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Sample records for cerebrovascular disease study

  1. Neurology Case Studies: Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad U; Gorelick, Philip B

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses interesting vascular neurology cases including the management of intracranial stenosis, migraine headache and stroke risk, retinal artery occlusions associated with impaired hearing, intracranial occlusive disease, a heritable cause of stroke and vascular cognitive impairment, and an interesting clinico-neuroradiologic disorder associated with eclampsia. PMID:27445238

  2. PET in Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Powers, William J.; Zazulia, Allyson R.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Investigation of the interplay between the cerebral circulation and brain cellular function is fundamental to understanding both the pathophysiology and treatment of stroke. Currently, PET is the only technique that provides accurate, quantitative in vivo regional measurements of both cerebral circulation and cellular metabolism in human subjects. We review normal human cerebral blood flow and metabolism and human PET studies of ischemic stroke, carotid artery disease, vascular dementia, intracerebral hemorrhage and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and discuss how these studies have added to our understanding of the pathophysiology of human cerebrovascular disease. PMID:20543975

  3. Aquaporin-4 and Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Heling; Huang, Chuyi; Ding, Hongyan; Dong, Jing; Gao, Zidan; Yang, Xiaobo; Tang, Yuping; Dong, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are conditions caused by problems with brain vasculature, which have a high morbidity and mortality. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the most abundant water channel in the brain and crucial for the formation and resolution of brain edema. Considering brain edema is an important pathophysiological change after stoke, AQP4 is destined to have close relation with cerebrovascular diseases. However, this relation is not limited to brain edema due to other biological effects elicited by AQP4. Till now, multiple studies have investigated roles of AQP4 in cerebrovascular diseases. This review focuses on expression of AQP4 and the effects of AQP4 on brain edema and neural cells injuries in cerebrovascular diseases including cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the current review, we pay more attention to the studies of recent years directly from cerebrovascular diseases animal models or patients, especially those using AQP4 gene knockout mice. This review also elucidates the potential of AQP4as an excellent therapeutic target. PMID:27529222

  4. Aquaporin-4 and Cerebrovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chu, Heling; Huang, Chuyi; Ding, Hongyan; Dong, Jing; Gao, Zidan; Yang, Xiaobo; Tang, Yuping; Dong, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are conditions caused by problems with brain vasculature, which have a high morbidity and mortality. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the most abundant water channel in the brain and crucial for the formation and resolution of brain edema. Considering brain edema is an important pathophysiological change after stoke, AQP4 is destined to have close relation with cerebrovascular diseases. However, this relation is not limited to brain edema due to other biological effects elicited by AQP4. Till now, multiple studies have investigated roles of AQP4 in cerebrovascular diseases. This review focuses on expression of AQP4 and the effects of AQP4 on brain edema and neural cells injuries in cerebrovascular diseases including cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the current review, we pay more attention to the studies of recent years directly from cerebrovascular diseases animal models or patients, especially those using AQP4 gene knockout mice. This review also elucidates the potential of AQP4as an excellent therapeutic target. PMID:27529222

  5. [Gender difference in cerebrovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Fusao; Kato, Yoko; Kobayashi, Shoutai

    2015-04-01

    We discuss about the gender difference of cerebrovascular disease according to the data of Japan Standard Stroke Registry Study. The male proportion was dominant in cerebrovascular disease except for subarachnoid hemorrhage(SAH). According to the data of Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, age-adjusted death rate in cerebral infarction and intracerebral hemorrhage were higher in male than in female, however, in SAH the rate was no different between male and female. The incidence of SAH is higher in women than in men, but this gender difference emerges not earlier than age 59. Most cases of SAH were occurring in the ages ranging from 50's in male and 70's in female. The total male-to-female ratio was approximately 1:2. The female proportion was dominant in older patients. PMID:25936150

  6. Other cerebrovascular occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Erica C S; Schaefer, Pamela W; Singhal, Aneesh B

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we review the optimal imaging modalities for subacute and chronic stroke. We discuss the utility of computed tomography (CT) and multimodal CT imaging. Further, we analyze the importance of specific magnetic resonance imaging sequences, such as diffusion-weighted imaging for acute ischemic stroke, T2/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery for subacute and chronic stroke, and susceptibility imaging for detection of intracranial hemorrhages. Different ischemic stroke mechanisms are reviewed, and how these imaging modalities may aid in the determination of such. Further, we analyze how topographic patterns in ischemic stroke may provide important clues to the diagnosis, in addition to the temporal evolution of the stroke. Lastly, specific cerebrovascular occlusive diseases are reviewed, with emphasis on the optimal imaging modalities and their findings in each condition. PMID:27432673

  7. Imaging Inflammation in Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Gounis, Matthew J; van der Marel, Kajo; Marosfoi, Miklos; Mazzanti, Mary L; Clarençon, Frédéric; Chueh, Ju-Yu; Puri, Ajit S; Bogdanov, Alexei A

    2015-10-01

    Imaging inflammation in large intracranial artery pathology may play an important role in the diagnosis of and risk stratification for a variety of cerebrovascular diseases. Looking beyond the lumen has already generated widespread excitement in the stroke community, and the potential to unveil molecular processes in the vessel wall is a natural evolution to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the pathogenesis of diseases, such as ICAD and brain aneurysms. PMID:26351362

  8. Pulsatile and steady components of blood pressure and subclinical cerebrovascular disease: the Northern Manhattan Study

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Jose; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Cheung, Ken; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.; Wright, Clinton B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess whether pulse pressure (PP) is associated, independently of mean arterial pressure (MAP), with perivascular spaces (PVS), lacunar lesions presumably ischemic (LPI), and white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV) seen on brain MRI. METHODS Participants in the Northern Manhattan Study had their blood pressure (BP) taken during their baseline enrollment visit and again during a visit for a brain MRI a mean of 7 years later. We assessed small and large PVS, lacunar LPI, and WMHV on MRI. We examined the association of systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), MAP, and PP at baseline with subclinical markers of cerebrovascular disease using generalized linear models and adjusting for vascular risk factors. RESULTS Imaging and BP data were available for 1009 participants (mean age 68 ± 8 years, 60% women, 60% Hispanic). DBP was associated with lacunar LPI and WMHV, while SBP was associated with small and large PVS. Using MAP and PP together disclosed that the effect size for PP was greater for large PVS while the effect of MAP was greater for lacunar LPI and WMHV. The effects of DBP were flat or negative at any degree of SBP > 120 mm Hg for small and large PVS, while a positive association was noted for lacunar LPI and WMHV with any DBP increase over any degree of SBP. CONCLUSIONS We report here a segregated association between the pulsatile and steady components of the BP with subclinical markers of cerebrovascular disease. These differential associations may reflect the underlying pathology of these biomarkers. PMID:26259124

  9. Lipid profile components and subclinical cerebrovascular disease in the Northern Manhattan Study

    PubMed Central

    Willey, Joshua Z.; Gardener, Hannah; Moon, Yeseon P.; Yoshita, Mitsuhiro; DeCarli, Charles; Cheung, Ying Kuen; Sacco, Ralph L.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Wright, Clinton B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Subclinical cerebrovascular disease has been associated with multiple adverse events related to aging, including stroke and dementia. The modifiable risk factors for subclinical cerebrovascular disease beyond hypertension have not been well characterized. Our objective was to examine the association between baseline, and changes over time, in lipid profile components and subclinical cerebrovascular disease on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Fasting plasma lipids were collected on participants in the Northern Manhattan Study, a prospective cohort study examining risk factors for cardiovascular disease in a multi-ethnic elderly urban dwelling population. A subsample of the cohort underwent brain MRI between 2003 and 2008 (a median of 6.2 (range=0–14) years after enrollment, when repeat fasting lipids were obtained. We used lipid profile components at the time of initial enrollment (n=1256 with lipids available) as categorical variables, as well as change in clinical categories over the 2 measures (n=1029). The main outcome measures were (1)total white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV) using linear regression, and (2)silent brain infarcts (SBI) using logistic regression. Results None of the plasma lipid profile components at the time of enrollment were associated with WMHV. The association between baseline lipids and WMHV was however modified by apoE status (chi-squared with 2 degrees of freedom, p=0.03), such that among apoE4 carriers those with total cholesterol (TC) ≥200mg/dl had a trend towards smaller WMHV than those with TC<200mg/dl (difference in log WMHV − 0.19, p=0.07) while there was no difference among apoE3 carriers. When examining the association between WMHV and change in lipid profile components we noted an association with change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)(>50 mg/dl for women,>40 mg/dl for men) and TC. A transition from low risk high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)(>50 mg/dl for women,>40 mg

  10. Thermography in Occlusive Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mawdsley, C.; Samuel, E.; Sumerling, M. D.; Young, G. B.

    1968-01-01

    Cooling of the skin over the medial supraorbital region in 80% of patients who have an occlusion or severe stenosis of a carotid artery can be demonstrated by facial thermography. Minor stenotic lesions in the carotid arteries do not produce characteristic thermographic changes, while thermography is of no help in the diagnosis of vertebrobasilar arterial disease. Thermographic changes suggestive of carotid arterial lesions are found occasionally in patients whose angiograms are normal, owing to variations in the size of the frontal sinuses, or factors such as fever or inflammatory lesions. It is suggested that facial thermography is of value in the preliminary investigation of patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:5676953

  11. Study on Analysis and Pattern Recognition of the Manifestation of the Pulse Detection of Cerebrovascular Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, J.; Wang, Y. C.; Hong, W. X.; Zhang, W. P.

    2006-10-01

    Cerebrovascular Disease (CVD) is also called stroke in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). CVD is a kind of frequent diseases with high incidence, high death rate, high deformity rate and high relapse rate. The pathogenesis of CVD has relation to many factors. In modern medicine, we can make use of various instruments to check many biochemical parameters. However, at present, the early detection of CVD can mostly be done artificially by specialists. In TCM the salted expert can detect the state of a CVD patient by felling his (or her) pulse. It is significant to apply the modern information and engineering techniques to the early discovery of CVD. It is also a challenge to do this in fact. In this paper, the authors presented a detection method of CVD basing on analysis and pattern recognition of Manifestation of the Pulse of TCM using wavelet technology and Neural Networks. Pulse signals from normal health persons and CVD patients were studied comparatively. This research method is flexible to deal with other physiological signals.

  12. Long-term effects of pioglitazone on first attack of ischemic cerebrovascular disease in older people with type 2 diabetes: A case-control study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Hsien-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-08-01

    Long-term studies demonstrating the effect of pioglitazone use on primary prevention of ischemic cerebrovascular disease in older people with type 2 diabetes mellitus are lacking. This study investigated the relationship between pioglitazone use and first attack of ischemic cerebrovascular disease in Taiwan.We conducted a case-control study using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 2359 type 2 diabetic subjects aged ≥65 years with newly diagnosed ischemic cerebrovascular disease from 2005 to 2011 as the case group and 4592 sex- and age-matched, randomly selected type 2 diabetic subjects aged ≥65 years without ischemic cerebrovascular disease as the control group. The odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) of ischemic cerebrovascular disease associated with pioglitazone use was measured by the multivariable unconditional logistic regression model.After adjustment for confounding factors, the multivariable logistic regression analysis disclosed that the adjusted ORs of first attack of ischemic cerebrovascular disease associated with cumulative duration of using pioglitazone were 3.34 for <1 year (95% CI 2.59-4.31), 2.53 for 1 to 2 years (95% CI 1.56-4.10), 2.20 for 2 to 3 years (95% CI 1.05-4.64), and 1.09 for ≥3 years (95% CI 0.55-2.15), respectively.Our findings suggest that pioglitazone use does not have a protective effect on primary prevention for ischemic cerebrovascular disease among older people with type 2 diabetes mellitus during the first 3 years of use. Whether using pioglitazone for >3 years would have primary prevention for ischemic cerebrovascular disease needs a long-term research to prove. PMID:27495077

  13. Influence of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides on risk of cerebrovascular disease: the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

    PubMed Central

    Lindenstrøm, E.; Boysen, G.; Nyboe, J.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To estimate the influence of plasma total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides on risk of cerebrovascular disease. DESIGN--The Copenhagen City Heart Study is a prospective observational survey with two cardiovascular examinations at five year intervals. Non-fasting plasma lipids were measured in participants once at each examination, along with other variables. The Cox regression model was used to establish the effect of the factors recorded on cerebrovascular events of mostly, but not exclusively, ischaemic origin. SUBJECTS--19,698 women and men at least 20 years old, randomly selected after age stratification from an area of central Copenhagen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Initial cases of stroke and transient ischaemic attack recorded from hospital records and death certificates from 1976 through 1988. RESULTS--660 non-haemorrhagic and 33 haemorrhagic events were recorded. Total cholesterol was positively associated with risk of non-haemorrhagic events, but only for levels > 8 mmol/l, corresponding to the upper 5% of the distribution in the study population. For lower plasma cholesterol values the relative risk remained nearly constant. Plasma triglyceride concentration was significantly, positively associated with risk of non-haemorrhagic events. The relative risk corresponding to an increase of 1 mmol/l was 1.12 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.16). There was a negative, log linear association between high density lipoprotein cholesterol and risk of non-haemorrhagic events (0.53 (0.34 to 0.83)). There was no indication that the effects of plasma lipids were different in women and men. CONCLUSIONS--The pattern of the association between plasma cholesterol and risk of ischaemic cerebrovascular disease was not log linear, and the increased risk was confined to the upper 5% of the cholesterol distribution. Further studies should concentrate on the association between plasma cholesterol and verified haemorrhagic stroke. PMID

  14. Left Atrial Volumes and Reservoir Function Are Associated With Subclinical Cerebrovascular Disease: The Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions (CABL) Study

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Cesare; Jin, Zhezhen; Liu, Rui; Iwata, Shinichi; Tugcu, Aylin; Yoshita, Mitsuhiro; Homma, Shunichi; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Rundek, Tatjana; DeCarli, Charles; Wright, Clinton B.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Di Tullio, Marco R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the relationship of left atrial (LA) phasic volumes and LA reservoir function with subclinical cerebrovascular disease in a stroke-free community-based cohort. Background An increase in LA size is associated with cardiovascular events including stroke. However, it is not known whether LA phasic volumes and reservoir function are associated with subclinical cerebrovascular disease. Methods LA minimum (LAVmin) and maximum (LAVmax) volumes, and LA reservoir function, measured as total emptying volume (LAEV) and total emptying fraction (LAEF), were assessed by real-time three-dimensional echocardiography in 455 stroke-free participants from the community-based Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions (CABL) study. Subclinical cerebrovascular disease was assessed as silent brain infarcts (SBI) and white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV) by brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results SBI prevalence was 15.4%; mean WMHV was 0.66±0.92%. Participants with SBI showed greater LAVmin (17.1±9.3 vs. 12.5±5.6 ml/m2, p<0.01) and LAVmax (26.6±8.8 vs. 23.3±7.0 ml/m2, p<0.01) compared to those without SBI. LAEV (9.5±3.4 vs. 10.8±3.9 ml/m2, p<0.01) and LAEF (38.7±14.7% vs. 47.0±11.9%, p<0.01) were also reduced in participants with SBI. In univariate analyses, greater LA volumes and smaller reservoir function were significantly associated with greater WMHV. In multivariate analyses, LAVmin remained significantly associated with SBI [adjusted odds ratio (OR) per SD increase: 1.37, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.04–1.80, p<0.05] and with WMHV (β=0.12, p<0.01), whereas LAVmax was not independently associated with either. Smaller LAEF was independently associated with SBI (adjusted OR=0.67, 95% CI 0.50–0.90, p<0.01) and WMHV (β=−0.09, p<0.05). Conclusions Greater LA volumes and reduced LA reservoir function are associated with subclinical cerebrovascular disease detected by brain MRI in subjects without history of stroke. LAVmin and LAEF

  15. Cerebrovascular disease in ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Love, Seth; Miners, J Scott

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) have more in common than their association with ageing. They share risk factors and overlap neuropathologically. Most patients with AD have Aβ amyloid angiopathy and degenerative changes affecting capillaries, and many have ischaemic parenchymal abnormalities. Structural vascular disease contributes to the ischaemic abnormalities in some patients with AD. However, the stereotyped progression of hypoperfusion in this disease, affecting first the precuneus and cingulate gyrus, then the frontal and temporal cortex and lastly the occipital cortex, suggests that other factors are more important, particularly in early disease. Whilst demand for oxygen and glucose falls in late disease, functional MRI, near infrared spectroscopy to measure the saturation of haemoglobin by oxygen, and biochemical analysis of myelin proteins with differential susceptibility to reduced oxygenation have all shown that the reduction in blood flow in AD is primarily a problem of inadequate blood supply, not reduced metabolic demand. Increasing evidence points to non-structural vascular dysfunction rather than structural abnormalities of vessel walls as the main cause of cerebral hypoperfusion in AD. Several mediators are probably responsible. One that is emerging as a major contributor is the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (EDN1). Whilst there is clearly an additive component to the clinical and pathological effects of hypoperfusion and AD, experimental and clinical observations suggest that the disease processes also interact mechanistically at a cellular level in a manner that exacerbates both. The elucidation of some of the mechanisms responsible for hypoperfusion in AD and for the interactions between CVD and AD has led to the identification of several novel therapeutic approaches that have the potential to ameliorate ischaemic damage and slow the progression of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26711459

  16. Insomnia, Daytime Sleepiness and Cardio-Cerebrovascular Diseases in the Elderly: A 6-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jaussent, Isabelle; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Ancelin, Marie-Laure; Besset, Alain; Helmer, Catherine; Tzourio, Christophe; Ritchie, Karen; Bouyer, Jean; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine 1) the associations between history of cardio-cerebrovascular diseases (CVD) and insomnia complaints and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), and 2) the relationships between sleep complaints and future CVD in persons over 65. Methods CVD was assessed at baseline and during two, four, and six-year follow-up in 5494 non-demented subjects. Self-reported insomnia complaints (poor sleep quality, difficulty in initiating sleep, difficulty in maintening sleep, and early morning awakening), EDS and sleep medication use were evaluated at baseline. Logistic regression models and Cox proportional hazard models, with delayed entry and age of participants as the time scale, were adjusted for socio-demographic, lifestyle and clinical variables. Results At baseline, 748 participants had a past-history of CVD. A past-history of CVD was associated with EDS (OR = 1.28 95%CI = [1.05–1.57]) and the number of insomnia complaints (OR = 1.26 95%CI = [1.03–1.55] for 1–2 insomnia complaints; OR = 1.32 95%CI = [1.03–1.71] for ≥3 complaints). In longitudinal analyses, neither the four components of insomnia nor the number of insomnia complaints were significantly associated with first or recurrent CVD events (n = 391 events). EDS was independently associated with future CVD events even after adjusting for prescribed sleep medication and past-history of CVD (HR = 1.35 95%CI = [1.06–1.71]). Conclusion Our results suggest that the relationships between sleep complaints and CVD could be complex. Insomnia complaints are more likely a consequence of CVD, whereas EDS appears to be a determinant of CVD independently of past-history of CVD. EDS screening may thus constitute a means of detecting persons at high risk of CVD. PMID:23457496

  17. Increased levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis are associated with ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease in humans: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    GHIZONI, Janaina Salomon; TAVEIRA, Luís Antônio de Assis; GARLET, Gustavo Pompermaier; GHIZONI, Marcos Flávio; PEREIRA, Jefferson Ricardo; DIONÍSIO, Thiago José; BROZOSKI, Daniel Thomas; SANTOS, Carlos Ferreira; SANT'ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the role of periodontal disease in the development of stroke or cerebral infarction in patients by evaluating the clinical periodontal conditions and the subgingival levels of periodontopathogens. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with ischemic (I-CVA) or hemorrhagic (H-CVA) cerebrovascular episodes (test group) and 60 systemically healthy patients (control group) were evaluated for: probing depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing and plaque index. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were both identified and quantified in subgingival plaque samples by conventional and real-time PCR, respectively. Results: The test group showed a significant increase in each of the following parameters: pocket depth, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, plaque index and number of missing teeth when compared to control values (p<0.05, unpaired t-test). Likewise, the test group had increased numbers of sites that were contaminated with P. gingivalis (60%x10%; p<0.001; chi-squared test) and displayed greater prevalence of periodontal disease, with an odds ratio of 48.06 (95% CI: 5.96-387.72; p<0.001). Notably, a positive correlation between probing depth and the levels of P. gingivalis in ischemic stroke was found (r=0.60; p=0.03; Spearman's rank correlation coefficient test). A. actinomycetemcomitans DNA was not detected in any of the groups by conventional or real-time PCR. Conclusions: Stroke patients had deeper pockets, more severe attachment loss, increased bleeding on probing, increased plaque indexes, and in their pockets harbored increased levels of P. gingivalis. These findings suggest that periodontal disease is a risk factor for the development of cerebral hemorrhage or infarction. Early treatment of periodontitis may counteract the development of cerebrovascular episodes. PMID:22437687

  18. Cerebrovascular Disease Is Associated with Outcomes after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A U.S. Total Joint Registry Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Lewallen, David G.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the association of cerebrovascular disease with patient-reported outcomes (PROs) of moderate-severe activity limitation and moderate-severe pain at 2- and 5-years after primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. 7,139 primary and 4,234 revision TKAs were included. Compared to the patients without cerebrovascular disease, those with cerebrovascular disease had a higher odds ratio (OR) of moderate-severe limitation at 2-years and 5-years, 1.32 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02, 1.72; P=0.04) and 1.83 (95% CI: 1.32, 2.55; P<0.001). No significant associations were noted with moderate-severe pain at 2-years or 5-years. In conclusion, we found that cerebrovascular disease is independently associated with pain and function outcomes after primary TKA. This should be taken into consideration when discussing expected outcomes of TKA with patients. PMID:23664282

  19. Role of transcranial Doppler in cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Amit A; Sharma, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is the only noninvasive modality for the assessment of real-time cerebral blood flow. It complements various anatomic imaging modalities by providing physiological-flow related information. It is relatively cheap, easily available, and can be performed at the bedside. It has been suggested as an essential component of a comprehensive stroke centre. In addition to its importance in acute cerebrovascular ischemia, its role is expanding in the evaluation of cerebral hemodynamics in various disorders of the brain. The "established" clinical indications for the use of TCD include cerebral ischemia, sickle cell disease, detection of right-to-left shunts, subarachnoid hemorrhage, periprocedural or surgical monitoring, and brain death. We present the role of TCD in acute cerebrovascular ischemia, sonothrombolysis, and intracranial stenosis. PMID:27625245

  20. Symptomatic Epilepsies due to Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dakaj, Nazim; Shatri, Nexhat; Isaku, Enver; Zeqiraj, Kamber

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebro-vascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of symptomatic epilepsies. This study aims to investigate: a) Frequency of epilepsy in patients with CVD; b) Correlation of epilepsy with the type of CVD (ischemic and hemorrhage) and with age. Methodology: It is analyzed medical documentation of 816 hospitalized patients with CVD in the clinic of Neurology in University Clinical Center (UCC) during the period January - December 2010. The study included data on patients presenting with epileptic seizures after CVD, and those with previously diagnosed epilepsy, are not included in the study. The diagnosis of CVD, are established in clinical neurological examination and the brain imaging (computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging). The diagnosis of epilepsy is established by the criteria of ILAE (International League against Epilepsy) 1983, and epileptic seizures are classified according to the ILAE classification, of 1981. Results: Out of 816 patients with CVD, 692 were with ischemic stroke and 124 with hemorrhage. From 816 patients, epileptic seizures had 81 (10%), of which 9 patients had been diagnosed with epilepsy earlier and they are not included in the study. From 72 (99%) patients with seizures after CVD 25 (33%) have been with ischemia, whereas 47 (67%) with hemorrhage. Conclusion: CVD present fairly frequent cause of symptomatic epilepsies among patients treated in the clinic of Neurology at UCC (about 10%). The biggest number of patients with epilepsy after CVD was with intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:25685086

  1. Chronic Pancreatitis Correlates With Increased Risk of Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tuck-Siu; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Chi-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lai, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to explore whether there is a relationship between chronic pancreatitis and cerebrovascular disease in Taiwan. Using the claims data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, we identified 16,672 subjects aged 20 to 84 years with a new diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis from 2000 to 2010 as the chronic pancreatitis group. We randomly selected 65,877 subjects aged 20 to 84 years without chronic pancreatitis as the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Both groups were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and the index year of diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of cerebrovascular disease at the end of 2011 was measured. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for cerebrovascular disease risk associated with chronic pancreatitis and other comorbidities. The overall incidence of cerebrovascular disease was 1.24-fold greater in the chronic pancreatitis group than that in the nonchronic pancreatitis group (14.2 vs. 11.5 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI = 1.19–1.30). After controlling for confounding factors, the adjusted HR of cerebrovascular disease was 1.27 (95% CI = 1.19–1.36) for the chronic pancreatitis group as compared with the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Woman (adjusted HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.31–1.51), age (every 1 year, HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.04–1.05), atrial fibrillation (adjusted HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.02–1.48), chronic kidney disease (adjusted HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.31–1.67), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (adjusted HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.16–1.40), diabetes mellitus (adjusted HR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.72–1.92), hypertension (adjusted HR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.56–1.76), and peripheral atherosclerosis (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.06–1.51) were other factors significantly associated with cerebrovascular disease. Chronic pancreatitis is

  2. Radiation-epidemiological Study of Cerebrovascular Diseases in the Cohort of Russian Recovery Operation Workers of the Chernobyl Accident.

    PubMed

    Kashcheev, V V; Chekin, S Yu; Maksioutov, M A; Tumanov, K A; Menyaylo, A N; Kochergina, E V; Kashcheeva, P V; Gorsky, A I; Shchukina, N V; Karpenko, S V; Ivanov, V K

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases (CeVD) in the cohort of Russian workers involved in recovery tasks after the Chernobyl accident. The studied cohort consists of 53,772 recovery operation workers (liquidators) who arrived in the zone of the Chernobyl accident within the first year after this accident (26 April 1986-26 April 1987). The mean external whole body dose in the cohort was 0.161 Gy, while individual doses varied from 0.0001 Gy to 1.42 Gy. During the follow-up period 1986-2012, a total of 23,264 cases of CeVD were diagnosed as a result of annual health examinations. A Poisson regression model was applied for estimation of radiation risks and for an assessment of other risk factors of CeVD. The following factors were considered as risk factors for CeVD: the dose, duration of the liquidators' work in the Chernobyl zone, and the concomitant diseases (hypertension, ischemic heart disease, atherosclerosis, and diabetes). The baseline incidence of CeVD is statistically significantly (p < 0.001) associated with all studied concomitant diseases. The incidence of CeVD has revealed a statistically significant dose response with the lack of a latent period and with the average ERR/Gy = 0.45, 95% CI: (0.28, 0.62), p < 0.001. Radiation risks of CeVD statistically significantly (p = 0.03) varied with the duration of liquidators' stay in the Chernobyl zone; for those who stayed in the Chernobyl zone less than 6 wk, ERR/Gy = 0.64, 95% CI = (0.38; 0.93), p < 0.001. Among studied concomitant diseases, diabetes mellitus statistically significantly (p = 0.002) increases the radiation risk of CeVD: for liquidators with diagnosed diabetes, ERR/Gy = 1.29. PMID:27356064

  3. [Epidemiology of cerebrovascular disease in Spain].

    PubMed

    Brea, Angel; Laclaustra, Martín; Martorell, Esperanza; Pedragosa, Angels

    2013-01-01

    In Spain, cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is a very common cause of morbidity and hospitalization. They are the second leading cause of mortality in the general population, and the first in women. They also constitute a very high social spending, which is estimated to increase in coming years, due to the aging of our population. Data from the Hospital Morbidity Survey of the National Statistics Institute recorded, in 2011, 116,017 strokes and 14,933 transient ischemic attacks, corresponding, respectively, to an incidence of 252 and 32 events per 100,000 people. In 2002, the cost of hospitalization for each stroke was estimated at €3,047. The amount of total cost health care throughout the life of a stroke patient is calculated at €43,129. Internationally, the direct costs of stroke constitute 3% of national health spending, this being similar amount in different countries around us. Hypertension was the cardiovascular risk factor (CVRF) more prevalent in both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, followed by dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus. Peripheral arterial disease and hypertension were more frequently associated with atherothrombotic events, atrial fibrillation with cardioembolic strokes, and obesity and high blood pressure to lacunar infarcts. In Spain, as showing several studies, we are far from optimal control of CVRF, especially in secondary prevention of stroke. According to the ICTUSCARE study, achieving recommended values was 17.6% in the case of hypertension, 29.8% in LDL-cholesterol, 74.9% of smoking, and 50.2% in diabetes mellitus. In this review, we analyze in detail the epidemiology, prevention and costs originated by CVD. PMID:24238835

  4. Cerebrovascular contributions to aging and Alzheimer's disease in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, Donna M; Schmitt, Frederick A; Head, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a common cause of intellectual disability and is also associated with early age of onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Due to an extra copy of chromosome 21, most adults over 40years old with DS have beta-amyloid plaques as a result of overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein. Cerebrovascular pathology may also be a significant contributor to neuropathology observed in the brains of adults with DS. This review describes the features of cardiovascular dysfunction and cerebrovascular pathology in DS that may be modifiable risk factors and thus targets for interventions. We will describe cerebrovascular pathology, the role of co-morbidities, imaging studies indicating vascular pathology and the possible consequences. It is clear that our understanding of aging and AD in people with DS will benefit from further studies to determine the role that cerebrovascular dysfunction contributes to cognitive health. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26593849

  5. Cerebral blood flow in sickle cell cerebrovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Huttenlocher, P.R.; Moohr, J.W.; Johns, L.; Brown, F.D.

    1984-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been studied by the xenon-133 (/sup 133/Xe) inhalation method in 16 children with suspected sickle cell cerebrovascular disease. Abnormalities consisting of decreases in total, hemispheral, or regional CBF were found in 17 of 26 studies. Eleven studies performed immediately after stroke, transient ischemic attack, or depression of state of alertness showed abnormalities. In addition to confirming regional cerebrovascular insufficiency in children with stroke due to major cerebral artery occlusion, the method detected diffuse decrease in CBF in children with stupor, coma, and seizures who had normal angiographic findings. In contrast, six of seven studies obtained after exchange transfusion or during maintenance on hypertransfusion therapy showed normal findings. The difference between results in patients with acute neurologic disturbances and those receiving transfusion therapy was statistically significant (P less than .005). The data indicate that the /sup 133/Xe method reliably demonstrates cerebrovascular impairment in sickle cell disease. They also suggest that CBF changes in patients with sickle cell disease can be reversed by exchange transfusion and by hypertransfusion therapy. The /sup 133/Xe CBF method may be useful for following up children with sickle cell disease who are at high risk for recurrent stroke.

  6. Carotid Stiffness: A Novel Cerebrovascular Disease Risk Factor

    PubMed Central

    van Sloten, Thomas T.; Stehouwer, Coen D.A.

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stiffening is considered an important element in the pathogenesis of cerebrovascular diseases. These include stroke as well as vascular dementia and depression. However, results of individual studies evaluating the association between carotid stiffening and incident stroke have been inconsistent. Therefore, we have conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis, showing that carotid stiffening is associated with incident stroke independently of cardiovascular risk factors and aortic stiffness. In addition, carotid stiffening improved stroke risk prediction beyond the Framingham stroke risk factors and aortic stiffness. Other studies have shown that carotid stiffening is associated with a higher incidence of vascular dementia and depressive symptoms. This suggests that carotid stiffness is a potential separate target for prevention strategies of cerebrovascular disease. PMID:27493900

  7. Cysticercosis and cerebrovascular disease: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Del Brutto, O H

    1992-01-01

    Ischaemic cerebrovascular disease is a relatively common but under-recognised complication of neurocysticercosis. It is usually caused by inflammatory occlusion of the arteries at the base of the brain secondary to cysticercotic arachnoiditis. In most cases, the involved vessels are of small diameter and the neurological picture is limited to a lacunar syndrome secondary to a small cerebral infarct. However, large infarcts related to the occlusion of the middle cerebral artery or even the internal carotid artery have also been reported in this setting. CT and CSF examination usually support the cause-and-effect relationship between neurocysticercosis and the cerebral infarct by showing abnormalities compatible with cysticercotic arachnoiditis. An accurate diagnosis of this condition is important since early treatment with steroids is advised to ameliorate the subarachnoid inflammatory reaction which may cause recurrent cerebral infarcts. PMID:1583508

  8. Application of infrared thermal imaging in the study of preventing cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases with Chinese medicine health food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ziru; Zhang, Xusheng

    2009-08-01

    To explore the assessing technique which could objectively reflect the characteristics of Chinese medicine in the prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, four balance features of infrared thermal images (ITI) corresponding to the up and down, left and right, proximal and distal balance of blood circulation of human body were studied. First, the ITI features of the middle-aged and elderly people with lipid abnormality history were compared with those of the healthy youth. It was found that the balance state of the youth was significantly better than that of the middle-aged and elderly, P<=0.01 for all the balance features. For the youth, the balance state of females was better than that of the males. But this sexual difference disappeared for the middle-aged and elderly group. Second, a double-blind randomized trial was carried out to study the influences of Shengyi capsule, a Chinese medicine health food with the function of helping to decrease serum lipid, on the balance features. The subjects were middle-aged and elderly people with lipid abnormality history. Shengyi capsule was taken by the trial group while Xuezhikang capsule (with lovastatin as the main effective component) by the control group for 108 days. The balance features of ITI showed that Shengyi was significantly better than Xuezhikang in improving the whole body balance of blood circulation (including the up and down, left and right, proximal and distal balance). The relative efficacy rate was 81.0% for the trial group and 33.3% for the control group, there was significant difference between the two groups (P=0.002). Shengyi could effectively decrease the low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) but the effect of Xuezhikang in decreasing total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-C was better than Shengyi. Though the lipid-lowering effect of Shengyi was not as good as Xuezhikang, ITI reflected the obvious advantage of Shengyi in improving the whole body balance of blood circulation which

  9. Genetic Polymorphisms of Transcription Factor NRF2 and of its Host Gene Sulfiredoxin (SRXN1) are Associated with Cerebrovascular Disease in a Finnish Cohort, the TAMRISK Study

    PubMed Central

    Kunnas, Tarja; Määttä, Kirsi; Nikkari, Seppo T

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of many cardiovascular disorders, such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. NRF2 is the primary transcriptional regulator of several antioxidant genes, including that of sulfiredoxin (SRXN1). The association of genotypes of NRF2 and SRXN1 with cardiovascular conditions was studied in a Finnish cohort of 336 subjects with diagnosed hypertension and 480 normotensive controls from the Tampere adult population cardiovascular risk study (TAMRISK). Samples were genotyped for four SNPs (rs1962142, rs2706110, rs6721961 and rs6706649) in the NRF2 gene region and four SNPs (rs6053666, rs6116929, rs2008022, rs6085283) in the SRXN1 gene region using Competitive Allele Specific PCR (KASP) technique. Cardiovascular diseases were followed up from 2005 to 2014 using the Finnish National Hospital Discharge Registry (HILMO). Four out of eight studied polymorphisms: rs6721961, rs1962142, rs2706110 of NRF2, and rs6053666 of SRXN1 were associated with cerebrovascular disease. NRF2 polymorphism rs6721961 showed association with hypertension. NRF2 and SRXN1 polymorphisms, previously thought to be associated with human disease, appear to be associated particularly with cerebrovascular disease. PMID:27226772

  10. Industrial accident compensation insurance benefits on cerebrovascular and heart disease in Korea.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong Su; Choi, Jae Wook; Chang, Soung Hoon; Lee, Kun Sei

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the importance of work-related cerebrovascular and heart disease from the viewpoint of expenses. Using the insurance benefit paid for the 4,300 cases, this study estimated the burden of insurance benefits spent on work-related cerebrovascular and heart disease. The number of cases with work-related cerebrovascular and heart disease per 100,000 insured workers were 3.36 in 1995; they were increased to 13.16 in 2000. By the days of occurrence, the estimated number of cases were 1,336 in 2001 (95% CI: 1,211-1,460 cases) and 1,769 in 2005 (CI: 1,610-1,931 cases). The estimated average insurance benefits paid per person with work-related cerebrovascular and heart disease was 75-19 million won for medical care benefit and 56 million won for other benefits except medical care. By considering the increase in insurance payment and average pay, the predicted insurance benefits for work-related cerebrovascular and heart disease was 107.9 billion won for the 2001 cohort and 192.4 billion won for the 2005 cohort. From an economic perspective, the results will be used as important evidence for the prevention and management of work-related cerebrovascular and heart disease. PMID:12923322

  11. The Architecture of an Automatic eHealth Platform With Mobile Client for Cerebrovascular Disease Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingce; Bie, Rongfang; Wu, Zhongke; Zhou, Mingquan; Cao, Rongfei; Xie, Lizhi; Zhang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, cerebrovascular disease has been the leading cause of death and adult disability in the world. This study describes an efficient approach to detect cerebrovascular disease. Objective In order to improve cerebrovascular treatment, prevention, and care, an automatic cerebrovascular disease detection eHealth platform is designed and studied. Methods We designed an automatic eHealth platform for cerebrovascular disease detection with a four-level architecture: object control layer, data transmission layer, service supporting layer, and application service layer. The platform has eight main functions: cerebrovascular database management, preprocessing of cerebral image data, image viewing and adjustment model, image cropping compression and measurement, cerebrovascular segmentation, 3-dimensional cerebrovascular reconstruction, cerebrovascular rendering, cerebrovascular virtual endoscope, and automatic detection. Several key technologies were employed for the implementation of the platform. The anisotropic diffusion model was used to reduce the noise. Statistics segmentation with Gaussian-Markov random field model (G-MRF) and Stochastic Estimation Maximization (SEM) parameter estimation method were used to realize the cerebrovascular segmentation. Ball B-Spline curve was proposed to model the cerebral blood vessels. Compute unified device architecture (CUDA) based on ray-casting volume rendering presented by curvature enhancement and boundary enhancement were used to realize the volume rendering model. We implemented the platform with a network client and mobile phone client to fit different users. Results The implemented platform is running on a common personal computer. Experiments on 32 patients’ brain computed tomography data or brain magnetic resonance imaging data stored in the system verified the feasibility and validity of each model we proposed. The platform is partly used in the cranial nerve surgery of the First Hospital

  12. Brain imaging changes associated with risk factors for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease in asymptomatic patients.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Joseph I; Tang, Cheuk Y; de Haas, Hans J; Changchien, Lisa; Goliasch, Georg; Dabas, Puneet; Wang, Victoria; Fayad, Zahi A; Fuster, Valentin; Narula, Jagat

    2014-10-01

    Reviews of imaging studies assessing the brain effects of vascular risk factors typically include a substantial number of studies with subjects with a history of symptomatic cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease and/or events, limiting our ability to disentangle the primary brain effects of vascular risk factors from those of resulting brain and cardiac damage. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review of brain changes from imaging studies in patients with vascular risk factors but without clinically manifest cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease or events. The 77 studies included in this review demonstrate that in persons without symptomatic cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, or peripheral vascular disease, the vascular risk factors of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, hyperlipidemia, and smoking are all independently associated with brain imaging changes before the clinical manifestation of cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease. We conclude that the identification of brain changes associated with vascular risk factors, before the manifestation of clinically significant cerebrovascular damage, presents a window of opportunity wherein adequate treatment of these modifiable vascular risk factors may prevent the development of irreversible deleterious brain changes and potentially alter patients' clinical course. PMID:25323165

  13. Contributing Mechanisms of Aortic Atheroma in Ischemic Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qi; Ma, Xin

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the correlation between aortic atheroma (AA) and the occurrence and recurrence of ischemic cerebrovascular disease (ICVD) has attracted much attention, but the contributory mechanisms remain controversial. This review analyzes related research on the roles of AA in ICVD, and demonstrates the correlation between the formation and development of AA and abnormal metabolism, inflammation, hemodynamic changes, and other contributory factors. The presence of complex aortic plaque (CAP) in the ascending aorta and aortic arch increases the risk of cerebral embolism and degree of injury, while the association between CAP in the descending aorta and cerebral embolism remains ambiguous. AA also functions as an indicator of atherosclerosis burden as well as hypercoagulability, which may further increase the risk of ICVD. Further study on the relationship of AA to ICVD will improve diagnosis and treatment in clinical practice. PMID:26522269

  14. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cerebrovascular disease: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Lahousse, Lies; Tiemeier, Henning; Ikram, M Arfan; Brusselle, Guy G

    2015-11-01

    Along with the aging population, the public health burden of cerebrovascular disease is increasing. Cerebral small vessel disease and accumulation of brain pathology associate with cognitive decline and can lead to clinical outcomes, such as stroke and dementia. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a common respiratory disease among elderly. The quality of life and prognosis of patients with COPD is greatly determined by the presence of comorbidities including stroke and cognitive impairment. Despite the clinical relevance of cerebral small vessel disease, stroke and (vascular) cognitive impairment in patients with COPD, literature is scarce and underlying mechanisms are unknown. The aim of the present review is therefore to summarize current scientific knowledge, to provide a better understanding of the interplay between COPD and the aging brain and to define remaining knowledge gaps. This narrative review article 1) overviews the epidemiology of cerebral small vessel disease, stroke and cognitive impairment in patients with COPD; 2) discusses potential underlying mechanisms including aging, smoking, systemic inflammation, vasculopathy, hypoxia and genetic susceptibility; and 3) highlights areas requiring further research. PMID:26342840

  15. Digital subtraction angiography in pediatric cerebrovascular occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Faerber, E.N.; Griska, L.A.B.; Swartz, J.D.; Capitanio, M.A.; Popky, G.L.

    1984-08-01

    While conventional angiography has been used to demonstrate cerebrovascular occlusive disease in the past, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is capable of showing progressive vascular involvement with ease, simplicity, and extremely low morbidity, making it particularly well suited for children and outpatients either alone or coordinated with computed tomography. The authors discuss the usefulness and advantages of DSA as demonstrated in 7 infants and children with hemiplegia, 4 of whom had sickle-cell disease.

  16. Physical exercise-induced protection on ischemic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Li, Mei; Dong, Fang; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise is any bodily activity to enhance or maintain physical fitness and overall health and wellness. A series of associated studies have demonstrated that physical exercise could alleviate the infarct volume, increase the collateral circulation, promote endothelial progenitor cells, improve cerebral blood flow after cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. In this review, we summed up the protective effects of physical exercise on cerebral blood flow (CBF), vascular endothelium, vascular vasodilation, endothelial progenitor cells and collateral circulation. An awareness of the exercise intervention benefits for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases may encourage more patients with cerebral infarction and myocardial infarction and people with high risk factors to accept exercise interventions for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. PMID:26884896

  17. Long-Term Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Mortality Due to Cardiovascular Disease and Cerebrovascular Disease in Shenyang, China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baijun; Zhang, Liwen; Chen, Xi; Ma, Nannan; Yu, Fei; Guo, Huimin; Huang, Hui; Lee, Yungling Leo; Tang, Naijun; Chen, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between ambient air pollution exposure and mortality of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases in human is controversial, and there is little information about how exposures to ambient air pollution contribution to the mortality of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases among Chinese. The aim of the present study was to examine whether exposure to ambient-air pollution increases the risk for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a retrospective cohort study among humans to examine the association between compound-air pollutants [particulate matter <10 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2)] and mortality in Shenyang, China, using 12 years of data (1998–2009). Also, stratified analysis by sex, age, education, and income was conducted for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular mortality. The results showed that an increase of 10 µg/m3 in a year average concentration of PM10 corresponds to 55% increase in the risk of a death cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio [HR], 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.51 to 1.60) and 49% increase in cerebrovascular disease (HR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.45 to 1.53), respectively. The corresponding figures of adjusted HR (95%CI) for a 10 µg/m3 increase in NO2 was 2.46 (2.31 to 2.63) for cardiovascular mortality and 2.44 (2.27 to 2.62) for cerebrovascular mortality, respectively. The effects of air pollution were more evident in female that in male, and nonsmokers and residents with BMI<18.5 were more vulnerable to outdoor air pollution. Conclusion/Significance Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution is associated with the death of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases among Chinese populations. PMID:21695220

  18. Chronic mild cerebrovascular dysfunction as a cause for Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Humpel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive chronic disorder and is characterized by β-amyloid plaques and angiopathy, tau pathology, neuronal cell death, and inflammatory responses. The reasons for this disease are not known. This review proposes the hypothesis that a chronic mild longlasting cerebrovascular dysfunction could initiate a cascade of events leading to AD. It is suggested that (vascular) risk factors (e.g. hypercholesterolemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia) causes either damage of the cerebrovascular system including silent strokes or causes dysregulation of beta-amyloid clearance at the blood-brain barrier resulting in increased brain beta-amyloid. A cascade of subsequent downstream events may lead to disturbed metabolic changes, and neuroinflammation and tau pathology. The role of NGF on the cell death of cholinergic neurons is discussed. Additional risk factors (e.g. acidosis, metals) contribute to plaque development. PMID:21112383

  19. Depression as a Risk Factor for the Initial Presentation of Twelve Cardiac, Cerebrovascular, and Peripheral Arterial Diseases: Data Linkage Study of 1.9 Million Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    George, Julie; Walters, Kate; Osborn, David P.; Batty, G. David; Stogiannis, Dimitris; Rapsomaniki, Eleni; Pujades-Rodriguez, Mar; Denaxas, Spiros; Udumyan, Ruzan; Kivimaki, Mika; Hemingway, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is associated with coronary heart disease and stroke, but associations with a range of pathologically diverse cardiovascular diseases are not well understood. We examine the risk of 12 cardiovascular diseases according to depression status (history or new onset). Methods Cohort study of 1,937,360 adult men and women, free from cardiovascular disease at baseline, using linked UK electronic health records between 1997 and 2010. The exposures were new-onset depression (a new GP diagnosis of depression and/or prescription for antidepressants during a one-year baseline), and history of GP-diagnosed depression before baseline. The primary endpoint was initial presentation of 12 cardiovascular diseases after baseline. We used disease-specific Cox proportional hazards models with multiple imputation adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors (age, sex, socioeconomic status, smoking, blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol). Results Over a median [IQR] 6.9 [2.1–10.5] years of follow-up, 18.9% had a history of depression and 94,432 incident cardiovascular events occurred. After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, history of depression was associated with: stable angina (Hazard Ratio = 1.38, 95%CI 1.32–1.45), unstable angina (1.70, 1.60–1.82), myocardial infarction (1.21, 1.16–1.27), unheralded coronary death (1.23, 1.14–1.32), heart failure (1.18, 1.13–1.24), cardiac arrest (1.14, 1.03–1.26), transient ischemic attack (1.31, 1.25–1.38), ischemic stroke (1.26, 1.18–1.34), subarachnoid haemorrhage (1.17, 1.01–1.35), intracerebral haemorrhage (1.30, 1.17–1.45), peripheral arterial disease (1.24, 1.18–1.30), and abdominal aortic aneurysm (1.12,1.01–1.24). New onset depression developed in 2.9% of people, among whom 63,761 cardiovascular events occurred. New onset depression was similarly associated with each of the 12 diseases, with no evidence of stronger associations compared to history of depression. The strength of

  20. Correlation of cerebrovascular disorder and anxiety: The Kecskemet study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipos, Kornel; Bodo, Michael; Szalay, Piroska; Szucs, Attila

    2010-04-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that anxiety is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, specifically stroke, we simultaneously measured anxiety and cerebral vascular alternation, using a computer-based system, "Cerberus." Sixty nine psychiatric patients (including an alcoholic subgroup) were selected as subjects for measurements conducted in Kecskemet, Hungary. The five-item short form of anxiety test (STAI) was administered twice during the same session. Between each test, brain pulse waves were recorded by rheoencephalogram (REG). A REG peak time above 180 milliseconds was considered a cerebrovascular alteration (modified after Jenkner). Data were sorted into two groups: low anxiety (N=10) and high anxiety (N=10). Significant differences were found between cardiovascular risk factors (p< 0.001), REG peak time (p<0.043), and heart rate (p< 0.045). Six subjects showed cerebrovascular alteration in the high anxiety group, and two in the low anxiety group. For the two anxiety groups, there were no significant differences in body mass index, cardiovascular sympathetic-parasympathetic balance, age and symptoms of transient ischemic attack. The correlation of REG and age was significantly different only for the alcoholic subgroup (Szalay et al, 2007). These data support the hypothesis that a correlation exists between cerebrovascular disorder and anxiety in the studied population.

  1. Cerebrovascular disease in children with HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Charles K; Eley, Brian; Wieselthaler, Nicky; Ndondo, Alvin; Wilmshurst, Jo M

    2016-05-01

    An estimated 3.2 million children worldwide have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in prolonged survival, leading to an increase in complications previously recognized in adults. Children with HIV infection have increased risk of cerebrovascular disease from multiple aetiologies including HIV-associated vasculopathy, opportunistic vasculitis, cardioembolism or coagulopathy, all of which may be secondary to the infection. Prevalence of cerebrovascular disease in HIV-infected children is underestimated because of limited neuroimaging in low and middle income countries, silent events without overt motor manifestations, and mislabeling as HIV encephalopathy for non-motor manifestations such as behavioural and cognitive difficulties. No management guidelines for cerebrovascular disease in HIV-infected children exist but common practices target risk factors for stroke in low and middle income countries. Where capacity permits, screening for opportunistic infections, vasculitis, coagulopathy and cardioembolism is important. Optimising virological suppression, correction of anaemia, control of seizures and aspirin prophylaxis are management priorities. Neurosurgical interventions may have a role. PMID:26890389

  2. Cerebrovascular diseases and depression: epidemiology, mechanisms and treatment.

    PubMed

    Göthe, F; Enache, D; Wahlund, L O; Winblad, B; Crisby, M; Lökk, J; Aarsland, D

    2012-09-01

    Both cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and depression are common conditions in the elderly, and there is emerging evidence of a bi-directional relationship: 1) depression can cause CVD and stroke, transient ischemic attack; and 2) subcortical CVD are associated with increased risk for depression. The frequency of poststroke depression is highest during the first month after the stroke, but remains high even after several years. Depression is associated with poorer functional prognosis and higher mortality after stroke. There is good evidence that severity of functional impairment, high neuroticism, low social support as well as genetic factors are associated with an increased risk for post-stroke depression. Deep white matter lesions are the most consistent imaging correlate of depression. Potential mechanisms mediating the association between depression and CVD are neuroinflammation and HPA-axis activation, fronto-subcortical circuit lesions, and serotonergic dysfunction. Antidepressants have demonstrated effect on poststroke depression in meta-analyses, and such drugs as well as vitamin B can reduce the incidence of depression in stroke survivors. In addition, serotonergic drugs may strengthen poststroke motor and cognitive recovery, potentially through restorative mechanisms. Psychotherapeutic strategies such as problem-solving therapy seem to be effective. There is emerging evidence that treatment of cardiovascular disease and risk-factors can reduce the risk for late-life depression, but more studies are needed to test this hypothesis. PMID:22801433

  3. Relationship between retinal vascular occlusions and incident cerebrovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Wengen; Wang, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies investigating the role of retinal vascular occlusions, on cerebrovascular diseases (CVD) have been reported, but the results are still inconsistent. We therefore sought to evaluate the relationship between retinal vascular occlusions and CVD. We systematically searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and ScienceDirect databases through January 31, 2016 for studies evaluating the effect of retinal vascular occlusions on the risk of CVD. Data were abstracted using predefined criteria, and then pooled by RevMan 5.3 software. A total of 9 retrospective studies were included in this meta-analysis. When compared with individuals without retinal vascular occlusions, both individuals with retinal artery occlusion (RAO) (odds ratio [OR] = 2.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21–3.34; P = 0.005) and individuals with retinal vein occlusion (RVO) (OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.24–1.50; P < 0.00001) had higher risks of developing CVD. Additionally, both individuals with central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) (OR = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.12–3.56; P = 0.02) and branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO) (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.03–1.48; P = 0.04) were significantly associated with increased risk of CVD. Published literatures support both RVO and RAO are associated with increased risks of CVD. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27368050

  4. Occupational exposure to particulate air pollution and mortality due to ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Torén, Kjell; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Nilsson, Tohr; Järvholm, Bengt

    2007-01-01

    Objectives A growing number of epidemiological studies are showing that ambient exposure to particulate matter air pollution is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, whether occupational exposure increases this risk is not clear. The aim of the present study was to examine whether occupational exposure to particulate air pollution increases the risk for ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Methods The study population was a cohort of 176 309 occupationally exposed Swedish male construction workers and 71 778 unexposed male construction workers. The definition of exposure to inorganic dust (asbestos, man‐made mineral fibres, dust from cement, concrete and quartz), wood dust, fumes (metal fumes, asphalt fumes and diesel exhaust) and gases and irritants (organic solvents and reactive chemicals) was based on a job‐exposure matrix with focus on exposure in the mid‐1970s. The cohort was followed from 1971 to 2002 with regard to mortality to ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Relative risks (RR) were obtained by the person‐years method and from Poisson regression models adjusting for baseline values of blood pressure, body mass index, age and smoking habits. Results Any occupational particulate air pollution was associated with an increased risk for ischemic heart disease (RR 1.13, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.19), but there was no increased risk for cerebrovascular disease (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.07). There was an increased risk for ischaemic heart disease and exposure to inorganic dust (RR 1.07, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.12) and exposure to fumes (RR 1.05, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.10), especially diesel exhaust (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.24). There was no significantly increased risk for cerebrovascular disease and exposure to inorganic dust, fumes or wood dust. Conclusions Occupational exposure to particulate air pollution, especially diesel exhaust, among construction workers increases the risk for ischaemic heart disease. PMID

  5. [Treatment and rehabilitation of dysphagia following cerebrovascular disease].

    PubMed

    López-Liria, Remedios; Fernández-Alonso, Melodie; Vega-Ramírez, Francisco A; Salido-Campos, M Ángeles; Padilla-Góngora, David

    2014-03-16

    INTRODUCTION. Bronchopneumonia is a frequent complication in the first days after a cerebrovascular disease and is linked with a higher rate of mortality. It occurs in patients with an altered level of consciousness or tussigenic reflex, and could be prevented with an early dysphagia rehabilitation programme. AIMS. To review the scientific literature on the treatment and rehabilitation of patients with dysphagia after suffering a stroke, published between 2002 and 2012. DEVELOPMENT. A search conducted in the PubMed, Cochrane, PEDro, CINAHL and ENFISPO databases yielded 15 papers that fulfilled eligibility criteria and the initial aims of the study, providing information about 3,212 patients. The different protocols and techniques for re-education in dysphagia are described and include compensatory strategies, orofacial regulation therapy, music therapy, sensory stimulation, lip muscle, tongue, pharynx, larynx and respiratory tract training, Mendelsohn manoeuvre, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS. The studies examined in this research claim that the treatment of dysphagia following a stroke can improve the function of deglutition (coordination, speed, volume), quality of life and people's social relationships. Further work needs to be carried out to establish or define what kind of therapies, techniques, exercises or manoeuvres are the most effective in dysphagia. Generally agreed treatment or rehabilitation protocols also need to be drawn up within units that address stroke in an integrated manner. PMID:24610693

  6. Long-term effects of pioglitazone on first attack of ischemic cerebrovascular disease in older people with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Hsien-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Long-term studies demonstrating the effect of pioglitazone use on primary prevention of ischemic cerebrovascular disease in older people with type 2 diabetes mellitus are lacking. This study investigated the relationship between pioglitazone use and first attack of ischemic cerebrovascular disease in Taiwan. We conducted a case-control study using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 2359 type 2 diabetic subjects aged ≥65 years with newly diagnosed ischemic cerebrovascular disease from 2005 to 2011 as the case group and 4592 sex- and age-matched, randomly selected type 2 diabetic subjects aged ≥65 years without ischemic cerebrovascular disease as the control group. The odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) of ischemic cerebrovascular disease associated with pioglitazone use was measured by the multivariable unconditional logistic regression model. After adjustment for confounding factors, the multivariable logistic regression analysis disclosed that the adjusted ORs of first attack of ischemic cerebrovascular disease associated with cumulative duration of using pioglitazone were 3.34 for <1 year (95% CI 2.59–4.31), 2.53 for 1 to 2 years (95% CI 1.56–4.10), 2.20 for 2 to 3 years (95% CI 1.05–4.64), and 1.09 for ≥3 years (95% CI 0.55–2.15), respectively. Our findings suggest that pioglitazone use does not have a protective effect on primary prevention for ischemic cerebrovascular disease among older people with type 2 diabetes mellitus during the first 3 years of use. Whether using pioglitazone for >3 years would have primary prevention for ischemic cerebrovascular disease needs a long-term research to prove. PMID:27495077

  7. Morphometric study of cervical anterior horn cells and pyramidal tracts in medulla oblongata and the spinal cord in patients with cerebrovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y; Wada, Y; Otomo, E; Tsukagoshi, H

    1991-04-01

    To clarify the effect of damage to the upper motor neurons on lower motor neurons, quantitative studies were made regarding the cross-sectional area and the number of the individual anterior horn cells in the lateral nuclear cell groups of the 5th segment of the cervical spinal cord (C5), and regarding the cross-sectional areas of the pyramidal tract in the medulla, and in the spinal cord at the C5 and L2 levels. The subjects included 45 patients with cerebrovascular disease (CVD), and 50 age-matched controls without neurological disease. The medullary pyramid (MP) and the ventral funiculus (VF), ipsilateral to the hemispheric lesion, were compared with the MP and VF of the other, unaffected, side. The ventro-lateral funiculus (VLF), anterior horn (AH) and C5 anterior horn cell (AHC), contralateral to the lesion, were also compared with the VLF, AH, and AHC of the other, unaffected, side. The AHC area (mean cross-sectional area of anterior horn cells) and the MP area, VF area, VLF area, AH area (mean cross-sectional areas of MP, VF, VLF and AH) associated with the hemispheric lesional side were significantly decreased, compared with those of the unaffected sides and the controls. However, there was no significant difference in AHC number between the affected and unaffected sides in patients with CVD, nor between the affected side and the controls. In order to examine the relationship between a decrease in AHC area and degree of paralysis, CVD patients were divided into two groups according to degree of muscle strength: the severe and mild paralysis groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2072114

  8. Imaging of cerebrovascular pathology in animal models of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Klohs, Jan; Rudin, Markus; Shimshek, Derya R.; Beckmann, Nicolau

    2014-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular pathology may interact with neurodegeneration and thus aggravate cognitive decline. As the relationship between these two processes is poorly understood, research has been increasingly focused on understanding the link between cerebrovascular alterations and AD. This has at last been spurred by the engineering of transgenic animals, which display pathological features of AD and develop cerebral amyloid angiopathy to various degrees. Transgenic models are versatile for investigating the role of amyloid deposition and vascular dysfunction, and for evaluating novel therapeutic concepts. In addition, research has benefited from the development of novel imaging techniques, which are capable of characterizing vascular pathology in vivo. They provide vascular structural read-outs and have the ability to assess the functional consequences of vascular dysfunction as well as to visualize and monitor the molecular processes underlying these pathological alterations. This article focusses on recent in vivo small animal imaging studies addressing vascular aspects related to AD. With the technical advances of imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance, nuclear and microscopic imaging, molecular, functional and structural information related to vascular pathology can now be visualized in vivo in small rodents. Imaging vascular and parenchymal amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition as well as Aβ transport pathways have been shown to be useful to characterize their dynamics and to elucidate their role in the development of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and AD. Structural and functional imaging read-outs have been employed to describe the deleterious affects of Aβ on vessel morphology, hemodynamics and vascular integrity. More recent imaging studies have also addressed how inflammatory processes partake in the pathogenesis of the disease. Moreover, imaging can be pivotal in the search for novel therapies targeting the vasculature. PMID:24659966

  9. Case-Control Study of Platelet Glycoprotein Receptor Ib and IIb/IIIa Expression in Patients with Acute and Chronic Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Peter; Drechsler, Christiane; Gunreben, Ignaz; Heuschmann, Peter Ulrich; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Animal models have been instrumental in defining thrombus formation, including the role of platelet surface glycoprotein (GP) receptors, in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). However, the involvement of GP receptors in human ischemic stroke pathophysiology and their utility as biomarkers for ischemic stroke risk and severity requires elucidation. Aims To determine whether platelet GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa receptors are differentially expressed in patients with AIS and chronic cerebrovascular disease (CCD) compared with healthy volunteers (HV) and to identify predictors of GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa expression. Methods This was a case—control study of 116 patients with AIS or transient ischemic attack (TIA), 117 patients with CCD, and 104 HV who were enrolled at our University hospital from 2010 to 2013. Blood sampling was performed once in the CCD and HV groups, and at several time points in patients with AIS or TIA. Linear regression and analysis of variance were used to analyze correlations between platelet GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa receptor numbers and demographic and clinical parameters. Results GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa receptor numbers did not significantly differ between the AIS, CCD, and HV groups. GPIb receptor expression level correlated significantly with the magnitude of GPIIb/IIIa receptor expression and the neutrophil count. In contrast, GPIIb/IIIa receptor numbers were not associated with peripheral immune-cell sub-population counts. C-reactive protein was an independent predictor of GPIIb/IIIa (not GPIb) receptor numbers. Conclusions Platelet GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa receptor numbers did not distinguish between patient or control groups in this study, negating their potential use as a biomarker for predicting stroke risk. PMID:25748430

  10. Multimodal nanoprobes to target cerebrovascular amyloid in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Jaruszewski, Kristen M; Curran, Geoffry L; Swaminathan, Suresh K; Rosenberg, Jens T; Grant, Samuel C; Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Lowe, Val J; Poduslo, Joseph F; Kandimalla, Karunya K

    2014-02-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) results from the accumulation of Aβ proteins primarily within the media and adventitia of small arteries and capillaries of the cortex and leptomeninges. CAA affects a majority of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and is associated with a rapid decline in cognitive reserve. Unfortunately, there is no pre-mortem diagnosis available for CAA. Furthermore, treatment options are few and relatively ineffective. To combat this issue, we have designed nanovehicles (nanoparticles-IgG4.1) capable of targeting cerebrovascular amyloid (CVA) and serving as early diagnostic and therapeutic agents. These nanovehicles were loaded with Gadolinium (Gd) based (Magnevist(®)) magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) agents, such as (125)I. In addition, the nanovehicles carry either anti-inflammatory and anti-amyloidogenic agents such as curcumin or immunosuppressants such as dexamethasone, which were previously shown to reduce cerebrovascular inflammation. Owing to the anti-amyloid antibody (IgG4.1) grafted on the surface, the nanovehicles are capable of specifically targeting CVA deposits. The nanovehicles effectively marginate from the blood flow to the vascular wall as determined by using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technology. They demonstrate excellent distribution to the brain vasculature and target CVA, thus providing MRI and SPECT contrast specific to the CVA in the brain. In addition, they also display the potential to carry therapeutic agents to reduce cerebrovascular inflammation associated with CAA, which is believed to trigger hemorrhage in CAA patients. PMID:24331706

  11. Dietary patterns and cardio-cerebrovascular disease in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Honglin; Qu, Meng; Yang, Peirong; Yang, Biao

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Dietary pattern and its association with cardio-cerebrovascular disease have not been studied in Baoji city by now. This study was aimed to identify the dietary patterns among Chinese adults in Baoji, and explore the association between these dietary patterns and cardio-cerebrovascular disease. SUBJECTS/METHODS A total of 4,968 participants were included in this study at 12 counties. With multistage stratified random sampling and semi quantitative food frequency questionnaire, the prevalence of cardio-cerebrovascular disease and dietary intake were investigated in 2013. We used factor analysis to establish dietary patterns. RESULTS A total of 4,968 participants over 15 years old were included in this study. Five dietary patterns were identified in Baoji: protein, balanced, beans, prudent, and traditional patterns. The protein dietary pattern mainly included animal and plant proteins and was negatively associated with hypertension as well as stroke. The balanced pattern included carbohydrates, protein, and fat and was negatively associated with hypertension as well as stroke. The beans pattern was mainly beans and beans products and was negatively associated with hypertension. The prudent pattern only included staple foods and pickled vegetables and was positively associated with hypertension as well as coronary heart disease. The traditional pattern was representative of local Baoji traditional recipes and was positively associated with hypertension. CONCLUSIONS The protein, balanced, and beans dietary patterns showed many protective effects on cardio-cerebrovascular disease. Based on these results, Baoji city residents should be encouraged to choose protein, balanced, and beans dietary patterns and abandon prudent and traditional patterns to prevent incidence of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and stroke. PMID:26060544

  12. Thirty-Year Trends in Mortality from Cerebrovascular Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Won; Lee, Hye Sun; Suh, Il

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Cerebrovascular disease is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Korea. Understanding of cerebrovascular disease mortality trends is important to reduce the health burden from cerebrovascular diseases. We examined the changing pattern of mortality related to cerebrovascular disease in Korea over 30 years from 1983 to 2012. Subjects and Methods Numbers of deaths from cerebrovascular disease, hemorrhagic stroke, and cerebral infarction were obtained from the national Cause of Death Statistics. Crude and age-adjusted mortality rates were calculated for men and women for each year. Penalized B-spline methods, which reduce bias and variability in curve fitting, were used to identify the trends of 30-year mortality and identify the year of highest mortality. Results During the 30 years, cerebrovascular disease mortality has markedly declined. The age-adjusted cerebrovascular disease mortality rate has decreased by 78% in men and by 68% in women. In the case of hemorrhagic stroke, crude mortality peaked in 2001 but age-adjusted mortality peaked in 1994. Between 1994 and 2012, age-adjusted mortality from hemorrhagic stroke has decreased by 68% in men and 59% in women. In the case of cerebral infarction, crude and age-adjusted mortality rates steeply increased until 2004 and 2003, respectively, and both rates decreased rapidly thereafter. Conclusion Cerebrovascular disease mortality rate has significantly decreased over the last 30 years in Korea, but remains a health burden. The prevalence of major cardiovascular risk factors are still highly prevalent in Korea. PMID:27482259

  13. [Recent progress in intravascular neurosurgery for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Hyodo, A; Harakuni, T; Shingaki, T; Tsurushima, H; Saito, A; Yoshii, Y

    2000-12-01

    With the recent advances in the devices and techniques in intravascular neurosurgery such as microcatheters or a digital subtraction angiography, intravascular neurosurgery plays an important role for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease. We describe here, a recent progress in intravascular neurosurgery for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease. As a treatment of cerebrovascular disease, we discuss the treatment of cerebral aneurysm using Guglielmi detachable coils (GDC), and the treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular disease such as the thrombolytic therapy for the acute embolic occlusion of the cerebral artery, and a percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) or a stenting for the stenotic lesion of the cerebral arteries. Embolization of the cerebral aneurysm using GDC is less invasive method compare to the standard neurosurgical clipping of aneurysm. So, recently it becomes one of standard methods of the treatment of cerebral aneurysm. Thrombolytic therapy, PTA and stenting also become an important treatment for the ischemic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:11464467

  14. LAMBL’S EXCRESCENCES: ASSOCIATION WITH CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASE AND PATHOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Carlos A.; Schevchuck, Oleksandr; Tolstrup, Kirsten; Roldan, Paola C.; Macias, Leonardo; Qualls, Clifford R.; Greene, Ernest R.; Hayek, Reyaad; Charlton, Gerald; Sibbitt, Wilmer L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lambl’s excrescences (LEx) are detected by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and are characterized as thin, elongated, and hypermobile structures located at the leaflets’ coaptation point of the heart valves. The association of LEx with cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is still undefined and yet patients with LEx and suspected CVD receive unproven effective antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy or even undergo valve surgery. Also, the association of LEx with aging and atherogenic, inflammatory, or thrombogenic parameters has not been reported. Methods 77 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (71 women, age 37±12 years) and 26 age-and-sex matched healthy controls (22 women, age 34±11 years) prospectively underwent routine history and physical exam, transcranial Doppler, brain MRI, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), carotid duplex, and clinical and laboratory evaluations of atherogenesis, inflammation, platelet activity, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. Subjects without stroke/TIA on enrollment (with and without LEx) had a median follow-up of 57 months. Results On enrollment, 33 (43%) of 77 patients had CVD manifested as acute stroke/TIA (23 patients), cerebromicroembolism by transcranial Doppler (17 patients), or cerebral infarcts by MRI (14 patients). Mitral or aortic valve LEx were equally frequent in healthy controls (46%) as in patients with and without any CVD (39% and 43%), stroke/TIA (35% and 43%), cerebromicroembolism (41% and 42%), or cerebral infarcts (36% and 43%) (all p≥0.72). Also, other mechanisms for CVD other than LEx such as Libman-Sacks vegetations, patent foramen ovale or interatrial septal aneurysm, aortic or carotid atherosclerosis, or thrombogenesis were found in ≥94% of patients with CVD. In addition, 36 subjects with and 44 without LEx had similar low incidence of stroke/TIA [1(1.3%) and 2(2.5%), respectively, p=1.0] during follow-up. Finally, LEx were not associated with aging, atherogenic risk factors

  15. Cohort profile of the UK Biobank: diagnosis and characteristics of cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, J; Walters, M; Padmanabhan, S; Dawson, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The UK Biobank is a large-scale biomedical resource, containing sociodemographic and medical information, including data on a previous diagnosis of stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). We described these participants and their medication usage. Participants We identified participants who either self-reported or were identified from a nurse-led interview, having suffered a stroke or a TIA and compared them against participants without stroke ort TIA. We assessed their risk factor burden (sex, age, deprivation, waist to hip ratio (WHR), hypertension, smoking, alcohol intake, diabetes, physical exercise and oral contraception use (oral contraceptive pill, OCP)) and medication usage. Findings to date We studied 502 650 people (54.41% women), 6669 (1.23%) participants self-reported a stroke. The nurse-led interview identified 7669 (1.53%) people with stroke and 1781 (0.35%) with TIA. Hypertension, smoking, higher WHR, lower alcohol consumption and diabetes were all more common in people with cerebrovascular disease (p<0.0001 for each). Women with cerebrovascular disease were less likely to have taken the OCP (p=0.0002). People with cerebrovascular disease did more exercise (p=0.03). Antithrombotic medication was taken by 81% of people with stroke (both self-report and nurse-led responders) and 89% with TIA. For self-reported stroke, 63% were taking antithrombotic and cholesterol medications, 54% taking antithrombotic and antihypertensive medications and 46% taking all 3. For the nurse-led interview and TIA, these figures were 65%, 54% and 46%, and 70%, 53% and 45%, respectively. Future plans The UK Biobank provides a large, generalisable and contemporary data source in a young population. The characterisation of the UK Biobank cohort with cerebrovascular disease will form the basis for ongoing research using this data source. PMID:27006341

