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Sample records for cerebrospinal fluid stasis

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid stasis and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Whedon, James M; Glassey, Donald

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesize that stasis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) occurs commonly and is detrimental to health. Physiologic factors affecting the normal circulation of CSF include cardiovascular, respiratory, and vasomotor influences. The CSF maintains the electrolytic environment of the central nervous system (CNS), influences systemic acid-base balance, serves as a medium for the supply of nutrients to neuronal and glial cells, functions as a lymphatic system for the CNS by removing the waste products of cellular metabolism, and transports hormones, neurotransmitters, releasing factors, and other neuropeptides throughout the CNS. Physiologic impedance or cessation of CSF flow may occur commonly in the absence of degenerative changes or pathology and may compromise the normal physiologic functions of the CSF. CSF appears to be particularly prone to stasis within the spinal canal. CSF stasis may be associated with adverse mechanical cord tension, vertebral subluxation syndrome, reduced cranial rhythmic impulse, and restricted respiratory function. Increased sympathetic tone, facilitated spinal segments, dural tension, and decreased CSF flow have been described as closely related aspects of an overall pattern of structural and energetic dysfunction in the axial skeleton and CNS. Therapies directed at affecting CSF flow include osteopathic care (especially cranial manipulation), craniosacral therapy, chiropractic adjustment of the spine and cranium, Network Care (formerly Network Chiropractic), massage therapy (including lymphatic drainage techniques), yoga, therapeutic breath-work, and cerebrospinal fluid technique. Further investigation into the nature and causation of CSF stasis, its potential effects upon human health, and effective therapies for its correction is warranted. PMID:19472865

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... the normally clear fluid that moves in the space around the spinal cord. ... patient with neurologic disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea due to cochlear dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Syal, Rajan; Tyagi, Isha; Goyal, Amit

    2005-07-01

    Cochlear dysplasia associated with defect in stapes footplate can be a cause of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak in these cases is usually done by packing the vestibule with muscle or fascia. This traditional method of repair has 30-60% failure rate. Cerebrospinal fluid leak in four such patients was successfully repaired using multiple layer packing of vestibule, reinforced by pedicle temporalis muscle graft. Intraoperatively continuous lumbar drain was done. Magnetic resonance imaging of inner ear using 3D FSE T2WI and 3D FIESTA sequences was found helpful noninvasive investigation to localize site and route of cerebrospinal fluid leak. PMID:15911019

  4. The Maze of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The author analyzes a historical, long, and tortuous way to discover the cerebrospinal fluid. At least 35 physicians and anatomists described in the text have laid the fundamentals of recognition of this biological fluid's presence. On the basis of crucial anatomical, experimental, and clinical works there are four greatest physicians who should be considered as equal cerebrospinal fluid's discoverers: Egyptian Imhotep, Venetian Nicolo Massa, Italian Domenico Felice Cotugno, and French François Magendie. PMID:24396600

  5. Hyaluronan in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Laurent, U B; Laurent, T C; Hellsing, L K; Persson, L; Hartman, M; Lilja, K

    1996-09-01

    We studied the concentration of hyaluronan in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in various diseases and attempted to define its reference interval. A radioassay utilizing cartilage proteins with affinity for hyaluronan was used in determining the concentration of 200 lumbar and 27 ventricular CSF specimens and 11 brain cyst fluids. Molecular weight distributions were determined by gel chromatography and localization in brain tissue by histochemistry. The hyaluronan level of lumbar CSF showed an increase with age; comparatively healthy children had (mean +/- SD) 50 +/- 41 micrograms/L (n = 40) and adults 166 +/- 77 micrograms/L (n = 9); i.e. significantly different values. The highest level was recorded in a patient with meningitis (> 8000 micrograms/L). More than 4000 micrograms/ L was noted in a patient with tumour metastasis in the cerebellum. Significantly elevated levels were especially found with spinal stenosis, head injury and cerebral infarction, but also in inflammatory medical disorders, hydrocephalus and encephalitis. We found no significant increase in multiple sclerosis and some other neurological diseases. Ventricular CSF of adults contained significantly less hyaluronan (53 +/- 73 micrograms/L; n = 16) than lumbar CSF. Hyaluronan in cyst fluids varied from 31 to 25,000 micrograms/L. Weight average molecular weight of hyaluronan in CSF was 2.9-3.0 x 10(5) and in brain tumour cyst fluid 2.4 x 10(6). In search for the origin of hyaluronan in CSF it was found that its concentration in the choroid plexus and leptomeninges was low, but that hyaluronan was accumulated in the superficial layer of the cerebral cortex. Continued screening for hyaluronan in CSF may be valuable in cases of inflammatory diseases, tumours and obstruction to CSF flow. PMID:8899053

  6. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus.

    PubMed

    Oleś, Krzysztof; Składzien, Jacek; Betlej, Marek; Chrzan, Robert; Mika, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus, obesity and no history of trauma. Follow-up imaging scans confirmed enlargement of the defect within the posterior clival framework to the size of 16 × 9 × 4 mm with a suspected meningocerebral hernia. The surgeons used the "two nostrils - four hands" endoscopic operating technique. The patient reported a history of cerebrospinal fluid leaks lasting for 3 years, with increasingly shorter leak-free periods and an increasing incidence of inflammatory complications. The patient recovered without complications, and she was discharged 14 days after the surgery. Good local outcome and improved patient condition were achieved postoperatively. PMID:26865899

  7. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus

    PubMed Central

    Składzien, Jacek; Betlej, Marek; Chrzan, Robert; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus, obesity and no history of trauma. Follow-up imaging scans confirmed enlargement of the defect within the posterior clival framework to the size of 16 × 9 × 4 mm with a suspected meningocerebral hernia. The surgeons used the “two nostrils – four hands” endoscopic operating technique. The patient reported a history of cerebrospinal fluid leaks lasting for 3 years, with increasingly shorter leak-free periods and an increasing incidence of inflammatory complications. The patient recovered without complications, and she was discharged 14 days after the surgery. Good local outcome and improved patient condition were achieved postoperatively. PMID:26865899

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid secretion by the choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Damkier, Helle H; Brown, Peter D; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2013-10-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium is a cuboidal cell monolayer, which produces the majority of the cerebrospinal fluid. The concerted action of a variety of integral membrane proteins mediates the transepithelial movement of solutes and water across the epithelium. Secretion by the choroid plexus is characterized by an extremely high rate and by the unusual cellular polarization of well-known epithelial transport proteins. This review focuses on the specific ion and water transport by the choroid plexus cells, and then attempts to integrate the action of specific transport proteins to formulate a model of cerebrospinal fluid secretion. Significant emphasis is placed on the concept of isotonic fluid transport across epithelia, as there is still surprisingly little consensus on the basic biophysics of this phenomenon. The role of the choroid plexus in the regulation of fluid and electrolyte balance in the central nervous system is discussed, and choroid plexus dysfunctions are described in a very diverse set of clinical conditions such as aging, Alzheimer's disease, brain edema, neoplasms, and hydrocephalus. Although the choroid plexus may only have an indirect influence on the pathogenesis of these conditions, the ability to modify epithelial function may be an important component of future therapies. PMID:24137023

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure and the eye.

    PubMed

    Morgan, William H; Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Lind, Christopher R P; Colley, Steve; Kang, Min H; House, Philip H; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) interacts with intraocular pressure (IOP) and blood pressure to exert a major influence upon the eye, particularly the optic nerve head region. There is increased interest regarding the influence of CSFP upon disorders affecting this region, in particular glaucoma and idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Additionally, a high proportion of astronauts develop features similar to idiopathic intracranial hypertension that persist for years after returning to Earth. The factors that affect the CSFP influence upon the optic nerve and globe are likely to influence the outcome of various ophthalmic disorders. PMID:25877896

  10. Pseudoepiphora from cerebrospinal fluid leak: case report.

    PubMed Central

    Dryden, R M; Wulc, A E

    1986-01-01

    A 4-year-old tearing child with obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct was treated with dacryocystorhinostomy three years after naso-orbital injury. However, what appeared to be tearing persisted, and meningitis developed. Coronal CT scans demonstrated traumatic encephalocele of the posterior superior orbital roof. A chronic orbital cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak was diagnosed. To our knowledge no case of chronic CSF leak has been reported that simulated tearing in an otherwise asymptomatic child. In the tearing patient who has a naso-orbital fracture the possibility of chronic CSF leak should be considered. Images PMID:3741820

  11. Penetration of colistin into cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Markantonis, S L; Markou, N; Fousteri, M; Sakellaridis, N; Karatzas, S; Alamanos, I; Dimopoulou, E; Baltopoulos, G

    2009-11-01

    Colistin penetration into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was studied in five critically ill adult patients receiving colistin methanesulfonate for infections by multiresistant gram-negative bacilli. Colistin concentrations were determined in paired serum and CSF samples, with the latter taken by lumbar puncture, with the exception of one patient with an external ventriculostomy. CSF-to-serum ratios (0.051 to 0.057) for all study patients coincided at all sampling times. The low level (5%) of penetration suggests inadequate bactericidal colistin concentrations in the CSF. PMID:19704130

  12. A Case of Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhoea: A Surgical Challenge

    PubMed Central

    R, Sumitha; Hari, P M; Kumar, S Ramya; Hariprasad, R

    2013-01-01

    CEREBROSPINAL FLUID rhinorrhoea is defined as the leakage of CEREBROSPINAL FLUID through the nose due to communication between nasal cavity and Sub-arachnoid space. It occurs due to breach in 4 layers – mucosa of the nose and PNS, skull base, Duramater, Subarachnoid membrane. With the advent of nasal endoscope and advancement in technology, Endoscopic Endonasal closure of CEREBROSPINAL FLUID leak has reached tremendous heights due to exact localization and precise placement of graft. In this article, we are publishing a case report of Non-traumatic normal pressure CEREBROSPINAL FLUID leak of more than 1.5cm in size which was successfully closed Endoscopically by multilayered technique PMID:23998089

  13. Vasoactive intestinal peptide in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Sharpless, N S; Thal, L J; Perlow, M J; Tabaddor, K; Waltz, J M; Shapiro, K N; Amin, I M; Engel, J; Crandall, P H

    1984-01-01

    Immunoreactive vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was measured in lumbar and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with various neurological disorders and in 2 hour aliquots of cisternal fluid removed continuously from rhesus monkeys. Although most of the VIP in concentrated pools of human ventricular fluid and of monkey cisternal fluid co-eluted with synthetic porcine VIP28 on a column of Sephadex G-25 superfine, there was evidence that smaller immunoreactive fragments were also present. A circadian pattern of CSF VIP concentration was observed in 2 of the 3 monkeys studied, with highest levels occurring at night and lowest during the day. Ventricular fluid VIP levels were highest in hydrocephalic children and lowest in patients with multiple sclerosis or epilepsy, while VIP was not detectable in ventricular fluid from patients in coma following a severe head injury. There were no significant differences in VIP concentrations in CSF from patients with dystonia. Parkinson's disease, or Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that VIP containing neurons are not affected in these disorders. Lumbar fluid VIP levels were low in patients undergoing aneurysm surgery. Since VIP is a potent vasodilator, these findings may have important implications in relation to the development of vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:6473166

  14. Hourly analysis of cerebrospinal fluid glucose shows large diurnal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Marcel M; Leen, Wilhelmina G; Willemsen, Michèl A; Slats, Diane; Claassen, Jurgen A

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid analysis is important in the diagnostics of many neurological disorders. Since the influence of food intake on the cerebrospinal fluid glucose concentration and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio is largely unknown, we studied fluctuations in these parameters in healthy adult volunteers during a period of 36 h. Our observations show large physiological fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid glucose and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio, and their relation to food intake. These findings provide novel insights into the physiology of cerebral processes dependent on glucose levels such as energy formation (e.g. glycolysis), enzymatic reactions (e.g. glycosylation), and non-enzymatic reactions (e.g. advanced endproduct glycation). PMID:26945018

  15. A new look at cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    According to the traditional understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physiology, the majority of CSF is produced by the choroid plexus, circulates through the ventricles, the cisterns, and the subarachnoid space to be absorbed into the blood by the arachnoid villi. This review surveys key developments leading to the traditional concept. Challenging this concept are novel insights utilizing molecular and cellular biology as well as neuroimaging, which indicate that CSF physiology may be much more complex than previously believed. The CSF circulation comprises not only a directed flow of CSF, but in addition a pulsatile to and fro movement throughout the entire brain with local fluid exchange between blood, interstitial fluid, and CSF. Astrocytes, aquaporins, and other membrane transporters are key elements in brain water and CSF homeostasis. A continuous bidirectional fluid exchange at the blood brain barrier produces flow rates, which exceed the choroidal CSF production rate by far. The CSF circulation around blood vessels penetrating from the subarachnoid space into the Virchow Robin spaces provides both a drainage pathway for the clearance of waste molecules from the brain and a site for the interaction of the systemic immune system with that of the brain. Important physiological functions, for example the regeneration of the brain during sleep, may depend on CSF circulation. PMID:24817998

  16. Systemic parameters associated with cerebrospinal fluid pressure.

    PubMed

    Berdahl, John P

    2013-01-01

    Low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure has recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. Although little data currently exists, various systemic parameters may affect CSF pressure. CSF pressure increases with increased body mass index (BMI), which corroborates recent studies that have demonstrated elevated BMI may be protective of glaucoma. CSF pressure decreases with age, while the incidence of glaucoma increases with age. Blood pressure has been reported to influence CSF pressure in some studies but not others. Women appear to have a slightly lower CSF pressure than men and CSF pressure shows diurnal fluctuation, as do blood pressure and intraocular pressure. Additionally, postural changes likely alter CSF pressure near the optic nerve. Finally, many factors that may affect CSF pressure (such as medications, genetics, race, and others) have yet to be studied conclusively. PMID:23733117

  17. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid tau in Wernicke encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Frijlink, Daphne W; Tilanus, Joachim J; Roks, Gerwin

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) commonly presents with oculomotor abnormalities, gait ataxia and confusion. WE can mimic rapidly progressive dementia syndromes, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is frequently used for diagnosis of several dementia subtypes, predominantly CJD and Alzheimer's disease. The combination of very high CSF tau (tau) and normal phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels is almost exclusively seen in aggressive diseases, such as CJD. The authors present a case of a woman with WE, caused by chronic insufficient dietary intake, with highly elevated CSF tau and normal p-tau. The clinical symptoms and CSF findings raised the suspicion of CJD. However, shortly after immediate treatment with thiamine the patient clinically improved. At follow-up, 2.5?months later, she had made a good recovery. This case of rapidly progressive dementia illustrates that, even in the case of a highly elevated CSF tau, clinicians should be alert for treatable causes such as WE. PMID:22879004

  18. Imhotep and the discovery of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned. PMID:24744920

  19. Imhotep and the Discovery of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned. PMID:24744920

  20. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution 2D-LC MS/MS analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. We identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis. The data are available in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000248. PMID:24677814

  1. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Lauren M; Wild, Edward J

    2016-03-31

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is enriched in brain-derived components and represents an accessible and appealing means of interrogating the CNS milieu to study neurodegenerative diseases and identify biomarkers to facilitate the development of novel therapeutics. Many such CSF biomarkers have been proposed for Huntington's disease (HD) but none has been validated for clinical trial use. Across many studies proposing dozens of biomarker candidates, there is a notable lack of statistical power, consistency, rigor and validation. Here we review proposed CSF biomarkers including neurotransmitters, transglutaminase activity, kynurenine pathway metabolites, oxidative stress markers, inflammatory markers, neuroendocrine markers, protein markers of neuronal death, proteomic approaches and mutant huntingtin protein itself. We reflect on the need for large-scale, standardized CSF collections with detailed phenotypic data to validate and qualify much-needed CSF biomarkers for clinical trial use in HD. PMID:27031730

  2. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-03-20

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  3. Ceftriaxone diffusion into cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Latif, R; Dajani, A S

    1983-01-01

    We evaluated the diffusion of ceftriaxone into the cerebrospinal fluid of 27 infants and children with meningitis who were receiving conventional antimicrobic therapy. Ceftriaxone was administered as a single 75 mg/kg dose and was given early or late or both in the course of the illness. Three hours after a dose, the mean cerebrospinal fluid ceftriaxone level was 5.7 micrograms/ml in patients studied early in the course of meningitis and 2.1 micrograms/ml in patients studied later in the illness. Six hours after a dose, the mean cerebrospinal fluid ceftriaxone levels early and late in meningitis were 7.2 and 2.5 micrograms/ml, respectively. The diffusion did not correlate with the leukocyte count or the protein or glucose content of the cerebrospinal fluid. Serial, simultaneous cerebrospinal fluid and plasma ceftriaxone levels were also determined in three additional patients with ventriculo-peritoneal shunt infections and external ventriculostomy drainage. The cerebrospinal fluid ceftriaxone levels in these patients ranged from 0.7 to 8.3 micrograms/ml. Our data indicate that ceftriaxone diffuses sufficiently and consistently into the cerebrospinal fluid to warrant its assessment in the treatment of meningitis. PMID:6299184

  4. Proteome analysis of chick embryonic cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Aparicio, Mariano; Bueno, David

    2006-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF), a complex fluid containing different protein fractions that contributes to the regulation of the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. Using 2-DE, protein sequencing and database searches, we identified and analyzed the proteome of the E-CSF from chick embryos (Gallus gallus). We identified 26 different gene products, including proteins related to the extracellular matrix, proteins associated with the regulation of osmotic pressure and metal transport, proteins related to cell survival, MAP kinase activators, proteins involved in the transport of retinol and vitamin D, antioxidant and antimicrobial proteins, intracellular proteins and some unknown proteins. Most of these gene products are involved in the regulation of developmental processes during embryogenesis in systems other than E-CSF. Interestingly, 14 of them are also present in adult human CSF proteome, and it has been reported that they are altered in the CSF of patients suffering neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis is a key contribution to the general understanding of CNS development, and may also contribute to greater knowledge of these human diseases. PMID:16287170

  5. Quantitative evaluation fo cerebrospinal fluid shunt flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chervu, S.; Chervu, L.R.; Vallabhajosyula, B.; Milstein, D.M.; Shapiro, K.M.; Shulman, K.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    The authors describe a rigorous method for measuring the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in shunt circuits implanted for the relief of obstructive hydrocephalus. Clearance of radioactivity for several calibrated flow rates was determined with a Harvard infusion pump by injecting the Rickham reservoir of a Rickham-Holter valve system with 100 ..mu..Ci of Tc-99m as pertechnetate. The elliptical and the cylindrical Holter valves used as adjunct valves with the Rickham reservoir yielded two different regression lines when the clearances were plotted against flow rats. The experimental regression lines were used to determine the in vivo flow rates from clearances calculated after injecting the Rickham reservoirs of the patients. The unique clearance characteristics of the individual shunt systems available requires that calibration curves be derived for an entire system identical to one implanted in the patient being evaluated, rather than just the injected chamber. Excellent correlation between flow rates and the clinical findings supports the reliability of this method of quantification of CSF shunt flow, and the results are fully accepted by neurosurgeons.

  6. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Japanese Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Nabonita; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Tripathi, Piyush; Kumar, Rashmi; Suryavanshi, Amol; Basu, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia. Acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) is a group of central nervous system (CNS) disorders caused by a wide range of viruses, bacteria, fungi, chemicals and toxins. It is important to distinguish between various forms of infectious encephalitis with similar clinical manifestations in order to ensure specific and accurate diagnosis and development of subsequent therapeutic strategies. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is in direct contact with the CNS and hence it is considered to be an excellent source for identifying biomarkers for various neurological disorders. With the recent advancement in proteomic methodologies, the field of biomarker research has received a remarkable boost.  The present study identifies potential biomarkers for JE using a proteomics based approach. The CSF proteomes from ten patients each with JE and Non-JE acute encephalitis were analyzed by 2D gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry. Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP), fibrinogen gamma chain, fibrinogen beta chain, complement C4-B, complement C3 and cytoplasmic actin were found to be significantly elevated in case of JE indicating severe disruption of the blood brain barrier and DBP can be suggested to be an important diagnostic marker. PMID:26309732

  7. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid tau in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Frijlink, Daphne W; Tilanus, Joachim J; Roks, Gerwin

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) commonly presents with oculomotor abnormalities, gait ataxia and confusion. WE can mimic rapidly progressive dementia syndromes, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is frequently used for diagnosis of several dementia subtypes, predominantly CJD and Alzheimer's disease. The combination of very high CSF tau (tau) and normal phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels is almost exclusively seen in aggressive diseases, such as CJD. The authors present a case of a woman with WE, caused by chronic insufficient dietary intake, with highly elevated CSF tau and normal p-tau. The clinical symptoms and CSF findings raised the suspicion of CJD. However, shortly after immediate treatment with thiamine the patient clinically improved. At follow-up, 2.5 months later, she had made a good recovery. This case of rapidly progressive dementia illustrates that, even in the case of a highly elevated CSF tau, clinicians should be alert for treatable causes such as WE. PMID:22879004

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow Studies and Recent Advancements.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Erin J; Yamada, Shinya

    2016-04-01

    This article provides an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques used to assess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) movement in the central nervous system (CNS), including Phase-Contrast (PC), Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse, and simultaneous multi slice echo planar phase contrast imaging. These techniques have been used to assess CSF movement in the CNS under normal and pathophysiological situations. PC can quantitatively measure stroke volume in selected regions, particularly the aqueduct of Sylvius, as synchronized to the heartbeat. The PC is frequently used to investigate those patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus and a Chiari I malformation. Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse, with high signal-to-noise ratio, captures motion of CSF anywhere in the CNS over a time period of up to 5 seconds. Variations of PC-MRI improved temporal resolution and included contributions from respiration. With non-invasive imaging such as these, more can be understood about CSF dynamics, especially with respect to the relative effects of cardiac and respiratory changes on CSF movement. PMID:27063659

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Inflammatory Cytokines and Aggression in Personality Disordered Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Royce; Coussons-Read, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neurochemical studies have pointed to a modulatory role in human aggression for a variety of central neurotransmitters and neuromodulators such as cytokines. While animal studies of cytokines suggest an aggression-facilitating role for central cytokines, especially for interleukin-1β and other cytokines, no cerebrospinal fluid studies of cytokines have yet been reported in regard to human aggression. Methods: Basal lumbar cerebrospinal fluid samples were obtained from 38 physically healthy subjects with DSM-5 Personality Disorder and assayed for cerebrospinal fluid interleukin-6 (log IL-6) and cerebrospinal fluid soluble IL-1 Receptor II protein in the context of their relationship with measures of aggression. Results: Cerebrospinal fluid soluble interleukin-1 Receptor II (r=.35, r2 = .12, P= .03), but not log interleukin-6 (r = -.05, r2 = .00, P= .76), levels were positively correlated with a composite measure of aggression. Adding relevant covariates, including cerebrospinal fluid levels of serotonin and dopamine metabolites, to the statistical model doubled the strength of this relationship (partial r = .54, r2 = .29, P= .002). No relationship was seen with history of suicidal behavior or with any measure of impulsivity, negative affectivity, or of general dimensions of personality. Conclusion: These data suggest a positive relationship between at least one inflammatory cytokine in the central nervous system and aggression in human subjects. This finding adds to the complex picture of the central neurochemistry of impulsive aggression in human subjects. PMID:25650410

  10. Quantitative proteomics of delirium cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Poljak, A; Hill, M; Hall, R J; MacLullich, A M; Raftery, M J; Tai, J; Yan, S; Caplan, G A

    2014-01-01

    Delirium is a common cause and complication of hospitalization in older people, being associated with higher risk of future dementia and progression of existing dementia. However relatively little data are available on which biochemical pathways are dysregulated in the brain during delirium episodes, whether there are protein expression changes common among delirium subjects and whether there are any changes which correlate with the severity of delirium. We now present the first proteomic analysis of delirium cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and one of few studies exploring protein expression changes in delirium. More than 270 proteins were identified in two delirium cohorts, 16 of which were dysregulated in at least 8 of 17 delirium subjects compared with a mild Alzheimer's disease neurological control group, and 31 proteins were significantly correlated with cognitive scores (mini-mental state exam and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation III). Bioinformatics analyses revealed expression changes in several protein family groups, including apolipoproteins, secretogranins/chromogranins, clotting/fibrinolysis factors, serine protease inhibitors and acute-phase response elements. These data not only provide confirmatory evidence that the inflammatory response is a component of delirium, but also reveal dysregulation of protein expression in a number of novel and unexpected clusters of proteins, in particular the granins. Another surprising outcome of this work is the level of similarity of CSF protein profiles in delirium patients, given the diversity of causes of this syndrome. These data provide additional elements for consideration in the pathophysiology of delirium as well as potential biomarker candidates for delirium diagnosis. PMID:25369144

  11. Quantitative proteomics of delirium cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Poljak, A; Hill, M; Hall, R J; MacLullich, A M; Raftery, M J; Tai, J; Yan, S; Caplan, G A

    2014-01-01

    Delirium is a common cause and complication of hospitalization in older people, being associated with higher risk of future dementia and progression of existing dementia. However relatively little data are available on which biochemical pathways are dysregulated in the brain during delirium episodes, whether there are protein expression changes common among delirium subjects and whether there are any changes which correlate with the severity of delirium. We now present the first proteomic analysis of delirium cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and one of few studies exploring protein expression changes in delirium. More than 270 proteins were identified in two delirium cohorts, 16 of which were dysregulated in at least 8 of 17 delirium subjects compared with a mild Alzheimer's disease neurological control group, and 31 proteins were significantly correlated with cognitive scores (mini-mental state exam and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation III). Bioinformatics analyses revealed expression changes in several protein family groups, including apolipoproteins, secretogranins/chromogranins, clotting/fibrinolysis factors, serine protease inhibitors and acute-phase response elements. These data not only provide confirmatory evidence that the inflammatory response is a component of delirium, but also reveal dysregulation of protein expression in a number of novel and unexpected clusters of proteins, in particular the granins. Another surprising outcome of this work is the level of similarity of CSF protein profiles in delirium patients, given the diversity of causes of this syndrome. These data provide additional elements for consideration in the pathophysiology of delirium as well as potential biomarker candidates for delirium diagnosis. PMID:25369144

  12. [Diagnosis of spinal diseases by cerebrospinal fluid examination].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R M

    1979-01-01

    In this work, changes in the cerebrospinal fluid in acute and chronic polyneuritis as well as in the Guillan-Barré-Strohl syndrome are discussed and and it is pointed out that a specific coordination of the inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid syndromes to certain pathogens or noxae cannot be made. For the differentiation of the Guillain-Barré-Strohl syndrome and existence of increased gamma-globulin bands with identical mobility in the serum is pointed out. In myelitic disease pictures, acute and chronic cerebrospinal fluid syndromes are distinguished also in the cerebrospinal fluid according to the clinical course; regular changes, however, cannot be derived. Syphilitic cerebrospinal-fluid syndromes can easily be differentiated by their immunoactive findings. In multiple sclerosis, we distinguish between typical and atypical changes in the cerebrospinal fluid. Above all, the oligoclonal bands, i. e. the discontinuous proceeding of the gamma-globulin zone and the existence of several bands in the agar gel electrophoresis, play an essential role. In 95 per cent of the cases, oligoclonal bands can be shown. There are no greater differences with respect to oligoclonal bands between intermittent and chronic-progressive courses. For the differential diagnosis of haemorrhagic syndromes, the cerebrospinal fluid cell picture can make a considerable contribution. Macrophages loaded with erythrocytes indicate that a haemorrhage occurred 12 to 18 hours before; macrophages loaded with haemosiderin indicate a haemorrhage that occurred 6 to 8 days before; and macrophages loaded with erythrocytes and haemosiderin indicate a seeping haemorrhage or an event that occurred several times. The Nonne-Froin syndrome indicates a massive protein increase often with a regular or only slightly increased number of cells. The importance of the Queckenstedt tests is pointed out. A particular role is played by meningitis carcinomatosa et sarcomatosa with the demonstration of a great number of tumour cells. PMID:532463

  13. Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker in cognitively normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Jon B; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Harten, Argonde C; Glodzik, Lidia; Martinez-Lage, Pablo; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella; Rami, Lorena; Hansson, Oskar; Sperling, Reisa; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Osorio, Ricardo S; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Vandijck, Manu; Hampel, Harald; Teipl, Stefan; Moghekar, Abhay; Albert, Marilyn; Hu, William T; Monge Argilés, Jose A; Gorostidi, Ana; Teunissen, Charlotte E; De Deyn, Peter P; Hyman, Bradley T; Molinuevo, Jose L; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Linazasoro, Gurutz; de Leon, Mony J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q

    2015-09-01

    In a large multicentre sample of cognitively normal subjects, as a function of age, gender and APOE genotype, we studied the frequency of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid levels of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers including: total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42. Fifteen cohorts from 12 different centres with either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays or Luminex® measurements were selected for this study. Each centre sent nine new cerebrospinal fluid aliquots that were used to measure total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42 in the Gothenburg laboratory. Seven centres showed a high correlation with the new Gothenburg measurements; therefore, 10 cohorts from these centres are included in the analyses here (1233 healthy control subjects, 40-84 years old). Amyloid-β amyloid status (negative or positive) and neurodegeneration status (negative or positive) was established based on the pathological cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's disease cut-off values for cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 and total tau, respectively. While gender did not affect these biomarker values, APOE genotype modified the age-associated changes in cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers such that APOE ε4 carriers showed stronger age-related changes in cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau, total tau and amyloid-β1-42 values and APOE ε2 carriers showed the opposite effect. At 40 years of age, 76% of the subjects were classified as amyloid negative, neurodegeneration negative and their frequency decreased to 32% at 85 years. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-negative group remained stable. The amyloid-negative neurodegeneration-positive group frequency increased slowly from 1% at 44 years to 16% at 85 years, but its frequency was not affected by APOE genotype. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-positive frequency increased from 1% at 53 years to 28% at 85 years. Abnormally low cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 levels were already frequent in midlife and APOE genotype strongly affects the levels of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42, phosphorylated tau and total tau across the lifespan without influencing the frequency of subjects with suspected non-amyloid pathology. PMID:26220940

  14. Application of transport phenomena analysis technique to cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Lam, C H; Hansen, E A; Hall, W A; Hubel, A

    2013-12-01

    The study of hydrocephalus and the modeling of cerebrospinal fluid flow have proceeded in the past using mathematical analysis that was very capable of prediction phenomenonologically but not well in physiologic parameters. In this paper, the basis of fluid dynamics at the physiologic state is explained using first established equations of transport phenomenon. Then, microscopic and molecular level techniques of modeling are described using porous media theory and chemical kinetic theory and then applied to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. Using techniques of transport analysis allows the field of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics to approach the level of sophistication of urine and blood transport. Concepts such as intracellular and intercellular pathways, compartmentalization, and tortuosity are associated with quantifiable parameters that are relevant to the anatomy and physiology of cerebrospinal fluid transport. The engineering field of transport phenomenon is rich and steeped in architectural, aeronautical, nautical, and more recently biological history. This paper summarizes and reviews the approaches that have been taken in the field of engineering and applies it to CSF flow. PMID:24091435

  15. More Than the Brain's Drain: Does Cerebrospinal Fluid Help the Brain Convey Messages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, John

    1999-01-01

    Examines the role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a clear, colorless liquid that constantly bathes the brain and spinal cord. Scientists argue that cerebrospinal fluid carries important signals for sleep, appetite, and sex. Evaluates past and current research documenting the purpose of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. (CCM)

  16. Arachnoid cysts do not contain cerebrospinal fluid: A comparative chemical analysis of arachnoid cyst fluid and cerebrospinal fluid in adults

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Arachnoid cyst (AC) fluid has not previously been compared with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the same patient. ACs are commonly referred to as containing "CSF-like fluid". The objective of this study was to characterize AC fluid by clinical chemistry and to compare AC fluid to CSF drawn from the same patient. Such comparative analysis can shed further light on the mechanisms for filling and sustaining of ACs. Methods Cyst fluid from 15 adult patients with unilateral temporal AC (9 female, 6 male, age 22-77y) was compared with CSF from the same patients by clinical chemical analysis. Results AC fluid and CSF had the same osmolarity. There were no significant differences in the concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium or glucose. We found significant elevated concentration of phosphate in AC fluid (0.39 versus 0.35 mmol/L in CSF; p = 0.02), and significantly reduced concentrations of total protein (0.30 versus 0.41 g/L; p = 0.004), of ferritin (7.8 versus 25.5 ug/L; p = 0.001) and of lactate dehydrogenase (17.9 versus 35.6 U/L; p = 0.002) in AC fluid relative to CSF. Conclusions AC fluid is not identical to CSF. The differential composition of AC fluid relative to CSF supports secretion or active transport as the mechanism underlying cyst filling. Oncotic pressure gradients or slit-valves as mechanisms for generating fluid in temporal ACs are not supported by these results. PMID:20537169

  17. Myeloma cells in the cerebrospinal fluid in plasma cell neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    Myeloma cells were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of two patients with plasma cell neoplasia during the myelographic studies of 38 patients whose myeloma was associated with extensive neurological complications. The myeloma cells were looked for in Wright stained centrifuged deposit of 2–5 ml samples of the cerebrospinal fluid obtained during myelography. The possibility that occult traumatic lumbar puncture had allowed entry of circulating myeloma cells from the peripheral blood into the subarachnoid space was excluded by the absence of myeloma cells in smears of peripheral blood and its buffy coat. Up to the end stages of the disease the meningeal myeloma lesions remained microscopical and no signs of raised intracranial tension were manifested by either patient. Images PMID:4443811

  18. Upcoming candidate cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimers disease

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Anne M; Perrin, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Dementia due to Alzheimers disease (AD) is estimated to reach epidemic proportions by the year 2030. Given the limited accuracy of current AD clinical diagnosis, biomarkers of AD pathologies are currently being sought. Reductions in cerebrospinal fluid levels of ?-amyloid 42 (a marker of amyloid plaques) and elevations in tau species (markers of neurofibrillary tangles and/or neurodegeneration) are well-established as biomarkers useful for AD diagnosis and prognosis. However, novel markers for other features of AD pathophysiology (e.g., ?-amyloid processing, neuroinflammation and neuronal stress/dysfunction) and for other non-AD dementias are required to improve the accuracy of AD disease diagnosis, prognosis, staging and therapeutic monitoring (theragnosis). This article discusses the potential of several promising novel cerebrospinal fluid analytes, highlights the next steps critical for advancement in the field, and provides a prediction on how the field may evolve in 510 years. PMID:22917147

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G disrupts blood brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Nasrin; Berg, Carsten Tue; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2015-08-01

    To clarify the significance of immunoglobulin G autoantibody specific for the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 in cerebrospinal fluid, aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G from a neuromyelitis optica patient was administered intrathecally to naïve mice, and the distribution and pathogenic impact was evaluated. A distinct distribution pattern of aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G deposition was observed in the subarachnoid and subpial spaces where vessels penetrate the brain parenchyma, via a paravascular route with intraparenchymal perivascular deposition. Perivascular astrocyte-destructive lesions were associated with blood-borne horseradish peroxidase leakage indicating blood-brain barrier breakdown. The cerebrospinal fluid aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G therefore distributes widely in brain to initiate astrocytopathy and blood-brain barrier breakdown. PMID:26339679

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Monoamine Metabolite Analysis in Pediatric Movement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Tonduti, Davide; Zorzi, Giovanna; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zibordi, Federica; Garavaglia, Barbara; Nardocci, Nardo

    2015-11-01

    Abnormal concentrations of dopamine and serotonin metabolites in the cerebrospinal fluid is the diagnostic hallmark of a group of treatable conditions known as the monoamine neurotransmitter disorders. We assessed cerebrospinal fluid dopamine and serotonin metabolite concentrations in a series of 69 patients affected by movement disorders of unknown etiology. Abnormal results were disclosed in 13/69 subjects (19%). Both primary and secondary monoamine neurotransmitter disorders were observed. The clinical presentation of both forms was hypokinetic-rigid syndrome or dystonia. L-Dopa treatment resulted in significant improvement of the clinical picture in the majority of primary neurotransmitter disorders. Eight patients presented a secondary neurotransmitter disorder. One suffered from a GM2 gangliosidosis and one from infantile bilateral striatal necrosis. Etiologic diagnoses were not established in the others. L-Dopa was started in four patients, leading to a significant improvement of hypokinesia in the patient suffering from GM2 gangliosidosis and a slight improvement in 3 unclassified patients. PMID:25907776

  1. Cisternal cerebrospinal fluid analysis in 24 sheep with chronic coenurosis.

    PubMed

    Zobba, Rosanna; Manunta, Maria Lucia; Evangelisti, Maria Antonietta; Alberti, Alberto; Visco, Stefanoa; Dimauro, Corrado; Pinna Parpaglia, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Coenurosis, a neurological parasitic infection of ruminants caused by the larval stage of Taenia multiceps, is commonly reported in Sardinia, the most representative region for ovine population in Italy. Chronic form appears as a consequence of cyst development, frequently reported in the brain and spinal cord. Diagnostic suspect of coenurosis is based on physical and neurological examination. The aim of this article is to describe physical, biochemical and cytological aspects of cisternal cerebrospinal fluid of 24 sheep with chronic coenurosis and to evaluate whether these alterations are helpful in the diagnosis of coenurosis. Cerebrospinal fluid was altered in 20 animals (83.3%). Increase of total protein was revealed in 7 animals (29.2%); an increase of total nucleated cell count was observed in 18 samples (75%). Cytological examination revealed mononuclear pleocytosis in 17 animals (70.1%). Eosinophils were observed in 16 animals in various degree (66.7%). Our results show that cerebrospinal fluid confirms signs of Central Nervous System inflammation in 20 animals out of 24 (83.3%) and in particular it was useful to identify a parasitic inflammation in 66.7% of the animals in which eosinophils were observed. Considering the results of this study, the very absence of significant neutrophilic pleocytosis could be considered useful to diagnose chronic cerebral coenurosis. PMID:24715594

  2. Analysis of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khoonsari, Payam Emami; Häggmark, Anna; Lönnberg, Maria; Mikus, Maria; Kilander, Lena; Lannfelt, Lars; Bergquist, Jonas; Ingelsson, Martin; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder accounting for more than 50% of cases of dementia. Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease relies on cognitive tests and analysis of amyloid beta, protein tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau in cerebrospinal fluid. Although these markers provide relatively high sensitivity and specificity for early disease detection, they are not suitable for monitor of disease progression. In the present study, we used label-free shotgun mass spectrometry to analyse the cerebrospinal fluid proteome of Alzheimer’s disease patients and non-demented controls to identify potential biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease. We processed the data using five programs (DecyderMS, Maxquant, OpenMS, PEAKS, and Sieve) and compared their results by means of reproducibility and peptide identification, including three different normalization methods. After depletion of high abundant proteins we found that Alzheimer’s disease patients had lower fraction of low-abundance proteins in cerebrospinal fluid compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). Consequently, global normalization was found to be less accurate compared to using spiked-in chicken ovalbumin for normalization. In addition, we determined that Sieve and OpenMS resulted in the highest reproducibility and PEAKS was the programs with the highest identification performance. Finally, we successfully verified significantly lower levels (p<0.05) of eight proteins (A2GL, APOM, C1QB, C1QC, C1S, FBLN3, PTPRZ, and SEZ6) in Alzheimer’s disease compared to controls using an antibody-based detection method. These proteins are involved in different biological roles spanning from cell adhesion and migration, to regulation of the synapse and the immune system. PMID:26950848

  3. Chicken cerebrospinal fluid: normal composition and response to insulin administration

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D. K.; Hazelwood, R. L.

    1969-01-01

    1. With the exception of Na, K and Cl clear cerebrospinal fluid (c.s.f.) obtained from chickens varying in age from 6 weeks to 2 years did not reveal significant alterations in composition as could be related to age per se. 2. Considerably higher levels of total protein and glucose are found in chicken c.s.f. than are found in mammalian fluid; slightly more chloride is found in chicken than most mammalian c.s.f.'s. 3. Intravenous beef insulin depressed chicken cerebrospinal fluid glucose levels; insulin placed intracisternally had no effect on the avian glycogen body glycogen content indicating that c.s.f. glucose constancy, with or without glycogen body assistance, is not responsible for the resistance of the chicken to pharmacological doses of insulin. 4. Bovine insulin injected into the cisterna magna of chickens depresses plasma glucose partially by acting over vagal pathways to release endogenous insulin and partially by diffusion across the c.s.f.—blood barrier to exert a peripheral effect. PMID:5770920

  4. Ocular blood flow and cerebrospinal fluid pressure in glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Promelle, Véronique; Bouzerar, Roger; Jany, Benjamin; Milazzo, Solange; Balédent, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Disease mechanism underlying glaucoma remains unclear. Extensive research on this pathology has highlighted changes in vascular parameters and in circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Here, we review the most recent research on alterations in ocular blood flow and/or CSF flow in glaucoma. Ultrasound Doppler imaging studies have shown an increased resistive index in ophthalmic artery’s in glaucoma. Furthermore, changes in optic nerve CSF circulation, which can be assessed with magnetic resonance imaging, may lead to a greater translaminar pressure difference, mechanical stress, and poor clearance of toxic substances. This constitutes a new approach for understanding blood–CSF interactions involved in glaucoma. PMID:26962460

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in neurological diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Shahim, Pashtun; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Darin, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mattsson, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers is an integral part of neurology. Basic CSF biomarkers, such as CSF/serum albumin ratio and CSF cell counts, have been used to diagnose inflammatory and infectious CNS disorders in adults and children for decades. During recent years, however, numerous biomarkers for neuronal and astroglial injury, as well as disease-specific protein inclusions, have been developed for neurodegenerative disorders in adults. The overall aim of this paper is to give an updated overview of some of these biomarkers with special focus on their possible relevance to neurological disorders in children and adolescents. PMID:23026858

  6. Diagnosis of chordoma by cytologic examination of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Marigil, M A; Pardo-Mindan, F J; Joly, M

    1983-09-01

    This is a case report of a 44-year-old man with a chordoma of the clivus that caused dysphonia, low back pain, and urinary and fecal incontinence. The diagnosis was made by cytologic study of the CSF, which demonstrated vacuolated malignant cells. The patient was treated with intrathecal methotrexate, dexamethasone, and radiotherapy. At autopsy extensive dissemination of chordoma was found at the base of the brain, in the ventricles, and in the leptomeninges of the spinal cord. This is the sixth reported case of intrathecal dissemination of a chordoma and the first diagnosed by cytology of the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:6881106

  7. Confocal Raman microscopy of pathologic cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Lonkina, T. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Sundukov, A. V.; Migmanov, T. E.; Lademann, J.; Darvin, M. E.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the spatial localization of leucocytes, bacteria, and erythrocytes in the crystal pattern of a dried droplet of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is established. Characteristic lines are detected and identified in the Raman spectrum of the CSF that point to the presence of pathologic cells therein and can be used in a timely way to diagnose meningitis, the spectroscopic sample preparation procedure being simple enough. A dry CSF sample retains its characteristic spectral features for no less than three days, which is important for its safe keeping and transportation, and also for the computer processing of its spectra.

  8. Use of cerebrospinal fluid enzyme immunoassay for diagnosis of neurosyphilis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yung; Yeung, Kwok-Hung; Ho, Hing-Fung; Ho, King-Man; Tin-Keung Lam, Edman; Leung, Wai-Lin; Kam, Kai-Man

    2014-07-01

    Neurosyphilis is a difficult clinical stage of syphilis as there is no ideal method for diagnosis and workup requires lumbar puncture which may sometimes provide ambiguous results especially in HIV co-infected patients. Enzyme immunoassay is a widely used screening test for syphilis in serum, but its test performance was not well studied in cerebrospinal fluid. To examine the diagnostic performance of cerebrospinal fluid-enzyme immunoassay (CSF-EIA) in neurosyphilis, we conducted a prospective study for two years. All consecutive patients admitted for workup of neurosyphilis under the Social Hygiene Service, in Hong Kong, were included. Laboratory tests on CSF included several serological tests, CSF cell count, and protein. Forty-five patients were prospectively recruited, of which 29 people were living with HIV / AIDS. Using diagnostic case definition standard stipulated in the IUSTI 2008 guidelines, 17 patients satisfied the diagnosis of neurosyphilis. The CSF-EIA test provided 100% in both sensitivity and negative predictive value; its specificity was 46.4% (13/28, 95% CI 31.8-61%). Specificity improved to 80.8% (95% CI: 68.4-93.2%) with optical density cut-off value at 1.4 for cases with CSF red cell counts <600/mm(3) This is the first study on use of CSF-EIA in neurosyphilis. CSF-EIA showed high sensitivity and high negative predictive value in the study population and the presence of CSF red cells < 600/mm(3)might not affect its accuracy. PMID:24334293

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure in conscious head-down tilted rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severs, Walter B.; Morrow, Bret A.; Keil, Lanny C.

    1991-01-01

    The acute effects of a 1-h -45 deg head-down tilt on continouously recorded cerebrospinal fluid pressure (PCSF) of conscious rats are studied in order to investigate the shift of blood volume into the thoracic cavity in microgravity. PCSF, evaluated in 15-min time blocks over a 3-h experiment, increased slightly (less than 0.05) during the first 30 min of a control hour at 0 deg. There was a transient increase for about 5 min immediately after tilt (-45 deg) that may have been due to head movement after the position change. PCSF was statistically unchanged (above 0.05) during the second (-45 deg) hour and the third (0 deg) recovery hour. It is shown that the dynamics of intracranial pressure regulation can accommodate the acute cephalad fluid shift after tilting.

  10. Evaluation of the Production and Absorption of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    MIYAJIMA, Masakazu; ARAI, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    The traditional hypothesis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics presumes that CSF is primarily produced in the choroid plexus (CP), then flows from the ventricles into the subarachnoid spaces, and mainly reabsorbed in the arachnoid granulations. This hypothesis is necessary to reconsider in view of recent research and clinical observations. This literature review presents numerous evidence for a new hypothesis of CSF hydrodynamics—(1) A significantly strong relationship exists between the CSF and interstitial fluid (IF), (2) CSF and IF are mainly produced and absorbed in the parenchymal capillaries of the brain and spinal cord. A considerable amount of CSF and IF are also absorbed by the lymphatic system, and (3) CSF movement is not unidirectional flow. It is only local mixing and diffusion. PMID:26226980

  11. Cerebrospinal Fluid Mechanics and Its Coupling to Cerebrovascular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linninger, Andreas A.; Tangen, Kevin; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Frim, David

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is not stagnant but displays fascinating oscillatory flow patterns inside the ventricular system and reversing fluid exchange between the cranial vault and spinal compartment. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of pulsatile CSF motion. Observations contradicting classical views about its bulk production and clearance are highlighted. A clinical account of diseases of abnormal CSF flow dynamics, including hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, Chiari malformation type 1, and pseudotumor cerebri, is also given. We survey medical imaging modalities used to observe intracranial dynamics in vivo. Additionally, we assess the state of the art in predictive models of CSF dynamics. The discussion addresses open questions regarding CSF dynamics as they relate to the understanding and management of diseases.

  12. Optical analysis of suspended particles in the cerebrospinal fluid obtained by puncture from patients diagnosed with the disorders of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staroń, Waldemar; Herbowski, Leszek; Gurgul, Henryk

    2007-04-01

    The goal of the work was to determine the values of cumulative parameters of the cerebrospinal fluid. Values of the parameters characterise statistical cerebrospinal fluid obtained by puncture from the patients diagnosed due to suspicion of normotensive hydrocephalus. The cerebrospinal fluid taken by puncture for the routine examinations carried out at the patients suspected of normotensive hydrocephalus was analysed. In the paper there are presented results of examinations of several dozens of puncture samples of the cerebrospinal fluid coming from various patients. Each sample was examined under the microscope and photographed in 20 randomly chosen places. On the basis of analysis of the pictures showing the area of 100 x 100μm, the selected cumulative parameters such as count, numerical density, field area and field perimeter were determined for each sample. Then the average value of the parameters was determined as well.

  13. Ganciclovir penetrates into the cerebrospinal fluid of an infant with congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Natale, Fabio; Bizzarri, Bianca; Cardi, Veronica; Gaeta, Aurelia; Villani, Paola; Liuzzi, Giuseppina; De Curtis, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no evidence whether ganciclovir, or its oral prodrug valganciclovir, penetrates into the cerebrospinal fluid of human infants treated for congenital cytomegalovirus infection. Here, we report a case study providing evidence that ganciclovir, administered as valganciclovir, reaches the infant's cerebrospinal fluid when used at the currently recommended dose for congenital cytomegalovirus infection. PMID:25888518

  14. Antifungal activity in human cerebrospinal fluid and plasma after intravenous administration of Allium sativum.

    PubMed

    Davis, L E; Shen, J K; Cai, Y

    1990-04-01

    Commercial Allium sativum (garlic) extract was given intravenously to two patients with cryptococcal meningitis and three patients with other types of meningitis. Plasma titers of anti-Cryptococcus neoformans activity rose twofold over preinfusion titers. Anti-C. neoformans activity was detected in four of five cerebrospinal fluid samples but not in pooled normal cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:2188589

  15. Stasis Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Flugman, SL et al . (authors) and Elston DM et al (editors). “Stasis dermatitis.” Medscape . Last updated ... References Flugman, SL et al . (authors) and Elston DM et al . (editors). “Stasis dermatitis.” Medscape . Last updated ...

  16. A Subglandular Breast Cerebrospinal Fluid Pseudocyst Following Postsurgical Shunt Migration.

    PubMed

    Mlynek, Karolina; Frautschi, Russell; Halasa, Brianna; Kwiecien, Grzegorz; Papay, Francis

    2015-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage catheters have been associated with numerous complications in various anatomic locations, because of migration, infection, and obstruction. However, breast-related CSF shunt complications tend to occur infrequently or have seldom been reported in the empirical literature. Therefore, a case is presented detailing a breast pseudocyst caused by migration and subsequent coiling of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt in the right breast pocket. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case that has been reported in the peer-reviewed literature of a pseudocyst resulting from a CSF drainage catheter coiling around the breast implant post pancreaticoduodenectomy. Moreover, this case highlights the importance of cross-disciplinary procedural awareness, particularly in regards to breast, ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and pancreatic procedures. PMID:26894004

  17. Monoamine metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, D; Pullar, I A; Mawdsley, C; Kinloch, N; Yates, C M

    1977-01-01

    The concentrations of homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindolylacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 4-hydroxy, 3-methoxyphenylethylene glycol (MHPG) were estimated in the lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of control subjects and in some patients who probably, and others who definitely, suffered from multiple sclerosis (MS). In the control group, the concentration of HVA was lower in people who underwent lumbar puncture having fasted and been recumbent for 12 hours before the procedure than in those from whom CSF was obtained under non-standardised conditions. These studies demonstrate that a standardised procedure for lumbar puncture is required in order to obtain meaningful results. In patients suffering from MS the CSF 5-HIAA concentrations were significantly lower than in comparable controls but the HVA concentrations did not differ. There was no relationship between metabolite concentrations, site of lesion, the duration of the disease, gamma-globulin levels nor the occurrence of relapse within the previous month. PMID:925693

  18. On Chip Analysis of CNS Lymphoma in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Turetsky, Anna; Lee, Kyungheon; Song, Jun; Giedt, Randy J.; Kim, Eunha; Kovach, Alexandra E.; Hochberg, Ephraim P.; Castro, Cesar M.; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Molecular profiling of central nervous system lymphomas in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples can be challenging due to the paucicellular and limited nature of the samples. Presented herein is a microfluidic platform for complete CSF lymphoid cell analysis, including single cell capture in sub-nanoliter traps, and molecular and chemotherapeutic response profiling via on-chip imaging, all in less than one hour. The system can detect scant lymphoma cells and quantitate their kappa/lambda immunoglobulin light chain restriction patterns. The approach can be further customized for measurement of additional biomarkers, such as those for differential diagnosis of lymphoma subtypes or for prognosis, as well as for imaging exposure to experimental drugs. PMID:26000053

  19. Bilateral striopallidodentate calcinosis: cerebrospinal fluid, imaging, and electrophysiological studies.

    PubMed

    Manyam, B V; Bhatt, M H; Moore, W D; Devleschoward, A B; Anderson, D R; Calne, D B

    1992-04-01

    We report the genetic, clinical, electrophysiological, and imaging studies in a family with bilateral striopallidodentate calcinosis (Fahr's disease). The intracerebral calcium deposits occurred before onset of the symptoms in the third decade of life. Progressive neurological deterioration occurred in the fifth decade of life in the proband. Cerebrospinal fluid homocarnosine, a central nervous system-specific peptide, was increased twofold in patients with autosomal dominant bilateral stripallidodentate calcinosis; in sporadic cases, there was no detectable homocarnosine and a decreased level of histidine. With advancing age, the amount of calcification increases, but it has not been determined if a critical amount must be reached before symptoms occur. Computerized tomography is superior to magnetic resonance imaging for radiological diagnosis. Despite diffuse striatal calcification, striatal 6-[18F]fluoro-L-dopa uptake did not reveal any difference between patients and control subjects, from which we infer persisting integrity of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. PMID:1586138

  20. Confounding Factors Influencing Amyloid Beta Concentration in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Bjerke, Maria; Portelius, Erik; Minthon, Lennart; Wallin, Anders; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Anckarsäter, Rolf; Andreasen, Niels; Zetterberg, Henrik; Andreasson, Ulf; Blennow, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    Background. Patients afflicted with Alzheimer's disease (AD) exhibit a decrease in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentration of the 42 amino acid form of β-amyloid (Aβ42). However, a high discrepancy between different centers in measured Aβ42 levels reduces the utility of this biomarker as a diagnostic tool and in monitoring the effect of disease modifying drugs. Preanalytical and analytical confounding factors were examined with respect to their effect on the measured Aβ42 level. Methods. Aliquots of CSF samples were either treated differently prior to Aβ42 measurement or analyzed using different commercially available xMAP or ELISA assays. Results. Confounding factors affecting CSF Aβ42 levels were storage in different types of test tubes, dilution with detergent-containing buffer, plasma contamination, heat treatment, and the origin of the immunoassays used for quantification. Conclusion. In order to conduct multicenter studies, a standardized protocol to minimize preanalytical and analytical confounding factors is warranted. PMID:20798852

  1. A Subglandular Breast Cerebrospinal Fluid Pseudocyst Following Postsurgical Shunt Migration

    PubMed Central

    Mlynek, Karolina; Frautschi, Russell; Halasa, Brianna; Kwiecien, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage catheters have been associated with numerous complications in various anatomic locations, because of migration, infection, and obstruction. However, breast-related CSF shunt complications tend to occur infrequently or have seldom been reported in the empirical literature. Therefore, a case is presented detailing a breast pseudocyst caused by migration and subsequent coiling of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt in the right breast pocket. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case that has been reported in the peer-reviewed literature of a pseudocyst resulting from a CSF drainage catheter coiling around the breast implant post pancreaticoduodenectomy. Moreover, this case highlights the importance of cross-disciplinary procedural awareness, particularly in regards to breast, ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and pancreatic procedures. PMID:26894004

  2. Quantitative Proteomics of Vestibular Schwannoma Cerebrospinal Fluid: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kazemizadeh Gol, Mohammad Abraham; Lund, Troy C; Levine, Samuel C; Adams, Meredith E

    2016-05-01

    This pilot study aimed to identify candidate proteins for future study that are differentially expressed in vestibular schwannoma (VS) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and to compare such proteins with those previously identified in perilymph and specimen secretions. CSF was collected intraoperatively prior to removal of untreated sporadic VS (3 translabyrinthine, 3 middle cranial fossa approaches) and compared with reference CSF samples. After proteolytic digestion and iTRAQ labeling, tandem mass spectrometry with ProteinPilot was used to identify candidate proteins. Of the 237 proteins detected, 13 were dysregulated in ≥3 of the 6 VS patients versus controls, and 13 were dysregulated (12 up, 1 down) in samples from patients with class D versus class B hearing. Four perilymph proteins of interest were dysregulated in ≥1 VS CSF samples. Thus, 26 candidate VS CSF biomarkers were identified that should be considered in future VS biomarker and tumor pathophysiology investigations. PMID:26932958

  3. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid levels of colistin in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Karvanen, Matti; Iosifidis, Elias; Jansson, Britt; Plachouras, Diamantis; Cars, Otto; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2010-09-01

    Using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method, the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of colistin were determined in patients aged 1 months to 14 years receiving intravenous colistimethate sodium (60,000 to 225,000 IU/kg of body weight/day). Only in one of five courses studied (a 14-year-old receiving 225,000 IU/kg/day) did serum concentrations exceed the 2 microg/ml CLSI/EUCAST breakpoint defining susceptibility to colistin for Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter. CSF colistin concentrations were <0.2 microg/ml but increased in the presence of meningitis (approximately 0.5 microg/ml or 34 to 67% of serum levels). PMID:20585114

  4. Huntington's disease cerebrospinal fluid seeds aggregation of mutant huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Z; Dai, W; van Erp, T G M; Overman, J; Demuro, A; Digman, M A; Hatami, A; Albay, R; Sontag, E M; Potkin, K T; Ling, S; Macciardi, F; Bunney, W E; Long, J D; Paulsen, J S; Ringman, J M; Parker, I; Glabe, C; Thompson, L M; Chiu, W; Potkin, S G

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat producing a mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with a polyglutamine-repeat expansion. Onset of symptoms in mutant huntingtin gene-carrying individuals remains unpredictable. We report that synthetic polyglutamine oligomers and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from BACHD transgenic rats and from human HD subjects can seed mutant huntingtin aggregation in a cell model and its cell lysate. Our studies demonstrate that seeding requires the mutant huntingtin template and may reflect an underlying prion-like protein propagation mechanism. Light and cryo-electron microscopy show that synthetic seeds nucleate and enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation. This seeding assay distinguishes HD subjects from healthy and non-HD dementia controls without overlap (blinded samples). Ultimately, this seeding property in HD patient CSF may form the basis of a molecular biomarker assay to monitor HD and evaluate therapies that target mHTT. PMID:26100538

  5. Huntington's disease cerebrospinal fluid seeds aggregation of mutant huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Tan, Z; Dai, W; van Erp, T G M; Overman, J; Demuro, A; Digman, M A; Hatami, A; Albay, R; Sontag, E M; Potkin, K T; Ling, S; Macciardi, F; Bunney, W E; Long, J D; Paulsen, J S; Ringman, J M; Parker, I; Glabe, C; Thompson, L M; Chiu, W; Potkin, S G

    2015-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat producing a mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with a polyglutamine-repeat expansion. Onset of symptoms in mutant huntingtin gene-carrying individuals remains unpredictable. We report that synthetic polyglutamine oligomers and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from BACHD transgenic rats and from human HD subjects can seed mutant huntingtin aggregation in a cell model and its cell lysate. Our studies demonstrate that seeding requires the mutant huntingtin template and may reflect an underlying prion-like protein propagation mechanism. Light and cryo-electron microscopy show that synthetic seeds nucleate and enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation. This seeding assay distinguishes HD subjects from healthy and non-HD dementia controls without overlap (blinded samples). Ultimately, this seeding property in HD patient CSF may form the basis of a molecular biomarker assay to monitor HD and evaluate therapies that target mHTT. PMID:26100538

  6. The cerebrospinal fluid: regulator of neurogenesis, behavior, and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zappaterra, Mauro W.; Lehtinen, Maria K.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has attracted renewed interest as an active signaling milieu that regulates brain development, homeostasis, and disease. Advances in proteomics research have enabled an improved characterization of the CSF from development through adulthood, and key neurogenic signaling pathways that are transmitted via the CSF are now being elucidated. Due to its immediate contact with neural stem cells in the developing and adult brain, the CSF's ability to swiftly distribute signals across vast distances in central nervous system is opening avenues to novel and exciting therapeutic approaches. In this review, we will discuss the development of the choroid plexus-CSF system, and review the current literature on how the CSF actively regulates mammalian brain development, behavior, and responses to traumatic brain injury. PMID:22415326

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid proteome of patients with acute Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Warren, H. Shaw

    2012-01-01

    During acute Lyme disease, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of meningitis and other neurologic symptoms. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing a deep view into the proteome for patients diagnosed with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified differences in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. We identified 108 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease from controls. Comparison between infected patients and control subjects revealed differences in proteins in the CSF associated with cell death localized to brain synapses and others that likely originate from brain parenchyma. PMID:22900834

  8. The oxysterol and cholestenoic acid profile of mouse cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Crick, Peter J.; Beckers, Lien; Baes, Myriam; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxysterols and cholestenoic acids are oxidised forms of cholesterol with a host of biological functions. The possible roles of oxysterols in various neurological diseases makes the analysis of these metabolites in the central nervous system of particular interest. Here, we report the identification and quantification of a panel of twelve sterols in mouse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry exploiting enzyme assisted derivatisation for sterol analysis technology. We found low levels of oxysterols and cholestenoic acids in CSF in the range of 5 pg/mL–2.6 ng/mL. As found in man, these concentrations are one to two orders of magnitude lower than in plasma. PMID:25759118

  9. Embryonic blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier formation and function

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, David; Parvas, Maryam; Hermelo, Ismaïl; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development and adult life, brain cavities and ventricles are filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF has attracted interest as an active signaling medium that regulates brain development, homeostasis and disease. CSF is a complex protein-rich fluid containing growth factors and signaling molecules that regulate multiple cell functions in the central nervous system (CNS). The composition and substance concentrations of CSF are tightly controlled. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that embryonic CSF (eCSF) has a key function as a fluid pathway for delivering diffusible signals to the developing brain, thus contributing to the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells, and to the expansion and patterning of the brain. From fetal stages through to adult life, CSF is primarily produced by the choroid plexus. The development and functional activities of the choroid plexus and other blood–brain barrier (BBB) systems in adults and fetuses have been extensively analyzed. However, eCSF production and control of its homeostasis in embryos, from the closure of the anterior neuropore when the brain cavities become physiologically sealed, to the formation of the functional fetal choroid plexus, has not been studied in as much depth and remains open to debate. This review brings together the existing literature, some of which is based on experiments conducted by our research group, concerning the formation and function of a temporary embryonic blood–CSF barrier in the context of the crucial roles played by the molecules in eCSF. PMID:25389383

  10. Early embryonic brain development in rats requires the trophic influence of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Alonso, M I; Santiago, C; Moro, J A; De la Mano, A; Carretero, R; Gato, A

    2009-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid has shown itself to be an essential brain component during development. This is particularly evident at the earliest stages of development where a lot of research, performed mainly in chick embryos, supports the evidence that cerebrospinal fluid is involved in different mechanisms controlling brain growth and morphogenesis, by exerting a trophic effect on neuroepithelial precursor cells (NPC) involved in controlling the behaviour of these cells. Despite it being known that cerebrospinal fluid in mammals is directly involved in corticogenesis at fetal stages, the influence of cerebrospinal fluid on the activity of NPC at the earliest stages of brain development has not been demonstrated. Here, using "in vitro" organotypic cultures of rat embryo brain neuroepithelium in order to expose NPC to or deprive them of cerebrospinal fluid, we show that the neuroepithelium needs the trophic influence of cerebrospinal fluid to undergo normal rates of cell survival, replication and neurogenesis, suggesting that NPC are not self-sufficient to induce their normal activity. This data shows that cerebrospinal fluid is an essential component in chick and rat early brain development, suggesting that its influence could be constant in higher vertebrates. PMID:19540909

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid ceramides from patients with multiple sclerosis impair neuronal bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Vidaurre, Oscar G.; Haines, Jeffery D.; Katz Sand, Ilana; Adula, Kadidia P.; Huynh, Jimmy L.; McGraw, Corey A.; Zhang, Fan; Varghese, Merina; Sotirchos, Elias; Bhargava, Pavan; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Pasinetti, Giulio; Zhang, Weijia; Inglese, Matilde; Calabresi, Peter A.; Wu, Gang; Miller, Aaron E.; Haughey, Norman J.; Lublin, Fred D.

    2014-01-01

    Axonal damage is a prominent cause of disability and yet its pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Using a xenogeneic system, here we define the bioenergetic changes induced in rat neurons by exposure to cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with multiple sclerosis compared to control subjects. A first discovery cohort of cerebrospinal fluid from 13 patients with multiple sclerosis and 10 control subjects showed that acute exposure to cerebrospinal fluid from patients with multiple sclerosis induced oxidative stress and decreased expression of neuroprotective genes, while increasing expression of genes involved in lipid signalling and in the response to oxidative stress. Protracted exposure of neurons to stress led to neurotoxicity and bioenergetics failure after cerebrospinal fluid exposure and positively correlated with the levels of neurofilament light chain. These findings were validated using a second independent cohort of cerebrospinal fluid samples (eight patients with multiple sclerosis and eight control subjects), collected at a different centre. The toxic effect of cerebrospinal fluid on neurons was not attributable to differences in IgG content, glucose, lactate or glutamate levels or differences in cytokine levels. A lipidomic profiling approach led to the identification of increased levels of ceramide C16:0 and C24:0 in the cerebrospinal fluid from patients with multiple sclerosis. Exposure of cultured neurons to micelles composed of these ceramide species was sufficient to recapitulate the bioenergetic dysfunction and oxidative damage induced by exposure to cerebrospinal fluid from patients with multiple sclerosis. Therefore, our data suggest that C16:0 and C24:0 ceramides are enriched in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis and are sufficient to induce neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction and axonal damage. PMID:24893707

  12. [Spontaneous nerve root cerebrospinal fluid leaks and intracranial hypotension: case report].

    PubMed

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Ferraz, Fernando Antonio Patriani; Boscato, Giovana; Shimokawa, Marcos

    2003-03-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a rare syndrome, characterized by pressure in the cerebrospinal fluid ranging between 50 and 70 mmH2O and postural headache. Its diagnosis is made through the clinical presentation, measurement of the cerebrospinal fluid pressure and neurorimage features. The clinical recognition of this pathology has been increasing and the differential diagnosis must be made with inflammatory meningeal processes and tumor. We report a case of spontaneous nerve root cerebrospinal fluid leaks in a 34 year-old man and intracranial hypotension. A literature review was performed evaluating the clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of this unusual pathology. PMID:12715038

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Palmqvist, Sebastian; Mattsson, Niklas; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-04-01

    SEE RABINOVICI DOI101093/BRAIN/AWW025 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42change before amyloid PET during preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease. We included 437 non-demented subjects from the prospective, longitudinal Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. All underwent(18)F-florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42analysis at baseline and at least one additional positron emission tomography after a mean follow-up of 2.1 years (range 1.1-4.4 years). Group classifications were based on normal and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography results at baseline. We found that cases with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and normal positron emission tomography at baseline accumulated amyloid with a mean rate of 1.2%/year, which was similar to the rate in cases with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (1.2%/year,P = 0.86). The mean accumulation rate of those with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid was more than three times that of those with both normal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (0.35%/year,P= 0.018). The group differences were similar when analysing yearly change in standardized uptake value ratio of florbetapir instead of percentage change. Those with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography deteriorated more in memory and hippocampal volume compared with the other groups (P< 0.001), indicating that they were closer to Alzheimer's disease dementia. The results were replicated after adjustments of different factors and when using different cut-offs for amyloid-β abnormality including a positron emission tomography classification based on the florbetapir uptake in regions where the initial amyloid-β accumulation occurs in Alzheimer's disease. This is the first study to show that individuals who have abnormal cerebrospinal amyloid-β42but normal amyloid-β positron emission tomography have an increased cortical amyloid-β accumulation rate similar to those with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography and higher rate than subjects where both modalities are normal. The results indicate that cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42becomes abnormal in the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease, before amyloid positron emission tomography and before neurodegeneration starts. PMID:26936941

  14. "Tasting" the cerebrospinal fluid: Another function of the choroid plexus?

