Science.gov

Sample records for cerebral venous sinus

  1. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Allroggen, H.; Abbott, R.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a challenging condition because of its variability of clinical symptoms and signs. It is very often unrecognised at initial presentation. All age groups can be affected. Large sinuses such as the superior sagittal sinus are most frequently involved. Extensive collateral circulation within the cerebral venous system allows for a significant degree of compensation in the early stages of thrombus formation. Systemic inflammatory diseases and inherited as well as acquired coagulation disorders are frequent causes, although in up to 30% of cases no underlying cause can be identified. The oral contraceptive pill appears to be an important additional risk factor. The spectrum of clinical presentations ranges from headache with papilloedema to focal deficit, seizures and coma. Magnetic resonance imaging with venography is the investigation of choice; computed tomography alone will miss a significant number of cases. It has now been conclusively shown that intravenous heparin is the first-line treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis because of its efficacy, safety and feasability. Local thrombolysis may be indicated in cases of deterioration, despite adequate heparinisation. This should be followed by oral anticoagulation for 3-6 months. The prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is generally favourable. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.


Keywords: cerebral venous sinus thrombosis PMID:10622773

  2. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  3. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-10-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  4. Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Ismail A; Wasay, Mohammad

    2016-03-15

    Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, once a common and deadly disease, has fortunately become rare now. Not only that the incidence has fallen significantly after the antibiotic era, the morbidity and mortality has also decreased substantially. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is by far the commonest form of septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Due to its rare occurrence, a lot of current generation clinicians have not encountered the entity in person. Despite all the advances in diagnostic modalities, a high index of clinical suspicion remains the mainstay in prompt diagnosis and management of this potentially lethal condition. Keeping this in view, the authors have reviewed the subject including the old literature and have summarized the current approach to diagnosis and management. Septic cavernous thrombosis is a fulminant disease with dramatic presentation in most cases comprised of fever, periorbital pain and swelling, associated with systemic symptoms and signs. The preceding infection is usually in the central face or paranasal sinuses. The disease rapidly spreads to contralateral side and if remains undiagnosed and untreated can result in severe complications or even death. Prompt diagnosis using radiological imaging in suspected patient, early use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and judicial use of anticoagulation may save the life and prevent disability. Surgery is used only to treat the nidus of infection. PMID:26944152

  5. Seizure in Pregnancy Following Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Farzi, Farnoush; Abdollahzadeh, Mehrsima; Faraji, Roya; Chavoushi, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Seizure involves less than 1% of pregnancies; however it is associated with increased maternal and fetal complications. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare, but potentially life-threatening cause of seizure during pregnancy, presenting primarily as seizure in 12% - 31.9% of cases. Pregnancy and puerperium are known as the risk factors of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Case Presentation: Here is presented a case of seizure after delivery by cesarean section in an otherwise healthy woman. The final diagnosis was cerebral venous sinus thrombosis probably due to hypercoagulable state in pregnancy. Conclusions: If seizure occurs during the peripartum period, along with providing complete cardiovascular and respiratory support, advanced diagnostic measures are needed and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis should be considered as a possible diagnosis. PMID:26161329

  6. Uncontrolled seizures resulting from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicating neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Faraji, Fardin; Didgar, Farshid; Talaie-Zanjani, Afsoon; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare form of stroke caused by thrombosis in venous sinuses of the brain. In this study, we reported on a patient with venous sinus thrombosis and brucellosis who presented with uncontrolled seizure despite being treated with anti-epileptic drugs at high doses. The case was a 33-year-old woman with a history of controlled complex partial seizure who presented with headache, asthenia, and uncontrolled seizure for one month. She was febrile and a brain CT scan indicated hemorrhagic focus in the left posterior parietal and the temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography also proved venous sinus thrombosis in the left transverse sinus. Besides [In addition], a laboratory assessment confirmed brucellosis. Following the treatment with anti-coagulant, anti-brucellosis, and anti-epileptic agents, the patient was discharged in good condition with medical orders. Clinical suspicion and accurate evaluation of a patient's history is the most important clue in diagnosis and treatment of brucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, especially in uncontrolled seizure in patients who had previously been under control. PMID:24250168

  7. Caring for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in children

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Mubashira; Wasay, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in children is increasingly recognized as diagnostic tools and clinical awareness has improved. It is a multifactorial disease where prothrombotic risk factors and predisposing clinical conditions usually in combination constitute the underlying etiology. Clinical features range from headache, seizures to comatose state. Although symptomatic treatment involving control of infections, seizures and intracranial hypertension is uniform, use of anticoagulation and local thrombolytic therapy is still controversial. Morbidity and mortality can be significant and long-term neurological sequelae include developmental delay, sensorimotor and visual deficits and epilepsy. PMID:21887032

  8. Cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis associated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin injection and oral contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Min, Jiangyong; Bhatt, Archit; Aburashed, Rany; Burton, Stephen

    2012-06-01

    Although patients of cerebral sinus thrombosis after intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been previously reported; reports of cerebral venous thrombosis secondary to subcutaneous injection of immunoglobulin (SIG) in conjunction with oral contraceptives are nonexistent in the current literature. We describe here a patient of cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis occurring after the combination of SIG and oral contraceptive use. Furthermore, we shall explore proper clinical precautions for someone who receives IG therapy, especially in conjunction with the use of oral contraceptives. PMID:21915646

  9. Acute subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Hanish; Chaudhary, Ashwani; Mahajan, Anuj; Paul, Birinder

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare type of stroke primarily affecting young women. Diagnosis is generally delayed or overlooked due to a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms. Subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is very rare. We report a case of 40-year-old female with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis who presented to us with an acute subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage besides venous infarct. Management of such patients is complicated due to the rarity of the condition and contraindication for the use of anticoagulation. We conducted a thorough literature search through PubMed and could find only nine cases of spontaneous subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:27057237

  10. Antiphospholipid syndrome presenting as cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: a case series and a review.

    PubMed

    Shlebak, Abdul

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral venous sinus system is a rare site for venous thrombosis except in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome. We describe three patients presenting with cerebral venous thrombosis in association with other thrombotic sites in two patients and as an only site in one patient. Antiphospholipid syndrome has varied clinical manifestations but the defining feature is the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. In this report we will review the clinical and laboratory diagnostic criteria and the management of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:26424813

  11. Unusual Case of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in Patient with Ulcerative Colitis in Remission.

    PubMed

    Meher, Lalit Kumar; Dalai, Siba Prasad; Panda, Sameer; Hui, Pankaj Kumar; Nayak, Sachidananda

    2016-05-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an idiopathic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis along with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and arterial thrombosis have occasionally been reported as a complication in the active phase of UC being attributed to its pro-thrombotic state. This paper depicts a 38-year-old female with a history of UC in remission who developed sudden onset headache, blurring of vision and seizures. Subsequent diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis was made with MRI venography and treated with low molecular weight heparin with complete resolution of symptoms. The highlights of this case underscore the importance of evaluating cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as a cause of acute onset neurological deterioration in a setting of inflammatory bowel disease. It also emphasizes on the hypothesis that the risk of venous thrombosis or other hypercoagulable states have no direct relationship with the disease activity or flare-up. PMID:27437291

  12. Unusual Case of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in Patient with Ulcerative Colitis in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Lalit Kumar; Panda, Sameer; Hui, Pankaj Kumar; Nayak, Sachidananda

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an idiopathic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis along with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and arterial thrombosis have occasionally been reported as a complication in the active phase of UC being attributed to its pro-thrombotic state. This paper depicts a 38-year-old female with a history of UC in remission who developed sudden onset headache, blurring of vision and seizures. Subsequent diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis was made with MRI venography and treated with low molecular weight heparin with complete resolution of symptoms. The highlights of this case underscore the importance of evaluating cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as a cause of acute onset neurological deterioration in a setting of inflammatory bowel disease. It also emphasizes on the hypothesis that the risk of venous thrombosis or other hypercoagulable states have no direct relationship with the disease activity or flare-up. PMID:27437291

  13. Assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis using T2*-weighted gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bidar, Fatemeh; Faeghi, Fariborz; Ghorbani, Askar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the advantages of gradient echo (GRE) sequences in the detection and characterization of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis compared to conventional magnetic resonance sequences. Methods: A total of 17 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) were evaluated using different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. The MRI sequences included T1-weighted spin echo (SE) imaging, T*2-weighted turbo SE (TSE), fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), T*2-weighted conventional GRE, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). MR venography (MRV) images were obtained as the golden standard. Results: Venous sinus thrombosis was best detectable in T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences in all patients except in one case. Venous thrombosis was undetectable in DWI. T*2-weighted GRE sequences were superior to T*2-weighted TSE, T1-weighted SE, and FLAIR. Enhanced MRV was successful in displaying the location of thrombosis. Conclusion: T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences are probably the best method for the assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The mentioned method is non-invasive; therefore, it can be employed in the clinical evaluation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:27326365

  14. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as presenting feature of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ennaifer, R; Moussa, A; Mouelhi, L; Salem, M; Bouzaidi, S; Debbeche, R; Trabelsi, S; Najjar, T

    2009-01-01

    Thrombosis is a well recognized complication of inflammatory bowel disease that occurs in 1.3 to 6.4% of patients, however, cerebral vascular involvement is unusual. We present the case of a 16-year-old female in whom cerebral venous thrombosis was the presenting symptom of an active ulcerative pancolitis. Thrombophilia screen (plasma levels of proteins C and S, antithrombin, antibeta2-glycoprotein, lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies, activated protein C resistance, homocystein level antinuclear antibodies) was negative. The patient was successfully treated with anticoagulant therapy, phenobarbital and sulfasalazine. Cerebral venous thrombosis is an exceptional presenting feature of ulcerative colitis. Disease activity may play a major role in the occurrence of thrombosis. PMID:19902870

  15. Migraine-like headache in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Funda Uysal; Tellioglu, Serdar; Koc, Rabia Soylu; Leventoglu, Alev

    2015-01-01

    A 20-year-old female, university student presented with severe, throbbing, unilateral headache, nausea and vomiting that started 2 days ago. The pain was aggravated with physical activity and she had photophobia. She had been taking contraceptive pills due to polycystic ovary for 3 months. Cranial computed tomography was uninformative and she was considered to have the first attack of migraine. She did not benefit from triptan treatment and as the duration of pain exceeded 72 h further imaging was done. Cranial MRI and MR venography revealed a central filling defect and lack of flow in the left sigmoid sinus caused by venous sinus thrombosis. In search for precipitating factors besides the use of contraceptive pills, plasma protein C activity was found to be depressed (42%, normal 70-140%), homocystein was minimally elevated (12.7 μmol/L, normal 0-12 μmol/L) and anti-cardiolipin IgM antibody was close to the upper limit. PMID:25666780

  16. A rare presentation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis associated with tubercular meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Lalla, Rakesh; Patil, Tushar B; Tiwari, Navin

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis may manifest as meningitis, meningoencephalitis, tuberculoma, tubercular abscess, stroke due to tuberculous vasculitis and tuberculous encephalopathy. Occasionally, tubercular meningitis (TBM) can predispose to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). We report a young man, who developed CVST as a complication of TBM. Worsening of pre-existing headache, impairment of consciousness and seizures should raise suspicion of CVST in any patient with CNS infection. Early diagnosis and appropriate clinical management are important for good outcome. PMID:23917359

  17. A rare presentation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis associated with tubercular meningitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Lalla, Rakesh; Patil, Tushar B; Tiwari, Navin

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis may manifest as meningitis, meningoencephalitis, tuberculoma, tubercular abscess, stroke due to tuberculous vasculitis and tuberculous encephalopathy. Occasionally, tubercular meningitis (TBM) can predispose to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). We report a young man, who developed CVST as a complication of TBM. Worsening of pre-existing headache, impairment of consciousness and seizures should raise suspicion of CVST in any patient with CNS infection. Early diagnosis and appropriate clinical management are important for good outcome. PMID:23917359

  18. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in the patient with multiple sclerosis associated with congenital antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Yuhei; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Shimoe, Yutaka; Niimi, Hideki; Kitajima, Isao; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2016-04-28

    We report the case of a 25-year-old man with multiple sclerosis (MS) who had severe headache and unconsciousness. He suffered from optic neuritis that had started at age 6. From the age of 12 years, he had suffered from multiple sclerosis (MS) cerebral lesions that relapsed three times over for 5 years. At age 25, he showed a new lesion in the cerebellar cortex, suggesting an exacerbation of the MS. However, magnetic resonance imaging findings the next day showed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. His laboratory findings showed low antithrombin activity. Genetic analysis revealed a single-base substitution (C>T) at the codon 359 (Arg to STOP) in the 5th exon portion of the antithrombin gene, heterozygote. In the literature review, 17 cases of multiple sclerosis associated with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, which occurred after the lumbar puncture and the treatment with high-dose methylpredonisolone in 11 of these cases. In our case, antithrombin deficiency, hyperhomocystinemia, infection, and lumbar puncture were suggested as the risk factors. PMID:27010094

  19. Whole-Brain Computed Tomographic Perfusion Imaging in Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Ciambella, Chelsey C.; Masud, Muhammad W.; Levy, Elad I.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (VST) can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical presentation. The utility of perfusion imaging for diagnosing VST is not well understood. Summary We retrospectively reviewed cases of acute VST in patients who underwent whole-brain (320-detector-row) computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging in combination with craniocervical CT venography. Perfusion maps that were analyzed included cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time, and time to peak. Among the 10 patients with acute VST included in this study, 9 had perfusion abnormalities. All perfusion abnormalities were localized in areas adjacent to the occluded sinus and did not match typical anterior or posterior circulation arterial territories. Bilateral perfusion deficits were seen in 4 cases. In 2 cases, parenchymal hemorrhage was diagnosed on noncontrast CT imaging; in those cases, focal CBV and CBF were reduced. Key Messages Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging with 320-detector-row scanners can further assist in establishing the diagnosis of VST by detecting perfusion abnormalities corresponding to venous and not arterial territories. CT perfusion could assist in the differentiation between focal reversible changes, such as those caused by vasogenic edema, and irreversible changes due to infarction. PMID:27051406

  20. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with ophthalmic manifestations in 18-year-olds on oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeffrey J; Hassoun, Ameer; Elmalem, Valerie I

    2014-08-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare and potentially life-threatening cause of stroke. In the past few decades, the incidence and patient demographics have changed because of many factors, including the widespread use of oral contraceptives, improved detection of prothrombotic conditions, and advancement of imaging technology. The presentation of CVST is varied and can include ocular signs and symptoms. We present 2 cases of oral contraceptive-induced CVST in 18-year-old women, whose main presenting findings were ophthalmologic. PMID:24803635

  1. Heparin Resistance and Anticoagulation Failure in a Challenging Case of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    King, Adam B; O'Duffy, Anne E; Kumar, Avinash B

    2016-07-01

    We report a challenging case of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (multiple etiologic factors) that was complicated by heparin resistance secondary to suspected antithrombin III (ATIII) deficiency. A 20-year-old female previously healthy and currently 8 weeks pregnant presented with worsening headaches, nausea, and decreasing Glasgow Coma Scale/Score (GCS), necessitating mechanical ventilatory support. Imaging showed extensive clots in multiple cerebral venous sinuses including the superior sagittal sinus, transverse, sigmoid, jugular veins, and the straight sinus. She was started on systemic anticoagulation and underwent mechanical clot removal and catheter-directed endovascular thrombolysis with limited success. Complicating the intensive care unit care was the development of heparin resistance, with an inability to reach the target partial thomboplastin time (PTT) of 60 to 80 seconds. At her peak heparin dose, she was receiving >35 000 units/24 h, and her PTT was subtherapeutic at <50 seconds. Deficiency of ATIII was suspected as a possible etiology of her heparin resistance. Fresh frozen plasma was administered for ATIII level repletion. Given her high thrombogenic risk and challenges with conventional anticoagulation regimens, we transitioned to argatroban for systemic anticoagulation. Heparin produces its major anticoagulant effect by inactivating thrombin and factor X through an AT-dependent mechanism. For inhibition of thrombin, heparin must bind to both the coagulation enzyme and the AT. A deficiency of AT leads to a hypercoagulable state and decreased efficacy of heparin that places patients at high risk of thromboembolism. Heparin resistance, especially in the setting of critical illness, should raise the index of suspicion for AT deficiency. Argatroban is an alternate agent for systemic anticoagulation in the setting of heparin resistance. PMID:27366296

  2. Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in Iran: Cumulative Data, Shortcomings and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Borhani Haghighi, Afshin; Ashjazadeh, Nahid; Safari, Anahid; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a frequent cause of cerebrovascular disease in Iran. Objectives In this study, we report cumulative data of published Iranian studies in a systematic manner with critically appraisal and presenting future directions. Materials and Methods The authors systematically searched the ISI web of knowledge, Pubmed, Scopus, EBESCO and iranmedex for keywords attributed to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The methodological and demographic characteristics, etiology, site of involvement and clinical manifestations of the patients with CVST were investigated. Results Seven eligible series with 465 patients were found. Age of the patients were between 29.5-43.8 in these series. The ratio of Female to male was 2.79. The Mortality rate was 11.4%. Oral contraceptive pills the single most common risk factor in the all series(40-71% of female patients). Headache(80-97%), sensori/motor deficits(39-64%) and seizure(20-62%) were the most common clinical presentations. Hemorrhagic transformation was seen in 11-58% of the patients. All included studies have substantial shortcomings. Majority of the studies were retrospective and only one study was population based. Despite the ethnic heterogeneity in Iran, none of these studies reported ethnic information. Detailed methodology was missing in all studies. The extent of investigation for hematologicalor neoplastic disorders was not clear methods. Only one study reported a subgroup with multifactorialetiology. Neither Barthel index nor modified Rankin scale were reported in any studies. The mortality was reported only in the three studies. The analysis of prognostic factors was not done in any study. Conclusions To overcome theses hortcomings, more well-structured epidemiologic studies should be conducted in Iran as a CVST-raising country. PMID:23483618

  3. The assessment of proinflammatory cytokines in the patients with the history of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Farnaz; Ghorbani, Askar; Fatehi, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence is accumulating that venous thromboembolism is not limited to coagulation system and immune system seems to be involved in formation and resolution of thrombus. Some studies have demonstrated the role of inflammatory factors in deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of limbs; however, there has not been such study in the patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). The purpose of this study was to evaluate inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the patients with the history of CVST. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 20 patients with the first episode of CVST and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included. The patients were seen only after anticoagulant treatment had been discontinued for at least 3 months. IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α levels, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured in two groups. Results: The median age of patients was 37.0 [interquartile range (IQR) = 31.75-42.75] and in control group was 42.0 (IQR = 38.0-40.6) (P = 0.18). In patients group, 14 (70%) were females and in control group, also, 14 (70%) subjects were female (P = 0.01). It is significant that the level of IL-6 was significantly higher in the control group [patients: median: 9.75, IQR: 8.98-10.65; controls: median: 11.45, IQR: 10.28-13.10; P = 0.01]; however, the ESR level was higher in the patients. On the subject of IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α, no significant difference was detected. Conclusion: We did not find higher concentrations of inflammatory ILs in the patients with the history of CVST that is contradictory with some findings in venous thrombosis of the extremities; however, the studies with larger sample size may be required. PMID:27326361

  4. Traumatic Dural Venous Sinus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, You-Sub; Jung, Seung-Hoon; Lim, Dong-Ho; Kim, Tae-Sun; Kim, Jae-Hyoo

    2015-01-01

    Objective The importance of traumatic dural venous sinus injury lies in the probability of massive blood loss at the time of trauma or emergency operation resulting in a high mortality rate during the perioperative period. We considered the appropriate methods of treatment that are most essential in the overall management of traumatic dural venous sinus injuries. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of all cases involving patients with dural venous sinus injury who presented to our hospital between January 1999 and December 2014. Results Between January 1999 and December 2014, 20 patients with a dural venous sinus injury out of the 1,200 patients with severe head injuries who had been operated upon in our clinic were reviewed retrospectively. There were 17 male and 3 female patients. In 11 out of the 13 patients with a linear skull fracture crossing the dural venous sinus, massive blood loss from the injured sinus wall could be controlled by simple digital pressure using Gelfoam. All 5 patients with a linear skull fracture parallel to the sinus over the venous sinus developed massive sinus bleeding that could not be controlled by simple digital pressure. Conclusion When there is a linear skull fracture parallel to the sinus over the dural venous sinus or a depressed skull fracture penetrating the sinus, the surgeon should be prepared for the possibility of potentially fatal venous sinus injury, even in the absence of a hematoma. PMID:27169076

  5. Sinus thrombectomy for purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis utilizing a novel combination of the Trevo stent retriever and the Penumbra ACE aspiration catheter: the stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique.

    PubMed

    Mascitelli, Justin R; Pain, Margaret; Zarzour, Hekmat K; Baxter, Peter; Ghatan, Saadi; Mocco, J

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial complications of sinusitis are rare but life threatening. We present a case of a 17-year-old woman with sinusitis who deteriorated over the course of 12 days from subdural empyema and global purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The patient was managed with surgery and mechanical thrombectomy utilizing a novel 'stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique', in which a Trevo stent retriever (Stryker) was anchored in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) while a 5 MAX ACE reperfusion catheter (Penumbra) was passed back and forth from the SSS to the sigmoid sinus with resultant dramatic improvement in venous outflow. The patient was extubated on postoperative day 3 and was discharged with minimal lower extremity weakness on postoperative day 11. This is the first report using the Trevo stent retriever for sinus thrombosis. It is important to keep these rare complications in mind when evaluating patients with oral and facial infections. PMID:26002667

  6. Sinus thrombectomy for purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis utilizing a novel combination of the Trevo stent retriever and the Penumbra ACE aspiration catheter: the stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique.

    PubMed

    Mascitelli, Justin R; Pain, Margaret; Zarzour, Hekmat K; Baxter, Peter; Ghatan, Saadi; Mocco, J

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial complications of sinusitis are rare but life threatening. We present a case of a 17-year-old woman with sinusitis who deteriorated over the course of 12 days from subdural empyema and global purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The patient was managed with surgery and mechanical thrombectomy utilizing a novel 'stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique', in which a Trevo stent retriever (Stryker) was anchored in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) while a 5 MAX ACE reperfusion catheter (Penumbra) was passed back and forth from the SSS to the sigmoid sinus with resultant dramatic improvement in venous outflow. The patient was extubated on postoperative day 3 and was discharged with minimal lower extremity weakness on postoperative day 11. This is the first report using the Trevo stent retriever for sinus thrombosis. It is important to keep these rare complications in mind when evaluating patients with oral and facial infections. PMID:26019186

  7. A case of hereditary protein S deficiency presenting with cerebral sinus venous thrombosis and deep vein thrombosis at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Nair, Velu; Mohapatro, A K; Sreedhar, M; Indrajeet, I K; Tewari, A K; Anand, A C; Mathew, O P

    2008-01-01

    A 35-year-old healthy male with no history of any past medical illness developed severe headache, vomiting and drowsiness while at high altitude (4,572 m) in the eastern Himalayan ranges. He was evacuated to a tertiary-care hospital where he was diagnosed to have cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) on magnetic resonance imaging, with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of his right popliteo-femoral vein on color Doppler study. Investigation for thrombophilia revealed protein S (PS) deficiency in this patient. Family screening revealed low levels of PS in two elder brothers. One brother had a history of 'stroke in young' at the age of 20 years with the other being asymptomatic. This established the hereditary nature of PS deficiency. We are not aware of any previously published report on hereditary PS deficiency combined with CSVT and DVT occurring at high altitude. However, 1 case of protein C deficiency with CSVT has been reported previously. PMID:18434709

  8. [Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis associated with hyperhomocysteinemia due to combined deficiencies of folate and vitamin B12].

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Yuhei; Neshige, Shuichiro; Takemaru, Makoto; Shiga, Yuji; Takeshima, Shinichi; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of convulsive seizures. Radiological examinations revealed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in the anterior part of the superior sagittal sinus. He had marked hyperhomocysteinemia (93.5 nmol/ml) due to combined deficiencies of folate and vitamin B12. He was T/T homozygous for methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism. He received a supplement therapy of vitamins. First, he was administered folate orally. After 3 months, the serum level of homocysteine decreased to 22.6 nmol/ml (an 86% reduction), but was still above the normal level. Next, an additional supplement therapy of vitamin B12 lowered the homocysteine level to normal (12.3 nmol/ml) after 4 months. These results showed that the increase of homocysteine levels in this patient was mainly caused by the deficiency of folate. Additionally, acquired risk factors like vitamin deficiencies increased the level of serum homocysteine to almost 100 nmol/ml. PMID:26797484

  9. [Cerebral venous thrombosis during tuberculous meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Guenifi, W; Boukhrissa, H; Gasmi, A; Rais, M; Ouyahia, A; Hachani, A; Diab, N; Mechakra, S; Lacheheb, A

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare disease characterized by its clinical polymorphism and multiplicity of risk factors. Infections represent less than 10% of etiologies. Tuberculosis is not a common etiology, only a few observations are published in the literature. Between January 2005 and March 2015, 61 patients were hospitalized for neuro-meningeal tuberculosis. Among them, three young women had presented one or more cerebral venous sinus thromboses. No clinical feature was observed in these patients; vascular localizations were varied: sagittal sinus (2 cases), lateral sinus (2 cases) and transverse sinus (1 case). With anticoagulant and antituberculosis drugs, the outcome was favorable in all cases. During neuro-meningeal tuberculosis, the existence of consciousness disorders or neurological focal signs is not always the translation of encephalitis, hydrocephalus, tuberculoma or ischemic stroke; cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be the cause and therefore should be sought. PMID:27090100

  10. Mechanical thrombectomy for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis employing a novel combination of Angiojet and Penumbra ACE aspiration catheters: the Triaxial Angiojet technique.

    PubMed

    Bress, Aaron; Hurst, Robert; Pukenas, Bryan; Smith, Michelle; Kung, David

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) can be life threatening. A previously healthy woman in her early forties on oral contraceptives presented with global CVST and rapid clinical deterioration. A novel 'Triaxial Angiojet technique' (KSAW Shuttle [Cook Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA], 5 MAX ACE [Penumbra Inc., Alameda, CA, USA], and Angiojet [Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA]) was employed to gain access into the superior sagittal sinus. The 5 MAX ACE reperfusion catheter was shortened prior to placing a 4 Fr Angiojet catheter through it. This resulted in markedly improved recanalization with good anterograde flow. The patient was extubated on postoperative day 2 and discharged neurologically intact on postoperative day 10. We report the first case of placing an Angiojet catheter through a larger Penumbra reperfusion catheter when access through a tortuous sigmoid and transverse sinus could not be obtained with a 6 Fr support catheter. PMID:27052259

  11. Imaging of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bonneville, F

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a potentially life-threatening emergency. The wide ranging of clinical symptoms makes the use of imaging in "slices" even more important for diagnosis. Both CT and MRI are used to diagnose the occlusion of a venous sinus, but MRI is superior to CT for detecting a clot in the cortical or deep veins. CT can show the hyperintense clot spontaneously and CT angiography the intraluminal defect. MRI also detects this thrombus, whose signal varies over time: in the acute phase, it is hypointense in T2*, whilst T1 and T2 can appear falsely reassuring; in the subacute phase, it is hyperintense on all sequences (T1, T2, FLAIR, T2*, diffusion). MRI easily shows the ischemic damage, even hemorrhagic, in the cerebral parenchyma in cases of CVT. Finally, imaging may reveal pathology at the origin of the CVT, such as a fracture of the skull, infection, tumor, dural fistula, or intracranial hypotension. PMID:25465119

  12. Cerebral venous angiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.; Gilmor, R.L.; Richmond, B.

    1984-04-01

    Several unusual cases of cerebral venous angiomas as well as some characteristic cases are reported. The characteristic angiographic feature is that of a collection of dilated medullary veins draining into a single large draining vein, which appears first in the early venous phase and persists into the late venous phase of the arteriogram. Computed tomography (CT) was abnormal in 12/13 cases. The draining vein was the most common abnormality identified on CT. Coronal and sagittal reconstruction may be helpful in demonstrating the draining vein. A case of large twin venous angiomas, a case of hemorrhage from a venous angioma, and a case of a venous angioma with an incidentally associated glioblastoma are presented.