  16. Cerebrovascular pathology during the progression of experimental Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Patrizia; Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Neves, Ines Das; Rousset, Marie-Claude; Baranger, Kévin; Rivera, Santiago; Jeanneteau, Freddy; Claeysen, Sylvie; Marchi, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence point to a possible role of cerebrovascular dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The 5xFAD mouse model of AD expresses human amyloid precursor protein and presenilin genes with mutations found in AD patients. It remains unknown whether amyloid deposition driven by these mutations is associated with cerebrovascular changes. 5xFAD and wild type mice (2 to 12months old; M2 to M12) were used. Thinned skull in vivo 2-photon microscopy was used to determine Aβ accumulation on leptomeningeal or superficial cortical vessels over time. Parenchymal microvascular damage was assessed using FITC-microangiography. Collagen-IV and CD31 were used to stain basal lamina and endothelial cells. Methoxy-XO4, Thioflavin-S or 6E10 were used to visualize Aβ accumulation in living mice or in fixed brain tissues. Positioning of reactive IBA1 microglia and GFAP astrocytes at the vasculature was rendered using confocal microscopy. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) staining was used to visualize perivascular pericytes. In vivo 2-photon microscopy revealed Methoxy-XO4(+) amyloid perivascular deposits on leptomeningeal and penetrating cortical vessels in 5xFAD mice, typical of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Amyloid deposits were visible in vivo at M3 and aggravated over time. Progressive microvascular damage was concomitant to parenchymal Aβ plaque accumulation in 5xFAD mice. Microvascular inflammation in 5xFAD mice presented with sporadic FITC-albumin leakages at M4 becoming more prevalent at M9 and M12. 3D colocalization showed inflammatory IBA1(+) microglia proximal to microvascular FITC-albumin leaks. The number of perivascular PDGFRβ(+) pericytes was significantly decreased at M4 in the fronto-parietal cortices, with a trend decrease observed in the other structures. At M9-M12, PDGFRβ(+) pericytes displayed hypertrophic perivascular ramifications contiguous to reactive microglia. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy and

  17. The role of cerebrovascular disease when there is concomitant Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Vemuri, Prashanthi; Knopman, David S

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrovascular Pathologies (CVP) are the most common co-existent pathologies observed in conjunction with Alzheimer disease. CVP rarely exists in isolation in later life, and CVP most likely plays a supporting role, rather than a sole leading role, in the pathogenesis of dementia. Our goal is to illustrate CVP's role using neuroimaging biomarkers. First, we discuss the frequency of CVP and present data from population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. Here, we used a novel metric for identifying individuals with cerebrovascular imaging abnormalities (that we designate as "V+") and present the frequency of V-/V+ in the context of absence and presence of β-amyloid elevation (designated A-/A+). Next, we discuss the contribution of CVP to neurodegeneration and use hippocampal volume loss over time in a subset of participants categorized as A-V-, A-V+, A+V-, A+V+. Lastly, we discuss the contribution of CVP to cognitive impairment and conclude with the considerations for design of future studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26408957

  18. A Non-Invasive Method to Assess Cerebral Perfusion Pressure in Geriatric Patients with Suspected Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Nan; He, Peng; Qin, Chunchang; Yang, Deyu; Li, Zhiwei; Xie, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) can adversely impact cerebrovascular hemodynamics but cannot be practically measured in most clinical settings. Here, we aimed to establish a representative mathematical model for CPP in geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease. Methods A total of 100 patients (54 males and 46 females between 60–80 years of age) with suspected cerebrovascular disease and no obvious cerebrovascular stenosis were selected for invasive CPP monitoring via catheterization of the middle segment of the common carotid arteries and openings of the vertebral arteries bilaterally. Curves were function-fitted using MATLAB 7.0, and data was statistically processed by SPSS 20.0. Results MATLAB 7.0 constructed eighth-order Fourier functions that fit all recorded CPP curves. Since the coefficients of the 100 functions were significantly different, all functions were standardized to derive one representative function. By manipulating the heart rate and maximum/minimum CPP of the representative function, estimated CPP curves can be constructed for patients with differing heart rates, intracranial pressures (ICPs) and blood pressures. Conclusions CPP can be well-modeled through an eighth-order Fourier function that can be constructed from a patient’s brachial artery blood pressure (BABP), ICP and heart rate. This function is representative of geriatric patients with cerebrovascular disease and can be used in the future study of cerebral hemodynamics. PMID:25789855

  19. Trends in Mortality from Cerebrovascular and Hypertensive Diseases in Brazil Between 1980 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Villela, Paolo Blanco; Klein, Carlos Henrique; de Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebrovascular and hypertensive diseases are among the main causes of death worldwide. However, there are limited data about the trends of these diseases over the years. Objective To evaluate the temporal trends in mortality rates and proportional mortality from cerebrovascular and hypertensive diseases according to sex and age in Brazil between 1980 and 2012. Methods We evaluated the underlying causes of death between 1980 and 2012 in both sexes and by age groups for circulatory diseases (CD), cerebrovascular diseases (CBVD), and hypertensive diseases (HD). We also evaluated death due to all causes (AC), external causes (EC), and ill-defined causes of death (IDCD). Data on deaths and population were obtained from the Department of Information Technology of the Unified Health System (Departamento de Informática do Sistema Único de Saúde, DATASUS/MS). We estimated crude and standardized annual mortality rates per 100,000 inhabitants and percentages of proportional mortality rates. Results With the exception of EC, the mortality rates per 100,000 inhabitants of all other diseases increased with age. The proportional mortality of CD, CBVD, and HD increased up to the age range of 60-69 years in men and 70-79 years in women, and reached a plateau in both sexes after that. The standardized rates of CD and CBVD declined in both sexes. However, the HD rates showed the opposite trend and increased mildly during the study period. Conclusion Despite the decline in standardized mortality rates due to CD and CBVD, there was an increase in deaths due to HD, which could be related to factors associated with the completion of the death certificates, decline in IDCD rates, and increase in the prevalence of hypertension. PMID:27355586

  20. Reduced cerebrovascular reserve is regionally associated with cortical thickness reductions in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junseok A; Leung, Jackie; Lerch, Jason P; Kassner, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder which adversely affects cerebrovascular health. Previous studies have demonstrated regional cortical thinning in SCD. However, the reason behind regional reductions in cortical thickness remains unclear. Therefore, we aimed to explore the possible link between the state of cerebrovascular health and cortical thickness. In this study, we obtained magnetic resonance (MR) based measures of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), a measure of vascular health, and cortical thickness in SCD patients (N=60) and controls of similar age and similar gender ratio (N=27). The group comparison analysis revealed significant regionally specific reductions in CVR and cortical thickness in the SCD group compared to the controls. In addition, a regional association analysis was performed between CVR and cortical thickness in the SCD group which revealed a significant regional association in several brain regions with the highest strength of association observed in the left cuneus, right post central gyrus and the right temporal pole. The regional association analysis revealed that significant associations were found in brain regions with high metabolic activity (anterior cingulate, posterior cingulate, occipital gyrus, precuneus) thus demonstrating that these regions could be most vulnerable to structural damage under hypoxic conditions. PMID:27026656

  1. Genetic polymorphisms and cerebrovascular disease in children with sickle cell anemia from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Filho, Isaac Lima da Silva; Leite, Ana Claudia Celestino Bezerra; Moura, Patrícia Gomes; Ribeiro, Georgina Severo; Cavalcante, Andréa Cony; Azevedo, Flávia Carolina Marques de; Andrada-Serpa, Maria José de

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to examine possible genetic risk factors related to the occurrence of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in Brazilian population, the frequency of β(S)-globin gene haplotypes and co-inheritance with α-thalassemia (-α(3.7kb)) and single nucleotide polymorphism of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR-C677T), Factor V Leiden (FV-G1691A) and prothrombin (PT-G20210A) genes in children from Rio de Janeiro. Ninety four children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) were included, 24 patients with cerebrovascular involvement and 70 patients without CVD as control group. The mean age of children at the time of the cerebrovascular event was similar to the control group. The frequency of -α(3.7kb) thalassemia was similar in both groups (p=0.751). Children with Bantu/Atypical β(S)-globin gene haplotype presented 15 times more chance (OR=15.4 CI 95% 2.9-81.6) of CVD than the other β(S)-globin gene haplotypes. The C677T polymorphism of MTHFR gene was similar in both groups (p=0.085). No mutation in the FV Leiden or PT genes was found. A large study seems necessary to establish the role of these genetic polymorphisms in Brazilian miscegenated population. PMID:21755116

  2. Intermittent hypoxia training protects cerebrovascular function in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Manukhina, Eugenia B; Downey, H Fred; Shi, Xiangrong; Mallet, Robert T

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of death and disability among older adults. Modifiable vascular risk factors for AD (VRF) include obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, and metabolic syndrome. Here, interactions between cerebrovascular function and development of AD are reviewed, as are interventions to improve cerebral blood flow and reduce VRF. Atherosclerosis and small vessel cerebral disease impair metabolic regulation of cerebral blood flow and, along with microvascular rarefaction and altered trans-capillary exchange, create conditions favoring AD development. Although currently there are no definitive therapies for treatment or prevention of AD, reduction of VRFs lowers the risk for cognitive decline. There is increasing evidence that brief repeated exposures to moderate hypoxia, i.e. intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), improve cerebral vascular function and reduce VRFs including systemic hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, and mental stress. In experimental AD, IHT nearly prevented endothelial dysfunction of both cerebral and extra-cerebral blood vessels, rarefaction of the brain vascular network, and the loss of neurons in the brain cortex. Associated with these vasoprotective effects, IHT improved memory and lessened AD pathology. IHT increases endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO), thereby increasing regional cerebral blood flow and augmenting the vaso- and neuroprotective effects of endothelial NO. On the other hand, in AD excessive production of NO in microglia, astrocytes, and cortical neurons generates neurotoxic peroxynitrite. IHT enhances storage of excessive NO in the form of S-nitrosothiols and dinitrosyl iron complexes. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD, and IHT reduces oxidative stress in a number of experimental pathologies. Beneficial effects of IHT in experimental neuropathologies other than AD, including dyscirculatory encephalopathy, ischemic stroke injury, audiogenic

  3. Graves' Disease Associated with Cerebrovascular Disease and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khochtali, Ines; Hamza, Nadia; Gassab, Elyes; Baba, Asma; Kacem, Maha; Frih, Mahbouba; Mahjoub, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid disorders are commonly associated with coagulopathy. Patients with hyperthyroidism have increased risk for developing thromboembolic accidents, which are favoured by a simultaneous presence of antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome. in this paper, we describe the case of a patient with Graves' disease, who developed strokes with antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome. PMID:20862345

  4. The role of oxidative stress and NADPH oxidase in cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Chrissobolis, Sophocles; Faraci, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    The study of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress remains a very active area of biological research particularly in relation to cellular signaling and the role of ROS in disease. In the cerebral circulation, oxidative stress occurs in diverse forms of disease and with aging. Within the vessel wall, ROS produce complex structural and functional changes that have broad implications for regulation of cerebral perfusion and permeability of the blood–brain barrier. These oxidative stress-induced changes are thought to contribute to the progression of cerebrovascular disease. Here, we highlight recent findings in relation to oxidative stress in the cerebral vasculature, with an emphasis on the emerging role for NADPH oxidases as a source of ROS and the role of ROS in models of disease. PMID:18929509

  5. Association between fish consumption, long chain omega 3 fatty acids, and risk of cerebrovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Rajiv; Stevens, Sarah; Gorman, Donal; Pan, An; Warnakula, Samantha; Chowdhury, Susmita; Ward, Heather; Johnson, Laura; Crowe, Francesca; Hu, Frank B

    2012-01-01

    Objective To clarify associations of fish consumption and long chain omega 3 fatty acids with risk of cerebrovascular disease for primary and secondary prevention. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Studies published before September 2012 identified through electronic searches using Medline, Embase, BIOSIS, and Science Citation Index databases. Eligibility criteria Prospective cohort studies and randomised controlled trials reporting on associations of fish consumption and long chain omega 3 fatty acids (based on dietary self report), omega 3 fatty acids biomarkers, or supplementations with cerebrovascular disease (defined as any fatal or non-fatal ischaemic stroke, haemorrhagic stroke, cerebrovascular accident, or transient ischaemic attack). Both primary and secondary prevention studies (comprising participants with or without cardiovascular disease at baseline) were eligible. Results 26 prospective cohort studies and 12 randomised controlled trials with aggregate data on 794 000 non-overlapping people and 34 817 cerebrovascular outcomes were included. In cohort studies comparing categories of fish intake the pooled relative risk for cerebrovascular disease for 2-4 servings a week versus ≤1 servings a week was 0.94 (95% confidence intervals 0.90 to 0.98) and for ≥5 servings a week versus 1 serving a week was 0.88 (0.81 to 0.96). The relative risk for cerebrovascular disease comparing the top thirds of baseline long chain omega 3 fatty acids with the bottom thirds for circulating biomarkers was 1.04 (0.90 to 1.20) and for dietary exposures was 0.90 (0.80 to 1.01). In the randomised controlled trials the relative risk for cerebrovascular disease in the long chain omega 3 supplement compared with the control group in primary prevention trials was 0.98 (0.89 to 1.08) and in secondary prevention trials was 1.17 (0.99 to 1.38). For fish or omega 3 fatty acids the estimates for ischaemic and haemorrhagic cerebrovascular events were broadly

  6. Spatial Analysis of the Relationship between Mortality from Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease and Drinking Water Hardness

    PubMed Central

    Ferrándiz, Juan; Abellán, Juan J.; Gómez-Rubio, Virgilio; López-Quílez, Antonio; Sanmartín, Pilar; Abellán, Carlos; Martínez-Beneito, Miguel A.; Melchor, Inmaculada; Vanaclocha, Hermelinda; Zurriaga, Óscar; Ballester, Ferrán; Gil, José M.; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Ocaña, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    Previously published scientific papers have reported a negative correlation between drinking water hardness and cardiovascular mortality. Some ecologic and case–control studies suggest the protective effect of calcium and magnesium concentration in drinking water. In this article we present an analysis of this protective relationship in 538 municipalities of Comunidad Valenciana (Spain) from 1991–1998. We used the Spanish version of the Rapid Inquiry Facility (RIF) developed under the European Environment and Health Information System (EUROHEIS) research project. The strategy of analysis used in our study conforms to the exploratory nature of the RIF that is used as a tool to obtain quick and flexible insight into epidemiologic surveillance problems. This article describes the use of the RIF to explore possible associations between disease indicators and environmental factors. We used exposure analysis to assess the effect of both protective factors—calcium and magnesium—on mortality from cerebrovascular (ICD-9 430–438) and ischemic heart (ICD-9 410–414) diseases. This study provides statistical evidence of the relationship between mortality from cardiovascular diseases and hardness of drinking water. This relationship is stronger in cerebrovascular disease than in ischemic heart disease, is more pronounced for women than for men, and is more apparent with magnesium than with calcium concentration levels. Nevertheless, the protective nature of these two factors is not clearly established. Our results suggest the possibility of protectiveness but cannot be claimed as conclusive. The weak effects of these covariates make it difficult to separate them from the influence of socioeconomic and environmental factors. We have also performed disease mapping of standardized mortality ratios to detect clusters of municipalities with high risk. Further standardization by levels of calcium and magnesium in drinking water shows changes in the maps when we remove the

  7. Cerebrovascular Disease Risk in Older Head and Neck Cancer Patients After Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Grace L.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Garden, Adam S.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Weber, Randal S.; Ang, K.-Kian; Rosenthal, David I.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Cerebrovascular disease is common in head and neck cancer patients, but it is unknown whether radiotherapy increases the cerebrovascular disease risk in this population. Patients and Methods We identified 6,862 patients (age > 65 years) from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) –Medicare cohort diagnosed with nonmetastatic head and neck cancer between 1992 and 2002. Using proportional hazards regression, we compared risk of cerebrovascular events (stroke, carotid revascularization, or stroke death) after treatment with radiotherapy alone, surgery plus radiotherapy, or surgery alone. To further validate whether treatment groups had equivalent baseline risk of vascular disease, we compared the risks of developing a control diagnosis, cardiac events (myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass graft, or cardiac death). Unlike cerebrovascular risk, no difference in cardiac risk was hypothesized. Results Mean age was 76 ± 7 years. Ten-year incidence of cerebrovascular events was 34% in patients treated with radiotherapy alone compared with 25% in patients treated with surgery plus radiotherapy and 26% in patients treated with surgery alone (P < .001). After adjusting for covariates, patients treated with radiotherapy alone had increased cerebrovascular risk compared with surgery plus radiotherapy (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.42; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.77) and surgery alone (HR = 1.50; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.90). However, no difference was found for surgery plus radiotherapy versus surgery alone (P = .60). As expected, patients treated with radiotherapy alone had no increased cardiac risk compared with the other treatment groups (P = .63 and P = .81). Conclusion Definitive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, but not postoperative radiotherapy, was associated with excess cerebrovascular disease risk in older patients. PMID:18725647

  8. Microbubbles as drug delivery systems in cerebrovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Mariacarmela; Demitri, Christian; Sannino, Alessandro; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Bacigaluppi, Marco; Comi, Giancarlo; Corea, Francesco

    2009-11-01

    The field of neurovascular ultrasound is growing rapidly with new applications. While ultrasound contrast agents were initially used to overcome poor transcranial bone windows for identification of cerebral arteries, newgeneration microbubbles in combination with innovative contrast-specific ultrasound techniques now enable potential therapeutic procedures. This article will provide a review of recent and emerging developments along with patents in ultrasound technology and contrast-specific therapeutic techniques for cerebrovascular patients. PMID:19601922

  9. Anesthetic issues and perioperative blood pressure management in patients who have cerebrovascular diseases undergoing surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Jellish, W Scott

    2006-11-01

    Patients who have cerebrovascular disease and vascular insufficiency routinely have neurosurgical and nonneurosurgical procedures. Anesthetic priorities must provide a still bloodless operative field while maintaining cardiovascular stability and renal function. Patients who have symptoms or a history of cerebrovascular disease are at increased risk for stroke, cerebral hypoperfusion, and cerebral anoxia. Type of surgery and cardiovascular status are key concerns when considering neuroprotective strategies. Optimization of current condition is important for a good outcome; risks must be weighed against perceived benefits in protecting neurons. Anesthetic use and physiologic manipulations can reduce neurologic injury and assure safe and effective surgical care when cerebral hypoperfusion is a real and significant risk. PMID:16935193

  10. The Greater Sensitivity of Elderly APOE ε4 Carriers to Anticholinergic Medications Is Independent of Cerebrovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Nebes, Robert D.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Perera, Subashan; Halligan, Edythe M.; Saxton, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies found use of anticholinergic medications to be associated with greater performance decrements in older persons who carry an ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene than in those carrying only ε2 or ε3 alleles. Objectives The present study examined whether the apparently greater behavioral toxicity of anticholinergic drugs in ε4 carriers may result from an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease, which is more common in ε4 carriers. Methods Cross-sectional data were available from 240 normal elderly [pe1]community volunteers who had participated in 2 different studies of the cognitive and motor effects of normal aging. As part of these studies, information was gathered on subjects' use of anticholinergic medications (based on an inventory of medications taken within 24 hours of testing), risk of cerebrovascular disease (Framingham Stroke Risk Profile), and APOE genotype. Performance data were also available from measures of general cognitive status (Mini-Mental State Examination), executive function (Trail Making Test), mood (Geriatric Depression Scale), sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and walking speed. Logistic and linear regression models were used to examine how outcomes differed between genotypes and drug use, independent of the risk of cerebrovascular disease. Results In persons with a non-ε4 genotype, anticholinergic medication use did not significantly affect any of the behavioral measures. By contrast, among ε4 carriers, those taking anticholinergic drugs performed significantly worse than did those not taking such drugs on tests of general cognitive status, executive function, mood, and sleep. Adjusting for participants' stroke risk had a minimal effect on these results. Conclusions Anticholinergic medication use was associated with poorer performance on measures of cognition, sleep, and mood only in older persons who carried 1 or more ε4 alleles of the APOE gene; this effect did not appear to be the result

  11. Neuritic Plaques and Cerebrovascular Amyloid in Alzheimer Disease are Antigenically Related

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Caine W.; Quaranta, Vito; Glenner, George G.

    1985-12-01

    A synthetic peptide (Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser-Gly-Tyr), homologous to the amino terminus of a protein purified from cerebrovascular amyloid (β protein), induced antibodies in BALB/c mice that were used immunohistochemically to stain not only amyloid-laden cerebral vessels but neuritic plaques as well. These findings suggest that the amyloid in neuritic plaques shares antigenic determinants with β protein of cerebral vessels. Since the amino acid compositions of plaque amyloid and cerebrovascular amyloid are similar, it is likely that plaque amyloid also consists of β protein. This possibility suggests a model for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease involving β protein.

  12. [Descriptive study of cerebrovascular accidents in Douala, Cameroon].

    PubMed

    Chiasseu, Mbeumi M T; Mbahe, S

    2011-10-01

    A cerebrovascular accident or stroke is a sudden-onset cerebral deficit of vascular origin lasting more than 24 hours. These events represent the second leading cause of death in the world and take a particularly heavy toll in third world countries. The purpose of this study was to describe cerebrovascular lesions (type, location, size) as well as patient age and gender in Cameroon. Brain CT-scan and MRI findings from 50 stroke patients admitted to two health centers in Douala were reviewed. Data showed that 74% of patients were over 50 years of age, the 51-60 year group being the most affected. Patients were male in 64% of cases. Ischemic stroke accounted for 60% of cases versus 40% for hemorrhagic stroke. The most affected sites were the sylvian territory site in ischemic stroke and the temporal lobe in hemorrhagic stroke, acconting for 43.3% and 35% of cases respectively. The median size of ischemic and hemorrhagic lesions were 2.81 cm3, and 26.98 cm3 respectively. Hemorrhagic stroke and lacunar infarcts were more common in this sample. Discrepancies between results at the two hospitals may be due to the use of different imaging techniques. Indeed, MRI is known to be more sensitive than CT-scan for acute detection of stroke lesions. PMID:22235625

  13. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Pneumoconiosis Patients: A Population-based Study, 1996-2011.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Ho, Shang-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-03-01

    Pneumoconiosis is a parenchymal lung disease that develops through the inhalation of inorganic dust at work. Cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events are leading causes of mortality and adult disability worldwide. This retrospective cohort study investigated the association between pneumoconiosis, and cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events by using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan. The data analyzed in this study was retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We selected 6940 patients with pneumoconiosis from the database as our study cohort. Another 27,760 patients without pneumoconiosis were selected and matched with those with pneumoconiosis according to age and sex as the comparison cohort. We used univariate and multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analyses to determine the association between pneumoconiosis and the risk of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events after adjusting for medical comorbidities. After adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities, the patients with pneumoconiosis exhibited a significantly higher incidence of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.24) than did those without pneumoconiosis. The incidence of hemorrhagic stroke was higher, but not significant, in the pneumoconiosis patients (HR 1.20, 95% CI 0.99-1.46). No statistically significant differences were observed between the pneumoconiosis and nonpneumoconiosis groups in acute coronary syndrome (HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.95-1.26). The findings of this study reveal an association between pneumoconiosis and a higher risk of cerebrovascular events after adjustment for comorbidities. Healthcare providers should control the related risk factors for primary prevention of stroke in pneumoconiosis patients. PMID:26945404

  14. Relationship between haze and acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Jun; Cui, Meng-Meng; Fan, Da; Zhang, De-Shan; Lian, Hui-Xin; Yin, Zhao-Yin; Li, Jin

    2015-03-01

    Haze is an atmospheric phenomenon in which dry particulate pollutants obscure the sky. Haze has been associated with chronic diseases, but its relationship with acute diseases is less clear. We aimed to determine the association between haze and acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases, in order to determine the influence of haze on human health. We compared the number of cases of acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases in Beijing Emergency Center between 2006 and 2013, with haze data from Beijing Observatory. The relationship between the number of hazy days and the number of cases of the above types of diseases was analyzed using univariate analyses. Both the number of cases and the number of hazy days showed a rising trend. The average number of cases per day for all three diseases was higher on hazy days than on non-hazy days. There was a positive correlation between the number of hazy days and the number of cases, and this correlation showed a hysteretic quality. Haze has an influence on acute cardiovascular (CVDs), cerebrovascular (CBDs), and respiratory system (RSDs) diseases. Haze seems to have an additive effect, since the associations between haze and number of cases were stronger in the following month than in the preceding month. The increasing trend in the number of hazy days might worsen the problem of haze-related diseases. PMID:25292298

  15. 7-T MRI in Cerebrovascular Diseases: Challenges to Overcome and Initial Results.

    PubMed

    Harteveld, Anita A; van der Kolk, Anja G; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Luijten, Peter R; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the investigation of cerebrovascular diseases. Compared with computed tomography (CT) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA), its advantages in diagnosing cerebrovascular pathology include its superior tissue contrast, its ability to visualize blood vessels without the use of a contrast agent, and its use of magnetic fields and radiofrequency pulses instead of ionizing radiation. In recent years, ultrahigh field MRI at 7 tesla (7 T) has shown promise in the diagnosis of many cerebrovascular diseases. The increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR; 2.3x and 4.7x increase compared with 3 and 1.5 T, respectively) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at this higher field strength can be exploited to obtain a higher spatial resolution and higher lesion conspicuousness, enabling assessment of smaller brain structures and lesions. Cerebrovascular diseases can be assessed at different tissue levels; for instance, changes of the arteries feeding the brain can be visualized to determine the cause of ischemic stroke, regional changes in brain perfusion can be mapped to predict outcome after revascularization, and tissue damage, including old and recent ischemic infarcts, can be evaluated as a marker of ischemic burden. For the purpose of this review, we will discriminate 3 levels of assessment of cerebrovascular diseases using MRI: Pipes, Perfusion, and Parenchyma (3 Ps). The term Pipes refers to the brain-feeding arteries from the heart and aortic arch, upwards to the carotid arteries, vertebral arteries, circle of Willis, and smaller intracranial arterial branches. Perfusion is the amount of blood arriving at the brain tissue level, and includes the vascular reserve and perfusion territories. Parenchyma refers to the acute and chronic burden of brain tissue damage, which includes larger infarcts, smaller microinfarcts, and small vessel disease manifestations such as white matter lesions, lacunar infarcts, and microbleeds

  16. One is the Deadliest Number: The Detrimental Effects of Social Isolation on Cerebrovascular Diseases and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Friedler, Brett; Crapser, Joshua; McCullough, Louise

    2014-01-01

    The deleterious effects of chronic social isolation (SI) have been recognized for several decades. Isolation is a major source of psychosocial stress and is associated with an increased prevalence of vascular and neurological diseases. In addition, isolation exacerbates morbidity and mortality following acute injuries such as stroke or myocardial infarction. In contrast, affiliative social interactions can improve organismal function and health. The molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. Recently, results from large epidemiological trials and pre-clinical studies have revealed several potential mediators of the detrimental effects of isolation. At least three major biological systems have been implicated; the neuroendocrine (HPA) axis, the immune system, and the autonomic nervous system. This review summarizes studies examining the relationship between isolation and mortality and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying SI. Cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and neurological diseases including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke and Alzheimer’s disease are given special emphasis in the context of SI. Sex differences are highlighted and studies are separated into clinical and basic science for clarity. PMID:25537401

  17. Controlled study on the effect of pentoxifylline and an ergot alkaloid derivative on regional cerebral blood flow in patients with chronic cerebrovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, A.; Tsuda, Y.

    1988-05-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 90 patients with CBF decreased due to vascular diseases was studied by using the xenon 133 inhalation technique and a 32-detector setup. Whereas 30 patients received their standard basic therapy only and were regarded as controls, 30 others received 3 x 2 mg/day of an ergot alkaloid (co-dergocrine mesylate), and 30 others received 3 x 400 mg pentoxifylline (slow-release formulation)/day orally. Therapy was performed for eight weeks and CBF measured before start of treatment, after a four-week treatment period, and at the end of the study. CBF did not change significantly in the control group; both the pentoxifylline and the ergot alkaloid group presented with a significant increase in the CBF. This positive effect was significantly more pronounced in the pentoxifylline group and affected more ischemic than other brain tissues. In addition, symptoms like sleep disturbances, vertigo, and tinnitus improved significantly during the pentoxifylline observation period.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity in cerebral small vessel disease: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Blair, Gordon W; Doubal, Fergus N; Thrippleton, Michael J; Marshall, Ian; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) pathophysiology is poorly understood. Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) impairment may play a role, but evidence to date is mainly indirect. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows investigation of CVR directly in the tissues affected by SVD. We systematically reviewed the use of MRI to measure CVR in subjects with SVD. Five studies (total n = 155 SVD subjects, 84 controls) provided relevant data. The studies included different types of patients. Each study used blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) MRI to assess CVR but a different vasoactive stimulus and method of calculating CVR. CVR decreased with increasing white matter hyperintensities in two studies (n = 17, 11%) and in the presence of microbleeds in another. Three studies (n = 138, 89%) found no association of CVR with white matter hyperintensities. No studies provided tissue-specific CVR values. CVR decreased with age in three studies, and with female gender and increasing diastolic blood pressure in one study. Safety and tolerability data were limited. Larger studies using CVR appear to be feasible and are needed, preferably with more standardized methods, to determine if specific clinical or radiological features of SVD are more or less associated with impaired CVR. PMID:26884471

  19. Homocysteine Induced Cerebrovascular Dysfunction: A Link to Alzheimer’s Disease Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, P.K; Vacek, J.C; Kalani, A; Tyagi, N

    2015-01-01

    A high serum level of homocysteine, known as hyperhomocystenemia (HHcy) is associated with vascular dysfunction such as altered angiogenesis and increased membrane permeability. Epidemiological studies have found associations between HHcy and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression that eventually leads to vascular dementia (VaD). VaD is the second most common cause of dementia in people older than 65, the first being AD. VaD affects the quality of life for those suffering by drastically decreasing their cognitive function. VaD, a cerebrovascular disease, generally occurs due to cerebral ischemic events from either decreased perfusion or hemorrhagic lesions. HHcy is associated with the hallmarks of dementia such as tau phosphorylation, Aβ aggregation, neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Previous reports also suggest HHcy may promote AD like pathology by more than one mechanism, including cerebral microangiopathy, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, neurotoxicity and apoptosis. Despite the corelations presented above, the question still exists – does homocysteine have a causal connection to AD? In this review, we highlight the role of HHcy in relation to AD by discussing its neurovascular effects and amelioration with dietary supplements. Moreover, we consider the studies using animal models to unravel the connection of Hcy to AD. PMID:26157520

  20. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker losartan prevents and rescues cerebrovascular, neuropathological and cognitive deficits in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Ongali, Brice; Nicolakakis, Nektaria; Tong, Xin-Kang; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Lecrux, Clotilde; Imboden, Hans; Hamel, Edith

    2014-08-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) receptor blockers that bind selectively AngII type 1 (AT1) receptors may protect from Alzheimer's disease (AD). We studied the ability of the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan to cure or prevent AD hallmarks in aged (~18months at endpoint, 3months treatment) or adult (~12months at endpoint, 10months treatment) human amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. We tested learning and memory with the Morris water maze, and evaluated neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling using [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-PET and laser Doppler flowmetry responses to whisker stimulation. Cerebrovascular reactivity was assessed with on-line videomicroscopy. We measured protein levels of oxidative stress enzymes (superoxide dismutases SOD1, SOD2 and NADPH oxidase subunit p67phox), and quantified soluble and deposited amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), AngII receptors AT1 and AT2, angiotensin IV receptor AT4, and cortical cholinergic innervation. In aged APP mice, losartan did not improve learning but it consolidated memory acquisition and recall, and rescued neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling and cerebrovascular dilatory capacity. Losartan normalized cerebrovascular p67phox and SOD2 protein levels and up-regulated those of SOD1. Losartan attenuated astrogliosis, normalized AT1 and AT4 receptor levels, but failed to rescue the cholinergic deficit and the Aβ pathology. Given preventively, losartan protected cognitive function, cerebrovascular reactivity, and AT4 receptor levels. Like in aged APP mice, these benefits occurred without a decrease in soluble Aβ species or plaque load. We conclude that losartan exerts potent preventive and restorative effects on AD hallmarks, possibly by mitigating AT1-initiated oxidative stress and normalizing memory-related AT4 receptors. PMID:24807206

  1. Cerebrovascular disease in South Asia – Part II: Risk factors and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Vibha, Deepti; Prasad, Kameshwar

    2012-01-01

    In South Asian countries, conventional vascular risk factors like hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cardiac disease, smoking, obesity, atrial fibrillation are the dominant ones, while other aetiologies like rheumatic heart disease, infective meningitis-related infarcts and postpartum cerebral venous thrombosis also constitute a big fraction. This review discusses the evidence of prevalence of various risk factors in South Asian countries and possible measures to combat the rising burden of cerebrovascular disease. The last part of the review discusses prevention and identification of risk factors that are unique to or especially found in patient population of South Asia. PMID:24175078

  2. Intracranial stenosis, cerebrovascular diseases, and cognitive impairment in chinese.

    PubMed

    Hilal, Saima; Saini, Monica; Tan, Chuen Seng; Catindig, Joseree A; Dong, Yan Hong; Holandez, Rachelle L; Niessen, Wiro J; Vrooman, Henri A; Ting, Eric; Wong, Tien Yin; Chen, Christopher; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Ikram, Mohammad K

    2015-01-01

    Extracranial carotid artery disease has been shown to be related to cognitive deficits. However, limited data are available on intracranial stenosis (ICS) and cognitive impairment. We investigate the association between ICS and cognitive impairment in Chinese. Subjects (n=278), recruited from the Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore Study, underwent comprehensive clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including 3-dimensional-time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Cognitive function was expressed as composite and domain-specific Z-scores. Cognitive impairment no dementia and dementia were diagnosed according to internationally accepted diagnostic criteria. Linear and logistic regression models were adjusted for age, sex, education, vascular risk factors, and other MRI markers. A total of 29 (10.4%) persons had ICS on MRA, which was significantly associated with both composite cognitive Z-scores [mean difference in Z-score, presence vs. absence of ICS: -0.37 (95% confidence interval: -0.63, -0.12)] and specific domains including executive function, language, visuomotor speed, verbal memory, and visual memory. ICS was also related to significant cognitive impairment (odds ratio: 5.10 [1.24 to 21.02]). With respect to other MRI markers, adjusted for the presence of lacunar infarcts, the associations of ICS with both composite and domain-specific Z-scores, and significant cognitive impairment became nonsignificant; however, adjustment for other MRI markers did not alter these associations. In this Chinese population, presence of ICS was associated with cognitive impairment independent of vascular risk factors. These associations may be mediated through the presence of infarcts. PMID:24731981

  3. Vascular lesions in mixed dementia, vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular disease: the Kurihara Project.

    PubMed

    Meguro, Kenichi; Tanaka, Naofumi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kei; Satoh, Masayuki

    2012-11-15

    The concept and diagnosis for mixed dementia is not simple, since it is difficult to identify the type and regions of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) responsible for causing dementia. An investigation is needed to confirm the presence of mixed dementia, those who met the criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and those for vascular dementia (VaD). According to the community-based stroke, dementia, and bed-confinement prevention in Kurihara, northern Japan (Kurihara Project), the prevalence of dementia and dementing diseases was surveyed in 2008-2010. Five hundred and ninety people finally agreed to participate (47.0%), and 73 (12.4%) people were diagnosed with dementia according to the DSM-IV. Using MRI, intensive evaluations on CVDs were performed for the 49 dementia patients associated with CVDs (mixed dementia, VaD, and AD with CVD). For the mixed dementia group, all had left subcortical strategic CVDs. These included the caudate head and thalamus. For the VaD group, all patients had at least cortical CVDs or subcortical strategic CVDs. The AD with CVD group had non-strategic CVDs in cortical, subcortical, or other areas in 5 or 6 patients each. Two extreme concepts regarding CVD and dementia are possible. One is that there is no concept for mixed dementia or VaD. An alternative is that the vascular factor should be considered as primary. Our data showed an importance of cortical and subcortical "strategic" areas, the latter included thalamus and caudate head. PMID:22871542

  4. Depression and Cerebrovascular Disease: Could Vortioxetine Represent a Valid Treatment Option?

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Pala, Andrea Norcini; Finco, Gabriele; Musu, Mario; Moro, Maria Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Depression and cerebrovascular atherosclerosis often occur in comorbidity showing neuropsychological impairment and poor response to antidepressant treatment. Objective is to evaluate if new antidepressant vortioxetine may be a potential treatment option. Mechanism of Action : Vortioxetine has 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D antagonists, 5-HT1B partial agonist and a 5-HT1A agonist and serotonin transporter inhibitor property. Efficacy and safety in Major Depressive Disorders and in cognitive impairment : The majority of trials (one of them in older people) showed efficacy for vortioxetine against placebo and no differences against other active treatments. The Adverse Effects ranged from 15.8% more to 10.8% less than placebo. In the elderly, only nausea was found higher than placebo. Effects on arterial blood pressure and cardiac parameters including the ECG-QT segment were similar to placebo. Elderly depressive patients on vortioxetine showed improvement versus placebo and other active comparators in Auditory Verbal Learning Test and Digit Symbol Substitution Test scores. The inclusion criteria admitted cases with middle cerebrovascular disease. Conclusion : The mechanism of action, the efficacy on depression and safety profile and early data on cognitive impairment make Vortioxetine a strong candidate for use in depression associated with cerebrovascular disease. This information must be supported by future randomized controlled trials. PMID:25893002

  5. Relationship between retinal vascular occlusions and incident cerebrovascular diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Wengen; Wang, Changyun

    2016-06-01

    Several studies investigating the role of retinal vascular occlusions, on cerebrovascular diseases (CVD) have been reported, but the results are still inconsistent. We therefore sought to evaluate the relationship between retinal vascular occlusions and CVD.We systematically searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and ScienceDirect databases through January 31, 2016 for studies evaluating the effect of retinal vascular occlusions on the risk of CVD. Data were abstracted using predefined criteria, and then pooled by RevMan 5.3 software.A total of 9 retrospective studies were included in this meta-analysis. When compared with individuals without retinal vascular occlusions, both individuals with retinal artery occlusion (RAO) (odds ratio [OR] = 2.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21-3.34; P = 0.005) and individuals with retinal vein occlusion (RVO) (OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.24-1.50; P < 0.00001) had higher risks of developing CVD. Additionally, both individuals with central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) (OR = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.12-3.56; P = 0.02) and branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO) (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.03-1.48; P = 0.04) were significantly associated with increased risk of CVD.Published literatures support both RVO and RAO are associated with increased risks of CVD. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27368050

  6. Cerebrovascular function and cognition in childhood: a systematic review of transcranial doppler studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The contribution of cerebrovascular function to cognitive performance is gaining increased attention. Transcranial doppler (TCD) is portable, reliable, inexpensive and extremely well tolerated by young and clinical samples. It enables measurement of blood flow velocity in major cerebral arteries at rest and during cognitive tasks. Methods We systematically reviewed evidence for associations between cognitive performance and cerebrovascular function in children (0-18 years), as measured using TCD. A total of 2778 articles were retrieved from PsychInfo, Pubmed, and EMBASE searches and 25 relevant articles were identified. Results Most studies investigated clinical groups, where decreased blood flow velocities in infants were associated with poor neurological functioning, and increased blood flow velocities in children with Sickle cell disease were typically associated with cognitive impairment and lower intelligence. Studies were also identified assessing autistic behaviour, mental retardation and sleep disordered breathing. In healthy children, the majority of studies reported cognitive processing produced lateralised changes in blood flow velocities however these physiological responses did not appear to correlate with behavioural cognitive performance. Conclusion Poor cognitive performance appears to be associated with decreased blood flow velocities in premature infants, and increased velocities in Sickle cell disease children using TCD methods. However knowledge in healthy samples is relatively limited. The technique is well tolerated by children, is portable and inexpensive. It therefore stands to make a valuable contribution to knowledge regarding the underlying functional biology of cognitive performance in childhood. PMID:24602446

  7. Trends in age-specific cerebrovascular disease in the European Union

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Sun, Wei; Ji, Yue; Shi, Jing; Xuan, Qinkao; Wang, Xiuzhi; Xiao, Junjie; Kong, Xiangqing

    2014-01-01

    Although the mortality of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) has been steadily declined in the European Union (EU), CVD remains among the major causes of death in EU. As risk factors such asobesity and diabetes mellitus are increasing, the trends of European CVD mortality remains unknown. To understand the variation in CVD mortality of different EU countries, we studied the trends in CVD mortality in EU countries over the last three decades between males and females. Age- and sex-specific mortality rates between 1980 and 2011 were calculated by data from the WHO mortality database. Joinpoint software was used to calculate annual percentage changes and to characterize trends in mortality rates over time. Our study showed that between 1980 and 2011, CVD mortality significantly decreased in both men and women across all age groups. The specific mortality trends varied largely between EU countries. The plateau trend was observed in little regions at different age groups, however, the EU as a whole displayed declined trend CVD mortality. During the last three decades, CVD mortality decreased substantially in the entire population of EU. However, despite this overall decline in CVD mortality, several areas were identified as having no change in their CVD mortality rates at different period. The whole EU needs to establish strict prevention measures toreduce the incidence of CVD risk factors. PMID:25550927

  8. Selective neuronal loss in ischemic stroke and cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Jean-Claude; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Fujioka, Masayuki; Endres, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    As a sequel of brain ischemia, selective neuronal loss (SNL)—as opposed to pannecrosis (i.e. infarction)—is attracting growing interest, particularly because it is now detectable in vivo. In acute stroke, SNL may affect the salvaged penumbra and hamper functional recovery following reperfusion. Rodent occlusion models can generate SNL predominantly in the striatum or cortex, showing that it can affect behavior for weeks despite normal magnetic resonance imaging. In humans, SNL in the salvaged penumbra has been documented in vivo mainly using positron emission tomography and 11C-flumazenil, a neuronal tracer validated against immunohistochemistry in rodent stroke models. Cortical SNL has also been documented using this approach in chronic carotid disease in association with misery perfusion and behavioral deficits, suggesting that it can result from chronic or unstable hemodynamic compromise. Given these consequences, SNL may constitute a novel therapeutic target. Selective neuronal loss may also develop at sites remote from infarcts, representing secondary ‘exofocal' phenomena akin to degeneration, potentially related to poststroke behavioral or mood impairments again amenable to therapy. Further work should aim to better characterize the time course, behavioral consequences—including the impact on neurological recovery and contribution to vascular cognitive impairment—association with possible causal processes such as microglial activation, and preventability of SNL. PMID:24192635

  9. Arterial Transit Time Mapping Obtained by Pulsed Continuous 3D ASL Imaging with Multiple Post-Label Delay Acquisitions: Comparative Study with PET-CBF in Patients with Chronic Occlusive Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsujikawa, Tetsuya; Kimura, Hirohiko; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Isozaki, Makoto; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro; Okazawa, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    Arterial transit time (ATT) is most crucial for measuring absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) by arterial spin labeling (ASL), a noninvasive magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion assessment technique, in patients with chronic occlusive cerebrovascular disease. We validated ASL-CBF and ASL-ATT maps calculated by pulsed continuous ASL (pCASL) with multiple post-label delay acquisitions in patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease. Fifteen patients underwent MR scans, including pCASL, and positron emission tomography (PET) scans with 15O-water to obtain PET-CBF. MR acquisitions with different post-label delays (1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 sec) were also obtained for ATT correction. The theoretical framework of 2-compartmental model (2CM) was also used for the delay compensation. ASL-CBF and ASL-ATT were calculated based on the proposed 2CM, and the effect on the CBF values and the ATT correction characteristics were discussed. Linear regression analyses were performed both on pixel-by-pixel and region-of-interest bases in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. There were significant correlations between ASL-CBF and PET-CBF both for voxel values (r = 0.74 ± 0.08, slope: 0.87 ± 0.22, intercept: 6.1 ± 4.9) and for the MCA territorial comparison in both affected (R2 = 0.67, y = 0.83x + 6.3) and contralateral sides (R2 = 0.66, y = 0.74x + 6.3). ASL-ATTs in the affected side were significantly longer than those in the contralateral side (1.51 ± 0.41 sec and 1.12 ± 0.30 sec, respectively, p <0.0005). CBF measurement using pCASL with delay compensation was feasible and fairly accurate even in altered hemodynamic states. PMID:27275779

  10. A Highly Similar Mathematical Model for Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity in Geriatric Patients with Suspected Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Li, Qi; Wang, Jisheng; Xiang, Hu; Ge, Hong; Wang, Hui; Xie, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity(CBFV) is an important parameter for study of cerebral hemodynamics. However, a simple and highly similar mathematical model has not yet been established for analyzing CBFV. To alleviate this issue, through TCD examination in 100 geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease (46 males and 54 females), we established a representative eighth-order Fourier function Vx(t) that simulates the CBFV. The measured TCD waveforms were compared to those derived from Vx(t), an illustrative Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was employed to determine the validity. The results showed that the TCD waves could been reconstructed for patients with different CBFVs by implementing their variable heart rates and the formulated maximum/minimum of Vx(t). Comparisons between derived and measured TCD waveforms suggest that the two waveforms are very similar. The results confirm that CBFV can be well-modeled through an eighth-order Fourier function. This function Vx(t) can be used extensively for a prospective study of cerebral hemodynamics in geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease. PMID:26497612

  11. A Highly Similar Mathematical Model for Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity in Geriatric Patients with Suspected Cerebrovascular Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Li, Qi; Wang, Jisheng; Xiang, Hu; Ge, Hong; Wang, Hui; Xie, Peng

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity(CBFV) is an important parameter for study of cerebral hemodynamics. However, a simple and highly similar mathematical model has not yet been established for analyzing CBFV. To alleviate this issue, through TCD examination in 100 geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease (46 males and 54 females), we established a representative eighth-order Fourier function Vx(t) that simulates the CBFV. The measured TCD waveforms were compared to those derived from Vx(t), an illustrative Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was employed to determine the validity. The results showed that the TCD waves could been reconstructed for patients with different CBFVs by implementing their variable heart rates and the formulated maximum/minimum of Vx(t). Comparisons between derived and measured TCD waveforms suggest that the two waveforms are very similar. The results confirm that CBFV can be well-modeled through an eighth-order Fourier function. This function Vx(t) can be used extensively for a prospective study of cerebral hemodynamics in geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease.

  12. Factors Affecting the Designation of Cerebrovascular Diseases as Work-Related in Administrative Litigation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeongsu; Rim, Hwayoung; Chang, Sounghoon; Lee, Kunsei

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that could be used as standardized criteria for evaluating occupational diseases in initial assessments or requests for examination. Using 100 administrative litigation cases on the work-relatedness of cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs) by the Seoul Branch of the Korea Labor Welfare Corporation (KLWC) from 1997 to 2002, we estimated the relationship between the investigated variables and designation of the work-relatedness of the CVD. As for the age, the odds ratio of the acceptance rate of a case as work-related in subjects over 60 yr of age was 0.08 (95% CI, 0.01-0.75), which was compared to subjects under 30 yr of age. Regarding working hours, the odds ratio of the acceptance rate of a case as work-related in CVDs in those over 56 hr was 9.50 (95% CI, 1.92-47.10) when compared to those less than 56 hr. As for the benefit type, the odds ratio of the acceptance rate of a case as work-related in medical benefits was 5.74 (95% CI, 1.29-25.54), compared to survivor benefits. As for the criteria for defining situations as work overload, the odds ratio of the acceptance rate of a case as work-related in injured workers was 12.06 (95% CI, 3.12-46.62), compared to that in non-injured workers. Our findings show that the criteria for defining situations of work overload played an important role in assessing the work-relatedness of CVDs in administrative litigation, and it is necessary to make the scientific evidence on judgement of work-relatedness on overwork. PMID:18437006

  13. Cerebrovascular Diseases in Workers at Mayak PA: The Difference in Radiation Risk between Incidence and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Simonetto, Cristoforo; Schöllnberger, Helmut; Azizova, Tamara V; Grigoryeva, Evgenia S; Pikulina, Maria V; Eidemüller, Markus

    2015-01-01

    A detailed analysis of cerebrovascular diseases (CeVD) for the cohort of workers at Mayak Production Association (PA) is presented. This cohort is especially suitable for the analysis of radiation induced circulatory diseases, due to the detailed medical surveillance and information on several risk factors. The risk after external, typically protracted, gamma exposure is analysed, accounting for potential additional internal alpha exposure. Three different endpoints have been investigated: incidence and mortality from all cerebrovascular diseases and incidence of stroke. Particular emphasis was given to the form of the dose-response relationship and the time dependence of the radiation induced risk. Young attained age was observed to be an important, aggravating modifier of radiation risk for incidence of CeVD and stroke. For incidence of CeVD, our analysis supports a dose response sub-linear for low doses. Finally, the excess relative risk per dose was confirmed to be significantly higher for incidence of CeVD compared to CeVD mortality and incidence of stroke. Arguments are presented for this difference to be based on a true biological effect. PMID:25933038

  14. Cerebrovascular Diseases in Workers at Mayak PA: The Difference in Radiation Risk between Incidence and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Simonetto, Cristoforo; Schöllnberger, Helmut; Azizova, Tamara V.; Grigoryeva, Evgenia S.; Pikulina, Maria V.; Eidemüller, Markus

    2015-01-01

    A detailed analysis of cerebrovascular diseases (CeVD) for the cohort of workers at Mayak Production Association (PA) is presented. This cohort is especially suitable for the analysis of radiation induced circulatory diseases, due to the detailed medical surveillance and information on several risk factors. The risk after external, typically protracted, gamma exposure is analysed, accounting for potential additional internal alpha exposure. Three different endpoints have been investigated: incidence and mortality from all cerebrovascular diseases and incidence of stroke. Particular emphasis was given to the form of the dose-response relationship and the time dependence of the radiation induced risk. Young attained age was observed to be an important, aggravating modifier of radiation risk for incidence of CeVD and stroke. For incidence of CeVD, our analysis supports a dose response sub-linear for low doses. Finally, the excess relative risk per dose was confirmed to be significantly higher for incidence of CeVD compared to CeVD mortality and incidence of stroke. Arguments are presented for this difference to be based on a true biological effect. PMID:25933038

  15. Treatment of Thyroid Dysfunctions Decreases the Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Men but Not in Women: Results of the MONICA/KORA Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Meisinger, Christa; Jourdan, Carolin; Heier, Margit; Hauner, Hans; Peters, Annette; Linseisen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thyroid disorders are well known to be associated with cardiovascular diseases. Some studies have shown that the negative effects of thyroid disorders are partially reversible after adequate treatment. The aim of this analysis was to assess the risk of incident ischemic cerebrovascular diseases in study participants treated for thyroid dysfunctions in a population-based cohort study. Methods For the presented analyses data from 8564 male and 8714 female individuals aged 25 to 74 years of the MONICA/KORA cohort were used (median follow-up 14.0 years). A combined binary variable “thyroid disorder” (TDC) was created utilizing data on self-reported physician-treated thyroid disorders and information about medication use. To examine the association between TDC and incident ischemic cerebrovascular events, we performed multiple adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression models and calculated hazard ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (HR, 95%CI). Results During follow-up between 1984 and 2008/2009, 514 incident fatal and non-fatal ischemic cerebrovascular events occurred in men and 323 in women. At baseline, 3.5% of men and 15.6% of women reported TDC. In the fully adjusted model, males who reported TDC had a significantly reduced risk of ischemic cerebrovascular events (HR = 0.52, 95%CI = 0.29–0.92). A similar result was obtained in men, when we utilized information on thyroid hormones use only. For the total study population and for women with TDC we found no association with ischemic cerebrovascular events. Conclusions In our longitudinal analyses subjects with treated thyroid diseases had no increased risk of incident ischemic cerebrovascular events. Surprisingly in males, even a significantly reduced risk of incident ischemic cerebrovascular events was found, a result that deserves further clarification. PMID:27191851

  16. Moyamoya disease - a vasculopahty and an uncommon cause of recurrent cerebrovascular accidents.

    PubMed

    Hamirani, Yasmin S; Valikhani, Mohammad; Sweney, Allison; Khan, Hafsa; Pathan, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a very rare chronic cerebrovascular disease of unknown etiology characterized by recurrent ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes. Initially diagnosed in Japan and named after finding puff of smoke like collateral blood vessels around the occluded blood vessels of circle of Willis. With increase awareness this disease is now diagnosed more often. Medical and surgical treatment have been used to treat the disease, with surgical treatment been mostly experimental. Special attention should be given to the surgical treatment which has shown to have an edge over the medical treatment in some clinical trials especially in young patients with recurrent strokes to prevent progressive cognitive decline and to improve their quality of life. In our patient, who is a young man, the diagnosis was picked up late and when surgical evaluation was performed, it was considered to be fruitless with findings of nonviable brain tissue on MRI imaging. PMID:22470591

  17. Cerebrovascular dysfunction and microcirculation rarefaction precede white matter lesions in a mouse genetic model of cerebral ischemic small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Joutel, Anne; Monet-Leprêtre, Marie; Gosele, Claudia; Baron-Menguy, Céline; Hammes, Annette; Schmidt, Sabine; Lemaire-Carrette, Barbara; Domenga, Valérie; Schedl, Andreas; Lacombe, Pierre; Hubner, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic small vessel disease (SVD) is the leading cause of vascular dementia and a major contributor to stroke in humans. Dominant mutations in NOTCH3 cause cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a genetic archetype of cerebral ischemic SVD. Progress toward understanding the pathogenesis of this disease and developing effective therapies has been hampered by the lack of a good animal model. Here, we report the development of a mouse model for CADASIL via the introduction of a CADASIL-causing Notch3 point mutation into a large P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC). In vivo expression of the mutated PAC transgene in the mouse reproduced the endogenous Notch3 expression pattern and main pathological features of CADASIL, including Notch3 extracellular domain aggregates and granular osmiophilic material (GOM) deposits in brain vessels, progressive white matter damage, and reduced cerebral blood flow. Mutant mice displayed attenuated myogenic responses and reduced caliber of brain arteries as well as impaired cerebrovascular autoregulation and functional hyperemia. Further, we identified a substantial reduction of white matter capillary density. These neuropathological changes occurred in the absence of either histologically detectable alterations in cerebral artery structure or blood-brain barrier breakdown. These studies provide in vivo evidence for cerebrovascular dysfunction and microcirculatory failure as key contributors to hypoperfusion and white matter damage in this genetic model of ischemic SVD. PMID:20071773

  18. Principles and Clinical Application of Dual-energy Computed Tomography in the Evaluation of Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Charlie Chia-Tsong; Kwan, Gigi Nga Chi; Singh, Dalveer; Pratap, Jit; Watkins, Trevor William

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) simultaneously acquires images at two X-ray energy levels, at both high- and low-peak voltages (kVp). The material attenuation difference obtained from the two X-ray energies can be processed by software to analyze material decomposition and to create additional image datasets, namely, virtual noncontrast, virtual contrast also known as iodine overlay, and bone/calcium subtraction images. DECT has a vast array of clinical applications in imaging cerebrovascular diseases, which includes: (1) Identification of active extravasation of iodinated contrast in various types of intracranial hemorrhage; (2) differentiation between hemorrhagic transformation and iodine staining in acute ischemic stroke following diagnostic and/or therapeutic catheter angiography; (3) identification of culprit lesions in intra-axial hemorrhage; (4) calcium subtraction from atheromatous plaque for the assessment of plaque morphology and improved quantification of luminal stenosis; (5) bone subtraction to improve the depiction of vascular anatomy with more clarity, especially at the skull base; (6) metal artifact reduction utilizing virtual monoenergetic reconstructions for improved luminal assessment postaneurysm coiling or clipping. We discuss the physical principles of DECT and review the clinical applications of DECT for the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. PMID:27512615

  19. Principles and Clinical Application of Dual-energy Computed Tomography in the Evaluation of Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Charlie Chia-Tsong; Kwan, Gigi Nga Chi; Singh, Dalveer; Pratap, Jit; Watkins, Trevor William

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) simultaneously acquires images at two X-ray energy levels, at both high- and low-peak voltages (kVp). The material attenuation difference obtained from the two X-ray energies can be processed by software to analyze material decomposition and to create additional image datasets, namely, virtual noncontrast, virtual contrast also known as iodine overlay, and bone/calcium subtraction images. DECT has a vast array of clinical applications in imaging cerebrovascular diseases, which includes: (1) Identification of active extravasation of iodinated contrast in various types of intracranial hemorrhage; (2) differentiation between hemorrhagic transformation and iodine staining in acute ischemic stroke following diagnostic and/or therapeutic catheter angiography; (3) identification of culprit lesions in intra-axial hemorrhage; (4) calcium subtraction from atheromatous plaque for the assessment of plaque morphology and improved quantification of luminal stenosis; (5) bone subtraction to improve the depiction of vascular anatomy with more clarity, especially at the skull base; (6) metal artifact reduction utilizing virtual monoenergetic reconstructions for improved luminal assessment postaneurysm coiling or clipping. We discuss the physical principles of DECT and review the clinical applications of DECT for the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. PMID:27512615

  20. The role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular lesions in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Gjumrakch; Smith, Mark A; Seyidov, Dilara; Neal, Maxwell Lewis; Lamb, Bruce T; Nunomura, Akihiko; Gasimov, Eldar K; Vinters, Harry V; Perry, George; LaManna, Joseph C; Friedland, Robert P

    2002-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and stroke are two leading causes of age-associated dementia. A rapidly growing body of evidence indicates that increased oxidative stress from reactive oxygen radicals is associated with the aging process and age-related degenerative disorders such as atherosclerosis, ischemia/reperfusion, arthritis, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases. New evidence has also indicated that vascular lesions are a key factor in the development of AD. This idea is based on a positive correlation between AD and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases such as arterio- and atherosclerosis and ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this review we consider recent evidence supporting the existence of an intimate relationship between oxidative stress and vascular lesions in the pathobiology of AD. We also consider the opportunities for therapeutic interventions based on the molecular pathways involved with these causal relationships. PMID:11770899

  1. The Effects of Chunghyul-Dan (A Korean Medicine Herbal Complex) on Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Diseases: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woo-Sang; Kwon, Seungwon; Cho, Seung-Yeon; Park, Seong-Uk; Moon, Sang-Kwan; Park, Jung-Mi; Ko, Chang-Nam; Cho, Ki-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Chunghyul-dan (CHD) is a herbal complex containing 80% ethanol extract and is composed of Scutellariae Radix, Coptidis Rhizoma, Phellodendri Cortex, Gardeniae Fructus, and Rhei Rhizoma. We have published several experimental and clinical research articles on CHD. It has shown antilipidemic, antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic, and inhibitory effects on ischemic stroke recurrence with clinical safety in the previous studies. The antilipidemic effect of CHD results from 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and pancreatic lipase-inhibitory activity. The antihypertensive effect likely results from the inhibitory effect on endogenous catecholamine(s) release and harmonization of all components showing the antihypertensive effects. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on endothelial cells are implicated to dictate the antiatherosclerotic effects of CHD. It also showed neuroprotective effects on cerebrovascular and parkinsonian models. These effects of CHD could be helpful for the prevention of the recurrence of ischemic stroke. Therefore, we suggest that CHD could be a promising medication for treating and preventing cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. However, to validate and better understand these findings, well-designed clinical studies are required. PMID:27340412

  2. VKORC1 and CD-14 genetic polymorphisms associate with susceptibility to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jian; Zhang, Zhiguo; Ge, Yuanyuan; Zhen, Juan; Leng, Jiyan; Wang, Jianmeng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the associations of VKORC1 rs2359612 and rs9923231 and CD-14 rs2569190 with susceptibility to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases (CCVD). Methods: A case-control study was conducted with 614 cases of CCVD patients selected at our hospital between January 2011 and June 2012 as case group and 590 healthy individuals participating physical examination during the same period as control group. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay was used to detect genotypes of VKORC1 and CD-14 genetic polymorphisms. SHEsis software was used to conduct haplotype analysis and logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for CCVD. Results: The genotype and allele frequencies of VKORC1 rs2359612 and rs9923231 and CD-14 rs2569190 between the case and control groups were statistically different (all P<0.05). Haplotype analysis showed that the frequencies of CAT and TAT haplotypes were significantly higher while the frequencies of TAC and TGC haplotypes were significantly lower in the case group than those in the control group (P = 0.013, 0.029, 0.019 and 0.042, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that age, systolic pressure, smoking history and VKORC1 rs2359612 maybe risk factors for CCVD; and body mass index (BMI), diastolic pressure and VKORC1 rs9923231 may be protective factors for CCVD (all P<0.05). Conclusion: VKORC1 rs2359612 and rs9923231, and CD-14 rs2569190 might associate with susceptibility to CCVD. CAT and TAT haplotypes may be risk factors while TAC and TGC haplotype may be protective factors for CCVD. PMID:26884960

  3. [Wallerian degeneration demonstrated by MRI and functional outcome in patients suffering from supratentorial cerebrovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Shirotani, Toshiki; Takahara, Takashi; Arimoto, Hirohiko; Inohara, Masashi; Ono, Kenichiro; Shimizu, Akira

    2002-07-01

    An early diagnosis of the outcome of patients with cerebrovascular disease is important for selecting the optimal treatment strategy. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prognosis of Wallerian degeneration on MRI in stroke patients with hemiparesis. The subjects consisted of 87 stroke patients, 50 hemorrhagic patients and 37 ischemic patients, who were evaluated by MRI at 1 to 6,275 days after stroke onset. Among the 36 patients who were evaluated by consecutive MRI, 161 films were obtained and analyzed. Wallerian degeneration was diagnosed when a small prolonged T 2 lesion was seen in the corticospinal tract of the brainstem on at least two contiguous slices. The atrophic rate of the midbrain was calculated as: (the area of the unaffected side of the midbrain--the area of the affected side of the midbrain)/2 x (the area of the unaffected side of the midbrain). The patients' ability to perform the activities of daily living was scored by the Barthel index (BI). Wallerian degeneration in the ipsilateral brainstem was seen for two to three months in 32 cases (37%) and in 58 films (36%) and disappeared about 3 years after the onset of stroke. Wallerian degeneration correlated with the BI scores from 2 to 6 months after stroke (p < 0.05), although no relationship was observed at 7 months or later. From 2 to 6 months after stroke, the shrinkage of the midbrain on MRI correlated with the BI scores (p < 0.001), although no relationship was observed at 7 months or later. It was therefore both Wallerian degeneration and a shrunken midbrain observed on MRIs, evaluated from 2 to 6 months after stroke were thus suggested to indicate a poor outcome in such patients. PMID:12187715

  4. Assessment and Imaging of the Cerebrovascular Glycocalyx.

    PubMed

    Haeren, Roel Hubert Louis; van de Ven, Steffi Elisabeth Maria; van Zandvoort, Marcus Anna Maria Jacobus; Vink, Hans; van Overbeeke, Jacobus Johannes; Hoogland, Govert; Rijkers, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The glycocalyx is a gel-like layer lining the luminal surface of the endothelium. The glycocalyx exerts an important barrier role because it prevents exposure of plasma components to the endothelial surface. Disruption of the glycocalyx by local inflammation or ischemia results in decreased glycocalyx thickness which is associated with a number of vascular diseases. The cerebrovascular glycocalyx has sparsely been studied, but is of great interest because of its potential role in cerebrovascular disease. In this review, we describe all existing techniques to visualize the glycocalyx and designate techniques that may be suitable for studying the cerebrovascular glycocalyx. A total of seven imaging techniques are discussed thoroughly, including transmission electron microscopy, intravital microscopy, micro-particle image velocimetry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, two-photon laser scanning microscopy, orthogonal polarization spectral imaging and sidestream dark field/oblique imaging. Measurement of serum concentrations of glycocalyx-specific constituents is another method for glycocalyx analysis. Also, we have reviewed the methods of glycocalyx analysis by using these imaging techniques. So far, the cerebrovascular glycocalyx has only been studied in vitro. However, other cerebral microcirculatory properties have been studied in vivo. This suggests that the cerebrovascular glycocalyx can be studied in vivo by using some of the described techniques, when specific software is subjoined to the analysis. In conclusion, we have summarized techniques available for glycocalyx assessment, and explained the significance and technical possibilities regarding cerebrovascular glycocalyx visualization. Cerebrovascular glycocalyx assessment would add valuable information to our understanding of the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular disease. Moreover, as a part of the blood-brain barrier, more knowledge on the cerebrovascular glycocalyx may lead to better understanding of

  5. First translational 'Think Tank' on cerebrovascular disease, cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Barone, Frank C; Gustafson, Deborah; Crystal, Howard A; Moreno, Herman; Adamski, Mateusz G; Arai, Ken; Baird, Alison E; Balucani, Clotilde; Brickman, Adam M; Cechetto, David; Gorelick, Philip; Biessels, Geert Jan; Kiliaan, Amanda; Launer, Lenore; Schneider, Julie; Sorond, Farzaneh A; Whitmer, Rachel; Wright, Clinton; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2016-01-01

    As the human population continues to age, an increasing number of people will exhibit significant deficits in cognitive function and dementia. It is now recognized that cerebrovascular, metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases all play major roles in the evolution of cognitive impairment and dementia. Thus with our more recent recognition of these relationships and our need to understand and more positively impact on this world health problem, "The Leo and Anne Albert Charitable Trust" (Gene Pranzo, Trustee with significant support from Susan Brogan, Meeting Planner) provided generous support for this inaugural international workshop that was held from April 13-16, 2015 at the beautiful Ritz Carlton Golf Resort in North Naples, Florida. Researchers from SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY organized the event by selecting the present group of translationally inclined preclinical, clinical and population scientists focused on cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk and its progression to vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and dementia. Participants at the workshop addressed important issues related to aging, cognition and dementia by: (1) sharing new data, information and perspectives that intersect vascular, metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, (2) discussing gaps in translating population risk, clinical and preclinical information to the progression of cognitive loss, and (3) debating new approaches and methods to fill these gaps that can translate into future therapeutic interventions. Participants agreed on topics for group discussion prior to the meeting and focused on specific translational goals that included promoting better understanding of dementia mechanisms, the identification of potential therapeutic targets for intervention, and discussed/debated the potential utility of diagnostic/prognostic markers. Below summarizes the new data-presentations, concepts, novel directions and specific discussion topics addressed by this international

  6. The utility of cardiovascular drugs in the treatment of cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bösel, Julian; Amiri, Hemasse

    2010-09-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases share many pathophysiological traits, often impact one another and share several risk factors, though not always to the same magnitude. Therefore, it is not surprising that many classes of cardiovascular drugs have demonstrated effectiveness in the primary prevention, acute treatment and secondary prevention of stroke. Important advances have been made since 2007 in the use of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, antihypertensives, antiarrhythmics and statins for the treatment of stroke. This review summarizes selected clinical trials of cardiovascular drugs completed from 2007 to 2010 that generated important evidence supporting the efficacy of these drugs in stroke treatment. Ongoing trials and preclinical research of promising agents and treatment strategies are also discussed. PMID:20730696

  7. Secular trends in mortality for cerebrovascular diseases in Japan, 1960 to 1979.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Tanaka, Y; Hayashi, M; Ueda, Y; Date, C; Baba, T; Shoji, H; Horimoto, T; Owada, K

    1982-01-01

    In Japan the age-adjusted death rate from cerebrovascular diseases has decreased for both males and females since 1965. This downward trend accelerated in 1971. This is not due to artifacts such as changes in diagnostic methods of stroke and in rules for coding cause of death on death certificates. The progress and spread of detection, treatment and control of hypertension appears to have been the greatest contributing factor. Furthermore, improvement in the dietary habits, that is, a decrease in salt intake and an appropriate increase in the amount of animal fat and protein taken are also considered to have contributed to the decline in stroke mortality. The regional difference in the standardized mortality ratio for stroke markedly observed in 1960 was still seen even in the 1970's, but the difference became smaller. Mechanization of farming works may be partly accountable for the decrease in the regional difference. PMID:7123589

  8. ISI values and interhemispheric differences in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease; correlations with clinical and angiographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Mosmans, P.C.; Veering, M.M.; Jonkman, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    Xenon 133 inhalation CBF studies of one hundred patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease in the territory of the carotid artery were compared in an attempt to gain more insight into the collateral capacity, especially in those with a stenosis or occlusion of one of the major arteries. Asymmetry of the ISI values for the two hemispheres was expressed as a ratio. High ratios (greater ISI asymmetries) were found for patients with an occlusion of the internal carotid or middle cerebral artery, especially--but not exclusively--those with the more severe clinical symptoms. It also appeared that even when the patient is in a good clinical condition, an elevated ratio reflects insufficiency of the collateral supply to the affected side. The ISI values for individual patients seem to be less useful, partly due to the variable age dependency of this flow parameter.