    PubMed

    Tomás, J; Santos, C R A; Quintela, T; Gonçalves, I

    2016-04-21

    The choroid plexus (CP) located in brain ventricles, by forming the interface between the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is in a privileged position to monitor the composition of these body fluids. Yet, the mechanisms involved in this surveillance system remain to be identified. The taste transduction pathway senses some types of molecules, thereby evaluating the chemical content of fluids, not only in the oral cavity but also in other tissues throughout the body, such as some cell types of the airways, the gastrointestinal tract, testis and skin. Therefore, we hypothesized that the taste transduction pathway could also be operating in the CP to assess the composition of the CSF. We found transcripts for some taste receptors (Tas1r1, Tas1r2, Tas1r3, Tas2r109 and Tas2r144) and for downstream signaling molecules (α-Gustducin, Plcβ2, ItpR3 and TrpM5) that encode this pathway, and confirmed the expression of the corresponding proteins in Wistar rat CP explants and in the CP epithelial cells (CPEC). The functionality of the T2R receptor expressed in CP cells was assessed by calcium imaging, of CPEC stimulated with the bitter compound d-Salicin, which elicited a rise in the intracellular Ca(2+). This effect was diminished in the presence of the bitter receptor blocker Probenecid. In summary, we described the expression of the taste-related components involved in the transduction signaling cascade in CP. Taken together, our results suggest that the taste transduction pathway in CPEC makes use of T2R receptors in the chemical surveillance of the CSF composition, in particular to sense bitter noxious compounds. PMID:26850994

  15. Evaluation of cytospin precision in low cellularity canine cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Krimer, Paula M; Haley, Allison C; Harvey, Stephen B; Schatzberg, Scott J

    2016-03-01

    The cell count and differential of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytologic examination classify CSF as inflammatory or not. The cytospin cell yield is related to cell count, but to our knowledge a relationship has not been characterized and cytospin precision is undocumented in any species. The objective of our study was to calculate intra-assay precision of cellular yield and differential on cytocentrifuged canine CSF, determine the factors that may affect precision, and predict the number of cytospins necessary to confirm mild neutrophilic pleocytosis. Ten concurrent replicate cytospins were created from nonhemorrhagic CSF, obtained from 60 dogs in other terminal studies, with either a manual or calibrated pipetting technique. Up to 500 cells per cytospin were counted and classified on each slide. Coefficient of variation (CV), multiple regression, and probabilities were calculated for relationships between cell yield and independent factors including technique, total nucleated cell count, cell differential, and total protein. Manual and calibrated pipetting had similar CVs (average 31%) for total cell yield, but the calibrated technique had fewer foamy macrophages. CV for neutrophil percentage among low cellularity samples with any neutrophils was 146%. Probability based on linear regression showed that 1 cytospin is sufficient to identify samples with >3% neutrophils. Occasional neutrophils, eosinophils, mitotic figures, phagocytic cells, and ependymal cells were seen in many low cellularity canine CSF samples. Canine CSF cytospin cell yield and differential evaluations are imprecise. Calibrated rather than manual pipetting is recommended. PMID:26965236

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in human genetic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Ladogana, Anna; Sanchez-Juan, Pascual; Mitrová, Eva; Green, Alison; Cuadrado-Corrales, Natividad; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Koscova, Silvia; Aguzzi, Adriano; Sklaviadis, Theodoros; Kulczycki, Jerzy; Gawinecka, Joanna; Saiz, Albert; Calero, Miguel; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Knight, Richard; Zerr, Inga

    2009-10-01

    The 14-3-3 protein test has been shown to support the clinical diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) when associated with an adequate clinical context, and a high differential potential for the diagnosis of sporadic CJD has been attributed to other cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteins such as tau protein, S100b and neuron specific enolase (NSE). So far there has been only limited information available about biochemical markers in genetic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (gTSE), although they represent 10-15% of human TSEs. In this study, we analyzed CSF of 174 patients with gTSEs for 14-3-3 (n = 166), tau protein (n = 78), S100b (n = 46) and NSE (n = 50). Levels of brain-derived proteins in CSF varied in different forms of gTSE. Biomarkers were found positive in the majority of gCJD (81%) and insert gTSE (69%), while they were negative in most cases of fatal familial insomnia (13%) and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (10%). Disease duration and codon 129 genotype influence the findings in a different way than in sporadic CJD. PMID:19444528

  17. Surgical challenge: endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid leaks (CSF) result from an abnormal communication between the subarachnoid space and the extracranial space. Approximately 90% of CSF leak at the anterior skull base manifests as rhinorrhea and can become life-threatening condition. Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) has become a common otolaryngologist procedure. The aim of this article is to consider our experience and to evaluate the outcomes in patients who underwent a purely endoscopic repair of CSF leaks of the anterior skull base. Findings Retrospective chart review was performed of all patients surgically treated for CSF leaks presenting to the Section of Nasal and Sinus Disorders at the Service of ENTHead and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela (CHUS), between 2004 and 2010. A total of 30 patients who underwent repair CSF leak by ESS. The success rate was 93.4% at the first attempt; only two patients (6.6%) required a second surgical procedure, and none of it was necessary to use a craniotomy for closure. Follow-up periods ranged from 4?months to 6?years. Conclusion Identifying the size, site, and etiology of the CSF leak remains the most important factor in the surgical success. It is generally accepted that the ESS have made procedures minimally invasive, and CSF leak is now one of its well-established indications with low morbidity and high success rate, with one restriction for fistulas of the posterior wall of the frontal sinus should be repaired in conjunction with open techniques. PMID:22925201

  18. Reduced cerebrospinal fluid ethanolamine concentration in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Shintaro; Hattori, Kotaro; Sasayama, Daimei; Yokota, Yuki; Matsumura, Ryo; Matsuo, Junko; Ota, Miho; Hori, Hiroaki; Teraishi, Toshiya; Yoshida, Sumiko; Noda, Takamasa; Ohashi, Yoshiaki; Sato, Hajime; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Motohashi, Nobutaka; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids play key roles in the function of the central nervous system, and their alterations are implicated in psychiatric disorders. In the search for a biomarker for major depressive disorder (MDD), we used high-performance liquid chromatography to measure amino acids and related molecules in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 52 patients with MDD (42 depressed and 10 remitted; DSM-IV) and 54 matched controls. Significant differences were found in four amino acid concentrations between the depressed patients and controls. After Bonferroni correction, only ethanolamine (EA) levels remained significantly reduced in depressed patients (nominal P = 0.0000011). A substantial proportion of the depressed patients (40.5%) showed abnormally low CSF EA levels (<12.1??M) (P = 0.000033; OR = 11.6, 95% CI: 3.143.2). When patients with low EA and those with high EA levels were compared, the former had higher scores for overall depression severity (P = 0.0033) and Somatic Anxiety symptoms (P = 0.00026). In unmedicated subjects, CSF EA levels showed a significant positive correlation with levels of homovanillic acid (P = 0.0030) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (P = 0.019). To our knowledge, this is the first study showing that patients with MDD have significantly lower CSF EA concentrations compared with control subjects. CSF EA could be a state-dependent biomarker for a subtype of MDD. PMID:25589364

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid choline levels are decreased in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Manyam, B V; Giacobini, E; Colliver, J A

    1990-06-01

    We examined acetylcholinsterase (AChE) activity and choline levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in 16 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 9 control subjects of corresponding age: 8 were untreated Parkinson's patients; 4 were treated with carbidopa-levodopa (100/1,000 mg/day) for 20 +/- 3 months; and 4 were treated with carbidopa-levodopa (110/1,100 mg/day) for 28 +/- 18 months plus amantadine (200 mg/day) for 16 +/- 8 months. CSF choline levels (nmol/ml) were 2.97 +/- 0.79 (control subjects); 1.31 +/- 0.29 (untreated patients); 1.00 +/- 0.29 (carbidopa-levodopa treated); and 1.26 +/- 0.19 (carbidopa-levodopa/amantadine treated). Choline levels were significantly lower in untreated and treated patients compared to control subjects (p = 0.0001). AChE activity did not differ in Parkinson's disease patients as compared to control subjects. The reduced level of choline in CSF may reflect a deficit in choline transport into the brain or a decrease of choline-phospholipid output from the brain. PMID:2360805

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid acetylcholinesterase and choline measurements in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Manyam, B V; Giacobini, E; Colliver, J A

    1990-08-01

    The caudate nucleus has the highest acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the brain and it has been shown that autopsied brain tissue of patients with Huntington's disease (HD) have reduced levels of acetylcholine. Because of these findings, the cholinergic function in HD was studied by measuring cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) choline levels and AChE activity during a randomized, double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled clinical trial of isoniazid. While mean choline levels adjusted for age were lower compared with controls (P = 0.0007), AChE activity did not differ between HD patients and normal controls. Treatment with isoniazid had no significant effect on CSF choline levels or CSF AChE activity. CSF AChE activity showed a statistically significant increase with advancing age. The reduced level of choline in CSF of HD patients may reflect either a defect in choline transport into the brain or a decrease of choline-phospholipid output from the brain. PMID:2146369

  1. Increased cerebrospinal fluid fibrinogen in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Kotaro; Ota, Miho; Sasayama, Daimei; Yoshida, Sumiko; Matsumura, Ryo; Miyakawa, Tomoko; Yokota, Yuuki; Yamaguchi, Shinobu; Noda, Takamasa; Teraishi, Toshiya; Hori, Hiroaki; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Goto, Yu-ichi; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) presumably includes heterogeneous subgroups with differing pathologies. To obtain a marker reflecting such a subgroup, we analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of fibrinogen, which has been reported to be elevated in the plasma of patients with MDD. Three fibrinogen-related proteins were measured using aptamer-based analyses and CSF samples of 30 patients with MDD and 30 controls. The numbers of patients with an excessively high level (>99 percentile of the controls) was significantly increased (17 to 23%). Measurement reproducibility of these results was confirmed by an ELISA for fibrinogen (Pearson's r = 0.77). In an independent sample set from 36 patients and 30 controls, using the ELISA, results were similar (22%). When these two sample sets were combined, the number of patients with a high fibrinogen level was significantly increased (15/66; odds ratio 8.53; 95% confidence interval 1.9-39.1, p = 0.0011). By using diffusion tensor imaging, we found white matter tracts abnormalities in patients with a high fibrinogen level but not those patients with a normal fibrinogen level, compared with controls. Plasma fibrinogen levels were similar among the diagnostic groups. Our results point to a subgroup of MDD represented by increased CSF fibrinogen and white matter tract abnormalities. PMID:26081315

  2. The Association of Meningitis with Postoperative Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kyle P.; Isaacson, Brandon; Kutz, J. Walter; Purcell, Patricia L.; Roland, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk factors for and the clinical course of postoperative meningitis following lateral skull base surgery and to determine its relationship to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula. Patients Patients undergoing lateral skull base surgery between July 1999 and February 2010 at an academic tertiary referral center. All subjects had culture-proven meningitis or suspected bacterial meningitis in the postoperative period. Medical records were compared with the lateral skull base patients who did not develop meningitis. Results Of 508 procedures, 16 patients developed meningitis (3.1%). The most common diagnosis was acoustic neuroma in 81.3%; 68.8% of patients had a CSF leak prior to onset of meningitis, and 50% received a lumbar drain. The median time from surgery to the onset of meningitis was 12 days with a range of 2 to 880 days. The relative risk of developing meningitis in the setting of postoperative CSF fistula is 10.2 (p < 0.0001). No meningitis-associated mortality was observed. Conclusions Postoperative meningitis occurred in a small number of patients undergoing lateral skull base surgery. A postoperative CSF fistula leads to an increased risk of meningitis by a factor of 10.2. PMID:24294557

  3. Regional specificity of cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities in first episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Narr, Katherine L; Bilder, Robert M; Woods, Roger P; Thompson, Paul M; Szeszko, Philip; Robinson, Delbert; Ballmaier, Martina; Messenger, Bradley; Wang, YungPing; Toga, Arthur W

    2006-01-30

    The timing and regional specificity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) enlargements have not been well described in schizophrenia. High-resolution magnetic resonance images and computational image analysis methods were used to localize cross-sectional changes in lateral ventricle and sulcal and subarachnoid CSF in first episode schizophrenia patients (51 males/21 females) and healthy subjects (37 males/41 females). Volumes were obtained for each lateral ventricle horn and regional differences identified by comparing the distances from the ventricular surfaces to the central core at anatomically matched locations. Extra-cortical CSF differences were compared by measuring the proportion of CSF voxels sampled from spatially homologous cortical surface points. Significant extra-cortical CSF enlargements were observed in first episode patients, where regional differences surrounded the temporal, anterior frontal and parietal cortices. Volume and ventricular surface analyses failed to show significant effects of diagnosis. However, interactions indicated dorsal superior horn expansions in female patients compared with same-sex controls. Since ventricular enlargements are widely reported in chronic patients, our observations at first episode suggest ventricular enlargement may progress after disease onset with early changes occurring around the dorsal superior horn. In contrast, sulcal and subarachnoid CSF increases may be manifest near or before the first episode but after brain development is complete, reflecting pronounced reductions in proximal brain tissue. PMID:16386409

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of brain specific proteins in optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Lim, E T; Grant, D; Pashenkov, M; Keir, G; Thompson, E J; Söderström, M; Giovannoni, G

    2004-06-01

    This study evaluates levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) brain-specific proteins (BSP) in subjects with optic neuritis (ON) who are at high risk of progression to multiple sclerosis (MS). Forty-one subjects had acute ON and 17 subjects with other neurological diseases (OND) served as controls. Twenty-one subjects with ON had white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intrathecal synthesis of oligoclonal IgG bands (OB) consistent with being at high risk of progression to MS; eight of whom later were diagnosed with clinically definite MS (CDMS). Levels of S100B, ferritin and two neurofilament heavy chain phosphoforms (NfH(SM134) and NfH(SM135)) were analysed using ELISA technique. A putative index of 'axonal health' was expressed as a ratio of NfH(SM134) to NfH(S135). NfH(SM134) and the NfH(SM134:SM135) were significantly elevated in subjects with ON compared to controls. No significant differences in levels of CSF BSP were seen between ON subjects with CDMS plus those at high risk of progression to MS and ON subjects with normal MRI and negative CSF analysis. In conclusion, there is evidence of axonal damage in subjects who present with ON, which is independent of the diagnosis of CDMS. PMID:15222688

  5. CNS tumours: oligoclonal immunoglobulin D in cerebrospinal fluid and serum.

    PubMed

    Mavra, M; Drulovic, J; Levic, Z; Stojsavljevic, N; Grujicic, D; Janicijevic, M; Thompson, E J

    1999-08-01

    Oligoclonal immunoglobulin D bands were detected by isoelectric focusing in 7 out of 25 unconcentrated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from patients with tumours of the central nervous system (CNS). The tumours were confirmed by clinical and histological findings. Two patients with CNS malignancy had intrathecal synthesis of oligoclonal bands both IgD and IgG. Four patients with a variety of CNS tumours had a systemic IgD immune response but no oligoclonal IgG bands. One patient with the most malignant tumour histology had a systemic IgD response as well as local synthesis of IgG. The study reveals several new aspects regarding CNS tumours: they are immunologically active and are capable of invoking oligoclonal immunoglobulin production both within the CNS and systemically. Multiple immunoglobulin activation can be found in malignant CNS tumours, and systemic IgD production may occur independently from IgG synthesis and may represent an immune response to a neoantigen produced in the CNS compartment. PMID:10442454

  6. Equine cerebrospinal fluid: reference values of normal horses.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, I G; Whitlock, R H; Tasker, J B

    1977-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected from the atlanto-occipital (AO) and lumbosacral (LS) subarachnoid spaces of 24 horses and 21 ponies that had no clinical evidence of neurologic disease. Depth of needle insertion, pressures, refractive index, rapid reagent strip test (protein, glucose, blood, pH) results, cell counts, content of protein, glucose, sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, phosphorus, urea nitrogen, and cholesterol, and activities of creatine phosphokinase, aspartate transaminase, lactic dehydrogenase, and alkaline phosphatase were determined. The resulting clinical reference values obtained were discussed in light of the published normal values for CSF from horses, other animals, and man. White cell counts in CSF were found to be from 0 to 6/microliters. Values for protein content were distributed between wider limits than previously reported values. The LS-AO difference is proposed as a criterion for clinical evaluation of CSF protein content. Ponies were found to have more protein in their CSF than did the horses, and CSF from the LS site contained more glucose than that from the AO site. The CSF electrolyte composition was similar to that of previous reports. Enzyme activities in equine CSF are reported for the 1st time. PMID:911095

  7. Visualization of the cerebrospinal fluid drainage into the Galen's vein.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, P H; Gotow, T; Ichimura, T; Nakatani, T; Takasu, N; Kodaka, R; Sumitani, S; Fukuda, T

    1985-04-01

    Arachnoid granulations are not always present in lower mammals and primate newborns. In order to visualize the route for the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to drain into the venous system, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was injected into the lateral ventricle or cisterna cerebellomedullaris of the mouse and rat. From 30 to 60 min after the commencing of a slow infusion for 15-30 min of 0.05-0.1 ml solution containing 10-20 mg HRP, the mouse, whose skull had been exposed, was dropped into cold acetone at dry ice temperature; other animals were fixed by perfusion with aldehyde solution. The frozen head was dissected in a cryostat kept at -18 degrees C to remove the skull, but leave the dura mater and the falx cerebri. The brain with meninges was cut into 30-45 microns sagittal sections in the cryostat, and processed for peroxidase reaction. The perfusion-fixed brains were used for scanning electron microscopy and for electron microscope observation of the tracer. The reaction product was found within fenestrated venous capillaries of the choroid plexus. The route for the HRP in the CSF to drain into the sinus rectus via the vena choroidea and vena cerebri magna was directly visualized in the mouse. PMID:4038002

  8. The longitudinal cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Elizabeth; Larkin, James R.; Claridge, Tim D. W.; Talbot, Kevin; Sibson, Nicola R.; Turner, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Neurochemical biomarkers are urgently sought in ALS. Metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy is a highly sensitive method capable of revealing nervous system cellular pathology. The 1H-NMR CSF metabolomic signature of ALS was sought in a longitudinal cohort. Six-monthly serial collection was performed in ALS patients across a range of clinical sub-types (n = 41) for up to two years, and in healthy controls at a single time-point (n = 14). A multivariate statistical approach, partial least squares discriminant analysis, was used to determine differences between the NMR spectra from patients and controls. Significantly predictive models were found using those patients with at least one year's interval between recruitment and the second sample. Glucose, lactate, citric acid and, unexpectedly, ethanol were the discriminating metabolites elevated in ALS. It is concluded that 1H-NMR captured the CSF metabolomic signature associated with derangements in cellular energy utilization connected with ALS, and was most prominent in comparisons using patients with longer disease duration. The specific metabolites identified support the concept of a hypercatabolic state, possibly involving mitochondrial dysfunction specifically. Endogenous ethanol in the CSF may be an unrecognized novel marker of neuronal tissue injury in ALS. PMID:26121274

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in clinically isolated syndromes and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Michele; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Benedetti, Maria Donata; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Monaco, Salvatore

    2007-09-01

    A panel of three cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers for clinically isolated syndromes (CIS) and multiple sclerosis (MS), based on SDS-PAGE, 2-D maps, and immunoblot results, is here proposed. No individual marker has any specificity, though, since they appear in a number of other neurological diseases. However the set of three, with the respective modulation sign (up-regulated or maintained at constant level), appears to be unique for MS. These proteins are: tau protein (levels remaining constant and undistinguishable from controls, contrary to up- and downregulation in other neurological disorders); 14-3-3 protein (strong upregulation of distinct isoforms) and cystatin C (changing in accordance to disease stage and progression). As an additional evidence, one can rely in the pattern of isoforms of 14-3-3, as obtained by 2-D maps and Western blot analysis: this pattern further distinguishes the variation of this protein from other neurological syndromes, notably sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), motor neuron diseases and other dementias. In contrast, a similar qualitative and quantitative upregulation of 14-3-3 is observed in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), a demyelinating condition affecting the peripheral nervous system. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time in which such a panel of biomarkers is reported in MS. PMID:21136750

  10. Clinical implications of acute cerebrospinal fluid changes following iophendylate myelography.

    PubMed

    Mehta, H J; Ramakantan, R; Piparia, D H; Hande, A M; Goel, A; Satoskar, A R; Dastur, F D

    1992-01-01

    Clinical features and serial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of 50 patients who underwent myelography with iophendylate were studied. Forty two patients (84%) developed one or more features suggestive of meningism lasting for 2-4 days. There was significant rise in the average (mean) CSF counts from 9.81 in the premyelogram sample to 532.6 at the end of 24 hours (p less than 0.001). Both neutrophil and lymphocyte (p less than 000) count increased. At the end of one week, there was significant decrease of total cells in the CSF to 204 (p less than 0.001). Both, neutrophils and lymphocytes decreased. There was significant rise in total proteins in the 24 hours sample, but the fall at one week was not significant statistically. The sugar and chloride values did not change significantly. All CSF samples were negative for bacterial cultures. In conclusion, a significant proportion of the patients undergoing iophendylate myelography develop clinical features suggestive of meningeal irritation and change in the CSF fractions suggestive of meningitis: however these changes are transient and do not warrant institution of chemotherapy or steroids. PMID:1512716

  11. Cystatin C in cerebrospinal fluid as a biomarker of ALS.

    PubMed

    Tsuji-Akimoto, Sachiko; Yabe, Ichiro; Niino, Masaaki; Kikuchi, Seiji; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2009-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is diagnosed on the basis of progressive symptoms in both the upper and lower motor neurons. Because there are no specific biomarkers for ALS, it is difficult to diagnose this disease in its early stages. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained from 14 patients in the early stages of ALS, from 13 with polyneuropathy, and from 16 with other neurological disorders. The concentration of cystatin C in the CSF was measured using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. The concentration of cystatin C in the CSF was significantly lower in ALS patients than in the control subjects who were patients with polyneuropathy or other neurological diseases (patients with ALS, polyneuropathy, and other diseases exhibited 5.5 +/- 0.3, 6.7 +/- 0.4, and 6.9 +/- 0.3 mg/L cystatin C, respectively; ALS patients vs. control subjects: p = 0.014 and ALS patients vs. polyneuropathy patients: p = 0.024). Cystatin C may be a useful biomarker of ALS and can be used to distinguish between ALS and polyneuropathy. PMID:19444952

  12. Subtotal Petrosectomy and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage in Unilateral Anacusis

    PubMed Central

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Appiani, Mario Ciniglio; Re, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study presents a group of patients experiencing recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage associated with ipsilateral anacusis who underwent subtotal petrosectomies with the goal of stopping the CSF leak and preventing meningitis. Materials and Methods Eight patients with CSF leakage were enrolled: three patients with giant vestibular schwannomas had CSF leakage after gamma knife failure and subsequent removal via a retrosigmoid approach; two patients had malformations at the level of the inner ear with consequent translabyrinthine fistulas; two had posttraumatic CSF leakages; and one had a CSF leakage coexisting with an encephalocele. Two patients developed meningitis that resolved with antibiotic therapy. Each patient had preoperative anacusis and vestibular nerve areflexia on the affected side. Results The patients with congenital or posttraumatic CSF leaks had undergone at least one unsuccessful endaural approach to treat the fistula. All eight patients were treated successfully with a subtotal petrosectomy. The symptoms disappeared within 2 months postoperatively. No meningitis, signs of fistula, or other symptoms occurred during the follow-up. Conclusion A subtotal petrosectomy should be the first choice of treatment in patients with recurrent CSF leakage whenever there is associated unilateral anacusis. PMID:25452896

  13. The longitudinal cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Elizabeth; Larkin, James R; Claridge, Tim D W; Talbot, Kevin; Sibson, Nicola R; Turner, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Neurochemical biomarkers are urgently sought in ALS. Metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy is a highly sensitive method capable of revealing nervous system cellular pathology. The (1)H-NMR CSF metabolomic signature of ALS was sought in a longitudinal cohort. Six-monthly serial collection was performed in ALS patients across a range of clinical sub-types (n = 41) for up to two years, and in healthy controls at a single time-point (n = 14). A multivariate statistical approach, partial least squares discriminant analysis, was used to determine differences between the NMR spectra from patients and controls. Significantly predictive models were found using those patients with at least one year's interval between recruitment and the second sample. Glucose, lactate, citric acid and, unexpectedly, ethanol were the discriminating metabolites elevated in ALS. It is concluded that (1)H-NMR captured the CSF metabolomic signature associated with derangements in cellular energy utilization connected with ALS, and was most prominent in comparisons using patients with longer disease duration. The specific metabolites identified support the concept of a hypercatabolic state, possibly involving mitochondrial dysfunction specifically. Endogenous ethanol in the CSF may be an unrecognized novel marker of neuronal tissue injury in ALS. PMID:26121274

  14. Increased Ventricular Cerebrospinal Fluid Lactate in Depressed Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Kailyn A. L.; Mao, Xiangling; Case, Julia A. C.; Kang, Guoxin; Shungu, Dikoma C.; Gabbay, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction has been increasingly examined as a potential pathogenic event in psychiatric disorders, although its role early in the course of major depressive disorder (MDD) is unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate mitochondrial dysfunction in medication-free adolescents with MDD through in vivo measurements of neurometabolites using high-spatial resolution multislice/multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Methods Twenty-three adolescents with MDD and 29 healthy controls, ages 12–20, were scanned at 3T and concentrations of ventricular cerebrospinal fluid lactate, as well as N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), total creatine (tCr), and total choline (tCho) in the bilateral caudate, putamen, and thalamus were reported. Results Adolescents with MDD exhibited increased ventricular lactate compared to healthy controls [F(1, 41) = 6.98, p = .01]. However, there were no group differences in the other neurometabolites. Dimensional analyses in the depressed group showed no relation between any of the neurometabolites and symptomatology, including anhedonia and fatigue. Conclusions Increased ventricular lactate in depressed adolescents suggests mitochondrial dysfunction may be present early in the course of MDD; however it is still not known whether the presence of mitochondrial dysfunction is a trait vulnerability of individuals predisposed to psychopathology or a state feature of the disorder. Therefore, there is a need for larger multimodal studies to clarify these chemical findings in the context of network function. PMID:26802978

  15. Molecular biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Brit; Hecker, Michael; Zettl, Uwe Klaus

    2015-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system, usually occurring in young adults and leading to disability. Despite the progress in technology and intensive research work of the last years, diagnosing MS can still be challenging. A heterogenic and complex pathophysiology with various types of disease courses makes MS unique for each patient. There is an urgent need to identify markers facilitating rapid and accurate diagnosis and prognostic assessments with regard to optimal therapy for each MS patient. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an outstanding source of specific markers related to MS pathology. Molecules reflecting specific pathological processes, such as inflammation, cellular damage, and loss of blood-brain-barrier integrity, are detectable in CSF. Clinically used biomarkers of CSF are oligoclonal bands, IgG-index, measles-rubella-zoster-reaction, anti-aquaporin 4 antibodies, and antibodies against John Cunningham virus. Many other potential biomarkers have been proposed in recent years. In this review we examine the current scientific knowledge on CSF molecular markers that could guide diagnosis and discrimination of different MS forms, support treatment decisions, or be helpful in monitoring and predicting disease progression, therapy response, and complications such as opportunistic infections. PMID:26071103

  16. A potential endophenotype for Alzheimer's disease: cerebrospinal fluid clusterin.

    PubMed

    Deming, Yuetiva; Xia, Jian; Cai, Yefei; Lord, Jenny; Holmans, Peter; Bertelsen, Sarah; Holtzman, David; Morris, John C; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H; Kauwe, John; Goate, Alison; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have associated clusterin (CLU) variants with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the role of CLU on AD pathogenesis is not totally understood. We used cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma CLU levels as endophenotypes for genetic studies to understand the role of CLU in AD. CSF, but not plasma, CLU levels were significantly associated with AD status and CSF tau/amyloid-beta ratio, and highly correlated with CSF apolipoprotein E (APOE) levels. Several loci showed almost genome-wide significant associations including LINC00917 (p = 3.98 × 10(-7)) and interleukin 6 (IL6, p = 9.94 × 10(-6), in the entire data set and in the APOE ε4- individuals p = 7.40 × 10(-8)). Gene ontology analyses suggest that CSF CLU levels may be associated with wound healing and immune response which supports previous functional studies that demonstrated an association between CLU and IL6. CLU may play a role in AD by influencing immune system changes that have been observed in AD or by disrupting healing after neurodegeneration. PMID:26545630

  17. Simulating transitional hydrodynamics of the cerebrospinal fluid at extreme scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Kartik; Roller, Sabine; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    Chiari malformation type I is a disorder characterized by the herniation of cerebellar tonsils into the spinal canal through the foramen magnum resulting in obstruction to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow. The flow of pulsating bidirectional CSF is of acutely complex nature due to the anatomy of the conduit containing it - the subarachnoid space. We report lattice Boltzmann method based direct numerical simulations on patient specific cases with spatial resolution of 24 μm amounting meshes of up to 2 billion cells conducted on 50000 cores of the Hazelhen supercomputer in Stuttgart. The goal is to characterize intricate dynamics of the CSF at resolutions that are of the order of Kolmogorov microscales. Results unfold velocity fluctuations up to ~ 10 KHz , turbulent kinetic energy ~ 2 times of the mean flow energy in Chiari patients whereas the flow remains laminar in a control subject. The fluctuations confine near the cranio-vertebral junction and are commensurate with the extremeness of pathology and the extent of herniation. The results advocate that the manifestation of pathological conditions like Chiari malformation may lead to transitional hydrodynamics of the CSF, and a prudent calibration of numerical approach is necessary to avoid overlook of such phenomena.

  18. Short-term stability of Borrelia garinii in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Berenová, Dagmar; Krsek, Daniel; Šípková, Lenka; Lukavská, Alena; Malý, Marek; Kurzová, Zuzana; Hořejší, Jan; Kodym, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the optimal conditions for short-term storage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples for direct diagnosis of Lyme disease. A mixture of Borrelia-negative CSFs spiked with a defined amount of cultured Borrelia garinii was used. Borrelia stability was investigated over 7 days at four different temperatures [room temperature (RT), +4, -20 and -70 °C]. Quantitative changes in CSF Borrelia were measured by quantitative PCR (qPCR), and morphological changes in the spirochetes were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These qPCR results were statistically evaluated. We found +4 °C to be an optimal temperature for short-term storage of CSF samples intended for TEM observation. There was no significant difference between the temperatures tested in the average quantity of Borrelia measured by qPCR. On the contrary, electron optical diagnosis of frozen samples and samples stored at RT showed destructive morphological changes and decreased spirochete counts. Our results show that optimal conditions for the pre-analytical phase of investigation of one type of material can differ depending on the diagnostic method employed. PMID:26104540

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Mukaetova-Ladinska, Elizabeta B.; Monteith, Rachael; Perry, Elaine K.

    2010-01-01

    More than 750,000 of the UK population suffer from some form of cognitive impairment and dementia. Of these, 5–20% will have Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). Clinico-pathological studies have shown that it is the low frequency of DLB clinical core features that makes the DLB diagnosis hardly recognisable during life, and easily misdiagnosed for other forms of dementia. This has an impact on the treatment and long-term care of the affected subjects. Having a biochemical test, based on quantification of a specific DLB biomarker within Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) could be an effective diagnostic method to improve the differential diagnosis. Although some of the investigated DLB CSF biomarkers are well within the clinical criteria for sensitivity and specificity (>90%), they all seem to be confounded by the contradictory data for each of the major groups of biomarkers (α-synuclein, tau and amyloid proteins). However, a combination of CSF measures appear to emerge, that may well be able to differentiate DLB from other dementias: α-synuclein reduction in early DLB, a correlation between CSF α-synuclein and Aβ42 measures (characteristic for DLB only), and t-tau and p-tau181 profile (differentiating AD from DLB). PMID:21048932

  20. Two-compartment model of radioimmunotherapy delivered through cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    He, Ping; Kramer, Kim; Smith-Jones, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat; Humm, John; Larson, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 131I-3F8 injected into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was a safe modality for the treatment of leptomeningeal metastases (JCO, 25:5465, 2007). A single-compartment pharmacokinetic model described previously (JNM 50:1324, 2009) showed good fitting to the CSF radioactivity data obtained from patients. We now describe a two-compartment model to account for the ventricular reservoir of 131I-3F8 and to identify limiting factors that may impact therapeutic ratio. Methods Each parameter was examined for its effects on (1) the area under the radioactivity concentration curve of the bound antibody (AUC[CIAR]), (2) that of the unbound antibody AUC[CIA], and (3) their therapeutic ratio (AUC [CIAR]/AUC[CIA]). Results Data fitting showed that CSF kBq/ml data fitted well using the two-compartment model (R=0.950.03). Correlations were substantially better when compared to the one-compartment model (R=0.920.11 versus 0.770.21, p=0.005). In addition, we made the following new predictions: (1) Increasing immunoreactivity of 131I-3F8 from 10% to 90% increased both (AUC[CIAR]) and therapeutic ratio ([AUC[CIAR]/AUC[CIA

  1. Identification of Ehrlichia chaffeensis morulae in cerebrospinal fluid mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Dunn, B E; Monson, T P; Dumler, J S; Morris, C C; Westbrook, A B; Duncan, J L; Dawson, J E; Sims, K G; Anderson, B E

    1992-08-01

    We report a case of ehrlichiosis in a 72-year-old man who developed extreme lethargy, acute renal failure requiring hemodialysis, and respiratory insufficiency requiring intubation. Lumbar puncture performed on the second day of hospitalization revealed significant cellular pleocytosis. Ehrlichia morulae were tentatively identified in mononuclear cells in routinely processed Wright-stained cytospin preparations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Identification was confirmed by a specific immunocytochemical staining procedure. Subsequent identification specifically as Ehrlichia chaffeensis morulae was established by polymerase chain reaction analysis, which revealed E. chaffeensis-specific DNA in CSF, bone marrow, and blood samples; by indirect fluorescent-antibody analysis, the patient developed an antibody titer of 32,768 against E. chaffeensis antigen. The patient responded to intravenous therapy with doxycycline and dexamethasone. Subsequently, neurologic, hematologic, renal, and pulmonary status had returned to baseline at follow-up 12 weeks after admission. To our knowledge, this is the first identification of E. chaffeensis morulae in CSF cells in an infected patient. PMID:1500537

  2. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control.

    PubMed

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M F; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E

    2014-08-28

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called "embryonic CSF." Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life. PMID:25165044

  3. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control

    PubMed Central

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M. Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M. F.; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called “embryonic CSF.” Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life. PMID:25165044

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  5. Increased cerebrospinal fluid fibrinogen in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Kotaro; Ota, Miho; Sasayama, Daimei; Yoshida, Sumiko; Matsumura, Ryo; Miyakawa, Tomoko; Yokota, Yuuki; Yamaguchi, Shinobu; Noda, Takamasa; Teraishi, Toshiya; Hori, Hiroaki; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Goto, Yu-ichi; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) presumably includes heterogeneous subgroups with differing pathologies. To obtain a marker reflecting such a subgroup, we analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of fibrinogen, which has been reported to be elevated in the plasma of patients with MDD. Three fibrinogen-related proteins were measured using aptamer-based analyses and CSF samples of 30 patients with MDD and 30 controls. The numbers of patients with an excessively high level (>99 percentile of the controls) was significantly increased (17 to 23%). Measurement reproducibility of these results was confirmed by an ELISA for fibrinogen (Pearson’s r = 0.77). In an independent sample set from 36 patients and 30 controls, using the ELISA, results were similar (22%). When these two sample sets were combined, the number of patients with a high fibrinogen level was significantly increased (15/66; odds ratio 8.53; 95% confidence interval 1.9–39.1, p = 0.0011). By using diffusion tensor imaging, we found white matter tracts abnormalities in patients with a high fibrinogen level but not those patients with a normal fibrinogen level, compared with controls. Plasma fibrinogen levels were similar among the diagnostic groups. Our results point to a subgroup of MDD represented by increased CSF fibrinogen and white matter tract abnormalities. PMID:26081315

  6. Enterovirus-D68 in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Two Children with Aseptic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Lunghi, Giovanna; Zampiero, Alberto; Tagliabue, Claudia; Orlandi, Anna; Torresani, Erminio; Niesters, Hubert; Principi, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    This case report describes two previously healthy children with aseptic meningitis whose cerebrospinal fluid was positive for enterovirus-D68, which indicates direct involvement of this infectious agent in the development of this neurologic disease. PMID:26859634

  7. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Presenting with Seizure due to Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage after Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yaman, Mesut Emre

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid leakage may commonly occur during spinal surgeries and it may cause dural tears. These tears may result in hemorrhage in the entire compartments of the brain. Most common site of such hemorrhages are the veins in the cerebellar region. We report a case of hemorrhage, mimicking aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a cerebrospinal fluid leakage following lumbar spinal surgery and discuss the possible mechanisms of action. PMID:26885288

  8. Cytomegalovirus Antibody in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Schizophrenic Patients Detected by Enzyme Immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller Torrey, E.; Yolken, Robert H.; Winfrey, C. Jack

    1982-05-01

    By means of enzyme immunoassay techniques to detect the presence of antibody to cytomegalovirus, the cerebrospinal fluid of 178 patients with schizophrenia, 17 patients with bipolar disorders, and 11 other psychiatric patients was compared with that of 79 neurological patients and 41 normal control subjects. The cerebrospinal fluid of 20 of the schizophrenic patients and 3 of the patients with bipolar disorders showed significant increases in immunoglobulin M antibody to cytomegalovirus; no difference was found in patients on or off psychotropic medications.

  9. Assessing cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea: a two-dimensional electrophoresis approach.

    PubMed

    Burkhard, P R; Rodrigo, N; May, D; Sztajzel, R; Sanchez, J C; Hochstrasser, D F; Schiffer, E; Reverdin, A; Lacroix, J S; Shiffer, E

    2001-05-01

    Assessment of nasal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula commonly relies on the determination of CSF markers in an aqueous rhinorrhea, such as the beta2-transferrin immunofixation assay. While generally reliable, false positive and false negative results have been reported for most of the laboratory tests yet available. Based on the hypothesis that the simultaneous assessment of several CSF markers may yield an increased sensitivity and specificity, we used a proteomics, two-dimensional electrophoresis 2-DE based approach to study samples of nasal secretions obtained from 18 patients suspected of CSF rhinorrhea. Since CSF, nasal mucus and plasma may coexist in the nasal cavities, we first defined five specific markers for each of these biological fluids (transferrin, prostaglandin-D synthase, transthyretin, and two unknown trains of spots for CSF, immunoglobulin A (IgA) S-chain, lipocortin-1, lipocalin-1, prolactine-inducible protein and palatal lung nasal epithelium clone protein for mucus, haptoglobin alpha1/2- and beta-chains, fibrinogen alpha-, beta- and gamma-chains for plasma). Gels from the rhinorrhea patients were then compared to these 2-DE reference maps to determine the presence or absence of the defined markers, and clinical data were independently compared to the results of the 2-DE study. In all cases, the biological fluid(s) anticipated to be present in the nasal secretions based on clinical data were correctly identified by 2-DE. Moreover, an excellent correlation was found in nine patients who underwent extensive workup for suspected CSF rhinorrhea, since CSF was found by the 2-DE method in four patients in whom a CSF fistula was confirmed, whereas the test was negative in five patients in whom a CSF fistula was excluded. In the remaining patients, mucus, sometimes contamined with blood, was found to be the major component of the nasal secretions, confirming that clear mucus may mimick CSF rhinorrhea. These preliminary results suggest that a 2-DE-based multimarker approach is a valid, sensitive, and specific method to assess the presence of CSF in occult rhinorrhea. PMID:11425238

  10. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid and cerebrospinal fluid cells from patients with multiple sclerosis for detection of JC virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    lacobaeus, E; Ryschkewitsch, C; Gravell, M; Khademi, M; Wallstrom, E; Olsson, T; Brundin, L; Major, EO

    2009-01-01

    Objective 1) To determine whether JC virus (JCV) DNA was present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) in comparison with controls and 2) to find out if our clinical material, based on presence of JCV DNA, included any patient at risk for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Methods The prevalence of JCV DNA was analyzed in CSF and plasma from 217 patients with MS, 86 patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), and 212 patients with other neurological diseases (OND). In addition, we analyzed CSF cells, the first report of JCV DNA in CSF cells in a single sample, and peripheral blood cells in a subgroup of MS (n = 49), CIS (n = 14) and OND (n = 53). Results A low copy number of JCV DNA was detected in one MS cell free CSF sample and in one MS CSF cell samples. None of these had any signs of PML or developed this disease during follow-up. In addition, two OND plasma samples were JCV DNA positive, whereas all the other samples had no detectable virus. Conclusion A low copy number of JCV DNA may occasionally be observed both in MS and other diseases and may occur as part of the normal biology of JC virus in humans. This study does not support the hypothesis that patients with MS would be at increased risk to develop PML, and consequently screening of CSF as a measurable risk for PML is not useful. PMID:18805840

  11. Progressive Differentiation and Instructive Capacities of Amniotic Fluid and Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteomes following Neural Tube Closure.

    PubMed

    Chau, Kevin F; Springel, Mark W; Broadbelt, Kevin G; Park, Hye-Yeon; Topal, Salih; Lun, Melody P; Mullan, Hillary; Maynard, Thomas; Steen, Hanno; LaMantia, Anthony S; Lehtinen, Maria K

    2015-12-21

    After neural tube closure, amniotic fluid (AF) captured inside the neural tube forms the nascent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Neuroepithelial stem cells contact CSF-filled ventricles, proliferate, and differentiate to form the mammalian brain, while neurogenic placodes, which generate cranial sensory neurons, remain in contact with the AF. Using in vivo ultrasound imaging, we quantified the expansion of the embryonic ventricular-CSF space from its inception. We developed tools to obtain pure AF and nascent CSF, before and after neural tube closure, and to define how the AF and CSF proteomes diverge during mouse development. Using embryonic neural explants, we demonstrate that age-matched fluids promote Sox2-positive neurogenic identity in developing forebrain and olfactory epithelia. Nascent CSF also stimulates SOX2-positive self-renewal of forebrain progenitor cells, some of which is attributable to LIFR signaling. Our Resource should facilitate the investigation of fluid-tissue interactions during this highly vulnerable stage of early brain development. PMID:26702835

  12. Placental ischemia increases seizure susceptibility and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Junie P

    2015-01-01

    Eclampsia is diagnosed in preeclamptic patients who develop unexplained seizures and/or coma during pregnancy or postpartum. Eclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, accounting for ∼13% of maternal deaths worldwide. Little is known about the mechanisms contributing to the pathophysiology of eclampsia, partly due to the lack of suitable animal models. This study tested the hypothesis that placental ischemia, induced by reducing utero-placental perfusion, increases susceptibility to seizures, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammation, and neurokinin B (NKB) expression in brain and plasma. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a pro-convulsive drug, was injected into pregnant and placental ischemic rats (40 mg/kg, i.p.) on gestational day 19 followed by video monitoring for 30 min. Seizure scoring was blindly conducted. Placental ischemia hastened the onset of seizures compared to pregnant controls but had no effect on seizure duration. Placental ischemia increased CSF levels of IL-2, IL-17, IL-18 and eotaxin (CCL11), had no effect on plasma NKB; however, PTZ increased plasma NKB in both pregnant and placental ischemic rats. NKB was strongly correlated with latency to seizure in normal pregnant rats (R2 = 0.88 vs. 0.02 in placental ischemic rats). Lastly, NKB decreased in the anterior cerebrum in response to placental ischemia and PTZ treatment but was unchanged in the posterior cerebrum. These data demonstrate that placental ischemia is associated with increased susceptibility to seizures and CSF inflammation; thus provides an excellent model for elucidating mechanisms of eclampsia-like symptoms. Further studies are required to determine the role of CSF cytokines/chemokines in mediating increased seizure susceptibility. PMID:26603461

  13. Diagnostic Performance of Galactomannan Antigen Testing in Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Chong, G M; Maertens, J A; Lagrou, K; Driessen, G J; Cornelissen, J J; Rijnders, B J A

    2016-02-01

    Testing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for the presence of galactomannan (GM) antigen may help in diagnosing cerebral aspergillosis (CA). However, the use of the CSF GM test as a diagnostic test has been little studied. We evaluated its diagnostic performance by comparing the CSF GM optical density indexes (ODI) at different cutoffs in patients with probable and proven CA to those in patients without CA. Patients from 2 tertiary referral hospitals with suspected CA between 2004 and 2014 and in whom CSF GM ODI had been determined were selected. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Infectious Diseases Study Mycoses Group (EORTC/MSG) definitions of invasive aspergillosis and CA were used, but with the exclusion of the test to be validated (i.e., the CSF GM test) as a microbiological EORTC/MSG criterion. The study population consisted of 44 patients (4 with proven CA, 13 with probable CA, and 27 with no CA). Of the 17 patients with CA, 15 had a CSF GM ODI of ≥2.0. Of 27 patients without CA, 26 had a CSF GM ODI of <0.5 and 1 had a CSF GM ODI of 8.2. When a GM CSF ODI cutoff of 1.0 was used, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 88.2%, 96.3%, 93.8%, and 92.9%, respectively. The same results were found when a CSF GM ODI cutoff of 0.5 or 2.0 was used. Testing GM in CSF has a high diagnostic performance for diagnosing CA and may be useful to diagnose or virtually rule out the infection without the need for a cerebral biopsy. PMID:26659218

  14. Brain Gene Expression Signatures From Cerebrospinal Fluid Exosome RNA Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, S. B.; Stevens, B.; Calvillo, E.; Tang, R.; Gutierrez Flores, B.; Hu, L.; Skog, J.; Bershad, E.

    2016-01-01

    While the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome observations have focused on ocular symptoms, spaceflight has been also associated with a number of other performance and neurologic signs, such as headaches, cognitive changes, vertigo, nausea, sleep/circadian disruption and mood alterations, which, albeit likely multifactorial, can also result from elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). We therefore hypothesize that these various symptoms are caused by disturbances in the neurophysiology of the brain structures and are correlated with molecular markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as indicators of neurophysiological changes. Exosomes are 30-200 nm microvesicles shed into all biofluids, including blood, urine, and CSF, carrying a highly rich source of intact protein and RNA cargo. Exosomes have been identified in human CSF, and their proteome and RNA pool is a potential new reservoir for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in brain gene expression via exosome analysis in patients suffering from ICP elevation of varied severity (idiopathic intracranial hypertension -IIH), a condition which shares some of the neuroophthalmological features of VIIP, as a first step toward obtaining evidence suggesting that cognitive function and ICP levels can be correlated with biomarkers in the CSF. Our preliminary work, reported last year, validated the exosomal technology applicable to CSF analysis and demonstrated that it was possible to obtain gene expression evidence of inflammation processes in traumatic brain injury patients. We are now recruiting patients with suspected IIH requiring lumbar puncture at Baylor College of Medicine. Both CSF (5 ml) and human plasma (10 ml) are being collected in order to compare the pattern of differentially expressed genes observed in CSF and in blood. Since blood is much more accessible than CSF, we would like to determine whether plasma biomarkers for elevated ICP can be identified. This may eventually lead to a blood test to diagnose intracranial hypertension.

  15. Endostatin level in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Salza, Romain; Oudart, Jean-Baptiste; Ramont, Laurent; Maquart, François-Xavier; Bakchine, Serge; Thoannès, Henri; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the level of endostatin, a fragment of collagen XVIII that accumulates in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), in the cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The concentrations of total protein, endostatin, amyloid-β1-42 peptide, tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in CSF of patients with AD (n = 57), behavioral frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, n = 22), non AD and non FTD dementia (nAD/nFTD, n = 84), and 45 subjects without neurodegenerative diseases. The statistical significance of the results was assessed by Mann-Whitney and Kruskal and Wallis tests, and by ROC analysis. The concentration of endostatin in CSF was higher than the levels of the three markers of AD both in control subjects and in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The endostatin/amyloid-β1-42 ratio was significantly increased in patients with AD (257%, p < 0.0001) and nAD/nFTD (140%, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. The endostatin/tau protein ratio was significantly decreased in patients with AD (-49%, p < 0.0001) but was increased in bvFTD patients (89%, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. In the same way, the endostatin/hyperphosphorylated tau protein ratio was decreased in patients with AD (-21%, p = 0.0002) but increased in patients with bvFTD (81%, p = 0.0026), compared to controls. The measurement of endostatin in CSF and the calculation of its ratio relative to well-established AD markers improve the diagnosis of bvFTD patients and the discrimination of patients with AD from those with bvFTD and nAD/nFTD. PMID:25408220

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Candidates Associated with Human WNV Neuroinvasive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fraisier, Christophe; Papa, Anna; Granjeaud, Samuel; Hintzen, Rogier; Martina, Byron; Camoin, Luc; Almeras, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the epidemiology of WNV in humans has changed in the southern regions of Europe, with high incidence of West Nile fever (WNF) cases, but also of West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND). The lack of human vaccine or specific treatment against WNV infection imparts a pressing need to characterize indicators associated with neurological involvement. By its intimacy with central nervous system (CNS) structures, modifications in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition could accurately reflect CNS pathological process. Until now, few studies investigated the association between imbalance of CSF elements and severity of WNV infection. The aim of the present study was to apply the iTRAQ technology in order to identify the CSF proteins whose abundances are modified in patients with WNND. Forty-seven proteins were found modified in the CSF of WNND patients as compared to control groups, and most of them are reported for the first time in the context of WNND. On the basis of their known biological functions, several of these proteins were associated with inflammatory response. Among them, Defensin-1 alpha (DEFA1), a protein reported with anti-viral effects, presented the highest increasing fold-change (FC>12). The augmentation of DEFA1 abundance in patients with WNND was confirmed at the CSF, but also in serum, compared to the control individual groups. Furthermore, the DEFA1 serum level was significantly elevated in WNND patients compared to subjects diagnosed for WNF. The present study provided the first insight into the potential CSF biomarkers associated with WNV neuroinvasion. Further investigation in larger cohorts with kinetic sampling could determine the usefulness of measuring DEFA1 as diagnostic or prognostic biomarker of detrimental WNND evolution. PMID:24695528

  17. Amyloid and tau cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Because of the emerging intersections of HIV infection and Alzheimer's disease, we examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers related of amyloid and tau metabolism in HIV-infected patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study we measured soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPPα and sAPPβ), amyloid beta fragment 1-42 (Aβ1-42), and total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau) in CSF of 86 HIV-infected (HIV+) subjects, including 21 with AIDS dementia complex (ADC), 25 with central nervous system (CNS) opportunistic infections and 40 without neurological symptoms and signs. We also measured these CSF biomarkers in 64 uninfected (HIV-) subjects, including 21 with Alzheimer's disease, and both younger and older controls without neurological disease. Results CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ concentrations were highly correlated and reduced in patients with ADC and opportunistic infections compared to the other groups. The opportunistic infection group but not the ADC patients had lower CSF Aβ1-42 in comparison to the other HIV+ subjects. CSF t-tau levels were high in some ADC patients, but did not differ significantly from the HIV+ neuroasymptomatic group, while CSF p-tau was not increased in any of the HIV+ groups. Together, CSF amyloid and tau markers segregated the ADC patients from both HIV+ and HIV- neuroasymptomatics and from Alzheimer's disease patients, but not from those with opportunistic infections. Conclusions Parallel reductions of CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ in ADC and CNS opportunistic infections suggest an effect of CNS immune activation or inflammation on neuronal amyloid synthesis or processing. Elevation of CSF t-tau in some ADC and CNS infection patients without concomitant increase in p-tau indicates neural injury without preferential accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau as found in Alzheimer's disease. These biomarker changes define pathogenetic pathways to brain injury in ADC that differ from those of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:20028512

  18. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Monoamine Metabolites in the Epileptic Baboon

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Patel, Mayuri; Uteshev, Victor V.

    2016-01-01

    The baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In this retrospective study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolites and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated in 263 baboons of a pedigreed colony. CSF monoamine abnormalities have been linked to reduced seizure thresholds, behavioral abnormalities and SUDEP in various animal models of epilepsy. The levels of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylglycol, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and homovanillic acid in CSF samples drawn from the cisterna magna were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. These levels were compared between baboons with seizures (SZ), craniofacial trauma (CFT) and asymptomatic, control (CTL) baboons, between baboons with abnormal and normal EEG studies. We hypothesized that the CSF levels of major monoaminergic metabolites (i.e., dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine) associate with the baboons’ electroclinical status and thus can be used as clinical biomarkers applicable to seizures/epilepsy. However, despite apparent differences in metabolite levels between the groups, usually lower in SZ and CFT baboons and in baboons with abnormal EEG studies, we did not find any statistically significant differences using a logistic regression analysis. Significant correlations between the metabolite levels, especially between 5-HIAA and HVA, were preserved in all electroclinical groups. While we were not able to demonstrate significant differences in monoamine metabolites in relation to seizures or EEG markers of epilepsy, we cannot exclude the monoaminergic system as a potential source of pathogenesis in epilepsy and SUDEP. A prospective study evaluating serial CSF monoamine levels in baboons with recently witnessed seizures, and evaluation of abnormal expression and function of monoaminergic receptors and transporters within epilepsy-related brain regions, may impact the electroclinical status. PMID:26924854

  19. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Philip S.; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P < 0.05). Discordance (mainly isolated cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β positivity) differed by diagnostic group (P < 0.001) and was seen in 21% of cognitively healthy people but only 6% in dementia patients. The finding that cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β provide partially independent information about a wide range of Alzheimer's measures supports the theory that these modalities represent partly different aspects of Alzheimer's pathology. The fact that mismatch, with positive cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β but normal positron emission tomography amyloid-β, is relatively common in cognitively healthy people may be considered when using these biomarkers to identify early stage Alzheimer's disease. Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β may be more strongly related to early stage Alzheimer's disease, whereas increased positron emission tomography amyloid-β may be more strongly related to disease progression. PMID:25541191

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin: relation to cognition and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Skillbäck, Tobias; Törnqvist, Ulrika; Andreasson, Ulf; Trojanowski, John Q; Weiner, Michael W; Shaw, Leslie M; Mattsson, Niklas; Blennow, Kaj

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic dysfunction is linked to cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, measurement of synapse proteins in cerebrospinal fluid may be useful biomarkers to monitor synaptic degeneration. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of the postsynaptic protein neurogranin are increased in Alzheimer's disease, including in the predementia stage of the disease. Here, we tested the performance of cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin to predict cognitive decline and brain injury in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study. An in-house immunoassay was used to analyse neurogranin in cerebrospinal fluid samples from a cohort of patients who at recruitment were diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 95) or mild cognitive impairment (n = 173), as well as in cognitively normal subjects (n = 110). Patients with mild cognitive impairment were grouped into those that remained cognitively stable for at least 2 years (stable mild cognitive impairment) and those who progressed to Alzheimer's disease dementia during follow-up (progressive mild cognitive impairment). Correlations were tested between baseline cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin levels and baseline and longitudinal cognitive impairment, brain atrophy and glucose metabolism within each diagnostic group. Cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin was increased in patients with Alzheimer's disease dementia (P < 0.001), progressive mild cognitive impairment (P < 0.001) and stable mild cognitive impairment (P < 0.05) compared with controls, and in Alzheimer's disease dementia (P < 0.01) and progressive mild cognitive impairment (P < 0.05) compared with stable mild cognitive impairment. In the mild cognitive impairment group, high baseline cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin levels predicted cognitive decline as reflected by decreased Mini-Mental State Examination (P < 0.001) and increased Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (P < 0.001) scores at clinical follow-up. In addition, high baseline cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin levels in the mild cognitive impairment group correlated with longitudinal reductions in cortical glucose metabolism (P < 0.001) and hippocampal volume (P < 0.001) at clinical follow-up. Furthermore, within the progressive mild cognitive impairment group, elevated cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin levels were associated with accelerated deterioration in Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (β = 0.0017, P = 0.01). These data demonstrate that cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin is increased already at the early clinical stage of Alzheimer's disease and predicts cognitive deterioration and disease-associated changes in metabolic and structural biomarkers over time. PMID:26373605

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities in patients with neoplastic meningitis. An evaluation using /sup 111/In-DTPA ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, S.A.; Trump, D.L.; Chen, D.C.; Thompson, G.; Camargo, E.E.

    1982-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics were evaluated by /sup 111/In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (/sup 111/In-DTPA) ventriculography in 27 patients with neoplastic meningitis. Nineteen patients (70 percent) had evidence of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbances. These occurred as ventricular outlet obstructions, abnormalities of flow in the spinal canal, or flow distrubances over the cortical convexities. Tumor histology, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, myelograms, and computerized axial tomographic scans were not sufficient to predict cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns. These data indicate that cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities are common in patients with neoplastic meningitis and that /sup 111/In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging is useful in characterizing these abnormalities. This technique provides insight into the distribution of intraventricularly administered chemotherapy and may provide explanations for treatment failure and drug-induced neurotoxicity in patients with neoplastic meningitis.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid ceftazidime kinetics in patients with external ventriculostomies.

    PubMed Central

    Nau, R; Prange, H W; Kinzig, M; Frank, A; Dressel, A; Scholz, P; Kolenda, H; Sörgel, F

    1996-01-01

    Ceftazidime has proven to be effective for the treatment of bacterial meningitis caused by multiresistant gram-negative bacteria. Since nosocomial central nervous system infections are often accompanied by only a minor dysfunction of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier, patients with noninflammatory occlusive hydrocephalus who had undergone external ventriculostomy were studied (n = 8). Serum and CSF were drawn repeatedly after the administration of the first dose of ceftazidime (3 g over 30 min intravenously), and concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography by using UV detection. The concentrations of ceftazidime in CSF were maximal at 1 to 13 h (median, 5.5 h) after the end of the infusion and ranged from 0.73 to 2.80 mg/liter (median, 1.56 mg/liter). The elimination half-lives were 3.13 to 18.1 h (median, 10.7 h) in CSF compared with 2.02 to 5.24 h (median, 3.74 h) in serum. The ratios of the areas under the concentration-time curves in CSF and serum (AUCCSF/AUCS) ranged from 0.027 to 0.123 (median, 0.054). After the administration of a single dose of 3 g, the maximum concentrations of ceftazidime in CSF were approximately four times higher than those after the administration of 2-g intravenous doses of cefotaxime (median, 0.44 mg/liter) and ceftriaxone (median, 0.43 mg/liter) (R. Nau, H. W. Prange, P. Muth, G. Mahr, S. Menck, H. Kolenda, and F. Sörgel, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 37:1518-1524, 1993). The median AUCCSF/AUCS ratio of ceftazidime was slightly below that of cefotaxime (0.12), but it was 1 order of magnitude above the median AUCCSF/AUCS of ceftriaxone (0.007) (Nau et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 37:1518-1524, 1993). The concentrations of ceftazidime observed in CSF were above the MICs for most Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. However, they are probably not high enough to be rapidly bactericidal. For this reason, the daily dose should be increased to 12 g in cases of P. aeruginosa infections of the central nervous system when the blood-CSF barrier is minimally impaired. PMID:8851607

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Canine Cervical Spondylomyelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Vaquero, Paula; da Costa, Ronaldo C.; Allen, Matthew J.; Moore, Sarah A.; Keirsey, Jeremy K.; Green, Kari B.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Objective To identify proteins with differential expression in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 15 clinically normal (control) dogs and 15 dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM). Summary of Background Data Canine CSM is a spontaneous, chronic, compressive cervical myelopathy similar to human cervical spondylotic myelopathy. There is a limited knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying these conditions. Differentially expressed CSF proteins may contribute with novel information about the disease pathogenesis in both dogs and humans. Methods Protein separation was performed with two-dimensional electrophoresis. A Student’s t-test was used to detect significant differences between groups (P < 0.05). Three comparisons were made: 1) control versus CSM-affected dogs, 2) control versus non-corticosteroid treated CSM-affected dogs, and 3) non-corticosteroid treated CSM-affected versus corticosteroid treated CSM-affected dogs. Protein spots exhibiting at least a statistically significant 1.25-fold change between groups were selected for subsequent identification with capillary-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results A total of 96 spots had a significant average change of at least 1.25-fold in one of the three comparisons. Compared to the CSF of control dogs, CSM-affected dogs demonstrated increased CSF expression of eight proteins including vitamin D-binding protein, gelsolin, creatine kinase B-type, angiotensinogen, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, SPARC, calsyntenin-1, and complement C3, and decreased expression of pigment epithelium-derived factor, prostaglandin-H2 D-isomerase, apolipoprotein E, and clusterin. In the CSF of CSM-affected dogs, corticosteroid treatment increased the expression of haptoglobin, transthyretin isoform 2, cystatin C-like, apolipoprotein E, and clusterin, and decreased the expression of angiotensinogen, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, and gelsolin. Conclusions Many of the differentially expressed proteins are associated with damaged neural tissue, bone turnover, and/or compromised blood-spinal cord barrier. The knowledge of the protein changes that occur in CSM and upon corticosteroid treatment of CSM-affected patients will aid in further understanding the pathomechanisms underlying this disease. PMID:26030213

  4. Agents of equine viral encephalomyelitis: correlation of serum and cerebrospinal fluid antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Keane, D P; Little, P B; Wilkie, B N; Artsob, H; Thorsen, J

    1988-01-01

    A survey was conducted by testing 115 paired equine serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples by hemagglutination-inhibition for antibodies to Powassan and snowshoe hare viruses, and by virus neutralization for antibodies to equine herpesvirus type 1. Twenty-five samples were from horses with spontaneous neurological disease and the remainder from horses euthanized because of various nonneurological disorders. All sera and cerebrospinal fluids were negative for antibodies to Powassan virus. Fifty-one sera (44.3%) and 15 cerebrospinal fluids (13.0%) had antibodies to snowshoe hare virus. Ninety-eight sera (85.2%) and four cerebrospinal fluids (3.5%) were positive for antibodies to equine herpesvirus type 1. Powassan virus was inoculated intracerebrally into one, and intravenously into four ponies. Neurological signs associated with a nonsuppurative encephalomyelitis occurred in three ponies. Antibodies to Powassan virus were detected in sera of all animals but in cerebrospinal fluids of only two. Powassan virus was isolated from brain and spinal cord of only the intracerebrally inoculated animal. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2836046

  5. Mammalian embryonic cerebrospinal fluid proteome has greater apolipoprotein and enzyme pattern complexity than the avian proteome.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Bueno, David

    2005-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid, which has an essential role in the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. We identified and analyzed the proteome of Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid from rat embryos (Rattus norvegicus), which includes proteins involved in the regulation of Central Nervous System development. The comparison between mammalian and avian Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid proteomes reveals great similarity, but also greater complexity in some protein groups. The pattern of apolipoproteins and enzymes in CSF is more complex in the mammals than in birds. This difference may underlie the greater neural complexity and synaptic plasticity found in mammals. Fourteen Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid gene products were previously identified in adult human Cerebro-Spinal Fluid proteome, and interestingly they are altered in patients with neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis may contribute to our understanding of Central Nervous System development and evolution, and these human diseases. PMID:16335996

  6. Ultrasensitive Stain for Proteins in Polyacrylamide Gels Shows Regional Variation in Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merril, Carl R.; Goldman, David; Sedman, Sylvia A.; Ebert, Michael H.

    1981-03-01

    A new silver stain for electrophoretically separated polypeptides can be rapidly and easily used and can detect as little as 0.01 nanogram of protein per square millimeter. When employed with two-dimensional electrophoresis, it should permit qualitative and quantitative characterization of protein distributions in body fluids and tissues. It has been used to demonstrate regional variations in cerebrospinal fluid proteins.

  7. Altered cerebrospinal fluid neuropeptide Y and peptide YY immunoreactivity in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Kaye, W H; Berrettini, W; Gwirtsman, H; George, D T

    1990-06-01

    The related central nervous system peptides neuropeptide Y and peptide YY have been found to be among the most potent endogenous stimulants of feeding behavior. We measured these neuropeptides in cerebrospinal fluid to determine whether they contributed to the pathophysiologic characteristics of anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Cerebrospinal fluid neuropeptide Y concentrations were significantly elevated in underweight anorectic patients and in many of the anorectic patients studied at intervals after weight restoration. These levels normalized in long-term weight-restored anorectic patients who had a return of normal menstrual cycles. Increased neuropeptide Y activity may contribute to several characteristic disturbances in anorexia, including menstrual dysregulation. Cerebrospinal fluid peptide YY concentrations were significantly elevated in normal-weight bulimic patients abstinent from pathological eating behavior for a month compared with themselves when actively bingeing and vomiting or compared with healthy volunteers. Increased peptide YY activity may contribute to a drive to overfeed in normal-weight bulimic patients. PMID:2350207

  8. Antibodies Against Equine Herpesvirus 1 in the Cerebrospinal Fluid in the Horse

    PubMed Central

    Blythe, Linda L.; Mattson, Donald E.; Lassen, E. Duane; Craig, A. Morrie

    1985-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies against equine herpesvirus 1 were measured in serum and cerebrospinal fluid of 16 horses and ponies from a closed herd both before and after vaccination with modified live equine herpesvirus 1. These titers were also measured in 22 neurologically normal and 15 neurologically abnormal horses at a teaching hospital. Animals from the closed herd had prevaccination serum titers up to 1:8 and postvaccination serum titers up to 1:128. Horses from the teaching hospital had serum titers up to 1:64. Cerebrospinal fluid titers were not detected in the vaccinated horses or the neurologically normal horses but a low titer (1:8) was noted in one neurologically abnormal horse. This titer probably resulted from hemorrhage into the cerebrospinal fluid following trauma. PMID:17422553

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    See Rabinovici (doi:10.1093/brain/aww025) for a scientific commentary on this article. Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET during preclinical stages of Alzheimer’s disease. We included 437 non-demented subjects from the prospective, longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. All underwent 18F-florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 analysis at baseline and at least one additional positron emission tomography after a mean follow-up of 2.1 years (range 1.1–4.4 years). Group classifications were based on normal and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography results at baseline. We found that cases with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and normal positron emission tomography at baseline accumulated amyloid with a mean rate of 1.2%/year, which was similar to the rate in cases with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (1.2%/year, P = 0.86). The mean accumulation rate of those with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid was more than three times that of those with both normal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (0.35%/year, P = 0.018). The group differences were similar when analysing yearly change in standardized uptake value ratio of florbetapir instead of percentage change. Those with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography deteriorated more in memory and hippocampal volume compared with the other groups (P < 0.001), indicating that they were closer to Alzheimer’s disease dementia. The results were replicated after adjustments of different factors and when using different cut-offs for amyloid-β abnormality including a positron emission tomography classification based on the florbetapir uptake in regions where the initial amyloid-β accumulation occurs in Alzheimer’s disease. This is the first study to show that individuals who have abnormal cerebrospinal amyloid-β42 but normal amyloid-β positron emission tomography have an increased cortical amyloid-β accumulation rate similar to those with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography and higher rate than subjects where both modalities are normal. The results indicate that cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 becomes abnormal in the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease, before amyloid positron emission tomography and before neurodegeneration starts. PMID:26936941

  10. Petrous apex cephalocele presenting with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea in an adult.

    PubMed

    Warade, Abhijit G; Misra, Basant K

    2016-03-01

    Petrous apex cephalocele (PAC) is a rare condition with very few case reports in the literature. We report a 26-year-old man with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea that was misdiagnosed elsewhere and operated unsuccessfully via the endonasal route. CT cisternography revealed a 3mm right PAC for which he underwent a right subtemporal extradural approach and successful repair. We present what is to our knowledge the first case report in the literature of an adult presenting with cerebrospinal fluid leak and discuss the diagnostic dilemmas in the diagnosis of PAC, difficulties in management and review the available literature. PMID:26549681

  11. [Cerebrospinal fluid proteins in the course of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in children].

    PubMed

    Wyszkowki, J; Adamczyk, A; Kaciński, M

    1980-01-01

    In cerebrospinal fluid samples obtained from lumbar tap from 31 children with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis the concentration of total protein was determined and electrophoretic separation of protein fractions on paper was carried out from 1 to 28 months after the onset of first clinical symptoms. Moreover, in 22 children the concentration of IgG was determined by electroimmunodiffusion. The reference group included 22 children without organic diseases of the central nervous system. In nearly half the samples of the cerebrospinal fluid obtained from these children a rise was observed in total protein level, and in most samples a significant fall of albumin proportion and an evident rise of this relative proportion of globulins (tau + gamma) and IgG immunoglobulins was observed. No correlation was demonstrated between changes in cerebrospinal proteins and the phase of the disease and its duration. PMID:7393388

  12. Evaluation of postmortem drug concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid compared with blood and pericardial fluid.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Mariko; Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Inamori-Kawamoto, Osamu; Oritani, Shigeki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    In forensic toxicology, body fluids are important materials not only as alternatives to blood but also for investigation of postmortem drug redistributions and pharmaco-/toxicokinetic analysis; however, there are limited data on postmortem drug distributions in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The present study reviewed toxicological data of autopsy cases (n=103), in which drugs were detected in CSF using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), to investigate drug concentrations in CSF, compared with blood and pericardial fluid (PCF) concentrations. Oral/injected amphetamines (n=23) showed similar CSF and blood/PCF concentrations with partly lower CSF concentrations (about ×0.5-1.1). CSF concentrations of the venous anesthetic midazolam (n=7) were lower with poor correlations. Oral caffeine (n=15), acetaminophen (n=7), chlorpheniramine (n=6), dihydrocodeine (n=6), and phenobarbital (n=21) showed equivalent to lower CSF concentrations (about ×0.2-1.2), compared with blood and PCF concentrations; however, CSF phenobarbital concentrations were high in a fatal intoxication case. CSF concentrations of phenothiazine derivatives (n=29) were markedly lower (about ×0.1) than blood/PCF concentrations. The distribution of the local anesthetic lidocaine used in critical medical care (n=49) markedly varied by case. These findings suggest that CSF is useful in routine forensic toxicology as an alternative to blood as well as for investigating pharmaco-/toxicokinetics and postmortem redistributions. PMID:26218406

  13. Abnormal Expression of Cerebrospinal Fluid Cation Chloride Cotransporters in Patients with Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Sofia Temudo; Armstrong, Judith; Roche, Ana; Ortez, Carlos; Pérez, Ana; O’Callaghan, Maria del Mar; Pereira, Antonina; Sanmartí, Francesc; Ormazábal, Aida; Artuch, Rafael; Pineda, Mercedes; García-Cazorla, Angels

    2013-01-01

    Objective Rett Syndrome is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder caused mainly by mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2. The relevance of MeCP2 for GABAergic function was previously documented in animal models. In these models, animals show deficits in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. Neuronal Cation Chloride Cotransporters (CCCs) play a key role in GABAergic neuronal maturation, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor is implicated in the regulation of CCCs expression during development. Our aim was to analyse the expression of two relevant CCCs, NKCC1 and KCC2, in the cerebrospinal fluid of Rett syndrome patients and compare it with a normal control group. Methods The presence of bumetanide sensitive NKCC1 and KCC2 was analysed in cerebrospinal fluid samples from a control pediatric population (1 day to 14 years of life) and from Rett syndrome patients (2 to 19 years of life), by immunoblot analysis. Results Both proteins were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid and their levels are higher in the early postnatal period. However, Rett syndrome patients showed significantly reduced levels of KCC2 and KCC2/NKCC1 ratio when compared to the control group. Conclusions Reduced KCC2/NKCC1 ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid of Rett Syndrome patients suggests a disturbed process of GABAergic neuronal maturation and open up a new therapeutic perspective. PMID:23894354

  14. Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii Strain 5021_13, Isolated from Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Patil, Prashant P.; Midha, Samriti; Ray, Pallab

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 4.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii strain 5021_13, a cerebrospinal fluid isolate from northern India. This genome information will help studies toward understanding the epidemiology and pathogenicity of this important nosocomial pathogen. PMID:26472849

  15. Letter to the editor: Identification of Sarcocystis capracanis in cerebrospinal fluid from sheep with neurological disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent report (Formisano et al., 2013) identified clinical sacrocystosis in 2 adult sheep. The diagnosis relied primarily on characterization of DNA extracted from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and paraffin-embedded heart tissue. Parasites identified as merozoites were identified in CSF smears stained...

  16. Flow Cytometry To Assess Cerebrospinal Fluid Fungal Burden in Cryptococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Scriven, James E; Graham, Lisa M; Schutz, Charlotte; Scriba, Thomas J; Wilkinson, Robert J; Boulware, David R; Meintjes, Graeme; Lalloo, David G; Urban, Britta C

    2016-03-01

    Fungal burden in the cerebrospinal fluid is an important determinant of mortality in cryptococcal meningitis, but its use in aiding clinical decision making is hampered by the time involved to perform quantitative cultures. Here, we demonstrate the potential of flow cytometry as a novel and rapid technique to address this issue. PMID:26719441

  17. Flow Cytometry To Assess Cerebrospinal Fluid Fungal Burden in Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Lisa M.; Schutz, Charlotte; Scriba, Thomas J.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Boulware, David R.; Meintjes, Graeme; Lalloo, David G.; Urban, Britta C.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal burden in the cerebrospinal fluid is an important determinant of mortality in cryptococcal meningitis, but its use in aiding clinical decision making is hampered by the time involved to perform quantitative cultures. Here, we demonstrate the potential of flow cytometry as a novel and rapid technique to address this issue. PMID:26719441

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of central catecholamine deficiency in Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Holmes, Courtney; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2012-06-01

    Central catecholamine deficiency characterizes α-synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that cerebrospinal fluid levels of neuronal metabolites of catecholamines provide neurochemical biomarkers of these disorders. To test this hypothesis we measured cerebrospinal fluid levels of catechols including dopamine, norepinephrine and their main respective neuronal metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and dihydroxyphenylglycol in Parkinson's disease and two other synucleinopathies, multiple system atrophy and pure autonomic failure. Cerebrospinal fluid catechols were assayed in 146 subjects-108 synucleinopathy patients (34 Parkinson's disease, 54 multiple system atrophy, 20 pure autonomic failure) and 38 controls. In 14 patients cerebrospinal fluid was obtained before or within 2 years after the onset of parkinsonism. The Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and pure autonomic failure groups all had lower cerebrospinal fluid dihydroxyphenylacetic acid [0.86 ± 0.09 (SEM), 1.00 ± 0.09, 1.32 ± 0.12 nmol/l] than controls (2.15 ± 0.18 nmol/l; P < 0.0001; P < 0.0001; P = 0.0002). Dihydroxyphenylglycol was also lower in the three synucleinopathies (8.82 ± 0.44, 7.75 ± 0.42, 5.82 ± 0.65 nmol/l) than controls (11.0 ± 0.62 nmol/l; P = 0.009, P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001). Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid was lower and dihydroxyphenylglycol higher in Parkinson's disease than in pure autonomic failure. Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid was 100% sensitive at 89% specificity in separating patients with recent onset of parkinsonism from controls but was of no value in differentiating Parkinson's disease from multiple system atrophy. Synucleinopathies feature cerebrospinal fluid neurochemical evidence for central dopamine and norepinephrine deficiency. Parkinson's disease and pure autonomic failure involve differential dopaminergic versus noradrenergic lesions. Cerebrospinal fluid dihydroxyphenylacetic acid seems to provide a sensitive means to identify even early Parkinson's disease. PMID:22451506

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Vasospasm Enhances Endothelin Contraction in Rat Cerebral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Assenzio, Barbara; Martin, Erica L.; Stankevicius, Edgaras; Civiletti, Federica; Fontanella, Marco; Boccaletti, Riccardo; Berardino, Maurizio; Mazzeo, AnnaTeresa; Ducati, Alessandro; Simonsen, Ulf; Mascia, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have suggested that cerebrospinal fluid from patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) leads to pronounced vasoconstriction in isolated arteries. We hypothesized that only cerebrospinal fluid from SAH patients with vasospasm would produce an enhanced contractile response to endothelin-1 in rat cerebral arteries, involving both endothelin ETA and ETB receptors. Methods Intact rat basilar arteries were incubated for 24 hours with cerebrospinal fluid from 1) SAH patients with vasospasm, 2) SAH patients without vasospasm, and 3) control patients. Arterial segments with and without endothelium were mounted in myographs and concentration-response curves for endothelin-1 were constructed in the absence and presence of selective and combined ETA and ETB receptor antagonists. Endothelin concentrations in culture medium and receptor expression were measured. Results Compared to the other groups, the following was observed in arteries exposed to cerebrospinal fluid from patients with vasospasm: 1) larger contractions at lower endothelin concentrations (p<0.05); 2) the increased endothelin contraction was absent in arteries without endothelium; 3) higher levels of endothelin secretion in the culture medium (p<0.05); 4) there was expression of ETA receptors and new expression of ETB receptors was apparent; 5) reduction in the enhanced response to endothelin after ETB blockade in the low range and after ETA blockade in the high range of endothelin concentrations; 6) after combined ETA and ETB blockade a complete inhibition of endothelin contraction was observed. Conclusions Our experimental findings showed that in intact rat basilar arteries exposed to cerebrospinal fluid from patients with vasospasm endothelin contraction was enhanced in an endothelium-dependent manner and was blocked by combined ETA and ETB receptor antagonism. Therefore we suggest that combined blockade of both receptors may play a role in counteracting vasospasm in patients with SAH. PMID:25629621

  20. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid regulates neuroepithelial survival, proliferation, and neurogenesis in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Gato, Angel; Moro, J A; Alonso, M I; Bueno, D; De La Mano, A; Martín, C

    2005-05-01

    Early in development, the behavior of neuroepithelial cells is controlled by several factors, which act in a developmentally regulated manner. Diffusible factors are secreted locally by the neuroepithelium itself, although other nearby structures may also be involved. Evidence suggests a physiological role for the cerebrospinal fluid in the development of the brain. Here, using organotypic cultures of chick embryo neuroepithelial explants from the mesencephalon, we show that the neuroepithelium in vitro is not able to self-induce cell survival, replication, and neurogenesis. We also show that the embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) promotes neuroepithelial stem cell survival and induces proliferation and neurogenesis in mesencephalic explants. These data strongly suggest that E-CSF is involved in the regulation of neuroepithelial cells behavior, supporting the hypothesis that this fluid plays a key role during the early development of the central nervous system. PMID:15803475

  1. Antibody and Viral Nucleic Acid Testing of Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Eastern Equine Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, David C.; Howard, John J.; Oliver, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis diagnostic serum antibody can appear 6 days after the onset of symptoms, and its numbers can increase 4-fold in 4 days, arguing for early and frequent serum testing. In populations where cerebrospinal fluid viral nucleic acid testing sensitivity and specificity remain undetermined, cerebrospinal antibody testing should also be performed. PMID:26063852

  2. Effect of methylprednisolone on entry of ampicillin and gentamicin into cerebrospinal fluid in experimental pneumococcal and Escherichia coli meningitis.