  13. Successful endovascular management of venous sinus thrombosis complicating trans-labyrinthine removal of vestibular schwanomma.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Nauman F; Ray, Abhishek; Singer, Justin; Nord, Ryan; Sunshine, Jeffrey; Megerian, Cliff A; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; Semaan, Maroun T

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare complication of surgical treatment of vestibular schwanomma. We present a rare case of extensive venous sinus thrombosis after trans-labyrinthine approach that was refractory to systemic anti-coagulation. Mechanical aspiration thrombectomy was utilized to re-canalize the venous sinuses and resulted in successful resolution of neurological symptoms. Indications of utilizing endovascular approaches are discussed that will enable skull base surgeons to address this uncommon yet potentially fatal complication. PMID:27045766

  14. Intraventricular hemorrhage caused by intracranial venous sinus thrombosis: Case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Song, Shuijiang; Ouyang, Zhiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) may occur as an isolated event from primary ventricular bleeding or as a complication of brain hemorrhage from another etiology. It is associated with high mortality and morbidity. The underlying risk factors include hypertension and aneurysms, among others. However, not all the exact etiologies are known. In this study, a case of a 24-year-old man who suffered from a headache and a decline in memory has been reported. A brain computed tomography scan suggested the diagnosis of spontaneous intraventricular hemorrhage. However, brain magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance venography, and other tests eventually confirmed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be one of the causes of intraventricular hemorrhage and should be considered for unexplained intraventricular hemorrhage. PMID:27428184

  15. Intraventricular hemorrhage caused by intracranial venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbo; Song, Shuijiang; Ouyang, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) may occur as an isolated event from primary ventricular bleeding or as a complication of brain hemorrhage from another etiology. It is associated with high mortality and morbidity. The underlying risk factors include hypertension and aneurysms, among others. However, not all the exact etiologies are known. In this study, a case of a 24-year-old man who suffered from a headache and a decline in memory has been reported. A brain computed tomography scan suggested the diagnosis of spontaneous intraventricular hemorrhage. However, brain magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance venography, and other tests eventually confirmed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be one of the causes of intraventricular hemorrhage and should be considered for unexplained intraventricular hemorrhage. PMID:27428184

  16. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as the initial presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuji; Takeda, Hidetaka; Furuya, Daisuke; Nagoya, Harumitsu; Deguchi, Ichiro; Fukuoka, Takuya; Tanahashi, Norio

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is very rare. We present a woman with thrombosis of the superior sagittal, straight, transverse and sigmoid sinuses who presented with SAH in the right temporal sulcus and bilateral cerebellar sulci. Brain perfusion CT demonstrated a delay of the mean transit time and high cerebral blood volume around the right posterior temporal lobe and cerebellum. These findings were compatible with venous congestion and they suggest the possibility that extension of the dural sinus thrombosis into the superficial veins caused localized venous hypertension with dilatation of the thin, fragile-walled cortical veins which eventually ruptured into the subarachnoid space. PMID:20190485

  17. The efficacy and safety of low-molecular-weight heparin and unfractionated heparin in the treatment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Afshari, Daryoush; Moradian, Nasrin; Nasiri, Freshteh; Razazian, Nazanin; Bostani, Arash; Sariaslani, Payam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and safety of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and unfractionated heparin (UFH) in the treatment of patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST), and to provide an appropriate treatment option in these patients. Method: This is a randomized double blind clinical trial conducted between December 2013 and December 2014. The subjects were selected among patients referred to Neurology Department, Imam Reza Hospital; affiliated to Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Fifty-two cases of CVST were included in this study and randomly divided into 2 groups. Twenty-six cases received LMWH and the other 26 cases received UFH. The primary outcomes include hospital mortality rate and neurologic deficits as assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The secondary end point was disability as measured by the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS). Results: We observed the rate of mortality and neurological deficits and disability based on NIHSS, and the MRS did not differ between the 2 groups. Conclusion: The efficacy of LMWH and UFH in reduction of neurologic deficit and functional disability in patients with CVST are similar. PMID:26492115

  18. Factor V Leiden, factor V Cambridge, factor II GA20210, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Saadatnia, Mohammad; Salehi, Mansour; Movahedian, Ahmad; Shariat, Seyed Ziaeddin Samsam; Salari, Mehri; Tajmirriahi, Marzieh; Asadimobarakeh, Elham; Salehi, Rasoul; Amini, Gilda; Ebrahimi, Homa; Kheradmand, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Factor V G1691A (FV Leiden), FII GA20210, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutations are the most common genetic risk factors for thromboembolism in the Western countries. However, there is rare data in Iran about cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis (CVST) patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of common genetic thrombophilic factors in CVST patients. Materials and Methods: Forty consequently CVST patients from two University Hospital in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences aged more than 15 years from January 2009 to January 2011 were recruited. In parallel, 51 healthy subjects with the same age and race from similar population selected as controls. FV Leiden, FII GA20210, MTHFR C677T, and FV Cambridge gene mutations by polymerase chain reaction technique were evaluated in case and control groups. Results: FV Leiden, FII GA20210, and FV Cambridge gene mutations had very low prevalence in both case (5%, 2%, 0%) and control (2.5%, 0%, 0%) and were not found any significant difference between groups. MTHFR C677T mutations was in 22 (55%) of patients in case group and 18 (35.5%) of control group (P = 0.09). Conclusion: This study showed that the prevalence of FV Leiden, FII GA20210, and FV Cambridge were low. Laboratory investigations of these mutations as a routine test for all patients with CVST may not be cost benefit. PMID:26600830

  19. Venous sinus occlusive disease: MR findings

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, W.T.C.; Simonson, T.M.; Tali, E.T.; Fisher, D.J. ); Wang, A.M. ); Koci, T.M. ); Simon, J.H. ); Jinkins, J.R. ); Tsai, Fong )

    1994-02-01

    To study MR patterns of venous sinus occlusive disease and to relate them to the underlying pathophysiology by comparing the appearance and pathophysiologic features of venous sinus occlusive disease with those of arterial ischemic disease. The clinical data and MR examinations of 26 patients with venous sinus occlusive disease were retrospectively reviewed with special attention to mass effect, hemorrhage, and T2-weighted image abnormalities as well as to abnormal parenchymal, venous, or arterial enhancement after intravenous gadopentetate dimeglumine administration. Follow-up studies when available were evaluated for atrophy, infraction, chronic mass effect, and hemorrhage. Mass effect was present in 25 of 26 patients. Eleven of the 26 had mass effect without abnormal signal on T2-weighted images. Fifteen patients had abnormal signal on T2-weighted images, but this was much less extensive than the degree of brain swelling in all cases. No patient showed abnormal parenchymal or arterial enhancement. Abnormal venous enhancement was seen in 10 of 13 patients who had contrast-enhanced studies. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage was seen in nine patients with high signal on T2-weighted images predominantly peripheral to the hematoma in eight. Three overall MR patterns were observed in acute sinus thrombosis: (1) mass effect without associated abnormal signal on T2-weighted images, (2) mass effect with associated abnormal signal on T2-weighted images and/or ventricular dilatation that may be reversible, and (3) intraparenchymal hematoma with surrounding edema. MR findings of venus sinus occlusive disease are different from those of arterial ischemia and may reflect different underlying pathophysiology. In venous sinus occlusive disease, the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (vasogenic edema and abnormal parenchymal enhancement) does not always occur, and brain swelling can persist up to 2 years with or without abnormal signal on T2-weighted images. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Current Status of the Application of Intracranial Venous Sinus Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kan; Yu, Tiecheng; Yuan, Yongjie; Yu, Jinlu

    2015-01-01

    The intracranial venous sinus is an important component of vascular disease. Many diseases involve the venous sinus and are accompanied by venous sinus stenosis (VSS), which leads to increased venous pressure and high intracranial pressure. Recent research has focused on stenting as a treatment for VSS related to these diseases. However, a systematic understanding of venous sinus stenting (VS-Stenting) is lacking. Herein, the literature on idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), venous pulsatile tinnitus, sinus thrombosis, high draining venous pressure in dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and tumor-caused VSS was reviewed and analyzed to summarize experiences with VS-Stenting as a treatment. The literature review showed that satisfactory therapeutic effects can be achieved through stent angioplasty. Thus, the present study suggests that selective stent release in the venous sinus can effectively treat these diseases and provide new possibilities for treating intracranial vascular disease. PMID:26516306

  1. Dural Venous System in the Cavernous Sinus: A Literature Review and Embryological, Functional, and Endovascular Clinical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    MITSUHASHI, Yutaka; HAYASAKI, Koji; KAWAKAMI, Taichiro; NAGATA, Takashi; KANESHIRO, Yuta; UMABA, Ryoko; OHATA, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The cavernous sinus (CS) is one of the cranial dural venous sinuses. It differs from other dural sinuses due to its many afferent and efferent venous connections with adjacent structures. It is important to know well about its complex venous anatomy to conduct safe and effective endovascular interventions for the CS. Thus, we reviewed previous literatures concerning the morphological and functional venous anatomy and the embryology of the CS. The CS is a complex of venous channels from embryologically different origins. These venous channels have more or less retained their distinct original roles of venous drainage, even after alterations through the embryological developmental process, and can be categorized into three longitudinal venous axes based on their topological and functional features. Venous channels medial to the internal carotid artery “medial venous axis” carry venous drainage from the skull base, chondrocranium and the hypophysis, with no direct participation in cerebral drainage. Venous channels lateral to the cranial nerves “lateral venous axis” are exclusively for cerebral venous drainage. Venous channels between the internal carotid artery and cranial nerves “intermediate venous axis” contribute to all the venous drainage from adjacent structures, directly from the orbit and membranous skull, indirectly through medial and lateral venous axes from the chondrocranium, the hypophysis, and the brain. This concept of longitudinal venous axes in the CS may be useful during endovascular interventions for the CS considering our better understandings of its functions in venous drainage. PMID:27063146

  2. Dural Venous System in the Cavernous Sinus: A Literature Review and Embryological, Functional, and Endovascular Clinical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Yutaka; Hayasaki, Koji; Kawakami, Taichiro; Nagata, Takashi; Kaneshiro, Yuta; Umaba, Ryoko; Ohata, Kenji

    2016-06-15

    The cavernous sinus (CS) is one of the cranial dural venous sinuses. It differs from other dural sinuses due to its many afferent and efferent venous connections with adjacent structures. It is important to know well about its complex venous anatomy to conduct safe and effective endovascular interventions for the CS. Thus, we reviewed previous literatures concerning the morphological and functional venous anatomy and the embryology of the CS. The CS is a complex of venous channels from embryologically different origins. These venous channels have more or less retained their distinct original roles of venous drainage, even after alterations through the embryological developmental process, and can be categorized into three longitudinal venous axes based on their topological and functional features. Venous channels medial to the internal carotid artery "medial venous axis" carry venous drainage from the skull base, chondrocranium and the hypophysis, with no direct participation in cerebral drainage. Venous channels lateral to the cranial nerves "lateral venous axis" are exclusively for cerebral venous drainage. Venous channels between the internal carotid artery and cranial nerves "intermediate venous axis" contribute to all the venous drainage from adjacent structures, directly from the orbit and membranous skull, indirectly through medial and lateral venous axes from the chondrocranium, the hypophysis, and the brain. This concept of longitudinal venous axes in the CS may be useful during endovascular interventions for the CS considering our better understandings of its functions in venous drainage. PMID:27063146

  3. Successful sinus restoration for transverse-sigmoid sinus dural arteriovenous fistula complicated by multiple venous sinus occlusions: The usefulness of preoperative computed tomography venography

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Koichiro; Higashi, Toshio; Sakamoto, Seisaburo; Inoue, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although sinus restoration for transverse-sigmoid sinus (TSS) dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) has rarely been reported over the past decade, its advantage and indication still remain unclear. Herein, we discuss the indications and technical aspects of this therapy with a review of the literature. Case Description: A 79-year-old female was referred to our department with generalized convulsion. An angiogram revealed a DAVF at the junction of the right TSS. The right sigmoid and left transverse sinuses were occluded, which resulted in remarkable leptomeningeal venous reflux and cerebral venous congestion. A preoperative computed tomography (CT) venogram precisely revealed the occluded segment of the right sigmoid sinus, which facilitated the sinus restoration with balloon percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting. Conclusion: Sinus restoration is preferable in patients with severe cerebral venous congestion due to multiple sinus occlusions and/or a restricted collateral venous outlet. CT venography is useful for precise evaluation of the length and configuration of the occluded segment, which thus make it possible to evaluate the feasibility of stenting. PMID:26392914

  4. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Thrombosis of Cerebral Veins and Sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Sergey Borisovich; Bocharov, Aleksei Vasilievich; Mikeladze, Ketevan; Gasparian, Sergey Surenovich; Serova, Natalia Konstantinovna; Shakhnovich, Alexander Romanovich

    2014-01-01

    Summary Acute thrombosis of cerebral veins and sinuses (ATCVS) is a multifactorial disease with grave consequences. Because of its rare occurrence there are no proven treatment guidelines. Sixteen patients with ATCVS were treated. The final diagnosis was confirmed by digital subtraction angiography. Sinus catheterization was performed via transfemoral venous access. Treatment included mechanical manipulation of thrombi and thrombolytic therapy. A regression of clinical symptoms with a concomitant decrease of intracranial hypertension was achieved in all patients. Long-term results were studied in eight patients: none presented clinical signs of intracranial hypertension. Endovascular transvenous recanalization is an effective treatment for acute thrombosis of cerebral veins and sinuses. Along with the local thrombolysis, significant potential in the treatment of this complex pathology lies in the transvenous endovascular techniques of mechanical thrombus extraction, especially in patients with intracranial hemorrhage for whom the use of thrombolytic agents is restricted. PMID:25196622

  5. A Series of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thromboses Treated with Intra-Arterial tPA infused over Ten Hours with a 0.027-inch Catheter and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ziu, Endrit; Haley, O'Hara; Ibrahimi, Muhammad; Simon, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) can have devastating results, with mortality reported in 44% of cases. No randomized trials exist in order to define what qualifies as failure of conservative therapy, and there is no specific intervention to date which is considered safe and effective. Case series suggest that thrombolysis infusion is safer than thrombectomy, but methods of administration, dose, and duration of therapy tend to vary widely. We present three consecutive CVST patients treated with heparin who suffered both clinical and radiographic deterioration, and went on to have endovascular therapy. Each patient was successfully recanalized by placing a 0.027-inch microcatheter at the proximal portion of the thrombus and infusing 20 mg of alteplase dissolved in 1 liter of normal saline infused at 100 ml per hour for an infusion of 2 mg of alteplase per hour for ten hours.  PMID:27462480

  6. Cerebral venous thrombosis in a patient with acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Morkhandikar, S; Priyamvada, P S; Srinivas, B H; Parameswaran, S

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis of the cerebral venous sinuses (CVT) is described in nephrotic syndrome. A 13-year-old girl was admitted with acute post-infectious glomerulonephritis (APIGN). Subsequently she developed recurrent seizures with focal neurological deficits. On evaluation, she was found to have CVT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of CVT in APIGN. Identifying this complication is imperative, as timely diagnosis and treatment could be lifesaving. PMID:27194837

  7. Impact of Jugular Vein Valve Function on Cerebral Venous Haemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Toro, Eleuterio F; Muller, Lucas O; Cristini, Mariapaola; Menegatti, Erica; Zamboni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    We quantify the effect of internal-jugular vein function on intracranial venous haemodynamics, with particular attention paid to venous reflux and intracranial venous hypertension. Haemodynamics in the head and neck is quantified by computing the velocity, flow and pressure fields, and vessel cross-sectional area in all major arteries and veins. For the computations we use a global, closed-loop multi-scale mathematical model for the entire human circulation, recently developed by the first two authors. Validation of the model against in vitro and in vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measurements have been reported elsewhere. Here, the circulation model is equipped with a sub-model for venous valves. For the study, in addition to a healthy control, we identify two venous-valve related conditions, namely valve incompetence and valve obstruction. A parametric study for subjects in the supine position is carried out for nine cases. It is found that valve function has a visible effect on intracranial venous haemodynamics, including dural sinuses and deep cerebral veins. In particular, valve obstruction causes venous reflux, redirection of flow and intracranial venous hypertension. The clinical implications of the findings are unknown, though they may relate to recent hypotheses linking some neurological conditions to extra-cranial venous anomalies. PMID:26256005

  8. Optoacoustic monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation through extracerebral blood

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, I. Y.; Petrov, Y.; Prough, D. S.; Deyo, D. J.; Cicenaite, I.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2011-01-01

    There is strong clinical evidence that controlling cerebral venous oxygenation (oxyhemoglobin saturation) is critically important for patients with severe traumatic brain injury as well as for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, the only available method for cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring is invasive and requires catheterization of the internal jugular vein. We designed and built a novel optoacoustic monitor of cerebral venous oxygenation as measured in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), the large midline cerebral vein. To the best of our knowledge, optical monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation through overlying extracerebral blood is reported for the first time in this paper. The system was capable of detecting SSS signals in vivo at 700, 800, and 1064 nm through the thick (5–6 mm) sheep skull containing the circulating blood. The high (submillimeter) in-depth resolution of the system provided identification of the SSS peaks in the optoacoustic signals. The SSS peak amplitude closely followed the actual SSS blood oxygenation measured invasively using catheterization, blood sampling, and “gold standard” CO-Oximetry. Our data indicate the system may provide accurate measurement of the SSS blood oxygenation in patients with extracerebral blood over the SSS. PMID:22254173

  9. Cerebral arterial occlusion and intracranial venous thrombosis in a woman taking oral contraceptives.

    PubMed Central

    Montón, F.; Rebollo, M.; Quintana, F.; Berciano, J.

    1984-01-01

    Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus are reported in a 30-year-old woman taking oral contraceptives (OC). The coexistence of arterial and venous cerebral pathology as a complication of OC use has only been previously reported in one case. The pathogenesis of this rare association is briefly discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6462985

  10. Enhanced global mathematical model for studying cerebral venous blood flow.

    PubMed

    Müller, Lucas O; Toro, Eleuterio F

    2014-10-17

    Here we extend the global, closed-loop, mathematical model for the cardiovascular system in Müller and Toro (2014) to account for fundamental mechanisms affecting cerebral venous haemodynamics: the interaction between intracranial pressure and cerebral vasculature and the Starling-resistor like behaviour of intracranial veins. Computational results are compared with flow measurements obtained from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), showing overall satisfactory agreement. The role played by each model component in shaping cerebral venous flow waveforms is investigated. Our results are discussed in light of current physiological concepts and model-driven considerations, indicating that the Starling-resistor like behaviour of intracranial veins at the point where they join dural sinuses is the leading mechanism. Moreover, we present preliminary results on the impact of neck vein strictures on cerebral venous hemodynamics. These results show that such anomalies cause a pressure increment in intracranial cerebral veins, even if the shielding effect of the Starling-resistor like behaviour of cerebral veins is taken into account. PMID:25169660

  11. Cerebral autoregulation with changes in arterial and cerebral venous pressure

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, R.W.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of cerebral venous pressure (Pcv) elevation on cerebral autoregulation has been incompletely studied. The authors compared the effect of decreased cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) by elevated Pcv and decreased arterial pressure (Pa) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a canine modified bypass model. CPP of 80, 70, 60, 50, 40 and 30 mmHg were produced by decreasing Pa with intracranial pressure (ICP) and Pcv maintained at 0 mmHg (group 1, n = 5), or by elevating Pcv as Pa was maintained at 80 mmHg (group 2, n = 5. CBF was measured using radiolabeled microspheres, and CMRO/sub 2/ = CBF times arterial-sagittal sinus O/sub 2/ content difference. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) = CPP/CBF. In group 1 CBF (ml/100 gm/min) was unchanged from control (36 +/- 4) as CPP was decreased from 80 to 40 mmHg. As CPP was decreased to 30 mmHg, CBF decreased to 28 +/- 1. CVR (mmHg/ml/min/100 gm) was 2.3 +/- 0.3 and progressively decreased to 1.0 +/- 0.1 at CPP of 30 mmHg. In group 2 CBF was 34 +/- 3 and was unchanged as CPP decreased to 50 mmHg. At CPP of 40 and 30 mmHg CBF decreased to 25 +/- 3 and 22 +/- 2 respectively. Control CRV was 2.4 +/- 0.2 and progressively decreased to 1.4 +/- 0.1 as CPP decreased to 30 mmHg. CMRO/sub 2/ was unchanged from control in both groups. Thus, CBF is maintained to low CPP regardless of whether vascular transmural pressure was decreased (decrease Pa) or increased (increased Pcv) demonstrating that the myogenic mechanism of autoregulation may be unimportant in normoxic dogs.

  12. Quantitative MRV is Correlated with Intravenous Pressures Before and After Venous Sinus Stenting: Implications for Treatment and Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Darian R.; Stevenson, Matthew; Moss, Heather E; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Aletich, Victor; Jain, Sachin; Charbel, Fady T.; Alaraj, Ali

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Endovascular stenting is an effective treatment for patients with clinically significant cerebral venous sinus stenosis. Traditionally, stenting is indicated in patients with elevated intravenous pressures on conventional venography; however, noninvasive monitoring is more desirable. Quantitative magnetic resonance angiography is an imaging modality that allows blood flow assessment noninvasively. Established in the arterial system, applications to the venous sinuses have been limited to date. OBJECTIVE In this study, we examined quantitative magnetic resonance venography (qMRV) flow in patients before and after venous stenting and correlated these results with intravenous pressure measurements and clinical outcomes. METHODS Five patients with intracranial hypertension (IH) secondary to venous sinus stenosis underwent cerebral venous stenting between 2009 and 2013 at a single institution. Preoperatively venous sinus flow was determined using qMRV, and intravenous pressure measured during venography. After stenting, intravenous pressure, qMRV flow, and clinical outcomes were assessed and compared. RESULTS A mean prestenotic intravenous pressure of 45.2 mmHg was recorded before stenting which decreased to 27.4mmHg afterwards (Wilcoxon signed rank test P=.04). Total jugular outflow on qMRV increased by 260.2 ml/min. Analysis of the change in intravenous pressure and qMRV flow identified a linear relationship (Pearson's correlation r= .926). All patients displayed clinical improvement, including vision. CONCLUSION Venous outflow by qMRV increases after endovascular stenting and correlates with significantly improved intravenous pressures. These findings establish qMRV as a useful adjunct to measure venous flow after stenting, and as a potential tool in the selection and postoperative surveillance of the cerebral venous sinus stenosis patient. PMID:25860429

  13. [Case of straight sinus venous thrombosis presenting as depression and disorientation due to bilateral thalamic lesions].

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Yoshihiko; Sonoda, Kenichiro; Senda, Miho; Tamura, Naotoshi; Araki, Nobuo; Tanahashi, Norio; Shimazu, Kunio

    2006-09-01

    A 45-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of progressive inactivity and mild disturbance of consciousness which appeared two weeks ago. Brain CT revealed symmetric hypointensity of bilateral thalamus, and the lesion appeared hyperintensity on T2 weighted MRI image. He was first considered as immune-mediated cerebritis, and steroid pulse therapy was applied, but the clinical features were not improved. The diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis was established, when MR venography (MRV) showed severe stenosis in straight sinus. Consciousness was improved after the start of anticoagulation therapy, but mild dementia was remained as a sequela. MRV was useful to distinguish straight sinus thrombosis from cerebritis in this case. PMID:17260809

  14. Endovascular treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis: Contemporary multicenter experience

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Lopes, Demetrius K; Binning, Mandy J; Veznedaroglu, Erol; Liebman, Kenneth M; Arthur, Adam S; Doss, Vinodh T; Levy, Elad I

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular therapy of cerebral venous thrombosis using modern approaches to intracranial recanalization, such as stent retrievers and aspiration thrombectomy, is not well described. We performed a retrospective review of data for consecutive patients with venous sinus thrombosis who underwent endovascular treatment between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2013 at participating institutions. We identified a total of 13 patients with a diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis. The most frequently utilized type of endovascular intervention was the Penumbra aspiration system (Penumbra Inc., Alameda, California, USA) (nine cases), followed by local infusion of tissue plasminogen activator (bolus and/or drip in six cases) and stent retrievers (Solitaire FR (Covidien, Irvine, California, USA) in three cases and Trevo (Stryker, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA) in one case). Overall, multimodality treatment (two or more different types of devices or approaches) was performed in 62% of cases. Follow-up data were available for 11 patients; of those, five had a favorable clinical outcome (defined as modified Rankin Scale score of 0–2) and three patients died. Various endovascular approaches are utilized in current clinical practice. A multimodal approach to endovascular therapy for the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis resulted in partial or complete restoration of flow in all cases, yet the mortality rate of 27% indicates the need for improvement in recanalization strategies for this disorder. PMID:26055685

  15. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and dural arteriovenous fistula in a 75-year-old man primarily presenting with repeated transient visual obscurations.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeo; Matsuno, Hiromasa; Omoto, Shusaku; Sakuta, Kenichi; Terasawa, Yuka; Iguchi, Yasuyuki

    2016-04-28

    A 75-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of repeated transient visual obscurations of greying vision. The transient visual obscurations were caused by rotating his neck or the Valsalva manoeuver, and they recovered in about 30 seconds. A few weeks later, pulsatile tinnitus of the right ear and a dull headache developed. Both ocular fundi showed papilledema, and there was significant intracranial hypertension on cerebrospinal fluid examination. He was diagnosed as having right sigmoid sinus thrombosis and a dural arteriovenous fistula with a rapid arteriovenous shunt from the right ascending pharyngeal artery and the right occipital artery to the right transverse sinus. Anticoagulant therapy was started, and coil embolization was performed. The transient visual obscurations, headache, and tinnitus improved dramatically after the procedure. We hypothesized that the transient visual obscurations were triggered by rotating the neck or performing the Valsalva manoeuver as they both increase the pressure of cerebrospinal fluid, inducing transient optic nerve ischemia and visual obscurations under mild intracranial hypertension. Transient visual obscurations are an important initial symptom of intracranial hypertension. PMID:27010097

  16. Cerebral venous thrombosis in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Bindu; Goyal, Rajeev; Nihal, Lalit; Reddy, Rajasekhar

    2013-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis has been reported to show hyper coagulation leading to peripheral and rarely central thrombosis. A 35-year-old female was admitted with chief complaints of increased frequency of bloody diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss for 2 months. The patient was diagnosed to have ulcerative colitis after sigmoidoscopy and biopsy and she was started on treatment. Two days later, the patient developed headache and seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain showed cerebral venous thrombosis with venous infarcts. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated. PMID:23546367

  17. Cerebral Venous Congestion as Indication for Thrombolytic Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Fong Y. Kostanian, Varoujan; Rivera, Monica; Lee, Kwo-Whie; Chen, Clayton C.; Nguyen, Thong H.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To carry out a retrospective analysis of patients with acute dural sinus thrombosis, and the role of cerebral venous congestion in patient management. Methods. Twenty-five patients were identified with the clinical and imaging diagnosis of acute dural sinus thrombosis. The imaging diagnosis was by magnetic resonance (MR) and/or computed tomography (CT) venography. There was a female predominance with a female to male ratio of 1.5 to 1 (16 women, 9 men). The age range was from 19 to 64 years old with an average age of 37 years. The first 10 patients, who ranged in age from 21 to 64 years old (average 37 years), received only anticoagulation therapy with heparin and warfarin for periods ranging from 5 days to 2 months. The remaining 15 patients ranged in age from 19 to 57 years old (average 38 years). They either underwent subsequent thrombectomy after a trial of anticoagulation therapy, or went straight to thrombectomy. These latter 15 patients had initial evidence of cerebral venous congestion, either clinically by severe or worsening symptoms despite anticoagulation therapy, or on initial or subsequent CT or MR imaging. In our experience, the cerebral venous congestion imaging findings included intracranial hemorrhage, a hematoma, or edema. The thrombolytic treatment technique consisted of the advancement of a 6 Fr guiding catheter to the jugular bulb or sigmoid sinus from a transfemoral approach. A microcatheter was then advanced to the proximal portion of the thrombus and then either tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or urokinase was injected to prevent clot propagation. A balloon catheter was used to perform thrombectomy since the thrombolytic agents can be injected via the inner lumen with an inflated balloon. The inflated balloon helped to keep the venous flow from washing out the thrombolytic agent, thus facilitating the agent's effect. Results. The first 10 patients received only anticoagulation therapy with heparin and warfarin for periods

  18. [Case of cerebral venous thrombosis caused by MPO-ANCA associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsutomu; Fujimori, Juichi; Yoshida, Shun; Kaneko, Kimihiko; Kodera, Takao

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a 72-year-old woman presenting MPO-ANCA-associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis and venous thrombosis. Five years prior, positive MPO-ANCA and renal dysfunction had been indicated. At that time, oral steroids and tacrolimus were given to treat systemic vasculitis. During the course of the disease, she repeated otitis media. Saddle nose appeared. She was suspected of having localized type granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). She was hospitalized because of consciousness disturbance and was diagnosed as having MPO-ANCA-associated hypertrophic pachymenigitis and venous thrombosis. Brain MRI detected thick dura mater with abnormal enhancement, predominantly on the right cerebral hemisphere, and tentorium cerebella partially along with the cerebral sulci. MRI revealed vasogenic brain edema lesions in the right occipital, parietal, and temporal lobes and cytotoxic edema lesions in the right parietal lobe and centrum semiovale. MR venography revealed stenosis of the venous sinus including confluence of sinuses, straight sinus, and right transverse sinus. Subsequent treatment with corticosteroids, an immunosuppressant, and an anticoagulant led to recovery. No patient with MPO-ANCA-associated hypertrophic pachymenigitis and venous thrombosis that developed alternation of consciousness has ever been reported. This is therefore regarded as a rare case. PMID:25342019

  19. Novel optoacoustic system for noninvasive continuous monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury are a major cause of death for individuals under 50 years of age. In the USA alone, 150,000 patients per year suffer moderate or severe TBI. Moreover, TBI is a major cause of combatrelated death. Monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation is critically important for management of TBI patients because cerebral venous blood oxygenation below 50% results in death or severe neurologic complications. At present, there is no technique for noninvasive, accurate monitoring of this clinically important variable. We proposed to use optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation by probing cerebral veins such as the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and validated it in animal studies. In this work, we developed a novel, medical grade optoacoustic system for continuous, real-time cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring and tested it in human subjects at normal conditions and during hyperventilation to simulate changes that may occur in patients with TBI. We designed and built a highly-sensitive optoacoustic probe for SSS signal detection. Continuous measurements were performed in the near infrared spectral range and the SSS oxygenation absolute values were automatically calculated in real time using a special algorithm developed by our group. Continuous measurements performed at normal conditions and during hyperventilation demonstrated that hyperventilation resulted in approximately 12% decrease of cerebral venous blood oxygenation.

  20. The cerebral venous system and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Imray, Christopher H E

    2016-01-15

    Most hypobaric hypoxia studies have focused on oxygen delivery and therefore cerebral blood inflow. Few have studied venous outflow. However, the volume of blood entering and leaving the skull (∼700 ml/min) is considerably greater than cerebrospinal fluid production (0.35 ml/min) or edema formation rates and slight imbalances of in- and outflow have considerable effects on intracranial pressure. This dynamic phenomenon is not necessarily appreciated in the currently taught static "Monro-Kellie" doctrine, which forms the basis of the "Tight-Fit" hypothesis thought to underlie high altitude headache, acute mountain sickness, and high altitude cerebral edema. Investigating both sides of the cerebral circulation was an integral part of the 2007 Xtreme Everest Expedition. The results of the relevant studies performed as part of and subsequent to this expedition are reviewed here. The evidence from recent studies suggests a relative venous outflow insufficiency is an early step in the pathogenesis of high altitude headache. Translation of knowledge gained from high altitude studies is important. Many patients in a critical care environment develop hypoxemia akin to that of high altitude exposure. An inability to drain the hypoxemic induced increase in cerebral blood flow could be an underappreciated regulatory mechanism of intracranial pressure. PMID:26294747

  1. Complications of cerebral vein and sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ferro, José M; Canhâo, P

    2008-01-01

    Thrombosis of the dural sinus and encephalic veins (CVT) is an infrequent condition accounting for less than 1% of all strokes. Several recent prospective series, in particular the large International Study on Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis cohort, definitely have shown a more benign prognosis compared with that of arterial strokes: CVT has an acute case fatality of less than 5%, and almost 80% of patients recover without sequelae. However, patients surviving the acute phase of CVT are at risk of a number of complications such as recurrence of any thrombotic events in about 7%, recurrence of CVT in about 2-12%, seizures in 5 to 32%, visual loss due to optic atrophy in percentages that range from less than 1 to 5%, presence of dural fistula (there are no data available about exact frequency) and neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric sequelae characterized by aphasia, abulia and depression. However, there is only little information on the long-term neuropsychological outcome. Studies investigating professional status, cognitive performance, depressive symptoms and quality of life evidenced depression and anxiety in 2/3 of CVT patients despite an apparent good recovery in 87% of these patients. Thus, patients should be encouraged to return to previous occupations and hobbies and reassured about the very low risk of recurrence. PMID:18004061

  2. The Ovine Cerebral Venous System: Comparative Anatomy, Visualization, and Implications for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Nitzsche, Björn; Lobsien, Donald; Seeger, Johannes; Schneider, Holm; Boltze, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are significant causes of death and disability in humans. Improvements in diagnostic and therapeutic approaches strongly rely on adequate gyrencephalic, large animal models being demanded for translational research. Ovine stroke models may represent a promising approach but are currently limited by insufficient knowledge regarding the venous system of the cerebral angioarchitecture. The present study was intended to provide a comprehensive anatomical analysis of the intracranial venous system in sheep as a reliable basis for the interpretation of experimental results in such ovine models. We used corrosion casts as well as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography to scrutinize blood drainage from the brain. This combined approach yielded detailed and, to some extent, novel findings. In particular, we provide evidence for chordae Willisii and lateral venous lacunae, and report on connections between the dorsal and ventral sinuses in this species. For the first time, we also describe venous confluences in the deep cerebral venous system and an ‘anterior condylar confluent’ as seen in humans. This report provides a detailed reference for the interpretation of venous diagnostic imaging findings in sheep, including an assessment of structure detectability by in vivo (imaging) versus ex vivo (corrosion cast) visualization methods. Moreover, it features a comprehensive interspecies-comparison of the venous cerebral angioarchitecture in man, rodents, canines and sheep as a relevant large animal model species, and describes possible implications for translational cerebrovascular research. PMID:24736654

  3. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  4. Subacute methotrexate neurotoxicity and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in a 12-year-old with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism: homocysteine-mediated methotrexate neurotoxicity via direct endothelial injury.