  9. Cerebrovascular diseases in the cohort of workers first employed at Mayak PA in 1948-1958.

    PubMed

    Azizova, T V; Muirhead, C R; Druzhinina, M B; Grigoryeva, E S; Vlasenko, E V; Sumina, M V; O'Hagan, J A; Zhang, W; Haylock, R G E; Hunter, N

    2010-12-01

    The incidence of and mortality from cerebrovascular diseases (CVD) have been studied in a cohort of 12,210 workers first employed at one of the main plants of the Mayak nuclear facility during 1948-1958 and followed up to 31 December 2000. Information on external γ-ray doses is available for virtually all of these workers (99.9%); the mean total γ-ray dose (± SD) was 0.91 ± 0.95 Gy (99th percentile 3.9 Gy) for men and 0.65 ± 0.75 Gy (99th percentile 2.99 Gy) for women. In contrast, plutonium body burden was measured only for 30.0% of workers; among those monitored, the mean cumulative liver dose from plutonium α-particle exposure (± SD) was 0.40 ± 1.15 Gy (99th percentile 5.88 Gy) for men and 0.81 ± 4.60 Gy (99th percentile 15.95 Gy) for women. A total of 4418 cases of CVD, including 665 cases of stroke, and 753 deaths from CVD, including 404 deaths from stroke, were identified in the study cohort. Having adjusted for non-radiation factors, there were statistically significant increasing trends in CVD incidence but not mortality with both total external γ-ray dose and internal liver dose. Much of the evidence for increased incidence in relation to external dose arose for workers with cumulative doses above 1 Gy. Although the dose response is consistent with linearity, the statistical power to detect non-linearity at external doses below 1 Gy was low. CVD incidence was statistically significantly higher among workers with a plutonium liver dose above 0.1 Gy. There was a statistically significant increasing trend in incidence with increasing internal dose, even after adjusting for external dose, although the trend estimates differed between workers at different plants. The risk estimates for external radiation are generally compatible with those from other large occupational studies, although the incidence data point to higher risk estimates compared to those from the Japanese A-bomb survivors. PMID:21128809

  10. Impaired Cerebrovascular Function in Coronary Artery Disease Patients and Recovery Following Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Anazodo, Udunna C.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Suskin, Neville; Ssali, Tracy; Wang, Danny J. J.; St. Lawrence, Keith S.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) poses a risk to the cerebrovascular function of older adults and has been linked to impaired cognitive abilities. Using magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, we investigated changes in resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to hypercapnia in 34 CAD patients and 21 age-matched controls. Gray matter volume (GMV) images were acquired and used as a confounding variable to separate changes in structure from function. Compared to healthy controls, CAD patients demonstrated reduced CBF in the superior frontal, anterior cingulate (AC), insular, pre- and post-central gyri, middle temporal, and superior temporal regions. Subsequent analysis of these regions demonstrated decreased CVR in the AC, insula, post-central and superior frontal regions. Except in the superior frontal and precentral regions, regional reductions in CBF and CVR were identified in brain areas where no detectable reductions in GMV were observed, demonstrating that these vascular changes were independent of brain atrophy. Because aerobic fitness training can improve brain function, potential changes in regional CBF were investigated in the CAD patients after completion of a 6-months exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program. Increased CBF was observed in the bilateral AC, as well as recovery of CBF in the dorsal aspect of the right AC, where the magnitude of increased CBF was roughly equal to the reduction in CBF at baseline compared to controls. These exercise-related improvements in CBF in the AC is intriguing given the role of this area in cognitive processing and regulation of cardiovascular autonomic control. PMID:26779011

  11. Cardiometabolic risk factors predict cerebrovascular health in older adults: results from the Brain in Motion study.

    PubMed

    Tyndall, Amanda V; Argourd, Laurie; Sajobi, Tolulope T; Davenport, Margie H; Forbes, Scott C; Gill, Stephanie J; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Anderson, Todd J; Wilson, Ben J; Smith, Eric E; Hogan, David B; Hill, Michael D; Poulin, Marc J

    2016-04-01

    Aging and physical inactivity are associated with an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS). With the rising prevalence of MetS, it is important to determine the extent to which it affects cerebrovascular health. The primary purpose of this report is to examine the impact of MetS on cerebrovascular health (resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) peak velocity (V¯P), cerebrovascular conductance (CVC), and CBF responses to hypercapnia) in healthy older adults with normal cognition. A secondary goal was to examine the influence of apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 expression on these indices. In a sample of 258 healthy men and women older than 53 years, 29.1% met criteria for MetS. MetS, sex, and age were found to be significant predictors of CVC, and V¯P, MetS, and APOE status were significant predictors of V¯P-reactivity, and CVC-reactivity was best predicted by MetS status. After controlling for these factors, participants with MetS demonstrated lower cerebrovascular measures (CVC, V¯P, CVC-reactivity, and V¯P-reactivity) compared to participants without MetS. APOE ε4 carriers had higher V¯P-reactivity than noncarriers. These results provide evidence that cardiometabolic and vascular risk factors clustered together as the MetS predict measures of cerebrovascular health indices in older adults. Higher V¯P-reactivity in APOE ε4 carriers suggests vascular compensation for deleterious effects of this known risk allele for Alzheimer's disease and stroke. PMID:27117804

  12. Perturbations of the cerebrovascular matrisome: A convergent mechanism in small vessel disease of the brain?

    PubMed

    Joutel, Anne; Haddad, Iman; Ratelade, Julien; Nelson, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    The term matrisome refers to the ensemble of proteins constituting the extracellular matrix (ECM) (core matrisome) as well as the proteins associated with the ECM. Every organ has an ECM with a unique composition that not only provides the support and anchorage for cells, but also controls fundamental cellular processes as diverse as differentiation, survival, proliferation, and polarity. The current knowledge of the matrisome of small brain vessels is reviewed with a focus on the basement membrane (BM), a specialized form of ECM located at the interface between endothelial cells, contractile cells (smooth muscle cells and pericytes), and astrocyte endfeet—a very strategic location in the communication pathway between the cerebral microcirculation and astrocytes. We discuss some of the most recent genetic data and relevant findings from experimental models of nonamyloid cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). We propose the concept that perturbations of the cerebrovascular matrisome is a convergent pathologic pathway in monogenic forms of SVD, and is likely relevant to the sporadic disease. PMID:25853907

  13. Analysis of Anaphylactic Shock Caused by 17 Types of Traditional Chinese Medicine Injections Used to Treat Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu-Jiao; Wang, De-Wang; Meng, Ling; Wang, Yong-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Several reports describing anaphylactic shock following treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases with Chinese herbal injections were described. Our analysis of these reports showed that anaphylactic shock caused by traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) injections for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases is common but also sometimes fatal. Therefore, we proposed the following four suggestions for improving the clinical safety of delivering Chinese herbal injections and reducing the occurrence of allergic shock. First, patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are at high risk, so they should only be given TCM injections after a doctor's diagnosis and approval. Second, people in allergic groups can suffer anaphylactic shock, so vigilance is important in the treatment of all age groups, although even more caution should be exercised when treating children or elderly people. In fact, TCM injections may not be appropriate for those age groups, so that they should be carefully considered before treatment. Third, no significant gender differences have been noted in patients with anaphylactic shock, so all patients should be carefully monitored, irrespective of gender. Fourth, the timeframe in which different drugs cause anaphylactic shock varies; thus, patients should be observed as long as possible. PMID:26000291

  14. Investigation of cerebral iron deposition in aged patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease using susceptibility-weighted imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Liu, Jun; Liu, Huanghui; Liao, Yunjie; Cao, Lu; Ye, Bin; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate focal iron deposition level in the brain in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease and its correlation with cerebral small vessel disease imaging markers. Patients and methods Seventy-four patients with first-ever transient ischemic attack (median age: 69 years; 30 males and 44 females) and 77 patients with positive ischemic stroke history (median age: 72 years; 43 males and 34 females) were studied retrospectively. On phase image of susceptibility-weighted imaging and regions of interest were manually drawn at the bilateral head of the caudate nucleus, lenticular nucleus (LN), thalamus (TH), frontal white matter, and occipital white matter. The correlation between iron deposition level and the clinical and imaging variables was also investigated. Results Iron deposition level at LN was significantly higher in patients with previous stroke history. It linearly correlated with the presence and number of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) but not with white matter hyperintensity and lacunar infarct. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that deep structure CMBs were the most relevant in terms of iron deposition at LN. Conclusion Iron deposition at LN may increase in cases of more severe ischemia in aged patients with transient ischemic attack, and it may be an imaging marker for CMB of ischemic origin. PMID:27574434

  15. Cost-effectiveness of adenotonsillectomy in reducing obstructive sleep apnea, cerebrovascular ischemia, vaso-occlusive pain, and ACS episodes in pediatric sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Avnish; Jerrell, Jeanette M; Stallworth, James R

    2011-02-01

    In children with sickle cell disease (SCD), adenotonsillar hypertrophy or recurrent tonsillitis are frequently linked with an increased risk of obstructive sleep apnea, cerebrovascular ischemia, or frequent pain episodes and often require an adenoidectomy and/or tonsillectomy. Interventions designed to prevent these complications, control vaso-occlusive pain episodes, and avoid hospitalizations may reduce the significant personal and economic burden of SCD. This study compares episode recurrence and treatment costs for cerebrovascular ischemia, vaso-occlusive pain, acute chest syndrome (ACS), and obstructive sleep apnea in children who had an adenotonsillectomy (A/T surgery, N = 256; 11.7%) and a matched cohort of those who did not (N = 512; 23.3%) from a cohort of 2,194 children and adolescents with SCD from South Carolina's Medicaid system. A/T surgery was associated with a significantly reduced rate of visits over time for obstructive sleep apnea and cerebrovascular ischemia (e.g., stroke, transient ischemic attacks), but not with any change in the rate of visits for vaso-occlusive pain or ACS/pneumonia visits. The rate of mean acute (emergency and inpatient) service costs was significantly decreasing over time after an increase about the time the A/T surgery was performed. The cost-effectiveness of adenoidectomy and/or tonsillectomy for treating obstructive sleep apnea and preventing cerebrovascular ischemia without increasing vaso-occlusive pain episodes or long-term acute service costs in routine clinical practice settings was demonstrated. The matched control group of SCD patients without A/T surgery contained more patients with severe vaso-occlusive pain episodes, ACS visits, and higher mean total costs over time and appears to represent a different phenotype of children with SCD. PMID:20714723

  16. [Secular trends in mortality for cerebrovascular diseases in Taiwan (1959-1989)].

    PubMed

    Su, C L; Chang, S F; Hung, T P

    1992-03-01

    Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is predominantly a disease of the elderly, and its morbidity effects increase with advancing age. In Taiwan, the increasing proportion of the elderly, as a result of medical progress and improved health care in the past 30 years, is largely responsible for the apparent increase in the number of CVD deaths. From 1963 to 1981, CVD was the leading cause of death. The crude mortality rate (CMR) and age-specific mortality rate (ASMR) of CVD by sex were derived from vital statistical data from 1959 to 1989 in Taiwan. The age-adjusted mortality rate (AAMR) using the standard world population of WHO and the cumulative mortality rate (CUMR) from birth to less than 80 years of age were calculated. Before 1983, the total number of CVD deaths had increased steadily for 30 years. In 1989, the CMR was 76.6/100,000 in men and 67.7/100,000 in women. The highest AAMR was 158.5/100,000 in 1973 for men and 130.2/100,000 in 1972 for women, and the lowest AAMR was 91.3/100,000 in 1989 for men and 81.1/100,000 in 1972 for women. The highest CUMR was 26.3% in 1968 for men and 20.8% in 1972 for women, and the lowest CUMR was 14.5% in 1989 for men and 13.6% in 1989 for women. The AAMR and CUMR for both sexes reached a maximum in 1972 and began to decline thereafter. The declines in AAMR and CUMR were averaging 2%/yr for both sexes after 1972 and were averaging 5%/yr for men and 4%/yr for women after 1983. This declining trend in CVD deaths in Taiwan began later and has been slower than similar trends in Japan and the U.S. PMID:1354713

  17. Cerebrovascular diseases at the C. Mondino National Institute of Neurology: from Ottorino Rossi to the present day

    PubMed Central

    Micieli, Giuseppe; Martignoni, Emilia; Sandrini, Giorgio; Bono, Giorgio; Nappi, Giuseppe

    Summary This paper traces the development of research and healthcare models in the field of cerebrovascular disorders at the C. Mondino National Institute of Neurology in Pavia, Italy. It starts with a description of the original experiences of Ottorino Rossi and his thesis on atherosclerosis which date back to the beginning of the last century; it then illustrates the connections between his seminal essay and the future directions followed by research in this institute, through to the development of one of the first stroke units in Italy. In this context, we examine a large range of scientific approaches, many related to cerebrovascular diseases (such as headaches) and autonomic disorders, and some of their biological and physiological markers. The originality of an approach also based on tools of advanced technology, including information technology, is emphasised, as is the importance of passion and perseverance in the pursuit of extraordinary results in what is an extremely complex and difficult field. PMID:21729590

  18. The Vulnerability of Vessels Involved in the Role of Embolism and Hypoperfusion in the Mechanisms of Ischemic Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Accurate definition and better understanding of the mechanisms of stroke are crucial as this will guide the effective care and therapy. In this paper, we review the previous basic and clinical researches on the causes or mechanisms of ischemic cerebrovascular diseases (ICVD) and interpret the correlation between embolism and hypoperfusion based on vascular stenosis and arterial intimal lesions. It was suggested that if there is no embolus (dynamic or in situ emboli), there might be no cerebral infarction. Three kinds of different clinical outcomes of TIA were theoretically interpreted based on its mechanisms. We suppose that there is a correlation between embolism and hypoperfusion, and which mechanisms (hypoperfusion or hypoperfusion induced microemboli) playing the dominant role in each type of ICVD depends on the unique background of arterial intimal lesions (the vulnerability of vessels). That is to say, the vulnerability of vessels is involved in the role of embolism and hypoperfusion in the mechanisms of ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. This inference might enrich and provide better understandings for the underlying etiologies of ischemic cerebrovascular events. PMID:27314040

  19. Aortic Complex Plaque Predicts the Risk of Cryptogenic Ischemic Cerebrovascular Disease Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jing; Ma, Xin; Qie, Jingyuan; Ji, Xunming

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the correlations between aortic complex plaque (ACP) and the recurrence of cryptogenic ischemic cerebrovascular disease (CICVD), and to investigate the clinical significance of ACP in CICVD. Methods CICVD patients (aged 17 to 84 years) admitted into the Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, from July 2011 to December 2013, were consecutively recruited, and divided into ACP and non-ACP groups according to head and neck computerized tomographic (CT) angiography. Recurrences of cerebral ischemic events (CIEs) were compared between these groups after follow-up. Results A total of 117 patients were enrolled (ACP group: 69, non-ACP group: 48) and followed up for a mean of 9.86 months (range: 3-33). The average age of the ACP group was 62.88 years, with 59.4% older than 60 years; the average age of the non-ACP group was 50.29 years, with 37.5% older than 60 years. At the 6-month follow-up, the recurrence rate of CIEs in the ACP group was significantly higher than that of the non-ACP group (17.0% [7/47] and 0% [0/36], respectively; χ2 = 4.283, P = 0.046). The cumulative recurrence risk for CIEs of the ACP group was significantly higher than for the non-ACP group (P = 0.004). Multivariate Cox survival analysis showed that ACP presence was an independent risk factor for CIE recurrence for CICVD patients (relative risk [RR] = 7.803, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.827~33.319, P = 0.006). Conclusions ACP increased the recurrence risk of CIE in CICVD, and elderly CICVD patients should receive greater attention regarding the significance of ACP in recurrent CICVD. PMID:27114844

  20. Hypertension and cerebrovascular damage.

    PubMed

    Veglio, Franco; Paglieri, Cristina; Rabbia, Franco; Bisbocci, Daniela; Bergui, Mauro; Cerrato, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    Hypertension is the most important modifiable factor for cerebrovascular disease. Stroke and dementia are growing health problems that have considerable social and economical consequences. Hypertension causes brain lesions by several mechanisms predisposing to lacunar infarctions, leucoaraiosis, and white matter changes as well as to intracerebral haemorrhages. These parenchymal damages determine evident or silent neurological alterations that often precede the onset of cognitive decline. It is important to recognize cerebrovascular disease and, above all, to correlate typical lesions to hypertension. Antihypertensive therapy has shown clinical benefits in primary and secondary prevention of stroke. These drugs represent important instruments against cerebrovascular disease but their effects on cognition are still matter of debate. Cerebral parenchymal and functional damages have to be considered together to make medical intervention more incisive. PMID:19100549

  1. Study of nanosensor systems for hypertension associated cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2015-04-01

    Hypertension and hypertension associated cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases are on a rise. At-least 970 million people in the world and Seventy percent of the American adults are affected by high blood pressure, also known as hypertension. Even though blood pressure monitoring systems are readily available, the number of people being affected has been increasing. Most of the blood pressure monitoring systems require cumbersome approaches. Even the noninvasive techniques have not lowered the number of people affected nor did at-least increase the user base of these systems. Uncontrolled or untreated hypertension may lead to various cerebrovascular disorders including stroke, hypertensive crisis, lacunar infarcts intracerebral damage, microaneurysm, and cardiovascular disorders including heart failure, myocardial infraction, and ischemic heart disease. Hypertension is rated as the one of the most important causes of premature death in spite of the technical advances in biomedical technology. This paper briefs a review of the widely adopted blood pressure monitoring methods, research techniques, and finally, proposes a concept of implementing nanosensors and wireless communication for real time non-invasive blood pressure monitoring.

  2. [Clinical and tomographic aspects of hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease associated with hypertensive crisis in adults under 50 years of age].

    PubMed

    Arismendi-Morillo, G J; Fernández-Abreu, M; Añez-Moreno, R E

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze both the clinical and tomographic aspects of the hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease (HCd), associated with hypertensive crisis in adults under 50 years of age. Forty six patients, who were not under anticoagulant therapy, were not using illegal drugs, who had not a cerebral tumor disease, and who had neither arteriovenous malformations nor past traumatic episodes, were studied. Seventy eight percent of the patients had preexisted arterial hypertension, 30% of them had at least a previous emergency for a hypertensive crisis. Mortality for intracerebral hematoma (ICH) and for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was 21% and 23% respectively. In 68% of the cases, ICH was located in the deep structures of the brain. Asymmetric ventricular system, compression or the absence of mesencephalic cisterna were significantly associated (p > 0.01; p > 0.001 respectively) with higher mortality. There was not a significant difference between the deceased and the survivors in relation with their systolic and diastolic arterial pressure on admission to the emergency unit. A significant positive relation was found between the severity of the injury (percentage of patients with an Scale Coma Glasgow < or = 8 points) and the mortality percentage for the type of HCd (r = 0.81 for ICH; p < 0.001, r = 0.98 for SAH; p < 0.001). Age and a low Scale Coma Glasgow score on the admission, represent unfavorable prognostic factors. Due to the different criteria used to evaluate the tomographic characteristics of intracerebral hematomas, comparisons of the present results with other findings can be difficult. PMID:11029832

  3. Delusional Infestation in a Patient with Renal Failure, Metabolic Syndrome, and Chronic Cerebrovascular Disease Treated with Aripiprazole: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Carpiniello, Bernardo; Pinna, Federica; Tuveri, Raffaella

    2011-01-01

    Delusional infestation is an aspecific psychiatric condition manifested either as a primary psychotic disorder or a secondary disorder induced by a wide range of very different medical conditions. Both primary and secondary delusional infestations seem to respond to typical and atypical antipsychotics. The latter are considered the first-line treatment although the use of second-generation antipsychotics featuring a higher metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal tolerability is preferable in secondary cases, which often occur in patients with multiple, severe medical conditions. We report a case of a 72-year-old patient affected by delusional infestation associated with severe renal failure, metabolic syndrome, hypertensive cardiopathy, and chronic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:22174718

  4. Potassium channelopathy-like defect underlies early-stage cerebrovascular dysfunction in a genetic model of small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Dabertrand, Fabrice; Krøigaard, Christel; Bonev, Adrian D.; Cognat, Emmanuel; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Domenga-Denier, Valérie; Hill-Eubanks, David C.; Brayden, Joseph E.; Joutel, Anne; Nelson, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), caused by dominant mutations in the NOTCH3 receptor in vascular smooth muscle, is a genetic paradigm of small vessel disease (SVD) of the brain. Recent studies using transgenic (Tg)Notch3R169C mice, a genetic model of CADASIL, revealed functional defects in cerebral (pial) arteries on the surface of the brain at an early stage of disease progression. Here, using parenchymal arterioles (PAs) from within the brain, we determined the molecular mechanism underlying the early functional deficits associated with this Notch3 mutation. At physiological pressure (40 mmHg), smooth muscle membrane potential depolarization and constriction to pressure (myogenic tone) were blunted in PAs from TgNotch3R169C mice. This effect was associated with an ∼60% increase in the number of voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels, which oppose pressure-induced depolarization. Inhibition of KV1 channels with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) or treatment with the epidermal growth factor receptor agonist heparin-binding EGF (HB-EGF), which promotes KV1 channel endocytosis, reduced KV current density and restored myogenic responses in PAs from TgNotch3R169C mice, whereas pharmacological inhibition of other major vasodilatory influences had no effect. KV1 currents and myogenic responses were similarly altered in pial arteries from TgNotch3R169C mice, but not in mesenteric arteries. Interestingly, HB-EGF had no effect on mesenteric arteries, suggesting a possible mechanistic basis for the exclusive cerebrovascular manifestation of CADASIL. Collectively, our results indicate that increasing the number of KV1 channels in cerebral smooth muscle produces a mutant vascular phenotype akin to a channelopathy in a genetic model of SVD. PMID:25646445

  5. [Change in number of residents who plan to specialize in cerebrovascular disease and neurointervention in the Department of Neurology of Kyushu University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    As an example of the Neurology Department of the University, I will report on the human resources education and changes in the number of young neurologists who want to specialize in cerebrovascular disease and neurointervention therapy in the Department of Neurology of Kyushu University. In our department, 12% (14/116) of residents planned to specialize in cerebrovascular diseases and 9% (11/116) of residents wanted to learn neurointerventional therapy. These rates are not high. However, in the past year, four out of seven residents want to specialize in cerebrovascular diseases and all want to learn neurointerventional therapy. It is possible that advances in neurointerventional therapy have influenced young neurologists. It is necessary to develop a system that encourages young neurologists to undertake these specializations in universities all over Japan. PMID:25672746

  6. Platelet aggregability and in vivo platelet deposition in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease--evaluation by indium-111-platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Isaka, Y.; Kimura, K.; Uehara, A.; Hashikawa, K.; Mieno, M.; Matsumoto, M.; Handa, N.; Nakabayashi, S.; Imaizumi, M.; Kamada, T. )

    1989-12-15

    In ischemic cerebrovascular disease, it is not clear whether platelet function in vitro actually reflects the situation in vivo. Using indium-111 platelet scintigraphy as a method for detecting platelet activation in vivo, we tried to elucidate this problem. Twenty eight patients with chronic stage of ischemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and 17 control subjects were examined. Platelet scintigrams were positive in 9 of 28 patients in CVD, while all were negative in control. A comparison of the results obtained from qualitative platelet imaging and platelet aggregability was performed to evaluate whether threshold aggregation concentration (TAC) grade differed across the three groups (control, CVD patients without platelet deposition and CVD patients with platelet deposition). CVD patients with platelet deposition showed a higher TAC than those patients who did not show platelet deposition (P less than 0.05) or control subjects without platelet deposition (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that some patients in chronic stages of CVD may have active platelet deposition on carotid atheromatous lesions, and presence of platelet deposition in vivo could contribute to reduce platelet reactivity in peripheral blood.

  7. [The role of electronic databases in practical decision making in the care of patients with cerebrovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Bereczki, Dániel

    2002-06-01

    The information revolution of recent years, the general accessibility of computers and especially the Internet, provided the possibility of immediate access to the newest and most reliable results of clinical research in everyday medical practice. When a question arises regarding the care of a certain patient, we can have answers within minutes. Summaries of systematic reviews of the Cochrane Library and abstracts of papers of several thousand journals indexed on MEDLINE are available free of charge. In addition, over 70,000 Internet home pages provide some sort of health care information. The fast accessibility of information made it possible to apply a new method, called evidence-based medicine, in everyday practice. This method implies the effective search of an answer to a well formed question, and the critical evaluation of the results found during the search. This paper summarises the most important electronic databases that can be used in the care of patients with cerebrovascular diseases. The paper emphasises the advantages and dangers of the use of the Internet. Enlisted are the most important English- and Hungarian-language home pages with information on cerebrovascular diseases. Internet addresses of home pages providing methodological help in critically evaluating the literature are also given. The paper summarises the most important questions to consider when we want to evaluate the validity and importance of papers on diagnostic methods, on prognosis, on treatment effect, when we read systematic reviews, economic evaluations, clinical decision analyses and guidelines. PMID:12073546

  8. Effects of physical therapy on cytokines and two color analysis-lymphocyte subsets in patients with cerebrovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, H; Machida, I; Handa, H; Yoshida, Y; Akiba, T; Itoh, K; Tamura, J; Kubota, K

    1999-01-01

    The effects of physical therapy on immunological parameters were evaluated in 12 patients (8 males and 4 females, 69.2 +/- 9.0 years) with cerebrovascular diseases in a stable situation two to three months after the onset of stroke who entered in our hospital between 1994 and 1997. After a two-month physical therapy program, the proportions of helper-inducer T (Thi) cells and suppressor-inducer T (Tsi) cells were increased significantly and that of cytotoxic T (Tc) cells was decreased, although those of HLA-DR+, suppressor T (Ts) and activated T (Tac) cells were not changed. The antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was significantly increased, although natural killer (NK) cell activity was not changed. The serum levels of interleukin-2 receptor was significantly increased but those of interleukin-2, interleukin-6 and interleukin-12 were not changed. The serum levels of interleukin-10, interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were not detectable, while interleukin-1beta was decreased in 2 patients and interleukin-10 was increased in 2 patients. These findings suggest that daily physical exercise may activate the immune system possibly through the cytokine network in patients with cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). PMID:10515238

  9. Platelet aggregability and in vivo platelet deposition in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease--evaluation by indium-111-platelet scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Isaka, Y; Kimura, K; Uehara, A; Hashikawa, K; Mieno, M; Matsumoto, M; Handa, N; Nakabayashi, S; Imaizumi, M; Kamada, T

    1989-12-15

    In ischemic cerebrovascular disease, it is not clear whether platelet function in vitro actually reflects the situation in vivo. Using indium-111 platelet scintigraphy as a method for detecting platelet activation in vivo, we tried to elucidate this problem. Twenty eight patients with chronic stage of ischemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and 17 control subjects were examined. Platelet scintigrams were positive in 9 of 28 patients in CVD, while all were negative in control. A comparison of the results obtained from qualitative platelet imaging and platelet aggregability was performed to evaluate whether threshold aggregation concentration (TAC) grade differed across the three groups (control, CVD patients without platelet deposition and CVD patients with platelet deposition). CVD patients with platelet deposition showed a higher TAC than those patients who did not show platelet deposition (P less than 0.05) or control subjects without platelet deposition (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that some patients in chronic stages of CVD may have active platelet deposition on carotid atheromatous lesions, and presence of platelet deposition in vivo could contribute to reduce platelet reactivity in peripheral blood. PMID:2633402

  10. Study on the cerebrovascular reserve capacity by MR perfusion weighted imaging in SHR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Quan; Dong, Yang; Chen, WenLi; Lin, Xueying; Xing, Da; Huang, Li

    2007-05-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death, and approximately 50% of survivors have a residual neurologic deficit and greater than 25% require chronic care. Cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC) describes how far cerebral perfusion can increase from a baseline value after stimulation. High blood pressure is the most important independent risk factor for stroke and other vascular diseases. The incidence of stroke in the hypertensive is six times higher than in the patient with normal blood pressure. CVRC in the hypertensive was even lower than in control patients. MR perfusion weighted imaging (MR PWI) with the well-established acetazolamide (ACZ) stimulation test has been used for assessing brain function. The aim of this work is to assess the cerebrovascular reserve capacity by MR PWI with "ACZ" tolerance test in spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) and to identify its value in evaluating the CVRC. Experimental animal including 3 groups: Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) (12-week-old) as control group, SHR (12-week-old and 20-week-old) as experimental group. MR PWI was performed respectively before and after acetazolamide administrated orally in 3 groups on a clinical 1.5 Tesla GE Signa MR fx/i whole-body MR system. The ROI was chosen in the bilateral frontal lobe to measure the value of rCBV, rCBF and MTT. The results showed that before ACZ-test, there was statistic differences between the WKY and SHR(12-week-old), and between SHR(12-week-old) and SHR(20-week-old) in the values of rCBV and rCBF (P>0.05), and after ACZ-test, there were statistic differences between WKY and SHR (20-week-old), and between SHR(12-week-old) and SHR(20-week-old) in the rCBV value (P<0.05). It is concluded that the method of MRI PWI combined with the "ACZ stress test" can provide more qualitative and half-quantitative information on the cerebral perfusion to evaluate the CVRC in SHR.

  11. Short-Term Effects of Gaseous Pollutants and Particulate Matter on Daily Hospital Admissions for Cardio-Cerebrovascular Disease in Lanzhou: Evidence from a Heavily Polluted City in China

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shan; Wang, Minzhen; Wang, Shigong; Tao, Yan; Shang, Kezheng

    2013-01-01

    Panel studies show a consistent association between increase in the cardiovascular hospitalizations with air pollutants in economically developed regions, but little evidence in less developed inland areas. In this study, a time-series analysis was used to examine the specific effects of major air pollutants [particulate matter less than 10 microns in diameter (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen dioxides (NO2)] on daily hospital admissions for cardio-cerebrovascular diseases in Lanzhou, a heavily polluted city in China. We examined the effects of air pollutants for stratified groups by age and gender, and conducted the modifying effect of seasons on air pollutants to test the possible interaction. The significant associations were found between PM10, SO2 and NO2 and cardiac disease admissions, SO2 and NO2 were found to be associated with the cerebrovascular disease admissions. The elderly was associated more strongly with gaseous pollutants than younger. The modifying effect of seasons on air pollutants also existed. The significant effect of gaseous pollutants (SO2 and NO2) was found on daily hospital admissions even after adjustment for other pollutants except for SO2 on cardiac diseases. In a word, this study provides the evidence for the detrimental short-term health effects of urban gaseous pollutants on cardio-cerebrovascular diseases in Lanzhou. PMID:23358231

  12. Retinal vascular image analysis as a potential screening tool for cerebrovascular disease: a rationale based on homology between cerebral and retinal microvasculatures

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Niall; Aslam, Tariq; MacGillivray, Thomas; Pattie, Alison; Deary, Ian J; Dhillon, Baljean

    2005-01-01

    The retinal and cerebral microvasculatures share many morphological and physiological properties. Assessment of the cerebral microvasculature requires highly specialized and expensive techniques. The potential for using non-invasive clinical assessment of the retinal microvasculature as a marker of the state of the cerebrovasculature offers clear advantages, owing to the ease with which the retinal vasculature can be directly visualized in vivo and photographed due to its essential two-dimensional nature. The use of retinal digital image analysis is becoming increasingly common, and offers new techniques to analyse different aspects of retinal vascular topography, including retinal vascular widths, geometrical attributes at vessel bifurcations and vessel tracking. Being predominantly automated and objective, these techniques offer an exciting opportunity to study the potential to identify retinal microvascular abnormalities as markers of cerebrovascular pathology. In this review, we describe the anatomical and physiological homology between the retinal and cerebral microvasculatures. We review the evidence that retinal microvascular changes occur in cerebrovascular disease and review current retinal image analysis tools that may allow us to use different aspects of the retinal microvasculature as potential markers for the state of the cerebral microvasculature. PMID:15817102

  13. Plasma homocysteine, Alzheimer and cerebrovascular pathology: a population-based autopsy study

    PubMed Central

    Polvikoski, Tuomo; Kivipelto, Miia; Tanskanen, Maarit; Myllykangas, Liisa; Erkinjuntti, Timo; Mäkelä, Mira; Oinas, Minna; Paetau, Anders; Scheltens, Philip; van Straaten, Elizabeth C. W.; Sulkava, Raimo; Solomon, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Elevated plasma total homocysteine is associated with increased risk of dementia/Alzheimer’s disease, but underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are not fully understood. This study investigated possible links between baseline homocysteine, and post-mortem neuropathological and magnetic resonance imaging findings up to 10 years later in the Vantaa 85+ population including people aged ≥85 years. Two hundred and sixty-five individuals had homocysteine and autopsy data, of which 103 had post-mortem brain magnetic resonance imaging scans. Methenamine silver staining was used for amyloid-β and modified Bielschowsky method for neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques. Macroscopic infarcts were identified from cerebral hemispheres, brainstem and cerebellum slices. Standardized methods were used to determine microscopic infarcts, cerebral amyoloid angiopathy, and α-synuclein pathology. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for visual ratings of the degree of medial temporal lobe atrophy, and periventricular and deep white matter hyperintensities. Elevated baseline homocysteine was associated with increased neurofibrillary tangles count at the time of death: for the highest homocysteine quartile, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 2.60 (1.28–5.28). The association was observed particularly in people with dementia, in the presence of cerebral infarcts, and with longer time between the baseline homocysteine assessment and death. Also, elevated homocysteine tended to relate to amyloid-β accumulation, but this was seen only with longer baseline-death interval: odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 2.52 (0.88–7.19) for the highest homocysteine quartile. On post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging, for the highest homocysteine quartile odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 3.78 (1.12–12.79) for more severe medial temporal atrophy and 4.69 (1.14–19.33) for more severe periventricular white matter hyperintensities. All associations were independent of

  14. Pharmacologically targeted NMDA receptor antagonism by NitroMemantine for cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hiroto; Xia, Peng; Cui, Jiankun; Talantova, Maria; Bodhinathan, Karthik; Li, Wenjun; Holland, Emily A.; Tong, Gary; Piña-Crespo, Juan; Zhang, Dongxian; Nakanishi, Nobuki; Larrick, James W.; McKercher, Scott R.; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Wang, Yuqiang; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Stroke and vascular dementia are leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Neuroprotective therapies have been proposed but none have proven clinically tolerated and effective. While overstimulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) is thought to contribute to cerebrovascular insults, the importance of NMDARs in physiological function has made this target, at least in the view of many in ‘Big Pharma,’ ‘undruggable’ for this indication. Here, we describe novel NitroMemantine drugs, comprising an adamantane moiety that binds in the NMDAR-associated ion channel that is used to target a nitro group to redox-mediated regulatory sites on the receptor. The NitroMemantines are both well tolerated and effective against cerebral infarction in rodent models via a dual allosteric mechanism of open-channel block and NO/redox modulation of the receptor. Targeted S-nitrosylation of NMDARs by NitroMemantine is potentiated by hypoxia and thereby directed at ischemic neurons. Allosteric approaches to tune NMDAR activity may hold therapeutic potential for cerebrovascular disorders. PMID:26477507

  15. Cerebrovascular and ventilatory responses to acute isocapnic hypoxia in healthy aging and lung disease: effect of vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sara E; Waltz, Xavier; Kissel, Christine K; Szabo, Lian; Walker, Brandie L; Leigh, Richard; Anderson, Todd J; Poulin, Marc J

    2015-08-15

    Acute hypoxia increases cerebral blood flow (CBF) and ventilation (V̇e). It is unknown if these responses are impacted with normal aging, or in patients with enhanced oxidative stress, such as (COPD). The purpose of the study was to 1) investigate the effects of aging and COPD on the cerebrovascular and ventilatory responses to acute hypoxia, and 2) to assess the effect of vitamin C on these responses during hypoxia. In 12 Younger, 14 Older, and 12 COPD, we measured peak cerebral blood flow velocity (V̄p; index of CBF), and V̇e during two 5-min periods of acute isocapnic hypoxia, under conditions of 1) saline-sham; and 2) intravenous vitamin C. Antioxidants [vitamin C, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase, and catalase], oxidative stress [malondialdehyde (MDA) and advanced protein oxidation product], and nitric oxide metabolism end products (NOx) were measured in plasma. Following the administration of vitamin C, vitamin C, SOD, catalase, and MDA increased, while NOx decreased. V̄p and V̇e sensitivity to hypoxia was reduced in Older by ∼60% (P < 0.02). COPD patients exhibited similar V̄p and V̇e responses to Older (P > 0.05). Vitamin C did not have an effect on the hypoxic V̇e response but selectively decreased the V̄p sensitivity in Younger only. These findings suggest a reduced integrative reflex (i.e., cerebrovascular and ventilatory) during acute hypoxemia in healthy older adults. Vitamin C does not appear to have a large influence on the cerebrovascular or ventilatory responses during acute hypoxia. PMID:26089546

  16. Effects of fasting during Ramadan on cerebrovascular hemodynamics: A transcranial Doppler study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Akhoundi, Fahimeh H.; Rezaei, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: To determine whether Islamic fasting would change cerebral blood flow during Ramadan. Methods: The study group comprised 20 subjects (16 males and 4 females) on a regimen of 1 month food and water intake restriction, according to Islamic fasting ritual. Subjects were evaluated for cerebral bolo flow through a middle cerebral artery (MCA) by means of transcranial Doppler (TCD), the day before starting Ramadan fasting and the day after the month of Ramadan. Results: Our results showed no statistically significant changes after Ramadan in cerebrovascular hemodynamic, in comparison before Ramadan. Conclusion: Although some studies showed metabolic changes during Ramadan fasting (increasing hematocrite, decreasing amount of hemoglobin, dehydration, platelet aggregation, and lipid profile alternations) the findings suggest that Islamic fasting has no significant effects on cerebral blood flow. PMID:27141273

  17. Gender differences in neurologic emergencies part I: a consensus summary and research agenda on cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Tracy E; Seigel, Todd A; Mackenzie, Richard S; Marcolini, Evie G; Wira, Charles R; Healy, Megan E; Wright, David W; Gentile, Nina T

    2014-12-01

    Cerebrovascular neurologic emergencies including ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and migraine are leading causes of death and disability that are frequently diagnosed and treated in the emergency department (ED). Although sex and gender differences in neurologic emergencies are beginning to become clearer, there are many unanswered questions about how emergency physicians should incorporate sex and gender into their research initiatives, patient evaluations, and overall management plans for these conditions. After evaluating the existing gaps in the literature, a core group of ED researchers developed a draft of future research priorities. Participants in the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference neurologic emergencies working group then discussed and approved the recommended research agenda using a standardized nominal group technique. Recommendations for future research on the role of sex and gender in the diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes pertinent to ED providers are described for each of three diagnoses: stroke, SAH, and migraine. Recommended future research also includes investigation of the biologic and pathophysiologic differences between men and women with neurologic emergencies as they pertain to ED diagnoses and treatments. PMID:25422086

  18. The effects of ambient temperature on cerebrovascular mortality: an epidemiologic study in four climatic zones in China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Little evidence is available about the association between temperature and cerebrovascular mortality in China. This study aims to examine the effects of ambient temperature on cerebrovascular mortality in different climatic zones in China. Method We obtained daily data on weather conditions, air pollution and cerebrovascular deaths from five cities (Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, Wuhan, and Guangzhou) in China during 2004-2008. We examined city-specific associations between ambient temperature and the cerebrovascular mortality, while adjusting for season, long-term trends, day of the week, relative humidity and air pollution. We examined cold effects using a 1°C decrease in temperature below a city-specific threshold, and hot effects using a 1°C increase in temperature above a city-specific threshold. We used a meta-analysis to summarize the cold and hot effects across the five cities. Results Beijing and Tianjin (with low mean temperature) had lower thresholds than Shanghai, Wuhan and Guangzhou (with high mean temperature). In Beijing, Tianjin, Wuhan and Guangzhou cold effects were delayed, while in Shanghai there was no or short induction. Hot effects were acute in all five cities. The cold effects lasted longer than hot effects. The hot effects were followed by mortality displacement. The pooled relative risk associated with a 1°C decrease in temperature below thresholds (cold effect) was 1.037 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.020, 1.053). The pooled relative risk associated with a 1°C increase in temperature above thresholds (hot effect) was 1.014 (95% CI: 0.979, 1.050). Conclusion Cold temperatures are significantly associated with cerebrovascular mortality in China, while hot effect is not significant. People in colder climate cities were sensitive to hot temperatures, while people in warmer climate cities were vulnerable to cold temperature. PMID:24690204

  19. Relationship of obesity and insulin resistance with the cerebrovascular reactivity: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with increased risk for stroke. The breath-holding index (BHI) is a measure of vasomotor reactivity of the brain which can be measured with the transcranial Doppler (TCD). We aim to evaluate obesity as an independent factor for altered cerebrovascular reactivity. Methods Cerebrovascular hemodynamics (mean flow velocities MFV, pulsatility index, PI, resistance index, RI, and BHI) was determined in 85 non-obese (Body Mass Index, BMI ≤27 kg/m2) and 85 obese subjects (BMI ≥35 kg/m2) without diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Anthropometric and metabolic variables, and scores to detect risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were analyzed for their association with the cerebrovascular reactivity. Results The BHI was significantly lower in subjects with obesity according to BMI and in subjects with abdominal obesity, but the PI and RI were not different between groups. There was a linear association between the BMI, the HOMA-IR, the Matsuda index, the waist circumference, and the neck circumference, with the cerebrovascular reactivity. After adjusting for insulin resistance, neck circumference, and abdominal circumference, obesity according to BMI was negatively correlated with the cerebrovascular reactivity. Conclusions We found a diminished vasomotor reactivity in individuals with obesity which was not explained by the presence of insulin resistance. PMID:24383894

  20. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, dementia, and cerebrovascular pathology in elders receiving home services

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin D deficiency has potential adverse effects on neurocognitive health and subcortical function. However, no studies have examined the association between vitamin D status, dementia, and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicators of cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Cross-sectional inves...

  1. Cortical and Leptomeningeal Cerebrovascular Amyloid and White Matter Pathology in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roher, Alex E; Kuo, Yu-Min; Esh, Chera; Knebel, Carmen; Weiss, Nicole; Kalback, Walter; Luehrs, Dean C; Childress, Jennifer L; Beach, Thomas G; Weller, Roy O; Kokjohn, Tyler A

    2003-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by neurofibrillary tangles and by the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in senile plaques and in the walls of cortical and leptomeningeal arteries as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). There also is a significant increase of interstitial fluid (ISF) in cerebral white matter (WM), the pathological basis of which is largely unknown. We hypothesized that the accumulation of ISF in dilated periarterial spaces of the WM in AD correlates with the severity of CAA, with the total Aβ load in the cortex and with Apo E genotype. A total of 24 AD brains and 17 nondemented age-matched control brains were examined. CAA was seen in vessels isolated from brain by using EDTA-SDS lysis stained by Thioflavin-S. Total Aβ in gray matter and WM was quantified by immunoassay, ApoE genotyping by PCR, and dilatation of perivascular spaces in the WM was assessed by quantitative histology. The study showed that the frequency and severity of dilatation of perivascular spaces in the WM in AD were significantly greater than in controls (P < 0.001) and correlated with Aβ load in the cortex, with the severity of CAA, and with ApoE ɛ4 genotype. The results of this study suggest that dilation of perivascular spaces and failure of drainage of ISF from the WM in AD may be associated with the deposition of Aβ in the perivascular fluid drainage pathways of cortical and leptomeningeal arteries. This failure of fluid drainage has implications for therapeutic strategies to treat Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:12865947

  2. Deaths from cerebrovascular diseases correlated to month of birth: elevated risk of death from subarachnoid hemorrhage among summer-born

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, K.; Imaizumi, Y.

    It has been suggested that maternal nutrition, and fetal and infant growth have an important effect on the risk of cardiovascular disease in adult life. We investigated the population-based distribution of deaths from cerebrovascular diseases (ICD9 codes 430, 431, or 434) in Japan in 1986-1994 as a function of birth month, by examining death-certificate records. For a total of 853 981 people born in the years 1900-1959, the distribution of the number of deaths according to the month of birth was compared with the distribution expected from the monthly numbers of all births for each sex and for the corresponding birth decade. For those born between 1920 and 1949, there were significant discrepancies between the actual numbers of deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage (ICD9 430) and the numbers expected, and these differences were related to the month of birth. Those born in summer, June-September, consistently had an elevated risk of death, particularly men, where the excess risk was 8%-23%. This tendency was also observed, less distinctly but significantly, for deaths from intracerebral hemorrhage (ICD9 431), but was not observed for those dying from occlusion of the cerebral arteries (ICD9 434). The observation that the risk of dying from subarachnoid hemorrhage was more than 10% higher among those born in the summer implies that at least one in ten deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage has its origin at a perinatal stage. Although variations in hypertension in later life, which could possibly be ''programmed'' during the intra-uterine stages, could be an explanation for this observation, the disease-specific nature of the observation suggests the involvement of aneurysm formation, which is a predominant cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  3. Venous Thromboembolism and Cerebrovascular Events in Patients with Giant Cell Arteritis: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Crowson, Cynthia S.; Makol, Ashima; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Saitta, Antonino; Salvarani, Carlo; Matteson, Eric L.; Warrington, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and cerebrovascular events in a community-based incidence cohort of patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) compared to the general population. Methods A population-based inception cohort of patients with incident GCA between January 1, 1950 and December 31, 2009 in Olmsted County, Minnesota and a cohort of non-GCA subjects from the same population were assembled and followed until December 31, 2013. Confirmed VTE and cerebrovascular events were identified through direct medical record review. Results The study population included 244 patients with GCA with a mean ± SD age at diagnosis of 76.2 ± 8.2 years (79% women) and an average length of follow-up of 10.2 ± 6.8 years. Compared to non-GCA subjects of similar age and sex, patients diagnosed with GCA had a higher incidence (%) of amaurosis fugax (cumulative incidence ± SE: 2.1 ± 0.9 versus 0, respectively; p = 0.014) but similar rates of stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), and VTE. Among patients with GCA, neither baseline characteristics nor laboratory parameters at diagnosis reliably predicted risk of VTE or cerebrovascular events. Conclusion In this population-based study, the incidence of VTE, stroke and TIA was similar in patients with GCA compared to non-GCA subjects. PMID:26901431

  4. Arterial pulse wave velocity, inflammatory markers, pathological GH and IGF states, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Michael R; Evans, Peter; Davies, Bruce; Baker, Julien S

    2008-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) measurements provide information regarding risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, but only in a specific artery. Arterial stiffness (AS) can be determined by measurement of arterial pulse wave velocity (APWV). Separate from any role as a surrogate marker, AS is an important determinant of pulse pressure, left ventricular function and coronary artery perfusion pressure. Proximal elastic arteries and peripheral muscular arteries respond differently to aging and to medication. Endogenous human growth hormone (hGH), secreted by the anterior pituitary, peaks during early adulthood, declining at 14% per decade. Levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) are at their peak during late adolescence and decline throughout adulthood, mirror imaging GH. Arterial endothelial dysfunction, an accepted cause of increased APWV in GH deficiency (GHD) is reversed by recombinant human (rh) GH therapy, favorably influencing the risk for atherogenesis. APWV is a noninvasive method for measuring atherosclerotic and hypertensive vascular changes increases with age and atherosclerosis leading to increased systolic blood pressure and increased left ventricular hypertrophy. Aerobic exercise training increases arterial compliance and reduces systolic blood pressure. Whole body arterial compliance is lowered in strength-trained individuals. Homocysteine and C-reactive protein are two inflammatory markers directly linked with arterial endothelial dysfunction. Reviews of GH in the somatopause have not been favorable and side effects of treatment have marred its use except in classical GHD. Is it possible that we should be assessing the combined effects of therapy with rhGH and rhIGF-I? Only multiple intervention studies will provide the answer. PMID:19337549

  5. A pilot study of cerebrovascular reactivity autoregulation after pediatric cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer K.; Brady, Ken M.; Chung, Shang-En; Jennings, Jacky M.; Whitaker, Emmett E.; Aganga, Devon; Easley, Ronald B.; Heitmiller, Kerry; Jamrogowicz, Jessica L.; Larson, Abby C.; Lee, Jeong-Hoo; Jordan, Lori C.; Hogue, Charles W.; Lehmann, Christoph U.; Bembea, Mela M.; Hunt, Elizabeth A.; Koehler, Raymond C.; Shaffner, Donald H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Improved survival after cardiac arrest has placed greater emphasis on neurologic resuscitation. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the relationship between cerebrovascular autoregulation and neurologic outcomes after pediatric cardiac arrest. Methods Children resuscitated from cardiac arrest had autoregulation monitoring during the first 72 hours after return of circulation with an index derived from near-infrared spectroscopy in a pilot study. The range of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) with optimal vasoreactivity (MAPOPT) was identified. The area under the curve (AUC) of the time spent with MAP below MAPOPT and MAP deviation below MAPOPT was calculated. Neurologic outcome measures included placement of a new tracheostomy or gastrostomy, death from a primary neurologic etiology (brain death or withdrawal of support for neurologic futility), and change in the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category score (ΔPCPC). Results Thirty-six children were monitored. Among children who did not require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), children who received a tracheostomy/gastrostomy had greater AUC during the second 24 hours after resuscitation than those who did not (P=0.04; n=19). Children without ECMO who died from a neurologic etiology had greater AUC during the first 48 hours than did those who lived or died from cardiovascular failure (P=0.04; n=19). AUC below MAPOPT was not associated with ΔPCPC when children with or without ECMO were analyzed separately. Conclusions Deviation from the blood pressure with optimal autoregulatory vasoreactivity may predict poor neurologic outcomes after pediatric cardiac arrest. This experimental autoregulation monitoring technique may help individualize blood pressure management goals after resuscitation. PMID:25046743

  6. Predictive and preventive strategies to advance the treatments of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases: the Ukrainian context

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Despite great efforts in treatments of cardiovascular diseases, the field requires innovative strategies because of high rates of morbidity, mortality and disability, indicating evident deficits in predictive vascular diagnosis and individualized treatment approaches. Talking about the vascular system, currently, physicians are not provided with integrated medical approaches to diagnose and treat vascular diseases. Only an individual global approach to the analysis of all segments in the vascular system of a patient allows finding the optimal way for vascular disease treatment. As for the existing methodology, there is a dominance of static methods such as X-ray contrast angiography and magnetic resonance imaging in angiomode. Taking into account the world experience, this article deals with innovative strategies, aiming at predictive diagnosis in vascular system, personalization of the biomedical treatment approaches, and targeted prevention of individual patient cohorts. Clinical examples illustrate the advances in corresponding healthcare sectors. Recommendations are provided to promote the field. PMID:23083430

  7. Average Daily Blood Pressure, not Office Blood Pressure, is Associated with Progression of Cerebrovascular Disease and Cognitive Decline in Older People

    PubMed Central

    White, William B.; Wolfson, Leslie; Wakefield, Dorothy B.; Hall, Charles B.; Campbell, Patrick; Moscufo, Nicola; Schmidt, Julia; Kaplan, Richard F.; Pearlson, Godfrey; Guttmann, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    Background High blood pressure (BP) is a risk factor for cerebrovascular disease, including stroke. Little is known about the importance of BP on the progression of microvascular disease of the brain that has been associated with functional decline in mobility and cognition in older people. Methods and Results This was a prospective cohort of subjects 75-89 years to determine relations among vascular risk factors, white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHs), and functional status. 99 subjects were enrolled using a balanced 3×3 matrix stratified by age and mobility performance and 72 subjects completed all sets of baseline and follow-up studies at 2 years. Subjects were excluded if there were medications, systemic or neurologic diseases that could compromise mobility. Ambulatory and clinic BP monitoring, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), gait studies and neuropsychological testing were performed at baseline and after 24 months. Brain classification into normal white matter and T2-hyperintense WMH was performed using semi-automated segmentation. Quantitative measures of mobility and cognitive function were obtained longitudinally. Increased ambulatory systolic BP, but not clinic systolic BP, from baseline to 24 month follow-up was associated with increased WMH over that same period, as as well as measures of executive function/processing speed. Similar associations were observed for 24 hour BP, awake BP, and sleep BP, but not the surge between the sleep and awake time at the 24 month time point. Conclusions These data demonstrate for the first time the importance of 24-hour systolic BP in the progression of brain WMH burden associated with impairment of cognitive function in older people. The 24-hour systolic BP may be a potential target for intervention in the elderly to reduce vascular disease of the brain and impairment of function. PMID:22105196

  8. Albuminuria, Cerebrovascular Disease and Cortical Atrophy: among Cognitively Normal Elderly Individuals.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun Bin; Shin, Hee-Young; Park, Sang Eon; Chun, Phillip; Jang, Hye Ryoun; Yang, Jin-ju; Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Yeo Jin; Jung, Na-Yeon; Lee, Jin San; Lee, Juyoun; Jang, Young Kyoung; Jang, Eun Young; Kang, Mira; Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Changsoo; Min, Ju-Hong; Ryu, Seungho; Na, Duk L; Seo, Sang Won

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that decreased glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria have different roles in brain structure alterations. We enrolled 1,215 cognitively normal individuals, all of whom underwent high-resolution T1-weighted volumetric magnetic resonance imaging scans. The cerebral small vessel disease burdens were assessed with white matter hyperintensities (WMH), lacunes, and microbleeds. Subjects were considered to have an abnormally elevated urine albumin creatinine ratio if the value was ≥17 mg/g for men and ≥25 mg/g for women. Albuminuria, but not estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), was associated with increased WMH burdens (p = 0.002). The data was analyzed after adjusting for age, sex, education, history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, ischemic heart disease, stroke, total cholesterol level, body mass index, status of smoking and alcohol drinking, and intracranial volume. Albuminuria was also associated with cortical thinning, predominantly in the frontal and occipital regions (both p < 0.01) in multiple linear regression analysis. However, eGFR was not associated with cortical thickness. Furthermore, path analysis for cortical thickness showed that albuminuria was associated with frontal thinning partially mediated by WMH burdens. The assessment of albuminuria is needed to improve our ability to identify individuals with high risk for cognitive impairments, and further institute appropriate preventive measures. PMID:26878913

  9. Effect of high-intensity pulse irradiation with linear polarized near-infrared rays on muscle tone in patients with cerebrovascular disease: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Nobuyuki; Takezako, Nobuhiro; Shimonishi, Yuko; Usuda, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated effects of a high-intensity linear polarized near-infrared ray irradiation for mitigation of muscle hypertonia. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 patients with cerebrovascular disease. [Methods] Subjects were randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. The intervention group received irradiation of the triceps surae. Passive range of motion and passive resistive joint torque of ankle dorsiflexion were measured before and after the intervention in knee extended and flexed positions. [Results] In the knee extended position, the mean changes in passive range of motion were 2.70° and −0.50° in the intervention and control groups, respectively, and the mean changes in passive resistive joint torque were −1.42 and −0.26 N·m in the intervention and control groups, respectively. In the knee flexed position, the mean changes in passive range of motion were 3.70° and 0.70° in the intervention and control groups, respectively, and the mean changes in passive resistive joint torque were −2.38 and −0.31 N·m in the intervention and control groups, respectively. In both knee positions, the mean changes in the two indices were greater in the intervention group than in the control group. [Conclusion] High-intensity linear polarized near-infrared ray irradiation increases passive range of motion and decreases passive resistive joint torque. PMID:26834360

  10. Objective cardiac markers and cerebrovascular lesions in Indian seniors.

    PubMed

    Charles, Stephanie H; Tow, Amanda C; Verghese, Joe

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors are implicated in cerebrovascular disease, resulting in cognitive impairment. This study investigated the relationship between objective cardiac markers and cerebral changes in older Indian adults with and without dementia. Dementia patients with major electrocardiographic (EKG) abnormalities were 8.19 times more likely to have evidence of stroke on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with patients with no EKG abnormalities (p<.05). The relationship between major EKG abnormalities and stroke on MRI was not significant for patients without dementia. Objective cardiac markers may identify MRI cerebrovascular lesions in patients with dementia, and thus guide neuroimaging allocation in resource-poor areas. PMID:25107661

  11. Does Long Term Use of Piracetam Improve Speech Disturbances Due to Ischemic Cerebrovascular Diseases?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gungor, Levent; Terzi, Murat; Onar, Musa Kazim

    2011-01-01

    Aphasia causes significant disability and handicap among stroke survivors. Language therapy is recommended for aphasic patients, but not always available. Piracetam, an old drug with novel properties, has been shown to have mild beneficial effects on post-stroke aphasia. In the current study, we investigated the effects of 6 months treatment with…

  12. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Pneumoconiosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Ho, Shang-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pneumoconiosis is a parenchymal lung disease that develops through the inhalation of inorganic dust at work. Cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events are leading causes of mortality and adult disability worldwide. This retrospective cohort study investigated the association between pneumoconiosis, and cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events by using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan. The data analyzed in this study was retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We selected 6940 patients with pneumoconiosis from the database as our study cohort. Another 27,760 patients without pneumoconiosis were selected and matched with those with pneumoconiosis according to age and sex as the comparison cohort. We used univariate and multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analyses to determine the association between pneumoconiosis and the risk of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events after adjusting for medical comorbidities. After adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities, the patients with pneumoconiosis exhibited a significantly higher incidence of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–1.24) than did those without pneumoconiosis. The incidence of hemorrhagic stroke was higher, but not significant, in the pneumoconiosis patients (HR 1.20, 95% CI 0.99–1.46). No statistically significant differences were observed between the pneumoconiosis and nonpneumoconiosis groups in acute coronary syndrome (HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.95–1.26). The findings of this study reveal an association between pneumoconiosis and a higher risk of cerebrovascular events after adjustment for comorbidities. Healthcare providers should control the related risk factors for primary prevention of stroke in pneumoconiosis patients. PMID:26945404

  13. Cerebrovascular neurosurgery in evolution: the endovascular paradigm.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Grant C; Dumont, Travis M; Eller, Jorge L; Mokin, Maxim; Snyder, Kenneth V; Levy, Elad I; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Hopkins, L Nelson

    2014-02-01

    Endovascular technique represents an important, minimally invasive approach to treating cerebrovascular disease. In this article, we discuss the origins of endovascular neurosurgery as a discipline in the context of important technical milestones, evidence-based medicine, and future cerebrovascular neurosurgical training. Cerebrovascular neurosurgery has seen a steady, convergent evolution toward the surgeon capable of seamless incorporation of open and endovascular approaches to any complex vascular disease affecting the central nervous system. Neurosurgery must assume the leadership role in the multidisciplinary neurovascular team. PMID:24402487

  14. Hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Romero, Javier M; Rosand, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Primary or nontraumatic spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 10-15% of all strokes, and has a poor prognosis. ICH has a mortality rate of almost 50% when associated with intraventricular hemorrhage within the first month, and 80% rate of dependency at 6 months from onset. Neuroimaging is critical in identifying the underlying etiology and thus assisting in the important therapeutic decisions. There are several imaging modalities available in the workup of patients who present with ICH, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). A review of the current imaging approach, as well as a differential diagnosis of etiologies and imaging manifestations of primary versus secondary intraparenchymal hemorrhage, is presented. Active bleeding occurs in the first hours after symptom onset, with early neurologic deterioration. Identifying those patients who are more likely to have hematoma expansion is an active area of research, and there are many ongoing therapeutic trials targeting this specific patient population at risk. PMID:27432674

  15. Cerebrovascular Complications After Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alejaldre, Aída; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Santos, Miguel Ángel; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Neurological complications in orthotopic heart transplantation represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality despite successful transplantation. The most frequent perioperative neurological complications are delirium or encephalopathy. In this period cerebrovascular complication ranges between 5-11%. After the perioperative period, the 5-year stroke risk after cardiac transplantation is 4.1%. In a retrospective study conducted with 314 patients who underwent cardiac transplantation, it was found that 20% of cerebrovascular complications occurred within the first two weeks after transplantation, while 80% occurred in the late postoperative phase. Of these, ischemic stroke is the most common subtype. In the perioperative periode, hemodynamic instability, cardiac arrest, extracorporeal circulation over 2 hours, prior history of stroke, and carotid stenosis greater than 50% have been reported to be risk factors for the occurrence of cerebrovascular complications. Perioperative cerebrovascular complications are associated with higher mortality and poor functional outcome at one year follow-up. After the perioperative period, the only factor that has been significantly associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular complications is a history of prior stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic. Other associated factors include unknown atrial fibrillation, septic emboli from endocarditis, cardiac catheterization and perioperative hemodynamic shock. According to the TOAST etiologic classification, the most prevalent etiologic subtype of ischemic stroke is undetermined cause. PMID:21804780

  16. Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease Associated microRNAs Are Dysregulated in Placental Tissues Affected with Gestational Hypertension, Preeclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hromadnikova, Ilona; Kotlabova, Katerina; Hympanova, Lucie; Krofta, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Aims To demonstrate that pregnancy-related complications are associated with alterations in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular microRNA expression. Gene expression of 32 microRNAs (miR-1-3p, miR-16-5p, miR-17-5p, miR-20a-5p, miR-20b-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-23a-3p, miR-24-3p, miR-26a-5p, miR-29a-3p, miR-33a-5p, miR-92a-3p, miR-100-5p, miR-103a-3p, miR-122-5p, miR-125b-5p, miR-126-3p, miR-130b-3p, miR-133a-3p, miR-143-3p, miR-145-5p, miR-146a-5p, miR-155-5p, miR-181a-5p, miR-195-5p, miR-199a-5p, miR-208a-3p, miR-210-3p, miR-221-3p, miR-342-3p, miR-499a-5p, and miR-574-3p) was assessed in placental tissues, compared between groups (35 gestational hypertension, 80 preeclampsia, 35 intrauterine growth restriction and 20 normal pregnancies) and correlated with the severity of the disease with respect to clinical signs, delivery date, and Doppler ultrasound parameters. Initially, selection and validation of endogenous controls for microRNA expression studies in placental tissues affected by pregnancy-related complications have been carried out. Results The expression profile of microRNAs was different between pregnancy-related complications and controls. The up-regulation of miR-499a-5p was a common phenomenon shared between gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Preeclamptic pregnancies delivering after 34 weeks of gestation and IUGR with abnormal values of flow rate in the umbilical artery demonstrated up-regulation of miR-1-3b. Preeclampsia and IUGR requiring termination of gestation before 34 weeks of gestation were associated with down-regulation of miR-26a-5p, miR-103a-3p and miR-145-5p. On the other hand, some of microRNAs (miR-16-5p, miR-100-5p, miR-122-5p, miR-125b-5p, miR-126-3p, miR-143-3p, miR-195-5p, miR-199a-5p, miR-221-3p, miR-342-3p, and miR-574-3p) were only down-regulated or showed a trend to down-regulation just in intrauterine growth restriction pregnancies requiring the delivery before 34 weeks of gestation. Conclusion

  17. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of cerebrovascular events in patients with osteoarthritis: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lapi, Francesco; Piccinni, Carlo; Simonetti, Monica; Levi, Miriam; Lora Aprile, Pierangelo; Cricelli, Iacopo; Cricelli, Claudio; Fanelli, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies show that the risk of cardiovascular adverse events for certain traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is similar to that of rofecoxib. While these results are focused on ischemic cardiomyopathy, there is little evidence concerning the risk of ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack and hemorrhagic stroke. Additionally, there is no information on nimesulide and ketoprofen, the most frequently prescribed NSAIDs in Italy, along with diclofenac. This study aims to determine whether the use of NSAIDs is associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular events in Italy. We performed a case-control analysis nested in a cohort of patients with osteoarthritis between 2002 and 2011 who were newly treated with NSAIDs. The patients were followed until December 31, 2012. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) of cerebrovascular events (index date) associated with current (until 30 days before the index date), recent (31-365 days) and past (>365 days) use of NSAIDs. Within a cohort of 29,722 patients, 1566 cases (1546 matched with controls) were identified (incidence rate = 11.0/1000 person-years). The overall rate of cerebrovascular event was not elevated with current NSAIDs overall when compared with past use. Among individual NSAIDs, diclofenac and ketoprofen were the molecules significantly associated with an increased rate of cerebrovascular events (OR = 1.53; 95 % CI 1.04-2.24; OR = 1.62; 95 % CI 1.02-2.58, respectively). The most frequent event was hemorrhagic stroke following the use of ketoprofen (OR = 2.09; 95 % CI 1.05-4.15). Diclofenac and ketoprofen seemed to increase the risk of cerebrovascular events. These findings might influence the choice of NSAIDs according to patient characteristics. PMID:26271463

  18. [The effect of some medications used in the treatment of cerebrovascular diseases on free radical oxidation in the model systems].

    PubMed

    Kolpikova, O S; Farkhutdinov, R R; Magzhanov, R V

    2002-01-01

    The effect of 5 medications used in the treatment of ischemic brain lesions on free radical oxidation was studied. The efficacy level was evaluated by chemoluminescent changes in the model systems generating active oxygen species and lipid peroxides radicals. The most active antioxidants inhibiting chemo luminescence proved to be mexidol, cavinton, instenon. Piracetam acts less effectively. Actovegin did not practically display any antioxidant activity. Thus, the medications studied have different effect on free radical oxidation, dysregulation of which underlies many neurological diseases i.e. ischemic blood circulation disorders. PMID:12233253

  19. Perceived efficacy of cyclandelate in the treatment of cochleovestibular and retinal disturbances related to cerebrovascular insufficiency. A study in general practice comprising 2772 patients.

    PubMed

    Memin, Y

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the perceived efficacy and safety of cyclandelate when used in general practice, an open multicentre study was performed comprising 2772 patients with symptoms of vertigo, tinnitus or visual disturbances thought to result from cerebrovascular insufficiency. After 90 days' treatment with cyclandelate 1600 mg daily in 2 doses, both the severity and frequency of these symptoms declined. The general practitioners rated the overall therapeutic efficacy of cyclandelate as 'excellent' or 'good' in 81% of patients, while 77% of patients considered the efficacy of the drug to be 'excellent' or 'good'. Side effects were infrequent and of a mild nature. Thus, when used in the setting of general practice, cyclandelate seems to be a safe and apparently effective treatment for patients with symptoms of vertigo, tinnitus and visual disturbances attributable to chronic cerebrovascular insufficiency. PMID:3497796

  20. Hemispheric asymmetry in cerebrovascular reactivity of the human primary motor cortex: an in vivo study at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Driver, Ian D; Andoh, Jamila; Blockley, Nicholas P; Francis, Susan T; Gowland, Penny A; Paus, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    Current functional MRI (fMRI) approaches assess underlying neuronal activity through monitoring the related local variations in cerebral blood oxygenation, blood volume and blood flow. This vascular response is likely to vary across brain regions and across individuals, depending on the composition of the local vascular bed and on the vascular capacity to dilate. The most widely used technique uses the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal, which arises from a complex combination of all of these factors. The model of handedness provides a case where one brain region (dominant motor cortex) is known to have a stronger BOLD response over another (non-dominant motor cortex) during hand motor task performance. We predict that this is accompanied by a higher vascular reactivity in the dominant motor cortex, when compared with the non-dominant motor cortex. Precise measurement of end-tidal CO2 and a novel sinusoidal CO2 respiratory challenge were combined with the high sensitivity and finer spatial resolution available for fMRI at 7 T to measure BOLD cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in eight healthy male participants. BOLD CVR was compared between the left (dominant) and right (non-dominant) primary motor cortices of right-handed adults. Hemispheric asymmetry in vascular reactivity was predicted and observed in the primary motor cortex (left CVR = 0.60 ± 0.15%/mm Hg; right CVR = 0.47 ± 0.08%/mm Hg; left CVR > right CVR, P = 0.04), the first reported evidence of such a vascular difference. These findings demonstrate a cerebral vascular asymmetry between the left and right primary motor cortex. The origin of this asymmetry largely arises from the contribution of large draining veins. This work has implications for future motor laterality studies that use BOLD, and it is also suggestive of a vascular plasticity in the human primary motor cortex. PMID:25788020

  1. Cerebrovascular Damage Mediates Relations Between Aortic Stiffness and Memory.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Leroy L; Woodard, Todd; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; van Buchem, Mark A; Torjesen, Alyssa A; Inker, Lesley A; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J; Mitchell, Gary F

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stiffness is associated with cognitive decline. Here, we examined the association between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and cognitive function and investigated whether cerebrovascular remodeling and parenchymal small vessel disease damage mediate the relation. Analyses were based on 1820 (60% women) participants in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. Multivariable linear regression models adjusted for vascular and demographic confounders showed that higher carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was related to lower memory score (standardized β: -0.071±0.023; P=0.002). Cerebrovascular resistance and white matter hyperintensities were each associated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and memory (P<0.05). Together, cerebrovascular resistance and white matter hyperintensities (total indirect effect: -0.029; 95% CI, -0.043 to -0.017) attenuated the direct relation between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and memory (direct effect: -0.042; 95% CI, -0.087 to 0.003; P=0.07) and explained ≈41% of the observed effect. Our results suggest that in older adults, associations between aortic stiffness and memory are mediated by pathways that include cerebral microvascular remodeling and microvascular parenchymal damage. PMID:26573713

  2. Time series analysis of the association between ambient temperature and cerebrovascular morbidity in the elderly in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian-Jing; Ma, Wei-Ping; Zhao, Nai-Qing; Wang, Xi-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Research on the association between ambient temperature and cerebrovascular morbidity is scarce in China. In this study, we applied mixed generalized additive model (MGAM) to daily counts of cerebrovascular disease of Shanghai residents aged 65 years or older from 2007–2011, stratified by gender. Weighted daily mean temperature up to lags of one week was smoothed by natural cubic spline, and was added into the model to assess both linear and nonlinear effects of temperature. We found that when the mean temperature increased by 1 °C, the male cases of cerebrovascular disease reduced by 0.95% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.80%, 1.10%) or reduced by 0.34% (95% CI: −0.68, 1.36%) in conditions of temperature was below or above 27 °C. However, for every 1 °C increase in temperature, the female cases of cerebrovascular disease increased by 0.34% (95% CI: −0.26%, 0.94%) or decreased by 0.92% (95% CI: 0.72, 1.11%) in conditions of temperature was below or above 8 °C, respectively. Temperature and cerebrovascular morbidity is negatively associated in Shanghai. MGAM is recommended in assessing the association between environmental hazards and health outcomes in time series studies. PMID:26750421

  3. Time series analysis of the association between ambient temperature and cerebrovascular morbidity in the elderly in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xian-Jing; Ma, Wei-Ping; Zhao, Nai-Qing; Wang, Xi-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Research on the association between ambient temperature and cerebrovascular morbidity is scarce in China. In this study, we applied mixed generalized additive model (MGAM) to daily counts of cerebrovascular disease of Shanghai residents aged 65 years or older from 2007-2011, stratified by gender. Weighted daily mean temperature up to lags of one week was smoothed by natural cubic spline, and was added into the model to assess both linear and nonlinear effects of temperature. We found that when the mean temperature increased by 1 °C, the male cases of cerebrovascular disease reduced by 0.95% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.80%, 1.10%) or reduced by 0.34% (95% CI: -0.68, 1.36%) in conditions of temperature was below or above 27 °C. However, for every 1 °C increase in temperature, the female cases of cerebrovascular disease increased by 0.34% (95% CI: -0.26%, 0.94%) or decreased by 0.92% (95% CI: 0.72, 1.11%) in conditions of temperature was below or above 8 °C, respectively. Temperature and cerebrovascular morbidity is negatively associated in Shanghai. MGAM is recommended in assessing the association between environmental hazards and health outcomes in time series studies.