    PubMed

    Scheld, W M; Brodeur, J P

    1983-01-01

    The influence of methylprednisolone on the passage of ampicillin and gentamicin into and activity within cerebrospinal fluid was examined in two models of experimental meningitis. Steroid pretreatment reduced the concentrations of these drugs in purulent cerebrospinal fluid of rabbits with experimental pneumococcal and Escherichia coli meningitis (P less than 0.05). However, the resultant mean concentrations of these antibiotics in cerebrospinal fluid still exceeded the minimal bactericidal concentrations of the infecting organisms. The rate of bactericidal effect in vivo was unaffected by steroid therapy in each model. Methylprednisolone did not have deleterious effects on the course of treated experimental meningitis under these short-term (24-h) experiments. PMID:6338816

  3. A Novel Unbiased Proteomic Approach to Detect the Reactivity of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Neurological Diseases*

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Krishnakumar N.; Steer, David L.; Short, Martin; Petratos, Steven; Smith, Ian; Bernard, Claude C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis represent global health issues. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to understand the pathogenesis of this and other central nervous system disorders, so that more effective therapeutics can be developed. Cerebrospinal fluid is a potential source of important reporter molecules released from various cell types as a result of central nervous system pathology. Here, we report the development of an unbiased approach for the detection of reactive cerebrospinal fluid molecules and target brain proteins from patients with multiple sclerosis. To help identify molecules that may serve as clinical biomarkers for multiple sclerosis, we have biotinylated proteins present in the cerebrospinal fluid and tested their reactivity against brain homogenate as well as myelin and myelin-axolemmal complexes. Proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, blotted onto membranes and probed separately with biotinylated unprocessed cerebrospinal fluid samples. Protein spots that reacted to two or more multiple sclerosis-cerebrospinal fluids were further analyzed by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In addition to previously reported proteins found in multiple sclerosis cerebrospinal fluid, such as αβ crystallin, enolase, and 14–3-3-protein, we have identified several additional molecules involved in mitochondrial and energy metabolism, myelin gene expression and/or cytoskeletal organization. These include aspartate aminotransferase, cyclophilin-A, quaking protein, collapsin response mediator protein-2, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1, and cofilin. To further validate these findings, the cellular expression pattern of collapsin response mediator protein-2 and ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 were investigated in human chronic-active MS lesions by immunohistochemistry. The observation that in multiple sclerosis lesions phosphorylated collapsin response mediator protein-2 was increased, whereas Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 was down-regulated, not only highlights the importance of these molecules in the pathology of this disease, but also illustrates the use of our approach in attempting to decipher the complex pathological processes leading to multiple sclerosis and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21421798

  4. Cytokine network analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hornig, M; Gottschalk, G; Peterson, D L; Knox, K K; Schultz, A F; Eddy, M L; Che, X; Lipkin, W I

    2016-02-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome is an unexplained debilitating disorder that is frequently associated with cognitive and motor dysfunction. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid from 32 cases, 40 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 19 normal subjects frequency-matched for age and sex using a 51-plex cytokine assay. Group-specific differences were found for the majority of analytes with an increase in cases of CCL11 (eotaxin), a chemokine involved in eosinophil recruitment. Network analysis revealed an inverse relationship between interleukin 1 receptor antagonist and colony-stimulating factor 1, colony-stimulating factor 2 and interleukin 17F, without effects on interleukin 1α or interleukin 1β, suggesting a disturbance in interleukin 1 signaling. Our results indicate a markedly disturbed immune signature in the cerebrospinal fluid of cases that is consistent with immune activation in the central nervous system, and a shift toward an allergic or T helper type-2 pattern associated with autoimmunity. PMID:25824300

  5. Soluble Megalin is Reduced in Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples of Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Spuch, Carlos; Antequera, Desireé; Pascual, Consuelo; Abilleira, Soledad; Blanco, María; Moreno-Carretero, María José; Romero-López, Jesús; Ishida, Tetsuya; Molina, Jose Antonio; Villarejo, Alberto; Bermejo-Pareja, Felix; Carro, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Megalin or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, which has been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD) by clearing brain amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) across the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier at the choroid plexus. Here, we found a soluble form of megalin secreted from choroid plexus epithelial cells. Soluble megalin levels were also localized in the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), being reduced in AD patients. We have also shown that soluble megalin binding to Aβ is decreased in the CSF of AD patients, suggesting that decreased sequestration of Aβ in the CSF could be associated with defective clearance of Aβ and an increase of brain Aβ levels. Thus, therapies, which increase megalin expression, at the choroid plexus and/or enhance circulating soluble megalin hold potential to control brain Aβ-related pathologies in AD. PMID:25926771

  6. Soluble Megalin is Reduced in Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples of Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Spuch, Carlos; Antequera, Desireé; Pascual, Consuelo; Abilleira, Soledad; Blanco, María; Moreno-Carretero, María José; Romero-López, Jesús; Ishida, Tetsuya; Molina, Jose Antonio; Villarejo, Alberto; Bermejo-Pareja, Felix; Carro, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Megalin or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, which has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by clearing brain amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) across the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier at the choroid plexus. Here, we found a soluble form of megalin secreted from choroid plexus epithelial cells. Soluble megalin levels were also localized in the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), being reduced in AD patients. We have also shown that soluble megalin binding to Aβ is decreased in the CSF of AD patients, suggesting that decreased sequestration of Aβ in the CSF could be associated with defective clearance of Aβ and an increase of brain Aβ levels. Thus, therapies, which increase megalin expression, at the choroid plexus and/or enhance circulating soluble megalin hold potential to control brain Aβ-related pathologies in AD. PMID:25926771

  7. The significance of the cerebrospinal fluid examination in the management of chlorpropamide-induced hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Kaplinsky, N; Frankl, O

    1980-01-01

    Chlorpropamide-induced hypoglycemia is often overlooked, misdiagnosed, and mistreated, because of the atypical, insidious, and intermittent clinical picture and because of the normal serum glucose level in some of the patients when arriving at the hospital. These facts are demonstrated in three case reports. Since the correction of low glucose levels in the cerebrospinal fluid occurs hours after its correction in the serum, examining and at times following the cerebrospinal fluid glucose levels in patients with chlorpropamide-induced neuroglycopenia will enable physicians to diagnose and cure more patients. A high index of suspicion should exist in the presence of any atypical encephalopathy, mainly in the elderly diabetic patient treated with chlorpropamide and suffering from impaired cerebral, hepatic, or renal function. By suspecting and identifying neuroglycopenia, disabling residual deficits and even death could eventually be prevented. PMID:7389545

  8. Value of cerebrospinal fluid ?-synuclein species as biomarker in Parkinson's diagnosis and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Parnetti, Lucilla; Cicognola, Claudia; Eusebi, Paolo; Chiasserini, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Since diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) is mostly based on clinical criteria, it is almost impossible to formulate an early diagnosis, as well as a timely differential diagnosis versus other parkinsonisms. A great effort in searching reliable biomarkers both for early diagnosis and prognosis in PD is currently ongoing. Cerebrospinal fluid has been widely investigated as potential source for such biomarkers, with particular emphasis on ?-synuclein (?-syn) species. We reviewed all the clinical studies carried out so far on cerebrospinal fluid quantification of ?-syn species in PD. Current evidence supports the value of total and oligomeric ?-syn in PD diagnosis and in the differential diagnosis of PD and other parkinsonisms. Conversely, the role of ?-syn species in PD prognosis remains unsatisfactory. PMID:26643452

  9. Factors Influencing the Measurement of Lysosomal Enzymes Activity in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Parnetti, Lucilla; Eusebi, Paolo; Paciotti, Silvia; De Carlo, Claudia; Codini, Michela; Tambasco, Nicola; Rossi, Aroldo; Agnaf, Omar M. El.; Calabresi, Paolo; Beccari, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the activities of lysosomal enzymes in cerebrospinal fluid have recently been proposed as putative biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. To define the operating procedures useful for ensuring the reliability of these measurements, we analyzed several pre-analytical factors that may influence the activity of β-glucocerebrosidase, α-mannosidase, β-mannosidase, β-galactosidase, α-fucosidase, β-hexosaminidase, cathepsin D and cathepsin E in cerebrospinal fluid. Lysosomal enzyme activities were measured by well-established fluorimetric assays in a consecutive series of patients (n = 28) with different neurological conditions, including Parkinson's disease. The precision, pre-storage and storage conditions, and freeze/thaw cycles were evaluated. All of the assays showed within- and between-run variabilities below 10%. At −20°C, only cathepsin D was stable up to 40 weeks. At −80°C, the cathepsin D, cathepsin E, and β-mannosidase activities did not change significantly up to 40 weeks, while β-glucocerebrosidase activity was stable up to 32 weeks. The β-galactosidase and α-fucosidase activities significantly increased (+54.9±38.08% after 4 weeks and +88.94±36.19% after 16 weeks, respectively). Up to four freeze/thaw cycles did not significantly affect the activities of cathepsins D and E. The β-glucocerebrosidase activity showed a slight decrease (−14.6%) after two freeze/thaw cycles. The measurement of lysosomal enzyme activities in cerebrospinal fluid is reliable and reproducible if pre-analytical factors are accurately taken into consideration. Therefore, the analytical recommendations that ensue from this study may contribute to the establishment of actual values for the activities of cerebrospinal fluid lysosomal enzymes as putative biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24983953

  10. Factors influencing the measurement of lysosomal enzymes activity in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Persichetti, Emanuele; Chiasserini, Davide; Parnetti, Lucilla; Eusebi, Paolo; Paciotti, Silvia; De Carlo, Claudia; Codini, Michela; Tambasco, Nicola; Rossi, Aroldo; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; El Agnaf, Omar M; Calabresi, Paolo; Beccari, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the activities of lysosomal enzymes in cerebrospinal fluid have recently been proposed as putative biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. To define the operating procedures useful for ensuring the reliability of these measurements, we analyzed several pre-analytical factors that may influence the activity of β-glucocerebrosidase, α-mannosidase, β-mannosidase, β-galactosidase, α-fucosidase, β-hexosaminidase, cathepsin D and cathepsin E in cerebrospinal fluid. Lysosomal enzyme activities were measured by well-established fluorimetric assays in a consecutive series of patients (n = 28) with different neurological conditions, including Parkinson's disease. The precision, pre-storage and storage conditions, and freeze/thaw cycles were evaluated. All of the assays showed within- and between-run variabilities below 10%. At -20°C, only cathepsin D was stable up to 40 weeks. At -80°C, the cathepsin D, cathepsin E, and β-mannosidase activities did not change significantly up to 40 weeks, while β-glucocerebrosidase activity was stable up to 32 weeks. The β-galactosidase and α-fucosidase activities significantly increased (+54.9±38.08% after 4 weeks and +88.94±36.19% after 16 weeks, respectively). Up to four freeze/thaw cycles did not significantly affect the activities of cathepsins D and E. The β-glucocerebrosidase activity showed a slight decrease (-14.6%) after two freeze/thaw cycles. The measurement of lysosomal enzyme activities in cerebrospinal fluid is reliable and reproducible if pre-analytical factors are accurately taken into consideration. Therefore, the analytical recommendations that ensue from this study may contribute to the establishment of actual values for the activities of cerebrospinal fluid lysosomal enzymes as putative biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24983953

  11. Development of a theoretical framework for analyzing cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Benjamin; Voorhees, Abram; Vedel, Søren; Wei, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Background To date hydrocephalus researchers acknowledge the need for rigorous but utilitarian fluid mechanics understanding and methodologies in studying normal and hydrocephalic intracranial dynamics. Pressure volume models and electric circuit analogs introduced pressure into volume conservation; but control volume analysis enforces independent conditions on pressure and volume. Previously, utilization of clinical measurements has been limited to understanding of the relative amplitude and timing of flow, volume and pressure waveforms; qualitative approaches without a clear framework for meaningful quantitative comparison. Methods Control volume analysis is presented to introduce the reader to the theoretical background of this foundational fluid mechanics technique for application to general control volumes. This approach is able to directly incorporate the diverse measurements obtained by clinicians to better elucidate intracranial dynamics and progression to disorder. Results Several examples of meaningful intracranial control volumes and the particular measurement sets needed for the analysis are discussed. Conclusion Control volume analysis provides a framework to guide the type and location of measurements and also a way to interpret the resulting data within a fundamental fluid physics analysis. PMID:19772652

  12. High accuracy (stable isotope dilution) measurements of lead in serum and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Manton, W I; Cook, J D

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of lead in blood, serum, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine was measured in patients with neurological disease and in control subjects including cases of plumbism. A plot of blood lead versus serum lead resembles the familiar curves of blood lead versus either free erythrocyte porphyrin or urinary delta-aminolaevulinic acid in that serum lead is constant up to a blood lead concentration of 40 micrograms/dl (2 mumol/l) and rises steeply thereafter. The serum lead concentrations yield renal clearances in the range 5-22 ml/min in agreement with values obtained with radiolead on man and predicted from animal studies. The lead content of cerebrospinal fluid is consistently less than that of serum, averaging 50% of the serum concentration for blood leads of less than 20 micrograms/dl (1 mumol/l) but rising to 80-90% in cases of plumbism. Patients with motor neurone disease could not be distinguished from those with other neurological diseases on the basis of the lead content of their serum or cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:6378251

  13. Differential proteomics analysis of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinsons disease

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lifei; Wang, Dongtao; Wang, Lihong; Lan, Wenjie; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    Parkinsons disease (PD) is one common neurodegenerative disease featured with degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra. Multiple factors participate in the pathogenesis and progression of PD. In this study, we investigated the proteomics profiles of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluids from both PD patients and normal people, in order to explore the correlation between disease factors and PD. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from both PD and normal people and were separated for mononuclear cells in vitro. Proteins were then extracted and separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteins with differential expressions were identified by comparison to standard proteome expression profile map, followed by software and database analysis. In PD patients, there were 8 proteins with consistent expression profile and 16 proteins with differential expressions. Those differential proteins identified include cytoskeleton proteins (actin, myosin), signal transduction proteins (adenosine cyclase binding protein 1, calcium binding protein, talin) and anti-oxidation factor (thioredoxin peroxide reductase). PD patients had differential protein expressional profiles in the mononuclear cells of cerebrospinal fluids compared to normal people, suggesting the potential involvement of cytoskeleton and signal transduction proteins in apoptosis of neuronal apoptosis and PD pathogenesis. PMID:26823915

  14. Stasis dermatitis and ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    Stasis dermatitis is a change in the skin that occurs when blood collects (pools) in the veins of the ... heart. Some people with venous insufficiency develop stasis dermatitis. Blood pools in the veins of the lower ...

  15. Application of Control Volume Analysis to Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Cohen, Benjamin; Anor, Tomer; Madsen, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is among the most common birth defects and may not be prevented nor cured. Afflicted individuals face serious issues, which at present are too complicated and not well enough understood to treat via systematic therapies. This talk outlines the framework and application of a control volume methodology to clinical Phase Contrast MRI data. Specifically, integral control volume analysis utilizes a fundamental, fluid dynamics methodology to quantify intracranial dynamics within a precise, direct, and physically meaningful framework. A chronically shunted, hydrocephalic patient in need of a revision procedure was used as an in vivo case study. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements within the patient's aqueduct were obtained in four biomedical state and were analyzed using the methods presented in this dissertation. Pressure force estimates were obtained, showing distinct differences in amplitude, phase, and waveform shape for different intracranial states within the same individual. Thoughts on the physiological and diagnostic research and development implications/opportunities will be presented.

  16. Estimation of post-mortem interval: A comparison between cerebrospinal fluid and vitreous humour chemistry.

    PubMed

    Swain, Rajanikanta; Kumar, Adarsh; Sahoo, Jyotiranjan; Lakshmy, R; Gupta, S K; Bhardwaj, D N; Pandey, R M

    2015-11-01

    Accurate estimation of post-mortem interval is of great importance in medico-legal autopsy cases. The present study is intended to compare the accuracy of estimating post-mortem interval from biochemical parameters of vitreous humour and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Both the fluids were collected from 100 medico-legal autopsies with known time of death and analysed for potassium, glucose, sodium, calcium, urea and creatinine. The current study found that vitreous humour is a better fluid in comparison to CSF for estimation of post-mortem interval. It is also observed that among the statistically significant parameters in both the fluids, level of potassium and sodium in vitreous humour are giving more accurate results in comparison to their corresponding parameters in CSF while accuracy of glucose is more or less same in both the fluid. Nevertheless potassium concentration in vitreous humour is a single best time honoured parameter to estimate post-mortem interval. PMID:26454503

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood Biomarkers of Neuroaxonal Damage in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dujmovic, Irena

    2011-01-01

    Following emerging evidence that neurodegenerative processes in multiple sclerosis (MS) are present from its early stages, an intensive scientific interest has been directed to biomarkers of neuro-axonal damage in body fluids of MS patients. Recent research has introduced new candidate biomarkers but also elucidated pathogenetic and clinical relevance of the well-known ones. This paper reviews the existing data on blood and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neuroaxonal damage in MS and highlights their relation to clinical parameters, as well as their potential predictive value to estimate future disease course, disability, and treatment response. Strategies for future research in this field are suggested. PMID:22096642

  18. Development and functions of the choroid plexus–cerebrospinal fluid system

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Melody P.; Monuki, Edwin S.; Lehtinen, Maria K.

    2015-01-01

    The choroid plexus (ChP) is the principal source of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which has accepted roles as a fluid cushion and a sink for nervous system waste in vertebrates. Various animal models have provided insight into how the ChP–CSF system develops and matures. In addition, recent studies have uncovered new, active roles for this dynamic system in the regulation of neural stem cells, critical periods and the overall health of the nervous system. Together, these findings have brought about a paradigm shift in our understanding of brain development and health, and have stimulated new initiatives for the treatment of neurological disease. PMID:26174708

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypernatremia Elevates Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Blood Pressure via the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Sean D; Lang, Susan M; Simmonds, Sarah S; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2015-12-01

    Elevated NaCl concentrations of the cerebrospinal fluid increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in salt-sensitive hypertension. Neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a pivotal role in the regulation of SNA and receive mono- or polysynaptic inputs from several hypothalamic structures responsive to hypernatremia. Therefore, the present study investigated the contribution of RVLM neurons to the SNA and pressor response to cerebrospinal fluid hypernatremia. Lateral ventricle infusion of 0.15 mol/L, 0.6 mol/L, and 1.0 mol/L NaCl (5 µL/10 minutes) produced concentration-dependent increases in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure, despite no change in splanchnic SNA and a decrease in renal SNA. Ganglionic blockade with chlorisondamine or acute lesion of the lamina terminalis blocked or significantly attenuated these responses, respectively. RVLM microinjection of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) agonist muscimol abolished the sympathoexcitatory response to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl. Furthermore, blockade of ionotropic glutamate, but not angiotensin II type 1, receptors significantly attenuated the increase in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure. Finally, single-unit recordings of spinally projecting RVLM neurons revealed 3 distinct populations based on discharge responses to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl: type I excited (46%; 11/24), type II inhibited (37%; 9/24), and type III no change (17%; 4/24). All neurons with slow conduction velocities were type I cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that acute increases in cerebrospinal fluid NaCl concentrations selectively activate a discrete population of RVLM neurons through glutamate receptor activation to increase SNA and arterial blood pressure. PMID:26416846

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum cytokine profiles in narcolepsy with cataplexy: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jaussent, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Scholz, Sabine; Bayard, Sophie; Cristol, Jean Paul; Blain, Hubert; Dupuy, Anne-Marie

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide strong support that narcolepsy-cataplexy is an immune-mediated disease. Only few serum cytokine studies with controversial results were performed in narcolepsy and none in the cerebrospinal fluid. We measured a panel of 12 cytokines by a proteomic approach in the serum of 35 patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to 156 healthy controls, and in the cerebrospinal fluid of 34 patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to 17 non-narcoleptic patients; and analyzed the effect of age, duration and severity of disease on the cytokine levels. After multiple adjustments we reported lower serum IL-2, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1 and EGF levels, and a tendency for higher IL-4 level in narcolepsy compared to controls. Significant differences were only found for IL-4 in cerebrospinal fluid, being higher in narcolepsy. Positive correlations were found in serum between IL-4, daytime sleepiness, and cataplexy frequency. The expression of some pro-inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, VEGF, EGF, IL2, IL-1β, IFN-γ) in either serum or CSF was negatively correlated with disease severity and duration. No correlation was found for any specific cytokine in 18 of the patients with narcolepsy with peripheral and central samples collected the same day. Significant decreased pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine profiles were found at peripheral and central levels in narcolepsy, together with a T helper 2/Th1 serum cytokine secretion imbalance. To conclude, we showed some evidence for alterations in the cytokine profile in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to controls at peripheral and central levels, with the potential role of IL-4 and significant Th1/2 imbalance in the pathophysiology of narcolepsy. PMID:24394344

  1. Level of nutrition affects leptin concentrations in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid in sheep.

    PubMed

    Blache, D; Tellam, R L; Chagas, L M; Blackberry, M A; Vercoe, P E; Martin, G B

    2000-06-01

    In mature male sheep, the level of nutrition acutely influences the secretion of reproductive hormones. The mechanism involved is not fully understood but findings in humans and laboratory rodents would suggest a major role for leptin that is secreted from adipose tissue and then travels via the circulation to the central nervous system. Before we can begin to test this hypothesis, we need to be able to measure leptin concentrations in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid. We have therefore developed a radioimmunoassay using antibodies raised against biologically active recombinant bovine-ovine leptin. Using this assay, we found that plasma concentrations of leptin were highly correlated to back-fat thickness and to the ratio of back-fat thickness to liveweight, in female and castrated male sheep. Plasma concentrations of leptin were higher in female sheep than in castrated or intact male sheep. Serial samples (every 5 min) suggested that the secretion of leptin in male sheep is episodic but it does not appear to show clear pulsatility, increases post-prandially, or a diurnal rhythm. Leptin concentrations in both plasma and cerebrospinal fluid increased within 5 days in male sheep fed a diet with a high content of energy and protein that also stimulates the secretion of LH pulses. These data suggest that in sheep, as in other species, leptin production is correlated with the mass of adipose tissue and that the hormone passes from the circulation to the cerebrospinal fluid and then to hypothalamic sites. There, it may affect appetite and perhaps GnRH secretion. The role of leptin in the link between nutrition and reproduction needs further investigation. PMID:10828846

  2. The clinical use of cerebrospinal fluid studies in demyelinating neurological diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, M. G.; Kennedy, P. G.

    1987-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of definite multiple sclerosis is supported by abnormalities in the cerebrospinal fluid: variable mild pleocytosis and elevation of total protein, moderately elevated total IgG in most patients, and the almost invariable presence of discrete immunoglobulins after electrophoresis, the oligoclonal bands. The oligoclonal bands are non-specific, and are seen in most diseases of the nervous system, but their temporal uniformity in each patient with multiple sclerosis is characteristic. Prognostically, patients with a single episode of optic neuritis or paraesthesia who have oligoclonal bands are more likely to develop multiple sclerosis than if the spinal fluid were normal. In the Guillain-Barré syndrome, the spinal fluid total protein is transiently elevated, with no pleocytosis. Oligoclonal bands are usually found in the acute phase and only persist in those patients with chronic or relapsing polyneuropathy. Images Figure 1 PMID:3328189

  3. Clearance from cerebrospinal fluid of intrathecally administered beta-endorphin in monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.C.; Burns, R.S.; Dubois, M.; Cohen, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    Five adult male monkeys (Macaca mulatta) weighing 7.1-9.9 kg were given synthetic human beta-endorphin (800 micrograms) and (/sup 14/C)methoxy-inulin (50 microCi) in 400 microliters of normal saline intrathecally. Serial samples of cerebrospinal fluid were drawn through a previously positioned indwelling spinal catheter and were assayed for concentrations of beta-endorphin (determined by radioimmunoassay) and inulin (determined by liquid scintillation counter). Spinal fluid concentrations of beta-endorphin and inulin peaked and declined in a parallel manner. The clearance ratio (calculated from the reciprocal of the ratio of the areas under the respective curves of elimination of the two species) remained remarkably similar from animal to animal, giving a mean value of 1.060 +/- 0.090 (SEM). This ratio, being near unity, suggests that beta-endorphin is eliminated from spinal fluid in a fashion similar to that of inulin, which is removed exclusively by bulk absorption.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Technologies for Quantifying Extracellular Vesicles (EVs) in Clinical Cerebrospinal Fluids (CSF)

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Johnny C.; Ramakrishnan, Valya; Nolan, John P.; Duggan, Erika; Fu, Chia-Chun; Hochberg, Fred H.; Chen, Clark C.; Carter, Bob S.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have emerged as a promising biomarker platform for glioblastoma patients. However, the optimal method for quantitative assessment of EVs in clinical bio-fluid remains a point of contention. Multiple high-resolution platforms for quantitative EV analysis have emerged, including methods grounded in diffraction measurement of Brownian motion (NTA), tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS), vesicle flow cytometry (VFC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Here we compared quantitative EV assessment using cerebrospinal fluids derived from glioblastoma patients using these methods. For EVs <150 nm in diameter, NTA detected more EVs than TRPS in three of the four samples tested. VFC particle counts are consistently 2–3 fold lower than NTA and TRPS, suggesting contribution of protein aggregates or other non-lipid particles to particle count by these platforms. While TEM yield meaningful data in terms of the morphology, its particle count are consistently two orders of magnitude lower relative to counts generated by NTA and TRPS. For larger particles (>150 nm in diameter), NTA consistently detected lower number of EVs relative to TRPS. These results unveil the strength and pitfalls of each quantitative method alone for assessing EVs derived from clinical cerebrospinal fluids and suggest that thoughtful synthesis of multi-platform quantitation will be required to guide meaningful clinical investigations. PMID:26901428

  5. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vecsei, L.; Csala, B.; Widerloev, E.E.; Ekman, R.; Czopf, J.; Palffy, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were investigated by use of radioimmunoassay in patients suffering from chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The somatostatin level was significantly decreased in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis compared to the control group. The magnitude of this change was more pronounced in patients with severe clinical symptoms of the illness. The CSF neuropeptide Y concentration did not differ from the control values. These findings suggest a selective involvement of somatostatin neurotransmission in multiple sclerosis.

  6. Levels of enolase and other enzymes in the cerebrospinal fluid as indices of pathological change

    PubMed Central

    Royds, Janice A; Timperley, Walter R; Taylor, Christopher B

    1981-01-01

    The activities of enolase, aldolase, pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine phosphokinase were measured in cerebrospinal fluid of 121 patients presenting with a range of disorders of the central nervous system. The results from 41 patients undergoing myelography were used as controls. An assessment was made of the relative merits of these five enzymes as markers of brain damage with special reference to brain tumours. Enolase was the most sensitive marker of pathological change and was the only enzyme raised in the CSF of patients with low grade astrocytomas. PMID:7334408

  7. Non Invasive Microwave Sensor for the Detection of Lactic Acid in Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, J. H.; Mason, A.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.; Field, M.; Shackcloth, M.; Browning, P.

    2011-08-01

    This research involves the use of a low power microwave sensor for analysis of lactic acid in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), an indicator of neurological impairment during aortic aneurysm surgery which could provide the basis for improved treatment regimes and better quality of care with more efficient use of resources. This paper presents initial work using standard lactate curves in water followed by lactate in "synthetic CSF". A multi-modal spectral signature has been defined for lactate, forming the basis for subsequent development of microwave sensor platform that is able to detect concentrations of lactic acid in CSF of volumes less than 1ml.

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Diagnosing Alzheimer's Disease in Clinical Practice: An Illustration with 3 Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Slats, Diane; Spies, Petra E.; Sjögren, Magnus J.C.; Verhey, Frans R.J.; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the brain specific biomarkers amyloid β42 (Aβ42) and total tau (t-tau) protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has a sensitivity and specificity of more than 85% for differentiating Alzheimer's Disease (AD) from non-demented controls. International guidelines are contradictory in their advice on the use of CSF biomarkers in AD diagnostics, resulting in a lack of consistency in clinical practice. We present three case reports that illustrate clinical practice according to the Dutch and European guidelines and portray the value of CSF biomarker analysis as an add-on diagnostic to the standard diagnostic workup for AD. PMID:20689628

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid from Alzheimer's Disease Patients Contains Fungal Proteins and DNA.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Rábano, Alberto; Rodal, Izaskun; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease is important for patient management and to assess the effectiveness of clinical intervention. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers constitute a powerful tool for diagnosis and monitoring disease progression. We have analyzed the presence of fungal proteins and DNA in CSF from AD patients. Our findings reveal that fungal proteins can be detected in CSF with different anti-fungal antibodies using a slot-blot assay. Additionally, amplification of fungal DNA by PCR followed by sequencing distinguished several fungal species. The possibility that these fungal macromolecules could represent AD biomarkers is discussed. PMID:26401766

  10. An evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal banding confirmed by immunofixation on agarose gel.

    PubMed Central

    George, P M; Lorier, M A; Donaldson, I M

    1983-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 115 consecutive patients undergoing diagnostic lumbar puncture or myelography was examined to determine the usefulness of immunofixation, following agarose gel electrophoresis, in the detection of oligoclonal IgG. All electrophoretic patterns were evaluated with and without immunofixation, and the interpretation of 9% of specimens was altered by immunofixation. The demonstration of oligoclonal IgG was shown to be more reliable in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis than other indices of intrathecal synthesis of IgG. It is concluded that immunofixation should be used routinely when examining CSF for oligoclonal banding. PMID:6875583

  11. [Cerebrospinal fluid pressure studies after the intravenous administration of the steroid narcotic, alphaxolone + alphadolone acetate (Althesin)].

    PubMed

    Ekhart, E; List, W F; Vadon, P; Oberbauer, R

    1979-09-30

    The effect of alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate on cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), mean arterial blood pressure (MPA), heart rate (BMP) and blood gases was investigated in 18 patients. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was calculated from the difference MAP minus CSFP. Alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate lowered the normal CSFP and normalized ketamin induced increase of CSFP. Premedication with alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate delayed the ketamin induced increase of CSFP, which returned to norm after a second dose of alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate. This effect was seen despite elevation of pCO2 in all patients breathing spontaneously. PMID:395762

  12. Silver staining of unconcentrated cerebrospinal fluid in agarose gel (Panagel) electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mehta, P D; Mehta, S P; Patrick, B A

    1984-05-01

    We subjected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 20 patients with multiple sclerosis and 20 patients with other neurological diseases to agarose gel ( Panagel ) electrophoresis followed by staining with silver. Ten microliters of unconcentrated CSF from multiple sclerosis patients containing 0.4 to 0.8 microgram of immunoglobulin G was found to be optimum for detection of oligoclonal IgG bands, so identified by immunofixation. The band patterns for unconcentrated CSF stained with silver were almost identical to those for the same CSF concentrated 40-fold and stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue. Silver staining thus enables the clinical laboratory to electrophorese unconcentrated CSF on commercially prepared ( Panagel ) plates. PMID:6201302

  13. The use of cerebrospinal fluid and neuropathologic studies in neuropsychiatry practice and research.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Kalyani; Irwin, David J

    2015-06-01

    The gold standard for diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases (ie, Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) is neuropathologic examination at autopsy. As such, laboratory studies play a central role in antemortem diagnosis of these conditions and their differentiation from the neuroinflammatory, infectious, toxic, and other nondegenerative etiologies (eg, rapidly progressive dementias) that are encountered in neuropsychiatric practice. This article summarizes the use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) laboratory studies in the diagnostic evaluation of dementia syndromes and emerging CSF biomarkers specific for underlying neuropathology in neurodegenerative disease research. PMID:25998118

  14. Cronobacter sakazakii DNA Detection in Cerebrospinal Fluid of a Patient with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Mimic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Piombo, Marianna; Chiarello, Daniela; Corbetto, Marzia; Di Pino, Giovanni; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Angeletti, Silvia; Riva, Elisabetta; De Florio, Lucia; Capone, Fioravante; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old male noticed progressive weakness of the right lower limb with gait disturbance. Over the following months, motor deficits worsened, spreading to the right upper limb. Electromyography showed active denervation in the upper and lower limb muscles. A diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was made. About 2 years after symptom onset, gradual improvement occurred. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis performed about 3 years after the beginning of symptoms identified Cronobacter sakazakii. Since no other possible causes were identified, we suggest that an almost completely reversible ALS-like syndrome had been triggered by Cronobacter infection in our immunocompetent patient. PMID:26955334

  15. A 34-Day-Old With Fever, Cerebrospinal Fluid Pleocytosis, and Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Horner, Kimberly; Yamada, Masaki; Zuccoli, Giulio; Rosenberg, Stacy; Greene, Stephanie; Vellody, Kishore; Zuckerbraun, Noel S

    2016-01-01

    A 34-day-old previously healthy boy born full term presented to the emergency department with fever at home (38.1C), fussiness, and decreased oral intake for 1 day. He was difficult to console at home. He had decreased oral intake without emesis, diarrhea, or a change in urine output. He did not have rhinorrhea, cough, or increased work of breathing noted by parents. He lived at home with his parents and 13-year-old brother, did not attend day care, and had no sick contacts. On examination, he was fussy but consolable. He was febrile to 39.3C, tachycardic (180 beats per minute), and tachypneic (64 breaths per minute), with mottling and a capillary refill of 3 seconds. The remainder of his examination was normal, without an infectious focus for his fever. A complete blood cell count with differential revealed leukocytosis. A basic metabolic panel was normal. A catheter urinalysis was normal. Cerebrospinal fluid examination yielded pleocytosis, low glucose, and elevated protein. Blood cultures were persistently positive with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, but cerebrospinal fluid cultures remained negative. We present his case, management, and ultimate diagnosis. PMID:26644490

  16. A Rare Case of Spontaneous Pneumocephalus Associated with Nontraumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Tarar, Omer; Syed, Amer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Spontaneous nontraumatic pneumocephalus (PNC) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are both very uncommon conditions. We report a rare case of spontaneous pneumocephalus associated with CSF leak secondary to right sphenoid sinus bony defect without history of trauma. Case Description. 51-year-old Hispanic female with past medical history of hypertension and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) presented to the emergency room complaining of headache and clear discharge from the right nostril. Physical examination was significant for right frontal sinus tenderness and clear discharge from right nostril. Computed Tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed moderate amount of extra-axial air within the right cerebral hemisphere indicative of pneumocephalus. CT scan of facial bones showed bony defect along the right sphenoid sinus with abnormal CSF collection. The patient was started on intravenous antibiotics for meningitis prophylaxis and subsequently underwent transsphenoidal repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak with abdominal fat graft. CSF rhinorrhea stopped completely after the surgery with near complete resolution of pneumocephalus before discharge. Conclusions. Early identification of pneumocephalus and surgical intervention can help decrease the morbidity and avoid possible complications. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, although rare, can lead to CSF leak and pneumocepahlus.

  17. Multicommutated flow analysis system for determination of total protein in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Strzelak, Kamil; Wiśniewska, Agnieszka; Bobilewicz, Dagna; Koncki, Robert

    2014-10-01

    A fully mechanized, computer-controlled, multicommutated flow analysis (MCFA) system dedicated for total protein determination in cerebrospinal fluid samples has been developed. For the protein determination the Exton method has been applied. Dedicated turbidimetric and nephelometric flow-through detectors operating according to paired-emitter detector diode principle have been fabricated by integration of two or three respective light emitting diodes. The developed MCFA system is characterized by robust, compact design and low consumption of the sample (72 μ L). The limits of detection for turbidimetric and nephelometric detection mode are 65 mg L(-1) and 9 mg L(-1), respectively. For turbidimetric measurements the range of linear response offered by the MCFA system is 72-900 mg L(-1), whereas in the case of nephelometric detection 18-500 mg L(-1) linear range is obtained. The throughput of the MCFA system is over 30 injection per hour. The analytical system was optimized with bovine serum albumin standards and successfully validated with real samples of human cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:25059127

  18. GWAS of cerebrospinal fluid tau levels identifies risk variants for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Kauwe, John S K; Harari, Oscar; Jin, Sheng Chih; Cai, Yefei; Karch, Celeste M; Benitez, Bruno A; Jeng, Amanda T; Skorupa, Tara; Carrell, David; Bertelsen, Sarah; Bailey, Matthew; McKean, David; Shulman, Joshua M; De Jager, Philip L; Chibnik, Lori; Bennett, David A; Arnold, Steve E; Harold, Denise; Sims, Rebecca; Gerrish, Amy; Williams, Julie; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Peskind, Elaine R; Galasko, Douglas; Fagan, Anne M; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Goate, Alison M

    2013-04-24

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau, tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (ptau), and Aβ₄₂ are established biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and have been used as quantitative traits for genetic analyses. We performed the largest genome-wide association study for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau/ptau levels published to date (n = 1,269), identifying three genome-wide significant loci for CSF tau and ptau: rs9877502 (p = 4.89 × 10⁻⁹ for tau) located at 3q28 between GEMC1 and OSTN, rs514716 (p = 1.07 × 10⁻⁸ and p = 3.22 × 10⁻⁹ for tau and ptau, respectively), located at 9p24.2 within GLIS3 and rs6922617 (p = 3.58 × 10⁻⁸ for CSF ptau) at 6p21.1 within the TREM gene cluster, a region recently reported to harbor rare variants that increase AD risk. In independent data sets, rs9877502 showed a strong association with risk for AD, tangle pathology, and global cognitive decline (p = 2.67 × 10⁻⁴, 0.039, 4.86 × 10⁻⁵, respectively) illustrating how this endophenotype-based approach can be used to identify new AD risk loci. PMID:23562540

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid prohormone processing and neuropeptides stimulating feed intake of dairy cows during early lactation.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, Björn; Laeger, Thomas; Husi, Holger; Mullen, William

    2015-02-01

    After parturition, feed intake of dairy cows increases within the first weeks of lactation, but the molecular mechanisms stimulating or delaying the slope of increase are poorly understood. Some of the molecules controlling feed intake are neuropeptides that are synthesized as propeptides and subsequently processed before they bind to specific receptors in feeding centers of the brain. Cerebrospinal fluid surrounds most of the feed intake regulatory centers and contains numerous neuropeptides. In the present study, we used a proteomic approach to analyze the neuropeptide concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid taken from dairy cows between day -18 and -10, and between day +10 and +20 relative to parturition. We found 13 proteins which were only present in samples taken before parturition, 13 proteins which were only present in samples taken after parturition, and 25 proteins which were commonly present, before and after parturition. Among them, differences in pro-neuropeptide Y, proenkephalin-A, neuroendocrine convertase-2, neurosecretory protein VGF, chromogranin-A, and secretogranin-1 and -3 concentrations relative to parturition highlight propeptides and prohormone processings involved in the control of feed intake and energy homeostasis. Scaffold analysis further emphasized an increased tone of endogenous opioids associated with the postparturient increase of feed intake. PMID:25547169

  20. The choroid plexus-cerebrospinal fluid interface in Alzheimer's disease: more than just a barrier

    PubMed Central

    Balusu, Sriram; Brkic, Marjana; Libert, Claude; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E.

    2016-01-01

    The choroid plexus is a complex structure which hangs inside the ventricles of the brain and consists mainly of choroid plexus epithelial (CPE) cells surrounding fenestrated capillaries. These CPE cells not only form an anatomical barrier, called the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), but also present an active interface between blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CPE cells perform indispensable functions for the development, maintenance and functioning of the brain. Indeed, the primary role of the choroid plexus in the brain is to maintain homeostasis by secreting CSF which contains different molecules, such as nutrients, neurotrophins, and growth factors, as well as by clearing toxic and undesirable molecules from CSF. The choroid plexus also acts as a selective entry gate for leukocytes into the brain. Recent findings have revealed distinct changes in CPE cells that are associated with aging and Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we review some recent findings that highlight the importance of the CPE-CSF system in Alzheimer's disease and we summarize the recent advances in the regeneration of brain tissue through use of CPE cells as a new therapeutic strategy. PMID:27212900

  1. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid collaborates with the isthmic organizer to regulate mesencephalic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Martín, Cristina; Alonso, María I; Moro, José A; Bueno, David; Gato, Angel

    2005-11-01

    Early in development, the behavior of neuroepithelial cells is controlled by several factors acting in a developmentally regulated manner. Recently it has been shown that diffusible factors contained within embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) promote neuroepithelial cell survival, proliferation, and neurogenesis in mesencephalic explants lacking any known organizing center. In this paper, we show that mesencephalic and mesencephalic+isthmic organizer explants cultured only with basal medium do not express the typically expressed mesencephalic or isthmic organizer genes analyzed (otx2 and fgf8, respectively) and that mesencephalic explants cultured with embryonic CSF-supplemented medium do effect such expression, although they exhibit an altered pattern of gene expression, including ectopic shh expression domains. Other trophic sources that are able to maintain normal neuroepithelial cell behavior, i.e., fibroblast growth factor-2, fail to activate this ectopic shh expression. Conversely, the expression pattern of the analyzed genes in mesencephalic+isthmic organizer explants cultured with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid-supplemented medium mimics the pattern for control embryos developed in ovo. We demonstrate that embryonic CSF collaborates with the isthmic organizer in regulation of the expression pattern of some characteristic neuroectodermal genes during early stages of central nervous system (CNS) development, and we suggest that this collaboration is not restricted to the maintenance of neuroepithelial cell survival. Data reported in this paper corroborate the hypothesis that factors contained within embryonic CSF contribute to the patterning of the CNS during early embryonic development. PMID:16180222

  2. Intraneuronal tau aggregation precedes diffuse plaque deposition, but amyloid-β changes occur before increases of tau in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Braak, Heiko; Zetterberg, Henrik; Del Tredici, Kelly; Blennow, Kaj

    2013-11-01

    In comparison to the levels in age and gender-matched controls, reduced levels of pathological amyloid-β protein in cerebrospinal fluid routinely precede the onset of Alzheimer's disease-related symptoms by several years, whereas elevated soluble abnormal tau fractions (phosphorylated tau, total tau protein) in cerebrospinal fluid are detectable only with the onset and progression of clinical symptoms. This sequence of events in cerebrospinal fluid (amyloid-β changes detectable prior to abnormal tau changes) contrasts with that in which both proteins develop in the brain, where intraneuronal tau inclusions (pretangles, neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads) appear decades before the deposition of amyloid-β plaques (diffuse plaques, neuritic plaques). This viewpoint attempts to address questions arising in connection with this apparent sequential discrepancy-questions and issues for which there are currently no clear-cut answers. PMID:23756600

  3. Liquor cotunnii: the history of cerebrospinal fluid in Domenico Cotugno's work.

    PubMed

    Di Ieva, Antonio; Yaşargil, M Gazi

    2008-08-01

    Domenico Cotugno was a famous physician who lived in Naples in the 18th century. At the age of only 25 years, he published an important book on the anatomy of the inner ear that contained some theories concerning the physiology of hearing, the later developments of which were associated with the name of Hermann von Helmholtz. Three years later, he wrote a book on the physiopathological causes of sciatic pain, in which, for the first time in medical history, he differentiated true sciatic pain from the pain attributable to secondary causes. Using a series of meticulous dissections and elegant experiments, he showed that not only brain ventricles but also the subarachnoid spaces of the cranium and spine were filled with circulating fluid, which is why cerebrospinal fluid is also known as "liquor cotunnii." PMID:18797366

  4. Endoscopic Endonasal Repair of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage Caused by a Rare Traumatic Clival Fracture.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Akihiro; Komatsu, Fuminari; Hotta, Kazuko; Imai, Masaaki; Oda, Shinri; Shimoda, Masami; Matsumae, Mitsunori

    2016-02-15

    An 89-year-old male presented with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea associated with head trauma sustained as a pedestrian in a traffic accident. Computed tomography (CT) showed pneumocephalus and multiple cranial bone fractures, including the clivus. Although the CSF rhinorrhea was treated conservatively for a week, clinical symptoms did not improve and surgical repair was performed. Preoperative thin-sliced bone CT and steady-state magnetic resonance images revealed a bone defect at the middle clivus and a collection of CSF fluid from the clival fistula in the sphenoid sinus. Endoscopic endonasal reconstruction was performed, and the 3-mm diameter dural tear and bone defect at the middle clivus were well visualized. The fistula was repaired using a pedicled nasoseptal mucosal flap. The CSF rhinorrhea completely disappeared as a result of the endoscopic endonasal surgery. The present report describes a rare case of CSF rhinorrhea caused by a traumatic clival fracture and surgical management by endoscopic endonasal surgery. PMID:26804187

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage from the umbilicus: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dolas, Ilyas; Apaydin, Hasan Ogunc; Yucetas, Seyho Cem; Ucar, Mehmet Davut; Kilinc, Suleyman; Ucler, Necati

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Shunt catheters within the peritoneal cavity have migrated through and perforated almost all the intra-abdominal hollow viscera. An umbilical cerebrospinal fluid fistula following a ventriculoperitoneal shunt is an extremely rare complication. CASE PRESENTATION We report a 8-month-old infant who presented with leak of clear fluid from the umbilicus, seven months after a ventriculoperitoneal shunt operation. We could not see distal tip of the shunt on examination. After the operation, the patient’s follow-up was uneventful. Discussion The direct effect of CSF and VP shunt, such as chronic irrigation, silicon allergy, foreign body reaction, may cause sterile inflammation on the abdominal structures and this inflammation may soften tissue and cause CFS leakage and VP shunt extrusion. Conclusion If the distal tip detected on umbilical region, these patients should be examined frequently for umbilical shunt pathologies, especially infants. PMID:26814999

  6. [Advances in Biomarkers of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood].

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen; Li, Shang-xun; Li, Xue-jian; Xu, Hong-yun

    2015-12-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is defined as a mild brain trauma resulting in a short loss of consciousness and alteration of mental status. It may also occasionally develop persistent and progressive symptoms. It has been confirmed that MTBI causes changes of anatomic structures in central nervous system and biomarkers in the body fluid. However, there is no sufficient research on relevance among threshold for the brain injury, individual vulnerability and duration of disturbance of consciousness. Furthermore, there are no reliable diagnostic methods to establish whether a blow to the head is sufficient to cause the brain injury. This review provides references for biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid and blood associated with TBI. It also provides application status and potential prospects for further assessment and diagnosis of MTBI. PMID:27141807

  7. Endoscopic Endonasal Repair of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage Caused by a Rare Traumatic Clival Fracture

    PubMed Central

    HIRAYAMA, Akihiro; KOMATSU, Fuminari; HOTTA, Kazuko; IMAI, Masaaki; ODA, Shinri; SHIMODA, Masami; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    An 89-year-old male presented with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea associated with head trauma sustained as a pedestrian in a traffic accident. Computed tomography (CT) showed pneumocephalus and multiple cranial bone fractures, including the clivus. Although the CSF rhinorrhea was treated conservatively for a week, clinical symptoms did not improve and surgical repair was performed. Preoperative thin-sliced bone CT and steady-state magnetic resonance images revealed a bone defect at the middle clivus and a collection of CSF fluid from the clival fistula in the sphenoid sinus. Endoscopic endonasal reconstruction was performed, and the 3-mm diameter dural tear and bone defect at the middle clivus were well visualized. The fistula was repaired using a pedicled nasoseptal mucosal flap. The CSF rhinorrhea completely disappeared as a result of the endoscopic endonasal surgery. The present report describes a rare case of CSF rhinorrhea caused by a traumatic clival fracture and surgical management by endoscopic endonasal surgery. PMID:26804187

  8. Membrane-Introduction Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Desflurane, Propofol and Fentanyl in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid for Estimation BBB Properties

    PubMed Central

    Cherebillo, Vyacheslav Yu.; Polegaev, Andrei V.

    2015-01-01

    A possibility to use the Membrane-Introduction Mass Spectrometry (MIMS) with membrane separator interface has evolved into a powerful method for measurement of anaesthetic agents absolute concentration in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid for the study of blood-brain barrier (BBB) properties. Recent advanced a new membrane material was used for drug concentration measurement in biologic fluids. A hydrophobic membrane was used in the interface to separate anaesthetic agents from biological fluids: inhalational anaesthetic desflurane,hypnotic propofol, analgesic fentanyl. The selective detection of volatile anesthetic agents in blood does not require long-term sample processing before injecting the sample into mass-spectrometer interface, in contrast to chromatographic methods. Mass-spectrometric interface for the measurement of anaesthetic agent concentration in biological fluids (blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid) is described. Sampling of biological fluids was performed during balanced inhalational (desflurane, fentanyl) anaesthesia and total intravenous (propofol, fentanyl) anaesthesia. PMID:26412969

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid T cell clones from patients with multiple sclerosis: recognition of idiotopes on monoclonal IgG secreted by autologous cerebrospinal fluid B cells.

    PubMed

    Holmøy, Trygve; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Thompson, Keith Michael; Hestvik, Anne Lise Karlsgot; Bogen, Bjarne; Vartdal, Frode

    2005-06-01

    Due to somatic recombination and hypermutation, Ig variable heavy (V(H)) and light (V(L)) regions contain unique immunogenic determinants, idiotopes (Id), which can stimulate T cells. To address the relevance of this in a human disease, monoclonal IgG (mAb)-secreting B cell clones were established from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of two patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). HLA-DR-restricted CD4(+) T cell lines and clones from CSF of both patients specifically recognized autologous CSF mAb. The CSF T cell clones produced IFN-gamma; some also produced TNF-alpha, IL-10 and IL-5. V(H) and V(L) on the monoclonal IgG derived from CSF B cells expressed amino acid replacements due to somatic mutations. A T cell epitope was mapped to a V(H) framework region, where an amino acid replacement was critical for the T cell recognition. The finding of Id-specific T cells and Id-bearing B cells in the CSF indicates that they coexist within the diseased organ, and provide a basis for the study of Id-driven T-B cell collaboration in a human autoimmune disease. PMID:15864781

  10. Physical characteristics in the new model of the cerebrospinal fluid system.

    PubMed

    Jurjević, Ivana; Rados, Milan; Oresković, Janko; Prijić, Radovan; Tvrdeić, Ante; Klarica, Marijan

    2011-01-01

    It is unknown which factors determine the changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure inside the craniospinal system during the changes of the body position. To test this, we have developed a new model of the CSF system, which by its biophysical characteristics and dimensions imitates the CSF system in cats. The results obtained on a model were compared to those in animals observed during changes of body position. A new model was constructed from two parts with different physical characteristics. The "cranial" part is developed from a plastic tube with unchangeable volume, while the "spinal" part is made of a rubber baloon, with modulus of elasticity similar to that of animal spinal dura. In upright position, in the "cranial" part of the model the negative pressure appears without any measurable changes in the fluid volume, while in "spinal" part the fluid pressure is positive. All of the observed changes are in accordance to the law of the fluid mechanics. Alterations of the CSF pressure in cats during the changes of the body position are not significantly different compared to those observed on our new model. This suggests that the CSF pressure changes are related to the fluid mechanics, and do not depend on CSF secretion and circulation. It seems that in all body positions the cranial volume of blood and CSF remains constant, which enables a good blood brain perfusion. PMID:21648311

  11. Neural Differentiation of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    FARIVAR, Shirin; MOHAMADZADE, Zahra; SHIARI, Reza; FAHIMZAD, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective Wharton’s jelly (WJ) is the gelatinous connective tissue from the umbilical cord. It is composed of mesenchymal stem cells, collagen fibers, and proteoglycans. The stem cells in WJ have properties that are interesting for research. For example, they are simple to harvest by noninvasive methods, provide large numbers of cells without risk to the donor, the stem cell population may be expanded in vitro, cryogenically stored, thawed, genetically manipulated, and differentiated in vitro. In our study, we investigated the effect of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on neural differentiation of human WJ stem cells. Material & Methods The cells in passage 2 were induced into neural differentiation with different concentrations of human cerebrospinal fluid. Differentiation along with neural lineage was documented by expression of three neural markers: Nestin, Microtubule-Associated Protein 2 (MAP2), and Glial Fibrillary Astrocytic Protein (GFAP) for 21 days. The expression of the identified genes was confirmed by Reverse Transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Results Treatment with 100 and 200μg/ml CSF resulted in the expression of GFAP and glial cells marker on days 14 and 21. The expression of neural-specific genes following CSF treatment was dose-dependent and time-dependent. Treatment of the cells with a twofold concentration of CSF, led to the expression of MAP2 on day 14 of induction. No expression of GFAP was detected before day 14 or MAP2 before day 21, which shows the importance of the treatment period. In the present study, expression analysis for the known neural markers: Nestin, GFAP, and MAP2 using RT-PCR were performed. The data demonstrated that CSF could play a role as a strong inducer. Conclusion RT-PCR showed that cerebrospinal fluid promotes the expression of Nestin, MAP2, and GFAP mRNA in a dose-dependent manner, especially at a concentration of 200 μl/ml. In summary, CSF induces neurogenesis of WJ stem cells that encourages tissue engineering applications with these cells for treatments of neurodegenerative defects and traumatic brain injury. PMID:25767544

  12. Hepatitis B virus compartmentalization in the cerebrospinal fluid of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ene, L; Duiculescu, D; Tardei, G; Ruta, S; Smith, D M; Mehta, S; Letendre, S; Achim, C L

    2015-04-01

    We detected hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 26 adolescents co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) with neurological disease and studied compartmentalization of HBV in the CSF. More than half of the subjects with positive HBV DNA plasma also had CSF positive for HBV. CSF HBV DNA was found in subjects with preserved blood-brain barrier integrity. In a subgroup of these subjects, compartmentalized evolution of HBV was demonstrated by distinct profiles of resistance mutations. Future studies are warranted to determine the clinical significance of HBV presence in the CSF and its contribution to HIV-associated neurological disease. PMID:25658525

  13. Characterization of a virus isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with epidemic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M P; Alvarez, R; del Barco, D G; Falcón, V; de la Rosa, M C; de la Fuente, J

    1998-01-01

    A previously unknown disease, termed epidemic neuropathy (EN), occurred in Cuba between 1991 and 1993. When samples of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 45 patients with EN and 11 controls were inoculated into cultures of VERO cells, almost all (93%) of the samples from the cases of EN but only one (9%) of the control samples produced a slowly progressing cytopathological effect (CPE). Although the results of other studies indicated the presence of a picornavirus-like virus in CSF samples from EN cases, the CPE and other physico-chemical characteristics observed were not those expected of picorn-viruses. Several aetiological factors may have contributed to EN but at least one virus could have played a major role. PMID:9614459

  14. Refractory Thoracolumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak after Multiple Spinal Ependymoma Resections Treated with External Ventricular Drainage.

    PubMed

    Galgano, Michael A; Hazama, Ali; Deshaies, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    Study Design?Case report. Objective?Temporary external ventricular drainage for refractory thoracolumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is not reported in the literature. We describe a recent case that utilized this technique. Methods?Retrospective review of the patient's case notes was performed and the literature on this subject reviewed. Results?The patient underwent multiple complex spinal surgeries for resection of innumerable metastatic ependymoma lesions. A case of significant refractory CSF leak developed and as a last resort a right frontal external ventricular drain was placed. The CSF leak ceased, and the patient was eventually discharged home without further complication. Conclusion?External ventricular drainage can be a viable option for temporary proximal CSF diversion to treat refractory thoracolumbar CSF leaks. PMID:26835210

  15. Endoscopic Repair of Frontal Sinus Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks after Firearm Injuries: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Camilo; Solares, C. Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe two cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak repair after gunshot wound to the head. Design Retrospective review of two cases. Settings A large regional tertiary care facility. Participants Two patients with gunshot wounds to the skull base. Main Outcome Measures Preoperative and postoperative physical and radiologic findings. Results Patients in this series underwent endoscopic surgery, debridement, and repair of CSF leaks after gunshot wounds to the head. To date, the patients are without CSF leak. Conclusions Endoscopic closure of anterior skull base CSF leaks in patients with gunshot wounds can be safe and effective. Treatment should be decided by the severity of neurologic deterioration throughout the emergency period and the existence or absence of associated intracranial lesions. Timing for surgery should be decided with great care and with a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26251818

  16. Three-dimensional computational prediction of cerebrospinal fluid flow in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Sweetman, Brian; Xenos, Michalis; Zitella, Laura; Linninger, Andreas A.

    2011-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces is presented. Patient-specific brain geometries were reconstructed from magnetic resonance images. The model was validated by comparing the predicted flow rates with Cine phase-contrast MRI measurements. The model predicts the complex CSF flow patterns and pressures in the ventricular system and subarachnoid space of a normal subject. The predicted maximum rostral to caudal CSF flow in the pontine cistern precedes the maximum rostral to caudal flow in the ventricles by about 10% of the cardiac cycle. This prediction is in excellent agreement with the subject-specific flow data. The computational results quantify normal intracranial dynamics and provide a basis for analyzing diseased intracranial dynamics. PMID:21215965

  17. Metal concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid and blood plasma from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Roos, Per M; Vesterberg, Olof; Syversen, Tore; Flaten, Trond Peder; Nordberg, Monica

    2013-02-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and fatal degenerative disorder of motor neurons. The cause of this degeneration is unknown, and different causal hypotheses include genetic, viral, traumatic and environmental mechanisms. In this study, we have analyzed metal concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma in a well-defined cohort (n = 17) of ALS patients diagnosed with quantitative electromyography. Metal analyses were performed with high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Statistically significant higher concentrations of manganese, aluminium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, zinc, lead, vanadium and uranium were found in ALS CSF compared to control CSF. We also report higher concentrations of these metals in ALS CSF than in ALS blood plasma, which indicate mechanisms of accumulation, e.g. inward directed transport. A pattern of multiple toxic metals is seen in ALS CSF. The results support the hypothesis that metals with neurotoxic effects are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:23225075

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid constituents of cat vary with susceptibility to motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucot, James B.; Crampton, George H.; Matson, Wayne R.; Gamache, Paul H.

    1989-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid drawn from the fourth ventricles of the brains of cats during and after the development of motion sickness was studied to determine what neurotransmitters may be involved in the development of the sickness. The analytical procedure, which uses HPLC coupled with n-electrode coulometric electrochemical detection to measure many compounds with picogram sensitivity, is described. Baseline levels of DOPAC, MHPGSO4, uric acid, DA, 5-HIAA, and HVA were lower on motion and control days in cats which became motion sick when compared with cats which did not. None of the total of 36 identified compounds identified in the samples varied as a function of either exposure to motion or provocation of emesis. It is concluded that susceptibility to motion sickness is a manifestation of individual differences related to fundamental neurochemical composition.

  19. Ferritin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid predict Alzheimer's disease outcomes and are regulated by APOE

    PubMed Central

    Ayton, Scott; Faux, Noel G.; Bush, Ashley I.; Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack Jr., Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Khachaturian, Zaven; Sorensen, Greg; Kuller, Lew; Raichle, Marc; Paul, Steven; Davies, Peter; Fillit, Howard; Hefti, Franz; Holtzman, Davie; Marcel Mesulam, M.; Potter, William; Snyder, Peter; Schwartz, Adam; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Harvey, Danielle; Bernstein, Matthew; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Landau, Susan; Cairns, Nigel J.; Householder, Erin; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Faber, Kelley; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Thal, Leon; Buckholtz, Neil; Albert, Marylyn; Frank, Richard; Hsiao, John; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D'Agostino II, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Murali Doraiswamy, P.; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Saleem Ismail, M.; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging-Yuek; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristine; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Hudson, Leon; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B.; Kitzmiller, Tamar J.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Finger, Elizabether; Pasternak, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Elizabeth Smith, Karen; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Raudin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Fargher, Kristin; Ashok Raj, Balebail; Neylan, Thomas; Grafman, Jordan; Davis, Melissa; Morrison, Rosemary; Hayes, Jacqueline; Finley, Shannon; Friedl, Karl; Fleischman, Debra; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; James, Olga; Massoglia, Dino; Jay Fruehling, J.; Harding, Sandra; Peskind, Elaine R.; Petrie, Eric C.; Li, Gail; Yesavage, Jerome A.; Taylor, Joy L.; Furst, Ansgar J.

    2015-01-01

    Brain iron elevation is implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, but the impact of iron on disease outcomes has not been previously explored in a longitudinal study. Ferritin is the major iron storage protein of the body; by using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of ferritin as an index, we explored whether brain iron status impacts longitudinal outcomes in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort. We show that baseline CSF ferritin levels were negatively associated with cognitive performance over 7 years in 91 cognitively normal, 144 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 67 AD subjects, and predicted MCI conversion to AD. Ferritin was strongly associated with CSF apolipoprotein E levels and was elevated by the Alzheimer's risk allele, APOE-ɛ4. These findings reveal that elevated brain iron adversely impacts on AD progression, and introduce brain iron elevation as a possible mechanism for APOE-ɛ4 being the major genetic risk factor for AD. PMID:25988319

  20. Aβ dimer-containing human cerebrospinal fluid disrupts synaptic plasticity: prevention by systemic passive immunization

    PubMed Central

    Klyubin, Igor; Betts, Vicki; Welzel, Alfred; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wallin, Anders; Lemere, Cynthia A.; Cullen, William K.; Peng, Ying; Wisniewski, Thomas; Selkoe, Dennis J.; Anwyl, Roger; Walsh, Dominic M.; Rowan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The current development of immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s disease is based on the assumption that human-derived amyloid β protein (Aβ) can be targeted in a similar manner to animal cell-derived or synthetic Aβ. Because the structure of Aβ depends on its source and the presence of co-factors, it is of great interest to determine if human-derived oligomeric Aβ species impair brain function and if so, whether or not their disruptive effects can be prevented using antibodies. We report that untreated ex vivo human cerebrospinal fluid that contains Aβ dimers rapidly inhibits hippocampal long-term potentiation in vivo and that acute systemic infusion of an anti-Aβ monoclonal antibody can prevent this disruption of synaptic plasticity. Aβ monomer isolated from human CSF did not affect LTP. These results strongly support a strategy of passive immunization against soluble Aβ oligomers in early Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18417702

  1. Metabolic clearance of insulin from the cerebrospinal fluid in the anesthetized rat

    SciTech Connect

    Manin, M.; Broer, Y.; Balage, M.; Rostene, W.; Grizard, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Infusion of 125I-(Tyr A14)-insulin at tracer doses into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resulted in a slow rate of increase in the CSF-labeled insulin during the first 2 hours with a plateau thereafter. Labeled insulin was cleared from the CSF at a higher rate than 3H-inulin, a marker of CSF bulk flow. The labeled insulin was mainly distributed in all the ventricular and periventricular brain regions. Small amounts of degraded insulin appeared in the CSF. Coinfusion with an excess of unlabeled insulin impaired the clearance and degradation of labeled insulin. It also inhibited the labeling in medial hypothalamus, olfactory bulbs and brain stem. In contrast, coinfusion of ribonuclease B (used to test the specificity of uptake) was without any effect. It was concluded that there is an active insulin intake from CSF into brain specific compartments that is presumably essential for the effects of insulin on brain function.

  2. Efavirenz pharmacokinetics in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma over a 24-hour dosing interval.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Aylin; Watson, Victoria; Dickinson, Laura; Back, David

    2012-09-01

    We determined the pharmacokinetics of efavirenz in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) over a 24-h dosing interval in a patient who had undergone a lumbar drain because of cryptococcal meningitis. Drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in paired CSF (n = 24) and plasma (n = 25) samples. The median plasma efavirenz concentration was 3,718 ng/ml (range, 2,439 to 4,952), and the median CSF concentration was 16.3 ng/ml (range, 7.3 to 22.3). The CSF/plasma area-under-the-curve ratio was 0.0044 corresponding to a CSF penetration of 0.44% of plasma. PMID:22687515

  3. Effects of spatial variation of skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers on optical mapping of brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuping; Shibahara, Nanae; Kuramashi, Daishi; Okawa, Shinpei; Kakuta, Naoto; Okada, Eiji; Maki, Atsushi; Yamada, Yukio

    2010-07-01

    In order to investigate the effects of anatomical variation in human heads on the optical mapping of brain activity, we perform simulations of optical mapping by solving the photon diffusion equation for layered-models simulating human heads using the finite element method (FEM). Particularly, the effects of the spatial variations in the thicknesses of the skull and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layers on mapping images are investigated. Mapping images of single active regions in the gray matter layer are affected by the spatial variations in the skull and CSF layer thicknesses, although the effects are smaller than those of the positions of the active region relative to the data points. The increase in the skull thickness decreases the sensitivity of the images to active regions, while the increase in the CSF layer thickness increases the sensitivity in general. The images of multiple active regions are also influenced by their positions relative to the data points and by their depths from the skin surface.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid can be used for HIV genotyping when it fails in blood

    PubMed Central

    Rotta, Indianara; Raboni, Sonia Mara; Ribeiro, Cléa Elisa Lopes; Riedel, Maristela; Winhescki, Maria da Graça; Smith, Davey M.; Ellis, Ronald J.; de Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    Blood plasma specimens are the clinical standard for HIV-1 pol gene genotyping from viral populations; however, it is not always successful, often from low viral loads or the presence of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors. Objective To describe the successful of HIV-1 genotyping in two samples of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), after genotype procedures failed from blood. Method Two HIV-infected patients enrolled in a neurocognitive research study were evaluated when standard HIV-1 genotyping failed from blood plasma samples. Genotyping was performed using the commercial system TRUGENE® HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and the OpenGene® DNA Sequencing System (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY, USA). Results CSF genotyping was performed via the same commercial platform and was successful in both cases. Conclusion This report demonstrates that CSF could be used as an alternate clinical specimen for HIV-1 genotyping when it fails from blood. PMID:25054982

  5. Quantification of Amino Acid Neurotransmitters in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, José Augusto; Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Background : Neurocysticercosis is a parasitic disease that affects the central nervous system. Its main clinical manifestations are epileptic seizures. The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between neurotransmitter concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the different evolutive forms of neurocysticercosis with or without seizures. Methods : Neurotransmitter concentrations (Aspartate, Glutamate, GABA, Glutamine, Glycine, Taurine) were determined in CSF samples from 42 patients with neurocysticercosis divided into patients with the active cystic form (n = 24, 12 with and 12 without seizures) and patients with calcified form (n = 18, 12 with and 6 without seizures), and a control group consisting of 59 healthy subjects. Results : Alterations in amino acid concentration were observed in all patients with neurocysticercosis. Conclusion : We conclude that disturbances in amino acid metabolism accompany the presentation of neurocysticercosis. Replacement of the terms inactive cyst by reactive inactive cyst and calcification by reactive calcification is suggested. PMID:26157521

  6. Non-linear relationships of cerebrospinal fluid biomarker levels with cognitive function: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) β-amyloid (Aβ) and Tau proteins change in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We tested if the relationships of these biomarkers with cognitive impairment are linear or non-linear. Methods We assessed cognitive function and assayed CSF Aβ and Tau biomarkers in 95 non-demented volunteers and 97 AD patients. We then tested non-linearities in their inter-relations. Results CSF biomarkers related to cognitive function in the non-demented range of cognition, but these relations were weak or absent in the patient range; Aβ1-40's relationship was biphasic. Conclusions Major biomarker changes precede clinical AD and index cognitive impairment in AD poorly, if at all. PMID:21329517

  7. Determination of kynurenic acid in rat cerebrospinal fluid by HPLC with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ye; Luchetti, David; Schaeffer, Eric; Cutrone, Jingfang

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive HPLC method using fluorescence detection was developed to determine kynurenic acid (KYNA) level in rat cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The method development was accomplished by screening different columns, optimizing zinc acetate concentration and determining the optimal HPLC flow rate. This method allowed direct injection of the CSF samples onto an Xselect C18 column and KYNA levels were measured fluorometrically by forming a fluorescent complex with zinc acetate that was delivered post-column. The limit of quantitation was 0.2 n m with 30 μL injection, corresponding to 6 fmol (signal-to-noise ratio = 10). The improved sensitivity enabled the measurement of KYNA in naive and drug-treated rat CSF. PMID:25963282

  8. Resistance to outflow of cerebrospinal fluid after central infusions of angiotensin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Severs, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    Infusions of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into the cerebroventricles of conscious rats can raise CSF pressure (CSFp). This response can be modified by some neuropeptides. One of these, angiotensin, facilitates the rise in CSFp. We measured CSFp in conscious rats with a computerized system and evaluated resistance to CSF outflow during infusion of artificial CSF, with or without angiotensin, from the decay kinetics of superimposed bolus injections. Angiotensin (10 ng/min) raised CSFp (P less than 0.05) compared with solvent, but the resistance to CSF outflow of the two groups was similar (P greater than 0.05). Because CSFp was increased by angiotensin without an increase in the outflow resistance, a change in some volume compartment is likely. Angiotensin may raise CSFp by increasing CSF synthesis; this possibility is supported, since the choroid plexuses contain an intrinsic isorenin-angiotensin system. Alternatively, angiotensin may dilate pial arteries, leading to an increased intracranial blood volume.

  9. Spontaneous sphenoid sinus cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningoencephalocele – are they due to patent Sternberg's canal?

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewska, Magdalena; Krzeski, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Sternberg's canal is a congenital bony defect in the lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus. If it persists to adulthood, it may become a source of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak (CSF) and meningoencephalocele. The aim of the study was to describe the authors’ experience and review articles related to spontaneous sphenoid sinus CSF leaks and Sternberg's canal. We analysed patients managed surgicallly due to sphenoid sinus CSF leak and performed a PubMed database search. Two female patients with spontaneous CSF leak of sphenoid origin were found. Both patients underwent surgery with the endoscopic endonasal approach, and the defect was closed using the multi-layer technique. Twelve articles related to CSF leaks of sphenoid origin (due to Sternberg's canal) were found in the PubMed database. Lines of lesser resistance within sphenoid bone may underlie CSF leak pathology together with intracranial hypertension. The endoscopic transnasal approach to the sphenoid sinus is an excellent alternative to standard transcranial procedures. PMID:26240642

  10. [Endoscopic treatment of idiopathic spontaneous although cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kansu, Leyla; Akkuzu, Babür; Avci, Suat

    2009-01-01

    Although cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea is a rarely seen clinical entity, it is a condition which should be considered carefully by otolaryngologists and neurosurgeons because it has the possibility of serious complications unless it is treated. Trauma is the most common causative factor. Idiopathic spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea is a very rare entity which is difficult to manage and which has high recurrence rates. Although in the past CSF rhinorrhea used to be treated by intracranial route, nowadays endonasal endoscopic surgery is preferred because of wide usage of rigid endoscopes with much fewer complications, In this article, a case of 43-year-old female with idiopathic spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea repaired by endonasal endoscopic surgery is presented, and the diagnosis and the treatment of CSF rhinorrhea is reviewed. PMID:19793046

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of phenylacetic acid in mental illness: behavioral associations and response to neuroleptic treatment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R P; Faull, K; Javaid, J I; Davis, J M

    1995-05-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid levels of phenylacetic acid (CSF PAA) were obtained from normal controls and from drug-free psychiatric inpatients (schizophrenia, major depression, mania, and schizoaffective disorder). Post-treatment CSF PAA levels were obtained from 16 patients after 4 weeks of neuroleptic treatment. Phenylacetic acid levels were higher in women and were significantly correlated with age. There were no differences in CSF PAA levels between the various diagnostic groups and no difference between the paranoid and the nonparanoid subtypes of schizophrenia. CSF PAA was significantly correlated with several measures of psychopathology, especially the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale hostility/suspiciousness factor. Neuroleptic treatment did not result in significant PAA changes. These findings are discussed in light of the amphetamine-like role ascribed to phenylethylamine, the precursor of PAA. PMID:7639084

  12. Do genes and environment meet to regulate cerebrospinal fluid dynamics? Relevance for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Palha, Joana A.; Santos, Nadine C.; Marques, Fernanda; Sousa, João; Bessa, João; Miguelote, Rui; Sousa, Nuno; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopment disorder in which the interplay of genes and environment contributes to disease onset and establishment. The most consistent pathological feature in schizophrenic patients is an enlargement of the brain ventricles. Yet, so far, no study has related this finding with dysfunction of the choroid plexus (CP), the epithelial cell monolayer located within the brain ventricles that is responsible for the production of most of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Enlarged brain ventricles are already present at the time of disease onset (young adulthood) and, of notice, isolated mild ventriculomegaly detected in utero is associated with subsequent mild neurodevelopmental abnormalities similar to those observed in children at high risk of developing schizophrenia. Here we propose that altered CP/CSF dynamics during neurodevelopment may be considered a risk, causative and/or participating factor for development of schizophrenia. PMID:22891052

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid examination may be useful in diagnosing neurosyphilis in asymptomatic HIV+ patients with syphilis.

    PubMed

    Salamano, Ronald; Ballesté, Raquel; Perna, Abayubá; Rodriguez, Natalia; Lombardo, Diego; García, Natalia; López, Pablo; Cappuccio, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Lumbar puncture in neurologically asymptomatic HIV+ patients is still under debate. There are different criteria for detecting neurosyphilis through cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), especially in cases that are negative through the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL), regarding cellularity and protein content. However, a diagnosis of neurosyphilis can still exist despite negative VDRL. Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (TPHA) titers and application of the TPHA index in albumin and IgG improve the sensitivity, with a high degree of specificity. Thirty-two patients were selected for this study. VDRL was positive in five of them. The number of diagnoses reached 14 when the other techniques were added. It was not determined whether cellularity and increased protein levels were auxiliary tools in the diagnosis. According to our investigation, CSF analysis using the abovementioned techniques may be useful in diagnosing neurosyphilis in these patients. PMID:26982990

  14. Biomarkers for Severity of Spinal Cord Injury in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lubieniecka, Joanna M.; Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H. T.; Stoynov, Nikolay; Liu, Jie; Mottus, Randy; Pfeifer, Tom; Kwon, Brian K.; Coorssen, Jens R.; Foster, Leonard J.; Grigliatti, Thomas A.; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges in management of spinal cord injury (SCI) is that the assessment of injury severity is often imprecise. Identification of reliable, easily quantifiable biomarkers that delineate the severity of the initial injury and that have prognostic value for the degree of functional recovery would significantly aid the clinician in the choice of potential treatments. To find such biomarkers we performed quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from rats 24 h after either a moderate or severe SCI. We identified a panel of 42 putative biomarkers of SCI, 10 of which represent potential biomarkers of SCI severity. Three of the candidate biomarkers, Ywhaz, Itih4, and Gpx3 were also validated by Western blot in a biological replicate of the injury. The putative biomarkers identified in this study may potentially be a valuable tool in the assessment of the extent of spinal cord damage. PMID:21559420

  15. Ferritin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid predict Alzheimer's disease outcomes and are regulated by APOE.

    PubMed

    Ayton, Scott; Faux, Noel G; Bush, Ashley I

    2015-01-01

    Brain iron elevation is implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, but the impact of iron on disease outcomes has not been previously explored in a longitudinal study. Ferritin is the major iron storage protein of the body; by using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of ferritin as an index, we explored whether brain iron status impacts longitudinal outcomes in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort. We show that baseline CSF ferritin levels were negatively associated with cognitive performance over 7 years in 91 cognitively normal, 144 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 67 AD subjects, and predicted MCI conversion to AD. Ferritin was strongly associated with CSF apolipoprotein E levels and was elevated by the Alzheimer's risk allele, APOE-ɛ4. These findings reveal that elevated brain iron adversely impacts on AD progression, and introduce brain iron elevation as a possible mechanism for APOE-ɛ4 being the major genetic risk factor for AD. PMID:25988319

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid as a reflector of central cholinergic and amino acid neurotransmitter activity in cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Manyam, B V; Giacobini, E; Ferraro, T N; Hare, T A

    1990-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amino acid neurotransmitters, related compounds, and their precursors, choline levels, and acetylcholinesterase activity were measured in the CSF of patients with cerebellar ataxia during a randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled clinical trial of physostigmine salicylate. The CSF gamma-aminobutyric acid, methionine, and choline levels, adjusted for age, were significantly lower in patients with cerebellar ataxia compared with controls. Physostigmine selectively reduced the level of CSF isoleucine and elevated the levels of phosphoethanolamine. No change occurred in CSF acetylcholinesterase activity and in the levels of plasma amino compounds in patients with cerebellar ataxia when compared with controls. Median ataxia scores did not statistically differ between placebo and physostigmine nor did functional improvement occur in any of the patients. PMID:1978660

  17. The function, composition and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in companion animals: part I - function and composition.