    PubMed

    Mahadeo, Kris M; Dhall, Girish; Panigrahy, Ashok; Lastra, Carlos; Ettinger, Lawrence J

    2010-02-01

    From as early as the 1970s methotrexate has been associated with disseminated necrotizing leukoencephalopathy and other neurotoxic sequelae. Yet, a clear mechanism for methotrexate-induced neurotoxicity has not been established. The authors describe the case of a 12-year-old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation, who developed subacute methotrexate-induced toxicity and cerebral venous thrombosis after receiving intrathecal methotrexate. The role of homocysteine as a possible mediator in methotrexate-induced neurotoxicity via direct endothelial injury is discussed. PMID:20121554

  5. Treatment of progressive cerebral sinuses thrombosis with local thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Mohammadian, R; Sohrabi, B; Mansourizadeh, R; Mohammadian, F; Nazempour, A; Farhoudi, M; Pashapour, A; Taher Aghdam, A A; Hashemzadeh, A; Pourkakrodi, M

    2012-03-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a potentially serious disease, with nonspecific clinical symptoms and an unpredictable outcome. Despite adequate anticoagulation, a patient's clinical condition can rapidly deteriorate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of local thrombolysis in these patients. Consecutive patients with progressive cerebral venous thrombosis between October 2008 and January 2011 were enrolled prospectively. Progressive CVT was defined as the persistence of neurologic findings (headache, blurred vision, and visual field defects) despite at least four days (or 48 hours in patients with involvement of more than one sinus) on full anticoagulation therapy with heparin and development of focal neurologic deficits or cortical hemorrhage. We excluded patients with large hematomas and predisposing malignancies like leukemia. All patients underwent local thrombolysis with 30 mg recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA). Overall, 26 patients were enrolled with a mean age of 35.5 years (range 18 to 56 years). Six patients (23%) were male and twenty patients (77%) were female. The most common presenting feature was headache and the most common neurologic finding was papilledema, which was present in all patients. Eighty-five percent of women had a history of oral contraceptive pill consumption. Successful recanalization was achieved in all patients except one (96.2%). Neurological examinations and follow-up assessments were based on a modified Rankin scale (mRS). Favorable outcome and recovery was defined as a mRS score of 0-1. Follow-up assessments at the third week showed that 25 out of 26 recovered, with 18 having a mRS score of 0 and 7 with a mRS score of 1. There were no procedure-related neurological complications. Our results show that local thrombolysis is a safe and effective treatment modality for patients suffering from progressive CVT. PMID:22440606

  6. Cerebral venous dynamics in newborn mice with intracranial hemorrhage studied using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. N.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Sindeeva, O. A.; Pavlova, O. N.; Shuvalova, E. P.; Huang, Q.; Zhu, D.; Li, P.; Tuchin, V. V.; Luo, Q.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the stress-induced development of the intracranial hemorrhage in newborn mice with the main attention to its latent stage. Our study is based on the laser speckle contrast imaging of the cerebral venous blood flow and the wavelet-based analysis of experimental data. We study responses of the sagittal sinus in different frequency ranges associated with distinct regulatory mechanisms and discuss significant changes of the spectral power in the frequency area associated with the NO-related endothelial function.

  7. Detrended fluctuation analysis of cerebral venous dynamics in newborn mice with intracranial hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. N.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Bibikova, O. A.; Pavlova, O. N.; Mohammad, Y. K.; Huang, Q.; Zhu, D.; Li, P.; Tuchin, V. V.; Luo, Q.

    2015-03-01

    We study pathological changes in cerebral venous dynamics in newborn mice using the laser speckle contrast imaging and the detrended fluctuation analysis with a special attention to the latent stage of the development of the intracranial hemorrhage. We show that this stage is characterized by a high responsiveness of the sagittal sinus to pharmacological stimulations of adrenorelated dilation. We conclude that this effect can be considered as an important mechanism underlying the development of ICH in newborns.

  8. Cerebral venous thrombosis revealing an ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Taous, Abdellah; Berri, Maha Aït; Lamsiah, Taoufik; Zainoun, Brahim; Ziadi, Tarik; Rouimi, Abdelhadi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has been reported as an uncommon and devastating complication of ulcerative colitis (UC), with an annual incidence varying between 0,5 to 6,7%. It is suspected to be a consequence of the hypercoagulable state occurring during disease relapse. We report a case of 22-year-old female patient presenting with CVT revealing an UC. Our case raises the awareness among health professionals about the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) as a rare etiology of CVT, and signifies the importance of considering antithrombotic prophylaxis in all hospitalised IBD patients, especially those with active disease. PMID:27279947

  9. Cerebral Venous Air Embolism Secondary to Mesenteric Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Aileen; Matsuda, Brent; Leo, Qi Jie Nicholas; Sung, Hiro

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare, yet potentially fatal condition. We present a case of retrograde cerebral venous air emboli arising from the hepatic portal venous system, secondary to a mesenteric infarction. A 69-year-old man with a history of gastrointestinal amyloidosis presented with fever and lethargy. Computed tomography of the brain detected multiple foci of air in the right frontal, fronto-parietal, and left lateral frontal sulci consistent with cerebral venous air emboli. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed moderate thickening and dilatation of the small bowel with diffuse scattered intestinal pneumatosis suggestive of mesenteric infarction with resultant extensive intrahepatic portal venous air. The patient was deemed a poor candidate for surgical intervention and died as a result of septic shock. We believe the cerebral venous air emboli was a result of retrograde flow of air arising from the hepatic venous air ascending via the inferior and superior vena cava to the cerebral venous system. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of retrograde cerebral venous air embolism arising from hepatic portal venous system secondary to mesenteric infarction. The clinical significance and prognosis in this setting requires further investigation. PMID:27239392

  10. The Impact of Sinus in the Flow Dynamics around Prosthetic Venous Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Wei-Hsin; Chen, Henry Y.; Berwick, Zachary; Krieger, Joshua; Chambers, Sean; Dabiri, Dana; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2013-11-01

    The valves in the venous system are surrounded by a thinner but expandable vein section that forms a pocket region known as the sinus. The exact function of the sinus pocket for the venous valves is not fully understood. This is especially an issue for the bioprostheticvalve, since most of the prosthetic valves do not have a sinus pocket. To determine the impact of the sinus pocket on the flow dynamics to a prosthetic valve, an in-vitro experiment was setup at normal physiological flow conditions to simulate the flow inside a venous system. Two different valve designs were tested in glass tubes simulating the vein vessel with and without the sinus pocket profile using 2-D particle image velocimetry (PIV). Velocity measurements were made, and vorticity and flow shear were calculated. The results show that vortex structures near the valve leaflet tip were preserved better with the sinus present. The jet width at valve exit was found to be narrower with sinus than without sinus, and the effect was more significant with longer leaflet length. The results suggest that the sinus pocket alters the flow around the valve and functions as a flow regulator. For prosthetic valve without sinus, a shorter leaflet would provide similar effect of sinus and thus is more preferable.

  11. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Meppiel, Elodie; Crassard, Isabelle; de Latour, Régis Peffault; de Guibert, Sophie; Terriou, Louis; Chabriat, Hugues; Socié, Gérard; Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare acquired disorder of hematopoietic stem cells characterized by hemolytic anemia, marrow failure, and a high incidence of life-threatening venous thrombosis. Cerebral venous system is the second most frequent location of thrombosis after hepatic veins. However, data about PNH-related cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) are very scarce because of the rarity of both the disorders. We report a French study about PNH patients with CVT. Patients were recruited retrospectively, from the Société Française d’Hématologie (SFH) registry of 465 patients with PNH; the Lariboisière registry of 399 patients with CVT; and a direct contact with 26 French Hematology Units. We review cases reported since 1938 in the English and French language literature. We then compared patients of our series with cases from the literature, with non-PNH-related CVT cases from Lariboisière registry, and with PNH patients without CVT from SFH registry. Fifteen patients were included between 1990 and 2012. Most patients were women (12/15) and half of them presented associated hormonal venous thrombosis risk factors. Three patients had concomitant hepatic vein thrombosis. CVT was the first manifestation of PNH in 4 patients. No major difference in CVT characteristics was found compared with non-PNH-related CVT cases, except for a younger age at diagnosis in PNH patients (P < 0.001). All patients were treated with anticoagulation therapy. One death occurred in acute stage. All surviving patients were independent 1 year after. Median survival time was 9 years. Recurrent thrombosis rate was 50% at 6 years, occurring in patients that did not have bone marrow transplantation or eculizumab therapy. Cases of death were mainly related to hepatic vein thrombosis. Prognosis of CVT was good in our series. However, these patients have a poor long-term prognosis due to PNH disease by itself. PNH treatment should be proposed as soon as possible to

  12. Influence of central venous pressure upon sinus node responses to arterial baroreflex stimulation in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, A. L.; Takeshita, A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Abboud, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements were made of sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation with phenylephrine injection or neck suction, before and during changes of central venous pressure provoked by lower body negative pressure or leg and lower truck elevation. Variations of central venous pressure between 1.1 and 9.0 mm Hg did not influence arterial baroreflex mediated bradycardia. Baroreflex sinus node responses were augmented by intravenous propranolol, but the level of responses after propranolol was comparable during the control state, lower body negative pressure, and leg and trunk elevation. Sinus node responses to very brief baroreceptor stimuli applied during the transitions of central venous pressure also were comparable in the three states. The authors conclude that physiological variations of central venous pressure do not influence sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation in man.

  13. Maxillary odontogenic sinusitis, complicated with cerebral abscess--case report.

    PubMed

    Onişor-Gligor, F; Lung, T; Pintea, B; Mureşan, O; Pop, P B; Juncar, M

    2012-01-01

    Maxillary sinus inflammation, when untreated or incorrectly treated, may extend locoregionally, the remaining paranasal sinuses being the first affected anatomical structures. This is why the understanding of the inflammatory pathology of the maxillary sinus, and particularly of the complications it can generate, is extremely important. The purpose of this presentation is to point out that inflammations of the paranasal sinuses are susceptible to develop complications in certain conditions and threaten the patient's life due to the proximity of vital structures. This is the case of a 16 years old male patient who developed a left maxillary and frontal sinusitis, complicated with cerebral abscess. Early detection, multidisciplinary approach and proper indication of surgical treatment, as well as early suspicion of complication, especially in young male adolescents, are extremely important. PMID:22712359

  14. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring during hyperventilation in healthy volunteers with a novel optoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Deyo, Donald J.; Henkel, Sheryl N.; Seeton, Roger; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2013-03-01

    Monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation is useful to facilitate management of patients with severe or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prompt recognition of low cerebral venous oxygenation is a key to avoiding secondary brain injury associated with brain hypoxia. In specialized clinical research centers, jugular venous bulb catheters have been used for cerebral venous oxygenation monitoring and have demonstrated that oxygen saturation < 50% (normal range is 55-75%) correlates with poor clinical outcome. We developed an optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation. Recently, we designed and built a novel, medical grade optoacoustic system operating in the near-infrared spectral range for continuous, real-time oxygenation monitoring in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein. In this work, we designed and built a novel SSS optoacoustic probe and developed a new algorithm for SSS oxygenation measurement. The SSS signals were measured in healthy volunteers during voluntary hyperventilation, which induced changes in SSS oxygenation. Simultaneously, we measured exhaled carbon dioxide concentration (EtCO2) using capnography. Good temporal correlation between decreases in optoacoustically measured SSS oxygenation and decreases in EtCO2 was obtained. Decreases in EtCO2 from normal values (35-45 mmHg) to 20-25 mmHg resulted in SSS oxygenation decreases by 3-10%. Intersubject variability of the responses may relate to nonspecific brain activation associated with voluntary hyperventilation. The obtained data demonstrate the capability of the optoacoustic system to detect in real time minor changes in the SSS blood oxygenation.

  15. Partial Aortic Occlusion and Cerebral Venous Steal: Venous Effects of Arterial Manipulation in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pranevicius, Osvaldas; Pranevicius, Mindaugas; Liebeskind, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke therapy emphasizes early arterial clot lysis or removal. Partial aortic occlusion has recently emerged as an alternative hemodynamic approach to augment cerebral perfusion in acute ischemic stroke. The exact mechanism of cerebral flow augmentation with partial aortic occlusion remains unclear and may involve more than simple diversion of arterial blood flow from the lower body to cerebral collateral circulation. The cerebral venous steal hypothesis suggests that even a small increase in tissue pressure in the ischemic area will divert blood flow to surrounding regions with lesser tissue pressures. This may cause no-reflow (absence of flow after restoration of arterial patency) in the ischemic core and “luxury perfusion” in the surrounding regions. Such maldistribution may be reversed with increased venous pressure titrated to avoid changes in intracranial pressure. We propose that partial aortic occlusion enhances perfusion in the brain by offsetting cerebral venous steal. Partial aortic occlusion redistributes blood volume into the upper part of the body, manifest by an increase in central venous pressure. Increased venous pressure recruits the collapsed vascular network and, by eliminating cerebral venous steal, corrects perifocal perfusion maldistribution, analogous to positive end expiratory pressure recruitment of collapsed airways to decrease ventilation/perfusion mismatch in the lungs. PMID:21441149

  16. Anatomical variation of cerebral venous drainage: the theoretical effect on jugular bulb blood samples.

    PubMed

    Beards, S C; Yule, S; Kassner, A; Jackson, A

    1998-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated significant variation in bilateral jugular venous oxygen saturation measurements which may be of clinical significance. We have therefore measured variations in normal dural sinus venous drainage to assess the possible effects of normal anatomical variations on measured jugular venous oxygen saturation. Normal volunteers (n = 25) were imaged using magnetic resonance venography to demonstrate variations in venous anatomy. Flow was measured in the superior sagittal sinus and bilaterally in the transverse sinus, sigmoid sinus proximal to the jugular bulb and proximal jugular vein using phase difference magnetic resonance imaging. Examination of magnetic resonance venogram images showed considerable variability in the symmetry of transverse sinus flow. Complete absence of one transverse sinus was seen in four cases and significant asymmetry in the size of the transverse sinuses was present in 13. Quantitative flow studies demonstrated that the ratio of superior sagittal sinus to combined jugular bulb flow showed remarkably little variation (0.46 +/- 0.06). Measurements of transverse sinus flow showed significant asymmetry (< 40% of superior sagittal sinus flow in one transverse sinus) in 21 of 25 volunteers. The effect of the observed asymmetry on jugular venous oxygen saturation was modelled based on the assumption of either a supratentorial or infratentorial lesion. This model predicted significant asymmetry in jugular venous oxygen saturation measurements (> 10%) in 65% of cases with a supratentorial lesion which is in close agreement with clinical observations. This study suggests that normal variations in venous drainage may account for observed asymmetry in jugular venous oxygen saturation measurements. PMID:9771169

  17. Cerebral venous infarction during a high altitude expedition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S; Chng, S M; Singh, R

    2009-08-01

    Bilateral venous infarction of the brain due to thrombosis of the deep cerebral venous system is relatively rare, accounting for approximately 3-8 percent of all cases of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). Known risk factors include the use of oral contraceptives, pregnancy, puerperium, malignancy and thrombophilic states. CVT, in the setting of acute mountain sickness (AMS), has rarely been reported. We present an unusual occurrence of bilateral deep subcortical venous infarction in a previously-well, 39-year-old woman, who developed AMS during a high altitude expedition in Nepal. The possible mechanisms responsible for this unfortunate event include dehydration with resultant relative polycythaemia and raised intracranial pressure at high altitudes. CVT should be considered in mountain climbers presenting with progressive neurological deterioration that is not solely attributable to AMS. PMID:19710966

  18. Cerebral venous thrombosis after ventriculoperitoneal shunting: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Teppei; Ayuzawa, Satoshi; Aoki, Tsukasa; Ikeda, Go; Shiigai, Masanari; Matsumura, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal shunting (VPS) is a simple procedure, but there are several potential complications. We describe the first reported case of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) after VPS. A 69-year-old man suffering from normal pressure hydrocephalus underwent left VPS. Two months later he developed CVT and cerebral venous hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the thrombus formation just adjacent to the shunt tube. One possible cause is compression of the cortical vein after brain shift and/or tension of the cortical vein due to intracranial hypotension. A protein C deficiency was also detected. Surgeons should be aware that cerebral venous thrombosis can occur after VPS. PMID:24257484

  19. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis after Ventriculoperitoneal Shunting: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    MATSUBARA, Teppei; AYUZAWA, Satoshi; AOKI, Tsukasa; IKEDA, Go; SHIIGAI, Masanari; MATSUMURA, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal shunting (VPS) is a simple procedure, but there are several potential complications. We describe the first reported case of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) after VPS. A 69-year-old man suffering from normal pressure hydrocephalus underwent left VPS. Two months later he developed CVT and cerebral venous hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the thrombus formation just adjacent to the shunt tube. One possible cause is compression of the cortical vein after brain shift and/or tension of the cortical vein due to intracranial hypotension (IH). A protein C deficiency was also detected. Surgeons should be aware that cerebral venous thrombosis can occur after VPS. PMID:24257484

  20. Beware of Venous Anomalies in Young Patients with Sick Sinus Syndrome: A Report of Two Cases of Sick Sinus Syndrome with Systemic Venous Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Rathakrishnan, Shanmuga Sundaram; Kaliappan, Tamilarasu; Gopalan, Rajendiran

    2015-01-01

    We report two young patients with symptomatic sick sinus syndrome admitted for permanent pacemaker implantation (PPI). On evaluation with echocardiography, one of them was found to have persistent left superior vena cava and venography showed absent right superior vena cava also. He underwent PPI with leads inserted via left superior vena cava, coronary sinus, right atrium and right ventricle. The other patient was incidentally found to have interrupted inferior vena cava with azygos continuation while being planned for temporary pacemaker implantation. She underwent successful PPI. We would like to stress the importance of having a high suspicion for these systemic venous anomalies in patients presenting with sick sinus syndrome especially at young age. If we could diagnose preoperatively, we can avoid on table surprises. PMID:27326354

  1. Coincidental cerebral venous thrombosis and subarachnoid haemorrhage related to ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Claudia; Baumgartner, Annette; Mader, Irina; Rijntjes, Michel; Meckel, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) are rare cerebrovascular pathologies. Here, we report the extremely rare coincidental presentation of both entities and discuss the likely relationship in aetiology and their optimal management. A female patient presented with headache and progressive neurological deficits. Cranial computed tomography and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed dural venous sinus thrombosis, left-sided frontal and parietal infarcts, and left middle and anterior cerebral artery stenosis. In addition, left hemispheric subarachnoid haemosiderosis was seen on MRI. Following standard anticoagulation therapy for CVT, she represented with acute SAH. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm and left middle cerebral artery/anterior cerebral artery vasospasms that were responsive to intra-arterial nimodipine. The latter were already present on the previous MRI, and had most likely prevented the detection of the aneurysm initially. The aneurysm was successfully coil embolised, and the patient improved clinically. Despite this case being an extremely rare coincidence, a ruptured aneurysm should be excluded in the presence of CVT and non-sulcal SAH. A careful consideration of treatment of both pathologies is required, since anticoagulation may have a potentially negative impact on aneurysmal bleeding. PMID:27188326

  2. Junction between the great cerebral vein and the straight sinus: an anatomical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study on 25 human brain cadaveric dissections.

    PubMed

    Dagain, A; Vignes, J R; Dulou, R; Dutertre, G; Delmas, J M; Guerin, J; Liguoro, D

    2008-07-01

    The cerebral venous system is poorly understood, and best appreciated under macroscopic anatomical considerations. We present an anatomical and immunohistochemical studies to better define the morphological characteristics of the junction between the great cerebral vein and the straight sinus. Twenty-five cadaveric specimens from the anatomy laboratory of the University Victor Segalen of Bordeaux were studied. The observation of the venous junctions with the straight sinus was performed under an operating microscope. The smooth muscular actin immunohistochemical staining was performed for 18 veno-sinosal junctions. Five venous junctions were observed using an electron microscope. We observed 3 different anatomic aspects: type 1 was a junction with a small elevation in its floor and a posterior thickening (14 cases); type 2 was a junction with an outgrowth on the floor like a cornice (7 cases); and type 3 was a junction presenting a nodule. Microscopic study of type 1 and 2 junctions showed a positive coloration to orceine attesting the presence of elastic fibers. Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of smooth muscular actin and S 100 protein attesting the presence of smooth muscular fibers and nervous fibers. We observed in the ultrastructural study, a morphological progression of the endothelium. The venous orifice of the great cerebral vein into the straight sinus could be anatomically assimilated as a true "sphincter." Its function in the regulation of the cerebral blood flow needs further exploration. PMID:18470937

  3. Noninvasive optoacoustic monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation in newborns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Wynne, Karon E.; Petrov, Yuriy; Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Richardson, C. Joan; Prough, Donald S.

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral ischemia after birth and during labor is a major cause of death and severe complications such as cerebral palsy. In the USA alone, cerebral palsy results in permanent disability of 10,000 newborns per year and approximately 500,000 of the total population. Currently, no technology is capable of direct monitoring of cerebral oxygenation in newborns. This study proposes the use of an optoacoustic technique for noninvasive cerebral ischemia monitoring by probing the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein. We developed and built a multi-wavelength, near-infrared optoacoustic system suitable for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral ischemia in newborns with normal weight (NBW), low birth-weight (LBW, 1500 - 2499 g) and very low birth-weight (VLBW, < 1500 g). The system was capable of detecting SSS signals through the open anterior and posterior fontanelles as well as through the skull. We tested the system in NBW, LBW, and VLBW newborns (weight range: from 675 g to 3,000 g) admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. We performed single and continuous measurements of the SSS blood oxygenation. The data acquisition, processing and analysis software developed by our group provided real-time, absolute SSS blood oxygenation measurements. The SSS blood oxygenation ranged from 60% to 80%. Optoacoustic monitoring of the SSS blood oxygenation provides valuable information because adequate cerebral oxygenation would suggest that no therapy was necessary; conversely, evidence of cerebral ischemia would prompt therapy to increase cerebral blood flow.

  4. Headache as the only neurological sign of cerebral venous thrombosis: a series of 17 cases

    PubMed Central

    Cumurciuc, R; Crassard, I; Sarov, M; Valade, D; Bousser, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Headache is the most frequent symptom in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), and usually the first. However, it has rarely been reported as the only symptom of CVT. Objectives: To study the characteristics of patients in whom headache was the only presentation of CVT in the absence of intracranial hypertension, subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), meningitis, or other intracranial lesion. Methods: From a prospective study of 123 consecutive patients with CVT only those with isolated headache and normal brain computed tomography (CT) scan and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination were included in the present study. All patients underwent an extensive systematic aetiological work-up and were given intravenous heparin followed by oral anticoagulants. A detailed description of the headache was obtained. Results: Headache was only sign of CVT in 17 patients. The lateral sinus was the most frequently involved sinus (n = 15). Onset of headache was progressive in 11, acute in 3, and thunderclap in 3 patients. Once established, the headache was continuous in 15, diffuse in four and unilateral in 13, usually ipsilateral to the occluded lateral sinus. No specific risk factor or cause was found. All had a favourable evolution. Conclusion: The pathogenesis of isolated headache in CVT in the absence of intracranial hypertension, SAH, meningitis or intracerebral lesion is unknown but may involve changes in the walls of the occluded sinus. Hence MRI/MRV should be used to look for signs of CVT in all patients with recent headache (progressive or thunderclap) even when the CT scan and CSF examination are normal. PMID:16024884

  5. Cerebral venous hemodynamic abnormalities in episodic and chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Petolicchio, Barbara; Viganò, Alessandro; di Biase, Lazzaro; Tatulli, Doriana; Toscano, Massimiliano; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Passarelli, Francesco; Di Piero, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Alterations of cerebral venous drainage have been demonstrated in chronic migraine (CM), suggesting that cerebral venous hemodynamic abnormalities (CVHAs) play a role in this condition. The aim of the present study was to look for a correlation between CM and CVHAs. We recruited 33 subjects suffering from CM with or without analgesic overuse, 29 episodic migraine (EM) patients with or without aura, and 21 healthy subjects as controls (HCs). CVHAs were evaluated by transcranial and extracranial echo-color Doppler evaluation of five venous hemodynamic parameters. CVHAs were significantly more frequent in the CM and EM patients than in the HCs. In the migraine patients, CVHAs were not correlated with clinical features. The significantly greater frequency of CVHAs observed in the migraineurs may reflect a possible relationship between migraine and these abnormalities. Prospective longitudinal studies are needed to investigate whether CVHAs have a role in the processes of migraine chronification. PMID:27358220

  6. An ultrasonic Doppler venous outflow method for the continuous measurement of cerebral blood flow in conscious sheep.

    PubMed

    Upton, R; Grant, C; Ludbrook, G

    1994-07-01

    A pulsed ultrasonic Doppler venous outflow method was developed for the continuous measurement of global cerebral blood flow (CBF) in conscious sheep. The sheep were prepared under anesthesia with a "suture down"-style ultrasonic flow probe on the dorsal sagittal sinus placed via a trephine hole. Angiographic and dye studies showed that the dorsal sagittal sinus at the point of placement of the probe collected the majority of the blood from the cerebral hemispheres. Studies of the blood velocity profile across the sinus showed that the dimensions of the dorsal sagittal sinus changed minimally with changes in CBF in vivo. The velocity measurements were calibrated under anesthesia against an in vivo direct venous outflow method. Control CBF values for six sheep ranged from 31 to 53 ml/min for the area of brain described above; for two sheep in which the weight of the brain was determined, this gave total CBF values of approximately 34 and 30 ml min-1 100 g-1. The CBF measured varied in the expected manner with changes in the end-tidal CO2 concentration in expired breath and showed transient reductions with the barbiturate thiopentone and transient increases with the opiate alfentanil. It is concluded that the method is simple and accurate. PMID:8014216

  7. A Case of Unexplained Cerebral Sinus Thrombosis in a 22-Year-Old Obese Caucasian Woman.

    PubMed

    Seheult, Jansen N; Chibisov, Irina

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we present the case of a 22-year old obese Caucasian woman female with no acquired thrombophilic risk factors who was diagnosed with extensive cerebral sinus thrombosis. A detailed thrombophilia workup demonstrated persistently elevated plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) activity levels, with an elevated PAI-1 antigen concentration and homozygosity for the PAI-1 4G allele (4G/4G genotype). The patient was treated with indefinite warfarin anticoagulation medication due to the unprovoked nature of her thrombotic event. Disturbances in the fibrinolytic system, in particular PAI-1, have been related to an increased risk of arterial and venous thrombosis. In this article, we discuss the pathophysiology of hypofibrinolysis associated with elevated PAI-1 levels and the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism. PMID:27287941

  8. The dorsal sagittal venous sinus anatomical variations in brachycephalic, dolichocephalic, and mesocephalic dogs and their significance for brain surgery.

    PubMed

    Carreira, L Miguel; Ferreira, António; Burilo, Fernando Liste

    2011-11-01

    Dorsal sagittal venous sinus (DSVS) is an encephalic structure located in the midline of brain dorsal surface, starting behind the frontal venous sinus and following the brain falx in its extension. Knowing DSVS morphology and cranial-cerebral relationships it is very important for surgeon when he is planning the placement of craniotomies, in order to prevent the damage of this structure. The main purpose of this study were to establish craniometric points that can be used as key points of neurosurgical importance providing an anatomic framework to brain access regarding the localization of DSVS, and to characterize the morphology of DSVS in the three groups considered in study according their type of skull (brachycephalic-B, dolychocephalic-D and mesocephalic-M). The study was performed on 138 formalin-fixed cerebral hemispheres of 69 adult dog cadavers (23 of each group) which had been removed from the skulls after the introduction of plastic catheters through properly positioned burr holes placed on the five craniometric points considered: asterion(ast), bregma(br), glabella(g), stephanion(st) and pterion(pt). From the three groups, DSVS length and width were different, his geometry in B assumed a triangular appearance and in D, M a "butterfly" shape. From all craniometric points considered, only bregma (br) can be useful as a landmark to delimitate DSVS morphology in all three groups. Asterion in M, stephanion in B, glabella and pterion in all three groups, can not be used to compose a framework that help to understand skull surface projection of DSVS morphology, since their measurements were not uniform. PMID:21972218

  9. Development of the Pulmonary Vein and the Systemic Venous Sinus: An Interactive 3D Overview

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Gert; Moorman, Antoon F. M.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the normal formation of the heart is crucial for the understanding of cardiac pathologies and congenital malformations. The understanding of early cardiac development, however, is complicated because it is inseparably associated with other developmental processes such as embryonic folding, formation of the coelomic cavity, and vascular development. Because of this, it is necessary to integrate morphological and experimental analyses. Morphological insights, however, are limited by the difficulty in communication of complex 3D-processes. Most controversies, in consequence, result from differences in interpretation, rather than observation. An example of such a continuing debate is the development of the pulmonary vein and the systemic venous sinus, or “sinus venosus”. To facilitate understanding, we present a 3D study of the developing venous pole in the chicken embryo, showing our results in a novel interactive fashion, which permits the reader to form an independent opinion. We clarify how the pulmonary vein separates from a greater vascular plexus within the splanchnic mesoderm. The systemic venous sinus, in contrast, develops at the junction between the splanchnic and somatic mesoderm. We discuss our model with respect to normal formation of the heart, congenital cardiac malformations, and the phylogeny of the venous tributaries. PMID:21779373

  10. Evaluation of cerebral venous thrombosis secondary to oral contraceptive use in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Hasan H; Varol, Sefer; Akıl, Eşref; Acar, Abdullah; Demir, Caner F

    2015-01-01

    Our goal was to evaluate the clinical patterns, additional risk factors, treatment and outcome of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) related to adolescent oral contraceptive pill (OCP) usage. We evaluated 22 patients with CVT related to OCPs admitted to Firat and Dicle University Hospitals from January 2008 to January 2013. We assessed the clinical features, risk factors, imaging results and prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance were the preferred procedures for the diagnosis of CVT. MRI revealed parenchymal lesions in 11 (50 %) patients, and the remaining patients had normal MRIs. The sinuses most frequently affected by thrombosis were the superior sagittal sinus and the transverse sinus. The additional risk factors identified for CVT were antiphospholipid syndrome, protein C deficiency, protein C and S deficiency, factor V Leiden associated with heterozygous antithrombin III deficiency, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and prothrombin gene mutations. CVT may be overlooked in adolescents because it is more common among middle-aged and elderly adults. CVT should be suspected in the presence of neurological symptoms in adolescents, especially in those using OCPs. PMID:25092566

  11. Cerebral venous thrombosis associated with micro-abscesses: case report.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Wataru; Fujita, Keishi; Onuma, Kuniyuki; Kamezaki, Takao; Sakashita, Shingo; Sugita, Shintarou

    2013-01-01

    We present a case that is most likely Lemierre's syndrome. A 19-year-old man presented to us with -common-cold-like symptoms, which he had had for 2 days, such as slight fever, general malaise, anorexia, sore throat, and headache. Eight days after the onset of these symptoms, he died of brain herniation due to cerebral venous thrombosis associated with micro-abscesses detected in pathological examination. PMID:23564158

  12. Changes in mixed venous and coronary sinus P50 secondary to anesthesia and cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, P L; Graham, B H; Moyers, J R; Hamilton, W K; Ports, T A; Ullyot, D J; Chatterjee, K