  4. Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Control on Return from ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughson, Richard Lee; Shoemaker, Joel Kevin; Blaber, Andrew Philip; Arbeille, Philippe; Greaves, Danielle Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Control on Return from ISS (CCISS) will study the effects of long-duration spaceflight on crew members' heart functions and their blood vessels that supply the brain. Learning more about the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems could lead to specific countermeasures that might better protect future space travelers. This experiment is collaborative with the Canadian Space Agency.

  5. Molecular imaging of cerebrovascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, Nohra; Jabbour, Pascal; Magnotta, Vincent; Hasan, David

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation is a key component in the pathogenesis of cerebrovascular lesions. Two agents have emerged as promising possibilities for imaging cerebrovascular lesions. These agents are ferumoxytol and myeloperoxidase (MPO)-specific paramagnetic magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Ferumoxytol is an iron oxide nanoparticle coated by a carbohydrate shell that is used in MRI studies as an inflammatory marker as it is cleared by macrophages. Ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI allows noninvasive assessment of the inflammatory status of cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations and, possibly, may differentiate "unstable" lesions that require early intervention from "stable" lesions that can be safely observed. Several pilot studies have also suggested that MPO-specific paramagnetic MR contrast agent, di-5-hydroxytryptamide of gadopentetate dimeglumine, may allow imaging of inflammation in the wall of saccular aneurysms in animal models. However, studies in human subjects have yet to be performed. In this paper, we review current data regarding ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI and MPO-specific paramagnetic MR contrast agent and discuss current and future applications. PMID:24323714

  6. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  7. Endocannabinoids in cerebrovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Benyó, Zoltán; Ruisanchez, Éva; Leszl-Ishiguro, Miriam; Sándor, Péter; Pacher, Pál

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral blood flow is tightly regulated by myogenic, endothelial, metabolic, and neural mechanisms under physiological conditions, and a large body of recent evidence indicates that inflammatory pathways have a major influence on the cerebral blood perfusion in certain central nervous system disorders, like hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and vascular dementia. All major cell types involved in cerebrovascular control pathways (i.e., smooth muscle, endothelium, neurons, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia, and leukocytes) are capable of synthesizing endocannabinoids and/or express some or several of their target proteins [i.e., the cannabinoid 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) receptors and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel]. Therefore, the endocannabinoid system may importantly modulate the regulation of cerebral circulation under physiological and pathophysiological conditions in a very complex manner. Experimental data accumulated since the late 1990s indicate that the direct effect of cannabinoids on cerebral vessels is vasodilation mediated, at least in part, by CB1 receptors. Cannabinoid-induced cerebrovascular relaxation involves both a direct inhibition of smooth muscle contractility and a release of vasodilator mediator(s) from the endothelium. However, under stress conditions (e.g., in conscious restrained animals or during hypoxia and hypercapnia), cannabinoid receptor activation was shown to induce a reduction of the cerebral blood flow, probably via inhibition of the electrical and/or metabolic activity of neurons. Finally, in certain cerebrovascular pathologies (e.g., subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as traumatic and ischemic brain injury), activation of CB2 (and probably yet unidentified non-CB1/non-CB2) receptors appear to improve the blood perfusion of the brain via attenuating vascular inflammation. PMID:26825517

  8. A new scheme for grading the quality of scientific reports that evaluate imaging modalities for cerebrovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I

    2007-10-01

    Imaging of head and neck vasculature continues to improve with the application of new technology. To judge the value of new technologies reported in the literature, it is imperative to develop objective standards optimized against bias and favoring statistical power and clinical relevance. A review of the existing literature identified the following items as lending scientific value to a report on imaging technology: prospective design, comparison with an accepted modality, unbiased patient selection, standardized image acquisition, blinded interpretation, and measurement of reliability. These were incorporated into a new grading scheme. Two physicians tested the new scheme and an established scheme to grade reports published in the medical literature. Inter-observer reliability for both methods was calculated using the kappa coefficient. A total of 22 reports evaluating imaging modalities for cervical internal carotid artery stenosis were identified from a literature search and graded by both schemes. Agreement between the two physicians in grading the level of scientific evidence using the new scheme was excellent (kappa coefficient: 0.93, p<0.0001). Agreement using the established scheme was less rigorous (kappa coefficient: 0.39, p<0.0001). The weighted kappa coefficients were 0.95 and 0.38 for the new and established schemes, respectively. Overall agreement was higher for the newer scheme (95% versus 64%). The new grading scheme can be used reliably to categorize the strength of scientific knowledge provided by individual studies of vascular imaging. The new method could assist clinicians and researchers in determining appropriate clinical applications of newly reported technical advances. PMID:17901862

  9. Clinical Significance of Cerebrovascular Biomarkers and White Matter Tract Integrity in Alzheimer Disease: Clinical correlations With Neurobehavioral Data in Cross-Sectional and After 18 Months Follow-ups.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Kung; Lu, Yan-Ting; Huang, Chi-Wei; Lin, Pin-Hsuan; Chen, Nai-Ching; Lui, Chun-Chung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Lee, Chen-Chang; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Sz-Fan; Chang, Chiung-Chih

    2015-07-01

    Cerebrovascular risk factors and white matter (WM) damage lead to worse cognitive performance in Alzheimer dementia (AD). This study investigated WM microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging in patients with mild to moderate AD and investigated specific fiber tract involvement with respect to predefined cerebrovascular risk factors and neurobehavioral data prediction cross-sectionally and after 18 months. To identify the primary pathoanatomic relationships of risk biomarkers to fiber tract integrity, we predefined 11 major association tracts and calculated tract specific fractional anisotropy (FA) values. Eighty-five patients with AD underwent neurobehavioral assessments including the minimental state examination (MMSE) and 12-item neuropsychiatric inventory twice with a 1.5-year interval to represent major outcome factors. In the cross-sectional data, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, vitamin B12, and homocysteine levels correlated variably with WM FA values. After entering the biomarkers and WM FA into a regression model to predict neurobehavioral outcomes, only fiber tract FA or homocysteine level predicted the MMSE score, and fiber tract FA or age predicted the neuropsychiatric inventory total scores and subdomains of apathy, disinhibition, and aberrant motor behavior. In the follow-up neurobehavioral data, the mean global FA value predicted the MMSE and aberrant motor behavior subdomain, while age predicted the anxiety and elation subdomains. Cerebrovascular risk biomarkers may modify WM microstructural organization, while the association with fiber integrity showed greater clinical significance to the prediction of neurobehavioral outcomes both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. PMID:26181568

  10. Rapid and local autoregulation of cerebrovascular blood flow: a deep-brain imaging study in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kuga, Nahoko; Hirata, Tadashi; Sakai, Ikuko; Tanikawa, Yoshihisa; Chiou, Huei Yu; Kitanishi, Takuma; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    The brain obtains energy by keeping the cerebral blood flow constant against unexpected changes in systemic blood pressure. Although this homeostatic mechanism is widely known as cerebrovascular autoregulation, it is not understood how widely and how robustly it works in the brain. Using a needle-like objective lens designed for deep-tissue imaging, we quantified the degree of autoregulation in the mouse hippocampus with single-capillary resolution. On average, hippocampal blood flow exhibited autoregulation over a comparatively broad range of arterial blood pressure and did not significantly respond to pressure changes induced by the pharmacological activation of autonomic nervous system receptors, whereas peripheral tissues showed linear blood flow changes. At the level of individual capillaries, however, about 40% of hippocampal capillaries did not undergo rapid autoregulation. This heterogeneity suggests the presence of a local baroreflex system to implement cerebral autoregulation. PMID:19074968

  11. Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk factors and events associated with second-generation antipsychotic compared to antidepressant use in a non-elderly adult sample: results from a claims-based inception cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Correll, Christoph U; Joffe, Benjamin I; Rosen, Lisa M; Sullivan, Timothy B; Joffe, Russell T

    2015-01-01

    This is a study of the metabolic and distal cardiovascular/cerebrovascular outcomes associated with the use of second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) compared to antidepressants (ADs) in adults aged 18-65 years, based on data from Thomson Reuters MarketScan® Research Databases 2006-2010, a commercial U.S. claims database. Interventions included clinicians' choice treatment with SGAs (allowing any comedications) versus ADs (not allowing SGAs). The primary outcomes of interest were time to inpatient or outpatient claims for the following diagnoses within one year of SGA or AD discontinuation: hypertension, ischemic and hypertensive heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. Secondary outcomes included the same diagnoses at last follow-up time point, i.e., not censoring observations at 365 days after SGA or AD discontinuation. Cox regression models, adjusted for age, gender, diagnosis of schizophrenia and mood disorders, and number of medical comorbidities, were run. Among 284,234 individuals, those within one year of exposure to SGAs versus ADs showed a higher risk of essential hypertension (adjusted hazard ratio, AHR+1.16, 95% CI: 1.12-1.21, p<0.0001), diabetes mellitus (AHR+1.43, CI: 1.33-1.53, p<0.0001), hypertensive heart disease (AHR+1.34, CI: 1.10-1.63, p<0.01), stroke (AHR+1.46, CI: 1.22-1.75, p<0.0001), coronary artery disease (AHR+1.17, CI: 1.05-1.30, p<0.01), and hyperlipidemia (AHR+1.12, CI: 1.07-1.17, p<0.0001). Unrestricted follow-up results were consistent with within one-year post-exposure results. Increased risk for stroke with SGAs has previously only been demonstrated in elderly patients, usually with dementia. This study documents, for the first time, a significantly increased risk for stroke and coronary artery disease in a non-elderly adult sample with SGA use. We also confirm a significant risk for adverse metabolic outcomes. These findings raise concerns about the longer-term safety of SGAs, given

  12. Alterations in default-mode network connectivity may be influenced by cerebrovascular changes within 1 week of sports related concussion in college varsity athletes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Militana, Adam R; Donahue, Manus J; Sills, Allen K; Solomon, Gary S; Gregory, Andrew J; Strother, Megan K; Morgan, Victoria L

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this pilot study is to use complementary MRI strategies to quantify and relate cerebrovascular reactivity, resting cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity alterations in the first week following sports concussion in college varsity athletes. Seven college athletes (3F/4M, age = 19.7 ± 1.2 years) were imaged 3-6 days following a diagnosed sports related concussion and compared to eleven healthy controls with no history of concussion (5M/6F, 18-23 years, 7 athletes). Cerebrovascular reactivity and functional connectivity were measured using functional MRI during a hypercapnia challenge and via resting-state regional partial correlations, respectively. Resting cerebral blood flow was quantified using arterial spin labeling MRI methods. Group comparisons were made within and between 18 regions of interest. Cerebrovascular reactivity was increased after concussion when averaged across all regions of interest (p = 0.04), and within some default-mode network regions, the anterior cingulate and the right thalamus (p < 0.05) independently. The FC was increased in the concussed athletes within the default-mode network including the left and right hippocampus, precuneus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (p < 0.01), with measures being linearly related to cerebrovascular reactivity in the hippocampus in the concussed athletes. Significant resting cerebral blood flow changes were not detected between the two groups. This study provides evidence for increased cerebrovascular reactivity and functional connectivity in the medial regions of the default-mode network within days of a single sports related concussion in college athletes. Our findings emphasize the utility of complementary cerebrovascular measures in the interpretation of alterations in functional connectivity following concussion. PMID:25972119

  13. Topology and hemodynamics of the cortical cerebrovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Sven; Reichold, Johannes; Schneider, Matthias; Székely, Gábor; Weber, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The cerebrovascular system continuously delivers oxygen and energy substrates to the brain, which is one of the organs with the highest basal energy requirement in mammals. Discontinuities in the delivery lead to fatal consequences for the brain tissue. A detailed understanding of the structure of the cerebrovascular system is important for a multitude of (patho-)physiological cerebral processes and many noninvasive functional imaging methods rely on a signal that originates from the vasculature. Furthermore, neurodegenerative diseases often involve the cerebrovascular system and could contribute to neuronal loss. In this review, we focus on the cortical vascular system. In the first part, we present the current knowledge of the vascular anatomy. This is followed by a theory of topology and its application to vascular biology. We then discuss possible interactions between cerebral blood flow and vascular topology, before summarizing the existing body of the literature on quantitative cerebrovascular topology. PMID:22472613

  14. [Ischemic cerebrovascular accidents in childhood].

    PubMed

    Pascual Pascual, S I; Pascual Castroviejo, I; Vélez, A

    1988-04-01

    Authors review 53 children, aged 0 to 14 years, affected with cerebrovascular ischemic strokes. Largest aetiological groups were: a) congenital heart disease, 16 patients; b) arteritis of unknown cause, 11; c) idiopathic arterial occlusion without arteritis images on angiography, 7; d) moyamoya disease, 6; and d) local or systemic infections, 5. The mode of onset was as completed stroke in 72% and stroke in evolution in 24%. After acute stage 17.6% of patients presented other definitive strokes, 11.7% suffered only transient ischemic strokes (TIA), and 4% reversible ischemic neurologic deficits (RIND). Mean follow-up was 4.36 years, 9.8% of patients died, 11.8% recovered completely and 52.9% improved after initial stroke. Poor global evolution was associated with heart disease (p less than 0.05) and with onset of strokes before age 2 (p less than 0.05). Most important sequelae, besides motor impairment, were epilepsy (49%) and mental retardation (50% got less than IQ 80). Late epilepsy was associated with seizures at onset (p less than 0.05). Clinical factors of adverse mental development were: a) seizures at onset, b) late epilepsy and c) stroke before age 2. 66% of cases had two or more arterial lesions in the same or in different arterial trees. Therefore, embolic and arteritic factors probably play an important role in infancy and childhood stroke. PMID:3400936

  15. The neuropathology and cerebrovascular mechanisms of dementia.

    PubMed

    Raz, Limor; Knoefel, Janice; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of dementia is increasing in our aging population at an alarming rate. Because of the heterogeneity of clinical presentation and complexity of disease neuropathology, dementia classifications remain controversial. Recently, the National Plan to address Alzheimer’s Disease prioritized Alzheimer’s disease-related dementias to include: Alzheimer’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, and mixed dementias. While each of these dementing conditions has their unique pathologic signature, one common etiology shared among all these conditions is cerebrovascular dysfunction at some point during the disease process. The goal of this comprehensive review is to summarize the current findings in the field and address the important contributions of cerebrovascular, physiologic, and cellular alterations to cognitive impairment in these human dementias. Specifically, evidence will be presented in support of small-vessel disease as an underlying neuropathologic hallmark of various dementias, while controversial findings will also be highlighted. Finally, the molecular mechanisms shared among all dementia types including hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial bioenergetics, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and blood–brain barrier permeability responsible for disease etiology and progression will be discussed. PMID:26174330

  16. Risks of cerebrovascular events related to open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Attum, A A; Girardet, R; Barbie, R; Yared, S; Raleigh, D; Mathew, T; Hymes, W; Lansing, A

    1998-08-01

    Prevention of perioperative cerebrovascular injury in patients undergoing open heart surgery is a serious task for the surgeon, especially as age and severity of atherosclerotic disease increases. The most significant predisposing factors have been identified as existing carotid arterial disease or prior stroke, heavy calcification of the aorta, renal dysfunction, advanced age, and diabetes mellitus. We have studied a series of 600 open heart patients from 1992 to 1995 from the incidence of peri-operative stroke and mortality, evaluating 16 risk factors: heavy calcification of the ascending aorta, asymptomatic carotid disease, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, prior CVA, left ventricular function (ejection fraction of 20% or less), age greater than 70, renal dysfunction, transmural myocardial infarction, fluid balance index greater than 2500 ccs, smoking, type of procedure, emergency procedure, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, cardiopulmonary bypass time, gender, and hypertension Stroke occurred in 8 patients (1.3%), one of whom die postoperatively. Full or near-full recovery was experienced by 5 patients; 2 patients remained partially dysfunctional at the end of the study period. The operative mortality was 2.0% (12 patients); 10 deaths occurred in hospital and 2 following discharge within 30 days postoperatively. The risk of stroke was 15 times greater in patients over age 70; 16 times greater in older males (> or = 70 years); 5 times greater in patients with prior stroke or existing (asymptomatic) carotid artery disease; 8 times greater in patients with renal dysfunction; 4 times greater with a positive fluid balance index; and twice greater when cardiopulmonary bypass exceeded 110 minutes. Four of the stroke patients had diabetes mellitus. Two of 9 patients with heavy calcification of the aortic arch suffered cerebrovascular injury. Six or more of the risk factors studied were present in 81 patients; all 8 stroke patients (9.9%) came from this

  17. Risk factors for traumatic blunt cerebrovascular injury diagnosed by computed tomography angiography in the pediatric population: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Sivakumar, Walavan; Metzger, Ryan R; Bollo, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is frequently used to examine patients for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) after cranial trauma, but the pediatric population at risk for BCVI is poorly defined. Although CTA is effective for BCVI screening in adults, the increased lifetime risk for malignant tumors associated with this screening modality warrants efforts to reduce its use in children. The authors' objective was to evaluate the incidence of BCVI diagnosed by CTA in a pediatric patient cohort and to create a prediction model to identify children at high risk for BCVI. METHODS Demographic, clinical, and radiographic data were collected retrospectively for pediatric patients who underwent CTA during examination for traumatic cranial injury from 2003 through 2013. The primary outcome was injury to the carotid or vertebral artery diagnosed by CTA. RESULTS The authors identified 234 patients (mean age 8.3 years, range 0.04-17 years, 150 [64%] boys) who underwent CTA screening for BCVI. Of these, 24 (10.3%) had a focal neurological deficit, and 153 (65.4%) had intracranial hemorrhage on a head CTA. Thirty-seven BCVIs were observed in 36 patients (15.4%), and 16 patients (6.8%) died. Multivariate regression analysis identified fracture through the carotid canal, petrous temporal bone fracture, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of < 8, focal neurological deficit, and stroke on initial CT scan as independent risk factors for BCVI. A prediction model for identifying children at high risk for BCVI was created. A score of ≤ 2 yielded a 7.9% probability of BCVI and a score of ≥ 3 a risk of 39.3% for BCVI. CONCLUSIONS For cranial trauma in children, fracture of the petrous temporal bone or through the carotid canal, focal neurological deficit, stroke, and a GCS score of < 8 are independent risk factors for BCVI. PMID:25745952

  18. Cerebrovascular autoregulation: lessons learned from spaceflight research.

    PubMed

    Blaber, Andrew P; Zuj, Kathryn A; Goswami, Nandu

    2013-08-01

    This review summarizes our current understanding of cerebral blood flow regulation with exposure to microgravity, outlines potential mechanisms associated with post-flight orthostatic intolerance, and proposes future directions for research and linkages with cerebrovascular disorders found in the general population. It encompasses research from cellular mechanisms (e.g. hind limb suspension: tissue, animal studies) to whole body analysis with respect to understanding human responses using space analogue studies (bed rest, parabolic flight) as well as data collected before, during, and after spaceflight. Recent evidence indicates that cerebrovascular autoregulation may be impaired in some astronauts leading to increased susceptibility to syncope upon return to a gravitational environment. The proposed review not only provides insights into the mechanisms of post-flight orthostatic intolerance, but also increases our understanding of the mechanisms associated with pathophysiological conditions (e.g. unexplained syncope) with clinical applications in relation to postural hypotension or intradialytic hypotension. PMID:23132388

  19. Ultra-sensitive molecular MRI of cerebrovascular cell activation enables early detection of chronic central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Axel; Gauberti, Maxime; Macrez, Richard; Jullienne, Amandine; Briens, Aurélien; Raynaud, Jean-Sébastien; Louin, Gaelle; Buisson, Alain; Haelewyn, Benoit; Docagne, Fabian; Defer, Gilles; Vivien, Denis; Maubert, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Since endothelial cells can be targeted by large contrast-carrying particles, molecular imaging of cerebrovascular cell activation is highly promising to evaluate the underlying inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cerebrovascular cell activation can reveal CNS disorders in the absence of visible lesions and symptoms. To this aim, we optimized contrast carrying particles targeting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and MRI protocols through both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although, pre-contrast MRI images failed to reveal the ongoing pathology, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed hypoperfusion-triggered CNS injury in vascular dementia, unmasked amyloid-induced cerebrovascular activation in Alzheimer's disease and allowed monitoring of disease activity during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed the cerebrovascular cell activation associated with known risk factors of CNS disorders such as peripheral inflammation, ethanol consumption, hyperglycemia and aging. By providing a dramatically higher sensitivity than previously reported methods and molecular contrast agents, the technology described in the present study opens new avenues of investigation in the field of neuroinflammation. PMID:22813950

  20. [Daily life activities following cerebrovascular infarct].

    PubMed

    Pradat-Diehl, Pascale; Peskine, Anne

    2006-09-15

    Cerebro-vascular disease is the first cause of handicap in France. Disabilities in daily life activities are due to motor, visual and cognitive impairments following a stroke. Difficulties arise while grooming, getting dressed, eating, moving around ... the WHO presents with a new classification of functioning, that has been followed by a recent law in France. The aim is to place the handicapped citizen in daily life and not just to list his/her deficiencies. Rehabilitation after stroke has to establish functional objectives early so as to include daily life goals in re-education. PMID:17002070

  1. Effects of age and sex on cerebrovascular function in the rat middle cerebral artery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of estrogen on cerebrovascular function are well known, the age-dependent deleterious effects of estrogen are largely unstudied. It was hypothesized that age and sex interact in modulating cerebrovascular reactivity to vasopressin (VP) by altering the role of prostanoids in vascular function. Methods Female (F) Sprague–Dawley rats approximating key stages of “hormonal aging” in humans were studied: premenopausal (mature multigravid, MA, cyclic, 5–6 months) and postmenopausal (reproductively senescent, RS, acyclic, 10–12 months). Age-matched male (M) rats were also studied. Reactivity to VP (10−12–10−7 M) was measured in pressurized middle cerebral artery segments in the absence or presence of selective inhibitors of COX-1 (SC560, SC, 1 μM) or COX-2 (NS398, NS, 10 μM). VP-stimulated release of PGI2 and TXA2 were measured using radioimmunoassay of 6-keto-PGF1α and TXB2 (stable metabolites, pg/mg dry wt/45 min). Results In M, there were no changes in VP-induced vasoconstriction with age. Further, there were no significant differences in basal or in low- or high-VP-stimulated PGI2 or TXA2 production in younger or older M. In contrast, there were marked differences in cerebrovascular reactivity and prostanoid release with advancing age in F. Older RS F exhibited reduced maximal constrictor responses to VP, which can be attributed to enhanced COX-1 derived dilator prostanoids. VP-induced vasoconstriction in younger MA F utilized both COX-1 and COX-2 derived constrictor prostanoids. Further, VP-stimulated PGI2 and TXA2 production was enhanced by endogenous estrogen and decreased with advancing age in F, but not in M rats. Conclusions This is the first study to examine the effects of age and sex on the mechanisms underlying cerebrovascular reactivity to VP. Interestingly, VP-mediated constriction was reduced by age in F, but was unchanged in M rats. Additionally, it was observed

  2. Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Young Subjects with Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Buterbaugh, John; Wynstra, Charles; Provencio, Natalie; Combs, Daniel; Gilbert, Michael; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Regional brain alterations may be involved in the pathogenesis and adverse consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The objectives for the current study were to (1) determine cerebrovascular reactivity in the motor areas that control upper airway musculature in patients with OSA, and (2) determine whether young patients with OSA have decreased cerebrovascular reactivity in response to breath holding. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Academic center. Participants: Twelve subjects with OSA (age 24–42 y; apnea-hypopnea index 17; interquartile range [IQR] 9, 69 per hour) and control subjects (n = 10; age 29–44 y; AHI 2; IQR 1, 3 per hour). Measurements and Results: Subjects underwent blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) while awake, swallowing, and breath holding. In subjects with OSA, during swallowing, there was less activity in the brainstem than in controls (P = 0.03) that remained reduced after adjusting for cortical motor strip activity (P = 0.036). In OSA subjects, brain regions of increased cerebrovascular reactivity (38; IQR 17, 96 cm3) was smaller than that in controls (199; IQR 5, 423 cm3; P = 0.01). In OSA subjects, brain regions of decreased cerebrovascular reactivity during breath hold was greater (P = 0.01), and the ratio of increased-to-decreased brain regions was lower than that of controls (P = 0.006). Adjustment for cerebral volumes, body mass index, and white matter lesions did not change these results substantively. Conclusions: In patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), diminished change in brainstem activity during swallowing and reduced cerebrovascular reactivity may contribute to the etiopathogenesis and adverse cerebrovascular consequences, respectively. We speculate that decreased cerebral auto-regulation may be causative of gray matter loss in OSA. Citation: Buterbaugh J, Wynstra C, Provencio N, Combs D, Gilbert M, Parthasarathy S. Cerebrovascular reactivity in

  3. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... if they have a history of: Abnormal cholesterol Diabetes Heart disease (coronary artery disease) High blood pressure ( hypertension ) Kidney disease involving hemodialysis Smoking Stroke ( cerebrovascular disease )

  4. NIRS-based noninvasive cerebrovascular regulation assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S.; Richmond, I.; Borgos, J.; Mitra, K.

    2016-03-01

    Alterations to cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been implicated in diverse neurological conditions, including mild traumatic brain injury, microgravity induced intracranial pressure (ICP) increases, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-measured regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (rSO2) provides an estimate of oxygenation of the interrogated cerebral volume that is useful in identifying trends and changes in oxygen supply to cerebral tissue and has been used to monitor cerebrovascular function during surgery and ventilation. In this study, CO2-inhalation-based hypercapnic breathing challenges were used as a tool to simulate CBF dysregulation, and NIRS was used to monitor the CBF autoregulatory response. A breathing circuit for the selective administration of CO2-compressed air mixtures was designed and used to assess CBF regulatory responses to hypercapnia in 26 healthy young adults using non-invasive methods and real-time sensors. After a 5 or 10 minute baseline period, 1 to 3 hypercapnic challenges of 5 or 10 minutes duration were delivered to each subject while rSO2, partial pressure of end tidal CO2 (PETCO2), and vital signs were continuously monitored. Change in rSO2 measurements from pre- to intrachallenge (ΔrSO2) detected periods of hypercapnic challenges. Subjects were grouped into three exercise factor levels (hr/wk), 1: 0, 2:>0 and <10, and 3:>10. Exercise factor level 3 subjects showed significantly greater ΔrSO2 responses to CO2 challenges than level 2 and 1 subjects. No significant difference in ΔPETCO2 existed between these factor levels. Establishing baseline values of rSO2 in clinical practice may be useful in early detection of CBF changes.

  5. Landmark papers in cerebrovascular neurosurgery 2015.

    PubMed

    Moore, Justin M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Gupta, Raghav; Adeeb, Nimer; Patel, Apar S; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Thomas, Ajith J

    2016-09-01

    The management of cerebrovascular disease has advanced considerably in 2015. Five randomized control trials have firmly established the role of endovascular thrombectomy for ischemic strokes due to large vessel occlusion. The randomized trial of intraarterial treatment for acute ischemic stroke (MR CLEAN) (Berkhemer et al. NEJM 2015;372:11-20) was the first of a series on the topic. There was a total of 5 randomized controlled trials published showing benefit in terms of functional outcomes at 90days for mechanical thrombectomy including the Endovascular Therapy for Ischemic stroke with perfusion-imaging selection (EXTEND IA) (Campbell et al. NEJM 2015;372:1009-18), the Randomized assessment of rapid endovascular treatment of ischemic stroke (ESCAPE) (Goyal et al. NEJM 2015;372:1019-30) trials, the stent-retriever thrombectomy after IV t-PA is t-PA alone in stroke (SWIFT-PRIME) (Saver et al. NEJM 2015;372:2285-95), and the thrombectomy within 8h after symptom onset in Ischemic stroke (REVASCAT) trial (Jovin et al. NEJM 2015; 372:2296-306). Six-year results from randomized controlled Barrow Ruptured Aneurysm Trial (BRAT) found no significant difference in functional outcomes in patients ruptured aneurysms treated surgically clippings versus endovascular treatment (Spetzler et al. JNS 2015;123:609-17. The 10-year results of the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm trial (ISAT) reported similar mortality rates and good functional outcomes between clipped and coiled patients (Molyneux et al. Lancet 2015;385:691-7). We also discuss the impact of genome wide sequencing studies in familial aneurysms, the largest publication on stent assisted coiling and flow diverter for aneurysms and noteworthy papers relevant to Moyamoya and cavernous malformations (Yang et al. Neurosurgery 2015;77:241-7). PMID:27366977

  6. Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to acute hypoxia following exposure to intermittent hypoxia in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Glen E; Brugniaux, Julien V; Pialoux, Vincent; Duggan, Cailean T C; Hanly, Patrick J; Ahmed, Sofia B; Poulin, Marc J

    2009-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) is thought to be responsible for many of the long-term cardiovascular consequences associated with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Experimental human models of IH can aid in investigating the pathophysiology of these cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of IH on the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular response to acute hypoxia and hypercapnia in an experimental human model that simulates the hypoxaemia experienced by OSA patients. We exposed 10 healthy, male subjects to IH for 4 consecutive days. The IH profile involved 2 min of hypoxia (nadir = 45.0 mmHg) alternating with 2 min of normoxia (peak = 88.0 mmHg) for 6 h. The cerebral blood flow response and the pressor responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia were assessed after 2 days of sham exposure, after each day of IH, and 4 days following the discontinuation of IH. Nitric oxide derivatives were measured at baseline and following the last exposure to IH. After 4 days of IH, mean arterial pressure increased by 4 mmHg (P < 0.01), nitric oxide derivatives were reduced by 55% (P < 0.05), the pressor response to acute hypoxia increased (P < 0.01), and the cerebral vascular resistance response to hypoxia increased (P < 0.01). IH alters blood pressure and cerebrovascular regulation, which is likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease in patients with OSA. PMID:19417094

  7. Cerebrovascular regulation, exercise, and mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Meehan, William P.; Iverson, Grant L.; Taylor, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A substantial number of people who sustain a mild traumatic brain injury report persistent symptoms. Most common among these symptoms are headache, dizziness, and cognitive difficulties. One possible contributor to sustained symptoms may be compromised cerebrovascular regulation. In addition to injury-related cerebrovascular dysfunction, it is possible that prolonged rest after mild traumatic brain injury leads to deconditioning that may induce physiologic changes in cerebral blood flow control that contributes to persistent symptoms in some people. There is some evidence that exercise training may reduce symptoms perhaps because it engages an array of cerebrovascular regulatory mechanisms. Unfortunately, there is very little work on the degree of impairment in cerebrovascular control that may exist in patients with mild traumatic brain injury, and there are no published studies on the subacute phase of recovery from this injury. This review aims to integrate the current knowledge of cerebrovascular mechanisms that might underlie persistent symptoms and seeks to synthesize these data in the context of exploring aerobic exercise as a feasible intervention to treat the underlying pathophysiology. PMID:25274845

  8. Homocysteine and cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: a biochemical, neuroimaging, and genetic study.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; Lage, Pablo Martínez; Sanchez-Mut, Jose; Lamet, Isabel; Pagonabarraga, Javier; Toledo, Jon B; García-Garcia, David; Clavero, Pedro; Samaranch, Lluis; Irurzun, Cecilia; Matsubara, Juan M; Irigoien, Jaione; Bescos, Emilia; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Pérez-Tur, Jordi; Obeso, Jose A

    2009-07-30

    The role of the plasma level of homocysteine (Hcy), as a primary outcome, and the effect of silent cerebrovascular lesions and genetic variants related to Hcy metabolism, as secondary outcomes, in the cognitive decline and dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD) were studied. This case-control study focused on 89 PD patients of minimum 10 years of evolution and older than 60 years, who were neuropsychologically classified either as cognitively normal (n = 37), having mild cognitive impairment (Petersen criteria) (n = 22), or suffering from dementia (DSM-IV) (n = 30), compared with cognitively normal age-matched control subjects (n = 30). Plasma levels of Hcy, vitamins B12 and B6, folic acid, polymorphisms in genes related to Hcy metabolism (MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, and CBS) and silent cerebrovascular events were analyzed. Plasma levels of Hcy were increased in PD patients (P = 0.0001). There were no differences between the groups of patients. The brain vascular burden was similar among PD groups. There was no association between polymorphisms in the studied genes and the Hcy plasma levels or cognitive status in PD patients. We found no evidence for a direct relationship between Hcy plasma levels and cognitive impairment and dementia in PD. No indirect effect through cerebrovascular disease or genetic background was found either. PMID:19452554

  9. Clinical Evaluation of Effects of Chronic Resveratrol Supplementation on Cerebrovascular Function, Cognition, Mood, Physical Function and General Well-Being in Postmenopausal Women—Rationale and Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Hamish Michael; Howe, Peter Ranald Charles; Wong, Rachel Heloise Xiwen

    2016-01-01

    Background: This methodological paper presents both a scientific rationale and a methodological approach for investigating the effects of resveratrol supplementation on mood and cognitive performance in postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women have an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia, which may be at least partly due to loss of beneficial effects of estrogen on the cerebrovasculature. We hypothesise that resveratrol, a phytoestrogen, may counteract this risk by enhancing cerebrovascular function and improving regional blood flow in response to cognitive demands. A clinical trial was designed to test this hypothesis. Method: Healthy postmenopausal women were recruited to participate in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled (parallel comparison) dietary intervention trial to evaluate the effects of resveratrol supplementation (75 mg twice daily) on cognition, cerebrovascular responsiveness to cognitive tasks and overall well-being. They performed the following tests at baseline and after 14 weeks of supplementation: Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Cambridge Semantic Memory Battery, the Double Span and the Trail Making Task. Cerebrovascular function was assessed simultaneously by monitoring blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries using transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Conclusion: This trial provides a model approach to demonstrate that, by optimising circulatory function in the brain, resveratrol and other vasoactive nutrients may enhance mood and cognition and ameliorate the risk of developing dementia in postmenopausal women and other at-risk populations. PMID:27005658

  10. High-intensity interval exercise and cerebrovascular health: curiosity, cause, and consequence

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Cotter, James D; Brassard, Patrice; Bailey, Damian M

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is a uniquely effective and pluripotent medicine against several noncommunicable diseases of westernised lifestyles, including protection against neurodegenerative disorders. High-intensity interval exercise training (HIT) is emerging as an effective alternative to current health-related exercise guidelines. Compared with traditional moderate-intensity continuous exercise training, HIT confers equivalent if not indeed superior metabolic, cardiac, and systemic vascular adaptation. Consequently, HIT is being promoted as a more time-efficient and practical approach to optimize health thereby reducing the burden of disease associated with physical inactivity. However, no studies to date have examined the impact of HIT on the cerebrovasculature and corresponding implications for cognitive function. This review critiques the implications of HIT for cerebrovascular function, with a focus on the mechanisms and translational impact for patient health and well-being. It also introduces similarly novel interventions currently under investigation as alternative means of accelerating exercise-induced cerebrovascular adaptation. We highlight a need for studies of the mechanisms and thereby also the optimal dose-response strategies to guide exercise prescription, and for studies to explore alternative approaches to optimize exercise outcomes in brain-related health and disease prevention. From a clinical perspective, interventions that selectively target the aging brain have the potential to prevent stroke and associated neurovascular diseases. PMID:25833341

  11. Engineering theranostic nanovehicles capable of targeting cerebrovascular amyloid deposits.

    PubMed

    Agyare, Edward K; Jaruszewski, Kristen M; Curran, Geoffry L; Rosenberg, Jens T; Grant, Samuel C; Lowe, Val J; Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Paravastu, Anant K; Poduslo, Joseph F; Kandimalla, Karunya K

    2014-07-10

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by the deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) proteins within the walls of the cerebral vasculature with subsequent aggressive vascular inflammation leading to recurrent hemorrhagic strokes. The objective of the study was to develop theranostic nanovehicles (TNVs) capable of a) targeting cerebrovascular amyloid; b) providing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast for the early detection of CAA; and c) treating cerebrovascular inflammation resulting from CAA. The TNVs comprised of a polymeric nanocore made from Magnevist (MRI contrast agent) conjugated chitosan. The nanocore was also loaded with cyclophosphamide (CYC), an immunosuppressant shown to reduce the cerebrovascular inflammation in CAA. Putrescine modified F(ab')2 fragment of anti-amyloid antibody, IgG4.1 (pF(ab')24.1) was conjugated to the surface of the nanocore to target cerebrovascular amyloid. The average size of the control chitosan nanoparticles (conjugated with albumin and are devoid of Magnevist, CYC, and pF(ab')24.1) was 164±1.2 nm and that of the TNVs was 239±4.1 nm. The zeta potential values of the CCNs and TNVs were 21.6±1.7 mV and 11.9±0.5 mV, respectively. The leakage of Magnevist from the TNVs was a modest 0.2% over 4 days, and the CYC release from the TNVs followed Higuchi's model that describes sustained drug release from polymeric matrices. The studies conducted in polarized human microvascular endothelial cell monolayers (hCMEC/D3) in vitro as well as in mice in vivo have demonstrated the ability of TNVs to target cerebrovascular amyloid. In addition, the TNVs provided contrast for imaging cerebrovascular amyloid using MRI and single photon emission computed tomography. Moreover, the TNVs were shown to reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production by the Aβ challenged blood brain barrier (BBB) endothelium more effectively than the cyclophosphamide alone. PMID:24735640

  12. Oxidative stress upregulates the NMDA receptor on cerebrovascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Betzen, Christian; White, Robin; Zehendner, Christoph M; Pietrowski, Eweline; Bender, Bianca; Luhmann, Heiko J; Kuhlmann, Christoph R W

    2009-10-15

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated oxidative stress has been implicated in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in a variety of neuropathological diseases. Although some interactions between both phenomena have been elucidated, possible influences of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the NMDA-R itself have so far been neglected. The objective of this study was to examine how the cerebroendothelial NMDA-R is affected by exposure to oxidative stress and to assess possible influences on BBB integrity. RT-PCR confirmed several NMDA-R subunits (NR1, NR2B-D) expressed in the bEnd3 cell line (murine cerebrovascular endothelial cells). NR1 protein expression after exposure to ROS was observed via in-cell Western. The functionality of the expressed NMDA-R was determined by measuring DiBAC fluorescence in ROS-preexposed cells upon stimulation with the specific agonist NMDA. Finally, the effects on barrier integrity were evaluated using the ECIS system to detect changes in monolayer impedance upon NMDA-R stimulation after exposure to ROS. The expression of NR1 significantly (p<0.001) increased 72 h after 30 min exposure to superoxide (+33.8+/-7.5%), peroxynitrite (+84.9+/-10.7%), or hydrogen peroxide (+92.8+/-7.6%), resulting in increased cellular response to NMDA-R stimulation and diminished monolayer impedance. We conclude that oxidative stress upregulates NMDA-R on cerebrovascular endothelium and thus heightens susceptibility to glutamate-induced BBB disruption. PMID:19660541

  13. Immunotherapy of cerebrovascular amyloidosis in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, Veronica; Weiss, Ronen; Benromano, Tali; Kfir, Einat; Blumenfeld-Katzir, Tamar; Tempel-Brami, Catherine; Assaf, Yaniv; Xia, Weiming; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Weiner, Howard L; Frenkel, Dan

    2012-02-01

    Cerebrovascular amyloidosis is caused by amyloid accumulation in walls of blood vessel walls leading to hemorrhagic stroke and cognitive impairment. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) expression levels correlate with the degree of cerebrovascular amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and TGF-β1 immunoreactivity in such cases is increased along the cerebral blood vessels. Here we show that a nasally administered proteosome-based adjuvant activates macrophages and decreases vascular amyloid in TGF-β1 mice. Animals were nasally treated with a proteosome-based adjuvant on a weekly basis for 3 months beginning at age 13 months. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) we found that while control animals showed a significant cerebrovascular pathology, proteosome-based adjuvant prevents further brain damage and prevents pathological changes in the blood-brain barrier. Using an object recognition test and Y-maze, we found significant improvement in cognition in the treated group. Our findings support the potential use of a macrophage immunomodulator as a novel approach to reduce cerebrovascular amyloid, prevent microhemorrhage, and improve cognition. PMID:21371785

  14. The role of Alzheimer’s and cerebrovascular pathology in mediating the effects of age, race, and apolipoprotein E genotype on dementia severity in pathologically confirmed Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gavett, Brandon E.; John, Samantha E.; Gurnani, Ashita S.; Bussell, Cara A.; Saurman, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dementia severity can be modeled as the construct δ, representing the “cognitive correlates of functional status.” Objective We recently validated a model for estimating δ in the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center’s Uniform Data Set; however, δ’s association with neuropathology remains untested. Methods We used data from 727 decedents evaluated at Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) Centers nationwide. Participants spoke English, had no genetic abnormalities, and were pathologically diagnosed with AD as a primary or contributing etiology. Clinical data from participants’ last visit prior to death were used to estimate dementia severity (δ). Results A structural equation model using age, education, race, and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype (number of ε2 and ε4 alleles) as predictors and latent AD pathology and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) pathology as mediators fit the data well (RMSEA = 0.031; CFI = .957). AD pathology mediated the effects of age and APOE genotype on dementia severity. An older age at death and more ε2 alleles were associated with less AD pathology and, in turn, with less severe dementia. In contrast, more ε4 alleles were associated with more pathology and more severe dementia. Although age and race contributed to differences in CVD pathology, CVD pathology was not related to dementia severity in this sample of decedents with pathologically confirmed AD. Conclusions Using δ as an estimate of dementia severity fits well within a structural model in which AD pathology directly affects dementia severity and mediates the relationship between age and APOE genotype on dementia severity. PMID:26444761

  15. [Nuts, cardio and cerebrovascular risks. A Spanish perspective].

    PubMed

    Nus, Meritxell; Ruperto, Mar; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2004-06-01

    Nuts have been included in human diets for ages. They are very appreciated and used as a central component of sweets and desserts. However, during the last decades, scientific interest in those foods has increased enormously as many epidemiologic studies show protective effects of nut consumption on coronary heart disease in different population groups. To date, many clinical trials have analyzed the positive effects of nuts consumption (almond, walnut, pistachio, Macadamia nut, and pecan) on the lipid profile, decreasing total and low density lipoproteins (LDL) cholesterol. However, whether these effects are only due to their fatty acid composition or to any other bioactive compounds, such as tocopherols, phytosterols and phytoestrogens, it is still unknown. This paper, aims to review comparative composition aspects of nuts, such as the positive effects on body weight, lipoprotein metabolism, and protection against cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The inclusion of 25 g/day of nuts, mainly raw, into a prudent diet seems to be recommended. Further investigations, as actual information is still scarce, in order to dilucidate the relationship between nuts consumption and vascular diseases are proposed. PMID:15586681

  16. Cerebrovascular Dysfunction in Preeclamptic Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Erica S.; Cipolla, Marilyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive, multi-system disorder of pregnancy that affects several organ systems, including the maternal brain. Cerebrovascular dysfunction during preeclampsia can lead to cerebral edema, seizures, stroke and potentially maternal mortality. This review will discuss the effects of preeclampsia on the cerebrovasculature that may adversely affect the maternal brain, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation and blood-brain barrier disruption, and the resultant clinical outcomes including posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and maternal stroke. Potential long-term cognitive outcomes of preeclampsia and the role of the cerebrovasculature are also reviewed. PMID:26126779

  17. Protecting Against Cerebrovascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Guang; Arai, Ken; Murata, Yoshihiro; Wang, Sophia; Stins, Monique F.; Lo, Eng H.; van Leyen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose The concept of the neurovascular unit suggests that effects on brain vasculature must be considered if neuroprotection is to be achieved in stroke. We previously reported that 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX) is upregulated in the peri-infarct area after middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice, and 12/15-LOX contributes to brain damage after ischemia–reperfusion. The current study was designed to investigate 12/15-LOX involvement in vascular injury in the ischemic brain. Methods In cell culture, a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line was subjected to either hypoxia or H2O2-induced oxidative stress with or without lipoxygenase inhibitors. For in vivo studies, mice were subjected to 90 minutes middle cerebral artery occlusion, and the effects of either 12/15-LOX gene knockout or treatment with lipoxygenase inhibitors were compared. Expression of 12/15-LOX and claudin-5 as well as extravasation of immunoglobulin G were detected by immunohistochemistry. Edema was measured as water content of brain hemispheres according to the wet–dry weight method. Results Brain endothelial cells were protected against hypoxia and H2O2 by the lipoxygenase inhibitor baicalein. After focal ischemia, 12/15-LOX was increased in neurons and endothelial cells. The vascular tight junction protein claudin-5 underwent extensive degradation in the peri-infarct area, which was partially prevented by the lipoxygenase inhibitor baicalein. Leakage of immunoglobulin G into the brain parenchyma was significantly reduced in 12/15-LOX knockout mice as well as wild-type mice treated with baicalein. Likewise, brain edema was significantly ameliorated. Conclusion 12/15-LOX may contribute to ischemic brain damage not just by causing neuronal cell death, but also by detrimental effects on the brain microvasculature. 12/15-LOX inhibitors may thus be effective as both neuroprotectants and vasculoprotectants. PMID:18635843

  18. Age-related decrease in cerebrovascular-derived neuroprotective proteins: effect of acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Debjani; Sanchez, Alma; Yin, Xiangling; Martinez, Joseph; Grammas, Paula

    2012-01-01

    As the population ages, the need for effective methods to maintain brain function in older adults is increasingly pressing. Vascular disease and neurodegenerative disorders commonly co-occur in older persons. Cerebrovascular products contribute to the neuronal milieu and have important consequences for neuronal viability. In this regard vascular derived neuroprotective proteins, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) are important for maintaining neuronal viability, especially in the face of injury and disease. The objective of this study is to measure and compare levels of VEGF, PEDF and PACAP released from isolated brain microvessels of Fischer 344 rats at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months of age. Addition of acetaminophen to isolated brain microvessels is employed to determine whether this drug affects vascular expression of these neuroprotective proteins. Experiments on cultured brain endothelial cells are performed to explore the mechanisms/mediators that regulate the effect of acetaminophen on endothelial cells. The data indicate cerebrovascular expression of VEGF, PEDF and PACAP significantly decreases with age. The age-associated decrease in VEGF and PEDF is ameliorated by addition of acetaminophen to isolated brain microvessels. Also, release of VEGF, PEDF, and PACAP from cultured brain endothelial cells decreases with exposure to the oxidant stressor menadione. Acetaminophen treatment upregulates VEGF, PEDF and PACAP in brain endothelial cells exposed to oxidative stress. The effect of acetaminophen on cultured endothelial cells is in part inhibited by the selective thrombin inhibitor hirudin. The results of this study suggest that acetaminophen may be a useful agent for preserving cerebrovascular function. If a low dose of acetaminophen can counteract the decrease in vascular-derived neurotrophic factors evoked by age and oxidative stress, this drug

  19. Increased accumulation of the cardio-cerebrovascular disease treatment drug tanshinone in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots by the enzymes 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase and 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Luo, Xiuqin; Ju, Guanhua; Yu, Xiaohong; Hao, Xiaolong; Huang, Qiang; Xiao, Jianbo; Cui, Lijie; Kai, Guoyin

    2014-09-01

    Tanshinone is widely used for treatment of cardio-cerebrovascular diseases with increasing demand. Herein, key enzyme genes SmHMGR (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase) and SmDXR (1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase) involved in the tanshinone biosynthetic pathway were introduced into Salvia miltiorrhiza (Sm) hairy roots to enhance tanshinone production. Over-expression of SmHMGR or SmDXR in hairy root lines can significantly enhance the yield of tanshinone. Transgenic hairy root lines co-expressing HMGR and DXR (HD lines) produced evidently higher levels of total tanshinone (TT) compared with the control and single gene transformed lines. The highest tanshinone production was observed in HD42 with the concentration of 3.25 mg g(-1) DW. Furthermore, the transgenic hairy roots showed higher antioxidant activity than control. In addition, transgenic hairy root harboring HMGR and DXR (HD42) exhibited higher tanshinone content after elicitation by yeast extract and/or Ag(+) than before. Tanshinone can be significantly enhanced to 5.858, 6.716, and 4.426 mg g(-1) DW by YE, Ag(+), and YE-Ag(+) treatment compared with non-induced HD42, respectively. The content of cryptotanshinone and dihydrotanshinone was effectively elevated upon elicitor treatments, whereas there was no obvious promotion effect for the other two compounds tanshinone I and tanshinone IIA. Our results provide a useful strategy to improve tanshinone content as well as other natural active products by combination of genetic engineering with elicitors. PMID:24913677

  20. Lesions of nucleus tractus solitarii globally impair cerebrovascular autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishitsuka, T.; Iadecola, C.; Underwood, M.D.; Reis, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    The authors studied the effects of acute bilateral electrolytic lesions of the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and its autoregulation in rats anesthetized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated. rCBF or regional cerebral glucose utilization (rCGU) was measured 30 min after NTS lesions, by the UC-iodoantipyrine technique or 2-deoxyglucose method, respectively. Cerebrovascular autoregulation was assessed in groups of 4-5 rats at three levels of arterial pressure (AP):90, 125, and 140 mmHg. AP was lowered by hemorrhage or elevated by intravenous infusion of phenylephrine. NTS lesions did not alter rCBF at 125 mmHg but resulted in loss of autoregulation. In contrast, lesions of the cuneate nucleus or transection of the baroreceptor afferents did not alter autoregulation. NTS lesions did not affect the reactivity of the cerebrovascular bed to hypercarbia or hypocarbia nor the rCGU in any brain regions. They conclude that lesions of the NTS impair cerebrovascular autoregulation. The effect is not due to changes in metabolism, nonspecific effects of the lesions, vasoparalysis, or interruption of the baroreceptor reflex arch. Neural pathways originating in or passing through the NTS can regulate the cerebrovascular autoregulation of the entire brain.

  1. [Acute cerebrovascular disorders during surgical operations on abdominal organs].

    PubMed

    Kudriavtsev, A A

    2000-01-01

    Acute cerebrovascular disorders were found in 4.78% of the patients operated on for acute abdominal diseases. Such disorders were revealed during the first 3 days of the postoperative period in 86.9% and appeared as transitory ischemic attacks (21.9%), acute hypertensive encephalopathy (12.4%), ischemic stroke with reversible neurological deficit (27.6%), ischemic stroke with stable neurological deficit (20%), hemorrhagic stroke (2.9%), mixed stroke (2.9%). The pathogenesis of vascular disorder in examined cases included systemic and cerebral hemodynamic disorders, acid-alkaline imbalance, impaired blood gas composition and biochemical and physicochemical blood properties, altered cranial great arteries, cerebrovascular emboli, endogenous intoxication and age-related changes. In the first 24 postoperative hours, actovegin and instenon therapy accelerated neurological deficit regression and recovered cerebral hemodynamics in postoperative strokes. PMID:10957794

  2. Economic valuation of informal care in cerebrovascular accident survivors in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebrovascular diseases are the second leading cause of death worldwide and one of the health conditions which demand the highest level of social services. The aim of this study was to estimate the social cost of non-professional (informal) care provided to survivors of cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) with some type of disability in Spain. Methods We obtained data from the 2008 Survey on Disability, Independent Living and Dependency (EDAD-08) on the main characteristics of individuals who provide informal care to survivors of CVAs in Spain. We estimated the cost of substituting informal care in favor of formal care provided by professional caregivers (proxy good method) and performed a statistical analysis of the relationship between degree of dependency and number of care hours provided using ordinary least squares regression. Results The number of disabled people diagnosed with CVA totaled 1,975 (329,544 people when extrapolating to the national population using the elevation factor provided by EDAD-08). Of these, 1,221 individuals (192,611 people extrapolated to the national population) received at least one hour of informal care per week. The estimated hours of informal care provided in 2008 amounted to 852 million. The economic valuation of the time of informal care ranges from 6.53 billion euros (at 7.67 euros/hour) to 10.83 billion euros (when calculating each hour of care at 12.71 euros). The results of our statistical analysis highlight the importance of degree of dependency in explaining differences in the number of hours of informal care provided. Conclusions The results of our study reveal the high social cost of cerebrovascular accidents in Spain. In addition, evidence is presented of a correlation between higher degree of dependency in CVA survivors and greater number of hours of care received. An integral approach to care for CVA survivors requires that the caregivers’ role and needs be taken into account. PMID:24308349

  3. Subjective and objective knowledge and decisional role preferences in cerebrovascular patients compared to controls

    PubMed Central

    Riechel, Christina; Alegiani, Anna Christina; Köpke, Sascha; Kasper, Jürgen; Rosenkranz, Michael; Thomalla, Götz; Heesen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk knowledge and active role preferences are important for patient involvement in treatment decision-making and adherence. Although knowledge about stroke warning signs and risk factors has received considerable attention, objective knowledge on secondary prevention and further self-esteem subjective knowledge have rarely been studied. The aim of our study was to investigate knowledge and treatment decisional role preferences in cerebrovascular patients compared to controls. Methods We performed a survey on subjective and objective stroke risk knowledge and autonomy preferences in cerebrovascular patients from our stroke outpatient clinic (n=262) and from pedestrians on the street taken as controls during a “World Stroke Day” (n=274). The questionnaire includes measures for knowledge and decisional role preferences from previously published questionnaires and newly developed measures, for example, subjective knowledge, revealed on a visual analog scale. Results The overall stroke knowledge was low to moderate, with no differences between patients and controls. Knowledge about secondary prevention was particularly low. Only 10%–15% of participants correctly estimated the stroke absolute risk reduction potential of aspirin. The medical data interpretation competence was moderate in both groups. Age and basic mathematical and statistical understanding (numeracy) were the only independent predictors of objective stroke knowledge, whereas previous stroke had no impact on stroke knowledge. However, patients were thought to be better informed than controls. Approximately 60% of both patients and controls claimed to prefer a shared decision-making approach in treatment decisions. Conclusion The level of stroke risk knowledge in patients with cerebrovascular diseases was as low as in randomly selected pedestrians, although patients felt better informed. Both groups preferred involvement in treatment decision-making. We conclude that educational concepts

  4. Neurosonological Examination: A Non-Invasive Approach for the Detection of Cerebrovascular Impairment in AD

    PubMed Central

    Urbanova, Barbora; Tomek, Ales; Mikulik, Robert; Magerova, Hana; Horinek, Daniel; Hort, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in vascular impairment associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This interest was stimulated by the findings of higher incidence of vascular risk factors in AD. Signs of vascular impairment were investigated notably in the field of imaging methods. Our aim was to explore ultrasonographic studies of extra- and intracranial vessels in patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and define implications for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of the disease. The most frequently studied parameters with extracranial ultrasound are intima-media thickness in common carotid artery, carotid atherosclerosis, and total cerebral blood flow. The transcranial ultrasound concentrates mostly on flow velocities, pulsatility indices, cerebrovascular reserve capacity, and cerebral microembolization. Studies suggest that there is morphological and functional impairment of cerebral circulation in AD compared to healthy subjects. Ultrasound as a non-invasive method could be potentially useful in identifying individuals in a higher risk of progression of cognitive decline. PMID:24478651

  5. Cerebrovascular stenoses with cerebral infarction in a child with Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ardinger, R H; Goertz, K K; Mattioli, L F

    1994-07-01

    We report on a patient with Williams syndrome who suffered a cerebrovascular accident. Clinical evaluation demonstrated the presence of carotid and cerebral arterial stenoses. We believe these lesions led to acute cerebrovascular ischemia and a non-hemorrhagic cerebral infarction. It is possible the stenoses were exacerbated by a vasculitis. The stenoses were identified by both invasive and noninvasive imaging studies. These studies may have a role in the evaluation of persons with Williams syndrome. PMID:8074144

  6. Neuroimaging Assessment of Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Concussion: Current Concepts, Methodological Considerations, and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Michael J.; Ryner, Lawrence N.; Sobczyk, Olivia; Fierstra, Jorn; Mikulis, David J.; Fisher, Joseph A.; Duffin, James; Mutch, W. Alan C.

    2016-01-01

    Concussion is a form of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that presents with a wide spectrum of subjective symptoms and few objective clinical findings. Emerging research suggests that one of the processes that may contribute to concussion pathophysiology is dysregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) leading to a mismatch between CBF delivery and the metabolic needs of the injured brain. Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) is defined as the change in CBF in response to a measured vasoactive stimulus. Several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques can be used as a surrogate measure of CBF in clinical and laboratory studies. In order to provide an accurate assessment of CVR, these sequences must be combined with a reliable, reproducible vasoactive stimulus that can manipulate CBF. Although CVR imaging currently plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of many cerebrovascular diseases, only recently have studies begun to apply this assessment tool in patients with concussion. In order to evaluate the quality, reliability, and relevance of CVR studies in concussion, it is important that clinicians and researchers have a strong foundational understanding of the role of CBF regulation in health, concussion, and more severe forms of TBI, and an awareness of the advantages and limitations of currently available CVR measurement techniques. Accordingly, in this review, we (1) discuss the role of CVR in TBI and concussion, (2) examine methodological considerations for MRI-based measurement of CVR, and (3) provide an overview of published CVR studies in concussion patients. PMID:27199885

  7. Noninvasive evaluation of the extracranial carotid arteries in patients with cerebrovascular events and atrial fibrillations.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, J; Rothlauf, E; Materese, E; Halperin, J

    1988-08-01

    Noninvasive carotid artery testing was performed in 73 patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who were referred because of symptoms or signs of cerebrovascular disease. Thromboembolism related to atrial fibrillation without valvular heart disease was the probable source of cerebral ischemia in 25 (80%) of 31 patients with stroke and coexisting atherosclerotic disease at the carotid artery bifurcation in six (20%). Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation was the probable source of symptoms in nine (70%) of 13 of patients with transient cerebral ischemia, while coexisting carotid artery disease was present in four (30%). Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation accounted for the symptoms in four of five patients with amaurosis fugax, with atherosclerotic carotid artery disease present in one. The remaining 24 patients had nonhemispheric symptoms of cerebrovascular disease, including vertebrobasilar insufficiency, dizziness, and syncope, and only one had a carotid lesion. A significantly higher proportion of patients with focal hemispheric symptoms had coexisting carotid disease than patients with nonfocal symptoms had, suggesting that atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease contributes to stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Noninvasive carotid artery testing may be helpful in identifying atherosclerotic lesions at the carotid artery bifurcation in patients with atrial fibrillation and cerebrovascular disease, because different therapeutic modalities may be appropriate when two potential sources of cerebral ischemia are present. PMID:3041939

  8. Biosimulation and visualization: effect of cerebrovascular geometry on hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Marie; Kobayashi, Toshio; Takagi, Kiyoshi

    2002-10-01

    Hemodynamics plays an important role in cardiovascular disorders, and the authors are applying numerical and experimental studies of cerebrovascular blood flow to the creation and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. In particular, this study aims to investigate the effects of cerebrovascular geometry on hemodynamics, such as flow pattern, wall shear stress distribution, and pressure. This report consists mainly of two parts: numerical study of blood flow in the artery extracted from computer tomography data, and numerical and experimental studies of a curved pipe model. The simulation was conducted by using a finite element method; the experiment was conducted by particle imaging velocimetry. Numerical and experimental results are compared and both show similar secondary flow behavior. PMID:12496038

  9. FastStats: Cerebrovascular Disease or Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  10. Surgical management of cerebrovascular disease. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Ojemann, R.G.; Crowell, R.M.; Heros, R.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a concise and practical description of the current treatment of these conditions at the Massachusetts General Hospital. It is clearly written and has excellent reproductions of roentgenograms, as well as detailed and explicit drawings. One of its strengths is that it presents a unified approach that has been used over a number of years with very satisfactory results.

  11. A different reason for cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bilir, Ozlem; Ersunan, Gokhan; Kalkan, Asım; Ozmen, Tuna; Yigit, Yahya

    2013-05-01

    Bee stings are commonly encountered worldwide. Various manifestations after a bee sting have been described. Local reactions are common. Unusually, manifestations such as vomiting, diarrhea, dyspnea, generalized edema, acute renal failure, hypotension, and collapse may occur. Rarely, vasculitis, serum sickness, neuritis, and encephalitis have been described, which generally develop days to weeks after a sting. We report a case of a 35-year-old man who developed neurologic deficit 6 hours after a bee sting, which was confirmed to be left parietooccipital infarction on magnetic resonance imaging scan. We report this case due to its rarity. PMID:23399346

  12. Prospective Screening for Blunt Cerebrovascular Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Preston R.; Fabian, Timothy C.; Croce, Martin A.; Cagiannos, Catherine; Williams, J. Scott; Vang, Meng; Qaisi, Waleed G.; Felker, Richard E.; Timmons, Shelly D.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To prospectively examine outcomes associated with an aggressive screening protocol for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI), and to compare the accuracy of computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) versus conventional angiography with respect to BCVI diagnosis. Summary Background Data In the past 5 years, BCVI (carotid and vertebral arteries) has been recognized with increasing frequency. Initial studies described blunt carotid injuries and their associated morbidity, while more recent reports have established the devastating potential of blunt vertebral injuries. It has been suggested that early diagnosis and anticoagulation will improve outcomes and that less-invasive diagnostic techniques than conventional angiography are desirable for screening. However, there are neither established screening criteria nor studies comparing optimal diagnostic modalities. Methods The screened population included all patients with cervical spine fractures, LeFort II or III facial fractures, Horner’s syndrome, skull base fractures involving the foramen lacerum, neck soft tissue injury, or neurological abnormalities unexplained by intracranial injuries. Patients underwent screening with four-vessel cerebral angiography. During the first half of the study, patients also underwent helical CTA. Selected patients during this same period underwent MRA. At the time of diagnosis, anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy was instituted unless clinically contraindicated. Results of this screening protocol were compared to a previously published cohort with cerebrovascular injuries (1995–1999) from the authors’ institution. Results Two hundred sixteen patients were screened over a 2-year period (3.5% of all blunt trauma admissions). Angiography identified 24 patients with carotid artery injuries (CAI) and 43 patients with vertebral artery injuries (VAI) for an overall screening yield of 29%. While the incidence of CAI remained similar between

  13. Elevated Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein-I in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Hemorrhagic Cerebrovascular Diseases : Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jin Pyeong; Cho, Won-Sang; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Seung-Ki; Oh, Chang Wan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Elevated cellular retinoic acid binding protein-I (CRABP-I) is thought to be related to the abnormal proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Accordingly, a higher CRABP-I level could cause disorganized vessel walls by causing immature SMC phenotypes and altering extracellular matrix proteins which could result in vulnerable arterial walls with inadequate responses to hemodynamic stress. We hypothesized that elevated CRABP-I level in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) could be related to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Moreover, we also extended this hypothesis in patients with vascular malformation according to the presence of hemorrhage. Methods We investigated the CSF of 26 patients : SAH, n=7; unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA), n=7; arteriovenous malformation (AVM), n=4; cavernous malformation (CM), n=3; control group, n=5. The optical density of CRABP-I was confirmed by Western blotting and presented as mean±standard error of the measurement. Results CRABP-I in SAH (0.33±0.09) was significantly higher than that in the UIA (0.12±0.01, p=0.033) or control group (0.10±0.01, p=0.012). Hemorrhage presenting AVM (mean 0.45, ranged 0.30-0.59) had a higher CRABP-I level than that in AVM without hemorrhage presentation (mean 0.16, ranged 0.14-0.17). The CRABP-I intensity in CM with hemorrhage was 0.21 and 0.31, and for CM without hemorrhage 0.14. Overall, the hemorrhage presenting group (n=11, 0.34±0.06) showed a significantly higher CRABP-I intensity than that of the non-hemorrhage presenting group (n=10, 0.13±0.01, p=0.001). Conclusion The results suggest that elevated CRABP-I in the CSF could be related with aneurysm rupture. Additionally, a higher CRABP-I level seems to be associated with hemorrhage development in vascular malformation. PMID:25733988

  14. Cerebrovascular Responses During Lower Body Negative Pressure-Induced Presyncope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriyama, Kana; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan R.; Ueno, T.; Ballard, R. E.; Fortney, S. M.

    1996-01-01

    Reduced orthostatic tolerance is commonly observed after space flight, occasionally causing presyncopal conditions. Although the cerebrovascular system may play an important role in presyncope, there have been few reports concerning cerebral hemodynamics during presyncope. The purpose of this study was to investigate cerebrovascular responses during presyncope induced by lower body negative pressure (LBNP). Seven healthy male volunteers were exposed to LBNP in steps of -10 mmHg every 3 min until presyncopal symptoms were detected. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were measured with a finger cuff. Cerebral tissue oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations were estimated using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity at the middle cerebral artery was measured with Transcranial Doppler Sonography (TCD). We focused on the data during the 2 min before endpoint. BP marked a gradual decrease (91 to 86 mmHg from 2 min to 30 sec before endpoint), which was accelerated along with HR decrease during the final 30 sec (86 to 71 mmHg). Cerebral oxy-Hb concentration decreases as presyncope is approached while total-Hb concentration remains fairly constant. TCD reveals a decrease in the CBF velocity. The TCD and NIRS results suggest that CBF decreases along with the BP decrease. Cerebrovascular responses during presyncope are closely related to cardiovascular responses.

  15. Incidence of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease in Mexican Americans

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Angina Pectoris; Death, Sudden, Cardiac; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Peripheral Vascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Diabetes Mellitus, Non-insulin Dependent; Diabetes Mellitus

  16. GORE Flow Reversal System and GORE Embolic Filter Extension Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-22

    Carotid Stenosis; Constriction, Pathologic; Carotid Artery Diseases; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Brain Diseases; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Vascular Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Pathological Conditions, Anatomical

  17. Prevalence and Incidence of Myocardial Infarction and Cerebrovascular Accident in Ageing Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, J.; Rozeboom, W.; Penning, C.; Evenhuis, H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological information on age-related cardiovascular disease in people with intellectual disability (ID) is scarce and inconclusive. We compared prevalence and incidence of cerebrovascular accident and myocardial infarction over age 50 in a residential population with ID to that in a general practice population. Method: Lifetime…

  18. Impaired cerebrovascular hemodynamics are associated with cerebral white matter damage

    PubMed Central

    Purkayastha, Sushmita; Fadar, Otite; Mehregan, Aujan; Salat, David H; Moscufo, Nicola; Meier, Dominik S; Guttmann, Charles RG; Fisher, Naomi DL; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Sorond, Farzaneh A

    2014-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) in elderly individuals with vascular diseases are presumed to be due to ischemic small vessel diseases; however, their etiology is unknown. We examined the cross-sectional relationship between cerebrovascular hemodynamics and white matter structural integrity in elderly individuals with vascular risk factors. White matter hyperintensity volumes, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD) were obtained from MRI in 48 subjects (75±7years). Pulsatility index (PI) and dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA) was assessed using transcranial Doppler ultrasound of the middle cerebral artery. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation was calculated from transfer function analysis (phase and gain) of spontaneous blood pressure and flow velocity oscillations in the low (LF, 0.03 to 0.15 Hz) and high (HF, 0.16 to 0.5 Hz) frequency ranges. Higher PI was associated with greater WMH (P<0.005). Higher phase across all frequency ranges was associated with greater FA and lower MD (P<0.005). Lower gain was associated with higher FA in the LF range (P=0.001). These relationships between phase and FA were significant in the territories limited to the middle cerebral artery as well as across the entire brain. Our results show a strong relationship between impaired cerebrovascular hemodynamics (PI and dCA) and loss of cerebral white matter structural integrity (WMH and DTI metrics) in elderly individuals. PMID:24129749

  19. Innovative Interventional and Imaging Registries: Precision Medicine in Cerebrovascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Precision medicine in cerebrovascular disorders may be greatly advanced by the use of innovative interventional and imaging-intensive registries. Registries have remained subsidiary to randomized controlled trials, yet vast opportunities exist to leverage big data in stroke. Summary This overview builds upon the rationale for innovative, imaging-intensive interventional registries as a pivotal step in realizing precision medicine for several cerebrovascular disorders. Such enhanced registries may serve as a model for expansion of our translational research pipeline to fully leverage the role of phase IV investigations. The scope and role of registries in precision medicine are considered, followed by a review on the history of stroke and interventional registries, data considerations, critiques or barriers to such initiatives, and the potential modernization of registry methods into efficient, searchable, imaging-intensive resources that simultaneously offer clinical, research and educational added value. Key Messages Recent advances in technology, informatics and endovascular stroke therapies converge to provide an exceptional opportunity for registries to catapult further progress. There is now a tremendous opportunity to deploy registries in acute stroke, intracranial atherosclerotic disease and carotid disease where other clinical trials leave questions unanswered. Unlike prior registries, imaging-intensive and modernized methods may leverage current technological capabilities around the world to efficiently address key objectives and provide added clinical, research and educational value. PMID:26600792

  20. [Genetic study of allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Luo

    2012-09-01

    Allergic diseases mentioned in this review is regarding to I type allergic inflammation induced by an IgE-mediated reaction, including asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis and food allergy. It is convinced that allergic diseases belong to multiple genes diseases and are controlled by both genetic and environmental factors. Meanwhile there exists gene-gene as well as gene-environment interactions during the development of the disease. The aim of this review is to summarize the toolkit, advance, inherent difficulties and future clinical application prospect in genetic studies of allergic disease. PMID:23214325

  1. Cerebrovascular ischemic events in wind instrument players.

    PubMed

    Evers, S; Altenmüller, E; Ringelstein, E B

    2000-09-26

    Two cases of ischemic stroke due to carotid artery dissection occurring during wind instrument playing, probably caused by increased intrathoracic and subsequent intrapharyngeal pressure, are presented. A review of the literature revealed three similar patients with other types of cerebrovascular events, such as paradoxical cerebral embolism due to a patent foramen ovale and spinal epidural hematoma during trumpet playing. PMID:10994010

  2. Current Perspectives on the Beneficial Role of Ginkgo biloba in Neurological and Cerebrovascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Kevin M.; Shah, Zahoor A.