    PubMed

    Di Terlizzi, Roberta; Platt, Simon

    2006-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a clear, colourless ultrafiltrate of plasma with low protein content and few cells. The CSF is mainly produced by the choroid plexus, but also by the ependymal lining cells of the brain's ventricular system. CSF flows through the ventricular system and then into the subarachnoid space and it is subsequently absorbed through the subarachnoid villi into the venous system. CSF has several functions in the nervous system. It protects the brain during blood pressure fluctuations, regulates the chemical environment of the central nervous system and it is a vehicle for intracerebral transport. This two-part article reviews CSF function, physiology, analytical techniques and interpretations in disease states of companion animals. This first part will address the function and composition of CSF in companion animals. PMID:16154365

  18. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. Influences on cerebral hemodynamic and cerebrospinal fluid pressure--chemical autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Tachibana, H.; Hardenberg, J.P.; Dowell, R.E. Jr.; Kitagawa, Y.; Mortel, K.F.

    1984-02-01

    Blood flow in the cerebral gray matter was measured in normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease by 133Xe inhalation. Flow values in the frontal and temporal gray matter increased after lowering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure by lumbar puncture in normal pressure hydrocephalus (p less than 0.05) and also after shunting. One case with cerebral complications did not improve clinically. In Alzheimer disease the reverse (decreases in flow in the gray matter) occurred after removal of CSF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus was associated with impaired cerebral vasomotor responsiveness during 100% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide inhalation. This complication was restored toward normal after CSF removal and/or shunting. Cerebral blood flow measurements appear to be useful for confirming the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus and predicting the clinical benefit from shunting.

  19. Oligoclonal Bands in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Black Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    da Gama, Paulo Diniz; Machado, Luís dos Ramos; Livramento, José Antonio; Gomes, Hélio Rodrigues; Adoni, Tarso; Morales, Rogério de Rizo; da Gama, Rodrigo Assad Diniz; da Gama, Daniel Assad Diniz; Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurélio; Fragoso, Yara Dadalti; Callegaro, Dagoberto

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility is a well-recognized factor in the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of oligoclonal bands (OCB) restricted to the cerebrospinal fluid, in an ethnically mixed group of MS patients in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Techniques used to detect OCB consisted of isoelectric focusing followed by immunoblotting. OCB were found in 49 (54.4%) out of 90 patients with clinically definite MS; out of the 23 brown/black patients, 17 (73.9%) were OCB+; out of the 66 white patients, 32 (48.5%) were OCB+; and the only patient yellow was OCB+ (p = 0.05). Analysis of the IgG index was also consistent with the findings, but with lower statistical significance. The data presented in our study show that the ethnic differences in MS extend to the immune response. PMID:26295036

  20. Shotgun Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Using Off-Gel Electrophoresis as the First Dimension Separation

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Lashanda N.; Shores, Kevin; Knapp, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Shotgun proteomic analysis usually employs multidimensional separations with the first dimension most commonly being strong cation exchange (SCX) liquid chromatography (LC). SCX-LC is necessarily a serial process for preparation of multiple samples. Here we apply a newly available tool, off-gel electrophoresis (OGE), for first dimension separation of peptide mixtures from digests of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a complex and low total protein-containing sample. OGE first dimension fractionation enabled identification of a total of 156 unique proteins compared to 115 identified in previous work using first dimension SCX fractionation. OGE can be used to process multiple samples unattended with easy retrieval of the separated fractions. Thus shotgun analysis using OGE as the first dimension separation offers a significant advantage both in terms of sample throughput as well as increased numbers of identified proteins. PMID:18778093

  1. Isoelectric focusing of gamma globulins in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Trotter, J L; Banks, G; Wang, P

    1977-12-01

    The technique of isoelectric focusing has been adapted for rapid clinical analysis for globulins in cerebrospinal fluid with use of commercially prepared horizontal-slab acrylamide gels. The globulin fraction is concentrated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, which allows more of the relevant protein to be applied, use of a wider range of total protein concentrations, and higher resolution than is true for previously described methods. Critical variables include a constant concentration and volume of IgG, a constant low temperature of the acrylamide gel, and sensitive staining with Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250. The apparatus used is adaptable for other electrophoretic procedures in the clinical laboratory, and the use of commercially prepared gel slabs is more convenient, more reproducible, and requires less time than other methods. PMID:72619

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid HIV-1 Compartmentalization in a Patient With AIDS and Acute Varicella-Zoster Virus Meningomyeloradiculitis

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, E. Liana; Adegbulugbe, Ademiposi A.; Sheikh, Virginia; Imamichi, Hiromi; Dewar, Robin L.; Hammoud, Dima A.; Sereti, Irini; Lane, H. Clifford

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of AIDS presenting as varicella-zoster virus (VZV) meningomyeloradiculitis associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) quasispecies compartmentalization within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and a CSF viral load that was 1 log higher than in peripheral blood. Prolonged antiviral therapy for both VZV and HIV type 1 was associated with partial resolution. PMID:23728149

  3. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with domoic acid toxicosis identifies proteins associated with neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Neely, Benjamin A; Soper, Jennifer L; Gulland, Frances M D; Bell, P Darwin; Kindy, Mark; Arthur, John M; Janech, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    Proteomic studies including marine mammals are rare, largely due to the lack of fully sequenced genomes. This has hampered the application of these techniques toward biomarker discovery efforts for monitoring of health and disease in these animals. We conducted a pilot label-free LC-MS/MS study to profile and compare the cerebrospinal fluid from California sea lions with domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) and without DAT. Across 11 samples, a total of 206 proteins were identified (FDR<0.1) using a composite mammalian database. Several peptide identifications were validated using stable isotope labeled peptides. Comparison of spectral counts revealed seven proteins that were elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid from sea lions with DAT: complement C3, complement factor B, dickkopf-3, malate dehydrogenase 1, neuron cell adhesion molecule 1, gelsolin, and neuronal cell adhesion molecule. Immunoblot analysis found reelin to be depressed in the cerebrospinal fluid from California sea lions with DAT. Mice administered domoic acid also had lower hippocampal reelin protein levels suggesting that domoic acid depresses reelin similar to kainic acid. In summary, proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in marine mammals is a useful tool to characterize the underlying molecular pathology of neurodegenerative disease. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002105 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002105). PMID:26364553

  4. A differentially expressed set of microRNAs in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) can diagnose CNS malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Drusco, Alessandra; Bottoni, Arianna; Laganà, Alessandro; Acunzo, Mario; Fassan, Matteo; Cascione, Luciano; Antenucci, Anna; Kumchala, Prasanthi; Vicentini, Caterina; Gardiman, Marina P.; Alder, Hansjuerg; Carosi, Mariantonia A.; Ammirati, Mario; Gherardi, Stefano; Luscrì, Marilena; Carapella, Carmine; Zanesi, Nicola; Croce, Carlo M.

    2015-01-01

    Central Nervous System malignancies often require stereotactic biopsy or biopsy for differential diagnosis, and for tumor staging and grading. Furthermore, stereotactic biopsy can be non-diagnostic or underestimate grading. Hence, there is a compelling need of new diagnostic biomarkers to avoid such invasive procedures. Several biological markers have been proposed, but they can only identify specific prognostic subtype of Central Nervous System tumors, and none of them has found a standardized clinical application. The aim of the study was to identify a Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature that could differentiate among Central Nervous System malignancies. CSF total RNA of 34 neoplastic and of 14 non-diseased patients was processed by NanoString. Comparison among groups (Normal, Benign, Glioblastoma, Medulloblastoma, Metastasis and Lymphoma) lead to the identification of a microRNA profile that was further confirmed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. Hsa-miR-451, -711, 935, -223 and -125b were significantly differentially expressed among the above mentioned groups, allowing us to draw an hypothetical diagnostic chart for Central Nervous System malignancies. This is the first study to employ the NanoString technique for Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling. In this article, we demonstrated that Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling mirrors Central Nervous System physiologic or pathologic conditions. Although more cases need to be tested, we identified a diagnostic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature with good perspectives for future diagnostic clinical applications. PMID:26246487

  5. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in cerebrospinal fluid for diagnosis of AIDS-related central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Arribas, J R; Clifford, D B; Fichtenbaum, C J; Roberts, R L; Powderly, W G; Storch, G A

    1995-01-01

    The diagnostic utility of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA detection in cerebrospinal fluid for the diagnosis of central nervous system lymphoma was evaluated with two different PCR assays to test a collection of cerebrospinal fluid samples from 24 AIDS patients with central nervous system disorders. A PCR assay amplifying a fragment from the BamHI-W region had the highest clinical and analytic sensitivity. The BamHI-W PCR assay detected EBV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid from 83% (5 of 6) of patients with pathologically proven primary central nervous system lymphoma and 7% (1 of 16) of controls with autopsy-proven nonlymphomatous central nervous system disorders. EBV DNA was also detected in one patient with autopsy-proven systemic lymphoma involving the central nervous system and one patient with probable primary central nervous system lymphoma. EBV DNA was detected consistently when central nervous system lymphoma involved meningeal surfaces. PCR for EBV in cerebrospinal fluid appears to be useful for diagnosis of AIDS-related central nervous system lymphoma, but additional studies are required to better define the sensitivity of the assay and to understand the significance of a positive test in the absence of lymphoma. PMID:7650190

  6. Genetic Relationship between Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Nasopharyngeal and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Two Infants with Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Ana Lucia Sampaio Sgambatti; Pimenta, Fabiana Cristina; Brandileone, Maria Cristina C.; Laval, Cristina Aparecida; Guerra, Maria Luiza; de Andrade, João Guimarães; Di Fabio, Jose Luis

    2003-01-01

    The molecular epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from carriage and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concurrently recovered from the same individual has not yet been reported. By using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we demonstrated the genetic linkage among strains from CSF and nasopharynges of two children with pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:12904432

  7. Pharmacokinetics of methotrexate in the cerebrospinal fluid after intracerebroventricular administration in patients with meningeal carcinomatosis and altered cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.T.; Wilkinson, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters of the distribution and elimination of intracerebroventricularly administered methotrexate (MTX) were evaluated in three patients with meningeal carcinomatosis. Abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics, which were not otherwise clinically evident, were diagnosed by 111In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate radionuclide imaging. Alterations in CSF flow resulted in large changes in MTX distribution. Reduced cortical convexity (type III), spinal subarachnoid (type II), or ventricular (type I) CSF flow resulted in a prolongation of the single-pass mean residence time of MTX in the peripheral compartment by as much as eightfold and a reduction in intercompartmental clearance by 94-99%. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis can affect both CSF MTX distribution and elimination, each to a different extent, within the same patient. Total MTX clearance from the CSF was reduced by 79-93% in the patients studied. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model, with elimination occurring from the peripheral compartment, gave values for the distribution rate constant from the central to the peripheral compartment (k12), which decreased with the extent of CSF flow abnormality. However, the elimination rate constant from the peripheral compartment (k20) was reduced to an extent apparently independent of CSF flow abnormality (percentage reduction in k12 and k20, respectively: type III, 18 and 66; type II, 67 and 86; type I, 78 and 48). Inadequate distribution and locally high concentrations of MTX within the CSF may contribute to therapeutic failure and neurotoxicity. Monitoring of MTX levels in the CSF may be deceiving when samples are drawn from the site of injection, since the distribution kinetics are altered by abnormal CSF flow dynamics.

  8. Potential diagnostic applications of side chain oxysterols analysis in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Valerio; Caccia, Claudio

    2013-07-01

    The neurospecific cholesterol 24-hydroxylase converts excess brain cholesterol into 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24OHC) which, via the liver X receptor (LXR), can increase the expression and synthesis of astrocyte ApoE. 24OHC effluxes directly from brain into plasma where it is considered an indicator of brain cholesterol turnover. It is reduced in neurodegenerative disease states proportionally to the severity of disease and the degree of brain atrophy. In the early phases of active disease, a higher rate of turnover may result in transitory increases in plasma 24OHC. Less than 1% of the total brain excretion of 24OHC occurs via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) whereas almost all 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OHC) excretion is dependent on the function of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. Iincreased CSF oxysterols were found in patients with neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases in the presence of barrier dysfunction. In neurodegeneration, free cholesterol released from dying cells may engulf neurons. Cholesterol also increases Amyloid β (Aβ) deposition and tau pathology. ApoE, 24OHC, tau and soluble APP were correlated in Alzheimer disease (AD) samples. Excess of cholesterol converted into 24OHC may up-regulate ApoE synthesis which is a scavenger for Aβ and Tau. In AD this protective mechanism seems to be inefficient, probably due to the presence of high concentrations of 27OHC, microvascular dysfunction and the decreased efficiency of ApoE4 as lipid transporter and Aβ scavenger. 24OHC itself was cytotoxic. Analysis of side chain oxysterols in the CSF is likely to provided useful information about cholesterol metabolism and ApoE function in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:23541982

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Signature in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Leslie M.; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Knapik-Czajka, Malgorzata; Clark, Christopher M.; Aisen, Paul S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Blennow, Kaj; Soares, Holly; Simon, Adam; Lewczuk, Piotr; Dean, Robert; Siemers, Eric; Potter, William; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Develop a cerebrospinal fluid biomarker signature for mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) subjects. Methods Amyloid-β 1 to 42 peptide (Aβ1-42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at the threonine 181 were measured in (1) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained during baseline evaluation of 100 mild AD, 196 mild cognitive impairment, and 114 elderly cognitively normal (NC) subjects in ADNI; and (2) independent 56 autopsy-confirmed AD cases and 52 age-matched elderly NCs using a multiplex immunoassay. Detection of an AD CSF profile for t-tau and Aβ1-42 in ADNI subjects was achieved using receiver operating characteristic cut points and logistic regression models derived from the autopsy-confirmed CSF data. Results CSF Aβ1-42 was the most sensitive biomarker for AD in the autopsy cohort of CSF samples: receiver operating characteristic area under the curve of 0.913 and sensitivity for AD detection of 96.4%. In the ADNI cohort, a logistic regression model for Aβ1-42, t-tau, and APOε4 allele count provided the best assessment delineation of mild AD. An AD-like baseline CSF profile for t-tau/Aβ1-42 was detected in 33 of 37 ADNI mild cognitive impairment subjects who converted to probable AD during the first year of the study. Interpretation The CSF biomarker signature of AD defined by Aβ1-42 and t-tau in the autopsy-confirmed AD cohort and confirmed in the cohort followed in ADNI for 12 months detects mild AD in a large, multisite, prospective clinical investigation, and this signature appears to predict conversion from mild cognitive impairment to AD. PMID:19296504

  10. Quantitative evaluation of changes in gait after extended cerebrospinal fluid drainage for normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Felix; Hickman, Thu-Trang; Tinl, Megan; Iracheta, Christine; Chen, Grace; Flynn, Patricia; Shuman, Matthew E; Johnson, Tatyana A; Rice, Rebecca R; Rice, Isaac M; Wiemann, Robert; Johnson, Mark D

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is characterized by gait instability, urinary incontinence and cognitive dysfunction. These symptoms can be relieved by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, but the time course and nature of the improvements are poorly characterized. Attempts to prospectively identify iNPH patients responsive to CSF drainage by evaluating presenting gait quality or via extended lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage (eLCD) trials are common, but the reliability of such approaches is unclear. Here we combine eLCD trials with computerized quantitative gait measurements to predict shunt responsiveness in patients undergoing evaluation for possible iNPH. In this prospective cohort study, 50 patients presenting with enlarged cerebral ventricles and gait, urinary, and/or cognitive difficulties were evaluated for iNPH using a computerized gait analysis system during a 3day trial of eLCD. Gait speed, stride length, cadence, and the Timed Up and Go test were quantified before and during eLCD. Qualitative assessments of incontinence and cognition were obtained throughout the eLCD trial. Patients who improved after eLCD underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, and symptoms were reassessed serially over the next 3 to 15months. There was no significant difference in presenting gait characteristics between patients who improved after drainage and those who did not. Gait improvement was not observed until 2 or more days of continuous drainage in most cases. Symptoms improved after eLCD in 60% of patients, and all patients who improved after eLCD also improved after shunt placement. The degree of improvement after eLCD correlated closely with that observed after shunt placement. PMID:26775149

  11. miRNA contents of cerebrospinal fluid extracellular vesicles in glioblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Johnny C.; Ramakrishnan, Valya; Kim, Ryan; Phillips, Shirley; Kaimal, Vivek; Mao, Ying; Hua, Wei; Yang, Isaac; Fu, Chia-Chun; Nolan, John; Nakano, Ichiro; Yang, Yuanfan; Beaulieu, Martin; Carter, Bob S.; Chen, Clark C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Analysis of extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from plasma or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has emerged as a promising biomarker platform for therapeutic monitoring in glioblastoma patients. However, the contents of the various subpopulations of EVs in these clinical specimens remain poorly defined. Here we characterize the relative abundance of miRNA species in EVs derived from the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of glioblastoma patients. Methods EVs were isolated from glioblastoma cell lines as well as the plasma and CSF of glioblastoma patients. The microvesicle subpopulation was isolated by pelleting at 10,000×g for 30 min after cellular debris was cleared by a 2,000×g (20 min) spin. The exosome subpopulation was isolated by pelleting the microvesicle supernatant at 120,000×g (120 min). qRT-PCR was performed to examine the distribution of miR-21, miR-103, miR-24, and miR-125. Global miRNA profiling was performed in select glioblastoma CSF samples. Results In plasma and cell line derived EVs, the relative abundance of miRNAs in exosome and microvesicles were highly variable. In some specimens, the majority of the miRNA species were found in exosomes while in other, they were found in microvesicles. In contrast, CSF exosomes were enriched for miRNAs relative to CSF microvesicles. In CSF, there is an average of one molecule of miRNA per 150-25,000 EVs. Conclusion Most EVs derived from clinical biofluids are devoid of miRNA content. The relative distribution of miRNA species in plasma exosomes or microvesicles is unpredictable. In contrast, CSF exosomes are the major EV compartment that harbor miRNAs. PMID:25903655

  12. Sphingolipid metabolism correlates with cerebrospinal fluid Beta amyloid levels in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fonteh, Alfred N; Ormseth, Cora; Chiang, Jiarong; Cipolla, Matthew; Arakaki, Xianghong; Harrington, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are important in many brain functions but their role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is not completely defined. A major limit is availability of fresh brain tissue with defined AD pathology. The discovery that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains abundant nanoparticles that include synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles offer an accessible sample to study these organelles, while the supernatant fluid allows study of brain interstitial metabolism. Our objective was to characterize sphingolipids in nanoparticles representative of membrane vesicle metabolism, and in supernatant fluid representative of interstitial metabolism from study participants with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction. We recently described the recruitment, diagnosis, and CSF collection from cognitively normal or impaired study participants. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we report that cognitively normal participants had measureable levels of sphingomyelin, ceramide, and dihydroceramide species, but that their distribution differed between nanoparticles and supernatant fluid, and further differed in those with cognitive impairment. In CSF from AD compared with cognitively normal participants: a) total sphingomyelin levels were lower in nanoparticles and supernatant fluid; b) levels of ceramide species were lower in nanoparticles and higher in supernatant fluid; c) three sphingomyelin species were reduced in the nanoparticle fraction. Moreover, three sphingomyelin species in the nanoparticle fraction were lower in mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal participants. The activity of acid, but not neutral sphingomyelinase was significantly reduced in the CSF from AD participants. The reduction in acid sphingomylinase in CSF from AD participants was independent of depression and psychotropic medications. Acid sphingomyelinase activity positively correlated with amyloid ?42 concentration in CSF from cognitively normal but not impaired participants. In dementia, altered sphingolipid metabolism, decreased acid sphingomyelinase activity and its lost association with CSF amyloid ?42 concentration, underscores the potential of sphingolipids as disease biomarkers, and acid sphingomyelinase as a target for AD diagnosis and/or treatment. PMID:25938590

  13. Sphingolipid Metabolism Correlates with Cerebrospinal Fluid Beta Amyloid Levels in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fonteh, Alfred N.; Ormseth, Cora; Chiang, Jiarong; Cipolla, Matthew; Arakaki, Xianghong; Harrington, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are important in many brain functions but their role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is not completely defined. A major limit is availability of fresh brain tissue with defined AD pathology. The discovery that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains abundant nanoparticles that include synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles offer an accessible sample to study these organelles, while the supernatant fluid allows study of brain interstitial metabolism. Our objective was to characterize sphingolipids in nanoparticles representative of membrane vesicle metabolism, and in supernatant fluid representative of interstitial metabolism from study participants with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction. We recently described the recruitment, diagnosis, and CSF collection from cognitively normal or impaired study participants. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we report that cognitively normal participants had measureable levels of sphingomyelin, ceramide, and dihydroceramide species, but that their distribution differed between nanoparticles and supernatant fluid, and further differed in those with cognitive impairment. In CSF from AD compared with cognitively normal participants: a) total sphingomyelin levels were lower in nanoparticles and supernatant fluid; b) levels of ceramide species were lower in nanoparticles and higher in supernatant fluid; c) three sphingomyelin species were reduced in the nanoparticle fraction. Moreover, three sphingomyelin species in the nanoparticle fraction were lower in mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal participants. The activity of acid, but not neutral sphingomyelinase was significantly reduced in the CSF from AD participants. The reduction in acid sphingomylinase in CSF from AD participants was independent of depression and psychotropic medications. Acid sphingomyelinase activity positively correlated with amyloid β42 concentration in CSF from cognitively normal but not impaired participants. In dementia, altered sphingolipid metabolism, decreased acid sphingomyelinase activity and its lost association with CSF amyloid β42 concentration, underscores the potential of sphingolipids as disease biomarkers, and acid sphingomyelinase as a target for AD diagnosis and/or treatment. PMID:25938590

  14. Cisterna magna microdialysis of sup 22 Na to evaluate ion transport and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Knuckey, N.W.; Fowler, A.G.; Johanson, C.E.; Nashold, J.R.; Epstein, M.H. )

    1991-06-01

    Microdialysis is used in vivo for measuring compounds in brain interstitial fluid. The authors describe another application of this technique to the central nervous system, namely microprobe dialysis in the cisterna magna to study the dynamics of ion transport and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) formation in the rat. The choroid plexus is the major source of CSF, which is produced by active transport of Na from blood into the cerebral ventricles. Formation of CSF is directly proportional to the blood-to-CSF transport of Na. By injecting {sup 22}Na into the systemic circulation and quantifying its movement into CSF by microdialysis, one can reliably estimate alterations in the rate of CSF formation. The sensitivity of this system was determined by administering acetazolamide, a standard inhibitor of CSF production. Because acetazolamide is known to decrease CSF formation by 40% to 50%, the cisternal microdialysis system in animals treated with this drug should detect a corresponding decrease in the amount of {sup 22}Na dialyzed. This hypothesis is supported by the {sup 22}Na uptake curves for control versus treated animals: that is, by the acetazolamide-induced average diminution of about 45% in both the rate and extent of tracer accession to dialysate. Bumetanide, a loop diuretic, reduced by 30% the {sup 22}Na entry into dialysate. Microprobe dialysis of fluid in the cisterna magna is thus a minimally invasive and economical method for evaluating effects of drugs and hormones on the choroid plexus-CSF system.

  15. Effects of irregular cerebrospinal fluid production rate in human brain ventricular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadzri, Edi Azali; Shamsudin, Amir Hamzah; Osman, Kahar; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Aziz, Azian Abd

    2012-06-01

    Hydrocephalus is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the ventricles and cavities in the brain. It occurs when the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow or absorption is blocked or when excessive CSF is secreted. The excessive accumulation of CSF results in an abnormal widening of the ventricles. This widening creates potentially harmful pressure on the tissues of the brain. In this study, flow analysis of CSF was conducted on a three-dimensional model of the third ventricle and aqueduct of Sylvius, derived from MRI scans. CSF was modeled as Newtonian Fluid and its flow through the region of interest (ROI) was done using EFD. Lab software. Different steady flow rates through the Foramen of Monro, classified by normal and hydrocephalus cases, were modeled to investigate its effects. The results show that, for normal and hydrocephalus cases, the pressure drop of CSF flow across the third ventricle was observed to be linearly proportionally to the production rate increment. In conclusion, flow rates that cause pressure drop of 5 Pa was found to be the threshold for the initial sign of hydrocephalus.

  16. Blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier in normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Masaki; Chiba, Yoichi; Murakami, Ryuta; Matsumoto, Koichi; Kawauchi, Machi; Fujihara, Ryuji

    2016-04-01

    Blood-borne substances can invade into the extracellular spaces of the brain via endothelial cells in sites without the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and can travel through the interstitial fluid (ISF) of the brain parenchyma adjacent to non-BBB sites. It has been shown that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains directly into the blood via the arachnoid villi and also into lymph nodes via the subarachnoid spaces of the brain, while ISF drains into the cervical lymph nodes through perivascular drainage pathways. In addition, the glymphatic pathway of fluids, characterized by para-arterial pathways, aquaporin4-dependent passage through astroglial cytoplasm, interstitial spaces, and paravenous routes, has been established. Meningeal lymphatic vessels along the superior sagittal sinus were very recently discovered. It is known that, in mice, blood-borne substances can be transferred to areas with intact BBB function, such as the medial regions of the hippocampus, presumably through leaky vessels in non-BBB sites. In the present paper, we review the clearance mechanisms of interstitial substances, such as amyloid-β peptides, as well as summarize models of BBB deterioration in response to different types of insults, including acute ischemia followed by reperfusion, hypertension, and chronic hypoperfusion. Lastly, we discuss the relationship between perivascular clearance and brain disorders. PMID:26920424

  17. Human cerebrospinal fluid increases the excitability of pyramidal neurons in the in vitro brain slice

    PubMed Central

    Bjorefeldt, Andreas; Andreasson, Ulf; Daborg, Jonny; Riebe, Ilse; Wasling, Pontus; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hanse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The composition of brain extracellular fluid is shaped by a continuous exchange of substances between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid. The CSF is known to contain a wide range of endogenous neuromodulatory substances, but their collective influence on neuronal activity has been poorly investigated. We show here that replacing artificial CSF (aCSF), routinely used for perfusion of brain slices in vitro, with human CSF (hCSF) powerfully boosts spontaneous firing of CA1, CA3 and layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the rat brain slice. CA1 pyramidal neurons in hCSF display lowered firing thresholds, more depolarized resting membrane potentials and reduced input resistance, mimicking properties of pyramidal neurons recorded in vivo. The increased excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons was completely occluded by intracellular application of GTPγS, suggesting that endogenous neuromodulators in hCSF act on G-protein coupled receptors to enhance excitability. We found no increase in spontaneous inhibitory synaptic transmission by hCSF, indicating a differential effect on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Our findings highlight a previously unknown function of the CSF in promoting spontaneous excitatory activity, and may help to explain differences observed in the activity of pyramidal neurons recorded in vivo and in vitro. PMID:25556798

  18. Alterations in protein regulators of neurodevelopment in the cerebrospinal fluid of infants with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Morales, Diego M; Townsend, R Reid; Malone, James P; Ewersmann, Carissa A; Macy, Elizabeth M; Inder, Terrie E; Limbrick, David D

    2012-06-01

    Neurological outcomes of preterm infants with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus are among the worst in newborn medicine. There remains no consensus regarding the diagnosis or treatment of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus, and the pathological pathways leading to the adverse neurological sequelae are poorly understood. In the current study, we developed an innovative approach to simultaneously identify potential diagnostic markers of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and investigate novel pathways of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus-related neurological disability. Tandem multi-affinity fractionation for specific removal of plasma proteins from the hemorrhagic cerebrospinal fluid samples was combined with high resolution label-free quantitative proteomics. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid obtained from infants with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus demonstrated marked differences in the levels of 438 proteins when compared with cerebrospinal fluid from age-matched control infants. Amyloid precursor protein, neural cell adhesion molecule-L1, neural cell adhesion molecule-1, brevican and other proteins with important roles in neurodevelopment showed profound elevations in posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus cerebrospinal fluid compared with control. Initiation of neurosurgical treatment of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus resulted in resolution of these elevations. The results from this foundational study demonstrate the significant promise of tandem multi-affinity fractionation-proteomics in the identification and quantitation of protein mediators of neurodevelopment and neurological injury. More specifically, our results suggest that cerebrospinal fluid levels of proteins such as amyloid precursor protein or neural cell adhesion molecule-L1 should be investigated as potential diagnostic markers of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus. Notably, dysregulation of the levels these and other proteins may directly affect ongoing neurodevelopmental processes in these preterm infants, providing an entirely new hypothesis for the developmental disability associated with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus. PMID:22186713

  19. Three-dimensional computational modeling of subject-specific cerebrospinal fluid flow in the subarachnoid space.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumeet; Soellinger, Michaela; Boesiger, Peter; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2009-02-01

    This study aims at investigating three-dimensional subject-specific cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics in the inferior cranial space, the superior spinal subarachnoid space (SAS), and the fourth cerebral ventricle using a combination of a finite-volume computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments. An anatomically accurate 3D model of the entire SAS of a healthy volunteer was reconstructed from high resolution T2 weighted MRI data. Subject-specific pulsatile velocity boundary conditions were imposed at planes in the pontine cistern, cerebellomedullary cistern, and in the spinal subarachnoid space. Velocimetric MRI was used to measure the velocity field at these boundaries. A constant pressure boundary condition was imposed at the interface between the aqueduct of Sylvius and the fourth ventricle. The morphology of the SAS with its complex trabecula structures was taken into account through a novel porous media model with anisotropic permeability. The governing equations were solved using finite-volume CFD. We observed a total pressure variation from -42 Pa to 40 Pa within one cardiac cycle in the investigated domain. Maximum CSF velocities of about 15 cms occurred in the inferior section of the aqueduct, 14 cms in the left foramen of Luschka, and 9 cms in the foramen of Magendie. Flow velocities in the right foramen of Luschka were found to be significantly lower than in the left, indicating three-dimensional brain asymmetries. The flow in the cerebellomedullary cistern was found to be relatively diffusive with a peak Reynolds number (Re)=72, while the flow in the pontine cistern was primarily convective with a peak Re=386. The net volumetric flow rate in the spinal canal was found to be negligible despite CSF oscillation with substantial amplitude with a maximum volumetric flow rate of 109 mlmin. The observed transient flow patterns indicate a compliant behavior of the cranial subarachnoid space. Still, the estimated deformations were small owing to the large parenchymal surface. We have integrated anatomic and velocimetric MRI data with computational fluid dynamics incorporating the porous SAS morphology for the subject-specific reconstruction of cerebrospinal fluid flow in the subarachnoid space. This model can be used as a basis for the development of computational tools, e.g., for the optimization of intrathecal drug delivery and computer-aided evaluation of cerebral pathologies such as syrinx development in syringomelia. PMID:19102569

  20. Comparison of Phadebact coagglutination, Bactogen latex agglutination, and counterimmunoelectrophoresis for detection of Haemophilus influenzae type b antigens in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J K; Kelly, M T

    1983-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid specimens from patients with suspected meningitis were screened with the Phadebact Haemophilus Test (Pharmacia Diagnostics), with Bactogen (Wampole Laboratories), and by counterimmunoelectrophoresis. With culture-positive fluids, Phadebact coagglutination detected 95%, Bactogen latex agglutination detected 91%, and counterimmunoelectrophoresis detected only 79%. Both agglutination techniques were 25-fold more sensitive than counterimmunoelectrophoresis when tested with dilutions of positive fluids. To obtain specific reactions with the Phadebact reagents it was necessary to heat treat (95 degrees C, 5 min) the fluid; with Bactogen and counterimmunoelectrophoresis this was not necessary. PMID:6603467

  1. Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid and Plasma Biomarkers in the Diagnosis of Neurodegenerative Disorders and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Montine, Kathleen S.; Keene, C. Dirk; Montine, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Biomarkers are one type of laboratory testing being developed in response to the therapeutic imperative for diseases that cause cognitive impairment and dementia. The role of biomarkers is already transforming the organization and conduct of clinical trials, and if successful will likely contribute in the future to the medical management of patients with these diseases. Despite the obvious utility of practicality of blood- or urine-based biomarkers, so far results from these fluid compartments have not been reproducible. In contrast, substantial progress has been made in cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. Here we review the stages of cerebrospinal fluid biomarker development for several common and unusual diseases that cause cognitive impairment and dementia, stressing the distinction between diagnostic and mechanistic biomarkers. Future applications will likely focus on diagnosis of latent or early-stage disease, assessment of disease progression, mechanism of injury, and response to experimental therapeutics. PMID:21725901

  2. [Case of herpes simplex encephalitis with hypersomnia and low orexin level in the cerebrospinal fluid].

    PubMed

    Mukaino, Akihiro; Kinoshita, Ikuo; Fukushima, Naomi; Otsubo, Mayumi; Kanbayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman suffered from high fever (38°C) and abnormal behavior, was admitted to our hospital on the seventh day of the fever. At admission, she was stuporous, and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed pleocytosis (55/μl, monocytes). Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) images showed high-intensity signals in the medial temporal lobe, inferior surface of the frontal cortex, right cerebellar vermis, and left thalamus. We diagnosed herpes simplex encephalitis, based on the finding of an elevated titer of herpes simplex virus antibody in the CSF (2.90). She was started on treatment with acyclovir and steroid pulse therapy, which was followed by rapid clinical improvement. After recovering from the stupor, the patient exhibited the symptoms of hypersomnia with low orexin level in the CSF. Thus, we should bear in mind that other than consciousness disturbance, patients with herpes simplex encephalitis can also present with rare complications due to the extent of the lesions. PMID:24705834

  3. Quantification of the cerebrospinal fluid from a new whole body MRI sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebret, Alain; Petit, Eric; Durning, Bruno; Hodel, Jérôme; Rahmouni, Alain; Decq, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    Our work aims to develop a biomechanical model of hydrocephalus both intended to perform clinical research and to assist the neurosurgeon in diagnosis decisions. Recently, we have defined a new MR imaging sequence based on SPACE (Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrast using different flip-angle Evolution). On these images, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) appears as a homogeneous hypersignal. Therefore such images are suitable for segmentation and for volume assessment of the CSF. In this paper we present a fully automatic 3D segmentation of such SPACE MRI sequences. We choose a topological approach considering that CSF can be modeled as a simply connected object (i.e. a filled sphere). First an initial object which must be strictly included in the CSF and homotopic to a filled sphere, is determined by using a moment-preserving thresholding. Then a priority function based on an Euclidean distance map is computed in order to control the thickening process that adds "simple points" to the initial thresholded object. A point is called simple if its addition or its suppression does not result in change of topology neither for the object, nor for the background. The method is validated by measuring fluid volume of brain phantoms and by comparing our volume assessments on clinical data to those derived from a segmentation controlled by expert physicians. Then we show that a distinction between pathological cases and healthy adult people can be achieved by a linear discriminant analysis on volumes of the ventricular and intracranial subarachnoid spaces.

  4. Regulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in neurodegenerative, neurovascular and neuroinflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Simon, Matthew J; Iliff, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation and turnover provides a sink for the elimination of solutes from the brain interstitium, serving an important homeostatic role for the function of the central nervous system. Disruption of normal CSF circulation and turnover is believed to contribute to the development of many diseases, including neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, ischemic and traumatic brain injury, and neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis. Recent insights into CSF biology suggesting that CSF and interstitial fluid exchange along a brain-wide network of perivascular spaces termed the 'glymphatic' system suggest that CSF circulation may interact intimately with glial and vascular function to regulate basic aspects of brain function. Dysfunction within this glial vascular network, which is a feature of the aging and injured brain, is a potentially critical link between brain injury, neuroinflammation and the development of chronic neurodegeneration. Ongoing research within this field may provide a powerful new framework for understanding the common links between neurodegenerative, neurovascular and neuroinflammatory disease, in addition to providing potentially novel therapeutic targets for these conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuro Inflammation edited by Helga E. de Vries and Markus Schwaninger. PMID:26499397

  5. Flow induced by ependymal cilia dominates near-wall cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the lateral ventricles

    PubMed Central

    Siyahhan, Bercan; Knobloch, Verena; de Zélicourt, Diane; Asgari, Mahdi; Schmid Daners, Marianne; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-01-01

    While there is growing experimental evidence that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow induced by the beating of ependymal cilia is an important factor for neuronal guidance, the respective contribution of vascular pulsation-driven macroscale oscillatory CSF flow remains unclear. This work uses computational fluid dynamics to elucidate the interplay between macroscale and cilia-induced CSF flows and their relative impact on near-wall dynamics. Physiological macroscale CSF dynamics are simulated in the ventricular space using subject-specific anatomy, wall motion and choroid plexus pulsations derived from magnetic resonance imaging. Near-wall flow is quantified in two subdomains selected from the right lateral ventricle, for which dynamic boundary conditions are extracted from the macroscale simulations. When cilia are neglected, CSF pulsation leads to periodic flow reversals along the ventricular surface, resulting in close to zero time-averaged force on the ventricle wall. The cilia promote more aligned wall shear stresses that are on average two orders of magnitude larger compared with those produced by macroscopic pulsatile flow. These findings indicate that CSF flow-mediated neuronal guidance is likely to be dominated by the action of the ependymal cilia in the lateral ventricles, whereas CSF dynamics in the centre regions of the ventricles is driven predominantly by wall motion and choroid plexus pulsation. PMID:24621815

  6. An improved radioimmunoassay for myelin basic protein-like immunoreactive material in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Barry, R; Lawrence, M; Thompson, A; McDonald, I; Groome, N

    1990-01-01

    A modified radioimmunoassay protocol is described which can measure elevated levels of myelin basic protein-like immunoreactive material in the cerebrospinal fluid of some patients with multiple sclerosis or head injury and in rats developing an acute demyelinating form of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. The assay uses synthetic peptides that differ in their sequences from natural myelin basic protein for both standard and radioligand, but in apparent contrast to previously published assays serial dilutions of samples produce the expected dose estimates when interpolated from the standard curve. A second radioimmunoassay was produced with high sensitivity and specificity for myelin basic protein peptides with a carboxyl terminus at phenylalanine 89. This assay was used in attempts to detect the myelin basic protein-like immunoreactivity recently reported to occur in human urine. This radioimmunoassay failed to detect specific immunoreactivity in urine samples from control and multiple sclerosis donors. The specificities of both assays were studied using a wide range of synthetic peptides and the importance of this information to the design of future assays is addressed. Our work reinforces that of others in suggesting the complex situation involved in the design of assays for MBP fragments in body fluids. We are willing to distribute the reagents for use in our CSF assay to researchers who request them. PMID:20504594

  7. Floating dural sac sign is a sensitive magnetic resonance imaging finding of spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Takaaki; Hatazawa, Jun; Sato, Shinya; Kanoto, Masafumi; Fukao, Akira; Kayama, Takamasa

    2013-01-01

    We would like to propose floating dural sac sign, which is observed as a hyperintense band or rim around the spinal dural sac on axial T2-weighted images, as a sensitive sign to identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. One hundred patients with orthostatic headache were prospectively registered in 11 hospitals. These patients were examined by brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (n = 89), radioisotope cisternography (n = 89), MR myelography (n = 86), axial T2-weighted imaging of the spine (n = 70), and computed tomography myelography (n = 2). In this study, we separately evaluated the imaging findings of intracranial hypotension and spinal CSF leakage. Among 100 patients, 16 patients were diagnosed as having spinal CSF leaks. Of 70 patients examined with axial T2-weighted imaging, 14 patients were diagnosed with spinal CSF leaks, and floating dural sac sign was observed in 17 patients, 13 patients with spinal CSF leaks and 4 without CSF leaks (sensitivity 92.9%, specificity 92.9%). Of 86 patients examined by MR myelography, extradural fluid was observed in only 3 patients (sensitivity 21.4%, specificity 100%). The floating dural sac sign was a sensitive sign that can be used to identify CSF leakage. Spinal axial T2-weighted imaging might be a good screening method for spinal CSF leakage that can help to avoid the need for lumbar puncture. PMID:23615408

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Markers of Neurodegeneration and Rates of Brain Atrophy in Early Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tarawneh, Rawan; Head, Denise; Allison, Samantha; Buckles, Virginia; Fagan, Anne M.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Measures of neuronal loss are likely good surrogates for clinical and radiological disease progression in Alzheimer disease (AD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of neuronal injury or neurodegeneration may offer usefulness in predicting disease progression and guiding outcome assessments and prognostic decisions in clinical trials of disease-modifying therapies. Visinin-like protein 1 (VILIP-1) has demonstrated potential usefulness as a marker of neuronal injury in AD. OBJECTIVE To investigate the usefulness of CSF VILIP-1, tau, p-tau181, and Aβ42 levels in predicting rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy in early AD and cognitively normal control subjects over time. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Longitudinal observational study of brain atrophy in participants with early AD and cognitively normal controls. Study participants had baseline CSF biomarker measurements and longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging assessments for a mean follow-up period of 2 to 3 years. Mixed linear models assessed the ability of standardized baseline CSF biomarker measures to predict rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy over the follow-up period. The setting was The Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis. Participants (mean age, 72.6 years) were individuals with a clinical diagnosis of very mild AD (n = 23) and cognitively normal controls (n = 64) who were enrolled in longitudinal studies of healthy aging and dementia. The study dates were 2000 to 2010. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Correlations between baseline CSF biomarker measures and rates of whole-brain or regional atrophy in the AD and control cohorts over the follow-up period. RESULTS Baseline CSF VILIP-1, tau, and p-tau181 levels (but not Aβ42 levels) predicted rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy in AD over the follow-up period. Baseline CSF VILIP-1 levels predicted whole-brain (P = .006), hippocampal (P = .01), and entorhinal (P = .001) atrophy rates at least as well as tau and p-tau181 in early AD. Cognitively normal controls whose CSF VILIP-1, tau, or p-tau181 levels were in the upper tercile had higher rates of whole-brain (P = .02, P = .003, and P = .02, respectively), hippocampal (P = .001, P = .01, and P = .02, respectively), and entorhinal (P = .007, P = .01, and P = .01, respectively) atrophy compared with those whose levels were in the lower 2 terciles. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Cerebrospinal fluid VILIP-1 levels predict rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy similarly to tau and p-tau181 and may provide a useful CSF biomarker surrogate for neurodegeneration in early symptomatic and preclinical AD. PMID:25867677

  9. The Mediational Effects of FDG Hypometabolism on the Association between Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers and Neurocognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, N. Maritza; Johnson, Sterling C.; Gleason, Carey E.; Jagust, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of tau and amyloid beta42 suggest possible active underlying Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) including neurometabolic dysfunction and neurodegeneration leading to eventual cognitive decline. But the temporal relationship between CSF, imaging markers of neural function, and cognition has not been described. Using a statistical mediation model, we examined relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analytes (hyperphosphorylated tau (p-Tau181p), β-amyloid 1–42 (Aβ1–42), total tau (t-Tau), and their ratios); change in cognitive function; and change in [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake using positron emission tomography (PET). We hypothesized that a) abnormal CSF protein values at baseline, result in cognitive declines by decreasing neuronal glucose metabolism across time, and b) the role of altered glucose metabolism in the assumed causal chain varies by brain region and the nature of CSF protein alteration. Data from 412 individuals participating in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging (ADNI) cohort studies were included in analyses. At baseline, individuals were cognitively normal (N = 82), or impaired: 241 with mild cognitive impairment, and 89 with Alzheimer’s disease. A parallel-process latent growth curve model was used to test mediational effects of changes in regional FDG-PET uptake over time in relation to baseline CSF biomarkers and changes in cognition, measured with the 13-item Alzheimer Disease’s Assessment Scale–cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog). Findings suggested a causal sequence of events; specifically, FDG hypometabolism acted as a mediator between antecedent CSF biomarker alterations and subsequent cognitive impairment. Higher baseline concentrations of t-Tau, and p-Tau181p were more predictive of decline in cerebral glucose metabolism than lower baseline concentrations of Aβ1–42. FDG-PET changes appeared to mediate t-Tau or t-Tau/Aβ1–42 -associated cognitive change across all brain regions examined. Significant direct effects of alterations in Aβ1–42 levels on hypometabolism were observed in a single brain region: middle/inferior temporal gyrus. Results support a temporal framework model in which reduced CSF amyloid-related biomarkers occur earlier in the pathogenic pathway, ultimately leading to detrimental cognitive effects. Also consistent with this temporal framework model, baseline markers of neurofibrillary degeneration predicted changes in brain glucose metabolism in turn causing longitudinal cognitive changes, suggesting that tau-related burden precedes neurometabolic dysfunction. While intriguing, the hypothesized mediational relationships require further validation. PMID:25450107

  10. Properties of subependymal cerebrospinal fluid contacting neurones in the dorsal vagal complex of the mouse brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Orts-Del'Immagine, Adeline; Wanaverbecq, Nicolas; Tardivel, Catherine; Tillement, Vanessa; Dallaporta, Michel; Trouslard, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contacting neurones have been observed in various brain regions such as the hypothalamus, the dorsal nucleus of the raphe and around the central canal (cc) of the spinal cord but their functional role remains unclear. At the level of the spinal cord, subependymal cerebrospinal fluid contacting neurones (S-CSF-cNs) present a peculiar morphology with a soma close to the ependymal layer, a process projecting towards the cc and ending with a bud and a cilium. These neurones were recently shown to express polycystin kidney disease 2-like 1 (PKD2L1 or TRPP3) channels that are members of the polycystin subtype of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily and that have been proposed as either chemo- or mechanoreceptors in several tissues. Using immunohistological techniques and whole-cell electrophysiological recordings in brain slices obtained from PKD2L1:EGFP transgenic adult mice, we looked for and determined the functional properties of S-CSF-cNs in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC), a hindbrain structure controlling autonomic functions such as blood pressure, energy balance and food intake. Here, we demonstrate that S-CSF-cNs received GABAergic and/or glycinergic synaptic entries and were also characterised by the presence of non-selective cationic channels of large conductance that could be detected even under whole-cell configuration. The channel activity was not affected by Psalmopoeus cambridgei toxin 1, a blocker of acid sensing ion channels (ASICs), but was blocked by amiloride and by a strong extracellular acidification. In contrast, extracellular alkalinisation and hypo-osmotic shocks increased channel activity. Based on these properties, we suggest that the single-channel activity recorded in medullar S-CSF-cNs is carried by PKD2L1 channels. Our study therefore reinforces the idea that PKD2L1 is a marker of S-CSF-cNs and points toward a role for S-CSF-cNs in the detection of circulating signals and of modifications in the extracellular environment. PMID:22570378

  11. The mediational effects of FDG hypometabolism on the association between cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and neurocognitive function.

    PubMed

    Dowling, N Maritza; Johnson, Sterling C; Gleason, Carey E; Jagust, William J

    2015-01-15

    Positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of tau and amyloid beta42 suggest possible active underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD) including neurometabolic dysfunction and neurodegeneration leading to eventual cognitive decline. But the temporal relationship between CSF, imaging markers of neural function, and cognition has not been described. Using a statistical mediation model, we examined relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analytes (hyperphosphorylated tau (p-Tau(181p)), β-amyloid peptides 1-42 (Aβ(1-42)), total tau (t-Tau), and their ratios); change in cognitive function; and change in [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake using positron emission tomography (PET). We hypothesized that a) abnormal CSF protein values at baseline, result in cognitive declines by decreasing neuronal glucose metabolism across time, and b) the role of altered glucose metabolism in the assumed causal chain varies by brain region and the nature of CSF protein alteration. Data from 412 individuals participating in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging (ADNI) cohort studies were included in analyses. At baseline, individuals were cognitively normal (N = 82), or impaired: 241 with mild cognitive impairment, and 89 with Alzheimer's disease. A parallel-process latent growth curve model was used to test mediational effects of changes in regional FDG-PET uptake over time in relation to baseline CSF biomarkers and changes in cognition, measured with the 13-item Alzheimer Disease's Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog). Findings suggested a causal sequence of events; specifically, FDG hypometabolism acted as a mediator between antecedent CSF biomarker alterations and subsequent cognitive impairment. Higher baseline concentrations of t-Tau, and p-Tau(181p) were more predictive of decline in cerebral glucose metabolism than lower baseline concentrations of Aβ(1-42). FDG-PET changes appeared to mediate t-Tau or t-Tau/Aβ(1-42)-associated cognitive change across all brain regions examined. Significant direct effects of alterations in Aβ(1-42) levels on hypometabolism were observed in a single brain region: middle/inferior temporal gyrus. Results support a temporal framework model in which reduced CSF amyloid-related biomarkers occur earlier in the pathogenic pathway, ultimately leading to detrimental cognitive effects. Also consistent with this temporal framework model, baseline markers of neurofibrillary degeneration predicted changes in brain glucose metabolism in turn causing longitudinal cognitive changes, suggesting that tau-related burden precedes neurometabolic dysfunction. While intriguing, the hypothesized mediational relationships require further validation. PMID:25450107

  12. A meta-analysis of serum and cerebrospinal fluid autoantibodies in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ho, Roger C; Thiaghu, C; Ong, Huiyi; Lu, Yanxia; Ho, Cyrus S; Tam, Wilson W; Zhang, Melvyn W

    2016-02-01

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is one of the most devastating presentations of SLE and comprises of psychiatric, central and peripheral neurological signs and symptoms. Previous studies suggest the possible associations between various autoantibodies (Abs) and NPSLE. The magnitudes of such association varied between studies. We performed a meta-analysis to pool data on serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels and positivity of Abs in blood and cerebrospinal fluid in patients with NPSLE and SLE. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify studies that fulfilled inclusion criteria. A random-effects model was used to calculate overall combined odd ratio (OR) and mean levels with its corresponding 95% confidence interval to evaluate the relationship between individual Abs and NPSLE patients relative to SLE patients. Forty-one studies met the inclusion criteria and were used in this analysis. There was a significantly greater proportion of NPSLE patients who demonstrated positivity for serum anti-cardiolipin (aCL) Abs (OR=1.63, p=0.016), lupus anticoagulants (LA) Abs (OR=1.91 p=0.01), anti-phospholipid (APL) Abs (OR=2.08, p=0.001), anti-ribosomal P Abs (OR=2.29, p<0.001), anti-neuronal Abs (OR=9.50, p<0.001) as compared to SLE patients. In NPSLE patients, there was a significant increased prevalence of positive titres for CSF anti-neuronal Abs (OR=36.84, p=0.001) as compared to SLE patients. Among the 19 neuropsychiatric syndromes, the positivity of these serum autoantibodies were found specifically significantly associated with the manifestations of mood disorder, psychosis, cerebrovascular disease, seizure disorders, acute confusional state, cognitive dysfunction, headache, movement disorder, demyelinating syndrome and polyneuropathy, with ORs ranging from 1.84 to 4.73. Meta-regression identified proportion of women as significant moderator for the heterogeneity of aCL (p=0.004) and anti-neuronal Abs (p=0.0007); mean age for the heterogeneity of aCL (p=0.042) and LA (p=0.020) Abs, mean duration of illness for the heterogeneity of aCL Abs (p=0.035), and mean SLEDAI scores for the heterogeneity of anti-ribosomal P Abs (p=0.014). NPSLE patients are more likely to have elevated serum levels of aCL, LA, APL, anti-ribosomal P Abs and anti-neuronal Abs compared with SLE patients. Further research is required to evaluate the accuracy of using the above antibodies as an adjunct diagnostic tool in NPSLE. PMID:26497108

  13. Diagnostic identification of malignant cells in the cerebrospinal fluid by tumor-specific qRT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Rosanda, Cristina; Gambini, Claudio; Carlini, Barbara; Conte, Massimo; De Bernardi, Bruno; Garaventa, Alberto; Corrias, Maria Valeria

    2006-01-01

    Tumor specific quantitative RT-PCRs for two neuroblastoma specific molecular markers, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and GD2 synthase, were used to unequivocally demonstrate the neoplastic nature of the cells present in the cerebrospinal fluid of a neuroblastoma patient. After radical surgery of two separate tumoral lesions, localized in the extradural area, the patient presented with meningitis. Common sites of neuroblastoma metastatization, e.g. bone and bone marrow, were not infiltrated by tumor cells, as assessed by standard scintigraphy, morphological investigation and by sensitive and specific immunocytochemical and molecular assays. The results presented here demonstrate the successful use of tumor-specific qRT-PCRs in cerebrospinal fluid to investigate questionable clinical cases. The technique, which compared to other detection methods (e.g., immunocytochemistry) requires very few cells, yields unambiguous information once a suspected diagnosis has been formulated and a tumor-specific molecular marker is available. PMID:17028920

  14. Genome-wide copy number analysis of cerebrospinal fluid tumor cells and their corresponding archival primary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Magbanua, Mark Jesus M.; Roy, Ritu; Sosa, Eduardo V.; Hauranieh, Louai; Kablanian, Andrea; Eisenbud, Lauren E.; Ryazantsev, Artem; Au, Alfred; Scott, Janet H.; Melisko, Michelle; Park, John W.

    2014-01-01

    A debilitating complication of breast cancer is the metastatic spread of tumor cells to the leptomeninges or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Patients diagnosed with this aggressive clinical syndrome, known as leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, have very poor prognosis. Despite improvements in detecting cerebrospinal fluid tumor cells (CSFTCs), information regarding their molecular biology is extremely limited. In our recent work, we utilized a protocol previously used for circulating tumor cell isolation to purify tumor cells from the CSF. We then performed genomic characterization of CSFTCs as well as archival tumors from the same patient. Here, we describe the microarray data and quality controls associated with our study published in the Cancer Research journal in 2013 [1]. We also provide an R script containing code for quality control of microarray data and assessment of copy number calls. The microarray data has been deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus under accession # GSE46068. PMID:26484071

  15. Associations between a locus downstream DRD1 gene and cerebrospinal fluid dopamine metabolite concentrations in psychosis.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Dimitrios; Söderman, Erik; Axelsson, Tomas; Sedvall, Göran C; Terenius, Lars; Agartz, Ingrid; Jönsson, Erik G

    2016-04-21

    Dopamine activity, mediated by the catecholaminergic neurotransmitter dopamine, is prominent in the human brain and has been implicated in schizophrenia. Dopamine targets five different receptors and is then degraded to its major metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA). We hypothesized that genes encoding dopamine receptors may be associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HVA concentrations in patients with psychotic disorder. We searched for association between 67 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the five dopamine receptor genes i.e., DRD1, DRD2, DRD3, DRD4 and DRD5, and the CSF HVA concentrations in 74 patients with psychotic disorder. Nominally associated SNPs were also tested in 111 healthy controls. We identified a locus, located downstream DRD1 gene, where four SNPs, rs11747728, rs11742274, rs265974 and rs11747886, showed association with CSF HVA concentrations in psychotic patients. The associations between rs11747728, which is a regulatory region variant, and rs11742274 with HVA remained significant after correction for multiple testing. These associations were restricted to psychotic patients and were absent in healthy controls. The results suggest that the DRD1 gene is implicated in the pathophysiology of psychosis and support the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia. PMID:26957229

  16. Canine C-reactive protein measurements in cerebrospinal fluid by a time-resolved immunofluorimetric assay.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Subiela, Silvia; Caldin, Marco; Parra, Maria Dolores; Ottolini, Nicola; Bertolini, Giovanna; Bernal, Luis J; García-Martinez, Juan D; Cerón, Jose J

    2011-01-01

    In the current study, the quantification of C-reactive protein (CRP) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of dogs using an adapted time-resolved immunofluorimetric assay (TR-IFMA) was investigated, as well as whether the assay could be used to detect the range of CRP concentrations found in different clinical situations. Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were below 15% in all cases. The TR-IFMA measured the CRP values in a proportional and linear manner (r  =  0.99); also CRP concentrations measured in CSF and in serum were significantly correlated (r  =  0.80, P  =  0.003). The limit of detection of the method was 7.1 × 10(-6) mg/l. The assay was able to detect differences in CRP concentrations in CSF of dogs with inflammatory disorders compared with dogs with spinal cord compression or idiopathic epilepsy. In conclusion, TR-IFMA constitutes a very sensitive, precise, and accurate method for the measurement of CRP concentrations in CSF. PMID:21217029

  17. Application of polymerase chain reaction on cerebrospinal fluid for diagnosis of cerebral coenurosis in small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Amrabadi, Omidreza; Sharifiyazdi, Hassan; Moazeni, Mohammad; Akbari, Maryam; Ghane, Mohsen

    2015-10-01

    Sheep and goats serve as intermediate hosts for the canine tapeworm Taenia multiceps. The cysts produced by the intermediate stage of parasite are usually found in the cerebral hemispheres of small ruminants, and the resulting disease is commonly known as coenurosis. Coenurosis is clinically manifested in the form of various nervous symptoms, depending on the exact location of the cyst. The variety of neurological symptoms contributes to the complexity of clinical diagnosis and reinforces the need for a more specific and acceptable diagnostic approach. We demonstrated here, for the first time, that the T. multiceps DNA is present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the infected sheep and goats. In addition, the molecular genetic marker of the mitochondrial DNA was applied phylogenetically to show that our isolates together with other T. multiceps strains comprised a monophyletic group that is a sister to Taenia krabbei. Pairwise comparison between the cox1 sequences of our study and other T. multiceps genotypes existing in the GenBank showed similarity ranging from 98 to 100%. Accordingly, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be used for amplification of DNA of the parasite originated from the CSF and provides a valuable method for accurate identification of coenurosis cases. PMID:26122997

  18. Role of cerebrospinal fluid-contacting nucleus in sodium sensing and sodium appetite.

    PubMed

    Xing, Dan; Wu, Yuehong; Li, Guangling; Song, Siyuan; Liu, Yuepeng; Liu, He; Wang, Xing; Fei, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Licai

    2015-08-01

    The brainstem plays an important role in controlling sodium and water homeostasis. It is a major regulatory site for autonomic and motor functions. Moreover, it integrates cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) signals with neuronal and hormonal signals. Evidence suggests that the CSF-contacting nucleus (CSF-CN) transmits and integrates CSF signals, but, the definitive role of CSF-CN in sodium homeostasis is poorly understood. In this study, we used c-Fos as a marker of neuronal activity and causing colocalization of Nax channel and 5-HT. This proved that CSF-CN played a role in sensing the increase of CSF sodium level. Then, we determined the role of the CSF-contacting nucleus in increasing the sodium appetite of rats. So, we performed targeted lesion of the CSF-contacting nucleus in the brainstem using the cholera toxin subunit B-saporin (CB-SAP), a cytotoxin coupled to cholera toxin subunit B. The lesion of the CSF-CN showed decreased and degenerative neurons, while sodium appetite have increased and Fos immunocytochemistry detected neuronal activity in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN), but not in the subfornical organ (SFO) and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT). These results indicate that the CSF-CN plays an important role in sensing CSF sodium level and satiating sodium appetite by influencing the LPBN but not SFO and OVLT. The Nax channel and 5-HT might be the molecular mechanisms through which contribute to sodium homeostasis. PMID:25911266

  19. Analysis of brain nuclei accessible to ghrelin present in the cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Cabral, A; Fernandez, G; Perello, M

    2013-12-01

    Ghrelin is a stomach-derived peptide hormone that acts in the brain to regulate many important physiological functions. Ghrelin receptor, named the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), is present in many brain areas with or without obvious direct access to ghrelin circulating in the bloodstream. Ghrelin is also present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) but the brain targets of CSF ghrelin are unclear. Here, we studied which brain areas are accessible to ghrelin present in the CSF. For this purpose, we centrally injected mice with fluorescein-labeled ghrelin (F-ghrelin) peptide tracer and then systematically mapped the distribution of F-ghrelin signal through the brain. Our results indicated that centrally injected F-ghrelin labels neurons in most of the brain areas where GHSR is present. Also, we detected F-ghrelin uptake in the ependymal cells of both wild-type and GHSR-null mice. We conclude that CSF ghrelin is able to reach most of brain areas expressing GHSR. Also, we propose that the accessibility of CSF ghrelin to the brain parenchyma occurs through the ependymal cells in a GHSR-independent manner. PMID:24042041

  20. Evaluation of Treponemal Serum Tests Performed on Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis

    PubMed Central

    Guarner, Jeannette; Jost, Heather; Pillay, Allan; Sun, Yongcheng; Cox, David; Notenboom, Robert; Workowski, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the use of treponemal serum tests in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to diagnose neurosyphilis since CSF–Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) is specific but lacks sensitivity. Methods We tested CSF specimens using the following treponemal serum tests: INNO-LIA, Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TP-PA), Trep-Sure, and Maxi-Syph. The reference standard to calculate sensitivity and specificity was having two or more reactive/positive tests on CSF. Results The reference standard group included 11 cases that fulfilled the definition of neurosyphilis (reactive CSF-VDRL plus symptoms) and three cases that did not fulfill the definition: two cases had neurologic symptoms but a nonreactive CSF-VDRL, and one had several positive CSF syphilis tests (reactive VDRL and positive treponemal and syphilis polymerase chain reaction) but no history (referred sample). Controls included 18 patients in whom a CSF-VDRL was performed the same week as patients in the reference group. The sensitivity was 85.7% (12/14) for CSF-VDRL, 92.9% (13/14) for Trep-Sure, 100% (10/10) for Maxi-Syph, 92.3% (12/13) for INNO-LIA, and 83.3% (10/12) for TP-PA. Specificity was 100% for all tests. Conclusions Treponemal serum tests performed on CSF were useful in identifying two patients with nonreactive CSF-VDRL. PMID:25779998

  1. Connective tissue spectrum abnormalities associated with spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Reinstein, Eyal; Pariani, Mitchel; Bannykh, Serguei; Rimoin, David L; Schievink, Wouter I

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of connective tissue abnormalities among patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks in a prospective study using a large cohort of patients. We enrolled a consecutive group of 50 patients, referred for consultation because of CSF leak. All patients have been carefully examined for the presence of connective tissue abnormalities, and based on findings, patients underwent genetic testing. Ancillary diagnostic studies included echocardiography, eye exam, and histopathological examinations of skin and dura biopsies in selected patients. We identified nine patients with heritable connective tissue disorders, including Marfan syndrome, Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and other unclassified forms. In seven patients, spontaneous CSF leak was the first noted manifestation of the genetic disorder. We conclude that spontaneous CSF leaks are associated with a spectrum of connective tissue abnormalities and may be the first noted clinical presentation of the genetic disorder. We propose that there is a clinical basis for considering spontaneous CSF leak as a clinical manifestation of heritable connective tissue disorders, and we suggest that patients with CSF leaks should be screened for connective tissue and vascular abnormalities. PMID:22929030

  2. A case of cerebrospinal fluid leak in an infant after spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Allee, Joy I; Goins, Kathryn M; Berde, Charles B; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2013-05-01

    A 2 month old, 51 kg female infant underwent neuraxial anesthesia for repair of a right inguinal hernia. After two unsuccessful attempts at obtaining free-flowing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the L(3)-L(4) lumbar interspace with a 25-gauge (G) neonatal spinal needle, clear CSF was obtained using a Quincke 22-G needle. After easy aspiration, a total of 0.7 mL of 0.75% hyperbaric bupivicaine was injected intrathecally. Immediately after the spinal block, a caudal epidural block was placed by injecting 2 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 using a 22-G Quincke spinal needle. Surgery and recovery were uneventful. Two days later, after a crying spell, a bulging, grape size swelling was noted in the infant's lumbar region. Examination was normal except that her fontanel was mildly depressed when she was upright, and a 1 - 1.5 cm soft, nontender swelling in her lumbar area bulged out when she strained. The bulge resolved over the next 48 hours. In the majority of neonates, CSF leaks into the epidural space after lumbar puncture. In our case, the patient showed CSF accumulation at the site of puncture. PMID:23688958

  3. Proteomic Identification of Biomarkers in the Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of Astrocytoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khwaja, Fatima W.; Reed, Matthew S.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Schmotzer, Brian J.; Gillespie, G.Yancey; Guha, Abhijit; Groves, Morris D.; Kesari, Santosh; Pohl, Jan; Van Meir, Erwin G.

    2008-01-01

    The monitoring of changes in the protein composition of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can be used as a sensitive indicator of central nervous system (CNS) pathology, yet its systematic application to analysis of CNS neoplasia has been limited. There is a pressing need for both a better understanding of gliomagenesis, and the development of reliable biomarkers of the disease. In this report, we used two proteomic techniques, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and cleavable Isotope-Coded Affinity Tag (cICAT), to compare CSF proteomes in order to identify tumor and grade specific biomarkers in patients bearing brain tumors of differing histologies and grades. Retrospective analyses were performed on 60 samples derived from astrocytomas WHO grade II, III and IV, schwannomas, metastastic brain tumors, inflammatory samples and non-neoplastic controls. We identified 103 potential tumor-specific markers; of which 20 were high-grade astrocytoma-specific. These investigations allowed us to identify a spectrum of signature proteins that could differentiate between low (AII) and high-grade (AIV) astrocytoma, which may represent new diagnostic, prognostic and disease follow-up markers when used alone or in combination. These candidate biomarkers may also have functional properties that play a critical role in the development and malignant progression of human astrocytomas, thus possibly representing novel therapeutic targets for this highly lethal disease. PMID:17269713

  4. Diagnosis of acute leukemia in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-acute leukemia).

    PubMed

    Crespo-Solis, Erick; López-Karpovitch, Xavier; Higuera, Jesús; Vega-Ramos, Beatriz

    2012-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid-acute leukemia (CSF-acute leukemia) is a frequent and serious complication in patients with acute leukemia. One of the major problems of this complication is the diagnosis process itself. CSF cytology is currently considered the gold standard for establishing the diagnosis, a technique which presents various processing limitations, seriously impacting the predictive values. In the last 11 years, studies of CSF flow cytometry analysis done in patients with acute leukemia have demonstrated superiority in comparison with CSF cytology. Although comparative studies between these two techniques have been reported since 2001, no new consensus or formal changes to the gold standard have been established for the CSF acute leukemia diagnosis. The evidence suggests that positive flow cytometry cases, considered as indeterminate cases, will behave like disease in the central nervous system (CNS). Nevertheless, we think there are some variables and considerations that must be first evaluated under research protocols before CNS relapse can be established with only one positive flow cytometry analysis in the setting of indeterminate CSF samples. This paper proposes a diagnostic algorithm and complementary strategies. PMID:22639108

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for differentiation of frontotemporal lobar degeneration from Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David J.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Accurate ante mortem diagnosis in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is crucial to the development and implementation of etiology-based therapies. Several neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, including the major protein constituents of inclusions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated with amyloid-beta (Aβ1−42) plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle pathology, can be measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for diagnostic applications. Comparative studies using autopsy-confirmed samples suggest that CSF total-tau (t-tau) and Aβ1−42 levels can accurately distinguish FTLD from AD, with a high t-tau to Aβ1−42 ratio diagnostic of AD; however, there is also an urgent need for FTLD-specific biomarkers. These analytes will require validation in large autopsy-confirmed cohorts and face challenges of standardization of within- and between-laboratory sources of error. In addition, CSF biomarkers with prognostic utility and longitudinal study of CSF biomarker levels over the course of disease are also needed. Current goals in the field include identification of analytes that are easily and reliably measured and can be used alone or in a multi-modal approach to provide an accurate prediction of underlying neuropathology for use in clinical trials of disease modifying treatments in FTLD. To achieve these goals it will be of the utmost importance to view neurodegenerative disease, including FTLD, as a clinicopathological entity, rather than exclusively a clinical syndrome. PMID:23440936

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid tau levels are a marker for molecular subtype in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Karch, André; Hermann, Peter; Ponto, Claudia; Schmitz, Matthias; Arora, Amandeep; Zafar, Saima; Llorens, Franc; Müller-Heine, Annika; Zerr, Inga

    2015-05-01

    The molecular subtype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is an important prognostic marker for patient survival. However, subtype determination is not possible during lifetime. Because the rate of disease progression is associated with the molecular subtype, this study aimed at investigating if total tau, a marker of neuronal death, allows premortem diagnosis of molecular subtype when codon 129 genotype is known. Two hundred ninety-six sCJD patients were tested for their cerebrospinal fluid total tau level at the time of diagnosis and were investigated for their sCJD subtype postmortem. There was a significant association between tau levels and the prion protein type in patients with codon 129 MM (p < 0.001), MV (p = 0.004), and VV (p = 0.001) genotype. Receiver operating characteristic analyses showed values of area under the curve of 0.76-0.80 for the different genotypes indicating a good diagnostic validity of the test. Total tau can be used as a diagnostic test for the assessment of prion protein type when codon 129 genotype is known. It provides valuable information for physicians and next of kin about the further course of disease. PMID:25749129

  7. Anti-GAD65 Containing Cerebrospinal Fluid Does not Alter GABAergic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hackert, Jana K.; Müller, Lorenz; Rohde, Marco; Bien, Christian G.; Köhling, Rüdiger; Kirschstein, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase of 65 kDa (GAD65) antibodies have been reported in a variety of neurological disorders such as stiff-person syndrome (SPS), sporadic ataxia and some cases of epilepsy. Since the target is believed to be the cytoplasmic enzyme GAD65, the key enzyme of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis, the pathophysiological role of these antibodies is poorly understood. Here, we stereotactically injected human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) containing GAD65-antibodies into the hippocampus of rats in vivo and then prepared hippocampal slices 1–2 days after post-operative recovery. We characterized both evoked and spontaneous GABAergic transmission in vitro using sharp microelectrode and patch-clamp recordings in CA1 neurons. Intracellular recordings with sharp microelectrodes from CA1 neurons showed that evoked GABAAR- or GABABR-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSP) remained unaltered in anti-GAD65 tissue. These results were confirmed with patch-clamp recordings showing no difference in evoked gabazine-sensitive inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). In addition, spontaneous IPSCs also showed no difference between anti-GAD65 tissue and controls with respect to the mean frequency, the mean amplitude and the sIPSC distribution. In conclusion, stereotactic injection of GAD65-antibodies into the hippocampus leaves evoked and spontaneous GABAergic synaptic transmission intact. Hence, dysfunction of the inhibitory GABAergic system does not appear to be the major mechanism of epileptogenicity in this disease.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid amino compounds in Parkinson's disease. Alterations due to carbidopa/levodopa.

    PubMed

    Manyam, B V; Ferraro, T N; Hare, T A

    1988-01-01

    Employing a triple-column ion-exchange/fluorometric procedure, 29 amino compounds, including amino acid neurotransmitters, were measured in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from two groups of patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease de novo (n = 6) and those who were treated with carbidopa/levodopa (n = 6), and from neurologically normal controls (n = 10). Consideration was given to in vivo and in vitro factors known to influence levels of various CSF constituents. Results showed statistically significant decreases in the levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid, homocarnosine, phosphoethanolamine, and threonine, and elevation of ornithine levels, in the CSF of de novo patients with Parkinson's disease compared with controls. These changes "normalized" following treatment with carbidopa/levodopa. This study suggests that Parkinson's disease may be characterized by defects in specific amino compound metabolic pathways, resulting in central nervous system amino compound imbalances that may contribute to the pathophysiology of this disorder. Carbidopa/levodopa therapy tends to "normalize" these amino compound imbalances. PMID:3337677

  9. Neuronal and Glia-Related Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hjalmarsson, Clara; Bjerke, Maria; Andersson, Björn; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Åberg, N David; Olsson, Bob; Eckerström, Carl; Bokemark, Lena; Wallin, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cerebral ischemia promotes morphological reactions of the neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia in experimental studies. Our aim was to examine the profile of CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) biomarkers and their relation to stroke severity and degree of white matter lesions (WML). METHODS A total of 20 patients (mean age 76 years) were included within 5–10 days after acute ischemic stroke (AIS) onset. Stroke severity was assessed using NIHSS (National Institute of Health stroke scale). The age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) scale was used to evaluate the extent of WML on CT-scans. The concentrations of specific CSF biomarkers were analyzed. RESULTS Patients with AIS had significantly higher levels of NFL (neurofilament, light), T-tau, myelin basic protein (MBP), YKL-40, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) compared with controls; T-Tau, MBP, GFAP, and YKL-40 correlated with clinical stroke severity, whereas NFL correlated with severity of WML (tested by Mann–Whitney test). CONCLUSIONS Several CSF biomarkers increase in AIS, and they correlate to clinical stroke severity. However, only NFL was found to be a marker of degree of WML. PMID:24932109

  10. Unilateral Endoscopic Approach for Repair of Frontal Sinus Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Roehm, Corrie E.; Brown, Seth M.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak closure remains one of the most difficult surgeries for skull base surgeons, particularly with frontal sinus involvement. Technological advances in endoscopic surgery increasingly allow for less morbid approaches to the frontal sinus. We describe a series of patients who underwent endoscopic frontal sinus CSF leak repair utilizing a unilateral approach, to evaluate the utility and outcomes of this method. We performed a retrospective review of four cases in tertiary care centers. Participants included patients with CSF leak involving the frontal sinus. Main outcome measures included cessation of CSF leak and frontal sinus patency. Three patients were closed on the first surgical attempt; one with a communicating hydrocephalus required a revision procedure. Leak etiologies included prior craniotomy for frontal sinus mucopyocele, spontaneous meningoencephalocele, erosion due to mucormycosis, and prior endoscopic sinus surgery. The frontal sinus remained patent in three of four patients. No patients have evidence of a leak at a minimum of 1 year after surgery. The repair of frontal sinus CSF leaks is possible in specific cases with an endoscopic unilateral approach in leaks with multiple etiologies. Surgeons should consider this approach when selecting the appropriate procedure for repair of frontal sinus CSF leaks. PMID:22451816

  11. Pneumocephalus leading to the diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid leak and esophageal perforation after cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C Rory; Boone, Christine E; Pendleton, James; Elder, Benjamin D; Wei, Zhikui; Hsu, Wesley; Sciubba, Daniel M; Witham, Timothy F

    2016-04-01

    Pneumocephalus is a collection of air within in the intracranial cavity, most commonly seen following traumatic injury or cranial surgeries. Esophageal injury and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak are rare complications that may occur following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). We present a novel case of pneumocephalus arising from unrestricted leakage of CSF via coincident esophageal injury and durotomy in a patient who underwent an ACDF after trauma. A 21-year-old man presented to an outside hospital with C5/C6 subluxation, complete spinal cord injury, and quadriplegia from a motor vehicle accident. He underwent an ACDF, during which a CSF leak was observed. He was then transferred to our institution for rehabilitation and tracheostomy placement 1week after the ACDF surgery. Following the tracheostomy, the patient developed intractable fevers and nonspecific symptoms. A CT scan demonstrated frontal pneumocephalus without mass effect. Air was found in the retropharyngeal space. There were no accumulations of CSF in the neck. Extravasation of contrast around instrumentation at C5/C6 on a cine esophagogram demonstrated an esophageal perforation at that level. Pneumocephalus may form when large volumes of CSF escape from the intracranial space and air is drawn into the space by the negative pressure. In this unusual case, the esophageal perforation promoted the formation of the pneumocephalus. Treatment included closure of both defects, disrupting the suspected communication between the intracranial space and the esophagus. PMID:26778810

  12. Special dendritic and axonal endings formed by the cerebrospinal fluid contacting neurons of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Vigh, B; Vigh-Teichmann, I; Aros, B

    1977-10-14

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contacting neurons have a dendritic process which protrudes into the central canal, and is provided with one long kinocilium and many shorter stereocilia (about 80 in the turtle) as revealed by scanning electron mecroscopy. The shape, number and arrangement of the cilia are similar to those of known receptor endings. The silver impregnated axons of these cells converge to a paired centrosuperficial tract forming terminal enlargements at the ventrolateral surface of the spinal cord. Lying among glial endfeet these terminals are ultrastructurally similar to those present in known neurosecretory areas. The nerve endings are attached to the basal lamina, and they comprise many synaptic vesicles (200 to 400 A in diameter), as well as granular vesicles of different sizes (diameter 600 to 1800 A). The axons may lie within finger-like protrusions on the surface of the spinal cord, or they may terminate around vesseles. Morphological evidence suggests that these nerve terminals and the corresponding CSF contacting perikarya represent a spinal neurosecretory system possibly influenced by information taken up by its special dendrites protruding into the inner CSF space. PMID:922853

  13. Failure of cerebrospinal fluid homovanillic acid to predict levodopa response in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, William J.; Klawans, Harold L.

