maintaining adequate clearance of Aβ from the brain. PMID:26448331

  6. Thiazine Red+ platelet inclusions in Cerebral Blood Vessels are first signs in an Alzheimer’s Disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kniewallner, Kathrin M.; Wenzel, Daniela; Humpel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Strong evidence shows an association between cerebral vascular diseases and Alzheimer´s disease (AD). In order to study the interaction of beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques with brain vessels, we crossbred an AD mouse model (overexpressing amyloid precursor protein with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations, APP_SweDI) with mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the flt-1/VEGFR1 promoter in vessels (GFP_FLT1). Our data show, that only very few Aβ plaques were seen in 4-months old mice, focused in the mammillary body and in the lateral septal nucleus. The number of plaques markedly increased with age being most prominent in 12-months old mice. Thiazine Red was used to verify the plaques. Several Thiazine Red+ inclusions were found in GFP+ vessels, but only in non-perfused 4-months old mice. These inclusions were verified by Resorufin stainings possibly representing cerebral amyloid angiopathy. The inclusions were also seen in non-crossbred APP_SweDI but not in wildtype and GFP_FLT1 mice. In order to characterize these inclusions Flow Cytometry (FACS) analysis demonstrated that platelets were specifically stained by Thiazine Red+, more pronounced when aggregated. In conclusion, our data show that Thiazine Red+ inclusions representing aggregated platelets are a first pathological sign in AD before plaque development and may become important therapeutic targets in early AD. PMID:27345467

  7. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease: consensus statement from the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute, Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Moledina, Shahin; Haworth, Sheila G; Ivy, Dunbar; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Banjar, Hanaa; Diaz, Gabriel; Heath-Freudenthal, Alexandria; Galal, Ahmed Nasser; Humpl, Tilman; Kulkarni, Snehal; Lopes, Antonio; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Puri, G D; Rossouw, Beyra; Harikrishnan, S; Saxena, Anita; Udo, Patience; Caicedo, Lina; Tamimi, Omar; Adatia, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac catheterization is important in the diagnosis and risk stratification of pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PHVD) in children. Acute vasoreactivity testing provides key information about management, prognosis, therapeutic strategies, and efficacy. Data obtained at cardiac catheterization continue to play an important role in determining the surgical options for children with congenital heart disease and clinical evidence of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute met to develop a consensus statement regarding indications for, conduct of, acute vasoreactivity testing with, and pitfalls and risks of cardiac catheterization in children with PHVD. This document contains the essentials of those discussions to provide a rationale for the hemodynamic assessment by cardiac catheterization of children with PHVD. PMID:27076908

  8. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease: consensus statement from the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute, Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces

    PubMed Central

    del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Moledina, Shahin; Haworth, Sheila G.; Ivy, Dunbar; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Banjar, Hanaa; Diaz, Gabriel; Heath-Freudenthal, Alexandria; Galal, Ahmed Nasser; Humpl, Tilman; Kulkarni, Snehal; Lopes, Antonio; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Puri, G. D.; Rossouw, Beyra; Harikrishnan, S.; Saxena, Anita; Udo, Patience; Caicedo, Lina; Tamimi, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac catheterization is important in the diagnosis and risk stratification of pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PHVD) in children. Acute vasoreactivity testing provides key information about management, prognosis, therapeutic strategies, and efficacy. Data obtained at cardiac catheterization continue to play an important role in determining the surgical options for children with congenital heart disease and clinical evidence of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute met to develop a consensus statement regarding indications for, conduct of, acute vasoreactivity testing with, and pitfalls and risks of cardiac catheterization in children with PHVD. This document contains the essentials of those discussions to provide a rationale for the hemodynamic assessment by cardiac catheterization of children with PHVD. PMID:27076908

  9. A chronic scheme of cranial window preparation to study pial vascular reactivity in murine cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Peng Kai; Meays, Diana; Frangos, John A.; Carvalho, Leonardo J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The acute implantation of a cranial window for studying cerebroarteriolar reactivity in living animals involves a highly surgically-invasive craniotomy procedure at the time of experimentation, which limits its application in severely ill animals such as in the experimental murine model of cerebral malaria (ECM). To overcome this problem, a chronic window implantation scheme was designed and implemented. Methods A partial craniotomy is first performed by creating a skull bone flap in the healthy mice, which are then left to recover for 1–2 weeks, followed by infection to induce ECM. Uninfected animals are utilized as control. When cranial superfusion is needed, the bone flap is retracted and window implantation completed by assembling a perfusion chamber for compound delivery to the exposed brain surface. The presurgical step is intended to minimize surgical trauma on the day of experimentation. Results Chronic preparations in uninfected mice exhibited remarkably improved stability over acute ones by significantly reducing periarteriolar tissue damage and enhancing cerebroarteriolar dilator responses. The chronic scheme was successfully implemented in ECM mice which unveiled novel preliminary insights on impaired cerebroarteriolar reactivity and eNOS dysfunction. Conclusion The chronic scheme presents an innovative approach for advancing our mechanistic understanding on cerebrovascular dysfunction in ECM. PMID:23279271

  10. Structural description and combined 3D display for superior analysis of cerebral vascularity from MRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, Gabor; Koller, Thomas; Kikinis, Ron; Gerig, Guido

    1994-09-01

    Medical image analysis has to support the clinicians ability to identify, manipulate and quantify anatomical structures. On scalar 2D image data, a human observer is often superior to computer assisted analysis, but the interpretation of vector- valued data or data combined from different modalities, especially in 3D, can benefit from computer assistance. The problem of how to convey the complex information to the clinician is often tackled by providing colored multimodality renderings. We propose to go a step beyond by supplying a suitable modelling of anatomical and functional structures encoding important shape features and physical properties. The multiple attributes regarding geometry, topology and function are carried by the symbolic description and can be interactively queried and edited. Integrated 3D rendering of object surfaces and symbolic representation acts as a visual interface to allow interactive communication between the observer and the complex data, providing new possibilities for quantification and therapy planning. The discussion is guided by the prototypical example of investigating the cerebral vasculature in MRA volume data. Geometric, topological and flow-related information can be assessed by interactive analysis on a computer workstation, providing otherwise hidden qualitative and quantitative information. Several case studies demonstrate the potential usage for structure identification, definition of landmarks, assessment of topology for catheterization, and local simulation of blood flow.

  11. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation: an emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Savoiardo, M; Erbetta, A; Di Francesco, J C; Brioschi, M; Silani, V; Falini, A; Storchi, G; Brighina, L; Ferrarese, C; Ticozzi, N; Messina, S; Girotti, F

    2011-05-15

    Three elderly patients with, respectively: mild cognitive impairment, severe and progressive neurologic involvement, and focal neurologic deficit, were observed. MRI showed multiple areas of white matter edema, at times partially involving the cortex, in the first two patients, and a single area in the third. Treatment with steroids determined the disappearance of the lesions and clinical amelioration. The key to the diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation (CAA-ri) was the demonstration, with appropriate MRI sequences, of microbleeds consistent with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). This diagnosis was supported by genetic analysis of APOE with demonstration of ε4/ε4 genotype, found in about 80% of CAA patients who develop inflammatory changes. In the appropriate clinical setting, MRI demonstration of microbleeds supported by results of genetic analysis of APOE may strongly support the diagnosis of CAA-ri thus avoiding cerebral biopsy. PMID:24059616

  12. Association between abdominal aortic diameter and peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, C; Bonapace, S; Starr, J; Radia, M; Bulpitt, C J

    1997-09-01

    Fifty-four elderly people 81.2 years +/- 7.4 (mean age +/- s.d., range 66-98 years) were selected. These included 20 men (78.6 +/- 6.4 years, range 70-91 years) and 34 women (82.2 +/- 7.6 years, range 66-98 years). The relationship between the size of the abdominal aorta and various cardiovascular risk indicators such as calf:-brachial systolic pressure ratio, plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and random blood glucose were examined. Abdominal aortic diameter correlated well with calf:-brachial systolic ratio measured by Doppler method over the posterior tibial artery and taking the lowest result of the right and left side (r = -0.28, P = 0.04). This correlation tended to be stronger in men (r = -0.55, P = 0.02) compared to women (r = -0.10, P = 0.57). However, the relationship tended to be confined to the systolic pressure in the left leg, raising the hypothesis that left-sided vascular disease is better related to aortic diameter, possibly due to a difference in the effects of reflected waves between the two sides. This needs further investigation. The contrast between the sexes was seen in the absence of any significant difference in resting blood pressure and calf:brachial systolic pressure ratio between the two. This finding suggests that the sex differences in the relationship between the size of the abdominal aorta and calf:brachial systolic pressure ratio are related to intrinsic properties of the arterial wall. PMID:9364278

  13. An integrated pathway interaction network for the combination of four effective compounds from ShengMai preparations in the treatment of cardio-cerebral ischemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Lv, Yan-ni; Tan, Yi-sha; Shen, Kai; Zhai, Ke-feng; Chen, Hong-lin; Kou, Jun-ping; Yu, Bo-yang

    2015-01-01

    Aim: SMXZF (a combination of ginsenoside Rb1, ginsenoside Rg1, schizandrin and DT-13) derived from Chinese traditional medicine formula ShengMai preparations) is capable of alleviating cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice. In this study we used network pharmacology approach to explore the mechanisms of SMXZF in the treatment of cardio-cerebral ischemic diseases. Methods: Based upon the chemical predictors, such as chemical structure, pharmacological information and systems biology functional data analysis, a target-pathway interaction network was constructed to identify potential pathways and targets of SMXZF in the treatment of cardio-cerebral ischemia. Furthermore, the most related pathways were verified in TNF-α-treated human vascular endothelial EA.hy926 cells and H2O2-treated rat PC12 cells. Results: Three signaling pathways including the NF-κB pathway, oxidative stress pathway and cytokine network pathway were demonstrated to be the main signaling pathways. The results from the gene ontology analysis were in accordance with these signaling pathways. The target proteins were found to be associated with other diseases such as vision, renal and metabolic diseases, although they exerted therapeutic actions on cardio-cerebral ischemic diseases. Furthermore, SMXZF not only dose-dependently inhibited the phosphorylation of NF-κB, p50, p65 and IKKα/β in TNF-α-treated EA.hy926 cells, but also regulated the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway in H2O2-treated PC12 cells. Conclusion: NF-κB signaling pathway, oxidative stress pathway and cytokine network pathway are mainly responsible for the therapeutic actions of SMXZF against cardio-cerebral ischemic diseases. PMID:26456587

  14. The Impact of Obesity on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Subclinical Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Gregory L.; Bertoni, Alain G.; Shea, Steven; Tracy, Russell; Watson, Karol E.; Blumenthal, Roger S.; Chung, Hyoju; Carnethon, Mercedes R.

    2010-01-01

    Background To assess the importance of the obesity epidemic on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, we determined the prevalence of obesity and the relationship of obesity to CVD risk factors and subclinical vascular disease. Methods The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis is an observational cohort study involving 6814 persons aged 45 to 84 years who were free of clinical CVD at baseline (2000–2002). The study assessed the association between body size and CVD risk factors, medication use, and subclinical vascular disease (coronary artery calcium, carotid artery intimal medial thickness, and left ventricular mass). Results A large proportion of white, African American, and Hispanic participants were overweight (60% to 85%) and obese (30% to 50%), while fewer Chinese American participants were overweight (33%) or obese (5%). Hypertension and diabetes were more prevalent in obese participants despite a much higher use of antihy-pertensive and/or antidiabetic medications. Obesity was associated with a greater risk of coronary artery calcium (17%), internal carotid artery intimal medial thickness greater than 80th percentile (32%), common carotid artery intimal medial thickness greater than 80th percentile (45%), and left ventricular mass greater than 80th percentile (2.7-fold greater) compared with normal body size. These associations persisted after adjustment for traditional CVD risk factors. Conclusions These data confirm the epidemic of obesity in most but not all racial and ethnic groups. The observed low prevalence of obesity in Chinese American participants indicates that high rates of obesity should not be considered inevitable. These findings may be viewed as indicators of potential future increases in vascular disease burden and health care costs associated with the obesity epidemic. PMID:18474756

  15. In-vivo Vascular Wall Shear Rate and Circumferential Strain of Renal Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H.; Rubin, Jonathan M.; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E.; Shih, Albert J.; Weitzel, William F.

    2012-01-01

    This study measures the vascular wall shear rate at the vessel edge using decorrelation based ultrasound speckle tracking. Results for nine healthy and eight renal disease subjects are presented. Additionally, the vascular wall shear rate and circumferential strain during physiologic pressure, pressure equalization and hyperemia are compared for five healthy and three renal disease subjects. The mean and maximum wall shear rates were measured during the cardiac cycle at the top and bottom wall edges. The healthy subjects had significantly higher mean and maximum vascular wall shear rate than the renal disease subjects. The key findings of this research were that the mean vascular wall shear rates and circumferential strain changes between physiologic pressure and hyperemia that was significantly different between healthy and renal disease subjects. PMID:23211936

  16. A Case of Polyarteritis Nodosa Presenting Initially as Peripheral Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Sameer; Lu, Lee

    2008-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a rare necrotizing vasculitis that can be progressive and fatal, and its initial presenting symptom may be leg claudication due to peripheral vascular ischemia. To date, there have been fewer than ten case reports of polyarteritis nodosa presenting as peripheral vascular disease. We report a case of a 38-year-old man initially diagnosed to have premature peripheral vascular disease who presented 1 year later with symptoms consistent with giant cell arteritis and subsequently developed bowel ischemia leading to a fatal outcome. Based on the autopsy and the patient’s clinical course, the final diagnosis was polyarteritis nodosa. This case illustrates the challenges in diagnosing polyarteritis nodosa and the importance of considering vasculitis in young patients presenting with atypical presentations of diseases such as peripheral vascular disease or giant cell arteritis. PMID:18560943

  17. Diabetes and its vascular complications in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Jones, J J; Watkins, P J; Owyong, L Y; Loh, P P; Kutty, M K; Jogie, B

    1978-12-01

    One hundred and thirty-two newly diagnosed Asian diabetic patients (39 Malay, 30 Chinese and 63 Indians) have been studied in Kuala Lumpur. The highest proportion of diabetic patients were Indian and the lowest were Chinese. Vascular complications were equally common in Asian diabetic patients as in Europeans; coronary heart disease was relatively more common in Indians and cerebral vascular disease in Chinese. Twenty percent of all Asian diabetic patients requiring admission to hospital also had coronary heart disease, 9% had cerebral vascular disease and 8% had gangrene or ulceration of the feet. In Kuala Lumpur, diabetes is a very important risk factor for coronary heart disease: 17% of all patients admitted to the General Hospital with coronary heart disease were already diabetic. PMID:749278

  18. Kuhlmann vascularized bone grafting for treatment of Kienböck's disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Msek, Hichem; Benzarti, Sofien; Boussen, Monia; Maalla, Riadh

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Kienböck's disease has historically been determined by staging, ulnar variance, and presence or absence of arthritic changes. With the advent of newer techniques of vascularized bone grafting, the status of the cartilage shell of the lunate has become another factor that can influence the procedure performed. The purpose of this article is to describe the technique of Kuhlmann vascularized bone graft for Kienböck's disease. In addition, the indications, contraindications, and outcomes are described.

  19. Kuhlmann vascularized bone grafting for treatment of Kienböck's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Msek, Hichem; Benzarti, Sofien; Boussen, Monia; Maalla, Riadh

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Kienböck's disease has historically been determined by staging, ulnar variance, and presence or absence of arthritic changes. With the advent of newer techniques of vascularized bone grafting, the status of the cartilage shell of the lunate has become another factor that can influence the procedure performed. The purpose of this article is to describe the technique of Kuhlmann vascularized bone graft for Kienböck's disease. In addition, the indications, contraindications, and outcomes are described. PMID:27583101

  20. Dyslipidemia Induced by Drugs Used for the Prevention and Treatment of Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Athyros, Vasilios G; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2011-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major vascular risk factor. Interestingly, several agents used for the prevention and treatment of vascular diseases have an adverse effect on the lipid profile. In addition, agents belonging to the same class (e.g. beta blockers) can have significantly different actions on lipid levels. We summarize the effects of drugs used for the prevention and treatment of vascular diseases on the lipid profile. These effects should be considered when selecting a specific agent, particularly in high-risk patients. PMID:21769302

  1. VEGF gene therapy for coronary artery disease and peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Henrik Sandvad; Rasmussen, Camilla Sandvad; Macko, Jennifer

    2002-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are significant medical problems worldwide. Although substantial progress has been made in prevention as well as in the treatment, particularly of CAD, there are a large number of patients, who despite maximal medical treatment have substantial symptomatology and who are not candidates for mechanical revascularization. Therapeutic angiogenesis represents a novel, conceptually appealing treatment option. Ad{sub GV}VEGF121.10 (BIOBYPASS) is an adenovector, carrying the transgene encoding for human vascular endothelial growth factor 121 (VEGF{sub 121}). A number of preclinical studies have demonstrated angiogenic activity of BIOBYPASS, not only anatomically but also functionally. Phase I clinical studies have demonstrated that intramyocardial infection of BIOBYPASS in patients with severe CAD as well as intramuscular injections of BIOBYPASS in patients with severe peripheral vascular disease (PVD) was well tolerated; furthermore, these studies provided some intriguing indications of activity, which led to initiation of major randomized Phase II 'proof-of-concept' studies. This paper provides a review of the rationale behind BIOBYPASS as well as a summary of pertinent preclinical and early clinical data.

  2. Single Sustained Inflation followed by Ventilation Leads to Rapid Cardiorespiratory Recovery but Causes Cerebral Vascular Leakage in Asphyxiated Near-Term Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Sobotka, Kristina S.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Crossley, Kelly J.; Ong, Tracey; Schmölzer, Georg M.; Barton, Samantha K.; McDougall, Annie R. A.; Miller, Suzie L.; Tolcos, Mary; Klingenberg, Claus; Polglase, Graeme R.

    2016-01-01

    Background A sustained inflation (SI) rapidly restores cardiac function in asphyxic, bradycardic newborns but its effects on cerebral haemodynamics and brain injury are unknown. We determined the effect of different SI strategies on carotid blood flow (CaBF) and cerebral vascular integrity in asphyxiated near-term lambs. Methods Lambs were instrumented and delivered at 139 ± 2 d gestation and asphyxia was induced by delaying ventilation onset. Lambs were randomised to receive 5 consecutive 3 s SI (multiple SI; n = 6), a single 30 s SI (single SI; n = 6) or conventional ventilation (no SI; n = 6). Ventilation continued for 30 min in all lambs while CaBF and respiratory function parameters were recorded. Brains were assessed for gross histopathology and vascular leakage. Results CaBF increased more rapidly and to a greater extent during a single SI (p = 0.01), which then decreased below both other groups by 10 min, due to a higher cerebral oxygen delivery (p = 0.01). Blood brain barrier disruption was increased in single SI lambs as indicated by increased numbers of blood vessel profiles with plasma protein extravasation (p = 0.001) in the cerebral cortex. There were no differences in CaBF or cerebral oxygen delivery between the multiple SI and no SI lambs. Conclusions Ventilation with an initial single 30 s SI improves circulatory recovery, but is associated with greater disruption of blood brain barrier function, which may exacerbate brain injury suffered by asphyxiated newborns. This injury may occur as a direct result of the initial SI or to the higher tidal volumes delivered during subsequent ventilation. PMID:26765258

  3. Dilating venous disease: Pathophysiology and a systematic aspect to different vascular territories.

    PubMed

    Yetkin, Ertan; Ileri, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    Venous disease is a common but overlooked clinical problem and is an important mortality and morbidity factor depending on the effected vascular territory. Different contributing factors play role on the clinical manifestation of the disease. Peripheral varices of lower extremities, hemorrhoids, varicoceles, pelvic varicose veins are the vasculopathy of veins running toward heart but against gravity. We hypothesize that all these clinical entities share common pathophysiologic steps in terms of vascular wall remodeling and vessel wall damage. A systematic approaches to both arterial and venous dilating disease in further studies and research would increase our understanding on the pathophysiology of dilating vascular disease and would provoke to find out new treatment modalities. Varicose remodeling of veins occurs by a complex interplay of various factors including both physical forces and extracellular matrix remodeling mechanisms. This article focuses on the systematic aspects of dilating venous disease with a focus on pathophysiology under the term of "Dilating Venous Disease". PMID:27142148

  4. Exercise testing and training in patients with peripheral vascular disease and lower extremity amputation.

    PubMed

    Priebe, M; Davidoff, G; Lampman, R M

    1991-05-01

    Patients with peripheral vascular disease have a high risk of coronary artery disease. The risk is even greater when the peripheral vascular disease leads to lower extremity amputation. Exercise testing using lower extremity exercise has been the "gold standard" for screening for coronary artery disease, but many patients with peripheral vascular disease and those with amputations have difficulty doing this type of exercise. Arm exercise ergometry has been shown to be a safe and effective alternative for the detection of coronary artery disease in patients who cannot do leg exercise. This test has also been used to determine safe exercise levels and may be able to predict the ultimate level of prosthetic use in amputees. Exercise training with arm ergometry also improves cardiovascular efficiency and upper body strength in poorly conditioned patients. Studies are needed to appreciate fully the role of exercise testing and training in the recovery of these patients after amputation. PMID:1866958

  5. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-04-01

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction.

  6. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25873429

  7. Detecting resting-state brain activity by spontaneous cerebral blood volume fluctuations using whole brain vascular space occupancy imaging.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xinyuan; Gu, Hong; Yan, Lirong; Lu, Hanzhang; Wang, Danny J J; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe; Zhuo, Yan; Yang, Yihong

    2014-01-01

    Resting-state brain activity has been investigated extensively using BOLD contrast. However, BOLD signal represents the combined effects of multiple physiological processes and its spatial localization is less accurate than that of cerebral blood flow and volume (CBF and CBF, respectively). In this study, we demonstrate that resting-state brain activity can be reliably detected by spontaneous fluctuations of CBV-weighted signal using whole-brain gradient and spin echo (GRASE) based vascular space occupancy (VASO) imaging. Specifically, using independent component analysis, intrinsic brain networks, including default mode, salience, executive control, visual, auditory, and sensorimotor networks were revealed robustly by the VASO technique. We further demonstrate that task-evoked VASO signal aligned well with expected gray matter areas, while blood-oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal extended outside of these areas probably due to their different spatial specificity. The improved spatial localization of VASO is consistent with previous studies using animal models. Moreover, we showed that the 3D-GRASE VASO images had reduced susceptibility-induced signal voiding, compared to the BOLD technique. This is attributed to the fact that VASO does not require T2* weighting, thus the acquisition can use a shorter TE and can employ spin-echo scheme. Consequently VASO-based functional connectivity signals were well preserved in brain regions that tend to suffer from signal loss and geometric distortion in BOLD, such as orbital prefrontal cortex. Our study suggests that 3D-GRASE VASO imaging, with its improved spatial specificity and less sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts, may have advantages in resting-state fMRI studies. PMID:24055705

  8. Plasma Biomarkers of Inflammation, Endothelial Function and Hemostasis in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Stewart J; Doubal, Fergus N; Chappell, Francesca M; Valdés-Hernández, Maria C; Wang, Xi; Rumley, An; Lowe, Gordon D.O; Dennis, Martin S; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-01-01

    Background The cause of lacunar ischemic stroke, a clinical feature of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), is largely unknown. Inflammation and endothelial dysfunction have been implicated. Plasma biomarkers could provide mechanistic insights but current data are conflicting. White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are an important imaging biomarker of SVD. It is unknown if plasma biomarkers add predictive capacity beyond age and vascular risk factors in explaining WMH. Methods We prospectively recruited patients presenting with non-disabling ischemic stroke, classifying them clinically and with the help of MRI as lacunar or cortical. We measured biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and hemostasis for >1 month after stroke and compared biomarker levels between stroke subtypes. We quantitatively calculated WMH. We used multiple linear regression analysis to model WMH as a function of age, sex, hypertension and smoking (the baseline model). We fitted exploratory models using plasma biomarkers as predictor variables to assess model improvement over baseline. Results We recruited 125 patients. The lacunar group (n = 65) had lower tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) levels in unadjusted (7.39 vs. 8.59 ng/ml, p = 0.029) and adjusted (p = 0.035) analyses compared with the cortical group (n = 60). There were no significant differences in the other plasma biomarkers. The results for t-PA were consistent with an updated meta-analysis, although the effect remains non-significant (standardized mean difference −0.08 (95% CI −0.25 to 0.09)). The baseline regression model explained 29% of the variance in quantitative WMH (R2 0.289). Inflammatory biomarkers showed minor improvement over baseline (R2 0.291), but the other plasma biomarkers did not improve the baseline model. Conclusion Plasma t-PA levels appear to differ between lacunar and cortical stroke subtypes, late after stroke, independent of age, sex and vascular risk factors and may reflect endothelial

  9. Obesity and risk of vascular disease: importance of endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Matthias; Baretella, Oliver; Meyer, Matthias R

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has become a serious global health issue affecting both adults and children. Recent devolopments in world demographics and declining health status of the world's population indicate that the prevalence of obesity will continue to increase in the next decades. As a disease, obesity has deleterious effects on metabolic homeostasis, and affects numerous organ systems including heart, kidney and the vascular system. Thus, obesity is now regarded as an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis-related diseases such as coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction and stroke. In the arterial system, endothelial cells are both the source and target of factors contributing to atherosclerosis. Endothelial vasoactive factors regulate vascular homeostasis under physiological conditions and maintain basal vascular tone. Obesity results in an imbalance between endothelium-derived vasoactive factors favouring vasoconstriction, cell growth and inflammatory activation. Abnormal regulation of these factors due to endothelial cell dysfunction is both a consequence and a cause of vascular disease processes. Finally, because of the similarities of the vascular pathomechanisms activated, obesity can be considered to cause accelerated, ‘premature’ vascular aging. Here, we will review some of the pathomechanisms involved in obesity-related activation of endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction, the clinical relevance of obesity-associated vascular risk, and therapeutic interventions using ‘endothelial therapy’ aiming at maintaining or restoring vascular endothelial health. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3 PMID:21557734

  10. Phenomics of Vascular Disease: The Systematic Approach to the Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Han, Yeshan; Li, Li; Zhang, Yaping; Yuan, Hong; Ye, Linda; Zhao, Jianzhong; Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2015-01-01

    Vascular diseases are usually caused by multifactorial pathogeneses involving genetic and environmental factors. Our current understanding of vascular disease is, however, based on the focused genotype/phenotype studies driven by the "one-gene/one-phenotype" hypothesis. Drugs with "pure target" at individual molecules involved in the pathophysiological pathways are the mainstream of current clinical treatments and the basis of combination therapy of vascular diseases. Recently, the combination of genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics has unraveled the etiology and pathophysiology of vascular disease in a big-data fashion and also revealed unmatched relationships between the omic variability and the much narrower definition of various clinical phenotypes of vascular disease in individual patients. Here, we introduce the phenomics strategy that will change the conventional focused phenotype/genotype/genome study to a new systematic phenome/genome/proteome approach to the understanding of pathophysiology and combination therapy of vascular disease. A phenome is the sum total of an organism's phenotypic traits that signify the expression of genome and specific environmental influence. Phenomics is the study of phenome to quantitatively correlate complex traits to variability not only in genome, but also in transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, interactome, and environmental factors by exploring the systems biology that links the genomic and phenomic spaces. The application of phenomics and the phenome-wide associated study (PheWAS) will not only identify a systemically-integrated set of biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of vascular disease but also provide novel treatment targets for combination therapy and thus make a revolutionary paradigm shift in the clinical treatment of these devastating diseases. PMID:25313004

  11. Phenomics of Vascular Disease: The Systematic Approach to the Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yeshan; Li, Li; Zhang, Yaping; Yuan, Hong; Ye, Linda; Zhao, Jianzhong; Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2015-01-01

    Vascular diseases are usually caused by multifactorial pathogeneses involving genetic and environmental factors. Our current understanding of vascular disease is, however, based on the focused genotype/phenotype studies driven by the “one-gene/one-phenotype” hypothesis. Drugs with “pure target” at individual molecules involved in the pathophysiological pathways are the mainstream of current clinical treatments and the basis of combination therapy of vascular diseases. Recently, the combination of genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics has unraveled the etiology and pathophysiology of vascular disease in a big-data fashion and also revealed unmatched relationships between the omic variability and the much narrower definition of various clinical phenotypes of vascular disease in individual patients. Here, we introduce the phenomics strategy that will change the conventional focused phenotype/genotype/genome study to a new systematic phenome/genome/proteome approach to the understanding of pathophysiology and combination therapy of vascular disease. A phenome is the sum total of an organism’s phenotypic traits that signify the expression of genome and specific environmental influence. Phenomics is the study of phenome to quantitatively correlate complex traits to variability not only in genome, but also in transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, interactome, and environmental factors by exploring the systems biology that links the genomic and phenomic spaces. The application of phenomics and the phenome-wide associated study (PheWAS) will not only identify a systemically-integrated set of biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of vascular disease but also provide novel treatment targets for combination therapy and thus make a revolutionary paradigm shift in the clinical treatment of these devastating diseases.