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract is an alternative medicine available as a standardized formulation, EGb 761®, which consists of ginkgolides, bilobalide, and flavonoids. The individual constituents have varying therapeutic mechanisms that contribute to the pharmacological activity of the extract as a whole. Recent studies show anxiolytic properties of ginkgolide A, migraine with aura treatment by ginkgolide B, a reduction in ischemia-induced glutamate excitotoxicity by bilobalide, and an alternative antihypertensive property of quercetin, among others. These findings have been observed in EGb 761 as well and have led to clinical investigation into its use as a therapeutic for conditions such as cognition, dementia, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular diseases. This review explores the therapeutic mechanisms of the individual EGb 761 constituents to explain the pharmacology as a whole and its clinical application to cardiovascular and neurological disorders, in particular ischemic stroke. PMID:26604665

  3. Impact of breath holding on cardiovascular respiratory and cerebrovascular health.

    PubMed

    Dujic, Zeljko; Breskovic, Toni

    2012-06-01

    Human underwater breath-hold diving is a fascinating example of applied environmental physiology. In combination with swimming, it is one of the most popular forms of summer outdoor physical activities. It is performed by a variety of individuals ranging from elite breath-hold divers, underwater hockey and rugby players, synchronized and sprint swimmers, spear fishermen, sponge harvesters and up to recreational swimmers. Very few data currently exist concerning the influence of regular breath holding on possible health risks such as cerebrovascular, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. A literature search of the PubMed electronic search engine using keywords 'breath-hold diving' and 'apnoea diving' was performed. This review focuses on recent advances in knowledge regarding possibly harmful physiological changes and/or potential health risks associated with breath-hold diving. Available evidence indicates that deep breath-hold dives can be very dangerous and can cause serious acute health problems such a collapse of the lungs, barotrauma at descent and ascent, pulmonary oedema and alveolar haemorrhage, cardiac arrest, blackouts, nitrogen narcosis, decompression sickness and death. Moreover, even shallow apnoea dives, which are far more frequent, can present a significant health risk. The state of affairs is disturbing as athletes, as well as recreational individuals, practice voluntary apnoea on a regular basis. Long-term health risks of frequent maximal breath holds are at present unknown, but should be addressed in future research. Clearly, further studies are needed to better understand the mechanisms related to the possible development or worsening of different clinical disorders in recreational or competitive breath holding and to determine the potential changes in training/competition regimens in order to prevent these adverse events. PMID:22574634

  4. The pulsatility volume index: an indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on fast magnetic resonance imaging of cardiac and respiratory pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Evans, Karleyton C; Bhat, Himanshu; Keil, Boris; Rosen, Bruce R; Boas, David A; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-05-13

    The influence of cardiac activity on the viscoelastic properties of intracranial tissue is one of the mechanisms through which brain-heart interactions take place, and is implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Cerebrovascular disease risk is not fully explained by current risk factors, including arterial compliance. Cerebrovascular compliance is currently estimated indirectly through Doppler sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of blood velocity changes. In order to meet the need for novel cerebrovascular disease risk factors, we aimed to design and validate an MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on direct endogenous measures of blood volume changes. We implemented a fast non-gated two-dimensional MRI pulse sequence based on echo-planar imaging (EPI) with ultra-short repetition time (approx. 30-50 ms), which stepped through slices every approximately 20 s. We constrained the solution of the Bloch equations for spins moving faster than a critical speed to produce an endogenous contrast primarily dependent on spin volume changes, and an approximately sixfold signal gain compared with Ernst angle acquisitions achieved by the use of a 90° flip angle. Using cardiac and respiratory peaks detected on physiological recordings, average cardiac and respiratory MRI pulse waveforms in several brain compartments were obtained at 7 Tesla, and used to derive a compliance indicator, the pulsatility volume index (pVI). The pVI, evaluated in larger cerebral arteries, displayed significant variation within and across vessels. Multi-echo EPI showed the presence of significant pulsatility effects in both S0 and [Formula: see text] signals, compatible with blood volume changes. Lastly, the pVI dynamically varied during breath-holding compared with normal breathing, as expected for a compliance indicator. In summary, we characterized and performed an initial validation of a novel MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance, which might prove useful

  5. [THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS IN HYPERTENSIVE ENCEPHALOPATHY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS BY STUDYING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF CEREBRAL HEMODYNAMICS AND CEREBRAL PERFUSION STATUS].

    PubMed

    Sviridova, N K; Yavorsky, V V

    2015-01-01

    Intrigue progression of hypertensive encephalopathy (HE) in older patients is that the development of cognitive impairment and high blood pressure underestimated, aslo exist without clinical manifestations. In recent decades convincing proved that the basis for the development of various diseases is cerebral dysfunction systems regulating brain blood flow, including--autoregulation system, which largely affects the blood supply to the brain. This explains the fact that patients with chronic brain ischemia cerebral hemodynamic status largely depends on the condition and stability of the regulatory mechanisms of systemic and cerebral hemodynamics, particularly of systemic blood pressure, regional cerebral blood supply, normalization which, in the early stages of development disorders, prevents of serious complications. In this paper the theoretical generalization and new solution of scientific and practical problems of hypertension influence on the formation of chronic cerebral ischemia in elderly patients on a background of hypertension--specified risk factors and especially the formation of a comprehensive study on the basis of clinical and neurological data, tool sand methods for neuroimaging research developed and improved methods of diagnosis. Found that in elderly patients with HE and HBP observed significant (P < 0.05) increase in the thickness of the intima-media complex was significantly higher (dextra--1.12 ± 0.03 and sinistra--1.11 ± 0.03), than middle-aged patients with hypertension at HE, which constitutes a violation of the elastic properties of the vascular wall. Established correlation data radionuclide study ultrasonic duplex scanning of vessels of the head and neck. A negative correlation of intima-media and severity of lesions according to hypoperfusion of computer tomography single photon emission (r = -0.49; P < 0.05); confirming the progression of HE in elderly patients needs improvement and treatment. PMID:27089714

  6. STUDY OF WATERBORNE DISEASE OCCURRENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SDWA Amendments of 1996 added a requirement for EPA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to jointly carry out "pilot waterborne disease occurrence studies for at least five major U.S. communities or public water systems" and "prepare a report on the findin...

  7. Study of neuroprotection of donepezil, a therapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Akasofu, S; Kimura, M; Kosasa, T; Sawada, K; Ogura, H

    2008-09-25

    Donepezil is a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Although acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are thought to be symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease, it is not clear whether they are effective against progressive degeneration of neuronal cells. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of donepezil against ischemic damage, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) excitotoxicity, and amyloid-beta (Abeta) toxicity using rat brain primary cultured neurons. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released into the culture medium was measured as a marker of neuronal cell damage. As an ischemic damage model, we used oxygen-glucose deprivation in rat cerebral cortex primary cultured neurons. Pretreatment with donepezil (0.1, 1 and 10 microM) significantly decreased LDH release in a concentration-dependent manner. However, other acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (galantamine, tacrine and rivastigmine) did not significantly decrease LDH release. In a NMDA excitotoxicity model, pretreatment with donepezil (0.1, 1 and 10 microM) decreased the LDH release in a concentration-dependent manner. In binding assay for glutamate receptors, donepezil at 100 microM only slightly inhibited binding to the glycine and polyamine sites on NMDA receptor complex. We further examined the effect of donepezil on Abeta (1-40)- and Abeta (1-42)-induced toxicity in primary cultures of rat septal neurons. Pretreatment with donepezil (0.1, 1 and 10 microM) significantly decreased LDH release induced by Abetas in a concentration-dependent manner. However, other acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (galantamine and tacrine) and NMDA receptor antagonists (memantine and dizocilpine (MK801)) did not significantly decrease LDH release. These results demonstrate that donepezil has protective effects against ischemic damage, glutamate excitotoxicity and Abeta toxicity to rat primary cultured neurons and these effects are not dependent on acetylcholinesterase inhibition

  8. Cholesterol-Lowering Atherosclerosis Study (CLAS)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-12

    Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Carotid Artery Diseases; Cerebral Arteriosclerosis; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Coronary Arteriosclerosis; Coronary Disease; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Ischemia; Atherosclerosis

  9. Endothelial dysfunction, vascular disease and stroke: the ARTICO study.

    PubMed

    Roquer, J; Segura, T; Serena, J; Castillo, J

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a fundamental step in the atherosclerotic disease process. Its presence is a risk factor for the development of clinical events, and may represent a marker of atherothrombotic burden. Also, endothelial dysfunction contributes to enhanced plaque vulnerability, may trigger plaque rupture, and favors thrombus formation. The assessment of endothelial vasomotion is a useful marker of atherosclerotic vascular disease. There are different methods to assess endothelial function: endothelium-dependent vasodilatation brachial flow-mediated dilation, cerebrovascular reactivity to L-arginine, and the determination of some biomarkers such as microalbuminuria, platelet function, and C-reactive protein. Endothelial dysfunction has been observed in stroke patients and has been related to stroke physiopathology, stroke subtypes, clinical severity and outcome. Resting ankle-brachial index (ABI) is also considered an indicator of generalized atherosclerosis, and a low ABI is associated with an increase in stroke incidence in the elderly. Despite all these data, there are no studies analyzing the predictive value of ABI for new cardiovascular events in patients after suffering an acute ischemic stroke. ARTICO is an ongoing prospective, observational, multicenter study being performed in 50 Spanish hospitals. The aim of the ARTICO study is to evaluate the prognostic value of a pathological ABI (study will increase the knowledge of patient outcome after ischemic stroke and may help to improve our ability to detect patients at high risk of stroke recurrence or major cardiovascular events. PMID:19342831

  10. Silent cerebrovascular damage and its early correlates in essential hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Paglieri, Cristina; Rabbia, Franco; Bergui, Mauro; Genesia, Maria Luisa; Canadè, Antonella; Berra, Elena; Fulcheri, Chiara; Covella, Michele; Di Stefano, Cristina; Cerrato, Paolo; Veglio, Franco

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the association between cognitive functions, cerebrovascular damage, and cerebrovascular reactivity in 71 essential young hypertensives (age matched) and 22 normotensives (age matched). They underwent ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, neurocognitive tests, cerebral magnetic resonance, and transcranial Doppler. Twenty-three percent of patients showed more than 10 white matter lesions and 8% showed none. No control subjects showed more than 10 white matter lesions and 90% of normal controls showed no lesions. Patients with more than 10 white matter alterations had longer hypertensive story and showed significant lower nocturnal blood pressure fall. Pulsatility index was correlated with the number of white matter lesions. PMID:22574940

  11. The cerebrovascular effects of physostigmine are not mediated through the substantia innominata.

    PubMed

    Peruzzi, P; Lacombe, P; Moro, V; Vaucher, E; Levy, F; Seylaz, J

    1993-08-01

    This study sought to determine whether the cortical cholinergic projections from Meynert's nucleus are actually the target of the cholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine, which presents the ability to increase cortical blood flow. To this aim, the multiregional cerebrovascular effects of physostigmine in rats with and without lesion of the substantia innominata (SI), the equivalent of Meynert's nucleus of primates, were investigated. Unilateral SI lesions were made using ibotenic acid in three groups of rats. Four to 11 days later, the cortical choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity was measured in one group to assess the efficacy of the lesion. In the two other groups, the regional cerebral blood flow was measured using the [14C]iodoantipyrine technique, under physostigmine (0.2 mg/kg/h iv) or control conditions. SI lesion induced 27-59% fall in cortical ChAT activity in the ipsilateral hemisphere with the frontal area most affected. Despite these large biochemical differences, the lesion had little cerebrovascular effects. Side-to-side blood flow differences did not exceed 11% and did not strictly overlap the ChAT depletion. Physostigmine increased flow (38-66%) in all cortical areas, with no frontal predominance. Despite these considerable vasodilations, there were no significant differences between the lesioned and the intact hemisphere, nor any significant interaction between physostigmine and SI lesion. Thus, physostigmine does not actually activate the SI neuron terminals. This result suggests that cholinesterase inhibitors cannot be used as presynaptic markers of the cholinergic activity of this nucleus and casts doubts on their specificity as enhancement therapeutic agents in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:8405268

  12. Circulatory disease mortality in the Massachusetts tuberculosis fluoroscopy cohort study.

    PubMed

    Little, Mark P; Zablotska, Lydia B; Brenner, Alina V; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2016-03-01

    High-dose ionizing radiation is associated with circulatory disease. Risks from lower-dose fractionated exposures, such as from diagnostic radiation procedures, remain unclear. In this study we aimed to ascertain the relationship between fractionated low-to-medium dose radiation exposure and circulatory disease mortality in a cohort of 13,568 tuberculosis patients in Massachusetts, some with fluoroscopy screenings, between 1916 and 1961 and follow-up until the end of 2002. Analysis of mortality was in relation to cumulative thyroid (cerebrovascular) or lung (all other circulatory disease) radiation dose via Poisson regression. Over the full dose range, there was no overall radiation-related excess risk of death from circulatory disease (n = 3221; excess relative risk/Gy -0.023; 95% CI -0.067, 0.028; p = 0.3574). Risk was somewhat elevated in hypertensive heart disease (n = 89; excess relative risk/Gy 0.357; 95% CI -0.043, 1.030, p = 0.0907) and slightly decreased in ischemic heart disease (n = 1950; excess relative risk/Gy -0.077; 95% CI -0.130, -0.012; p = 0.0211). However, under 0.5 Gy, there was a borderline significant increasing trend for all circulatory disease (excess relative risk/Gy 0.345; 95% CI -0.032, 0.764; p = 0.0743) and for ischemic heart disease (excess relative risk/Gy 0.465; 95% CI, -0.032, 1.034, p = 0.0682). Pneumolobectomy increased radiation-associated risk (excess relative risk/Gy 0.252; 95% CI 0.024, 0.579). Fractionation of dose did not modify excess risk. In summary, we found no evidence of radiation-associated excess circulatory death risk overall, but there are indications of excess circulatory death risk at lower doses (<0.5 Gy). Although consistent with other radiation-exposed groups, the indications of higher risk at lower doses are unusual and should be confirmed against other data. PMID:26255039

  13. Acute cerebrovascular incident in a young woman: Venous or arterial stroke? – Comparative analysis based on two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Katarzyna; Zimny, Anna; Kowalczyk, Edyta; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Cerebrovascular diseases are the most common neurological disorders. Most of them are arterial strokes, mainly ischemic, less often of hemorrhagic origin. Changes in the course of cerebral venous thrombosis are less common causes of acute cerebrovascular events. Clinical and radiological presentation of arterial and venous strokes (especially in emergency head CT) may pose a diagnostic problem because of great resemblance. However, the distinction between arterial and venous stroke is important from a clinical point of view, as it carries implications for the treatment and determinates patient’s prognosis. Case Report In this article, we present cases of two young women (one with an acute venous infarction, the second with an arterial stroke) who presented with similar both clinical and radiological signs of acute vascular incident in the cerebral cortex. We present main similarities and differences between arterial and venous strokes regarding the etiology, clinical symptoms and radiological appearance in various imaging techniques. Conclusions We emphasize that thorough analysis of CT (including cerebral vessels), knowledge of symptoms and additional clinical information (e.g. risk factors) may facilitate correct diagnosis and allow planning further diagnostic imaging studies. We also emphasize the importance of MRI, especially among young people, in the differential diagnosis of venous and arterial infarcts. PMID:24505227

  14. Global mortality, disability, and the contribution of risk factors: Global Burden of Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Murray, C J; Lopez, A D

    1997-05-17

    The Global Burden of Disease Study used the disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) to compare death and disability from various disorders in developing and developed countries. In 1990, developing countries carried almost 90% of the global disease burden yet were recipients of only 10% of global health care funding. The highest disease burdens were in sub-Saharan Africa (21.4% of global total) and India (20.9%). Communicable, maternal, perinatal, and nutritional disorders (group 1 causes) predominated in sub-Saharan Africa (65.9% of burden), while noncommunicable diseases (group 2 causes) accounted for 80% of the burden in established market economies; injuries (group 3) did not differ substantially across regions. The ratio of group 2 to group 1 disorders can be used as a measure of the epidemiologic transition. Group 2 disorders already surpass group 1 disorders in China, Latin America, and the Caribbean. On a global level, group 1, 2, and 3 causes accounted for 43.9%, 40.9%, and 15.1%, respectively, of DALYs. Overall, the top 3 causes of DALYs in 1990 were lower respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, and perinatal disorders (low birth weight and birth asphyxia or birth trauma). In developed countries, these causes were ischemic heart disease, unipolar major depression, and cerebrovascular diseases. Malnutrition was the risk factor responsible for the greatest loss of DALYs (15.9%), followed by poor water supply, sanitation, and personal hygiene (6.8%). PMID:9164317

  15. Simultaneous cerebrovascular and cardiovascular responses during presyncope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bondar, R. L.; Kassam, M. S.; Stein, F.; Dunphy, P. T.; Fortney, S.; Riedesel, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Presyncope, characterized by symptoms and signs indicative of imminent syncope, can be aborted in many situations before loss of consciousness occurs. The plasticity of cerebral autoregulation in healthy humans and its behavior during this syncopal prodrome are unclear, although systemic hemodynamic instability has been suggested as a key factor in the precipitation of syncope. Using lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to simulate central hypovolemia, we previously observed falling mean flow velocities (MFVs) with maintained mean arterial blood pressure (MABP). These findings, and recent reports suggesting increased vascular tone within the cerebral vasculature at presyncope, cannot be explained by the classic static cerebral autoregulation curve; neither can they be totally explained by a recent suggestion of a rightward shift in this curve. METHODS: Four male and five female healthy volunteers were exposed to presyncopal LBNP to evaluate their cerebrovascular and cardiovascular responses by use of continuous acquisition of MFV from the right middle cerebral artery with transcranial Doppler sonography, MABP (Finapres), and heart rate (ECG). RESULTS: At presyncope, MFV dropped on average by 27.3 +/- 14% of its baseline value (P < .05), while MABP remained at 2.0 +/- 27% above its baseline level. Estimated cerebrovascular resistance increased during LBNP. The percentage change from baseline to presyncope in MFV and MABP revealed consistent decreases in MFV before MABP. CONCLUSIONS: Increased estimated cerebrovascular resistance, falling MFV, and constant MABP are evidence of an increase in cerebral vascular tone with falling flow, suggesting a downward shift in the cerebral autoregulation curve. Cerebral vessels may have a differential sensitivity to sympathetic drive or more than one type of sympathetic innervation. Future work to induce dynamic changes in MABP during LBNP may help in assessing the plasticity of the cerebral autoregulation

  16. Reduced regional cerebral blood flow in aged noninsulin-dependent diabetic patients with no history of cerebrovascular disease: evaluation by N-isopropyl- sup 123 I-p-iodoamphetamine with single-photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wakisaka, M.; Nagamachi, S.; Inoue, K.; Morotomi, Y.; Nunoi, K.; Fujishima, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow was measured using N-isopropyl-{sup 123}I-iodoamphetamine with single-photon emission computed tomography (CT) in 16 aged patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM, average age 72.8 years, average fasting plasma glucose 7.7 mmol/L), and 12 nondiabetic subjects (71.6 years, 5.3 mmol/L). None had any history of a cerebrovascular accident. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels did not differ between groups. Areas of hypoperfusion were observed in 14 diabetic patients (12 patients had multiple lesions) and in 6 nondiabetic subjects (3 had multiple lesions). Areas where radioactivity was greater than or equal to 65% of the maximum count of the slice was defined as a region with normal cerebral blood flow (region of interest A, ROI-A), and areas where the count was greater than or equal to 45% were defined as brain tissue regions other than ventricles (ROI-B). The average ROI-A/B ratio of 16 slices was used as a semiquantitative indicator of normal cerebral blood flow throughout the entire brain. Mean ROI-A/B ratio was 49.6 +/- 1.7% in the diabetic group, significantly lower than the 57.9 +/- 1.6% at the nondiabetic group (p less than 0.005). The ratio was inversely correlated with SBP (r = -0.61, p less than 0.05), total cholesterol (r = -0.51, p less than 0.05), and atherogenic index (r = -0.64, p less than 0.01), and was positively correlated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (r = 0.51, p less than 0.05) in the diabetic, but not the nondiabetic group. These observations suggest that the age-related reduction in cerebral blood flow may be accelerated by a combination of hyperglycemia plus other risk factors for atherosclerosis.

  17. Apolipoprotein E and Sex Bias in Cerebrovascular Aging of Men and Mice.

    PubMed

    Finch, Caleb E; Shams, Sara

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) research has mainly focused on neurodegenerative processes associated with the classic neuropathologic markers of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Additionally, cerebrovascular contributions to dementia are increasingly recognized, particularly from cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Remarkably, in AD brains, the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ɛ4 allele shows male excess for cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), a marker of SVD, which is opposite to the female excess of plaques and tangles. Mouse transgenic models add further complexities to sex-ApoE ɛ4 allele interactions, with female excess of both CMBs and brain amyloid. We conclude that brain aging and AD pathogenesis cannot be understood in humans without addressing major gaps in the extent of sex differences in cerebrovascular pathology. PMID:27546867

  18. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, dementia, and cerebrovascular pathology in elders receiving home services

    PubMed Central

    Buell, J S.; Dawson-Hughes, B; Scott, T M.; Weiner, D E.; Dallal, G E.; Qui, W Q.; Bergethon, P; Rosenberg, I H.; Folstein, M F.; Patz, S; Bhadelia, R A.; Tucker, K L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D deficiency has potential adverse effects on neurocognitive health and subcortical function. However, no studies have examined the association between vitamin D status, dementia, and cranial MRI indicators of cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Methods: Cross-sectional investigation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], dementia, and MRI measures of CVD in elders receiving home care (aged 65–99 years) from 2003 to 2007. Results: Among 318 participants, the mean age was 73.5 ± 8.1 years, 231 (72.6%) were women, and 109 (34.3%) were black. 25(OH)D concentrations were deficient (<10 ng/mL) in 14.5% and insufficient (10–20 ng/mL) in 44.3% of participants. There were 76 participants (23.9%) with dementia, 41 of which were classified as probable AD. Mean 25(OH)D concentrations were lower in subjects with dementia (16.8 vs 20.0 ng/mL, p < 0.01). There was a higher prevalence of dementia among participants with 25(OH)D insufficiency (≤20 ng/mL) (30.5% vs 14.5%, p < 0.01). 25(OH)D deficiency was associated with increased white matter hyperintensity volume (4.9 vs 2.9 mL, p < 0.01), grade (3.0 vs 2.2, p = 0.04), and prevalence of large vessel infarcts (10.1% vs 6.9%, p < 0.01). After adjustment for age, race, sex, body mass index, and education, 25(OH)D insufficiency (≤20 ng/mL) was associated with more than twice the odds of all-cause dementia (odds ratio [OR] = 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–4.2), Alzheimer disease (OR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.1–6.1), and stroke (with and without dementia symptoms) (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.0–4.0). Conclusions: Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency was associated with all-cause dementia, Alzheimer disease, stroke (with and without dementia symptoms), and MRI indicators of cerebrovascular disease. These findings suggest a potential vasculoprotective role of vitamin D. GLOSSARY 25(OH)D = 25-hydroxyvitamin D; AIREN = Association Internationale pour la Recherché et l'Enseignement en Neurosciences; BMI = body mass index; CI

  19. Cerebrovascular endothelial dysfunction induced by mercury exposure at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra; Furieri, Lorena Barros; Briones, Ana María; Avendaño, María Soledad; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Salaices, Mercedes; Alonso, María Jesús

    2016-03-01

    Mercury (Hg) has many harmful vascular effects by increasing oxidative stress, inflammation and vascular/endothelial dysfunction, all of which may contribute to cerebrovascular diseases development. We aimed to explore the effects of chronic low-mercury concentration on vascular function in cerebral arteries and the mechanisms involved. Basilar arteries from control (vehicle-saline solution, im) and mercury chloride (HgCl2)-treated rats for 30 days (first dose 4.6μg/kg, subsequent dose 0.07μg/kg/day, im, to cover daily loss) were used. Vascular reactivity, protein expression, nitric oxide (NO) levels and superoxide anion (O2(-)) production were analyzed. HgCl2 exposure increased serotonin contraction and reduced the endothelium-dependent vasodilatation to bradykinin. After NO synthase inhibition, serotonin responses were enhanced more in control than in mercury-treated rats while bradykinin-induced relaxation was abolished. NO levels were greater in control than Hg-treated rats. Tiron and indomethacin reduced vasoconstriction and increased the bradykinin-induced relaxation only in HgCl2-treated rats. Vascular O2(-) production was greater in mercury-treated when compared to control rats. Protein expressions of endothelial NO synthase, copper/zinc (Cu/Zn), Manganese (Mn) and extracellular-superoxide dismutases were similar in cerebral arteries from both groups. Results suggest that Hg treatment increases cerebrovascular reactivity by reducing endothelial negative modulation and NO bioavailability; this effect seems to be dependent on increased reactive oxygen species and prostanoids generation. These findings show, for the first time, that brain vasculature are also affected by chronic mercury exposure and offer further evidence that even at small concentration, HgCl2 is hazardous and might be an environmental risk factor accounting for cerebral vasospasm development. PMID:26945730

  20. Haplotype studies in Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.R.; Bull, P.C.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.; Walshe, J.M. )

    1994-01-01

    In 51 families with Wilson disease, the authors have studied DNA haplotypes of dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms (CA repeats) in the 13q14.3 region, to examine these markers for association with the Wilson disease gene (WND). In addition to a marker (D13S133) described elsewhere, the authors have developed three new highly polymorphic markers (D13S314, D13S315, and D13S316) close to the WND locus. The authors have examined the distribution of marker alleles at the loci studied and have found that D13S314, D13S133, and D13S316 each show nonrandom distribution on chromosomes carrying the WND mutation. The authors have studied haplotypes of these three markers and have found that there are highly significant differences between WND and normal haplotypes in northern European families. These findings have important implications for mutation detection and molecular diagnosis in families with Wilson disease. 25 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Occult endocrine dysfunction in patients of cerebrovascular accident

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. V. S. Hari; Kumar, Sandeep; Ahmad, Faiz M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cerebrovascular disorders are common conditions leading to significant morbidity and mortality in the population. Occult endocrine disorders also contribute to the morbidity and we studied the prevalence of endocrine dysfunction in patients of cerebrovascular accident (CVA). Materials and Methods: We evaluated 30 patients of CVA (aged 18-75, admission within 72 h of symptoms and positive neuroimaging) in this prospective, observational study. All subjects were assessed clinically and biochemically for hormonal dysfunction at admission and for mortality at the end of 1 month. The patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 (infarct, n = 20) and Group 2 (hemorrhage, n = 10) and the data were analyzed with appropriate statistical tests using GraphPad Prism Software, version 6. Results: The study participants (24M:6F) had a mean age of 60.7 ± 11.4 years and body weight of 67.2 ± 11.4 kg. Fourteen out of 30 patients showed results consistent with an endocrine disorder, including sick euthyroid syndrome (SES) and central hypothyroidism (n = 10), secondary hypogonadism (n = 3), subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 1), and growth hormone (GH) deficiency in two patients. The endocrine conditions did not differ significantly between both the groups and nine out of 30 patients succumbed to their illness within 1 month. None of the hormonal parameters studied, could predict the 30 day mortality. Conclusion: Endocrine disorders are common in acute stage of CVA and commonest finding is a SES. Hormonal dysfunction did not differ based on the etiology of the CVA. Long-term follow-up is essential to understand the morbidity contributed by the hormonal alterations. PMID:27011637

  2. Adipokines as Possible New Predictors of Cardiovascular Diseases: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Pala, Laura; Monami, Matteo; Ciani, Silvia; Dicembrini, Ilaria; Pasqua, Alessandro; Pezzatini, Anna; Francesconi, Paolo; Cresci, Barbara; Mannucci, Edoardo; Rotella, Carlo Maria

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims. The secretion of several adipocytokines, such as adiponectin, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aFABP), and visfatin, is altered in subjects with abdominal adiposity; these endocrine alterations could contribute to increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of the study was to assess the relationship among adiponectin, RBP4, aFABP, and visfatin, and incident cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results. A case-control study, nested within a prospective cohort, on 2945 subjects enrolled for a diabetes screening program was performed. We studied 18 patients with incident fatal or nonfatal IHD (Ischemic Heart Disease) or CVD (Cerebrovascular Disease), compared with 18 matched control subjects. Circulating adiponectin levels were significantly lower in cases of IHD with respect to controls. Circulating RBP4 levels were significantly increased in CVD and decreased in IHD with respect to controls. Circulating aFABP4 levels were significantly increased in CVD, while no difference was associated with IHD. Circulating visfatin levels were significantly lower in cases of both CVD and IHD with respect to controls, while no difference was associated with CVD. Conclusions. The present study confirms that low adiponectin is associated with increased incidents of IHD, but not CVD, and suggests, for the first time, a major effect of visfatin, aFABP, and RBP4 in the development of cardiovascular disease. PMID:21869928

  3. Cerebrovascular Accident Incidence in the NASA Astronaut Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPelusa, Michael B.; Charvat, Jacqueline M.; Lee, Lesley R.; Wear, Mary L.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The development of atherosclerosis is strongly associated with an increased risk for cerebrovascular accidents (CVA), including stroke and transient ischemic attacks (TIA). Certain unique occupational exposures that individuals in the NASA astronaut corps face, specifically high-performance aircraft training, SCUBA training, and spaceflight, are hypothesized to cause changes to the cardiovascular system. These changes, which include (but are not limited to) oxidative damage as a result of radiation exposure and circadian rhythm disturbance, increased arterial stiffness, and increased carotid-intima-media thickness (CIMT), may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis and subsequent CVA. The purpose of this study was to review cases of CVA in the NASA astronaut corps and describe the comorbidities and occupational exposures associated with CVA.

  4. Cognitive performance correlates with cerebrovascular impairments in multi-infarct dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, B.W.; Meyer, J.S.; Rogers, R.L.; Gandhi, S.; Tanahashi, N.; Mortel, K.F.; Tawaklna, T.

    1986-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by the /sup 133/Xe inhalation method in patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID, N = 26), Alzheimer's dementia (AD, N = 19), and among age-matched, neurologically normal, healthy volunteers (N = 26). Cognitive performance was assessed in all subjects using the Cognitive Capacity Screening Examination (CCSE). Cerebral vasomotor responses were calculated from differences in values of mean hemispheric gray matter blood flow (Delta CBF) measured during inhalation of 100% oxygen (hyperoxia) compared with CBF measured while breathing room air. Significant correlations were found between CCSE performance and vasomotor responsiveness in patients with MID (P less than .01), but not in patients with AD or in neurologically normal volunteers. Loss of vasomotor responsiveness is an indicator of cerebrovascular disease with rigidity and/or loss of reactivity of cerebral vessels, which impairs cerebrovascular responses to situational demands and predisposes to cerebral ischemia. Loss of cerebral vasomotor responsiveness among MID patients, which is a biologic marker of cerebrovascular disease, provides confirmatory evidence of the vascular etiology of MID and assists in separating MID from AD patients.

  5. Chronic cerebrovascular dysfunction after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jullienne, Amandine; Obenaus, Andre; Ichkova, Aleksandra; Savona-Baron, Catherine; Pearce, William J; Badaut, Jerome

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) often involve vascular dysfunction that leads to long-term alterations in physiological and cognitive functions of the brain. Indeed, all the cells that form blood vessels and that are involved in maintaining their proper function can be altered by TBI. This Review focuses on the different types of cerebrovascular dysfunction that occur after TBI, including cerebral blood flow alterations, autoregulation impairments, subarachnoid hemorrhage, vasospasms, blood-brain barrier disruption, and edema formation. We also discuss the mechanisms that mediate these dysfunctions, focusing on the cellular components of cerebral blood vessels (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, astrocytes, pericytes, perivascular nerves) and their known and potential roles in the secondary injury cascade. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27117494

  6. Strangulation injuries in children. Part 2. Cerebrovascular hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Hanigan, W C; Aldag, J; Sabo, R A; Rose, J; Aaland, M

    1996-01-01

    The cerebrovascular hemodynamics were recorded in two children with comparable hypoxic-ischemic injuries after strangulation. Monitoring was initiated within 13 hours of injury and continued for at least 38 hours. The profile included continuous measurements of cortical regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with a subdural thermal diffusion probe, intracranial pressure, mean arterial pressure, and expired CO2 tension. Data sets were obtained every 15 minutes or every 5 minutes during epochs of hyperventilation and inotropic support. Arterial CO2 and oxygen content and pH and, in the second patient, cardiac output (and cardiac index) were determined every 3 to 6 hours. Both children showed cortical hyperemia with a gradual rise of rCBF during the study; neither child showed elevated intracranial pressure. Mean CO2 reactivities were 1.8 and 2.1 mL/100 g/minute/mm Hg, with gradual elevations during the study. Mean cerebrovascular resistances were 0.7 and 0.9 mL/100 g/minute/mm Hg, respectively. Dissociative vasoparalysis with loss of autoregulation and preservation of CO2 reactivity was observed in both children. In the second child, during two periods of hyperventilation, an inverse steal occurred with rCBF indirectly related to expired CO2 tension; the rCBF was not related to changes in cardiac output or cardiac index. Neurologic outcome was not related to mean levels of rCBF, CPP, and CO2 reactivity, or clinical dissociative vasoparalysis. Lower initial and mean values of rCBF and an inverse steal after hyperventilation were associated with a poor outcome in the second patient. PMID:8577003

  7. Cerebrovascular effects of nitric oxide manipulation in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Fouyas, Ioannis P; Kelly, Paul A T; Ritchie, Isobel M; Whittle, Ian R

    1997-01-01

    Evidence that nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity is altered in chronic hypertension is conflicting, possibly as a result of heterogeneity in both the nature of the dysfunction and in the disease process itself. The brain is particularly vulnerable to the vascular complications of chronic hypertension, and the aim of this study was to assess whether differences in the cerebrovascular responsiveness to the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), and to the NO donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) might indicate one possible source of these complications. Conscious spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and WKY rats, were treated with L-NAME (30 mg kg−1, i.v.), 7-NI (25 mg kg−1, i.p.), SIN-1 (0.54 or 1.8 mg kg−1 h−1, continuous i.v. infusion) or saline (i.v.), 20 min before the measurement of local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) by the fully quantitative [14C]-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic technique. With the exception of mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), there were no significant differences in physiological parameters between SHR and WKY rats within any of the treatment groups, or between treatment groups. L-NAME treatment increased MABP by 27% in WKY and 18% in SHR groups, whilst 7-NI had no significant effect in either group. Following the lower dose of SIN-1 infusion, MABP was decreased to a similar extent in both groups (around −20%). There was no significant difference in MABP between groups following the higher dose of SIN-1, but this represented a decrease of −41% in SHR and −21% in WKY rats. With the exception of one brain region (nucleus accumbens), there were no significant differences in basal LCBF between WKY and SHR. L-NAME produced similar decreases in LCBF in both groups, ranging between −10 and −40%. The effect of 7-NI upon LCBF was more pronounced in the SHR (ranging from −34 to −57%) compared with the WKY (ranging from −14 to −43%), and in seven out of the

  8. [Moyamoya disease].

    PubMed

    Esin, R G; Isayeva, Yu N; Gorobets, E A; Tokareva, N V; Esin, O R

    2016-01-01

    Moya-moya is a rare cerebrovascular disease characterized by the progressive occlusion of cerebral vessels with partial switching off the circle of Willis and arteries that feed it. The article provides a review of literature, modern diagnostic criteria and a description of a single clinical case. The onset of the disease in this patient was characterized by headache and speech disorders.An analysis of speech disorders showed that they were systemic. They were registered at all language levels (phonetic, lexical,morphological, syntactic). A long diagnostic search may be explained by clinical manifestations that are atypical for other cerebrovascular diseases and by the rarity of the disease. PMID:27386589

  9. Influenza Vaccination Reduces Dementia Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Hsu, Yi-Ping; Kao, Pai-Feng; Hao, Wen-Rui; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lin, Chao-Feng; Sung, Li-Chin; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Taiwan has the highest prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) worldwide. CKD, a manifestation of vascular diseases, is associated with a high risk of dementia. Here, we estimated the association between influenza vaccination and dementia risk in patients with CKD. Data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan were used in this study. The study cohort included all patients diagnosed with CKD (according to International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes) at healthcare facilities in Taiwan (n = 32,844) from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2007. Each patient was followed up to assess dementia risk or protective factors: demographic characteristics of age and sex; comorbidities of diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cerebrovascular diseases, parkinsonism, epilepsy, substance and alcohol use disorders, mood disorder, anxiety disorder, psychotic disorder, and sleep disorder; urbanization level; monthly income; and statin, metformin, aspirin, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) use. A propensity score was derived using a logistic regression model for estimating the effect of vaccination by accounting for covariates that predict receiving the intervention (vaccine). A time-dependent Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) of dementia among vaccinated and unvaccinated CKD patients. The study population comprised 11,943 eligible patients with CKD; 5745 (48%) received influenza vaccination and the remaining 6198 (52%) did not. The adjusted HRs (aHRs) of dementia decreased in vaccinated patients compared with those in unvaccinated patients (influenza season, noninfluenza season, and all seasons: aHRs = 0.68, 0.58, and 0.64; P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0001, respectively). In the sensitivity analysis, adjustments were made to estimate the association of age and sex; diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cerebrovascular diseases, anxiety

  10. [Comprehensive therapy of cerebral and cerebrovascular decompensation (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, G

    1980-06-01

    Many psychiatric syndroms in older age are based on cerebral and cerebrovascular decompensation. Diagnosis of metabolic dysfunction or vascular dysregulation--leading to cerebral decompensation--and their therapy is of greater importance than immediate therapy of psychiatric syndroms. We use Strophantin therapy, hemodilation, stabilization of blood pressure, antidiabetics combined with mild sedation by low dose neuroleptics. After achieving metabolic and cerebrovascular equilibrium we start more or less specific psychiatric syndrom therapy like antidepressants. PMID:6109459

  11. Fasting Glucose is a Useful Indicator for Cerebrovascular Risk in Non-Diabetic Koreans: Association With Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyang; Yoon, So Ra; Na, Ga Yoon; Jun, Mira; Ahn, Mok-Ryeon; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Oh Yoen

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose are associated with incidence of cerebro-/cardio-vascular diseases. This study hypothesized that fasting glycemic status may reflect cerebrovascular risk in non-diabetic Koreans. Fasting glycemic status, lipid profiles, oxidative stress, and inflammation markers were measured in non-diabetic subjects (healthy controls, n = 112 and stroke n = 41). Systolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), triglycerides, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CPR), interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were higher, and high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterols were lower in patients with stroke than healthy controls. Fasting glucose positively correlated with hs-CRP, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) and malondialdehyde. The significances continued or at least turned to a trend after adjustments for confounding factors. Multiple regression analyses revealed that fasting glucose was mainly associated with cerebrovascular risk (β'-coefficient = 0.284, p < 0.0001) together with age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, hs-CRP, body mass index, dietary poly unsaturated fatty acid/saturated fatty acid (PUFA/SFA), and HbA1C (r(2) = 0.634, p = 0.044). The subjects were subdivided by their fasting glucose levels [normal fasting glucose: 70-99 mg/dL, n = 91 [NFG-control] and n = 27 [NFG-stroke]; higher fasting glucose: 100-125 mg/dL, n = 21 [HFG-control] and n = 14 [HFG-stroke]). In both controls and stroke patients, HFG groups show higher triglyceride, total- and LDL-cholesterol and lower HDL-cholesterol than NFG groups. Control-HFG group showed significantly higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation than control-NFG group. Stroke-HFG group also showed significantly higher inflammatory levels than stroke-NFG group, moreover the highest among the groups. Additionally, stroke-NFG group consumed higher PUFA/SFA than stroke-HFG group. Fasting glucose

  12. Fasting Glucose is a Useful Indicator for Cerebrovascular Risk in Non-Diabetic Koreans: Association With Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hyang; Yoon, So Ra; Na, Ga Yoon; Jun, Mira; Ahn, Mok-Ryeon; Cha, Jae-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose are associated with incidence of cerebro-/cardio-vascular diseases. This study hypothesized that fasting glycemic status may reflect cerebrovascular risk in non-diabetic Koreans. Fasting glycemic status, lipid profiles, oxidative stress, and inflammation markers were measured in non-diabetic subjects (healthy controls, n = 112 and stroke n = 41). Systolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), triglycerides, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CPR), interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were higher, and high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterols were lower in patients with stroke than healthy controls. Fasting glucose positively correlated with hs-CRP, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) and malondialdehyde. The significances continued or at least turned to a trend after adjustments for confounding factors. Multiple regression analyses revealed that fasting glucose was mainly associated with cerebrovascular risk (β'-coefficient = 0.284, p < 0.0001) together with age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, hs-CRP, body mass index, dietary poly unsaturated fatty acid/saturated fatty acid (PUFA/SFA), and HbA1C (r2 = 0.634, p = 0.044). The subjects were subdivided by their fasting glucose levels [normal fasting glucose: 70-99 mg/dL, n = 91 [NFG-control] and n = 27 [NFG-stroke]; higher fasting glucose: 100-125 mg/dL, n = 21 [HFG-control] and n = 14 [HFG-stroke]). In both controls and stroke patients, HFG groups show higher triglyceride, total- and LDL-cholesterol and lower HDL-cholesterol than NFG groups. Control-HFG group showed significantly higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation than control-NFG group. Stroke-HFG group also showed significantly higher inflammatory levels than stroke-NFG group, moreover the highest among the groups. Additionally, stroke-NFG group consumed higher PUFA/SFA than stroke-HFG group. Fasting glucose may

  13. Job decision latitude, job demands, and cardiovascular disease: a prospective study of Swedish men.

    PubMed Central

    Karasek, R; Baker, D; Marxer, F; Ahlbom, A; Theorell, T

    1981-01-01

    The association between specific job characteristics and subsequent cardiovascular disease was tested using a large random sample of the male working Swedish population. The prospective development of coronary heart disease (CHD) symptoms and signs was analyzed using a multivariate logistic regression technique. Additionally, a case-controlled study was used to analyze all cardiovascular-cerebrovascular (CHD-CVD) deaths during a six-year follow-up. The indicator of CHD symptoms and signs was validated in a six-year prospective study of CHD deaths (standardized mortality ratio 5.0; p less than or equal to .001). A hectic and psychologically demanding job increases the risk of developing CHD symptoms and signs (standardized odds ratio 1.29, p less than 0.25) and premature CHD-CVD death (relative risk 4.0, p less than .01). Low decision latitude-expressed as low intellectual discretion and low personal schedule freedom-is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Low intellectual discretion predicts the development of CHD symptoms and signs (SOR 1.44, p less than .01), while low personal schedule freedom among the majority of workers with the minimum statutory education increases the risk of CHD-CVD death (RR 6.6, p less than .0002). The associations exist after controlling for age, education, smoking, and overweight. PMID:7246835

  14. Cerebrovascular correlates of vitamin D deficiency in older adults living near the Equator: results from the Atahualpa Project.

    PubMed

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Mera, Robertino M; Macias, Jorge; Morales, Gabriela; Zambrano, Mauricio

    2015-12-01

    All studies attempting to find an association between vitamin D deficiency and cerebrovascular diseases have been conducted at latitudes far away from the Equator, where living conditions, cardiovascular risk factors, and sunshine exposure are different from tropical regions. We aimed to assess cerebrovascular correlates of vitamin D deficiency in community-dwelling older adults living in Atahualpa, a village located in rural coastal Ecuador. Out of 267 individuals enrolled in the neuroimaging substudy of the Atahualpa Project, 220 (82%) signed the informed consent. Mean age of participants was 70·9 ± 7·8 years, and 126 (57%) were women. Fifty-four (25%) persons have vitamin D levels <20 ng/ml, 47 (21%) had ischemic strokes, and 53 (24%) had moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin. Exposure effect models constructed with vitamin D deficiency as the exposure, white matter hyperintensities and ischemic stroke as the outcomes, and confounders--age, gender, body mass index, physical activity, blood pressure, fasting glucose, total cholesterol, ionized calcium, phosphorus, intact parathormone, and serum creatinine--as independent variables revealed a significant association of vitamin D deficiency with white matter hyperintensities (P = 0·006) but not with ischemic strokes (P = 0·359). This study shows an association of vitamin D deficiency with diffuse subcortical brain damage in older adults living in a tropical region. Lack of awareness of the importance of vitamin D deficiency might be one of the factors influencing the high prevalence of white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin in underserved Latin American populations. PMID:26310517

  15. Distinct non-cerebrovascular risk factors for ischemic lacunar stroke and non-lacunar stroke: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y F; Luo, C H; Liu, Y J; Lu, W H; Su, B R

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a non-communicable disease of increasing socioeconomic importance in aging populations. This study compared the risk factors implicated in two subtypes of ischemic stroke: lacunar stroke (LS) and non-lacunar stroke (NLS). A retrospective case control study was conducted on a total of 368 patients [220 cases (59.8%) of NLS and 148 cases (40.2%) of LS] with first-time onset of ischemic stroke. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to compare multiple non-cerebrovascular risk factors between the two groups. More patients with a history of diabetes were found in the NLS than the LS group (40.5 vs 26.4%), and that both fasting glucose and HbA1C levels before the onset of stroke were higher in NLS than LS patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that patients with a history of diabetes were 1.57 times more likely to have NLS than LS (OR = 1.57, 95%CI = 0.95-3.26). Moreover, male patients were more likely to develop NLS than females (OR = 1.46, 95%CI = 0.79-2.69), and patients with elevated fibrinogen levels were 1.4 times more likely to develop NLS than LS (OR = 1.40, 95%CI = 1.09-1.80). Additionally, patients who were heavy drinkers (OR = 1.39, 95%CI = 0.68-2.84) or smokers (OR = 1.62, 95%CI = 0.91-2.89) were more likely to develop NLS than LS. Other risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, age, and average blood pressure, did not differ between the two types of stroke. Thus, distinct non-cerebrovascular risk factors (male gender, long history of diabetes, elevated fibrinogen, heavy smoking, and heavy drinking) are associated with a higher risk of developing non-lacunar stroke than lacunar stroke. PMID:25966082

  16. Neurovascular and Cognitive failure in Alzheimer's Disease: Benefits of Cardiovascular Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Edith; Royea, Jessika; Ongali, Brice; Tong, Xin-Kang

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial and multifaceted disease for which we currently have very little to offer since there is no curative therapy, with only limited disease-modifying drugs. Recent studies in AD mouse models that recapitulate the amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology converge to demonstrate that it is possible to salvage cerebrovascular function with a variety of drugs and, particularly, therapies used to treat cardiovascular diseases such as hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. These drugs can reestablish dilatory function mediated by various endothelial and smooth muscle ion channels as well as nitric oxide availability, benefits that result in normalized brain perfusion. These cerebrovascular benefits would favor brain perfusion, which may help maintain neuronal function and, possibly, delay cognitive failure. However, restoring cerebrovascular function in AD mouse models was not necessarily accompanied by rescue of cognitive deficits related to spatial learning and memory. The results with cardiovascular therapies rather suggest that drugs originally designed to treat cardiovascular diseases that concurrently restore cerebrovascular and cognitive function do so through their pleiotropic effects. Specifically, recent findings suggest that these drugs act directly on brain cells and neuronal pathways involved in memory formation, hence, working simultaneously albeit independently on neuronal and vascular targets. These findings may help select medications for patients with cardiovascular diseases at risk of developing AD with increasing age. Further, they may identify molecular targets for recovering memory pathways that bear potential for new therapeutic avenues. PMID:26993506

  17. Study Links Climate Change to Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158680.html Study Links Climate Change to Kidney Disease Rising temperatures, less rain seen ... 5, 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change may boost rates of chronic kidney disease worldwide ...

  18. Study Links Climate Change to Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158680.html Study Links Climate Change to Kidney Disease Rising temperatures, less rain ... 5, 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change may boost rates of chronic kidney disease ...

  19. Alternative projections of mortality and disability by cause 1990-2020: Global Burden of Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Murray, C J; Lopez, A D

    1997-05-24

    As part of the Global Burden of Disease Study, three scenarios of future mortality and disability were identified. The scenarios were based on future health status as a function of projected changes in key socioeconomic variables that influence health status. Regression equations for mortality rates for nine cause-of-death clusters were developed by region based on gross domestic product per person, average number of years of education, time (as a proxy for technological change), and smoking intensity. Life expectancy at birth was projected, in all three scenarios, to increase for women (to about 90 years in established market economies by 2020), with far smaller gains in male life expectancy. Worldwide, annual mortality from communicable maternal, perinatal, and nutritional disorders (group 1 causes) is expected to decline from 17.2 million to 10.3 million in 2020 in the baseline model. Also expected is a very large increase in deaths from non-communicable diseases (group 2 causes) from 28.1 million in 1990 to 49.7 million in 2020. Deaths from injuries (group 3) are projected to increase from 5.1 million to 8.4 million. Diarrheal diseases, perinatal disorders, measles, and malaria are expected to decline dramatically as causes of death in the 1990-2020 period, while lung cancer, stomach cancer, war injuries, liver cancer, and HIV are expected to move up five or more places in the ranking. In 2020, the 10 leading causes of disability-adjusted life-years (in descending order) are projected to be ischemic heart disease, unipolar major depression, road traffic accidents, cerebrovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lower respiratory infections, tuberculosis, war injuries, diarrheal diseases, and HIV. Tobacco-attributable mortality is projected to increase from 3.0 million in 1990 to 8.4 million in 2020 (9% of the worldwide mortality burden). PMID:9167458

  20. Central respiratory chemosensitivity and cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity: a rebreathing demonstration illustrating integrative human physiology.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Christina M; Skow, Rachel J; Tymko, Michael M; Boulet, Lindsey M; Davenport, Margie H; Steinback, Craig D; Ainslie, Philip N; Lemieux, Chantelle C M; Day, Trevor A

    2016-03-01

    One of the most effective ways of engaging students of physiology and medicine is through laboratory demonstrations and case studies that combine 1) the use of equipment, 2) problem solving, 3) visual representations, and 4) manipulation and interpretation of data. Depending on the measurements made and the type of test, laboratory demonstrations have the added benefit of being able to show multiple organ system integration. Many research techniques can also serve as effective demonstrations of integrative human physiology. The "Duffin" hyperoxic rebreathing test is often used in research settings as a test of central respiratory chemosensitivity and cerebrovascular reactivity to CO2. We aimed to demonstrate the utility of the hyperoxic rebreathing test for both respiratory and cerebrovascular responses to increases in CO2 and illustrate the integration of the respiratory and cerebrovascular systems. In the present article, methods such as spirometry, respiratory gas analysis, and transcranial Doppler ultrasound are described, and raw data traces can be adopted for discussion in a tutorial setting. If educators have these instruments available, instructions on how to carry out the test are provided so students can collect their own data. In either case, data analysis and quantification are discussed, including principles of linear regression, calculation of slope, the coefficient of determination (R(2)), and differences between plotting absolute versus normalized data. Using the hyperoxic rebreathing test as a demonstration of the complex interaction and integration between the respiratory and cerebrovascular systems provides senior undergraduate, graduate, and medical students with an advanced understanding of the integrative nature of human physiology. PMID:26873894

  1. Maternal cerebrovascular accidents in pregnancy: incidence and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Jennifer; Murphy, Cliona; Murray, Aoife; O'Laoide, Risteard; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2010-01-01

    Stroke occurring during pregnancy and the postnatal period is a rare but potentially catastrophic event. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and outcomes of pregnancies complicated by maternal stroke in a single centre. This is a prospective study of over 35,000 consecutive pregnancies over a four-year period at the National Maternity Hospital in Dublin from 2004 to 2008; in addition we also retrospectively examined all cases of maternal mortality at our institution over a 50-year period from 1959 to 2009. We prospectively identified eight cases of strokes complicating pregnancy and the postnatal period giving an overall incidence of 22.34 per 100,000 pregnancies or 24.74 per 100,000 deliveries. There were no stroke-related mortalities during that time. Retrospective analysis of maternal mortality revealed 102 maternal deaths over a 50-year period, 19 (18.6%) of which were due to cerebrovascular accidents. In conclusion, strokes complicating pregnancy and the puerperium remain a rare event and though there appears to be evidence that the incidence is increasing, the associated maternal mortality appears to be falling.

  2. [Ketamine racemate and S-(+)-ketamine. Cerebrovascular effects and neuroprotection following focal ischemia].

    PubMed

    Werner, C; Reeker, W; Engelhard, K; Lu, H; Kochs, E

    1997-03-01

    The phencyclidine derivative ketamine is a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist with the thalamo-neocortical projection system as the primary site of action. Racemic ketamine consists of the enantiomers S(+)-ketamine and R(-)-ketamine. Racemic ketamine has never been considered an adequate anaesthetic agent in neurosurgical patients since it produces regionally specific stimulation of cerebral metabolism (CMRO2) and increases cerebral blood flow (CBF) and intracranial pressure (ICP). However, recent experiments suggest that both tracemic ketamine and S(+)-ketamine may reduce infarct size in animal models of incomplete cerebral ischaemia and brain injury. This experimental protective effect appears to be related to decreases in Ca++ influx and maintenance of brain tissue magnesium levels due to NMDA and quisqualate receptor blockade by ketamine. Studies in dogs have shown that racemic ketamine (2.0 mg/kg) increases CBF in the presence of the cerebral vasodilator N2O. In contrast, studies in rats without background anaesthesia showed increases in CBF after racemic ketamine (100 mg/kg i.p.). This suggests that the cerebrovascular effects of racemic ketamine are related to the pre-existing cerebrovascular tone induced by background anaesthetics. Cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity was maintained regardless of the baseline cerebrovascular resistance. There are several mechanisms by which racemic ketamine may increase CBF. It induces dose-dependent respiratory depression with consequent mild hypercapnia in spontaneously ventilating subjects. This produces vasodilation due to the intact cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity. Racemic ketamine also induces regional neuroexcitation, which leads to stimulation of cerebral glucose consumption in the limbic, extrapyramidal, auditory, and sensory-motor systems. This regional neuroexcitation with increased CMRO2 produces increases in CBF that can be blocked by infusion of barbiturates or benzodiazepines. However

  3. [Resistance to antiplatelet drugs in patients with cerebrovascular disorders].

    PubMed

    Suslina, Z A; Tanashian, M M; Domashenko, M A

    2011-01-01

    This review concerns clinical and laboratory resistance to antiplatelet drugs (aspirin and clopidogrel) in patients with cerebrovascular disorders. Results of certain clinical trials showed that laboratory resistance to antiaggregants is associated with recurrent thromboembolic vascular events. The commonest causes of aspirin resistance are production of arachidonic acid metabolites via the lipoxygenase pathway, poor compliance with the treatment, polymorphism of the genes encoding for cyclooxygenase and glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, endothelial dysfunction. The causes of clopidogrel resistance include inadequate doses of the drug, its low absorption, poor compliance with the treatment, polymorphism of ADP receptors, GP IIb/IIIa and cytochrome P450 genes, acute coronary syndrome and stroke, metabolic syndrome. Therapeutic efficacy of antiaggregants can be improved by increasing their doses, using membranotropic agents, correcting endothelial dysfunction, etc. Because the apparent variability of antiplatelet drug resistance is currently due to the use of different test-systems by different authors, the evaluation of individual sensitivity to a given drug showing laboratory resistance and the choice of alternative therapy are thus far possible only in the framework of clinical studies. Large-scale prospective multicenter trials of antiplatelet drug resistance are needed along with research for better understanding mechanisms of individual platelet sensitivity and resistance to antiaggregants and developing efficacious methods for their correction. PMID:21901881

  4. Effects of Dietary Nitrates on Systemic and Cerebrovascular Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Bryan H.; Adams, Richard G.; Asadi, M. Sadegh; Millis, Richard M.; Haddad, Georges E.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow dysregulation is often associated with hypertension. We hypothesized that a beetroot juice (BRJ) treatment could decrease blood pressure and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR). We subjected 12 healthy females to control and BRJ treatments. Cerebrovascular resistance index (CVRI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), total vascular resistance (TVR), and the heart rate-systolic pressure product (RPP) measured at rest and at two exercise workloads were lower after the BRJ treatment. CVRI, SBP, and RPP were lower without a lower TVR at the highest exercise level. These findings suggest improved systemic and cerebral hemodynamics that could translate into a dietary treatment for hypertension. PMID:24455404

  5. Movement Disorders Following Cerebrovascular Lesions in Cerebellar Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar circuitry is important to controlling and modifying motor activity. It conducts the coordination and correction of errors in muscle contractions during active movements. Therefore, cerebrovascular lesions of the cerebellum or its pathways can cause diverse movement disorders, such as action tremor, Holmes’ tremor, palatal tremor, asterixis, and dystonia. The pathophysiology of abnormal movements after stroke remains poorly understood. However, due to the current advances in functional neuroimaging, it has recently been described as changes in functional brain networks. This review describes the clinical features and pathophysiological mechanisms in different types of movement disorders following cerebrovascular lesions in the cerebellar circuits. PMID:27240809

  6. Movement Disorders Following Cerebrovascular Lesions in Cerebellar Circuits.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong-Min

    2016-05-01

    Cerebellar circuitry is important to controlling and modifying motor activity. It conducts the coordination and correction of errors in muscle contractions during active movements. Therefore, cerebrovascular lesions of the cerebellum or its pathways can cause diverse movement disorders, such as action tremor, Holmes' tremor, palatal tremor, asterixis, and dystonia. The pathophysiology of abnormal movements after stroke remains poorly understood. However, due to the current advances in functional neuroimaging, it has recently been described as changes in functional brain networks. This review describes the clinical features and pathophysiological mechanisms in different types of movement disorders following cerebrovascular lesions in the cerebellar circuits. PMID:27240809

  7. AltitudeOmics: Resetting of Cerebrovascular CO2 Reactivity Following Acclimatization to High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jui-Lin; Subudhi, Andrew W.; Duffin, James; Lovering, Andrew T.; Roach, Robert C.; Kayser, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported enhanced cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity upon ascent to high altitude using linear models. However, there is evidence that this response may be sigmoidal in nature. Moreover, it was speculated that these changes at high altitude are mediated by alterations in acid-base buffering. Accordingly, we reanalyzed previously published data to assess middle cerebral blood flow velocity (MCAv) responses to modified rebreathing at sea level (SL), upon ascent (ALT1) and following 16 days of acclimatization (ALT16) to 5260 m in 21 lowlanders. Using sigmoid curve fitting of the MCAv responses to CO2, we found the amplitude (95 vs. 129%, SL vs. ALT1, 95% confidence intervals (CI) [77, 112], [111, 145], respectively, P = 0.024) and the slope of the sigmoid response (4.5 vs. 7.5%/mmHg, SL vs. ALT1, 95% CIs [3.1, 5.9], [6.0, 9.0], respectively, P = 0.026) to be enhanced at ALT1, which persisted with acclimatization at ALT16 (amplitude: 177, 95% CI [139, 215], P < 0.001; slope: 10.3%/mmHg, 95% CI [8.2, 12.5], P = 0.003) compared to SL. Meanwhile, the sigmoidal response midpoint was unchanged at ALT1 (SL: 36.5 mmHg; ALT1: 35.4 mmHg, 95% CIs [34.0, 39.0], [33.1, 37.7], respectively, P = 0.982), while it was reduced by ~7 mmHg at ALT16 (28.6 mmHg, 95% CI [26.4, 30.8], P = 0.001 vs. SL), indicating leftward shift of the cerebrovascular CO2 response to a lower arterial partial pressure of CO2 (PaCO2) following acclimatization to altitude. Sigmoid fitting revealed a leftward shift in the midpoint of the cerebrovascular response curve which could not be observed with linear fitting. These findings demonstrate that there is resetting of the cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity operating point to a lower PaCO2 following acclimatization to high altitude. This cerebrovascular resetting is likely the result of an altered acid-base buffer status resulting from prolonged exposure to the severe hypocapnia associated with ventilatory acclimatization to high altitude. PMID:26779030

  8. Cerebrovascular disease as the initial clinical presentation of haematological disorders.

    PubMed

    Arboix, A; Besses, C

    1997-01-01

    We describe 14 patients (mean age 57 years) in whom stroke or TIA was the presenting manifestation of a haematologic disorder. Twelve patients had an ischaemic stroke and 2 a haemorrhagic stroke. This group represented 1.27% (14/1,099) of the total number of patients with first-ever stroke diagnosed from 1986 to 1992 at our institution, accounted for 1.32% (12/906) of all brain infarcts and 1.03% (2/193) of all haemorrhagic strokes, and was the most common aetiology (25%) of ischaemic stroke of unusual cause. Haematological disorders included essential thrombocythaemia (6), polycythaemia vera (1), smoker's polycythaemia (1), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (1), IgA lambda myeloma (1), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (1), Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia (1), chronic granulocytic leukaemia (1) and IgG lambda myeloma (1). Stroke subtypes included definitive cerebral infarct (10), TIA (2), parenchymal haemorrhage (1) and spontaneous subdural haematoma (1). Vascular territories in ischaemic stroke were the carotid in 7 patients, the vertebrobasilar in 1 and undetermined in 4. Mean follow-up was 40 months (range, 1-96 months). The mortality rate was 18.7%. PMID:9208259

  9. Long-term trends in cardiovascular disease mortality and association with respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Mercer, A J

    2016-03-01

    The recent decline in cardiovascular disease mortality in Western countries has been linked with changes in life style and treatment. This study considers periods of decline before effective medical interventions or knowledge about risk factors. Trends in annual age-standardized death rates from cerebrovascular disease, heart disease and circulatory disease, and all cardiovascular disease are reviewed for three phases, 1881-1916, 1920-1939, and 1940-2000. There was a consistent decline in the cerebrovascular disease death rate between 1891 and 2000, apart from brief increases after the two world wars. The heart disease and circulatory disease death rate was declining between 1891 and 1910 before cigarette smoking became prevalent. The early peak in cardiovascular mortality in 1891 coincided with an influenza pandemic and a peak in the death rate from bronchitis, pneumonia and influenza. There is also correspondence between short-term fluctuations in the death rates from these respiratory diseases and cardiovascular disease. This evidence of ecological association is consistent with the findings of many studies that seasonal influenza can trigger acute myocardial infarction and episodes of respiratory infection are followed by increased risk of cardiovascular events. Vaccination studies could provide more definitive evidence of the role in cardiovascular disease and mortality of influenza, other viruses, and common bacterial agents of respiratory infection. PMID:26243537

  10. Lumpy Skin Disease in Iraq: Study of the Disease Emergence.

    PubMed

    Al-Salihi, K A; Hassan, I Q

    2015-10-01

    This study intends to report the first emergence of lumpy skin disease (LSD) in Iraq, in addition to describing its related clinical signs. In August 2013, 21 cases of four outbreaks developed clinical signs suggestive of LSD in the Nineveh (Mosul) and Baghdad Governorates, which were considered as the first infected foci of LSD in Iraq. The disease was diagnosed tentatively, on the basis of clinical signs and epidemiological features, and it was confirmed as positive by the polymerase chain reaction and histopathological features. In September 2013, eight new outbreaks of LSD also appeared in Baghdad and Nineveh. In 2014, the disease spread rapidly to the governorates of Kirkuk, Salah Al-Din, Al-Anbar, Diyala, Wasit, Babil, Karbala, Najaf, Al-Diwaniyah, Muthanna, Maysan, DhiQar and Basra. The total number of infected cows and calves reported was 7396 and 227, respectively. The apparent morbidity and mortality rates were 9.11% and 0.51%, respectively, while the apparent case-fatality rate was 5.56%. Skin nodules, anorexia, reduce in milk production and decrease in bodyweight were the common clinical signs. Moreover, myiasis and mastitis were seen as complications in some infected animals. Attempts were made to stop the distribution of the disease including quarantine and treatment, control over animal movement and arthropod control. Ring vaccination was used in a 10 km radius zone around the outbreak with live sheep pox vaccine. The highly contagious transboundary nature of the LSD, its endemic distribution in the Iraqi neighbouring countries, and the current armed conflict in the area were the possible factors for the disease being introduced into the country. LSD had spread through the Middle East and Gulf peninsula and could be a cause of danger to the rest of Asia and Europe. International precaution, cooperation and exchange of information could guarantee the prevention and further spread of the disease to the rest of Asia and Europe. PMID:26105081

  11. Beyond Volume: Hospital-Based Healthcare Technology for Better Outcomes in Cerebrovascular Surgical Patients Diagnosed With Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Sang Gyu; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Jang, Sung-In

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We examined whether the level of hospital-based healthcare technology was related to the 30-day postoperative mortality rates, after adjusting for hospital volume, of ischemic stroke patients who underwent a cerebrovascular surgical procedure. Using the National Health Insurance Service-Cohort Sample Database, we reviewed records from 2002 to 2013 for data on patients with ischemic stroke who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures. Statistical analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazard models to test our hypothesis. A total of 798 subjects were included in our study. After adjusting for hospital volume of cerebrovascular surgical procedures as well as all for other potential confounders, the hazard ratio (HR) of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals was 2.583 (P < 0.001). We also found that, although the HR of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals with high volume as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals with high volume was the highest (10.014, P < 0.0001), cerebrovascular surgical procedure patients treated in low healthcare technology hospitals had the highest 30-day mortality rate, irrespective of hospital volume. Although results of our study provide scientific evidence for a hospital volume/30-day mortality rate relationship in ischemic stroke patients who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures, our results also suggest that the level of hospital-based healthcare technology is associated with mortality rates independent of hospital volume. Given these results, further research into what components of hospital-based healthcare technology significantly impact mortality is warranted. PMID:26986122

  12. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-01-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia–lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  13. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-12-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  14. Cerebrovascular plaque segmentation using object class uncertainty snake in MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bipul; Saha, Punam K.; Wolf, Ronald; Song, Hee Kwon; Wright, Alexander C.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2005-04-01

    Atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease leads to formation of lipid-laden plaques that can form emboli when ruptured causing blockage to cerebral vessels. The clinical manifestation of this event sequence is stroke; a leading cause of disability and death. In vivo MR imaging provides detailed image of vascular architecture for the carotid artery making it suitable for analysis of morphological features. Assessing the status of carotid arteries that supplies blood to the brain is of primary interest to such investigations. Reproducible quantification of carotid artery dimensions in MR images is essential for plaque analysis. Manual segmentation being the only method presently makes it time consuming and sensitive to inter and intra observer variability. This paper presents a deformable model for lumen and vessel wall segmentation of carotid artery from MR images. The major challenges of carotid artery segmentation are (a) low signal-to-noise ratio, (b) background intensity inhomogeneity and (c) indistinct inner and/or outer vessel wall. We propose a new, effective object-class uncertainty based deformable model with additional features tailored toward this specific application. Object-class uncertainty optimally utilizes MR intensity characteristics of various anatomic entities that enable the snake to avert leakage through fuzzy boundaries. To strengthen the deformable model for this application, some other properties are attributed to it in the form of (1) fully arc-based deformation using a Gaussian model to maximally exploit vessel wall smoothness, (2) construction of a forbidden region for outer-wall segmentation to reduce interferences by prominent lumen features and (3) arc-based landmark for efficient user interaction. The algorithm has been tested upon T1- and PD- weighted images. Measures of lumen area and vessel wall area are computed from segmented data of 10 patient MR images and their accuracy and reproducibility are examined. These results correspond

  15. Aspirin failure in patients presenting with acute cerebrovascular ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Halawani, Saeed H M; Williams, David J P; Adefurin, Abiodun; Webster, John; Greaves, Michael; Ford, Isobel

    2011-08-01

    Aspirin is the most commonly used antiplatelet drug for prevention of ischaemic stroke. In order to determine the prevalence and nature of aspirin failure, we studied 51 adults admitted with suspected ischaemic stroke and already prescribed daily aspirin. Within 48 hours (h) of onset, blood and urine samples were collected to assess platelet aggregation, activation and aspirin response by a range of methods. All tests were then repeated on a second sample taken 24 h after witnessed administration of 75 mg or 150 mg aspirin. At entry to the study, incomplete response to aspirin, measured by arachidonic acid (AA)-stimulated platelet aggregation, was found in 43% of patients. Following in-hospital aspirin administration, there was a significant decrease in AA-aggregation (p=0.001) suggesting poor adherence to therapy prior to admission. However, residual aggregation (10-15%) persisted in 11 subjects - suggesting alternative causes. In incomplete responders on admission, platelet aggregation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was significantly higher compared with responders (p<0.05) but there were no significant differences in collagen aggregation, platelet fibrinogen binding or P-selectin expression, plasma von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, or the urinary metabolite, 11-dehydro-TxB2. Incomplete platelet inhibition is common around the time of acute cerebrovascular ischaemic events in patients prescribed aspirin. Up to 50% of these observations appear due to incomplete adherence to aspirin therapy. Intervention studies are required to determine the clinical relevance of measured platelet response to aspirin in terms of outcome, and the effectiveness of improved pharmacotherapy for stroke prevention. PMID:21544317

  16. The Sarcoglycan complex is expressed in the cerebrovascular system and is specifically regulated by astroglial Cx30 channels.