    1973-01-01

    Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid homovanillic acid levels were estimated in 60 patients with Parkinsonism before and during levodopa treatment. There was a slight negative correlation between pretreatment CSF homovanillic acid levels and disability. There was no correlation between pretreatment homovanillic acid levels and clinical response to levodopa. Patients with high pretreatment levels did as well as those with depressed levels. High (normal or near normal) levels of CSF homovanillic acid in a patient with Parkinsonism do not necessarily indicate that the Parkinsonism will not respond to levodopa. These patients should receive the benefit of a trial of levodopa. There was also no correlation between homovanillic acid level during tratment and improvement. Patients with minimal increases in CSF homovanillic acid responded as well as those with greater elevations. Failure of levodopa to increase CSF homovanillic acid significantly does not indicate that the patient will not respond to levodopa and that levodopa should be discontinued. Other factors, such as vitamin B6 consumption, should be investigated. PMID:4753871

  14. Examination of deposits in cerebrospinal fluid shunt valves using scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Charalambides, Constantinos; Sgouros, Spyros

    2012-01-01

    Obstruction remains the most common complication of cerebrospinal fluid shunts. The valve constitutes an important site of potential malfunction. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the extent and composition of debris depositions along the structural components of the shunt valve.We examined three explanted Medos programmable valves. The valves were stored and examined wet. They were cut open and disassembled. All specimens were studied under a scanning electron microscope (SEM; Quanta 200; FEI, Hillsboro, OR, USA) operating at different levels of accelerating voltage and 110 μA beam current. Valve areas analyzed included the ruby ball and collar, the flat spring with its pillar, and the staircase cam. The elemental composition, in areas with abnormal deposits, was subsequently determined by energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS) using a Si (Li) detector (Sapphire; EDAX, Mahwah, NJ, USA) with a super ultrathin Be window.All explanted valves had varying degrees of deposits in all surveyed areas. The extent of the deposits was not related to the time since implantation. The effect of these deposits on proper functioning of the valve as well as their pathogenesis is difficult to establish. PMID:22116429

  15. Low cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin (Orexin) and altered energy homeostasis in human narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Nishino, S; Ripley, B; Overeem, S; Nevsimalova, S; Lammers, G J; Vankova, J; Okun, M; Rogers, W; Brooks, S; Mignot, E

    2001-09-01

    Hypocretins (orexins) are hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in sleep and energy homeostasis. Hypocretin mutations produce narcolepsy in animal models. In humans, narcolepsy is rarely due to hypocretin mutations, but this system is deficient in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain of a small number of patients. A recent study also indicates increased body mass index (BMI) in narcolepsy. The sensitivity of low CSF hypocretin was examined in 38 successive narcolepsy-cataplexy cases [36 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQB1*0602-positive] and 34 matched controls (15 controls and 19 neurological patients). BMI and CSF leptin levels were also measured. Hypocretin-1 was measurable (169 to 376 pg/ml) in all controls. Levels were unaffected by freezing/thawing or prolonged storage and did not display any concentration gradient. Hypocretin-1 was dramatically decreased (<100 pg/ml) in 32 of 38 patients (all HLA-positive). Four patients had normal levels (2 HLA-negative). Two HLA-positive patients had high levels (609 and 637 pg/ml). CSF leptin and adjusted BMI were significantly higher in patients versus controls. We conclude that the hypocretin ligand is deficient in most cases of human narcolepsy, providing possible diagnostic applications. Increased BMI and leptin indicate altered energy homeostasis. Sleep and energy metabolism are likely to be functionally connected through the hypocretin system. PMID:11558795

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis : CSF Biomarkers of SIV Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Bissel, Stephanie J; Kofler, Julia; Nyaundi, Julia; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Wiley, Clayton A

    2016-06-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has led to increased survival of HIV-infected patients but also increased prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. We previously identified YKL40 as a potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker of lentiviral central nervous system (CNS) disease in HIV-infected patients and in the macaque model of HIV encephalitis. The aim of this study was to define the specificity and sensitivity along with the predictive value of YKL40 as a biomarker of encephalitis and to assess its relationship to CSF viral load. CSF YKL40 and SIV RNA concentrations were analyzed over the course of infection in 19 SIV-infected pigtailed macaques and statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship to encephalitis. Using these relationships, CSF alterations of 31 neuroimmune markers were studied pre-infection, during acute and asymptomatic infection, at the onset of encephalitis, and at necropsy. YKL40 CSF concentrations above 1122 ng/ml were found to be a specific and sensitive biomarker for the presence of encephalitis and were highly correlated with CSF viral load. Macaques that developed encephalitis had evidence of chronic CNS immune activation during early, asymptomatic, and end stages of infection. At the onset of encephalitis, CSF demonstrated a rise of neuroimmune markers associated with macrophage recruitment, activation and interferon response. CSF YKL40 concentration and viral load are valuable biomarkers to define the onset of encephalitis. Chronic CNS immune activation precedes the development of encephalitis while some responses suggest protection from CNS lentiviral disease. PMID:27059917

  17. Alterations in cerebrospinal fluid apolipoprotein E and amyloid beta-protein after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kay, Andrew D; Petzold, Axel; Kerr, Mary; Keir, Geoff; Thompson, Ed; Nicoll, James A R

    2003-10-01

    There is evidence that apolipoprotein E (apoE) and amyloid beta-protein (Abeta), which are implicated in the pathology of chronic neurodegenerative disorders, are involved in the response of the brain to acute injury; however, human in vivo evidence is sparse. We conducted a prospective observational study to determine the magnitude and time-course of alterations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) apoE and Abeta concentrations after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the relationship of these changes to severity of injury and clinical outcome. Enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) was used to assay apoE, Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) in serial CSF samples from 13 patients with TBI and 13 controls. CSF S100B and tau were assayed as surrogate markers of brain injury. There was a significant decrease in CSF apoE (p < 0.001) and Abeta (p< 0.001) after TBI contrasting the observed elevation in CSF S100B (p < 0.001) and tau (p < 0.001) concentration. There was significant correlation (r = 0.67, p = 0.01) between injury severity and the decrease in Abeta(1-40) concentration after TBI. In vivo, changes in apoE and Abeta concentration occur after TBI and may be important in the response of the human brain to injury. PMID:14588111

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid baclofen concentrations in patients undergoing continuous intrathecal baclofen therapy.

    PubMed

    Albright, A Leland; Thompson, Kristen; Carlos, Signe; Minnigh, M Beth

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to report concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) baclofen in children undergoing chronic intrathecal baclofen (ITB) infusions. CSF baclofen concentrations were analyzed in 53 specimens obtained by intrathecal catheter aspiration from 43 participants (28 males, 15 females; range 3-44y, mean 16y [SD 8y 11mo]), with functioning baclofen pumps and catheters. Daily ITB doses ranged from 70 to 1395 microg per day (mean 607 microg per day [SD 363], median 575). Baclofen concentration was quantified by high-pressure liquid chromatography and confirmed by injection onto a gas chromatograph. CSF baclofen concentrations from children receiving either simple continuous or complex infusions ranged from 0.2 to 20.0 microg/ml (mean 4.64 microg/ml, median 3.3 microg/ml). CSF baclofen concentrations from children receiving simple continuous infusions ranged from 0.5 to 12.9 (mean 4.7 microg/ml, median 3.55 microg/ml). There was no correlation between ITB dosage and CSF baclofen concentration. We conclude that baclofen concentration can be measured to determine if baclofen is present in CSF. However, there appears to be no correlation between the ITB dose infused and the corresponding CSF baclofen level. PMID:17518926

  19. Recommended standard of cerebrospinal fluid analysis in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Mark S; Thompson, Edward J; Deisenhammer, Florian; Giovannoni, Gavin; Grimsley, Guy; Keir, Geoffrey; Ohman, Sten; Racke, Michael K; Sharief, Mohammad; Sindic, Christian J M; Sellebjerg, Finn; Tourtellotte, Wallace W

    2005-06-01

    New criteria for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) were published as the result of an internationally formed committee. To increase the specificity of diagnosis and to minimize the number of false diagnoses, the committee recommended the use of both clinical and paraclinical criteria, the latter involving information obtained from magnetic resonance imaging, evoked potentials, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Although rigorous magnetic resonance imaging requirements were provided, the "new criteria paper" fell short in terms of guidelines as to how the CSF analysis should be performed and simply equated the IgG index with isoelectric focusing, without any justification. The spectrum of parameters analyzed and methods for CSF analysis differ worldwide and often yield variable results in terms of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and reliability, with no decided "optimal" CSF test for the diagnosis of MS. To address this question specifically, an international panel of experts in MS and CSF diagnostic techniques was convened and the result was this article, representing a consensus of all the participants. These recommendations for establishing a standard for the evaluation of CSF in patients suspected of having MS should greatly complement the new criteria in ensuring that a correct diagnosis of MS is being made. PMID:15956157

  20. Meta-analysis of apolipoprotein E levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Talwar, Puneet; Sinha, Juhi; Grover, Sandeep; Agarwal, Rachna; Kushwaha, Suman; Srivastava, M V Padma; Kukreti, Ritushree

    2016-01-15

    The possible association between Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been studied extensively. However, previous findings have been inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis of observational studies, seeking to provide insights into ApoE's potential as a biomarker for AD. A systematic literature search of PubMed (MEDLINE), EMBASE, and Web of Science was performed to retrieve relevant studies evaluating ApoE levels in CSF from AD subjects and controls. The association between ApoE levels in the CSF and AD was estimated by the weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) using a random-effect model. We identified 24 studies that included 1064AD cases and 1338 non-demented controls. Although the pooled WMD did not indicate a significant association between AD and ApoE levels (-0.30mg/l; 95% CI: -0.69 to 0.09; P=0.13), sub-group analysis controlling for patient sample size (n≥43) revealed significantly lower ApoE levels (WMD: -0.66mg/l; 95% CI: -1.02 to -0.31; P=0.0002) among patients with AD than in controls. Publication bias was absent and sensitivity analysis did not result in any significant change in the pooled estimates, indicating highly stable results. The present meta-analysis indicates the potential of CSF ApoE levels as a predictor of AD association. PMID:26723997

  1. An improved method of transcutaneous cisterna magna puncture for cerebrospinal fluid sampling in rats.

    PubMed

    Mahat, Mahamad Yunnus A; Fakrudeen Ali Ahamed, N; Chandrasekaran, S; Rajagopal, Sridharan; Narayanan, Shridhar; Surendran, Narayanan

    2012-11-15

    A simple, reproducible and chronic technique of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection in rats was developed by direct cisterna magna (CM) puncture utilizing stereotaxic apparatus. CSF collection apparatus was constructed using 1 mL syringe, silicone tubing, 21G disposable needle and water. Animal was placed on an elevated platform over stereotaxic apparatus base and puncture site was identified with the aid of stereotaxic co-ordinates. The volume of CSF collected varied from 100 to 180 μL with mean CSF volume of 150 μL. Neurological deficits were recorded according to the modified Bederson's scoring system 24h post CSF collection and differential cell count in CSF samples was performed. Animals continued to be normal with regular feed intake and gained body weight (∼24%) even after repeated sampling for four weeks and showed no severe neurological deficits (mean Bederson score<1 for four weeks). Neuropharmacokinetic data for Phenytoin sodium, MS 275 and Valproic acid (VPA) demonstrated CSF uptake with CSF(AUC)/plasma(AUC) ratio (K(p,CSF)) of 0.09, 0.01 and 0.33, respectively. This model exemplifies the 3R's of animal use and has been successfully implemented at Orchid Chemicals and Pharmaceuticals Limited for lead optimization of CNS penetrating HDAC inhibitors. PMID:23000275

  2. Age-Specific Characteristics and Coupling of Cerebral Arterial Inflow and Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Schmid Daners, Marianne; Knobloch, Verena; Soellinger, Michaela; Boesiger, Peter; Seifert, Burkhardt; Guzzella, Lino; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to quantify age-related differences in the characteristics and coupling of cerebral arterial inflow and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. To this end, 3T phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging blood and CSF flow data of eleven young ( years) and eleven elderly subjects ( years) with a comparable sex-ratio were acquired. Flow waveforms and their frequency composition, transfer functions from blood to CSF flows and cross-correlations were analyzed. The magnitudes of the frequency components of CSF flow in the aqueduct differ significantly between the two age groups, as do the frequency components of the cervical spinal CSF and the arterial flows. The males' aqueductal CSF stroke volumes and average flow rates are significantly higher than those of the females. Transfer functions and cross-correlations between arterial blood and CSF flow reveal significant age-dependence of phase-shift between these, as do the waveforms of arterial blood, as well as cervical-spinal and aqueductal CSF flows. These findings accentuate the need for age- and sex-matched control groups for the evaluation of cerebral pathologies such as hydrocephalus. PMID:22666360

  3. Measurement of fluorescent probes concentration ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenic process of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, begins years before the clinical diagnosis. Here, we suggest a novel method which may detect AD up to nine years earlier than current exams, minimally invasive, with minimal risk, pain and side effects. The method is based on previous reports which relate the concentrations of biomarkers in the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) (Aβ and Tau proteins) to the future development of AD in mild cognitive impairment patients. Our method, which uses fluorescence measurements of the relative concentrations of the CSF biomarkers, replaces the lumbar puncture process required for CSF drawing. The process uses a miniature needle coupled trough an optical fiber to a laser source and a detector. The laser radiation excites fluorescent probes which were prior injected and bond to the CSF biomarkers. Using the ratio between the fluorescence intensities emitted from the two biomarkers, which is correlated to their concentration ratio, the patient's risk of developing AD is estimated. A theoretical model was developed and validated using Monte Carlo simulations, demonstrating the relation between fluorescence emission and biomarker concentration. The method was tested using multi-layered tissue phantoms simulating the epidural fat, the CSF in the sub-arachnoid space and the bone. These phantoms were prepared with different scattering and absorption coefficients, thicknesses and fluorescence concentrations in order to simulate variations in human anatomy and in the needle location. The theoretical and in-vitro results are compared and the method's accuracy is discussed.

  4. The UKNEQAS scheme for cerebrospinal fluid haem pigments: a paradigm for service improvement.

    PubMed

    Beetham, Robert; Egner, William; Patel, Dina

    2011-11-01

    We describe the programme of an established External Quality Assurance (EQA) provider and a Specialist Advisory Group (SAG) to develop a successful EQA scheme for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) haem pigments as an example of a professionally led, unfunded initiative with the real potential to benefit patients. Within three years, we had assured sample stability, stoichiometry, and published best practice guidelines, enabling both analytical results and interpretation to be assessed and reported with an educative summary of the desired responses. Misclassification scoring of analysis and interpretation was introduced. Following audit, guidelines were modified and republished. The outcomes were as follows: Participant numbers increased from 63 at inception to 150 10 years later; The percentage of participants using visual inspection, a poor practice indicator, decreased from 27% to less than 1%; In all, 94-100% of participants consistently detected minor increases in bilirubin over the last four years of the scheme; More than 93% of participants were able to interpret analytical results linked to straightforward clinical scenarios; Misclassification scoring demonstrated that more complex scenarios repeatedly posed problems and is the next challenge to address. Scheme success is attributed to the experience of the operator and the formation of a voluntary expert advisory group, with both concerned to advance science and patient safety and thus contribute unpaid time and effort in order to succeed. In times of fiscal constraint, such resource may not be so readily available, yet is a vital part of continuous quality improvement for the benefit of patients. PMID:21948489

  5. Natural killer cell subsets in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martín, E; Picón, C; Costa-Frossard, L; Alenda, R; Sainz de la Maza, S; Roldán, E; Espiño, M; Villar, L M; Álvarez-Cermeño, J C

    2015-05-01

    Changes in blood natural killer (NK) cells, important players of the immune innate system, have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied percentages and total cell counts of different effector and regulatory NK cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of MS patients and other neurological diseases to gain clearer knowledge of the role of these cells in neuroinflammation. NK cell subsets were assessed by flow cytometry in CSF of 85 consecutive MS patients (33 with active disease and 52 with stable MS), 16 with other inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (IND) and 17 with non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND). MS patients showed a decrease in percentages of different CSF NK subpopulations compared to the NIND group. However, absolute cell counts showed a significant increase of all NK subsets in MS and IND patients, revealing that the decrease in percentages does not reflect a real reduction of these immune cells. Remarkably, MS patients showed a significant increase of regulatory/effector (CD56(bright) /CD56(dim) ) NK ratio compared to IND and NIND groups. In addition, MS activity associated with an expansion of NK T cells. These data show that NK cell subsets do not increase uniformly in all inflammatory neurological disease and suggest strongly that regulatory CD56(bright) and NK T cells may arise in CSF of MS patients as an attempt to counteract the CNS immune activation characteristic of the disease. PMID:25565222

  6. Natural killer cell subsets in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martín, E; Picón, C; Costa-Frossard, L; Alenda, R; Sainz de la Maza, S; Roldán, E; Espiño, M; Villar, L M; Álvarez-Cermeño, J C

    2015-01-01

    Changes in blood natural killer (NK) cells, important players of the immune innate system, have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied percentages and total cell counts of different effector and regulatory NK cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of MS patients and other neurological diseases to gain clearer knowledge of the role of these cells in neuroinflammation. NK cell subsets were assessed by flow cytometry in CSF of 85 consecutive MS patients (33 with active disease and 52 with stable MS), 16 with other inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (IND) and 17 with non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND). MS patients showed a decrease in percentages of different CSF NK subpopulations compared to the NIND group. However, absolute cell counts showed a significant increase of all NK subsets in MS and IND patients, revealing that the decrease in percentages does not reflect a real reduction of these immune cells. Remarkably, MS patients showed a significant increase of regulatory/effector (CD56bright/CD56dim) NK ratio compared to IND and NIND groups. In addition, MS activity associated with an expansion of NK T cells. These data show that NK cell subsets do not increase uniformly in all inflammatory neurological disease and suggest strongly that regulatory CD56bright and NK T cells may arise in CSF of MS patients as an attempt to counteract the CNS immune activation characteristic of the disease. PMID:25565222

  7. Zinc in Alzheimer's Disease: A Meta-Analysis of Serum, Plasma, and Cerebrospinal Fluid Studies.

    PubMed

    Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Brewer, George J; Simonelli, Ilaria; Mariani, Stefania; Siotto, Mariacristina; Bucossi, Serena; Squitti, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether zinc levels in serum, plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid are altered in Alzheimer's disease (AD), we performed meta-analyses of 27 studies on the topic published from 1983 to 2014. The subjects' sample obtained by merging studies was a pooled total of 777 AD subjects and 1,728 controls for serum zinc studies, 287 AD subjects and 166 controls for plasma zinc, and of 292 AD subjects and 179 controls for CSF zinc. The main result of this meta-analysis is the very high heterogeneity among the studies either in demographic terms or in methodological approaches. Although we considered these effects in our analyses, the heterogeneity persisted and it has to be taken into account in the interpretation of the results. Our meta-analysis indicated that serum zinc appears significantly decreased in AD patients compared with healthy controls, and this result is confirmed when serum and plasma studies were analyzed together. If we considered the age-matched studies, the meta-analysis carried out on only six studies showed no significant difference in zinc levels between AD and healthy controls (SMD =-0.55, 95% CI (-1.18; 0.09); p = 0.094; I2 = 91%). In the light of these findings, we speculated about the possibility that the decreases observed could indicate a possible dietary zinc deficiency and we suggested that the possible involvement of zinc alterations in AD may have an interplay with copper metabolism. PMID:25697706

  8. Partial characterization of a novel endogenous opioid in human cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.E.; Lipman, J.J.; Byrne, W.L.

    1987-12-07

    Human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains many uncharacterized endogenous opioids, in addition to the known enkephalins, endorphins, and dynorphins. These opioids may be separated by gel filtration chromatography and identified by radioreceptor assay for opioid activity. One region of the chromatographic elution profile, designated Peak B has previously been shown to be related to the pain status of chronic pain patients. The authors now report that human Peak B isolated from the CSF of pain-free elective surgery patients is present at a typical concentration equivalent in activity to 1.4 pmol of morphine sulfate per ml of CSF measured by radioreceptor assay. At a dose of 0.06 and 0.12 pmol morphine sulfate equivalents of CSF (MSE), injected into the cerebroventricular system of the mouse, Peak B produced an antinociceptive effect, the intensity and duration of which was dose-dependent and which was antagonized by naloxone. The mouse vas deferens (MVD) preparation was inhibited by Peak B in a manner that was sensitive to antagonism by naloxone only at low (< 1.0 ..mu..M) but not at higher (>6.0 ..mu..M) concentrations of the antagonist. Peak B activity in the MVD assay was unaffected by treatment with trypsin or ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin. 32 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure Gradients in Healthy Volunteers and Patients with Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    HAYASHI, Naokazu; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori; YATSUSHIRO, Satoshi; HIRAYAMA, Akihiro; ABDULLAH, Afnizanfaizal; KURODA, Kagayaki

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can depict not only anatomical information, but also physiological factors such as velocity and pressure gradient. Measurement of these physiological factors is necessary to understand the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) environment. In this study we quantified CSF motion in various parts of the CSF space, determined changes in the CSF environment with aging, and compared CSF pressure gradient between patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and healthy elderly volunteers. Fifty-seven healthy volunteers and six iNPH patients underwent four-dimensional (4D) phase-contrast (PC) MRI. CSF motion was observed and the pressure gradient of CSF was quantified in the CSF space. In healthy volunteers, inhomogeneous CSF motion was observed whereby the pressure gradient markedly increased in the center of the skull and gradually decreased in the periphery of the skull. For example, the pressure gradient at the ventral surface of the brainstem was 6.6 times greater than that at the convexity of the cerebrum. The pressure gradient was statistically unchanged with aging. The pressure gradient of patients with iNPH was 3.2 times greater than that of healthy volunteers. The quantitative analysis of 4D-PC MRI data revealed that the pressure gradient of CSF can be used to understand the CSF environment, which is not sufficiently given by subjective impression of the anatomical image. PMID:26226976

  10. NMR metabonomics of cerebrospinal fluid distinguishes between Parkinson's disease and controls.

    PubMed

    Öhman, Anders; Forsgren, Lars

    2015-05-01

    This study assesses if nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabonomics can discriminate between Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and control subjects, and consequently identify metabolic markers for the disease. One-dimensional (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used for quantitative analysis of metabolites in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 10 PD patients and 10 control individuals, together with uni- and multivariate statistical analysis to discriminate between the groups and to identify significantly altered metabolite concentrations. In total 60 metabolites were identified and of those 38 were quantified in all CSF samples. An overall lowering of metabolite content was observed in PD patients compared to control subjects (fold change of 0.85±0.30). Multivariate statistics reveal significant changes (ǀw*ǀ>0.2) among nine metabolites (alanine, creatinine, dimethylamine, glucose, lactate, mannose, phenylalanine, 3-hydroxyisobutyric acid and 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid). Three of these (alanine, creatinine and mannose) are identified as significantly changed also by univariate statistics (p<0.00132, Bonferroni corrected). Panels with all or a selected set of these metabolites were successfully used for discriminating between the two groups. In conclusion, NMR metabonomics can readily determine metabolite concentrations in CSF, identify putative biomarkers that distinguish between the PD patients and control subjects, and thus potentially become a tool for diagnostic purposes. PMID:25817365

  11. ID3 contributes to cerebrospinal fluid seeding and poor prognosis in medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The inhibitor of differentiation (ID) genes have been implicated as promoters of tumor progression and metastasis in many human cancers. The current study investigated the expression and functional roles of ID genes in seeding and prognosis of medulloblastoma. Methods ID gene expression was screened in human medulloblastoma tissues. Knockdown of ID3 gene was performed in medulloblastoma cells in vitro. The expression of metastasis-related genes after ID3 knockdown was assessed. The effect of ID3 knockdown on tumor seeding was observed in an animal model in vivo. The survival of medulloblastoma patients was plotted according to the ID3 expression levels. Results Significantly higher ID3 expression was observed in medulloblastoma with cerebrospinal fluid seeding than tumors without seeding. Knockdown of ID3 decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and suppressed the migration of D283 medulloblastoma cells in vitro. In a seeding model of medulloblastoma, ID3 knockdown in vivo with shRNA inhibited the growth of primary tumors, prevented the development of leptomeningeal seeding, and prolonged animal survival. High ID3 expression was associated with shorter survival of medulloblastoma patients, especially in Group 4 medulloblastomas. Conclusions High ID3 expression is associated with medullolbastoma seeding and is a poor prognostic factor, especially in patients with Group 4 tumors. ID3 may represent the metastatic/ aggressive phenotype of a subgroup of medulloblastoma. PMID:23768125

  12. Clinical Prognosis in Neonatal Bacterial Meningitis: The Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongying; Ren, Fang; Luo, Zhongcheng; Zhang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Neonates are at high risk of meningitis and of resulting neurologic complications. Early recognition of neonates at risk of poor prognosis would be helpful in providing timely management. From January 2008 to June 2014, we enrolled 232 term neonates with bacterial meningitis admitted to 3 neonatology departments in Shanghai, China. The clinical status on the day of discharge from these hospitals or at a postnatal age of 2.5 to 3 months was evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Patients were classified into two outcome groups: good (167 cases, 72.0%, GOS = 5) or poor (65 cases, 28.0%, GOS = 1–4). Neonates with good outcome had less frequent apnea, drowsiness, poor feeding, bulging fontanelle, irritability and more severe jaundice compared to neonates with poor outcome. The good outcome group also had less pneumonia than the poor outcome group. Besides, there were statistically significant differences in hemoglobin, mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width, C-reaction protein, procalcitonin, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose and CSF protein. Multivariate logistic regression analyses suggested that poor feeding, pneumonia and CSF protein were the predictors of poor outcome. CSF protein content was significantly higher in patients with poor outcome. The best cut-offs for predicting poor outcome were 1,880 mg/L in CSF protein concentration (sensitivity 70.8%, specificity 86.2%). After 2 weeks of treatment, CSF protein remained higher in the poor outcome group. High CSF protein concentration may prognosticate poor outcome in neonates with bacterial meningitis. PMID:26509880

  13. Small molecules present in the cerebrospinal fluid metabolome influence superoxide dismutase 1 aggregation.

    PubMed

    Cristóvão, Joana S; Leal, Sónia S; Cardoso, Isabel; Gomes, Cláudio M

    2013-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) aggregation is one of the pathological markers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. The underlying molecular grounds of SOD1 pathologic aggregation remains obscure as mutations alone are not exclusively the cause for the formation of protein inclusions. Thus, other components in the cell environment likely play a key role in triggering SOD1 toxic aggregation in ALS. Recently, it was found that ALS patients present a specific altered metabolomic profile in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) where SOD1 is also present and potentially interacts with metabolites. Here we have investigated how some of these small molecules affect apoSOD1 structure and aggregation propensity. Our results show that as co-solvents, the tested small molecules do not affect apoSOD1 thermal stability but do influence its tertiary interactions and dynamics, as evidenced by combined biophysical analysis and proteolytic susceptibility. Moreover, these compounds influence apoSOD1 aggregation, decreasing nucleation time and promoting the formation of larger and less soluble aggregates, and in some cases polymeric assemblies apparently composed by spherical species resembling the soluble native protein. We conclude that some components of the ALS metabolome that shape the chemical environment in the CSF may influence apoSOD1 conformers and aggregation. PMID:24048249

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid-based kinetic biomarkers of axonal transport in monitoring neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Fanara, Patrizia; Wong, Po-Yin A; Husted, Kristofor H; Liu, Shanshan; Liu, Victoria M; Kohlstaedt, Lori A; Riiff, Timothy; Protasio, Joan C; Boban, Drina; Killion, Salena; Killian, Maudi; Epling, Lorrie; Sinclair, Elisabeth; Peterson, Julia; Price, Richard W; Cabin, Deborah E; Nussbaum, Robert L; Brühmann, Jörg; Brandt, Roland; Christine, Chadwick W; Aminoff, Michael J; Hellerstein, Marc K

    2012-09-01

    Progress in neurodegenerative disease research is hampered by the lack of biomarkers of neuronal dysfunction. We here identified a class of cerebrospinal fluid-based (CSF-based) kinetic biomarkers that reflect altered neuronal transport of protein cargo, a common feature of neurodegeneration. After a pulse administration of heavy water (2H2O), distinct, newly synthesized 2H-labeled neuronal proteins were transported to nerve terminals and secreted, and then appeared in CSF. In 3 mouse models of neurodegeneration, distinct 2H-cargo proteins displayed delayed appearance and disappearance kinetics in the CSF, suggestive of aberrant transport kinetics. Microtubule-modulating pharmacotherapy normalized CSF-based kinetics of affected 2H-cargo proteins and ameliorated neurodegenerative symptoms in mice. After 2H2O labeling, similar neuronal transport deficits were observed in CSF of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) compared with non-PD control subjects, which indicates that these biomarkers are translatable and relevant to human disease. Measurement of transport kinetics may provide a sensitive method to monitor progression of neurodegeneration and treatment effects. PMID:22922254

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels in type 1 narcolepsy patients very close to onset.

    PubMed

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Pizza, Fabio; Knudsen, Stine; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Jennum, Poul; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by a loss of hypocretin (orexin) signaling in the brain. Genetic data suggests the disorder is caused by an autoimmune attack on hypocretin producing neurons in hypothalamus. This hypothesis has however not yet been confirmed by consistent findings of autoreactive antibodies or T-cells in patient samples. One explanation for these negative results may be that the autoimmune process is no longer active when patients present to the clinic. With increasing awareness in recent years, more and more patients have been diagnosed closer and closer to disease onset. In this study, we tested whether an active immune process in the brain could be detected in these patients, as reflected by increased cytokine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Using multiplex analysis, we measured the levels of 51 cytokines and chemokines in the CSF of 40 type 1 narcolepsy patients having varying disease duration. For comparison, we used samples from 9 healthy controls and 9 patients with other central hypersomnia. Cytokine levels did not differ significantly between controls and patients, even in 5 patients with disease onset less than a month prior to CSF sampling. PMID:25771509

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for differentiation of frontotemporal lobar degeneration from Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David J; Trojanowski, John Q; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Accurate ante mortem diagnosis in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is crucial to the development and implementation of etiology-based therapies. Several neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, including the major protein constituents of inclusions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated with amyloid-beta (Aβ(1-42)) plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle pathology, can be measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for diagnostic applications. Comparative studies using autopsy-confirmed samples suggest that CSF total-tau (t-tau) and Aβ(1-42) levels can accurately distinguish FTLD from AD, with a high t-tau to Aβ(1-42) ratio diagnostic of AD; however, there is also an urgent need for FTLD-specific biomarkers. These analytes will require validation in large autopsy-confirmed cohorts and face challenges of standardization of within- and between-laboratory sources of error. In addition, CSF biomarkers with prognostic utility and longitudinal study of CSF biomarker levels over the course of disease are also needed. Current goals in the field include identification of analytes that are easily and reliably measured and can be used alone or in a multi-modal approach to provide an accurate prediction of underlying neuropathology for use in clinical trials of disease modifying treatments in FTLD. To achieve these goals it will be of the utmost importance to view neurodegenerative disease, including FTLD, as a clinicopathological entity, rather than exclusively a clinical syndrome. PMID:23440936

  17. Detection Of Human Herpesvirus-6 In Cerebrospinal Fluid Of Patients With Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Karen; Honarmand, Somayeh; Espinoza, Alex; Akhyani, Nahid; Glaser, Carol; Jacobson, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Objective Virus infections are the most common causes of encephalitis, a syndrome characterized by acute inflammation of the brain. Over 150 different viruses have been implicated in the pathogenesis of encephalitis, however due to limitations with diagnostic testing, etiologies of over half of the cases remain unknown. Methods To investigate whether HHV-6 is an etiological agent of encephalitis, we examined for evidence of virus infection by determining the presence of viral sequence using PCR and assessed HHV-6 antibody reactivity in the cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) of encephalitis patients with unknown etiology. In a cohort study, we compared virus specific antibody levels in CSF samples of patients with encephalitis, relapsing-remitting MS and other neurologic diseases (OND). Results Our results demonstrated elevated levels of HHV-6 IgG as well as IgM levels in a subset of encephalitis patients compared with OND. Moreover, cell-free viral DNA that is indicative of active infection was detected in 40% (14/35) of encephalitis patients, while no amplifiable viral sequence was found in either relapsing-remitting MS or OND patients. Additionally, a significant correlation between PCR detection and anti-HHV-6 antibody response was also demonstrated. Interpretation Collectively, these results suggested HHV-6 as a possible pathogen in a subset of encephalitis cases. PMID:19334059

  18. A fast and reproducible method for albumin isolation and depletion from serum and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Holewinski, Ronald J; Jin, Zhicheng; Powell, Matthew J; Maust, Matthew D; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2013-03-01

    Analysis of serum and plasma proteomes is a common approach for biomarker discovery, and the removal of high-abundant proteins, such as albumin and immunoglobins, is usually the first step in the analysis. However, albumin binds peptides and proteins, which raises concerns as to how the removal of albumin could impact the outcome of the biomarker study while ignoring the possibility that this could be a biomarker subproteome itself. The first goal of this study was to test a new commercially available affinity capture reagent from Protea Biosciences and to compare the efficiency and reproducibility to four other commercially available albumin depletion methods. The second goal of this study was to determine if there is a highly efficient albumin depletion/isolation system that minimizes sample handling and would be suitable for large numbers of samples. Two of the methods tested (Sigma and ProteaPrep) showed an albumin depletion efficiency of 97% or greater for both serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Isolated serum and CSF albuminomes from ProteaPrep spin columns were analyzed directly by LC-MS/MS, identifying 128 serum (45 not previously reported) and 94 CSF albuminome proteins (17 unique to the CSF albuminome). Serum albuminome was also isolated using Vivapure anti-HSA columns for comparison, identifying 105 proteins, 81 of which overlapped with the ProteaPrep method. PMID:23300121

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid-iophendylate contrast on gradient-echo MR images.

    PubMed

    Jack, C R; Gehring, D G; Ehman, R L; Felmlee, J P

    1988-11-01

    The effect on the signal intensities of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and iophendylate (Pantopaque) and on CSF-iophendylate contrast was studied in vitro with a small-nutation-angle (alpha) gradient refocused magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique (GRASS) as alpha, repetition time (TR), and echo time (TE) were varied. CSF signal intensity was consistently greater than that of iophendylate. Therefore, retained intraspinal iophendylate may be considered in the differential diagnosis of focal areas of low signal intensity at the periphery of the spinal canal on GRASS images. At constant TE and TR, an increase in alpha from 6 degrees to 45 degrees increased the signal intensities of CSF and iophendylate but decreased CSF-iophendylate contrast. At constant alpha and TR, an increase in TE from 13 to 28 msec decreased the signal intensities of CSF and iophendylate but increased contrast. At constant alpha and TE, an increase in TR from 50 to 400 msec increased the signal intensities of CSF and iophendylate, as well as contrast. Clinical examples of the contrast behavior of retained intraspinal iophendylate on both spin-echo and GRASS images corroborate the experimental findings. Retained intraspinal iophendylate may mimic the appearance of intra-or extra-dural lesions, magnetic susceptibility artifact, and flow on gradient-echo MR images of the spine. PMID:3175007

  20. Reduced gastrin releasing peptide in cerebrospinal fluid after recovery from bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Frank, G K; Kaye, W H; Ladenheim, E E; McConaha, C

    2001-08-01

    People with anorexia (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) have altered patterns of eating. It is possible that alterations of the neuropeptide gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), a bombesin (BBS) -like peptide with potent central anorexigenic activity, could contribute to disturbed eating behavior. To avoid the confounding effects of pathologic eating behavior, we measured cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) GRP concentrations in women who were long-term recovered (>1 year, normal weight, and regular menstrual cycles, no binging or purging) from AN (REC AN, N=12) or BN (REC BN, N=21) compared to healthy control women (NC, N=15). CSF GRP was significantly lower (chi(2)=9.41(3), p<0.01) in REC BN (9.6+/-3.1 pg/ml) compared to NC (13.4+/-5.5 pg/ml) and REC AN (11.6+/-2.9 pg/ml). Persistent GRP abnormalities after recovery from BN raise the possibility that this alteration might be trait-related and contribute to episodic hyperphagia in BN. PMID:11562153

  1. Evidence for Fungal Infection in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Brain Tissue from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Marina, Ana Isabel; Morato, Esperanza; Rábano, Alberto; Rodal, Izaskun; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Among neurogenerative diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal illness characterized by a progressive motor neuron dysfunction in the motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. ALS is the most common form of motor neuron disease; yet, to date, the exact etiology of ALS remains unknown. In the present work, we have explored the possibility of fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in brain tissue from ALS patients. Fungal antigens, as well as DNA from several fungi, were detected in CSF from ALS patients. Additionally, examination of brain sections from the frontal cortex of ALS patients revealed the existence of immunopositive fungal antigens comprising punctate bodies in the cytoplasm of some neurons. Fungal DNA was also detected in brain tissue using PCR analysis, uncovering the presence of several fungal species. Finally, proteomic analyses of brain tissue demonstrated the occurrence of several fungal peptides. Collectively, our observations provide compelling evidence of fungal infection in the ALS patients analyzed, suggesting that this infection may play a part in the etiology of the disease or may constitute a risk factor for these patients. PMID:25892962

  2. Evidence for fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Marina, Ana Isabel; Morato, Esperanza; Rábano, Alberto; Rodal, Izaskun; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Among neurogenerative diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal illness characterized by a progressive motor neuron dysfunction in the motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. ALS is the most common form of motor neuron disease; yet, to date, the exact etiology of ALS remains unknown. In the present work, we have explored the possibility of fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in brain tissue from ALS patients. Fungal antigens, as well as DNA from several fungi, were detected in CSF from ALS patients. Additionally, examination of brain sections from the frontal cortex of ALS patients revealed the existence of immunopositive fungal antigens comprising punctate bodies in the cytoplasm of some neurons. Fungal DNA was also detected in brain tissue using PCR analysis, uncovering the presence of several fungal species. Finally, proteomic analyses of brain tissue demonstrated the occurrence of several fungal peptides. Collectively, our observations provide compelling evidence of fungal infection in the ALS patients analyzed, suggesting that this infection may play a part in the etiology of the disease or may constitute a risk factor for these patients. PMID:25892962

  3. Plasma vasopressin concentrations positively predict cerebrospinal fluid vasopressin concentrations in human neonates.

    PubMed

    Carson, Dean S; Howerton, Christopher L; Garner, Joseph P; Hyde, Shellie A; Clark, Catherine L; Hardan, Antonio Y; Penn, Anna A; Parker, Karen J

    2014-11-01

    Central arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays a critical role in mammalian social behavior and has been hypothesized to be a biomarker of certain human neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism. However, opportunities to collect post-mortem brain tissue or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from children are extremely limited, and the use of less invasive peripheral assessments (e.g., blood, urine, or saliva) of AVP as a proxy for more invasive central measures has not been well validated. Further, almost nothing is known about AVP biology in very young infants. Therefore in the present study we concomitantly collected basal CSF and plasma samples from N = 20 neonates undergoing clinical sepsis evaluation (all were sepsis negative) and quantified AVP concentrations via well-validated enzyme-immunoassay methodology. Plasma AVP concentrations significantly and positively predicted CSF AVP concentrations (r = 0.73, p = 0.0021), and this relationship persisted when variance attributed to sex, gestational age, and sample collection time was controlled for in the statistical model (r = 0.75, p = 0.0047). These findings provide preliminary support for the use of basal plasma AVP measurement as a proxy for basal brain AVP activity in pediatric populations. Future studies are now required to determine the relationship between behavioral measures and AVP concentrations in both central and peripheral compartments in young infants and older children. PMID:25148831

  4. Ultrasound-guided atlanto-occipital puncture for cerebrospinal fluid analysis on the standing horse.

    PubMed

    Depecker, M; Bizon-Mercier, C; Couroucé-Malblanc, A

    2014-01-11

    The atlanto-occipital site (AO) is convenient for retrieving an adequate volume and quality of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the diagnosis of neurological disease in horses. However, general anaesthesia is not always possible for horses displaying severe neurological signs, or for economical reasons. The objectives of the present work were to determine the feasibility and safety of ultrasound-guided CSF puncture at the AO site on the standing horse. Seven horses (six healthy and one mildly ataxic) were sedated with acepromazine (0.02 mg/kg bodyweight intravenously or 0.04 mg/kg bodyweight intramuscularly) and detomidine (0.01 mg/kg bodyweight intravenously), and placed in stocks or in a recovery stall with the head kept on a headstand. Puncture was performed by ultrasonographic guidance with a parasagittal technique, as previously described, using a 20 g, 3.5 inch spinal needle. In all horses, no adverse reaction was observed when crossing the dura mater and 20 ml of CSF was rapidly retrieved without any blood contamination. Ultrasound-guided CSF puncture can be performed easily at the AO site on a healthy standing horse. Regarding the potential risk of this procedure, safety measures and close observation are essential. Further studies on a larger amount of ataxic horses are also required before considering this technique as an alternative option for CSF puncture. PMID:24225443

  5. Identification of a Biomarker in Cerebrospinal Fluid for Neuronopathic Forms of Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zigdon, Hila; Savidor, Alon; Levin, Yishai; Meshcheriakova, Anna; Schiffmann, Raphael; Futerman, Anthony H.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease, a recessive inherited metabolic disorder caused by defects in the gene encoding glucosylceramidase (GlcCerase), can be divided into three subtypes according to the appearance of symptoms associated with central nervous system involvement. We now identify a protein, glycoprotein non-metastatic B (GPNMB), that acts as an authentic marker of brain pathology in neurological forms of Gaucher disease. Using three independent techniques, including quantitative global proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in samples from Gaucher disease patients that display neurological symptoms, we demonstrate a correlation between the severity of symptoms and GPNMB levels. Moreover, GPNMB levels in the CSF correlate with disease severity in a mouse model of Gaucher disease. GPNMB was also elevated in brain samples from patients with type 2 and 3 Gaucher disease. Our data suggest that GPNMB can be used as a marker to quantify neuropathology in Gaucher disease patients and as a marker of treatment efficacy once suitable treatments towards the neurological symptoms of Gaucher disease become available. PMID:25775479

  6. Higher level of NT-proCNP in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tomasiuk, Ryszard; Lipowski, Dariusz; Szlufik, Stanislaw; Peplinska, Krystyna; Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Malgorzata

    2016-02-12

    Aminoterminal pro-C type natriuretic peptide (NT-proCNP) as an active form of CNP, has been recently proven to be a potential marker of sepsis and to be linked to inflammatory diseases. So far, there are no studies describing the level of NT-proCNP in meningitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of NT-proCNP in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with meningitis and to compare it with the serum level of CRP and procalcitonin (PCT) in this group of patients. The results were compared to serum levels of CRP, PCT and CSF levels of cytosis, protein and lactate. NT-proCNP levels were statistically significant between the control group and the meningitis groups (p=0.02; R=0.3). We also noted a correlation between the level of NT-proCNP in the CSF of all of the study groups (controls and meningitis patients) and the CSF levels of cytosis (p<0.5; R=0.43), protein (p<0.05; R=0.39) and lactate (p<0.05; R=0.34), and also the serum level of CRP (p<0.05; R=0.30), but not serum PCT (p>0.05; R=0.11). These results suggest that NT-proCNP could be a potential marker of meningitis, but it cannot be used to distinguish between the types of meningitis. PMID:26742639

  7. The predictive value of cerebrospinal fluid tap-test in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, B P; Carelli, E F; Honorato, D C; Facure, J J

    1997-06-01

    Eighteen patients (mean age of 66.5 years) with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) underwent a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt surgery. Prior to operation a cerebrospinal fluid tap-test (CSF-TT) was performed with measurements of gait pattern and psychometric functions (memory, visuo-motor speed and visuo-constructive skills) before and after the removal of 50 ml CSF by lumbar puncture (LP). Fifteen patients improved and 3 were unchanged after surgery. Short duration of disease, gait disturbance preceding mental deterioration, wide temporal horns and small sulci on CT-scan were associated with good outcome after shunting. There was a good correlation between the results of CSF-TT and shunt surgery (chi 2 = 4.11, phi = 0.48, p < 0.05), with gait test showing highest correlation (r = 0.99, p = 0.01). In conclusion, this version of CSF-TT proved to be an effective test to predict improvement after shunting in patients with NPH. PMID:9629375

  8. Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak through the Posterior Aspect of the Petrous Bone*

    PubMed Central

    Nadaraja, Garani S.; Monfared, Ashkan; Jackler, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak through the posterior fossa (PF) aspect of the petrous bone is exceedingly rare. A case series allows analysis of etiologies and how they may differ from the more common middle fossa (MF) route of leakage. The design was a retrospective case series. The setting was a tertiary care institution. A series of three patients with PF spontaneous CSF leaks was identified. High-resolution imaging (CT and MRI) and intraoperative observations were evaluated. Both in this series and in previously reported cases, patients share the demographics typically found in the MF leak population. In our series, two patterns of PF CSF leak were identified: (1) large unilateral with cerebellar encephalocele and (2) small punctate defects just lateral to the endolymphatic sac. Two presented with simultaneous MF and PF leaks suggesting a shared etiology, at least in some cases, with a role for increased intracranial pressure. In spontaneous CSF leaks, it is important to evaluate the posterior petrous bone along with the tegmen. The concomitant appearance of MF with PF leaks points out the risk that repair via MF craniotomy could fail to identify a leakage site in the vicinity of the endolymphatic sac. PMID:23372998

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid substance P concentrations are elevated in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Per; Almqvist, Erik G; Wallin, Anders; Johansson, Jan-Ove; Andreasson, Ulf; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Svensson, Johan

    2015-11-16

    The neuropeptides substance P, orexin A (hypocretin-1) and neurotensin are signaling molecules that influence brain activity. We examined their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels in a study population consisting of Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) diagnosed with AD dementia upon follow-up (n=32), stable MCI (SMCI, n=13), other dementias (n=15), and healthy controls (n=20). CSF substance P level was increased in AD patients compared to patients with other dementias and healthy controls (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). Patients with other dementia or SMCI had lower CSF orexin A level than AD patients (both P<0.05) and marginally lower level than healthy controls (both P=0.05). CSF neurotensin level was similar in all groups. In the total study population (n=80), CSF substance P level correlated positively with CSF levels of T-tau and P-tau, and in AD patients (n=32), CSF substance P level correlated positively with CSF Aβ1-42 level. In conclusion, CSF substance P level was elevated in AD patients and correlated with CSF Aβ1-42 level, a well established marker of senile plaque pathology. The role of low CSF orexin A level in other dementias or SMCI needs to be explored in further studies. PMID:26453765

  10. Leptin Levels Are Negatively Correlated with 2-Arachidonoylglycerol in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, James; Azim, Syed; Rebecchi, Mario J.; Galbavy, William; Feng, Tian; Reinsel, Ruth; Rizwan, Sabeen; Fowler, Christopher J.; Benveniste, Helene; Kaczocha, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background There is compelling evidence in humans that peripheral endocannabinoid signaling is disrupted in obesity. However, little is known about the corresponding central signaling. Here, we have investigated the relationship between gender, leptin, body mass index (BMI) and levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of primarily overweight to obese patients with osteoarthritis. Methodology/Principal Findings Patients (20 females, 15 males, age range 44-78 years, BMI range 24-42) undergoing total knee arthroplasty for end-stage osteoarthritis were recruited for the study. Endocannabinoids were quantified by liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry. AEA and 2-AG levels in the serum and CSF did not correlate with either age or BMI. However, 2-AG levels in the CSF, but not serum, correlated negatively with CSF leptin levels (Spearman’s ρ -0.48, P=0.0076, n=30). No such correlations were observed for AEA and leptin. Conclusions/Significance In the patient sample investigated, there is a negative association between 2-AG and leptin levels in the CSF. This is consistent with pre-clinical studies in animals, demonstrating that leptin controls the levels of hypothalamic endocannabinoids that regulate feeding behavior. PMID:25835291

  11. Determination of enterostatin in human cerebrospinal fluid by capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, S; Prasad, C; Robertson, H J; Liu, Y M

    2001-02-01

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection is described for quantification of enterostatin (Val-Pro-Asp-Pro-Arg), a pentapeptide involved in appetite regulation and insulin secretion. Enterostatin and two other pentapeptides belonging to the enterostatin family (i.e. Ala-Pro-Gly-Pro-Arg and Val-Pro-Gly-Pro-Arg) were well separated from each other. The peptides were fluorescently tagged with naphthalene-2,3- dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) and separated by micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) in the presence of methanol as an organic modifier. Coupled with LIF detection, the method had a detection limit of 4.8 x 10(-6) M for enterostatin. The relative standard deviation was to be 4.0% from five determinations of enterostatin at 37.2 microM in a human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample. Twenty-three human CSF samples were analyzed. The level of enterostatin ranged from 24 microM to 51 microM with a mean (+/- SEM) value of 41.7 +/- 2.0 microM. PMID:11293697

  12. Temporary Lumbar Subcutaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt Placement in Pediatric Patient: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Xiao, WeiGang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We report the technical aspects of lumbar subcutaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt for temporary CSF drainage that may be an alternative strategy to lumbar catheter placement with external drainage system. CASE DESCRIPTION A 7 years and nine-month old boy with developmental delay, intermittent episodes of agitation, and combination of myoclonic and generalized tonic clonic seizures, associated with communicating hydrocephalus was evaluated. A temporary CSF drainage trial was contemplated to determine whether a permanent CSF shunt would be beneficial. A temporary lumbar subcutaneous CSF shunt was performed to avoid catheter dislodgement or drainage system disruption due to child’s agitative behavior and seizures. The catheter was inserted into the subarachnoid space at L3–L4 vertebral level and advanced approximately 20 cm above site of insertion and approximately 4 cm was imbedded into the subcutaneous tissue. An ultrasound two days later demonstrated CSF collection in subcutaneous tissue measuring 3.48 cm × 0.84 cm surrounding the catheter tip. The patient’s parents reported improvement in clinical symptoms after four days of CSF drainage. CONCLUSIONS Lumbar subcutaneous CSF shunt may be used for temporary CSF drainage for diagnostic purposes without the need for in patient admission and monitoring required for standard lumbar catheter with external CSF drainage system. PMID:26958154

  13. Assessment of cerebrospinal fluid outflow conductance using an adaptive observer--experimental and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Andersson, K; Manchester, I R; Andersson, N; Shiriaev, A; Malm, J; Eklund, A

    2007-11-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) patients have a disturbance in the dynamics of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) system. The outflow conductance, C, of the CSF system has been suggested to be prognostic for positive outcome after treatment with a CSF shunt. All current methods for estimation of C have drawbacks; these include lack of information on the accuracy and relatively long investigation times. Thus, there is a need for improved methods. To accomplish this, the theoretical framework for a new adaptive observer (OBS) was developed which provides real-time estimation of C. The aim of this study was to evaluate the OBS method and to compare it with the constant pressure infusion (CPI) method. The OBS method was applied to data from infusion investigations performed with the CPI method. These consisted of repeated measurements on an experimental set-up and 30 patients with suspected INPH. There was no significant difference in C between the CPI and the OBS method for the experimental set-up. For the patients there was a significant difference, -0.84+/-1.25 microl (s kPa)(-1), mean +/- SD (paired sample t-test, p<0.05). However, such a difference is within clinically acceptable limits. This encourages further development of this new real-time approach for estimation of the outflow conductance. PMID:17978420

  14. Direct Identification of Enteroviruses in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Suspected Meningitis by Nested PCR Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Krasota, Alexandr; Loginovskih, Natalia; Ivanova, Olga; Lipskaya, Galina

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses, the most common human viral pathogens worldwide, have been associated with serous meningitis, encephalitis, syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis, myocarditis and the onset of diabetes type 1. In the future, the rapid identification of the etiological agent would allow to adjust the therapy promptly and thereby improve the course of the disease and prognosis. We developed RT-nested PCR amplification of the genomic region coding viral structural protein VP1 for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical specimens and compared it with the existing analogs. One-hundred-fifty-nine cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) from patients with suspected meningitis were studied. The amplification of VP1 genomic region using the new method was achieved for 86 (54.1%) patients compared with 75 (47.2%), 53 (33.3%) and 31 (19.5%) achieved with previously published methods. We identified 11 serotypes of the Enterovirus species B in 2012, including relatively rare echovirus 14 (E-14), E-15 and E-32, and eight serotypes of species B and 5 enteroviruses A71 (EV-A71) in 2013. The developed method can be useful for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical material with the low virus loads such as CSF. PMID:26751470

  15. Proteome analysis of human cerebrospinal fluid as a diagnostic biomarker in patients with meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Ho; Lee, Sang Kwang; Yoo, Yong Cheol; Park, Nam Hyun; Park, Dan Bi; Yoo, Jong Shin; An, Hyun Joo; Park, Young Mok; Cho, Kyung Gi

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To identify meningioma-specific proteins, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 4 patients with a meningioma and 4 patients with a non-brain tumorous lesion were analyzed. Material/Methods Two-dimensional electrophoresis and electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry analyses revealed 10 unique spots, containing 11 independent proteins (spot #2 and #4 each contained 2 proteins and spot #3 was not identified) were evident in CSF associated with human meningioma: serum albumin precursor (3 different isoforms), Apolipoprotein E (Apo E), Apolipoprotein J precursor (Apo J), Transthyretin precursor (TTR), Prostaglandin D2 synthase 21kDa (PTGDS), proapolipoprotein, Chain D hemoglobin Ypsilanti, alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), and beta-2-microglobulin precursor (β2M). Results The contents of Apo E, Apo J and AAT were increased, while PTGDS, TTR and β2M were decreased. Conclusions The results observed by 2-dimensional electrophoresis were verified by Western blot analysis. The unique proteins may represent possible candidate biomarkers of meningioma. PMID:23111736

  16. Subtypes based on cerebrospinal fluid and magnetic resonance imaging markers in normal elderly predict cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Nettiksimmons, J; Harvey, D; Brewer, J; Carmichael, O; DeCarli, C; Jack, C R; Petersen, R; Shaw, L M; Trojanowski, J Q; Weiner, M W; Beckett, L

    2010-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show patterns of change in Alzheimer's disease (AD) that precede dementia. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) studied normal controls (NC), subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and subjects with AD to identify patterns of biomarkers to aid in early diagnosis and effective treatment of AD. Two hundred twenty-two NC underwent baseline MRI and clinical examination at baseline and at least one follow-up. One hundred twelve also provided CSF at baseline. Unsupervised clustering based on initial CSF and MRI measures was used to identify clusters of participants with similar profiles. Repeated measures regression modeling assessed the relationship of individual measures, and of cluster membership, to cognitive change over 3 years. Most individuals showed little cognitive change. Individual biomarkers had limited predictive value for cognitive decline, but membership in the cluster with the most extreme profile was associated with more rapid decline in ADAS-cog. Subtypes among NC based on multiple biomarkers may represent the earliest stages of subclinical cognitive decline and AD. PMID:20542598

  17. Sealing of cerebrospinal fluid leakage during conventional transsphenoidal surgery using a fibrin-coated collagen fleece.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang Ki; Kim, Yong Bae; Hong, Je Beom; Lee, Kyu Sung

    2015-04-01

    The prevention of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is a key feature of the transsphenoidal approach (TSA) to the pituitary fossa. Although fibrin-coated collagen fleece (Tachosil, Nycomed, Linz, Austria) is a powerful topical hemostatic agent whose usage is increasing in open neurosurgery, the use of Tachosil in TSA surgery has not yet gained wide clinical acceptance. We retrospectively evaluated whether the lone use of Tachosil without additional packing material or postoperative lumbar drainage was effective to prevent CSF leakage in TSA surgery in 101 patients. Additionally, we compared it to a conventional sellar closure technique in 54 patients. Only two (1.9%) of the patients in the Tachosil application group developed postoperative CSF rhinorrhea. No other postoperative complications occurred, including infection or material detachment. However, in the conventional packing group, five (9.3%) patients developed postoperative CSF rhinorrhea and one (1.9%) developed meningitis during the postoperative period. The mean length of postoperative hospital stay was significantly shorter in the Tachosil treatment group than in the standard closure group. These results may indicate that sellar repair using Tachosil can be effective to prevent CSF leakage after TSA surgery, and obviate the need for an autologous tissue graft or postoperative lumbar drainage. PMID:25630424

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid profiles with increasing number of cerebral microbleeds in a continuum of cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Shams, Sara; Granberg, Tobias; Martola, Juha; Li, Xiaozhen; Shams, Mana; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Cavallin, Lena; Aspelin, Peter; Kristoffersen-Wiberg, Maria; Wahlund, Lars-Olof

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are hypothesised to have an important yet unknown role in the dementia disease pathology. In this study we analysed increasing number of CMBs and their independent associations with routine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in a continuum of cognitive impairment. A total of 1039 patients undergoing dementia investigation were analysed and underwent lumbar puncture, and an MRI scan. CSF samples were analysed for amyloid β (Aβ) 42, total tau (T-tau), tau phosphorylated at threonine 18 (P-tau) and CSF/serum albumin ratios. Increasing number of CMBs were independently associated with low Aβ42 levels, in the whole cohort, Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment (p < 0.05). CSF/serum albumin ratios were high with multiple CMBs (p < 0.001), reflecting accompanying blood-brain barrier dysfunction. T-tau and P-tau levels were lower in Alzheimer's patients with multiple CMBs when compared to zero CMBs, but did not change in the rest of the cohort. White matter hyperintensities were associated with low Aβ42 in the whole cohort and Alzheimer's disease (p < 0.05). Aβ42 is the routine CSF-biomarker mainly associated with CMBs in cognitive impairment, and there is an accumulative effect with increasing number of CMBs. PMID:26661151

  19. Simultaneous Determination of All Forms of Biopterin and Neopterin in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In humans, genetic defects of the synthesis or regeneration of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an essential cofactor in hydroxylation reactions, are associated with severe neurological disorders. The diagnosis of these conditions relies on the determination of BH4, dihydrobiopterin (BH2), and dihydroneopterin (NH2) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As MS/MS is less sensitive than fluorescence detection (FD) for this purpose, the most widely used method since 1980 involves two HPLC runs including two differential off-line chemical oxidation procedures aiming to transform the reduced pterins into their fully oxidized fluorescent counterparts, biopterin (B) and neopterin (N). However, this tedious and time-consuming two-step indirect method underestimates BH4, BH2, and NH2 concentrations. Direct quantification of BH4 is essential for studying its metabolism and for monitoring the efficacy of BH4 supplementation in patients with genetic defects. Here we describe a single step method to simultaneously measure BH4, BH2, B, NH2, and N in CSF by HPLC coupled to FD after postcolumn coulometric oxidation. All target pterins were quantified in CSF with a small volume (100 μL), and a single filtration step for sample preparation and analysis. As compared to the most widely used method in more than 100 CSF samples, this new assay is the easiest route for accurately determining in a single run BH4, BH2, and NH2 in CSF in deficit situations as well as for monitoring the efficacy of the treatment. PMID:24650440

  20. Proteome analysis of biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid of neuromyelitis optica patients

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shumei; Guo, Xuxiao; Qin, Zhaoyu; Wang, Banqin; Li, Xiaohong; Qin, Yanjiang; Liu, Yi-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To better understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying neuromyelitis optica (NMO), we developed a proteomics platform for biomarker discovery in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with NMO. Methods Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were used to compare the CSF proteome of NMO patients with that of controls. A subsequent ELISA and western blot analysis were performed to verify the results of the proteomic analysis. Pathway Studio 5.0 software was used to determine possible functional interactions among these differentially expressed proteins. Results Using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF MS, we identified 11 differentially expressed proteins and two isoforms of these same proteins. The expression of four proteins was enhanced, whereas the expression of seven proteins was reduced in the NMO group in comparison to the control group. These differences in protein expression were confirmed by performing ELISA and western blot analyses (p<0.01). Protein network analyses revealed biologic interactions and cross-talks among these differentially expressed proteins. Conclusions Because of their unique expression profile in NMO CSFs, these proteins are candidate biomarkers for NMO. Thus, our findings may have important implications for both the diagnosis of NMO and the further understanding of its pathogenesis. PMID:19710940

  1. Evaluation of the effect of oral omeprazole on canine cerebrospinal fluid production: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Girod, M; Allerton, F; Gommeren, K; Tutunaru, A C; de Marchin, J; Van Soens, I; Ramery, E; Peeters, D

    2016-03-01

    Administration of omeprazole by ventriculo-cisternal perfusion or intravenously has been shown to decrease cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production in dogs and rabbits. Oral omeprazole has consequently been recommended to reduce CSF production in dogs with conditions in which clinical signs may be attributable to an accumulation of CSF in the central nervous system (e.g. hydrocephalus, syringomyelia). The albumin quotient (QAlb), the ratio between CSF and serum albumin concentration, has been proposed as a reliable means to evaluate CSF production; decreasing CSF production should cause an increase in QAlb. The aims of this study were to assess the effect of oral administration of omeprazole on QAlb in dogs and to compare two methods to assess CSF albumin concentration. Fifteen healthy Beagle dogs received omeprazole (1.2 mg/kg/day) orally for 14 days; CSF and blood were obtained before and after treatment. CSF albumin concentrations were evaluated by nephelometry and high-resolution protein electrophoresis. Regardless of the method used for measuring albumin, QAlb did not change significantly following oral omeprazole administration, suggesting that CSF production in healthy dogs may not be affected by chronic oral therapy with omeprazole. PMID:26852945

  2. Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Alzheimer's Disease Modifying Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Na-Young; Shin, Dong Wun; Trojanowski, John Q

    2014-01-01

    Until now, a disease-modifying therapy (DMT) that has an ability to slow or arrest Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression has not been developed, and all clinical trials involving AD patients enrolled by clinical assessment alone also have not been successful. Given the growing consensus that the DMT is likely to require treatment initiation well before full-blown dementia emerges, the early detection of AD will provide opportunities to successfully identify new drugs that slow the course of AD pathology. Recent advances in early detection of AD and prediction of progression of the disease using various biomarkers, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) A?1-42, total tau and p-tau181 levels, and imagining biomarkers, are now being actively integrated into the designs of AD clinical trials. In terms of therapeutic mechanisms, monitoring these markers may be helpful for go/no-go decision making as well as surrogate markers for disease severity or progression. Furthermore, CSF biomarkers can be used as a tool to enrich patients for clinical trials with prospect of increasing statistical power and reducing costs in drug development. However, the standardization of technical aspects of analysis of these biomarkers is an essential prerequisite to the clinical uses. To accomplish this, global efforts are underway to standardize CSF biomarker measurements and a quality control program supported by the Alzheimer's Association. The current review summarizes therapeutic targets of developing drugs in AD pathophysiology, and provides the most recent advances in the PMID:25598657

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurovascular dysfunction in mild dementia and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Melanie D; Sagare, Abhay P; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of age-related dementias. In addition to genetics, environment, and lifestyle, growing evidence supports vascular contributions to dementias including dementia because of AD. Alzheimer's disease affects multiple cell types within the neurovascular unit (NVU), including brain vascular cells (endothelial cells, pericytes, and vascular smooth muscle cells), glial cells (astrocytes and microglia), and neurons. Thus, identifying and integrating biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses and injury with established AD biomarkers, amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, has a potential to contribute to better understanding of the disease process in dementias including AD. Here, we discuss the existing literature on cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses during early stages of dementia and AD. We suggest that the clinical usefulness of established AD biomarkers, Aβ and tau, could be further improved by developing an algorithm that will incorporate biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses and injury. Such biomarker algorithm could aid in early detection and intervention as well as identify novel treatment targets to delay disease onset, slow progression, and/or prevent AD. PMID:25899298

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid-derived Semaphorin3B orients neuroepithelial cell divisions in the apicobasal axis.