    1980-10-01

    Changes in oxyhemoglobin dissociation compensate partially for decreased O2 transport caused by high altitude, anemia, and cardiac disease. This investigation determined whether similar changes occurred in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization and the possible significance of such changes. In 15 patients scheduled for coronary vein bypass surgery the following were inserted: a #7 French catheter into the coronary sinus or great cardiac vein, a pulmonary arterial catheter (Swan-Ganz), and a radial arterial catheter. Patients were anesthetized with either halothane-N2O 50% or morphine (2 mg/kg IV) with N2O 50%. Hemodynamic status was measured and blood samples were taken from the catheters in the preoperative period and after endotracheal intubation, sternotomy, bypass, and chest closure. Blood samples were analyzed for pH, blood gas tensions, and O2 saturation. Values for P50 for mixed venous and coronary sinus blood were calculated from O2 tension and saturation. Patients were divided into two groups on the basis of peroperative mixed venous P50 values: group I had normal P50 levels of 26.1 +/- 2.0 torr (mean +/- SD); group II had elevated values for mixed venous blood P50 of 32.5 +/- 1.6 (mean +/- SD). Unlike group I, group II had depressed ventricular function and higher P50 values for coronary sinus blood than for mixed venous blood. Induction of anesthesia increased P50 values in group I but not in group II and removed the significant differences between group I and group II mixed venous P50 values. In group II patients, cardiopulmonary bypass lowered the elevated P50 of coronary sinus blood so that it equaled P50 for mixed venous blood. It is concluded that induction of anesthesia may elevate P50 in patients who have normal preoperative P50 values. The already elevated P50 values of patients with ventricular dysfunction did not change. Cardiopulmonary bypass decreased coronary sinus P50 in group II patients, and this change might be deleterious if

  13. A venous outflow method for continuously monitoring cerebral blood flow in the rat.

    PubMed

    Morii, S; Ngai, A C; Ko, K R; Winn, H R

    1986-02-01

    We analyzed the retroglenoid venous outflow (VOF) technique in the rat to document the validity of this method of measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF). Stereotypic changes in CBF were obtained with VOF during hypercarbia and hypotension. O2 content of retroglenoid venous blood did not differ significantly from O2 content of blood obtained from the sagittal sinus, suggesting minimal extracerebral contamination of the retroglenoid venous blood. This lack of extracerebral contamination was further analyzed using a double tracer technique (125I-labeled serum albumin, 22Na) that quantitated minimal extracerebral contamination in the retroglenoid vein. CBF measurements were made simultaneously using microsphere and VOF methods, and excellent correlation was found between the two techniques over a wide range of CBF during normoxia, hypoxia, and normoxic hypocarbia and hypercarbia. However, a decrease in the ratio of VOF to microsphere CBF was observed during severe normoxic hypotension (mean arterial pressure = 41 +/- 4 mmHg). VOF represented 18% of total CBF as measured by microsphere method. This study indicates that the retroglenoid outflow technique in rats is a valid method of measuring CBF. PMID:3080902

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Venous Sinus Stenosis in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Complications, Neurological Outcomes, and Radiographic Results

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Robert M.; Wang, Tony; Ding, Dale; Durst, Christopher R.; Crowley, R. Webster; Chalouhi, Nohra; Hasan, David M.; Dumont, Aaron S.; Jabbour, Pascal; Liu, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) may result in a chronic debilitating disease. Dural venous sinus stenosis with a physiologic venous pressure gradient has been identified as a potential etiology in a number of IIH patients. Intracranial venous stenting has emerged as a potential treatment alternative. Methods. A systematic review was carried out to identify studies employing venous stenting for IIH. Results. From 2002 to 2014, 17 studies comprising 185 patients who underwent 221 stenting procedures were reported. Mean prestent pressure gradient was 20.1 mmHg (95% CI 19.4–20.7 mmHg) with a mean poststent gradient of 4.4 mmHg (95% CI 3.5–5.2 mmHg). Complications occurred in 10 patients (5.4%; 95% CI 4.7–5.4%) but were major in only 3 (1.6%). At a mean clinical follow-up of 22 months, clinical improvement was noted in 130 of 166 patients with headaches (78.3%; 95% CI 75.8–80.8%), 84 of 89 patients with papilledema (94.4%; 95% CI 92.1–96.6%), and 64 of 74 patients with visual symptoms (86.5%; 95% CI 83.0–89.9%). In-stent stenosis was noted in six patients (3.4%; 95% CI 2.5–4.3%) and stent-adjacent stenosis occurred in 19 patients (11.4%; 95% CI 10.4–12.4), resulting in restenting in 10 patients. Conclusion. In IIH patients with venous sinus stenosis and a physiologic pressure gradient, venous stenting appears to be a safe and effective therapeutic option. Further studies are necessary to determine the long-term outcomes and the optimal management of medically refractory IIH. PMID:26146651

  15. Anatomy of the intramural venous sinuses of the right atrium and their tributaries.

    PubMed

    Ortale, J R; Marquez, C Q

    1998-01-01

    A precise knowledge of the mode of opening of the vv. on the anterior wall of the right ventricle, i.e., directly or by means of intramural venous sinuses in the right atrium, is of fundamental importance for cardiologic methods of examination and treatment. We dissected 32 hearts obtained from cadavers belonging to adult individuals of unknown age and sex, fixed and stored in formalin. A total of 151 veins were detected for the 32 cases. The following distribution was observed: 33 right marginal vv. (m) in 29/32, 59 anterior vv. of the right ventricle (a) in 29/32, 29 vv. of the arterial cone (c) in 26/32, 17 posterior vv. of the cone (p) in 17/32, and 13 Zuckerkandl vv. (z) in 13/32. Of these veins, a) 4 m emptied into the right atrium, with one of them forming a bifurcation and emptying twice; b) 4 m continued into a small cardiac v.; c) 6 collector vv. present in 4/32 cases emptied into the right atrium and received 2 m, 5 a, 2 c, 3 p and 2 z; d) 35 intramural venous sinuses were present in 30/32 or 94% of cases emptied into the right atrium and received 15 m, 26 a, 5 c, 4 p, 3 z and 32 collector vv., into which 8 m, 28 a, 22 c, 10 p and 8 z drained. In conclusion, these venous sinuses are normal and are very important for venous drainage. PMID:9574485

  16. Novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Feher, Gergely; Illes, Zsolt; Komoly, Samuel; Hargroves, David

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely diverse clinical features, predisposing factors, brain imaging findings, and outcome. Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of CVT management, however, it is not supported by high-quality evicence. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been extensively studied in patients with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and non-valvular atrial fibrillation. The aim of our work was to review the available evidence for NOACs in the treatment of CVT. Based on our literature search there is insufficient evidence to support the use of NOACs in CVT, although case series with rivaroxaban and dabigatran have showed promising results. PMID:25994451

  17. Cerebral venous thrombosis following spinal surgery in a patient with Factor V Leiden mutation.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Baran; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Akakın, Akın; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Konya, Deniz

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a devastating event leading to high mortality and morbidity rates. We present a case of cerebral venous thrombosis that occurred following spinal surgery in a patient with Factor V Leiden mutation and G1691A heterozygosity. Possible prevention and treatment strategies have been discussed. PMID:26414646

  18. Cerebral venous thrombosis associated with thyrotoxicosis, the use of desmopressin and elevated factor VIII/von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Waqar; Aljerdi, Salman; Decker, Barbara; Cushman, Mary; Hamill, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon disorder associated with diverse processes. We report a patient who, while receiving desmopressin and contraceptive pills (OCP), developed straight sinus thrombosis. Clinical assessment and laboratory investigations revealed untreated hyperthyroidism and a hypercoagulable state, characterised by high levels of von Willebrand factor, factor VIII coagulant activity and IgM cardiolipin antibody. The clinical picture improved with anticoagulation, treatment of hyperthyroidism and discontinuation of OCP and desmopressin. To the best of our knowledge, the association between the use of oral desmopressin and CVT has not been described. The multiple risk factors present in our case were probably additive in increasing the risk of CVT. Although this case represents a rare occurrence, practitioners should be alerted to the possible associations of desmopressin, oral contraceptives and Graves' disease with venous thrombosis. PMID:27503942

  19. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... my acute sinusitis is caused by viruses or bacteria? Acute viral sinusitis is likely if you have ... to tell if my sinusitis is caused by bacteria? Because sinusitis is treated differently based on cause. ...

  20. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can get from viral sinusitis or allergic rhinitis (inflammation of the nose and sinuses due to ... doctor just in case. Viral sinusitis and allergic rhinitis are more common, but bacterial sinusitis often needs ...

  1. Degree of Sigmoid Sinus Compression and the Symptom Relief Using Magnetic Resonance Angiography in Venous Pulsating Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To show that mechanical compression of sigmoid sinus is effective for treatment of pulsatile tinnitus caused by sigmoid sinus enlargement, and to evaluate the relationship between the compression degree of sigmoid sinus and the tinnitus symptom relief using magnetic resonance angiography. Methods Medical records of twenty-four patients who were diagnosed with venous tinnitus caused by sigmoid sinus enlargement and underwent mechanical compression of sigmoid sinus were reviewed between April 2009 and May 2013. All these patients received computed tomography and magnetic resonance venography study before undergoing surgery and were followed for at least 4 months. Results Twenty-three patients felt relief from tinnitus three months after the surgery, and the cross-sectional area of the sigmoid sinus on the tinnitus side was compressed approximately by half (46%-69%) after the surgery. There were 4 patients whose tinnitus suddenly disappeared while lying on the operating table before operation, which may be a result of the patient's emotional tension or postural changes from standing. One of the four patients felt no relief from tinnitus after the surgery, with the cross-sectional area of the sigmoid sinus only compressed by 30%. And two patients of them had a recurrence of tinnitus about 6 months after the surgery. Seven patients had sigmoid sinus diverticula, and tinnitus would not disappear merely by eliminating the diverticulum until by compressing the sigmoid sinus to certain degree. There were 3 minor complications, including aural fullness, head fullness and hyperacusis. The preoperative low frequency conductive and sensorineural hearing loss of 7 subjects subsided. Conclusion Mechanical compression of sigmoid sinus is an effective treatment for pulsatile tinnitus caused by sigmoid sinus enlargement, even if it might be accompanied by sigmoid sinus diverticulum. A compression degree of sigmoid sinus about 54% is adequate for the relief of tinnitus

  2. Use of single-slice thick slab phase-contrast angiography for the diagnosis of dural venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Adams, W M; Laitt, R D; Beards, S C; Kassner, A; Jackson, A

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the reliability of single-slice phase-contrast angiography (SSPCA) as a rapid technique for the investigation of suspected dural venous sinus occlusion. Images were obtained on 25 normal volunteers to document the accuracy of SSPCA in the demonstration of slow flow states. Normal volunteers were imaged using sagittal and coronal SSPCA (slice thickness 13 cm, matrix 256 x 256, TR 14 ms, TE 7 ms, flip angle 20 degrees, peak velocity encoding rate 30 cm/s). Sinus patency and flow rate were confirmed by measurement of flow in the superior sagittal and transverse sinuses using quantified single-slice phase difference images. Imaging was performed in 50 patients undergoing routine brain scans in order to determine the optimal slice orientation for clinical use. Twenty-one patients with suspected dural venous sinus thrombosis were also investigated with SSPCA and the diagnosis confirmed by one or more alternative imaging techniques. Imaging time was 29 s per acquisition and image quality was good in all cases. Variations in dural sinus patency and flow in normal volunteers were accurately predicted by SSPCA (kappa = 0.92). Use of a single angulated slice (130 mm thick, para-sagittal image angled 30 degrees towards coronal and 30 degrees towards transverse) provided sufficient separation of right- and left-sided venous structures to allow use of a single projection. The presence and extent of sinus occlusions in 14 patients and the absence of thrombosis in 7 were accurately identified by SSPCA. Sensitivity and specificity in this limited study were both 100%. The SSPCA technique takes less than 30 s and provides a reliable and rapid technique for the diagnosis of dural venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:10525876

  3. [Takayasu arteritis and cerebral venous thrombosis: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Mingo, E; Riofrío Cabeza, S; Villa Albuger, T; Velasco Blanco, M J

    2014-01-01

    Palpitations, paresthesias and anxiety are very common reasons of consultation in primary care. We report the case of a 40 year-old Caucasian woman who came to the clinic due to these symptoms, and was finally diagnosed with Takayasu arteritis. Later, she had an episode of headache, as the initial manifestation of cerebral venous thrombosis. Takayasu arteritis is a systemic vasculitis affecting medium and large arteries, mainly leacausing stenosis of the aorta and its branches. It most frequently affects Asian women, being much rarer in Europe. The primary care doctor plays a key role in the initial diagnosis and monitoring of patients with rare diseases, such as Takayasu arteritis, and must be a basic support for the patient and family, providing information and advice, and contributing with his work to reduce the vulnerability of this group. PMID:24468302

  4. Brain Herniations into the Dural Venous Sinuses or Calvarium: MRI of a Recently Recognized Entity

    PubMed Central

    Battal, Bilal; Castillo, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Brain herniations into dural venous sinuses (DVS) are rare findings recently described and their etiology and clinical significance are controversial. We describe five patients with brain herniations into the DVS or calvarium identified on MRI, and discuss their imaging findings, possible causes, and relationship to the patient's symptoms. All patients were examined with MRI including high resolution pre- and post-contrast T1- and T2-weighted sequences. With respect to brain herniations we documented their locations, signal intensities in different sequences, and size. We then reviewed clinical records in an attempt to establish if any symptoms were related to the presence of these herniations. Three males and two females were examined (age range, 11-68 years). Three patients had unilateral temporal lobe herniations into transverse sinuses, one had a cerebellar herniation into the skull, and one had bilateral temporal lobe herniations into the transverse sinuses as well as a cerebellar herniation into the sigmoid sinus. In all, the herniated brain and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had normal signal intensity on all MRI sequences. When correlated with clinical symptoms, brain herniations were thought to be incidental and asymptomatic in three patients and two patients had histories of headaches. Brain herniations with surrounding CSF into the DVS/skull should be considered potential sources of filling defects in the DVS. We believe that they are probably incidental findings that may be more common than previously recognized and should be not confused with the more common arachnoid granulations, clots, or tumors. Two patients had headaches, but their relation to the presence of herniated brain was uncertain. PMID:24571834

  5. Lessons from surgical outcome for intracranial meningioma involving major venous sinus.

    PubMed

    Han, Moon-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Jin; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Yang, Jung-In; Kang, Woo Dae; Lim, Sa-Hoe; Jang, Woo-Youl; Jung, Tae-Young; Kim, In-Young; Jung, Shin

    2016-08-01

    Intracranial meningiomas involving the major venous sinus (MVS) pose several complication risks upon performing radical resection. Some surgeons consider MVS invasion a contraindication for a complete resection of meningioma, and others suggest total resection followed by venous reconstruction. The aim of the study was to analyze our surgical results and discuss management strategy for intracranial meningiomas involving the MVS. Between 1993 and 2011, 107 patients with intracranial meningiomas involving MVS underwent surgery in our institution. Clinicoradiological features including pathological features and operative findings were retrospectively analyzed. Median follow-up duration was 60.2 months (range, 6.2-218.2 months). Distributions of tumor cases according to the involved sinus were as follows: 86% parasagittal, 10.3% tentorial, and 3.7% peritorcular. Simpson Grade I/II removal was achieved in 93 of 107 patients (87%). Partially or totally occluded MVS by their meningiomas (Sindou classification IV and V) was found in 39 patients (36%). Progression rate was 12% (13/107) and progression-free survival rates were 89%, 86%, and 80% at 5, 7, and 10 years, respectively. Sindou classification (IV/V) and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score 6 month after the surgery (KPS < 90) were predictive factors for progression in our study (P = 0.044 and P = 0.001, respectively). The resection degree did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.484). Interestingly, there was no progression in patients that underwent radiation therapy or gamma knife radiosurgery for residual tumor. There were no perioperative deaths. Complication rate was 21% with brain swelling being the most common complication. There was no predictive factor for occurrence of postoperative complication in this study. In conclusion, complete tumor resection with sinus reconstruction did not significantly prevent tumor recurrence in intracranial meningioma involving MVS. Considering the

  6. Lessons from surgical outcome for intracranial meningioma involving major venous sinus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Moon-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Jin; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Yang, Jung-In; Kang, Woo Dae; Lim, Sa-Hoe; Jang, Woo-Youl; Jung, Tae-Young; Kim, In-Young; Jung, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intracranial meningiomas involving the major venous sinus (MVS) pose several complication risks upon performing radical resection. Some surgeons consider MVS invasion a contraindication for a complete resection of meningioma, and others suggest total resection followed by venous reconstruction. The aim of the study was to analyze our surgical results and discuss management strategy for intracranial meningiomas involving the MVS. Between 1993 and 2011, 107 patients with intracranial meningiomas involving MVS underwent surgery in our institution. Clinicoradiological features including pathological features and operative findings were retrospectively analyzed. Median follow-up duration was 60.2 months (range, 6.2–218.2 months). Distributions of tumor cases according to the involved sinus were as follows: 86% parasagittal, 10.3% tentorial, and 3.7% peritorcular. Simpson Grade I/II removal was achieved in 93 of 107 patients (87%). Partially or totally occluded MVS by their meningiomas (Sindou classification IV and V) was found in 39 patients (36%). Progression rate was 12% (13/107) and progression-free survival rates were 89%, 86%, and 80% at 5, 7, and 10 years, respectively. Sindou classification (IV/V) and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score 6 month after the surgery (KPS < 90) were predictive factors for progression in our study (P = 0.044 and P = 0.001, respectively). The resection degree did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.484). Interestingly, there was no progression in patients that underwent radiation therapy or gamma knife radiosurgery for residual tumor. There were no perioperative deaths. Complication rate was 21% with brain swelling being the most common complication. There was no predictive factor for occurrence of postoperative complication in this study. In conclusion, complete tumor resection with sinus reconstruction did not significantly prevent tumor recurrence in intracranial meningioma involving MVS

  7. Rare variants of total anomalous pulmonary venous connection to coronary sinus-echocardiographic recognition and surgical correction.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Munesh; Radhakrishnan, Sitaraman; Iyer, Krishna S; Shrivastava, Savitri

    2008-01-01

    Total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC) to the coronary sinus is a well-known entity but variations in connection sites are known to occur, the commonest among them is mixed connection. Here we describe two rare variants of TAPVC to coronary sinus. Group I (3 cases) in which there were dual sites of connection and group II (2 cases), TAPVC to coronary sinus was associated with a persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC). This was seen in total number of 45 cases of isolated TAPVC and 8 cases of TAPVC to coronary sinus between 2000 and December 2005 in our institute. All patients underwent surgical correction. In both of these groups, surgical correction may pose a challenge, which is discussed. PMID:19240320

  8. Immunocompetent young man with cerebral abscess and cortical venous infarction mimicking cerebritis caused by Gemella morbillorum.

    PubMed

    Milnik, Annette; Gazis, Angelos; Tammer, Ina; Bartels, Claudius

    2013-01-01

    Gemella morbillorum is an anaerobic gram-positive diplococcus and in most cases a harmless commensal, which occasionally causes infections in the central nervous system. We report on an immunocompetent young man with focal neurological symptoms and cephalgia caused by a cerebral abscess. Although successful treatment was done with neurosurgical intervention and antibiotic therapy, he suffered from a venous infarction 5 weeks after first diagnosis, which mimicked cerebritis as an early stage of relapsing abscess. Imaging and investigation of cerebrospinal fluid was necessary for sufficient differential diagnosis and antibiotic therapy could be stopped after altogether 8 weeks of treatment. In summary, G morbillorum causes not only biphasic infections, but also can be accompanied by infarction in the central nervous system despite sufficient antibiotic therapy. PMID:23355562

  9. Cerebral venous malformation with meningioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MU, QINGCHUN; ZHANG, KUN; WANG, JUSTIN; SAYARI, ARASH; HUANG, HAIYAN

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old female patient was admitted to The First Hospital of Jilin University (Changchun, China) on 1st October 2011 with a 10-day history of discontinuous, whole-brain headache and a 1-year history of impaired vision and memory deterioration, accompanied by right facial numbness. Clinical signs and radiological features observed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) led to the diagnosis of an intracranial meningioma accompanied by a cerebral venous malformation (CVM). The patient underwent neurosurgical resection of the meningioma, but required no further treatment for the CVM. At a 1-year follow-up examination, the patient continued to complain of discontinuous headache. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to reconfirm the CVM diagnosis; however, no treatment was administered due to the high risks of treatment and only mild symptoms experienced by the patient. The present case demonstrates the efficacy of DSA for detecting the presence and specific nature of CVM, and compares the value of MRI and DSA in the diagnosis of CVM. The majority of CVM patients exhibit no clinical symptoms, and the disease prognosis is typically favorable. PMID:26998016

  10. Inherited prothrombotic risk factors and cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hillier, C E; Collins, P W; Bowen, D J; Bowley, S; Wiles, C M

    1998-10-01

    Fifteen patients with cerebral venous thrombosis were ascertained retrospectively. Their case notes were reviewed, and stored or new blood was assayed for factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation, prothrombin gene mutation 20201A, and 5,10 methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation. A clinical risk factor was identified in 13 patients--the oral contraceptive pill (5), puerperium (1), HRT (1), mastoiditis (1), dehydration (1), lumbar puncture and myelography (1), carcinoma (1), lupus anticoagulant (2). In addition, two patients had the FVL mutation and five (one of whom also had the FVL mutation) were homozygous for the MTHFR mutation. The latter showed a higher than expected frequency compared to 300 healthy controls from South Wales (OR 3.15.95% Cl 1.01-9.83). No patient had the prothrombin 20201A mutation. Two patients died and three had a monocular visual deficit following anticoagulation (13) or thrombolytic (2) treatment, but there was no association between the presence of a primary prothrombotic risk factor and outcome. These results confirm the importance of investigating patients for both clinical predisposing factors and primary prothrombotic states. PMID:10024925

  11. Cerebral Venous Infarction: A Potentially Avoidable Complication of Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Takashi; Okun, Michael S.; Burdick, Adam; Jacobson, Charles E; Foote, Kelly D.

    2013-01-01

    Object Despite numerous reports on the morbidity and mortality of deep brain stimulation (DBS), cerebral venous infarction has rarely been reported. We present four cases of venous infarct secondary to DBS surgery. Methods The diagnosis of venous infarction was based on: 1) delayed onset of new neurologic deficits on post-operative day 1 or 2, and 2) significant edema surrounding the superficial aspect of the implanted lead, with or without subcortical hemorrhage on CT scan. Results Four cases (0.8%/lead, 1.3%/patient) of symptomatic cerebral venous infarction were identified out of 500 DBS lead implantation procedures between July 2002 and August 2009. All four patients had Parkinson’s disease (PD). Their DBS leads were implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) (n=2), and the internal globus pallidus (GPi) (n=2). Retrospective review of the targeting confirmed that the planned trajectory passed within 3mm of a cortical vein in two cases for which contrast-enhanced pre-operative MRI was available. In the other two cases, contrasted targeting images were not obtained preoperatively. Conclusion Cerebral venous infarction is a potentially avoidable, but serious complication. To minimize its incidence, we propose the use of high resolution, contrast-enhanced, T1 weighted MR images to delineate cerebral venous anatomy, along with careful stereotactic planning of the lead trajectory to avoid injury to venous structures. PMID:23738501

  12. Retrograde venous invasion in renal cell carcinoma: a complication of sinus vein and main renal vein invasion.

    PubMed

    Bonsib, Stephen M; Bhalodia, Ami

    2011-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma, especially clear cell, gains access to the venous system as the initial route of extrarenal spread. Intravenous growth can involve extrarenal veins or renal veins in other portions of the kidney, referred to herein as retrograde venous invasion. This study investigates the incidence and defines the pathological features of retrograde venous invasion. Retrograde venous invasion is defined as rounded nodules of tumor separated from the primary tumor and in a location that conforms to the venous outflow. Nine cases of retrograde venous invasion were identified in a series of 115 renal cell carcinomas (8%). Two blocks from each case were stained with elastic van Gieson, Masson trichrome, CD31 and desmin to evaluate intravenous involvement. All cases were staged using the 2010 TNM staging schema. The tumors ranged in size from 4.2 to 17 cm. All cases showed sinus vein and main renal vein invasion (pT3a); three cases involved the vena cava (pT3b). Direct continuity between the primary tumor and tumor in the main renal vein was grossly evident in every case. Involved sinus veins could be followed retrograde to the cortex between renal pyramids with tumor nodules arrayed along the pyramid-cortex interface. Histologically, the involved parenchymal veins lacked a smooth muscle media and elastica. CD31 demonstrated an endothelial cell lining around many nodules. As intravenous nodules enlarged endothelium was lost, extra-venous invasion occurred and nodules coalesced and merged with the primary tumor. In conclusion, retrograde venous invasion occurred only with main renal vein involvement. Gross evaluation allowed detection in every case. Histological confirmation of intravenous nature is challenging due to the absence of smooth muscle in parenchymal veins. As retrograde growth becomes extensive nodules coalesce and merge with the primary tumor and may be included in measurement of primary tumor size if this process is unrecognized. PMID:21822202

  13. A Prospective Study of the Clinical Profile, Outcome and Evaluation of D-dimer in Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Dharanipragada, Subrahmanyam; Basu, Debdatta; Ananthakrishnan, Ramesh; Surendiran, Deepanjali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral Venous Thrombosis (CVT) is a well known disease with diverse clinical presentation and causes. With advances in neuroimaging and changing lifestyles, the clinical profile and causes of CVT are changing. D-dimer has been studied in early diagnosis of CVT with variable results. This prospective study was carried out to assess the clinical profile of CVT and role of D-dimer in diagnosis of CVT. Aim To study various aspects of CVT and role of D-dimer. Materials and Methods The study period was September 2012 to July 2014 and included 80 imaging proven patients of CVT. We also included 39 controls for assessing D-dimer. Data was collected according to a preformed format. D-dimer was assessed by a rapid semi-quantitative latex agglutination assay. Discharged patients were followed up to six months. Results Of the total 44 were women and 36 were men (F: M=1.2:1). The mean age of the patients was 29.5±9.68 years. Most common clinical features were headache 77 (96.25%), papilloedema (67.5%) and seizures 51 (63.75%). Pregnancy was the most common cause of CVT. Superior sagittal and transverse sinuses were the most common sinuses to be affected. The sensitivity and specificity of D-dimer for diagnosing CVT was 84.62% and 80% respectively. The risk factors for poor prognosis were altered sensorium, presence of sepsis, increased sinus involvement and deep sinus thrombosis. Conclusion CVT affects both sexes equally. Puerperium still contributes to majority of the cases. Iron deficiency anaemia needs to be evaluated as a contributing factor for incidence of CVT. D-dimer is not useful in puerperal female with CVT. Positive D-dimer will strengthen the suspicion of CVT in patients with acute headache followed by a neurological deficit. PMID:27504325

  14. Morphological Variations in the Transverse Venous Sinus Anatomy of Dogs and its Relationship to Skull Landmarks.

    PubMed

    Carreira, L Miguel; Ferreira, A

    2016-08-01

    We characterized the anatomical morphology of the transverse venous sinus (TVS) of 69 canine adult cadavers belonging to three groups: brachycephalic (B), dolichocephalic (D) and mesaticephalic (M). In addition, we outlined its path over the skull using five classic human craniometric points (CPs): the asterion (ast), the bregma (b), the glabella (g), the stephanion (st) and the pterion (pt). The study aimed to establish anatomical differences in the TVS between groups and in the relationship between the TVS and skull. We found that TVS anatomy and its relationships to skull landmarks vary markedly between the groups, with similar anatomical arrangements in B and M. The TVS length can be ranked as M < B < D (with D being the biggest), whereas the width can be ranked as M < D < B (with B being the widest) with the right side being smaller than the left. In the B and M groups, the TVS assumes a craniocaudal trajectory that is closer to the lateral skull wall than in D, where the TVS presents a caudocranial direction. By documenting the morphological characteristics of the TVS, we can create a set of anatomical references allowing construction of a basic framework to greatly decrease the probability of TVS injury during neuronavigation procedures when supported by a good knowledge of the skull, brain anatomies and their relationships. PMID:26315333

  15. Chronic fungal sinusitis leading to disastrous cerebral aspergillosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral angioinvasion is a fatal complication of disseminated aspergillosis and has been rarely described in diabetic population in the absence of ketoacidosis. We present a case of invasive fungal sinusitis in a 79 year old diabetic man who presented with chronic frontal headaches. Despite appropriate medical and surgical treatment, the disease progressed and the patient eventually succumbed to a fatal ruptured mycotic aneurysm. We emphasize that clinicians should consider this in the differential diagnoses of all diabetics who present with chronic sinusitis, as early diagnosis could be the key in the successful treatment. PMID:20069073

  16. Cerebral venous thrombosis complicated by hemorrhagic infarction secondary to ventriculoperitoneal shunting.

    PubMed

    Son, Won-Soo; Park, Jaechan

    2010-10-01

    While a delayed intracerebral hemorrhage at the site of a ventricular catheter has occasionally been reported in literature, a delayed hemorrhage caused by venous infarction secondary to ventriculoperitoneal shunting has not been previously reported. In the present case, a 68-year-old woman underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting through a frontal burr hole, and developed a hemorrhagic transformation of venous infarction on the second postoperative day. This massive venous infarction was caused by bipolar coagulation and occlusion of a large paramedian cortical vein in association with atresia of the rostral superior sagittal sinus. Thus, to eliminate the risk of postoperative venous infarction, technical precautions to avoid damaging surface vessels in a burr hole are required under loupe magnification in ventriculoperitoneal shunting. PMID:21113365

  17. TRANSITION TO COLLATERAL FLOW AFTER ARTERIAL OCCLUSION PREDISPOSES TO CEREBRAL VENOUS STEAL

    PubMed Central

    Pranevicius, Osvaldas; Pranevicius, Mindaugas; Pranevicius, Henrikas; Liebeskind, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Stroke related tissue pressure increase in the core (Pcore) and penumbra (Ppen) determines regional cerebral perfusion pressure (rCPP) defined as a difference between local inflow pressure (Pi) and venous (Pv) or tissue pressure, whichever is higher. We previously showed that venous pressure reduction below the Pcore causes blood flow diversion - cerebral venous steal. Now we investigated how transition to collateral circulation after complete arterial occlusion affects rCPP distribution. Methods We modified two parallel Starling resistor model to simulate transition to collateral inflow after complete main stem occlusion. We decreased Pv from the arterial pressure (Pa) to zero, and investigated how arterial and venous pressure elevation augments rCPP. Results When core pressure exceeded venous (Pcore>Pv), rCPP=Pi−Pcore. Venous pressure (Pv) decrease from Pa to Pcore caused smaller Pi to drop augmenting rCPP. Further drop of Pv to Ppen decreased rCPP in the core but augmented rCPP in penumbra. After transition to collateral circulation, lowering Pv below Ppen further decreased rCPP and collaterals themselves became pathway for steal. Venous pressure level at which rCPP in the core becomes zero we termed the “point of no reflow” (PONR). Transition from direct to collateral circulation resulted in decreased Pi, decreased rCPP, and a shift of PONR to higher venous loading values. Arterial pressure augmentation increased rCPP, but only after venous pressure exceeded PONR. Conclusion In the presence of tissue pressure gradients, transition to collateral flow predisposes to venous steal (collateral failure) which may be reversed by venous pressure augmentation. PMID:22246692

  18. Cerebral venous overdrainage: an under-recognized complication of cerebrospinal fluid diversion.

    PubMed

    Barami, Kaveh

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the altered physiology following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion in the setting of adult hydrocephalus is important for optimizing patient care and avoiding complications. There is mounting evidence that the cerebral venous system plays a major role in intracranial pressure (ICP) dynamics especially when one takes into account the effects of postural changes, atmospheric pressure, and gravity on the craniospinal axis as a whole. An evolved mechanism acting at the cortical bridging veins, known as the "Starling resistor," prevents overdrainage of cranial venous blood with upright positioning. This protective mechanism can become nonfunctional after CSF diversion, which can result in posture-related cerebral venous overdrainage through the cranial venous outflow tracts, leading to pathological states. This review article summarizes the relevant anatomical and physiological bases of the relationship between the craniospinal venous and CSF compartments and surveys complications that may be explained by the cerebral venous overdrainage phenomenon. It is hoped that this article adds a new dimension to our therapeutic methods, stimulates further research into this field, and ultimately improves our care of these patients. PMID:27581321

  19. A venous outflow method for measurement of rapid changes of the cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption in the rat.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, B; Siesjö, B K

    1983-01-01

    A technique for continuous measurement of cerebral venous outflow in the rat is described. The method involves cannulation of one retroglenoid vein close to its exit from the skull, and diversion of cerebral venous blood through a closed extracorporal circuit with a drop recording device, the blood being returned to the central venous circulation via a catheter in the external jugular vein. Occlusion of the contralateral retroglenoid vein increases measured flow and minimizes extracerebral contamination of the diverted cerebral venous blood. The venous outflow system is not further isolated from cerebral or potential extracerebral collaterals. Thus, the mass of tissue drained cannot be exactly defined anatomically. However, the experiments involving changes of PP, arterial CO2 tension, and induction of epileptic seizure activity, and simultaneous indirect measurements with radioactive tracer technique, indicate that significant extracerebral contamination does not occur and that in short term measurements the venous outflow represents cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a constant mass of (dorsal and central, mainly forebrain) cerebral tissue. Measurement of arterial blood pressure and pressure in the cisterna magna allows calculation of cerebral perfusion pressure (PP). By simultaneous measurement of arterial and cerebral venous oxygen content changes in cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO2) can be calculated. The method has been applied to document several situations of transient CBF and CMRO2 changes. PMID:6658967

  20. Cerebral venous thrombosis associated with homozygous factor V Leiden mutation in a 15-year-old girl of Tunisian origin.