    PubMed

    Boulay, Anne-Cécile; Saubaméa, Bruno; Cisternino, Salvatore; Mignon, Virginie; Mazeraud, Aurélien; Jourdren, Laurent; Blugeon, Corinne; Cohen-Salmon, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes, the most prominent glial cell type in the brain, send specialized processes called endfeet, around blood vessels and express a large molecular repertoire regulating the cerebrovascular system physiology. One of the most striking properties of astrocyte endfeet is their enrichment in gap junction proteins Connexin 43 and 30 (Cx43 and Cx30) allowing in particular for direct intercellular trafficking of ions and small signaling molecules through perivascular astroglial networks. In this study, we addressed the specific role of Cx30 at the gliovascular interface. Using an inactivation mouse model for Cx30 (Cx30(Δ/Δ); Δ means deleted allele) we showed that absence of Cx30 does not affect blood-brain barrier (BBB) organization and permeability. However, it results in the cerebrovascular fraction, in a strong upregulation of Sgcg encoding γ-Sarcoglycan (γ-SG), a member of the Dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) connecting cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The same molecular event occurs in Cx30(T5M/T5M) mutated mice, where Cx30 channels are closed, demonstrating that Sgcg regulation relied on Cx30 channel functions. We further characterized the expression of other Sarcoglycan complex (SGC) molecules in the cerebrovascular system and showed the presence of α-, β-, δ-, γ-, ε- and ζ- SG, as well as Sarcospan. Their expression was however not modified in Cx30(Δ/Δ). These results suggest that a full SGC might be present in the cerebrovascular system, and that expression of one of its member, γ-SG, depends on Cx30 channels. As described in skeletal muscles, the SGC may contribute to membrane stabilization and signal transduction in the cerebrovascular system, which may therefore be regulated by Cx30 channel-mediated functions. PMID:25698924

  17. The Sarcoglycan complex is expressed in the cerebrovascular system and is specifically regulated by astroglial Cx30 channels

    PubMed Central

    Boulay, Anne-Cécile; Saubaméa, Bruno; Cisternino, Salvatore; Mignon, Virginie; Mazeraud, Aurélien; Jourdren, Laurent; Blugeon, Corinne; Cohen-Salmon, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes, the most prominent glial cell type in the brain, send specialized processes called endfeet, around blood vessels and express a large molecular repertoire regulating the cerebrovascular system physiology. One of the most striking properties of astrocyte endfeet is their enrichment in gap junction proteins Connexin 43 and 30 (Cx43 and Cx30) allowing in particular for direct intercellular trafficking of ions and small signaling molecules through perivascular astroglial networks. In this study, we addressed the specific role of Cx30 at the gliovascular interface. Using an inactivation mouse model for Cx30 (Cx30Δ/Δ; Δ means deleted allele) we showed that absence of Cx30 does not affect blood-brain barrier (BBB) organization and permeability. However, it results in the cerebrovascular fraction, in a strong upregulation of Sgcg encoding γ-Sarcoglycan (γ-SG), a member of the Dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) connecting cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The same molecular event occurs in Cx30T5M/T5M mutated mice, where Cx30 channels are closed, demonstrating that Sgcg regulation relied on Cx30 channel functions. We further characterized the expression of other Sarcoglycan complex (SGC) molecules in the cerebrovascular system and showed the presence of α-, β-, δ-, γ-, ε- and ζ- SG, as well as Sarcospan. Their expression was however not modified in Cx30Δ/Δ. These results suggest that a full SGC might be present in the cerebrovascular system, and that expression of one of its member, γ-SG, depends on Cx30 channels. As described in skeletal muscles, the SGC may contribute to membrane stabilization and signal transduction in the cerebrovascular system, which may therefore be regulated by Cx30 channel-mediated functions. PMID:25698924

  18. Education Attenuates the Effect of Medial Temporal Lobe Atrophy on Cognitive Function in Alzheimer’s Disease: The MIRAGE Study

    PubMed Central

    Perneczky, Robert; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Green, Robert C.; DeCarli, Charles; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Kurz, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Functional imaging and neuropathological studies suggest that individuals with higher education have better cognitive performance at the same level of brain pathology than less educated subjects. No in vivo studies are available that directly test how education modifies the effect of structural pathology on cognition in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The present study therefore aimed to measure this effect using data from a large multi-center study. 270 patients with AD underwent cognitive testing using the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotyping, and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. A linear regression analysis was used to examine the relation of medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA), as a proxy of AD pathology, to MMSE score, adjusting for age, gender, APOE, cerebrovascular disease, ethnicity, education, and disease duration. An interaction term for MTA and education was introduced to test the hypothesis that education modifies the effect of MTA on cognition. There was a significant inverse association between MTA and cognition. Most interestingly, the interaction term between education and MTA was significant suggesting that education modifies the relation of MTA to cognition. At any level of pathology, cognition remained higher for better educated individuals. PMID:19542606

  19. Differentiated cerebrovascular effects of physostigmine and tacrine in cortical areas deafferented from the nucleus basalis magnocellularis suggest involvement of basalocortical projections to microvessels.

    PubMed

    Peruzzi, P; von Euw, D; Lacombe, P

    2000-04-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors used to treat Alzheimer's disease according to the principle of cholinergic replacement therapy have proved to be less beneficial than expected. The present study was designed to investigate the cerebrovascular response to physostigmine and tacrine in the experimental model of lesioning of the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM), a model involving a cholinergic deficit. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured by the [14C]iodoantipyrine tissue sampling technique in conscious rats infused with i.v. physostigmine (0.2 mg/kg/h), tacrine (8 mg/kg/h), or saline, 3-5 weeks after unilateral lesion of the NBM with ibotenic acid. Physostigmine and tacrine dose-dependently increased blood flow in most cortical and subcortical regions compared to the control group. However, physostigmine caused smaller blood flow increases in several areas, mostly cortical, of the lesioned compared to the intact hemisphere. The converse was observed with tacrine. A facilitated circulatory response appeared in cortical areas deafferented from the NBM, especially in the frontal cortex. These results provide evidence for distinct NBM-dependent components of the cortical cerebrovascular effects of physostigmine and tacrine. They suggest the involvement of different cellular postsynaptic targets of the NBM. The physostigmine-type effects could involve direct projects onto an inhibitory cortical interneuron supersensitized by deafferentation. This arrangement may explain why physostigmine and perhaps other cholinergic agonists are unable to specifically compensate for a deficit in NBM functioning. The tacrine-type effects presumably involve projections to the microvasculature, including perivascular astrocytes. The neurovascular junction would be sensitized by deafferentation from the NBM. Our data suggest that the regulatory mechanisms of blood flow originating in the NBM might constitute a target of neurodegenerative processes of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:10818530

  20. Cerebrovascular Time Constant in Patients with Head Injury.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, Alex; Kalentiev, George; Gribkov, Alexander; Voennov, Oleg; Grigoryeva, Vera

    2016-01-01

    The cerebrovascular time constant (τ) theoretically estimates how fast the cerebral arterial bed is filled by blood volume after a sudden change in arterial blood pressure during one cardiac cycle. The aim of this study was to assess the time constant of the cerebral arterial bed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) with and without intracranial hematomas (IH). We examined 116 patients with severe TBI (mean 35 ± 15 years, 61 men, 55 women). The first group included 58 patients without IH and the second group included 58 patients with epidural (7), subdural (48), and multiple (3) hematomas. Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) was performed 1-12 days after TBI in the first group and 2-8 days after surgical evacuation of the hematoma in the second group. Arteriovenous amplitude of regional cerebral blood volume oscillation was calculated as the difference between arterial and venous blood volume in the "region of interest" of 1 cm(2). Mean arterial pressure was measured and the flow rate of the middle cerebral artery was recorded with transcranial Doppler ultrasound after PCT. The time constant was calculated by the formula modified by Kasprowicz. The τ was shorter (p = 0.05) in both groups 1 and 2 in comparison with normal data. The time constant in group 2 was shorter than in group 1, both on the side of the former hematoma (р = 0.012) and on the contralateral side (р = 0.044). The results indicate failure of autoregulation of cerebral capillary blood flow in severe TBI, which increases in patients with polytrauma and traumatic IH. PMID:26463964

  1. Cerebrovascular Responsiveness to Hypercapnia Is Stable over Six Months in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Matthew D; Tyndall, Amanda V; Davenport, Margie H; Argourd, Laurie; Anderson, Todd J; Eskes, Gail A; Friedenreich, Christine M; Hogan, David B; Leigh, Richard; Meshi, Bernard; Smith, Eric E; Wilson, Ben J; Wilton, Stephen B; Poulin, Marc J

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this Brain in Motion (BIM) sub-study was to determine the 6-month stability of resting blood flow velocity and cerebrovascular responsiveness to a euoxic hypercapnic challenge in a group of physically inactive community dwelling men and men aged ≥55 yrs (range 55-92 yrs). At baseline and 6 months later 88 women (65±6 yr) and 78 men (67±7 yr) completed a hypercapnic challenge (step changes from resting end-tidal PCO2 ((PETCO2) to +1, +5 and +8 mmHg above rest) while cerebral blood flow velocity was assessed using transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Peak velocity of the middle cerebral artery (MCAv) was increased (p<0.05) at the second visit during rest (51±2 vs. 52±4); however, these differences were abolished (p>0.05) when MCAv was normalized to PETCO2. During hypercapnia, MCAv tended to be increased at follow-up, but this finding was absent when MCAv/PETCO2 was compared across time. Cerebrovascular reactivity (i.e., ΔMCAv/ΔPETCO2) was similar (p>0.05) between testing occasions regardless of the approach taken (i.e., considering only the lower step [from +1 to +5 mmHg]; the upper step [+5 to +8 mmHg]; or the complete test taken together). In conclusion, this study has shown that cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular responsiveness to acute euoxic hypercapnia are stable in older, healthy adults over a 6-month period. Modest changes in MCAv over time must be viewed in the context of underlying differences in PETCO2, an important finding with implications for future studies considering cerebral blood flow velocity. PMID:26599343

  2. Cerebrovascular Responsiveness to Hypercapnia Is Stable over Six Months in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Matthew D.; Tyndall, Amanda V.; Davenport, Margie H.; Argourd, Laurie; Anderson, Todd J.; Eskes, Gail A.; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Hogan, David B.; Leigh, Richard; Meshi, Bernard; Smith, Eric E.; Wilson, Ben J.; Wilton, Stephen B.; Poulin, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this Brain in Motion (BIM) sub-study was to determine the 6-month stability of resting blood flow velocity and cerebrovascular responsiveness to a euoxic hypercapnic challenge in a group of physically inactive community dwelling men and men aged ≥55 yrs (range 55–92 yrs). At baseline and 6 months later 88 women (65±6 yr) and 78 men (67±7 yr) completed a hypercapnic challenge (step changes from resting end-tidal PCO2 ((PETCO2) to +1, +5 and +8 mmHg above rest) while cerebral blood flow velocity was assessed using transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Peak velocity of the middle cerebral artery (MCAv) was increased (p<0.05) at the second visit during rest (51±2 vs. 52±4); however, these differences were abolished (p>0.05) when MCAv was normalized to PETCO2. During hypercapnia, MCAv tended to be increased at follow-up, but this finding was absent when MCAv/PETCO2 was compared across time. Cerebrovascular reactivity (i.e., ΔMCAv/ΔPETCO2) was similar (p>0.05) between testing occasions regardless of the approach taken (i.e., considering only the lower step [from +1 to +5 mmHg]; the upper step [+5 to +8 mmHg]; or the complete test taken together). In conclusion, this study has shown that cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular responsiveness to acute euoxic hypercapnia are stable in older, healthy adults over a 6-month period. Modest changes in MCAv over time must be viewed in the context of underlying differences in PETCO2, an important finding with implications for future studies considering cerebral blood flow velocity. PMID:26599343

  3. Is alpha-chloralose plus halothane induction a suitable anesthetic regimen for cerebrovascular research?

    PubMed

    Bonvento, G; Charbonné, R; Corrèze, J L; Borredon, J; Seylaz, J; Lacombe, P

    1994-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether alpha-chloralose, when associated with an initial period of halothane, is a suitable anesthetic regimen for cerebrovascular studies. For this purpose, rats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose plus halothane induction were first subjected to noxious stimuli, and the behavior, EEG and systemic variables were recorded. During a second step, cortical blood flow was measured with laser-Doppler flowmetry and the time-course of the cerebrovascular reactivity to hypercapnia were measured in artificially ventilated rats anesthetized with either alpha-chloralose (40 mg.kg-1, s.c.) plus halothane induction (1.5% given during the first 45-60 min) or halothane alone (1.5%). Finally, an experimental paradigm was developed that allowed the comparison of the hypercapnic reactivity, both in awake and anesthetized conditions in the same animal. Our results show that the association of alpha-chloralose with halothane leads to stable cardiovascular parameters and immobility of ventilated rats, placed in ear bars without curare, for 3 h without any sign of discomfort. Based on EEG criteria, we found that halothane induction lengthens the duration of alpha-chloralose anesthesia (253 +/- 19 vs. 200 +/- 15 min, P < 0.01). Under alpha-chloralose alone or in association with halothane induction, the vascular reactivity to hypercapnia was considerably impaired (-85% compared to the awake state, P < 0.01), but this impairment was transient, since a control reactivity was restored 150-190 min after induction of anesthesia. Under halothane alone, the vascular reactivity remained reduced throughout the experiment. These results provide evidence that alpha-chloralose plus halothane induction is a suitable anesthetic regimen which displays a temporal window of normal cerebrovascular reactivity. PMID:7895056

  4. Increased cerebrovascular sensitivity to endothelin-1 in a rat model of obstructive sleep apnea: a role for endothelin receptor B.

    PubMed

    Durgan, David J; Crossland, Randy F; Lloyd, Eric E; Phillips, Sharon C; Bryan, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with cerebrovascular diseases. However, little is known regarding the effects of OSA on the cerebrovascular wall. We tested the hypothesis that OSA augments endothelin-1 (ET-1) constrictions of cerebral arteries. Repeated apneas (30 or 60 per hour) were produced in rats during the sleep cycle (8 hours) by remotely inflating a balloon implanted in the trachea. Four weeks of apneas produced a 23-fold increase in ET-1 sensitivity in isolated and pressurized posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) compared with PCAs from sham-operated rats (EC50=10(-9.2) mol/L versus 10(-10.6) mol/L; P<0.001). This increased sensitivity was abolished by the ET-B receptor antagonist, BQ-788. Constrictions to the ET-B receptor agonist, IRL-1620, were greater in PCAs from rats after 2 or 4 weeks of apneas compared with that from sham-operated rats (P=0.013). Increased IRL-1620 constrictions in PCAs from OSA rats were normalized with the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) blocker, SKF96365, or the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y27632. These data show that OSA increases the sensitivity of PCAs to ET-1 through enhanced ET-B activity, and enhanced activity of TRPCs and ROCK. We conclude that enhanced ET-1 signaling is part of a pathologic mechanism associated with adverse cerebrovascular outcomes of OSA. PMID:25425077

  5. Attenuated NOx responses and myocardial ischemia, a possible risk for structural vascular disease in African men: the SABPA study.

    PubMed

    Uys, A S; Malan, L; van Rooyen, J M; Steyn, H S; Reimann, M; Ziemssen, T

    2014-07-01

    Chronically elevated blood pressure has been associated with impaired NO-mediated vasodilation and structural vascular disease risk. This study aimed to determine whether significant associations exist regarding NO metabolite (NOx) responses, cardiovascular function and structural vascular disease in a cohort of African and Caucasian men. The study included 81 African and 94 Caucasian male teachers stratified via median splits into low and high NOx ethnic groups. Ambulatory blood pressure, electrocardiogram monitoring and ultrasound carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) images were obtained. Cardiovascular measurements and fasting blood for NOx responses were measured during rest and on challenging the cardiovascular system with the Stroop colour-word conflict test. African men displayed significantly higher resting NOx as well as higher number of 24 h silent ischemic events than their Caucasian counterparts. Low NOx African men displayed enhanced α-adrenergic and ECG ST segment depression acute mental stress responses as well as 24 h silent ischemic events associated with CIMT (adjusted R(2) = 0.47; β = 0.25; confidence interval (CI) = 0.13, 0.41). African men demonstrated a vulnerable cardiovascular profile. Novel findings revealed α-adrenergic-driven blood pressure responses and less NO bioavailability during acute stress. The association between myocardial ischemia and CIMT in this group emphasized their risk for future coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular events. PMID:24401953

  6. Endometriosis Linked to Heart Disease in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... epidemiologic research in reproductive medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Missmer said the study found an association between endometriosis and the risk of heart disease, but can't prove a cause-and-effect relationship. She believes this is the first study to ...

  7. Evolution of a multidisciplinary cerebrovascular center: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Hui, Ferdinand K; Spiotta, Alejandro M; Katzan, Irene; Manno, Edward M; Masaryk, Thomas J; Rasmussen, Peter A

    2012-03-01

    The Cerebrovascular Center at the Cleveland Clinic is an integrated, multidisciplinary center comprising vascular neurologists, neurointensivists, physiatrists, open and endovascular neurosurgeons, interventional neurologists and interventional neuroradiologists administered through a single financial center with unified governance and leadership. This report describes the history and evolution of the center from conceptualization to the present, as well as outlining lessons learned in the formation and maturation of the group. PMID:21990440

  8. CARBON MONOXIDE CONTRIBUTES TO HYPOTENSION-INDUCED CEREBROVASCULAR VASODILATION IN PIGLETS

    PubMed Central

    Kanu, Alie; Whitfield, John; Leffler, Charles W.

    2006-01-01

    The gaseous compound carbon monoxide (CO) has been identified as an important endogenous biological messenger in the brain and is a major component in regulation of cerebrovascular circulation in newborns. CO is produced endogenously by catabolism of heme to CO, free iron, and biliverdin during enzymatic degradation of heme by heme oxygenase (HO). The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that endogenously produced CO contributes to hypotension-induced vasodilation of cerebral arterioles. Experiments used anesthetized piglets with implanted, closed cranial windows. Topical application of the HO substrate, heme-L-lysinate (HLL), caused dilation of pial arterioles that was blocked by a metal porphyrin inhibitor of HO, chromium mesoporphyrin (CrMP). In normotensive piglets (arterial pressure 64±4 mm Hg), CrMP did not cause vasoconstriction of pial arterioles but rather a transient dilation. Hypotension (50% of basal blood pressure) increased cerebral CO production and dilated pial arterioles from 66±2μm to 92±7μm. In hypotensive piglets, topical CrMP or i.v. SnPP decreased cerebral CO production and produced pial arteriolar constriction to normotensive diameters. In additional experiments, since prostacyclin and nitric oxide (NO) are also key dilators that can contribute to cerebrovascular dilation, we held their levels constant. NO/prostacyclin clamp was accomplished with continuous, simultaneous application of indomethacin, Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), and minimal dilatory concentrations of iloprost and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). With constant NO and prostacyclin, the transient dilator and prolonged constrictor responses to CrMP of normotensive and hypotensive piglets, respectively, were the same as when NO and prostaglandins were not held constant. These data suggest that endogenously produced CO contributes to cerebrovascular dilation in response to reduced perfusion pressure. PMID:16751286

  9. [Metagenomic studies and infectious diseases diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, A E; Brusnigina, N F

    2015-01-01

    Principles of mass parallel sequencing, otherwise called next generation sequencing (NGS), appeared at the beginning of 2000s and were realized in dozens of NGS platforms. High performance and sequencing speed of NGS platforms opened wide horizons for scientists in the field of genomic studies, including metagenomic, first of all related to studies of structure of various microbiocenoses. Dozens of studies dedicated to studies of microbiome and virome of various biotopes of humans in normal state and pathology by using NGS platforms have appeared, forming novel conceptions on pathogenesis and epidemiology ofvarious infectious diseases. Significant cost reduction of the analysis facilitates expansion of sphere of application for NGS technologies not only in the field of fundamental, but also applied microbiologic studies, including etiologic diagnostics of infectious diseases. Due to the increase of the number of cases of infectious diseases, that do not have a typical clinical presentation, use of metagenomic approach is of particular importance, allowing to carry out detection of a wide spectrum of causative agents of bacterial, viral and parasitic infections. Technologic features of mass parallel sequencing platform, main methods of metagenomic studies and bioinformatics approaches, used for the analysis of data obtained, are presented in the review. Studies on healthy human microbiome and in pathology are described; possibilities and perspectives of metagenomic approach application in diagnos- tics and system of epidemiologic control of infectious diseases are examined. PMID:26016350

  10. Dynamic estimation of three-dimensional cerebrovascular deformation from rotational angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chong; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; De Craene, Mathieu; and others

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of detecting and quantifying 3D cerebrovascular wall motion from a single 3D rotational x-ray angiography (3DRA) acquisition within a clinically acceptable time and computing from the estimated motion field for the further biomechanical modeling of the cerebrovascular wall. Methods: The whole motion cycle of the cerebral vasculature is modeled using a 4D B-spline transformation, which is estimated from a 4D to 2D+t image registration framework. The registration is performed by optimizing a single similarity metric between the entire 2D+t measured projection sequence and the corresponding forward projections of the deformed volume at their exact time instants. The joint use of two acceleration strategies, together with their implementation on graphics processing units, is also proposed so as to reach computation times close to clinical requirements. For further characterizing vessel wall properties, an approximation of the wall thickness changes is obtained through a strain calculation. Results: Evaluation on in silico and in vitro pulsating phantom aneurysms demonstrated an accurate estimation of wall motion curves. In general, the error was below 10% of the maximum pulsation, even in the situation when substantial inhomogeneous intensity pattern was present. Experiments on in vivo data provided realistic aneurysm and vessel wall motion estimates, whereas in regions where motion was neither visible nor anatomically possible, no motion was detected. The use of the acceleration strategies enabled completing the estimation process for one entire cycle in 5-10 min without degrading the overall performance. The strain map extracted from our motion estimation provided a realistic deformation measure of the vessel wall. Conclusions: The authors' technique has demonstrated that it can provide accurate and robust 4D estimates of cerebrovascular wall motion within a clinically acceptable time, although it

  11. Cerebrovascular regulation in the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.; Novak, V.; Spies, J. M.; Novak, P.; Petty, G. W.

    1999-01-01

    Patients with the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) have symptoms of orthostatic intolerance despite having a normal orthostatic blood pressure (BP), which suggests some impairment of cerebrovascular regulation. Cerebrovascular autoregulation refers to the maintenance of normal cerebral blood flow in spite of changing BP. Mechanisms of autoregulation include myogenic, metabolic and neurogenic vasoregulation. Beat-to-beat recording of blood-flow velocity (BFV) is possible using transcranial Doppler imaging. It is possible to evaluate autoregulation by regressing deltaBFV to deltaBP during head-up tilt. A number of dynamic methods, relating deltaBFV to deltaBP during sudden induced changes in BP by occluding then releasing peripheral arterial flow or by the Valsalva maneuver. The deltaBFV to deltaBP provides an index of autoregulation. In orthostatic hypotension, the autoregulated range is typically expanded. In contrast, paradoxical vasoconstriction occurs in POTS because of an increased depth of respiration, resulting in hypocapnic cerebrovascular constriction, and impaired autoregulation.

  12. Cerebrovascular reactivity is associated with maximal aerobic capacity in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Jill N; Taylor, Jennifer L; Kluck, Breann N; Johnson, Christopher P; Joyner, Michael J

    2013-05-15

    Recently, several high-impact reviews suggest that regular aerobic exercise is beneficial for maintaining cognitive function in aging adults. Higher cerebral blood flow and/or cerebrovascular reactivity may explain the favorable effect of exercise on cognition. In addition, prostaglandin-mediated vasodilator responses may be influenced by regular exercise. Therefore, our purpose was to evaluate middle cerebral artery (MCA) vasodilator responses in healthy adults before and after cyclooxygenase inhibition. A total of 16 young (26 ± 6 yr; 8 males, 8 females) and 13 older (64 ± 6 yr; 7 males, 6 females) healthy adults participated in the study. Aerobic fitness was determined by maximal aerobic capacity (Vo2max) on a cycle ergometer. MCA velocity (MCAv) was measured at baseline and during stepped hypercapnia (2%, 4%, and 6% FiCO2) before and after cyclooxygenase inhibition using indomethacin. To account for differences in blood pressure, cerebrovascular conductance index (CVCi) was calculated as MCAv/mean arterial pressure. Cerebrovascular reactivity slopes were calculated from the correlation between either MCAv or CVCi and end-tidal CO2. Young adults demonstrated greater MCAv reactivity (1.61 ± 0.17 vs. 1.06 ± 0.15 cm·s(-1)·mmHg(-1); P < 0.05) and CVCi reactivity (0.015 ± 0.002 vs. 0.007 ± 0.002 cm·s(-1)·mmHg(-1); P < 0.05) compared with the older adults. There was no association between cerebrovascular reactivity and Vo2max in the combined group of subjects; however, in older adults MCAv reactivity was correlated with maximal aerobic fitness (r = 0.64; P < 0.05). Furthermore, the change in MCAv reactivity (between baseline and indomethacin trials) was also associated with Vo2max (r = 0.59; P < 0.05) in older adults. Cerebral vasodilator responses to hypercapnia were associated with maximal aerobic capacity in healthy older adults. These results may explain the physiological link between regular aerobic exercise and improved cognitive function in aging

  13. The role of APOE in cerebrovascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tai, Leon M; Thomas, Riya; Marottoli, Felecia M; Koster, Kevin P; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Morris, Alan W J; Bu, Guojun

    2016-05-01

    The ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE4) is associated with cognitive decline during aging, is the greatest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and has links to other neurodegenerative conditions that affect cognition. Increasing evidence indicates that APOE genotypes differentially modulate the function of the cerebrovasculature (CV), with apoE and its receptors expressed by different cell types at the CV interface (astrocytes, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, brain endothelial cells). However, research on the role of apoE in CV dysfunction has not advanced as quickly as other apoE-modulated pathways. This review will assess what aspects of the CV are modulated by APOE genotypes during aging and under disease states, discuss potential mechanisms, and summarize the therapeutic significance of the topic. We propose that APOE4 induces CV dysfunction through direct signaling at the CV, and indirectly via modulation of peripheral and central pathways. Further, that APOE4 predisposes the CV to damage by, and exacerbates the effects of, additional risk factors (such as sex, hypertension, and diabetes). ApoE4-induced detrimental CV changes include reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF), modified neuron-CBF coupling, increased blood-brain barrier leakiness, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, hemorrhages and disrupted transport of nutrients and toxins. The apoE4-induced detrimental changes may be linked to pericyte migration/activation, astrocyte activation, smooth muscle cell damage, basement membrane degradation and alterations in brain endothelial cells. PMID:26884068

  14. CEREBROVASCULAR TOXICITY OF PCB153 IS ENHANCED BY BINDING TO SILICA NANOPARTICLES

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bei; Chen, Lei; Choi, Jeong June; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Environmental polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are frequently bound onto nanoparticles (NPs). However, the toxicity and health effects of PCBs assembled onto nanoparticles are unknown. The aim of this study was to study the hypothesis that binding PCBs to silica NPs potentiates PCB-induced cerebrovascular toxicity and brain damage in an experimental stroke model. Mice (C57BL/6, males, 12-week-old) were exposed to PCB153 bound to NPs (PCB153-NPs), PCB153, or vehicle. PCB153 was administered in the amount of 5 ng/g body weight. A group of treated animals was subjected to a 40 min ischemia, followed by a 24 h reperfusion. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, brain infarct volume, expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins, and inflammatory mediators were assessed. As compared to controls, a 24 h exposure to PCB153-NPs injected into cerebral vasculature resulted in significant elevation of the BBB permeability, disruption of TJ protein expression, increased proinflammatory responses, and enhanced monocyte transmigration in mouse brain capillaries. Importantly, exposure to PCB153-NPs increased stroke volume and potentiated brain damage in mice subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. A long-term (30 days) oral exposure to PCB153-NPs resulted in a higher PCB153 content in the abdominal adipose tissue and amplified adhesion of leukocytes to the brain endothelium as compared to treatment with PCB153 alone. This study provides the first evidence that binding to NPs increases cerebrovascular toxicity of environmental toxicants, such as PCB153. PMID:23081707

  15. [ANTIPLATELET AND ANTI-ISCHEMIC EFFECTS OF MEMANTINE AND 5-HYDROXYADAMANTAN-2-ONE IN PATIENTS WITH CEREBROVASCULAR PATHOLOGY AND IN EXPERIMENTS].

    PubMed

    Tanashyan, M M; Shabalinal, A A; Gnedovskaya, E V; Gan, T S; Kurza, E V; Maslennikov, D V; Mirzoyan, R S

    2016-01-01

    It was investigated the effect of two adamantane derivatives, memantine and 5-hydroxyadamantan-2-one (5-HA), in patients with cerebrovascular disorders. In vitro studies showed that 5-HA, unlike memantine, exhibited antiplatelet activity. Experiments showed that memantine reduced cerebral blood flow in the brain cortex of intact rats and those under conditions of transient global ischemia, whereas 5-HA only selectively improved blood flow in ischemic brain and was superior to the reference drug nimodipine. The obtained data indicate the leading role of the GABA-ergic (rather than glutamatergic mechanisms) in implementation of the anti-ischemic cerebrovascular activity. PMID:27416678

  16. The Cerebrovascular Basement Membrane: Role in the Clearance of β-amyloid and Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Alan W. J.; Carare, Roxana O.; Schreiber, Stefanie; Hawkes, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the walls of cerebral blood vessels, is observed in the majority of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains and is thought to be due to a failure of the aging brain to clear Aβ. Perivascular drainage of Aβ along cerebrovascular basement membranes (CVBMs) is one of the mechanisms by which Aβ is removed from the brain. CVBMs are specialized sheets of extracellular matrix that provide structural and functional support for cerebral blood vessels. Changes in CVBM composition and structure are observed in the aged and AD brain and may contribute to the development and progression of CAA. This review summarizes the properties of the CVBM, its role in mediating clearance of interstitial fluids and solutes from the brain, and evidence supporting a role for CVBM in the etiology of CAA. PMID:25285078

  17. [Soft tissue calcifications in panoramic radiography. A risk factor for cerebrovascular accidents?].

    PubMed

    Ariayi, Ayesha Shekeba; Berndt, Dorothea; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Panoramic radiography is a basic diagnostic tool in the dental field where calcifications are seen occasionally in the lateral parts of the x-ray. The differential diagnosis are carotid artery atheromas, calcified submandibular lymphnodes and sialoliths of the submandibular gland. 4007 panoramic radiographs (100%) from patients >40 years were scanned retrospectively. Special emphasis was given to the carotid artery territory (CAT). 225 soft tissue calcifications were found (5.6%). 144 patients had calcifications in the CAT (3.6%), 73 showed calcified submandibular lymphnodes (1.8%), and 8 (0.2%) sialoliths. The female to male ratio was 54.7%:45.3%. Pneumatic diseases were beside hypertension and smoking a risk factor for CAT calcification. Carotid artery atheromas are the main risk for cerebrovascular insults. Dentists can help to detect patients at risk for stroke. Their patients can be referred for further diagnostics (ultrasound). PMID:19954131

  18. Voxel Based Analysis of Surgical Revascularization for Moyamoya Disease: Pre- and Postoperative SPECT Studies.

    PubMed

    Fushimi, Yasutaka; Okada, Tomohisa; Takagi, Yasushi; Funaki, Takeshi; Takahashi, Jun C; Miyamoto, Susumu; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a chronic, progressive, cerebrovascular occlusive disease that causes abnormal enlargement of collateral pathways (moyamoya vessels) in the region of the basal ganglia and thalamus. Cerebral revascularization procedures remain the preferred treatment for patients with MMD, improving the compromised cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, voxel based analysis (VBA) of revascularization surgery for MMD based on data from pre- and postoperative data has not been established. The latest algorithm called as Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL) has been introduced for VBA as the function of statistical parametric mapping (SPM8), and improved registration has been achieved by SPM8 with DARTEL. In this study, VBA was conducted to evaluate pre- and postoperative single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images for MMD by SPM8 with DARTEL algorithm, and the results were compared with those from SPM8 without DARTEL (a conventional method). Thirty-two patients with MMD who underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) bypass surgery as the first surgery were included and all patients underwent pre- and postoperative 3D T1-weighted imaging and SPECT. Pre- and postoperative SPECT images were registered to 3D T1-weighted images, then VBA was conducted. Postoperative SPECT showed more statistically increased CBF areas in the bypassed side cerebral hemisphere by using SPM8 with DARTEL (58,989 voxels; P<0.001), and increased ratio of CBF after operation was less than 15%. Meanwhile, postoperative SPECT showed less CBF increased areas by SPM8 without DARTEL. In conclusion, VBA was conducted for patients with MMD, and SPM8 with DARTEL revealed that postoperative SPECT showed statistically significant CBF increases over a relatively large area and with at most 15% increase ratio. PMID:26867219

  19. Essential role for smooth muscle BK channels in alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengchong; Xi, Qi; Ahmed, Abu; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Dopico, Alejandro M.

    2004-12-01

    Binge drinking is associated with increased risk for cerebrovascular spasm and stroke. Acute exposure to ethanol at concentrations obtained during binge drinking constricts cerebral arteries in several species, including humans, but the mechanisms underlying this action are largely unknown. In a rodent model, we used fluorescence microscopy, patch-clamp electrophysiology, and pharmacological studies in intact cerebral arteries to pinpoint the molecular effectors of ethanol cerebrovascular constriction. Clinically relevant concentrations of ethanol elevated wall intracellular Ca2+ concentration and caused a reversible constriction of cerebral arteries (EC50 = 27 mM; Emax = 100 mM) that depended on voltage-gated Ca2+ entry into myocytes. However, ethanol did not directly increase voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents in isolated myocytes. Constriction occurred because of an ethanol reduction in the frequency (-53%) and amplitude (-32%) of transient Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) currents. Ethanol inhibition of BK transients was caused by a reduction in Ca2+ spark frequency (-49%), a subsarcolemmal Ca2+ signal that evokes the BK transients, and a direct inhibition of BK channel steady-state activity (-44%). In contrast, ethanol failed to modify Ca2+ waves, a major vasoconstrictor mechanism. Selective block of BK channels largely prevented ethanol constriction in pressurized arteries. This study pinpoints the Ca2+ spark/BK channel negative-feedback mechanism as the primary effector of ethanol vasoconstriction.

  20. Correlation of Barometer Pressure and Incidence of Cerebrovascular Insult

    PubMed Central

    Slatina, Enes; Music, Miralem; Babic, nermina; Pleho –Kapic, Amna; Dervisevic, Senad; Salibasic, Mirhan; Mujaric, ekrema

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The intention of this work is to research whether the link between the barometer pressure and the cerebrovascular insult (CVI) exists. The stroke is the first cause of non-traumatic disability and third illness by mortality in the majority of available relevant literature. Goals: Goal of the sudy was to research all the cases of the patients who suffered from the acute stroke in the Canton of Sarajevo and those who were treated in the pre-hospital phase by Emergency Medical Institute staff and their working diagnosis was established as CVI ac. Material and methods: The criteria in the research were established for inclusion and exclusion of cases. The days with and without CVI cases were compared with the meteorological data obtained from the Hydro-meteorological Institute of Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina . Since the approval was requested and obtained from the Hydro-meteorological Institute, all the meteorological data could be compared. The meteorological data comprise the barometer pressure measuring every day at 7 h, 14 h and 21 h. Results and discussion: In the retrospective study, there will be followed, during three years (2004, 2005 and 2006), the cases of the patients who suffered from the stroke, and, the emergency medical care was offered to them by the side of the Emergency Medical Institute of Canton of Sarajevo staff. All the cases in the Canton of Sarajevo were followed regardless of the place of incidence: whether the help was offered in Institute’s outpatient departments, patient’s flat or at public place. Due to the extensiveness of data (in the analysis comprising three years, there was the total of 1930 cases), the test of normal distribution was used. Since it was about the pre-hospital research, the acute stroke was looked at generally without division by types. The certain diagnostics by types can only be established in the hospital. Conclusion: The results in the research indicate that the extreme values of barometer

  1. Genomics and disease resistance studies in livestock☆

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Stephen C; Woolliams, John A

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the application of genetic and genomic techniques to disease resistance, the interpretation of data arising from such studies and the utilisation of the research outcomes to breed animals for enhanced resistance. Resistance and tolerance are defined and contrasted, factors affecting the analysis and interpretation of field data presented, and appropriate experimental designs discussed. These general principles are then applied to two detailed case studies, infectious pancreatic necrosis in Atlantic salmon and bovine tuberculosis in dairy cattle, and the lessons learnt are considered in detail. It is concluded that the rate limiting step in disease genetic studies will generally be provision of adequate phenotypic data, and its interpretation, rather than the genomic resources. Lastly, the importance of cross-disciplinary dialogue between the animal health and animal genetics communities is stressed. PMID:26339300

  2. Social media methods for studying rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Stringer, Kathleen A; Donohue, Janet E; Yu, Sunkyung; Shaver, Ashley; Caruthers, Regine L; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Fifer, Carlen; Goldberg, Caren; Russell, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    For pediatric rare diseases, the number of patients available to support traditional research methods is often inadequate. However, patients who have similar diseases cluster "virtually" online via social media. This study aimed to (1) determine whether patients who have the rare diseases Fontan-associated protein losing enteropathy (PLE) and plastic bronchitis (PB) would participate in online research, and (2) explore response patterns to examine social media's role in participation compared with other referral modalities. A novel, internet-based survey querying details of potential pathogenesis, course, and treatment of PLE and PB was created. The study was available online via web and Facebook portals for 1 year. Apart from 2 study-initiated posts on patient-run Facebook pages at the study initiation, all recruitment was driven by study respondents only. Response patterns and referral sources were tracked. A total of 671 respondents with a Fontan palliation completed a valid survey, including 76 who had PLE and 46 who had PB. Responses over time demonstrated periodic, marked increases as new online populations of Fontan patients were reached. Of the responses, 574 (86%) were from the United States and 97 (14%) were international. The leading referral sources were Facebook, internet forums, and traditional websites. Overall, social media outlets referred 84% of all responses, making it the dominant modality for recruiting the largest reported contemporary cohort of Fontan patients and patients who have PLE and PB. The methodology and response patterns from this study can be used to design research applications for other rare diseases. PMID:24733869

  3. Evaluation of the cerebrovascular pressure reactivity index using non-invasive finapres arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kasprowicz, M; Schmidt, E; Kim, D J; Haubrich, C; Czosnyka, Z; Smielewski, P; Czosnyka, M

    2010-09-01

    A pressure reactivity index (PRx) can be assessed in patients with continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and intracranial pressure (ICP) as a moving correlation coefficient between slow fluctuations of these two signals within a low frequency bandwidth. The study aimed to investigate whether the invasive ABP monitoring can be replaced with non-invasive measurement of ABP using a Finapres plethysmograph (fABP) to calculate the fPRx. There is a well-defined group of patients, suffering from hydrocephalus and undergoing CSF pressure monitoring, which may benefit from such a measurement. 41 simultaneous day-by-day monitoring of ICP, ABP and fABP were performed for about 30 min in 10 head injury patients. A Bland-Altman assessment for agreement was used to compare PRx and fPRx calculations. Performance metrics and the McNemary test were used to determine whether fPRx is sensitive enough to distinguish between functioning and disturbed cerebrovascular pressure reactivity. The fPRx correlated with PRx (R(Spearman) = 0.92, p < 0.001; bias = -0.04; lower and upper limits of agreement: -0.26 and 0.17, respectively). The fPRx distinguished between active and passive reactivity in more than 89% cases. The fPRx can be used with care for assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity in patients for whom invasive ABP measurement is not feasible. The fPRx is sensitive enough to distinguish between functional and deranged reactivity. PMID:20664157

  4. The complex contribution of NOS interneurons in the physiology of cerebrovascular regulation

    PubMed Central

    Duchemin, Sonia; Boily, Michaël; Sadekova, Nataliya; Girouard, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    Following the discovery of the vasorelaxant properties of nitric oxide (NO) by Furchgott and Ignarro, the finding by Bredt and coll. of a constitutively expressed NO synthase in neurons (nNOS) led to the presumption that neuronal NO may control cerebrovascular functions. Consequently, numerous studies have sought to determine whether neuraly-derived NO is involved in the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Anatomically, axons, dendrites, or somata of NO neurons have been found to contact the basement membrane of blood vessels or perivascular astrocytes in all segments of the cortical microcirculation. Functionally, various experimental approaches support a role of neuronal NO in the maintenance of resting CBF as well as in the vascular response to neuronal activity. Since decades, it has been assumed that neuronal NO simply diffuses to the local blood vessels and produce vasodilation through a cGMP-PKG dependent mechanism. However, NO is not the sole mediator of vasodilation in the cerebral microcirculation and is known to interact with a myriad of signaling pathways also involved in vascular control. In addition, cerebrovascular regulation is the result of a complex orchestration between all components of the neurovascular unit (i.e., neuronal, glial, and vascular cells) also known to produce NO. In this review article, the role of NO interneuron in the regulation of cortical microcirculation will be discussed in the context of the neurovascular unit. PMID:22907993

  5. Elevated adiponectin prevents HIV protease inhibitor toxicity and preserves cerebrovascular homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Dasuri, Kalavathi; Pepping, Jennifer K; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Gupta, Sunita; Keller, Jeffrey N; Scherer, Philipp E; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J

    2016-06-01

    HIV protease inhibitors are key components of HIV antiretroviral therapies, which are fundamental in the treatment of HIV infection. However, the protease inhibitors are well-known to induce metabolic dysfunction which can in turn escalate the complications of HIV, including HIV associated neurocognitive disorders. As experimental and epidemiological data support a therapeutic role for adiponectin in both metabolic and neurologic homeostasis, this study was designed to determine if increased adiponectin could prevent the detrimental effects of protease inhibitors in mice. Adult male wild type (WT) and adiponectin-overexpressing (ADTg) mice were thus subjected to a 4-week regimen of lopinavir/ritonavir, followed by comprehensive metabolic, neurobehavioral, and neurochemical analyses. Data show that lopinavir/ritonavir-induced lipodystrophy, hypoadiponectinemia, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hypertriglyceridemia were attenuated in ADTg mice. Furthermore, cognitive function and blood-brain barrier integrity were preserved, while loss of cerebrovascular markers and white matter injury were prevented in ADTg mice. Finally, lopinavir/ritonavir caused significant increases in expression of markers of brain inflammation and decreases in synaptic markers in WT, but not in ADTg mice. Collectively, these data reinforce the pathophysiologic link from metabolic dysfunction to loss of cerebrovascular and cognitive homeostasis; and suggest that preservation and/or replacement of adiponectin could prevent these key aspects of HIV protease inhibitor-induced toxicity in clinical settings. PMID:26912411

  6. Imaging Parameters and Recurrent Cerebrovascular Events in Patients With Minor Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Yaghi, Shadi; Rostanski, Sara K.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Samai, Alyana; Silver, Brian; Blum, Christina A.; Jayaraman, Mahesh V.; Siket, Matthew S.; Khan, Muhib; Furie, Karen L.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Marshall, Randolph S.; Willey, Joshua Z.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Neurological worsening and recurrent stroke contribute substantially to morbidity associated with transient ischemic attacks and strokes (TIA-S). OBJECTIVE To determine predictors of early recurrent cerebrovascular events (RCVEs) among patients with TIA-S and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores of 0 to 3. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A retrospective cohort study was conducted at 2 tertiary care centers (Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, and Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana) between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2014. All patients with neurologist-diagnosed TIA-S with a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 0 to 3 who presented to the emergency department were included. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome (adjudicated by 3 vascular neurologists) was RCVE: neurological deterioration in the absence of a medical explanation or recurrent TIA-S during hospitalization. RESULTS Of the 1258 total patients, 1187 had no RCVEs and 71 had RCVEs; of this group, 750 patients (63.2%) and 39 patients (54.9%), respectively, were aged 60 years or older. There were 505 patients with TIA-S at Columbia University; 31 (6.1%) had RCVEs (15 patients had neurological deterioration only, 11 had recurrent TIA-S only, and 5 had both). The validation cohort at Tulane University consisted of 753 patients; 40 (5.3%) had RCVEs (24 patients had neurological deterioration only and 16 had both). Predictors of RCVE in multivariate models in both cohorts were infarct on neuroimaging (computed tomographic scan or diffusion-weighted imaging sequences on magnetic resonance imaging) (Columbia University: not applicable and Tulane University: odds ratio, 1.75; 95% CI, 0.82–3.74; P = .15) and large-vessel disease etiology (Columbia University: odds ratio, 6.69; 95% CI, 3.10–14.50 and Tulane University: odds ratio, 8.13; 95% CI, 3.86–17.12; P < .001). There was an increase in the percentage of

  7. Differential properties of Van der Pol — Duffing mathematical model of cerebrovascular haemodynamics based on clinical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshin, D. V.; Ufimtseva, I. V.; Cherevko, A. A.; Khe, A. K.; Orlov, K. Yu; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Chupakhin, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    The present paper discusses the method of identification (diseased/healthy) human cerebral vessels by using of mathematical model. Human cerebral circulation as a single tuned circuit, which consists of blood flow, elastic vessels and elastic brain gel tissue is under consideration. Non linear Van der Pol-Duffing equation is assumed as mathematical model of cerebrovascular circulation. Hypothesis of vascular pathology existence in some position of blood vessel, based on mathematical model properties for this position is formulated. Good reliability of hypothesis is proved statistically for 7 patients with arterial aneurysms.

  8. Protein transduction method for cerebrovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomoyuki; Ono, Shigeki; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Arimitsu, Seiji; Onoda, Keisuke; Tokunaga, Koji; Sugiu, Kenji; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Matsui, Hideki; Date, Isao

    2009-02-01

    Many studies have shown that a motif of 11 consecutive arginines (11R) is one of the most effective protein transduction domains (PTD) for introducing proteins into the cell membrane. By conjugating this "11R", all sorts of proteins can effectively and harmlessly be transferred into any kind of cell. We therefore examined the transduction efficiency of 11R in cerebral arteries and obtained results showing that 11R fused enhanced green fluorescent protein (11R-EGFP) immediately and effectively penetrated all layers of the rat basilar artery (BA), especially the tunica media. This method provides a revolutionary approach to cerebral arteries and ours is the first study to demonstrate the successful transductionof a PTD fused protein into the cerebral arteries. In this review, we present an outline of our studies and other key studies related to cerebral vasospasm and 11R, problems to be overcome, and predictions regarding future use of the 11R protein transduction method for cerebral vasospasm (CV). PMID:19247417

  9. Cerebrovascular responsiveness to steady-state changes in end-tidal CO2 during passive heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Low, David A.; Wingo, Jonathan E.; Keller, David M.; Davis, Scott L.; Zhang, Rong; Crandall, Craig G.

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that passive heat stress alters cerebrovascular responsiveness to steady-state changes in end-tidal CO2 (PetCO2). Nine healthy subjects (4 men and 5 women), each dressed in a water-perfused suit, underwent normoxic hypocapnic hyperventilation (decrease PetCO2 ~20 Torr) and normoxic hypercapnic (increase in PetCO2 ~9 Torr) challenges under normothermic and passive heat stress conditions. The slope of the relationship between calculated cerebrovascular conductance (CBVC; middle cerebral artery blood velocity/mean arterial blood pressure) and PetCO2 was used to evaluate cerebrovascular CO2 responsiveness. Passive heat stress increased core temperature (1.1 ± 0.2°C, P < 0.001) and reduced middle cerebral artery blood velocity by 8 ± 8 cm/s (P = 0.01), reduced CBVC by 0.09 ± 0.09 CBVC units (P = 0.02), and decreased PetCO2 by 3 ± 4 Torr (P = 0.07), while mean arterial blood pressure was well maintained (P = 0.36). The slope of the CBVC-PetCO2 relationship to the hypocapnic challenge was not different between normothermia and heat stress conditions (0.009 ± 0.006 vs. 0.009 ± 0.004 CBVC units/Torr, P = 0.63). Similarly, in response to the hypercapnic challenge, the slope of the CBVC-PetCO2 relationship was not different between normothermia and heat stress conditions (0.028 ± 0.020 vs. 0.023 ± 0.008 CBVC units/Torr, P = 0.31). These results indicate that cerebrovascular CO2 responsiveness, to the prescribed steady-state changes in PetCO2, is unchanged during passive heat stress. PMID:18218916

  10. Head position modifies cerebrovascular response to orthostatic stress.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Timothy D; Serrador, Jorge M; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2003-01-31

    Previous experiments have shown that the vestibular system participates in cardiovascular control. However, the effects of vestibular activation on cerebrovascular regulation are not known. Therefore, the present experiment tested the hypothesis that specific vestibular activations may be beneficial to cerebral circulation during simulated orthostatic stress. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (CBV; Doppler ultrasound) was measured to examine the effects of head-down neck flexion (HDNF) compared to head-down neck extension (HDNE) with and without lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -40 mmHg) (n=9). The change in CBV (DeltaCBV) during HDNF and HDNE were not different during baseline conditions, however, during LBNP, DeltaCBV was greater in HDNE compared to HDNF (-5.5+/-3.2 cm/s, -11+/-4.6%) vs. (-0.7+/-1.0 cm/s, -1.9+/-1.9%), respectively (P<0.05). Concomitantly, the change in cerebrovascular resistance (DeltaCVR) between rest and LBNP was also greater during HDNE (0.48+/-0.08 mmHg/cm per s, 42.8+/-10.8%) compared with HDNF (0.26+/-0.05 mmHg/cm per s, 22+/-4.1%) (P<0.05). P(ET)CO(2) was greater in HDNE (45+/-2 mmHg) compared to HDNF (42+/-2 mmHg; P<0.05) during LBNP. These results suggest that the vestibular system may affect cerebrovascular tone during simulated postural stress by either constriction or dilation, depending on the vestibular stimulus. PMID:12531493

  11. The role of myogenic mechanisms in human cerebrovascular regulation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Can Ozan; Hamner, J W; Taylor, J Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Although myogenic mechanisms have been hypothesized to play a role in cerebrovascular regulation, previous data from both animals and humans have not provided an unequivocal answer. However, cerebral autoregulation is explicitly non-linear and most prior work relied on simple linear approaches for assessment, potentially missing important changes in autoregulatory characteristics. Therefore, we examined cerebral blood flow responses to augmented arterial pressure oscillations with and without calcium channel blockade (nicardipine) during blood pressure fluctuations (oscillatory lower body negative pressure, OLBNP) across a range of frequencies in 16 healthy subjects. Autoregulation was characterized via a robust non-linear method (projection pursuit regression, PPR). Blockade resulted in significant tachycardia, a modest but significant elevation in mean arterial pressure, and reductions in mean cerebral blood flow and end-tidal CO2 during OLBNP. The reductions in flow were directly related to the reductions in CO2 (r= 0.57). While linear cross-spectral analysis showed that the relationship between pressure–flow fluctuations was preserved after blockade, PPR showed that blockade significantly altered the non-linearity between pressure and flow, particularly at the slowest fluctuations. At 0.03 Hz, blockade reduced the range of pressure fluctuations that can be buffered (7.5 ± 1.0 vs. 3.7 ± 0.8 mmHg) while increasing the autoregulatory slope (0.10 ± 0.05 vs. 0.24 ± 0.08 cm s−1 mmHg−1). Furthermore, the same rate of change in pressure elicited a change in flow more than twice as large as at baseline. Thus, our results show that myogenic mechanisms play a significant role in cerebrovascular regulation but this may not be appreciated without adequately characterizing the non-linearities inherent in cerebrovascular regulation. PMID:23959681

  12. Core curriculum illustration: blunt cerebrovascular injury.

    PubMed

    Verma, Nupur; Lehnert, Bruce E; Mitchell, Steven H; Linnau, Ken F

    2015-10-01

    This is the 15th installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online, please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for Study online at http://www.aseronline.org/curriculum/toc.htm . PMID:25877737

  13. The Science of Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia (VCID): A Framework for Advancing Research Priorities in the Cerebrovascular Biology of Cognitive Decline.

    PubMed

    Corriveau, Roderick A; Bosetti, Francesca; Emr, Marian; Gladman, Jordan T; Koenig, James I; Moy, Claudia S; Pahigiannis, Katherine; Waddy, Salina P; Koroshetz, Walter

    2016-03-01

    The World Health Organization reports that 47.5 million people are affected by dementia worldwide. With aging populations and 7.7 million new cases each year, the burden of illness due to dementia approaches crisis proportions. Despite significant advances in our understanding of the biology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the leading dementia diagnosis, the actual causes of dementia in affected individuals are unknown except for rare fully penetrant genetic forms. Evidence from epidemiology and pathology studies indicates that damage to the vascular system is associated with an increased risk of many types of dementia. Both Alzheimer's pathology and cerebrovascular disease increase with age. How AD affects small blood vessel function and how vascular dysfunction contributes to the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's are areas of intense research. The science of vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) integrates diverse aspects of biology and incorporates the roles of multiple cell types that support the function of neural tissue. Because of the proven ability to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease and hypertension with population benefits for heart and stroke outcomes, it is proposed that understanding and targeting the biological mechanisms of VCID can have a similarly positive impact on public health. PMID:27095366

  14. Antidepressants Alter Cerebrovascular Permeability and Metabolic Rate in Primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preskorn, Sheldon H.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Hartman, Boyd K.

    1982-07-01

    External detection of the annihilation radiation produced by water labeled with oxygen-15 was used to measure cerebrovascular permeability and cerebral blood flow in six rhesus monkeys. Use of oxygen-15 also permitted assessment of cerebral metabolic rate in two of the monkeys. Amitriptyline produced a dose-dependent, reversible increase in permeability at plasma drug concentrations which are therapeutic for depressed patients. At the same concentrations the drug also produced a 20 to 30 percent reduction in cerebral metabolic rate. At higher doses normal autoregulation of cerebral blood flow was suspended, but responsivity to arterial carbon dioxide was normal.

  15. Nonurgent commercial air travel after nonhemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident.

    PubMed

    Barros, Andrew; Duchateau, François-Xavier; Huff, J Stephen; Verner, Laurent; O'Connor, Robert E; Brady, William J

    2014-01-01

    Nonurgent commercial air travel in patients who have experienced a nonhemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident (CVA) may occur, particularly in the elderly traveling population. A recent CVA, particularly occurring during a person's travel, presents a significant challenge to the patient, companions, family, and health care team. Specific medical recommendation, based on accumulated scientific data and interpreted by medical experts, is needed so that travel health care professionals can appropriately guide the patient. Unfortunately, such recommendations are almost entirely lacking despite the relative frequency of CVA and air travel. This article reviews the existing recommendations with conclusions based on both these limited data and rationale conjecture. PMID:24787513

  16. [Clinical applications of arterial spin labeling technique in brain diseases].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zheng, Gang; Zhao, Tiezhu; Guo, Chao; Li, Lin; Lu, Guangming

    2013-02-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique is a kind of perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging method that is based on endogenous contrast, and it can measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) noninvasively. The ASL technique has advantages of noninvasiveness, simplicity and relatively lower costs so that it is more suitable for longitudinal studies compared with previous perfusion methods, such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), CT and the contrast agent based magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. This paper mainly discusses the current clinical applications of ASL in brain diseases as cerebrovascular diseases, brain tumors, Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy, etc. PMID:23488163

  17. Risk Factors in the Initial Presentation of Specific Cardiovascular Disease Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-03

    Heart Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Acute Myocardial Infarction; Unstable Angina; Chronic Stable Angina; Ischemic Stroke; Cerebrovascular Accident; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Sudden Coronary Death; Ventricular Arrhythmia; Sudden Death; Cardiac Arrest; Heart Failure

  18. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Elderly Patients After Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery for Early-Stage Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Julian C.; Kruser, Tim J.; Gondi, Vinai; Mohindra, Pranshu; Cannon, Donald M.; Harari, Paul M.; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Comprehensive neck radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to increase cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk in advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer. We assessed whether more limited neck RT used for early-stage (T1-T2 N0) glottic cancer is associated with increased CVD risk, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: We identified patients ≥66 years of age with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer from SEER diagnosed from 1992 to 2007. Patients treated with combined surgery and RT were excluded. Medicare CPT codes for carotid interventions, Medicare ICD-9 codes for cerebrovascular events, and SEER data for stroke as the cause of death were collected. Similarly, Medicare CPT and ICD-9 codes for peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were assessed to serve as an internal control between treatment groups. Results: A total of 1413 assessable patients (RT, n=1055; surgery, n=358) were analyzed. The actuarial 10-year risk of CVD was 56.5% (95% confidence interval 51.5%-61.5%) for the RT cohort versus 48.7% (41.1%-56.3%) in the surgery cohort (P=.27). The actuarial 10-year risk of PVD did not differ between the RT (52.7% [48.1%-57.3%]) and surgery cohorts (52.6% [45.2%-60.0%]) (P=.89). Univariate analysis showed an increased association of CVD with more recent diagnosis (P=.001) and increasing age (P=.001). On multivariate Cox analysis, increasing age (P<.001) and recent diagnosis (P=.002) remained significantly associated with a higher CVD risk, whereas the association of RT and CVD remained not statistically significant (HR=1.11 [0.91-1.37,] P=.31). Conclusions: Elderly patients with early-stage laryngeal cancer have a high burden of cerebrovascular events after surgical management or RT. RT and surgery are associated with comparable risk for subsequent CVD development after treatment in elderly patients.

  19. Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) - Ancillary Eye Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-05

    Atherosclerosis; Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Arteriosclerosis; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Heart Failure, Congestive; Myocardial Infarction; Heart Diseases; Diabetes Mellitus, Non-insulin Dependent; Hypertension; Diabetic Retinopathy; Macular Degeneration; Diabetes Mellitus

  20. Cerebrovascular complications and neurodevelopmental sequelae of neonatal ECMO.

    PubMed

    Graziani, L J; Gringlas, M; Baumgart, S

    1997-09-01

    A total of 355 infants have been treated with ECMO at our hospital between 1985 and 1996, 271 of whom have been enrolled in an ongoing prospective study; of the 271 infants enrolled, 223 (82%) survived, and most function within the normal range of development. Nevertheless, handicapping sequelae, including spastic forms of CP, hearing loss, and cognitive deficiencies at school age, have been noted in a significant minority of ECMO-treated survivors. The need for RCCA cannulation during venoarterial ECMO may increase the risk of a cerebrovascular injury, and lateralized CBF abnormalities have been noted on CDI and pulsed Doppler ultrasound studies during and after venoarterial bypass; however, post-ECMO CT scans, HUS, MR images, or clinical evaluations have not indicated selective or greater injury to the right, compared with the left, cerebral hemisphere in our survivors, nor was there a significant predilection for right, rather than left, cerebral hemispheric EEG abnormalities during or following venoarterial bypass. Although we routinely repair the RCCA following venoarterial ECMO, the long-term consequences of a permanently ligated artery have not as yet been demonstrated. We have noted the ominous predictive value of two or more recordings that disclose ES and BS EEG abnormalities before or during venoarterial ECMO and found that the need for vigorous CPR before or during RCCA cannulation significantly increased the risk of these two markedly abnormal bioelectric patterns. Because 85% of infants with severe respiratory failure have moderate to marked EEG abnormalities (including 23% who have BS or ES patterns) before ECMO, we believe that fetal and neonatal complications related to the occurrence and treatment of severe cardiorespiratory failure are responsible in large part for the neurologic sequelae in ECMO survivors. The risk for CP was significantly increased in survivors of neonatal venoarterial ECMO treated at our hospital who required CPR or who

  1. Paediatric UK demyelinating disease longitudinal study (PUDDLS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is evidence that at least 5% of Multiple sclerosis (MS) cases manifest in childhood. Children with MS present with a demyelinating episode involving single or multiple symptoms prior to developing a second event (usually within two years) to then meet criteria for diagnosis. There is evidence from adult cohorts that the incidence and sex ratios of MS are changing and that children of immigrants have a higher risk for developing MS. A paediatric population should reflect the vanguard of such changes and may reflect trends yet to be observed in adult cohorts. Studying a paediatric population from the first demyelinating event will allow us to test these hypotheses, and may offer further valuable insights into the genetic and environmental interactions in the pathogenesis of MS. Methods/Design The Paediatric UK Demyelinating Disease Longitudinal Study (PUDDLS) is a prospective longitudinal observational study which aims to determine the natural history, predictors and outcomes of childhood CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases. PUDDLS will involve centres in the UK, and will establish a cohort of children affected with a first CNS inflammatory demyelinating event for long-term follow up by recruiting for approximately 5 years. PUDDLS will also establish a biological sample archive (CSF, serum, and DNA), allowing future hypothesis driven research. For example, the future discovery of a biomarker will allow validation within this dataset for the evaluation of novel biomarkers. Patients will also be requested to consent to be contacted in the future. A secondary aim is to collaborate internationally with the International Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group when future collaborative studies are proposed, whilst sharing a minimal anonymised dataset. PUDDLS is the second of two jointly funded studies. The first (UCID-SS) is an epidemiological surveillance study that already received ethical approvals, and started on the 1st September 2009. There is

  2. Indomethacin-induced impairment of regional cerebrovascular reactivity: implications for respiratory control

    PubMed Central

    Hoiland, Ryan L; Ainslie, Philip N; Wildfong, Kevin W; Smith, Kurt J; Bain, Anthony R; Willie, Chris K; Foster, Glen; Monteleone, Brad; Day, Trevor A

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity impacts CO2–[H+] washout at the central chemoreceptors and hence has marked influence on the control of ventilation. To date, the integration of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and ventilation has been investigated exclusively with measures of anterior CBF, which has a differential reactivity from the vertebrobasilar system and perfuses the brainstem. We hypothesized that: (1) posterior versus anterior CBF would have a stronger relationship to central chemoreflex magnitude during hypercapnia, and (2) that higher posterior reactivity would lead to a greater hypoxic ventilatory decline (HVD). End-tidal forcing was used to induce steady-state hyperoxic (300 mmHg ) hypercapnia (+3, +6 and +9 mmHg ) and isocapnic hypoxia (45 mmHg ) before and following pharmacological blunting (indomethacin; INDO; 1.45 ± 0.17 mg kg−1) of resting CBF and reactivity. In 22 young healthy volunteers, ventilation, intra-cranial arterial blood velocities and extra-cranial blood flows were measured during these challenges. INDO-induced blunting of cerebrovascular flow responsiveness (CVR) to CO2 was unrelated to variability in ventilatory sensitivity during hyperoxic hypercapnia. Further results in a sub-group of volunteers (n = 9) revealed that elevations of via end-tidal forcing reduce arterial–jugular venous gradients, attenuating the effect of CBF on chemoreflex responses. During isocapnic hypoxia, vertebral artery CVR was related to the magnitude of HVD (R2 = 0.27; P < 0.04; n = 16), suggesting that CO2–[H+] washout from central chemoreceptors modulates hypoxic ventilatory dynamics. No relationships were apparent with anterior CVR. As higher posterior, but not anterior, CVR was linked to HVD, our study highlights the importance of measuring flow in posterior vessels to investigate CBF and ventilatory integration. Key points Anterior and posterior cerebral circulations have differential reactivity to changes in arterial blood gases, but the

  3. Moyamoya disease.

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, M.; Howlett, D. C.; Saks, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare cerebrovascular condition of uncertain aetiology commonly affecting young persons. The disease is mainly seen in Japanese patients. We report two cases of moyamoya disease in Caucasian women and review the postulated aetiological factors and associated conditions as well as the spectrum of invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities useful in the diagnosis and follow-up of the disease, with particular reference to the developing role of magnetic resonance imaging and angiography. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9373593

  4. Pharmacological removal of serum amyloid P component from intracerebral plaques and cerebrovascular Aβ amyloid deposits in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Millar, David J.; Richard-Londt, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Human amyloid deposits always contain the normal plasma protein serum amyloid P component (SAP), owing to its avid but reversible binding to all amyloid fibrils, including the amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils in the cerebral parenchyma plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). SAP promotes amyloid fibril formation in vitro, contributes to persistence of amyloid in vivo and is also itself directly toxic to cerebral neurons. We therefore developed (R)-1-[6-[(R)-2-carboxy-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-6-oxo-hexanoyl]pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (CPHPC), a drug that removes SAP from the blood, and thereby also from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in patients with AD. Here we report that, after introduction of transgenic human SAP expression in the TASTPM double transgenic mouse model of AD, all the amyloid deposits contained human SAP. Depletion of circulating human SAP by CPHPC administration in these mice removed all detectable human SAP from both the intracerebral and cerebrovascular amyloid. The demonstration that removal of SAP from the blood and CSF also removes it from these amyloid deposits crucially validates the strategy of the forthcoming ‘Depletion of serum amyloid P component in Alzheimer's disease (DESPIAD)’ clinical trial of CPHPC. The results also strongly support clinical testing of CPHPC in patients with CAA. PMID:26842068

  5. Firm, patient, and process variables associated with length of stay in four diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fernow, L Carol; McColl, I; Mackie, Christine

    1978-01-01

    Factors associated with length of stay in three London teaching hospitals during 1972 and 1975 were examined in patients treated for myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular disease, inguinal hernia without obstruction, and gall stones. Statistical analyses were carried out with multiple regressions on log lengths of stay. Increased length of stay was associated with infection in all four groups and with the seriousness of operative procedures in all but patients with cerebrovascular disease. Although age was a significant variable in patients with hernias and gall stones, it had relatively little practical effect on length of stay. Other significant variables in at least one disease were obesity, number of abnormalities in blood chemistry, administration of parenteral fluids or oxygen, or use of monitoring devices, and whether chest radiography was carried out, blood electrolytes and urea were measured, or anticoagulants were used. Patients with cerebrovascular disease who were not discharged to their own homes stayed on average more than two and a half times longer than other patients. Between a third and a half of the variance was explained by these variables and the variation among firms. The method described is reproducible in other hospital settings, and the study shows that much new information could be available routinely without mounting expensive field trials. PMID:630221

  6. Autism and Autoimmune Disease: A Family Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, John; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Described in a family in which the youngest boy has early infantile autism, Addison's disease, and moniliasis and two older boys have autoimmune disease with hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, moniliasis, and either alopecia totalis or diabetes mellitus, while the oldest boy and parents are symptom free. (KW)

  7. Spatial distribution of disease: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Selvin, S; Shaw, G; Schulman, J; Merrill, D W

    1987-09-01

    Maps transformed so as to have constant density of residential population were used to analyze the spatial distribution of disease in three specific areas. Each area had received recent attention because of suspected environmental pollution. The area adjacent to the Rocky Flats Facility (CO) was examined to identify any association between possible plutonium releases and increases in lung cancer or leukemia incidence. The industrial area of northern Contra Costa County (CA) was studied to explore a relationship between petrochemical industrial emissions and histologic-specific lung cancers. Finally, a suspected increase in the risk of congenital cardiac defects possibly related to pollution of the Santa Clara County (CA) water supply was investigated. No evidence of elevated risk of disease was found to be associated with either the Rocky Flats Facility or the polluted water of Santa Clara County. An increase in lung cancer, found by other investigators in earlier years, was shown to persist in association with industrial emissions in Contra Costa County. PMID:3476785

  8. Age-dependence of sensorimotor and cerebral electroencephalographic asymmetry in rats subjected to unilateral cerebrovascular stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The human population mostly affected by stroke is more than 65 years old. This study was designed to meet the recommendation that models of cerebral ischemia in aged animals are more relevant to the clinical setting than young animal models. Until now the majority of the pre-clinical studies examining age effects on stroke outcomes have used rats of old age. Considering the increasing incidence of stroke among younger than old human population, new translational approaches in animal models are needed to match the rejuvenation of stroke. A better knowledge of alterations in stroke outcomes in middle-aged rats has important preventive and management implications providing clues for future investigations on effects of various neuroprotective and neurorestorative drugs against cerebrovascular accidents that may occur before late senescence. Methods We evaluated the impact of transient focal ischemia, induced by intracerebral unilateral infusion of endothelin-1 (Et-1) near the middle cerebral artery of conscious rats, on volume of brain damage and asymmetry in behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) output measures in middle-aged (11–12 month-old) rats. Results We did not find any age-dependent difference in the volume of ischemic brain damage three days after Et-1 infusion. However, age was an important determinant of neurological and EEG outcomes after stroke. Middle-aged ischemic rats had more impaired somatosensory functions of the contralateral part of the body than young ischemic rats and thus, had greater left-right reflex/sensorimotor asymmetry. Interhemispheric EEG asymmetry was more evident in middle-aged than in young ischemic rats, and this could tentatively explain the behavioral asymmetry. Conclusions With a multiparametric approach, we have validated the endothelin model of ischemia in middle-aged rats. The results provide clues for future studies on mechanisms underlying plasticity after brain damage and motivate investigations of

  9. Common Heartburn Drugs Linked to Kidney Disease in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_158313.html Common Heartburn Drugs Linked to Kidney Disease in Study But finding can't show whether ... heartburn may be at increased risk of developing kidney disease, a new study suggests. The research is the ...

  10. Reconstructing cerebrovascular networks under local physiological constraints by integer programming

    SciTech Connect

    Rempfler, Markus; Schneider, Matthias; Ielacqua, Giovanna D.; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Klohs, Jan; Szekely, Gabor; Andres, Bjoern; Menze, Bjoern H.

    2015-04-23

    We introduce a probabilistic approach to vessel network extraction that enforces physiological constraints on the vessel structure. The method accounts for both image evidence and geometric relationships between vessels by solving an integer program, which is shown to yield the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to the probabilistic model. Starting from an over-connected network, it is pruning vessel stumps and spurious connections by evaluating the local geometry and the global connectivity of the graph. We utilize a high-resolution micro computed tomography (µCT) dataset of a cerebrovascular corrosion cast to obtain a reference network and learn the prior distributions of our probabilistic model. As a result, we perform experiments on micro magnetic resonance angiography (µMRA) images of mouse brains and discuss properties of the networks obtained under different tracking and pruning approaches.

  11. Reconstructing cerebrovascular networks under local physiological constraints by integer programming

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rempfler, Markus; Schneider, Matthias; Ielacqua, Giovanna D.; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Klohs, Jan; Szekely, Gabor; Andres, Bjoern; Menze, Bjoern H.