  12. Reduced myo-inositol and total choline measured with cerebral MRS in acute thyrotoxic Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Elberling, T V; Danielsen, E R; Rasmussen, A K; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Waldemar, G; Thomsen, C

    2003-01-14

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms in the acute thyrotoxic phase of Graves' disease suggest involvement of brain processes. Short-echo-time proton MRS was used to measure the cerebral metabolite profile in newly diagnosed and untreated Graves' disease. Sixteen patients with Graves' disease and 18 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were studied. The patients had significantly reduced total choline and myo-inositol in the acute phase of Graves' thyrotoxicosis compared with the healthy volunteers. PMID:12525741

  13. Homocysteinemia control by cysteine in cerebral vascular patients after methionine loading test: evidences in physiological and pathological conditions in cerebro-vascular and multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ulivelli, Monica; Priora, Raffaella; Di Giuseppe, Danila; Coppo, Lucia; Summa, Domenico; Margaritis, Antonios; Frosali, Simona; Bartalini, Sabina; Martini, Giuseppe; Cerase, Alfonso; Di Simplicio, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    The toxicity risk of hyperhomocysteinemia is prevented through thiol drug administration which reduces plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations by activating thiol exchange reactions. Assuming that cysteine (Cys) is a homocysteinemia regulator, the hypothesis was verified in healthy and pathological individuals after the methionine loading test (MLT). The plasma variations of redox species of Cys, Hcy, cysteinylglycine, glutathione and albumin (reduced, HS-ALB, and at mixed disulfide, XSS-ALB) were compared in patients with cerebral small vessels disease (CSVD) (n = 11), multiple sclerosis (MS) (n = 12) and healthy controls (n = 11) at 2-4-6 h after MLT. In MLT-treated subjects, the activation of thiol exchange reactions provoked significant changes over time in redox species concentrations of Cys, Hcy, and albumin. Significant differences between controls and pathological groups were also observed. In non-methionine-treated subjects, total Cys concentrations, tHcy and thiol-protein mixed disulfides (CSS-ALB, HSS-ALB) of CSVD patients were higher than controls. After MLT, all groups displayed significant cystine (CSSC) increases and CSS-ALB decreases, that in pathological groups were significantly higher than controls. These data would confirm the Cys regulatory role on the homocysteinemia; they also explain that the Cys-Hcy mixed disulfide excretion is an important point of hyperhomocysteinemia control. Moreover, in all groups after MLT, significant increases in albumin concentrations, named total albumin (tALB) and measured as sum of HS-ALB (spectrophometric), and XSS-ALB (assayed at HPLC) were observed. tALB increases, more pronounced in healthy than in the pathological subjects, could indicate alterations of albumin equilibria between plasma and other extracellular spaces, whose toxicological consequences deserve further studies. PMID:26969256

  14. Bioresorbable vascular scaffold in patients with complex coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Tamburino, Claudia I; Capranzano, Piera; Longo, Giovanni; Immè, Sebastiano; Tamburino, Giacomo; Scalia, Matteo; Condorelli, Antonio; Francaviglia, Bruno; LA Manna, Alessio; Sgroi, Carmelo; Grasso, Carmelo; DI Salvo, Maria E; Capodanno, Davide; Tamburino, Corrado

    2016-08-01

    The advent of fully bioresorbable stent technology is heralded as breakthrough technology in the current era of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) have the potential to introduce a paradigm shift in interventional cardiology, representing an anatomical and functional "vascular restoration" therapy instead of an artificial stiff tube encased by persistent metallic foreign body. Among BRS, the everolimus-eluting scaffold (ABSORB, Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA, USA) has been the most extensively investigated in clinical studies. The use of ABSORB in the treatment of relatively simple lesions appears to provide a similar degree of safety and efficacy compared with metallic drug-eluting stent (DES) treated under randomized trials conditions, but patients treated in real-world practice are far more complex than those included in randomized trials. Therefore, several ABSORB all-comers registries dealing with real world conditions are being performed. Their currently available results are summarized in the present overview. PMID:27128353

  15. [Beta-blockers usage in cardio-vascular diseases co-existing with COPD].

    PubMed

    Walczak, Dorota; Kowal, Aneta; Jankowska, Renata

    2012-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most frequent chronic diseases. Slightly reversable and progressive decrease in airflow through the airways is characteristic for the disease. It has been brought up last years that COPD course influences not only pulmonary system status but also many co-existing diseases in the eldery, especially cardio-vascular diseases, such as: ischaemic heart disease, hypertension, heart arrythmias, heart infarction. Wide usage and established position in the treatment of cardio-vascular diseases have the antagonists of beta-adrenergic receptors (beta-blockers). The aim of this work was the combination of the studies results quoted in the literature about the usage of beta-blockers in cardiovascular diseases co-existing with COPD. Conclusions. Nowadays there are no unambiguous recommendations for the usage of beta-blocker in patients with COPD and the decision about including them into treatment depends on the individually estimated risk of complications. PMID:23437704

  16. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase in Vascular Physiology and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Eduardo D.; Rezende, Bruno A.; Cortes, Steyner F.; Lemos, Virginia S.

    2016-01-01

    The family of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) has significant importance in various physiological mechanisms and is also involved in many pathological processes. Three NOS isoforms have been identified: neuronal NOS (nNOS or NOS 1), endothelial NOS (eNOS or NOS 3), and an inducible NOS (iNOS or NOS 2). Both nNOS and eNOS are constitutively expressed. Classically, eNOS is considered the main isoform involved in the control of the vascular function. However, more recent studies have shown that nNOS is present in the vascular endothelium and importantly contributes to the maintenance of the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system. In physiological conditions, besides nitric oxide (NO), nNOS also produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2•-) considered as key mediators in non-neuronal cells signaling. This mini-review highlights recent scientific releases on the role of nNOS in vascular homeostasis and cardiovascular disorders such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:27313545

  17. On arterial physiology, pathophysiology of vascular compliance, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Glasser, S P

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, the main emphasis in hypertension treatment has been on lowering diastolic blood pressure. Recently, this emphasis has been shifting toward systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, the latter of which might be a better indicator of future clinical events than either blood pressure reading alone or in combination. Increased pulse pressure indicates increased arterial stiffness and hence is commonly seen in older subjects. As patients age and vessels stiffen, there is a resulting loss of arterial compliance, the ability of the vessel to store blood volume temporarily as it is ejected with each systole. The arterial system acts like a Windkessel, or pump, as it converts intermittent flow from the heart into continuous flow to the organs. The process of stiffening occurs via vascular remodeling, a redistribution of the heterogeneous elements of the vascular wall. Endothelial dysfunction can trigger this remodeling process, increasing stiffness, raising blood pressure and pulse pressure, and ultimately leading to atherosclerosis, plaque formation, and attendant clinical events. Because angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and calcium antagonists can restore arterial compliance, they are suitable choices for hypertension treatment when it is complicated by vascular stiffness. PMID:11728285

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Vascular Calcification in Chronic Kidney Disease: The Link between Bone and the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Byon, Chang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and increases mortality in those patients. Impaired calcium and phosphate homeostasis, increased oxidative stress, and loss of calcification inhibitors have been linked to vascular calcification in CKD. Additionally, impaired bone may perturb serum calcium/phosphate and their key regulator, parathyroid hormone, thus contributing to increased vascular calcification in CKD. Therapeutic approaches for CKD, such as phosphate binders and bisphosphonates, have been shown to ameliorate bone loss as well as vascular calcification. The precise mechanisms responsible for vascular calcification in CKD and the contribution of bone metabolism to vascular calcification have not been elucidated. This review discusses the role of systemic uremic factors and impaired bone metabolism in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification in CKD. The regulation of the key osteogenic transcription factor Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and the emerging role of Runx2-dependent receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) in vascular calcification of CKD are emphasized. PMID:25947259

  19. "Ormilo disease" a disorder of zebu cattle in Tanzania: bovine cerebral theileriosis or new protozoan disease?

    PubMed

    Catalano, Deborah; Biasibetti, Elena; Lynen, Godelieve; Di Giulio, Giuseppe; De Meneghi, Daniele; Tomassone, Laura; Valenza, Federico; Capucchio, Maria Teresa

    2015-06-01

    "Ormilo" disease is a neurological disorder of cattle described by Maasai herders in Tanzania. It is attributed to infection by Theileria species, although no detailed data are available in the literature. The authors describe the macroscopical and histological changes observed in 30 brains of indigenous short-horn zebu cattle from Northern Tanzania, aged 2-9 years, with the characteristic neurological signs of "Ormilo". Moreover, the ultrastructural details observed in 14 selected brain samples were reported. Areas of congestion and hemorrhages, associated with the obstruction of the cerebral vessels with large numbers of parasitized lymphoid cells, were observed. Electron microscopy showed the presence of intralymphocytic parasites morphologically comparable to flagellated protozoa, not previously described in the lymphoid cells of cattle, but only reported during the sexual stages within the vector. Theileria taurotragi was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse line blot (RLB) in nine samples. The authors hypothesize that the parasite detected by electron microscopy could be a strain of a Theileria endemic to this region till now not investigated, having an intralymphocytic phase and being associated with other Theileria spp. infestation. Further studies are needed to better understand the etiology of "Ormilo" disease and to characterize the morphology of the observed parasite, clarifying its role in the disease in Tanzania. PMID:25851929

  20. The role of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in the management of pulmonary vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Butrous, Ghazwan

    2014-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE) can be used as therapeutic agents for various diseases such as dementia, depression, schizophrenia and erectile dysfunction in men, as well as congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatoid arthritis, other inflammatory diseases, diabetes and various other conditions. In this review we will concentrate on one type of PDE, mainly PDE5 and its role in pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:25780785

  1. Problems in cerebral blood flow calculation using xenon-133 in patients with pulmonary diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.; Jakobsen, M.; Enevoldsen, E.; Egede, F. )

    1990-05-01

    We used the end-tidal concentration of xenon-133 (air curve) to estimate the profile of its arterial concentration in calculating cerebral blood flow. We examined the effects of pulmonary disease and artificial ventilation on the air curve and the calculated cerebral blood flow. We studied the relation between arterial and end-tidal xenon activities in 19 subjects, of whom 15 had pulmonary dysfunction. The t 1/2 of the declining phases of the arterial and air curves were used to express their shapes. The mean +/- SD reference t 1/2 from 15 normal volunteers was 26.8 +/- 8.4 seconds. The mean +/- SD t 1/2 s of the air and arterial curves from the 15 patients with pulmonary dysfunction were 10.4 +/- 2.9 and 33.8 +/- 10.9 seconds. The degree of pulmonary dysfunction (expressed as the pulmonary shunt percentage) correlated with distortion of the air curve. Substituting the arterial for the air curve, mean calculated cerebral blood flow (as the initial slope index) increased from 40 to 61 for the 12 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The degree of underestimation of cerebral blood flow using the air curve correlated with the pulmonary shunt percentage. Our work confirms the problems of estimating cerebral blood flow in subjects with pulmonary dysfunction.

  2. Targeting the redox regulation of SERCA in vascular physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiaoyong; Evangelista, Alicia; Cohen, Richard A

    2010-04-01

    The sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) is essential for the control of intracellular free Ca(2+) levels. Although the importance for this enzyme in cardiac myocytes is well recognized, it is only recently that SERCA has been identified as an important effector of nitric oxide (NO) action in vascular cells. NO can stimulate the uptake of cytosolic Ca(2+) via SERCA by adducting glutathione to the reactive cysteine-674. Mutation of this single amino acid prevents the stimulation of Ca(2+) uptake by NO, as well as its ability to inhibit smooth muscle cell functions including migration. NO function is impaired in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and atherosclerosis, which are all associated with SERCA dysfunction caused by the increased oxidants in these diseases. Targeting the oxidant sources in vascular diseases to prevent SERCA from being oxidized and/or increasing the expression of SERCA may improve vascular disease development. PMID:20045379

  3. Effects of cranberry juice consumption on vascular function in patients with coronary artery disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cranberry juice contains polyphenolic compounds that could improve endothelial function and reduce cardiovascular disease risk. The objective was to examine the effects of cranberry juice on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease. We completed an acute pilot study with no placebo...

  4. Pathologic crossroads: cardio–vascular diseases, periodontal diseases and calcium antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, E; Angelescu, G

    2011-01-01

    RationaleDuring the last decennium t a more focused attention has been directed to the presence of chronic inflammation in cardiovascular diseases (CVD), but mainly to the high impact that this one has in generating and fastening the atherosclerotic process. ObjectiveTo highlight the causal relationship between periodontal diseases (PD) and CVD. One of the most important chronic inflammations, present in the modern societies in the vast majority of the population, is represented by the periodontal diseases (PD). Both types of diseases are characterized by a high and continuously increasing prevalence. It is now clear that they share some common risk factors, but it would be of great interest, not only for a scientific purpose, but also from a possible health benefit, as PD can be prevented and treated efficiently, to prove that there is a causal link between these two pathologies. MethodsWe will present a review of the actual data concerning their relationship DiscussionThe study of this causal relationship is made more difficult due to the increased utilization, due to the guides' recommendations of the calcium antagonists (CA) in treating CVD. Abreviations: AE = adverse effect; AMI = acute myocardial infarction; CA = calcium antagonists; CHD = coronary heart disease; COI = chronic oral infection; CsA = cyclosporine A; CVD = cardio-vascular diseases; DM = diabetes mellitus; DNA = deoxyribonucleic acid; GH = gingival hypertrophy; GO = gingival overgrowth; hs-CRP = high-sensitivity C reactive protein; IL = interleukine; ICAM = intracellular adhesion molecule; JE/MCP–1 = macrophage chemotactic protein; LPS– lipopolisaccharides; MIP–2 = macrophage inflammatory protein–2; MMP = matrix metalloproteinases; mRNA = messenger–ribonucleic acid; NOS = nitric oxide synthase; PAI–1 = plasminogen activator inhibitor–1; PD = periodontal diseases; TIMP = tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase; TNF = tumor necrosis factor; USA = United States of America; UFC = units

  5. Vascular and cognitive functions associated with cardiovascular disease in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ronald A.; Poppas, Athena; Forman, Daniel E.; Hoth, Karin F.; Haley, Andreana P.; Gunstad, John; Jefferson, Angela L.; Tate, David F.; Paul, Robert H.; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Ono, Mokato; Jerskey, Beth A.; Gerhard-Herman, Marie

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between systemic vascular function, neurocognitive performance, and structural brain abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among geriatric outpatients with treated, stable cardiovascular disease and no history of neurological illness (n = 88, ages 56–85 years). Vascular function was assessed by cardiac ejection fraction and output, sequential systolic and diastolic blood pressures, flow mediated brachial artery reactivity (BAR), and carotid intima media thickness (IMT). White matter hyperintensities (WMH) on MRI were quantified and examined relative to cognitive and vascular function. Principal component analysis revealed two primary vascular components: one associated with cardiac function, the other with atherosclerotic burden/endothelial dysfunction. Both factors were significantly associated with cognitive function and WMH volume. Reduced systolic variability and increased IMT were most strongly related to reduced attention, executive function, and information-processing speed. These findings suggest the possibility that systemic vascular indices may provide proxy measures of cerebrovascular dysfunction and reinforce the importance of achieving greater understanding of interaction between systemic vascular disease and brain dysfunction among elderly people with cardiovascular disease. PMID:18608677

  6. Cerebral microbleeds as a biomarker in Alzheimer's disease? A review in the field.

    PubMed

    Shams, Sara; Wahlund, Lars-Olof

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are a marker of small vessel disease, increasingly recognized as being of importance in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) process. CMBs influence in AD, and its longitudinal impact on disease progression is however still unknown. CMBs show several associations with AD across studies, are associated with decreased cerebrospinal fluid amyloid levels and are related with the ApoE ϵ4 allele, as well as other imaging manifestations typical for small vessel disease. CMBs, in addition to other markers of small vessel disease, are important to discover further in order to discern possible AD phenotypes. PMID:26641942

  7. Application of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Parameters to Detect Change in Longitudinal Studies in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease.

    PubMed

    Zeestraten, Eva Anna; Benjamin, Philip; Lambert, Christian; Lawrence, Andrew John; Williams, Owen Alan; Morris, Robin Guy; Barrick, Thomas Richard; Markus, Hugh Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is the major cause of vascular cognitive impairment, resulting in significant disability and reduced quality of life. Cognitive tests have been shown to be insensitive to change in longitudinal studies and, therefore, sensitive surrogate markers are needed to monitor disease progression and assess treatment effects in clinical trials. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is thought to offer great potential in this regard. Sensitivity of the various parameters that can be derived from DTI is however unknown. We aimed to evaluate the differential sensitivity of DTI markers to detect SVD progression, and to estimate sample sizes required to assess therapeutic interventions aimed at halting decline based on DTI data. We investigated 99 patients with symptomatic SVD, defined as clinical lacunar syndrome with MRI confirmation of a corresponding infarct as well as confluent white matter hyperintensities over a 3 year follow-up period. We evaluated change in DTI histogram parameters using linear mixed effect models and calculated sample size estimates. Over a three-year follow-up period we observed a decline in fractional anisotropy and increase in diffusivity in white matter tissue and most parameters changed significantly. Mean diffusivity peak height was the most sensitive marker for SVD progression as it had the smallest sample size estimate. This suggests disease progression can be monitored sensitively using DTI histogram analysis and confirms DTI's potential as surrogate marker for SVD. PMID:26808982

  8. Application of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Parameters to Detect Change in Longitudinal Studies in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zeestraten, Eva Anna; Benjamin, Philip; Lambert, Christian; Lawrence, Andrew John; Williams, Owen Alan; Morris, Robin Guy; Barrick, Thomas Richard; Markus, Hugh Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is the major cause of vascular cognitive impairment, resulting in significant disability and reduced quality of life. Cognitive tests have been shown to be insensitive to change in longitudinal studies and, therefore, sensitive surrogate markers are needed to monitor disease progression and assess treatment effects in clinical trials. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is thought to offer great potential in this regard. Sensitivity of the various parameters that can be derived from DTI is however unknown. We aimed to evaluate the differential sensitivity of DTI markers to detect SVD progression, and to estimate sample sizes required to assess therapeutic interventions aimed at halting decline based on DTI data. We investigated 99 patients with symptomatic SVD, defined as clinical lacunar syndrome with MRI confirmation of a corresponding infarct as well as confluent white matter hyperintensities over a 3 year follow-up period. We evaluated change in DTI histogram parameters using linear mixed effect models and calculated sample size estimates. Over a three-year follow-up period we observed a decline in fractional anisotropy and increase in diffusivity in white matter tissue and most parameters changed significantly. Mean diffusivity peak height was the most sensitive marker for SVD progression as it had the smallest sample size estimate. This suggests disease progression can be monitored sensitively using DTI histogram analysis and confirms DTI’s potential as surrogate marker for SVD. PMID:26808982

  9. Perceptions of Canadian vascular surgeons toward pharmacological risk reduction in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Omran, Mohammed; Lindsay, Thomas F; Major, Jennifer; Jawas, Ali; Leiter, Larry A; Verma, Subodh

    2006-09-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are at a markedly higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, with evidence indicating that risk-reduction pharmacotherapy can serve to attenuate cardiovascular events in these patients. Given the central role of vascular surgeons in the treatment of patients with PAD, we sought to determine their perceptions and knowledge of risk-reduction pharmacotherapy in patients with PAD. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 79 Canadian vascular surgeons who attended the 2004 annual meeting of the Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery, the largest and most representative meeting of its kind in Canada. The recommended targets of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood glucose, and blood pressure were known to 53.8%, 40.4%, and 57.7% of vascular surgeons, respectively. The majority of vascular surgeons (65.4%) reported screening for risk factors in <50% of cases. Although 90.4% of vascular surgeons would recommend antiplatelet therapy for PAD, only 5.8% would recommend angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and 19.2% would recommend lipid-lowering therapy with statins. Eighty-four percent of Canadian vascular surgeons indicated that their self-assessment of risk reduction in PAD was average to below average, yet 90.4% of them believed that risk-reduction therapy should be recommended or initiated by vascular surgeons. Canadian vascular surgeons' perceptions toward risk reduction in PAD identify knowledge and action gaps, despite the recognition that recommending and instituting therapy is important to patient care. Given the heightened risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with PAD, these data have important implications. PMID:16871436

  10. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  11. [Dynamic MRA in the evaluation of intracranial vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Gauvrit, J Y; Oppenheim, C; Savage, J; Nataf, F; Reyns, N; Pruvo, J P; Meder, J F; Leclerc, X

    2005-01-01

    Conventional catheter angiography (CCA) remains the gold standard for the evaluation of most intracranial vascular malformations. MRA techniques such as Time of Flight, Phase Contrast or 3D contrast-enhanced MRA, provide anatomic evaluation but without hemodynamic information. Recently developed, dynamic MRA is based on dynamic acquisition of images and image subtraction; these two principal characteristics produce images comparable to those obtained by CCA. The purpose of this review is to explain the principles, advantages and drawbacks of this technique in the evaluation of arteriovenous malformations, arteriovenous fistulas, aneurysms and venous thrombosis. PMID:15798609

  12. Significance of Haemodynamic and Haemostatic Factors in the Course of Different Manifestations of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: The SHEF-CSVD Study—Study Rationale and Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Staszewski, Jacek; Piusińska-Macoch, Renata; Skrobowska, Ewa; Brodacki, Bogdan; Pawlik, Rafał; Dutkiewicz, Tomasz; Piechota, Wiesław; Rączka, Alicja; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stępień, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Rationale. This paper describes the rationale and design of the SHEF-CSVD Study, which aims to determine the long-term clinical and radiological course of cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) and to evaluate haemostatic and haemodynamic prognostic factors of the condition. Design. This single-centre, prospective, non-interventional cohort study will follow 150 consecutive patients with different clinical manifestations of CSVD (lacunar ischaemic stroke, vascular dementia, vascular parkinsonism or spontaneous deep, intracerebral haemorrhage) and 50 age- and sex-matched controls over a period of 24 months. The clinical and radiological course will be evaluated basing on a detailed neurological, neuropsychological and MRI examinations. Haemodynamic (cerebral vasoreactivity, 24 h blood pressure control) and haemostatic factors (markers of endothelial and platelet dysfunction, brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation test) will be determined. Discussion. The scheduled study will specifically address the issue of haemodynamic and haemostatic prognostic factors and their course over time in various clinical manifestations of CSVD. The findings may aid the development of prophylactic strategies and individualised treatment plans, which are critical during the early stages of the disease. PMID:26317092

  13. Challenges, current status and future perspectives of proteomics in improving understanding, diagnosis and treatment of vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Moxon, Joseph V.; Padula, Matthew P.; Herbert, Ben R.; Golledge, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Technical advances have seen the rapid adoption of genomics and multiplex genetic polymorphism identification to research on vascular diseases. The utilization of proteomics for the study of vascular diseases has been limited by comparison. In this review we outline currently available proteomics techniques, the challenges to using these approaches and modifications which may improve the utilization of proteomics in the study of vascular diseases. PMID:19541510

  14. Increased Arterial Diameters in the Posterior Cerebral Circulation in Men with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Homola, György A.; Guerrero González, Hans; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Solymosi, László; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    A high load of white matter lesions and enlarged basilar arteries have been shown in selected patients with Fabry disease, a disorder associated with an increased stroke risk. We studied a large cohort of patients with Fabry disease to differentially investigate white matter lesion load and cerebral artery diameters. We retrospectively analyzed cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 87 consecutive Fabry patients, 20 patients with ischemic stroke, and 36 controls. We determined the white matter lesion load applying the Fazekas score on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences and measured the diameters of cerebral arteries on 3D-reconstructions of the time-of-flight-MR-angiography scans. Data of different Fabry patient subgroups (males – females; normal – impaired renal function) were compared with data of patients with stroke and controls. A history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks was present in 4/30 males (13%) and 5/57 (9%) females with Fabry disease, all in the anterior circulation. Only one man with Fabry disease showed confluent cerebral white matter lesions in the Fazekas score assessment (1%). Male Fabry patients had a larger basilar artery (p<0.01) and posterior cerebral artery diameter (p<0.05) compared to male controls. This was independent of disease severity as measured by renal function and did not lead to changes in arterial blood flow properties. A basilar artery diameter of >3.2 mm distinguished between men with Fabry disease and controls (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 86%, p<0.001), but not from stroke patients. Enlarged arterial diameters of the posterior circulation are present only in men with Fabry disease independent of disease severity. PMID:24475221

  15. Targeting smooth muscle microRNAs for therapeutic benefit in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Albinsson, Sebastian; Swärd, Karl

    2013-09-01

    In view of the bioinformatic projection that a third of all protein coding genes and essentially all biological pathways are under control of microRNAs (miRNAs), it is not surprising that this class of small RNAs plays roles in vascular disease progression. MiRNAs have been shown to be involved in cholesterol turnover, thrombosis, glucose homeostasis and vascular function. Some miRNAs appear to be specific for certain cells, and the role that such cell-specific miRNAs play in vascular disease is only beginning to be appreciated. A notable example is the miR-143/145 cluster which is enriched in mature and highly differentiated smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Here we outline and discuss the recent literature on SMC-expressed miRNAs in major vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, neointima formation, aortic aneurysm formation, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Forced expression of miR-145 emerges as a promising strategy for reduction and stabilization of atherosclerotic plaques as well as for reducing neointimal hyperplasia. It is concluded that if obstacles in the form of delivery and untoward effects of antimirs and mimics can be overcome, the outlook for targeting of SMC-specific miRNAs for therapeutic benefit in vascular disease is bright. PMID:23611811

  16. Dissecting the Contribution of Vascular Alterations and Aging to Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Janota, Cátia; Lemere, Cynthia A; Brito, Maria Alexandra

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by cognitive decline that afflicts as many as 45 % of individuals who survive past the age of 85. AD has been associated with neurovascular dysfunction and brain accumulation of amyloid-β peptide, as well as tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration, but the pathogenesis of the disease is still somewhat unclear. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis of AD, accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) aggregates initiates a sequence of events leading to neuronal injury and loss, and dementia. Alternatively, the vascular hypothesis of AD incorporates the vascular contribution to the disease, stating that a primary insult to brain microcirculation (e.g., stroke) not only contributes to amyloidopathy but initiates a non-amyloidogenic pathway of vascular-mediated neuronal dysfunction and injury, which involves blood-brain barrier compromise, with increased permeability of blood vessels, leakage of blood-borne components into the brain, and, consequently, neurotoxicity. Vascular dysfunction also includes a diminished brain capillary flow, causing multiple focal ischemic or hypoxic microinjuries, diminished amyloid-β clearance, and formation of neurotoxic oligomers, which lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we present and discuss relevant findings on the contribution of vascular alterations during aging to AD, with the hope that a better understanding of the players in the "orchestra" of neurodegeneration will be useful in developing therapies to modulate the "symphony". PMID:26143259