    PubMed

    Salem-Berrabah, Olfa Ben; Fekih-Mrissa, Nejiba; Laayouni, Samy; Gritli, Nasreddine; Mrissa, Ridha

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare disease. It has numerous and complex etiologies. Inherited or acquired prothrombotic states play a key role in the development of this disease, such as factor V G1691A mutation (FV Leiden). A 15-year-old girl presented to the Department of Neurology with a complaint of severe headache with visual blurring. The diagnosis of CVT was not initially suspected because of the patient's condition on presentation. An MRI showed thrombosis in the superior sagittal sinus, confirming venous stroke. Anticardiolipin and antiphospholipid antibodies were assessed. In addition, inherited prothrombotic defects, such as protein C, protein S, and antithrombin deficiencies, and genetic mutations for FV Leiden, prothrombin gene G20210A (FII G20210A), and methyltetrahydrofolate reductase C677T (MTHFR C677T) were studied. All results were unremarkable except for the unique homozygous FV Leiden mutation, which likely contributed to this prothrombotic situation. This study highlights the fact that FV Leiden may play a significant role in the onset of CVT in young patients. PMID:22048515

  1. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage in a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gentle Sunder; Poudyal, Bishesh Sharma; Sedain, Gopal; Mahmud, Khandokar Imran; Acharya, Niranja

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare type of hemolytic anemia, frequently associated with thrombophilia. PNH may rarely present with CVT. Approximately, one-third of the patients with CVT develop cerebral hemorrhage. Here, we present a rare combination of CVT presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage in a patient with PNH. High index of suspicion is needed to avoid misdiagnosis. Patient was successfully managed with anticoagulation therapy. PMID:27076714

  2. Angioarchitectural changes in subacute cerebral venous thrombosis. A synchrotron-based micro- and nano-CT study.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Erwin; Yeniguen, Mesut; Kreisel, Melanie; Kampschulte, Marian; Doenges, Simone; Sedding, Daniel; Ritman, Erik L; Gerriets, Tibo; Langheinrich, Alexander C

    2011-02-01

    It is well known that recanalization of thrombosed cerebral sinuses occurs early but without marked influence on the long-term outcome and on final venous infarct volume on magnetic resonance imaging. To better understand the possible microvascular mechanisms behind these clinical observations, we evaluated the sequels of subacute superior sagittal sinus (SSS) thrombosis in rats using micro- and nano-CT imaging of the same specimen to provide large volume and high resolution CT image data respectively. SSS thrombosis was induced in 11 animals which were euthanized after 6h (n=4) or 6 weeks (n=7). Eight sham-operated rats served as controls. After infusion of contrast into the vasculature of the brains, these were isolated and scanned using micro-, nano-, and synchrotron-based micro-CT ((8 μm³), (900 nm)³, and (1.9 μm³) voxel sizes). The cross-sectional area of the superior sagittal sinus, microvessels and cortical veins were quantified. Tissue sections were stained against VEGF antigen. Immunohistochemistry was confirmed using quantitative rtPCR. SSS thrombosis led to a congestion of the bridging veins after 6h. After 6 weeks, a network of small vessels surrounding the occluded SSS was present with concurrent return towards the diameter of the draining bridging veins of controls. This microvascular network connected to cortical veins as demonstrated by nano- and synchrotron-based micro-CT. Also the volume fraction and number of cortical veins increased significantly. Immunohistochemistry in the region of the microsvascular network demonstrated a strong immunoreactivity against VEGF, confirmed by rtPCR. The sequel of subacute SSS thrombosis induced a network of microvessels ("venogenesis") draining the bridging veins. Also the volume fraction of cortical veins increased significantly. PMID:20974267

  3. Angioarchitectural Changes in Subacute Cerebral Venous Thrombosis. A Synchrotron-based Micro- and Nano-CT Study

    SciTech Connect

    E Stolz; M Yeniguen; M Kreisel; M Kampschulte; S Doenges; D Sedding; E Ritman; T Gerriets; A Langheinrich

    2011-12-31

    It is well known that recanalization of thrombosed cerebral sinuses occurs early but without marked influence on the long-term outcome and on final venous infarct volume on magnetic resonance imaging. To better understand the possible microvascular mechanisms behind these clinical observations, we evaluated the sequels of subacute superior sagittal sinus (SSS) thrombosis in rats using micro- and nano-CT imaging of the same specimen to provide large volume and high resolution CT image data respectively. SSS thrombosis was induced in 11 animals which were euthanized after 6 h (n = 4) or 6 weeks (n = 7). Eight sham-operated rats served as controls. After infusion of contrast into the vasculature of the brains, these were isolated and scanned using micro-, nano-, and synchrotron-based micro-CT ((8 {mu}m{sup 3}), (900 nm){sup 3}, and (1.9 {mu}m{sup 3}) voxel sizes). The cross-sectional area of the superior sagittal sinus, microvessels and cortical veins were quantified. Tissue sections were stained against VEGF antigen. Immunohistochemistry was confirmed using quantitative rtPCR. SSS thrombosis led to a congestion of the bridging veins after 6 h. After 6 weeks, a network of small vessels surrounding the occluded SSS was present with concurrent return towards the diameter of the draining bridging veins of controls. This microvascular network connected to cortical veins as demonstrated by nano- and synchrotron-based micro-CT. Also the volume fraction and number of cortical veins increased significantly. Immunohistochemistry in the region of the microsvascular network demonstrated a strong immunoreactivity against VEGF, confirmed by rtPCR. The sequel of subacute SSS thrombosis induced a network of microvessels ('venogenesis') draining the bridging veins. Also the volume fraction of cortical veins increased significantly.

  4. Relative changes of cerebral arterial and venous blood volumes during increased cerebral blood flow: implications for BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Lee, S P; Duong, T Q; Yang, G; Iadecola, C; Kim, S G

    2001-05-01

    Measurement of cerebral arterial and venous blood volumes during increased cerebral blood flow can provide important information regarding hemodynamic regulation under normal, pathological, and neuronally active conditions. In particular, the change in venous blood volume induced by neural activity is one critical component of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal because BOLD contrast is dependent only on venous blood, not arterial blood. Thus, relative venous and arterial blood volume (rCBV) and cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in alpha-chlorolase-anesthetized rats under hypercapnia were measured by novel diffusion-weighted (19)F NMR following an i.v. administration of intravascular tracer, perfluorocarbons, and continuous arterial spin labeling methods, respectively. The relationship between rCBF and total rCBV during hypercapnia was rCBV(total) = rCBF(0.40), which is consistent with previous PET measurement in monkeys. This relationship can be linearized in a CBF range of 50-130 ml/100 g/min as DeltarCBV(total)/ DeltarCBF = 0.31 where DeltarCBV and DeltarCBF represent rCBV and rCBF changes. The average arterial volume fraction was 0.25 at a basal condition with CBF of approximately 60 ml/100 g/min and increased up to 0.4 during hypercapnia. The change in venous rCBV was 2-fold smaller than that of total rCBV (DeltarCBV(vein)/DeltarCBF = 0.15), while the arterial rCBV change was 2.5 times larger than that of total rCBV (DeltarCBV(artery)/DeltarCBF = 0.79). These NMR results were confirmed by vessel diameter measurements with in vivo videomicroscopy. The absolute venous blood volume change contributes up to 36% of the total blood volume change during hypercapnia. Our findings provide a quantitative physiological model of BOLD contrast. PMID:11323805

  5. [Successful delivery following subcutaneous heparin administration in a 7-weeks pregnant patient suffering from cerebral venous thrombosis due to secondary protein S deficiency].

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Hiroaki; Naruse, Satoshi; Koike, Tadashi; Okuizumi, Yuzuru; Fujita, Nobuya; Nagai, Hiroko

    2006-03-01

    A 25-year-old, 7-weeks pregnant woman was admitted to the Nagaoka Red Cross Hospital in a state of confusion, following fever, headache and vomiting. Brain CT and MRI showed swelling in the bilateral thalami, basal ganglia and splenium of corpus callosum, and thrombosis of the internal cerebral veins and straight sinus. Initial treatment by intravenous heparin and glycerol was successful, and she regained her consciousness, leaving antegrade amnesia and childish character change. Her free protein S antigen was 32% (normal 60-127) and subsequently rose to 70% after delivery. She was diagnosed as having secondary protein S deficiency associated with pregnancy. Because warfarin can be teratogenic, subcutaneous heparin injection was prescribed in order to prevent thrombosis and the patient subsequently had a successful delivery. This was the first case in Japanese of successful delivery after subcutaneous heparin treatment in a patient with cerebral venous thrombosis. PMID:16642938

  6. Differentiating the headache of cerebral venous thrombosis from post-dural puncture: A headache for anaesthesiologists

    PubMed Central

    Sherfudeen, Khaja Mohideen; Ramasamy, Gurumoorthi; Kaliannan, Senthil Kumar; Dammalapati, Pavan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare complication of lumbar puncture. Occasionally, the clinical picture of CVT may mimic post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) resulting in delayed diagnosis. A case of PDPH progressing to CVT is presented and the pathophysiology, diagnostic challenges and management options discussed in this article. PMID:27212724

  7. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... will develop sinusitis: Allergic rhinitis or hay fever Cystic fibrosis Going to day care Diseases that prevent the ... Nasal culture Nasal cytology Sweat chloride tests for cystic fibrosis Treatment SELF CARE Try the following steps to ...

  8. [Diagnostic criteria of ultrasonographic methods of the study of cerebral venous circulatory failure in initial manifestations of cerebrovascular disorders].

    PubMed

    Eninia, G I; Egere, D A; Robule, V Kh

    1990-01-01

    Altogether 94 patients with initial manifestations of brain blood supply failure (IMBBSF) consequent on vegetative vascular dystonia and atherosclerosis of the cerebral vessels were examined. Clinical, echopulsographic and dopplerographic examinations demonstrated that 54 patients had cerebral venous discirculation. The main diagnostic criteria for cerebral venous discirculation in patients with IMBBSF lie in an increase of the configuration of the diastolic part of the echoPG of the cerebral arteries, possibility of recording echoPG of the cerebral veins, a rise of the linear velocity of the blood flow in the jugular veins under head-down test during dopplerography. PMID:2175094

  9. Anatomical Variations of Cerebral MR Venography: Is Gender Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rambir; Bansal, Nikhil; Paliwal, Vimal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Knowledge of variations in the cerebral dural venous sinus anatomy seen on magnetic resonance (MR) venography is essential to avoid over-diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Very limited data is available on gender difference of the cerebral dural venous sinus anatomy variations. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was conducted to study the normal anatomy of the intracranial venous system and its normal variation, as depicted by 3D MR venography, in normal adults and any gender-related differences. Results A total of 1654 patients (582 men, 1072 women, age range 19 to 86 years, mean age: 37.98±13.83 years) were included in the study. Most common indication for MR venography was headache (75.4%). Hypoplastic left transverse sinus was the most common anatomical variation in 352 (21.3%) patients. Left transverse sinus was hypoplastic in more commonly in male in comparison to female (24.9% versus 19.3%, p = 0.009). Most common variation of superior sagittal sinus (SSS) was atresia of anterior one third SSS (15, 0.9%). Except hypoplastic left transverse sinus, rest of anatomical variations of the transverse and other sinuses were not significantly differ among both genders. Conclusion Hypoplastic left transverse sinus is the most common anatomical variation and more common in male compared to female in the present study. Other anatomical variations of dural venous sinuses are not significantly differ among both genders. PMID:27621945

  10. The post-occipital spinal venous sinus of the Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus: its anatomy and use for blood sample collection and intravenous infusions.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, Jan G; Kirberger, Robert M; Steyl, Johan C A; Soley, John T; Booyse, Dirk G; Huchzermeyer, Fritz W; Lowers, Russel H; Guillette, Louis J

    2014-01-01

    The post-occipital sinus of the spinal vein is often used for the collection of blood samples from crocodilians. Although this sampling method has been reported for several crocodilian species, the technique and associated anatomy has not been described in detail in any crocodilian, including the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus). The anatomy of the cranial neck region was investigated macroscopically, microscopically, radiographically and by means of computed tomography. Latex was injected into the spinal vein and spinal venous sinus of crocodiles to visualise the regional vasculature. The spinal vein ran within the vertebral canal, dorsal to and closely associated with the spinal cord and changed into a venous sinus cranially in the post-occipital region. For blood collection, the spinal venous sinus was accessed through the interarcuate space between the atlas and axis (C1 and C2) by inserting a needle angled just off the perpendicular in the midline through the craniodorsal cervical skin, just cranial to the cranial borders of the first cervical osteoderms. The most convenient method of blood collection was with a syringe and hypodermic needle. In addition, the suitability of the spinal venous sinus for intravenous injections and infusions in live crocodiles was evaluated. The internal diameter of the commercial human epidural catheters used during these investigations was relatively small, resulting in very slow infusion rates. Care should be taken not to puncture the spinal cord or to lacerate the blood vessel wall using this route for blood collection or intravenous infusions. PMID:24831995

  11. Intracranial venous thrombosis complicating oral contraception

    PubMed Central

    Dindar, F.; Platts, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    Four days after the onset of a severe headache a 22-year-old woman who had been taking oral contraceptives for less than three weeks had a convulsion, followed by right hemiparesis. Other focal neurologic signs and evidence of raised intracranial pressure appeared, and she became comatose on the seventh day. A left craniotomy revealed extensive cerebral venous thrombosis. She died the next day. On postmortem examination extensive thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus and draining cerebral veins, and multiple areas of cerebral hemorrhage and hemorrhagic infarction were seen. Some of the superficial cerebral veins showed focal necrosis of their walls, and the lateral lacunae of the superior sagittal sinus contained proliferating endothelial cells. The adrenal veins were also thrombosed. The significance of these findings is discussed. The literature on cerebrovascular complications of oral contraception, particularly cerebral venous thrombosis, is reviewed. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:4413961

  12. Why Current Doppler Ultrasound Methodology Is Inaccurate in Assessing Cerebral Venous Return: The Alternative of the Ultrasonic Jugular Venous Pulse

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of cerebral venous return is growing interest for potential application in clinical practice. Doppler ultrasound (DUS) was used as a screening tool. However, three meta-analyses of qualitative DUS protocol demonstrate a big heterogeneity among studies. In an attempt to improve accuracy, several authors alternatively measured the flow rate, based on the product of the time average velocity with the cross-sectional area (CSA). However, also the quantification protocols lacked of the necessary accuracy. The reasons are as follows: (a) automatic measurement of the CSA assimilates the jugular to a circle, while it is elliptical; (b) the use of just a single CSA value in a pulsatile vessel is inaccurate; (c) time average velocity assessment can be applied only in laminar flow. Finally, the tutorial describes alternative ultrasound calculation of flow based on the Womersley method, which takes into account the variation of the jugular CSA overtime. In the near future, it will be possible to synchronize the electrocardiogram with the brain inflow (carotid distension wave) and with the outflow (jugular venous pulse) in order to nicely have a noninvasive ultrasound picture of the brain-heart axis. US jugular venous pulse may have potential use in neurovascular, neurocognitive, neurosensorial, and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27006525

  13. [Percutaneous mitral commissurotomy associated to sinus venosus atrial septal defect and partially anomalous pulmonary venous connection: a case report].

    PubMed

    Fradi El Faleh, I; Ezzar, M T; Zaroui, A; Boussaada, R; Mechmèche, R

    2014-04-01

    Lutembacher's syndrome refers to the rare combination of congenital atrial septal defect and acquired mitral stenosis. It is rarely associated to partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection. This condition is treated surgically by mitral commissurotomy or mitral valve operation with concomitant closure of the atrial septal defect with correction of the abnormal pulmonary venous connection. Percutaneous mitral commissurotomy before surgery can be a therapeutic alternative when mitral valve stenosis is severe and valve anatomy is favourable. The authors bring back the case of a 24 years old man having mitral stenosis in sinus rhythm associated to sinus venosus septal defect and partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection. The diagnosis was made for the age of 17 years old on the occasion of dyspnea. He benefited in February 2003 of rescue percutaneous mitral commissurotomy because of pulmonary oedema. Mitral valve area increased from 0.7 cm(2) to 1.6 cm(2). The patient was clinically approved, so that he refused surgery and was lost sight. Seven years later (August 2010) he was taken back for a second rescue percutaneous mitral commissurotomy because of a very severe mitral stenosis (mitral valve area was 0.8cm(2)), in pulmonary oedema with echocardiographic evaluated pulmonary hypertension at 68mmHg. The trans-septal complicated of a false road from the right atrium, towards the pericardic cavity. The patient was operated as the matter of urgency, and benefited from a mitral valve replacement by mechanical prosthesis, of closure of sinus venosus septal defect by PTFE patch and correction of abnormal pulmonary venous connection. Operating suites were simple, and the postoperative echocardiography concludes to a good prosthesis profile, the absence of residual shunt and a decrease of pulmonary artery blood pressure from 68 to 40mmHg. In conclusion, percutaneous mitral commissurotomy may be a waiting procedure for surgery of this disease or emergency treatment of

  14. Bilateral cavernous sinus and superior ophthalmic vein thrombosis in the setting of facial cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Bruce; Hise, Joseph; Philip, Joseph; Spak, Cedric; Opatowsky, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare, potentially fatal cause of cerebral venous thrombosis. Infectious causes typically arise from the mid face, orbit, or sinonasal region. We present a case of bilateral cavernous sinus and superior ophthalmic thrombosis secondary to an extreme case of facial cellulitis. PMID:26722163

  15. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brow area Ethmoid sinuses—just behind the bridge of the nose, between the eyes Maxillary sinuses—inside each cheekbone Sphenoid sinuses—behind the ethmoids in the upper region of the nose and behind the eyes There are two basic types of sinusitis: Acute, which lasts up to 4 ...

  16. Homonymous hemianopia from infarction of the optic tract and lateral geniculate nucleus in deep cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Grabe, Hilary M; Bapuraj, J Rajiv; Wesolowski, Jeffrey R; Parmar, Hemant; Trobe, Jonathan D

    2012-03-01

    A 20-year-old man developed right homonymous hemianopia, hemiparesis, and hemisensory loss from deep cerebral venous thrombosis in the setting of high altitude. Approximately 3 months later, brain MRI showed encephalomalacia of the left optic tract and lateral geniculate nucleus, as well as signal abnormalities of the internal capsule and posterolateral thalamus. Homonymous hemianopia has previously been described in 1 case after deep cerebral venous thrombosis but without detailed neuroimaging features. PMID:22330851

  17. Management of cerebral venous thrombosis in a patient with Lane-Hamilton syndrome and coeliac disease, epilepsy and cerebral calcification syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grover, Patrick J; Jayaram, Raja; Madder, Hilary

    2010-12-01

    We describe a case of cerebral venous thrombosis presenting in a patient with Lane-Hamilton syndrome and coeliac disease epilepsy cerebral calcification syndrome. This is a first reported occurrence of this combination. Delayed anticoagulation with early external ventricular drain insertion for life-threatening raised intracranial pressure resulted in a successful outcome. PMID:21070152

  18. Effect of different surgical positions on the cerebral venous drainage: a pilot study using healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, T Y; Tan, A; Manninen, P; Chan, V W S; Venkatraghavan, L

    2016-07-01

    Excessive neck flexion and rotation in certain surgical positions may cause kinking of the internal jugular vein that obstructs cerebral venous blood flow and results in elevated intracranial pressure. The objective of this study was to measure internal jugular vein flow and identify potential impediments to venous flow in supine, prone, and park bench positions using non-anaesthetised volunteers. Twenty-seven volunteers were recruited. Venous flow rate was derived from ultrasound measurements of the vessel cross-sectional area and flow velocity. Change from supine to prone position produced a significant increase in both jugular vein cross-sectional areas without affecting venous flows. In the right park bench position, the right internal jugular vein cross-sectional area decreased from 1.2 to 0.9 cm(2) (p = 0.027) without substantive changes in mean venous flow rate (p = 0.91) when compared with supine. In summary, the internal jugular vein flow was not compromised by either prone or park bench positions in non-anaesthetised volunteers, and careful positioning may prevent kinking of the jugular vein. Further studies in anaesthetised and ventilated patients are needed to validate these results for clinical practice. PMID:27160870

  19. Penetrating intracranial gunshot wound transecting the right transverse sinus

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Narlin Bennet; Diaz, Cara; Crandall, Kenneth; Sansur, Charles

    2012-01-01

    A 23-year-old man sustained a gunshot wound to the posterior head. Imaging demonstrated a transection of the right transverse sinus, a retained bullet fragment and significant cerebellar oedema. The patient emergently underwent suboccipital decompression associated with brisk bleeding from the transverse sinus. Reported examples of surgical management of cerebral venous sinuses include: packing, grafting, patching and ligation. Our patient had a codominant transverse sinus and underwent successful unilateral ligation. His postoperative course was uneventful, however, he did require a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. He was subsequently discharged to rehab with a favourable outcome. PMID:22987903

  20. Cerebral venous circulatory disturbance as an informative prognostic marker for neonatal hemorrhagic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, Oxana; Pavlov, Alexey; Navolokin, Nikita; Lychagov, Vladislav; Abdurashitov, Arkady; Zinchenko, Ekaterina; Gekaluk, Artemiy; Zhu, Dan; Shi, Rui; Luo, Qingming; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal hemorrhagic stroke (NHS) is a major problem of future generation's health due to the high rate of death and cognitive disability of newborns after NHS. The incidence of NHS in neonates cannot be predicted by standard diagnostic methods. Therefore, the identification of prognostic markers of NHS is crucial. There is evidence that stress-related alterations of cerebral blood flow (CBF) may contribute to NHS. Here, we assessed the stroke-associated CBF abnormalities for high prognosis of NHS using a new model of NHS induced by sound stress in the pre- and post-stroke state. With this aim, we used interdisciplinary methods such as a histological assay of brain tissues, laser speckle contrast imaging and Doppler coherent tomography to monitor cerebral circulation. Our results suggest that the venous stasis with such symptoms as progressive relaxation of cerebral veins, decrease the velocity of blood flow in them are prognostic markers for a risk of NHS and are an informative platform for a future study of corrections of cerebral venous circulatory disturbance related to NHS.

  1. Computed tomographic angiography of the superficial cerebral venous anastomosis based on volume rendering, multi-planar reconstruction, and integral imaging display.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qiong; Chen, Feng; Jiang, Anhong; Huang, Yanping; Deng, Xuefei

    2015-12-01

    As damage to the superficial cerebral venous anastomosis may create catastrophic complications even after successful surgery, it is important to visualize and determine the normal features of the venous anastomosis with computed tomographic angiography. A total of 90 patients underwent a 64-detector row helical CT scan of head. The superficial cerebral venous anastomosis was reconstructed by volume rendering, multi-planar reconstruction, and integral display algorithm. In particular, we examined the vein of Trolard, the vein of Labbe, and the vein of Sylvian, in order to analyze the venous anastomosis. The superficial cerebral venous anastomosis varied across different individuals, and in this study, six types of anastomosis were found. In 28 % of patients, no venous anastomosis was found in the unilateral cerebral hemisphere. The display rate of the vein of Trolard, the vein of Labbe, and the vein of Sylvian in contributing to venous anastomosis was 70, 80, and 91 %, respectively. The number of vein of Trolard and vein of Labbe on the left side was greater than that of those on the right side. We implemented the 64-detector row helical CT as a rapid and noninvasive method to investigate the superficial cerebral venous anastomosis in our group of patients. We performed substantial image processing for the visualization of the superficial cerebral venous anastomosis; this would not only enable the early diagnosis of cerebral venous disease, but also protect the cerebral vein during neurosurgical intervention. PMID:26577709

  2. Sinus pericranii.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tammy L

    2012-01-01

    Sinus pericranii is a rare anomaly that occurs when there is communication between the intracranial and extracranial venous systems. Accurate diagnosis is complicated because several other cranial masses can mimic sinus pericranii. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging assessments are all essential for identifying the anomaly. This article examines the comparative advantages of various diagnostic imaging modalities, current imaging techniques, and typical findings associated with sinus pericranii. Treatment and management options also are discussed. PMID:22461344

  3. Venous sinus stenting is a valuable treatment for fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Elder, Benjamin D; Rory Goodwin, C; Kosztowski, Thomas A; Radvany, Martin G; Gailloud, Philippe; Moghekar, Abhay; Subramanian, Prem S; Miller, Neil R; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    Over the past 10 years, transverse sinus stenting has grown in popularity as a treatment for idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Although promising results have been demonstrated in several reported series, the vast majority of patients in these series have been treated on an elective basis rather than in the setting of fulminant disease with acute visual deterioration. We identified four patients who presented with severe acute vision loss between 2008 and 2012 who were treated with urgent transverse sinus stenting with temporary cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion with lumbar puncture or lumbar drain as a bridge to therapy. All patients presented with headache, and this was stable or had improved at last follow-up. Three patients had improvement in some or all visual parameters following stenting, whereas one patient who presented with severe acute vision loss and optic disc pallor progressed to blindness despite successful stenting. We hypothesize that she presented too late in the course of the disease for improvement to occur. Although the management of fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension remains challenging, we believe that transverse sinus stenting, in conjunction with temporary CSF diversion, represents a viable treatment option in the acute and appropriate setting. PMID:25579238

  4. Endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous sinus fistula: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Korkmazer, Bora; Kocak, Burak; Tureci, Ercan; Islak, Civan; Kocer, Naci; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Carotid cavernous sinus fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid system and the cavernous sinus. Several classification schemes have described carotid cavernous sinus fistulas according to etiology, hemodynamic features, or the angiographic arterial architecture. Increased pressure within the cavernous sinus appears to be the main factor in pathophysiology. The clinical features are related to size, exact location, and duration of the fistula, adequacy and route of venous drainage and the presence of arterial/venous collaterals. Noninvasive imaging (computed tomography, magnetic resonance, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, Doppler) is often used in the initial work-up of a possible carotid cavernous sinus fistulas. Cerebral angiography is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis, classification, and planning of treatment for these lesions. The endovascular approach has evolved as the mainstay therapy for definitive treatment in situations including clinical emergencies. Conservative treatment, surgery and radiosurgery constitute other management options for these lesions. PMID:23671750

  5. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with Migraine-Like Headache and the Trigeminovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Fábio A.; Sória, Marília Grando; Rizelio, Vanessa; Kowacs, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis- (CVT-) associated headache is considered a secondary headache, commonly presenting as intracranial hypertension headache in association with seizures and/or neurological signs. However, it can occasionally mimic migraine. We report a patient presenting with a migraine-like, CVT-related headache refractory to several medications but intravenous dihydroergotamine (DHE). The response to DHE, which is considered to be an antimigraine medication, in addition to the neurovascular nature of migraine, points out to a probable similarity between CVT-headache and migraine. Based on experimental studies, we discuss this similarity and hypothesize a trigeminovascular role in the genesis of CVT-associated headache. PMID:26989532

  6. [Cerebral venous thrombosis and subdural haematoma: complications of spontaneous intracranial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Fabricius, J; Klotz, J M; Hofmann, E; Behr, R; Neumann-Haefelin, T

    2012-10-01

    We report on the case of a spontaneous intracranial hypotension with subdural hygroma, as well as cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), both known complications of intracranial hypotension. The 45-year-old patient was subsequently treated - according to current guidelines for CVT - with anticoagulation, but developed subdural haematoma (SDH), which required neurosurgical treatment. Our case highlights the complex pathophysiological sequelae of intracranial hypotension, as well as the occasionally difficult treatment decisions. Subdural hygroma probably predisposes patients to SDH during anticoagulation. Thus, the potential benefit of anticoagulation needs to be weighed against the risk of SDH on an individual basis. PMID:23033205

  7. Modified three-dimensional skull base model with artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, and venous sinuses for training in skull base surgery: technical note.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuji; Oyama, Kazutaka; Ueno, Hideaki; Nakao, Yasuaki; Honma, Keiichirou

    2008-12-01

    Experience with dissection of the cavernous sinus and the temporal bone is essential for training in skull base surgery, but the opportunities for cadaver dissection are very limited. A modification of a commercially available prototype three-dimensional (3D) skull base model, made by a selective laser sintering method and incorporating surface details and inner bony structures such as the inner ear structures and air cells, is proposed to include artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, venous sinuses, and the internal carotid artery for such surgical training. The transpetrosal approach and epidural cavernous sinus surgery (Dolenc's technique) were performed on this modified model using a high speed drill or ultrasonic bone curette under an operating microscope. The model could be dissected in almost the same way as a real cadaver. The modified 3D skull base model provides a good educational tool for training in skull base surgery. PMID:19106500

  8. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with subdural haematoma as first presentation for systemic lupus erythematosus with negative antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Alboudi, Ayman; Sarathchandran, Pournamy; Alrukn, Suhail; Al Madani, Abubaker

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 30-year-old woman, without any previous comorbidities presenting with acute onset headache, altered sensorium and unsteadiness of gait. Neurological evaluation revealed a drowsy patient with papilloedema, bilateral lateral rectus palsy, generalised hyper-reflexia and up going plantar responses. Urgent imaging performed showed extensive cortical venous sinus thrombosis. Workup for secondary causes of cortical venous sinus thrombosis revealed very high titres of antinuclear antibody and anti-dsDNA, but negative antiphospholipid antibodies (APLA). In hospital she started developing other complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Urine evaluation revealed proteinuria and granular casts suggestive of glomerulonephritis. Cardiac evaluation revealed moderate pericardial effusion. We have discussed neurolupus as initial presentation of SLE and the rare occurrence of major neurovascular complications without secondary APLA syndrome. PMID:25080548

  9. A rare association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula with venous aneurysm and contralateral flow-related middle cerebral artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Harle, Robin A

    2013-01-01

    The association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) and ipsilateral flow related aneurysm has infrequently been reported. We describe a male patient who presented with an acute haemorrhagic stroke and was found to have a large right fronto-parietal intra-parenchymal haemorrhage from the ruptured Borden type II DAVF in addition to a large venous aneurysm and a flow related intraosseous aneurysm of the contralateral middle meningeal artery (MMA) all clearly delineated by CT and DSA. He underwent emergency stereotactic evacuation of the intraparenchymal haemorrhage and successful surgical treatment of all the vascular lesions at the same time with residual neurological deficit. To our knowledge, this is the first such reported case. We discuss the challenging surgical treatment, emphasising the role of CT/DSA in management, and provide a literature review. PMID:24051149

  10. A rare association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula with venous aneurysm and contralateral flow-related middle cerebral artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Harle, Robin A

    2013-01-01

    The association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) and ipsilateral flow related aneurysm has infrequently been reported. We describe a male patient who presented with an acute haemorrhagic stroke and was found to have a large right fronto-parietal intra-parenchymal haemorrhage from the ruptured Borden type II DAVF in addition to a large venous aneurysm and a flow related intraosseous aneurysm of the contralateral middle meningeal artery (MMA) all clearly delineated by CT and DSA. He underwent emergency stereotactic evacuation of the intraparenchymal haemorrhage and successful surgical treatment of all the vascular lesions at the same time with residual neurological deficit. To our knowledge, this is the first such reported case. We discuss the challenging surgical treatment, emphasising the role of CT/DSA in management, and provide a literature review. PMID:24051149

  11. Venous cerebral blood volume increase during voluntary locomotion reflects cardiovascular changes.

    PubMed

    Huo, Bing-Xing; Greene, Stephanie E; Drew, Patrick J

    2015-09-01

    Understanding how changes in the cardiovascular system contribute to cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV) increases is critical for interpreting hemodynamic signals. Here we investigated how systemic cardiovascular changes affect the cortical hemodynamic response during voluntary locomotion. In the mouse, voluntary locomotion drives an increase in cortical CBF and arterial CBV that is localized to the forelimb/hindlimb representation in the somatosensory cortex, as well as a diffuse venous CBV increase. To determine if the heart rate increases that accompany locomotion contribute to locomotion-induced CBV and CBF increases, we occluded heart rate increases with the muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist glycopyrrolate, and reduced heart rate with the β1-adrenergic receptor antagonist atenolol. We quantified the effects of these cardiovascular manipulations on CBV and CBF dynamics by comparing the hemodynamic response functions (HRF) to locomotion across these conditions. Neither the CBF HRF nor the arterial component of the CBV HRF was significantly affected by pharmacological disruption of the heart rate. In contrast, the amplitude and spatial extent of the venous component of the CBV HRF were decreased by atenolol. These results suggest that the increase in venous CBV during locomotion was partially driven by peripheral cardiovascular changes, whereas CBF and arterial CBV increases associated with locomotion reflect central processes. PMID:26057593

  12. Cerebral venous thrombosis in young adult with familial protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Franciele M; Silva, Caroline Ribeiro da; Borém, Michelle G; Miranda-Vilela, Ana L

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary thrombophilia is the inherited predisposition to venous or, occasionally, arterial thrombosis. In most cases, it is because of changes related to physiological coagulation inhibitors or mutations in genes of coagulation factors. Protein S, a vitamin K-dependent plasma glycoprotein, is a natural anticoagulant and its deficiency is associated with familial venous thrombosis. We present a case study that brings together two rare diseases, cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) and familial protein S deficiency, in a 21-year-old male patient with a positive family history of thrombosis. He developed a headache of moderate intensity lasting 30 days, followed by bizarre movements, which culminated in the patient's death. This report discusses the importance of family history for the diagnosis of hereditary thrombophilia, as well as the request for brain imaging for diagnosis of CVT for an early appropriate intervention, and the importance of specialized medical guidance for family members, who must receive medical advice to prevent another fatal episode in a family member. PMID:25304012

  13. [Medullary venous malformation with azygos anterior cerebral artery aneurysm: a case report].