    2015-04-23

    We introduce a probabilistic approach to vessel network extraction that enforces physiological constraints on the vessel structure. The method accounts for both image evidence and geometric relationships between vessels by solving an integer program, which is shown to yield the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to the probabilistic model. Starting from an over-connected network, it is pruning vessel stumps and spurious connections by evaluating the local geometry and the global connectivity of the graph. We utilize a high-resolution micro computed tomography (µCT) dataset of a cerebrovascular corrosion cast to obtain a reference network and learn the prior distributions of ourmore » probabilistic model. As a result, we perform experiments on micro magnetic resonance angiography (µMRA) images of mouse brains and discuss properties of the networks obtained under different tracking and pruning approaches.« less

  12. Cerebrovascular complications associated with idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Furlan, A J; Craciun, A R; Raju, N R; Hart, N

    1984-01-01

    One hundred fifty patients with idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS) were followed-up for an average of 5.5 years. There were 95 males and 55 females with a mean age of 51 years. Patients usually presented with cardiac symptoms or syncope; no patient presented with stroke. Eight patients (5%) died during follow-up, all from cardiac causes. Eleven patients (7%) developed cerebrovascular complications; 5 (3%) had a stroke and 6 (4%) had TIA only. Patients with IHSS and atrial fibrillation have a much greater stroke risk. Mitral annulus calcification may also increase stroke risk in IHSS. However, stroke is almost never the presenting manifestation of IHSS, and the longterm risk of stroke for most patients with known IHSS is low. PMID:6538354

  13. Cerebrovascular reactivity is increased with acclimatization to 3,454 m altitude.

    PubMed

    Flück, Daniela; Siebenmann, Christoph; Keiser, Stefanie; Cathomen, Adrian; Lundby, Carsten

    2015-08-01

    Controversy exists regarding the effect of high-altitude exposure on cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity (CVR). Confounding factors in previous studies include the use of different experimental approaches, ascent profiles, duration and severity of exposure and plausibly environmental factors associated with altitude exposure. One aim of the present study was to determine CVR throughout acclimatization to high altitude when controlling for these. Middle cerebral artery mean velocity (MCAv mean) CVR was assessed during hyperventilation (hypocapnia) and CO2 administration (hypercapnia) with background normoxia (sea level (SL)) and hypoxia (3,454 m) in nine healthy volunteers (26 ± 4 years (mean ± s.d.)) at SL, and after 30 minutes (HA0), 3 (HA3) and 22 (HA22) days of high-altitude (3,454 m) exposure. At altitude, ventilation was increased whereas MCAv mean was not altered. Hypercapnic CVR was decreased at HA0 (1.16% ± 0.16%/mm Hg, mean ± s.e.m.), whereas both hyper- and hypocapnic CVR were increased at HA3 (3.13% ± 0.18% and 2.96% ± 0.10%/mm Hg) and HA22 (3.32% ± 0.12% and 3.24% ± 0.14%/mm Hg) compared with SL (1.98% ± 0.22% and 2.38% ± 0.10%/mm Hg; P < 0.01) regardless of background oxygenation. Cerebrovascular conductance (MCAv mean/mean arterial pressure) CVR was determined to account for blood pressure changes and revealed an attenuated response. Collectively our results show that hypocapnic and hypercapnic CVR are both elevated with acclimatization to high altitude. PMID:25806704

  14. Clinical studies in lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boudes, Pol F

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) consist of over 40 diseases, some of which are amenable to treatment. In this review, we consider the regulatory context in which LSDs studies are performed, highlight design specificities and explore operational challenges. Orphan drug legislations, both in Europe and US, were effective to stimulate LSDs drug development. However, regulators flexibilities toward approval vary leading to global discrepancies in access to treatments. Study designs are constrained because few patients can be studied. This implies LSDs treatments need to demonstrate large levels of clinical efficacy. If not, an appropriate level of evidence is difficult to achieve. While biomarkers could address this issue, none have been truly accepted as primary outcome. Enrichment of study population can increase the chance of success, especially with clinical outcomes. Adaptive designs are operationally challenging. Innovative methods of analysis can be used, notably using a patient as his/her own control and responder analysis. The use of extension phases and patient registries as a source of historical comparison can facilitate data interpretation. Operationally, few patients are available per centers and multiple centers need to be initiated in multiple countries. This impacts time-lines and budget. In the future, regulators flexibility will be essential to provide patients access to innovative treatments. PMID:25003011

  15. Indomethacin-induced impairment of regional cerebrovascular reactivity: implications for respiratory control.

    PubMed

    Hoiland, Ryan L; Ainslie, Philip N; Wildfong, Kevin W; Smith, Kurt J; Bain, Anthony R; Willie, Chris K; Foster, Glen; Monteleone, Brad; Day, Trevor A

    2015-03-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity impacts CO₂-[H(+)] washout at the central chemoreceptors and hence has marked influence on the control of ventilation. To date, the integration of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and ventilation has been investigated exclusively with measures of anterior CBF, which has a differential reactivity from the vertebrobasilar system and perfuses the brainstem. We hypothesized that: (1) posterior versus anterior CBF would have a stronger relationship to central chemoreflex magnitude during hypercapnia, and (2) that higher posterior reactivity would lead to a greater hypoxic ventilatory decline (HVD). End-tidal forcing was used to induce steady-state hyperoxic (300 mmHg P ET ,O₂) hypercapnia (+3, +6 and +9 mmHg P ET ,CO₂) and isocapnic hypoxia (45 mmHg P ET ,O₂) before and following pharmacological blunting (indomethacin; INDO; 1.45 ± 0.17 mg kg(-1)) of resting CBF and reactivity. In 22 young healthy volunteers, ventilation, intra-cranial arterial blood velocities and extra-cranial blood flows were measured during these challenges. INDO-induced blunting of cerebrovascular flow responsiveness (CVR) to CO₂ was unrelated to variability in ventilatory sensitivity during hyperoxic hypercapnia. Further results in a sub-group of volunteers (n = 9) revealed that elevations of P ET,CO₂ via end-tidal forcing reduce arterial-jugular venous gradients, attenuating the effect of CBF on chemoreflex responses. During isocapnic hypoxia, vertebral artery CVR was related to the magnitude of HVD (R(2) = 0.27; P < 0.04; n = 16), suggesting that CO₂-[H(+)] washout from central chemoreceptors modulates hypoxic ventilatory dynamics. No relationships were apparent with anterior CVR. As higher posterior, but not anterior, CVR was linked to HVD, our study highlights the importance of measuring flow in posterior vessels to investigate CBF and ventilatory integration. PMID:25641262

  16. Prior head-down tilt does not impair the cerebrovascular response to head-up tilt

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Changbin; Gao, Yuan; Greaves, Danielle K.; Villar, Rodrigo; Beltrame, Thomas; Fraser, Katelyn S.

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that cerebrovascular autoregulation was not impaired during head-up tilt (HUT) that followed brief exposures to varying degrees of prior head-down tilt (HDT) was tested in 10 healthy young men and women. Cerebral mean flow velocity (MFV) and cardiovascular responses were measured in transitions to a 60-s period of 75° HUT that followed supine rest (control) or 15 s HDT at −10°, −25°, and −55°. During HDT, heart rate (HR) was reduced for −25° and −55°, and cardiac output was lower at −55° HDT. MFV increased during −10° HDT, but not in the other conditions even though blood pressure at the middle cerebral artery (BPMCA) increased. On the transition to HUT, HR increased only for −55° condition, but stroke volume and cardiac output transiently increased for −25° and −55°. Total peripheral resistance index decreased in proportion to the magnitude of HDT and recovered over the first 20 s of HUT. MFV was significantly less in all HDT conditions compared with the control in the first 5-s period of HUT, but it recovered quickly. An autoregulation correction index derived from MFV recovery relative to BPMCA decline revealed a delay in the first 5 s for prior HDT compared with control but then a rapid increase to briefly exceed control after −55° HDT. This study showed that cerebrovascular autoregulation is modified by but not impaired by brief HDT prior to HUT and that cerebral MFV recovered quickly and more rapidly than arterial blood pressure to protect against cerebral hypoperfusion and potential syncope. PMID:25749443

  17. Peripheral artery disease assessed by ankle-brachial index in patients with established cardiovascular disease or at least one risk factor for atherothrombosis - CAREFUL Study: A national, multi-center, cross-sectional observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate the presence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) via the ankle brachial index (ABI) in patients with known cardiovascular and/or cerebrovascular diseases or with at least one risk factor for atherothrombosis. Methods Patients with a history of atherothrombotic events, or aged 50-69 years with at least one cardiovascular risk factor, or > = 70 years of age were included in this multicenter, cross-sectional, non-interventional study (DIREGL04074). Demographics, medical history, physical examination findings, and physician awareness of PAD were analyzed. The number of patients with low ABI (< = 0.90) was analyzed. Results A total of 530 patients (mean age, 63.4 ± 8.7 years; 50.2% female) were enrolled. Hypertension and dyslipidemia were present in 88.7% and 65.5% of patients, respectively. PAD-related symptoms were evident in about one-third of the patients, and at least one of the pedal pulses was negative in 6.5% of patients. The frequency of low ABI was 20.0% in the whole study population and 30% for patients older than 70 years. Older age, greater number of total risk factors, and presence of PAD-related physical findings were associated with increased likelihood of low ABI (p < 0.001). There was no gender difference in the prevalence of low ABI, PAD symptoms, or total number of risk factors. Exercise (33.6%) was the most common non-pharmacological option recommended by physicians, and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) (45.4%) was the most frequently prescribed medication for PAD. Conclusion Our results indicate that advanced age, greater number of total risk factors and presence of PAD-related physical findings were associated with increased likelihood of low ABI. These findings are similar to those reported in similar studies of different populations, and document a fairly high prevalence of PAD in a Mediterranean country. PMID:21247449

  18. Non-ionizing radiofrequency electromagnetic waves traversing the head can be used to detect cerebrovascular autoregulation responses

    PubMed Central

    Oziel, M.; Hjouj, M.; Gonzalez, C. A.; Lavee, J.; Rubinsky, B.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring changes in non-ionizing radiofrequency electromagnetic waves as they traverse the brain can detect the effects of stimuli employed in cerebrovascular autoregulation (CVA) tests on the brain, without contact and in real time. CVA is a physiological phenomenon of importance to health, used for diagnosis of a number of diseases of the brain with a vascular component. The technology described here is being developed for use in diagnosis of injuries and diseases of the brain in rural and economically underdeveloped parts of the world. A group of nine subjects participated in this pilot clinical evaluation of the technology. Substantial research remains to be done on correlating the measurements with physiology and anatomy. PMID:26898944

  19. Non-ionizing radiofrequency electromagnetic waves traversing the head can be used to detect cerebrovascular autoregulation responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oziel, M.; Hjouj, M.; Gonzalez, C. A.; Lavee, J.; Rubinsky, B.

    2016-02-01

    Monitoring changes in non-ionizing radiofrequency electromagnetic waves as they traverse the brain can detect the effects of stimuli employed in cerebrovascular autoregulation (CVA) tests on the brain, without contact and in real time. CVA is a physiological phenomenon of importance to health, used for diagnosis of a number of diseases of the brain with a vascular component. The technology described here is being developed for use in diagnosis of injuries and diseases of the brain in rural and economically underdeveloped parts of the world. A group of nine subjects participated in this pilot clinical evaluation of the technology. Substantial research remains to be done on correlating the measurements with physiology and anatomy.

  20. Whole Genome Association Study of Johne's Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine Paratuberculosis, commonly referred to as Johne's disease, is a contagious bacterial disease estimated to be present in over 65% of US dairy herds and results in annual losses in the hundreds of millions of US dollars. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the bacteria resp...

  1. Retinal vascular changes are a marker for cerebral vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk. PMID:26008809

  2. Structural brain lesions in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Dolapcioglu, Can; Dolapcioglu, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications or manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease deserve particular attention because symptomatic conditions can require early diagnosis and treatment, whereas unexplained manifestations might be linked with pathogenic mechanisms. This review focuses on both symptomatic and asymptomatic brain lesions detectable on imaging studies, as well as their frequency and potential mechanisms. A direct causal relationship between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and asymptomatic structural brain changes has not been demonstrated, but several possible explanations, including vasculitis, thromboembolism and malnutrition, have been proposed. IBD is associated with a tendency for thromboembolisms; therefore, cerebrovascular thromboembolism represents the most frequent and grave CNS complication. Vasculitis, demyelinating conditions and CNS infections are among the other CNS manifestations of the disease. Biological agents also represent a risk factor, particularly for demyelination. Identification of the nature and potential mechanisms of brain lesions detectable on imaging studies would shed further light on the disease process and could improve patient care through early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26600970

  3. RETROSPECTIVE EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH WASTEWATER UTILIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A retrospective epidemiological study was carried out on the association between enteric disease incidence and wastewater utilization in 79 kibbutzim (cooperative agricultural settlements) in Israel having a population of 32,672. Medical records on disease incidence were collecte...

  4. New Approaches for Studying Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Gao, Bin; Karin, Michael; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Brenner, David

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is major cause of chronic liver injury which results in liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. According to the surveillance report published by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, liver cirrhosis is the 12th leading cause of death in the United States with 48 % of these deaths being attributed to excessive alcohol consumption. ALD includes a spectrum of disorders from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Several mechanisms play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. These include ethanol–induced oxidative stress and depletion of glutathione, pathological methionine metabolism, increased gut permeability and release of endotoxins into the portal blood, recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells including bone marrow-derived and liver resident macrophages (Kupffer cells). Chronic alcohol consumption results in liver damage and activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and myofibroblasts, leading to liver fibrosis. Here we discuss the current view on factors that are specific for different stages of ALD and those that regulate its progression, including cytokines and chemokines, alcohol-responsive intracellular signaling pathways, and transcriptional factors. We also review recent studies demonstrating that alcohol-mediated changes can be regulated on an epigenetic level, including microRNAs. Finally, we discuss the reversibility of liver fibrosis and inactivation of HSCs as a potential strategy for treating alcohol-induced liver damage. PMID:26594598

  5. Epidemiologic Studies of Exercise and Cardiovascular Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoye, Henry J.

    1977-01-01

    A physically more active life, while not being related to atherosclerosis, could enable some individuals to live longer with atherosclerosis before dying from or showing symptoms of coronary heart disease. (MJB)

  6. Nervous control of the cerebrovascular system: doubts and facts.

    PubMed

    Sándor, P

    1999-09-01

    Increased function of the central neurons results in increased neuronal metabolism and, as a consequence, increased concentration of metabolic end-products (H+, K+, adenosin) results in an increased cerebral blood flow (CBF). There is a general agreement among investigators that products of cerebral tissue metabolism as well as chemical stimuli are key factors that determine the rate of blood flow in the brain. CBF, however, may increase out of proportion to metabolic demands, may increase without significant change in local metabolism, and may increase much faster than the accumulation of the metabolic end-products. Therefore, the 100-year-old metabolic hypothesis of Roy and Sherrington, cannot fully explain the increases of CBF during increased functional activity of the central neurons. The tight coupling of neuronal activity and blood flow in the brain is demonstrated by a large amount of data. Therefore, the likelihood exists that neurogenic stimuli via perivascular nerve endings may act as rapid initiators, to induce a moment-to-moment dynamic adjustment of CBF to the metabolic demands, and further maintenance of these adjusted parameters is ensured by the metabolic and chemical factors. Perivascular nerve endings were identified in the outer smooth muscle layer of the cerebral arteries, arterioles and veins. Their axonterminals contain a large variety of neurotransmitters, often co-localised in synaptic vesicles. Stimulation of the nerves results in a release of transmitters into the narrow neuromuscular synaptic clefts in the cerebrovascular smooth muscle, close to specific receptor sites in the vessel wall. In spite of these facts, however, and in spite of the large number of new experimental evidences, the role of the nervous control of the cerebrovascular system is underestimated both in medical textbooks and in the common medical knowledge since decades. In the last 20 years major advances have been made that make it necessary to revise this false view

  7. Cerebrovascular and blood-brain barrier morphology in spontaneously hypertensive rats: effect of treatment with choline alphoscerate.

    PubMed

    Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow; Amenta, Francesco; Tomassoni, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic precursors increasing choline availability and acetylcholine synthesis/release may represent a therapeutic approach for countering cognitive impairment occurring in adult-onset dementia disorders. Choline alphoscerate (alpha-gliceryl-phosphoryl-choline, GPC) is among cholinergic precursors the most effective in enhancing acetylcholine biosynthesis and release in animal models. This study was designed to assess if a long-term treatment with GPC modify cerebrovascular components [perivascular astrocytes, blood-brain barrier (BBB) and microvessels] and endothelial inflammatory markers expression in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) used as a model of brain vascular injury. Male SHR aged 32 weeks and age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats were treated for 4 weeks with GPC (150 mg/kg/day) or a vehicle. Intracerebral arteries of different brain areas, perivascular astrocytes, BBB and endothelial inflammatory markers were assessed by quantitative morphological and immunohistochemical techniques. No significant changes in the size of perivascular astrocytes were observed in SHR versus normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats, whereas the expression of the BBB marker aquaporin-4 increased in SHR. This phenomenon was countered by GPC treatment. On the contrary, GPC has no vasodilator effect on brain micro-vessels. Endothelial markers and vascular adhesion molecules expression were not homogeneously affected by hypertension and GPC treatment in intracerebral vessels. The observation that treatment with GPC reversed BBB changes and countered to some extent micro-vessels changes occurring in SHR could explain data of clinical trials reporting an improvement of cognitive function in subjects suffering from cerebrovascular disorders and treated with GPC. These preclinical data suggest that the compound could have a cerebrovascular protective effect deserving a further characterization. PMID:25714975

  8. A retrospective study of disease in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Garner, M M

    2013-05-01

    This report reviews diseases of 1546 elasmobranchs representing at least 60 species submitted to Northwest ZooPath from 1994 to 2010. Cownose rays (Rhinoptera bonasus) (78), southern rays (Dasyatis americana) (75), dusky smooth-hounds (Mustelus canis) (74), bonnethead sharks (Sphyrna tiburo) (66), and bamboo sharks (Hemiscylliidae) (56) were the most commonly submitted species. Infectious/inflammatory disease was most common (33.5%) followed by nutritional (11.9%, mostly emaciation), traumatic (11.3%), cardiovascular (5.5%, mostly shock), and toxin-associated disease (3.7%). Bacterial infections (518/1546, 15%) included sepsis (136/518, 26%), dermatitis (7%), branchitis (6%), and enteritis (4%). Fungal infections (10/1546, 0.6%) included dermatitis (30%), hepatitis (30%), and branchitis (20%). Viral or suspected viral infections or disease processes (15/1546, 1%) included papillomatosis (47%), herpesvirus (20%), and adenovirus (7%). Parasitic infections (137/1546, 9%) included nematodiasis (36/137, 26%), ciliate infections (23%), trematodiasis (20%), coccidiosis (6%), myxozoanosis (5%), amoebiasis (4%), cestodiasis (1%), and flagellate infections (1%). Inflammation of unknown cause (401/1546, 26%) included enteritis (55/401, 14%), branchitis (9%), encephalitis (9%), and dermatitis (7%). Traumatic diseases (174/1546, 11.3%) included skin trauma (103/174, 60%), stress/maladaptation (9%), and gut trauma (7%). Toxicoses (57/1546, 4%) included toxic gill disease (16/57, 26%), gas bubble disease (19%), fenbendazole (7%), ammonia (7%), chlorine (5%), and chloramine (3%). Species trends included visceral nematodiasis in black-nosed sharks (Carcharhinus acronotus) (55%); sepsis in dusky smooth-hounds (41%), blue-spotted stingrays (36%), southern rays (36%), and wobeggong sharks (Orectolobus spp) (69%); emaciation in bamboo (33%) and bonnethead (32%) sharks and freshwater stingrays (Potamotrygon motoro) (32%); and trauma in bonnethead sharks (30%). PMID:23528944

  9. Postoperative Complications After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chung-Han; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chu, Chin-Chen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Liao, Kuang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Coronary artery disease is common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies have shown that patients with COPD have a higher risk of mortality than those without COPD after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, most of the previous studies were small, single-center studies with limited case numbers (or their only focus was mortality). The aim of our study was to focus on readmission, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), acute respiratory failure (ARF), cerebrovascular accident, and venous thromboembolism rates after CABG in an Asian COPD population. We conducted a nationwide case–control study in Taiwan using the claims database of hospitalization between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. Patients with COPD before CABG were defined as the case groups. Each case was propensity score-matched by age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease, with 2 controls selected from CABG patients without COPD. The outcomes of interest were mortality, wound infection, and the readmission rate over 30 days for the following diseases: AMI, pneumonia, ARF, cerebrovascular accident, and venous thromboembolism. There were 14,858 patients without COPD and 758 patients with COPD who underwent CABG. After propensity score matching, the 30-day mortality and 30-day readmission rates and AMI were higher in the non-COPD group. The incidences of pneumonia and ARF after CABG were higher in the COPD group. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease does not necessarily lead to mortality, readmission, or AMI after CABG, and the major respiratory complications associated with CABG in patients with COPD were pneumonia and ARF. PMID:26937939

  10. The burden of disease in Maputo City, Mozambique: registered and autopsied deaths in 1994.

    PubMed Central

    Dgedge, M.; Novoa, A.; Macassa, G.; Sacarlal, J.; Black, J.; Michaud, C.; Cliff, J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To classify the causes of death in Maputo City, Mozambique, using the methods of the Global Burden of Disease study, in order to provide information for health policy-makers and to obtain a baseline for future studies in Maputo City and provincial capitals. METHODS: Data were taken from the Maputo City death register and autopsy records for 1994. FINDINGS: A total of 9011 deaths were recorded in the death register, representing a coverage of approximately 86%. Of these, 8114 deaths (92%) were classified by cause. Communicable, maternal, perinatal, and nutritional disorders accounted for 5319 deaths; noncommunicable diseases for 1834; and injuries for 961. The 10 leading causes of registered deaths were perinatal disorders (1643 deaths); malaria (928); diarrhoeal diseases (814); tuberculosis (456); lower respiratory infections (416); road-traffic accidents (371); anaemia (269); cerebrovascular diseases (269); homicide (188); and bacterial meningitis (178). CONCLUSIONS: Infectious diseases of all types, injuries, and cerebrovascular disease ranked as leading causes of death, according to both the autopsy records and the city death register. AIDS-related deaths were underreported. With HIV infection increasing rapidly, AIDS will add to the already high burden of infectious diseases and premature mortality in Maputo City. The results of the study indicate that cause of death is a useful outcome indicator for disease control programmes. PMID:11436477

  11. [PECULIARITIES OF THE CEREBROVASCULAR EFFECTS OF GLUTAMIC ACID].

    PubMed

    Gan'shina, T S; Kurza, E V; Kurdyumov, I N; Maslennikov, D V; Mirzoyan, R S

    2016-01-01

    Experiments on nonlinear rats subjected to global transient cerebral ischemia revealed the ability of glutamic acid to improve cerebral circulation. Consequently, the excitatory amino acid can produce adverse (neurotoxic) and positive (anti-ischemic) effects in cerebral ischemia. The cerebrovascular effect of glutamic acid in cerebral ischemia is attenuated on the background action of the MNDA receptor blocker MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg intravenously) and eliminated by bicuculline. When glutamic acid is combined with the non-competitive MNDA receptor antagonist MK-801, neither one nor another drug shows its vasodilator effect. The results are indicative of the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory systems on the level of cerebral vessels and once again confirm our previous conclusion about the decisive role of GABA(A) receptors in brain vessels in the implementation of anti-ischemic activity of endogenous compounds (melatonin) and well-known pharmacological substances (mexidol, afobazole), and new chemical compounds based on GABA-containing lipid derivatives. PMID:27455572

  12. Executive function and cerebrovascular reactivity in pediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaya, Maria A; Rojas, Mary; Kupferman, Juan C; Lande, Marc B; Paterno, Kara; Brosgol, Yuri; Pavlakis, Steven G

    2015-04-01

    Primary hypertension is associated with decreased performance on neurocognitive testing and a blunted cerebrovascular reactivity to hypercapnia. Parents of 14 children with hypertension and prehypertension completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functions. Children underwent 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and transcranial Doppler with reactivity measurement using time-averaged maximum mean velocity and end-tidal carbon dioxide during hypercapnia-rebreathing test. Comparing the reactivity slope for the patients to historical controls showed a statistically significant difference (t = -5.19, df = 13, P < .001), with lower slopes. Pearson correlations of the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functions scores with the reactivity slopes showed a statistically significant inverse relationship with Behavioral Regulation Index (r = -.60, P = .02), Metacognition Index (r = -.40, P = .05), and the Global Executive Component (r = -.53, P = .05). Children with hypertension have decreased executive function, and this correlates to low transcranial Doppler-reactivity slopes, suggesting that the brain is a target organ in hypertensive children. PMID:23877480

  13. Boundary detection in disease mapping studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duncan; Mitchell, Richard

    2012-07-01

    In disease mapping, the aim is to estimate the spatial pattern in disease risk over an extended geographical region, so that areas with elevated risks can be identified. A Bayesian hierarchical approach is typically used to produce such maps, which represents the risk surface with a set of random effects that exhibit a single global level of spatial smoothness. However, in complex urban settings, the risk surface is likely to exhibit localized rather than global spatial structure, including areas where the risk varies smoothly over space, as well as boundaries separating populations that are geographically adjacent but have very different risk profiles. Therefore, this paper proposes an approach for capturing localized spatial structure, including the identification of such risk boundaries. The effectiveness of the approach is tested by simulation, before being applied to lung cancer incidence data in Greater Glasgow, UK, between 2001 and 2005. PMID:22045911

  14. Genetic studies of Unverricht-Luendborg disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lafreniere, R.G.; Dube, M.P.; Rouleau, G.A.

    1994-09-01

    Unverricht-Luendborg disease (ULD) is a progressive myoclonus epilepsy with an age of onset between 6 and 13 years, myoclonic jerks that progressively worsen, and mental deterioration. ULD shows an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The ULD gene has been genetically linked to 21q22.3, and more recently estimated to lie within 0.3 cM of the markers PFKL, D21S25, and D21S154, based on linkage disequilibrium. We have previously identified eight families affected with ULD and shown linkage to 21q22.3. In our efforts to identify the metabolic basis of the disease, we have identified several other families with ULD and are testing them for linkage to 21q22.3 We are also constructing a cosmid and YAC contig of the candidate EPM1 region in 21q22.3 and are in the process of identifying candidate genes therefrom.

  15. Mortality from Circulatory System Diseases among French Uranium Miners: A Nested Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Drubay, Damien; Caër-Lorho, Sylvaine; Laroche, Pierre; Laurier, Dominique; Rage, Estelle

    2015-05-01

    A significant association has been observed between radon exposure and cerebrovascular disease (CeVD) mortality among French uranium miners, but risk factors for circulatory system diseases (CSD) have not been previously considered. We conducted new analyses in the recently updated (through 2007) French cohort of uranium miners (n = 5,086), which included 442 deaths from CSD, 167 of them from ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 105 from CeVD. A nested case-control study was then set up to collect and investigate the influence of these risk factors on the relationships between mortality from CSD and occupational external gamma ray and internal ionizing radiation exposure (radon and long-lived radionuclides) in this updated cohort. The nested case-control study included miners first employed after 1955, still employed in 1976 and followed up through 2007. Individual information about CSD risk factors was collected from medical files for the 76 deaths from CSD (including 26 from IHD and 16 from CeVD) and 237 miners who had not died of CSD by the end of follow-up. The exposure-risk relationships were assessed with a Cox proportional hazard model weighted by the inverse sampling probability. A significant increase in all CSD and CeVD mortality risks associated with radon exposure was observed in the total cohort [hazard ratios: HRCSD/100 working level months (WLM) = 1.11, 95% confidence interval (1.01; 1.22) and HRCeVD/100 WLM = 1.25 (1.09; 1.43), respectively]. A nonsignificant exposure-risk relationship was observed for every type of cumulative ionizing radiation exposure and every end point [e.g., HRCSD/100WLM = 1.43 (0.71; 2.87)]. The adjustment for each CSD risk factor did not substantially change the exposure-risk relationships. When the model was adjusted for overweight, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and smoking status, the HR/100WLM for CSD, for example, was equal to 1.21 (0.54; 2.75); and when it was adjusted for risk factors selected with the

  16. Red blood cell distribution width and cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Danese, Elisa; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background The red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a rather simple measure of red blood cell (RBC) size heterogeneity (i.e., anisocytosis), which is easily calculated by dividing the standard deviation (SD) of erythrocyte volumes for the mean corpuscular volume (MCV). Emerging evidence suggests that, besides RBC abnormalities, many human disorders may be frequently associated with a high degree of anisocytosis. Methods In this narrative review, we analyzed the current scientific literature about the putative role and the potential epidemiologic association between RDW and cardiovascular diseases. The findings of the most representative epidemiological studies were summarized and discussed. Results Overall, considerable and convincing evidence has been brought that an increased RDW value is associated with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) [including acute myocardial infarction (AMI)], ischemic cerebrovascular disease (including stroke), peripheral artery disease (PAD), as well as with atrial fibrillation (AF), heart failure (HF) and hypertension. Higher anisocytosis also significantly and independently predicts adverse outcomes in patients with these conditions. Conclusions Although the role of anisocytosis in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases remains uncertain, the considerable evidence available so far suggests that the clinical use of RDW may be broadened beyond the conventional boundaries of erythrocyte disorders, in particular for assisting the diagnosis and prognostication of patients with ACS, ischemic cerebrovascular disease, PAD, HF and AF. PMID:26623117

  17. Cardiovascular disease in Adult Life after Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia: A population-based cohort study of 32,308 one-year survivors.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsdottir, Thorgerdur; Winther, Jeanette F; de Fine Licht, Sofie; Bonnesen, Trine G; Asdahl, Peter H; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Anderson, Harald; Wesenberg, Finn; Malila, Nea; Hasle, Henrik; Olsen, Jørgen H

    2015-09-01

    The lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease in a large cohort of childhood cancer survivors has not been fully assessed. In a retrospective population-based cohort study predicated on comprehensive national health registers, we identified a cohort of 32,308 one-year survivors of cancer diagnosed before the age of 20 in the five Nordic countries between the start of cancer registration in the 1940s and 1950s to 2008; 211,489 population comparison subjects were selected from national population registers. Study subjects were linked to national hospital registers, and the observed numbers of first hospital admission for cardiovascular disease among survivors were compared with the expected numbers derived from the population comparison cohort. Cardiovascular disease was diagnosed in 2,632 childhood cancer survivors (8.1%), yielding a standardized hospitalization rate ratio (RR) of 2.1 (95% CI 2.0-2.2) and an overall absolute excess risk (AER) of 324 per 100,000 person-years. At the end of follow-up 12% of the survivors were ≥ 50 years of age and 4.5% ≥ 60 years of age. Risk estimates were significantly increased throughout life, with an AER of ∼500-600 per 100,000 person-years at age ≥ 40. The highest relative risks were seen for heart failure (RR, 5.2; 95% CI 4.5-5.9), valvular dysfunction (4.6; 3.8-5.5) and cerebrovascular diseases (3.7; 3.4-4.1). Survivors of hepatic tumor, Hodgkin lymphoma and leukemia had the highest overall risks for cardiovascular disease, although each main type of childhood cancer had increased risk with different risk profiles. Nordic childhood cancer survivors are at markedly increased risk for cardiovascular disorders throughout life. These findings indicate the need for preventive interventions and continuous follow-up for this rapidly growing population. PMID:25648592

  18. Hemodynamic variability and cerebrovascular control after transient cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Allan, Philip D; Faulkner, James; O'Donnell, Terrence; Lanford, Jeremy; Wong, Lai-Kin; Saleem, Saqib; Woolley, Brandon; Lambrick, Danielle; Stoner, Lee; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    We investigated if hemodynamic variability, cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, and their interrelationships differ between patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and controls. We recorded blood pressure (BP) and bilateral middle cerebral artery flow velocity (MCAv) in a cohort of TIA patients (n = 17), and age-matched controls (n = 15). Spontaneous fluctuations in BP and MCAv were characterized by spectral power analysis, and CBF regulation was assessed by wavelet phase synchronization analysis in the very low- (0.02-0.07 Hz), low- (0.07-0.20 Hz), and high-frequency (0.20-0.40 Hz) ranges. Furthermore, cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity was assessed as a second metric of CBF regulation by inducing hypercapnia with 8% CO2 inhalation followed by hyperventilation driven hypocapnia. We found that TIA was associated with higher BP power (group effect, P < 0.05), but not MCAv power (P = 0.11). CBF regulation (assessed by wavelet phase synchronization and CO2 reactivity) was intact in patients (all P ≥ 0.075) across both hemispheres (all P ≥ 0.51). Pooled data (controls and affected hemisphere of patients) showed that BP and MCAv power were positively correlated at all frequency ranges (R(2) = 0.20-0.80, all P < 0.01). Furthermore, LF phase synchronization index was a significant determinant of MCAv power (P < 0.05), while VLF and HF phase synchronization index, and TIA were not (all P ≥ 0.50). These results indicate that CBF stability and control is maintained in TIA patients, but BPV is markedly elevated. BPV attenuation may be an important therapeutic strategy for enhancing secondary stroke prevention in patients who suffer a TIA. PMID:26537345

  19. Hemodynamic variability and cerebrovascular control after transient cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Philip D; Faulkner, James; O’Donnell, Terrence; Lanford, Jeremy; Wong, Lai-kin; Saleem, Saqib; Woolley, Brandon; Lambrick, Danielle; Stoner, Lee; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    We investigated if hemodynamic variability, cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, and their interrelationships differ between patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and controls. We recorded blood pressure (BP) and bilateral middle cerebral artery flow velocity (MCAv) in a cohort of TIA patients (n = 17), and age-matched controls (n = 15). Spontaneous fluctuations in BP and MCAv were characterized by spectral power analysis, and CBF regulation was assessed by wavelet phase synchronization analysis in the very low- (0.02–0.07 Hz), low- (0.07–0.20 Hz), and high-frequency (0.20–0.40 Hz) ranges. Furthermore, cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity was assessed as a second metric of CBF regulation by inducing hypercapnia with 8% CO2 inhalation followed by hyperventilation driven hypocapnia. We found that TIA was associated with higher BP power (group effect, P < 0.05), but not MCAv power (P = 0.11). CBF regulation (assessed by wavelet phase synchronization and CO2 reactivity) was intact in patients (all P ≥ 0.075) across both hemispheres (all P ≥ 0.51). Pooled data (controls and affected hemisphere of patients) showed that BP and MCAv power were positively correlated at all frequency ranges (R2 = 0.20–0.80, all P < 0.01). Furthermore, LF phase synchronization index was a significant determinant of MCAv power (P < 0.05), while VLF and HF phase synchronization index, and TIA were not (all P ≥ 0.50). These results indicate that CBF stability and control is maintained in TIA patients, but BPV is markedly elevated. BPV attenuation may be an important therapeutic strategy for enhancing secondary stroke prevention in patients who suffer a TIA. PMID:26537345

  20. Cerebrovascular responses to capsaicin in vitro and in situ.

    PubMed Central

    Edvinsson, L.; Jansen, I.; Kingman, T. A.; McCulloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. The cerebrovascular effects of capsaicin have been examined in vitro, in feline isolated cerebral arteries (circular segments, 2-3 mm long, 300-400 microns extended diameter) and, in situ, in pial arterioles (diameter 40-200 microns) on the cortical surface of chloralose-anaesthetized cats. 2. In isolated middle cerebral arteries, low concentrations of capsaicin (10(-14)-10(-10) M) effected a concentration-dependent relaxation of vessels precontracted with prostaglandin F2 alpha. This relaxant response was markedly attenuated by repeated administration of capsaicin but was minimally affected by the presence of atropine, propranolol, cimetidine or spantide in the tissue bath. 3. In isolated middle cerebral arteries, higher concentrations of capsaicin effected a marked concentration-dependent contraction. This contraction was not modified by 10(-6) M phentolamine or 10(-6) M ketanserin. A markedly reduced contraction by capsaicin was found upon the removal of calcium ions from the buffer solution. Also the calcium entry blocker nimodipine reversed the capsaicin-induced contraction. 4. Subarachnoid perivascular microapplication of capsaicin around individual pial arterioles in situ elicited a biphasic response (an immediate vasoconstriction followed by a sustained vasodilatation). The maximum vasoconstriction was a 60 +/- 6% reduction in diameter from base line and the maximum vasodilatation a 38 +/- 7% increase in diameter. Vasodilatation occurred at lower concentrations of capsaicin (EC50, approximately 5 x 10(-8) M) than those required for vasoconstriction (EC50 3 x 10(-7) M). 5. Trigeminal ganglionectomy 10-16 days before the microapplication abolished the in situ vasodilator effects of capsaicin (10(-6) M) applied perivascularly, but was without effect on the vasoconstrictor actions of this agent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2379036

  1. Effects of Hyul-Bu-Chuke-Tang on Erythrocyte Deformability and Cerebrovascular CO2 Reactivity in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woo-Sang; Park, Joo-Young; Byeon, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Young-Jee; Park, Jung-Mi; Park, Seong-Uk; Cho, Seung-Yeon; Moon, Sang-Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Aim. Hyul-bu-chuke-tang (HCEt) is a well-known traditional herbal medicine that is used for the treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular disorders. We investigated the acute effects of HCEt on erythrocyte deformability and cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity (CVR) in healthy male subjects. Materials and Methods. We examined erythrocyte deformability in an HCEt group (n = 14) and a control group (n = 10). CVR was measured using hyperventilation-induced CO2 reactivity of the middle cerebral artery and transcranial Doppler (TCD) in the HCEt group (n = 11). A historical control group (n = 10) of CVR measurements was also created from our previous study. All measurements were performed prior to and 1, 2, and 3 hours after HCEt administration. Results. HCEt significantly improved erythrocyte deformability 1 hour after administration compared to the control group (2.9 ± 1.1% versus −0.6 ± 1.0%, P = 0.034). HCEt significantly improved the CVR 2 hours after administration compared to the historical control group (9.1 ± 4.0% versus −8.1 ± 4.1%, P = 0.007). The mean blood pressure and pulse rate did not vary from baseline values in either group. Conclusions. We demonstrated that HCEt improved erythrocyte deformability and CVR. Our findings suggest that an improvement in erythrocyte deformability contributes to HCEt's effect on cerebral microcirculation. PMID:22690250

  2. Nonlinear effects of respiration on the crosstalk between cardiovascular and cerebrovascular control systems.

    PubMed

    Bari, Vlasta; Marchi, Andrea; De Maria, Beatrice; Rossato, Gianluca; Nollo, Giandomenico; Faes, Luca; Porta, Alberto

    2016-05-13

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems are vital control mechanisms responsible for guaranteeing homeostasis and are affected by respiration. This work proposes the investigation of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular control systems and the nonlinear influences of respiration on both regulations through joint symbolic analysis (JSA), conditioned or unconditioned on respiration. Interactions between cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems were evaluated as well by performing correlation analysis between JSA indexes describing the two control systems. Heart period, systolic and mean arterial pressure, mean cerebral blood flow velocity and respiration were acquired on a beat-to-beat basis in 13 subjects experiencing recurrent syncope episodes (SYNC) and 13 healthy individuals (non-SYNC) in supine resting condition and during head-up tilt test at 60° (TILT). Results showed that JSA distinguished conditions and groups, whereas time domain parameters detected only the effect of TILT. Respiration affected cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems in a nonlinear way and was able to modulate the interactions between the two control systems with different outcome in non-SYNC and SYNC groups, thus suggesting that the analysis of the impact of respiration on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems might improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the development of postural-related syncope. PMID:27044988

  3. Medicare Spends Billions on Chronic Kidney Disease, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158020.html Medicare Spends Billions on Chronic Kidney Disease, Study Finds ... affects nearly 14 percent of Americans and costs Medicare billions of dollars a year, a new study ...

  4. Targeted overexpression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in endothelial cells improves cerebrovascular reactivity in Ins2Akita-type-1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Saurav B; Mohan, Sumathy; Ford, Bridget M; Huang, Lei; Janardhanan, Preethi; Deo, Kaiwalya S; Cong, Linlin; Muir, Eric R; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-06-01

    Reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide due to impaired endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity is a leading cause of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. Enhancing eNOS activity in diabetes is a potential therapeutic target. This study investigated basal cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reactivity in wild-type mice, diabetic mice (Ins2(Akita+/-)), nondiabetic eNOS-overexpressing mice (TgeNOS), and the cross of two transgenic mice (TgeNOS-Ins2(Akita+/-)) at six months of age. The cross was aimed at improving eNOS expression in diabetic mice. The major findings were: (i) Body weights of Ins2(Akita+/-) and TgeNOS-Ins2(Akita+/-) were significantly different from wild-type and TgeNOS mice. Blood pressure of TgeNOS mice was lower than wild-type. (ii) Basal cerebral blood flow of the TgeNOS group was significantly higher than cerebral blood flow of the other three groups. (iii) The cerebrovascular reactivity in the Ins2(Akita+/-) mice was significantly lower compared with wild-type, whereas that in the TgeNOS-Ins2(Akita+/-) was significantly higher compared with the Ins2(Akita+/-) and TgeNOS groups. Overexpression of eNOS rescued cerebrovascular dysfunction in diabetic animals, resulting in improved cerebrovascular reactivity. These results underscore the possible role of eNOS in vascular dysfunction in the brain of diabetic mice and support the notion that enhancing eNOS activity in diabetes is a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26661212

  5. Genetic studies of Crohn's disease: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jimmy Z.; Anderson, Carl A.

    2014-01-01

    The exact aetiology of Crohn's disease is unknown, though it is clear from early epidemiological studies that a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors contributes to an individual's disease susceptibility. Here, we review the history of gene-mapping studies of Crohn's disease, from the linkage-based studies that first implicated the NOD2 locus, through to modern-day genome-wide association studies that have discovered over 140 loci associated with Crohn's disease and yielded novel insights into the biological pathways underlying pathogenesis. We describe on-going and future gene-mapping studies that utilise next generation sequencing technology to pinpoint causal variants and identify rare genetic variation underlying Crohn's disease risk. We comment on the utility of genetic markers for predicting an individual's disease risk and discuss their potential for identifying novel drug targets and influencing disease management. Finally, we describe how these studies have shaped and continue to shape our understanding of the genetic architecture of Crohn's disease. PMID:24913378

  6. Doppler ultrasound studies in pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Tinkanen, H; Kujansuu, E

    1992-01-01

    Ten women with tubo-ovarian abscess caused by pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) were investigated by transvaginal Doppler ultrasound during the acute and healing phases of the infection. The pulsatility index (PI) of the uterine arteries was measured and compared with the values obtained from 19 healthy women. Each control patient was investigated three times during a single menstrual cycle. In PID patients, the PI values were significantly lower than in controls in the same phase of the menstrual cycle. When C-reactive protein was > 50, the PI values were lowest and reverted to normal values when the infection subsided. In a case of chronic infection, the PI did not rise to normal despite normal infection parameters. Doppler ultrasound seems to offer a new method of assessing PID. PMID:1487185

  7. Slit Modulates Cerebrovascular Inflammation and Mediates Neuroprotection Against Global Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Altay, Tamer; McLaughlin, BethAnn; Wu, Jane Y.; Park, T.S.; Gidday, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    Cerebrovascular inflammation contributes to secondary brain injury following ischemia. Recent in vitro studies of cell migration and molecular guidance mechanisms have indicated that the Slit family of secreted proteins can exert repellant effects on leukocyte recruitment in response to chemoattractants. Utilizing intravital microscopy, we addressed the role of Slit in modulating leukocyte dynamics in the mouse cortical venular microcirculation in vivo following TNFα application or global cerebral ischemia. We also studied whether Slit affected neuronal survival in the mouse global ischemia model as well as in mixed neuronal-glial cultures subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation. We found that systemically administered Slit significantly attenuated cerebral microvessel leukocyte-endothelial adherence occurring 4 h after TNFα and 24 h after global cerebral ischemia. Administration of RoboN, the soluble receptor for Slit, exacerbated the acute chemotactic response to TNFα. These findings are indicative of a tonic repellant effect of endogenous Slit in brain under acute proinflammatory conditions. Three days of continuous systemic administration of Slit following global ischemia significantly attenuated the delayed neuronal death of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. Moreover, Slit abrogated neuronal death in mixed neuronal-glial cultures exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation. The ability of Slit to reduce the recruitment of immune cells to ischemic brain and to provide cytoprotective effects suggests that this protein may serve as a novel anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective target for stroke therapy. PMID:17714707

  8. Concurrent auditory perception difficulties in older adults with right hemisphere cerebrovascular accident

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Hossein; Moossavi, Abdollah; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Older adults with cerebrovascular accident (CVA) show evidence of auditory and speech perception problems. In present study, it was examined whether these problems are due to impairments of concurrent auditory segregation procedure which is the basic level of auditory scene analysis and auditory organization in auditory scenes with competing sounds. Methods: Concurrent auditory segregation using competing sentence test (CST) and dichotic digits test (DDT) was assessed and compared in 30 male older adults (15 normal and 15 cases with right hemisphere CVA) in the same age groups (60-75 years old). For the CST, participants were presented with target message in one ear and competing message in the other one. The task was to listen to target sentence and repeat back without attention to competing sentence. For the DDT, auditory stimuli were monosyllabic digits presented dichotically and the task was to repeat those. Results: Comparing mean score of CST and DDT between CVA patients with right hemisphere impairment and normal participants showed statistically significant difference (p=0.001 for CST and p<0.0001 for DDT). Conclusion: The present study revealed that abnormal CST and DDT scores of participants with right hemisphere CVA could be related to concurrent segregation difficulties. These findings suggest that low level segregation mechanisms and/or high level attention mechanisms might contribute to the problems. PMID:25679009

  9. [Central hemodynamics and cerebrovascular disorders in patients with idiopathic arterial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Foniakin, A V; Mashin, V Vl; Ataian, A S; Saprygina, L V

    2012-01-01

    A total of 65 patients (mean age 40.2 +/- 8.1 yr) with neurologic and neuropsychological disorders associated with long-term idiopathic arterial hypotension (IAH) were studied to estimate the state of their central blood circulation. Neuropsychological conditions were estimated from the state of higher psychic functions, such as memory speech, gnosis, praxis, cognition, attention, counting, writing, and reading abilities. Central hemodynamics was studied by 24 hr monitoring arterial pressure and echocardiography. Group 1 included patients without neurologic problems (n = 19), group 2 consisted of patients with early manifestations of chronic cerebrovascular insufficiency (n = 46, 71%). They were older than patients of group 1 and had a long history of IAH. It was shown that most patients presented with stably reduced systolic and diastolic AP and non-dipper type of low 24-hour SAD index. The cardiac index was elevated due to increased left ventricular ejection fraction (group 1) or increased heart rate (group 2). The severity of neuropsychic disorder was negatively related to SAD and DAD indices and positively to systolic hypotension time. PMID:23516869

  10. Ethnic differences in cross-sectional associations between impaired glucose regulation, identified by oral glucose tolerance test or HbA1c values, and cardiovascular disease in a cohort of European and South Asian origin

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, S. V.; Tillin, T.; Mayet, J.; Shibata, D. K.; Wright, A.; Heasman, J.; Beauchamp, N.; Forouhi, N. G.; Hughes, A. D.; Chaturvedi, N.

    2015-01-01

    Aims We contrasted impaired glucose regulation (prediabetes) prevalence, defined according to oral glucose tolerance test or HbA1c values, and studied cross-sectional associations between prediabetes and subclinical/clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a cohort of European and South-Asian origin. Methods For 682 European and 520 South-Asian men and women, aged 58–85 years, glycaemic status was determined by oral glucose tolerance test or HbA1c thresholds. Questionnaires, record review, coronary artery calcification scores and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging established clinical plus subclinical coronary heart and cerebrovascular disease. Results Prediabetes was more prevalent in South Asian participants when defined by HbA1c rather than by oral glucose tolerance test criteria. Accounting for age, sex, smoking, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides and waist–hip ratio, prediabetes was associated with coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease in European participants, most obviously when defined by HbA1c rather than by oral glucose tolerance test [odds ratios for HbA1c-defined prediabetes 1.60 (95% CI 1.07, 2.39) for coronary heart disease and 1.57 (95% CI 1.00, 2.51) for cerebrovascular disease]. By contrast, non-significant associations were present between oral glucose tolerance test-defined prediabetes only and coronary heart disease [odds ratio 1.41 (95% CI 0.84, 2.36)] and HbA1c-defined prediabetes only and cerebrovascular disease [odds ratio 1.39 (95% CI 0.69, 2.78)] in South Asian participants. Prediabetes defined by HbA1c or oral glucose tolerance test criteria was associated with cardiovascular disease (defined as coronary heart and/or cerebrovascular disease) in Europeans [odds ratio 1.95 (95% CI 1.31, 2.91) for HbA1c prediabetes criteria] but not in South Asian participants [odds ratio 1.00 (95% CI 0.62, 2.66); ethnicity interaction P=0.04]. Conclusions Prediabetes appeared to be less associated with cardiovascular disease in the

  11. The involvement of cerebrovascular reactivity in pathogenesis of space motion sickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalenko, Yu. E.; Beketov, A. I.; Weinstein, G. B.; Maximuk, V. F.; Skoromny, N. A.; Vasiljev, K. K.; Vorobjev, M. V.

    The aim of the presented work is to investigate the mechanisms of involvement of cerebral circulation in pathogenesis of space motion sickness. In experiments on chronic rabbits the 2-hours rocking and antiorthostasis served as a model of influences of the zero-gravity conditions intracranial hemo- and liquorodynamics. Cerebrovascular reactivity was evaluated as a response of cerebral blood flow and intracerebral rheoencephalography to functional loads (photostimulation, CO 2-inhalation, Stookey test). Shifts of water balance in the brain tissue has been assessed by means of three-frequency brain electrical impedance. Rocking plus antiorthostasis resulted in decrease of the cerebrovascular reactivity and hyperhydration. The data obtained show a significant decrease of compensatory abilities of the cerebrovascular system under the zero-gravity conditions.

  12. [Advances in Genomics Studies for Coronary Artery Disease].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhu, Hui-juan; Zeng, Yong

    2015-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the major life-threatening diseases. In addition to traditional risk factors including age, sex, smoking, hypertension,and diabetes, genomic studies have shown that CAD has obvious genetic predisposition. In recent years, the rapid advances in genomics shed new light on early diagnosis, risk stratification and new treatment targets. PMID:26564468

  13. Aging and Alzheimer's Disease: Lessons from the Nun Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowdon, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a woman who maintained high cognitive test scores until her death at 101 years of age despite anatomical evidence of Alzheimer's disease. The woman was part of a larger "Nun Study" in which 678 sisters donated their brains to teach others about the etiology of aging and Alzheimer's disease. Findings are discussed. (RJM)

  14. OBSERVATIONS ON THE STATE OF MARINE DISEASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    State of marine disease studies is described. erhaps the greatest area of success in the last 20 years has been in the identification and characterization of viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoan and metazoan disease agents. pening of new areas of investigation such as that of inte...

  15. Periodontal Disease and Adverse Birth Outcomes: A Study from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Mobeen, N; Jehan, I; Banjay, N; Moore, J; McClure, EM; Pasha, O; Wright, LL; Goldenberg, RL

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Periodontal disease may increase the risk of adverse birth outcomes; however, results have been mixed. Few studies have examined periodontal disease in developing countries. We describe the relationship between periodontal disease and birth outcomes in a community setting in Pakistan. METHODS Enrollment occurred at 20–26 wks. A study dentist performed the periodontal examination to assess probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), gingivitis index (GI) and plaque index (PI). Outcomes included stillbirth, neonatal mortality, <32 wk preterm birth (PTB), 32–36 wk PTB, and low birthweight (LBW), and are presented for increasing periodontal disease severity by quartiles (Q1-4). RESULTS Dental examinations and outcome data were completed for 1152 women. 81% were multiparous with a mean age of 27 yrs. 33% had no education. Dental caries were present in 47%, missing teeth in 27%, and 92% had no dental care in the last year. Periodontal disease was common: 87% had ≥ 4 teeth with a PD of >3mm, 54% had ≥4 teeth with a PI = 3, and 58% had ≥ 4 teeth with a GI = 3. In general, as the measure of periodontal disease increased, stillbirth, PTB <32 wks and neonatal mortality also increased. Late PTB and LBW were not related to measures of periodontal disease. Adjustment for demographic characteristics did not significantly change the relationships. CONCLUSION Pregnant Pakistani women have high levels of moderate to severe dental disease. Both stillbirth and neonatal mortality increased with the severity of periodontal disease. PMID:18455527

  16. Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Control on Return from International Space Station (CCISS)- Heart Rate and Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughson, R. L.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Blaber, A. P.; Arbeille, Ph.; Zuj, K. A.; Greaves, D. K.

    2008-06-01

    CCISS is a project to study the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses of astronauts before, during and after long-duration (>60-day) stays on the International Space Station. The CCISS experiments consist of three phases that are designed to achieve an integrated examination of components responsible for return of blood to the heart, the pumping of blood from the heart and the distribution to the vascular territories including the brain. In this report the data are obtained from the 24-h monitoring of physical activity (Actiwatch on wrist and ankle) and of heart rate (Holter monitor). The data show clear patterns of change in physical activity from predominantly leg-based on Earth to relatively little activity of the ankles with maintained or increased activity of the wrists on ISS. Both on Earth and on ISS the largest changes in heart rate occur during the periods of leg activity. Average heart rate was changed little during the periods of minimal activity or of sleep in comparisons of Earth with in-flight recording both within the first two weeks of flight and the last two weeks. These data clearly show the importance of monitoring heart rate and physical activity simultaneously and show that attempts to derive indicators of autonomic activity from spectral analysis of heart rate variability should not be performed in the absence of knowledge of both variables.

  17. A Comparative White Matter Study with Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's Disease with Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Rodrigo D; Rada, Rebecca C; Wilson, Jessica; Vidoni, Eric D; Morris, Jill K; Lyons, Kelly E; Pahwa, Rajesh; Burns, Jeffrey M; Honea, Robyn A

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are among the most common neurodegenerative disorders affecting older populations. AD is characterized by impaired memory and cognitive decline while the primary symptoms of PD include resting tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity. In PD, mild cognitive changes are frequently present, which could progress to dementia (PD dementia (PDD)). PDD and AD dementias are different in pathology although the difference in microstructural changes remains unknown. To further understand these diseases, it is essential to understand the distinct mechanism of their microstructural changes. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate white matter tract differences between early stage individuals with AD (n=14), PD (n=12), PDD (n=9), and healthy non-demented controls (CON) (n=13). We used whole brain tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) and a region of interest (ROI) analysis focused on the substantia nigra (SN). We found that individuals with PDD had more widespread white matter degeneration compared to PD, AD, and CON. Individuals with AD had few regional abnormalities in the anterior and posterior projections of the corpus callosum while PD and CON did not appear to have significant white matter degeneration when compared to other groups. ROI analyses showed that PDD had the highest diffusivity in the SN and were significantly different from CON. There were no significant ROI differences between CON, PD, or AD. In conclusion, global white matter microstructural deterioration is evident in individuals with PDD, and DTI may provide a means with which to tease out pathological differences between AD and PD dementias. PMID:24724042

  18. Biological Containment Facility for Studying Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuehne, Ralph W.

    1973-01-01

    To effectively characterize newly recognized viruses (Marburg, Lassa, etc.) and to study other highly virulent infections for which no effective prophylaxis or therapy exists, special containment facilities must be utilized and conventional techniques modified to minimize risk to laboratory personnel. This paper describes a laboratory suite for such studies, contained within a larger research facility; two separate biological safety cabinet systems, animal rooms support laboratories, change room facilities, shower, air lock, and other safety features are contained in the area. Details of design, construction, airflows, and equipment are described in addition to a discussion of operation, techniques, and modification of laboratory equipment utilized in actual studies. Images PMID:4751785

  19. Generating Transgenic Mouse Models for Studying Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Ju, Josephine M; Marietta, Eric V; Murray, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of current animal models for studying celiac disease, with a focus on generating HLA transgenic mouse models. Human Leukocyte Antigen class II molecules have been a particular target for transgenic mice due to their tight association with celiac disease, and a number of murine models have been developed which had the endogenous MHC class II genes replaced with insertions of disease susceptible HLA class II alleles DQ2 or DQ8. Additionally, transgenic mice that overexpress interleukin-15 (IL-15), a key player in the inflammatory cascade that leads to celiac disease, have also been generated to model a state of chronic inflammation. To explore the contribution of specific bacteria in gluten-sensitive enteropathy, the nude mouse and rat models have been studied in germ-free facilities. These reductionist mouse models allow us to address single factors thought to have crucial roles in celiac disease. No single model has incorporated all of the multiple factors that make up celiac disease. Rather, these mouse models can allow the functional interrogation of specific components of the many stages of, and contributions to, the pathogenic mechanisms that will lead to gluten-dependent enteropathy. Overall, the tools for animal studies in celiac disease are many and varied, and provide ample space for further creativity as well as to characterize the complete and complex pathogenesis of celiac disease. PMID:26498609

  20. Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular outcomes of long-term angiotensin receptor blockade: meta-analyses of trials in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Akioyamen, Leo; Levine, Mitchell; Sherifali, Diana; O'Reilly, Daria; Frankfurter, Claudia; Pullenayegum, Eleanor; Goeree, Ron; Tsoi, Bernice

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are widely used in managing essential hypertension, with considerable evidence available on their short-term efficacy in lowering blood pressure (BP). However, there currently exists limited "pooled" data examining the long-term efficacy of ARB treatment in controlling BP or mitigating cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis assessing the long-term effects of ARBs as a class on BP control, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for heart failure, cerebrovascular events (ie, stroke), cardiovascular mortality, and all-cause mortality. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched from inception to March 2015. Two evaluators independently reviewed studies for eligibility. Randomized controlled hypertension trials were included if they reported on ARB efficacy in either BP control (relative to placebo for periods ≥6 months) or cardiovascular/cerebrovascular outcomes (relative to non-ARB antihypertensive therapies for periods ≥24 months). Studies were pooled with a random-effects model using weighted mean differences (WMDs) and relative risks for continuous and dichotomous outcomes, respectively. A total of 11 articles were included in the narrative synthesis, representing seven unique trials (16,864 participants). Six ARB agents were studied: candesartan, eprosartan, irbesartan, olmesartan, losartan (each represented by one trial arm), and telmisartan (represented by two arms). ARB therapy significantly reduced mean systolic BP (WMD: -4.86; 95% CI: -6.19, -3.53 mm Hg) and diastolic BP (WMD: -2.75; 95% CI: -3.65, -1.86 mm Hg] compared to placebo. The risk of stroke was reduced by 21% in the ARB group compared with alternative antihypertensives (risk ratio: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.66, 0.96). ARBs did not, however, produce statistically significant reductions in the risk of myocardial infarction, heart failure hospitalization

  1. Ten-Year Study of a Wilson's Disease Dysarthric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Linda Susan; Parnell, Martha M.

    1987-01-01

    The 10-year longitudinal case study describes the history, speech therapy program, and treatment results for an adult male with Wilson's disease, a genetically based metabolic progressive neurological disorder which includes severe speech problems. (DB)

  2. Functional Analysis of the Human Genome:. Study of Genetic Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2003-04-01

    I will divide my remarks into 3 parts. First, I will give a brief summary of the Human Genome Project. Second, I will describe our work on human chromosome 7 to illustrate how we could contribute to the Project and disease research. Third, I would like to bring across the argument that study of genetic disease is an integral component of the Human Genome Project. In particular, I will use cystic fibrosis as an example to elaborate why I consider disease study is a part of functional genomics.

  3. Study on application of optical clearing technique in skin diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Hao; Liang, Yanmei; Wang, Jingyi; Li, Yan

    2012-11-01

    So far, the study of the optical clearing is almost always about healthy tissue. However, the ultimate goal is to detect diseases for clinical application. Optical clearing on diseased skins is explored. The effect is evaluated by applying a combined liquid paraffin and glycerol mixed solution on several kinds of diseased skins in vitro. Scanning experiments from optical coherence tomography show that it has different effects among fibroma, pigmented nevus, and seborrheic keratosis. Based on the results, we conclude that different skin diseases have different compositions and structures, and their optical parameters and biological characteristics should be different, which implies that the optical clearing technique may have selectivity and may not be suitable for all kinds of skin diseases.

  4. Heterogeneous Impact of ROCK2 on Carotid and Cerebrovascular Function.

    PubMed

    De Silva, T Michael; Kinzenbaw, Dale A; Modrick, Mary L; Reinhardt, Lindsey D; Faraci, Frank M

    2016-09-01

    Rho kinase (ROCK) has been implicated in physiological and pathophysiological processes, including regulation of vascular function. ROCK signaling is thought to be a critical contributor to cardiovascular disease, including hypertension and effects of angiotensin II (Ang II). Two isoforms of ROCK (1 and 2) have been identified and are expressed in vascular cells. In this study, we examined the importance of ROCK2 in relation to vessel function using several models and a novel inhibitor of ROCK2. First, incubation of carotid arteries with the direct RhoA activator CN-03 or Ang II impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation by ≈40% to 50% (P<0.05) without altering endothelium-independent relaxation. Both CN-03- and Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction was prevented by Y-27632 (an inhibitor of both ROCK isoforms) or the selective ROCK2 inhibitor SLX-2119. In contrast, SLX-2119 had little effect on contraction of carotid arteries to receptor-mediated agonists (serotonin, phenylephrine, vasopressin, or U46619). Second, in basilar arteries, SLX-2119 inhibited constriction to Ang II by ≈90% without significantly affecting responses to serotonin or KCl. Third, in isolated pressurized brain parenchymal arterioles, SLX-2119 inhibited myogenic tone in a concentration-dependent manner (eg, 1 μmol/L SLX-2119 dilated by 79±4%). Finally, SLX-2119 dilated small pial arterioles in vivo, an effect that was augmented by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. These findings suggest that ROCK2 has major, but heterogeneous, effects on function of endothelium and vascular muscle. The data support the concept that aberrant ROCK2 signaling may be a key contributor to select aspects of large and small vessel disease, including Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27432870

  5. ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDIES OF RENAL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Latta, Harrison

    1960-01-01

    The nephrotic syndrome, glomerulonephritis, disseminated lupus erythematosus and the Fanconi syndrome show characteristic changes with electron microscopy. Experimental studies of animals were carried out to determine the significance of such changes by observing reactions that occur under carefully controlled conditions. A lesion with collagen deposition that was found in the centrolobular region of glomeruli sheds new light on the function of this region. This evidence must be considered in developing an understanding of how the production of urine is controlled. Fluid-filled compartments and various bodies associated with the ultrastructure of tubule cells can be produced under conditions which suggest that these structures play a role in tubular resorption. ImagesFigure 1, 2.Figure 3.Figure 4, 5.Figure 6, 7.Figure 8, 9.Figure 10.Figure 11, 12.Figure 13, 14.Figure 15, 16.Figure 17. PMID:13759386

  6. Relationship between deep medullary veins in susceptibility-weighted imaging and ipsilateral cerebrovascular reactivity of middle cerebral artery in patients with ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    HAN, XIANJUN; OUYANG, LINHUI; ZHANG, CHUNNING; MA, HAILING; QIN, JINGCUI

    2016-01-01

    Deep cerebral veins have been recently associated with the severity of hemodynamic impairment in moyamoya disease. The aim of the current study was to determine the correlation of deep medullary veins (DMVs) in susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) with ipsilateral cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) of and anterior cecebrocervical artery stenosis in patients with ischemic stroke. Patients with unilateral TIA or infarction who underwent 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging SWI, digital subtraction angiography and transcranial Doppler with CO2 stimulation within the first 7 days of hospitalization were retrospectively selected. CVR and stenosis of anterior cerebrocervical arteries were compared between different DMVs stages in symptomatic hemispheres (SHs) and asymptomatic hemispheres (AHs). A total of 61 patients were subsequently included in the present study. A univariate analysis was conducted and results for age (PAHs=0.004, PSHs=0.006), hypertension (PAHs=0.008, PSHs=0.020), current smoking (PAHs=0.006, PSHs=0.021), CVR (PAHs=0.000, PSHs=0.000), and artery stenosis (PAHs=0.000, PSHs=0.000) were obtained. The results suggested statistically significant differences between DMVs grades in SHs and AHs. A subsequent multivariate analysis revealed that CVR (ORAHs=0.925, 95% CIAHs: 0.873–0.981; ORSHs=0.945, 95% CISHs: 0.896–0.996), and artery stenosis (ORAH=3.147, 95% CIAH: 1.010–9.806; ORSHs=2.882, 95% CISHs: 1.017–8.166) were independent risk factors of DMVs. In conclusion, 3.0 T SWI was useful in detecting the DMVs around the lateral ventricle in patients with atherosclerotic ischemic stroke. CVR and stenosis of anterior cerebrocervical arteries were independent risk factors for ipsilateral DMVs in SHs and AHs. PMID:27284303

  7. The association between cerebrovascular reactivity and resting-state fMRI functional connectivity in healthy adults: The influence of basal carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Golestani, Ali M; Kwinta, Jonathan B; Strother, Stephen C; Khatamian, Yasha B; Chen, J Jean

    2016-05-15

    Although widely used in resting-state fMRI (fMRI) functional connectivity measurement (fcMRI), the BOLD signal is only an indirect measure of neuronal activity, and is inherently modulated by both neuronal activity and vascular physiology. For instance, cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) varies widely across individuals irrespective of neuronal function, but the implications for fcMRI are currently unknown. This knowledge gap compromises our ability to correctly interpret fcMRI measurements. In this work, we investigate the relationship between CVR and resting fcMRI measurements in healthy young adults, in both the motor and the executive-control networks. We modulate CVR within each individual by subtly increasing and decreasing resting vascular tension through baseline end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2), and measure fcMRI during these hypercapnic, hypocapnic and normocapnic states. Furthermore, we assess the association between CVR and fcMRI within and across individuals. Within individuals, resting PETCO2 is found to significantly influence both CVR and resting fcMRI values. In addition, we find resting fcMRI to be significantly and positively associated with CVR across the group in both networks. This relationship is potentially mediated by concomitant alterations in BOLD signal fluctuation amplitude. This work clearly demonstrates and quantifies a major vascular modulator of resting fcMRI, one that is also subject and regional dependent. We suggest that individualized correction for CVR effects in fcMRI measurements is essential for fcMRI studies of healthy brains, and can be even more important in studying diseased brains. PMID:26908321

  8. Cardiomyopathy and Cerebrovascular Accident Associated with Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mochizuki, Ronald M.; Richter, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    A case report is presented of a 32 year-old male bodybuilder who sustained an ischemic cerebrovascular accident and showed signs of cardiomyopathy. Although no cause was found, the man had been taking steroids for 16 years. Harmful effects of steroid use are discussed. (IAH)

  9. Neckties and Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Young Healthy Males: A Pilot Randomised Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Mark; Quinn, Terence J.; Dawson, Jesse; Walters, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Background. A necktie may elevate intracranial pressure through compression of venous return. We hypothesised that a tight necktie would deleteriously alter cerebrovascular reactivity. Materials and Methods. A necktie was simulated using bespoke apparatus comprising pneumatic inner-tube with aneroid pressure-gauge. Using a randomised crossover design, cerebrovascular reactivity was measured with the “pseudo-tie” worn inflated or deflated for 5 minutes (simulating tight/loose necktie resp.). Reactivity was calculated using breath hold index (BHI) and paired “t” testing used for comparative analysis. Results. We enrolled 40 healthy male volunteers. There was a reduction in cerebrovascular reactivity of 0.23 units with “tight” pseudotie (BHI loose 1.44 (SD 0.48); BHI tight 1.21 (SD 0.38) P < .001). Conclusion. Impairment in cerebrovascular reactivity was found with inflated pseudo-tie. However, mean BHI is still within a range of considered normal. The situation may differ in patients with vascular risk factors, and confirmatory work is recommended. PMID:21076611

  10. Neckties and cerebrovascular reactivity in young healthy males: a pilot randomised crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Mark; Quinn, Terence J; Dawson, Jesse; Walters, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Background. A necktie may elevate intracranial pressure through compression of venous return. We hypothesised that a tight necktie would deleteriously alter cerebrovascular reactivity. Materials and Methods. A necktie was simulated using bespoke apparatus comprising pneumatic inner-tube with aneroid pressure-gauge. Using a randomised crossover design, cerebrovascular reactivity was measured with the "pseudo-tie" worn inflated or deflated for 5 minutes (simulating tight/loose necktie resp.). Reactivity was calculated using breath hold index (BHI) and paired "t" testing used for comparative analysis. Results. We enrolled 40 healthy male volunteers. There was a reduction in cerebrovascular reactivity of 0.23 units with "tight" pseudotie (BHI loose 1.44 (SD 0.48); BHI tight 1.21 (SD 0.38) P < .001). Conclusion. Impairment in cerebrovascular reactivity was found with inflated pseudo-tie. However, mean BHI is still within a range of considered normal. The situation may differ in patients with vascular risk factors, and confirmatory work is recommended. PMID:21076611

  11. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions. PMID:27264859

  12. A Comprehensive Prospective Clinical Study of Hydatid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Ankit; Hussain, Akhlak

    2014-01-01

    The actual prevalence of hydatid disease in northern part of India is found more than usually interpreted. The present study has been done on 25 patients suffering from hydatid disease of various sites and treated during June 2009 to November 2011 at JLN Medical College and Hospital, Ajmer, with the aim of studying the clinical manifestations of hydatid disease of different sites and/or organ system and of analysing the morbidity and mortality of hydatid disease. The age, sex, h/o dog contact, duration of hospital stay, clinical presentation, treatment advised, findings and difficulties encountered during operation, and postoperative management of patients as well as morbidity and mortality were recorded and analysed. We observed that the mean age was 40 years. The sex incidence revealed female preponderance in the study (M : F: 1 : 2). Duration of illness in the present study varied from 1 month to 6 years in case of liver hydatid disease. Majority of patients were from rural areas (21) and the remaining (4) from urban areas. Swelling was the most common presenting feature. Incidence of hydatid disease at unusual sites in India is higher than in other parts of the world. PMID:24734188

  13. [Adult Still's disease: study of a series of 11 cases].