    PubMed

    Arbeille, Elise; Reynaud, Florie; Sanyas, Isabelle; Bozon, Muriel; Kindbeiter, Karine; Causeret, Frédéric; Pierani, Alessandra; Falk, Julien; Moret, Frédéric; Castellani, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    The spatial orientation of cell divisions is fundamental for tissue architecture and homeostasis. Here we analysed neuroepithelial progenitors in the developing mouse spinal cord to determine whether extracellular signals orient the mitotic spindle. We report that Semaphorin3B (Sema3B) released from the floor plate and the nascent choroid plexus in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) controls progenitor division orientation. Delivery of exogenous Sema3B to neural progenitors after neural tube opening in living embryos promotes planar orientation of their division. Preventing progenitor access to cues present in the CSF by genetically engineered canal obstruction affects the proportion of planar and oblique divisions. Sema3B knockout phenocopies the loss of progenitor access to the CSF. Sema3B binds to the apical surface of mitotic progenitors and exerts its effect via Neuropilin receptors, GSK3 activation and subsequent inhibition of the microtubule stabilizer CRMP2. Thus, extrinsic control mediated by the Semaphorin signalling orients progenitor divisions in neurogenic zones. PMID:25721514

  5. Chronic infusion of opiate peptides to rat cerebrospinal fluid with osmotic minipumps.

    PubMed

    Saland, L C; Ortiz, E; Samora, A

    1984-09-01

    Beta-endorphin-related opiate peptides or the opiate antagonist naloxone were chronically infused for periods of 24 to 48 hours to the lateral cerebral ventricle of adult male rats using Alza osmotic minipumps. Previous studies have suggested a "chemotactic"-like effect of opiate peptides for supraependymal macrophages in the region of the third ventricle of the brain. The present study demonstrates a stimulatory effect of beta-endorphin infusion on the appearance of lymphocyte and neutrophil-like cells, in addition to macrophages, in the region of the third ventricle, suggestive of an intracerebral inflammatory response. None of the other molecules, including alpha-endorphin, methionine-enkephalin, naloxone, or sterile saline produced similar cellular responses after infusion, although some of the latter substances may have induced the appearance of supraependymal neuron-like cells in the area. Observations suggest that the chronic presence of beta-endorphin, a biologically active opiate peptide, will interact with cells of the immune system, which have the ability to gain access to the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:6091499

  6. Partial characterization of a novel endogenous opioid in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Miller, B E; Lipman, J J; Byrne, W L

    1987-12-01

    Human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains many uncharacterized endogenous opioids, in addition to the known enkephalins, endorphins, and dynorphins. These opioids may be separated by gel filtration chromatography and identified by radioreceptor assay for opioid activity. One region of the chromatographic elution profile, designated "Peak B" has previously been shown to be related to the pain status of chronic pain patients. We now report that human Peak B isolated from the CSF of pain-free elective surgery patients is present at a typical concentration equivalent in activity to 1.4 pmol of morphine sulfate per ml of CSF measured by radioreceptor assay. At a dose of 0.06 and 0.12 pmol morphine sulfate equivalents of CSF (MSE), injected into the cerebroventricular system of the mouse, Peak B produced an antinociceptive effect, the intensity and duration of which was dose-dependent and which was antagonized by naloxone. The mouse vas deferens (MVD) preparation was inhibited by Peak B in a manner that was sensitive to antagonism by naloxone only at low (less than 1.0 microM) but not at higher (greater than 6.0 microM) concentrations of the antagonist. Peak B activity in the MVD assay was unaffected by treatment with trypsin or alpha-chymotrypsin. PMID:3683089

  7. Volume transmission of beta-endorphin via the cerebrospinal fluid; a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that non-synaptic communication by volume transmission in the flowing CSF plays an important role in neural mechanisms, especially for extending the duration of behavioral effects. In the present review, we explore the mechanisms involved in the behavioral and physiological effects of β-endorphin (β-END), especially those involving the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as a message transport system to reach distant brain areas. The major source of β-END are the pro-opio-melano-cortin (POMC) neurons, located in the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (ARH), bordering the 3rd ventricle. In addition, numerous varicose β-END-immunoreactive fibers are situated close to the ventricular surfaces. In the present paper we surveyed the evidence that volume transmission via the CSF can be considered as an option for messages to reach remote brain areas. Some of the points discussed in the present review are: release mechanisms of β-END, independence of peripheral versus central levels, central β-END migration over considerable distances, behavioral effects of β-END depend on location of ventricular administration, and abundance of mu and delta opioid receptors in the periventricular regions of the brain. PMID:22883598

  8. The regulation of brain states by neuroactive substances distributed via the cerebrospinal fluid; a review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) system provides nutrients to and removes waste products from the brain. Recent findings suggest, however, that in addition, the CSF contains message molecules in the form of actively released neuroactive substances. The concentrations of these vary between locations, suggesting they are important for the changes in brain activity that underlie different brain states, and induce different sensory input and behavioral output relationships. The cranial CSF displays a rapid caudally-directed ventricular flow followed by a slower rostrally-directed subarachnoid flow (mainly towards the cribriform plate and from there into the nasal lymphatics). Thus, many brain areas are exposed to and can be influenced by substances contained in the CSF. In this review we discuss the production and flow of the CSF, including the mechanisms involved in the regulation of its composition. In addition, the available evidence for the release of neuropeptides and other neuroactive substances into the CSF is reviewed, with particular attention to the selective effects of these on distant downstream receptive brain areas. As a conclusion we suggest that (1) the flowing CSF is involved in more than just nutrient and waste control, but is also used as a broadcasting system consisting of coordinated messages to a variety of nearby and distant brain areas; (2) this special form of volume transmission underlies changes in behavioral states. PMID:20157443

  9. Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Promotes Neuronal Viability and Activity of Hippocampal Neuronal Circuits In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alcazar, Marta; Culley, Georgia; Lyckenvik, Tim; Mobarrez, Kristoffer; Bjorefeldt, Andreas; Wasling, Pontus; Seth, Henrik; Asztely, Frederik; Harrer, Andrea; Iglseder, Bernhard; Aigner, Ludwig; Hanse, Eric; Illes, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    For decades it has been hypothesized that molecules within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diffuse into the brain parenchyma and influence the function of neurons. However, the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits are largely unexplored and unknown. A major reason for this is the absence of appropriate neuronal in vitro model systems, and it is uncertain if neurons cultured in pure CSF survive and preserve electrophysiological functionality in vitro. In this article, we present an approach to address how human CSF (hCSF) influences neuronal circuits in vitro. We validate our approach by comparing the morphology, viability, and electrophysiological function of single neurons and at the network level in rat organotypic slice and primary neuronal cultures cultivated either in hCSF or in defined standard culture media. Our results demonstrate that rodent hippocampal slices and primary neurons cultured in hCSF maintain neuronal morphology and preserve synaptic transmission. Importantly, we show that hCSF increases neuronal viability and the number of electrophysiologically active neurons in comparison to the culture media. In summary, our data indicate that hCSF represents a physiological environment for neurons in vitro and a superior culture condition compared to the defined standard media. Moreover, this experimental approach paves the way to assess the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits as well as suggesting a novel strategy for central nervous system (CNS) disease modeling. PMID:26973467

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid from Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients Induces Mitochondrial and Lysosomal Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aparna; Varghese, Anu Mary; Vijaylakshmi, Kalyan; Sumitha, Rajendrarao; Prasanna, V K; Shruthi, S; Chandrasekhar Sagar, B K; Datta, Keshava K; Gowda, Harsha; Nalini, Atchayaram; Alladi, Phalguni Anand; Christopher, Rita; Sathyaprabha, Talakad N; Raju, Trichur R; Srinivas Bharath, M M

    2016-05-01

    In our laboratory, we have developed (1) an in vitro model of sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (sALS) involving exposure of motor neurons to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from sALS patients and (2) an in vivo model involving intrathecal injection of sALS-CSF into rat pups. In the current study, we observed that spinal cord extract from the in vivo sALS model displayed elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial dysfunction. Quantitative proteomic analysis of sub-cellular fractions from spinal cord of the in vivo sALS model revealed down-regulation of 35 mitochondrial proteins and 4 lysosomal proteins. Many of the down-regulated mitochondrial proteins contribute to alterations in respiratory chain complexes and organellar morphology. Down-regulated lysosomal proteins Hexosaminidase, Sialidase and Aryl sulfatase also displayed lowered enzyme activity, thus validating the mass spectrometry data. Proteomic analysis and validation by western blot indicated that sALS-CSF induced the over-expression of the pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein BNIP3L. In the in vitro model, sALS-CSF induced neurotoxicity and elevated ROS, while it lowered the mitochondrial membrane potential in rat spinal cord mitochondria in the in vivo model. Ultra structural alterations were evident in mitochondria of cultured motor neurons exposed to ALS-CSF. These observations indicate the first line evidence that sALS-CSF mediated mitochondrial and lysosomal defects collectively contribute to the pathogenesis underlying sALS. PMID:26646005

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurovascular dysfunction in mild dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Melanie D; Sagare, Abhay P; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of age-related dementias. In addition to genetics, environment, and lifestyle, growing evidence supports vascular contributions to dementias including dementia because of AD. Alzheimer's disease affects multiple cell types within the neurovascular unit (NVU), including brain vascular cells (endothelial cells, pericytes, and vascular smooth muscle cells), glial cells (astrocytes and microglia), and neurons. Thus, identifying and integrating biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses and injury with established AD biomarkers, amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, has a potential to contribute to better understanding of the disease process in dementias including AD. Here, we discuss the existing literature on cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses during early stages of dementia and AD. We suggest that the clinical usefulness of established AD biomarkers, Aβ and tau, could be further improved by developing an algorithm that will incorporate biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses and injury. Such biomarker algorithm could aid in early detection and intervention as well as identify novel treatment targets to delay disease onset, slow progression, and/or prevent AD. PMID:25899298

  12. Pharmacologic manipulation of the flushing action of cerebrospinal fluid. Effect on CSF diatrizoate levels.

    PubMed

    Harnish, P P; Samuel, K

    1988-12-01

    The continual production and absorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) provides for the dilution and removal of potentially toxic substances from the central nervous system (CNS). This study quantified changes in the CSF concentration of diatrizoate following pretreatment with various drugs that alter CSF production. Adult rats, pretreated with one of ten drugs or normal saline (control) and anesthetized, received sodium diatrizoate (2 mL/kg, IV). Blood and CSF were sampled 2 hours later, and the diatrizoate concentrations were measured. Serum diatrizoate levels in the control group averaged 144.3 micrograms/mL. There were no significant differences in serum levels between control and pretreated groups. The CSF diatrizoate concentration in the control group averaged 10.8 micrograms/mL. Pretreatment with acetazolamide, ritodrine, or probenecid resulted in a significant increase in the CSF concentration, to 24.7 micrograms/mL or 228% of control in the case of acetazolamide. Pretreatment with salicylate, carbachol, or aminophylline resulted in significantly lower CSF diatrizoate levels than control; 3.2 micrograms/mL (30% of control) for carbachol. Digoxin, furosemide, dibutyryl cAMP, or dexamethasone pretreatments had no significant effect on CSF diatrizoate concentrations. Thus, a wide range of drugs may significantly alter the concentration of diatrizoate in the CNS. Drug-induced changes in the rate of CSF production may be responsible for this action. PMID:2849595

  13. Detection of free immunoglobulin light chains in cerebrospinal fluids of patients with central nervous system lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Schroers, Roland; Baraniskin, Alexander; Heute, Christoph; Kuhnhenn, Jan; Alekseyev, Andriy; Schmiegel, Wolff; Schlegel, Uwe; Pels, Hendrik-Johannes

    2010-09-01

    Diagnosis of central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma depends on histopathology of brain biopsies, because no reliable disease marker in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been identified yet. B-cell lymphomas such as CNS lymphomas are clonally restricted and express either kappa or lambda immunoglobulin light chains. The aim of this study was to find out a potential diagnostic value of free immunoglobulin light chains released into the CSF of CNS lymphoma patients. Kappa (kappa) and lambda (lambda) free immunoglobulin light chains (FLC) were measured in CSF and serum samples collected from 21 patients with primary and secondary CNS lymphomas and 14 control patients with different neurologic disorders. FLC concentrations and ratios were compared between patient groups and were further analyzed in correlation with clinical, cytopathological, and radiological findings. FLC concentrations for all patients were lower in CSF when compared to serum. In patients with CNS lymphoma, the FLC ratios in CSF were higher (range 392-0.3) compared to control patients (range 3.0-0.3). Irrespective of cytopathological proven lymphomatous meningitis, in 11/21 lymphoma CSF samples the FLC ratios were markedly above 3.0 indicating a clonally restricted B-cell population. Increased FLC ratios in CSF were found in those patients showing subependymal lymphoma contact as detected in magnetic resonance imaging. In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that a significant proportion of patients with CNS lymphomas display a markedly increased FLC ratio in the CSF. PMID:20528903

  14. Diffusion tensor imaging of idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus and the cerebrospinal fluid tap test.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyunghun; Yoon, Uicheul; Choi, Woohyuk; Lee, Ho-Won

    2016-05-15

    We evaluated relationships between diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) findings and clinical profiles in idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) patients, along with differences in DTI parameters between cerebrospinal fluid tap test (CSFTT) responders and non-responders. Fifty-four INPH patients constituted the final group for analysis. Fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and mean diffusivity were assessed using atlas-based tract-mapping methods on 20 different fiber tracts. Uncorrected results revealed that CSFTT non-responders, when compared to responders, exhibited lower FA in the left anterior thalamic radiation (ATR), left cingulum-hippocampus (CgH), and left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO) and higher axial diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and mean diffusivity in the left CgH and left inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF). FA values in the ATR (bilateral), corticospinal tract (right), IFO (bilateral), and ILF (bilateral) were negatively correlated with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scores. In the right CgH, FA values showed significant positive correlations with Korean-Mini Mental State Examination scores and negative correlations with Clinical Dementia Rating Scale scores. Our findings may suggest a possibility for considering microstructural changes of white matter in patients with ventriculomegaly as potential imaging markers for the prediction of CSFTT responders. Unique patterns of white matter microstructural changes, as measured using DTI, might underlie impairments in distinct symptom domains in patients with INPH. PMID:27084223

  15. Biotransformation of nitric oxide in the cerebrospinal fluid of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Kokić, Aleksandra Nikolić; Stević, Zorica; Stojanović, Srdjan; Blagojević, Dusko P; Jones, David R; Pavlović, Sanja; Niketić, Vesna; Apostolski, Slobodan; Spasić, Mihajlo B

    2005-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that nitric oxide (NO*) over-production might be an important factor in the pathogenesis of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS). We measured significantly higher concentrations of uric acid and thiol group-containing molecules (R-SH groups) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from SALS patients compared to controls. The above factors, together with a slightly increased free iron concentration found in the CSF, favour conditions necessary for the formation of the dinitrosyl iron complex, capable of NO* bio-transformation. Thus, we performed ex vivo saturation of CSF (from both SALS patients and controls) with NO*. A decrease in the level of R-SH was found. This was more pronounced in the CSF from SALS patients. In the CSF from SALS patients the production of nitrite and hydroxylamine was greater than that observed in the CSF from controls. Moreover, we also found increased Cu,Zn-SOD activity in the CSF from SALS patients (when compared to control subjects) but no activity corresponding to Mn-SOD in any CSF samples. As Cu,Zn-SOD can react with nitroxyl forming NO*, the conditions for a closed, but continuous, loop of NO* biotransformation are present in the CSF of ALS patients. PMID:16354415

  16. Effects of positive and negative human contacts and intranasal oxytocin on cerebrospinal fluid oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Rault, Jean-Loup

    2016-07-01

    Despite the popularity of oxytocin (OT) research for its role in social behavior, the relationship between the social environment and endogenous central OT remains poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of positive and negative human contacts and intranasal OT administration on OT concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The pig was used as a model, with repeated CSF sampling through a spinal catheter using a within-subject design. Positive human contact led to sustained CSF OT elevation in pigs over 120min which outlasted the 15min interaction. Furthermore, the frequency of positive interactions was correlated with CSF OT increase. This provides a neurophysiological basis to positive human-animal relationships, with OT preserving bonds within but also between species through interactions. Conversely, CSF OT concentration did not vary during or after negative contact with an unfamiliar person, supporting CSF OT as a biomarker of positive valence in the human-animal relationship context. Intranasal OT administration resulted in peak CSF OT within 10min, with approximately 0.001% of the administered dose reaching the CSF. The sensitivity of the oxytocinergic system to variations in the social environment is a worthy area of investigation for its scientific and clinical implications. In particular, positive interactions result in outlasting central OT release. PMID:27032064

  17. Combined Approach for Tegmen Defects Repair in Patients with Cerebrospinal Fluid Otorrhea or Herniations: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Marchioni, Daniele; Bonali, Marco; Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo; Rubini, Alessia; Pavesi, Giacomo; Presutti, Livio

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe our departmental experience in the surgical repair of tegmen tympani defects using a combined transmastoid/minicraniotomic approach. Design Retrospective review of videos from surgery and patients' charts. Setting Tertiary university referral center. Participants Twenty-two patients who underwent surgical repair of tegmen defects associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage and/or meningocele/meningoencephalocele by a combined transmastoid/minicraniotomic approach. Main Outcome Measures A retrospective review of videos of surgery and charts of patients with tegmen tympani or tegmen antri defects and CSF leakage, temporal lobe encephalocele, and/or meningoencephalocele. Results All patients underwent the combined approach and had their defects closed, without significant intraoperative or postoperative complications. Conclusions Mastoidectomy with temporal minicraniotomy represents an effective approach in patients with tegmen tympani dehiscence; the advantages of this technique are the control of the floor of the middle cranial fossa and the possibility to reach bony defects located anteriorly without manipulation of the ossicular chain and temporal lobe. PMID:25093152

  18. Cytokines in the Cerebrospinal Fluids of Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, D.; Brenu, E. W.; Gottschalk, G.; Nguyen, T.; Marshall-Gradisnik, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Previous research has provided evidence for dysregulation in peripheral cytokines in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME). To date only one study has examined cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of CFS/ME patients. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the role of cytokines in CSF of CFS/ME patients. Methods. CSF was collected from 18 CFS/ME patients and 5 healthy controls. The CSF samples were examined for the expression of 27 cytokines (interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, basic FGF, eotaxin, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, IP-10, MCP-1 (MCAF), MIP-1α, MIP-1β, PDGF-BB, RANTES, TNF-α, and VEGF) using the Bio-Plex Human Cytokine 27-plex Assay. Results. Of the 27 cytokines examined, only IL-10 was significantly reduced in the CFS/ME patients in comparison to the controls. Conclusions. This preliminary investigation suggests that perturbations in inflammatory cytokines in the CSF of CFS/ME patients may contribute to the neurological discrepancies observed in CFS/ME. PMID:25834308

  19. Derivative spectrophotometric analysis of cerebrospinal fluid for the detection of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadri, P. R.; Majumder, A.; Morgan, C. J.; Pyne, G. J.; Zuccarello, M.; Jauch, E.; Wagner, K. R.; Clark, J. F.; Caffery, J., Jr.; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2003-11-01

    A cerebral aneurysm is a weakened portion of an artery in the brain. When a cerebral aneurysm ruptures, a specific type of bleeding known as a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurs. No test exists currently to screen people for the presence of an aneurysm. The diagnosis of a SAH is made after an aneurysm ruptures, and the literature indicates that nearly one-third of patients with a SAH are initially misdiagnosed and subjected to the risks associated with aneurysm re-rupture. For those individuals with a suspected SAH, a computerized tomography (CT) scan of the brain usually demonstrates evidence of the bleeding. However, in a considerable portion of people, the CT scan is unable to detect the blood that has escaped from the blood vessel. For circumstances when a SAH is suspected despite a normal CT scan, physicians make the diagnosis of SAH by performing a spinal tap. A spinal tap uses a needle to sample the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from the patient"s back; CSF is tainted with blood after the aneurysm ruptures. To distinguish between a common headache and a SAH, a fast and an effective solution is required. We describe the development of an effective detection system integrating hardware and a powerful software interface solution. Briefly, CSF from the patient is aspirated and excited with an appropriate wavelength of light. The software employs spectrophotometric analysis of the output spectra and lays the foundation for the development of portable and user-friendly equipment for detection of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm.

  20. Altered microRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid exosome in Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Gui, YaXing; Liu, Hai; Zhang, LiShan; Lv, Wen; Hu, XingYue

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinson's diseases (PD) is challenging, especially in the early stages of the disease. We developed a microRNA profiling strategy for exosomal miRNAs isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in PD and AD. Sixteen exosomal miRNAs were up regulated and 11 miRNAs were under regulated significantly in PD CSF when compared with those in healthy controls (relative fold > 2, p < 0.05). MiR-1 and miR-19b-3p were validated and significantly reduced in independent samples. While miR-153, miR-409-3p, miR-10a-5p, and let-7g-3p were significantly over expressed in PD CSF exosome. Bioinformatic analysis by DIANA-mirPath demonstrated that Neurotrophin signaling, mTOR signaling, Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, Dopaminergic synapse, and Glutamatergic synapse were the most prominent pathways enriched in quantiles with PD miRNA patterns. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts [amyloid precursor protein, APP), α-synuclein (α-syn), Tau, neurofilament, light gene (NF-L), DJ-1/PARK7, Fractalkine and Neurosin] and long non-coding RNAs (RP11-462G22.1 and PCA3) were differentially expressed in CSF exosomes in PD and AD patients. These data demonstrated that CSF exosomal RNA molecules are reliable biomarkers with fair robustness in regard to specificity and sensitivity in differentiating PD from healthy and diseased (AD) controls. PMID:26497684

  1. Approach to Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Biomarker Discovery and Evaluation in HIV Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Richard W.; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena S.; Smith, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Gisslen, Magnus

    2013-12-13

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previouslydefined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  2. Technetium Tc-99m pyrophosphate for cerebrospinal fluid leaks: radiopharmaceutical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ponto, James A; Graham, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To confirm the anticipated image quality and absence of adverse reactions in patients undergoing clinical practice cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak imaging procedures using technetium Tc-99m pyrophosphate (PYP). METHODS Following the recent discontinuation of preservative-free calcium trisodium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid kits, PYP was selected as a suitable alternative for CSF leak imaging procedures. Procedures were established for its preparation and dispensing, paying special attention to safety considerations, and its use in clinical practice was implemented. Medical records, including images, were reviewed for the first 15 patients undergoing clinical practice CSF imaging procedures using Tc-99m PYP to confirm anticipated image quality and absence of adverse effects. RESULTS Review of CSF leak imaging procedures using Tc-99m PYP in 15 patients showed images to be of uniformly high quality. The vast majority of injected radiopharmaceutical remained in the CSF throughout the duration of the imaging procedure, allowing visualization of CSF leaks. Only a small amount of Tc-99m PYP diffused into the blood with resultant uptake on the skeleton and excretion into the urine, which did not interfere with image interpretation. No adverse reactions were noted in any of the patients. CONCLUSION With proper attention to safety considerations, Tc-99m PYP is a safe and effective alternative for performing CSF leak imaging procedures. PMID:24257695

  3. Simultaneous Detection of Five Pathogens from Cerebrospinal Fluid Specimens Using Luminex Technology.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linfu; Wu, Rui; Shi, Xiaodan; Feng, Dongyun; Feng, Guodong; Yang, Yining; Dai, Wen; Bian, Ting; Liu, Tingting; He, Ying; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for the outcome of central nervous system (CNS) infections. In this study, we developed a multiplex PCR-Luminex assay for the simultaneous detection of five major pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, which frequently cause CNS infections. Through the hybridization reaction between multiplex PCR-amplified targets and oligonucleotide "anti-TAG" sequences, we found that the PCR-Luminex assay could detect as low as 10¹-10² copies of synthetic pathogen DNAs. Furthermore, 163 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from patients with suspected CNS infections were used to evaluate the efficiency of this multiplex PCR-Luminex method. Compared with Ziehl-Neelsen stain, this assay showed a high diagnostic accuracy for tuberculosis meningitis (sensitivity, 90.7% and specificity, 99.1%). For cryptococcal meningitis, the sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 97.1%, respectively, compared with the May Grunwald Giemsa (MGG) stain. For herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 encephalitis, the sensitivities were 80.8% and 100%, and the specificities were 94.2% and 99%, respectively, compared with Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) assays. Taken together, this multiplex PCR-Luminex assay showed potential efficiency for the simultaneous detection of five pathogens and may be a promising supplement to conventional methods for diagnosing CNS infections. PMID:26861363

  4. Identification of a New Cyclovirus in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Acute Central Nervous System Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Le Van; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Nghia, Ho Dang Trung; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Tu, Le Thi Phuong; de Vries, Michel; Canuti, Marta; Deijs, Martin; Jebbink, Maarten F.; Baker, Stephen; Bryant, Juliet E.; Tham, Nguyen Thi; BKrong, Nguyen Thi Thuy Chinh; Boni, Maciej F.; Loi, Tran Quoc; Phuong, Le Thi; Verhoeven, Joost T. P.; Crusat, Martin; Jeeninga, Rienk E.; Schultsz, Constance; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Hien, Tran Tinh; van der Hoek, Lia; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute central nervous system (CNS) infections cause substantial morbidity and mortality, but the etiology remains unknown in a large proportion of cases. We identified and characterized the full genome of a novel cyclovirus (tentatively named cyclovirus-Vietnam [CyCV-VN]) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens of two Vietnamese patients with CNS infections of unknown etiology. CyCV-VN was subsequently detected in 4% of 642 CSF specimens from Vietnamese patients with suspected CNS infections and none of 122 CSFs from patients with noninfectious neurological disorders. Detection rates were similar in patients with CNS infections of unknown etiology and those in whom other pathogens were detected. A similar detection rate in feces from healthy children suggested food-borne or orofecal transmission routes, while high detection rates in feces from pigs and poultry (average, 58%) suggested the existence of animal reservoirs for such transmission. Further research is needed to address the epidemiology and pathogenicity of this novel, potentially zoonotic virus. PMID:23781068

  5. ANXIETY IN MAJOR DEPRESSION AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID FREE GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID

    PubMed Central

    Mann, J. John; Oquendo, Maria A.; Watson, Kalycia Trishana; Boldrini, Maura; Malone, Kevin M.; Ellis, Steven P.; Sullivan, Gregory; Cooper, Thomas B.; Xie, Shan; Currier, Dianne

    2016-01-01

    Background Low gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is implicated in both anxiety and depression pathophysiology. They are often comorbid, but most clinical studies have not examined these relationships separately. We investigated the relationship of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) free GABA to the anxiety and depression components of a major depressive episode (MDE) and to monoamine systems. Methods and Materials Patients with a DSM-IV major depressive episode (N = 167: 130 major depressive disorder; 37 bipolar disorder) and healthy volunteers (N = 38) had CSF free GABA measured by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy. Monoamine metabolites were assayed by high performance liquid chromatography. Symptomatology was assessed by Hamilton depression rating scale. Results Psychic anxiety severity increased with age and correlated with lower CSF free GABA, controlling for age. CSF free GABA declined with age but was not related to depression severity. Other monoamine metabolites correlated positively with CSF GABA but not with psychic anxiety or depression severity. CSF free GABA was lower in MDD compared with bipolar disorder and healthy volunteers. GABA levels did not differ based on a suicide attempt history in mood disorders. Recent exposure to benzodiazepines, but not alcohol or past alcoholism, was associated with a statistical trend for more severe anxiety and lower CSF GABA. Conclusions Lower CSF GABA may explain increasing severity of psychic anxiety in major depression with increasing age. This relationship is not seen with monoamine metabolites, suggesting treatments targeting the GABAergic system should be evaluated in treatment-resistant anxious major depression and in older patients. PMID:24865448

  6. Sandwich grafting technique for endoscopic endonasal repair of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Saafan, Magdy Eisa; Albirmawy, Osama A; Tomoum, Mohamed Osama

    2014-05-01

    The surgical management of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhoea has changed significantly after the introduction of functional endoscopic sinus surgery. The clear anatomical exposure of the roof of the nasal and paranasal sinus cavities by the endoscope offers the surgeon a golden chance to identify the area of CSF leak, and thus enables one to adequately plan the management. The aim of this work is to evaluate the use of facia lata sandwich graft technique for endoscopic endonasal repair of CSF rhinorrhoea. Forty patients with CSF rhinorrhoea were treated endoscopically using 2 layers of facia lata (underlay and onlay) interposed with a layer of septal cartilage or conchal bone in-between (sandwich technique) for repair. Fifty-five percent of cases were regarded as spontaneous CSF leaks with no obvious cause, 30% following head injury and 15% were iatrogenic. The ethmoidal roof was the commonest location of CSF leak (60%) followed in frequency by the cribriform plate and the sphenoid sinus (20% each). Follow-up period was 12-24 months. We have achieved a 95% success rate in managing CSF leaks in our 40 patients in the first attempt repair and 100% success rate after second attempt repair. Endoscopic endonasal repair of CSF leaks is quite safe and effective procedure with high success rate and avoid the morbidity associated with craniotomy. Using the three-layer, sandwich-grafting technique of facia lata further adds more security to the sealing of CSF and augments the results of repair. PMID:23982671

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid control of neurogenesis induced by retinoic acid during early brain development.

    PubMed

    Alonso, M I; Martín, C; Carnicero, E; Bueno, D; Gato, A

    2011-07-01

    Embryonic-cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) plays crucial roles in early brain development including the control of neurogenesis. Although FGF2 and lipoproteins present in the E-CSF have previously been shown to be involved in neurogenesis, the main factor triggering this process remains unknown. E-CSF contains all-trans-retinol and retinol-binding protein involved in the synthesis of retinoic acid (RA), a neurogenesis inducer. In early chick embryo brain, only the mesencephalic-rombencephalic isthmus (IsO) is able to synthesize RA. Here we show that in chick embryo brain development: (1) E-CSF helps to control RA synthesis in the IsO by means of the RBP and all-trans-retinol it contains; (2) E-CSF has retinoic acid activity, which suggests it may act as a diffusion pathway for RA; and (3) the influence of E-CSF on embryonic brain neurogenesis is to a large extent due to its involvement in RA synthesis. These data help to understand neurogenesis from neural progenitor cells. PMID:21594951

  8. Quantification of ?-Aminobutyric Acid in Cerebrospinal Fluid Using Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arning, Erland; Bottiglieri, Teodoro

    2016-01-01

    We describe a simple stable isotope dilution method for accurate and precise measurement of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a clinical diagnostic test. Determination of GABA in CSF (50 ?L) was performed utilizing high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray positive ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). Analysis of free and total GABA requires two individual sample preparations and mass spectrometry analyses. Free GABA in CSF is determined by a 1:2 dilution with internal standard (GABA-D2) and injected directly onto the HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system. Determination of total GABA in CSF requires additional sample preparation in order to hydrolyze all the bound GABA in the sample to the free form. This requires hydrolyzing the sample by boiling in acidic conditions (hydrochloric acid) for 4 h. The sample is then further diluted 1:10 with a 90 % acetonitrile/0.1 % formic acid solution and injected into the HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system. Each assay is quantified using a five-point standard curve and is linear from 6 nM to 1000 nM and 0.63 ?M to 80 ?M for free and total GABA, respectively. PMID:26602123

  9. Clinical utility of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in the diagnosis of early Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Blennow, Kaj; Dubois, Bruno; Fagan, Anne M.; Lewczuk, Piotr; de Leon, Mony J.; Hampel, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Several potential disease-modifying drugs for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have failed to show any effect on disease progression in clinical trials, conceivably because the AD subjects are already too advanced to derive clinical benefit from treatment and because diagnosis based on clinical criteria alone introduces a high misdiagnosis rate. Thus, well-validated biomarkers for early detection and accurate diagnosis are crucial. Low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the amyloid-β (Aβ1-42) peptide, in combination with high total tau and phosphorylated tau, are sensitive and specific biomarkers highly predictive of progression to AD dementia in patients with mild cognitive impairment. However, interlaboratory variations in the results seen with currently available immunoassays are of concern. Recent worldwide standardization efforts and quality control programs include standard operating procedures for both preanalytical (e.g., lumbar puncture and sample handling) and analytical (e.g., preparation of calibration curve) procedures. Efforts are also ongoing to develop highly reproducible assays on fully automated instruments. These global standardization and harmonization measures will provide the basis for the generalized international application of CSF bio-markers for both clinical trials and routine clinical diagnosis of AD. PMID:24795085

  10. Direct Identification of Enteroviruses in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Suspected Meningitis by Nested PCR Amplification.

    PubMed

    Krasota, Alexandr; Loginovskih, Natalia; Ivanova, Olga; Lipskaya, Galina

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses, the most common human viral pathogens worldwide, have been associated with serous meningitis, encephalitis, syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis, myocarditis and the onset of diabetes type 1. In the future, the rapid identification of the etiological agent would allow to adjust the therapy promptly and thereby improve the course of the disease and prognosis. We developed RT-nested PCR amplification of the genomic region coding viral structural protein VP1 for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical specimens and compared it with the existing analogs. One-hundred-fifty-nine cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) from patients with suspected meningitis were studied. The amplification of VP1 genomic region using the new method was achieved for 86 (54.1%) patients compared with 75 (47.2%), 53 (33.3%) and 31 (19.5%) achieved with previously published methods. We identified 11 serotypes of the Enterovirus species B in 2012, including relatively rare echovirus 14 (E-14), E-15 and E-32, and eight serotypes of species B and 5 enteroviruses A71 (EV-A71) in 2013. The developed method can be useful for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical material with the low virus loads such as CSF. PMID:26751470

  11. Assessment of the Central Effects of Natural Uranium via Behavioural Performances and the Cerebrospinal Fluid Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Lestaevel, P.; Grison, S.; Favé, G.; Elie, C.; Dhieux, B.; Martin, J. C.; Tack, K.; Souidi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Natural uranium (NU), a component of the earth's crust, is not only a heavy metal but also an alpha particle emitter, with chemical and radiological toxicity. Populations may therefore be chronically exposed to NU through drinking water and food. Since the central nervous system is known to be sensitive to pollutants during its development, we assessed the effects on the behaviour and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) metabolome of rats exposed for 9 months from birth to NU via lactation and drinking water (1.5, 10, or 40 mg·L−1 for male rats and 40 mg·L−1 for female rats). Medium-term memory decreased in comparison to controls in male rats exposed to 1.5, 10, or 40 mg·L−1 NU. In male rats, spatial working memory and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour were only altered by exposure to 40 mg·L−1 NU and any significant effect was observed on locomotor activity. In female rats exposed to NU, only locomotor activity was significantly increased in comparison with controls. LC-MS metabolomics of CSF discriminated the fingerprints of the male and/or female NU-exposed and control groups. This study suggests that exposure to environmental doses of NU from development to adulthood can have an impact on rat brain function.

  12. Simultaneous Detection of Five Pathogens from Cerebrospinal Fluid Specimens Using Luminex Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linfu; Wu, Rui; Shi, Xiaodan; Feng, Dongyun; Feng, Guodong; Yang, Yining; Dai, Wen; Bian, Ting; Liu, Tingting; He, Ying; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for the outcome of central nervous system (CNS) infections. In this study, we developed a multiplex PCR-Luminex assay for the simultaneous detection of five major pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, which frequently cause CNS infections. Through the hybridization reaction between multiplex PCR-amplified targets and oligonucleotide “anti-TAG” sequences, we found that the PCR-Luminex assay could detect as low as 101–102 copies of synthetic pathogen DNAs. Furthermore, 163 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from patients with suspected CNS infections were used to evaluate the efficiency of this multiplex PCR-Luminex method. Compared with Ziehl-Neelsen stain, this assay showed a high diagnostic accuracy for tuberculosis meningitis (sensitivity, 90.7% and specificity, 99.1%). For cryptococcal meningitis, the sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 97.1%, respectively, compared with the May Grunwald Giemsa (MGG) stain. For herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 encephalitis, the sensitivities were 80.8% and 100%, and the specificities were 94.2% and 99%, respectively, compared with Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) assays. Taken together, this multiplex PCR-Luminex assay showed potential efficiency for the simultaneous detection of five pathogens and may be a promising supplement to conventional methods for diagnosing CNS infections. PMID:26861363

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics in multiple sclerosis patients through phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lagana, Maria Marcella; Chaudhary, Anamika; Balagurunathan, Deepa; Utriainen, David; Kokeny, Paul; Feng, Wei; Cecconi, Pietro; Hubbard, David; Haacke, E Mark

    2014-01-01

    We studied cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics at the cervical level in association with internal jugular veins (IJV) flow for 92 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify flow of the CSF and major vessels (including the IJV and the carotid arteries) at the C2-C3 level in the neck. Contrast enhanced MR angiography and time-of-flight MR venography were used to subdivide MS patients into stenotic (ST) and non-stenotic (NST) populations. We evaluated: IJV flow normalized by arterial flow; CSF peaks; CSF outflow duration and its onset from systole. We tested if these variables were statistically different among different MS phenotypes and between ST and NST MS patients. The delay between the beginning of beginning of systole and the CSF outflow was higher in ST compared to NST MS. Less IJV flow was observed in ST vs NST MS. None of the measures was different between the different MS phenotypes. These results suggest that alterations of IJV morphology affect both IJV flow and CSF flow timing but not CSF flow amplitude. PMID:25233279

  14. What is the significance of an isolated positive cryptococcal antigen in the cerebrospinal fluid of cancer patients?

    PubMed

    Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2003-06-01

    We evaluated the significance of an isolated positive cryptococcal antigen titer in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 12 cancer patients. In most of the cases, the test had a low titer, was frequently associated with an intracranial malignancy and was considered to represent a false-positive result. Hence, an isolated cryptococcal antigen in the CSF has an unclear clinical value and must be interpreted with caution. PMID:12801355

  15. Changes in MMP-9 and TIMP-1 Concentrations in Cerebrospinal Fluid after 1 Week of Treatment of Childhood Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Pelkonen, Tuula; Lauhio, Anneli; Lappalainen, Maija; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Bernardino, Luis; Tervahartiala, Taina; Sorsa, Timo; Peltola, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    We explored the changes of the initially highly upgraded cerebrospinal fluid matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and tissue inhibitor of MMP 1 (TIMP-1) response during recovery of childhood bacterial meningitis and their association with outcome. The sizes of these changes varied substantially, but a steeper decrease in the MMP-9 and an increase of the TIMP-1 concentrations augured a better outcome. PMID:25903567

  16. Changes in MMP-9 and TIMP-1 Concentrations in Cerebrospinal Fluid after 1 Week of Treatment of Childhood Bacterial Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Roine, Irmeli; Pelkonen, Tuula; Lauhio, Anneli; Lappalainen, Maija; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Bernardino, Luis; Tervahartiala, Taina; Sorsa, Timo; Peltola, Heikki

    2015-07-01

    We explored the changes of the initially highly upgraded cerebrospinal fluid matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and tissue inhibitor of MMP 1 (TIMP-1) response during recovery of childhood bacterial meningitis and their association with outcome. The sizes of these changes varied substantially, but a steeper decrease in the MMP-9 and an increase of the TIMP-1 concentrations augured a better outcome. PMID:25903567

  17. Effects of mild hypothermia therapy on the levels of glutathione in rabbit blood and cerebrospinal fluid after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Chen, Yueliang

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mild hypothermia therapy on oxidative stress injury of rabbit brain tissue after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Materials and Methods: Rabbit models of cardiac arrest were established. After the restoration of spontaneous circulation, 50 rabbits were randomly divided into normothermia and hypothermia groups. The following five time points were selected: before CPR, immediately after CPR, 2 hr after CPR (hypothermia group reached the target temperature), 14 hr after CPR (hypothermia group before rewarming), and 24 hr after CPR (hypothermia group recovered to normal temperature). Glutathione (GSH) concentrations in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the normothermia and hypothermia groups were measured. Results: At 2, 14, and 24 hr after CPR, the GSH concentrations in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid were significantly higher in the hypothermia group than in the nomorthermia group. Conclusion: Mild hypothermia therapy may increase GSH concentrations in rabbit blood and cerebrospinal fluid after CPR as well as promote the recovery of cerebral function. PMID:25810895

  18. The body mass index (BMI) is significantly correlated with levels of cytokines and chemokines in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Anders; Carlsson, Lena; Lind, Anne-Li; Gordh, Torsten; Bodolea, Constantin; Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood; Thulin, Måns

    2015-12-01

    Cytokines and chemokines regulate many functions in the body including the brain. The interactions between adipose tissue and the central nervous system (CNS) are important for the regulation of energy balance. CNS function is also influenced by age. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of body mass index (BMI) and age on cytokine and chemokine levels in cerebrospinal fluid. Cerebrospinal fluid samples (n=89) were collected from patients undergoing routine surgical procedures. The samples were analyzed using the multiplex proximity extension assay (PEA) in which 92 different cytokines are measured simultaneously using minute sample volume. We found no significant correlations between age and cytokine levels for any of the studied markers. In contrast, at a false discovery rate of 10%, 19 markers were significantly associated with BMI (in decreasing significance: FGF-5, ADA, Beta-NGF, CD40, IL-10RB, CCL19, TGF-alpha, SIRT2, TWEAK, SCF, CSF-1, 4E-BP1, DNER, LIF-R, STAMPB, CXCL10, CXCL6, VEGF-A and CX3CL1). This study reveals a clear effect of BMI on cytokine and chemokine levels in cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:26188367

  19. Chemokine biomarkers in central nervous system tissue and cerebrospinal fluid in the Theiler's virus model mirror those in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pachner, Andrew R; Li, Libin; Gilli, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Chemokines have increasingly been implicated in inflammatory and infectious disease of the central nervous system, both as biomarkers and as molecules important in pathogenesis. Multiple sclerosis is a disabling disease of unknown etiology, and recently chemokines have been identified as being upregulated molecules in the disease. We were interested in how the chemokine expression patterns in the central nervous system of a viral model of multiple sclerosis, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD), compared to that in humans with multiple sclerosis. Cerebrospinal fluid and spinal cord tissue were analyzed for expression of a range of cytokines and chemokines. Three chemokines, CXCL10, CXCL9, and CCL5 were strongly and specifically upregulated in both the cerebrospinal fluid and spinal cord in chronic disease, a pattern identical to that in multiple sclerosis. These data, the first study of cytokines in central nervous system tissue and cerebrospinal fluid in TMEV-IDD, support the hypothesis that multiple sclerosis is caused by chronic infection with an as-yet unidentified pathogen, possibly a picornavirus. PMID:26141421

  20. Detection by polymerase chain reaction of Treponema pallidum DNA in cerebrospinal fluid from neurosyphilis patients before and after antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Noordhoek, G T; Wolters, E C; de Jonge, M E; van Embden, J D

    1991-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction with nested primer pairs based on the DNA sequence of the 39-kDa bmp gene of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum is described. The method allowed the detection of purified T. pallidum DNA equivalent to the amount of DNA in a single bacterium and was specific for T. pallidum subspecies. After concentration of DNA, using diatomaceous earth, it was possible to detect about 100 treponemes in 1 ml of cerebrospinal fluid. Cerebrospinal fluid samples from a total of 29 symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with neurosyphilis were tested for the presence of treponemal DNA before and at various intervals after intravenous treatment with penicillin. Prior to the penicillin treatment, we detected T. pallidum DNA in 5 of 7 patients with acute symptomatic neurosyphilis, in none of the 4 patients with chronic symptomatic neurosyphilis tested before treatment, and in 2 of 16 patients with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. Unexpectedly, T. pallidum DNA was also often detected in cerebrospinal fluid long after intervenous treatment with penicillin, sometimes up to 3 years after therapy. Images PMID:1774324

  1. Detection by polymerase chain reaction of Treponema pallidum DNA in cerebrospinal fluid from neurosyphilis patients before and after antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Noordhoek, G T; Wolters, E C; de Jonge, M E; van Embden, J D

    1991-09-01

    A polymerase chain reaction with nested primer pairs based on the DNA sequence of the 39-kDa bmp gene of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum is described. The method allowed the detection of purified T. pallidum DNA equivalent to the amount of DNA in a single bacterium and was specific for T. pallidum subspecies. After concentration of DNA, using diatomaceous earth, it was possible to detect about 100 treponemes in 1 ml of cerebrospinal fluid. Cerebrospinal fluid samples from a total of 29 symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with neurosyphilis were tested for the presence of treponemal DNA before and at various intervals after intravenous treatment with penicillin. Prior to the penicillin treatment, we detected T. pallidum DNA in 5 of 7 patients with acute symptomatic neurosyphilis, in none of the 4 patients with chronic symptomatic neurosyphilis tested before treatment, and in 2 of 16 patients with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. Unexpectedly, T. pallidum DNA was also often detected in cerebrospinal fluid long after intervenous treatment with penicillin, sometimes up to 3 years after therapy. PMID:1774324

  2. A computational model of cerebrospinal fluid production and reabsorption driven by Starling forces

    PubMed Central

    Buishas, Joel; Gould, Ian G.; Linninger, Andreas A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evidence has cast doubt on the classical model of river-like cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow from the choroid plexus to the arachnoid granulations. We propose a novel model of water transport through the parenchyma from the microcirculation as driven by Starling forces. This model investigates the effect of osmotic pressure on water transport between the cerebral vasculature, the extracellular space (ECS), the perivascular space (PVS), and the CSF. A rigorous literature search was conducted focusing on experiments which alter the osmolarity of blood or ventricles and measure the rate of CSF production. Investigations into the effect of osmotic pressure on the volume of ventricles and the flux of ions in the blood, choroid plexus epithelium, and CSF are reviewed. Increasing the osmolarity of the serum via a bolus injection completely inhibits nascent fluid flow production in the ventricles. A continuous injection of a hyperosmolar solution into the ventricles can increase the volume of the ventricle by up to 125%. CSF production is altered by 0.231 µL per mOsm in the ventricle and by 0.835 µL per mOsm in the serum. Water flux from the ECS to the CSF is identified as a key feature of intracranial dynamics. A complete mathematical model with all equations and scenarios is fully described, as well as a guide to constructing a computational model of intracranial water balance dynamics. The model proposed in this article predicts the effects the osmolarity of ECS, blood, and CSF on water flux in the brain, establishing a link between osmotic imbalances and pathological conditions such as hydrocephalus and edema. PMID:25358881

  3. Intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid pulsation artifacts on low-field magnetic resonance imaging: Potential pitfall in diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Ogbole, Godwin I.; Soneye, Mayowa A.; Okorie, Chinonye N.; Sammet, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsation artifact can pose a diagnostic problem in fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) appearing as intraventricular hyperintensity. The extent of this challenge among radiologists in Africa using low-field MRI systems is relatively sparsely documented in the literature. The purpose of this study was to identify the presence and frequency of ventricular CSF pulsation artifact (VCSFA) on FLAIR axial brain images with a low-field MR system. Materials and Methods: FLAIR axial images were obtained on a low-field 0.3T unit (6000 ms/108 ms/2 [repetition time/echo time/excitations], inversion time = 1700 ms, field of view = 28 cm, matrix = 195 × 256, and 6 mm contiguous sections). Two experienced radiologists independently rated VCSFA in the lateral, third, and fourth ventricles in 202 consecutive patients (age range 1–100 years) referred for brain MR for various indications. We reviewed the pattern of artifacts, to determine its relationship to age, gender, and third ventricular size. Results: The low-field FLAIR MR brain images of 33 patients (16.3%) showed VCSFA in at least one ventricular cavity. The fourth ventricle was the most common site of VCSFA (n = 10), followed by the third ventricle (n = 8) and the lateral ventricles (n = 7). Eight patients had VCSFA in multiple locations, one of them in all ventricles. A smaller third ventricular size and, to a lesser extent, younger age was significantly associated with VCSFA. CSF Pulsation of VCSFA did not occur across the brain parenchyma in the phase encoding direction. Conclusion: VCSFA may mimic pathology on low-field axial FLAIR brain images and are more common in young patients with smaller ventricular size. Although these artifacts are less frequently observed at lower magnetic field strengths, their recognition on low-field MRI systems is important in avoiding a misdiagnosis. PMID:27185981

  4. Cross-sectional imaging of thoracic and abdominal complications of cerebrospinal fluid shunt catheters.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Ferdia; Fardanesh, Reza; Morgan, Tara; Katz, Douglas S; Daly, Barry

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to review the imaging findings of distal (thoracic and abdominal) complications related to ventriculo-peritoneal (VP), ventriculo-pleural (VPL), and ventriculo-atrial (VA) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt catheter placement. Institution review board-approved single-center study of patients with thoracic and abdominal CSF catheter-related complications on cross-sectional imaging examinations over a 14-year period was performed. Clinical presentation, patient demographics, prior medical history, and subsequent surgical treatment were recorded. The presence or absence of CSF catheter-related infection and/or acute hydrocephalus on cross-sectional imaging was also recorded. There were 81 distal CSF catheter-related complications identified on 47 thoracic or abdominal imaging examinations in 30 patients (age 5-80 years, mean 39.3 years), most often on CT (CT = 42, MRI = 1, US = 4). Complications included 38 intraperitoneal and 11 extraperitoneal fluid collections. Extraperitoneal collections included nine abdominal wall subcutaneous (SC) pseudocysts associated with shunt migration and obesity, an intrapleural pseudocyst, and a breast pseudocyst. There were also two large VPL-related pleural effusions, a fractured catheter in the SC tissues, and a large VA shunt thrombus within the right atrium. Ten patients (33.3 %) had culture-positive infection from CSF or shunt catheter samples. Ten patients (33.3 %) had features of temporally related acute or worsening hydrocephalus on neuroimaging. In four of these patients, the detection of thoracic and abdominal complications on CT preceded and predicted the findings of acute hydrocephalus on cranial imaging. Thoracic and abdominal complications of CSF shunts, as can be identified on CT,  include shunt infection and/or obstruction, may be both multiple and recurrent, and may be predictive of concurrent acute intracranial problems. PMID:26610766

  5. Insights into pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma through proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Saratsis, Amanda M; Yadavilli, Sridevi; Magge, Suresh; Rood, Brian R; Perez, Jennifer; Hill, D Ashley; Hwang, Eugene; Kilburn, Lindsay; Packer, Roger J; Nazarian, Javad

    2012-05-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a leading cause of brain tumor-related death in children. DIPG is not surgically resectable, resulting in a paucity of tissue available for molecular studies. As such, tumor biology is poorly understood, and, currently, there are no effective treatments. In the absence of frozen tumor specimens, body fluids--such as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), serum, and urine--can serve as more readily accessible vehicles for detecting tumor-secreted proteins. We analyzed a total of 76 specimens, including CSF, serum, urine, and normal and tumor brainstem tissue. Protein profiling of CSF from patients with DIPG was generated by mass spectrometry using an LTQ-Orbitrap-XL and database search using the Sequest algorithm. Quantitative and statistical analyses were performed with ProteoIQ and Partek Genomics Suite. A total of 528 unique proteins were identified, 71% of which are known secreted proteins. CSF proteomic analysis revealed selective upregulation of Cyclophillin A (CypA) and dimethylarginase 1 (DDAH1) in DIPG (n = 10), compared with controls (n = 4). Protein expression was further validated with Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical assays using CSF, brain tissue, serum, and urine from DIPG and control specimens. Immunohistochemical staining showed selective upregulation of secreted but not cytosolic CypA and DDAH1 in patients with DIPG. In this study, we present the first comprehensive protein profile of CSF specimens from patients with DIPG to demonstrate selective expression of tumor proteins potentially involved in brainstem gliomagenesis. Detection of secreted CypA and DDAH1 in serum and urine has potential clinical application, with implications for assessing treatment response and detecting tumor recurrence in patients with DIPG. PMID:22492959

  6. Ciliogenesis and cerebrospinal fluid flow in the developing Xenopus brain are regulated by foxj1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Circulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) through the ventricular system is driven by motile cilia on ependymal cells of the brain. Disturbed ciliary motility induces the formation of hydrocephalus, a pathological accumulation of CSF resulting in ventricle dilatation and increased intracranial pressure. The mechanism by which loss of motile cilia causes hydrocephalus has not been elucidated. The aim of this study was: (1) to provide a detailed account of the development of ciliation in the brain of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis; and (2) to analyze the relevance of ependymal cilia motility for CSF circulation and brain ventricle morphogenesis in Xenopus. Methods Gene expression analysis of foxj1, the bona fide marker for motile cilia, was used to identify potentially ciliated regions in the developing central nervous system (CNS) of the tadpole. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to reveal the distribution of mono- and multiciliated cells during successive stages of brain morphogenesis, which was functionally assessed by bead injection and video microscopy of ventricular CSF flow. An antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO)-mediated gene knock-down that targeted foxj1 in the CNS was applied to assess the role of motile cilia in the ventricles. Results RNA transcripts of foxj1 in the CNS were found from neurula stages onwards. Following neural tube closure, foxj1 expression was seen in distinct ventricular regions such as the zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI), subcommissural organ (SCO), floor plate, choroid plexus (CP), and rhombomere boundaries. In all areas, expression of foxj1 preceded the outgrowth of monocilia and the subsequent switch to multiciliated ependymal cells. Cilia were absent in foxj1 morphants, causing impaired CSF flow and fourth ventricle hydrocephalus in tadpole-stage embryos. Conclusions Motile ependymal cilia are important organelles in the Xenopus CNS, as they are essential for the circulation of CSF and maintenance of homeostatic fluid pressure. The Xenopus CNS ventricles might serve as a novel model system for the analysis of human ciliary genes whose deficiency cause hydrocephalus. PMID:24229449

  7. A coupled hydrodynamic model of the cardiovascular and cerebrospinal fluid system.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryn A; Reymond, Philippe; Novy, Jan; Balédent, Olivier; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos

    2012-04-01

    Coupling of the cardiovascular and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) system is considered to be important to understand the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular and craniospinal disease and intrathecal drug delivery. A coupled cardiovascular and CSF system model was designed to examine the relation of spinal cord (SC) blood flow (SCBF) and CSF pulsations along the spinal subarachnoid space (SSS). A one-dimensional (1-D) cardiovascular tree model was constructed including a simplified SC arterial network. Connection between the cardiovascular and CSF system was accomplished by a transfer function based on in vivo measurements of CSF and cerebral blood flow. A 1-D tube model of the SSS was constructed based on in vivo measurements in the literature. Pressure and flow throughout the cardiovascular and CSF system were determined for different values of craniospinal compliance. SCBF results indicated that the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar SC each had a signature waveform shape. The cerebral blood flow to CSF transfer function reproduced an in vivo-like CSF flow waveform. The 1-D tube model of the SSS resulted in a distribution of CSF pressure and flow and a wave speed that were similar to those in vivo. The SCBF to CSF pulse delay was found to vary a great degree along the spine depending on craniospinal compliance and vascular anatomy. The properties and anatomy of the SC arterial network and SSS were found to have an important impact on pressure and flow and perivascular fluid movement to the SC. Overall, the coupled model provides predictions about the flow and pressure environment in the SC and SSS. More detailed measurements are needed to fully validate the model. PMID:22268106

  8. A balanced view of the cerebrospinal fluid composition and functions: Focus on adult humans.

    PubMed

    Spector, Reynold; Robert Snodgrass, S; Johanson, Conrad E

    2015-11-01

    In this review, a companion piece to our recent examination of choroid plexus (CP), the organ that secretes the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), we focus on recent information in the context of reliable older data concerning the composition and functions of adult human CSF. To accomplish this, we define CSF, examine the methodology employed in studying the CSF focusing on ideal or near ideal experiments and discuss the pros and cons of several widely used analogical descriptions of the CSF including: the CSF as the "third circulation," the CSF as a "nourishing liquor," the similarities of the CSF/choroid plexus to the glomerular filtrate/kidney and finally the CSF circulation as part of the "glymphatic system." We also consider the close interrelationship between the CSF and extracellular space of brain through gap junctions and the paucity of data suggesting that the cerebral capillaries secrete a CSF-like fluid. Recently human CSF has been shown to be in dynamic flux with heart-beat, posture and especially respiration. Functionally, the CSF provides buoyancy, nourishment (e.g., vitamins) and endogenous waste product removal for the brain by bulk flow into the venous (arachnoid villi and nerve roots) and lymphatic (nasal) systems, and by carrier-mediated reabsorptive transport systems in CP. The CSF also presents many exogenous compounds to CP for metabolism or removal, indirectly cleansing the extracellular space of brain (e.g., of xenobiotics like penicillin). The CSF also carries hormones (e.g., leptin) from blood via CP or synthesized in CP (e.g., IGF-2) to the brain. In summary the CP/CSF, the third circulation, performs many functions comparable to the kidney including nourishing the brain and contributing to a stable internal milieu for the brain. These tasks are essential to normal adult brain functioning. PMID:26247808

  9. A computational model of cerebrospinal fluid production and reabsorption driven by Starling forces.

    PubMed

    Buishas, Joel; Gould, Ian G; Linninger, Andreas A

    2014-10-01

    Experimental evidence has cast doubt on the classical model of river-like cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow from the choroid plexus to the arachnoid granulations. We propose a novel model of water transport through the parenchyma from the microcirculation as driven by Starling forces. This model investigates the effect of osmotic pressure on water transport between the cerebral vasculature, the extracellular space (ECS), the perivascular space (PVS), and the CSF. A rigorous literature search was conducted focusing on experiments which alter the osmolarity of blood or ventricles and measure the rate of CSF production. Investigations into the effect of osmotic pressure on the volume of ventricles and the flux of ions in the blood, choroid plexus epithelium, and CSF are reviewed. Increasing the osmolarity of the serum via a bolus injection completely inhibits nascent fluid flow production in the ventricles. A continuous injection of a hyperosmolar solution into the ventricles can increase the volume of the ventricle by up to 125%. CSF production is altered by 0.231 ?L per mOsm in the ventricle and by 0.835 ?L per mOsm in the serum. Water flux from the ECS to the CSF is identified as a key feature of intracranial dynamics. A complete mathematical model with all equations and scenarios is fully described, as well as a guide to constructing a computational model of intracranial water balance dynamics. The model proposed in this article predicts the effects the osmolarity of ECS, blood, and CSF on water flux in the brain, establishing a link between osmotic imbalances and pathological conditions such as hydrocephalus and edema. PMID:25358881

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid loss and threshold changes. 2. Electrocochleographic changes of the compound action potential after CSF aspiration: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Walsted, A; Nilsson, P; Gerlif, J

    1996-01-01

    Hearing loss has been reported following leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The etiology has been attributed to an induced imbalance in the intracochlear hydrodynamics. The present study reports a guinea pig model with surgically induced loss of CSF. In 18 anesthetized animals, CSF was drained by a suboccipital incision in the dura: Eighteen animals were used as controls. The compound action potentials were recorded by an ear canal silver electrode. The animals with CSF loss showed a small increase in threshold and latency, while the control group was unchanged. The concept of an induced inner ear fluid dysfunction after CSF leak is supported by these findings. PMID:9390807

  11. Visualisation of cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns in albino Xenopus larvae in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It has long been known that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), its composition and flow, play an important part in normal brain development, and ependymal cell ciliary beating as a possible driver of CSF flow has previously been studied in mammalian fetuses in vitro. Lower vertebrate animals are potential models for analysis of CSF flow during development because they are oviparous. Albino Xenopus laevis larvae are nearly transparent and have a straight, translucent brain that facilitates the observation of fluid flow within the ventricles. The aim of these experiments was to study CSF flow and circulation in vivo in the developing brain of living embryos, larvae and tadpoles of Xenopus laevis using a microinjection technique. Methods The development of Xenopus larval brain ventricles and the patterns of CSF flow were visualised after injection of quantum dot nanocrystals and polystyrene beads (3.1 or 5.8 μm in diameter) into the fourth cerebral ventricle at embryonic/larval stages 30-53. Results The fluorescent nanocrystals showed the normal development of the cerebral ventricles from embryonic/larval stages 38 to 53. The polystyrene beads injected into stage 47-49 larvae revealed three CSF flow patterns, left-handed, right-handed and non-biased, in movement of the beads into the third ventricle from the cerebral aqueduct (aqueduct of Sylvius). In the lateral ventricles, anterior to the third ventricle, CSF flow moved anteriorly along the outer wall of the ventricle to the inner wall and then posteriorly, creating a semicircle. In the cerebral aqueduct, connecting the third and fourth cerebral ventricles, CSF flow moved rostrally in the dorsal region and caudally in the ventral region. Also in the fourth ventricle, clear dorso-ventral differences in fluid flow pattern were observed. Conclusions This is the first visualisation of the orchestrated CSF flow pattern in developing vertebrates using a live animal imaging approach. CSF flow in Xenopus albino larvae showed a largely consistent pattern, with the exception of individual differences in left-right asymmetrical flow in the third ventricle. PMID:22534239

  12. A one-dimensional model of the spinal cerebrospinal-fluid compartment.

    PubMed

    Cirovic, Srdjan; Kim, Minsuok

    2012-02-01

    Modeling of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) system in the spine is strongly motivated by the need to understand the origins of pathological conditions such as the emergence and growth of fluid-filled cysts in the spinal cord. In this study, a one-dimensional (1D) approximation for the flow in elastic conduits was used to formulate a model of the spinal CSF compartment. The modeling was based around a coaxial geometry in which the inner elastic cylinder represented the spinal cord, middle elastic tube represented the dura, and the outermost tube represented the vertebral column. The fluid-filled annuli between the cord and dura, and the dura and vertebral column, represented the subarachnoid and epidural spaces, respectively. The system of governing equations was constructed by applying a 1D form of mass and momentum conservation to all segments of the model. The developed 1D model was used to simulate CSF pulse excited by pressure disturbances in the subarachnoid and epidural spaces. The results were compared to those obtained from an equivalent two-dimensional finite element (FE) model which was implemented using a commercial software package. The analysis of linearized governing equations revealed the existence of three types of waves, of which the two slower waves can be clearly related to the wave modes identified in previous similar studies. The third, much faster, wave emanates directly from the vertebral column and has little effect on the deformation of the spinal cord. The results obtained from the 1D model and its FE counterpart were found to be in good general agreement even when sharp spatial gradients of the spinal cord stiffness were included; both models predicted large radial displacements of the cord at the location of an initial cyst. This study suggests that 1D modeling, which is computationally inexpensive and amenable to coupling with the models of the cranial CSF system, should be a useful approach for the analysis of some aspects of the CSF dynamics in the spine. The simulation of the CSF pulse excited by a pressure disturbance in the epidural space, points to the possibility that regions of the spinal cord with abnormally low stiffness may be prone to experiencing large strains due to coughing and sneezing. PMID:22482672

  13. GDF15/MIC1 and MMP9 Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels in Parkinson’s Disease and Lewy Body Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Alice; Brockmann, Kathrin; Marquetand, Justus; Wurster, Isabel; Rattay, Tim W.; Roncoroni, Lorenzo; Schaeffer, Eva; Lerche, Stefanie; Apel, Anja; Deuschle, Christian; Berg, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Based on animal and ex-vivo experiments, Growth/Differentiation Factor-15 (GDF15, also called Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine-1, MIC1), a member of the transforming growth factor-beta family, and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9), a member of the matrix metalloprotease family may be potential markers for Lewy body disorders, i.e. Parkinson’s disease with (PDD) and without dementia (PDND) and Lewy body dementia (DLB). GDF15 has a prominent role in development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and repair, whereas MMP9 degrades, as a proteolytic enzyme, components of the extracellular matrix. In this study, cerebrospinal fluid GDF15 and MMP9 levels of 59 PDND, 17 PDD and 23 DLB patients, as well as of 95 controls were determined, and associated with demographic, clinical and biochemical parameters. Our analysis confirmed the already described association of GDF15 levels with age and gender. Corrected GDF15 levels were significantly higher in PDD than in PDND patients, and intermediate in DLB patients. Within Lewy body disorders, GDF15 levels correlated positively with age at onset of Parkinsonism and dementia, Hoehn & Yahr stage and cerebrospinal fluid t-Tau and p-Tau levels, and negatively with the Mini Mental State Examination. Remarkably, it does not relevantly correlate with disease duration. MMP9 was not relevantly associated with any of these parameters. Cerebrospinal GDF15, but not MMP9, may be a potential marker of and in Lewy body disorders. PMID:26938614

  14. GDF15/MIC1 and MMP9 Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels in Parkinson's Disease and Lewy Body Dementia.

    PubMed

    Maetzler, Walter; Deleersnijder, Willy; Hanssens, Valérie; Bernard, Alice; Brockmann, Kathrin; Marquetand, Justus; Wurster, Isabel; Rattay, Tim W; Roncoroni, Lorenzo; Schaeffer, Eva; Lerche, Stefanie; Apel, Anja; Deuschle, Christian; Berg, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Based on animal and ex-vivo experiments, Growth/Differentiation Factor-15 (GDF15, also called Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine-1, MIC1), a member of the transforming growth factor-beta family, and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9), a member of the matrix metalloprotease family may be potential markers for Lewy body disorders, i.e. Parkinson's disease with (PDD) and without dementia (PDND) and Lewy body dementia (DLB). GDF15 has a prominent role in development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and repair, whereas MMP9 degrades, as a proteolytic enzyme, components of the extracellular matrix. In this study, cerebrospinal fluid GDF15 and MMP9 levels of 59 PDND, 17 PDD and 23 DLB patients, as well as of 95 controls were determined, and associated with demographic, clinical and biochemical parameters. Our analysis confirmed the already described association of GDF15 levels with age and gender. Corrected GDF15 levels were significantly higher in PDD than in PDND patients, and intermediate in DLB patients. Within Lewy body disorders, GDF15 levels correlated positively with age at onset of Parkinsonism and dementia, Hoehn & Yahr stage and cerebrospinal fluid t-Tau and p-Tau levels, and negatively with the Mini Mental State Examination. Remarkably, it does not relevantly correlate with disease duration. MMP9 was not relevantly associated with any of these parameters. Cerebrospinal GDF15, but not MMP9, may be a potential marker of and in Lewy body disorders. PMID:26938614

  15. Diabetic Retinopathy and Estimated Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure. The Beijing Eye Study 2011

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya Xing; You, Qi Sheng; Yang, Diya; Xie, Xiao Bin; Xu, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) is a major determinant of central retinal vein pressure and thus of retinal capillary pressure. We tested the hypothesis whether prevalence and severity of diabetic retinopathy are associated with CSFP. Methods The population-based Beijing Eye Study 2011 included 3468 individuals with a mean age of 64.6±9.8 years. A detailed ophthalmic examination was performed including fundus photography for the assessment of diabetic retinopathy according. Based on a previous study with lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) measurements, CSFP was calculated as CSFP[mmHg] = 0.44xBody Mass Index[kg/m2]+0.16 Diastolic Blood Pressure[mmHg]–0.18xAge[Years]−1.91. Results In binary regression analysis, presence of diabetic retinopathy was significantly associated with higher levels of HbA1c (P<0.001; regression coefficient B:0.25; odds ratio (OR):1.28; 95% confidence interval (CI):1.15,1.43), higher blood concentration of glucose (P<0.001; B:0.40;OR:1.49;95%CI:1.36,1.63), longer known duration of diabetes mellitus (P<0.001; B:0.14;OR:1.15; 95%CI:1.11,1.19), higher systolic blood pressure (P<0.001; B:0.03;OR:1.03;95%CI:1.02,1.04), lower diastolic blood pressure (P<0.001; B:−0.06;OR:0.94;95%CI:0.91,0.97), and higher CSFP (P = 0.002; B:0.13;OR:1.14;95%CI:1.05,1.24). Severity of diabetic retinopathy was significantly associated with higher HbA1c value (P<0.001; standardized coefficient beta: 0.19; correlation coefficient B: 0.07;95%CI:0.05,0.08), higher blood concentration of glucose (P<0.001; beta:0.18;B:0.04;95%CI:0.04,0.05), longer known duration of diabetes mellitus (P<0.001; beta:0.20;B:0.03;95%CI:0.02,0.03), lower level of education (P = 0.001; beta:−0.05;B:−0.02;95%CI:−0.03,−0.01), lower diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.002; beta:−0.08;B:−0.001;95%CI:−0.004,−0.001), higher systolic blood pressure (P = 0.006; beta:0.06;B:0.001;95%CI:0.000,0.001), and higher CSFP (P = 0.006; beta:0.06;B:0.006;95%CI:0.002,0.010). Conclusions Higher prevalence and severity of diabetic retinopathy were associated with higher estimated CSFP after adjusting for systemic parameters. Higher CSFP through a higher retinal vein pressure may lead to more marked retinal venous congestion and vascular leakage in diabetic retinae. PMID:24789334

  16. Lack of KIs virus DNA in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid in Italy.

    PubMed

    Macera, Lisa; Focosi, Daniele; Manzin, Aldo; Ceccherini Nelli, Luca; Pistello, Mauro; Maggi, Fabrizio

    2015-10-01

    Dear Sirs, Satoh et al. recently screened 516 Japanese blood donors with PCR using primers constructed from the consensus domain of the helicase of positive-stranded RNA viruses. They reported a novel enveloped virus with a circular double-stranded DNA genome (tentatively named KIs virus, KIs-V) (Satoh et al., 2011) occurring in 36 out of the 100 hepatitis E (HEV) antibody-positive donors with elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (>60 IU/L). More recently, Biagini et al. failed to find KIs-V in plasma from 576 French blood donors with unknown HEV serostatus and unknown ALT values (Biagini et al., 2012). Based on an HEV seroprevalence of 3-52% in France, the authors suggested an uncommon frequency of KIs-V infection in healthy persons in France. To date, no information has been available on the prevalence of KIs-V DNA in Italy. In the present paper, we analyzed KIs-V in 242 plasma samples of blood donors, transplant recipients, and patients with chronic viral infections, and in 52 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of patients with different neurological disorders. Informed consent was obtained from all patients and the study was performed in accordance with the ethical standards laid down in the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its amendments. Viral DNA extraction was carried out on 200 μl of plasma or 200 μl of CSF by using QIAamp DNA blood kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Extracted nucleic acids were amplified for KIs-V DNA with the nested PCR protocol developed by Satoh et al. (2011) and used for screening Japanese blood donors. The first and second PCR rounds were designed on 458 and 304 nt-length fragments, respectively. To validate the amplification process, positive controls obtained from plasma dilutions of a synthetic template corresponding to the target sequence were run in each PCR. PCR sensitivity was less than 5 copies of target sequence. Fourteen liver and 16 kidney and/or pancreas transplant recipients were tested before transplantation and at the time after transplantation when viremia levels of TTV were highest, TTV having been validated by our group and others as a marker of functional immune deficiency (Focosi et al., 2014). None of the samples tested positive for KIs-V. At the same time, we also tested 79 healthy blood donors. Since determination of ALT is a mandatory part of on blood donation according to Italian law we could establish that only 2 donors had ALT values >60 IU/L but in any case <80 IU/L: all of them tested negative for KIs-V. No information on HEV status was available and HEV seroprevalence studies are limited in Italy (Arends et al., 2014). However regional studies show prevalences ranging from 2.9% to 8.8% (Masia et al., 2009). We also tested 50 HIV-positive patients, 41 HCV-positive patients, and 42 HBV-positive patients. None of the samples tested positive for KIs-V. Finally, cerebrospinal fluid from 52 patients with different neurological disorders was also tested. All these samples were negative for KIs-V DNA. Thus, although we cannot rule out the possibility that KIs-V circulates in Italy at a very low level and genetically different from the virus found in Japanese population, the results seem to demonstrate a very low prevalence of this novel virus in the Italian population. While the implication of KIs-V in human health remains under debate, extensive regional surveys will help to elucidate the geographical spread of KIs-V and to understand the natural history of the infection in human beings. PMID:26485020

  17. Multiplicity of cerebrospinal fluid functions: New challenges in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, Conrad E; Duncan, John A; Klinge, Petra M; Brinker, Thomas; Stopa, Edward G; Silverberg, Gerald D

    2008-01-01

    This review integrates eight aspects of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulatory dynamics: formation rate, pressure, flow, volume, turnover rate, composition, recycling and reabsorption. Novel ways to modulate CSF formation emanate from recent analyses of choroid plexus transcription factors (E2F5), ion transporters (NaHCO3 cotransport), transport enzymes (isoforms of carbonic anhydrase), aquaporin 1 regulation, and plasticity of receptors for fluid-regulating neuropeptides. A greater appreciation of CSF pressure (CSFP) is being generated by fresh insights on peptidergic regulatory servomechanisms, the role of dysfunctional ependyma and circumventricular organs in causing congenital hydrocephalus, and the clinical use of algorithms to delineate CSFP waveforms for diagnostic and prognostic utility. Increasing attention focuses on CSF flow: how it impacts cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics, neural stem cell progression in the subventricular zone, and catabolite/peptide clearance from the CNS. The pathophysiological significance of changes in CSF volume is assessed from the respective viewpoints of hemodynamics (choroid plexus blood flow and pulsatility), hydrodynamics (choroidal hypo- and hypersecretion) and neuroendocrine factors (i.e., coordinated regulation by atrial natriuretic peptide, arginine vasopressin and basic fibroblast growth factor). In aging, normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease, the expanding CSF space reduces the CSF turnover rate, thus compromising the CSF sink action to clear harmful metabolites (e.g., amyloid) from the CNS. Dwindling CSF dynamics greatly harms the interstitial environment of neurons. Accordingly the altered CSF composition in neurodegenerative diseases and senescence, because of adverse effects on neural processes and cognition, needs more effective clinical management. CSF recycling between subarachnoid space, brain and ventricles promotes interstitial fluid (ISF) convection with both trophic and excretory benefits. Finally, CSF reabsorption via multiple pathways (olfactory and spinal arachnoidal bulk flow) is likely complemented by fluid clearance across capillary walls (aquaporin 4) and arachnoid villi when CSFP and fluid retention are markedly elevated. A model is presented that links CSF and ISF homeostasis to coordinated fluxes of water and solutes at both the blood-CSF and blood-brain transport interfaces. Outline 1 Overview 2 CSF formation 2.1 Transcription factors 2.2 Ion transporters 2.3 Enzymes that modulate transport 2.4 Aquaporins or water channels 2.5 Receptors for neuropeptides 3 CSF pressure 3.1 Servomechanism regulatory hypothesis 3.2 Ontogeny of CSF pressure generation 3.3 Congenital hydrocephalus and periventricular regions 3.4 Brain response to elevated CSF pressure 3.5 Advances in measuring CSF waveforms 4 CSF flow 4.1 CSF flow and brain metabolism 4.2 Flow effects on fetal germinal matrix 4.3 Decreasing CSF flow in aging CNS 4.4 Refinement of non-invasive flow measurements 5 CSF volume 5.1 Hemodynamic factors 5.2 Hydrodynamic factors 5.3 Neuroendocrine factors 6 CSF turnover rate 6.1 Adverse effect of ventriculomegaly 6.2 Attenuated CSF sink action 7 CSF composition 7.1 Kidney-like action of CP-CSF system 7.2 Altered CSF biochemistry in aging and disease 7.3 Importance of clearance transport 7.4 Therapeutic manipulation of composition 8 CSF recycling in relation to ISF dynamics 8.1 CSF exchange with brain interstitium 8.2 Components of ISF movement in brain 8.3 Compromised ISF/CSF dynamics and amyloid retention 9 CSF reabsorption 9.1 Arachnoidal outflow resistance 9.2 Arachnoid villi vs. olfactory drainage routes 9.3 Fluid reabsorption along spinal nerves 9.4 Reabsorption across capillary aquaporin channels 10 Developing translationally effective models for restoring CSF balance 11 Conclusion PMID:18479516

  18. Exercise-induced changes of cerebrospinal fluid vascular endothelial growth factor in adult chronic hydrocephalus patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Shanahan, Kaitlyn J; Shriver, Leah P; Luciano, Mark G

    2016-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a growth factor demonstrated to be a key factor in cerebral angiogenesis and neurogenesis. It has been considered a critical component in hippocampus neurogenesis and memory formation and has been observed to increase in the rat hippocampus after exercise. We previously found increased VEGF levels in experimental chronic hydrocephalus in several brain areas and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), suggesting a role in the adaption to chronic hypoxia. Here we investigate the ability of moderate exercise to increase CSF-VEGF levels in adult chronic hydrocephalus patients. Lumbar CSF samples were collected from 17 normal pressure hydrocephalus patients. During CSF collection, 11 patients (exercise group) underwent a standard in-room occupational therapy session; six patients (no-exercise group) did not undergo a physical therapy session. CSF-VEGF levels were evaluated for increase related to exercise and the clinical response to CSF drainage. CSF-VEGF levels in the exercise group demonstrated significant increases 1-3hours post-exercise compared with the levels 1-2hours pre-exercise (p=0.04), and also showed significantly higher levels than the no-exercise groups (p=0.03). The post-exercise CSF-VEGF level in the group that did not clinically improve was significantly higher than both their own pre-exercise level (p=0.02) and that seen in the clinically improving group (p=0.05) after exercise. We conclude that CSF-VEGF levels can increase after moderate exercise even in elderly hydrocephalus patients. This suggests that a potential benefit of exercise, especially in CSF drainage non-improved patients, may exist via a central VEGF mechanism. PMID:26498093

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid lysosomal enzymes and alpha-synuclein in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Parnetti, Lucilla; Chiasserini, Davide; Persichetti, Emanuele; Eusebi, Paolo; Varghese, Shiji; Qureshi, Mohammad M; Dardis, Andrea; Deganuto, Marta; De Carlo, Claudia; Castrioto, Anna; Balducci, Chiara; Paciotti, Silvia; Tambasco, Nicola; Bembi, Bruno; Bonanni, Laura; Onofrj, Marco; Rossi, Aroldo; Beccari, Tommaso; El-Agnaf, Omar; Calabresi, Paolo

    2014-07-01

    To assess the discriminating power of multiple cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for Parkinson's disease (PD), we measured several proteins playing an important role in the disease pathogenesis. The activities of β-glucocerebrosidase and other lysosomal enzymes, together with total and oligomeric α-synuclein, and total and phosphorylated tau, were thus assessed in CSF of 71 PD patients and compared to 45 neurological controls. Activities of β-glucocerebrosidase, β-mannosidase, β-hexosaminidase, and β-galactosidase were measured with established enzymatic assays, while α-synuclein and tau biomarkers were evaluated with immunoassays. A subset of PD patients (n = 44) was also screened for mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase-encoding gene (GBA1). In the PD group, β-glucocerebrosidase activity was reduced (P < 0.05) and patients at earlier stages showed lower enzymatic activity (P < 0.05); conversely, β-hexosaminidase activity was significantly increased (P < 0.05). Eight PD patients (18%) presented GBA1 sequence variations; 3 of them were heterozygous for the N370S mutation. Levels of total α-synuclein were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in PD, in contrast to increased levels of α-synuclein oligomers, with a higher oligomeric/total α-synuclein ratio in PD patients when compared with controls (P < 0.001). A combination of β-glucocerebrosidase activity, oligomeric/total α-synuclein ratio, and age gave the best performance in discriminating PD from neurological controls (sensitivity 82%; specificity 71%, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.87). These results demonstrate the possibility of detecting lysosomal dysfunction in CSF and further support the need to combine different biomarkers for improving the diagnostic accuracy of PD. PMID:24436092

  20. Modified Graded Repair of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyun; Choi, Jai Ho; Kim, Young-Il; Kim, Sung Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective Complete sellar floor reconstruction is critical to avoid postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during transsphenoidal surgery. Recently, the pedicled nasoseptal flap has undergone many modifications and eventually proved to be valuable and efficient. However, using these nasoseptal flaps in all patients who undergo transsphenoidal surgery, including those who had none or only minor CSF leakage, appears to be overly invasive and time-consuming. Methods Patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal tumor surgery within a 5 year-period were reviewed. Since 2009, we classified the intraoperative CSF leakage into grades from 0 to 3. Sellar floor reconstruction was tailored to each leak grade. We did not use any tissue grafts such as abdominal fat and did not include any procedures of CSF diversions such as lumbar drainage. Results Among 200 cases in 188 patients (147 pituitary adenoma and 41 other pathologies), intraoperative CSF leakage was observed in 27.4% of 197 cases : 14.7% Grade 1, 4.6% Grade 2a, 3.0% Grade 2b, and 5.1% Grade 3. Postoperative CSF leakage was observed in none of the cases. Septal bone buttress was used for Grade 1 to 3 leakages instead of any other foreign materials. Pedicled nasoseptal flap was used for Grades 2b and 3 leakages. Unused septal bones and nasoseptal flaps were repositioned. Conclusion Modified classification of intraoperative CSF leaks and tailored repair technique in a multilayered fashion using an en-bloc harvested septal bone and vascularized nasoseptal flaps is an effective and reliable method for the prevention of postoperative CSF leaks. PMID:26279811

  1. The late and dual origin of cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Petracca, Yanina L; Sartoretti, Maria Micaela; Di Bella, Daniela J; Marin-Burgin, Antonia; Carcagno, Abel L; Schinder, Alejandro F; Lanuza, Guillermo M

    2016-03-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms that control the production of specialized neuronal types. However, how the timing of differentiation contributes to neuronal diversity in the developing spinal cord is still a pending question. In this study, we show that cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs), an anatomically discrete cell type of the ependymal area, originate from surprisingly late neurogenic events in the ventral spinal cord. CSF-cNs are identified by the expression of the transcription factors Gata2 and Gata3, and the ionic channels Pkd2l1 and Pkd1l2. Contrasting with Gata2/3(+) V2b interneurons, differentiation of CSF-cNs is independent of Foxn4 and takes place during advanced developmental stages previously assumed to be exclusively gliogenic. CSF-cNs are produced from two distinct dorsoventral regions of the mouse spinal cord. Most CSF-cNs derive from progenitors circumscribed to the late-p2 and the oligodendrogenic (pOL) domains, whereas a second subset of CSF-cNs arises from cells bordering the floor plate. The development of these two subgroups of CSF-cNs is differentially controlled by Pax6, they adopt separate locations around the postnatal central canal and they display electrophysiological differences. Our results highlight that spatiotemporal mechanisms are instrumental in creating neural cell diversity in the ventral spinal cord to produce distinct classes of interneurons, motoneurons, CSF-cNs, glial cells and ependymal cells. PMID:26839365

  2. Delivery of ziconotide to cerebrospinal fluid via intranasal pathway for the treatment of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Manda, Prashanth; Kushwaha, Avadhesh Singh; Kundu, Santanu; Shivakumar, H N; Jo, Seong Bong; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2016-02-28

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the plausibility of delivery of ziconotide to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via intranasal administration. Ziconotide was administered either in the form of solution or Kolliphor P 407 gels (KP 407) intranasally in Sprague-Dawley rats. The effect of incorporation of chitosan in the formulation was also investigated. Time course of drug in the CSF was investigated by collecting CSF from cisterna magna. Pharmacokinetics of ziconotide in CSF following intrathecal and intravenous (i.v.) administration of ziconotide was investigated. Upon intrathecal administration the elimination rate constant of ziconotide in CSF was found to be 1.01±0.34h(-1). The Cmax and Tmax of ziconotide in CSF following intravenous administration were found to be 37.78±6.8ng/mL and ~2h respectively. The time required to attain maximum concentration (Tmax) in CSF was less upon intranasal administration (15min) compared to i.v. administration (120min). Presence of chitosan enhanced the overall bioavailability of ziconotide from intranasal solution and gel formulations. The elimination rate constant of ziconotide in CSF following intranasal and intravenous administration of ziconotide solution was found to be 0.54±0.08h(-1) and 0.42±0.10h(-1) respectively. Whereas, intranasal administration of ziconotide in the form of in situ forming gel lowered the elimination rate significantly. These results suggest that intranasal administration could be a potential noninvasive and patient compliant method of delivering ziconotide to CSF to treat chronic pain. PMID:26732557

  3. Cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid of neurosyphilis patients: Identification of Urokinase plasminogen activator using antibody microarrays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Zheng, Dao-Cheng; Fang, Chang; Huang, Jin-Mei; Ke, Wu-Jian; Wang, Liu-Yuan; Zeng, Wei-Ying; Zheng, He-Ping; Yang, Bin

    2016-04-15

    Little is known regarding protein responses to syphilis infection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients presenting with neurosyphilis. Protein and antibody arrays offer a new opportunity to gain insights into global protein expression profiles in these patients. Here we obtained CSF samples from 46 syphilis patients, 25 of which diagnosed as having central nervous system involvement based on clinical and laboratory findings. The CSF samples were then analyzed using a RayBioH L-Series 507 Antibody Array system designed to simultaneously analyze 507 specific cytokines. The results indicated that 41 molecules showed higher levels in patients with neurosyphilis in comparison with patients without neural involvement. For validation by single target ELISA, we selected five of them (MIP-1a, I-TAC/CXCL11, Urokinase plasminogen activator [uPA], and Oncostatin M) because they have previously been found to be involved in central nervous system (CNS) disorders. The ELISA tests confirmed that uPA levels were significantly higher in the CSF of neurosyphilis patients (109.1±7.88pg/ml) versus patients without CNS involvement (63.86±4.53pg/ml, p<0.0001). There was also a clear correlation between CSF uPA levels and CSF protein levels (p=0.0128) as well as CSF-VDRL titers (p=0.0074) used to diagnose neurosyphilis. No significant difference between the two groups of patients, however, was found in uPA levels in the serum, suggesting specific activation of the inflammatory system in the CNS but not the periphery in neurosyphilis patients. We conclude that measurements of uPA levels in CSF may be an additional parameter for diagnosing neurosyphilis. PMID:27049560

  4. RT-QuIC analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Lynne I.; Peden, Alexander H.; Orrú, Christina D.; Wilham, Jason M.; Appleford, Nigel E.; Mallinson, Gary; Andrews, Mary; Head, Mark W.; Caughey, Byron; Will, Robert G.; Knight, Richard S.G.; Green, Alison J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Current cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) are based on the detection of surrogate markers of neuronal damage such as CSF 14-3-3 which are not specific for sCJD. A number of prion protein conversion assays have been developed, including real-time quaking induced conversion (RT-QuIC). The objective of this study is to investigate whether CSF RT-QuIC analysis could be used as a diagnostic test in sCJD. Methods An exploratory study was undertaken which analysed 108 CSF samples from patients with neuropathologically confirmed sCJD or from control patients. Of the 108 CSF samples 56 were from sCJD patients (30 female, 26 male, aged 31–84 years; 62.3 ± 13.5 years) and 52 were from control patients (26 female, 26 male, aged 43–84 years; 67.8 ± 10.4 years). A confirmatory group of 118 patients were subsequently examined which consisted of 67 cases of neuropathologically confirmed sCJD (33 female, 34 male, aged 39–82 years; 67.5 ± 9.0 years) and 51 control cases (26 female, 25 male, aged 36–87 years; 63.5 ± 11.6 years). Results The exploratory study showed that RT-QuIC analysis had a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 98% for the diagnosis of sCJD. These results were confirmed in the confirmatory study which showed that CSF RT-QuIC analysis had a sensitivity and specificity of 87% and 100% respectively. Interpretation This study shows that CSF RT-QuIC analysis has the potential to be a more specific diagnostic test for sCJD than current CSF tests. PMID:22926858

  5. Effects of hyperthermia on enzymes and electrolytes in blood and cerebrospinal fluid in dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deswal, K.; Chohan, I. S.