  17. Cerebral vasoconstriction reactions and plasma levels of ETBR, ET-1, and eNOS in patients with chronic high altitude disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shizheng; Hao, Guisheng; Zhang, Shukun; Jiang, Dongmei; Wuren, Tana; Luo, Junming

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine cerebral vasoconstriction in patients with chronic high altitude disease [cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR)], and to evaluate differences in alterations of brain vascular contractile reactivity of chronic mountain sickness (CMS) patients and healthy controls. Alterations of endothelin (ET) and its receptor, as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) levels in the plasma were examined to determine the cerebral reservation capacities in CMS patients. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound and carbon dioxide analysis methods were used to detect the CVR variances. At the same time, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay approaches were utilized to detect the ET and ET B receptor and the eNOS levels in serum of the CMS patients and healthy controls. CVR and CVRI levels in CMS patients were lower than those of the healthy control subjects and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). By contrast, eNOS and ET-1 levels were not statistically significant for CMS and healthy controls (P>0.05). However, the ET receptor concentration level was higher in CMS than the healthy controls. Thus, ET-1 may not be a direct etiological variation but may play compensatory roles in CMS patients. The results of the study may provide scientific clues for the prevention and treatment of CMS with higher blood coagulation states of cerebral infarction in patients with chronic high altitude disease. PMID:27485004

  18. Cerebral vasoconstriction reactions and plasma levels of ETBR, ET-1, and eNOS in patients with chronic high altitude disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shizheng; Hao, Guisheng; Zhang, Shukun; Jiang, Dongmei; Wuren, Tana; Luo, Junming

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine cerebral vasoconstriction in patients with chronic high altitude disease [cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR)], and to evaluate differences in alterations of brain vascular contractile reactivity of chronic mountain sickness (CMS) patients and healthy controls. Alterations of endothelin (ET) and its receptor, as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) levels in the plasma were examined to determine the cerebral reservation capacities in CMS patients. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound and carbon dioxide analysis methods were used to detect the CVR variances. At the same time, enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay approaches were utilized to detect the ET and ET B receptor and the eNOS levels in serum of the CMS patients and healthy controls. CVR and CVRI levels in CMS patients were lower than those of the healthy control subjects and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). By contrast, eNOS and ET‑1 levels were not statistically significant for CMS and healthy controls (P>0.05). However, the ET receptor concentration level was higher in CMS than the healthy controls. Thus, ET‑1 may not be a direct etiological variation but may play compensatory roles in CMS patients. The results of the study may provide scientific clues for the prevention and treatment of CMS with higher blood coagulation states of cerebral infarction in patients with chronic high altitude disease. PMID:27485004

  19. Cerebral Arterial Variations Associated with Moyamoya Disease Diagnosed by MR Angiography.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2014-12-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare progressive cerebrovascular steno-occlusive disease associated with different variations of the cerebral arteries. We evaluated the types and prevalence of such variations among patients with moyamoya disease. In our institution during the past seven years, we diagnosed 72 patients (24 male, 48 female; aged 6 to 75 years, mean, 42 years) with moyamoya disease by magnetic resonance (MR) angiography using either a 3-Tesla or one of two 1.5-T imagers and a standard time-of-flight technique without contrast media. An experienced neuroradiologist retrospectively reviewed the images. There were 15 cerebral arterial variations in 13 of 72 patients with moyamoya disease (18.1%), including four basilar artery fenestrations, three ophthalmic arteries arising from the middle meningeal artery, two intracranial vertebral artery fenestrations, two persistent first cervical intersegmental arteries, two persistent trigeminal arteries, one extracranial origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and one persistent stapedial artery. Although our number of patients was small, moyamoya disease was frequently associated with variations of the cerebral arteries, especially fenestrations in the vertebrobasilar system and persistent trigeminal artery. PMID:25489893

  20. Cigarette Smoke Modulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Phenotype: Implications for Carotid and Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Pascal M.; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I.; Gonzalez, Fernando; Hasan, David M.; Rosenwasser, Robert H.; Owens, Gary K.; Koch, Walter J.; Dumont, Aaron S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic modulation in the cerebral circulation and pathogenesis of stroke has not been determined. Cigarette smoke is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, but potential mechanisms are unclear, and its role in SMC phenotypic modulation has not been established. Methods and Results In cultured cerebral vascular SMCs, exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) resulted in decreased promoter activity and mRNA expression of key SMC contractile genes (SM-α-actin, SM-22α, SM-MHC) and the transcription factor myocardin in a dose-dependent manner. CSE also induced pro-inflammatory/matrix remodeling genes (MCP-1, MMPs, TNF-α, IL-1β, NF-κB). CSE increased expression of KLF4, a known regulator of SMC differentiation, and siKLF4 inhibited CSE induced suppression of SMC contractile genes and myocardin and activation of inflammatory genes. These mechanisms were confirmed in vivo following exposure of rat carotid arteries to CSE. Chromatin immune-precipitation assays in vivo and in vitro demonstrated that CSE promotes epigenetic changes with binding of KLF4 to the promoter regions of myocardin and SMC marker genes and alterations in promoter acetylation and methylation. Conclusion CSE exposure results in phenotypic modulation of cerebral SMC through myocardin and KLF4 dependent mechanisms. These results provides a mechanism by which cigarette smoke induces a pro-inflammatory/matrix remodeling phenotype in SMC and an important pathway for cigarette smoke to contribute to atherosclerosis and stroke. PMID:23967268

  1. Convergence of genes implicated in Alzheimer's disease on the cerebral cholesterol shuttle: APP, cholesterol, lipoproteins, and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Carter, C J

    2007-01-01

    Polymorphic genes associated with Alzheimer's disease (see ) delineate a clearly defined pathway related to cerebral and peripheral cholesterol and lipoprotein homoeostasis. They include all of the key components of a glia/neurone cholesterol shuttle including cholesterol binding lipoproteins APOA1, APOA4, APOC1, APOC2, APOC3, APOD, APOE and LPA, cholesterol transporters ABCA1, ABCA2, lipoprotein receptors LDLR, LRP1, LRP8 and VLDLR, and the cholesterol metabolising enzymes CYP46A1 and CH25H, whose oxysterol products activate the liver X receptor NR1H2 and are metabolised to esters by SOAT1. LIPA metabolises cholesterol esters, which are transported by the cholesteryl ester transport protein CETP. The transcription factor SREBF1 controls the expression of most enzymes of cholesterol synthesis. APP is involved in this shuttle as it metabolises cholesterol to 7-betahydroxycholesterol, a substrate of SOAT1 and HSD11B1, binds to APOE and is tethered to LRP1 via APPB1, APBB2 and APBB3 at the cytoplasmic domain and via LRPAP1 at the extracellular domain. APP cleavage products are also able to prevent cholesterol binding to APOE. BACE cleaves both APP and LRP1. Gamma-secretase (PSEN1, PSEN2, NCSTN) cleaves LRP1 and LRP8 as well as APP and their degradation products control transcription factor TFCP2, which regulates thymidylate synthase (TS) and GSK3B expression. GSK3B is known to phosphorylate the microtubule protein tau (MAPT). Dysfunction of this cascade, carved out by genes implicated in Alzheimer's disease, may play a major role in its pathology. Many other genes associated with Alzheimer's disease affect cholesterol or lipoprotein function and/or have also been implicated in atherosclerosis, a feature of Alzheimer's disease, and this duality may well explain the close links between vascular and cerebral pathology in Alzheimer's disease. The definition of many of these genes as risk factors is highly contested. However, when polymorphic susceptibility genes belong to

  2. Vascular Imaging: The Evolving Role of the Multidisciplinary Team Meeting in Peripheral Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Andrew; Roditi, Giles

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the importance of preinterventional cross-sectional imaging in the evaluation of peripheral arterial disease, as well as discussing the pros and cons of each imaging modality. The importance of a multidisciplinary team approach is emphasized. PMID:25435657

  3. Decoding Alzheimer's disease from perturbed cerebral glucose metabolism: implications for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhichun; Zhong, Chunjiu

    2013-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related devastating neurodegenerative disorder, which severely impacts on the global economic development and healthcare system. Though AD has been studied for more than 100 years since 1906, the exact cause(s) and pathogenic mechanism(s) remain to be clarified. Also, the efficient disease-modifying treatment and ideal diagnostic method for AD are unavailable. Perturbed cerebral glucose metabolism, an invariant pathophysiological feature of AD, may be a critical contributor to the pathogenesis of this disease. In this review, we firstly discussed the features of cerebral glucose metabolism in physiological and pathological conditions. Then, we further reviewed the contribution of glucose transportation abnormality and intracellular glucose catabolism dysfunction in AD pathophysiology, and proposed a hypothesis that multiple pathogenic cascades induced by impaired cerebral glucose metabolism could result in neuronal degeneration and consequently cognitive deficits in AD patients. Among these pathogenic processes, altered functional status of thiamine metabolism and brain insulin resistance are highly emphasized and characterized as major pathogenic mechanisms. Finally, considering the fact that AD patients exhibit cerebral glucose hypometabolism possibly due to impairments of insulin signaling and altered thiamine metabolism, we also discuss some potential possibilities to uncover diagnostic biomarkers for AD from abnormal glucose metabolism and to develop drugs targeting at repairing insulin signaling impairment and correcting thiamine metabolism abnormality. We conclude that glucose metabolism abnormality plays a critical role in AD pathophysiological alterations through the induction of multiple pathogenic factors such as oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and so forth. To clarify the causes, pathogeneses and consequences of cerebral hypometabolism in AD will help break the bottleneck of current AD study in finding

  4. Nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for vascular and cardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Cormode, David P.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in nanoparticle contrast agents for molecular imaging have made magnetic resonance imaging a promising modality for noninvasive visualization and assessment of vascular and cardiac disease processes. This review provides a description of the various nanoparticles exploited for imaging cardiovascular targets. Nanoparticle probes detecting inflammation, apoptosis, extracellular matrix, and angiogenesis may provide tools for assessing the risk of progressive vascular dysfunction and heart failure. The utility of nanoparticles as multimodal probes and/or theranostic agents has also been investigated. Although clinical application of these nanoparticles is largely unexplored, the potential for enhancing disease diagnosis and treatment is considerable. PMID:20967875

  5. Long term cerebral and vascular complications after irradiation of the neck in head and neck cancer patients: a prospective cohort study: study rationale and protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Successful treatment options for cancer result in more young long-term survivors prone for long-term complications. Carotid artery vasculopathy is a potential long-term complication after radiotherapy of the neck, resulting in cerebrovascular events and probably deficits in cognitive and motor functioning. Better insight into the underlying pathofysiology of radiotherapy induced carotid artery vasculopathy is needed for prognostic purposes and to develop preventive strategies. Methods/Design The current study is a prospective cohort study on the long-term cerebral and vascular complications after radiotherapy of the neck, in 103 patients treated for head and neck cancer, included in our study database between 2002 and 2008. Baseline protocol (before radiotherapy) included screening for cerebrovascular risk factors and intima media thickness measurement of carotid arteries by ultrasonography. Follow-up assessment more than 5 years after radiotherapy included screening of cerebrovascular risk factors, cerebrovascular events, neurological examination with gait and balance tests, extensive neuropsychological examination, self-report questionnaires, ultrasonography of the carotid arteries with measurement of intima media thickness and elastography, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and magnetic resonance angiography of the carotid arteries. Discussion The current study adds to the understanding of the causes and consequences of long-term cerebral and vascular changes after radiotherapy of the neck. These data will be helpful to develop a protocol for diagnostic and preventive strategies for long-term neurological complications in future head and neck cancer patients with anticipated radiotherapy treatment. PMID:24942263

  6. Patterns of cerebral glucose utilization in depression, multiple infarct dementia, and Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.; Metter, E.J.; Riege, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    Patterns of local cerebral glucose utilization were determined in moderately to severely disabled patients with depression (n=7), multiple infarct dementia (n=6), and Alzheimer's disease (n=6), and in normal controls (n=6), using positron emission tomography with the /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose method. Average global metabolic rate was decreased 30% in patients with Alzheimer's disease, but overlap among the other groups reduced the discriminant value of this measure. In depressed patients, the cerebral metabolic pattern was normal, except for evidence of hypometabolic zone in the posterior-inferior frontal cortex which was of marginal statistical significance. In multiple infarct dementia, focal metabolic defects were scattered throughout the brain and exceeded the extent of infarction. In Alzheimer's disease, metabolism was markedly reduced in cortex, especially parietal cortex, but relatively preserved in caudate, thalamus, anterior cingulate gyrus, pre and post central gyrus, and calcarine occipital cortex, a pattern duplicating the degree and location of pathological and neurochemical alterations characteristic of this disorder.

  7. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rezai, K.; Damasio, H.; Graff-Radford, N.; Eslinger, P.; Kirchner, P.

    1985-05-01

    In 37 patients (ages 58-81) with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied utilizing a dedicated SPECT system (Tomomatic-64) that produces rCBF images from 4-minute clearance of Xenon-133 in the brain. The authors have modified the device to acquire 5 continuous tomographic slices simultaneously. A consistent pattern of diminished blood flow was seen in 33 patients in the posterior-temporal and lower-parietal brain regions. Computer programs were developed to quantitate the size of the affected brain tissue in the posterolateral brain areas (confined to the posterior 40% and the lateral 25% of the major and minor brain axes respectively). They have previously reported normal rCBF in 25 volunteers to be greater than 45 ml/min/100g with less than 10% regional variation. Hence, an area was considered abnormal if rCBF measured less than 40 ml/min/100g or was less than 70% of the mean rCBF value in the anterior temporal-frontal regions.

  8. Cerebral cavernous malformations: from genes to proteins to disease.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Kalani, M Yashar S; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eales, Justin; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2012-01-01

    Over the past half century molecular biology has led to great advances in our understanding of angio- and vasculogenesis and in the treatment of malformations resulting from these processes gone awry. Given their sporadic and familial distribution, their developmental and pathological link to capillary telangiectasias, and their observed chromosomal abnormalities, cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are regarded as akin to cancerous growths. Although the exact pathological mechanisms involved in the formation of CCMs are still not well understood, the identification of 3 genetic loci has begun to shed light on key developmental pathways involved in CCM pathogenesis. Cavernous malformations can occur sporadically or in an autosomal dominant fashion. Familial forms of CCMs have been attributed to mutations at 3 different loci implicated in regulating important processes such as proliferation and differentiation of angiogenic precursors and members of the apoptotic machinery. These processes are important for the generation, maintenance, and pruning of every vessel in the body. In this review the authors highlight the latest discoveries pertaining to the molecular genetics of CCMs, highlighting potential new therapeutic targets for the treatment of these lesions. PMID:21962164

  9. Capillary pericytes regulate cerebral blood flow in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Brad A.; O’Farrell, Fergus M.; Buchan, Alastair M.; Lauritzen, Martin; Attwell, David

    2014-01-01

    Brain blood flow increases, evoked by neuronal activity, power neural computation and are the basis of BOLD functional imaging. It is controversial whether blood flow is controlled solely by arteriole smooth muscle, or also by capillary pericytes. We demonstrate that neuronal activity and the neurotransmitter glutamate evoke the release of messengers that dilate capillaries by actively relaxing pericytes. Dilation is mediated by prostaglandin E2, but requires nitric oxide release to suppress vasoconstricting 20-HETE synthesis. In vivo, when sensory input increases blood flow, capillaries dilate before arterioles and are estimated to produce 84% of the blood flow increase. In pathology, ischaemia evokes capillary constriction by pericytes. We show that this is followed by pericyte death in rigor, which may irreversibly constrict capillaries and damage the blood-brain barrier. Thus, pericytes are major regulators of cerebral blood flow and initiators of functional imaging signals. Prevention of pericyte constriction and death may reduce the long-lasting blood flow decrease which damages neurons after stroke. PMID:24670647

  10. Use of an optical technique to evaluate the cerebral vascular effects of alcohol (A): Effects on deoxyhemoglobin (DH) and levels of reduced cytochrome oxidase (rCO)

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, R.L.; Gebiewold, A.; Altura, B.M. )

    1992-02-26

    The dose-response effects of acute A infusion were studied to examine the suggestion that A can induce stroke-like events as a consequence of cerebral vasospasm. By employing a single sending and receiving fiber, an optical backscatter measurement was employed to monitor the levels in DH and rCO in a closed cranium preparation. Anesthetized rats were prepared by cannulating a branch of the internal carotid artery and subjected to either a bolus infusion (BI) or to a constant infusion (CI) of 5 or 10% A at various rates. Results showed that low BI doses of A typically produced a slight increase in the oxyhemoglobin signal indicating that vasodilation had probably occurred. Higher BI doses, however, produced a prompt and significant reduction in the hemoglobin signal with a rise in rCO suggesting a vasoconstrictor response leading to ischemia, followed by recovery within 3-5 min. CI of A produced a similar cerebral vascular response, in a dose-related manner, but of a more sustained nature. At 30-50% of the BI dose levels, a global blanching of the brain surface occurred; rCO levels increased by 50-90% with a corresponding decline in levels of oxyhemoglobin. Control experiments using identical volumes/flow rates of Ringers solution failed to produce any alterations in the optical spectrum. Overall, these data indicate that, depending on dose, (a) A can induce vasodilatory or vasoconstrictor effects in the intact brain; (b) the more pronounced effects involve vasospasm in the cortical microcirculation leading to global ischemia as determined by elevated levels of rCO and DH; (c) optical measurements permit direct noninvasive assessment of the cerebral vascular effects of substances of abuse.

  11. [Lyme disease acrodermitis chronica atrophicans: misleading vascular signs].

    PubMed

    Blaise, S; Fiandrino, G; Satger, B; Carpentier, P-H

    2014-05-01

    Lyme disease acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans is a tertiary form of Lyme borrelliosis. It occurs at least six months, but also up to several years, after a tick bite. This rare condition is probably underestimated because of the difficult diagnosis. Clinical presentations of acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans are quite variable depending upon the duration of the disease. Complimentary explorations are difficult to interpret and rarely specific. Only rare configurations allow formal diagnosis of Borrelia burgdoferi infection. We present a patient who exhibited an atypical clinical presentation of Lyme disease acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans. The clinical outcome was quite favorable with treatment, confirming the diagnosis. Such treatments, which are well tolerated and highly effective, are essential since an untreated disease can lead to potentially severe neurological involvement. PMID:24698204

  12. The Role of Pathogen-Secreted Proteins in Fungal Vascular Wilt Diseases

    PubMed Central

    de Sain, Mara; Rep, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    A limited number of fungi can cause wilting disease in plants through colonization of the vascular system, the most well-known being Verticillium dahliae and Fusarium oxysporum. Like all pathogenic microorganisms, vascular wilt fungi secrete proteins during host colonization. Whole-genome sequencing and proteomics screens have identified many of these proteins, including small, usually cysteine-rich proteins, necrosis-inducing proteins and enzymes. Gene deletion experiments have provided evidence that some of these proteins are required for pathogenicity, while the role of other secreted proteins remains enigmatic. On the other hand, the plant immune system can recognize some secreted proteins or their actions, resulting in disease resistance. We give an overview of proteins currently known to be secreted by vascular wilt fungi and discuss their role in pathogenicity and plant immunity. PMID:26473835

  13. Endothelial dysfunction is associated with the severity of cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Nezu, Tomohisa; Hosomi, Naohisa; Aoki, Shiro; Kubo, Satoshi; Araki, Mutsuko; Mukai, Tomoya; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Higashi, Yukihito; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2015-04-01

    The pathogenesis of cerebral small vessel disease, a disease that involves white matter lesions (WMLs) and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), is thought to be associated with endothelial dysfunction. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) has been used to measure endothelium-dependent vasodilation. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between endothelial function (as measured by FMD) and cerebral small vessel disease. Patients with a history of cerebrovascular disease and comorbidities were enrolled in this study (n=102; 69 males, 70.1±9.2 years). The patients were divided into two groups according to the severity of WMLs, which were assessed by Fazekas classification; grades 0 to 1 as mild WMLs group and grades 2 to 3 as severe WMLs group. A gradient-echo MRI was performed in 96 patients (94.1%) to evaluate whether CMBs were present. The patients in the severe WMLs group (n=40) were older (P=0.001), more frequently exhibited hypertension (P=0.045) and diabetes mellitus (P=0.026) and possessed lower FMD values (P<0.001) than the patients in the mild WMLs group (n=62). CMBs were observed in 30 patients (31.3%). Using receiver operating characteristic curves, the optimal FMD cutoff values for predicting the presence of severe WMLs and CMBs were 3.9% and 3.7%, respectively. On multivariate logistic analysis, FMD <4.0% (odds ratio 9.50; 95% confidence interval 3.55-28.83) was independently associated with severe WMLs. Additionally, FMD <3.8% (5.82; 2.23-16.50) was also associated with the presence of CMBs. Endothelial dysfunction as evaluated by FMD may be predictive of the severity of cerebral small vessel disease. PMID:25672660

  14. Retinal vascular imaging in early life: insights into processes and risk of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Jun; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-04-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally. In recent years, studies have shown that the origins of CVD may be traced to vascular and metabolic processes in early life. Retinal vascular imaging is a new technology that allows detailed non-invasive in vivo assessment and monitoring of the microvasculature. In this systematic review, we described the application of retinal vascular imaging in children and adolescents, and we examined the use of retinal vascular imaging in understanding CVD risk in early life. We reviewed all publications with quantitative retinal vascular assessment in two databases: PubMed and Scopus. Early life CVD risk factors were classified into four groups: birth risk factors, environmental risk factors, systemic risk factors and conditions linked to future CVD development. Retinal vascular changes were associated with lower birth weight, shorter gestational age, low-fibre and high-sugar diet, lesser physical activity, parental hypertension history, childhood hypertension, childhood overweight/obesity, childhood depression/anxiety and childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus. In summary, there is increasing evidence supporting the view that structural changes in the retinal microvasculature are associated with CVD risk factors in early life. Thus, the retina is a useful site for pre-clinical assessment of microvascular processes that may underlie the future development of CVD in adulthood. PMID:26435039

  15. Cerebral microvascular pericytes and neurogliovascular signaling in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Dalkara, Turgay; Alarcon-Martinez, Luis

    2015-10-14

    Increases in neuronal activity cause an enhanced blood flow to the active brain area. This neurovascular coupling is regulated by multiple mechanisms: Adenosine and lactate produced as metabolic end-products couple activity with flow by inducing vasodilation. As a specific mechanism to the brain, synaptic activity-induced Ca(2+) increases in astrocytes, interneurons and neurons translate neuronal activity to vasoactive signals such as arachidonic acid metabolites and NO. K(+) released onto smooth muscle cells through Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels on end-feet can also induce vasodilation during neuronal activity. An intense communication between the endothelia, pericytes and astrocytes is required for development and functioning of the neurovascular unit as well as the BBB. The ratio of pericytes to endothelial cells is higher in the cerebral microcirculation than other tissues. Pericytes play a role in distribution of microvascular blood flow in response to the local demand as a final regulatory step after arterioles, which feed a larger cohort of cells. Pericyte-endothelial communication is essential for vasculogenesis. Pericyte also take part in leukocyte infiltration and immune responses. The microvascular injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion plays a critical role in tissue survival after recanalization by inducing sustained pericyte contraction and microcirculatory clogging (no-reflow) and by disrupting BBB integrity. Suppression of oxidative/nitrative stress or sustained adenosine delivery during re-opening of an occluded artery improves the outcome of recanalization by promoting microcirculatory reflow. Pericyte dysfunction in retinal microvessels is the main cause of diabetic retinopathy. Recent findings suggest that the age-related microvascular dysfunction may initiate the neurodegenerative changes seen Alzheimer׳s dementia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Cell Interactions In Stroke. PMID:25862573

  16. Cerebral correlates of psychotic syndromes in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jellinger, Kurt A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Psychosis has been recognized as a common feature in neurodegenerative diseases and a core feature of dementia that worsens most clinical courses. It includes hallucinations, delusions including paranoia, aggressive behaviour, apathy and other psychotic phenomena that occur in a wide range of degenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, synucleinopathies (Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies), Huntington’s disease, frontotemporal degenerations, motoneuron and prion diseases. Many of these psychiatric manifestations may be early expressions of cognitive impairment, but often there is a dissociation between psychotic/behavioural symptoms and the rather linear decline in cognitive function, suggesting independent pathophysiological mechanisms. Strictly neuropathological explanations are likely to be insufficient to explain them, and a large group of heterogeneous factors (environmental, neurochemical changes, genetic factors, etc.) may influence their pathogenesis. Clinico-pathological evaluation of behavioural and psychotic symptoms (PS) in the setting of neurodegenerative and dementing disorders presents a significant challenge for modern neurosciences. Recognition and understanding of these manifestations may lead to the development of more effective preventive and therapeutic options that can serve to delay long-term progression of these devastating disorders and improve the patients’ quality of life. A better understanding of the pathophysiology and distinctive pathological features underlying the development of PS in neurodegenerative diseases may provide important insights into psychotic processes in general. PMID:21418522

  17. Choroidal Vascularity Index in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease: An EDI-OCT Derived Tool for Monitoring Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Li, Lilian Koh Hui; Nakhate, Vikram; Khandelwal, Neha; Mahendradas, Padmamalini

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the application of the choroidal vascularity index (CVI) in the follow-up of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKH) patients derived from image binarization of enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) images with Fiji software. Our secondary objective was to derive the retinochoroidal vascularity index based on en face fundus fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography (FFA and ICGA). Methods In this retrospective cohort study, EDI-OCT scans of 18 eyes of 9 patients with VKH were obtained at baseline within 2 weeks of acute presentation, and again at 6 to 12 months. Images with poor quality were excluded. Choroidal thickness (CT) and CVI were analyzed and compared to 13 eyes of 13 healthy controls. En face FFA and ICGA obtained from 12 eyes of 7 patients were segmented to derive retinochoroidal vascularity index. Results There was no statistical difference in age or sex between the study group and controls. Choroidal thickness of patients with VKH was 359.23 ± 57.63 μm at baseline, compared to 274.09 ± 56.98 μm in controls (P = 0.003). Follow-up CT in VKH patients was 282.62 ± 42.51 μm, which was significantly decreased from baseline (P = 0.0001). Choroidal vascularity index in VKH patients was 70.03 ± 1.93% at baseline, compared to 64.63 ± 1.92% in controls (P < 0.001). Choroidal vascularity index was 66.94 ± 1.82% at follow-up, significantly reduced from baseline (P < 0.0001). Fundus fluorescein angiography and ICGA retinochoroidal vascularity indices at baseline were 70.67 ± 2.65% and 66.42 ± 2.16%, respectively. Conclusions In this small series of VKH patients, EDI-OCT–derived CVI had a statistically significant reduction over time, similar to CT. We propose that OCT, FFA, and ICGA-derived vascularity indices may be potential novel supportive tools in monitoring disease progression in VKH. Translational Relevance Choroidal vascularity index can be used potentially to study and analyze the structural changes in

  18. The Vitamin D, Ionised Calcium and Parathyroid Hormone Axis of Cerebral Capillary Function: Therapeutic Considerations for Vascular-Based Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Virginie; Takechi, Ryusuke; Pallabage-Gamarallage, Menuka; Giles, Corey; Mamo, John C. L.