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Kobayashi, S; Sigemori, M; Watanabe, M; Kuramoto, S

    1987-03-01

    A case of medullary venous malformation with azygos anterior cerebral artery aneurysm is reported, which was associated with the leptomenigeal angiomatosis on the cortex of the right frontal lobe. A 62-year-old female was admitted to the Kurume University Hospital on June 21, 1985, because of a convulsive seizure. On admission, neurological and general examinations, except for slightly liver function disorder, was no abnormality. Plain CT scan showed the cortical atrophy and two small high-density areas in the right frontal lobe. Enhanced CT scan showed a high-density area in the genu of the corpus callosum. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), on T2 weighted image, showed a high signal intensity area in the right paraventricular deep white matter and the right frontal region. A right internal carotid angiogram in the venous phase showed numerous enlarged medullary veins in the deep frontal region, converging into a single large draining vein that empties into the basal vein of Rosenthal. An azygos anterior cerebral artery was visualized on the right and left carotid angiograms. The aneurysm was situated at the distal end of the azygos artery. Twenty eight days after admission, a right frontal cranioplastic craniotomy was performed. During operation, the surface of the right frontal lobe was covered by fine, vascular networks, which was reddish brown. A right frontal lobectomy, including venous malformation and vascular networks, was performed. The aneurysm was clipped via an interhemispheric approach. Histologically, the malformation vessels had spread into the subarachnoid space.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3600991

  14. Ultrasound of the Fetal Veins Part 3: The Fetal Intracerebral Venous System.

    PubMed

    Karl, K; Heling, K S; Chaoui, R

    2016-02-01

    The study of the intracerebral venous system in the fetus can only be achieved by means of high-resolution ultrasound equipment with sensitive color Doppler. In the past two decades, there has been a growing interest in the ultrasound examination of the fetal brain with few studies reporting on the brain vasculature during various stages of gestation. In comparison to other fetal venous systems, reports on the assessment of the fetal cerebral venous system are still scarce. This article presents a review on the fetal intracranial venous system with detailed discussions on the anatomy of the superficial and deep cerebral veins. Color Doppler of the main fetal cerebral veins to include the superior sagittal sinus, the straight sinus, the vein of Galen, the internal cerebral veins, the transverse sinuses and others is also discussed. Furthermore, this article highlights abnormal clinical conditions such as aneurysm of the vein of Galen, thrombosis of the dural sinus and variation in the course of some veins such as the straight sinus and falcine sinus. The role of pulsed Doppler examination in normal and growth-restricted fetuses is also discussed. PMID:26114342

  15. Reversible diencephalic dysfunction as presentation of deep cerebral venous thrombosis due to hyperhomocysteinemia and protein S deficiency: Documentation of a case

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Kaukab Maqbool; Kumar, Dheeraj

    2013-01-01

    A 45-year-old man presented with global headache, vomiting and abnormal behavior after cross-country run at high altitude. There was no seizure, loss of consciousness, fever or head injury. He was conscious, abulic and uncooperative with normal vitals. There was no focal neurological deficit. Non contrast computed tomography scan of head was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain showed venous infarct in bilateral thalami, left basal ganglia and periventricular white matter. Magnetic resonance venography revealed thrombosis involving internal cerebral veins, septal veins, thalamostriate veins, vein of Galen and proximal portion of straight sinus. His condition steadily improved on low molecular weight heparin bridged with oral anticoagulation for one year. At two months, serum homocysteine was 31.51 μmol/l (5.46-16.2 μmol/l) and protein S was 49.00% (77-143.00%). He received methylcobalamin, pyridoxine and folic acid. After 16 months, he was asymptomatic with partially recanalized deep cerebral veins and serum homocysteine falling to 16.50 μmol/l (5.46-16.2 μmol/l). PMID:23914104

  16. Early pregnancy cerebral venous thrombosis and status epilepticus treated with levetiracetam and lacosamide throughout pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ylikotila, Pauli; Ketola, Raimo A; Timonen, Susanna; Malm, Heli; Ruuskanen, Jori O

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke, accounting to less than 1% of all strokes. We describe a pregnant woman with a massive CVT in early pregnancy, complicated by status epilepticus. The mother was treated with levetiracetam, lacosamide, and enoxaparin throughout pregnancy. A male infant was born on pregnancy week 36, weighing 2.2kg. Both levetiracetam and and lacosamide were present in cord blood in levels similar to those in maternal blood. The infant was partially breast-fed and experienced poor feeding and sleepiness, starting to resolve after two first weeks. Milk samples were drawn 5 days after the delivery and a blood sample from the infant 3 days later. Lacosamide level in milk was low, resulting in an estimated relative infant dose of 1.8% of the maternal weight-adjusted daily dose in a fully breast-fed infant. This is the first case describing lacosamide use during pregnancy and lactation. PMID:26187779

  17. Hyperhomocysteinemia and other thrombophilic risk factors in 26 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Boncoraglio, G; Carriero, M R; Chiapparini, L; Ciceri, E; Ciusani, E; Erbetta, A; Parati, E A

    2004-06-01

    Despite the continuous description of new conditions pre-disposing for cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), no apparent cause is found in about 30% of cases. Hyperhomocysteinemia (hyper-Hcy) is an established risk factor for deep venous thrombosis and stroke but has not been clearly associated with increased risk of CVT. We assessed the prevalence of hyper-Hcy and other thrombophilic risk factors in a population of 26 consecutive patients with non-pyogenic CVT, by review of a prospectively maintained database. The prevalences of hyper-Hcy and prothrombin G20210A, factor V G1691A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutations in these patients were compared with those in 100 healthy controls and 100 patients with cerebroarterial disease. The prevalence of hyper-Hcy was greater in patients with CVT (10/26, 38.5%) than healthy controls (13/100; OR 4.18, 95% CI 1.58-11.16) and comparable with that in patients with cerebroarterial disease (42/100). No significant differences were found in the prevalences of prothrombin or MTHFR mutation. No factor V mutation was found. Our findings indicate that hyper-Hcy is associated with an increased risk of CVT. Additional prospective cohort studies on large series of patients are required to clarify the time relationship between hyper-Hcy and the thrombotic event. PMID:15171737

  18. Importance of repeat angiography in the diagnosis of iatrogenic anterior cerebral artery territory pseudoaneurysm following endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Munich, Stephan A; Cress, Marshall C; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Krishna, Chandan; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Snyder, Kenneth V

    2016-05-01

    Iatrogenic intracranial pseudoaneurysm formation and rupture are rare complications following endoscopic sinus surgery. Given the propensity for devastating neurologic injury after a relatively routine procedure, swift diagnosis and treatment is essential. The authors present a patient who experienced bifrontal intracranial hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured iatrogenic frontopolar artery pseudoaneurysm caused during routine endoscopic sinus surgery. The pseudoaneurysm was not present on initial angiograms but became apparent radiographically 19 days after the endoscopic procedure. Endovascular treatment consisted of coil and Onyx embolization for sacrifice of the parent vessel proximal to the lesion. Early recognition of iatrogenic intracranial vascular injury is important to allow for rapid treatment. Initial radiographic studies may be unreliable in excluding the presence of a pseudoaneurysm so delayed repeat angiographic assessment is necessary, particularly in the presence of a high index of clinical suspicion. Endovascular techniques may provide an effective and safe option for the treatment of iatrogenic anterior cerebral artery distribution pseudoaneurysms. PMID:25994943

  19. Delay in hospital admission of patients with cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ferro, José M; Lopes, M G; Rosas, M J; Fontes, J

    2005-01-01

    Factors influencing early hospital admission have been described for several stroke types but not for cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis (CVT). CVT is more difficult to diagnose than arterial stroke; delay in hospital admission may postpone CVT treatment. The purposes of this study were: (1) to describe the delay between the onset of symptoms and hospital admission of patients with CVT, and (2) to identify the variables that influence that delay. We registered the interval (days) between the onset of symptoms and hospital admission in 91 consecutive patients admitted to 20 Portuguese hospitals between June 1995 and June 1998. We also studied the impact of admission delay on treatments (prescription of anticoagulants and the number of days elapsed between the onset of symptoms and start of anticoagulation and admission). Median admission delay was 4 days. Twenty-two (25%) patients were admitted within 24 h. Two thirds of the patients were admitted within 7 days and 75% within 13 days. In multiple logistic regression analysis, admission within 24 h was positively associated with mental status disorder (delirium or abulia; OR = 4.59; 95% CI = 1.41-14.89) and negatively associated with headache (OR = 0.03; 95% CI = 0.00-0.32). Presentation as isolated intracranial hypertension was associated with admission delay of more than 4 days (OR = 2.63; 95% CI = 0.97-7.14). Papilloedema was associated with an admission delay of more than 13 days (OR = 4.69; 95% CI = 1.61-13.61). There was no association between admission delay and the proportion of anticoagulated patients. The interval between onset of symptoms and start of anticoagulation was shorter in patients admitted earlier (p = 0.0001, for either admission within 24 h, 4 or 13 days). There is a considerable delay until the clinical picture associated with CVT is recognised as justifying hospital admission, especially when patients present with symptoms identical to isolated intracranial hypertension syndrome. PMID

  20. Recurrent cerebral aneurysm formation and rupture within a short period due to invasive aspergillosis of the nasal sinus; pathological analysis of the catastrophic clinical course.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Yuki; Miyawaki, Satoru; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Okano, Atsushi; Imai, Hideaki; Shin, Masahiro; Sato, Kazuya; Tsuchida, Takeyuki; Hayashi, Toshihiro; Terao, Yasuo; Numakura, Satoe; Morikawa, Teppei; Shibahara, Junji; Kikuta, Shu; Kondo, Kenji; Tatsuno, Keita; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Tsuji, Shoji; Saito, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    Destructive infiltration of invasive fungal sinusitis can easily occur into the central nervous system (CNS). Cerebral aneurysms associated with fungal infection are highly vulnerable to rupture, and can frequently and rapidly take a serious clinical course. We experienced a patient who twice developed cerebral aneurysm followed by rupture due to invasive fugal sinusitis. This 77-year-old man was admitted for progressive bilateral visual disturbance, which was initially treated as idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis. The patient subsequently suffered subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) twice in only 12 days. Both SAH originated from different newly formed cerebral aneurysms. Trapping was performed for both ruptured aneurysms. Pathological examination of the resected aneurysms indicated the presence of fungi determined to be Aspergillus. This Aspergillus infection was also discovered inside the frontal sinus by endoscopic biopsy, so a regimen of antifungal agents was instituted. Prolonged antifungal therapy caused renal impairment, which ultimately led to the patient's death. Autopsy detected no mycotic infiltration of the major cerebral arteries, except for the 2 ruptured cerebral aneurysms. However, prolonged mycosis of the CNS, such as in the deep part in the falx cerebri and in the small veins proximal to the tentorium cerebelli, was observed, indicating that mycosis invading the cranium is refractory even to long-term administration of antifungal agents. The present case strongly suggests that urgent and proactive definitive diagnosis is essential to successfully treat invasive paranasal sinus aspergillosis. If infiltration of the CNS is suspected, early surgical resection and antifungal therapy must be initiated immediately. PMID:26722566

  1. Clinicoepidemiological profile of cerebral venous thrombosis in Algarve, Portugal: A retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Rodrigues, Fátima; Carneiro, Patricia; Macedo, Ana; Ferreira, Fátima; Basílio, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a very uncommon disorder with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. There are few studies describing the clinical and epidemiological profile of CVT in peripheral or rural areas. Over the last decades, the frequency in which this disease is diagnosed has increased due to greater awareness and availability of noninvasive diagnostic techniques. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based retrospective case review of adult (≥15 years) patients with CVT between 2001 and 2012 is described. 31 patients with confirmed imagiological diagnosis of CVT were included. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using R version 2.15.2. Incidence rate was computed as number of new cases by time. Confidence interval (CI) was set at 95% and P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The average annual incidence was 0.84 (CI: 0.58–1.18) to 0.73 (CI: 0.5–1.02) per 100 000 cases for adult population. There were 23 (74%) women and 8 (26%) men. Predominant initial manifestations were headache, followed by altered mental status and seizures. Median diagnostic delay from onset of illness was 8 days. All patients were treated with unfractionated heparin or low-molecular heparin followed by warfarin. Complete recovery occurred in the majority of cases 22 (78.6%) but two patients died during hospitalization. Conclusions: Albeit with some particularities, the epidemiology and clinical manifestations we found are comparable to what has been reported in western studies. PMID:26752915

  2. Safety assessment of anticoagulation therapy in patients with hemorrhagic cerebral venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Riasi, Hamid Reza; Noureddine, Ali; Masoudinezhad, Shahram; Yazdani, Siamak; Mirzae, Mohammad Mousavi; Razavi, Atena Sharifi; Ghandehari, Kosar

    2013-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation therapy is a routine treatment in patients with hemorrhagic cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). However, fear of hemorrhagic complications and deterioration course following anticoagulation often disturbs the responsible physician. Methods This was a Prospective observational study on consecutive CVT patients with hemorrhagic venous infarction or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) admitted in Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran, during 2006-2012. The diagnosis of CVT in suspected cases was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance venography (MRI/MRV), and computerized tomography (CT) angiography following established diagnostic criteria. Demographic data, clinical manifestations from onset to end of the observation period, location of thrombus, location and size of infarction and hemorrhage, and clinical course during treatment were recorded. Choice of the treatment was left to the opinion of the treating physician. Clinical course during 1 week of treatment was assessed based on the baseline modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. Three or more points decrease or increase of modified NIHSS after 1 week of treatment was considered as improvement or deterioration courses, respectively. Other clinical courses were categorized as stabilization course. Results 102 hemorrhagic CVT patients (80 females, 22 males) with mean age of 38.6 ± 8 years were prospectively investigated. Of the 102 hemorrhagic CVT patients in the acute phase, 52 patients (50.9%) were anticoagulated with adjusted dose intravenous heparin infusion and 50 cases (49.1%) received subcutaneous enoxaparin 1mg/Kg twice daily. Decreased consciousness had a significant effect on the clinical course of the patients (X2 = 9.493, df = 2, P = 0.009). Presence of SAH had no significant effect on the clinical course of our anticoagulated hemorrhagic CVT cases (X2 = 0.304, df = 2, P = 0.914). Extension of Infarction in more than two thirds of a hemisphere

  3. Venous stroke and status epilepticus due to milk-induced anemia in a child.

    PubMed

    Finkel, Leslie; Piantino, Juan; Goldstein, Joshua; Wainwright, Mark S

    2015-02-01

    The risk factors for cerebral sinus venous thrombosis include dehydration, infection, and anemia. The clinical presentation in children of venous strokes associated with cerebral venous thrombosis is variable and may include seizures. Acute management should focus on the treatment of the primary cause and anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy if needed. Early recognition and targeted treatment is important because survivors are at increased risk for long-term neurologic complications. We report a case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with status epilepticus and was subsequently found to have a cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in the transverse and sigmoid sinus, with venous infarction in the temporal lobe. Laboratory results were significant for a microcytic anemia caused by excessive milk intake. Although iron deficiency anemia is a common pediatric disorder, this uncommon presentation demonstrates the potential for neurologic complications secondary to anemia, as well as the need for a high index of suspicion in order to identify venous stroke as a cause in children who present to the emergency department with seizures. PMID:25513978

  4. Diagnostic Value of D-Dimer’s Serum Level in Iranian Patients with Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashami, Leila; Rakhshan, Vahid; Karimian, Hoda; Moghaddasi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a long-term debilitating vascular brain disease with high morbidity and mortality. It may be associated with rise in D-dimer level. The aim of this study was to examine this potential association and identify the critical D-dimer cut-off level corresponding to increase the risk of CVT. This case-control study was conducted on two groups of patients with and without CVT attending the Rasool Akram Hospital (Iran) during 2014 and 2015. D-dimer levels were measured by the rapid sensitive D-dimer assay. Data were analyzed by Spearman’s correlation coefficient test, independent-samples t-test, backward-selection multiple linear regression and multiple binary logistic regression analyses. Sensitivity-specificity tests were used to detect D-dimer cut-off for CVT. Differences between the D-dimer levels of the case and control groups were significant (P<0.001). It showed that each level of increase in the number of symptoms could increase the risk of thrombosis occurrence for about 3.5 times. All symptom types except for headache were associated with D-dimer level, while headache has negative association with D-dimer level. D-dimer cut-off point for CVT diagnosis was estimated at 350 ng/mg. We concluded that D-dimer serum level significantly rises in CVT patients. A rounded cut-off point of 350 ng/mg can be used as a diagnostic criterion for CVT prediction. PMID:27441064

  5. Impact of Provoking Risk Factors on the Prognosis of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Jae; Noh, Sang-Mi; Kang, Dong-Wha; Kim, Jong S.; Kwon, Sun U.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Little is known about the relationships between provoking risk factors, prognosis, and optimal duration of anticoagulation in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), especially in Asians. We aimed to investigate whether the prognosis and required duration of anticoagulation in CVT patients differ according to the provoking risk factors. Methods Prospectively recorded data from a tertiary medical center in South Korea were retrospectively reviewed. CVTs were categorized into three groups: unprovoked, those with possibly resolved provoking factors (PR), and those with persistent provoking factors (PP). The baseline characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of patients in these three groups were analyzed. Results From 2000 to 2015, 61 patients presented with CVT: 19 (31.1%) unprovoked, 11 (18.0%) with PR, and 31 (50.9%) with PP. The patients in our cohort had a slight female predominance and lower frequency of oral contraceptive use compared to Western cohorts. Median follow-up and duration of anticoagulation were 35 and 8 months, respectively. Despite the similarities in baseline characteristics, deaths (n=3; P=0.256) and recurrences (n=7; P=0.020) were observed only in the PP group. The median intervals to death and recurrence were 9 and 13 months, respectively. Death was associated with underlying disease activity, not with CVT progression. Recurrences in the PP group were associated with lack of anticoagulation (P=0.012). Conclusions Although the prognosis of CVT is generally benign in Koreans, recurrence and death were observed in patients with persistent risk factors, suggesting their need for long-term treatment with anticoagulants. PMID:27165266

  6. Coronary Sinus Biomarker Sampling Compared to Peripheral Venous Blood for Predicting Outcomes In Patients with Severe Heart Failure Undergoing Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: The BIOCRT Study

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Quynh A.; Januzzi, James L.; Szymonifka, Jackie; Thai, Wai-ee; Wai, Bryan; Lavender, Zachary; Sharma, Umesh; Sandoval, Ryan M.; Grunau, Zachary S.; Basnet, Sandeep; Babatunde, Adefolakemi; Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Min, James K.; Singh, Jagmeet P.

    2014-01-01

    Background A significant minority of patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) remain non-responsive to this intervention. Objective To determine whether coronary sinus (CS) or baseline peripheral venous (PV) levels of established and emerging heart failure (HF) biomarkers are predictive of CRT outcomes. Methods In 73 patients (age 68±12; 83% male; ejection fraction 27 7%) with CS and PV blood drawn simultaneously at the time of CRT implantation, we measured amino-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), galectin-3 (gal-3), and soluble (s)ST2 levels. NT-proBNP concentrations>2000 pg/mL, gal-3>25.9 ng/mL, and sST2>35 ng/mL were considered positive, based on established PV cutpoints for identifying “high risk” individuals with HF. CRT response was adjudicated by HF Clinical Composite Score. Major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) was defined as the composite endpoint of death, cardiac transplant, left ventricular assist device, and HF hospitalization at 2 years. Results NT-proBNP concentrations were 20% higher in the CS than periphery, while gal-3 and sST2 were 10% higher in periphery than CS (all p<0.001). There were 45% CRT non-responders at 6 months and 22% MACE. Triple positive CS values yielded the highest specificity of 95% for predicting CRT non-response. Consistently, CS strategies identified patients at higher risk for developing MACE, with over 11-fold adjusted increase for triple positive CS patients compared to triple negative patients (all p≤0.04). PV strategies were not predictive of MACE. Conclusions Our findings suggest that coronary sinus sampling of HF biomarkers may be better than peripheral venous blood levels for predicting CRT outcomes. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:25014756

  7. Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis complicating typhoid Fever in a teenager.

    PubMed

    Okunola, P O; Ofovwe, G E; Abiodun, M T; Azunna, C P

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus (sinovenous) thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare life-threatening disorder in childhood that is often misdiagnosed. CSVT encompasses cavernous sinus thrombosis, lateral sinus thrombosis, and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST). We present an adolescent girl who was well until two weeks earlier when she had a throbbing frontal headache and fever with chills; she later had dyspnoea, jaundice, melena stool, multiple seizures, nuchal rigidity, and monoparesis of the right lower limb a day before admission. Urine test for Salmonella typhi Vi antigen was positive, and Widal reaction was significant. Serial cranial computerized tomography scans revealed an expanding hypodense lesion in the parafalcine region consistent with SSST or a parasagittal abscess. Inadvertent left parietal limited craniectomy confirmed SSST. She recovered completely with subsequent conservative management. Beyond neuropsychiatric complications of Typhoid fever, CSVT should be highly considered when focal neurologic deficits are present. PMID:23227403

  8. Warden repair for superior sinus venosus atrial septal defect and anomalous pulmonary venous drainage in children: Anesthesia and transesophageal echocardiography perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Gadhinglajkar, Shrinivas; Sreedhar, Rupa; Dharan, Baiju S.; Chigurupati, Keerthi; Babu, Saravana

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Review of intraoperative anesthetic challenges and the role of transesophageal echocardiography in children with sinus venosus atrial septal defect and partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage undergoing Warden repair. Design: A retrospective observational case series. Methodolgy: Pediatric patients who underwent Warden repair between October 2011-September 2015 were recruited. Their preoperative clinical details, anesthetic techniques, intraoperative TEE findings and postoperative events were recorded from the medical records. The categorical variables and the continuous variables were expressed as number (percentages) and mean ± SD respectively. Results: A total of 35 patients were operated for Warden repair during the study period. Anesthesia was induced with the aim to prevent any fall in pulmonary vascular resistance. The right internal jugular vein was cannulated under ultrasound guidance using a short length cannula to monitor right superior vena cava pressure. Intraoperative TEE revealed the drainage of PAPVC high into RSVC in 22 patients. Persistent LSVC was found in 9 patients. After repair, TEE imaging detected a high gradient at Warden anastomotic site in 5 patients and 3 of them required revision of surgery. Rerouted pulmonary veins required surgical correction in 2 patients in view of obstruction. None of them had pulmonary venous and SVC obstruction in the postoperative period. Conclusion: The primary aim of anesthesia is to avoid any fall in PVR. Right IJV cannulation can be beneficial. The intraoperative TEE can help in delineating the anatomy of lesion and detecting anastomotic site obstruction. PMID:27052072

  9. Venous hemodynamics in neurological disorders: an analytical review with hydrodynamic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Venous abnormalities contribute to the pathophysiology of several neurological conditions. This paper reviews the literature regarding venous abnormalities in multiple sclerosis (MS), leukoaraiosis, and normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). The review is supplemented with hydrodynamic analysis to assess the effects on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics and cerebral blood flow (CBF) of venous hypertension in general, and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) in particular. CCSVI-like venous anomalies seem unlikely to account for reduced CBF in patients with MS, thus other mechanisms must be at work, which increase the hydraulic resistance of the cerebral vascular bed in MS. Similarly, hydrodynamic changes appear to be responsible for reduced CBF in leukoaraiosis. The hydrodynamic properties of the periventricular veins make these vessels particularly vulnerable to ischemia and plaque formation. Venous hypertension in the dural sinuses can alter intracranial compliance. Consequently, venous hypertension may change the CSF dynamics, affecting the intracranial windkessel mechanism. MS and NPH appear to share some similar characteristics, with both conditions exhibiting increased CSF pulsatility in the aqueduct of Sylvius. CCSVI appears to be a real phenomenon associated with MS, which causes venous hypertension in the dural sinuses. However, the role of CCSVI in the pathophysiology of MS remains unclear. PMID:23724917

  10. Venous hemodynamics in neurological disorders: an analytical review with hydrodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Beggs, Clive B

    2013-01-01

    Venous abnormalities contribute to the pathophysiology of several neurological conditions. This paper reviews the literature regarding venous abnormalities in multiple sclerosis (MS), leukoaraiosis, and normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). The review is supplemented with hydrodynamic analysis to assess the effects on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics and cerebral blood flow (CBF) of venous hypertension in general, and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) in particular.CCSVI-like venous anomalies seem unlikely to account for reduced CBF in patients with MS, thus other mechanisms must be at work, which increase the hydraulic resistance of the cerebral vascular bed in MS. Similarly, hydrodynamic changes appear to be responsible for reduced CBF in leukoaraiosis. The hydrodynamic properties of the periventricular veins make these vessels particularly vulnerable to ischemia and plaque formation.Venous hypertension in the dural sinuses can alter intracranial compliance. Consequently, venous hypertension may change the CSF dynamics, affecting the intracranial windkessel mechanism. MS and NPH appear to share some similar characteristics, with both conditions exhibiting increased CSF pulsatility in the aqueduct of Sylvius.CCSVI appears to be a real phenomenon associated with MS, which causes venous hypertension in the dural sinuses. However, the role of CCSVI in the pathophysiology of MS remains unclear. PMID:23724917

  11. Advances in Radiofrequency Ablation of the Cerebral Cortex in Primates Using the Venous System: Improvements for Treating Epilepsy with Catheter Ablation Technology

    PubMed Central

    Henz, Benhur D.; Friedman, Paul A.; Bruce, Charles J.; Holmes, David R.; Bower, Mark; Madhavan, Malini; DeSimone, Christopher V.; Wahnschaffe, Douglas; Berhow, Steven; Danielsen, Andrew J.; Ladewig, Dorothy J.; Mikell, Susan B.; Johnson, Susan B.; Suddendorf, Scott H.; Kara, Tomas; Worrell, Gregory A.; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pharmacology frequently fails for the treatment of epilepsy. Although surgical techniques are effective, these procedures are highly invasive. We describe feasibility and efficacy of minimally invasive mapping and ablation for the treatment of epilepsy. Methods Mapping and radiofrequency ablations were performed via the venous system in eleven baboons and three dogs. Results Mapping in deep cerebral areas was obtained in all animals. High-frequency pacing was able to induce seizure activity of local cerebral tissue in 72% of our attempts. Cerebral activity could be seen during mapping. Ablative lesions were deployed at deep brain sites without steam pops or sudden impedance rise. Histologic analysis showed necrosis at the sites of ablation in all primates. Conclusion Navigation through the cerebral venous system to map seizure activity is feasible. Radiofrequency energy can be delivered transvenously or transcortically to successful ablate cortical tissue in this animal model using this innovative approach. PMID:24836846

  12. Cerebral tubercular thrombophlebitis presenting as venous infarct: Magnetic resonance imaging and pathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Mangalore, Sandhya; Desai, Sunali; Mahadevan, Anita; Kovoor, Jerry M. E.; Vasudev, Late M. K.; Tally, Arun Bhagwandas; Shankar, Susarla Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement by tuberculosis to produce basal meningitis, hydrocephalus, arteritis and infarcts is well-known, the brunt of the pathology being borne by the arterial vasculature to produce neurological sequelae. However, tuberculous thrombophlebitis causing venous infarction is exceedingly rare. We present imaging and pathological features of two autopsy proven cases of tuberculous thrombophlebitis with venous infarcts involving superficial venous system in one and deep venous system in the other. This is the first study presenting radiopathologic correlation of this rare complication. Tuberculous thrombophlebitis should be suspected if basal exudates and multiple white matter T2 hyperintensities are seen on neuroimaging and the imaging protocol should include both magnetic resonance arteriogram and venogram. PMID:24753682

  13. "Venous congestion" as a cause of subcortical white matter T2 hypointensity on magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Jayaprakash Harsha; Parameswaran, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Subcortical T2 hypointensity is an uncommon finding seen in very limited conditions such as multiple sclerosis, Sturge-Weber syndrome, and meningitis. Some of the conditions such as moyamoya disease, severe ischemic-anoxic insults, early cortical ischemia, and infarcts are of "arterial origin." We describe two conditions in which "venous congestion" plays a major role in T2 hypointensity - cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) and dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF). The third case is a case of meningitis, showing T2 hypointensity as well, and can be explained by the "venous congestion" hypothesis. The same hypothesis can explain few of the other conditions causing subcortical T2 hypointensity. PMID:27570403

  14. [Two unusual complications of the Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome: carpal tunnel syndrome and cerebral venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Awada, A; Al Jumah, M; Al Ayafi, H

    2003-07-01

    Most neurological complications of the Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome are due to the presence of cerebral or spinal arteriovenous malformations and their consequences. We report 2 cases of unusual complications of this syndrome. In the first case, where the anomalies were restricted to the left upper extremity, the occurrence of hand numbness led to the discovery of a carpal tunnel syndrome, probably due to the lymphatic abnormal proliferation within the carpal tunnel. In the second case the disease was much more widespread and affecting, among other localizations, the cephalic extremity. The patient presented with intractable left motor seizures that appeared to be due to an occlusion of the right transverse and sigmoid sinuses. Treatment with heparin and anticonvulsants led to rapid recovery. PMID:12910081

  15. Sinus thrombosis—do animal models really cover the clinical syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Yenigün, Mesut; Jünemann, Martin; Gerriets, Tibo

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is an important cause of stroke in young patients. CVST represents with 0.5-3% of stroke cases a relatively rare disease. CVST affects 3-4 cases per 1 million overall and 7 cases per 1 million children and neonates. Typical clinical symptoms include headache, visual deficits and seizures. Beside the main condition associated with CVST in women in pregnancy and puerperium, the most frequently identified risk factors are oral hormonal contraceptives in combination with coagulation disorders. The initial treatment contains heparin and its efficacy is based on two randomized placebo-controlled trials including 79 patients together. A lack of understanding of the pathophysiology of CSVT makes animal models of this disease indispensable. Previously developed animal models of sinus sagittalis superior contributes to further clarify the pathophysiologic mechanisms and surrounding circumstances in the topic of cerebral venous thrombosis. PMID:26207231

  16. Lemierre syndrome complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis, the development of subdural empyemas, and internal carotid artery narrowing without cerebral infarction. Case report.