    1981-09-01

    The effects of exposure to various degrees of heat stress on serum glutamate—oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALK-P-ase), calcium and chlorides have been studied on 75 dogs. Rectal temperature (Tre) was recorded before and after exposure to heat stress. These dogs were divided into 5 groups, according to the Tre level attained after exposure to heat stress. Rectal temperature was raised from normal to 39.45±0.47‡C in the first group, to 40.93±0.17‡C in the second group, to 41.87±0.22‡C in the third group, to 42.90 ± 0.21‡C in the fourth group and to 43.93±0.19‡C in the fifth group. The concentration of enzymes SGOT, SGPT and ALK-P-ase in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) increased significantly with hyperthermia. Calcium and chlorides concentrations in blood and in CSF tended to increase in hyperthermia. The integrity of the blood brain barrier for these enzymes and calcium is maintained under mild hyperthermia but it breaks down partially under influence of more severe hyperthermia. Core temperature above 41‡C results in damage to tissues and consequential rise of plasma enzymes. This degree of hyperthermia also seems to mark the beginning of injury to blood brain barrier. Critical core temperature tolerated by 50% of animals was 44‡C.

  6. Routine Testing for Anaerobic Bacteria in Cerebrospinal Fluid Cultures Improves Recovery of Clinically Significant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Meredith E.; Thomas, Benjamin S.; Wallace, Meghan A.; Weber, Carol J.

    2014-01-01

    In North America, the widespread use of vaccines targeting Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae have dramatically altered the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis, while the methodology for culturing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens has remained largely unchanged. The aims of this study were 2-fold: to document the current epidemiology of bacterial meningitis at a tertiary care medical center and to assess the clinical utility of routinely querying for anaerobes in CSF cultures. To that end, we assessed CSF cultures submitted over a 2-year period. A brucella blood agar (BBA) plate, incubated anaerobically for 5 days, was included in the culture procedure for all CSF specimens during the second year of evaluation. In the pre- and postimplementation years, 2,353 and 2,302 CSF specimens were cultured, with 49 and 99 patients having positive culture results, respectively. The clinical and laboratory data for patients with positive cultures were reviewed. Anaerobic bacteria were isolated in the CSF samples from 33 patients post-BBA compared to two patients pre-BBA (P = 0.01). The anaerobic isolates included Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (n = 1), Propionibacterium species (n = 15), and Propionibacterium acnes (n = 19) isolates; all of these isolates were recovered on the BBA. Eight of the 35 patients from whom anaerobic organisms were isolated received antimicrobial therapy. Although six of these patients had central nervous system hardware, two patients did not have a history of a neurosurgical procedure and had community-acquired anaerobic bacterial meningitis. This study demonstrates that the simple addition of an anaerobically incubated BBA to the culture of CSF specimens enhances the recovery of clinically significant anaerobic pathogens. PMID:24622102

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Improves Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in the Early Detection of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brys, Miroslaw; Glodzik, Lidia; Mosconi, Lisa; Switalski, Remigiusz; De Santi, Susan; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Rich, Kenneth; Kim, Byeong C.; Mehta, Pankaj; Zinkowski, Ray; Pratico, Domenico; Wallin, Anders; Zetterberg, Henryk; Tsui, Wai H.; Rusinek, Henry; Blennow, Kaj; de Leon, Mony J.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known of combined utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for prediction of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and longitudinal data is scarce. We examined these biomarkers at baseline and longitudinally in incipient AD. Forty-five subjects [21 controls (NL-NL), 16 stable MCI (MCI-MCI), 8 MCI who declined to AD (MCI-AD)] received MRI and lumbar puncture at baseline and after 2 years. CSF measures included total and phosphorylated tau (T-tau, P-tau231), amyloid-β (Aβ42/Aβ40) and isoprostane. Voxel-based morphometry identified gray matter concentration (GMC) differences best distinguishing study groups and individual GMC values were calculated. Rate of medial temporal lobe (MTL) atrophy was examined using regional boundary shift (rBS) method. At baseline, for MRI, MCI-AD showed reduced GMC-MTL, and for CSF higher CSF T-tau, P-tau231, IP and lower Aβ42/Aβ40 as compared with MCI-MCI or NL-NL. Longitudinally, rBS-MTL atrophy was higher in MCI-AD than in either MCI-MCI or NL-NL, particularly in the left hemisphere. CSF data showed longitudinally greater increases of isoprostane in MCI-AD as compared with NL-NL. Combining baseline CSF-P-tau231 and GMC-MTL significantly increased overall prediction from 74% to 84% (pstep <0.05). These results provide support for including multiple modalities of biomarkers in the identification of memory clinic patients at increased risk for dementia. PMID:19221425

  8. Methodological aspects of ELISA analysis of thioredoxin 1 in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Mathias; Curbo, Sophie; Reiser, Kathrin; Masterman, Thomas; Braesch-Andersen, Sten; Areström, Irene; Ahlborg, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin-1 (Trx1) is a protein antioxidant involved in major cellular processes. Increased plasma levels of Trx1 have been associated with human diseases suggesting that Trx1 is a marker for oxidative stress with putative clinical use. However, the reported mean levels of Trx1 in the control cohorts vary a hundred-fold between studies (0.8-87 ng/ml), possibly due to methodological differences between the capture ELISA used in the different studies. The aim of this study was to investigate methodological aspects related to the ELISA measurement of Trx1. ELISAs utilizing different capture and detection combinations of antibodies to Trx1 and as well as recombinant human (rh) Trx1 standards from two sources were characterized. The different ELISAs were subsequently used to measure Trx1 in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples (CSF) from healthy donors and from patients with various neurological diagnoses. The Trx1 standards differed in their content of monomeric and oligomeric Trx1, which affected the ELISAs composed of different antibody combinations. Thus, the levels of Trx1 determined in human plasma and CSF samples varied depending on the antibody used in the ELISAs and on the rhTrx1 standard. Furthermore, the relevance of preventing interference by heterophilic antibodies (HA) in human plasma and CSF was investigated. The addition of a HA blocking buffer to human samples drastically reduced the ELISA signals in many samples showing that HA are likely to cause false positive results unless they are blocked. In conclusion, the study shows that the design of a Trx1 ELISA in regards to antibodies and standards used has an impact on the measured Trx1 levels. Importantly, analyses of human plasma and CSF without preventing HA interference may obscure the obtained data. Overall, the results of this study are crucial for the improvement of future studies on the association of Trx1 levels with various diseases. PMID:25075746

  9. Neuropharmacokinetics of two investigational compounds in rats: divergent temporal profiles in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cuyue; Chen, Ting; Kapadnis, Sudarshan; Hodgdon, Hilliary; Tao, Yi; Chen, Xing; Wen, Melody; Costa, Don; Murphy, Deirdre; Nolan, Scott; Flood, Dorothy G; Welty, Devin F; Koenig, Gerhard

    2014-10-15

    Two investigational compounds (FRM-1, (R)-7-fluoro-N-(quinuclidin-3-yl)benzo[b]thiophene-2-carboxamide and FRM-2, (R)-7-cyano-N-(quinuclidin-3-yl)benzo[b]thiophene-2-carboxamide) resided in rat brain longer than in systemic circulation. In Caco-2 directional transport studies, they both showed good intrinsic passive permeability but differed significantly in efflux susceptibility (efflux ratio of <2 and ∼7, respectively), largely attributed to P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Capitalizing on these interesting properties, we investigated how cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentration (CCSF) would be shaped by unbound plasma concentration (Cu,p) and unbound brain concentration (Cu,b) in disequilibrium conditions and at steady state. Following subcutaneous administration, FRM-1CCSF largely followed Cu,p initially and leveled between Cu,p and Cu,b. However, it gradually approached Cu,b and became lower than, but parallel to Cu,b at the terminal phase. In contrast, FRM-2CCSF temporal profile mostly paralleled the Cu,p but was at a much lower level. Upon intravenous infusion to steady state, FRM-1CCSF and Cu,b were similar, accounting for 61% and 69% of the Cu,p, indicating a case of largely passive diffusion-governed brain penetration where CCSF served as a good surrogate for Cu,b. On the contrary, FRM-2CCSF and Cu,b were remarkably lower than Cu,p (17% and 8% of Cu,p, respectively), suggesting that FRM-2 brain penetration was severely impaired by P-gp-mediated efflux and CCSF underestimated this impact. A semi-physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was constructed that adequately described the temporal profiles of the compounds in the plasma, brain and CSF. Our work provided some insight into the relative importance of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB) in modulating CCSF. PMID:25091561

  10. Brain ventricular volume and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Brian R.; Cohen, Ronald A.; Gongvatana, Assawin; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.; Johanson, Conrad E.; Stopa, Edward G.; Donahue, John E.; Silverberg, Gerald D.

    2010-01-01

    The frequent co-occurrence of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus suggests a possible link between ventricular dilation and AD. If enlarging ventricles serve as a marker of faulty cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance mechanisms, then a relationship may be demonstrable between increasing ventricular volume and decreasing levels of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) in CSF in preclinical and early AD. CSF biomarker data (Aβ, tau, and phosphorylated tau) as well as direct measurements of whole brain and ventricular volumes were obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative dataset. The ratio of ventricular volume to whole brain volume was derived as a secondary independent measure. Baseline data were used for the group analyses of 288 subjects classified as being either normal (n=87), having the syndrome of mild cognitive impairment (n=136), or mild AD (n=65). Linear regression models were derived for each biomarker as the dependent variable, using the MRI volume measures and age as independent variables. For controls, ventricular volume was negatively associated with CSF Aβ in APOE ε4 positive subjects. A different pattern was seen in AD subjects, in whom ventricular volume was negatively associated with tau, but not Aβ in ε4 positive subjects. Increased ventricular volume may be associated with decreased levels of CSF Aβ in preclinical AD. The basis for the apparent effect of APOE ε4 genotype on the relationship of ventricular volume to Aβ and tau levels is unknown, but could involve altered CSF-blood-brain barrier function during the course of disease. PMID:20182051

  11. Pharmacokinetics of colistin in cerebrospinal fluid after intraventricular administration of colistin methanesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Roberto; Cusato, Maria; Accetta, Giovanni; Marinò, Valeria; Procaccio, Francesco; Del Gaudio, Alfredo; Iotti, Giorgio A; Regazzi, Mario

    2012-08-01

    Intraventricular colistin, administered as colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), is the last resource for the treatment of central nervous system infections caused by panresistant Gram-negative bacteria. The doses and daily regimens vary considerably and are empirically chosen; the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pharmacokinetics of colistin after intraventricular administration of CMS has never been characterized. Nine patients (aged 18 to 73 years) were treated with intraventricular CMS (daily doses of 2.61 to 10.44 mg). Colistin concentrations were measured using a selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay. The population pharmacokinetics analysis was performed with the P-Pharm program. The pharmacokinetics of colistin could be best described by the one-compartment model. The estimated values (means ± standard deviations) of apparent CSF total clearance (CL/Fm, where Fm is the unknown fraction of CMS converted to colistin) and terminal half-life (t(1/2λ)) were 0.033 ± 0.014 liter/h and 7.8 ± 3.2 h, respectively, and the average time to the peak concentration was 3.7 ± 0.9 h. A positive correlation between CL/Fm and the amount of CSF drained (range 40 to 300 ml) was observed. When CMS was administered at doses of ≥5.22 mg/day, measured CSF concentrations of colistin were continuously above the MIC of 2 μg/ml, and measured values of trough concentration (C(trough)) ranged between 2.0 and 9.7 μg/ml. Microbiological cure was observed in 8/9 patients. Intraventricular administration of CMS at doses of ≥5.22 mg per day was appropriate in our patients, but since external CSF efflux is variable and can influence the clearance of colistin and its concentrations in CSF, the daily dose of 10 mg suggested by the Infectious Diseases Society of America may be more prudent. PMID:22687507

  12. Incidence and management of cerebrospinal fluid fistulas in 336 multilevel laminectomies with noninstrumented fusions

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence (e.g., 3–27%) and the types of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas occurring during multilevel lumbar laminectomy with noninstrumented spinal fusions varies. Methods: From 2000 to 2015, we retrospectively evaluated the incidence/etiologies of CSF fistulas occurring for 336 patients undergoing average 4.7 laminectomies with average 1.4 level noninstrumented fusions over a 15 year period. The varied etiologies of CSF leaks included; ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL) extending through the dura, postoperative surgical scar, iatrogenic traumatic leak, epidural steroid injections (ESI), resection of synovial cysts, and the removal of intradural tumors. Techniques for primary repairs included combinations of; 7-0 Gore-Tex (Newark, Delaware, USA) sutures, micro-dural staples, muscle patch/other (e.g., bovine pericardial) grafts, fibrin sealants/glues (e.g., Tisseel; Baxter International Inc., Westlake Village, CA, USA), and Duragen (Integra LifeSciences, Hawthorne, NY, USA) including both the thin and suturable types. Results: The etiologies of CSF fistulas in descending order included: Epidural spinal injections (ESI) (7 patients), synovial cysts (6 patients), OYL (5 patients), and equally for postoperative scar and intradural tumors (3 patients). CSF fistulas occurred in 24 (7.14%) of 336 patients; this frequency was reduced to 4.2% when ESI and intradural tumors were excluded. Conclusion: CSF fistulas occurred in 7.14% of 336 patients undergoing average 4.7 multilevel laminectomies with average 1.4 level noninstrumented fusions attributed to a lumbar stenosis with mild/moderate instability. The dural repair addressed seven prior ESI, six synovial cysts, five OYL, and operative scarring and intradural tumors (three apiece). Knowing the pathologies contributing to CSF fistulas should help the surgeon to better anticipate and treat these fistulas. PMID:26605107

  13. Purely endoscopic pterional extradural approach: A novel technique for repair of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Ajit Kumar; Goyal, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective descriptive study of an innovative surgical technique. Objective: To assess the feasibility and success of repair of transfrontal sinus cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea through pterional transcranial extradural approach using endoscope. Summary of Background Data: Repair of CSF rhinorrhea has seen advancement with the evolution of endoscopic transnasal techniques. However, leaks from defect in the posterior wall of frontal sinus still remain a challenge for the skull base surgeons and requires conventional craniotomy more often. We describe a novel technique to repair these leaks by purely endoscopic pterional extradural (PEPE) approach thereby avoiding complications associated with conventional craniotomy and endoscopic transnasal approaches. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with traumatic CSF rhinorrhea from the posterior wall of frontal sinus underwent repair with the present technique. They were followed up for 6–18 months and were evaluated for feasibility of procedure, recurrence of leak, and occurrence of the fresh neurological deficit. Results: Thirty-five patients underwent CSF rhinorrhea repair using the above technique. The procedure was accomplished in all patients without any intraoperative complications. There was no requirement of blood transfusion in any case. All patients had a cessation of CSF leak in the postoperative period, and there was no recurrence. There was no evidence of frontal lobe retraction injury in any of these patients, and no fresh neurological deficit was observed. Conclusion: This PEPE approach to repair CSF leak through the posterior wall of the frontal sinus is a novel technique in which we can avoid disadvantages associated with both conventional craniotomy as well as transnasal endoscopic approaches. PMID:27114672

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid Aβ levels correlate with structural brain changes in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Mona K; Alves, Guido; Hwang, Kristy S; Babakchanian, Sona; Bronnick, Kolbjorn S; Chou, Yi-Yu; Dalaker, Turi O; Kurz, Martin W; Larsen, Jan P; Somme, Johanne H; Thompson, Paul M; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn; Apostolova, Liana G

    2013-03-01

    ParkWest is a large Norwegian multicenter study of newly diagnosed drug-naïve subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD). Cognitively normal PD subjects (PDCN) and PD subjects with mild cognitive impairment (PDMCI) from this cohort have significant hippocampal atrophy and ventricular enlargement, compared to normal controls. Here, we aimed to investigate whether the same structural changes are associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amyloid beta (Aβ)38 , Aβ40 , Aβ42 , total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau). We performed three-dimensional radial distance analyses of the hippocampi and lateral ventricles using the MRI data from ParkWest subjects who provided CSF at baseline. Our sample consisted of 73 PDCN and 18 PDMCI subjects. We found significant associations between levels of all three CSF Aβ analytes and t-tau and lateral ventricular enlargement in the pooled sample. In the PDCN sample, all three amyloid analytes showed significant associations with the radial distance of the occipital and frontal horns of the lateral ventricles. CSF Aβ38 and Aβ42 showed negative associations, with enlargement in occipital and frontal horns of the lateral ventricles in the pooled sample, and a negative association with the occipital horns in PDMCI. CSF Aβ levels in early PD correlate with ventricular enlargement, previously associated with PD dementia. Therefore, CSF and MRI markers may help identify PD patients at high risk for developing cognitive decline and dementia in the course of their illness. Contrary to Alzheimer's disease, we found no associations between CSF t-tau and p-tau and hippocampal atrophy. PMID:23408705

  15. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypocretin-1 (Orexin-A) Level Fluctuates with Season and Correlates with Day Length.

    PubMed

    Boddum, Kim; Hansen, Mathias Hvidtfelt; Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2016-01-01

    The hypocretin/orexin neuropeptides (hcrt) are key players in the control of sleep and wakefulness evidenced by the fact that lack of hcrt leads to the sleep disorder Narcolepsy Type 1. Sleep disturbances are common in mood disorders, and hcrt has been suggested to be poorly regulated in depressed subjects. To study seasonal variation in hcrt levels, we obtained data on hcrt-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 227 human individuals evaluated for central hypersomnias at a Danish sleep center. The samples were taken over a 4 year timespan, and obtained in the morning hours, thus avoiding impact of the diurnal hcrt variation. Hcrt-1 concentration was determined in a standardized radioimmunoassay. Using biometric data and sleep parameters, a multivariate regression analysis was performed. We found that the average monthly CSF hcrt-1 levels varied significantly across the seasons following a sine wave with its peak in the summer (June-July). The amplitude was 19.9 pg hcrt/mL [12.8-26.9] corresponding to a 10.6% increase in midsummer compared to winter. Factors found to significantly predict the hcrt-1 values were day length, presence of snow, and proximity to the Christmas holiday season. The hcrt-1 values from January were much higher than predicted from the model, suggestive of additional factors influencing the CSF hcrt-1 levels such as social interaction. This study provides evidence that human CSF hcrt-1 levels vary with season, correlating with day length. This finding could have implications for the understanding of winter tiredness, fatigue, and seasonal affective disorder. This is the first time a seasonal variation of hcrt-1 levels has been shown, demonstrating that the hcrt system is, like other neurotransmitter systems, subjected to long term modulation. PMID:27008404

  16. Biochemical, histological and functional correction of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB by intra-cerebrospinal fluid gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Albert; Haurigot, Virginia; Garcia, Miguel; Marcó, Sara; Motas, Sandra; Villacampa, Pilar; Maggioni, Luca; León, Xavier; Molas, Maria; Sánchez, Víctor; Muñoz, Sergio; Leborgne, Christian; Moll, Xavier; Pumarola, Martí; Mingozzi, Federico; Ruberte, Jesús; Añor, Sònia; Bosch, Fatima

    2015-04-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive tool for the treatment of monogenic disorders, in particular for lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) caused by deficiencies in secretable lysosomal enzymes in which neither full restoration of normal enzymatic activity nor transduction of all affected cells are necessary. However, some LSD such as Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB (MPSIIIB) are challenging because the disease's main target organ is the brain and enzymes do not efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier even if present at very high concentration in circulation. To overcome these limitations, we delivered AAV9 vectors encoding for α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) to the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) of MPSIIIB mice with the disease already detectable at biochemical, histological and functional level. Restoration of enzymatic activity in Central Nervous System (CNS) resulted in normalization of glycosaminoglycan content and lysosomal physiology, resolved neuroinflammation and restored the pattern of gene expression in brain similar to that of healthy animals. Additionally, transduction of the liver due to passage of vectors to the circulation led to whole-body disease correction. Treated animals also showed reversal of behavioural deficits and extended lifespan. Importantly, when the levels of enzymatic activity were monitored in the CSF of dogs following administration of canine NAGLU-coding vectors to animals that were either naïve or had pre-existing immunity against AAV9, similar levels of activity were achieved, suggesting that CNS efficacy would not be compromised in patients seropositive for AAV9. Our studies provide a strong rationale for the clinical development of this novel therapeutic approach as the treatment for MPSIIIB. PMID:25524704

  17. Development of PCR assays to detect ampicillin resistance genes in cerebrospinal fluid samples containing Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Tenover, F C; Huang, M B; Rasheed, J K; Persing, D H

    1994-11-01

    We developed PCR primers specific for the blaTEM and blaROB ampicillin resistance genes. The specificity of the primers was confirmed by testing a series of Escherichia coli isolates containing a variety of ampicillin resistance genes and a series of ampicillin-resistant and ampicillin-susceptible Haemophilus influenzae isolates. There was a perfect correlation between ampicillin MICs, the presence of beta-lactamase (as determined by the nitrocefin test), and the results with the blaTEM and blaROB primers. Isolates of H. influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae obtained from 25 frozen cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens were also tested. Four of 14 H. influenzae isolates were positive with the blaTEM primers; none were positive with the blaROB primers. Ampicillin MICs were determined for the H. influenzae isolates, and penicillin MICs were determined for the S. pneumoniae isolates. Only the four PCR-positive H. influenzae isolates had elevated MICs of ampicillin and were beta-lactamase positive. None of the H. influenzae isolates contained the blaROB gene, and none of the S. pneumoniae isolates produced positive reactions with either primer set. We then used universal primers directed to conserved regions of rRNA and a Haemophilus detection probe to identify which of the 25 frozen samples of CSF contained H. influenzae. Fourteen of the 25 CSF specimens were positive for H. influenzae, which correlated with the number of organisms obtained by culture of the CSF samples. Four of the CSF samples were positive with the blaTEM primer set, and these correlated with the four H. influenzae isolates that were positive when tested directly by PCR. The blaTEM assay required the use of native Taq polymerase because Amplitaq preparations were contaminated with vector DNA that contained the blaTEM-1 gene. PMID:7852564

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid inflammatory markers in patients with multiple sclerosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Matejčíková, Z; Mareš, J; Přikrylová Vranová, H; Klosová, J; Sládková, V; Doláková, J; Zapletalová, J; Kaňovský, P

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Autoimmune inflammation is common in the early stages of MS. This stage is followed by the neurodegenerative process. The result of these changes is axon and myelin breakdown. Although MS is according to McDonald's revised diagnostic criteria primarily a clinical diagnosis, paraclinical investigation methods are an important part in the diagnosis of MS. In common practice, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord, examination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and examination of visual evoked potentials are used. There are an increasing number of studies dealing with biomarkers in CSF and their role in the diagnosis and treatment of MS. We hypothesized that the levels of some markers could be changed in MS in comparison with controls. We studied five inflammatory markers [interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8, interleukin-10 (IL-10), beta-2-microglobulin, orosomucoid]. CSF and serum levels of inflammatory markers were assessed in 38 patients with newly diagnosed MS meeting McDonald's revised diagnostic criteria and in 28 subjects as a control group (CG). Levels of beta-2-microglobulin and interleukin-8 in CSF were found to be significantly higher in MS patients in comparison to CG (p < 0.001 resp. p = 0.007). No differences in other CSF markers (IL-6, IL-10 and orosomucoid) and serum levels of all markers between both groups were found. The levels of two studied inflammatory markers were found to be increased at the time of first clinical symptoms of MS. Research on the role of inflammatory and neurodegenerative markers in MS should continue. PMID:24894698

  19. Genome-wide association study of NMDA receptor coagonists in human cerebrospinal fluid and plasma.

    PubMed

    Luykx, J J; Bakker, S C; Visser, W F; Verhoeven-Duif, N; Buizer-Voskamp, J E; den Heijer, J M; Boks, M P M; Sul, J H; Eskin, E; Ori, A P; Cantor, R M; Vorstman, J; Strengman, E; DeYoung, J; Kappen, T H; Pariama, E; van Dongen, E P A; Borgdorff, P; Bruins, P; de Koning, T J; Kahn, R S; Ophoff, R A

    2015-12-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) coagonists glycine, D-serine and L-proline play crucial roles in NMDAR-dependent neurotransmission and are associated with a range of neuropsychiatric disorders. We conducted the first genome-wide association study of concentrations of these coagonists and their enantiomers in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of human subjects from the general population (N=414). Genetic variants at chromosome 22q11.2, located in and near PRODH (proline dehydrogenase), were associated with L-proline in plasma (β=0.29; P=6.38 × 10(-10)). The missense variant rs17279437 in the proline transporter SLC6A20 was associated with L-proline in CSF (β=0.28; P=9.68 × 10(-9)). Suggestive evidence of association was found for the D-serine plasma-CSF ratio at the D-amino-acid oxidase (DAO) gene (β=-0.28; P=9.08 × 10(-8)), whereas a variant in SRR (that encodes serine racemase and is associated with schizophrenia) constituted the most strongly associated locus for the L-serine to D-serine ratio in CSF. All these genes are highly expressed in rodent meninges and choroid plexus, anatomical regions relevant to CSF physiology. The enzymes and transporters they encode may be targeted to further construe the nature of NMDAR coagonist involvement in NMDAR gating. Furthermore, the highlighted genetic variants may be followed up in clinical populations, for example, schizophrenia and 22q11 deletion syndrome. Overall, this targeted metabolomics approach furthers the understanding of NMDAR coagonist concentration variability and sets the stage for non-targeted CSF metabolomics projects. PMID:25666758

  20. Monochloroacetic acid lethality in the rat in relation to lactic acid accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroka, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    Potential antidotes for human exposure to monochloroacetic acid (MCA) were evaluated using a rodent model. Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) and phenobarbital (PB) but not ethanol or phenytoin, were found to be effective antidotes to monochloroacetic acid (MCA) in rats. DCA (110 mg/kg, ip), administered to rats 15 minutes after a LD-80 of MCA (80 mg/kg, iv), consistently reduced mortality to 0%, while PB reduced mortality to less than 20%. Both DCA and PB were found to be similarly effective in mice. The hypothesis that PB reduces mortality in MCA treated rats by altering the metabolic disposition of MCA was evaluated and rejected. Administration of PB to rats treated with a lethal dose of ({sup 14}C)MCA did not alter the concentrations of MCA or its metabolites in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or the extent of covalent binding between radioactivity equivalent to ({sup 14}C)MCA and brain proteins. The relationship between altered blood-brain barrier permeability and death in MCA treated rats was investigated. Treatment with MCA (80 mg/kg, iv) was associated with a significant (50%) increase in the permeability of the rat blood-brain barrier to ({sup 125}I)BSA. The effect was not altered by treatment with PB, however, suggesting that altered blood-brain barrier permeability does not have an important role in the lethal effect of MCA in rats. The effect of MCA on brain carbohydrate metabolism in vivo was investigated. CSF and blood lactic acid concentrations increased in MCA treated rats, and the increase in CSF levels was dose related. In individual MCA treated rats, CSF lactate concentrations paralleled the time course of ataxia and a discrete threshold for death (18 mmol/L) was observed. The relationship between excess brain lactate levels and death in MCA treated rats was investigated further.

  1. Specific absorbed fractions of energy from internal photon sources in brain tumor and cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F. )); Stubbs, J.B. )

    1995-03-01

    Transferrin, radiolabeled with In-111, can be coinjected into glioblastoma multiforme lesions, and subsequent scintigraphic imaging can demonstrate the biokinetics of the cytotoxic transferrin. The administration of [sup 111]In transferrin into a brain tumor results in distribution of radioactivity in the brain, brain tumor, and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Information about absorbed radiation doses to these regions, as well as other nearby tissues and organs, is important for evaluating radiation-related risks from this procedure. The radiation dose is usually estimated for a mathematical representation of the human body. We have included source/target regions for the eye, lens of the eye, spinal column, spinal CSF, cranial CSF, and a 100-g tumor within the brain of an adult male phantom developed by Cristy and Eckerman. The spinal column, spinal CSF, and the eyes have not been routinely included in photon transport simulations. Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) as a function of photon energy were calculated using the ALGAMP computer code, which utilizes Monte Carlo techniques for simulating photon transport. The ALGAMP code was run three times, with the source activity distributed uniformly within the tumor, cranial CSF, and the spinal CSF volumes. These SAFs, which were generated for 12 discrete photon energies ranging from 0.01 to 4.0 MeV, were used with decay scheme data to calculate [ital S]-values needed for estimating absorbed doses. [ital S]-values for [sup 111]In are given for three source regions (brain tumor, cranial CSF, and spinal CSF) and all standard target regions/organs, the eye and lens, as well as to tissues within these source regions. [ital S]-values for the skeletal regions containing active marrow are estimated. These results are useful in evaluating the radiation doses from intracranial administration of [sup 111]In transferrin.

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Culture Positivity and Clinical Outcomes After Amphotericin-Based Induction Therapy for Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Rolfes, Melissa A.; Rhein, Joshua; Schutz, Charlotte; Taseera, Kabanda; Nabeta, Henry W.; Huppler Hullsiek, Kathy; Akampuira, Andrew; Rajasingham, Radha; Musubire, Abdu; Williams, Darlisha A.; Thienemann, Friedrich; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Muzoora, Conrad; Meintjes, Graeme; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Amphotericin-based combination antifungal therapy reduces mortality from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated cryptococcal meningitis. However, 40%–50% of individuals have positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fungal cultures at completion of 2 weeks of amphotericin induction therapy. Residual CSF culture positivity has historically been associated with poor clinical outcomes. We investigated whether persistent CSF fungemia was associated with detrimental clinical outcomes in a contemporary African cohort. Methods. Human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals with cryptococcal meningitis in Uganda and South Africa received amphotericin (0.7–1.0 mg/kg per day) plus fluconazole (800 mg/day) for 2 weeks, followed by “enhanced consolidation” therapy with fluconazole 800 mg/day for at least 3 weeks or until cultures were sterile, and then 400 mg/day for 8 weeks. Participants were randomized to receive antiretroviral therapy (ART) either 1–2 or 5 weeks after diagnosis and observed for 6 months. Survivors were classified as having sterile or nonsterile CSF based on 2-week CSF cultures. Mortality, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), and culture-positive relapse were compared in those with sterile or nonsterile CSF using Cox regression. Results. Of 132 participants surviving 2 weeks, 57% had sterile CSF at 2 weeks, 23 died within 5 weeks, and 40 died within 6 months. Culture positivity was not significantly associated with mortality (adjusted 6-month hazard ratio, 1.2; 95% confidence interval, 0.6–2.3; P = .28). Incidence of IRIS or relapse was also not significantly related to culture positivity. Conclusions. Among patients, all treated with enhanced consolidation antifungal therapy and ART, residual cryptococcal culture positivity was not found to be associated with poor clinical outcomes. PMID:26716103

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid CXCL13 in Lyme neuroborreliosis and asymptomatic HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) CXCL13 is a diagnostic marker of Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB), as its levels have been shown to be significantly higher in LNB than in several other CNS infections. Levels have also been shown to decline after treatment with intravenous ceftriaxone, but levels after treatment with oral doxycycline have previously not been studied. Like Borrelia burgdorferi, HIV also has neurotropic properties. Elevated serum CXCL13 concentrations have been reported in HIV patients, but data on CSF levels are limited. Methods We longitudinally analysed CSF CXCL13 concentrations in 25 LNB patients before and after oral doxycycline treatment. Furthermore, we analysed CSF CXCL13 concentrations in 16 untreated LNB patients, 27 asymptomatic untreated HIV-1 infected patients and 39 controls with no signs of infectious or inflammatory disease. Results In the longitudinal LNB study, initially high CSF CXCL13 levels declined significantly after doxycycline treatment, which correlated to a decreased CSF mononuclear cell count. In the cross-sectional study, all the LNB patients had CSF CXCL13 levels elevated above the lowest standard point of the assay (7.8 pg/mL), with a median concentration of 500 pg/mL (range 34–11,678). Of the HIV patients, 52% had elevated CSF CXCL13 levels (median 10 pg/mL, range 0–498). There was a clear overlap in CSF CXCL13 concentrations between LNB patients and asymptomatic HIV patients. All but one of the 39 controls had CSF CXCL13 levels below 7.8 pg/mL. Conclusions We confirm previous reports of highly elevated CSF CXCL13 levels in LNB patients and that these levels decline after oral doxycycline treatment. The same pattern is seen for CSF mononuclear cells. CSF CXCL13 levels are elevated in neurologically asymptomatic HIV patients and the levels overlap those of LNB patients. The diagnostic value of CSF CXCL13 in LNB remains to be established. PMID:23294475

  4. Effects of Lowering Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure on the Shape of the Peripapillary Retina in Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sibony, Patrick; Kupersmith, Mark J.; Honkanen, Robert; Rohlf, F. James; Torab-Parhiz, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the deformations of the peripapillary retinal pigment epithelium–basement membrane (ppRPE/BM) layer in response to procedures that lower intracranial pressure (ICP). Second, to demonstrate how shape changes may complement the mean retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness as a measure of intracranial hypertension (ICH) and papilledema. Methods. We used geometric morphometrics on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images to analyze shape change of the ppRPE/BM layer after several interventions that lower cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. We also evaluated the effects of pressure-lowering interventions on both the anterior–posterior displacement of ppRPE/BM and the mean RNFL thickness. Forty-one patients with ICH and papilledema were studied before and after lumbar puncture (20), CSF shunt (9), and medical treatment of idiopathic ICH (23). We also compared the shape of 30 normal subjects to 23 patients whose papilledema resolved after medical treatment. Results. The ppRPE/BM-layer in ICH and papilledema is characterized by an asymmetric anterior deformation that moves posteriorly and becomes more V-shaped after each pressure-lowering intervention. The differences were statistically significant for all three groups. These shape changes also occur in patients with ongoing ICH who have secondary optic atrophy (without papilledema). Posterior displacement at the margin of the ppRPE/BM layer correlated strongly with overall shape changes. Conclusions. The subsurface contour of the ppRPE/BM layer is a dynamic property that changes with CSF pressure-lowering interventions. It can supplement the RNFL thickness as an indirect gauge of ICP and is particularly helpful in patients with secondary optic atrophy. Direct measurements of displacement at the basement membrane opening may serve as a more convenient office-based surrogate for shape analysis. PMID:25406288

  5. Increased cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of asymmetric dimethylarginine correlate with adverse clinical outcome in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Wu, Wei; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Qing-Rong; Ni, Li; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2014-08-01

    Elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, have been found in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In addition, CSF levels of ADMA are associated with the severity of vasospasm. However, the relation between CSF ADMA levels and the clinical outcome of SAH patients is still unclear. We hypothesized that elevated ADMA levels in CSF might be related to the clinical outcome of SAH patients. CSF ADMA levels were measured in 20 SAH patients at days 3-5, days 7-9 and days 12-14 after SAH onset using high-performance liquid chromatography. Cerebral vasospasm was assessed by transcranial Doppler ultra sonography. Clinical outcome at 2year follow-up was evaluated using the Karnofsky Performance Status scale (KPS). CSF ADMA concentrations in all SAH patients were significantly increased at days 3-5 (p=0.002) after SAH, peaked on days 7-9 (p<0.001) and remained elevated until days 12-14 (p<0.001). In subgroup analysis, significant increases of CSF ADMA levels were found in patients both with and without vasospasm. The KPS scores significantly correlated with CSF levels of ADMA at days 7-9 (correlation coefficient=-0.55, p=0.012; 95% confidence interval -0.80 to -0.14). Binary logistic regression analysis indicated that higher ADMA level at days 7-9 predicted a poor clinical outcome at 2year follow-up after SAH (odds ratio=1.722, p=0.039, 95% confidence interval 1.029 to 2.882). ADMA may be directly involved in the pathological process and future adverse prognosis of SAH. PMID:24814854

  6. Overton's rule helps to estimate the penetration of anti-infectives into patients' cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Marija; Munz, Martin; Sörgel, Fritz; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Eiffert, Helmut; Nau, Roland

    2012-02-01

    In 1900, Ernst Overton found that the entry of anilin dyes through the cell membranes of living cells depended on the lipophilicity of the dyes. The brain is surrounded by barriers consisting of lipid layers that possess several inward and outward active transport systems. In the absence of meningeal inflammation, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration of anti-infectives in humans estimated by the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) in CSF (AUC(CSF)) to that in serum (AUC(CSF)/AUC(S)) correlated positively with the lipid-water partition coefficient at pH 7.0 (log D) (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient r(S) = 0.40; P = 0.01) and negatively with the molecular mass (MM) (r(S) = -0.33; P = 0.04). The ratio of AUC(CSF) to the AUC of the fraction in serum that was not bound (AUC(CSF)/AUC(S,free)) strongly correlated with log D (r(S) = 0.67; P < 0.0001). In the presence of meningeal inflammation, AUC(CSF)/AUC(S) also correlated positively with log D (r(S) = 0.46; P = 0.002) and negatively with the MM (r(S) = -0.37; P = 0.01). The correlation of AUC(CSF)/AUC(S,free) with log D (r(S) = 0.66; P < 0.0001) was as strong as in the absence of meningeal inflammation. Despite these clear correlations, Overton's rule was able to explain only part of the differences in CSF penetration of the individual compounds. The site of CSF withdrawal (lumbar versus ventricular CSF), age of the patients, underlying diseases, active transport, and alterations in the pharmacokinetics by comedications also appeared to strongly influence the CSF penetration of the drugs studied. PMID:22106225

  7. Overton's Rule Helps To Estimate the Penetration of Anti-Infectives into Patients' Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Djukic, Marija; Munz, Martin; Sörgel, Fritz; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Eiffert, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    In 1900, Ernst Overton found that the entry of anilin dyes through the cell membranes of living cells depended on the lipophilicity of the dyes. The brain is surrounded by barriers consisting of lipid layers that possess several inward and outward active transport systems. In the absence of meningeal inflammation, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration of anti-infectives in humans estimated by the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) in CSF (AUCCSF) to that in serum (AUCCSF/AUCS) correlated positively with the lipid-water partition coefficient at pH 7.0 (log D) (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient rS = 0.40; P = 0.01) and negatively with the molecular mass (MM) (rS = −0.33; P = 0.04). The ratio of AUCCSF to the AUC of the fraction in serum that was not bound (AUCCSF/AUCS,free) strongly correlated with log D (rS = 0.67; P < 0.0001). In the presence of meningeal inflammation, AUCCSF/AUCS also correlated positively with log D (rS = 0.46; P = 0.002) and negatively with the MM (rS = −0.37; P = 0.01). The correlation of AUCCSF/AUCS,free with log D (rS = 0.66; P < 0.0001) was as strong as in the absence of meningeal inflammation. Despite these clear correlations, Overton's rule was able to explain only part of the differences in CSF penetration of the individual compounds. The site of CSF withdrawal (lumbar versus ventricular CSF), age of the patients, underlying diseases, active transport, and alterations in the pharmacokinetics by comedications also appeared to strongly influence the CSF penetration of the drugs studied. PMID:22106225

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokines in Naturally Occurring Canine Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Amanda R.; Welsh, C. Jane; Young, Colin; Spoor, Erich; Kerwin, Sharon C.; Griffin, John F.; Levine, Gwendolyn J.; Cohen, Noah D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Canine intervertebral disk herniation (IVDH) is a common, naturally occurring form of spinal cord injury (SCI) that is increasingly being used in pre-clinical evaluation of therapies. Although IVDH bears critical similarities to human SCI with respect to lesion morphology, imaging features, and post-SCI treatment, limited data are available concerning secondary injury mechanisms. Here, we characterized cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytokines, and chemokines in dogs with acute, surgically treated, thoracolumbar IVDH (n=39) and healthy control dogs (n=21) to investigate early inflammatory events after SCI. A bioplex system was used to measure interleukin (IL)-2, -6, -7, -8, -10, -15, and -18, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC)-like protein, IFN-γ-inducible protein-10, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Cytokine and chemokine concentrations in the CSF of healthy and SCI dogs were compared and, in SCI dogs, were correlated to the duration of SCI, behavioral measures of injury severity at the time of sampling, and neurological outcome 42 days post-SCI as determined by a validated ordinal score. IL-8 concentration was significantly higher in SCI cases than healthy controls (p=0.0013) and was negatively correlated with the duration of SCI (p=0.042). CSF MCP-1 and KC-like protein were positively correlated with CSF microprotein concentration in dogs with SCI (p<0.0001 and p=0.004). CSF MCP-1 concentration was negatively associated with 42-day postinjury outcome (p<0.0001). Taken together, these data indicate that cytokines and chemokines present after SCI in humans and rodent models are associated with SCI pathogenesis in canine IVDH. PMID:24786364

  9. Blood and Cerebrospinal Fluid α-Tocopherol and Selenium Concentrations in Neonatal Foals with Neuroaxonal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Finno, C.J.; Estell, K.E.; Katzman, S.; Winfield, L.; Rendahl, A.; Textor, J.; Bannasch, D.L.; Puschner, B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Equine neuroaxonal dystrophy/equine degenerative myeloencephalopathy (NAD/EDM) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting genetically predisposed foals maintained on α-tocopherol (α-TP)-deficient diet. Objective Intramuscular α-TP and selenium (Se) administration at 4 days of age would have no significant effect on serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) α-TP in healthy foals. Serum and CSF α-TP, but not Se, would be significantly decreased in NAD/EDM-affected foals during first year of life. Animals Fourteen Quarter horse foals; 10 healthy foals supplemented with 0.02 mL/kg injectable α-TP and Se (n = 5) or saline (n = 5) at 4 days of age and 4 unsupplemented NAD/EDM-affected foals. Methods Complete neurologic examinations were performed, blood and CSF were collected before (4 days of age) and after supplementation at 10, 30, 60, 120, 180, 240, and 360 days of age. Additional blood collections occurred at 90, 150, 210, and 300 days. At 540 days, NAD/EDM-affected foals and 1 unsupplemented healthy foal were euthanized and necropsies performed. Results Significant decreases in blood, CSF α-TP and Se found in the first year of life in all foals, with most significant changes in serum α-TP from 4–150 days. Dam α-TP and Se significantly influenced blood concentrations in foals. Injection of α-TP and Se did not significantly increase CSF Se, blood or CSF α-TP in healthy foals. NAD/EDM-affected foals had significantly lower CSF α-TP through 120 days. Conclusions and Clinical Importance Injection of α-TP and Se at 4 days of age does not significantly increase blood or CSF α-TP. Despite all 14 foals remaining deficient in α-TP, only the 4 genetically predisposed foals developed NAD/EDM. PMID:26391904

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid white cell count: discriminatory or otherwise for enteroviral meningitis in infants and young children?

    PubMed

    Tan, Natalie Woon Hui; Lee, Elis Yuexian; Khoo, Gloria Mei Chin; Tee, Nancy Wen Sim; Krishnamoorthy, Subramania; Choong, Chew Thye

    2016-04-01

    Non-polio enteroviruses (EV) are the most common viruses causing aseptic meningitis in children. We aim to evaluate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics of neonates and children with EV meningitis with a view to determine whether it could be discriminatory or otherwise in making a positive diagnosis. We performed a 3-year (July 2008-July 2011) retrospective study of children ≤16 years, treated at a tertiary children's hospital, with positive CSF EV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and negative blood and CSF bacterial cultures. A total of 206 children were studied. The median CSF white cell count was 79 cells/mm(3) (range 0-4608 cells/mm(3)). CSF pleocytosis was observed in 99/150 (66 %) aged ≤90 days, 3/4 (75 %) aged 90 days-1 year, and 49/52 (94 %) children ≥3 years. There was a huge variability in CSF pleocytosis in infants ≤90 days, where 34 % of them had no pleocytosis, while in 66 %, a wide range of pleocytosis that might even suggest bacterial meningitis was noted. CSF red cells were low, and protein or sugar values were not discriminatory. CSF pleocytosis in relation to increasing age was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.001). Early lumbar puncture within 48 h of symptoms and absence of CSF pleocytosis was also statistically significant (p = 0.039). CSF pleocytosis in EV meningitis is commoner in older children. As there was a huge variability in CSF pleocytosis in infants ≤90 days particularly, CSF analysis including EV PCR could avoid unnecessary antibiotic therapy. PMID:26463525

  11. Lumbar nerve rootlet entrapment by an iatrogenically spliced percutaneous intra-thecal lumbar cerebrospinal fluid catheter

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J.; Castro, Carlos A.; Scott, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Complications associated with the use of percutaneous intra-thecal lumbar indwelling spinal catheters include infection, hematoma, neurologic dysfunction, and persistent undesired retention among others. A case of iatrogenic splicing associated with neurologic dysfunction with the use of a percutaneous intra-thecal indwelling spinal catheter is presented in this study. Method Single case study review. Results Review of case materials indicate Y pattern splicing/fragmentation of an indwelling intra-thecal catheter causing neurologic dysfunction and resistance to removal during attempted removal. Pain and weakness were evident soon after insertion of the catheter and were amplified with attempted catheter removal. Computed tomography revealed a double dot sign on axial view and a Y appearance on sagittal view. Surgical findings revealed entrapment of nerve rootlets in the axilla of the spliced catheter. Conclusions Splicing/fragmentation causing neurologic dysfunction as well as catheter retention is described as a potential complication of intra-thecal indwelling cerebrospinal fluid catheters. A symptom of fragmentation of a catheter may include neurologic dysfunction including pain and weakness of a lumbar nerve root. If resistance is experienced upon attempted catheter removal, with or without associated neurologic dysfunction, further attempts at removal should not be attempted. In those cases in which pain and/or lumbar weakness are evident post catheter placement and/or following attempted removal, computed tomography should be performed. If fragmentation of a catheter is evident on CT scan, spinal surgical consultation should be obtained. Recommended spinal surgical intervention includes an open durotomy and visualization of catheter fragments and nerve rootlets and removal of catheter fragments. PMID:25600724

  12. 1H-NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid From Adult Bilateral Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jin Pyeong; Yun, Taeho; Jin, Xing; Cho, Won-Sang; Son, Young-Je; Bang, Jae Seung; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Oh, Chang Wan; Kim, Jeong Eun; Park, Sunghyouk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although metabolomics has been increasingly used to observe metabolic pattern and disease-specific metabolic markers, metabolite profiling for moyamoya disease (MMD) has not yet been done in adults. This study investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) metabolites specific to bilateral MMD (B-MMD) and compared them to those of unilateral MMD (U-MMD) or atherosclerotic stenosis with hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify metabolic biomarkers associated with MMD in adults. CSF samples of B-MMD (n = 29), U-MMD (n = 11), and atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease (ACVD) (n = 8) were recruited. Principal component analysis, partial least square discriminant analysis, and orthogonal projections to latent structure discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were done for the comparisons. Diagnostic performance was acquired by prediction of 1 left-out sample from the distinction model constructed with the rest of the samples. B-MMD showed an increase in glutamine (P < 0.001) and taurine (P = 0.004), and a decrease in glucose (P < 0.001), citrate (P = 0.002), and myo-inositol (P = 0.006) than those in ACVD. U-MMD showed a higher level of glutamine (P = 0.005) and taurine (P = 0.034), and a lower level of glutamate (P < 0.004) than those in ACVD. No difference at the metabolite level was observed between B-MMD and U-MMD. Cross-validation with the OPLS-DA model showed a high accuracy for the prediction of MMD. The results of the study suggest that a metabolomics approach may be helpful in confirming MMD and providing a better understanding of MMD pathogenesis. Elevated glutamine in the CSF may be associated with MMD pathogenesis, which was different from ACVD. PMID:25929894

  13. Direct sample injection for capillary electrophoretic determination of organic acids in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Ramautar, Rawi; Somsen, Govert W; de Jong, Gerhardus J

    2007-01-01

    Organic acids in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are potential diagnostic markers for neurological diseases and metabolic disorders. A capillary electrophoretic (CE) method for the direct analysis, i.e., without any sample preparation, of six organic acids in CSF was developed. A capillary coating consisting of a triple layer of charged polymers (polybrene-dextran sulfate-polybrene) was used in combination with a negative separation voltage, providing fast and efficient analysis of acidic compounds. Separation conditions, such as background electrolyte (BGE) concentration and pH were optimized, and the influence of albumin and sodium chloride was systematically studied using a set of test compounds. With injection volumes of ca. 44 nL, plate numbers of up to ca. 150,000 were obtained with a BGE of 200 mM sodium phosphate (pH 6.0). It appeared that high sodium chloride concentrations in the sample hardly affected the peak width and shape of the organic acids, most probably due to transient isotachophoresis effects occurring in the sample zone. Adverse effects of CSF proteins, which frequently compromise the CE performance, could be effectively minimized by the triple layer coating in combination with rinses of 0.1 M hydrochloric acid. Overall, the developed CE system allowed direct injections of CSF samples, yielding good separation efficiencies and stable migration times (RSDs<2%) for organic acids. Validation of the method with artificial and real CSF samples showed good linear responses (r>0.99), and LODs for the organic acids were in the range of 2-8 microg/mL when applying UV detection. RSDs for migration times and peak areas were <2% and <7%, respectively. The applicability of the CE system is shown for the determination of organic acids in CSF samples. PMID:17096088

  14. Effector T-cell trafficking between the leptomeninges and the cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Schläger, Christian; Körner, Henrike; Krueger, Martin; Vidoli, Stefano; Haberl, Michael; Mielke, Dorothee; Brylla, Elke; Issekutz, Thomas; Cabañas, Carlos; Nelson, Peter J; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Rohde, Veit; Bechmann, Ingo; Lodygin, Dmitri; Odoardi, Francesca; Flügel, Alexander

    2016-02-18

    In multiple sclerosis, brain-reactive T cells invade the central nervous system (CNS) and induce a self-destructive inflammatory process. T-cell infiltrates are not only found within the parenchyma and the meninges, but also in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that bathes the entire CNS tissue. How the T cells reach the CSF, their functionality, and whether they traffic between the CSF and other CNS compartments remains hypothetical. Here we show that effector T cells enter the CSF from the leptomeninges during Lewis rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of multiple sclerosis. While moving through the three-dimensional leptomeningeal network of collagen fibres in a random Brownian walk, T cells were flushed from the surface by the flow of the CSF. The detached cells displayed significantly lower activation levels compared to T cells from the leptomeninges and CNS parenchyma. However, they did not represent a specialized non-pathogenic cellular sub-fraction, as their gene expression profile strongly resembled that of tissue-derived T cells and they fully retained their encephalitogenic potential. T-cell detachment from the leptomeninges was counteracted by integrins VLA-4 and LFA-1 binding to their respective ligands produced by resident macrophages. Chemokine signalling via CCR5/CXCR3 and antigenic stimulation of T cells in contact with the leptomeningeal macrophages enforced their adhesiveness. T cells floating in the CSF were able to reattach to the leptomeninges through steps reminiscent of vascular adhesion in CNS blood vessels, and invade the parenchyma. The molecular/cellular conditions for T-cell reattachment were the same as the requirements for detachment from the leptomeningeal milieu. Our data indicate that the leptomeninges represent a checkpoint at which activated T cells are licensed to enter the CNS parenchyma and non-activated T cells are preferentially released into the CSF, from where they can reach areas of antigen availability and tissue damage. PMID:26863192

  15. Active removal of inorganic phosphate from cerebrospinal fluid by the choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Pedro M; Bataille, Amy M; Parker, Sonda L; Renfro, J Larry

    2014-06-01

    The P(i) concentration of mammalian cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is about one-half that of plasma, a phenomenon also shown here in the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias. The objective of the present study was to characterize the possible role of the choroid plexus (CP) in determining CSF P(i) concentration. The large sheet-like fourth CP of the shark was mounted in Ussing chambers where unidirectional (33)P(i) fluxes revealed potent active transport from CSF to the blood side under short-circuited conditions. The flux ratio was 8:1 with an average transepithelial resistance of 87 ± 17.9 Ω·cm(2) and electrical potential difference of +0.9 ± 0.17 mV (CSF side positive). Active P(i) absorption from CSF was inhibited by 10 mM arsenate, 0.2 mM ouabain, Na(+)-free medium, and increasing the K(+) concentration from 5 to 100 mM. Li(+) stimulated transport twofold compared with Na(+)-free medium. Phosphonoformic acid (1 mM) had no effect on active P(i) transport. RT-PCR revealed both P(i) transporter (PiT)1 and PiT2 (SLC20 family) gene expression, but no Na(+)-P(i) cotransporter II (SLC34 family) expression, in the shark CP. PiT2 immunoreactivity was shown by immunoblot analysis and localized by immunohistochemistry in (or near) the CP apical microvillar membranes of both the shark and rat. PiT1 appeared to be localized primarily to vascular endothelial cells. Taken together, these data indicate that the CP actively removes P(i) from CSF. This process has transport properties consistent with a PiT2, Na(+)-dependent transporter that is located in the apical region of the CP epithelium. PMID:24740787

  16. Differential expression of Haemophilus parasuis genes in response to iron restriction and cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Devon S.; MacInnes, Janet I.

    2007-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is an important opportunistic pathogen in swine of high health status, but to date no proven virulence factors have been described. As virulence factors are known to be regulated during disease, the objective of this study was to identify genes of a virulent serovar 5 strain with altered expression after iron restriction or in the presence of porcine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), conditions that reflect in vivo growth conditions. Using differential-display reverse-transcriptase-mediated polymerase chain reaction, we found that homologues of genes encoding fructose bisphosphate aldolase (fba), adenylosuccinate synthetase (purA), 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (cpdB), lipoprotein signal peptidase (lspA), pyrophosphate reductase (lytB), superoxide dismutase (sodC), tyrosyl t-RNA synthetase (tyrS), cysteine synthetase (cysK), an unknown protein, and a homologue of a hydrolase of the haloacid dehydrogenase superfamily were upregulated in response to iron restriction. In addition, the purA, cpdB, lspA, lytB, and sodC homologues, cDNAs homologous with a Na+/alanine symporter, fatty acid ligase (fadD), diadenosine tetraphosphatase (apaH), and an unknown protein were upregulated in response to CSF. In screening for the presence of these differentially expressed genes to assess their usefulness as diagnostic markers of high virulence potential, we detected homologues of all of these genes in all of the reference strains of the 15 established serovars. The hydrolase homologue, however, was expressed only in representative H. parasuis strains associated with a high virulence potential, suggesting that this enzyme may play a role in pathogenesis. PMID:17695592

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid APOE levels: an endophenotype for genetic studies for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Kauwe, John S K; Nowotny, Petra; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H; Mayo, Kevin; Bertelsen, Sarah; Hinrichs, Anthony; Fagan, Anne M; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Goate, Alison M

    2012-10-15

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma APOE protein levels from 641 individuals and genome-wide genotyped data from 570 of these samples. The aim of this study was to test whether CSF or plasma APOE levels could be a useful endophenotype for AD and to identify genetic variants associated with APOE levels. We found that CSF (P = 8.15 × 10(-4)) but not plasma (P = 0.071) APOE protein levels are significantly associated with CSF Aβ(42) levels. We used Mendelian randomization and genetic variants as instrumental variables to confirm that the association of CSF APOE with CSF Aβ(42) levels and clinical dementia rating (CDR) is not because of a reverse causation or confounding effect. In addition the association of CSF APOE with Aβ(42) levels was independent of the APOE ε4 genotype, suggesting that APOE levels in CSF may be a useful endophenotype for AD. We performed a genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with CSF APOE levels: the APOE ε4 genotype was the strongest single-genetic factor associated with CSF APOE protein levels (P = 6.9 × 10(-13)). In aggregate, the Illumina chip single nucleotide polymorphisms explain 72% of the variability in CSF APOE protein levels, whereas the APOE ε4 genotype alone explains 8% of the variability. No other genetic variant reached the genome-wide significance threshold, but nine additional variants exhibited a P-value <10(-6). Pathway mining analysis indicated that these nine additional loci are involved in lipid metabolism (P = 4.49 × 10(-9)). PMID:22821396

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid markers including trefoil factor 3 are associated with neurodegeneration in amyloid-positive individuals.

    PubMed

    Paterson, R W; Bartlett, J W; Blennow, K; Fox, N C; Shaw, L M; Trojanowski, J Q; Zetterberg, H; Schott, J M

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers associated with neurodegeneration in individuals with and without CSF evidence of Alzheimer pathology. We investigated 287 Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) subjects (age=74.9±6.9; 22/48/30% with Alzheimer's disease/mild cognitive impairment/controls) with CSF multiplex analyte data and serial volumetric MRI. We calculated brain and hippocampal atrophy rates, ventricular expansion and Mini Mental State Examination decline. We used false discovery rate corrected regression analyses to assess associations between CSF variables and atrophy rates in individuals with and without amyloid pathology, adjusting in stages for tau, baseline volume, p-tau, age, sex, ApoE4 status and diagnosis. Analytes showing statistically significant independent relationships were entered into reverse stepwise analyses. Adjusting for tau, baseline volume, p-tau, age, sex and ApoE4, 4/83 analytes were significantly independently associated with brain atrophy rate, 1/83 with ventricular expansion and 2/83 with hippocampal atrophy. The strongest CSF predictor for the three atrophy measures was low trefoil factor 3 (TFF3). High cystatin C (CysC) was associated with higher whole brain atrophy and hippocampal atrophy rates. Lower levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and chromogranin A (CrA) were associated with higher whole brain atrophy. In exploratory reverse stepwise analyses, lower TFF3 was associated with higher rates of whole brain, hippocampal atrophy and ventricular expansion. Lower levels of CrA were associated with higher whole brain atrophy rate. The relationship between low TFF3 and increased hippocampal atrophy rate remained after adjustment for diagnosis. We identified a series of CSF markers that are independently associated with rate of neurodegeneration in amyloid-positive individuals. TFF3, a substrate for NOTCH processing may be an important biomarker of neurodegeneration across the Alzheimer spectrum. PMID:25072324

  19. Identification of microRNAs in the cerebrospinal fluid as biomarker for the diagnosis of glioma.

    PubMed

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Kuhnhenn, Jan; Schlegel, Uwe; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Zöllner, Hannah; Schmiegel, Wolf; Hahn, Stephan; Schroers, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and lethal primary intracranial tumors. To date, no reliable biomarkers for the detection and risk stratification of gliomas have been identified. Recently, we demonstrated significant levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) to be present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with primary CNS lymphoma. Because of the involvement of miRNA in carcinogenesis, miRNAs in CSF may serve as unique biomarkers for minimally invasive diagnosis of glioma. The objective of this pilot study was to identify differentially expressed microRNAs in CSF samples from patients with glioma as potential novel glioma biomarkers. With use of a candidate approach of miRNA quantification by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), miRNAs with significant levels in CSF samples from patients with gliomas were identified. MiR-15b and miR-21 were differentially expressed in CSF samples from patients with gliomas, compared to control subjects with various neurologic disorders, including patients with primary CNS lymphoma and carcinomatous brain metastases. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis of miR-15b level revealed an area under the curve of 0.96 in discriminating patients with glioma from patients without glioma. Moreover, inclusion of miR-15b and miR-21 in combined expression analyses resulted in an increased diagnostic accuracy with 90% sensitivity and 100% specificity to distinguish patients with glioma from control subjects and patients with primary CNS lymphoma. In conclusion, the results of this pilot study demonstrate that miR-15b and miR-21 are markers for gliomas, which can be assessed in the CSF by means of qRT-PCR. Accordingly, miRNAs in the CSF have the potential to serve as novel biomarkers for the detection of gliomas. PMID:21937590

  20. Identification of microRNAs in the cerebrospinal fluid as biomarker for the diagnosis of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Kuhnhenn, Jan; Schlegel, Uwe; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Zöllner, Hannah; Schmiegel, Wolf; Hahn, Stephan; Schroers, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and lethal primary intracranial tumors. To date, no reliable biomarkers for the detection and risk stratification of gliomas have been identified. Recently, we demonstrated significant levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) to be present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with primary CNS lymphoma. Because of the involvement of miRNA in carcinogenesis, miRNAs in CSF may serve as unique biomarkers for minimally invasive diagnosis of glioma. The objective of this pilot study was to identify differentially expressed microRNAs in CSF samples from patients with glioma as potential novel glioma biomarkers. With use of a candidate approach of miRNA quantification by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), miRNAs with significant levels in CSF samples from patients with gliomas were identified. MiR-15b and miR-21 were differentially expressed in CSF samples from patients with gliomas, compared to control subjects with various neurologic disorders, including patients with primary CNS lymphoma and carcinomatous brain metastases. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis of miR-15b level revealed an area under the curve of 0.96 in discriminating patients with glioma from patients without glioma. Moreover, inclusion of miR-15b and miR-21 in combined expression analyses resulted in an increased diagnostic accuracy with 90% sensitivity and 100% specificity to distinguish patients with glioma from control subjects and patients with primary CNS lymphoma. In conclusion, the results of this pilot study demonstrate that miR-15b and miR-21 are markers for gliomas, which can be assessed in the CSF by means of qRT-PCR. Accordingly, miRNAs in the CSF have the potential to serve as novel biomarkers for the detection of gliomas. PMID:21937590

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin: an informative biomarker of central nervous system immune activation in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 invades the central nervous system (CNS) in the context of acute infection, persists thereafter in the absence of treatment, and leads to chronic intrathecal immunoactivation that can be measured by the macrophage activation marker, neopterin, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this review we describe our experience with CSF neopterin measurements in 382 untreated HIV-infected patients across the spectrum of immunosuppression and HIV-related neurological diseases, in 73 untreated AIDS patients with opportunistic CNS infections, and in 233 treated patients. In untreated patients, CSF neopterin concentrations are almost always elevated and increase progressively as immunosuppression worsens and blood CD4 cell counts fall. However, patients with HIV dementia exhibit particularly high CSF neopterin concentrations, above those of patients without neurological disease, though patients with CNS opportunistic infections, including CMV encephalitis and cryptococcal meningitis, also exhibit high levels of CSF neopterin. Combination antiretroviral therapy, with its potent effect on CNS HIV infection and CSF HIV RNA, mitigates both intrathecal immunoactivation and lowers CSF neopterin. However, despite suppression of plasma and CSF HIV RNA to below the detection limits of clinical assays (<50 copies HIV RNA/mL), CSF neopterin often remains mildly elevated, indicating persistent low-level intrathecal immune activation and raising the important questions of whether this elevation is driven by continued CNS infection and whether it causes continued indolent CNS injury. Although nonspecific, CSF neopterin can serve as a useful biomarker in the diagnosis of HIV dementia in the setting of confounding conditions, in monitoring the CNS inflammatory effects of antiretroviral treatment, and give valuable information to the cause of ongoing brain injury. PMID:20525234

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid APOE levels: an endophenotype for genetic studies for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Kauwe, John S.K.; Nowotny, Petra; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H.; Mayo, Kevin; Bertelsen, Sarah; Hinrichs, Anthony; Fagan, Anne M.; Holtzman, David M.; Morris, John C.; Goate, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma APOE protein levels from 641 individuals and genome-wide genotyped data from 570 of these samples. The aim of this study was to test whether CSF or plasma APOE levels could be a useful endophenotype for AD and to identify genetic variants associated with APOE levels. We found that CSF (P = 8.15 × 10−4) but not plasma (P = 0.071) APOE protein levels are significantly associated with CSF Aβ42 levels. We used Mendelian randomization and genetic variants as instrumental variables to confirm that the association of CSF APOE with CSF Aβ42 levels and clinical dementia rating (CDR) is not because of a reverse causation or confounding effect. In addition the association of CSF APOE with Aβ42 levels was independent of the APOE ɛ4 genotype, suggesting that APOE levels in CSF may be a useful endophenotype for AD. We performed a genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with CSF APOE levels: the APOE ɛ4 genotype was the strongest single-genetic factor associated with CSF APOE protein levels (P = 6.9 × 10−13). In aggregate, the Illumina chip single nucleotide polymorphisms explain 72% of the variability in CSF APOE protein levels, whereas the APOE ɛ4 genotype alone explains 8% of the variability. No other genetic variant reached the genome-wide significance threshold, but nine additional variants exhibited a P-value <10−6. Pathway mining analysis indicated that these nine additional loci are involved in lipid metabolism (P = 4.49 × 10−9). PMID:22821396

  3. Prognostic value of cerebrospinal fluid free fatty acid levels in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xue-Jun; Han, Meng; Wei, Guang-Chen; Duan, Chong-Hao

    2015-01-01

    In this study, prognostic value of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) free fatty acid (FFA) levels in patients confirmed with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) was evaluated in a Chinese population. A prospective cohort designed study was conducted at our hospital of the Emergency department from November, 2012 to September, 2014. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score on admission was applied to assess CSF levels of FFA and specific severity degree of stroke. Evaluation of the prognostic outcomes of those stroke patients used the modified Rankin scale scores at 90-days. Logistic regression analysis analyzed the prognostic value of FFA. NIHSS score results suggested a positive relationship between levels of CSF FFA levels and severity of stroke. There was an obviously higher trend of CSF FFA levels in patients with CE stroke than those of the non-CE stroke patients, with statistically difference (P < 0.05). Further, CSF FFA levels were evidently lower in those 73 patients with favorable outcome when compared to those with unfavorable outcomes [0.21(IQR, 0.11–0.28) mmol/L vs. 0.36 (IQR, 0.27–0.50) mmol/L, P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001]. Multivariate analysis results after possible confounders adjustment indicated that there was an increased risk of unfavorable outcome associated with CSF FFA levels ≥0.29 mmol/L (OR 5.12, 95%CI: 2.35–10.28; P < 0.0001). Collectively, CSF level of FFA at admission was suggested to be a useful, independent short-term prognostic marker in Chinese patient with AIS. PMID:26236218

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid Aβ40 is similarly reduced in patients with Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Baldeiras, Inês; Santana, Isabel; Leitão, Maria João; Ribeiro, Maria Helena; Pascoal, Rui; Duro, Diana; Lemos, Raquel; Santiago, Beatriz; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Oliveira, Catarina Resende

    2015-11-15

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers have been increasingly studied for dementia diagnosis, however the accuracy to distinguish between different forms of dementia is still unsatisfactory. In this study, the added value of another CSF Aβ-peptide (Aβ40), along with the core CSF markers t-Tau, p-Tau, and Aβ42, in the discrimination between two large dementia groups of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD; n=107), Alzheimer's Disease (AD; n=107) and non-demented subjects (n=33) was evaluated. In FTLD, t-Tau and p-Tau were significantly increased in relation to controls, but lower than in AD, while Aβ42 was similar in FTLD and controls, but higher than in AD. Equally reduced Aβ40 levels were seen in both dementia groups, and therefore the combination of Aβ40 with core CSF biomarkers optimally discriminated FTLD and AD patients from controls. Aβ42 and t-Tau were selected as the best biomarker subset to differentiate FTLD from AD, with no added value of Aβ40 to the model. Diagnostic accuracy between FTLD and AD was still sub-optimal, with a significant percentage (23%) of FTLD patients, in particularly women, carrying an ApoE-ε4 allele, showing a CSF-AD biomarkers profile. Although CSF Aβ40 does not appear to have an additional value in the distinction between FTLD and AD, it increases the discrimination between subjects with dementia from controls. A CSF-AD biomarker profile can be seen in patients with a clinical phenotype of FTLD, reinforcing the need for autopsy confirmation. PMID:26388316

  5. Chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with active and stable relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moreira, M A; Souza, A L S; Lana-Peixoto, M A; Teixeira, M M; Teixeira, A L

    2006-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system. Although its etiology is unknown, the accumulation and activation of mononuclear cells in the central nervous system are crucial to its pathogenesis. Chemokines have been proposed to play a major role in the recruitment and activation of leukocytes in inflammatory sites. They are divided into subfamilies on the basis of the location of conserved cysteine residues. We determined the levels of some CC and CXC chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 23 relapsing-remitting MS patients under interferon-ss-1a therapy and 16 control subjects using ELISA. MS patients were categorized as having active or stable disease. CXCL10 was significantly increased in the CSF of active MS patients (mean +/- SEM, 369.5 +/- 69.3 pg/mL) when compared with controls (178.5 +/- 29.1 pg/mL, P < 0.05). CSF levels of CCL2 were significantly lower in active MS (144.7 +/- 14.4 pg/mL) than in controls (237.1 +/- 16.4 pg/mL, P < 0.01). There was no difference in the concentration of CCL2 and CXCL10 between patients with stable MS and controls. CCL5 was not detectable in the CSF of most patients or controls. The qualitative and quantitative differences of chemokines in CSF during relapses of MS suggest that they may be useful as a marker of disease activity and of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:16612466

  6. The Streptococcus suis transcriptional landscape reveals adaptation mechanisms in pig blood and cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zongfu; Wu, Chunyan; Shao, Jing; Zhu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Weixue; Zhang, Wenwei; Tang, Min; Pei, Na; Fan, Hongjie; Li, Jiguang; Yao, Huochun; Gu, Hongwei; Xu, Xun; Lu, Chengping

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (SS) is an important pathogen of pigs, and it is also recognized as a zoonotic agent for humans. SS infection may result in septicemia or meningitis in the host. However, little is known about genes that contribute to the virulence process and survival within host blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Small RNAs (sRNA) have emerged as key regulators of virulence in several bacteria, but they have not been investigated in SS. Here, using a differential RNA-sequencing approach and RNAs from SS strain P1/7 grown in rich medium, pig blood, or CSF, we present the SS genome-wide map of 793 transcriptional start sites and 370 operons. In addition to identifying 29 sRNAs, we show that five sRNA deletion mutants attenuate SS virulence in a zebrafish infection model. Homology searches revealed that 10 sRNAs were predicted to be present in other pathogenic Streptococcus species. Compared with wild-type strain P1/7, sRNAs rss03, rss05, and rss06 deletion mutants were significantly more sensitive to killing by pig blood. It is possible that rss06 contributes to SS virulence by indirectly activating expression of SSU0308, a virulence gene encoding a zinc-binding lipoprotein. In blood, genes involved in the synthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and subversion of host defenses were up-regulated. In contrast, in CSF, genes for CPS synthesis were down-regulated. Our study is the first analysis of SS sRNAs involved in virulence and has both improved our understanding of SS pathogenesis and increased the number of sRNAs known to play definitive roles in bacterial virulence. PMID:24759092

  7. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypocretin-1 (Orexin-A) Level Fluctuates with Season and Correlates with Day Length

    PubMed Central

    Boddum, Kim; Hansen, Mathias Hvidtfelt; Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2016-01-01

    The hypocretin/orexin neuropeptides (hcrt) are key players in the control of sleep and wakefulness evidenced by the fact that lack of hcrt leads to the sleep disorder Narcolepsy Type 1. Sleep disturbances are common in mood disorders, and hcrt has been suggested to be poorly regulated in depressed subjects. To study seasonal variation in hcrt levels, we obtained data on hcrt-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 227 human individuals evaluated for central hypersomnias at a Danish sleep center. The samples were taken over a 4 year timespan, and obtained in the morning hours, thus avoiding impact of the diurnal hcrt variation. Hcrt-1 concentration was determined in a standardized radioimmunoassay. Using biometric data and sleep parameters, a multivariate regression analysis was performed. We found that the average monthly CSF hcrt-1 levels varied significantly across the seasons following a sine wave with its peak in the summer (June—July). The amplitude was 19.9 pg hcrt/mL [12.8–26.9] corresponding to a 10.6% increase in midsummer compared to winter. Factors found to significantly predict the hcrt-1 values were day length, presence of snow, and proximity to the Christmas holiday season. The hcrt-1 values from January were much higher than predicted from the model, suggestive of additional factors influencing the CSF hcrt-1 levels such as social interaction. This study provides evidence that human CSF hcrt-1 levels vary with season, correlating with day length. This finding could have implications for the understanding of winter tiredness, fatigue, and seasonal affective disorder. This is the first time a seasonal variation of hcrt-1 levels has been shown, demonstrating that the hcrt system is, like other neurotransmitter systems, subjected to long term modulation. PMID:27008404

  8. Receptor-mediated mechanism for the transport of prolactin from blood to cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R.J.; Slaby, F.J.; Posner, B.I.