    2015-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier dysfunction characterised by brain parenchymal extravasation of plasma proteins may contribute to risk of neurodegenerative disorders, however the mechanisms for increased capillary permeability are not understood. Increasing evidence suggests vitamin D confers central nervous system benefits and there is increasing demand for vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D may influence the CNS via modulation of capillary function, however such effects may be indirect as it has a central role in maintaining calcium homeostasis, in concert with calcium regulatory hormones. This study utilised an integrated approach and investigated the effects of vitamin D supplementation, parathyroid tissue ablation (PTX), or exogenous infusion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on cerebral capillary integrity. Parenchymal extravasation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) was used as a marker of cerebral capillary permeability. In C57BL/6J mice and Sprague Dawley rats, dietary vitamin D was associated with exaggerated abundance of IgG within cerebral cortex (CTX) and hippocampal formation (HPF). Vitamin D was also associated with increased plasma ionised calcium (iCa) and decreased PTH. A response to dose was suggested and parenchymal effects persisted for up to 24 weeks. Ablation of parathyroid glands increased CTX- and HPF-IgG abundance concomitant with a reduction in plasma iCa. With the provision of PTH, iCa levels increased, however the PTH treated animals did not show increased cerebral permeability. Vitamin D supplemented groups and rats with PTH-tissue ablation showed modestly increased parenchymal abundance of glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of astroglial activation. PTH infusion attenuated GFAP abundance. The findings suggest that vitamin D can compromise capillary integrity via a mechanism that is independent of calcium homeostasis. The effects of exogenous vitamin D supplementation on capillary function and in the context of prevention of vascular

  19. Type 2 diabetes aggravates Alzheimer's disease-associated vascular alterations of the aorta in mice.

    PubMed

    Sena, Cristina M; Pereira, Ana M; Carvalho, Cristina; Fernandes, Rosa; Seiça, Raquel M; Oliveira, Catarina R; Moreira, Paula I

    2015-01-01

    Vascular risk factors are associated with a higher incidence of dementia. In fact, diabetes mellitus is considered a main risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and both diseases are characterized by vascular dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, the effects of high-sucrose-induced type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the aorta of wild type (WT) and triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice were investigated. 3xTg-AD mice showed a significant decrease in body weight and an increase in postprandial glycemia, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and vascular nitrotyrosine, superoxide anion (O2•-), receptor for the advanced glycation end products (RAGE) protein, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels when compared to WT mice. High-sucrose intake caused a significant increase in body weight, postprandial glycemia, HbA1c, triglycerides, plasma vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and vascular nitrotyrosine, O2•-, RAGE, and MCP-1 levels in both WT and 3xTg-AD mice when compared to the respective control group. Also, a significant decrease in nitric oxide-dependent vasorelaxation was observed in 3xTg-AD and sucrose-treated WT mice. In conclusion, AD and T2D promote similar vascular dysfunction of the aorta, this effect being associated with elevated oxidative and nitrosative stress and inflammation. Also, AD-associated vascular alterations are potentiated by T2D. These findings support the idea that metabolic alterations predispose to the onset and progression of dementia. PMID:25471187

  20. Vascular pathobiology in chronic liver disease and cirrhosis – Current status and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Iwakiri, Yasuko; Shah, Vijay; Rockey, Don C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic liver disease is associated with remarkable alterations in the intra- and extrahepatic vasculature. Because of these changes, the fields of liver vasculature and portal hypertension have recently become closely integrated within the broader vascular biology discipline. As developments in vascular biology have evolved, a deeper understanding of vascular processes has led to a better understanding of the mechanisms of the dynamic vascular changes associated with portal hypertension and chronic liver disease. In this context, hepatic vascular cells, such as sinusoidal endothelial cells and pericyte-like hepatic stellate cells, are closely associated with one another, where they have paracrine and autocrine effects on each other and themselves. These cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Further, a variety of signaling pathways have recently come to light. These include growth factor pathways involving cytokines such as transforming growth factor β, platelet derived growth factor, and others as well as a variety of vasoactive peptides and other molecules. An early and consistent feature of liver injury is the development of an increase in intra-hepatic resistance; this is associated with changes in hepatic vascular cells and their signaling pathway that cause portal hypertension. A critical concept is that this process aggregates signals to the extrahepatic circulation, causing derangement in this system’s cells and signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to the collateral vessel formation and arterial vasodilation in the splanchnic and systemic circulation, which by virtue of the hydraulic derivation of Ohm’s law (pressure = resistance × flow), worsens portal hypertension. This review provides a detailed review of the current status and future direction of the basic biology of portal hypertension with a focus on the physiology, pathophysiology, and signaling of cells within the

  1. Vascular pathobiology in chronic liver disease and cirrhosis - current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Yasuko; Shah, Vijay; Rockey, Don C

    2014-10-01

    Chronic liver disease is associated with remarkable alterations in the intra- and extrahepatic vasculature. Because of these changes, the fields of liver vasculature and portal hypertension have recently become closely integrated within the broader vascular biology discipline. As developments in vascular biology have evolved, a deeper understanding of vascular processes has led to a better understanding of the mechanisms of the dynamic vascular changes associated with portal hypertension and chronic liver disease. In this context, hepatic vascular cells, such as sinusoidal endothelial cells and pericyte-like hepatic stellate cells, are closely associated with one another, where they have paracrine and autocrine effects on each other and themselves. These cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Further, a variety of signaling pathways have recently come to light. These include growth factor pathways involving cytokines such as transforming growth factor β, platelet derived growth factor, and others as well as a variety of vasoactive peptides and other molecules. An early and consistent feature of liver injury is the development of an increase in intra-hepatic resistance; this is associated with changes in hepatic vascular cells and their signaling pathway that cause portal hypertension. A critical concept is that this process aggregates signals to the extrahepatic circulation, causing derangement in this system's cells and signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to the collateral vessel formation and arterial vasodilation in the splanchnic and systemic circulation, which by virtue of the hydraulic derivation of Ohm's law (pressure = resistance × flow), worsens portal hypertension. This review provides a detailed review of the current status and future direction of the basic biology of portal hypertension with a focus on the physiology, pathophysiology, and signaling of cells within the liver, as well

  2. Co-occurrence of a cerebral cavernous malformation and an orbital cavernous hemangioma in a patient with seizures and visual symptoms: Rare crossroads for vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Choudhri, Omar; Feroze, Abdullah H.; Lad, Eleonora M.; Kim, Jonathan W.; Plowey, Edward D.; Karamchandani, Jason R.; Chang, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are angiographically occult vascular malformations of the central nervous system. As a result of hemorrhage and mass effect, patients may present with focal neurologic deficits, seizures, and other symptoms necessitating treatment. Once symptomatic, most often from hemorrhage, CCMs are treated with microsurgical resection. Orbital cavernous hemangiomas (OCHs) are similar but distinct vascular malformations that present within the orbital cavity. Even though CCMs and OCHs are both marked by dilated endothelial-lined vascular channels, they are infrequently seen in the same patient. Case Description: We provide a brief overview of the two related pathologies in the context of a patient presenting to our care with concomitant lesions, which were both resected in full without complication. Conclusion: This is the first known report that describes a case of concomitant CCM and OCH and explores the origins of two pathologies that are rarely encountered together in neurosurgical practice. Recognition of disparate symptomatologies is important for properly managing these patients. PMID:25071938

  3. Cranberry and blueberry: evidence for protective effects against cancer and vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Neto, Catherine C

    2007-06-01

    Growing evidence from tissue culture, animal, and clinical models suggests that the flavonoid-rich fruits of the North American cranberry and blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) have the potential ability to limit the development and severity of certain cancers and vascular diseases including atherosclerosis, ischemic stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases of aging. The fruits contain a variety of phytochemicals that could contribute to these protective effects, including flavonoids such as anthocyanins, flavonols, and proanthocyanidins; substituted cinnamic acids and stilbenes; and triterpenoids such as ursolic acid and its esters. Cranberry and blueberry constituents are likely to act by mechanisms that counteract oxidative stress, decrease inflammation, and modulate macromolecular interactions and expression of genes associated with disease processes. The evidence suggests a potential role for dietary cranberry and blueberry in the prevention of cancer and vascular diseases, justifying further research to determine how the bioavailability and metabolism of berry phytonutrients influence their activity in vivo. PMID:17533651

  4. Laurel wilt: Understanding an unusual and exotic vascular wilt disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laurel wilt kills American members of the Lauraceae plant family (Laurales, Magnoliid complex). These include significant components of Coastal Plain forest communities in the southeastern USA, most importantly redbay, as well as the commercial crop avocado. The disease has decimated redbay, swamp ...

  5. The advantage of coronal scanning in cerebral computed angiotomography for diagnosis of moyamoya disease

    SciTech Connect

    Asari, S.; Satoh, T.; Sakurai, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Sadamoto, K.

    1982-12-01

    The advantage of coronal scanning in cerebral computed angiotomography for diagnosis of and screening for moyamoya disease is demonstrated. Characteristic features on the coronal CT scan include (a) attenuation of and difficulty in following the supraclinoid internal carotid arteries and carotid fork and (b) abnormal ''nebula-like'' high-density areas consisting of irregular, tortuous, or patchy vessels arising in the basal cisterns and extending to the basal ganglia.

  6. Tau pathology-dependent remodelling of cerebral arteries precedes Alzheimer's disease-related microvascular cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Merlini, Mario; Wanner, Debora; Nitsch, Roger M

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterised by pathologic cerebrovascular remodelling. Whether this occurs already before disease onset, as may be indicated by early Braak tau-related cerebral hypoperfusion and blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment found in previous studies, remains unknown. Therefore, we systematically quantified Braak tau stage- and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA)-dependent alterations in the alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen, and elastin content of leptomeningeal arterioles, small arteries, and medium-sized arteries surrounding the gyrus frontalis medialis (GFM) and hippocampus (HIPP), including the sulci, of 17 clinically and pathologically diagnosed AD subjects (Braak stage IV-VI) and 28 non-demented control subjects (Braak stage I-IV). GFM and HIPP paraffin sections were stained for general collagen and elastin with the Verhoeff-van Gieson stain; α-SMA and CAA/amyloid β (Aβ) were detected using immunohistochemistry. Significant arterial elastin degradation was observed from Braak stage III onward and correlated with Braak tau pathology (ρ = 0.909, 95 % CI 0.370 to 0.990, p < 0.05). This was accompanied by an increase in neutrophil elastase expression by α-SMA-positive cells in the vessel wall. Small and medium-sized arteries exhibited significant CAA-independent α-SMA loss starting between Braak stage I and II-III, along with accumulation of phosphorylated paired helical filament (PHF) tau in the perivascular space of intraparenchymal vessels. α-SMA remained at the decreased level throughout the later Braak stages. In contrast, arterioles exhibited significant α-SMA loss only at Braak stage V and VI/in AD subjects, which was CAA-dependent/correlated with CAA burden (ρ = -0.422, 95 % CI -0.557 to -0.265, p < 0.0001). Collagen content was only significantly changed in small arteries. Our data indicate that vessel wall remodelling of leptomeningeal arteries is an early-onset, Braak tau pathology-dependent process

  7. Common Aging Signature in the Peripheral Blood of Vascular Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongbo; Han, Guangchun; Wang, Jiajia; Zeng, Fan; Li, Yuanming; Shao, Shaoju; Song, Fuhai; Bai, Zhouxian; Peng, Xing; Wang, Yan-Jiang; Shi, Xiangqun; Lei, Hongxing

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the two most dominant forms of dementia in elderly people. Due to the large overlap between AD and VaD in clinical observations, great controversies exist regarding the distinction and connection between these two types of senile dementia. Here for the first time, we resort to the gene expression pattern of the peripheral blood to compare AD and VaD objectively. In our previous work, we have demonstrated that the dysregulation of gene expression in AD is unique among the examined diseases including neurological diseases, cancer, and metabolic diseases. In this study, we found that the dysregulation of gene expression in AD and VaD is quite similar to each other at both functional and gene levels. Interestingly, the dysregulation started at the early stages of the diseases, namely mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). We have also shown that this signature is distinctive from that of peripheral vascular diseases. Comparison with aging studies revealed that the most profound change in AD and VaD, namely ribosome, is consistent with the accelerated aging scenario. This study may have implications to the common mechanism between AD and VaD. PMID:26099307

  8. Role of Inflammasome Activation in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Diseases of the Neurovascular Unit

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Islam N.; Ishrat, Tauheed; Fagan, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Inflammation is the standard double-edged defense mechanism that aims at protecting the human physiological homeostasis from devastating threats. Both acute and chronic inflammation have been implicated in the occurrence and progression of vascular diseases. Interference with components of the immune system to improve patient outcome after ischemic injury has been uniformly unsuccessful. There is a need for a deeper understanding of the innate immune response to injury in order to modulate, rather than to block inflammation and improve the outcome for vascular diseases. Recent Advances: Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors or NOD-like receptor proteins (NLRPs) can be activated by sterile and microbial inflammation. NLR family plays a major role in activating the inflammasome. Critical Issues: The aim of this work is to review recent findings that provided insights into key inflammatory mechanisms and define the place of the inflammasome, a multi-protein complex involved in instigating inflammation in neurovascular diseases, including retinopathy, neurodegenerative diseases, and stroke. Future Directions: The significant contribution of NLRP-inflammasome activation to vascular disease of the neurovascular unit in the brain and retina suggests that therapeutic strategies focused on specific targeting of inflammasome components could significantly improve the outcomes of these diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1188–1206. PMID:25275222

  9. [Vascular rehabilitation in patients with peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    de Holanda, Ana; Aubourg, Marion; Dubus-Bausière, Valérie; Eveno, Dominique; Abraham, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Lower limb peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent debilitating disease associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. The benefit of rehabilitation in PAD patients has been largely demonstrated, both for patients that undergo amputation, and for patients with claudication. In these latter patients, rehabilitation programs rely on a variety of additional techniques or tools, among which: stretching, specific muscle proprioception, walking and a variety of other physical activities, exercise or situations adapted to community life, lower limb and respiratory physiotherapy, patient's education, support for smoking cessation and healthy nutrition, social support, etc. Whether rehabilitation is performed in specialised integrated structures or performed on a home-based basis, various clinicians are involved. Despite evidence-based proof of efficacy, rehabilitation of PAD patients with claudication is still under-used. PMID:23669319

  10. Is the distinction between Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia possible and relevant?

    PubMed Central

    Ravona-Springer, Ramit; Davidson, Michael; Noy, Shlomo

    2003-01-01

    Advances in epidemiological, clinical, imaging, and neuropathological studies have undermined the clear distinction between vascular and Alzheimer-type dementia, which has characterized the last two decades of research in dementia. A significant degree of overlap between the two entities was demonstrated in terms of clinical expression, risk factors, and postmortem brain autopsy. In this article, we propose mechanisms by which cardiovascular risk factors might affect the manifestation of Alzheimer's disease, suggest possible explanations for the overlap with vascular dementia, and discuss the implications this might have on future differential diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:22033677

  11. Chronic administration of isocarbophos induces vascular cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Yin, Ya-Ling; Zhu, Mo-Li; Pan, Guo-Pin; Zhao, Fan-Rong; Lu, Jun-Xiu; Liu, Zhan; Wang, Shuang-Xi; Hu, Chang-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Vascular dementia, being the most severe form of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), is caused by cerebrovascular disease. Whether organophosphorus causes VCI remains unknown. Isocarbophos (0.5 mg/kg per 2 days) was intragastrically administrated to rats for 16 weeks. The structure and function of cerebral arteries were assayed. The learning and memory were evaluated by serial tests of step-down, step-through and morris water maze. Long-term administration of isocarbophos reduced the hippocampal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and acetylcholine (ACh) content but did not alter the plasma AChE activity, and significantly damaged the functions of learning and memory. Moreover, isocarbophos remarkably induced endothelial dysfunction in the middle cerebral artery and the expressions of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the posterior cerebral artery. Morphological analysis by light microscopy and electron microscopy indicated disruptions of the hippocampus and vascular wall in the cerebral arteries from isocarbophos-treated rats. Treatment of isocarbophos injured primary neuronal and astroglial cells isolated from rats. Correlation analysis demonstrated that there was a high correlation between vascular function of cerebral artery and hippocampal AChE activity or ACh content in rats. In conclusion, chronic administration of isocarbophos induces impairments of memory and learning, which is possibly related to cerebral vascular dysfunction. PMID:26818681

  12. Clinicopathological correlation of psychosis and brain vascular changes in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Simon Kang Seng; Hao, Ying; Chia, Pei Shi; Tan, Eng-King; Hameed, Shahul

    2016-01-01

    Psychosis is common in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, studies on neuropathology in vascular etiology contributing to psychosis in AD is lacking to date. The aim of this study was to investigate neuropathological vascular related changes in Alzheimer’s disease with psychosis. Data of patients with AD from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center between 2005 to September 2013 was accessed and reviewed. Presence of psychosis was determined based on Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire taken from the last visit within one year prior to death, and patients were divided into psychosis positive and negative group. Comparison of clinical details and neuropathological vascular changes between the groups was performed using Wilcoxon rank sum test and Chi-square/ Fisher’s exact test. Significant variables were further included in a multivariate logistic model. Overall, 145 patients was included. Of these, 50 patients were psychosis positive. Presence of one or more cortical microinfarcts and moderate to severe arteriosclerosis was found to be positively associated with psychosis. Our results suggest vascular changes correlate with psychosis in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26868671

  13. Cerebral correlates of psychotic symptoms in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mega, M.; Lee, L.; Dinov, I.; Mishkin, F.; Toga, A.; Cummings, J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Psychotic symptoms are produced by distributed neuronal dysfunction. Abnormalities of reality testing and false inference implicate frontal lobe abnormalities.
OBJECTIVES—To identify the functional imaging profile of patients with Alzheimer's disease manifesting psychotic symptoms as measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).
METHODS—Twenty patients with Alzheimer's disease who had SPECT and clinical evaluations were divided into two equal groups with similar mini mental status examination (MMSE), age, sex, and the range of behaviours documented by the neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI), except delusions and hallucinations. SPECT studies, registered to a probabilistic anatomical atlas, were normalised across the combined group mean intensity level, and subjected to a voxel by voxel subtraction of the non-psychotic minus psychotic groups. Subvolume thresholding (SVT) corrected random lobar noise to produce a three dimensional functional significance map.
RESULTS—The significance map showed lower regional perfusion in the right and left dorsolateral frontal, left anterior cingulate, and left ventral striatal regions along with the left pulvinar and dorsolateral parietal cortex, in the psychotic versus non-psychotic group.
CONCLUSION—Patients with Alzheimer's disease who manifest psychosis may have disproportionate dysfunction of frontal lobes and related subcortical and parietal structures.

 PMID:10896687

  14. PET/MR Imaging in Vascular Disease: Atherosclerosis and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Kjær, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    For imaging of atherosclerotic disease, lumenography using computed tomography, ultrasonography, or invasive angiography is still the backbone of evaluation. However, these methods are less effective to predict the likelihood of future thromboembolic events caused by vulnerability of plaques. PET and MR imaging have been used separately with success for plaque characterization. Where MR imaging has the ability to reveal plaque composition, PET has the ability to visualize plaque activity. Together this leads to a comprehensive evaluation of plaque vulnerability. In this review, the authors go through data and arguments that support increased use of PET/MR imaging in atherosclerotic imaging. PMID:27593251

  15. Mineral and bone disorder and vascular calcification in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peres, Luis Alberto Batista; Pércio, Pedro Paulo Verona

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcifications has been associated with bone and mineral disorders. The alterations in the serum level of calcium concentrations and phosphate are importants factors implicated in the arterial calcification in chronic kidney disease. The pathogenesis of vascular calcification is a complex mechanism and not completely clear, being able to correspond to an active process of cellular transformation and heterotopic ossification. Beyond the hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, they are involved in this process changes in the metabolism of inhibitors and promoters of calcification such as fetuin A, osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, and matrix gla protein. For the diagnosis of the calcified arterial injury are available several complementary methods, a method of estimate of the cardiovascular risk based on plain radiographs of the lumbar column and another method based on simple x-rays of the pelvis and hands. Below, we will present a review approching the link between vascular calcifications and mineral disorders. PMID:25055361

  16. Pulmonary vascular disease in mice xenografted with human BM progenitors from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Farha, Samar; Lichtin, Alan; Graham, Brian; George, Deepa; Aldred, Micheala; Hazen, Stanley L.; Loyd, James; Tuder, Rubin

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic myeloid progenitors released into the circulation are able to promote vascular remodeling through endothelium activation and injury. Endothelial injury is central to the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a proliferative vasculopathy of the pulmonary circulation, but the origin of vascular injury is unknown. In the present study, mice transplanted with BM-derived CD133+ progenitor cells from patients with PAH, but not from healthy controls, exhibited morbidity and/or death due to features of PAH: in situ thrombi and endothelial injury, angioproliferative remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy and failure. Myeloid progenitors from patients with heritable and/or idiopathic PAH all produced disease in xenografted mice. Analyses of hematopoietic transcription factors and colony formation revealed underlying abnormalities of progenitors that skewed differentiation toward the myeloid-erythroid lineage. The results of the present study suggest a causal role for hematopoietic stem cell abnormalities in vascular injury, right ventricular hypertrophy, and morbidity associated with PAH. PMID:22745307

  17. Preeclampsia and Vascular Function: A Window to Future Cardiovascular Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Enkhmaa, Davaasambuu; Wall, Danielle; Mehta, Puja K; Stuart, Jennifer J; Rich-Edwards, Janet Wilson; Merz, C Noel Bairey; Shufelt, Chrisandra

    2016-03-01

    Preeclampsia affects ∼3%-7% of all pregnancies and is the third leading cause of maternal mortality globally. Growing evidence indicates that preeclampsia results from vascular dysfunction, which also increases the risk for future cardiovascular events. Until recently, preeclampsia was considered a disorder limited to pregnancy, which fully resolved with the delivery of the placenta; however, it is now clear that women with a history of preeclampsia have approximately double the risk of future cardiovascular events compared to women with normotensive pregnancies. The aims of this review were to describe the hemodynamic and vascular changes that occur in normal and preeclamptic pregnancies, to review noninvasive methods to test vascular function, and to discuss the associated increased cardiovascular disease risk related to preeclampsia. PMID:26779584

  18. Coagulation Activation in Children with Sickle Cell Disease Is Associated with Cerebral Small Vessel Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Colombatti, Raffaella; De Bon, Emiliano; Bertomoro, Antonella; Casonato, Alessandra; Pontara, Elena; Omenetto, Elisabetta; Saggiorato, Graziella; Steffan, Agostino; Damian, Tamara; Cella, Giuseppe; Teso, Simone; Manara, Renzo; Rampazzo, Patrizia; Meneghetti, Giorgio; Basso, Giuseppe; Sartori, Maria Teresa; Sainati, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombotic complications in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) arise since infancy, but the role of the coagulation system in children has been poorly explored. To determine its role in the development of clinical complications in childhood we measured coagulation and endothelial parameters in children with SCD at steady state. Methods Markers of thrombin generation, fibrin dissolution and endothelial activation were evaluated in 38 children with SS-Sβ°, 6 with SC disease and 50 age and blood group matched controls. Coagulation variables were correlated with markers of hemolysis and inflammation, with the presence of cerebral and lung vasculopathy and with the frequency of clinical complications. Results SS-Sβ° patients presented higher levels of factor VIII, von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag) and collagen binding activity, tissue plasminogen activator antigen (t-PA:Ag), D-dimer, p-selectin, prothrombin fragment1+2 (F1+2) and lower ADAMTS-13:activity/VWF:Ag (p<0.05) compared to controls and SC patients. In SS-Sβ° patients coagulation variables correlated positively with markers of inflammation, hemolysis, and negatively with HbF (p<0.05). Patients with cerebral silent infarcts showed significant decrease in t-PA:Ag and ADAMTS-13 Antigen and a tendency toward higher D-dimer, F1+2, TAT compared to patients without them. D-dimer was associated with a six fold increased risk of cerebral silent infarcts. No correlation was found between coagulation activation and large vessel vasculopathy or other clinical events except for decreased t-PA:Ag in patients with tricuspid Rigurgitant Velocity >2.5m/sec. Conclusions SS-Sβ° disease is associated with extensive activation of the coagulation system at steady state since young age. ADAMTS-13 and t-PA:Ag are involved in the development of cerebral silent infarcts. PMID:24205317

  19. Primary Open Angle Glaucoma is Associated with MR Biomarkers of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mercieca, Karl; Cain, John; Hansen, Thomas; Steeples, Laura; Watkins, Amy; Spencer, Fiona; Jackson, Alan

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study tests the hypotheses that: 1) glaucoma is associated with evidence of cerebral small vessel disease; 2) that imaging biomarkers of cerebral small vessel disease in POAG and NTG will show different characteristics. 12 normal controls, 7 patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and 9 patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG) were recruited. Ophthalmological clinical assessment and MR imaging of the brain were performed. MR imaging was used to quantify white matter lesion load, frequency of dilated perivascular spaces (PVS) and abnormalities in cerebral hydrodynamics. Patients with POAG had significantly greater white matter lesion load (p < 0.05), more PVS in the centrum semiovale (p < 0.05) and had higher overall PVS scores than controls (p < 0.05). In the POAG group, optic cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) was positively correlated with deep white matter hyperintensities (R2 = 0.928, p < 0.01). Mean deviation on the Humphrey visual field assessment was negatively correlated with deep white matter lesion load (R2 = −0.840, p < 0.01), total white matter lesion load (R2 = −0.928, p < 0.01) and total PVS (R2 = −0.820, p < 0.01). MR evidence of cerebral small vessel disease is strongly associated with a diagnosis of POAG and with the severity of abnormalities in CDR and visual field. PMID:26923106

  20. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neonatal Pulmonary Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Abnormal lung development in the perinatal period can result in severe neonatal complications, including persistent pulmonary hypertension (PH) of the newborn and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a substantive role in the development of PH associated with these diseases. ROS impair the normal pulmonary artery (PA) relaxation in response to vasodilators, and ROS are also implicated in pulmonary arterial remodeling, both of which can increase the severity of PH. Recent Advances: PA ROS levels are elevated when endogenous ROS-generating enzymes are activated and/or when endogenous ROS scavengers are inactivated. Animal models have provided valuable insights into ROS generators and scavengers that are dysregulated in different forms of neonatal PH, thus identifying potential therapeutic targets. Critical Issues: General antioxidant therapy has proved ineffective in reversing PH, suggesting that it is necessary to target specific signaling pathways for successful therapy. Future Directions: Development of novel selective pharmacologic inhibitors along with nonantioxidant therapies may improve the treatment outcomes of patients with PH, while further investigation of the underlying mechanisms may enable earlier detection of the disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1926–1942. PMID:24350610

  1. Decreased MicroRNA Is Involved in the Vascular Remodeling Abnormalities in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Kalisha D.; Chen, Xianming; Moorthi, Ranjani N.; Gattone, Vincent H.; Allen, Matthew R.; Moe, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with CKD have abnormal vascular remodeling that is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control mRNA expression intracellularly and are secreted into the circulation; three miRNAs (miR-125b, miR-145 and miR-155) are known to alter vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and differentiation. We measured these vascular miRNAs in blood from 90 patients with CKD and found decreased circulating levels with progressive loss of eGFR by multivariate analyses. Expression of these vascular miRNAs miR-125b, miR-145, and miR-155 was decreased in the thoracic aorta in CKD rats compared to normal rats, with concordant changes in target genes of RUNX2, angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R), and myocardin. Furthermore, the expression of miR-155 was negatively correlated with the quantity of calcification in the aorta, a process known to be preceded by vascular de-differentiation in these animals. We then examined the mechanisms of miRNA regulation in primary VSMC and found decreased expression of miR-125b, 145, and 155 in VSMC from rats with CKD compared to normal littermates but no alteration in DROSHA or DICER, indicating that the low levels of expression is not due to altered intracellular processing. Finally, overexpression of miR-155 in VSMC from CKD rats inhibited AT1R expression and decreased cellular proliferation supporting a direct effect of miR-155 on VSMC. In conclusion, we have found ex vivo and in vitro evidence for decreased expression of these vascular miRNA in CKD, suggesting that alterations in miRNAs may lead to the synthetic state of VSMC found in CKD. The decreased levels in the circulation may reflect decreased vascular release but more studies are needed to confirm this relationship. PMID:23717629