    PubMed

    Westhout, Franklin; Hasso, Anton; Jalili, Mehrdad; Afghani, Behnoosh; Armstrong, William; Nwagwu, Chiedozie; Ackerman, Laurie L

    2007-01-01

    Lemierre syndrome is an extremely rare complication of mild-to-moderate pharyngeal infections. The authors present an unusual case of Lemierre syndrome in a 16-year-old boy with cavernous sinus thrombosis and right internal carotid artery narrowing without neurological sequelae, right subdural empyema, and cerebritis in the right temporal and occipital lobes. Neuroimaging also demonstrated right jugular vein thrombosis. Cultures of samples from the blood proved positive for the presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum. The patient underwent unilateral tonsillectomy, drainage of the peritonsillar abscess, and a myringotomy on the right side. Postoperatively the patient was treated conservatively with antibiotic therapy resulting in an excellent outcome. PMID:17233314

  17. Cerebral sodium extraction in the dog: a test for extracerebral contamintion

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alecy, L.G.; Rose, C.J.; Sellers, S.A.; Manfredi, J.P.

    1980-06-01

    The single-pass extraction of sodium was measured with and without sympathetic stimulation in dogs anesthetized with alpha-chloralose. A mixture of the test (/sup 24/Na) and reference ((/sup 125/I) RISA) substances was injected as a bolus into the common carotid artery. Single-drop samples were taken at approximately 1-s intervals from the sagittal sinus and the temporal sinus while cerebral blood flow was continuously measured at the temporal sinus by the venous outflow technique. The extraction measurements were used to test for extracerebral contamination of venous outflow. If true cerebral sodium extraction is assumed to be 1.4% and extracerebral sodium extraction is 60%, then these data indicate that extracerebral contamination is less than 10%.

  18. [Progressive Intracranial Hypertension due to Superior Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis Following Mild Head Trauma: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Suto, Yuta; Maruya, Jun; Watanabe, Jun; Nishimaki, Keiichi

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis after mild head trauma without skull fracture or intracranial hematoma is exceptionally rare. We describe an unusual case of progressive intracranial hypertension due to superior sagittal sinus thrombosis following mild head trauma. A 17-year-old boy presented with nape pain a day after a head blow during a gymnastics competition (backward double somersault). On admission, he showed no neurological deficit. CT scans revealed no skull fractures, and there were no abnormalities in the brain parenchyma. However, his headache worsened day-by-day and he had begun to vomit. Lumbar puncture was performed on Day 6, and the opening pressure was 40 cm of water. After tapping 20 mL, he felt better and the headache diminished for a few hours. MR venography performed on Day 8 revealed severe flow disturbance in the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus with multiple venous collaterals. Because of the beneficial effects of lumbar puncture, we decided to manage his symptoms of intracranial hypertension conservatively with repeated lumbar puncture and administration of glycerol. After 7 days of conservative treatment, his symptoms resolved completely, and he was discharged from the hospital. Follow-up MR venography performed on Day 55 showed complete recanalization of the superior sagittal sinus. The exact mechanism of sinus thrombosis in this case is not clear, but we speculate that endothelial damage caused by shearing stress because of strong rotational acceleration or direct impact to the superior sagittal sinus wall may have initiated thrombus formation. PMID:26136327

  19. Cerebral venous thrombosis in post-lumbar puncture intracranial hypotension: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kate, Mahesh P.

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of presentation of intracranial hypotension is clinically perplexing. We report a case of 31-year-old post-partum woman who underwent an uneventful caesarean section under spinal anesthesia. From the second day of surgery she developed postural headache, the headache lost its postural character after few days. She then developed seizures and ataxic hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features of severe intracranial hypotension in the brain and the spinal cord, and magnetic resonance venography showed cortical vein and partial superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Prothrombotic (etiological) work-up showed Protein C and S deficiency. She responded to anticoagulation therapy and recovered completely. On review of literature two distinct groups could be identified obstetric and non-obstetric. The non-obstetric group included patients who underwent diagnostic lumbar puncture, intrathecal injection of medications and epidural anesthesia for non-obstetric surgeries. Poor outcome and mortality was noted in non-obstetric group, while obstetric group had an excellent recovery. PMID:24627803

  20. Association study of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase A1298C mutation with cerebral venous thrombosis risk in an Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Ghaznavi; Zahra, Soheili; Shahram, Samiei; Soltanpour, Mohammad Soleiman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon condition characterized by severe clinical manifestations and high mortality rate. There is limited data on the role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) A1298C mutation as a risk factor for CVT development in Iranians. Aim: The aim was to investigate a possible association between fasting plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels, MTHFR A1298C mutation, and CVT in Iranian population. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 50 patients with a diagnosis of CVT (20–63 years old) and 75 healthy subjects (18–65 years old) as control. Genotyping of the MTHFR A1298C mutation and Hcy measurement was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique and enzyme immunoassay method, respectively. Results: Fasting plasma total Hcy levels were significantly higher in CVT patients than controls (P = 0.015). No significant differences were observed in the MTHFR A1298C genotypes frequency between CVT patients and controls (P > 0.05). The frequency of the 1298C allele was 36% and 37.5% in CVT patients and controls, respectively and did not differ significantly between the two groups (P = 0.16). Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that MTHFR A1298Cmutation is not a significant risk factor for CVT. PMID:26539365

  1. [Treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension by endovascular improvement of venous drainage of the brain].

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Pérez, M; Henkes, H

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also known as pseudotumor cerebri, is a syndrome of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of any known causative factor. Most patients with IIH respond to weight reduction, repeated lumbar punctures and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, such as acetazolamide and topiramate to reduce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production. Despite a number of pathogenetic theories, the cause of IIH remains unknown. With the availability of magnetic resonance (MR) venography and cerebral angiography, venous disease is increasingly being discussed as the etiology of IIH, with a high proportion of patients presenting with nonthrombotic unilateral or bilateral dural venous sinus stenoses. Based on this observation, endovascular stenting of stenotic dural sinuses in patients with IIH has gained popularity. Whether dural venous sinus stenoses are the cause or the consequence of increased ICP is still under debate. In patients with failure of conservative treatment or non-compliance, a more aggressive treatment, such as CSF shunting or surgical optic nerve fenestration, should be performed. For approximately 13 years endovascular stenting of the stenotic sinuses has been used and discussed as an alternative and effective treatment of IIH. Since the first report in 2002, individual cases and case series have been published demonstrating that stents immediately lower the venous pressure gradient, which is associated with clinical improvement. This effect occurs within days or weeks and is permanent in many cases. PMID:26400795

  2. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding

    PubMed Central

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-01-01

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic–clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully. PMID:23389726

  3. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding.

    PubMed

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-01-01

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic-clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully. PMID:23389726

  4. [Neonatal cerebral thrombosis and deficit of factor V leiden].

    PubMed

    Moliner Calderón, E; López Bernal, E; Ginovart Galiana, G; Nadal Amat, J; Cubells Riero, J

    2000-01-01

    Background Cerebral venous thrombosis is an inusual disease in neonatal age. Increasing reports of this disorder had described since magnetic resonance angiography is used. Case report Newborn of apropriate seze for gestational age was delivered at 35 weeks of gestation. Refered a severe hipoxic-isquemic disease with multisistemic afectation. The second day of life presented disseminated intravascular coagulation with pulmonary bleeding. The third day, the infant developed seizures that required treatment with diazepam in continuous perfussion. MR angiography visualized superior sagital and transvers sinus thrombosis. Coagulation study detected factor V Leiden. Comments Frecuently venous cerebral thrombosis is presenting with lethargy and seizures. The most common vessels involved are sagital and transvers sinus. It is described in association with exogenous risk factors that increasing blood hyperviscosity and additional inhered coagulation dissorders such as defects on antihrombina III, protein C and S and activate protein C resistance. The last defect has a hight prevalence in subjects with trombosis events. PMID:11003860

  5. Evolution of a symptomatic diffuse developmental venous anomaly with progressive cerebral atrophy in an atypical case of Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Koyo; Saito, Yoshiaki; Togawa, Masami; Shinohara, Yuki; Ito, Takamichi; Sugano, Hidenori; Itamura, Shinji; Nishimura, Yoko; Tamasaki, Akiko; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2015-09-01

    A 2-year-old boy had glaucoma, bilateral facial haemangioma and widespread blue nevi on the trunk and extremities since birth. Dilated medullary veins were detected in the left cerebral periventricular white matter on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Macrocephaly and delayed psychomotor development were observed during late infancy, and susceptibility-weighted angiography revealed an extensive developmental venous anomaly with multiple caput medusae throughout bilateral hemispheres, accompanied by periventricular hyperintense alterations on MRI and progressive diffuse atrophy of the cerebral mantle with left-sided predominance. Hypoperfusion in the left cerebral and cerebellar hemisphere was also uncovered. No meningeal haemangioma was observed. This patient may represent a novel subgroup of phakomatosis cases that can be regarded as a variant of Sturge-Weber syndrome. PMID:25547041

  6. A case-series study of cerebral venous thrombosis in women using short course oral contraceptive

    PubMed Central

    Khomand, Payam; Hassanzadeh, Kambiz

    2016-01-01

    Background: We report a case series of cerebral vein thrombosis (CVT) in women who used oral contraceptive pill (OCP) in the Muslims Ramadan and fasting month. Methods: This study was a retrospective case series of 9 patients with diagnosis of CVT, who admitted in the neurology ward of Tohid Hospital of Sanandaj, Iran, in July-August 2014-2015. Results: Patients had no history of thrombosis before. They were treated with oral contraceptive more than 1 month to be able to fast during Ramadan. They did not have other possible risk factors for CVT. A headache was the most common in 9/9 patients (100%) followed by vomiting and vertigo. Conclusion: We found that high rate of CVT in female population during Ramadan indicates that it needs be considered as a specific risk factor and should be considered by healthcare system. PMID:27326364

  7. An experimental study on laser-induced suturing of venous grafts in cerebral revascularization surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puca, Alfredo; Albanese, Alessio; Esposito, Giuseppe; Maira, Giulio; Rossi, Giacomo; Pini, Roberto

    2005-04-01

    To test laser-assisted high flow bypass in cerebral revascularization procedures, we set up an experimental model on rabbits which included harvesting a jugular vein graft and its implantation on the common carotid artery through a double end-to-side anastomosis. The study was carried out on 25 New Zealand rabbits by performing on each animal the proximal anastomosis using conventional suturing, while the distal one was obtained by means of low-power diode laser welding in association with the topical application of Indocyanine Green (ICG) solution to enhance local absorption of the laser light. After the procedure, the animals were subjected to a follow-up from 2 to 9 days. Bypass patency was evaluated by means of Doppler study. The vascular segments were excised and evaluated by histological and immunohistochemical examinations. Utilization of the diode laser was associated with a substantial shortening of the operative time, as well as with a more active endothelial regeneration process at the anastomotic site.

  8. Effect of ethanol on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism (CMRO2) in conscious sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Krasney, J.A.; Zubkov, B.; Iwamoto, J. )

    1991-03-11

    A moderate dose of ethanol severely depresses CBF and CMRO2 in the awake sheep fetus. However, the effects of ethanol on CBF and CMRO2 in the adult are unclear. The same dose of ethanol was infused for 2 hr in 5 ewes instrumented with aortic, left ventricular and sagittal sinus catheters. Ethanol caused ataxia accompanied by early modest and variable increases of total and regional CBF and CMRO2, followed by later modest and variable decreases of total and regional CBF (cerebellum) and CMRO2. Ethanol caused a cerebral transcapillary fluid shift as indicated by significant increases of the arterial-cerebral venous differences for hematocrit and hemoglobin. Brain wet-dry ratios increased by 10% above control levels. However, cerebral venous pressures were unchanged. The authors conclude that the adult cerebral response to ethanol differs quantitatively from that of the fetus. The functional significance of the cerebral fluid shift is unclear.

  9. Cerebral Air Embolism Following the Removal of a Central Venous Catheter in the Absence of Intracardiac Right-to-Left Shunting

    PubMed Central

    Eum, Da Hae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Hyung Won; Jung, Myung Jae; Lee, Jae Gil

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Air embolism following central venous catheter (CVC) removal is a relatively uncommon complication. Despite its rare occurrence, an air embolism can lead to serious outcomes. One of the most fatal complications is cerebral air embolism. We report a case of cerebral air embolism that occurred after the removal of a CVC in a patient with an underlying idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum, and a possible intrapulmonary shunt. Although the patient had a brief period of recovery, his condition deteriorated again, and retention of carbon dioxide was sustained due to aggravation of pneumonia. Despite full coverage of antibiotics and maximum care with the ventilator, the patient died about 5 weeks after the removal of the CVC. We suggest that strict compliance to protocols is required even while removing the catheter. Furthermore, additional caution to avoid air embolism is demanded in high-risk patients, such as in this case. PMID:25837752

  10. Effects of Hypothermic Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Internal Jugular Bulb Venous Oxygen Saturation, Cerebral Oxygen Saturation, and Bispectral Index in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiyong; Xu, Lili; Zhu, Zhirui; Seal, Robert; McQuillan, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) on cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2), internal jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), and bispectral index (BIS) used to monitor cerebral oxygen balance in pediatric patients.Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists Class II-III patients aged 1 to 4 years old with congenital heart disease scheduled for elective cardiac surgery were included in this study. Temperature, BIS, rSO2, mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and hematocrit were recorded. Internal jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation and SvO2 were obtained from blood gas analysis at the time points: after induction of anesthesia (T0), beginning of CPB (T1), ascending aortic occlusion (T2), 20 minutes after initiating CPB (T3), coronary reperfusion (T4), separation from CPB (T5), and at the end of operation (T6). The effect of hypothermia or changes in CPP on rSO2, SjvO2, SvO2, and BIS were analyzed.Compared with postinduction baseline values, rSO2 significantly decreased at all-time points: onset of extracorporeal circulation, ascending aortic occlusion, 20 minutes after CPB initiation, coronary reperfusion, and separation from CPB (P < 0.05). Compared with measurements made following induction of anesthesia, SjvO2 significantly increased with initiation of CPB, ascending aortic occlusion, 20 minutes after initiating CPB, coronary reperfusion, and separation from CPB (P < 0.05). Compared with induction of anesthesia, BIS significantly decreased with the onset of CPB, aortic cross clamping, 20 minutes after initiating CPB, and coronary reperfusion (P < 0.05). Bispectral index increased following separation from CPB. There was no significant change in SvO2 during cardiopulmonary bypass (P > 0.05). Correlation analysis demonstrated that rSO2 was positively related to CPP (r = 0.687, P = 0

  11. Sinus Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... ANATOMY > Sinus Anatomy Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ...

  12. Cerebral air embolism and subsequent transient neurologic abnormalities in a liver transplant recipient following the removal of the pulmonary artery catheter from the central venous access device: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Key; Jun, In-Gu; Jang, Dong-Min; Lim, Jinwook; Hwang, Gyu-Sam

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. We experienced a living-donor liver transplant recipient who presented with unexpected cerebral air embolism and transient neurologic abnormalities that subsequently developed just after the removal of the pulmonary artery catheter from the central venous access device. One day after the initial event, the patient's neurologic status gradually improved. The patient was discharged 30 days after liver transplantation without neurologic sequelae. PMID:26885308

  13. Solitaire FR device for treatment of dural sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Pukenas, Bryan Anthony; Kumar, Monisha; Stiefel, Michael; Smith, Michelle; Hurst, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Dural venous sinus thrombosis is a rare and potentially devastating disease. Several predisposing factors exist, including oral contraceptive therapy and colitis. First-line therapy consists of systemic anticoagulation. If first-line therapies fail, more aggressive endovascular therapies may be performed. We report our initial experience with the Solitaire FR device for treatment of refractory symptomatic dural venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:23257943

  14. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors Nasal Deformities Choanal Atresia Epiphora (Excessive Tearing) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Sinus Tumors Abtin Tabaee, MD Introduction Tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses are rare, accounting for fewer than 1% of all tumors. These ...

  15. Adult Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ...

  16. Sinusitis: Overview

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Sinusitis Overview What are sinuses? Sinuses are the air chambers in the bone behind your cheeks, eyebrows and jaw. They make mucus, a fluid that cleans bacteria and other particles out of the air you breathe. Tiny hairs called cilia (say: “sill-ee-ah”) sweep mucus out of your ...

  17. Pediatric Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan may help to determine how completely your child's sinuses are developed, where any blockage has occurred, and confirm the diagnosis of sinusitis. The doctor may look for factors that make your child more likely to get sinus infection, including structural ...

  18. The Accuracy of a Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Cerebral Oximetry Device and Its Potential Value for Estimating Jugular Venous Oxygen Saturation

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Keita; MacLeod, David B; Grocott, Hilary P.; Moretti, Eugene W.; Ames, Warwick; Vacchiano, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background An intriguing potential clinical use of cerebral oximeter measurements (SctO2) is the ability to noninvasively estimate jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2). Our purpose in this study was to determine the accuracy of the FORE-SIGHT® (CAS Medical Systems; Branford, CT), which is calibrated to a weighted average of 70% (SjvO2) and 30% arterial saturation, for Food and Drug Administration pre-market approval 510 (k) certification by adapting an industry standard protocol, ISO 9919:2005 [www.ISO.org] (used for pulse oximeters) and to evaluate the use of SctO2 and SpO2 measurements to noninvasively estimate jugular venous oxygen saturation (SnvO2). Methods Paired blood gas samples from the radial artery and the jugular venous bulb were collected from 20 healthy volunteers undergoing progressive oxygen desaturation from 100 to 70%. The blood sample pairs were analyzed via co-oximetry and used to calculate the approximate mixed vascular cerebral blood oxygen saturation, or reference SctO2 values (refSctO2), during increasing hypoxia. These reference values were compared to bilateral FORE-SIGHT SctO2 values recorded simultaneously with the blood gas draws to determine its accuracy. Bilateral SctO2 and SpO2 measurements were then used to calculate SnvO2 values which were compared to SjvO2. Results Two hundred forty-six arterial and 253 venous samples from 18 subjects were used in the analysis. The ipsilateral FORE-SIGHT SctO2 values showed a tolerance interval (TI) of [−10.72 10.90] Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) with standard error (SE) of 0.83 ± 0.073 with the refSctO2 values calculated using arterial and venous blood gases. The combined data had a CCC of 0. 81 + 0.059 with TI of [−9.22 9.40] with overall bias was 0.09% and amplitude of the root mean square of error after it was corrected with random effects analysis was 2.92%. The bias and variability values between the ipsilateral and the contralateral FORE-SIGHT SctO2

  19. [An advantage of T2*-weighted MRI for early detection of straight sinus thrombosis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Saito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Makio; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Ohta, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Jun A; Matsumoto, Sadayuki

    2009-10-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a 12-day history of severe non-throbbing headache. He showed no physical abnormality but obesity. On day 12, ring-shaped low intensity lesions inside straight sinus were revealed on T2*-weighted MRI image (T2*WI). On the following day (day 13), he was found unresponsive at home, and ambulated with disturbed consciousness. FLAIR and diffusion-weighted MRI image disclosed high intensity signals in bilateral thalamus which were postulated as vasogenic edema. MR venography and conventional cerebral angiography showed an absence of flow in inferior sagittal sinus, vein of Galen, and straight sinus. These findings confirmed the diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). Anticoagulant treatment was introduced and his consciousness level was gradually improved. On day 43, he was discharged with no neurological sequelae. A delay of correct diagnosis and treatment with CVT can lead to devastating disability or even to death. An early diagnosis of CVT is often dismissed owing to the nonspecific symptoms such as headache and nausea. Recent reports described high sensitivity of T2*WI for detecting CVT. Alterations in blood flow and oxyhemoglobin reduced products, deoxyhemoglobin, in thrombosed veins often produce the magnetic susceptibility on T2*WI. A detection of ring-shaped low intensity lesions within venous sinus on T2*WI were quite rare, and the signal changes of these sinus lesions were successfully visualized by chronological T2*WI. Taken together, our case implies that T2*WI is the powerful tool for the early detection of CVT, even before the critical symptoms might happen. PMID:19999146

  20. Multiwavelength optoacoustic system for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation: a pilot clinical test in the internal jugular vein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yuriy Y.; Petrova, Irina Y.; Patrikeev, Igor A.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Prough, Donald S.

    2006-06-01

    A noninvasive, high-resolution optoacoustic technique is a promising alternative to currently used invasive methods of brain oxygenation monitoring. We present the results of our pilot clinical test of this technique in healthy volunteers. Multiwavelength optoacoustic measurements (with nanosecond optical parametric oscillator as a source of radiation) were performed on the area of the neck overlying the internal jugular vein, a deeply located large vein that drains blood from the brain and from extracranial tissues. Optoacoustic signals induced in venous blood were measured with high resolution and signal-to-noise ratio despite the presence of a thick layer of overlying tissue (up to 10 mm). The characteristic parameters of the signal at different wavelengths correlated well with the spectrum of the effective attenuation coefficient of blood.

  1. Straight sinus: ultrastructural analysis aimed at surgical tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Amato, Marcelo Campos Moraes; Tirapelli, Luis Fernando; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Colli, Benedicto Oscar

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Accurate knowledge of the anatomy of the straight sinus (SS) is relevant for surgical purposes. During one surgical procedure involving the removal of part of the SS wall, the authors observed that the venous blood flow was maintained in the SS, possibly through a vein-like structure within the dural sinus or dural multiple layers. This observation and its divergence from descriptions of the histological features of the SS walls motivated the present study. The authors aimed to investigate whether it is possible to dissect the SS walls while keeping the lumen intact, and to describe the histological and ultrastructural composition of the SS wall. METHODS A total of 22 cadaveric specimens were used. The SS was divided into three portions: anterior, middle, and posterior. The characteristics of the SS walls were analyzed, and the feasibility of dissecting them while keeping the SS lumen intact was assessed. The thickness and the number of collagen fibers and other tissues in the SS walls were compared with the same variables in other venous sinuses. Masson's trichrome and Verhoeff's stains were used to assess collagen and elastic fibers, respectively. The data were analyzed using Zeiss image analysis software (KS400). RESULTS A vein-like structure independent of the SS walls was found in at least one of the portions of the SS in 8 of 22 samples (36.36%). The inferior wall could be delaminated in at least one portion in 21 of 22 samples (95.45%), whereas the lateral walls could seldom be delaminated. The inferior wall of the SS was thicker (p < 0.05) and exhibited less collagen and greater amounts of other tissues-including elastic fibers, connective tissue, blood vessels, and nerve fibers (p < 0.05)-compared with the lateral walls. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of muscle fibers at a level deeper than that of the subendothelial connective tissue in the inferior wall of the SS, extending from its junction with the great cerebral vein

  2. Straight sinus thrombosis during neurosurgical operation

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Hiroto; Nitta, Naoki; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perioperative straight sinus thrombosis is extremely rare. Case Description: A 59-year-old female was admitted to our department because of incidentally found small anterior cerebral artery (A1) aneurysm with microbleeding. After clipping the cerebral aneurysm, she had delayed emergence from anesthesia, total aphasia, and right hemiparesis. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head showed hyperintensity in the bilateral caudate nuclei, putamina, and thalami, and computed tomography of the head showed a hyperdense straight sinus, suggesting straight sinus thrombosis. Her neurologic symptoms improved gradually, and she achieved a full clinical recovery, with radiological evidence of recanalization of the straight sinus at follow-up. Conclusion: The possibility of straight sinus thrombosis should be considered in postoperative patients with unexplained postoperative deficits when MRI demonstrates hyperintensity in the bilateral basal ganglia and thalami on FLAIR signal images. PMID:27213104

  3. Sinus pericranii: advantages of MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Bigot, J L; Iacona, C; Lepreux, A; Dhellemmes, P; Motte, J; Gomes, H

    2000-10-01

    Sinus pericranii is a rare vascular anomaly involving an abnormal communication between the extracranial and intracranial circulations. A 3-year-old girl presented with a 2 x 2-cm, midline soft-tissue mass at the vertex. Plain skull films and CT using bone windows showed erosion of the parietal bones. MRI confirmed the clinical diagnosis by identifying communication of the vascular mass with the intracranial dural venous sinus. The advantages of MRI are discussed. PMID:11075608

  4. The role of hyperthyroidism as the predisposing factor for superior sagittal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jong-Uk; Kwon, Ki-Young; Hur, Jin-Woo; Lee, Jong-Won; Lee, Hyun-Koo

    2012-09-01

    Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST) is an uncommon cause of stroke, whose symptoms and clinical course are highly variable. It is frequently associated with a variety of hypercoagulable states. Coagulation abnormalities are commonly seen in patients with hyperthyroidism. To the best of our knowledge, there are few reports on the association between hyperthyroidism and cerebral venous thrombosis. We report on a 31-year-old male patient with a six-year history of hyperthyroidism who developed seizure and mental deterioration. Findings on brain computed tomography (CT) showed multiple hemorrhages in the subcortical area of both middle frontal gyrus and cerebral digital subtraction angiography (DSA) showed irregular intra-luminal filling defects of the superior sagittal sinus. These findings were consistent with hemorrhagic transformation of SSST. Findings on clinical laboratory tests were consistent with hyperthyroidism. In addition, our patient also showed high activity of factors IX and XI. The patient received treatment with oral anticoagulant and prophylthiouracil. His symptoms showed complete improvement. A follow-up cerebral angiography four weeks after treatment showed a recanalization of the SSS. In conclusion, findings of our case indicate that hypercoagulability may contribute to development of SSST in a patient with hyperthyroidism. PMID:23210057

  5. Cerebral and Sinus Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke . 2010 ; 41 : 1901 – 1906 . OpenUrl Abstract / FREE Full Text 3. ↵ Saposnik G , Barinagarrementeria F , Brown RD Jr . , ... Stroke . 2011 ; 42 : 1158 – 1192 . OpenUrl Abstract / FREE Full Text View Abstract Back to top Previous Article Next ...

  6. High prevalence of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) as presentation of cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency in childhood: molecular and clinical findings of Turkish probands.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Mehmet; Hismi, Burcu; Ozgul, Riza Koksal; Karaca, Sefayet; Yilmaz, Didem Yucel; Coskun, Turgay; Sivri, Hatice Serap; Tokatli, Aysegul; Dursun, Ali

    2014-01-25

    Classical homocystinuria is the most commonly inherited disorder of sulfur metabolism, caused by the genetic alterations in human cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) gene. In this study, we present comprehensive clinical findings and the genetic basis of homocystinuria in a cohort of Turkish patients. Excluding some CBS mutations, detailed genotype-phenotype correlation for different CBS mutations has not been established in literature. We aimed to make clinical subgroups according to main clinical symptoms and discussed these data together with mutational analysis results from our patients. Totally, 16 different mutations were identified; twelve of which had already been reported, and four are novel (p.N93Y, p.L251P, p.D281V and c.829-2A>T). The probands were classified into three major groups according to the clinical symptoms caused by these mutations. A psychomotor delay was the most common diagnostic symptom (n=12, 46.2% neurological presentation), followed by thromboembolic events (n=6, 23.1% vascular presentation) and lens ectopia, myopia or marfanoid features (n=5, 19.2% connective tissue presentation). Pyridoxine responsiveness was 7.7%; however, with partial responsive probands, the ratio was 53.9%. In addition, five thrombophilic nucleotide changes including MTHFR c.677 C>T and c.1298 A>C, Factor V c.1691 G>A, Factor II c.20210 G>A, and SERPINE1 4G/5G were investigated to assess their contributions to the clinical spectrum. We suggest that the effect of these polymorphisms on clinical phenotype of CBS is not very clear since the distribution of thrombophilic polymorphisms does not differ among specific groups. This study provides molecular findings of 26 Turkish probands with homocystinuria and discusses the clinical presentations and putative effects of the CBS mutations. PMID:24211323

  7. Effect of hypoxia and hypercapnia on ACE activity in the cerebral microcirculation of anesthetized dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Pitt, B.R.; Lister, G.; Dawson, C.A.; Linehan, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity of the cerebral microcirculation of anesthetized dogs was measured from cerebral venous outflow curves after bolus injection of a synthetic ACE substrate, (/sup 3/H)benzoyl-phenylalanyl-alanylproline ((/sup 3/H)BPAP), into a common carotid artery. Cerebral BPAP metabolism was quantified by measuring the concentration of (/sup 3/H)benzoyl-phenylalanine (the product of BPAP hydrolysis by ACE) in blood samples from the sagittal sinus after occlusion of the lateral sinuses with bone wax. Instantaneous BPAP metabolism in each sample increased as a function of time after injection, suggestive of perfusion heterogeneity, and averaged 59 +/- 4% (n = 8) over a single pass during normoxia and normocapnia. The ratio of Vmax (the maximal rate of cerebral BPAP metabolism) to Km (the concentration at Vmax/2), was calculated from instantaneous outflow curves using a model based on first-order kinetics. Increases in cerebral blood flow during either hypoxia or hypercapnia significantly reduced BPAP metabolism to 33 +/- 3 (n = 7) and 24 +/- 3% (n = 5), respectively; however, Vmax/Km of ACE activity (0.19 +/- 0.03 ml/s) was not affected by either condition. The lack of change in apparent kinetics of ACE activity (i.e., in Vmax/Km) during hypoxia or hypercapnia suggests that recruitment of cerebral capillaries was not a quantitatively significant factor in controlling BPAP metabolism with this degree of either hypoxia or hypercapnia.