    1987-05-01

    Prolactin (PRL) interacts with areas of the central nervous system which reside behind the blood-brain barrier. While vascular PRL does not cross this barrier, it is readily accessible to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from which it may gain access to the PRL-responsive areas of the brain. Studies were undertaken to characterize the mechanism responsible for the translocation of PRL from blood to CSF. Rats were given external jugular vein injections of (/sup 125/-I)iodo-PRL in the presence or absence of an excess of unlabeled ovine PRL (oPRL), human GH, bovine GH, or porcine insulin. CSF and choroid plexus were removed 60 min later. CSF samples were electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide slab gels and resultant autoradiographs were analyzed with quantitative microdensitometry. The data revealed that unlabeled lactogenic hormones, viz. oPRL and human GH, caused a statistically significant inhibition of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL transport from blood to CSF. In contrast, nonlactogenic hormones, viz bovine GH and insulin, had no effect on (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL transport into the CSF. An identical pattern of competition was observed in the binding of hormone to the choroid plexus. Furthermore, vascular injections of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL administered with a range of concentrations of unlabeled oPRL revealed a dose-response inhibition in the transport of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL from blood to CSF. The study demonstrates that PRL enters the CSF by a specific, PRL receptor-mediated transport mechanism. The data is consistent with the hypothesis that the transport mechanism resides at the choroid plexus. The existence of this transport mechanism reflects the importance of the cerebroventricular system in PRL-brain interactions.

  9. Increased Interleukin-17 in Peripheral Blood and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Neurosyphilis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cuini; Zhu, Lin; Gao, Zixiao; Guan, Zhifang; Lu, Haikong; Shi, Mei; Gao, Ying; Xu, Huanbin; Yang, X. Frank; Zhou, Pingyu

    2014-01-01

    Background Treponema pallidum infection evokes vigorous immune responses, resulting in tissue damage. Several studies have demonstrated that IL-17 may be involved in the pathogenesis of syphilis. However, the role of Th17 response in neurosyphilis remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, Th17 in peripheral blood from 103 neurosyphilis patients, 69 syphilis patients without neurological involvement, and 70 healthy donors were analyzed by flow cytometry. The level of IL-17 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was quantified by ELISA. One-year follow up for 44 neurosyphilis patients was further monitored to investigate the role of Th17/IL-17 in neurosyphilis. We found that the frequency of Th17 cells was significantly increased in peripheral blood of patients with neurosyphilis, in comparison to healthy donors. IL-17 in CSF were detected from 55.3% neurosyphilis patients (in average of 2.29 (0–59.83) pg/ml), especially in those with symptomatic neurosyphilis (61.9%). CSF IL-17 was predominantly derived from Th17 cells in neurosyphilis patients. Levels of IL-17 in CSF of neurosyphilis patients were positively associated with total CSF protein levels and CSF VDRL (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory) titers. Notably, neurosyphilis patients with undetectable CSF IL-17 were more likely to confer to CSF VDRL negative after treatment. Conclusions These findings indicate that Th17 response may be involved in central nervous system damage and associated with clinical symptoms in neurosyphilis patients. Th17/IL-17 may be used as an alternative surrogate marker for assessing the efficacy of clinical treatment of neurosyphilis patients. PMID:25080350

  10. Oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients with disease-associated mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccol E.; Morelli, Claudia; Doretti, Alberto; Rusconi, Daniela; Colombrita, Claudia; Sangalli, Davide; Verde, Federico; Finelli, Palma; Messina, Stefano; Ratti, Antonia; Silani, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis is usually performed to exclude inflammatory processes of the central nervous system. Although in a small subset of patients an intrathecal synthesis of IgG is detectable, usually there is no clear explanation for this evidence. This study investigates the occurrence of oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the CSF of a large series of ALS patients, attempting a correlation with genotype data. CSF was collected from 259 ALS patients. CSF parameters were measured according to standard procedures, and detection of OCBs performed by isoelectric focusing. The patients were screened for mutations in SOD1, FUS, TARDBP, ANG, OPTN, and C9ORF72. We observed the presence of OCBs in the CSF of 9/259 ALS patients (3.5 %), and of disease-associated mutations in 12 cases. OCBs were significantly more frequent in mutation carriers compared to the remaining cohort (3/12 vs 6/247; p < 0.01). Among patients with OCBs, two patients had the TARDBP p.A382T mutation (one of which in homozygous state), and one the ANG p.P-4S variant. Both patients carrying the p.A382T mutation had an atypical phenotype, one of them manifesting signs suggestive of a cerebellar involvement, and the other presenting neuroradiological findings suggestive of an inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system. Our results suggest that ALS patients with OCBs may harbor mutations in disease-causing genes. We speculate that mutations in both TARDBP and ANG genes may disrupt the bloodbrain barrier (BBB), promoting local immune responses and neuroinflammation. The role of mutant TARDBP and ANG genes on BBB integrity of ALS patients warrants further investigation. PMID:22752089

  11. Identification of longitudinally dynamic biomarkers in Alzheimer’s disease cerebrospinal fluid by targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia affecting greater than 26 million people worldwide. Although cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of Aβ42, tau, and p-tau181 are well established as diagnostic biomarkers of AD, there is a need for additional CSF biomarkers of neuronal function that continue to change during disease progression and could be used as pharmacodynamic measures in clinical trials. Multiple proteomic discovery experiments have reported a range of CSF biomarkers that differ between AD and control subjects. These potential biomarkers represent multiple aspects of the disease pathology. The performance of these markers has not been compared with each other, and their performance has not been evaluated longitudinally. Results We developed a targeted-proteomic, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) assay for the absolute quantitation of 39 peptides corresponding to 30 proteins. We evaluated the candidate biomarkers in longitudinal CSF samples collected from aged, cognitively-normal control (n = 10), MCI (n = 5), and AD (n = 45) individuals (age > 60 years). We evaluated each biomarker for diagnostic sensitivity, longitudinal consistency, and compared with CSF Aβ42, tau, and p-tau181. Four of 28 quantifiable CSF proteins were significantly different between aged, cognitively-normal controls and AD subjects including chitinase-3-like protein 1, reproducing published results. Four CSF markers demonstrated significant longitudinal change in AD: Amyloid precursor protein, Neuronal pentraxin receptor, NrCAM and Chromogranin A. Robust correlations were observed within some subgroups of proteins including the potential disease progression markers. Conclusion Using a targeted proteomics approach, we confirmed previous findings for a subset of markers, defined longitudinal performance of our panel of markers, and established a flexible proteomics method for robust multiplexed analyses. PMID:24902845

  12. Increased Concentrations of Interleukin-33 in the Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh, Abdollah; Mahdavi, Roya; Jamali, Mitra; Hajghani, Hossain; Nemati, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Hossain-Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Interleukin (IL)-33 is a cytokine with both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects involved in the pathogenesis of some inflammatory diseases. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IL-33 concentrations in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods Blood specimens were obtained from 140 patients with MS (46 males and 94 females) with various disease patterns and treatment plans and 140 healthy subjects (47 males and 93 females), who acted as a control group. CSF samples were collected from 20 MS group and 20 sex- and age-matched patients with other neurological diseases of nonautoimmune etiology. The serum and CSF concentrations of IL-33 were measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results The serum and CSF IL-33 levels were significantly higher in the MS group compared to the control group (p<0.001 and p<0.050, respectively). The serum IL-33 concentrations were also significantly higher in newly diagnosed (untreated) patients and patients treated with methylprednisolone or with interferon-β and methylprednisolone compared to the healthy patient group (p<0.007, p<0.002, and p<0.010, respectively). Moreover, the serum IL-33 concentrations in patients with relapsing-remitting (RRMS), primary progressive (PPMS), and secondary progressive (SPMS) forms of the disease were significantly higher than in the healthy control group (p<0.006, p<0.001, and p<0.020, respectively). Conclusions Our results showed increased concentrations of IL-33 in patients with MS including both untreated and treated MS patients and patients with the RRMS, SPMS, and PPMS forms. This suggests that IL-33 may be involved in the pathogenesis of all MS forms and treatment with methylprednisolone or both interferon-β plus methylprednisolone has no influence on IL-33 concentrations. PMID:26813806

  13. Diagnostic performance of amplified Mycobacterium tuberculosis direct test with cerebrospinal fluid, other nonrespiratory, and respiratory specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Pfyffer, G E; Kissling, P; Jahn, E M; Welscher, H M; Salfinger, M; Weber, R

    1996-01-01

    The Gen-Probe Amplified Mycobacterium tuberculosis Direct Test (MTD) was adapted to be used for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and a large variety of other nonrespiratory specimens. Standardized with artificially spiked dilution series of CSF, the modified MTD procedure consists of (i) increasing the amount of sample 10-fold, (ii) pretreating the specimen with a detergent, and (iii) increasing the amplification time from 2 to 3 h. Performance of MTD in a clinical mycobacteriology laboratory was tested over an extended period of time, involving a total of 322 nonrespiratory as well as 1,117 respiratory specimens from 998 patients. Results from MTD were compared with those from microscopy, culture, analysis of tuberculostearic acid by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (CSF only), and the final clinical diagnosis. When MTD results were compared with resolved data, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for MTD were 93.1, 97.7, 90.0, and 98.5%, respectively, for nonrespiratory specimens and 86.6, 96.4, 76.8, and 98.1%, respectively, for respiratory specimens. Our data demonstrate that (i) MTD is a robust, highly sensitive and specific technique for the rapid detection of M. tuberculosis complex in all types of clinical specimens, (ii) there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.005) in sensitivity and specificity for nonrespiratory compared with respiratory specimens, and (iii) repeating all MTDs which yield a result between 30,000 and 200,000 relative light units would help prevent a large number of false positives and, thus, enhance test specificity. PMID:8815093

  14. Increased levels of cerebrospinal fluid JNK3 associated with amyloid pathology: links to cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Gourmaud, Sarah; Paquet, Claire; Dumurgier, Julien; Pace, Clarisse; Bouras, Constantin; Gray, Françoise; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Meurs, Eliane F.; Mouton-Liger, François; Hugon, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background Alzheimer disease is characterized by cognitive decline, senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated τ proteins and neuronal loss. Aβ and τ are useful markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). C-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are serine-threonine protein kinases activated by phosphorylation and involved in neuronal death. Methods In this study, Western blots, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and histological approaches were used to assess the concentrations of Aβ, τ and JNK isoforms in postmortem brain tissue samples (10 Alzheimer disease and 10 control) and in CSF samples from 30 living patients with Alzheimer disease and 27 controls with neurologic disease excluding Alzheimer disease. Patients with Alzheimer disease were followed for 1–3 years and assessed using Mini–Mental State Examination scores. Results The biochemical and morphological results showed a significant increase of JNK3 and phosphorylated JNK levels in patients with Alzheimer disease, and JNK3 levels correlated with Aβ42 levels. Confocal microscopy revealed that JNK3 was associated with Aβ in senile plaques. The JNK3 levels in the CSF were significantly elevated in patients with Alzheimer disease and correlated statistically with the rate of cognitive decline in a mixed linear model. Limitations The study involved different samples grouped into 3 small cohorts. Evaluation of JNK3 in CSF was possible only with immunoblot analysis. Conclusion We found that JNK3 levels are increased in brain tissue and CSF from patients with Alzheimer disease. The finding that increased JNK3 levels in CSF could reflect the rate of cognitive decline is new and merits further investigation. PMID:25455349

  15. SCO-spondin from embryonic cerebrospinal fluid is required for neurogenesis during early brain development

    PubMed Central

    Vera, A.; Stanic, K.; Montecinos, H.; Torrejón, M.; Marcellini, S.; Caprile, T.

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) develops from the neural tube, a hollow structure filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (eCSF) and surrounded by neuroepithelial cells. Several lines of evidence suggest that the eCSF contains diffusible factors regulating the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of the neuroepithelium, although these factors are only beginning to be uncovered. One possible candidate as eCSF morphogenetic molecule is SCO-spondin, a large glycoprotein whose secretion by the diencephalic roof plate starts at early developmental stages. In vitro, SCO-spondin promotes neuronal survival and differentiation, but its in vivo function still remains to be elucidated. Here we performed in vivo loss of function experiments for SCO-spondin during early brain development by injecting and electroporating a specific shRNA expression vector into the neural tube of chick embryos. We show that SCO-spondin knock down induces an increase in neuroepithelial cells proliferation concomitantly with a decrease in cellular differentiation toward neuronal lineages, leading to hyperplasia in both the diencephalon and the mesencephalon. In addition, SCO-spondin is required for the correct morphogenesis of the posterior commissure and pineal gland. Because SCO-spondin is secreted by the diencephalon, we sought to corroborate the long-range function of this protein in vitro by performing gain and loss of function experiments on mesencephalic explants. We find that culture medium enriched in SCO-spondin causes an increased neurodifferentiation of explanted mesencephalic region. Conversely, inhibitory antibodies against SCO-spondin cause a reduction in neurodifferentiation and an increase of mitosis when such explants are cultured in eCSF. Our results suggest that SCO-spondin is a crucial eCSF diffusible factor regulating the balance between proliferation and differentiation of the brain neuroepithelial cells. PMID:23761733

  16. Analysis of cerebro-spinal fluid protein composition in early developmental stages in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Gato, A; Martín, P; Alonso, M I; Martín, C; Pulgar, M A; Moro, J A

    2004-04-01

    Foetal cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) has a very high protein concentration when compared to adult CSF, and in many species five major protein fractions have been described. However, the protein concentration and composition in CSF during early developmental stages remains largely unknown. Our results show that in the earliest stages (18 to 30 H.H.) of chick development there is a progressive increase in CSF protein concentration until foetal values are attained. In addition, by performing electrophoretic separation and high-sensitivity silver staining, we were able to identify a total of 21 different protein fractions in the chick embryo CSF. In accordance with the developmental pattern of their concentration, these can be classified as follows: A: high-concentration fractions which corresponded with the ones described in foetal CSF by other authors; B: low-concentration fractions which remained stable throughout the period studied; C: low-concentration fractions which show changes during this period. The evolution and molecular weight of the latter group suggest the possibility of an important biological role. Our data demonstrate that all the CSF protein fractions are present in embryonic serum; this could mean that the specific transport mechanisms in neuroepithelial cells described in the foetal period evolve in very early stages of development. In conclusion, this paper offers an accurate study of the protein composition of chick embryonic CSF, which will help the understanding of the influences on neuroepithelial stem cells during development and, as a result, the appropriate conditions for the in vitro study of embryonic/foetal nervous tissue cells. PMID:15039986

  17. Endothelin-1 gene polymorphisms influence cerebrospinal fluid endothelin-1 levels following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gallek, Matthew J; Alexander, Sheila A; Crago, Elizabeth; Sherwood, Paula R; Klamerus, Megan; Horowitz, Michael B; Poloyac, Samuel M; Conley, Yvette

    2015-03-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is a type of stroke with high morbidity and mortality. Increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels have been associated with increased risk of cerebral vasospasm, which is associated with increased morbidity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between ET-1 genotypes and ET-1 protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) measured 72 hr before angiographic vasospasm measurement in subjects at high risk of cerebral vasospasm. Specifically, this study evaluated the differences between variant positive and variant negative groups of nine different ET-1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in relationship with the ET-1 protein exposure rate. The CSF ET-1 protein levels were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. One functional SNP and eight ET-1 tagging SNPs were selected because they represent genetic variability in the entire ET-1 gene. The variant negative group of SNP rs2070699 was associated with a significantly higher ET-1 exposure rate than the variant positive group (p = 0.004), while the variant positive group of the rs5370 group showed a trend toward association with a higher ET-1 exposure rate (p = 0.051). Other SNPs were not informative. This is the first study to show differences in ET-1 exposure rate 72 hr before angiography in relation to ET-1 genotypes. These exploratory findings need to be replicated in a larger study; if replicated, these differences in genotypes may be a way to inform clinicians of those patients at a higher risk of increased ET-1 protein levels, which may lead to a higher risk of angiographic vasospasm. PMID:24852947

  18. [Beta amyloid in blood and cerebrospinal fluid is associated with high density lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Kudinova, N V; Kudinov, A R; Berezov, T T

    1996-01-01

    Cerebrovascular and parenchymal amyloid deposits found in brains of Alzheimer's disease, Down's syndrome and normal aging are mainly composed of aggregated amyloid beta protein (A beta), a unique peptide 39 to 44 amino acids long. A similar but soluble A beta (s A beta) has been identified in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and cell supernatants, indicating that it is a normal protein. We report here that s A beta in normal human plasma and CSF is complexed to high density lipoprotein (HDL) 3 and very high density lipoprotein (VHDL). Biotinylated synthetic peptide A beta 1-40 was traced in normal human plasma in in vitro experiments. Both tracer biotin-labeled A beta 1-40 and native s A beta were specifically recovered in HDL3 and VHDL as it was assessed in immunoprecipitation experiments of purified plasma lipoproteins and lipoprotein depleted plasma. This fact prompted us to ascertain whether the interaction of s A beta with HDL does occur in normal human CSF in vivo. For this purpose normals human CSF was fractionated by means of sequential flotation ultracentrifugation. The presence of s A beta in the resulting lipoprotein fractions as well as in the lipoprotein depleted CSF was analysed by immunoblot analysis, electron and immune-electron microscopy and native size exclusion chromatography. Immunoblot analysis with 6E10 monoclonal anti-A beta antibodies revealed s A beta association with all HDL subspecies of CSF, primarily HDL3 and VHDL and immunoelectron microscopy confirmed an association of s A beta with CSF-HDL particles of 16.8 + 3.2 nm. Native size exclusion chromatography followed by immunoblot analysis with antibodies against A beta and different apoliproproteins indicated an association of s A beta with HDL complexes of approximately 200 kDa molecular weight. Soluble A beta association with HDL3 and VHDL may be involved in maintaining the solubility of A beta in biological fluids and points to a possible role of lipoproteins and lipoprotein lipid in the biology of aminoloidogenic peptides. PMID:9139461

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid changes after intravenous injection of gadolinium chelate: assessment by FLAIR MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Bozzao, Alessandro; Floris, Roberto; Fasoli, Fabrizio; Fantozzi, Luigi Maria; Colonnese, Claudio; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2003-03-01

    Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence is currently used in clinical practice. Some reports emphasize the possibility that, in pathologic conditions, intravenous injection of gadolinium chelates may lead to an increased signal inside the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of CSF signal changes in pathologic conditions causing blood-brain barrier disruption or neovascularization when imaging is performed after intravenous injection of gadolinium. We obtained FLAIR sequences after gadolinium injection from 33 patients affected by different intracranial pathologies and 10 control subjects. Patients were affected by ischemic stroke in the subacute phase, from 2 to 7 days from onset of symptoms (12 patients), meningiomas (8 patients), high-grade gliomas (5 patients), previous surgical procedures for intra-axial neoplasms (5 patients), and multiple sclerosis with active plaques (3 patients). Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in patients and controls using a 1.5-T magnet, using T2- and T1-weighted FLAIR sequences. The FLAIR sequence was acquired before and 1-3 h after injection of a standard dose of gadolinium. In those patients affected by ischemic lesions, FLAIR sequences were repeated the next days and 3-4 days later. The CSF signal was visually evaluated by two readers and scored from 0 to 3 depending by the degree of enhancement. The location of CSF signal changes (close to the lesion, hemispheric, or diffuse) was also considered. The CSF signal was markedly increased after 3 h from intravenous injection of gadolinium in all the patients with stroke, in those with previous surgery, and in those with high-grade gliomas whose neoplasm's surface was in contact with the subarachnoid spaces (SAS) or ventricles; a strong enhancement was also evident inside the necrotic component of the tumor. The CSF changes were more evident close to the pathology and/or in the hemisphere involved by the pathology. Moderate CSF enhancement was observed in the SAS close to meningiomas. No signal changes were evident in all the others. In those patients with stroke imaged in the following days, CSF signal showed to be diffuse to both hemispheres the next day and returned to normal values within 2 days. In patients affected by pathologies with blood-brain barrier breakdown or neovascularization close the SAS or the ventricles, CSF changes, related to gadolinium leakage, are likely when FLAIR sequences are acquired 2-24 h after i.v. injection of the contrast. This pattern should be known in order to differentiate it from that of subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:12594563

  20. Osmolality of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH)

    PubMed Central

    Wibroe, Elisabeth A.; Yri, Hanne M.; Jensen, Rigmor H.; Wibroe, Morten A.; Hamann, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder of increased intracranial fluid pressure (ICP) of unknown etiology. This study aims to investigate osmolality of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with IIH. Methods We prospectively collected CSF from individuals referred on suspicion of IIH from 2011–2013. Subjects included as patients fulfilled Friedman and Jacobson’s diagnostic criteria for IIH. Individuals in whom intracranial hypertension was refuted were included as controls. Lumbar puncture with ICP measurement was performed at inclusion and repeated for patients after three months of treatment. Osmolality was measured with a Vapor Pressure Osmometer. Results We collected 90 CSF samples from 38 newly diagnosed patients and 28 controls. At baseline 27 IIH-samples and at 3 months follow-up 35 IIH-samples were collected from patients. We found no significant differences in osmolality between 1) patients at baseline and controls (p = 0. 86), 2) patients at baseline and after 3 months treatment (p = 0.97), and 3) patients with normalized pressure after 3 months and their baseline values (p = 0.79). Osmolality in individuals with normal ICP from 6–25 cmH2O (n = 41) did not differ significantly from patients with moderately elevated ICP from 26–45 cmH2O (n = 21) (p = 0.86) and patients with high ICP from 46–70 cmH2O (n = 4) (p = 0.32), respectively. There was no correlation between osmolality and ICP, BMI, age and body height, respectively. Mean CSF osmolality was 270 mmol/kg (± 1 SE, 95% confidence interval 267–272) for both patients and controls. Conclusions CSF osmolality was normal in patients with IIH, and there was no relation to treatment, ICP, BMI, age and body height. Mean CSF osmolality was 270 mmol/kg and constitutes a reference for future studies. Changes in CSF osmolality are not responsible for development of IIH. Other underlying pathophysiological mechanisms must be searched. PMID:26808050

  1. Assessing cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities in neurosyphilis patients without human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Li; Zhang, Hui-Lin; Huang, Song-Jie; Liu, Long; Tong, Man-Li; Lin, Li-Rong; Chen, Yu-Yan; Xi, Ya; Guo, Xiao-Jing; Zhang, Ya-Feng

    2013-12-01

    Neurosyphilis (NS) caused by Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum) subspecies pallidum, can affect the central nervous system during any stage of the disease. To assess several laboratory parameters for NS diagnosis, we performed a case control study on 42 hospitalized NS patients negative for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and 40 syphilis/non-NS patients, excluding NS patients at Xiamen Zhongshan Hospital from June 2010 to June 2011. Multivariate logistic regression model showed that the cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell (CSF-WBC, P = 0.009) levels, the CSF-LDH (P = 0.006) levels, the albumin quotient (P = 0.009) and the IgA index (P = 0.042) were independently associated with high risk of NS. The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed that the optimal cut-offs were 10 × 106 cells/L for the CSF-WBC concentration, 19.3 U/L for the CSF lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) concentration, 7.08 for the albumin quotient, and 0.14 for the IgA index. Combining the CSF-WBC level, the CSF-LDH level, the albumin quotient and the IgA index increased the NS diagnosis sensitivity to 97.6%. T. pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) index significantly correlated with the CSF-WBC (r = 0.453, P = 0.000), the IgA index (r = 0.446, P = 0.000), the albumin quotient (r = 0.262, P = 0.017), and the CSF-LDH (r = − 0.278, P = 0.012), respectively. In addition, there were correlations between the CSF-WBC and the IgA index (r = 0.329, P = 0.003), and between the CSF-WBC and the albumin quotient (r = 0.306, P = 0.005). Our results indicated that simultaneous testing of CSF-WBC levels, albumin quotient, IgA index and CSF-LDH can help predict the likelihood of NS in HIV-negative patients. PMID:24459685

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid soluble TREM2 is higher in Alzheimer disease and associated with mutation status.

    PubMed

    Piccio, Laura; Deming, Yuetiva; Del-Águila, Jorge L; Ghezzi, Laura; Holtzman, David M; Fagan, Anne M; Fenoglio, Chiara; Galimberti, Daniela; Borroni, Barbara; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Low frequency coding variants in TREM2 are associated with increased Alzheimer disease (AD) risk, while loss of functions mutations in the gene lead to an autosomal recessive early-onset dementia, named Nasu-Hakola disease (NHD). TREM2 can be detected as a soluble protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma, and its CSF levels are elevated in inflammatory CNS diseases. We measured soluble TREM2 (sTREM2) in the CSF of a large AD case-control dataset (n = 180) and 40 TREM2 risk variant carriers to determine whether CSF sTREM2 levels are associated with AD status or mutation status. We also performed genetic studies to identify genetic variants associated with CSF sTREM2 levels. CSF, but not plasma, sTREM2 was highly correlated with CSF total tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (r = 0.35, P < 1×10(-4); r = 0.40, P < 1×10(-4), respectively), but not with CSF Aβ42. AD cases presented higher CSF sTREM2 levels than controls (P = 0.01). Carriers of NHD-associated TREM2 variants presented significantly lower CSF sTREM2 levels, supporting the hypothesis that these mutations lead to reduced protein production/function (R136Q, D87N, Q33X or T66M; P = 1×10(-3)). In contrast, CSF sTREM2 levels were significantly higher in R47H carriers compared to non-carriers (P = 6×10(-3)), suggesting that this variant does not impact protein expression and increases AD risk through a different pathogenic mechanism than NHD variants. In GWAS analyses for CSF sTREM2 levels the most significant signal was located on the MS4A gene locus (P = 5.45 × 10(-07)) corresponding to one of the SNPs reported to be associated with AD risk in this locus. Furthermore, SNPs involved in pathways related to virus cellular entry and vesicular trafficking were overrepresented, suggesting that CSF sTREM2 levels could be an informative phenotype for AD. PMID:26754641

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Neuronal Biomarkers across the Spectrum of HIV Infection: Hierarchy of Injury and Detection

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Julia; Gisslen, Magnus; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fuchs, Dietmar; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Hagberg, Lars; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Spudich, Serena S.; Price, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The character of central nervous system (CNS) HIV infection and its effects on neuronal integrity vary with evolving systemic infection. Using a cross-sectional design and archived samples, we compared concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neuronal biomarkers in 143 samples from 8 HIV-infected subject groups representing a spectrum of untreated systemic HIV progression and viral suppression: primary infection; four groups of chronic HIV infection neuroasymptomatic (NA) subjects defined by blood CD4+ T cells of >350, 200–349, 50–199, and <50 cells/µL; HAD; treatment-induced viral suppression; and ‘elite’ controllers. Samples from 20 HIV-uninfected controls were also examined. The neuronal biomarkers included neurofilament light chain protein (NFL), total and phosphorylated tau (t-tau, p-tau), soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPPα, sAPPβ) and amyloid beta (Aβ) fragments 1–42, 1–40 and 1–38. Comparison of the biomarker changes showed a hierarchy of sensitivity in detection and suggested evolving mechanisms with progressive injury. NFL was the most sensitive neuronal biomarker. Its CSF concentration exceeded age-adjusted norms in all HAD patients, 75% of NA CD4<50, 40% of NA CD4 50–199, and 42% of primary infection, indicating common neuronal injury with untreated systemic HIV disease progression as well as transiently during early infection. By contrast, only 75% of HAD subjects had abnormal CSF t-tau levels, and there were no significant differences in t-tau levels among the remaining groups. sAPPα and β were also abnormal (decreased) in HAD, showed less marked change than NFL with CD4 decline in the absence of HAD, and were not decreased in PHI. The CSF Aβ peptides and p-tau concentrations did not differ among the groups, distinguishing the HIV CNS injury profile from Alzheimer's disease. These CSF biomarkers can serve as useful tools in selected research and clinical settings for patient classification, pathogenetic analysis, diagnosis and management. PMID:25541953

  4. Transthyretin, Thyroxine, and Retinol-Binding Protein in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid: Effect of Lead Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Lu, Yong-Ming; Lu, Guo-Yao; Zhao, Qiuqu; Cheung, Onpan; Blaner, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR), synthesized by the choroid plexus, is proposed to have a role in transport of thyroid hormones in the brain. Our previous studies in animals suggest that sequestration of lead (Pb) in the choroid plexus may lead to a marked decrease in TTR levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The objectives of this study were to establish in humans whether TTR and thyroxine (T4) are correlated in the CSF, and whether CSF levels of Pb are associated with those of TTR, T4, and/or retinol-binding protein (RBP). Eighty-two paired CSF and blood/serum samples were collected from patients undergoing clinical diagnosis of CSF chemistry. Results showed that the mean value of CSF concentrations for TTR was 3.33 ± 1.60 μg/mg of CSF proteins (mean ± SD, n = 82), for total T4 (TT4) was 1.56 ± 1.68 ng/mg (n = 82), for RBP was 0.34 ± 0.19 μg/mg (n = 82), and for Pb was 0.53 ± 0.69 μg/dl (n = 61 for those above the detection limit). Linear regression analyses revealed that CSF TTR levels were positively associated with those of CSF TT4 (r = 0.33, p < 0.005). CSF TTR concentrations, however, were inversely associated with CSF Pb concentrations (r = −0.29, p < 0.05). There was an inverse, albeit weak, correlation between CSF TT4 and CSF Pb concentrations (r = −0.22, p = 0.09). The concentrations of TTR, TT4, and Pb in the CSF did not vary as the function of their levels in blood or serum, but RBP concentrations in the CSF did correlate to those of serum (r = 0.39, p < 0.0005). Unlike TTR, CSF RBP concentrations were not influenced by Pb. These human data are consistent with our earlier observations in animals, which suggest that TTR is required for thyroxine transport in the CSF and that Pb exposure is likely associated with diminished TTR levels in the CSF. PMID:11294981

  5. Distribution in cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and lymph of epidurally injected morphine and inulin in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, P.A.; Yaksh, T.L.

    1986-06-01

    We describe procedures for catheterizing the epidural space, the azygos vein, and the thoracic lymph duct of dogs without using fluoroscopy. The success rates of the procedures were 100, 80, and 50%, respectively (n = 10). To assess the validity of the model, /sup 3/H-morphine and unlabeled morphine (2 mg) were injected epidurally in ten dogs. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), azygos venous blood, arterial blood, and lymph were sampled before and 5, 20, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300 and 360 min after injection. During the first 20 min, morphine levels in the azygos vein were about three and ten times greater than arterial and lymphatic levels, respectively (n = 3; P less than 0.01). Morphine levels were significantly greater in the azygos vein (n = 8) and the femoral artery (n = 10) during the first 20 and 60 min than they were later, respectively (P less than 0.05). In the lymph (n = 5), the levels of morphine at 60 min were statistically greater (P less than 0.05) than levels at 4, 5, and 6 hr. At no time were the concurrent arterial and lymph levels different from each other. In the lumbar CSF, the morphine peak concentration was reached 5-60 min after epidural injection and ranged between 5 and 93 micrograms/ml. In the CSF, the levels of morphine were significantly greater during the first 20 min than later (n = 7; P less than 0.05). The washout of the lumbar CSF curve for morphine appeared to be fitted by a two-compartment open model. The t1/2-alpha and t1/2-beta values were 14.7 +/- 7.2 min and 106 +/- 45 min, respectively (mean +/- SD). Cumulative percentages of the epidural dose of morphine passed into the azygos system within the first 5, 20, 60, and 120 min after injection were calculated to be 4.0 +/- 2.1, 23.5 +/- 14.6, 49.2 +/- 34.2, and 55.9 +/- 35.3, respectively (mean +/- SD; n = 8).

  6. The cerebrospinal fluid proteome in HIV infection: change associated with disease severity.

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Spudich, Serena S.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Liegler, Teri; Zetterberg, Henrik; Camp, David G.; Price, Richard W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-03-20

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a constant feature of systemic HIV infection with a clinical spectrum that ranges from chronic asymptomatic infection to severe cognitive and motor dysfunction. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has played an important part in defining the character of this evolving infection and response to treatment. To further characterize CNS HIV infection and its effects, we applied advanced high-throughput proteomic methods to CSF to identify novel proteins and their changes with disease progression and treatment. After establishing an accurate mass and time (AMT) tag database containing 23,141 AMT tags for CSF peptides, we analyzed 91 CSF samples by LC-MS from 12 HIV-uninfected and 14 HIV-infected subjects studied in the context of initiation of antiretroviral and correlated abundances of identified proteins (a) within and between subjects, (b) with all other proteins across the entire sample set, and (c) with 'external' CSF biomarkers of infection (HIV RNA), immune activation (neopterin) and neural injury (neurofilament light chain protein, NFL). We identified a mean of 2,333 +/- 328 (SD) peptides covering 307 +/-16 proteins in the 91 CSF sample set. Protein abundances differed both between and within subjects sampled at different time points and readily separated those with and without HIV infection. Proteins also showed inter-correlations across the sample set that were associated with biologically relevant dynamic processes. One-hundred and fifty proteins showed correlations with the external biomarkers. For example, using a threshold of cross correlation coefficient (Pearson's) {le}0.3 and {ge}0.3 for potentially meaningful relationships, a total of 99 proteins correlated with CSF neopterin (43 negative and 56 positive correlations) and related principally to neuronal plasticity and survival and to innate immunity. Pathway analysis defined several networks connecting the identified proteins, including one with amyloid precursor protein as a central node. Advanced CSF proteomic analysis enabled the identification of an array of novel protein changes across the spectrum of CNS HIV infection and disease. This initial analysis clearly demonstrated the value of contemporary state-of-the-art proteomic CSF analysis as a discovery tool in HIV infection with likely similar application to other neurological inflammatory and degenerative diseases.

  7. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shilian; Bai, Shumei; Qin, Zhaoyu; Yang, Yinrong; Cui, Yazhou; Qin, Yanjiang

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) is challenging for the lack of a specific diagnostic test. Recent researches in quantitative proteomics, however, offer new opportunities for biomarker discovery and the study of disease pathogenesis. To find more potential protein biomarkers, we used two technologies, 2-dimensional fluorescence difference in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and ultra-performance liquid chromato-graph coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF MS), to quantitatively analyse differential proteomic expression in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) between patients with MS (the experiment group) and patients with other neurological diseases (ONDs; the control group). Analysis by the former technology identified more than 43 different protein spots (39 proteins), of which 17 spots (13 proteins) showed more than 1.5-fold difference in abundance as analysed by DeCyder software (GE Healthcare, Piscataway. NJ, USA) between the MS and the ONDs groups. The expression of five protein spots was elevated and the expression of 12 protein spots was decreased in the MS group. Meanwhile, the latter method, UPLC/Q-TOF MS showed 68 different proteins. There were 45 proteins with a difference of more than 1.5 folds between the two groups, in which the expression of 20 proteins was elevated and the expression of 25 proteins was decreased in the MS group. Data provided by the two methods indicated that the proteins overlapped ratio was 27% in the 26 significant proteins that had the same regulation tendency. The differential CSF proteins were analysed further by biological network and it revealed interaction of them. The subsequent ELISA measuring the concentration of cystatin C (P < 0.01), which was one of the proteins discovered simultaneously with the two technologies, confirmed the results of the two quantitative proteomic analysis. The combination of the two quantitative proteomic technologies was helpful in discovering differentially expressed proteins that may have a connection with MS disease physiology and serve as useful biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment of MS diseases. PMID:19602050

  8. Peptide Fingerprinting of Alzheimer's Disease in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Identification and Prospective Evaluation of New Synaptic Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Zürbig, Petra; Raedler, Thomas J.; Arlt, Sönke; Kellmann, Markus; Mullen, William; Eichenlaub, Martin; Mischak, Harald; Wiedemann, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Background Today, dementias are diagnosed late in the course of disease. Future treatments have to start earlier in the disease process to avoid disability requiring new diagnostic tools. The objective of this study is to develop a new method for the differential diagnosis and identification of new biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) using capillary-electrophoresis coupled to mass-spectrometry (CE-MS) and to assess the potential of early diagnosis of AD. Methods and Findings Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 159 out-patients of a memory-clinic at a University Hospital suffering from neurodegenerative disorders and 17 cognitively-healthy controls was used to create differential peptide pattern for dementias and prospective blinded-comparison of sensitivity and specificity for AD diagnosis against the Criterion standard in a naturalistic prospective sample of patients. Sensitivity and specificity of the new method compared to standard diagnostic procedures and identification of new putative biomarkers for AD was the main outcome measure. CE-MS was used to reliably detect 1104 low-molecular-weight peptides in CSF. Training-sets of patients with clinically secured sporadic Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and cognitively healthy controls allowed establishing discriminative biomarker pattern for diagnosis of AD. This pattern was already detectable in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The AD-pattern was tested in a prospective sample of patients (n = 100) and AD was diagnosed with a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 83%. Using CSF measurements of beta-amyloid1-42, total-tau, and phospho181-tau, AD-diagnosis had a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 67% in the same sample. Sequence analysis of the discriminating biomarkers identified fragments of synaptic proteins like proSAAS, apolipoprotein J, neurosecretory protein VGF, phospholemman, and chromogranin A. Conclusions The method may allow early differential diagnosis of various dementias using specific peptide fingerprints and identification of incipient AD in patients suffering from MCI. Identified biomarkers facilitate face validity for the use in AD diagnosis. PMID:22046305

  9. Disease Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with First-Onset Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Oxley, David; Wang, Lan; Harris, Nathan; Koethe, Dagmar; Gerth, Christoph W; Nolden, Brit M; Gross, Sonja; Schreiber, Daniela; Reed, Benjamin; Bahn, Sabine

    2006-01-01

    Background Psychosis is a severe mental condition that is characterized by a loss of contact with reality and is typically associated with hallucinations and delusional beliefs. There are numerous psychiatric conditions that present with psychotic symptoms, most importantly schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, and some forms of severe depression referred to as psychotic depression. The pathological mechanisms resulting in psychotic symptoms are not understood, nor is it understood whether the various psychotic illnesses are the result of similar biochemical disturbances. The identification of biological markers (so-called biomarkers) of psychosis is a fundamental step towards a better understanding of the pathogenesis of psychosis and holds the potential for more objective testing methods. Methods and Findings Surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry was employed to profile proteins and peptides in a total of 179 cerebrospinal fluid samples (58 schizophrenia patients, 16 patients with depression, five patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, ten patients with Alzheimer disease, and 90 controls). Our results show a highly significant differential distribution of samples from healthy volunteers away from drug-naïve patients with first-onset paranoid schizophrenia. The key alterations were the up-regulation of a 40-amino acid VGF-derived peptide, the down-regulation of transthyretin at ~4 kDa, and a peptide cluster at ~6,800–7,300 Da (which is likely to be influenced by the doubly charged ions of the transthyretin protein cluster). These schizophrenia-specific protein/peptide changes were replicated in an independent sample set. Both experiments achieved a specificity of 95% and a sensitivity of 80% or 88% in the initial study and in a subsequent validation study, respectively. Conclusions Our results suggest that the application of modern proteomics techniques, particularly mass spectrometric approaches, holds the potential to advance the understanding of the biochemical basis of psychiatric disorders and may in turn allow for the development of diagnostics and improved therapeutics. Further studies are required to validate the clinical effectiveness and disease specificity of the identified biomarkers. PMID:17090210

  10. Normal Cerebrospinal Fluid Histamine and tele-Methylhistamine Levels in Hypersomnia Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Delallée, Nathalie; Jaussent, Isabelle; Scholz, Sabine; Bayard, Sophie; Croyal, Mickael; Schwartz, Jean-Charles; Robert, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine the activity of cerebral histaminergic system evaluated by CSF levels of histamine (HA) and tele-methylhistamine (t-MHA), its major metabolite, and their relationships with hypocretin-1 levels in a large population of patients with hypersomnia and neurological conditions. Design: sensitive liquid chromatographic-electrospray/tandem mass spectrometric assay was developed for the simultaneous quantification of CSF HA and t-MHA. Setting: ata were collected and CSF hypocretin-1 levels were measured using radioimmunoassay at the Sleep Disorders Center, Montpellier, France. CSF HA and t-MHA were measured in Bioprojet-Biotech, France Participants: One hundred fourteen unrelated patients with a suspicion of central hypersomnia underwent one night of polysomnography followed by the multiple sleep latency test. Sleep disorders were diagnosed clinically and using sleep studies: narcolepsy-cataplexy NC (n = 56), narcolepsy without cataplexy NwC (n = 27), idiopathic hypersomnia IH (n = 11), secondary narcolepsy (n = 3), and unspecified hypersomnia Uns EDS (n = 17). Fifty neurological patients without daytime sleepiness were included as controls. Measurements and Results: No between-hypersomnia group differences were found for CSF HA levels (median 708.62 pM extreme range [55.92-3335.50] in NC; 781.34 [174.08-4391.50] in NwC; 489.42 [177.45-906.70] in IH, and 1155.40 [134.80-2736.59] in Uns EDS) or for t-MHA levels. No association was found between CSF HA, t-MHA, or HA + t-MHA, sleepiness, treatment intake, and frequency of cataplexy. A slight negative correlation was found between age and HA levels. Further adjustment for the age revealed no significant HA levels difference between hypersomnia patients and controls. Conclusion: CSF histamine and tele-methylhistamine did not significantly differ between patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy and other etiologies of non-hypocretin-1 deficient central hypersomnias; these measurements, therefore, are not useful in assessing the etiology or severity of centrally mediated hypersomnia. Citation: Dauvilliers Y; Delalléee N; Jaussent I; Scholz S; Bayard S; Croyal M; Schwartz JC; Robert P. Normal cerebrospinal fluid histamine and tele-methylhistamine levels in hypersomnia conditions. SLEEP 2012;35(10):1359-1366. PMID:23024434

  11. Cerebrospinal Fluid Peptides as Potential Parkinson Disease Biomarkers: A Staged Pipeline for Discovery and Validation*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Movius, James; Dator, Romel; Aro, Patrick; Zhao, Yanchun; Pan, Catherine; Lin, Xiangmin; Bammler, Theo K.; Stewart, Tessandra; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Hu, Shu-Ching; Quinn, Joseph F.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Finding robust biomarkers for Parkinson disease (PD) is currently hampered by inherent technical limitations associated with imaging or antibody-based protein assays. To circumvent the challenges, we adapted a staged pipeline, starting from our previous proteomic profiling followed by high-throughput targeted mass spectrometry (MS), to identify peptides in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for PD diagnosis and disease severity correlation. In this multicenter study consisting of training and validation sets, a total of 178 subjects were randomly selected from a retrospective cohort, matching age and sex between PD patients, healthy controls, and neurological controls with Alzheimer disease (AD). From ∼14,000 unique peptides displaying differences between PD and healthy control in proteomic investigations, 126 peptides were selected based on relevance and observability in CSF using bioinformatic analysis and MS screening, and then quantified by highly accurate and sensitive selected reaction monitoring (SRM) in the CSF of 30 PD patients versus 30 healthy controls (training set), followed by diagnostic (receiver operating characteristics) and disease severity correlation analyses. The most promising candidates were further tested in an independent cohort of 40 PD patients, 38 AD patients, and 40 healthy controls (validation set). A panel of five peptides (derived from SPP1, LRP1, CSF1R, EPHA4, and TIMP1) was identified to provide an area under curve (AUC) of 0.873 (sensitivity = 76.7%, specificity = 80.0%) for PD versus healthy controls in the training set. The performance was essentially confirmed in the validation set (AUC = 0.853, sensitivity = 82.5%, specificity = 82.5%). Additionally, this panel could also differentiate the PD and AD groups (AUC = 0.990, sensitivity = 95.0%, specificity = 97.4%). Furthermore, a combination of two peptides belonging to proteins TIMP1 and APLP1 significantly correlated with disease severity as determined by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scores in both the training (r = 0.381, p = 0.038)j and the validation (r = 0.339, p = 0.032) sets. The novel panel of CSF peptides, if validated in independent cohorts, could be used to assist in clinical diagnosis of PD and has the potential to help monitoring or predicting disease progression. PMID:25556233

  12. Cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate in cerebrospinal fluid during thermoregulation and fever.

    PubMed Central

    Dascombe, M J; Milton, A S

    1976-01-01

    1. Samples of cerebrospinal fluid (c.s.f.) have been taken from the cisterna magna of unanaesthetized cats, whilst rectal temperature was recorded, during exposure of the animals to various ambient temperatures and during fever induced by pyrogen. The concentration of adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in samples of c.s.f. has been assayed. 2. Cats exposed to low ambient temperatures (-2 to +2 degrees C) for 3 h maintained body temperature by both behavioural and autonomic heat gain activity. Exposure of cats to high ambient temperatures (44 - 45 degrees C) for 3.5 h caused a rise in body temperatures of about 2.5 degrees C, despite behavioural and autonomic heat loss activity. Neither cold nor heat stress had a significant effect on c.s.f. cyclic AMP. 3. Fever induced by intravenous Shigella dysenteriae (2 and 20 mug/kg) was associated with a dose-related increase in the concentration of cyclic AMP in c.s.f. Paracetamol (75 mg/kg) injected I.P. before the onset of fever, suppressed the increase in both temperature and c.s.f. cyclic AMP in response to pyrogen. Paracetamol (50 and 100 mg/kg), injected after the onset of fever, caused a fall in temperature, which was not associated with a decrease in the concentration of cyclic AMP in c.s.f. 4. Fever induced in cats by intravenous Shigella dysenteriae (20 mug/kg) was associated with an increase in the concentration of cyclic AMP in plasma as well as in c.s.f. 5. The sodium salt of cyclic AMP (0.1-10 mg/kg) injected I.V. into unanaesthetized cats caused a dose-related hypothermia, which was associated with autonomic heat loss activity and a dose-related increase in the concentration of cyclic AMP in cisternal c.s.f., which was not mimicked by adenosine. 6. It is concluded that the raised concentrations of cyclic AMP in c.s.f., in response to pyrogen I.V., do not mediate fever in the cat and that the concentration of cyclic AMP in cisternal c.s.f. may be affected by changes in the plasma concentration of the nucleotide. PMID:190383

  13. Hypothermia Decreases Cerebrospinal Fluid Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Levels in Traumatic Brain Injury Children

    PubMed Central

    Thampatty, Bhavani P; Klamerus, Megan M; Oberly, Patrick J; Feldman, Kerri L; Bell, Michael J; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Adelson, P. David; Clark, Robert SB; Kochanek, Patrick M; Poloyac, Samuel M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pathological increases in asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, have been implicated in endothelial dysfunction and vascular diseases. Reduced NO early after traumatic brain injury (TBI) may contribute to hypoperfusion. Currently, methods to quantify ADMA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have not been fully explored. We aimed to develop and validate a method to determine ADMA in the CSF of a pediatric TBI population and to use this method to assess the effects of (i) TBI and (ii) therapeutic hypothermia (TH) on this mediator. Design, Setting, Patients An ancillary study to a prospective, phase II randomized clinical trial (RCT) of early hypothermia in a tertiary care pediatric intensive care unit for children with TBI admitted to Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results A UPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated to quantitate ADMA. A total of 56 samples collected over 3 days starting with injury onset were analyzed from the CSF of consented therapeutic hypothermia (n=9) and normothermia (n=10) children. Children undergoing diagnostic lumbar puncture (n=5) were controls. ADMA was present at a quantifiable level in all samples. Mean ADMA levels were significantly increased in normothermic TBI children compared to control (0.19± 0.08 μmol/L and 0.11± 0.02μmol/L respectively, p=0.01), and hypothermic children had significantly reduced mean ADMA levels (0.11 ± 0.05 μmol/L) vs. normothermic (p=0.03) measured on day 3. Patient demographics including age, gender, and NO levels (measured as nitrite and nitrate using liquid chromatography coupled with Griess reaction) did not significantly differ between normothermia and hypothermia groups. Also, NO levels did not correlate with ADMA concentrations. Conclusions ADMA levels were significantly increased in the CSF of TBI children. Early hypothermia attenuated this increase. The implications of attenuated ADMA on NOS activity and regional cerebral blood flow after TBI by TH deserve future attention. PMID:23439461

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid mitochondrial DNA – a novel DAMP in pediatric traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Walko, Thomas D.; Bola, R. Aaron; Hong, John D.; Au, Alicia K; Bell, Michael J; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Clark, Robert S. B; Aneja, Rajesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are nuclear or cytoplasmic proteins that are released from the injured tissues and activate the innate immune system. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a novel DAMP that is released into the extracellular milieu subsequent to cell death and injury. We hypothesized that cell death within the central nervous system in children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) would lead to release of mtDNA into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and has the potential to predict the outcome after trauma. Methods CSF was collected from children with severe TBI that required intracranial pressure monitoring with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores ≤ 8 via an externalized ventricular drain. Control CSF was obtained in children without TBI or meningoencephalitis that demonstrated no leukocytes in the diagnostic lumbar puncture. Results The median age for patients with TBI was 6.3 y and 62% were male. The common mechanisms of injury included motor vehicle collision (35.8%) followed by falls (21.5%) and inflicted TBI (19%); 6 children (14.2%) died during their ICU course. The mean CSF mtDNA concentration was 1.10E +05 ± 2.07E+05 and 1.63E+03 ± 1.80E+03 copies/µL in the pediatric TBI and control population respectively. Furthermore, the mean CSF mtDNA concentration in pediatric patients who later died or had severe disability was significantly higher than that of the survivors (1.63E+ 05 ± 2.77E+05 vs. 5.05E+04 ± 6.21E+04 copies/µL) (p<0.0001). We found a significant correlation between CSF mtDNA and HMGB1, another prototypical DAMP, concentrations (ρ = 0.574, p<0.05), supporting the notion that both DAMPs are increased in the CSF following TBI. Conclusions Our data suggest that CSF mtDNA is novel DAMP in TBI, and appears to be a useful biomarker that correlates with neurological outcome after TBI. Further inquiry into the components of mtDNA that modulate the innate immune response will be helpful in understanding the mechanism of local and systemic inflammation after TBI. PMID:24667615

  15. Identification and Validation of Novel Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Staging Early Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Malone, James P.; Shah, Aarti R.; Gilmore, Petra; Davis, Alan E.; Roe, Catherine M.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Li, Ge; Galasko, Douglas R.; Clark, Christopher M.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.; Townsend, R. Reid; Fagan, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ideally, disease modifying therapies for Alzheimer disease (AD) will be applied during the ‘preclinical’ stage (pathology present with cognition intact) before severe neuronal damage occurs, or upon recognizing very mild cognitive impairment. Developing and judiciously administering such therapies will require biomarker panels to identify early AD pathology, classify disease stage, monitor pathological progression, and predict cognitive decline. To discover such biomarkers, we measured AD-associated changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome. Methods and Findings CSF samples from individuals with mild AD (Clinical Dementia Rating [CDR] 1) (n = 24) and cognitively normal controls (CDR 0) (n = 24) were subjected to two-dimensional difference-in-gel electrophoresis. Within 119 differentially-abundant gel features, mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identified 47 proteins. For validation, eleven proteins were re-evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Six of these assays (NrCAM, YKL-40, chromogranin A, carnosinase I, transthyretin, cystatin C) distinguished CDR 1 and CDR 0 groups and were subsequently applied (with tau, p-tau181 and Aβ42 ELISAs) to a larger independent cohort (n = 292) that included individuals with very mild dementia (CDR 0.5). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses using stepwise logistic regression yielded optimal biomarker combinations to distinguish CDR 0 from CDR>0 (tau, YKL-40, NrCAM) and CDR 1 from CDR<1 (tau, chromogranin A, carnosinase I) with areas under the curve of 0.90 (0.85–0.94 95% confidence interval [CI]) and 0.88 (0.81–0.94 CI), respectively. Conclusions Four novel CSF biomarkers for AD (NrCAM, YKL-40, chromogranin A, carnosinase I) can improve the diagnostic accuracy of Aβ42 and tau. Together, these six markers describe six clinicopathological stages from cognitive normalcy to mild dementia, including stages defined by increased risk of cognitive decline. Such a panel might improve clinical trial efficiency by guiding subject enrollment and monitoring disease progression. Further studies will be required to validate this panel and evaluate its potential for distinguishing AD from other dementing conditions. PMID:21264269

  16. Does gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the cerebrospinal fluid modulate luteinizing hormone release?

    PubMed

    Skinner, D C; Caraty, A; Evans, N P

    1998-01-01

    The function of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is unknown. This study on ovariectomized ewes investigated whether CSF-GnRH has a role in modulating luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion either through an ultrashort-loop feedback system to affect GnRH secretion or to directly act on the pituitary gland after entering the hypothalamo-hypophysial portal system. In the first experiment, a 3-hour continuous infusion of exogenous GnRH (700 or 7 pg/min; n = 8) was administered into the third ventricle through a permanent indwelling cannula. Jugular LH concentrations were measured as an estimate of the activity of the GnRH 'pulse generator'. To assess the potential for a direct involvement of CSF-GnRH in pituitary stimulation of LH secretion, ewes were also implanted with a cannula to collect hypophysial portal blood. In a first investigation, radioactive (2 x 10(6) cpm 125I-GnRH; n = 3) GnRH was injected into the third ventricle, and the amount of radioactivity present in the portal and jugular blood after the injection measured. In a second investigation, cold GnRH was infused (400 pg/min; n = 3) into the third ventricle for 2 h, and portal and jugular blood collected for the determination of GnRH and LH concentrations, respectively. In the first experiment, neither rate of infusion of GnRH into the third ventricle had any effect on the mean interpulse interval, nadir, pulse amplitude or circulating level of systemic LH, suggesting that CSF-GnRH is not a component of an ultrashort-loop feedback system for GnRH. Furthermore, in the second experiment, despite extremely low levels of radioactivity (maximum: 120 cpm/ml) being detected in hypophysial portal blood (which may not have been intact decapeptide), in the second part of this experiment, no radioimmunoassayable GnRH associated with the period of infusion could be measured. These data demonstrate in ewes that little, if any, CSF-GnRH reaches the hypophysial portal blood, and this compartment of GnRH does not, thus, directly affect the pituitary gland. The present study strongly suggests, therefore, that CSF-GnRH does not modulate LH secretion. Whether this compartment of GnRH is involved in sexual behavior remains to be established. PMID:9485167

  17. Quantification of mutant huntingtin protein in cerebrospinal fluid from Huntington’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Edward J.; Boggio, Roberto; Langbehn, Douglas; Robertson, Nicola; Haider, Salman; Miller, James R.C.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Leavitt, Blair R.; Kuhn, Rainer; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Macdonald, Douglas; Weiss, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantification of disease-associated proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been critical for the study and treatment of several neurodegenerative disorders; however, mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT), the cause of Huntington’s disease (HD), is at very low levels in CSF and, to our knowledge, has never been measured previously. METHODS: We developed an ultrasensitive single-molecule counting (SMC) mHTT immunoassay that was used to quantify mHTT levels in CSF samples from individuals bearing the HD mutation and from control individuals in 2 independent cohorts. RESULTS: This SMC mHTT immunoassay demonstrated high specificity for mHTT, high sensitivity with a femtomolar detection threshold, and a broad dynamic range. Analysis of the CSF samples showed that mHTT was undetectable in CSF from all controls but quantifiable in nearly all mutation carriers. The mHTT concentration in CSF was approximately 3-fold higher in patients with manifest HD than in premanifest mutation carriers. Moreover, mHTT levels increased as the disease progressed and were associated with 5-year onset probability. The mHTT concentration independently predicted cognitive and motor dysfunction. Furthermore, the level of mHTT was associated with the concentrations of tau and neurofilament light chain in the CSF, suggesting a neuronal origin for the detected mHTT. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated that mHTT can be quantified in CSF from HD patients using the described SMC mHTT immunoassay. Moreover, the level of mHTT detected is associated with proximity to disease onset and diminished cognitive and motor function. The ability to quantify CSF mHTT will facilitate the study of HD, and mHTT quantification could potentially serve as a biomarker for the development and testing of experimental mHTT-lowering therapies for HD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Not applicable. FUNDING: CHDI Foundation Inc.; Medical Research Council (MRC) UK; National Institutes for Health Research (NIHR); Rosetrees Trust; Swedish Research Council; and Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation. PMID:25844897

  18. Selenium speciation in paired serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples of sheep.

    PubMed

    Humann-Ziehank, Esther; Ganter, Martin; Michalke, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to characterise selenium (Se) and Se species in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of sheep and its relation to the respective Se concentrations in serum. Paired samples from 10 adult sheep were used for the study. Five sheep were fed a diet with a marginal Se concentration of <0.05mg Se/kg diet dry weight (dw, Se(-)), and five animals were fed the same diet supplemented with sodium selenite revealing a concentration of 0.2mg Se/kg diet dw (Se(+)). The feeding strategy was conducted for two years; The results on metabolic effects were published previously. At the end of the feeding period, paired samples of serum and CSF were collected and analysed using ion exchange chromatography inductively coupled plasma-dynamic reaction cell-mass spectrometry (IEC-ICP-DRC-MS) technique for total Se concentration and concentrations of Se species. Albumin concentrations were analysed additionally. The feeding strategy caused significant differences (p<0.01) in serum Se concentrations with 33.1±5.11μg Se/l in the Se(-) group and 96.5±18.3μg Se/l in the Se(+) group, respectively. The corresponding total Se concentrations in CSF were 4.38±1.02μg Se/l and 6.13±1.64μg Se/l in the Se(-) and the Se(+) group, respectively, missing statistical significance (p=0.077). IEC-ICP-DRC-MS technique was able to differentiate the Se species selenoprotein P-bound Se (SePP), selenomethionine, glutathione peroxidase-bound Se (Se-GPx), selenocystine, thioredoxin reductase-bound Se, ovine serum albumin-bound Se (Se-OSA), SeIV and SeVI in ovine serum and CSF. Quantitatively, SePP is the main selenoprotein in ovine serum followed by Se-GPx. The CSF/blood ratio of albumin (QAlbumin) reflected a physiological function of the blood-CSF barrier in all sheep. QSe-species were higher than QAlbumin both feeding groups, supporting the hypothesis of local production of Se species in the brain. Significant positive regression lines for CSF vs. serum were found for albumin and Se-OSA only, suggesting a role of albumin to convey Se across the blood-CSF barrier. The ovine model, together with the IEC-ICP-DRC-MS technique to characterise the Se species, might be a worthwhile model for further studies as repeated sample collection as well as modification of the nutritional status is feasible and effective. PMID:26653738

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid kynurenines in multiple sclerosis; relation to disease course and neurocognitive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Aeinehband, Shahin; Brenner, Philip; Ståhl, Sara; Bhat, Maria; Fidock, Mark D; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Engberg, Göran; Jokinen, Jussi; Erhardt, Sophie; Piehl, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system, with a high rate of neurocognitive symptoms for which the molecular background is still uncertain. There is accumulating evidence for dysregulation of the kynurenine pathway (KP) in different psychiatric and neurodegenerative conditions. We here report the first comprehensive analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) kynurenine metabolites in MS patients of different disease stages and in relation to neurocognitive symptoms. Levels of tryptophan (TRP), kynurenine (KYN), kynurenic acid (KYNA) and quinolinic acid (QUIN) were determined with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry in cell-free CSF. At the group level MS patients (cohort 1; n=71) did not differ in absolute levels of TRP, KYN, KYNA or QUIN as compared to non-inflammatory neurological disease controls (n=20). Stratification of patients into different disease courses revealed that both absolute QUIN levels and the QUIN/KYN ratio were increased in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients in relapse. Interestingly, secondary progressive MS (SPMS) displayed a trend for lower TRP and KYNA, while primary progressive (PPMS) patients displayed increased levels of all metabolites, similar to a group of inflammatory neurological disease controls (n=13). In the second cohort (n=48), MS patients with active disease and short disease duration were prospectively evaluated for neuropsychiatric symptoms. In a supervised multivariate analysis using orthogonal projection to latent structures (OPLS-DA) depressed patients displayed higher KYNA/TRP and KYN/TRP ratios, mainly due to low TRP levels. Still, this model had low predictive value and could not completely separate the clinically depressed patients from the non-depressed MS patients. No correlation was evident for other neurocognitive measures. Taken together these results demonstrate that clinical disease activity and differences in disease courses are reflected by changes in KP metabolites. Increased QUIN levels of RRMS patients in relapse and generally decreased levels of TRP in SPMS may relate to neurotoxicity and failure of remyelination, respectively. In contrast, PPMS patients displayed a more divergent pattern more resembling inflammatory conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus. The pattern of KP metabolites in RRMS patients could not predict neurocognitive symptoms. PMID:26189678

  20. Lack of usutu virus RNA in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with encephalitis of unknown etiology, Tuscany, Italy.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Fabrizio; Mazzetti, Paola; Focosi, Daniele; Macera, Lisa; Scagnolari, Carolina; Manzin, Aldo; Antonelli, Guido; Nelli, Luca Ceccherini

    2015-06-01

    Usutu virus (USUV) is an African mosquito-borne flavivirus associated with human neurological disorders in Europe. Recently, USUV introduction in Europe has been traced back to Eurasian blackbirds deaths in the Tuscany region of Italy in 1996. Ninety-six cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with encephalitis of unknown etiology diagnosed in 2010-2013 were screened to determine whether USUV circulates in humans in Tuscany. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction, no positive patient was found. USUV does not seem to cause neuroinvasive disorders in humans in Tuscany. PMID:25712912

  1. Time Course of Prion Seeding Activity in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Scrapie-Infected Hamsters after Intratongue and Intracerebral Inoculations

    PubMed Central

    Orrù, Christina D.; Hughson, Andrew G.; Race, Brent; Raymond, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    To assess prospects for early diagnosis of prion disease based on prion seeding activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), we measured the activity over time in scrapie-infected hamsters by real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC). After intracerebral inoculation, activity appeared in CSF within 1 day and plateaued weeks before the onset of clinical signs. However, after intratongue inoculation, activity first appeared in CSF with the onset of clinical signs, well after higher-level accumulation of seeding activity in brain. PMID:22238438

  2. Adrenocorticotropic hormone in serial cerebrospinal fluid in man - Subject to acute regulation by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system?

    PubMed

    Kellner, Michael; Wortmann, Viola; Salzwedel, Cornelie; Kober, Daniel; Petzoldt, Martin; Urbanowicz, Tatiana; Pulic, Mersija; Boelmans, Kai; Yassouridis, Alexander; Wiedemann, Klaus

    2016-05-30

    Acute regulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system has not been investigated in man. In a pilot study in healthy male volunteers we measured ACTH every twenty minutes in serial CSF for three hours after an intravenous placebo, hydrocortisone (100mg) or insulin (2mg/kg) injection. No acute inhibitory or stimulatory effects of these interventions were discovered. Our results corroborate previous findings in rhesus monkeys. The regulation of CSF ACTH and its potential relevance for behavioral alterations in health and disease (e.g. major depression or anorexia nervosa) in humans need further study. PMID:27031591

  3. Glial fibrillary acidic protein as a marker of astrocytic activation in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Benninger, Felix; Glat, Micaela J; Offen, Daniel; Steiner, Israel

    2016-04-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) has been shown to be increased in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients suffering from neurological diseases involving the activation of astrocytes, but has not been studied in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients to our knowledge. CSF samples of patients with definite ALS and of those with other neurological diseases were evaluated for their GFAP concentrations. CSF-GFAP concentrations of patients with ALS were significantly elevated by 53% compared to patients with other neurologic diseases. GFAP might serve as a biomarker in ALS. Our findings support the concept that astrocytes play a role in ALS pathogenesis. PMID:26602604

  4. EBNA1 antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Erdur, Hebun; Scholz, Veronika; Streitz, Mathias; Hammer, Markus; Meisel, Christian; Schönemann, Constanze; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Rosche, Berit

    2016-05-15

    Epidemiological data suggests that Epstein-Barr virus may be involved in the pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). We aimed to determine the frequency of CD8+ T cells specific for one EBNA1-derived epitope (HPVGEADYFEY) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood of patients with MS and other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND). The frequency of specific CD8+ T cells was assessed by HLA-class-I-binding pentamers restricted to HLA-B35. The frequency of HPVGEADYFEY-specific CD8+ T cells did neither differ significantly in blood nor CSF in MS compared to OIND, but was consistently higher in CSF compared to blood regardless of diagnosis. PMID:27138093

  5. Laparoscopic repositioning of a ventriculo-peritoneal catheter tip for a sterile abdominal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pseudocyst.

    PubMed

    Oh, A; Wildbrett, P; Golub, R; Yu, L M; Goodrich, J; Lee, T

    2001-05-01

    Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pseudocyst is an uncommon but well-described complication that is reported to occur in <1% of ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunts. Management options for pseudocysts include various types of shunt revisions, which recently have been conducted laparoscopically. We report the case of an 11-year-old girl in whom a sterile abdominal CSF pseudocyst was successfully fenestrated and the VP catheter repositioned using laparoscopy. This technique in the setting of a noninfected pseudocyst has proven to be safe, with results comparable to the conventional open technique. However, the long-term success rate is still unknown. PMID:11353974

  6. Evaluation of S100B in cerebrospinal fluid as a potential biomarker for neurological diseases in calves.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yuka; Chiba, Shiori; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2015-05-01

    S100B in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-S100B) was measured in calves with 20 neurologic and 21 non-neurologic diseases to clarify its utility as a biomarker for neurologic diseases. The median CSF-S100B value in the neurologic disease group (43.0 ng/ml) was significantly higher than that in the non-neurologic disease group (10.2 ng/ml). As CSF-S100B levels in calves with neurologic diseases widely differed, the utility of CSF-S100B as a diagnostic marker for neurologic diseases in cattle remains inconclusive. PMID:25649061

  7. Evaluation of S100B in cerebrospinal fluid as a potential biomarker for neurological diseases in calves

    PubMed Central

    KOJIMA, Yuka; CHIBA, Shiori; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu; INOKUMA, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    S100B in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-S100B) was measured in calves with 20 neurologic and 21 non-neurologic diseases to clarify its utility as a biomarker for neurologic diseases. The median CSF-S100B value in the neurologic disease group (43.0 ng/ml) was significantly higher than that in the non-neurologic disease group (10.2 ng/ml). As CSF-S100B levels in calves with neurologic diseases widely differed, the utility of CSF-S100B as a diagnostic marker for neurologic diseases in cattle remains inconclusive. PMID:25649061

  8. Use of polymerase chain reaction and rabbit infectivity testing to detect Treponema pallidum in amniotic fluid, fetal and neonatal sera, and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Grimprel, E; Sanchez, P J; Wendel, G D; Burstain, J M; McCracken, G H; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1991-01-01

    The diagnosis of congenital syphilis continues to pose a difficult clinical challenge. Because the serodiagnosis of congenital syphilis has significant limitations, the direct detection of Treponema pallidum in suspect neonatal tissues or body fluids represents a desirable alternate diagnostic strategy. We developed and applied the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of T. pallidum in clinical material relevant to the diagnosis of congenital syphilis but which typically contain factors inhibitory for the PCR. Four methods of specimen processing were examined to circumvent PCR inhibition; clinical materials included amniotic fluids, neonatal sera, and neonatal cerebrospinal fluids. The PCR was 100% specific for T. T. pallidum compared with the sensitive rabbit infectivity test (RIT) for all clinical materials tested. For amniotic fluids, the PCR was 100% sensitive when correlated with the RIT but had a lesser sensitivity when applied to sera or cerebrospinal fluids, which typically contain few treponemes. The combined sensitivity of the PCR for all clinical samples was 78%. Positive PCR results also were obtained among some clinical specimens for which RIT was not performed; these results correlated well with either stigmata or risk factors for congenital syphilis. The combined results suggest that the PCR can be a useful adjunct to the diagnosis and clinical management of congenital syphilis and that it will provide a valuable tool for investigations of the pathogenesis of the disorder. Images PMID:1761693

  9. Intraocular Pressure and Estimated Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure. The Beijing Eye Study 2011

    PubMed Central

    You, Qi Sheng; Yang, Diya; Xie, Xiao Bin; Xu, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine a potential association between intraocular pressure (IOP) and cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) in a population-based setting. Methods The population-based Beijing Eye Study 2011 included 3468 individuals with a mean age of 64.6±9.8 years (range: 50–93 years). A detailed ophthalmic examination was performed. Based on a previous study with lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) measurements, CSFP was calculated as CSFP [mm Hg] = 0.44×Body Mass Index [kg/m2]+0.16×Diastolic Blood Pressure [mm Hg]–0.18×Age [Years]. Results In multivariate analysis, IOP was associated with higher estimated CSFP (P<0.001; standardized correlation coefficient beta: 0.27; regression coefficient B: 0.20; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16, 0.24), after adjusting for thinner central corneal thickness (P<0.001; beta: 0.45; B: 0.04;95%CI: 0.04,0.04), smaller corneal curvature radius (P<0.001; beta:−0.11; B:−1.13;95%CI:−1.61,−0.64), shallower anterior chamber depth (P = 0.01; beta:−0.05; B:−0.33;95%CI:−0.59,−0.08) and longer axial length (P = 0.002; beta: 0.08; B: 0.20;95%CI: 0.08,0.32)), and after adjusting for the systemic parameters of higher pulse rate (P<0.001; beta: 0.08; B: 0.02;95%CI: 0.01,0.03), higher prevalence of arterial hypertension (P = 0.002; beta: 0.06; B: 0.32;95%CI: 0.12,0.53)), frequency of drinking alcohol (P = 0.02; beta: 0.04; B: 0.09;95%CI: 0.01,0.17), higher blood concentration of triglycerides (P = 0.001; beta: 0.06; B: 0.06;95%CI: 0.02,0.10) and cholesterol (P = 0.049; beta: 0.04; B: 0.08;95%CI: 0.00,0.17), and body mass index (P<0.001; beta:−0.13; B:−0.09;95%CI:−0.13,−0.06). In a parallel manner, estimated CSFP (mean: 10.8±3.7 mm Hg) was significantly associated with higher IOP (P<0.001; beta: 0.13; B: 0.18;95%CI: 0.13,0.23) after adjusting for rural region of habitation (P<0.001; beta:−0.37; B:−2.78;95%CI:−3.07,−2.48), higher systolic blood pressure (P<0.001; beta: 0.34; B: 0.06;95%CI: 0.05,0.07), higher pulse rate (P = 0.003; beta: 0.05; B: 0.02;95%CI: 0.01,0.03), taller body height (P<0.001; beta: 0.11; B: 0.05;95%CI: 0.03,0.07), higher blood concentration of cholesterol (P = 0.003; beta: 0.05; B: 0.17;95%CI: 0.06,0.28) and higher level of education (P = 0.003; beta: 0.09; B: 0.30;95%CI: 0.16,0.45). Conclusions IOP was positively associated with estimated CSFP after adjusting for other ocular and systemic parameters. As a corollary, higher estimated CSFP was significantly associated with higher IOP in multivariate analysis. It fits with the notion that the arterial blood pressure, estimated CSFP and IOP are physiologically correlated with each other. PMID:25105777