  2. MTHFR and ACE Gene Polymorphisms and Risk of Vascular and Degenerative Dementias in the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Pratima; Pradhan, Sunil; Modi, Dinesh Raj; Mittal, Balraj

    2009-01-01

    Focal lacunar infarctions due to cerebral small vessel atherosclerosis or single/multiple large cortical infarcts lead to vascular dementia, and different genes and environmental factors have been implicated in causation or aggravation of the disease. Previous reports suggest that some of the risk factors may be common to both vascular as well as…

  3. Quantitative Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Vascular Dysfunction in Progressive Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ehling, Josef; Bábíčková, Janka; Gremse, Felix; Klinkhammer, Barbara M.; Baetke, Sarah; Knuechel, Ruth; Kiessling, Fabian; Floege, Jürgen; Lammers, Twan; Boor, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Progressive kidney diseases and renal fibrosis are associated with endothelial injury and capillary rarefaction. However, our understanding of these processes has been hampered by the lack of tools enabling the quantitative and noninvasive monitoring of vessel functionality. Here, we used micro-computed tomography (μCT) for anatomical and functional imaging of vascular alterations in three murine models with distinct mechanisms of progressive kidney injury: ischemia-reperfusion (I/R, days 1–56), unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO, days 1–10), and Alport mice (6–8 weeks old). Contrast-enhanced in vivo μCT enabled robust, noninvasive, and longitudinal monitoring of vessel functionality and revealed a progressive decline of the renal relative blood volume in all models. This reduction ranged from −20% in early disease stages to −61% in late disease stages and preceded fibrosis. Upon Microfil perfusion, high-resolution ex vivo μCT allowed quantitative analyses of three-dimensional vascular networks in all three models. These analyses revealed significant and previously unrecognized alterations of preglomerular arteries: a reduction in vessel diameter, a prominent reduction in vessel branching, and increased vessel tortuosity. In summary, using μCT methodology, we revealed insights into macro-to-microvascular alterations in progressive renal disease and provide a platform that may serve as the basis to evaluate vascular therapeutics in renal disease. PMID:26195818

  4. Incidence of cerebral microbleeds in preclinical Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Desmond, Patricia M.; Phal, Pramit M.; Steward, Christopher; Szoeke, Cassandra; Salvado, Olivier; Ellis, Kathryn A.; Martins, Ralph N.; Masters, Colin L.; Ames, David; Villemagne, Victor L.; Rowe, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the incidence and associations of lobar microbleeds (LMBs) in a longitudinal cohort with 11C–Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging. Methods: One hundred seventy-four participants from the observational Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Study of Ageing (97 with normal cognition [NC], 37 with mild cognitive impairment [MCI], and 40 with Alzheimer disease [AD] dementia) were assessed at 3 time points over 3 years with 3-tesla susceptibility-weighted MRI and 11C-PiB PET. MRIs were inspected for microbleeds, siderosis, infarction, and white matter hyperintensity severity, blind to clinical and PiB findings. Neocortical PiB standardized uptake value ratio, normalized to cerebellar cortex, was dichotomized as positive or negative (PiB+/−, standardized uptake value ratio >1.5). Annualized LMB incidence was calculated, and logistic regression was used to determine the association of incident LMBs with PiB, APOE ε4+ status, and cerebrovascular disease. Results: LMBs were present in 18.6% of NC, 24.3% of MCI, and 40% of AD participants (p < 0.05 vs NC). LMB incidence was 0.2 ± 0.6 per year in NC participants, 0.2 ± 0.5 in MCI, and 0.7 ± 1.4 in AD (p < 0.03 vs NC) and was 6-fold higher in PiB+ than PiB-NC. Incident LMBs were associated with age, APOE ε4+, PiB+, and baseline LMBs. Incidence of multiple LMBs was also associated with lacunar infarction and white matter hyperintensity severity. Conclusions: Older age, baseline LMBs, higher β-amyloid burden, and concomitant cerebrovascular disease may all confer higher risk of incident LMBs. This should be considered when designing protocols for amyloid-modifying clinical trials. PMID:24623839

  5. Circulating Microparticles from Crohn’s Disease Patients Cause Endothelial and Vascular Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Leonetti, Daniela; Reimund, Jean-Marie; Tesse, Angela; Viennot, Stéphanie; Martinez, Maria Carmen; Bretagne, Anne-Laure; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2013-01-01

    Background Microparticles (MPs) are small vesicles released during cell activation or apoptosis. They are involved in coagulation, inflammation and vascular dysfunction in several diseases. We characterized circulating MPs from Crohn’s Disease (CD) patients and evaluated their effects on endothelial function and vascular reactivity after in vivo injection into mice. Methods Circulating MPs and their cellular origins were examined by flow cytometry from blood samples from healthy subjects (HS) and inactive or active CD patients. MPs were intravenously injected into mice. After 24 hours, endothelial function and vascular reactivity were assessed. Results Circulating MP levels did not differ between HS and inactive CD patients except for an increase in leukocyte-derived MPs in CD. Active CD patients compared to HS displayed increased total circulating MPs, pro-coagulant MPs and those from platelets, endothelium, erythrocytes, leukocytes, activated leukocytes and activated platelets. A significant correlation was found between total levels of MPs, those from platelets and endothelial cells, and the Harvey-Bradshaw clinical activity index. MPs from CD, but not from HS, impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in mice aorta and flow-induced dilation in mice small mesenteric arteries, MPs from inactive CD patients being more effective than those from active patients. CDMPs induced vascular hypo-reactivity in aorta that was prevented by a nitric oxide (NO)-synthase inhibitor, and was associated with a subtle alteration of the balance between NO, reactive oxygen species and the release of COX metabolites. Conclusions We provide evidence that MPs from CD patients significantly alter endothelial and vascular function and therefore, may play a role in CD pathophysiology, at least by contributing to uncontrolled vascular-dependent intestinal damage. PMID:24019899

  6. Vascular access in elderly patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Bessias, Nikolaos; Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Tziviskou, Effie; Andrikopoulos, Vassilios

    2008-01-01

    During the last few years, the number of elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has been increasing worldwide. Establishment of a viable vascular access is of primary importance in these patients. This review discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the available vascular access modalities [namely arteriovenous (AV) fistulae, AV grafts, and central venous catheters (CVCs)] in elderly ESRD patients. AV fistulae seem to be superior when compared with other vascular access alternatives with respect to patency, morbidity and mortality rates. On the other hand, due to the age-related advanced atherosclerosis in the elderly, higher failure rates for AV fistulae in this age group have been described. Two controversial issues, namely the higher infection and thrombosis rates in elderly ESRD patients, are also discussed. Current evidence suggests that old age should not comprise a drawback when selecting the appropriate vascular access modality (AV fistula, AV graft or CVC) for the performance of hemodialysis. The possible vascular access options in elderly ESRD patients should not be different from younger individuals. PMID:18792799

  7. [Association of encephalic vascular accidents and Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Lopes, E R; Marquez, J O; da Costa Neto, B; Menezes, A A; Chapadeiro, M E

    1991-01-01

    The frequency of strokes was studied in chronic chagasic and years of age, non-chagasic patients, older than 15 coming to necropsy in Uberaba, from 1979 than 1988. The study consisted of paired sex and age matched controls. Two hundred and eight pairs were analysed. Either ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes were found in 41 (19.7%) of the chagasics and in 55 (26.4%) of the non-chagasic, a difference not significant at the level of 5%. Twelve (75%) of the former had infarcts and 4 (25%) had brain hemorrhage; five (31.3%) of the non-chagasics had ischemic strokes and 11 (68.7%) had hemorrhagic strokes. The differences were significant to the level of 5%. The results indicate a high frequency of ischemic strokes in human Chagas' disease and demonstrate a lesser frequency of hemorrhagic stroke in chagasics when compared with non-chagasics. PMID:1841424

  8. Detection of white matter lesions in cerebral small vessel disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riad, Medhat M.; Platel, Bram; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-02-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are diffuse white matter abnormalities commonly found in older subjects and are important indicators of stroke, multiple sclerosis, dementia and other disorders. We present an automated WML detection method and evaluate it on a dataset of small vessel disease (SVD) patients. In early SVD, small WMLs are expected to be of importance for the prediction of disease progression. Commonly used WML segmentation methods tend to ignore small WMLs and are mostly validated on the basis of total lesion load or a Dice coefficient for all detected WMLs. Therefore, in this paper, we present a method that is designed to detect individual lesions, large or small, and we validate the detection performance of our system with FROC (free-response ROC) analysis. For the automated detection, we use supervised classification making use of multimodal voxel based features from different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, including intensities, tissue probabilities, voxel locations and distances, neighborhood textures and others. After preprocessing, including co-registration, brain extraction, bias correction, intensity normalization, and nonlinear registration, ventricle segmentation is performed and features are calculated for each brain voxel. A gentle-boost classifier is trained using these features from 50 manually annotated subjects to give each voxel a probability of being a lesion voxel. We perform ROC analysis to illustrate the benefits of using additional features to the commonly used voxel intensities; significantly increasing the area under the curve (Az) from 0.81 to 0.96 (p<0.05). We perform the FROC analysis by testing our classifier on 50 previously unseen subjects and compare the results with manual annotations performed by two experts. Using the first annotator results as our reference, the second annotator performs at a sensitivity of 0.90 with an average of 41 false positives per subject while our automated method reached the same

  9. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-kinin system influences on diabetic vascular disease and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Flack, J M; Hamaty, M; Staffileno, B A

    1998-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an inordinately high risk of virtually all manifestations of cardiovascular-renal disease including atherosclerotic coronary and peripheral vascular disease, congestive heart failure, stroke, nephropathy, and cardiomyopathy unassociated with coronary heart disease. Abnormalities in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-kinin (RAAK) cascade have been implicated in the pathogenesis and clinical expression of these cardiovascular-renal sequelae. Thus, pharmacological modulation of the RAAK system is an attractive therapeutic target in diabetes mellitus. Indeed, emerging data from human clinical studies appear to confirm this thesis. PMID:9930381

  10. The Unfolded Protein Response in Retinal Vascular Diseases: Implications and Therapeutic Potential Beyond Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sarah X.; Ma, Jacey H.; Bhatta, Maulasri; Fliesler, Steven J.; Wang, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex, step-wise process of new vessel formation that is involved in both normal embryonic development as well as postnatal pathological processes, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Aberrant blood vessel growth, also known as neovascularization, in the retina and the choroid is a major cause of vision loss in severe eye diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, retinopathy of prematurity, and central and branch retinal vein occlusion. Yet, retinal neovascularization is causally and dynamically associated with vasodegeneration, ischemia, and vascular remodeling in retinal tissues. Understanding the mechanisms of retinal neovascularization is an urgent unmet need for developing new treatments for these devastating diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests a vital role for the unfolded protein response (UPR) in regulation of angiogenesis, in part through coordinating the secretion of pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as VEGF, and modulating endothelial cell survival and activity. Herein, we summarize current research in the context of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and UPR signaling in retinal angiogenesis and vascular remodeling, highlighting potential implications of targeting these stress response pathways in the prevention and treatment of retinal vascular diseases that result in visual deficits and blindness. PMID:25529848

  11. Arm exercise testing with myocardial scintigraphy in asymptomatic patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, S.; Rubler, S.; Bryk, H.; Sklar, B.; Glasser, L.

    1989-04-01

    Arm exercise with myocardial scintigraphy and oxygen consumption determinations was performed by 33 men with peripheral vascular disease, 40 to 74 years of age (group 2). None had evidence of coronary disease. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects (group 1) were also tested to determine the normal endurance and oxygen consumption during arm exercise in their age group and to compare the results with those obtained during a standard treadmill performance. The maximal heart rate, systolic blood pressure, pressure rate product, and oxygen consumption were all significantly lower for arm than for leg exercise. However, there was good correlation between all these parameters for both types of exertion. The maximal heart rate, work load and oxygen consumption were greater for group 1 subjects than in patients with peripheral vascular disease despite similar activity status. None of the group 1 subjects had abnormal arm exercise ECGs, while six members of group 2 had ST segment changes. Thallium-201 scintigraphy performed in the latter group demonstrated perfusion defects in 25 patients. After nine to 29 months of follow-up, three patients who had abnormal tests developed angina and one of them required coronary bypass surgery. Arm exercise with myocardial scintigraphy may be an effective method of detecting occult ischemia in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Those with good exercise tolerance and no electrocardiographic changes or /sup 201/T1 defects are probably at lower risk for the development of cardiac complications, while those who develop abnormalities at low exercise levels may be candidates for invasive studies.

  12. Disappointing reliability of pulsatility indices to identify candidates for magnetic resonance imaging screening in population-based studies assessing prevalence of cerebral small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Del Brutto, Oscar H.; Mera, Robertino M.; Andrade, María de la Luz; Castillo, Pablo R.; Zambrano, Mauricio; Nader, Juan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a challenge in remote areas where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not available. Hospital-based studies in high-risk or stroke patients have found an association between the pulsatility index (PI) of intracranial arteries – as derived from transcranial Doppler (TCD) – and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) of presumed vascular origin. We aimed to assess the reliability of cerebral pulsatility indices to identify candidates for MRI screening in population-based studies assessing prevalence of SVD. Methods: A representative sample of stroke-free Atahualpa residents aged ≥65 years investigated with MRI underwent TCD. Using generalized linear models, we evaluated whether the PI of major intracranial arteries correlate with WMH (used as a proxy of diffuse SVD), after adjusting for demographics and cardiovascular risk factors. Results: Out of 70 participants (mean age 70.6 ± 4.6 years, 57% women), 28 (40%) had moderate-to-severe WMH. In multivariate models, there were no differences across categories of WMH in the mean PI of middle cerebral arteries (1.10 ± 0.16 vs. 1.22 ± 0.24, β: 0.065, 95% confidence interval (CI): −0.084–0.177, P = 0.474) or vertebrobasilar arteries (1.11 ± 0.16 vs. 1.29 ± 0.27, β: 0.066, 95% CI: −0.0024–0.156, P = 0.146). Conclusions: Cerebral PI should not be used to identify candidates for MRI screening in population-based studies assessing the burden of SVD. PMID:26167015

  13. Association of brain amyloid-β with cerebral perfusion and structure in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Tosun, Duygu; Insel, Philip S; Simonson, Alix; Jack, Clifford R; Beckett, Laurel A; Donohue, Michael; Jagust, William; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W

    2014-05-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease have reduced cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging, but it is unclear how this is related to amyloid-β pathology. Using 182 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative we tested associations of amyloid-β with regional cerebral blood flow in healthy controls (n = 51), early (n = 66) and late (n = 41) mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 24). Based on the theory that Alzheimer's disease starts with amyloid-β accumulation and progresses with symptoms and secondary pathologies in different trajectories, we tested if cerebral blood flow differed between amyloid-β-negative controls and -positive subjects in different diagnostic groups, and if amyloid-β had different associations with cerebral blood flow and grey matter volume. Global amyloid-β load was measured by florbetapir positron emission tomography, and regional blood flow and volume were measured in eight a priori defined regions of interest. Cerebral blood flow was reduced in patients with dementia in most brain regions. Higher amyloid-β load was related to lower cerebral blood flow in several regions, independent of diagnostic group. When comparing amyloid-β-positive subjects with -negative controls, we found reductions of cerebral blood flow in several diagnostic groups, including in precuneus, entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (dementia), inferior parietal cortex (late mild cognitive impairment and dementia), and inferior temporal cortex (early and late mild cognitive impairment and dementia). The associations of amyloid-β with cerebral blood flow and volume differed across the disease spectrum, with high amyloid-β being associated with greater cerebral blood flow reduction in controls and greater volume reduction in late mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In addition to disease stage, amyloid-β pathology affects cerebral blood flow across the span from controls to

  14. Recent progress on small vessel disease with cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Li; Liu, Xue-Yuan; Fang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) refers to different degrees of cognitive dysfunction syndrome caused by all kinds of cerebral vascular disease and vascular factors. Before in the development of vascular dementia (VaD), early diagnosis and intervention can prevent and delay the progress of VCI, even reverse cognitive impairment. In this review, we summarized the research progress of vascular cognitive impairment in pathophysiology, biomarkers and treatments, etc. PMID:26221320

  15. [Cerebral ischemia in young adults].

    PubMed

    Berlit, P; Endemann, B; Vetter, P

    1991-08-01

    An overview is given over etiology and prognosis of cerebral ischemias until the age of 40. In a time period of 19 years, 168 patients were diagnosed with cerebral ischemia until the age of 40 (91 females, 77 males). The most frequent etiology is premature atherosclerosis in patients with vascular risk factors (up to 50%). Cardiogenic embolism is responsible for 1 to 34% of the cases: cardiac valve diseases and endocarditis being the most frequent sources. In 2 to 19% a vasculitis is diagnosed. While infectious arteritis is especially frequent in countries of the third world, immunovasculitides are common in Europe and the USA. Noninflammatory vasculopathies include spontaneous or traumatic dissection, fibromuscular dysplasia and vascular malformations. A migrainous stroke is especially frequent in female smokers with intake of oral contraceptives. During pregnancy both sinus thrombosis and arterial ischemia occur. Hematologic causes for ischemia are polycythemia, thrombocytosis and genetic diseases (sickle cell anemia, AT3-deficiency). Cerebral ischemia may occur in connection with the ingestion of ergot-derivates. The prognosis of cerebral ischemia in young adults is better than in older stroke-patients. PMID:1937340

  16. Exercise Training Could Improve Age-Related Changes in Cerebral Blood Flow and Capillary Vascularity through the Upregulation of VEGF and eNOS

    PubMed Central

    Viboolvorakul, Sheepsumon; Patumraj, Suthiluk

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of exercise training on age-induced microvascular alterations in the brain. Additionally, the association with the protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was also assessed. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary-young (SE-Young, n = 5), sedentary aged (SE-Aged, n = 8), immersed-aged (IM-Aged, n = 5), and exercise trained-aged (ET-Aged, 60 minutes/day and 5 days/week for 8 weeks, n = 8) rats. The MAPs of all aged groups, SE-Aged, IM-Aged, and ET-Aged, were significantly higher than that of the SE-Young group. The regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the SE-Aged and IM-Aged was significantly decreased as compared to SE-Young groups. However, rCBF of ET-Aged group was significantly higher than that in the IM-Aged group (P < 0.05). Moreover, the percentage of capillary vascularity (%CV) and the levels of VEGF and eNOS in the ET-Aged group were significantly increased compared to the IM-Aged group (P < 0.05). These results imply that exercise training could improve age-induced microvascular changes and hypoperfusion closely associated with the upregulation of VEGF and eNOS. PMID:24822184

  17. Mechanisms of Cognitive Impairment in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Multimodal MRI Results from the St George's Cognition and Neuroimaging in Stroke (SCANS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew J.; Patel, Bhavini; Morris, Robin G.; MacKinnon, Andrew D.; Rich, Philip M.; Barrick, Thomas R.; Markus, Hugh S.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common cause of vascular cognitive impairment. A number of disease features can be assessed on MRI including lacunar infarcts, T2 lesion volume, brain atrophy, and cerebral microbleeds. In addition, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive to disruption of white matter ultrastructure, and recently it has been suggested that additional information on the pattern of damage may be obtained from axial diffusivity, a proposed marker of axonal damage, and radial diffusivity, an indicator of demyelination. We determined the contribution of these whole brain MRI markers to cognitive impairment in SVD. Consecutive patients with lacunar stroke and confluent leukoaraiosis were recruited into the ongoing SCANS study of cognitive impairment in SVD (n = 115), and underwent neuropsychological assessment and multimodal MRI. SVD subjects displayed poor performance on tests of executive function and processing speed. In the SVD group brain volume was lower, white matter hyperintensity volume higher and all diffusion characteristics differed significantly from control subjects (n = 50). On multi-predictor analysis independent predictors of executive function in SVD were lacunar infarct count and diffusivity of normal appearing white matter on DTI. Independent predictors of processing speed were lacunar infarct count and brain atrophy. Radial diffusivity was a stronger DTI predictor than axial diffusivity, suggesting ischaemic demyelination, seen neuropathologically in SVD, may be an important predictor of cognitive impairment in SVD. Our study provides information on the mechanism of cognitive impairment in SVD. PMID:23613774

  18. Laser in situ keratomileusis in patients with collagen vascular disease: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Rachel G; Moshirfar, Majid; Edmonds, Jason N; Christiansen, Steven M; Behunin, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the current United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations regarding laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery in patients with collagen vascular diseases (CVD) and assess whether these patients make appropriate candidates for laser vision correction, and offer treatment recommendations based on identified clinical data. Methods A literature search was conducted using PubMed, Medline, and Ovid to identify all existing studies of LASIK in patients with collagen vascular diseases. The search was conducted without date limitations. Keywords used for the search included MeSH terms: laser in situ keratomileusis, LASIK, refractive surgery, ocular surgery, and cataract surgery connected by “and” with the following MeSH and natural-language terms: collagen vascular disease, rheumatic disease, systemic disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren’s syndrome, seronegative spondyloarthropathy, HLA B27, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis. The abstracts for all studies meeting initial search criteria were reviewed; relevant studies were included. No prospective studies were found; however, four retrospective case studies were identified that examined LASIK surgery in patients with CVD. Several case reports were also identified in similar fashion. Results The FDA considers CVD a relative contraindication to LASIK surgery, due largely to the ocular complications associated with disease in the CVD spectrum. However, recent studies of LASIK in patients with CVD indicate LASIK may be safe for patients with very well-controlled systemic disease, minimal ocular manifestations, and no clinical signs or history of dry-eye symptoms. Conclusion LASIK surgery may be safe in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus and the seronegative spondyloarthropathies if stringent preoperative criteria are met. Evidence suggests patients with Sjögren’s syndrome are not

  19. Impaired renal function impacts negatively on vascular stiffness in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are independently associated with increased vascular stiffness. We examined whether renal function contributes to vascular stiffness independently of CAD status. Methods We studied 160 patients with CAD and 169 subjects without CAD. The 4-variable MDRD formula was used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); impaired renal function was defined as eGFR <60 mL/min. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with the SphygmoCor® device. Circulating biomarkers were assessed in plasma using xMAP® multiplexing technology. Results Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had greater PWV compared to those with CAD and normal renal function (10.2 [9.1;11.2] vs 7.3 [6.9;7.7] m/s; P < 0.001). In all patients, PWV was a function of eGFR (β = −0.293; P < 0.001) even after adjustment for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, body mass index and presence or absence of CAD. Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had higher levels of adhesion and inflammatory molecules including E-selectin and osteopontin (all P < 0.05) compared to those with CAD alone, but had similar levels of markers of oxidative stress. Conclusions Renal function is a determinant of vascular stiffness even in patients with severe atherosclerotic disease. This was paralleled by differences in markers of cell adhesion and inflammation. Increased vascular stiffness may therefore be linked to inflammatory remodeling of the vasculature in people with impaired renal function, irrespective of concomitant atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23937620

  20. Clinical significance of Angiopoietin-1 in Behcet's disease patients with vascular involvement.

    PubMed

    Bassyouni, Iman H; Sharaf, Mohammed; Wali, Iman E; Mansour, Hossam M

    2016-06-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a chronic multisystem inflammatory disorder of unclear etiology. Vascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and angiogenesis may be in part responsible for the pathogenesis of BD. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) is a recent angiogenic mediator. The aim of the present study was to assess Ang-1 in the plasma of BD patients as well as to analyze its association with clinical, and laboratory parameters of the disease. The present study included 47 BD patients and 30 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Demographic, clinical, disease activity and severity were prospectively assessed. Plasma Ang-1 levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The plasma level of Ang-1 in BD patients was significantly lower than healthy controls (p = 0.005). Plasma Ang-1 level in patients with vascular affection was significantly lower than those without vascular affection (p = 0.045). Levels of Ang-1 showed a significant positive correlation with steroid dose. Patients who received cyclophosphamide or steroids showed a significant increase in plasma Ang-1 level. This was further confirmed by the results of the multivariate analysis. There was no significant association between plasma Ang-1 levels and other clinical manifestations or disease activity and severity. Plasma Ang-1 levels were diminished in our BD patients especially in patients with vascular involvement. Larger studies with further investigations of the precise role of Ang-1 in the pathogenesis of BD are needed and might lead to novel therapies for the clinical management of BD. PMID:25964071

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen for patients with above-knee amputations, persistent ischemia, and nonreconstructable vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Columbo, Jesse A; Ptak, Judy A; Buckey, Jay C; Walsh, Daniel B

    2016-04-01

    We describe four patients with above-knee amputations whose stump wounds failed to heal. After numerous revascularization attempts, these patients were diagnosed with nonreconstructable pelvic and groin vascular disease and were facing hip disarticulation. With the addition of hyperbaric oxygen treatment to vigilant wound care and negative pressure therapy, these patients healed their amputation stumps and were fit with prostheses. At their most recent follow-up, all patients were ambulating and using their prostheses. PMID:26033012

  2. A combined vascular surgical and clinical genetics approach to diffuse aneurysmal disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, K A; Choong, A M T L; Canham, N; Renton, S; Pollitt, R; Nesbitt, M; Kopcke, D; Islam, L; Buckley, J; Ghali, N; Vandersteen, A

    2015-07-01

    We report two patients who presented with extensive aneurysmal disease, in association with minimal external physical signs. Patient 1 remained genetically undiagnosed despite multiple structural, biochemical and genetic investigations. He made a good recovery following surgery for popliteal and left axillary artery aneurysms. Patient 2 was diagnosed with vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, associated with a high degree of tissue and blood vessel fragility, and is being managed conservatively. Early multidisciplinary assessment of such patients facilitates accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26264107

  3. Treatment of a High-Risk Diabetic Patient with Peripheral Vascular Disease and Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Latricia L; Kalmar, Garrett; Driver, Vickie R

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of calcaneal osteomyelitis that was surgically resected from a patient with diabetes and peripheral vascular disease. A 91-year-old male with history of type 2 diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, balloon angioplasty, and recent (2 months ago) stent of the superficial femoral artery presented to the emergency department with a left heel wound infection probed to bone. The patient reported having been on intravenous Zosyn for several months via an outside infectious disease provider for clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis, but noted no improvement. This report includes information regarding the clinical examination and imaging findings, which were used to assess this high-risk patient. Our patient underwent a partial calcanectomy and completed a 6-week course of intravenous antibiotics. The purpose of this case report is to illustrate limb preservation in a high-risk patient with compromised vascular supply who underwent a partial calcanectomy for treatment of calcaneal osteomyelitis. The patient underwent surgical resection of the calcaneus without complications and healed unremarkably with the ability to ambulate while wearing an ankle foot orthosis with a custom shoe. This report was authorized for publication as an educational report to contribute to generalizable knowledge and does not include any patient health information. PMID:27423990

  4. Circulating biologic markers of endothelial dysfunction in cerebral small vessel disease: A review.

    PubMed

    Poggesi, Anna; Pasi, Marco; Pescini, Francesca; Pantoni, Leonardo; Inzitari, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The term cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) refers to a group of pathologic processes with various etiologies that affect small arteries, arterioles, venules, and capillaries of the brain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates of SVD are lacunes, recent small subcortical infarcts, white-matter hyperintensities, enlarged perivascular spaces, microbleeds, and brain atrophy. Endothelial dysfunction is thought to have a role in the mechanisms leading to SVD-related brain changes, and the study of endothelial dysfunction has been proposed as an important step for a better comprehension of cerebral SVD. Among available methods to assess endothelial function in vivo, measurement of molecules of endothelial origin in peripheral blood is currently receiving selective attention. These molecules include products of endothelial cells that change when the endothelium is activated, as well as molecules that reflect endothelial damage and repair. This review examines the main molecular factors involved in both endothelial function and dysfunction, and the evidence linking endothelial dysfunction with cerebral SVD, and gives an overview of clinical studies that have investigated the possible association between endothelial circulating biomarkers and SVD-related brain changes. PMID:26058695