  8. Sinus aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    De Foer, C; Fossion, E; Vaillant, J M

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of Aspergillus sinusitis is often underestimated because the vast majority of cases are classified as "unspecified sinusitis". Two possible aetio-pathogenic mechanisms can be involved in the development of this fungal infection. Traditionally, the literature emphasised the "anglophone" hypothesis which is based on the inhalation of spores. More recently, the "french" model, based on oro-sinusal fistula and/or the perforation of the maxillary sinus by root canal-filling material, is believed to explain the majority of cases in our industrialised environments. Still, neither model explains the totality of cases and several remain beyond comprehension. The disease most commonly presents as a chronic bacterial sinusitis. The process can however become invasive, thus resembling malignancy, with eventually a fatal outcome. Doctors and dentists should know the possible danger, presented by zinc-oxide-eugenol-paste in the sinus. Radical surgery is the treatment of choice, since a prolonged conservative approach (antibiotics, corticosteroids) can only worsen the prognosis. This paper discusses different aspects of the disease, and presents 10 cases, observed at the University Hospitals of Paris (France) and Leuven (Belgium). PMID:2406288

  9. Sigmoid sinus thrombosis presenting with posterior alexia in a patient with Behçet's disease and polycythaemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P; Keightley, A; Kamble, R; Gunasekera, N; Johnson, MR

    2008-01-01

    Introduction A 59-year-old Caucasian woman presented with an acute onset of alexia, noticed whilst driving. She described how while she could read car number plates, she had lost the ability to read and understand words on roadside advertisements and car window stickers. Case presentation Neurological examination was unremarkable apart from the inability to read full words or sentences. Imaging of the brain, initially computed tomography, followed by magnetic resonance venography, confirmed a diagnosis of sigmoid sinus thrombosis with associated venous infarction. The patient's past medical history revealed that she had suffered an ischemic stroke and following investigation for this, had undergone a nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma. This was complicated by postoperative deep venous thrombosis. She had a persistent polycythaemia that was managed with venesection, and recently she had been diagnosed with Behçet's disease. Prior to this presentation, she had recently stopped her prophylactic antiplatelet medication as she was due to undergo a total knee replacement for osteoarthritis. She was managed with weight-adjusted, low molecular weight heparin followed by oral anticoagulation, and made a good recovery from her symptoms. Conclusion This case illustrates a classical neurological syndrome, highlights the importance of cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis as a cause of stroke, and the importance of remaining vigilant to a person's changing risk of venous thrombosis with evolving comorbidity. PMID:18500981

  10. Sinus CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - sinus; Computed axial tomography scan - sinus; Computed tomography scan - sinus; CT scan - sinus ... 2014:chap 67. Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, eds. Grainger & Allison's ...

  11. Brain Abscess Associated with Isolated Left Superior Vena Cava Draining into the Left Atrium in the Absence of Coronary Sinus and Atrial Septal Defect

    SciTech Connect

    Erol, Ilknur Cetin, I. Ilker; Alehan, Fuesun; Varan, Birguel; Ozkan, Sueleyman; Agildere, A. Muhtesem; Tokel, Kursad

    2006-06-15

    A previously healthy 12-year-old girl presented with severe headache for 2 weeks. On physical examination, there was finger clubbing without apparent cyanosis. Neurological examination revealed only papiledema without focal neurologic signs. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging showed the characteristic features of brain abscess in the left frontal lobe. Cardiologic workup to exclude a right-to-left shunt showed an abnormality of the systemic venous drainage: presence of isolated left superior vena cava draining into the left atrium in the absence of coronary sinus and atrial septal defect. This anomaly is rare, because only a few other cases have been reported.

  12. Endovascular Management of Sigmoid Sinus Diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Paramasivam, Srinivasan; Furtado, Sunil; Shigamatsu, Tomoyoshi; Smouha, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Sigmoid sinus diverticulum (SSD) is a rare vascular disorder due to dehiscence of the sigmoid plate. It may be associated with prediverticular venous sinus stenosis (SS) and usually presents as pulsatile tinnitus. The mechanism of development of the SSD and tinnitus from a sinus diverticulum and associated SS is unclear. Previous case reports have suggested that remodeling of the venous system targeting the stenosis, elimination of the diverticulum, or both, have resulted in symptom relief. We present a case of SSD with SS, treated by stenting of the stenosis along with coil embolization of the diverticulum, resulting in complete relief of symptoms. We have also reviewed the literature and discussed the evolution of management from open surgical treatment to endovascular treatment. PMID:27610124

  13. Endovascular Management of Sigmoid Sinus Diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Paramasivam, Srinivasan; Furtado, Sunil; Shigamatsu, Tomoyoshi; Smouha, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Sigmoid sinus diverticulum (SSD) is a rare vascular disorder due to dehiscence of the sigmoid plate. It may be associated with prediverticular venous sinus stenosis (SS) and usually presents as pulsatile tinnitus. The mechanism of development of the SSD and tinnitus from a sinus diverticulum and associated SS is unclear. Previous case reports have suggested that remodeling of the venous system targeting the stenosis, elimination of the diverticulum, or both, have resulted in symptom relief. We present a case of SSD with SS, treated by stenting of the stenosis along with coil embolization of the diverticulum, resulting in complete relief of symptoms. We have also reviewed the literature and discussed the evolution of management from open surgical treatment to endovascular treatment. PMID:27610124

  14. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate - a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Mark B; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik Bw

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% ([Formula: see text]), glutamate increased by 4.7% ([Formula: see text]) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p[Formula: see text]). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  15. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate – a magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik BW

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% (p<10-6), glutamate increased by 4.7% (p<10-4) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p<10-3). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  16. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  17. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1% to 5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and in people with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid [co-amoxiclav], doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides; different doses, long-course regimens), antihistamines, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intranasal). PMID:22189346

  18. [Venous ulcer].

    PubMed

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms. PMID:27405863

  19. Computerised tomographic detection of intracranial complications of paranasal sinus infections.

    PubMed

    Ogunseyinde, A O; Obajimi, M O; Agunloye, A M

    2004-01-01

    Ninety-four patients were referred for CT examination of the paranasal sinuses within a five year period. Only 11 (11.7%) of them had intracranial complications. These include cerebral, subdural and epidural abscesses, frontal bone osteomyelitis. The maxillary and ethmoidal sinuses were mostly involved and can be implicated as the sinogenic causes of intracranial infections. Sphenoidal sinus was not involved in any of the patients. PMID:15730085

  20. Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe

    MedlinePlus

    ... Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe Share | Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe Saline sinus rinses can bring relief to patients ... at a fraction of the cost. Saline Rinse Recipe Ingredients 1. Pickling or canning salt-containing no ...

  1. Sick sinus syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chambers is a common cause of sick sinus syndrome. Coronary artery disease , high blood pressure, and aortic and ... pressure may be normal or low. Sick sinus syndrome may cause symptoms of heart failure to start or get worse. Sick sinus ...

  2. The silent sinus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Jalalian, Faranak

    2013-01-01

    The silent sinus syndrome (SSS) involves painless facial asymmetry and enophthalmos, which is the result of chronic maxillary sinus atelectasis. In most cases, it is diagnosed clinically, however, using the characteristic imaging features including maxillary sinus outlet obstruction, sinus opacification, and sinus volume loss caused by inward retraction of the sinus walls. Obstruction of the maxillary ostium appears to play a critical role in the development of SSS. Treatment involves functional endoscopic surgery. PMID:23946747

  3. MR imaging appearance of frontal sinus barotrauma.

    PubMed

    Segev, Yoram; Landsberg, Roee; Fliss, Dan M

    2003-03-01

    We present the case of a flight passenger who experienced acute and severe headache during landing. MR imaging was performed because the patient had a history of vascular malformation and revealed an incidental venous angioma. A mass lesion in the frontal sinus, consistent with submucosal hematoma secondary to barotrauma, was thought to be the cause of the headache. To our knowledge, this is the first case of sinus barotrauma described in the radiologic literature and the first to describe the associated MR imaging findings. PMID:12637280

  4. Superior Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakase, Hiroyuki; Takeshima, Toshikazu; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Heimann, Axel; Kempski, Oliver

    1998-01-01

    Sinus-vein thrombosis is increasingly recognized as a much more frequent neurological disorder than was anticipated before. We examined the pathophysiology of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST) from 19 patients and a rat SSST model. We treated 19 cases with SSST who were diagnosed by angiography. The symptoms of nine patients, who suffered multiple intracerebral hemorrhage, were abrupt. In another ten patients who recovered satisfactorily, the condition progressed slowly and they were treated with heparin and urokinase. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that female, sudden onset (<24 hours) and posterior 1/3 occlusion are related to bad outcome. Experimentally, SSST was induced by ligation and slow injection of kaolin-cephalin suspension into SSS in rats. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Hb Sao2) using a “scanning” technique were measured at 48 locations, and fluorescence angiography was performed before and until 90 min after SSST induction. After 48 hours the animals were sacrificed for histological studies. Decrease of rCBF and tissue Hb SO2 and brain damage were seen in group B (n = 10) with an extension of thrombosis from SSS into cortical veins. Brain injury was not observed in group A (n = 8) with SSS thrombus alone and sham-operated animals (n = 5). In conclusion, a brain with acute extension of thrombus from SSS into cortical veins becomes critical for cerebral blood supply and metabolism. CBF, tissue HbSO2 and repeated angiography can be helpful monitors for the early detection of critical conditions after SSST. As to the therapy, restraint on the ongoing thrombus is essential to protect the brain with SSST, and we encourage the use of combination therapy of heparin and urokinase as early as possible in cases without intracerebral hemorrhage. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171061

  5. Venous insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and ankles Skin color changes around the ankles Varicose veins on the surface (superficial) Thickening and hardening of ... skin on the legs and ankles (lipodermatosclerosis) Surgery ( varicose vein stripping ) to treat chronic venous insufficiency has been ...

  6. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  7. Malignant fungal infection of the cavernous sinus: case report.

    PubMed

    Neil, Jayson A; Orlandi, Richard R; Couldwell, William T

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial spread of fungal infection is a life-threatening condition that usually affects immunocompromised patients. Here the authors present a case of biopsy-proven Aspergillus fumigatus infection of the paranasal sinuses in an immunocompetent patient with documented spread to the orbit, cavernous sinus, and petrous apex despite medical antifungal treatment. As a life-saving treatment, cavernous sinus resection with external carotid artery-middle cerebral artery bypass was performed. The authors discuss the literature regarding the intracranial spread of paranasal sinus fungal infections in immunocompetent patients and management strategies. PMID:26315007

  8. Comparison of Partial Volume Effects in Arterial and Venous Contrast Curves in CT Brain Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Alan J.; Bennink, Edwin; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Viergever, Max A.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Smit, Ewoud J.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In brain CT perfusion (CTP), the arterial contrast bolus is scaled to have the same area under the curve (AUC) as the venous outflow to correct for partial volume effects (PVE). This scaling is based on the assumption that large veins are unaffected by PVE. Measurement of the internal carotid artery (ICA), usually unaffected by PVE due to its large diameter, may avoid the need for partial volume correction. The aims of this work are to examine i) the assumptions behind PVE correction and ii) the potential of selecting the ICA obviating correction for PVE. Methods The AUC of the ICA and sagittal sinus were measured in CTP datasets from 52 patients. The AUCs were determined by i) using commercial CTP software based on a Gaussian curve-fitting to the time attenuation curve, and ii) by simple integration of the time attenuation curve over a time interval. In addition, frames acquired up to 3 minutes after first bolus passage were used to examine the ratio of arterial and venous enhancement. The impact of selecting the ICA without PVE correction was illustrated by reporting cerebral blood volume (CBV) measurements. Results In 49 of 52 patients, the AUC of the ICA was significantly larger than that of the sagittal sinus (p = 0.017). Measured after the first pass bolus, contrast enhancement remained 50% higher in the ICA just after the first pass bolus, and 30% higher 3 minutes later. CBV measurements were significantly lowered when the ICA was used without PVE correction. Conclusions Contradicting the assumptions underlying PVE correction, contrast in the ICA was significantly higher than in the sagittal sinus, even 3 minutes after the first pass of the contrast bolus. PVE correction might lead to overestimation of CBV if the CBV is calculated using the AUC of the time attenuation curves. PMID:24858308

  9. The Current Role of Venous Sampling in the Localization of Endocrine Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Jeshen H. G. Drake, William; Matson, Matthew

    2007-07-15

    Endocrine venous sampling plays a specific role in the diagnosis of endocrine disorders. In this article, we cover inferior petrosal sinus sampling, selective parathyroid venous sampling, hepatic venous sampling with arterial stimulation, adrenal venous sampling, and ovarian venous sampling. We review their indications and the scientific evidence justifying these indications in the diagnosis and management of Cushing's syndrome, hyperparathyroidism, pancreatic endocrine tumors, Conn's syndrome, primary hyperaldosteronism, pheochromocytomas, and androgen-secreting ovarian tumors. For each sampling technique, we compare its diagnostic accuracy with that of other imaging techniques and, where possible, look at how it impacts patient management. Finally, we incorporate venous sampling into diagnostic algorithms used at our institution.

  10. Cavernous sinus gas.

    PubMed

    Chen, S S; Shao, K N; Chiang, J H; Chang, C Y; Luo, C B; Lirng, J F; Teng, M M

    2000-07-01

    Gas within the cavernous sinus is an unusual finding. We report three patients who demonstrated gas in the cavernous sinus on computerized tomography (CT). The clinical information of these patients was reviewed for the possible source of the gas and the symptoms induced by the gas. Cavernous sinus gas was seen in two patients with sphenoid sinus fracture and in one patient after intravenous fluid infusion. None of the patients had symptoms referable to the cavernous sinus gas, but one patient had a grave prognosis due to trauma. Identification of cavernous sinus gas on CT and correlation with the clinical information is mandatory for further management. PMID:10934814

  11. Absence of the superior petrosal veins and sinus: Surgical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Ken; Ribas, Eduardo Santamaria Carvalhal; Kiyosue, Hiro; Komune, Noritaka; Miki, Koichi; Rhoton, Albert L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The superior petrosal vein, one of the most constant and largest drainage pathways in the posterior fossa, may result in complications if occluded. This study calls attention to a unique variant in which the superior petrosal veins and sinus were absent unilaterally, and the venous drainage was through the galenic and tentorial drainage groups. Methods: This study examines one venogram and another anatomic specimen in which the superior petrosal vein and sinus were absent. Results: The superior petrosal veins, described as 1–3 bridging veins, emptying into the superior petrosal sinus, are the major drainage pathways of the petrosal group of posterior fossa veins. In the cases presented, the superior petrosal vein and sinus were absent and venous drainage was through the galenic and tentorial groups, including the lateral mesencephalic or bridging vein on the tentorial cerebellar surface. Conclusions: In cases in which the superior petrosal sinus and veins are absent, care should be directed to preserving the collateral drainage through the galenic and tentorial tributaries. Although surgical strategies for intraoperative management and preservation of venous structures are still controversial, knowledge of the possible anatomical variations is considered to be essential to improve surgical outcomes. PMID:25745589

  12. [Maxillary sinus hypoplasia].

    PubMed

    Plaza, G; Ferrando, J; Martel, J; Toledano, A; de los Santos, G

    2001-03-01

    Maxillary sinus hypoplasia is rare, with an estimated prevalence of 1-5%. Out of the CT scans performed in sinusal patients between March 1998 and June 1999, we report on 4 isolated maxillary sinus hypoplasia, 4 maxillary sinus hypoplasia associated to concha bullosa, and 10 isolated conchae bullosas. All cases were evaluated by nasosinusal endoscopy and CT scan. Size, location and uni/bilateral presentation of concha bullosa is correlated to maxillary sinus hypoplasia presence, specially with regards to uncinate process presence, medial or lateral retraction. The pathogenesis of maxillary sinus hypoplasia is reviewed, and its relation to concha bullosa, evaluating how this could explain some cases of the so called chronic maxillary sinus atelectasia, as an acquired and progressive variant of maxillary sinus hypoplasia in adults. PMID:11428268

  13. Approaching chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Sarber, Kathleen M; Dion, Gregory Robert; Weitzel, Erik K; McMains, Kevin C

    2013-11-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a common disease that encompasses a number of syndromes that are characterized by sinonasal mucosal inflammation. Chronic sinusitis can be defined as two or more of the following symptoms lasting for more than 12 consecutive weeks: discolored rhinorrhea, postnasal drip, nasal obstruction, facial pressure or pain, or decreased sense of smell. Chronic sinusitis is further classified as chronic sinusitis with polyposis, chronic sinusitis without polyposis, or allergic fungal sinusitis using physical examination, and histologic and radiographic findings. Treatment methods for chronic sinusitis are based upon categorization of the disease and include oral and inhaled corticosteroids, nasal saline irrigations, and antibiotics in selected patients. Understanding the various forms of chronic sinusitis and managing and ruling out comorbidities are key to successful management of this common disorder. PMID:24192597

  14. Complications of Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ...

  15. Recurrent cerebral abscess secondary to a persistent left superior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Menachem, Jonathan N; Sundaram, Senthil N; Rhodes, John F

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral abscess is a serious neurological condition that is often of unclear etiology. Management is usually medical therapy with or without direct drainage, and when patients have recurrent episodes a structural abnormality should be considered. Persistent left superior vena cava is an uncommon condition in the absence of other forms of congenital heart disease. This venous connection most often enters the right-sided atrium through the coronary sinus but occasionally can connect directly to the left atrium near the wall between the orifice of the left pulmonary veins and left atrial appendage. This later congenital connection results in systemic venous return entering the left atrium directly. Thus allowing unfiltered, lower saturation blood entering the systemic system. This then places the patient at risk for systemic hypoxemia, paradoxical embolic events, and cerebral abscess. In our case report with recurrent cerebral abscess and a persistent left superior vena cava, we demonstrate when to consider this diagnosis, how to make the diagnosis, and a nonsurgical approach to repair the veno-atrial shunt. PMID:23710652

  16. Coronary venous oximetry using MRI.

    PubMed

    Foltz, W D; Merchant, N; Downar, E; Stainsby, J A; Wright, G A

    1999-11-01

    Based on the Fick law, coronary venous blood oxygen measurements have value for assessing functional parameters such as the coronary flow reserve. At present, the application of this measure is restricted by its invasive nature. This report describes the design and testing of a noninvasive coronary venous blood oxygen measurement using MRI, with a preliminary focus on the coronary sinus. After design optimization including a four-coil phased array and an optimal set of data acquisition parameters, quality tests indicate measurement precision on the order of the gold standard optical measurement (3%O(2)). Comparative studies using catheter sampling suggest reasonable accuracy (3 subjects), with variability dominated by sampling location uncertainty ( approximately 7%O(2)). Intravenous dipyridamole (5 subjects) induces significant changes in sinus blood oxygenation (22 +/- 9% O(2)), corresponding to flow reserves of 1.8 +/- 0.4, suggesting the potential for clinical utility. Underestimation of flow reserve is dominated by right atrial mixing and the systemic effects of dipyridamole. Magn Reson Med 42:837-848, 1999. PMID:10542342

  17. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  18. Carotid sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Mark

    2003-02-01

    This article reviews the recent literature about carotid sinus syndrome. It looks principally at the various ways in which it may present, the limited knowledge of its pathophysiology, and the role of carotid sinus massage in the investigation of carotid sinus syndrome. PMID:12619336

  19. Endovascular Treatment of a Dural Arteriovenous Fistula of the Transverse Sinus by Recanalisation, Angioplasty and Stent Deployment

    PubMed Central

    Weber, W.; Kis, B.; Esser, J.; Berlit, P.; Kühne, D.

    2003-01-01

    Summary We report the endovascular treatment of a 40-year-old woman with bilaterally thrombosed transverse sinuses and a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) causing cortical venous reflux by recanalization, angioplasty and stent deployment of the occluded sinus segment followed by occlusion of the DAVF by stent deployment in the fistulous segment. By recanalization of the occluded sinus we re-established normal anterograde venous drainage and eliminated the venous hypertension and cortical venous reflux. After the procedure, the patient was treated with aspirin and clopidogrel for three months. A follow-up examination showed total occlusion of the DAVF, patency of the sinus and a complete resolution of the clinical symptoms. PMID:20591305

  20. The venous drainage of the human myocardium.

    PubMed

    von Lüdinghausen, M

    2003-01-01

    New cardiological techniques such as coronary sinus catheterization and selective catheterization of the cardiac veins permit the opening of new experimental and clinical fields, for instance in venous angiography and the reverse nourishment of myocardium which is endangered by ischemia,and also in the electrophysiological study of the components of the conduction system. New approaches in heart surgery, such as the removal of accessory pathways of the conduction system (as in WPW syndrome), necessitate the realization of the topographical relationships of the vessels in the various sections of the coronary sulci in a different way. The objective of this work is, therefore, to present comprehensive and almost new macro- and microanatomical data about the venous drainage of the myocardium via the coronary sinus and its related and unrelated (non-coronary) cardiac veins. Examination of meticulously dissected heart specimens (of individuals who had achieved old or extreme old age at the time of their death in Germany: n=250) as well as corrosion casts of adult cardiac vessels (of individuals of all ages, n=25) formed the basis for the exact description and documentation of the occurrence, frequency, origin, and courses of both the normal and anomalously developed human coronary sinus and cardiac veins. A wide range of morphological and experimental references was consulted in order to enable thorough discussion of the anatomical findings in the light of modern cardiological diagnostics and treatment. The anatomical and clinical nomenclature is presented and there is a brief comment on modern diagnostic techniques and their applications where the cardiac veins are concerned. The two principal and one compound cardiac venous system are defined and discussed with reference to the existence of both the normal and anomalous coronary sinus and cardiac vein. 1. The greater (major) cardiac venous system (2) The smaller (minor) cardiac venous system (3)The compound cardiac

  1. Venous endothelial injury in central nervous system diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The role of the venous system in the pathogenesis of inflammatory neurological/neurodegenerative diseases remains largely unknown and underinvestigated. Aside from cerebral venous infarcts, thromboembolic events, and cerebrovascular bleeding, several inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), and optic neuritis, appear to be associated with venous vascular dysfunction, and the neuropathologic hallmark of these diseases is a perivenous, rather than arterial, lesion. Such findings raise fundamental questions about the nature of these diseases, such as the reasons why their pathognomonic lesions do not develop around the arteries and what exactly are the roles of cerebral venous inflammation in their pathogenesis. Apart from this inflammatory-based view, a new hypothesis with more focus on the hemodynamic features of the cerebral and extracerebral venous system suggests that MS pathophysiology might be associated with the venous system that drains the CNS. Such a hypothesis, if proven correct, opens new therapeutic windows in MS and other neuroinflammatory diseases. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the pathophysiology of MS, ADEM, pseudotumor cerebri, and optic neuritis, with an emphasis on the roles of venous vascular system programming and dysfunction in their pathogenesis. We consider the fundamental differences between arterial and venous endothelium, their dissimilar responses to inflammation, and the potential theoretical contributions of venous insufficiency in the pathogenesis of neurovascular diseases. PMID:24228622

  2. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling

    PubMed Central

    Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing’s syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88–100% and 67–100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50–70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres. PMID:27352844

  3. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling.

    PubMed

    Zampetti, Benedetta; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo; Loli, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing's syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88-100% and 67-100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50-70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres. PMID:27352844

  4. Venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wolberg, Alisa S; Rosendaal, Frits R; Weitz, Jeffrey I; Jaffer, Iqbal H; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Baglin, Trevor; Mackman, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) encompasses deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism. VTE is the leading cause of lost disability-adjusted life years and the third leading cause of cardiovascular death in the world. DVT leads to post-thrombotic syndrome, whereas pulmonary embolism can cause chronic pulmonary hypertension, both of which reduce quality of life. Genetic and acquired risk factors for thrombosis include non-O blood groups, factor V Leiden mutation, oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy, advanced age, surgery, hospitalization and long-haul travel. A combination of blood stasis, plasma hypercoagulability and endothelial dysfunction is thought to trigger thrombosis, which starts most often in the valve pockets of large veins. Animal studies have revealed pathogenic roles for leukocytes, platelets, tissue factor-positive microvesicles, neutrophil extracellular traps and factors XI and XII. Diagnosis of VTE requires testing and exclusion of other pathologies, and typically involves laboratory measures (such as D-dimer) and diagnostic imaging. VTE is treated with anticoagulants and occasionally with thrombolytics to prevent thrombus extension and to reduce thrombus size. Anticoagulants are also used to reduce recurrence. New therapies with improved safety profiles are needed to prevent and treat venous thrombosis. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/8ZyCuY. PMID:27189130

  5. Quantifying the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2013-02-01

    Preterm infants are highly susceptible to ischemic brain injury; consequently, continuous bedside monitoring to detect ischemia before irreversible damage occurs would improve patient outcome. In addition to monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF), assessing the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) would be beneficial considering that metabolic thresholds can be used to evaluate tissue viability. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that changes in absolute CMRO2 could be measured by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) with time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS). Absolute CBF was determined using bolus-tracking TR-NIRS to calibrate the DCS measurements. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation (SvO2) was determined by multiwavelength TR-NIRS measurements, the accuracy of which was assessed by directly measuring the oxygenation of sagittal sinus blood. In eight newborn piglets, CMRO2 was manipulated by varying the anesthetics and by injecting sodium cyanide. No significant differences were found between the two sets of SvO2 measurements obtained by TR-NIRS or sagittal sinus blood samples and the corresponding CMRO2 measurements. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean CMRO2 difference of 0.0268±0.8340 mL O2/100 g/min between the two techniques over a range from 0.3 to 4 mL O2/100 g/min.

  6. Computed tomographic observations pertinent to intracranial venous thrombotic and occulsive disease in childhood: state of the art, some new data, and hypotheses

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, H.D.; Ahmadi, J.; McComb, J.G.; Zee, C.S.; Becker, T.S.; Han, J.S.

    1982-05-01

    Selected topics are discussed and new observations recorded regarding computed tomographic (CT) evaluation of intracranial venous thrombotic and occlusive disease in childhood. High density of the vein of Galen and adjacent venous sinuses (relative to brain) can be seen normally in children. A number of potential pitfalls in the diagnosis of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis are also disclosed. A case of cavernous sinus thrombosis with abnormal CT changes is included. In addition, the normal CT appearance of the cavernous sinus is described. In some cases, filling defects occur which appear to correlate with normal cranial nerves. An unusual case of venous sinus occlusion by neoplasm (sarcoma) is presented. Finally, new findings in the Sturge-Weber syndrome are analyzed. Enhancement of the brain in this condition may have its basis in altered circulation resulting from fundamental venous abnormalities.

  7. Anatomical Variations of the Transverse-Sigmoid Sinus Junction: Implications for Endovascular Treatment of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Michael W; Bartels, Harrison G; Rodriguez, Analiz; Johnson, James E; Janjua, Rashid M

    2016-08-01

    Venous sinus pathology can result in multiple pathological diseases, including idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). There remains a paucity of information on anatomical luminal variations of the major venous sinuses which may contribute to the etiology of certain disease states. Thirty-six transverse and sigmoid sinuses were removed following dissection of 19 unfixed cadaveric heads. Sinuses were opened longitudinally to study luminal variations. A semiquantitative classification system was developed to assess septations and blind pouches. Seventy-nine percent of cadavers had a luminal anatomical variation. Forty-four percent and 42% of sinuses dissected had occurrence of a septations or blind pouches, respectively. Thirty percent of septations and 25% of pouches were classified as large. Incidence of anatomical variations was not statistically significant between cadaver gender or sinus laterality. Luminal variations are present in the transverse and sigmoid sinuses at rates higher than expected. This study is the first to report the presence of blind pouches in the luminal wall of transverse and sigmoid sinuses. These variations can have clinical importance to the endovascular surgeon and may also contribute to the pathophysiological etiology of venous sinus diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1037-1042, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27161529

  8. Cholesterol Granule of the Ethmoid Sinus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Praweswararat, Puangmali

    2016-02-01

    Cholesterol granuloma (CG) is common in the mastoid air cells, less common in the skull base and orbit, and uncommon in the paranasal sinuses. The most commonly affected sinus is the maxillary sinus, and it is very rare in the ethmoid and sphenoid sinus. CG is thought to be due to impair the venous and lymphatic drainage from the sinus cavity. In the early period of the disease, the patient has no symptoms but when the expanding cysts compress the surrounding structures, they cause bony erosion that leads to clinical symptoms such as nasal blockage, eye pain or visual loss. If the patients' presentation does not correlate with physical examination, concerns are raised, and imaging should be performed. This study reports a case of cholesterol granuloma of the ethmoid sinus treated with the endoscopic marsupialization technique. This paper will remind physicians of the characteristics of cholesterol granuloma, which are useful for differential diagnosis of patients with this condition. In addition, it is the first reported case of cholesterol granuloma of the ethmoid sinus in the Thai literature. PMID:27266241

  9. Microbiology of sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2011-03-01

    Most sinus infections are viral, and only a small proportion develops a secondary bacterial infection. Rhinoviruses, influenza viruses, and parainfluenza viruses are the most common causes of sinusitis. The most common bacteria isolated from pediatric and adult patients with community-acquired acute purulent sinusitis are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pyogenes. Staphylococcus aureus and anaerobic bacteria (Prevotella and Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium and Peptostreptococcus spp.) are the main isolates in chronic sinusitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other aerobic and facultative gram-negative rods are commonly isolated from patients with nosocomial sinusitis, the immunocompromised host, those with HIV infection, and in cystic fibrosis. Fungi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most common isolates in neutropenic patients. The microbiology of sinusitis is influenced by the previous antimicrobial therapy, vaccinations, and the presence of normal flora capable of interfering with the growth of pathogens. PMID:21364226

  10. Upper Body Venous Compliance Exceeds Lower Body Venous Compliance in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.

    1996-01-01

    Human venous compliance hypothetically decreases from upper to lower body as a mechanism for maintenance of the hydrostatic indifference level 'headward' in the body, near the heart. This maintains cardiac filling pressure, and thus cardiac output and cerebral perfusion, during orthostasis. This project entailed four steps. First, acute whole-body tilting was employed to alter human calf and neck venous volumes. Subjects were tilted on a tilt table equipped with a footplate as follows: 90 deg, 53 deg, 30 deg, 12 deg, O deg, -6 deg, -12 deg, -6 deg, O deg, 12 deg, 30 deg, 53 deg, and 90 deg. Tilt angles were held for 30 sec each, with 10 sec transitions between angles. Neck volume increased and calf volume decreased during head-down tilting, and the opposite occurred during head-up tilt. Second, I sought to cross-validate Katkov and Chestukhin's (1980) measurements of human leg and neck venous pressures during whole-body tilting, so that those data could be used with volume data from the present study to calculate calf and neck venous compliance (compliance = (Delta)volume/(Delta)pressure). Direct measurements of venous pressures during postural chances and whole-body tilting confirmed that the local changes in venous pressures seen by Katkov and Chestukhin (1980) are valid. The present data also confirmed that gravitational changes in calf venous pressure substantially exceed those changes in upper body venous pressure. Third, the volume and pressure data above were used to find that human neck venous compliance exceeds calf venous compliance by a factor of 6, thereby upholding the primary hypothesis. Also, calf and neck venous compliance correlated significantly with each other (r(exp 2) = 0.56). Fourth, I wished to determine whether human calf muscle activation during head-up tilt reduces calf venous compliance. Findings from tilting and from supine assessments of relaxed calf venous compliance were similar, indicating that tilt-induced muscle activation is