  5. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion enhances Tau hyperphosphorylation and reduces autophagy in Alzheimer's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lifeng; Ng, Gandi; Tan, Eng King; Liao, Ping; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Zeng, Li

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hypoperfusion and impaired autophagy are two etiological factors that have been identified as being associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nevertheless, the exact relationships among these pathological processes remain unknown. To elucidate the impact of cerebral hypoperfusion in AD, we created a unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (UCCAO) model by occluding the left common carotid artery in both young and old 3xTg-AD mice. Two months after occlusion, we found that ligation increases phospho-Tau (p-Tau) at Serine 199/202 in the hippocampus of 3-month-old AD mice, compared to sham-operated AD mice; whereas, there is no change in the wild type (WT) mice after ligation. Moreover, cerebral hypoperfusion led to significant increase of p-Tau in both the hippocampus and cortex of 16-month-old AD mice and WT mice. Notably, we did not detect any change in Aβ42 level in either young or old AD and WT mice after ligation. Interestingly, we observed a downregulation of LC3-II in the cortex of aged AD mice and WT mice after ligation. Our results suggest that elevated p-Tau and reduced autophagy are major cellular changes that are associated with hypoperfusion in AD. Therefore, targeting p-Tau and autophagy pathways may ameliorate hypoperfusion-induced brain damage in AD. PMID:27050297

  6. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion enhances Tau hyperphosphorylation and reduces autophagy in Alzheimer’s disease mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lifeng; Ng, Gandi; Tan, Eng King; Liao, Ping; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Zeng, Li

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hypoperfusion and impaired autophagy are two etiological factors that have been identified as being associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Nevertheless, the exact relationships among these pathological processes remain unknown. To elucidate the impact of cerebral hypoperfusion in AD, we created a unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (UCCAO) model by occluding the left common carotid artery in both young and old 3xTg-AD mice. Two months after occlusion, we found that ligation increases phospho-Tau (p-Tau) at Serine 199/202 in the hippocampus of 3-month-old AD mice, compared to sham-operated AD mice; whereas, there is no change in the wild type (WT) mice after ligation. Moreover, cerebral hypoperfusion led to significant increase of p-Tau in both the hippocampus and cortex of 16-month-old AD mice and WT mice. Notably, we did not detect any change in Aβ42 level in either young or old AD and WT mice after ligation. Interestingly, we observed a downregulation of LC3-II in the cortex of aged AD mice and WT mice after ligation. Our results suggest that elevated p-Tau and reduced autophagy are major cellular changes that are associated with hypoperfusion in AD. Therefore, targeting p-Tau and autophagy pathways may ameliorate hypoperfusion-induced brain damage in AD. PMID:27050297

  7. Selective accumulation of aluminum in cerebral arteries in Alzheimer's disease (AD).

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Surjyadipta; Zhao, Yuhai; Hill, James M; Culicchia, Frank; Kruck, Theodore P A; Percy, Maire E; Pogue, Aileen I; Walton, J R; Lukiw, Walter J

    2013-09-01

    Once biologically available aluminum bypasses gastrointestinal and blood-brain barriers, this environmentally-abundant neurotoxin has an exceedingly high affinity for the large pyramidal neurons of the human brain hippocampus. This same anatomical region of the brain is also targeted by the earliest evidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. The mechanism for the selective targeting and transport of aluminum into the hippocampus of the human brain is not well understood. In an effort to improve our understanding of a pathological aluminum entry system into the brain, this study examined the aluminum content of 8 arteries that supply blood to the hippocampus, including the aorta and several cerebral arteries. In contrast to age-matched controls, in AD patients we found a gradient of increasing aluminum concentration from the aorta to the posterior cerebral artery that supplies blood to the hippocampus. Primary cultures of human brain endothelial cells were found to have an extremely high affinity for aluminum when compared to other types of brain cells. Together, these results suggest for the first time that endothelial cells that line the cerebral vasculature may have biochemical attributes conducive to binding and targeting aluminum to selective anatomical regions of the brain, such as the hippocampus, with potential downstream pro-inflammatory and pathogenic consequences. PMID:23764827

  8. Primary multiple cerebral hydatid disease: still symptomatic despite pathologically confirmed death of the cyst.

    PubMed

    Yaka, Umut; Aras, Yavuz; Aydoseli, Aydın; Akcakaya, Mehmet Osman; Sencer, Altay; Imer, Murat; Hepgul, Kemal

    2013-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a life-threatening parasitic infestation caused by Echinococcus granulosus. Infection with E. granulosus typically results in the formation of hydatid cysts in liver, lungs, kidney and spleen. Majority of the intracranial cysts are secondary and solitary. Multiple primary cerebral cysts are uncommon. Surgical and medical management of a 14-year-old boy with multiple primary hydatid cysts are presented. 14 cysts, which were symptomatic due to their mass effect, were surgically removed, whereas a deep-seated asymptomatic cyst was followed-up with medical treatment. Despite proper antibiotic regimen the patient was admitted with epileptic seizures six months later. The deep-seated lesion was also surgically removed. Intraoperative observations and pathological examination demonstrated different characteristics, with pericystic gliosis, gel-like cyst content and death scolices within the cavity. In addition to the fact, that the presented case is an additional example for the rare primary multiple cerebral hydatid cysts, to our knowledge it is the first case of a dead cerebral hydatid cyst, causing symptoms despite effective medical treatment. PMID:24101271

  9. Pulmonary vascular disease in different types of congenital heart disease. Implications for interpretation of lung biopsy findings in early childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, S G

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular structure was studied by analysing serial reconstructions of the arterial pathways and random sections of tissue in the lungs of 16 children who died with different types of congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension. Cases of ventricular septal defect showed an appreciable increase in muscularity of both preacinar and intra-acinar (respiratory unit) arteries, and intimal proliferation was infrequent and mild. By contrast, cases of transposition of the great arteries with ventricular septal defect and atrioventricular septal defect showed an increase in preacinar muscularity, a short heavily muscularised arterial segment containing intimal proliferation at the entrance to the acinus, whereas the intra-acinar arteries beyond showed only a moderate increase in muscularity. In these children who were less than 1 year of age an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance was due to strategically placed small areas of intimal proliferation and not to widespread obliterative pulmonary vascular disease. The study demonstrated and explained differences in the appearance of the peripheral pulmonary arteries in different types of congenital heart disease, which help interpret the findings of lung biopsies. Images PMID:6498033

  10. Quantitative assessment of cerebral hemodynamic parameters by QUASAR arterial spin labeling in Alzheimer's disease and cognitively normal Elderly adults at 3-tesla.

    PubMed

    Mak, Henry K F; Chan, Queenie; Zhang, Zhipeng; Petersen, Esben T; Qiu, Deqiang; Zhang, Linda; Yau, Kelvin K W; Chu, Leung-Wing; Golay, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    QUASAR arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to investigate the role of vascular impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We hypothesized that the hemodynamic parameters monitoring cerebrovascular integrity, i.e., cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial blood volume (aBV), and arterial transit time (aTT), would be affected. 13 AD patients and 15 healthy control (HC) subjects underwent 3T MRI scanning. Two separate blood flow acquisitions were obtained with 1 slice overlap for whole brain coverage. CBF, aBV, and aTT maps were calculated using in-house software. Preprocessing and statistical analyses were performed on SPM5. Region-of-interest (ROI) studies of ten selected cerebral regions were also conducted. There were significant differences in mini mental status exam (MMSE) (AD: 16.3 ± 4.55, HC: 28.5 ± 2.00) and Alzheimer's disease assessment scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) scores (AD: 25.25 ± 9.64, HC: 5.51 ± 2.62) between the 2 groups (p < 0.001) but none in age (p = 0.068). CBF decreased significantly (p < 0.01) in AD compared to controls in the right middle cingulate, left cuneus, left inferior and middle frontal, right superior frontal, left inferior parietal, and right supramarginal gyri. ROI studies confirmed significant hemodynamic impairments in AD compared to HC (p < 0.05): CBF in middle and posterior cingulate, aBV in left superior temporal, right inferior parietal, and posterior cingulate, and aTT in left inferior frontal and middle cingulate gyri. CBF correlated positively while aTT correlated negatively to MMSE, and vice versa for ADAS-cog. Using QUASAR ASL, we found patterns of regional hemodynamic impairment typical of moderate AD, suggesting underlying vascular abnormality. As potential biomarkers, these hemodynamic parameters could differentiate patients from volunteers, and possibly indicate the conversion from healthy aging to mild cognitive impairment to AD. PMID:22504315

  11. Vascular disease modeling using induced pluripotent stem cells: Focus in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pitrez, P R; Rosa, S C; Praça, C; Ferreira, L

    2016-05-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent today an invaluable tool to create disease cell models for modeling and drug screening. Several lines of iPSCs have been generated in the last 7 years that changed the paradigm for studying diseases and the discovery of new drugs to treat them. In this article we focus our attention to vascular diseases in particular Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), a devastating premature aging disease caused by a mutation in the lamin A gene. In general, patients die because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Because the patients are fragile the isolation of a particular type of cells is very difficult. Therefore in the last 5 years, researchers have used cells derived from iPSCs to model aspects of the HGPS and to screen libraries of chemicals to retard or treat the disease. PMID:26474704

  12. Relationship between retinal vascular occlusions and incident cerebrovascular diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Wengen; Wang, Changyun

    2016-06-01

    Several studies investigating the role of retinal vascular occlusions, on cerebrovascular diseases (CVD) have been reported, but the results are still inconsistent. We therefore sought to evaluate the relationship between retinal vascular occlusions and CVD.We systematically searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and ScienceDirect databases through January 31, 2016 for studies evaluating the effect of retinal vascular occlusions on the risk of CVD. Data were abstracted using predefined criteria, and then pooled by RevMan 5.3 software.A total of 9 retrospective studies were included in this meta-analysis. When compared with individuals without retinal vascular occlusions, both individuals with retinal artery occlusion (RAO) (odds ratio [OR] = 2.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21-3.34; P = 0.005) and individuals with retinal vein occlusion (RVO) (OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.24-1.50; P < 0.00001) had higher risks of developing CVD. Additionally, both individuals with central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) (OR = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.12-3.56; P = 0.02) and branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO) (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.03-1.48; P = 0.04) were significantly associated with increased risk of CVD.Published literatures support both RVO and RAO are associated with increased risks of CVD. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27368050

  13. Spatiotemporal Dysfunction of the Vascular Permeability Barrier in Transgenic Mice with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Samit; Tan, Fang; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by chronic intravascular hemolysis that generates excess cell-free hemoglobin in the blood circulation. Hemoglobin causes multiple endothelial dysfunctions including increased vascular permeability, impaired reactivity to vasoactive agonists, and increased adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium. While the adhesive and vasomotor defects of SCD associated with cell-free hemoglobin are well defined, the vascular permeability phenotype remains poorly appreciated. We addressed this issue in two widely used and clinically relevant mouse models of SCD. We discovered that the endothelial barrier is normal in most organs in the young but deteriorates with aging particularly in the lung. Indeed, middle-aged sickle mice developed pulmonary edema revealing for the first time similarities in the chronic permeability phenotypes of the lung in mice and humans with SCD. Intravenous administration of lysed red blood cells into the circulation of sickle mice increased vascular permeability significantly in the lung without impacting permeability in other organs. Thus, increased vascular permeability is an endothelial dysfunction of SCD with the barrier in the lung likely the most vulnerable to acute inflammation. PMID:22778926

  14. Pharmacological treatment and prevention of cerebral small vessel disease: a review of potential interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Small vessel disease encompasses lacunar stroke, white matter hyperintensities, lacunes and microbleeds. It causes a quarter of all ischemic strokes, is the commonest cause of vascular dementia, and the cause is incompletely understood. Vascular prophylaxis, as appropriate for large artery disease and cardioembolism, includes antithrombotics, and blood pressure and lipid lowering; however, these strategies may not be effective for small vessel disease, or are already used routinely so precluding further detailed study. Further, intensive antiplatelet therapy is known to be hazardous in small vessel disease through enhanced bleeding. Whether acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, which delay the progression of Alzheimer's dementia, are relevant in small vessel disease remains unclear. Potential prophylactic and treatment strategies might be those that target brain microvascular endothelium and the blood brain barrier, microvascular function and neuroinflammation. Potential interventions include endothelin antagonists, neurotrophins, nitric oxide donors and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, peroxisome proliferator‐activated receptor‐gamma agonists, and prostacyclin mimics and phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitors. Several drugs that have relevant properties are licensed for other disorders, offering the possibility of drug repurposing. Others are in development. Since influencing multiple targets may be most effective, using multiple agents and/or those that have multiple effects may be preferable. We focus on potential small vessel disease mechanistic targets, summarize drugs that have relevant actions, and review data available from randomized trials on their actions and on the available evidence for their use in lacunar stroke. PMID:25727737

  15. A study on cerebral hemodynamic analysis of moyamoya disease by using perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the clinical applications of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with moyamoya disease (MMD). Twenty-two patients with moyamoya disease (9 men and 13 women) with a mean age of 9.3 years (range: 4-22 years) were enrolled in this study. Perfusion MRI was performed by scanning the patients7.5 cm upward from the base of the cerebellum before their being process for post-treatment. The scan led to the acquisition of the following four map images: the cerebral blood volume (CBV), the cerebral blood flow (CBF), the mean transit time (MTT) for the contrast medium, and the time to peak (TTP) for the contrast medium. The lesions were assessed using the CBV, the CBF, the MTT and the TTP maps of perfusion MRI; the MTT and the TTP were measured in the lesion areas, as well as in the normal and the symmetric areas. Perfusion defects were recognizable in all four perfusion MRI maps, and the MTT and the TTP showed a conspicuous delay in the parts where perfusion defects were recognized. The MTT and the TTP images of perfusion MRI reflected a significant correlation between the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), as well as the development of collateral vessels. The four perfusion MRI maps could be used to predict the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior circulation, as well as the development of the collateral vessels, which enabled a hemodynamic evaluation of the parts with perfusion defects. Overall, perfusion MRI is useful for the diagnosis and the treatment of moyamoya disease and can be applied to clinical practice.

  16. Review of the Ongoing Story of Appetite Suppressants, Serotonin Pathway, and Pulmonary Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Isabel S; Fares, Wassim H

    2016-05-15

    Obesity is pandemic in the Western Hemisphere, especially in the United States (US) and is associated with morbidity and mortality. Recent data show that a large proportion of the US population is at least overweight and almost 2 in 5 Americans are obese. This ongoing trend of increasing obesity rates has led to a thriving market for anorexigens. Despite the health benefits of weight loss, several anorexigens had devastating side effects including pulmonary vascular disease which manifests as the clinical syndrome of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). PAH is an incurable and fatal disease and is characterized by vascular constriction, hypertrophy, and proliferation that over time lead to right-sided cardiac failure. Over the past few decades, several weight loss medications have been associated with the development of PAH, possibly caused by an increase in systemic serotonin levels, resulting in vasoconstriction of the pulmonary arteries and initiating a cascade of pathologic vascular remodeling leading to vascular fibrosis. Once sufficient evidence for the association of these drugs with PAH or other related pathologies was found, many were removed from the market. However, there are other appetite suppressants still currently on the market (whether Food and Drug Administration-approved or "dietary supplements") that have to some extent similar mechanisms of action to those associated with PAH but lack robust enough data to prove or disprove an association. The serotonin pathway seems to be repeatedly implicated. In conclusion, given that PAH is a progressive and debilitating disease, it is important to highlight possible risk factors that could be avoided. PMID:27018933

  17. Vascular dysfunction and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the role of redox balance.

    PubMed

    Ives, Stephen J; Harris, Ryan A; Witman, Melissa A H; Fjeldstad, Anette S; Garten, Ryan S; McDaniel, John; Wray, D Walter; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by low pulmonary function, inflammation, free radical production, vascular dysfunction, and subsequently a greater incidence of cardiovascular disease. By administering an acute oral antioxidant cocktail to patients with COPD (n=30) and controls (n=30), we sought to determine the role of redox balance in the vascular dysfunction of these patients. Using a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design, patients with COPD and controls were ingested placebo or the antioxidant cocktail (vitamin C, vitamin E, α-lipoic acid) after which brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity were assessed using ultrasound Doppler. The patients exhibited lower baseline antioxidant levels (vitamin C and superoxide dismutase activity) and higher levels of oxidative stress (thiobarbituic acid reactive species) in comparison with controls. The patients also displayed lower basal flow-mediated dilation (P<0.05), which was significantly improved with antioxidant cocktail (3.1±0.5 versus 4.7±0.6%; P<0.05; placebo versus antioxidant cocktail), but not controls (6.7±0.6 versus 6.9±0.7%; P>0.05; placebo versus antioxidant cocktail). The antioxidant cocktail also improved pulse wave velocity in patients with COPD (14±1 versus 11±1 m·s(-1); P<0.05; placebo versus antioxidant cocktail) while not affecting controls (11±2 versus 10±1 m·s(-1); P>0.05; placebo versus antioxidant). Patients with COPD exhibit vascular dysfunction, likely mediated by an altered redox balance, which can be acutely mitigated by an oral antioxidant. Therefore, free radically mediated vascular dysfunction may be an important mechanism contributing to this population's greater risk and incidence of cardiovascular disease. PMID:24324045

  18. Memory strategy training in children with cerebral infarcts related to sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Yerys, Benjamin E; White, Desirée A; Salorio, Cynthia F; McKinstry, Robert; Moinuddin, Asif; DeBaun, Michael

    2003-06-01

    Cerebral infarcts occur in approximately 30% of children with sickle cell disease (SCD), but little information exists regarding remediation of associated cognitive deficits. The authors examined the benefits of training children with infarcts to use memory strategies. Six children with SCD-related infarcts received academic tutoring; three of these children received additional training in memory strategies (silent rehearsal to facilitate short-term memory and semantic organization to facilitate long-term memory). The performance of children receiving strategy training appeared to improve more than that of children receiving only tutoring. Memory in children with SCD-related infarcts may be enhanced through strategy training. PMID:12794531

  19. [A Case of Ruptured Peripheral Cerebral Aneurysm at Abnormal Vessels Associated with Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis:Similarity to Moyamoya Disease].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hajime; Kohno, Kanehisa; Tanaka, Hideo; Fukumoto, Shinya; Ichikawa, Haruhisa; Onoue, Shinji; Fumoto, Noriyuki; Ozaki, Saya; Maeda, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of ruptured peripheral cerebral aneurysm at abnormal vessels associated with severe stenosis at the middle cerebral artery (MCA). A 66-year-old woman was admitted at our hospital with headache on foot. Computed tomography (CT) showed intracerebral hemorrhage in the left fronto-basal area. Three-dimensional-CT and conventional angiogram revealed abnormal vessels, which were similar to those seen in moyamoya disease, with a small enhancement close to the hematoma. On day 11, subsequent cerebral angiogram demonstrated an aneurysm at the peripheral portion of an abnormal vessel arising from the left A2. On day 17, soon after the diagnosis of the ruptured aneurysm was made (while still at the subacute stage), we operated on the aneurysm. Superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA anastomosis was also performed to preserve cerebral blood flow and reduce hemodynamic stress. Several days after the operation, she had transient aphasia due to hyperperfusion of the MCA territory, but eventually recovered with no neurological deficit at discharge. Follow-up study revealed revascularization from the branches of the external carotid artery as well as the STA. On admission, we initially thought that this patient had abnormal vessels associated with arteriosclerotic MCA stenosis. However, the postoperative clinical course as well as the histopathological specimens of both the abnormal artery with the aneurysm and the STA revealed similar findings to those of moyamoya disease. Although this case did not satisfy the criteria for moyamoya disease, it is conceivable that a single arterial occlusive lesion associated with moyamoya-like vessels might develop in the same mechanism with that of moyamoya disease. PMID:27056872

  20. Clinical Outcomes of Radial Shortening Osteotomy and Vascularized Bone Graft in Kienböck's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Mohammad; Nouraei, Mohammad Hadi; Dehghani, Shaghayegh; Gholshahi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two surgery methods including radial shortening and radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft for treatment of stage II or IIIa of Kienböck's disease. It is a randomized, controlled clinical trial, which was carried out in 2011–2013. Twenty-four patients were assigned equally to radial shortening group (A) or radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft group (B). The outcome was assessed by Mayo Wrist score before and 9 months after surgery. The mean Mayo Wrist score (SD) was 27.1 (15.4) and 32.5 (18.3) before surgery and 74.6 (5.4) and 85.8 (5.1) after surgery for groups A and B, respectively. The mean score increased in both groups, and it was higher in group B significantly. Radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft is a valuable method which can be more effective than radial shortening alone, in early stages of Kienböck's disease. This trial is registered with IRCT201404127841N5.

  1. Vascularized Bone Grafts from the Dorsal Wrist for the Treatment of Kienböck Disease.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Makoto; Omokawa, Shohei; Kira, Tsutomu; Kawamura, Kenji; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The objective of this article is to evaluate functional and radiological outcomes of vascularized bone grafts for stage 2 and 3 Kienböck disease. The outcomes of three different donor sites via dorsal approach of the wrist were compared. Pearls and pitfalls in surgical technique were discussed. Methods There were 28 patients who underwent vascularized bone grafts, including the extensor fourth and fifth compartmental artery graft of distal radius in 8 patients, the first and second supraretinacular intercompartmental artery graft of distal radius in 12 patients, and the second dorsal metacarpal neck graft in 8 patients. Average age was 32 years, and radiological grading according to Lichtman classification was stage 2 in 8 patients, stage 3A in 10 patients, and stage 3B in 10 patients. Temporary pinning fixing the midcarpal joint was conducted for 10 weeks postoperatively. Results Follow-up periods averaged 70 months. Pain reduced in 27 patients, and visual analog scale for pain of pre- and postoperative level averaged 59 and 18. Range of wrist flexion and extension motion improved from 87 to 117 degrees, and average grip strength improved from 21 kg preoperatively to 33 kg postoperatively. Carpal height ratio had almost no change from 0.52 to 0.53. Fragmentation of necrotic bone healed in 7 of the 14 cases. Comparative analyses of functional and radiological outcomes between three donor sites found no significant difference. Conclusion Three different vascularized bone grafts from the dorsal wrist and hand area demonstrated favorable and comparable functional outcomes. It was technically important to elevate vascular bundle with surrounding retinaculum or fascia, to include sufficient periosteum, and to insert the vascularized bone as the cortex aligned longitudinally. PMID:27104073

  2. Prostacyclin synthesis stimulating plasma factor in patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Strobl-Jäger, E; Fitscha, P; Kaliman, J; Sinzinger, H; Peskar, B A

    1987-08-01

    Human plasma contains a factor capable of stimulating vascular prostacyclin generation even in atherosclerotic vessels with minimal in-vitro capacity for PGI2-synthesis. The activity of this prostacyclin stimulating plasma factor (PSPF) has been reported to be elevated in renal failure and hepatic coma. We are not aware of any data as to whether this PSPF plays a role in maintaining hemostatic balance in patients with peripheral vascular lesions. Therefore, we examined 62 patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD). This study group was subdivided into normo- and hyperlipemic subjects, patients with and without maturity onset diabetes, and plasma beta-thromboglobulin levels higher and lower than 50 ng/ml. 10 healthy sex and age matched persons served as controls. Vascular prostacyclin formation was studied in vitro after incubation of the patients' plasma and a buffer control with various tissue samples (human femoral artery, rat abdominal and thoracic aorta of healthy and of streptozotocin induced diabetic animals, swine endothelial layer and remaining tissue (media and adventitia) and cultured endothelial (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) of minipig arota. In addition, 6-oxo-PFG1 alpha formation by cultured EC and SMC (minipig aorta source) after incubation with tris HCl-buffer or plasma were estimated by means of specific radioimmunoassays. In general, tissue samples and cells incubated in plasma exhibit a marked increase of in-vitro PGI2-formation as compared to buffer. No difference could be found between PSPF of CHD-patients and healthy controls. Similar findings were obtained using incubated vascular tissue and cultured cells by means of the bioassay and specific RIA, respectively. These findings indicate that the PSPF does not seem to be of any clinical relevance in hemostatic regulation in patients with advanced atherosclerosis. PMID:2958884

  3. Vascular Damage in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Possible Role of Iron and Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, Giuseppina; Lombardi, Rosa; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica

    2016-01-01

    Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in Western countries. Recent data indicated that NAFLD is a risk factor by itself contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease independently of classical known risk factors. Hyperferritinemia and mild increased iron stores are frequently observed in patients with NAFLD and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the role of iron, through oxidative stress and interaction with insulin metabolism, in the development of vascular damage. Moreover, iron depletion has been shown to decrease atherogenesis in experimental models and in humans. This review presents the recent evidence on epidemiology, pathogenesis, and the possible explanation of the role of iron and ferritin in the development of cardiovascular damage in patients with NAFLD, and discusses the possible interplay between metabolic disorders associated with NAFLD and iron in the development of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27164079

  4. New Radiotracers for Imaging of Vascular Targets in Angiogenesis-related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous advances over the last several decades in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) allow for targeted imaging of molecular and cellular events in the living systems. Angiogenesis, a multistep process regulated by the network of different angiogenic factors, has attracted world-wide interests, due to its pivotal role in the formation and progression of different diseases including cancer, cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and inflammation. In this review article, we will summarize the recent progress in PET or SPECT imaging of a wide variety of vascular targets in three major angiogenesis-related diseases: cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and inflammation. Faster drug development and patient stratification for a specific therapy will become possible with the facilitation of PET or SPECT imaging and it will be critical for the maximum benefit of patients. PMID:25086372

  5. Perivascular adipose tissue in vascular function and disease: a review of current research and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Nicholas K.; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Jifeng; Zeng, Rong; Wu, Jiarui; Eitzman, Daniel T.; Chen, Y. Eugene; Chang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT), long assumed to be nothing more than vessel-supporting connective tissue, is now understood to be an important, active component of the vasculature, with integral roles in vascular health and disease. PVAT is an adipose tissue with similarities to both brown and white adipose tissue, although recent evidence suggests that PVAT develops from its own precursors. Like other adipose tissue depots, PVAT secretes numerous biologically active substances that can act in both autocrine and paracrine fashion. PVAT has also proven to be involved in vascular inflammation. While PVAT can support inflammation during atherosclerosis via macrophage accumulation, emerging evidence suggests that PVAT also has anti-atherosclerotic properties related to its abilities to induce non-shivering thermogenesis and metabolize fatty acids. We here discuss the accumulated knowledge of PVAT biology, and related research on models of hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:24833795

  6. More on Renal Salt Wasting Without Cerebral Disease: Response to Saline Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Bitew, Solomon; Imbriano, Louis; Miyawaki, Nobuyuki; Fishbane, Steven; Maesaka, John K.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: The existence and prevalence of cerebral salt wasting (CSW) or the preferred term, renal salt wasting (RSW), and its differentiation from syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) have been controversial. This controversy stems from overlapping clinical and laboratory findings and an inability to assess the volume status of these patients. The authors report another case of RSW without clinical cerebral disease and contrast it to SIADH. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Three patients with hyponatremia, hypouricemia, increased fractional excretion (FE) of urate, urine sodium >20 mmol/L, and concentrated urines were infused with isotonic saline after collection of baseline data. Results: One patient with RSW had pneumonia without cerebral disease and showed increased plasma aldosterone and FEphosphate, and two patients with SIADH had increased blood volume, low plasma renin and aldosterone, and normal FEphosphate. The patient with RSW responded to isotonic saline by excretion of dilute urines, prompt correction of hyponatremia, and normal water loading test after volume repletion. Hypouricemia and increased FEurate persisted after correction of hyponatremia. Two patients with SIADH failed to dilute their urines and remained hyponatremic during 48 and 110 h of saline infusion. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate appropriate stimulation of ADH in RSW. Differences in plasma renin and aldosterone levels and FEphosphate can differentiate RSW from SIADH, as will persistent hypouricemia and increased FEurate after correction of hyponatremia in RSW. FEphosphate was the only contrasting variable at baseline. The authors suggest an approach to treat the hyponatremic patient meeting criteria for SIADH and RSW and changing CSW to the more appropriate term, RSW. PMID:19201917

  7. New Therapeutic Approaches for Alzheimer’s Disease and Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Satoshi; Ihara, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown a strong relationship between Alzheimer’s disease (AD), cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), and cerebrovascular disease. Cognitive impairment in AD patients can result from cortical microinfarcts associated with CAA, as well as the synaptic and neuronal disturbances caused by cerebral accumulations of β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau proteins. The pathophysiology of AD may lead to a toxic chain of events consisting of Aβ overproduction, impaired Aβ clearance, and brain ischemia. Insufficient removal of Aβ leads to development of CAA and plays a crucial role in sporadic AD cases, implicating promotion of Aβ clearance as an important therapeutic strategy. Aβ is mainly eliminated by three mechanisms: (1) enzymatic/glial degradation, (2) transcytotic delivery, and (3) perivascular drainage (3-“d” mechanisms). Enzymatic degradation may be facilitated by activation of Aβ-degrading enzymes such as neprilysin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, and insulin-degrading enzyme. Transcytotic delivery can be promoted by inhibition of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), which mediates transcytotic influx of circulating Aβ into brain. Successful use of the RAGE inhibitor TTP488 in Phase II testing has led to a Phase III clinical trial for AD patients. The perivascular drainage system seems to be driven by motive force generated by cerebral arterial pulsations, suggesting that vasoactive drugs can facilitate Aβ clearance. One of the drugs promoting this system is cilostazol, a selective inhibitor of type 3 phosphodiesterase. The clearance of fluorescent soluble Aβ tracers was significantly enhanced in cilostazol-treated CAA model mice. Given that the balance between Aβ synthesis and clearance determines brain Aβ accumulation, and that Aβ is cleared by several pathways stated above, multi-drugs combination therapy could provide a mainstream cure for sporadic AD. PMID:25368578

  8. Vascular effects of phytoestrogens and alternative menopausal hormone therapy in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gencel, V B; Benjamin, M M; Bahou, S N; Khalil, R A

    2012-02-01

    Phytoestrogens are estrogenic compounds of plant origin classified into different groups including isoflavones, lignans, coumestans and stilbenes. Isoflavones such as genistein and daidzein are the most studied and most potent phytoestrogens, and are found mainly in soy based foods. The effects of phytoestrogens are partly mediated via estrogen receptors (ERs): ERα, ERβ and possibly GPER. The interaction of phytoestrogens with ERs is thought to induce both genomic and non-genomic effects in many tissues including the vasculature. Some phytoestrogens such as genistein have additional non-ER-mediated effects involving signaling pathways such as tyrosine kinase. Experimental studies have shown beneficial effects of phytoestrogens on endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle, and extracellular matrix. Phytoestrogens may also affect other pathophysiologic vascular processes such as lipid profile, angiogenesis, inflammation, tissue damage by reactive oxygen species, and these effects could delay the progression of atherosclerosis. As recent clinical trials showed no vascular benefits or even increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CV events with conventional menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), phytoestrogens are being considered as alternatives to pharmacologic MHT. Epidemiological studies in the Far East population suggest that dietary intake of phytoestrogens may contribute to the decreased incidence of postmenopausal CVD and thromboembolic events. Also, the WHO-CARDIAC study supported that consumption of high soybean diet is associated with lower mortalities from coronary artery disease. However, as with estrogen, there has been some discrepancy between the experimental studies demonstrating the vascular benefits of phytoestrogens and the data from clinical trials. This is likely because the phytoestrogens clinical trials have been limited in many aspects including the number of participants enrolled, the clinical end points investigated, and the lack of

  9. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Ali; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-09-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a clinico-radiological syndrome characterized by recurrent thunderclap headache, with or without neurologic symptoms, and reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries. RCVS affects patients in various racial and ethnic groups and in all age groups, although most commonly in the fourth decade of life. Many conditions and exposures have been linked to RCVS, including vasoactive drugs and the peripartum period. Disturbance of the cerebral vascular tone is thought to contribute to the disease's pathophysiology. RCVS generally follows a monophasic course. Associated strokes and cerebral hemorrhages are not uncommon. In this review we will attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of RCVS, with emphasis on the controversies in the field and the newest findings in the reported literature. PMID:25138149

  10. Recent Developments in Understanding Brain Aging: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Deak, Ferenc; Freeman, Willard M; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna; Sonntag, William E

    2016-01-01

    As the population of the Western world is aging, there is increasing awareness of age-related impairments in cognitive function and a rising interest in finding novel approaches to preserve cerebral health. A special collection of articles in The Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences brings together information of different aspects of brain aging, from latest developments in the field of neurodegenerative disorders to cerebral microvascular mechanisms of cognitive decline. It is emphasized that although the cellular changes that occur within aging neurons have been widely studied, more research is required as new signaling pathways are discovered that can potentially protect cells. New avenues for research targeting cellular senescence, epigenetics, and endocrine mechanisms of brain aging are also discussed. Based on the current literature it is clear that understanding brain aging and reducing risk for neurological disease with age requires searching for mechanisms and treatment options beyond the age-related changes in neuronal function. Thus, comprehensive approaches need to be developed that address the multiple, interrelated mechanisms of brain aging. Attention is brought to the importance of maintenance of cerebromicrovascular health, restoring neuroendocrine balance, and the pressing need for funding more innovative research into the interactions of neuronal, neuroendocrine, inflammatory and microvascular mechanisms of cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26590911

  11. Disordered mineral metabolism and vascular calcification in nondialyzed chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2006-04-01

    It is well established that abnormalities in mineral metabolism are apparent early in the course of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and result in clinically relevant consequences such as renal osteodystrophy. Furthermore, there is emerging evidence linking some of these abnormalities (hyperphosphatemia) to the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality experienced by nondialyzed patients with CKD. Most studies have evaluated vascular calcification in patients with stage 5 CKD. Reports published over the last 2 years show that the process begins rather early in CKD and is particularly severe among elderly and type 2 diabetic patients. Furthermore, "calcium begets calcium", such that the calcification burden in early CKD is an important predictor of subsequent progression, including the rapid increase seen in stage 5 CKD. There is an increasing body of evidence that supports the thesis that elevated serum levels of phosphorus and calcium and deficiency of inhibitors of calcification (for example, fetuin-A) are important in the progression of vascular calcification in patients with end-stage renal disease. However, the concentrations of calcium and phosphorus shown to induce mineralization in cell culture studies are not observed in most patients until late in stage 4 or stage 5 CKD. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have also been unable to show a correlation between serum levels of markers of disordered mineral metabolism and severity of vascular calcification. Future studies should evaluate the pathogenetic role of phosphorus retention, which occurs early in the course of CKD, in the induction and/or progression of vascular calcification. Finally, there is a need to identify alternative pathogenetic mechanisms that may be important causes of the high calcification burden observed early in CKD. PMID:16567266

  12. Thrombospondin-1 and CD47 Regulation of Cardiac, Pulmonary and Vascular Responses in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Natasha M.; Sharifi-Sanjani, Maryam; Csányi, Gábor; Pagano, Patrick J.; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular homeostasis and health is maintained through the balanced interactions of cardiac generated blood flow and cross-talk between the cellular components that comprise blood vessels. Central to this cross-talk is endothelial generated nitric oxide (NO) that stimulates relaxation of the contractile vascular smooth muscle (VSMC) layer of blood vessels. In cardiovascular disease this balanced interaction is disrupted and NO signaling lost. Work over the last several years indicates regulation of NO is much more complex than previously believed. It is now apparent the secreted protein thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), that is upregulated in cardiovascular disease and animal models of the same, on activating cell surface receptor CD47, redundantly inhibits NO production and NO signaling. This inhibitory event has implications for baseline and disease-related responses mediated by NO. Further work has identified that TSP1-CD47 signaling stimulates enzymatic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production to further limit blood flow and promote vascular disease. Herein consideration is given to the most recent discoveries in this regard which identify the TSP1-CD47 axis as a major proximate governor of cardiovascular health. PMID:24418252

  13. Cognitive variations among vascular dementia subtypes caused by small-, large-, or mixed-vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Jianping, Chen; Jianqing, Yuan; Shanquan, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Vascular dementia (VaD) is a heterogeneous disease that can vary in clinical presentation and cognitive profile. The cognitive profiles of different VaD subtypes depend on the anatomical distribution of the vascular insults that have been documented. Material and methods We reviewed demographic, cognitive, and imaging data in 402 patients who were clinically diagnosed with VaD between January 2002 and June 2012 at the First Affiliated Hospital of Gan Nan Medical College in Ganzhou, China. Results Based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results, patients were classified as having large- (24.1%), small- (70.4%), or mixed-vessel VaD (5.5%). Hypertension was the most prevalent risk factor (81%), followed by smoking (37%), hyperlipidemia (35%), and diabetes (27%). Hyperlipidemia, cardiac risk factors (history of cardiovascular disease, heart valve disorder) and carotid stenosis were more frequent in patients with large-vessel disease compared to those with small-vessel or mixed-vessel disease (p < 0.001). A median of 4 (maximum 11) cognitive domains were impaired in each VaD patient. After memory dysfunction, executive defects were the most prevalent (68.9%), and neurobehavioral dysfunction was the most rare (13.2%). Patients with small-vessel VaD showed more executive dysfunction than patients with large-vessel and mixed-vessel VaD (p < 0.05), whereas patients with large-vessel VaD had a higher prevalence of visuospatial or language dysfunction (p < 0.05). Conclusions The results indicate that specific subtypes and underlying vascular mechanisms will help predict clinical courses and produce more focused treatment and prevention of VaD. PMID:27478455

  14. Oxygen, a Key Factor Regulating Cell Behavior during Neurogenesis and Cerebral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuan; Zhu, Lingling; Fan, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen is vital to maintain the normal functions of almost all the organs, especially for brain which is one of the heaviest oxygen consumers in the body. The important roles of oxygen on the brain are not only reflected in the development, but also showed in the pathological processes of many cerebral diseases. In the current review, we summarized the oxygen levels in brain tissues tested by real-time measurements during the embryonic and adult neurogenesis, the cerebral diseases, or in the hyperbaric/hypobaric oxygen environment. Oxygen concentration is low in fetal brain (0.076–7.6 mmHg) and in adult brain (11.4–53.2 mmHg), decreased during stroke, and increased in hyperbaric oxygen environment. In addition, we reviewed the effects of oxygen tensions on the behaviors of neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro cultures at different oxygen concentration (15.2–152 mmHg) and in vivo niche during different pathological states and in hyperbaric/hypobaric oxygen environment. Moderate hypoxia (22.8–76 mmHg) can promote the proliferation of NSCs and enhance the differentiation of NSCs into the TH-positive neurons. Next, we briefly presented the oxygen-sensitive molecular mechanisms regulating NSCs proliferation and differentiation recently found including the Notch, Bone morphogenetic protein and Wnt pathways. Finally, the future perspectives about the roles of oxygen on brain and NSCs were given. PMID:21503147

  15. Amyloid Triggers Extensive Cerebral Angiogenesis Causing Blood Brain Barrier Permeability and Hypervascularity in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Biron, Kaan E.; Dickstein, Dara L.; Gopaul, Rayshad; Jefferies, Wilfred A.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence of reduced blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity preceding other Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology provides a strong link between cerebrovascular angiopathy and AD. However, the “Vascular hypothesis”, holds that BBB leakiness in AD is likely due to hypoxia and neuroinflammation leading to vascular deterioration and apoptosis. We propose an alternative hypothesis: amyloidogenesis promotes extensive neoangiogenesis leading to increased vascular permeability and subsequent hypervascularization in AD. Cerebrovascular integrity was characterized in Tg2576 AD model mice that overexpress the human amyloid precursor protein (APP) containing the double missense mutations, APPsw, found in a Swedish family, that causes early-onset AD. The expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins, occludin and ZO-1, were examined in conjunction with markers of apoptosis and angiogenesis. In aged Tg2576 AD mice, a significant increase in the incidence of disrupted TJs, compared to age matched wild-type littermates and young mice of both genotypes, was directly linked to an increased microvascular density but not apoptosis, which strongly supports amyloidogenic triggered hypervascularity as the basis for BBB disruption. Hypervascularity in human patients was corroborated in a comparison of postmortem brain tissues from AD and controls. Our results demonstrate that amylodogenesis mediates BBB disruption and leakiness through promoting neoangiogenesis and hypervascularity, resulting in the redistribution of TJs that maintain the barrier and thus, provides a new paradigm for integrating vascular remodeling with the pathophysiology observed in AD. Thus the extensive angiogenesis identified in AD brain, exhibits parallels to the neovascularity evident in the pathophysiology of other diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. PMID:21909359

  16. Quantitative detection of cerebral arteriosclerosis by means of the Doppler ultrasonic technique.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, M

    1986-01-01

    A correlation between the continuity of the cerebral blood flow pattern and the cerebral vascular resistance (namely, cerebral arteriosclerosis) was investigated by the Doppler ultrasonic technique. The following facts were observed. Examination of the brachial blood flow pattern in circulatory stress, i.e., hand-grasping, brachial-binding, cold- and warm-stimulating tests revealed that the more the peripheral vascular resistance was increased, the more was the discontinuity of brachial blood flow pattern increased. Investigation of the continuity of the cerebral blood flow pattern (internal carotid artery) in 18 young healthy persons and 46 elderly patients with cerebral vascular diseases revealed a continuous pattern in all of the young persons, while the discontinuous pattern was frequently observed in the elderly patients. These findings suggest that the cerebral vascular resistance is more increased in the elderly patients than in the young persons. The cerebral blood flow pattern was classified into the following three types according to the continuity of the cerebral blood flow pattern: continuous, intermediate and discontinuous type, and the relation to the Continuous Index (CI), which was devised as an objective parameter of the continuity, was examined. The following CI figures were obtained: 110-200% in the young persons; in the elderly patients: continuous type, 120-185%; intermediate type, 85-135%; discontinuous type, 50-85%. From the above findings it is postulated that the Doppler ultrasonic technique is useful for the quantitative detection of cerebral arteriosclerosis, i.e., anticipation of cerebral vascular accidents, and for the discrimination between arteriosclerotic dementia and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:3525327

  17. Assessing the cognitive impact of Alzheimer disease pathology and vascular burden in the aging brain: the Geneva experience.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; Gold, Gabriel; Kövari, Enikö; von Gunten, Armin; Imhof, Anouk; Bouras, Constantin; Hof, Patrick R

    2007-01-01

    The progressive development of Alzheimer disease (AD)-related lesions, such as neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), amyloid deposits and synaptic loss, and the occurrence of microvascular and small macrovascular pathology within the cerebral cortex are conspicuous neuropathologic features of brain aging. Recent neuropathologic studies strongly suggested that the clinical diagnosis of dementia depends more on the severity and topography of pathological changes than on the presence of a qualitative marker. However, several methodological problems, such as selection biases, case-control design, density-based measures and masking effects, of concomitant pathologies persisted. In recent years, we performed several clinicopathologic studies using stereological counting of AD lesions. In order to define the cognitive impact of lacunes and microvascular lesions, we also analyzed pure vascular cases without substantial AD pathology. Our data revealed that total NFT numbers in the CA1 field, cortical microinfarcts and subcortical gray matter lacunes were the stronger determinants of dementia. In contrast, the contribution of periventricular and subcortical white matter demyelinations had a modest cognitive effect even in rare cases with isolated microvascular pathology. Importantly, in cases with pure AD pathology, more than 50% of Clinical Dementia Rating scale variability was not explained by NFT, amyloid deposits and neuronal loss in the hippocampal formation. In cases with microvascular pathology or lacunes, this percentage was even lower. The present review summarizes our data in this field and discusses their relevance within the theoretical framework of the functional neuropathology of brain aging and with particular reference to the current efforts to develop standardized neuropathological criteria for mixed dementia. PMID:17036244

  18. Alterations of the vascular basal lamina in the cerebral cortex in drug abuse: a combined morphometric and immunohistochemical investigation.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Andreas; Kroehling, Claus; Mall, Gita; Penning, Randolph; Weis, Serge

    2005-07-01

    In drug abusers, white matter hyperintensities, perfusion deficits, and metabolic disturbances are detected by neuroimaging analyses in different brain regions. A specific pattern of involvement or a predominance of a specific brain region cannot be drawn. To examine changes of the cerebral microvasculature as a possible morphological substrate of the neuroimaging findings, brain specimens of 12 polydrug abusers and 8 controls were obtained at autopsy. The basal lamina of blood vessels from the frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes was analysed by means of immunohistochemistry for collagen type IV. The numerical density of vessels was determined in the gray and white matter, and their staining intensity was rated using a three-point scale. In the gray and white matter of polydrug abusers, the number of vessels showing strong immunoreactivity for collagen type IV was significantly reduced, whereas the number of vessels with mild and moderate immunoreactivity was increased as compared to controls. The total numerical density of vessels was not significantly changed. Our results show a significant reduction in immunoreactivity for collagen type IV in the brains from polydrug abusers compared to controls, which may be due to a thinning of the basal lamina of cerebral vessels. The data of the present study show morphological changes of the basal lamina in the brain of polydrug abusers, which might represent the morphological substrate of a disturbed blood-brain barrier. However, it remains yet to be established if the observed changes are responsible for the alterations seen in different neuroimaging analyses and which drug might be of major pathogenetic significance. PMID:15943945

  19. Clinical and haematological risk factors for cerebral macrovasculopathy in a sickle cell disease newborn cohort: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Sommet, Julie; Alberti, Corinne; Couque, Nathalie; Verlhac, Suzanne; Haouari, Zinedine; Mohamed, Damir; François, Martine; Missud, Florence; Holvoet, Laurent; Elmaleh, Monique; Ithier, Ghislaine; Denjean, André; Elion, Jacques; Baruchel, André; Benkerrou, Malika

    2016-03-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) have a significant vascular morbidity, especially cerebral macrovasculopathy (CV), detectable by transcranial Doppler. This study aimed to identify risk factors for CV using longitudinal biological and clinical data in a SCD newborn cohort followed at the Robert Debre Reference centre (n = 375 SS/Sβ(0) ). Median follow-up was 6·8 years (2677 patient-years). Among the 59 children presenting with CV, seven had a stroke. Overall, the incidence of CV was 2·20/100 patient-years [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1·64-2·76] and the incidence of stroke was 0·26/100 patient-years (95% CI: 0·07-0·46). The cumulative risk of CV by age 14 years was 26·0% (95% CI: 20·0-33·3%). Risk factors for CV were assessed by a Cox model encompassing linear multivariate modelling of longitudinal quantitative variables. Years per upper-airway obstruction [Hazard ratio (HR) = 1·47; 95% CI: 1·05-2·06] or bronchial obstruction (HR = 1·76; 95% CI: 1·49-2·08) and reticulocyte count (HR = 1·82 per 50 × 10(9) /l increase; 95% CI: 1·10-3·01) were independent risk factors whereas fetal haemoglobin level (HR = 0·68 per 5% increase; 95% CI: 0·48-0·96) was protective. Alpha-thalassaemia was not protective in multivariate analysis (ancillary analysis n = 209). Specific treatment for upper or lower-airway obstruction and indirect targeting of fetal haemoglobin and reticulocyte count by hydroxycarbamide could potentially reduce the risk of CV. PMID:26728571

  20. Neurologic disease induced in transgenic mice by cerebral overexpression of interleukin 6.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, I L; Abraham, C R; Masliah, E; Kemper, P; Inglis, J D; Oldstone, M B; Mucke, L

    1993-01-01

    Cytokines are thought to be important mediators in physiologic and pathophysiologic processes affecting the central nervous system (CNS). To explore this hypothesis, transgenic mice were generated in which the cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6), under the regulatory control of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene promoter, was overexpressed in the CNS. A number of transgenic founder mice and their offspring exhibited a neurologic syndrome the severity of which correlated with the levels of cerebral IL-6 expression. Transgenic mice with high levels of IL-6 expression developed severe neurologic disease characterized by runting, tremor, ataxia, and seizure. Neuropathologic manifestations included neuro-degeneration, astrocytosis, angiogenesis, and induction of acute-phase-protein production. These findings indicate that cytokines such as IL-6 can have a direct pathogenic role in inflammatory, infectious, and neurodegenerative CNS diseases. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7694279

  1. Reduced Numbers of Somatostatin Receptors in the Cerebral Cortex in Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint Beal, M.; Mazurek, Michael F.; Tran, Vinh T.; Chattha, Geetinder; Bird, Edward D.; Martin, Joseph B.

    1985-07-01

    Somatostatin receptor concentrations were measured in patients with Alzheimer's disease and controls. In the frontal cortex (Brodmann areas 6, 9, and 10) and temporal cortex (Brodmann area 21), the concentrations of somatostatin in receptors in the patients were reduced to approximately 50 percent of control values. A 40 percent reduction was seen in the hippocampus, while no significant changes were found in the cingulate cortex, postcentral gyrus, temporal pole, and superior temporal gyrus. Scatchard analysis showed a reduction in receptor number rather than a change in affinity. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity was significantly reduced in both the frontal and temporal cortex. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity was linearly related to somatostatin-receptor binding in the cortices of Alzheimer's patients. These findings may reflect degeneration of postsynaptic neurons or cortical afferents in the patients' cerebral cortices. Alternatively, decreased somatostatinlike immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease might indicate increased release of somatostatin and down regulation of postsynaptic receptors.

  2. Epidemiology and Risk Factors of Cerebral Ischemia and Ischemic Heart Diseases: Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Ernest Palomeras; Ruiz, Virgina Casado

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia and ischemic heart diseases, common entities nowadays, are the main manifestation of circulatory diseases. Cardiovascular diseases, followed by stroke, represent the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Both entities share risk factors, pathophisiology and etiologic aspects by means of a main common mechanism, atherosclerosis. However, each entity has its own particularities. Ischemic stroke shows a variety of pathogenic mechanisms not present in ischemic heart disease. An ischemic stroke increases the risk of suffering a coronary heart disease, and viceversa. The aim of this chapter is to review data on epidemiology, pathophisiology and risk factors for both entities, considering the differences and similarities that could be found in between them. We discuss traditional risk factors, obtained from epidemiological data, and also some novel ones, such as hyperhomocisteinemia or sleep apnea. We separate risk factors, as clasically, in two groups: nonmodifiables, which includes age, sex, or ethnicity, and modifiables, including hypertension, dyslipidemia or diabetis, in order to discuss the role of each factor in both ischemic events, ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease. PMID:21804773

  3. Specific binding of a mutated fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin to endothelial claudin-5 and its modulation of cerebral vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhuangbin; Yang, Zhenguo; Piontek, Anna; Eichner, Miriam; Krause, Gerd; Li, Longxuan; Piontek, Joerg; Zhang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The vertebrate blood-brain barrier (BBB) creates an obstacle for central nervous system-related drug delivery. Claudin-5 (Cldn5), expressed in large quantities in BBB, plays a vital role in restricting BBB permeability. The C-terminal domain of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (cCPE) has been verified as binding to a subset of claudins (Cldns). The Cldn5-binding cCPE194-319 variant cCPEY306W/S313H was applied in this study to investigate its ability to modulate the permeability of zebrafish larval BBB. In vitro results showed that cCPEY306W/S313H is able to bind specifically to Cldn5 in murine brain vascular endothelial (bEnd.3) cells, and is transported along with Cldn5 from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm, which in turn results in a reduction in transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER). Conversely, this effect can be reversed by removal of cCPEY306W/S313H. In an in vivo experiment, this study estimates the capability of cCPEY306W/S313H to modulate Cldn5 using a rhodamine B-Dextran dye diffusion assay in zebrafish larval BBB. The results show that cCPEY306W/S313H co-localized with Cldn5 in zebrafish cerebral vascular cells and modulated BBB permeability, resulting in dye leakage. Taken together, this study suggests that cCPEY306W/S313H has the capability - both in vitro and in vivo - to modulate BBB permeability temporarily by specific binding to Cldn5. PMID:27095710

  4. Effect of the α(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine on vascular regulation of the middle cerebral artery and the ophthalmic artery in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kaya, S; Kolodjaschna, J; Berisha, F; Polska, E; Pemp, B; Garhöfer, G; Schmetterer, L

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence that vascular beds distal to the ophthalmic artery (OA) show vasoconstriction in response to a step decrease in systemic blood pressure (BP). The mediators of this response are mostly unidentified. The aim of the current study was to test the hypothesis that α2-adrenoreceptors may contribute to the regulatory process in response to a decrease in BP. In this randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled study 14 healthy male volunteers received either 22mg yohimbine hydrochloride or placebo. Beat-to-beat BP was measured by analysis of arterial pressure waveform; blood flow velocities in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the OA were measured with Doppler ultrasound. Measurements were done before, during and after a step decrease in BP. The step decrease in BP was induced by bilateral thigh cuffs at a suprasystolic pressure followed by a rapid cuff deflation. After cuff deflation, BP returned to baseline after 7-8 pulse cycles (PC). Blood velocities in the MCA returned to baseline earlier (4 PC) than BP indicating peripheral vasodilatation. Blood velocities in the OA returned to baseline later (15-20 PC) indicating peripheral vasoconstriction. Yohimbine did not affect the blood velocity response in the MCA, but significantly shortened the time of OA blood velocities to return to baseline values (6-7 PC, p<0.05). In conclusion, our results indicate that yohimbine did not alter the regulatory response in the MCA, but modified the response of vascular beds distal to the OA. This suggests that α2-adrenoceptors play a role in the vasoconstrictor response of the vasculatures distal to the OA. PMID:20934440

  5. Verbal memory impairment in subcortical ischemic vascular disease: a descriptive analysis in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Epelbaum, S; Benisty, S; Reyes, S; O'Sullivan, M; Jouvent, E; Düring, M; Hervé, D; Opherk, C; Hernandez, K; Kurtz, A; Viswanathan, A; Bousser, M G; Dichgans, M; Chabriat, H

    2011-12-01

    In the elderly, the high prevalence of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology presents a major challenge to the investigation of memory decline in common diseases such as small vessel disease. CADASIL represents a unique clinical model to determine the spectrum of memory impairment in subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD). One hundred and forty CADASIL patients underwent detailed clinical, neuropsychological and imaging analyses. The Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test was used as a measure of verbal memory. Forty-four out of 140 CADASIL patients (31.4%) presented with memory impairment according to this test. Eight out of 44 (18.2%) subjects with memory impairment matched the definition of the amnestic syndrome of hippocampal type. While alterations in spontaneous recall were related to the severity of subcortical ischemic lesions, the profile of memory impairment, particularly the sensitivity to cueing was found related to other factors such as hippocampal atrophy. PMID:20149485

  6. Early Pulmonary Vascular Disease in Preterm Infants at Risk for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Marci K.; Younoszai, Adel; Miller, Joshua I.; Kinsella, John P.; Baker, Christopher D.; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Ingram, David A.; Abman, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with poor outcomes among preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), but whether early signs of pulmonary vascular disease are associated with the subsequent development of BPD or PH at 36 weeks post-menstrual age (PMA) is unknown. Objectives: To prospectively evaluate the relationship of early echocardiogram signs of pulmonary vascular disease in preterm infants to the subsequent development of BPD and late PH (at 36 wk PMA). Methods: Prospectively enrolled preterm infants with birthweights 500–1,250 g underwent echocardiogram evaluations at 7 days of age (early) and 36 weeks PMA (late). Clinical and echocardiographic data were analyzed to identify early risk factors for BPD and late PH. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 277 preterm infants completed echocardiogram and BPD assessments at 36 weeks PMA. The median gestational age at birth and birthweight of the infants were 27 weeks and 909 g, respectively. Early PH was identified in 42% of infants, and 14% were diagnosed with late PH. Early PH was a risk factor for increased BPD severity (relative risk, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.03–1.23) and late PH (relative risk, 2.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.28–6.33). Infants with late PH had greater duration of oxygen therapy and increased mortality in the first year of life (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Early pulmonary vascular disease is associated with the development of BPD and with late PH in preterm infants. Echocardiograms at 7 days of age may be a useful tool to identify infants at high risk for BPD and PH. PMID:25389562

  7. Sequestration of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Induces Late Restrictive Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wieck, Minna M.; Spurrier, Ryan G.; Levin, Daniel E.; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Hiatt, Michael J.; Reddy, Raghava; Hou, Xiaogang; Navarro, Sonia; Lee, Jooeun; Lundin, Amber; Driscoll, Barbara; Grikscheit, Tracy C.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome is a restrictive lung disease characterized by surfactant deficiency. Decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which demonstrates important roles in angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of restrictive lung diseases. Current animal models investigating VEGF in the etiology and outcomes of RDS require premature delivery, hypoxia, anatomically or temporally limited inhibition, or other supplemental interventions. Consequently, little is known about the isolated effects of chronic VEGF inhibition, started at birth, on subsequent developing lung structure and function. Objectives To determine whether inducible, mesenchyme-specific VEGF inhibition in the neonatal mouse lung results in long-term modulation of AECII and whole lung function. Methods Triple transgenic mice expressing the soluble VEGF receptor sFlt-1 specifically in the mesenchyme (Dermo-1/rtTA/sFlt-1) were generated and compared to littermate controls at 3 months to determine the impact of neonatal downregulation of mesenchymal VEGF expression on lung structure, cell composition and function. Reduced tissue VEGF bioavailability has previously been demonstrated with this model. Measurements and Main Results Triple transgenic mice demonstrated restrictive lung pathology. No differences in gross vascular development or protein levels of vascular endothelial markers was noted, but there was a significant decrease in perivascular smooth muscle and type I collagen. Mutants had decreased expression levels of surfactant protein C and hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha without a difference in number of type II pneumocytes. Conclusions These data show that mesenchyme-specific inhibition of VEGF in neonatal mice results in late restrictive disease, making this transgenic mouse a novel model for future investigations on the consequences of neonatal RDS and potential interventions. PMID:26863115

  8. Impact of Sex Hormone Metabolism on the Vascular Effects of Menopausal Hormone Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Durr-e-Nayab; Roach, Emir C.; Beauregard, Katie G.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in pre-menopausal women (Pre-MW) compared to men of the same age or post-menopausal women (Post-MW), suggesting cardiovascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen receptors (ERs) have been identified in the vasculature, and experimental studies have demonstrated vasodilator effects of estrogen/ER on the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and extracellular matrix. Several natural and synthetic estrogenic preparations have been developed for relief of menopausal vasomotor symptoms. However, whether menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) is beneficial in postmenopausal CVD remains controversial. Despite reports of vascular benefits of MHT from observational and experimental studies, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS) and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), have suggested that, contrary to expectations, MHT may increase the risk of CVD. These discrepancies could be due to age-related changes in sex hormone synthesis and metabolism, which would influence the effective dose of MHT and the sex hormone environment in Post-MW. Age-related changes in the vascular ER subtype, structure, expression, distribution, and post-ER signaling pathways in the endothelium and VSM, along with factors related to the design of RCTs, preexisting CVD condition, and structural changes in the blood vessels architecture have also been suggested as possible causes of MHT failure in CVD. Careful examination of these factors should help in identifying the causes of the changes in the vascular effects of estrogen with age. The sex hormone metabolic pathways, the active versus inactive estrogen metabolites, and their effects on vascular function, the mitochondria, the inflammatory process and angiogenesis should be further examined. Also, the genomic and non-genomic effects of estrogenic compounds should be viewed as integrated rather than discrete

  9. The resistance-compliance product of the pulmonary circulation varies in health and pulmonary vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hadinnapola, Charaka; Li, Qiuju; Su, Li; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Toshner, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) is traditionally used to describe pulmonary hemodynamic characteristics. However, it does not take into account pulmonary artery compliance (Ca) or pulsatile flow. The product of PVR and Ca is known as RC time. Previous studies assert that the PVR-Ca relationship is fixed and RC time is constant between health and disease states. We hypothesized that RC time was not constant in health and pulmonary vascular disease. Right heart catheterizations performed in Papworth Hospital over a 6 year period were analyzed. Subjects were divided into those with normal pulmonary hemodynamics (NPH group; n = 156) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH group; n = 717). RC time and the right ventricle (RV) oscillatory power fraction were calculated. RC time for the NPH group (0.47 ± 0.13 sec) is significantly lower than the PAH group (0.56 ± 0.16 sec; P < 0.0001). The RV oscillatory power fraction is lower in the NPH group (P < 0.0001). RC time correlates inversely with the RV oscillatory power fraction in each group. We conclude, there is an inverse relationship between PVR and Ca, however, this relationship is not always fixed. Consequently, RC time is significantly lower in health compared to disease with elevated pulmonary artery pressures. PAH leads to a decrease in cardiac efficiency. PMID:25902784

  10. Colectomy in patients with previous colectomy or occlusive vascular diseases: Pitfalls and precautions.

    PubMed

    Prevot, F; Sabbagh, C; Mauvais, F; Regimbeau, J-M

    2016-04-01

    Two principal branches from the aorta provide the colonic blood supply: the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries. There are numerous anatomical variations, which the surgeon must fully understand before embarking on any colonic surgery. A good knowledge of these variations is particularly important when the patient has already undergone colectomy or presents with occlusive vascular disease. The aim of this review is to summarize the standard anatomy and the main variations of the colonic blood supply as they apply to colorectal surgery in this setting. PMID:27009920

  11. Clinical evaluation of a near-infrared tissue spectrometer in peripheral vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xuefeng; Mao, Jian-Min; Xu, Xiaorong; Elmandjra, Mohamed; Bush, Robin; Christenson, Linda; O'Keefe, Bill; Bry, John

    2003-07-01

    We report results of a feasibility clinical evaluation of the near-infrared Photonify Tissue Spectrometer in detection of peripheral vascular disease (PVD). In the evaluation, using a blood pressured cuff, we measure changes in oxygen saturation (StO2) during a temporary occlusion of blood inflow. We use the post-occlusive StO2 recovery rate and the time needed for 80% recovery as parameters to differentiate healthy subjects from subjects with PVD, and obtained high diagnostic accuracy in 19 subjects enrolled in the clinical evaluation. This may suggest that the tissue spectrometer could be useful in diagnosis of PVD.

  12. The cell cycle: A critical therapeutic target to prevent vascular proliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Thierry; Nili, Nafiseh; Strauss, Bradley H

    2006-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention is the preferred revascularization approach for most patients with coronary artery disease. However, this strategy is limited by renarrowing of the vessel by neointimal hyperplasia within the stent lumen (in-stent restenosis). Vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation is a major component in this healing process. This process is mediated by multiple cytokines and growth factors, which share a common pathway in inducing cell proliferation: the cell cycle. The cell cycle is highly regulated by numerous mechanisms ensuring orderly and coordinated cell division. The present review discusses current concepts related to regulation of the cell cycle and new therapeutic options that target aspects of the cell cycle. PMID:16498512

  13. [Hyperhomocysteinemia: an independent risk factor or a simple marker of vascular disease?. 1. Basic data].

    PubMed

    Guilland, J-C; Favier, A; Potier de Courcy, G; Galan, P; Hercberg, S

    2003-03-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with increased risk of vascular disease. Homocysteine is a sulphur-containing amino acid whose metabolism stands at the intersection of two pathways: remethylation to methionine, which requires folate and vitamin B12 (or betaine in an alternative reaction); and transsulfuration to cystathionine which requires vitamin B6. The two pathways are coordinated by S-adenosylmethionine which acts as an allosteric inhibitor of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and as an activator of cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS). Hyperhomocysteinemia arises from disrupted homocysteine metabolism. Severe hyperhomocysteinemia is due to rare genetic defects resulting in deficiencies in CBS, MTHFR, or in enzymes involved in methyl cobalamine synthesis and homocysteine methylation. Mild hyperhomocysteinemia seen in fasting condition is due to mild impairment in the methylation pathway (i.e. folate or B12 deficiencies or MTHFR thermolability). Post-methionine-load hyperhomocysteinaemia may be due to heterozygous cystathionine-beta-synthase defect or B6 deficiency. Patients with homocystinuria and severe hyperhomocysteinemia develop arterial thrombotic events, venous thromboembolism, and more seldom premature arteriosclerosis. Experimental evidence suggests that an increased concentration of homocysteine may result in vascular changes through several mechanisms. High levels of homocysteine induce sustained injury of arterial endothelial cells, proliferation of arterial smooth muscle cells and enhance expression/activity of key participants in vascular inflammation, atherogenesis, and vulnerability of the established atherosclerotic plaque. These effects are supposed to be mediated through its oxidation and the concomitant production of reactive oxygen species. Other effects of homocysteine include: impaired generation and decreased bioavailability of endothelium-derived relaxing factor

  14. Correlations of lung morphology, pulmonary vascular resistance, and outcome in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bush, A; Busst, C M; Haworth, S G; Hislop, A A; Knight, W B; Corrin, B; Shinebourne, E A

    1988-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular resistance was measured in air, oxygen, and after administration of vasodilators in 14 children with pulmonary hypertension and congenital heart disease. Lung morphology was examined by light microscopy and assessed quantitatively. In this selected group of patients (a) medial muscle thickness of greater than 20% in the intra-acinar arteries and Heath-Edwards changes of I or II were significantly associated with perioperative death from pulmonary complications after cardiac surgery; (b) children with lower percentage medial muscle thickness had a higher baseline resistance (r = -0.84) associated with Heath-Edwards grade III or higher changes (most of these patients were not offered corrective surgery); (c) when the lowest pulmonary vascular resistance was less than 3 units, Heath-Edwards grading was I or II (n = 4). When the pulmonary vascular resistance was greater than 6 units, however, there was no direct correlation with Heath-Edwards grading (n = 9). Four patients with a resistance of greater than 6 units had only grade I or II changes. Three had a medial muscle thickness above 20%, and were among those who died at or soon after operation. It is concluded that (a) patients with a lowest pulmonary vascular resistance of greater than 6 units have a bad prognosis whatever their lung morphology; and (b) some patients with Heath-Edwards grade I or II will have a high resistance (this group has a high medial muscle mass and a poor prognosis and would not be detected by Heath-Edwards grading alone). PMID:3370183

  15. Reproducibility and variability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging markers in cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    De Guio, François; Jouvent, Eric; Biessels, Geert Jan; Black, Sandra E; Brayne, Carol; Chen, Christopher; Cordonnier, Charlotte; De Leeuw, Frank-Eric; Dichgans, Martin; Doubal, Fergus; Duering, Marco; Dufouil, Carole; Duzel, Emrah; Fazekas, Franz; Hachinski, Vladimir; Ikram, M Arfan; Linn, Jennifer; Matthews, Paul M; Mazoyer, Bernard; Mok, Vincent; Norrving, Bo; O'Brien, John T; Pantoni, Leonardo; Ropele, Stefan; Sachdev, Perminder; Schmidt, Reinhold; Seshadri, Sudha; Smith, Eric E; Sposato, Luciano A; Stephan, Blossom; Swartz, Richard H; Tzourio, Christophe; van Buchem, Mark; van der Lugt, Aad; van Oostenbrugge, Robert; Vernooij, Meike W; Viswanathan, Anand; Werring, David; Wollenweber, Frank; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Chabriat, Hugues

    2016-08-01

    Brain imaging is essential for the diagnosis and characterization of cerebral small vessel disease. Several magnetic resonance imaging markers have therefore emerged, providing new information on the diagnosis, progression, and mechanisms of small vessel disease. Yet, the reproducibility of these small vessel disease markers has received little attention despite being widely used in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. This review focuses on the main small vessel disease-related markers on magnetic resonance imaging including: white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, dilated perivascular spaces, microbleeds, and brain volume. The aim is to summarize, for each marker, what is currently known about: (1) its reproducibility in studies with a scan-rescan procedure either in single or multicenter settings; (2) the acquisition-related sources of variability; and, (3) the techniques used to minimize this variability. Based on the results, we discuss technical and other challenges that need to be overcome in order for these markers to be reliably used as outcome measures in future clinical trials. We also highlight the key points that need to be considered when designing multicenter magnetic resonance imaging studies of small vessel disease. PMID:27170700

  16. Cerebral White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Smith, Eric E.; Eichler, Florian S.; Filley, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of the cerebral white matter (WM) result in focal neurobehavioral syndromes, neuropsychiatric phenomena, and dementia. The cerebral WM contains fiber pathways that convey axons linking cerebral cortical areas with each other and with subcortical structures, facilitating the distributed neural circuits that subserve sensorimotor function, intellect, and emotion. Recent neuroanatomical investigations reveal that these neural circuits are topographically linked by five groupings of fiber tracts emanating from every neocortical area: (1) cortico-cortical association fibers; (2) corticostriatal fibers; (3) commissural fibers; and cortico-subcortical pathways to (4) thalamus and (5) pontocerebellar system, brain stem, and/or spinal cord. Lesions of association fibers prevent communication between cortical areas engaged in different domains of behavior. Lesions of subcortical structures or projection/striatal fibers disrupt the contribution of subcortical nodes to behavior. Disconnection syndromes thus result from lesions of the cerebral cortex, subcortical structures, and WM tracts that link the nodes that make up the distributed circuits. The nature and the severity of the clinical manifestations of WM lesions are determined, in large part, by the location of the pathology: discrete neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms result from focal WM lesions, whereas cognitive impairment across multiple domains—WM dementia—occurs in the setting of diffuse WM disease. We present a detailed review of the conditions affecting WM that produce these neurobehavioral syndromes, and consider the pathophysiology, clinical effects, and broad significance of the effects of aging and vascular compromise on cerebral WM, in an attempt to help further the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of these disorders. PMID:18990132

  17. An RNA-Sequencing Transcriptome and Splicing Database of Glia, Neurons, and Vascular Cells of the Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kenian; Sloan, Steven A.; Bennett, Mariko L.; Scholze, Anja R.; O'Keeffe, Sean; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Guarnieri, Paolo; Caneda, Christine; Ruderisch, Nadine; Deng, Shuyun; Liddelow, Shane A.; Zhang, Chaolin; Daneman, Richard; Maniatis, Tom; Barres, Ben A.

    2014-01-01

    The major cell classes of the brain differ in their developmental processes, metabolism, signaling, and function. To better understand the functions and interactions of the cell types that comprise these classes, we acutely purified representative populations of neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocyte precursor cells, newly formed oligodendrocytes, myelinating oligodendrocytes, microglia, endothelial cells, and pericytes from mouse cerebral cortex. We generated a transcriptome database for these eight cell types by RNA sequencing and used a sensitive algorithm to detect alternative splicing events in each cell type. Bioinformatic analyses identified thousands of new cell type-enriched genes and splicing isoforms that will provide novel markers for cell identification, tools for genetic manipulation, and insights into the biology of the brain. For example, our data provide clues as to how neurons and astrocytes differ in their ability to dynamically regulate glycolytic flux and lactate generation attributable to unique splicing of PKM2, the gene encoding the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase. This dataset will provide a powerful new resource for understanding the development and function of the brain. To ensure the widespread distribution of these datasets, we have created a user-friendly website (http://web.stanford.edu/group/barres_lab/brain_rnaseq.html) that provides a platform for analyzing and comparing transciption and alternative splicing profiles for various cell classes in the brain. PMID:25186741

  18. Regional Alterations in Cerebral Growth Exist Pre-operatively in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ortinau, Cynthia; Beca, John; Lambeth, Jennifer; Ferdman, Barbara; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Shimony, Joshua S.; Wallendorf, Michael; Neil, Jeffrey; Inder, Terrie

    2011-01-01

    Objective Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has defined neurologic abnormalities in infants with congenital heart disease (CHD) including pre-operative injury and delayed brain maturation. This study utilized qualitative scoring, cerebral biometry, and diffusion imaging to characterize pre-operative brain abnormalities in infants with CHD, including the identification of regions of greater vulnerability. Methods Sixty-seven infants with CHD had pre-operative MRI with analysis for brain injury by qualitative scoring and brain development by qualitative scoring, metrics and diffusion imaging. Results Qualitative abnormalities were common, with 42% of infants having pre-operative focal white matter lesions. Infants with CHD had smaller brain measures in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, cerebellum and brainstem (p<.001); with the frontal lobe and brainstem displaying the greatest alterations (p<.001). Smaller brain size in the frontal and parietal lobes correlated with delayed white matter microstructure reflected by diffusion imaging. Conclusion Infants with CHD commonly display brain injury and delayed brain development. Regional alterations in brain size are present, with the frontal lobe and brainstem demonstrating the greatest alterations, which may reflect a combination of developmental vulnerability and regional differences in cerebral circulation. PMID:22143100

  19. Risk factor analysis of cerebral white matter hyperintensities in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    van der Land, Veronica; Mutsaerts, Henri J M M; Engelen, Marc; Heijboer, Harriët; Roest, Mark; Hollestelle, Martine J; Kuijpers, Taco W; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Cnossen, Marjon H; Majoie, Charles B L M; Nederveen, Aart J; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is complicated by silent cerebral infarcts, visible as white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both local vaso-occlusion, elicited by endothelial dysfunction, and insufficiency of cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been proposed to be involved in the aetiology. We performed an explorative study to investigate the associations between WMHs and markers of endothelial dysfunction and CBF by quantifying WMH volume on 3.0 Tesla MRI. We included 40 children with HbSS or HbSβ(0) thalassaemia, with a mean age of 12.1 ± 2.6 years. Boys demonstrated an increased risk for WMHs (odds ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval 1.2-17.4), unrelated to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. In patients with WMHs, lower fetal haemoglobin (HbF) was associated with a larger WMH volume (regression coefficient = -0.62, R2 = 0.5, P = 0.04). Lower ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13) levels were associated with lower CBF in the white matter (regression coefficient = 0.07, R2 = 0.15, P = 0.03), suggesting that endothelial dysfunction could potentially hamper CBF. The findings of our explorative study suggest that a high level of HbF may be protective for WMHs and that endothelial dysfunction may contribute to the development of WMHs by reducing CBF. PMID:26492630

  20. Lhermitte-Duclos disease with neurofibrillary tangles in heterotopic cerebral grey matter.

    PubMed

    Rusiecki, D; Lach, B

    2016-01-01

    Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD), a disorder first described by French physicians Lhermitte and Duclos in 1920 [25], is a benign, slow growing dysplastic gangliocytoma of the cerebellum, characterized by replacement of the granule cell layer by abnormal granule and Purkinje like cells. The most frequent presenting signs and symptoms are megalocephaly, increased intracranial pressure, nausea, hydrocephalus, ataxia, gait abnormalities, and intermittent headaches, all of which are attributed to the mass effect [6,11,25]. Many cases are associated with a mutation in the phosphatase and tensin homolog or PTEN gene which is also involved in numerous otherwise unrelated central nervous system abnormalities, namely Cowden syndrome [1,6,11], autism spectrum disorder [18], cerebral cortical dysplasia [11,30] and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome [30]. The presence of cortical heterotopia has been reported in a small number of LDD cases [3,5,17,32]. We describe a unique case of LDD with cerebral cortical heterotopic grey matter containing neurofibrillary tangles. PMID:27543776

  1. Reduced regional cerebral blood flow in Huntington's disease studied by SPECT.

    PubMed Central

    Hasselbalch, S G; Oberg, G; Sørensen, S A; Andersen, A R; Waldemar, G; Schmidt, J F; Fenger, K; Paulson, O B

    1992-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied in 18 patients with Huntington's disease (HD) and 19 age- and sex-matched controls with high resolution single photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT), using Tc-99m-HMPAO. Significant reductions in tracer uptake were found in the caudate and lentiform nuclei (20 and 8%) and in the cerebral cortex, especially in the frontal and parietal areas (11-13%). No significant reductions were found in the thalamus, mesial temporal cortex, and occipital cortex. Fourteen patients had neuropsychological testing. Relationship between rCBF and cognitive function was tested by regression analysis. A linear relationship was found between test scores of Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Picture Arrangement Test and blood flow in the caudate nucleus. Other tests of cognitive function (Block Design Test, Face and Word Recognition Test, Street Fragmented Pictures Test, and Similarities Test) correlated better with flow in the cortical regions believed to be involved in solving those particular tests. These findings indicate, that blood flow is reduced in both cortical and subcortical structures in symptomatic HD, and that both reductions in cortical and subcortical blood flow may be related to cognitive function in HD. Images PMID:1469396

  2. Evidence for the absence of cerebral glucose-6-phosphatase activity in glycogen storage disease type I (Von Gierke's disease)

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Hawkins, R.A.; Philippart, M.

    1981-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) is characterized by a functional deficit in glucose-6-phosphatase that normally hydrolyzes glucose-6-PO/sub 4/ to glucose. This enzyme is primarily found in liver, kidney, and muscle but it is also present in brain, where it appears to participate in the regulation of cerebral tissue glucose. Since most neurological symptoms in GSD-I patients involve systemic hypoglycemia, previous reports have not examined possible deficiencies in phosphatase activity in the brain. Positron computed tomography, F-18-labeled 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and a tracer kinetic model for FDG were used to measure the cortical plasma/tissue forward and reverse transport, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation rate constants, tissue/plasma concentration gradient, tissue concentration turnover rate for this competitive analog of glucose, and the cortical metabolic rates for glucose. Studies were carried out in age-matched normals (N = 13) and a single GSD-I patient. The dephosphorylation rate constant in the GSD-I patient was about one tenth the normal value indicating a low level of cerebral phosphatase activity. The other measured parameters were within normal limits except for the rate of glucose phosphorylation which reflected a cortical glucose metabolic rate one half the normal value. Since glucose transport and tissue glucose concentration was normal, the reduced cortical glucose metabolism probably results from the use of alternative substrates (..beta..-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate) which are consistently elevated in the plasma of GSD-I patients.

  3. Circulating Progenitor Cells and Vascular Dysfunction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Sandra; García-Lucio, Jéssica; Peinado, Víctor I.; Tura-Ceide, Olga; Díez, Marta; Blanco, Isabel; Sitges, Marta; Petriz, Jordi; Torralba, Yolanda; Marín, Pedro; Roca, Josep; Barberà, Joan Albert

    2014-01-01

    Background In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), decreased progenitor cells and impairment of systemic vascular function have been suggested to confer higher cardiovascular risk. The origin of these changes and their relationship with alterations in the pulmonary circulation are unknown. Objectives To investigate whether changes in the number of circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells are associated with pulmonary hypertension or changes in endothelial function. Methods 62 COPD patients and 35 controls (18 non-smokers and 17 smokers) without cardiovascular risk factors other than cigarette smoking were studied. The number of circulating progenitors was measured as CD45+CD34+CD133+ labeled cells by flow cytometry. Endothelial function was assessed by flow-mediated dilation. Markers of inflammation and angiogenesis were also measured in all subjects. Results Compared with controls, the number of circulating progenitor cells was reduced in COPD patients. Progenitor cells did not differ between control smokers and non-smokers. COPD patients with pulmonary hypertension showed greater number of progenitor cells than those without pulmonary hypertension. Systemic endothelial function was worse in both control smokers and COPD patients. Interleukin-6, fibrinogen, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, vascular endothelial growth factor and tumor necrosis factor were increased in COPD. In COPD patients, the number of circulating progenitor cells was inversely related to the flow-mediated dilation of systemic arteries. Conclusions Pulmonary and systemic vascular impairment in COPD is associated with cigarette smoking but not with the reduced number of circulating hematopoietic progenitors. The latter appears to be a consequence of the disease itself not related to smoking habit. PMID:25171153

  4. Prevalence of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia: association with education. The Rotterdam study.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, A.; Breteler, M. M.; van Harskamp, F.; Claus, J. J.; van der Cammen, T. J.; Grobbee, D. E.; Hofman, A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To estimate the prevalence of dementia and its subtypes in the general population and examine the relation of the disease to education. DESIGN--Population based cross sectional study. SETTING--Ommoord, a suburb of Rotterdam. SUBJECTS--7528 participants of the Rotterdam study aged 55-106 years. RESULTS--474 cases of dementia were detected, giving an overall prevalence of 6.3%. Prevalence ranged from 0.4% (5/1181 subjects) at age 55-59 years to 43.2% (19/44) at 95 years and over. Alzheimer's disease was the main subdiagnosis (339 cases; 72%); it was also the main cause of the pronounced increase in dementia with age. The relative proportion of vascular dementia (76 cases; 16%), Parkinson's disease dementia (30; 6%), and other dementias (24; 5%) decreased with age. A substantially higher prevalence of dementia was found in subjects with a low level of education. The association with education was not due to confounding by cardiovascular disease. CONCLUSIONS--The prevalence of dementia increases exponentially with age. About one third of the population aged 85 and over has dementia. Three quarters of all dementia is due to Alzheimer's disease. In this study an inverse dose-response relation was found between education and dementia--in particular, Alzheimer's disease. PMID:7728032

  5. Sclerostin levels in uremic patients: a link between bone and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Annamaria; Lacquaniti, Antonio; Cernaro, Valeria; Ricciardi, Carlo Alberto; Loddo, Saverio; Romeo, Adolfo; Montalto, Gaetano; Costantino, Giuseppe; Torre, Francesco; Pettinato, Giuseppina; Salamone, Ignazio; Aloisi, Carmela; Santoro, Domenico; Buemi, Michele

    2016-06-01

    Sclerostin is a marker of low-turnover bone disease in end stage renal disease patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum sclerostin in uremic patients, analyzing its behavior during a single hemodialysis session. Twenty-one adult patients on intermittent hemodialysis treatment were enrolled. Acetate Free Bio-filtration (AFB) was the technique employed. Uremic patients were characterized by higher levels of serum sclerostin when compared with values observed in healthy subjects. Sclerostin assessed in pre-dialysis samples was 1.4 ± 1.02 ng/mL, whereas, in post dialysis samples, a reduction of sclerostin values was observed (0.8 ± 0.6 ng/mL; p: 0.008). Sclerostin correlated with parameters of dialysis adequacy, such as creatinine levels and Kt/V values, and it was significantly associated with atherosclerotic disease. Receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed a good diagnostic profile in identifying atherosclerotic disease. Sclerostin, a full dialyzable substance during AFB dialysis, is closely associated with atherosclerotic disease. Its reduction obtained through AFB could represent a defensive mechanism, improving vascular disease and renal osteodystrophy. PMID:27001371

  6. Neuropsychological Effects of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Matthew; Kirshner, Howard

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a condition of the cerebral arterioles and to a lesser extent capillaries and veins, wherein beta-amyloid is deposited. In arterioles, this preferentially targets vascular smooth muscle cells and in the later stages undermines the stability of the vessel. This condition is frequently comorbid with Alzheimer's disease and its role in cognitive impairment and dementia is a topic of considerable recent research. This article reviews recent literature which confirms that CAA independently contributes to cognitive impairment by potentiating the neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease, by predisposing to microhemorrhagic and microischemic injury to the brain parenchyma, and by interfering with the autoregulation of CNS blood flow. In this review, we discuss the clinical presentation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, with a focus on the neuropsychological manifestations of this vasculopathy. PMID:27357378

  7. Characterizing white matter health and organization in atherosclerotic vascular disease: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Bijanki, Kelly Rowe; Arndt, Stephan; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Nopoulos, Peg; Paradiso, Sergio; Matsui, Joy T.; Johnson, Hans J.; Moser, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic vascular<