    PubMed

    Ben Taarit, C; Turki, S; Ben Maïz, H

    2002-02-01

    Adult Still's disease is a systemic disease of unknown etiology. We report a retrospective study of 11 cases (9 females and 2 males) of adult Still's disease collected during 25 years. The mean age was 36 years. Fever, arthritis and skin rash was constant. Adenopathies and splenomegaly were observed in 2 patients. The laboratory findings was characterized by a constant inflammatory syndrome and leucocytosis. Hypertransaminasemia and hyperferritinemia were observed respectively in 7 cases and 3 cases. Corticosteroids were prescribed in all patients. Methotrexate was administered in 3 patients. Outcome was favorable in 10 cases, death incurred in one patient, secondary to acute hepatitis. PMID:12070839

  14. The study of parasite sharing for surveillance of zoonotic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Maxwell J.; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Davies, T. Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    Determining the factors that influence the transmission of parasites among hosts is important for directing surveillance of animal parasites before they successfully emerge in humans, and increasing the efficacy of programs for the control and management of zoonotic diseases. Here we present a review of recent advances in the study of parasite sharing, wildlife ecology, and epidemiology that could be extended and incorporated into proactive surveillance frameworks for multi-host infectious diseases. These methods reflect emerging interdisciplinary techniques with significant promise for the identification of future zoonotic parasites and unknown reservoirs of current zoonoses, strategies for the reduction of parasite prevalence and transmission among hosts, and decreasing the burden of infectious diseases.

  15. Insights into kidney diseases from genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have considerably improved our understanding of the genetic basis of kidney function and disease. Population-based studies, used to investigate traits that define chronic kidney disease (CKD), have identified >50 genomic regions in which common genetic variants associate with estimated glomerular filtration rate or urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Case-control studies, used to study specific CKD aetiologies, have yielded risk loci for specific kidney diseases such as IgA nephropathy and membranous nephropathy. In this Review, we summarize important findings from GWAS and clinical and experimental follow-up studies. We also compare risk allele frequency, effect sizes, and specificity in GWAS of CKD-defining traits and GWAS of specific CKD aetiologies and the implications for study design. Genomic regions identified in GWAS of CKD-defining traits can contain causal genes for monogenic kidney diseases. Population-based research on kidney function traits can therefore generate insights into more severe forms of kidney diseases. Experimental follow-up studies have begun to identify causal genes and variants, which are potential therapeutic targets, and suggest mechanisms underlying the high allele frequency of causal variants. GWAS are thus a useful approach to advance knowledge in nephrology. PMID:27477491

  16. Long term mortality study of chromate pigment workers who suffered lead poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J M

    1984-01-01

    Long term mortality was studied in a group of 57 chromate pigment workers who suffered clinical lead poisoning, mostly between 1930 and 1945. One death was attributed to lead poisoning and there were significant excesses of deaths from nephritis (observed/expected 3/0.24) and cerebrovascular disease (9/2.20), as well as non-significant excesses for respiratory diseases (7/3.59) and accidents and violence (3/1.13). The deaths from nephritis followed long spells of service exceeding 10 years. Poisoning appeared to have more adverse long term effects on older workers: 15 men aged 40 or over at the time of acute poisoning experienced generally high mortality, and 30 years later or by the end of 1981 only two survived instead of the seven expected. The risk of cerebrovascular disease appeared to be unrelated to duration of exposure and affected even men employed for under one year. Excluding the 57 lead poisoned men, other contemporary workers at the factories showed no excess mortality from cerebrovascular disease. PMID:6722043

  17. Particulate matter and heart disease: Evidence from epidemiological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Annette . E-mail: peters@gsf.de

    2005-09-01

    The association between particulate matter and heart disease was noted in the mid-nineties of last century when the epidemiological evidence for an association between air pollution and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular disease accumulated and first hypotheses regarding the pathomechanism were formulated. Nowadays, epidemiological studies have demonstrated coherent associations between daily changes in concentrations of ambient particles and cardiovascular disease mortality, hospital admission, disease exacerbation in patients with cardiovascular disease and early physiological responses in healthy individuals consistent with a risk factor profile deterioration. In addition, evidence was found that annual average PM{sub 2.5} exposures are associated with increased risks for mortality caused by ischemic heart disease and dysrhythmia. Thereby, evidence is suggesting not only a short-term exacerbation of cardiovascular disease by ambient particle concentrations but also a potential role of particles in defining patients' vulnerability to acute coronary events. While this concept is consistent with the current understanding of the factors defining patients' vulnerability, the mechanisms and the time-scales on which the particle-induced vulnerability might operate are unknown.

  18. Longitudinal study of heart disease in a Jamaican rural population

    PubMed Central

    Miall, W. E.; Del Campo, E.; Fodor, J.; Rhode, J. R. Nava; Ruiz, L.; Standard, K. L.; Swan, A. V.

    1972-01-01

    A long-term epidemiological study of heart disease in a representative rural community in Jamaica was started in 1962-63 and the first follow-up survey was carried out in 1967-68. This report describes the prevalence of several cardiovascular characteristics at each survey, and their associations with other measurements. The nature of the electrocardiographic abnormalities and their relationship with symptoms of effort pain and prolonged chest pain suggests that much of the disease seen in this population is ultimately ischaemic in origin despite evidence that classical myocardial infarction and severe coronary atheroma are relatively infrequent. Nevertheless both the symptoms and the electrocardiographic abnormalities had features that were not completely typical of occlusive disease of extramural coronary arteries. These findings are discussed in terms of the four conditions—hypertension, conventional coronary heart disease, small artery disease, and cardiomyopathy—that are believed to account for most cases of heart disease in this community, and it is concluded that the overall pattern of disease cannot be explained by any single disorder of overriding importance. The evidence suggests that all may be important contributors. PMID:4538187

  19. Clinical Significance of Fronto-Temporal Gray Matter Atrophy in Executive Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: The VCOHP Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Yoshida, Hisako; Haruyama, Naoki; Fujisaki, Kiichiro; Hirakata, Hideki; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-01-01

    Background & Objectives It is well known that cognitive impairment in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by executive dysfunction, rather than memory dysfunction, although the precise mechanism of this remains to be elucidated. The purpose of the present study is to examine the correlation between gray matter volume (GMV) and executive function in CKD patients. Design, Setting, Participants, Measurements This cross-sectional study recruited 95 patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD (NDD-CKD) with no history of cerebrovascular disease, who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Trail Making Test (TMT) in the VCOHP Study. The subjects underwent brain MRI and TMT part A (TMT-A) and part B (TMT-B). The segmentation algorithm from Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 software was applied to every T1-weighted MRI scan to extract tissue maps corresponding to gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. GMV was normalized by dividing by the total intracranial volume, calculated by adding GMV, white matter volume, and cerebrospinal fluid space volume. Then, normalized whole-brain GMV was divided into four categories of brain lobes; frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital. We assessed the correlation between normalized GMV and TMT using multivariable regression analysis. Results Normalized whole-brain GMV was significantly inversely correlated to the scores of TMT-A, TMT-B, and ΔTMT (TMT-B minus TMT-A). These correlations remained significant even after adjusting for relevant confounding factors. Normalized frontal and temporal GMV, but not parietal and occipital GMV, were significantly inversely correlated with TMT-A, TMT-B, and ΔTMT using multivariable regression analysis. Conclusions The present study demonstrates the correlation between normalized GMV, especially in the frontal and temporal lobes, and executive function, suggesting that fronto-temporal gray matter atrophy might contribute to executive dysfunction in NDD

  20. Cost effective assay choice for rare disease study designs.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Desmond D; Porsch, Robert M; Cherny, Stacey S; Capra, Valeria; Merello, Elisa; De Marco, Patrizia; Sham, Pak C; Garcia-Barceló, Maria-Mercè

    2015-01-01

    High throughput assays tend to be expensive per subject. Often studies are limited not so much by the number of subjects available as by assay costs, making assay choice a critical issue. We have developed a framework for assay choice that maximises the number of true disease causing mechanisms 'seen', given limited resources. Although straightforward, some of the ramifications of our methodology run counter to received wisdom on study design. We illustrate our methodology with examples, and have built a website allowing calculation of quantities of interest to those designing rare disease studies. PMID:25648394

  1. Chronic Kidney Disease Is Often Unrecognized among Patients with Coronary Heart Disease: The REGARDS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, William M.; Newsome, Britt B.; McClure, Leslie A.; Cushman, Mary; Howard, George; Audhya, Paul; Abramson, Jerome L.; Warnock, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with kidney disease are at increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and CHD is associated with an increased prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Awareness of CKD may potentially influence diagnostic decisions, life-style changes and pharmacologic interventions targeted at modifiable CHD risk factors. We describe here the degree to which persons with CHD are aware of their CKD. Methods The Reasons for Geographical and Racial Difference in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study, a population-based sample of US residents aged 45 and older. We included in our analyses 28,112 REGARDS participants recruited as of June 2007. We estimated GFR (eGFR) using the MDRD equation, defined CKD as a GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2, and ascertained awareness of chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease through self-report. We used the odds ratio to compare the association between awareness of kidney disease, as measured by GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2, among individuals with and without self-reported CHD by both the presence of CKD and the severity of impaired kidney function. Results Coronary heart disease was reported by 3,803 (14.1%) of subjects, and 11.3% of subjects had CKD by eGFR. Among all individuals with a GFR <60 ml/min/ 1.73 m2, 9.6% reported having been told by a physician that they had kidney disease. Among those with CHD and CKD, 5.0% were aware of their CKD compared to 2.0% in those without CHD [OR (95% CI) = 2.57 (2.08, 3.28)]. This difference persisted after controlling for the level of kidney function [aOR (95% CI) = 1.87 (1.43, 2.41)]. Conclusion There was a high prevalence of CKD and a low prevalence of awareness of kidney disease among older adults in the US population with or without coronary heart disease. These findings support recent recommendations that patients with cardiovascular disease be systematically screened for and educated about CKD. PMID:18663284

  2. Systemic diseases and oral health.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Mary; Lindefjeld Calabi, Kari A; San Martin, Laura

    2014-10-01

    The US population is at the beginning of a significant demographic shift; the American geriatric population is burgeoning, and average longevity is projected to increase in the coming years. Elder adults are affected by numerous chronic conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, and cerebrovascular diseases. These older adults need special dental care and an improved understanding of the complex interactions of oral disease and systemic chronic diseases that can complicate their treatment. Oral diseases have strong associations with systemic diseases, and poor oral health can worsen the impact of systemic diseases. PMID:25201543

  3. Wilson's disease studied with FDG and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, R.A.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1987-11-01

    Four patients with Wilson's disease and eight normal controls were studied with 2-deoxy-2-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET). The patients had diffusely reduced glucose metabolism in all brain regions evaluated compared with controls, with the exception of the thalamus. The ratio of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in the lenticular nuclei to hemispheres declined from 1.23 (+/- 0.14 SD) in controls to 1.03 (+/- 0.06) (p less than 0.025) in Wilson's disease patients. Compared with Huntington's disease, the PET FDG results in Wilson's disease indicate relatively less focal involvement of the caudate nucleus, more severe focal changes in the lenticular nuclei, and more significant global changes in glucose metabolism.

  4. A yeast model for the study of Batten disease.

    PubMed

    Pearce, D A; Sherman, F

    1998-06-01

    Although the CLN3 gene for Batten disease, the most common inherited neurovisceral storage disease of childhood, was identified in 1995, the function of the corresponding protein still remains elusive. We previously cloned the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue to the human CLN3 gene, designated BTN1, which is not essential and whose product is 39% identical and 59% similar to Cln3p. We report that btn1-Delta deletion yeast strains are more resistant to D-(-)-threo-2-amino-1-[p-nitrophenyl]-1,3-propanediol (denoted ANP), a phenotype that is complemented in yeast by the human CLN3 gene. Furthermore, the severity of Batten disease in humans and the degree of ANP resistance in yeast are related when the equivalent amino acid replacements in Cln3p and Btn1p are compared. These results indicate that yeast can be used as a model for the study of Batten disease. PMID:9618513

  5. Roles of NMDARs in maintenance of the mouse cerebrovascular endothelial cell-constructed tight junction barrier.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jui-Tai; Chen, Tyng-Guey; Chang, Yung-Chia; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate can activate NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and subsequently induces excitotoxic neuron loss. However, roles of NMDARs in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are little known. This study used a mouse cerebrovascular endothelial cell (MCEC) model to evaluate the effects of NMDAR activation on maintenance of the BBB and its possible mechanisms. Analysis of confocal microscopy revealed expressions of NMDAR subunits, GluN1 and GLUN2B, in MCECs. An immunoblot assay further showed the existence of GluN1 in plasma membranes of MCECs. In brain tissues, a confocal microscopic analysis demonstrated co-localization of GluN1 and factor VIII, a biomarker of MCECs. In addition, GluN1 mRNA was detected in MCECs and the brain. Functional assays showed that exposure of MCECs to NMDA increased calcium influx. Separately, NMDA suppressed transendothelial electrical resistance values, levels of occludin, and occludin tight junctions. As to the mechanism, NMDA stimulated sequential phosphorylations of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and mitogen-activated ERK (MEK)1. Interestingly, amounts of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and MMP9 in MCECs were augmented by NMDA. The NMDA-induced alterations in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and occludin levels were reversed by pretreatment with PD98059, a MEK inhibitor, and MK-801, a NMDAR antagonist, respectively. Therefore, this study shows the functional presence of NMDARs in MCECs, and NMDAR activation can disrupt the MCEC-constructed tight junction barrier via activation of the MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling pathway and upregulation of MMP2/9 expressions. PMID:26655082

  6. Oxidative Stress and C-Reactive Protein in Patients with Cerebrovascular Accident (Ischaemic Stroke)

    PubMed Central

    Thanoon, Imad A-J; Abdul-Jabbar, Hilmy AS; Taha, Dhia A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the presence of oxidative stress and inflammation in ischaemic stroke patients by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant status (TAS), and highly-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in the early post-ischaemic period, and to determine the role of Ginkgo biloba therapy in correcting the markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Methods: This study was conducted at Ibn Seena Hospital, Mosul City, Iraq and included 31 cerebrovascular accident (CVA) patients and 30 healthy controls. Ischaemic stroke patients were divided into two groups: group I (n = 15) received conventional therapy; group II (n = 16) received conventional therapy with G. biloba (1500 mg/day) for 30 days. Blood samples were obtained from patients and controls before treatment and assays done of serum levels of MDA, TAS, and hsCRP. For CVA patients, a post-treatment blood sample was taken and the same parameters reassessed. Results: Compared with the controls, patients’ serum levels of MDA, and hsCRP were significantly higher (P ≤0.001) and TAS significantly lower. Group I and II patients reported a significant reduction in serum levels of MDA and hsCRP and a significant increase in serum levels of TAS, in comparison with pre-treatment levels. There was no significant difference (P = 0.19) in serum MDA levels between groups I and II, whereas, serum TAS levels were significantly higher (P ≤0.01) and hsCRP significantly lower (P ≤0.01) in group II. Conclusion: Acute stroke is associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory response in the early period. G. biloba plays a potential role in reducing oxidative damage and inflammatory response. PMID:22548139

  7. Life-saving systemic thrombolysis in a patient with massive pulmonary embolism and a recent hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident.

    PubMed

    Bottinor, Wendy; Turlington, Jeremy; Raza, Syed; Roberts, Charlotte S; Malhotra, Rajiv; Jovin, Ion S; Abbate, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism is associated with mortality rates exceeding 50%. Current practice guidelines include the immediate administration of thrombolytic therapy in the absence of contraindications. However, thrombolysis for pulmonary embolism is said to be absolutely contraindicated in the presence of recent hemorrhagic stroke and other conditions. The current contraindications to thrombolytic therapy have been extrapolated from data on acute coronary syndrome and are not specific for venous thromboembolic disease. Some investigators have proposed that the current contraindications be viewed as relative, rather than absolute, in cases of high-risk pulmonary embolism. We present the case of a 60-year-old woman in whom massive pulmonary embolism led to cardiac arrest with pulseless electrical activity. Eight weeks earlier, she had sustained a hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident-a classic absolute contraindication to thrombolytic therapy. Despite this practice guideline, we administered tissue plasminogen activator systemically in order to save the patient's life. This therapy did not evoke intracranial bleeding, and the patient was eventually discharged from the hospital. Until guidelines specific to venous thromboembolic disease are developed, we think that the current contraindications to thrombolysis should be considered on an individual basis in patients who are at high risk of death from massive pulmonary embolism. PMID:24808778

  8. Life-Saving Systemic Thrombolysis in a Patient with Massive Pulmonary Embolism and a Recent Hemorrhagic Cerebrovascular Accident

    PubMed Central

    Bottinor, Wendy; Turlington, Jeremy; Raza, Syed; Roberts, Charlotte S.; Malhotra, Rajiv; Jovin, Ion S.; Abbate, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism is associated with mortality rates exceeding 50%. Current practice guidelines include the immediate administration of thrombolytic therapy in the absence of contraindications. However, thrombolysis for pulmonary embolism is said to be absolutely contraindicated in the presence of recent hemorrhagic stroke and other conditions. The current contraindications to thrombolytic therapy have been extrapolated from data on acute coronary syndrome and are not specific for venous thromboembolic disease. Some investigators have proposed that the current contraindications be viewed as relative, rather than absolute, in cases of high-risk pulmonary embolism. We present the case of a 60-year-old woman in whom massive pulmonary embolism led to cardiac arrest with pulseless electrical activity. Eight weeks earlier, she had sustained a hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident—a classic absolute contraindication to thrombolytic therapy. Despite this practice guideline, we administered tissue plasminogen activator systemically in order to save the patient's life. This therapy did not evoke intracranial bleeding, and the patient was eventually discharged from the hospital. Until guidelines specific to venous thromboembolic disease are developed, we think that the current contraindications to thrombolysis should be considered on an individual basis in patients who are at high risk of death from massive pulmonary embolism. PMID:24808778

  9. Acute tryptophan depletion potentiates 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-induced cerebrovascular hyperperfusion in adult male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, Eva L; Kelly, Paul A T; Dawson, Neil; Blokland, Arjan; Prickaerts, Jos; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Ferrington, Linda

    2010-05-15

    The serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) dysfunction found in depression may affect not only brain function (mood) but also cerebrovascular control. Similar, but possibly occult, disturbances may also be induced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity (MDMA, or "ecstasy"). Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) is widely used to identify vulnerability to depression, and we hypothesized that repeated MDMA administration would increase the sensitivity of rats to this acute serotonergic challenge. In this study, male Wistar rats were injected with MDMA (20 mg kg(-1), twice daily for 4 days) and challenged 3 weeks later with ATD, induced by intragastric administration of a nutritional mixture with tryptophan (TRP) removed. Cerebral metabolism (CMRG) and blood flow (CBF) were measured in parallel groups of animals following ATD by using quantitative [(14)C]2-deoxyglucose and [(14)C]iodoantipyrine autoradiographic techniques, respectively. A significant reduction in paroxetine binding to 5-HT transporter sites in MDMA-treated rats indicated 5HT terminal depletion, whereas the plasma TRP/sum large neutral amino acids ratio was reduced by 40% following ATD. Under all experimental conditions, the normal close correlation between CBF and metabolic demand was maintained. However, a global analysis of all brain regions revealed a significant decrease in the overall ratio of CBF to CMRG after ATD in control animals, whereas a higher ratio was observed after ATD in the MDMA-treated group. This increase in blood flow relative to cerebral metabolism suggests an ATD-induced loss of cerebrovascular tone in MDMA-treated animals that could have pathophysiological consequences and might conceivably contribute to the behavioral dysfunction of depression. PMID:19998482

  10. [Morphological study of bile in the diagnosis of biliary diseases].

    PubMed

    Potekhina, Iu P

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study principles of bile structurization in healthy people and patients with various biliary diseases. 160 patients with different biliary diseases and other diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone were examined. Samples of gallbladder bile were taken from corpses of young men, who did not have any diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone. Their diagnoses were confirmed by an ultrasound morphological study. Bile was studied by the cuneate dehydration and viscosimetric methods. The structure of facies of gallbladder bile under conditions of absence of diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone was shown. The facies have a wide convex peripheral zone (a cushion) without any well-defined border. The central part of the facies is amorphous or fine-grained, sometimes with occasional inclusions of larger crystals. Markers of exacerbation of chronic cholecystitis (dendrites in the central zone of bile facies) as well as signs of the presence of a malignant neoplasm touching the bile (large diamond-shaped crystals in the central zone of bile facies where dendrites begin) were discovered. PMID:14556555

  11. Parabiosis for the study of age-related chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Eggel, Alexander; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Summary Modern medicine wields the power to treat large numbers of diseases and injuries most of us would have died from just a hundred years ago. In view of this tremendous achievement, it can seem as if progress has slowed, and we have been unable to impact the most devastating diseases of our time. Chronic diseases of age such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis, or Alzheimer’s disease turn out to be of a complexity that may require transformative ideas and paradigms to understand and treat them. Parabiosis, which mimics aspects of the naturally occurring shared blood supply in conjoined twins in humans and certain animals, may just have the power to be such a transformative experimental paradigm. Forgotten and now shunned in many countries, it has contributed to major breakthroughs in tumor biology, endocrinology, and transplantation research in the past century, and a set of new studies in the US and Britain report stunning advances in stem cell biology and tissue regeneration using parabiosis between young and old mice. We review here briefly the history of parabiosis and discuss its utility to study physiological and pathophysiological processes. We argue that parabiosis is a technique that should enjoy wider acceptance and application, and that policies should be revisited especially if one is to study complex age-related, chronic disorders. PMID:24496774

  12. Improving translational studies: lessons from rare neuromuscular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Animal models play a key role in the development of novel treatments for human disease. This is particularly true for rare diseases – defined as disorders that affect less than 1 in 2000 people in the human population – for which, very often, there are no effective methods of treatment. Pharmaceutical companies are increasingly focussing on the development of therapies for the more than 7000 rare diseases. Because the majority of these are the result of single gene disorders, the exceptional ability to manipulate the mouse genome means that many such studies will take place in the laboratory mouse. But how good are the mouse models and how useful are they in assessing the potential for translational medicine? In this Editorial, I will discuss current difficulties in translational research as well as examples of good laboratory practice and guidelines that are being implemented to improve the translational potential of animal studies in the field of neuromuscular rare diseases. This could represent a potentially useful approach for adoption by other disease fields to achieve a greater success rate in translational studies. PMID:26438690

  13. Epidemiology of non-fatal cerebrovascular stroke and transient ischemic attacks in Al Quseir, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    El-Tallawy, Hamdy N; Farghaly, Wafaa MA; Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Abdel-Hakeem, Nabil M; Rageh, Tarek A; Badry, Reda; Kandil, Mahmoud R

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Stroke is a medical emergency that can cause permanent neurological damage, complications, and disability. We aim to determine the epidemiology of non-fatal cerebrovascular stroke (CVS) and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) in Al Quseir City, Red Sea, Egypt. Methods The total population (n=33,285) was screened through a door to door study by three specialists of neurology and 15 female social workers (for demographic data collection). All suspected stroke patients were subjected to a full clinical examination, computerized tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of their brain, blood sugar, lipogram, serum uric acid, complete blood cells, blood urea, and serum creatinine, as well as evaluated by Barthel Index and Scandinavian Stroke Scale. Carotid doppler, echocardiography, and thyroid functions were done for selected cases. Results CVS was recorded among 130 patients out of 19,848 subjects aged 20 years and more, yielding a total prevalence of 6.55/1,000 population. From June 1, 2010 to May 31, 2011, 36 patients were recorded to have stroke within 1-year, yielding an incidence rate of 1.81/1,000. Prevalence and incidence rates were higher among males than females, and both indices increased steadily with advancing age to reach the highest prevalence (37.02/1,000) and incidence rate (9.5/1,000) among aged persons 60 years and more. Conclusion The prevalence of non-fatal stroke in Al Quseir city (6.55/1,000) was at the lower range of that recorded in developing countries (5–10/1,000) and slightly higher than that recorded in industrialized countries (5/1,000 population). Ischemic stroke is the most common type of stroke. The prevalence of TIAs was 0.15/1,000. PMID:24293992

  14. Magnesium sulphate and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular adaptations to asphyxia in preterm fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, Robert; Davidson, Joanne O; Drury, Paul P; Wassink, Guido; Lear, Christopher A; van den Heuij, Lotte G; Gunn, Alistair J; Bennet, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium sulphate is a standard therapy for eclampsia in pregnancy and is widely recommended for perinatal neuroprotection during threatened preterm labour. MgSO4 is a vasodilator and negative inotrope. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of MgSO4 on the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses of the preterm fetus to asphyxia. Fetal sheep were instrumented at 98 ± 1 days of gestation (term = 147 days). At 104 days, unanaesthetised fetuses were randomly assigned to receive an intravenous infusion of MgSO4 (n = 6) or saline (n = 9). At 105 days all fetuses underwent umbilical cord occlusion for 25 min. Before occlusion, MgSO4 treatment reduced heart rate and increased femoral blood flow (FBF) and vascular conductance compared to controls. During occlusion, carotid and femoral arterial conductance and blood flows were higher in MgSO4-treated fetuses than controls. After occlusion, fetal heart rate was lower and carotid and femoral arterial conductance and blood flows were higher in MgSO4-treated fetuses than controls. Femoral arterial waveform height and width were increased during MgSO4 infusion, consistent with increased stroke volume. MgSO4 did not alter the fetal neurophysiological or nuchal electromyographic responses to asphyxia. These data demonstrate that a clinically comparable dose of MgSO4 increased FBF and stroke volume without impairing mean arterial pressure (MAP) or carotid blood flow (CaBF) during and immediately after profound asphyxia. Thus, MgSO4 may increase perfusion of peripheral vascular beds during adverse perinatal events. PMID:26077461

  15. Mapping cerebrovascular reactivity using concurrent fMRI and near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yunjie; Bergethon, Peter R.; Frederick, Blaise d.

    2011-02-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) reflects the compensatory dilatory capacity of cerebral vasculature to a dilatory stimulus and is an important indicator of brain vascular reserve. fMRI has been proven to be an effective imaging technique to obtain the CVR map when the subjects perform CO2 inhalation or the breath holding task (BH). However, the traditional data analysis inaccurately models the BOLD using a boxcar function with fixed time delay. We propose a novel way to process the fMRI data obtained during a blocked BH by using the simultaneously collected near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) data as regressor1. In this concurrent NIRS and fMRI study, 6 healthy subjects performed a blocked BH (5 breath holds with 20s durations intermitted by 40s of regular breathing). A NIRS probe of two sources and two detectors separated by 3 cm was placed on the right side of prefrontal area of the subjects. The time course of changes in oxy-hemoglobin (Δ[HbO]) was calculated from NIRS data and shifted in time by various amounts, and resampled to the fMRI acquisition rate. Each shifted time course was used as regressor in FEAT (the analysis tool in FSL). The resulting z-statistic maps were concatenated in time and the maximal value was taken along the time for all the voxels to generate a 3-D CVR map. The new method produces more accurate and thorough CVR maps; moreover, it enables us to produce a comparable baseline cerebral vascular map if applied to resting state (RS) data.

  16. Cerebrovascular responses during rowing: Do circadian rhythms explain morning and afternoon performance differences?

    PubMed

    Faull, O K; Cotter, J D; Lucas, S J E

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize cerebrovascular responses to rowing exercise, investigating whether their diurnal variation might explain performance differences across a day. Twelve male rowers completed incremental rowing exercise and a 2000-m ergometer time trial at 07:00 h and 16:00 h, 1 week apart, while middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv), cerebral (prefrontal), and muscular (vastus lateralis) tissue oxygenation and hemoglobin volume (via near-infrared spectroscopy), heart rate, and pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PET CO2) were recorded. MCAv was 20-25% above resting levels (68 ± 12 cm/s) during submaximal and maximal exercise intensities, despite PET CO2 being reduced during maximal efforts (down ∼ 0.5-0.8 kPa); thus revealing a different perfusion profile to the inverted-U observed in other exercise modes. The afternoon time trial was 3.4 s faster (95% confidence interval 0.9-5.8 s) and mean power output 3.2% higher (337 vs 347 W; P = 0.04), in conjunction with similar exercise-induced elevations in MCAv (P = 0.60) and reductions in cerebral oxygenation (TOI) (P = 0.12). At the muscle, afternoon trials involved similar oxygen extraction (HHb volume and TOI) albeit from a relatively lower total Hb volume (P < 0.01). In conclusion, rowing performance was better in the afternoon, but not in conjunction with differences in MCAv or exercise-induced differences in cerebral oxygenation. PMID:24942089

  17. Mediterranean Diet and Cardiovascular Disease: A Critical Evaluation of A Priori Dietary Indexes

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Annunziata; De Pergola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the a priori dietary indexes used in the studies that have evaluated the role of the Mediterranean Diet in influencing the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. All the studies show that this dietary pattern protects against cardiovascular disease, but studies show quite different effects on specific conditions such as coronary heart disease or cerebrovascular disease. A priori dietary indexes used to measure dietary exposure imply quantitative and/or qualitative divergences from the traditional Mediterranean Diet of the early 1960s, and, therefore, it is very difficult to compare the results of different studies. Based on real cultural heritage and traditions, we believe that the a priori indexes used to evaluate adherence to the Mediterranean Diet should consider classifying whole grains and refined grains, olive oil and monounsaturated fats, and wine and alcohol differently. PMID:26389950

  18. A Metabolic Study of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalliolia, Eirini; Ottolenghi, Chris; Hindmarsh, Peter; Hill, Nathan R.; Costelloe, Seán J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Positano, Vincenzo; Watt, Hilary C.; Frost, Chris; Björkqvist, Maria; Warner, Thomas T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Huntington’s disease patients have a number of peripheral manifestations suggestive of metabolic and endocrine abnormalities. We, therefore, investigated a number of metabolic factors in a 24-hour study of Huntington’s disease gene carriers (premanifest and moderate stage II/III) and controls. Methods Control (n = 15), premanifest (n = 14) and stage II/III (n = 13) participants were studied with blood sampling over a 24-hour period. A battery of clinical tests including neurological rating and function scales were performed. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose distribution was measured using magnetic resonance imaging. We quantified fasting baseline concentrations of glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoprotein (a), fatty acids, amino acids, lactate and osteokines. Leptin and ghrelin were quantified in fasting samples and after a standardised meal. We assessed glucose, insulin, growth hormone and cortisol concentrations during a prolonged oral glucose tolerance test. Results We found no highly significant differences in carbohydrate, protein or lipid metabolism markers between healthy controls, premanifest and stage II/III Huntington’s disease subjects. For some markers (osteoprotegerin, tyrosine, lysine, phenylalanine and arginine) there is a suggestion (p values between 0.02 and 0.05) that levels are higher in patients with premanifest HD, but not moderate HD. However, given the large number of statistical tests performed interpretation of these findings must be cautious. Conclusions Contrary to previous studies that showed altered levels of metabolic markers in patients with Huntington’s disease, our study did not demonstrate convincing evidence of abnormalities in any of the markers examined. Our analyses were restricted to Huntington’s disease patients not taking neuroleptics, anti-depressants or other medication affecting metabolic pathways. Even with the modest sample sizes studied, the lack of highly significant results

  19. Pulse oximetry in a cohort study of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Homi, J; Levee, L; Higgs, D; Thomas, P; Serjeant, G

    1997-03-01

    Oxygen saturation was determined by pulse oximetry in a representative sample of Jamaican patients with steady-state sickle cell disease in a cohort study from birth. There were 220 with homozygous sickle cell (SS) disease and 142 with sickle cell-haemoglobin C (SC) disease aged 9-18 years, and 122 with a normal haemoglobin (AA) genotype aged 15-18 years. Pulse oximetry (SpO2) values were lower in SS disease (mean [95% confidence interval], 92.5 [92.0-93.0]) than in SC disease (96.7[96.5-96.9]) or AA controls (97.1 [96.8-97.3]). Inhalation of 100% oxygen in SS patients with O2 saturations below 90% consistently increased saturation to 99-100%. In SS disease, SpO2 correlated positively with haemoglobin and fetal haemoglobin and negatively with reticulocyte counts but not with MCHC, MCV or bilirubin level. Mean SpO2 in SS subjects with a normal alpha globin gene complement (mean [SD], 91.7 [3.9]%) was lower than in heterozygotes (93.4 [4.0]%) or homozygotes (96.1 [3.0]%) for alpha+ thalassaemia, the effects of alpha-thalassaemia not being explained by differences in haemoglobin or MCHC. In SS disease, SpO2 levels were not associated with age (within this age range), sex, number of sick clinic visits or number of hospital admissions. Higher SpO2 levels were associated with greater height and weight, more frequent painful crises and less frequent acute chest syndrome, but these associations were not significant after adjustment for haemoglobin level. Desaturation is common in steady-state SS disease and knowledge of the individual's steady-state value may be important in the interpreting low values during acute complications. PMID:9146942

  20. Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome : Radiation Neurotoxins, Mechanisms of Toxicity, Neuroimmune Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Introduction: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (CvARS) is an extremely severe in-jury of Central Nervous System (CNS) and Peripheral Nervous System (PNS). CvARS can be induced by the high doses of neutron, heavy ions, or gamma radiation. The Syndrome clinical picture depends on a type, timing, and the doses of radiation. Four grades of the CvARS were defined: mild, moderate, severe, and extremely severe. Also, four stages of CvARS were developed: prodromal, latent, manifest, outcome -death. Duration of stages depends on the types, doses, and time of radiation. The CvARS clinical symptoms are: respiratory distress, hypotension, cerebral edema, severe disorder of cerebral blood microcirculation, and acute motor weakness. The radiation toxins, Cerebro-Vascular Radiation Neurotoxins (SvARSn), determine development of the acute radiation syndrome. Mechanism of action of the toxins: Though pathogenesis of radiation injury of CNS remains unknown, our concept describes the Cv ARS as a result of Neurotoxicity and Excitotoxicity, cell death through apoptotic necrosis. Neurotoxicity occurs after the high doses radiation exposure, formation of radiation neuro-toxins, possible bioradicals, or group of specific enzymes. Intracerebral hemorrhage can be a consequence of the damage of endothelial cells caused by radiation and the radiation tox-ins. Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB)and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCFB)is possibly the most significant effect of microcirculation disorder and metabolic insufficiency. NMDA-receptors excitotoxic injury mediated by cerebral ischemia and cerebral hypoxia. Dam-age of the pyramidal cells in layers 3 and 5 and Purkinje cell layer the cerebral cortex , damage of pyramidal cells in the hippocampus occur as a result of cerebral ischemia and intracerebral bleeding. Methods: Radiation Toxins of CV ARS are defined as glycoproteins with the molec-ular weight of RT toxins ranges from 200-250 kDa and with high enzymatic activity

  1. Neuroimaging studies of striatum in cognition part II: Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanganu, Alexandru; Provost, Jean-Sebastien; Monchi, Oury

    2015-01-01

    In recent years a gradual shift in the definition of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been established, from a classical akinetic-rigid movement disorder to a multi-system neurodegenerative disease. While the pathophysiology of PD is complex and goes much beyond the nigro-striatal degeneration, the striatum has been shown to be responsible for many cognitive functions. Patients with PD develop impairments in multiple cognitive domains and the PD model is probably the most extensively studied regarding striatum dysfunction and its influence on cognition. Up to 40% of PD patients present cognitive impairment even in the early stages of disease development. Thus, understanding the key patterns of striatum and connecting regions' influence on cognition will help develop more specific approaches to alleviate cognitive impairment and slow down its decline. This review focuses on the contribution of neuroimaging studies in understanding how striatum impairment affects cognition in PD. PMID:26500512

  2. The alpha-galactosidase A p.Arg118Cys variant does not cause a Fabry disease phenotype: data from individual patients and family studies

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Susana; Ortiz, Alberto; Germain, Dominique P.; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Gomes, António Caldeira; Camprecios, Marta; Fenollar-Cortés, Maria; Gallegos-Villalobos, Ángel; Garcia, Diego; García-Robles, José Antonio; Egido, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Eduardo; Herrero, José Antonio; Mas, Sebastián; Oancea, Raluca; Péres, Paloma; Salazar-Martín, Luis Manuel; Solera-Garcia, Jesús; Alves, Helena; Garman, Scott C.; Oliveira, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lysosomal α-galactosidase A (α-Gal) is the enzyme deficient in Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked glycosphingolipidosis caused by pathogenic mutations affecting the GLA gene. The early-onset, multi-systemic FD classical phenotype is associated with absent or severe enzyme deficiency, as measured by in vitro assays, but patients with higher levels of residual α-Gal activity may have later-onset, more organ-restricted clinical presentations. A change in the codon 118 of the wild-type α-Gal sequence, replacing basic arginine by a potentially sulfhydryl-binding cysteine residue – GLA p.(Arg118Cys) –, has been recurrently described in large FD screening studies of high-risk patients. Although the Cys118 allele is associated with high residual α-Gal activity in vitro, it has been classified as a pathogenic mutation, mainly on the basis of theoretical arguments about the chemistry of the cysteine residue. However its pathogenicity has never been convincingly demonstrated by pathology criteria. We reviewed the clinical, biochemical and histopathology data obtained from 22 individuals of Portuguese and Spanish ancestry carrying the Cys118 allele, including 3 homozygous females. Cases were identified either on the differential diagnosis of possible FD manifestations and on case-finding studies (n=11; 4 males), or on unbiased cascade screening of probands’ close relatives (n=11; 3 males). Overall, those data strongly suggest that the GLA p.(Arg118Cys) variant does not segregate with FD clinical phenotypes in a Mendelian fashion, but might be a modulator of the multifactorial risk of cerebrovascular disease, since the allelic frequency in stroke patients was 0.0087 (p=0.0185 vs the general population). The Cys118 allelic frequency in healthy Portuguese adults (n=696) has been estimated as 0.001, therefore not qualifying for “rare” condition. PMID:25468652

  3. Relationship between systemic diseases and endodontics: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will cover the relationship between systemic diseases and endodontics. PMID:18457702

  4. Studying infrared light therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiyan; Zeng, Yuhui; Meng, Qingqiang; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an extensive neurodegenerative disease. It is generally believed that there are some connections between AD and amyloid protein plaques in the brain. AD is a chronic disease that usually starts slowly and gets worse over time. The typical symptoms are memory loss, language disorders, mood swings and behavioral issues. Gradual losses of somatic functions eventually lead patients to death. Currently, the main therapeutic method is pharmacotherapy, which may temporarily reduce symptoms, but has many side effects. No current treatment can reverse AD's deterioration. Infrared (IR) light therapy has been studied in a range of single and multiple irradiation protocols in previous studies and was found beneficial for neuropathology. In our research, we have verified the effect of infrared light on AD through Alzheimer's disease mouse model. This transgenic mouse model is made by co-injecting two vectors encoding mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and mutant presenilin-1 (PSEN1). We designed an experimental apparatus for treating mice, which primarily includes a therapeutic box and a LED array, which emits infrared light. After the treatment, we assessed the effects of infrared light by testing cognitive performance of the mice in Morris water maze. Our results show that infra-red therapy is able to improve cognitive performance in the mouse model. It might provide a novel and safe way to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Drosophila tools and assays for the study of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Ugur, Berrak; Chen, Kuchuan; Bellen, Hugo J

    2016-03-01

    Many of the internal organ systems of Drosophila melanogaster are functionally analogous to those in vertebrates, including humans. Although humans and flies differ greatly in terms of their gross morphological and cellular features, many of the molecular mechanisms that govern development and drive cellular and physiological processes are conserved between both organisms. The morphological differences are deceiving and have led researchers to undervalue the study of invertebrate organs in unraveling pathogenic mechanisms of diseases. In this review and accompanying poster, we highlight the physiological and molecular parallels between fly and human organs that validate the use of Drosophila to study the molecular pathogenesis underlying human diseases. We discuss assays that have been developed in flies to study the function of specific genes in the central nervous system, heart, liver and kidney, and provide examples of the use of these assays to address questions related to human diseases. These assays provide us with simple yet powerful tools to study the pathogenic mechanisms associated with human disease-causing genes. PMID:26935102

  6. Drosophila tools and assays for the study of human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ugur, Berrak; Chen, Kuchuan; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many of the internal organ systems of Drosophila melanogaster are functionally analogous to those in vertebrates, including humans. Although humans and flies differ greatly in terms of their gross morphological and cellular features, many of the molecular mechanisms that govern development and drive cellular and physiological processes are conserved between both organisms. The morphological differences are deceiving and have led researchers to undervalue the study of invertebrate organs in unraveling pathogenic mechanisms of diseases. In this review and accompanying poster, we highlight the physiological and molecular parallels between fly and human organs that validate the use of Drosophila to study the molecular pathogenesis underlying human diseases. We discuss assays that have been developed in flies to study the function of specific genes in the central nervous system, heart, liver and kidney, and provide examples of the use of these assays to address questions related to human diseases. These assays provide us with simple yet powerful tools to study the pathogenic mechanisms associated with human disease-causing genes. PMID:26935102

  7. [Cardiac involvement in Fabry's disease].

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Frank; Breunig, Frank

    2008-03-15

    Fabry's disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder leading to an accumulation of globotriaosylceramides in the lysosomes of all tissues. The disease is characterized by a progressive involvement of important vital organs like the kidneys, the cerebrovascular system and the heart. Within the scope of this article an overview of Fabry's cardiomyopathy, the necessary cardiac diagnostic tests and, in addition, the new concept of enzyme replacement therapy is given. PMID:18344066

  8. Family Study of Platelet Membrane Fluidity in Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubenko, George S.; Wusylko, Michael; Cohen, Bruce M.; Boller, Francois; Teply, Ivana

    1987-10-01

    The fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene in labeled platelet membranes, an index of membrane fluidity, identifies a prominent subgroup of patients with Alzheimer's disease who manifest distinct clinical features. In a family study, the prevalence of this platelet membrane abnormality was 3.2 to 11.5 times higher in asymptomatic, first-degree relatives of probands with Alzheimer's disease than in neurologically healthy control subjects chosen without regard to family history of dementia. The pattern of the platelet membrane abnormality within families was consistent with that of a fully penetrant autosomal dominant trait. Thus, this abnormality of platelet membranes may be an inherited factor that is related to the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Gout secondary to chronic renal disease: studies on urate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, L F

    1980-10-01

    A report of 20 cases of gout considered to be secondary to chronic renal disease is presented. Studies of renal function and of uric acid metabolism were carried out in 16 patients. The daily production of urate remained within normal limits in the face of progressive renal dysfunction. Renal excretion of uric acid was decreased to a mean of 35.5% of the turnover. The cumulative urinary recovery of intravenously injected 14C-uric acid averaged 32.0%. In 3 patients 14C was successively retrieved in urinary allantoinand urea, in carbon dioxide of expired air, and in faeces. As in normal man, carbon dioxide and ammonia were the principal uricolytic products. The extrarenal excretion of uric acid assumes a greater role in chronic renal disease and eventually becomes the major route of elimination of uric acid. The possibility that gout may be secondary to intrinsic renal disease should be entertained when azotaemia is present. PMID:7436573

  10. Applications of systems approaches in the study of rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Jo; Lee, Saseong

    2015-01-01

    The complex interaction of molecules within a biological system constitutes a functional module. These modules are then acted upon by both internal and external factors, such as genetic and environmental stresses, which under certain conditions can manifest as complex disease phenotypes. Recent advances in high-throughput biological analyses, in combination with improved computational methods for data enrichment, functional annotation, and network visualization, have enabled a much deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying important biological processes by identifying functional modules that are temporally and spatially perturbed in the context of disease development. Systems biology approaches such as these have produced compelling observations that would be impossible to replicate using classical methodologies, with greater insights expected as both the technology and methods improve in the coming years. Here, we examine the use of systems biology and network analysis in the study of a wide range of rheumatic diseases to better understand the underlying molecular and clinical features. PMID:25750554

  11. [Overview of diet-related study in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Li, Guanwei; Ren, Jian'an; Li, Jieshou

    2015-12-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting any part of the digestive tract which relapses and remits throughout the disease course. It occurs in individuals with genetic susceptibility and involves an abnormal response of the immune system to the external environment. Besides, improved hygiene, abuse of antibiotics, westernization of diet with high sugar and fat are thought to be associated with rapidly increasing incidence of CD. Certain components of foods may influence gut inflammation through antigen presentation and alteration of the microflora. This article aims mainly to review diet-related clinical studies to outline its roles in the pathogenesis and progress of disease, and then give some evidence-based suggestions. PMID:26704014

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Mechanics and Its Coupling to Cerebrovascular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linninger, Andreas A.; Tangen, Kevin; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Frim, David

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is not stagnant but displays fascinating oscillatory flow patterns inside the ventricular system and reversing fluid exchange between the cranial vault and spinal compartment. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of pulsatile CSF motion. Observations contradicting classical views about its bulk production and clearance are highlighted. A clinical account of diseases of abnormal CSF flow dynamics, including hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, Chiari malformation type 1, and pseudotumor cerebri, is also given. We survey medical imaging modalities used to observe intracranial dynamics in vivo. Additionally, we assess the state of the art in predictive models of CSF dynamics. The discussion addresses open questions regarding CSF dynamics as they relate to the understanding and management of diseases.

  13. [Cerebrovascular complications of immunologically mediated heparin-induced thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Macha, K; Kloska, S; Dörfler, A; Raaz-Schrauder, D; Schwab, S; Köhrmann, M; Seifert, F

    2014-03-01

    Immunologically mediated heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a thrombotic disease caused by antibodies occurring after heparin exposure. Thrombocytopenia occurs within a few days after heparin exposure, about half of HIT-patients develop venous or arterial thrombotic complications. Neurological complications of HIT are mainly ischaemic stroke and sinus vein thrombosis. To ensure the primary clinical diagnosis functional and immunological assays for antibody detection are available. The probability for the occurrence of HIT depends on the nature of heparin employed (LMWH vs. UFH) and individual patient characteristics such as gender and primary disease (medical vs. surgical patients). In the case of suspected HIT heparin administration should be discontinued immediately and replaced by an alternative anticoagulation to prevent the expansion or development of further thrombotic complications. Herein we report a case of a patient suffering from HIT-associated embolic cerebral ischaemic stroke. PMID:24615586

  14. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  15. [Clinical and microbiological study of adult periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Nogueira Moreira, A; Fernández Canigia, L; Furman, C; Chiappe, V; Marcantoni, M; Bianchini, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a microbiological evaluation of sites with and without clinical evidence of moderate and severe periodontitis and their correlation with clinical parameters. A total of 52 disease sites and 10 healthy sites were selected according to clinical criteria. The following clinical indexes were measured for all the sites: plaque index, gingival index, blood on probing, depth on probing and insertion level. Samples of subgingival plaque were collected for culture and for differential counts of microbial morphotypes. In disease sites the most frequently isolated were: Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens (65%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (23%), Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (23%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (10%) and Peptostreptococcus sp. (31%). The aerobic gram-positive microflora was predominant in healthy sites. Significant differences were observed in microbial morphotypes between healthy and disease sites: cocci 18.71% and 78.90%, motile rods 46.12% and 16.70%, total spirochetes 26.48% and 2.80%, respectively. The presence of motile rods, spirochetes and P. intermedia/nigrescens were the parameters with most sensitivity to suspect periodontal disease. There were significant differences in the subgingival microflora between healthy and disease sites in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis. PMID:11594003

  16. External gamma radiation and mortality from cardiovascular diseases in the German WISMUT uranium miners cohort study, 1946-2008.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, M; Dufey, F; Sogl, M; Schnelzer, M; Walsh, L

    2013-03-01

    It is currently unclear whether exposure of the heart and vascular system, at lifetime accumulated dose levels relevant to the general public (<500 mGy), is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, data from the German WISMUT cohort of uranium miners were investigated for evidence of a relationship between external gamma radiation and death from cardiovascular diseases. The cohort comprises 58,982 former employees of the Wismut company. There were 9,039 recorded deaths from cardiovascular diseases during the follow-up period from 1946 to 2008. Exposures to external gamma radiation were estimated using a detailed job-exposure matrix. The exposures were based on expert ratings for the period 1946-1954 and measurements thereafter. The excess relative risk (ERR) per unit of cumulative gamma dose was obtained with internal Poisson regression using a linear ERR model with baseline stratification by age and calendar year. The mean cumulative gamma dose was 47 mSv for exposed miners (86 %), with a maximum of 909 mSv. No evidence for an increase in risk with increasing cumulative dose was found for mortality from all cardiovascular diseases (ERR/Sv = -0.13; 95 % confidence interval (CI): -0.38; 0.12) and ischemic heart diseases (n = 4,613; ERR/Sv = -0.03; 95 % CI: -0.38, 0.32). However, a statistically insignificant increase (n = 2,073; ERR/Sv = 0.44; 95 % CI: -0.16, 1.04) for mortality from cerebrovascular diseases was observed. Data on smoking, diabetes, and overweight are available for subgroups of the cohort, indicating no major correlation with cumulative gamma radiation. Confounding by these factors or other risk factors, however, cannot be excluded. In conclusion, the results provide weak evidence for an increased risk of death due to gamma radiation only for cerebrovascular diseases. PMID:23192731

  17. Metabolic disease in mental retardation: a study in Texas.

    PubMed

    Farrell, G; Johnson, R; Fabre, L; Farmer, R; Pellizzari, E; Stephenson, M

    1971-05-01

    Reported are the results of a study of patients admitted to the State Schools for the Mentally Retarded in Texas, over a two-year period from 1968-1970. Of 2029 cases, 185 were found on a detection battery screening to have possible metabolic disease. The report summarizes the findings on 93 cases studied in the metabolic ward at the Texas Research Institute. PMID:5173196

  18. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in children with severe head injuries. Part 2: Cerebrovascular resistance and its determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, P M; Matthews, D S; Eyre, J A

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that in children with severe head injuries the cerebral circulation does not respond appropriately to normal physiological control mechanisms, making children more susceptible than adults to low cerebrovascular resistance, increased cerebral blood flow (cerebral hyperaemia), and raised intracranial pressure. To investigate this issue, 122 serial measurements of cerebrovascular resistance in 17 children with severe head injuries have been performed and related to cerebral perfusion pressure, arterial CO2 (PaCO2), arterial oxygen content (AO2), and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). Cerebrovascular resistance values (mean (SD) 1.54 (0.61) mm Hg.ml-1.100 g.min) were normal or raised in most cases; 71 values (58%) were within the normal range, 39 (32%) above the upper limit, and only 12 (10%) below the lower limit. There was a significant correlation between cerebral perfusion pressure and cerebrovascular resistance (r = 0.32, p = 0.0003), suggesting preservation of pressure autoregulation. This correlation was absent in four of the five children who died or survived with severe handicap. Analysis by multilevel modelling indicated that, as in normal subjects, CMRO2, CPP, AO2, PaCO2, and cerebrovenous pH were important independent determinants of cerebrovascular resistance. The results indicate that normal cerebrovascular reactivity is often preserved in children with severe head injuries but may be impaired in the most severely injured patients. PMID:7876844

  19. Scintigraphic studies of inflammation in diffuse lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Line, B.R. )

    1991-09-01

    67Ga lung scintigraphy is an established means to assess alveolar inflammation in a wide variety of diffuse lung diseases. It can be used to monitor the extent and activity of the alveolitis during the course of the disease and as a follow-up evaluation to therapy. Although the mechanism of 67Ga localization is not established firmly, the isotope appears to act as a tracer for disturbed protein and cellular fluxes within the interstitium and alveolar spaces. The radiolabeled aerosol study may also be applied to the study of these fluxes as a reflection of inflammation and injury. Although Tc-DTPA clearance studies are highly sensitive to lung injury, they may be too nonspecific to separate lung injury from other physiologic processes effectively. 117 references.

  20. The Nakuru eye disease cohort study: methodology & rationale

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background No longitudinal data from population-based studies of eye disease in sub-Saharan-Africa are available. A population-based survey was undertaken in 2007/08 to estimate the prevalence and determinants of blindness and low vision in Nakuru district, Kenya. This survey formed the baseline to a six-year prospective cohort study to estimate the incidence and progression of eye disease in this population. Methods/Design A nationally representative sample of persons aged 50 years and above were selected between January 2007 and November 2008 through probability proportionate to size sampling of clusters, with sampling of individuals within clusters through compact segment sampling. Selected participants underwent detailed ophthalmic examinations which included: visual acuity, autorefraction, visual fields, slit lamp assessment of the anterior and posterior segments, lens grading and fundus photography. In addition, anthropometric measures were taken and risk factors were assessed through structured interviews. Six years later (2013/2014) all subjects were invited for follow-up assessment, repeating the baseline examination methodology. Discussion The methodology will provide estimates of the progression of eye diseases and incidence of blindness, visual impairment, and eye diseases in an adult Kenyan population. PMID:24886366

  1. Protective effect of treatment with black cumin oil on spatial cognitive functions of rats that suffered global cerebrovascular hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Azzubaidi, Marwan Saad; Saxena, Anil Kumar; Talib, Norlelawati Abi; Ahmed, Qamar Uddin; Dogarai, Bashar Bello

    2012-01-01

    The fixed oil of black cumin seeds, Nigella sativa L. (NSO), has shown considerable antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion has been linked to neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its subsequent cognitive impairment in which oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are the principal culprits. Cerebrovascular hypoperfusion was experimentally achieved by bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (2VO) in rats. Morris water maze (MWM) test was employed to assess the effects of NSO on spatial cognitive function before and after 2VO intervention. Rats were divided into long-term memory (LTM) and short-term memory (STM) groups, each was further subdivided into 3 subgroups: sham control, untreated 2VO and NSO treated 2VO group. All subgroups were tested with MWM at the tenth postoperative week. Working memory test results for both sham control and NSO treated groups showed significantly lower escape latency time and total distance travelled than untreated 2VO group. Similarly, LTM and STM MWM tests for sham control and NSO treated groups revealed significantly better maze test performance as compared to untreated 2VO group. Sham control and NSO treated 2VO groups demonstrated superior probe memory test performance as compared to untreated 2VO group. The fixed oil of Nigella sativa seeds has demonstrated noticeable spatial cognitive preservation in rats challenged with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion which indicates a promising prospective neuroprotective effect. PMID:22810217

  2. Bioinformatics investigation of therapeutic mechanisms of Xuesaitong capsule treating ischemic cerebrovascular rat model with comparative transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiangquan; Wei, Benjun; Chen, Hengwen; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Xuesaitong soft capsule (XST) which consists of panax notoginseng saponin (PNS) has been used to treat ischemic cerebrovascular diseases in China. The therapeutic mechanism of XST has not been elucidated yet from prospective of genomics and bioinformatics. Methods: A transcriptome analysis was performed to review series concerning middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rat model and XST intervention after MCAO from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were compared between blank group and model group, model group and XST group. Functional enrichment and pathway analysis were performed. Protein-Protein interaction network was constructed. The overlapping genes from two DEGs sets were screened out and profound analysis was performed. Results: Two series including 22 samples were obtained. 870 DEGs were identified between blank group and model group, and 1189 DEGs were identified between model group and XST group. GO terms and KEGG pathways of MCAO and XST intervention were significantly enriched. PPI networks were constructed to demonstrate the gene-gene interactions. The overlapping genes from two DEGs sets were highlighted. ANTXR2, FHL3, PRCP, TYROBP, TAF9B, FGFR2, BCL11B, RB1CC1 and MBNL2 were the pivotal genes and possible action sites of XST therapeutic mechanisms. Conclusion: MCAO is a pathological process with multiple. PMID:27347353

  3. Persistent Asymmetric Brain MIBG Activity Related to a Cerebrovascular Infarct.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xia; Zhuang, Hongming

    2016-04-01

    A 13-year-old woman with a history of left malignant carotid body paraganglioma status postsurgical resection underwent I-MIBG scan for staging. The images demonstrated no definite evidence of MIBG-avid disease. However, there was asymmetric activity in the region of the brain with relatively less activity on the left compared with the contralateral right side on the head images, which was related to prior infarct revealed from the patient's history. This asymmetric MIBG activity persisted 8 years later. PMID:26571441

  4. Prevalence and Patterns of Chronic Disease Pairs and Multimorbidity among Older Chinese Adults Living in a Rural Area

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yajun; Tan, Edwin C. K.; Cai, Chuanzhu; Jiang, Hui; Song, Aiqin; Qiu, Chengxuan

    2015-01-01

    Background The burden of chronic diseases in China is substantial now. Data on patterns of chronic diseases and multimorbidity among older adults, especially among those living in rural areas, are sparse. Objective We aim to investigate the prevalence and patterns of chronic disease pairs and multimorbidity in elderly people living in rural China. Methods This population-based study included 1480 adults aged 60 years and over (mean age 68.5 years, 59.4% women) living in a rural community. Data were derived from the Confucius Hometown Aging Project in Shandong, China (June 2010-July 2011). Chronic diseases were diagnosed through face-to-face interviews, clinical examinations, and laboratory tests. Patterns of chronic disease pairs and multimorbidity were explored using logistic regression and exploratory factor analyses. Results The prevalence of individual chronic diseases ranged from 3.0% for tumor to 76.4% for hypertension, and each disease was often accompanied with three or more other chronic diseases. The observed prevalence of pairs of chronic conditions exceeded the expected prevalence for several conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders, as well as pulmonary diseases and degenerative disorders. Chronic multimorbidity (≥2 chronic diseases) affected more than 90% of subjects, and two patterns of chronic multimorbidity were identified: cardiopulmonary-mental-degenerative disorder pattern (overall prevalence, 58.2%), and cerebrovascular-metabolic disorder pattern (62.6%). Prevalence of the cardiopulmonary-mental-degenerative disorder pattern increased with age, and was higher in men than women; whereas prevalence of the cerebrovascular-metabolic disorder pattern was higher in women than in men but did not vary by age. Conclusion Chronic multimorbidity was highly prevalent among older Chinese adults living in rural areas, and there were specific patterns of the co-occurrence of chronic diseases. Effort is needed to identify possible

  5. Serum Globotriaosylceramide Assay as a Screening Test for Fabry Disease in Patients with ESRD on Maintenance Dialysis in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Yup; Hyun, Young-Youl; Lee, Ji-Eun; Yoon, Hye-Ran; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Yoo, Han-Wook; Cho, Seong-Tae; Chun, No-Won; Jeoung, Byoung-Chunn; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Kim, Keong-Wook; Kim, Seong-Nam; Kim, Yung-A; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Yung-Chun; Lim, Hun-Kwan; Oh, Keong-Sik; Son, Seong-Hwan; Yu, Beong-Hee; Wee, Kyeong-So; Lee, Eun-Jong; Lee, Young-Ki; Noh, Jung-Woo; Kim, Seung-Jung; Choi, Kyu-Bok; Yu, Suk-Hee; Pyo, Heui-Jung

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive and progressive disease caused by α-galactosidase A (α-GaL A) deficiency. We sought to assess the prevalence of unrecognized Fabry disease in dialysis-dependent patients and the efficacy of serum globotriaosylceramide (GL3) screening. Methods A total of 480 patients of 1,230 patients among 17 clinics were enrolled. Serum GL3 levels were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. Additionally, we studied the association between increased GL3 levels and cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, or left ventricular hypertrophy. Results Twenty-nine patients had elevated serum GL3 levels. The α-GaL A activity was determined for the 26 patients with high GL3 levels. The mean α-GaL A activity was 64.6 nmol/hr/mg (reference range, 45 to 85), and no patient was identified with decreased α-GaL A activity. Among the group with high GL3 levels, 15 women had a α-GaL A genetics analysis. No point mutations were discovered among the women with high GL3 levels. No correlation was observed between serum GL3 levels and α-GaL A activity; the Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.01352 (p = 0.9478). No significant correlation was observed between increased GL3 levels and the frequency of cardiovascular disease or cerebrovascular disease. Conclusions Fabry disease is very rare disease in patients with end-stage renal disease. Serum GL3 measurements as a screening method for Fabry disease showed a high false-positive rate. Thus, serum GL3 levels determined by tandem mass spectrometry may not be useful as a screening method for Fabry disease in patients with end stage renal disease. PMID:21179280

  6. Plasma metabolomics in human pulmonary tuberculosis disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Frediani, Jennifer K; Jones, Dean P; Tukvadze, Nestan; Uppal, Karan; Sanikidze, Eka; Kipiani, Maia; Tran, ViLinh T; Hebbar, Gautam; Walker, Douglas I; Kempker, Russell R; Kurani, Shaheen S; Colas, Romain A; Dalli, Jesmond; Tangpricha, Vin; Serhan, Charles N; Blumberg, Henry M; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to characterize metabolites during tuberculosis (TB) disease and identify new pathophysiologic pathways involved in infection as well as biomarkers of TB onset, progression and resolution. Such data may inform development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. Plasma samples from adults with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB disease and their matched, asymptomatic, sputum culture-negative household contacts were analyzed using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to identify metabolites. Statistical and bioinformatics methods were used to select accurate mass/charge (m/z) ions that were significantly different between the two groups at a false discovery rate (FDR) of q<0.05. Two-way hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to identify clusters of ions contributing to separation of cases and controls, and metabolomics databases were used to match these ions to known metabolites. Identity of specific D-series resolvins, glutamate and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-derived trehalose-6-mycolate was confirmed using LC-MS/MS analysis. Over 23,000 metabolites were detected in untargeted metabolomic analysis and 61 metabolites were significantly different between the two groups. HCA revealed 8 metabolite clusters containing metabolites largely upregulated in patients with TB disease, including anti-TB drugs, glutamate, choline derivatives, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-derived cell wall glycolipids (trehalose-6-mycolate and phosphatidylinositol) and pro-resolving lipid mediators of inflammation, known to stimulate resolution, efferocytosis and microbial killing. The resolvins were confirmed to be RvD1, aspirin-triggered RvD1, and RvD2. This study shows that high-resolution metabolomic analysis can differentiate patients with active TB disease from their asymptomatic household contacts. Specific metabolites upregulated in the plasma of patients with active TB disease, including Mtb-derived glycolipids and resolvins, have potential as biomarkers

  7. MRI mapping of cerebrovascular reactivity via gas inhalation challenges.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hanzhang; Liu, Peiying; Yezhuvath, Uma; Cheng, Yamei; Marshall, Olga; Ge, Yulin

    2014-01-01

    The brain is a spatially heterogeneous and temporally dynamic organ, with different regions requiring different amount of blood supply at different time. Therefore, the ability of the blood vessels to dilate or constrict, known as Cerebral-Vascular-Reactivity (CVR), represents an important domain of vascular function. An imaging marker representing this dynamic property will provide new information of cerebral vessels under normal and diseased conditions such as stroke, dementia, atherosclerosis, small vessel diseases, brain tumor, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. In order to perform this type of measurement in humans, it is necessary to deliver a vasoactive stimulus such as CO2 and/or O2 gas mixture while quantitative brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) are being collected. In this work, we presented a MR compatible gas-delivery system and the associated protocol that allow the delivery of special gas mixtures (e.g., O2, CO2, N2, and their combinations) while the subject is lying inside the MRI scanner. This system is relatively simple, economical, and easy to use, and the experimental protocol allows accurate mapping of CVR in both healthy volunteers and patients with neurological disorders. This approach has the potential to be used in broad clinical applications and in better understanding of brain vascular pathophysiology. In the video, we demonstrate how to set up the system inside an MRI suite and how to perform a complete experiment on a human participant. PMID:25549106

  8. MRI Mapping of Cerebrovascular Reactivity via Gas Inhalation Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hanzhang; Liu, Peiying; Yezhuvath, Uma; Cheng, Yamei; Marshall, Olga; Ge, Yulin

    2014-01-01

    The brain is a spatially heterogeneous and temporally dynamic organ, with different regions requiring different amount of blood supply at different time. Therefore, the ability of the blood vessels to dilate or constrict, known as Cerebral-Vascular-Reactivity (CVR), represents an important domain of vascular function. An imaging marker representing this dynamic property will provide new information of cerebral vessels under normal and diseased conditions such as stroke, dementia, atherosclerosis, small vessel diseases, brain tumor, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. In order to perform this type of measurement in humans, it is necessary to deliver a vasoactive stimulus such as CO2 and/or O2 gas mixture while quantitative brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) are being collected. In this work, we presented a MR compatible gas-delivery system and the associated protocol that allow the delivery of special gas mixtures (e.g., O2, CO2, N2, and their combinations) while the subject is lying inside the MRI scanner. This system is relatively simple, economical, and easy to use, and the experimental protocol allows accurate mapping of CVR in both healthy volunteers and patients with neurological disorders. This approach has the potential to be used in broad clinical applications and in better understanding of brain vascular pathophysiology. In the video, we demonstrate how to set up the system inside an MRI suite and how to perform a complete experiment on a human participant. PMID:25549106

  9. CardioGenBase: A Literature Based Multi-Omics Database for Major Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    V, Alexandar; Nayar, Pradeep G.; Murugesan, R.; Mary, Beaulah; P, Darshana; Ahmed, Shiek S. S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) account for high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Both, genetic and epigenetic factors are involved in the enumeration of various cardiovascular diseases. In recent years, a vast amount of multi-omics data are accumulated in the field of cardiovascular research, yet the understanding of key mechanistic aspects of CVDs remain uncovered. Hence, a comprehensive online resource tool is required to comprehend previous research findings and to draw novel methodology for understanding disease pathophysiology. Here, we have developed a literature-based database, CardioGenBase, collecting gene-disease association from Pubmed and MEDLINE. The database covers major cardiovascular diseases such as cerebrovascular disease, coronary artery disease (CAD), hypertensive heart disease, inflammatory heart disease, ischemic heart disease and rheumatic heart disease. It contains ~1,500 cardiovascular disease genes from ~2,4000 research articles. For each gene, literature evidence, ontology, pathways, single nucleotide polymorphism, protein-protein interaction network, normal gene expression, protein expressions in various body fluids and tissues are provided. In addition, tools like gene-disease association finder and gene expression finder are made available for the users with figures, tables, maps and venn diagram to fit their needs. To our knowledge, CardioGenBase is the only database to provide gene-disease association for above mentioned major cardiovascular diseases in a single portal. CardioGenBase is a vital online resource to support genome-wide analysis, genetic, epigenetic and pharmacological studies. PMID:26624015

  10. Systemic Inflammation in Cardiovascular and Periodontal Disease: Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Glurich, Ingrid; Grossi, Sara; Albini, Boris; Ho, Alex; Shah, Rashesh; Zeid, Mohamed; Baumann, Heinz; Genco, Robert J.; De Nardin, Ernesto

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have implicated periodontal disease (PD) as a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). These studies addressed the premise that local infection may perturb the levels of systemic inflammatory mediators, thereby promoting mechanisms of atherosclerosis. Levels of inflammatory mediators in the sera of subjects with only PD, only CVD, both diseases, or neither condition were compared. Subjects were assessed for levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), ceruloplasmin, α1-acid-glycoprotein (AAG), α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT), and the soluble cellular adhesion molecules sICAM-1 and sVCAM by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent and/or radial immunodiffusion assays. CRP levels in subjects with either condition alone were elevated twofold above subjects with neither disease, whereas a threefold increase was noted in subjects with both diseases (P = 0.0389). Statistically significant increases in SAA and ACT were noted in subjects with both conditions compared to those with one or neither condition (P = 0.0162 and 0.0408, respectively). Ceruloplasmin levels were increased in subjects with only CVD (P = 0.0001). Increases in sVCAM levels were noted in all subjects with CVD (P = 0.0054). No differences in sICAM levels were noted among subject groups. A trend toward higher levels of AAG was noted in subjects with both conditions and for ACT in subjects with only PD. Immunohistochemical examination of endarterectomy specimens of carotid arteries from subjects with atherosclerosis documented SAA and CRP deposition in association with atheromatous lesions. The data support the hypothesis that localized persistent infection may influence systemic levels of inflammatory mediators. Changes in inflammatory mediator levels potentially impact inflammation-associated atherosclerotic processes. PMID:11874889

  11. [Clinical study on development of nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease].

    PubMed

    Kurashima, Atsuyuki

    2004-12-01

    problem, most are still unidentified. STUDY OF MAC LUNG DISEASE TREATMENT: It was known that Mycobacterium kansasii lung disease is healed with a chemotherapy like analog of anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy, already in those days. However, the results of MAC lung disease chemotherapy were extremely poor. We tried to express a physicians experience quantitatively as follows, in 1987. The results of 8 weeks sputum culture on Ogawa egg medium were converted semi-quantitatively to CFU numbers based on "Japanese standard guideline of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inspection". We exhibit the ratio of post-treatment consecutive 6 months culture yield to pre-treatment culture yield as response rate, about 110 pulmonary MAC cases. Through this study, we clarify the followings. The results of chemotherapy do not correlate susceptibility test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Multidrug regimen is more useful. Small extent of lesion is more responsive. Combination with aminoglycoside chemotherapy is more effective. These conclusions were almost same as the ATS guideline of 1990. New drugs such as, new macrolides and new quinolones appeared for pulmonary MAC treatment through the feedback from systemic MAC complicated AIDS treatments from the latter half of 90's. We measured the sensitive strain ratio at 2 mcg/ml of OFLX, CPFX, LVFX about 990 clinical isolates and could expect availability for M. kansasii or M. fortuitum, but these new quinolones are not enough effective for MAC. Also we examined MIC for various antimycobacterial agent by 50 MAC clinical isolates, and we could expect a certain availability of SPFX, GFLX, CPFX, CAM for MAC. The availability of clarithromycin (CAM) has been established through many randomized clinical trials for disseminated MAC complicated AIDS, but for pulmonary MAC, complete cure is still difficult if we use CAM including regimen. We performed surgical treatment for relatively young patients with localized lesions. We carry out the adaptation reference such

  12. [Alcohol and wine and cardiovascular diseases in epidemiologic studies].

    PubMed

    Sinkiewicz, Władysław; Weglarz, Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    Moderate alcohol intake is associated with lower risk of cardiovascular diseases. A large number of epidemiologic studies have demonstrated a U- or J-shaped relation between alcohol consumption and total mortality, coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke. The lowest risk occurs in those who drink one or two drinks per day. Many studies have dealt with the question if specific alcoholic beverage (vodka, beer, wine, liquor) might offer a greater protection. Red wine containing polyphenols is believed to possess exceptional cardioprotective properties, especially if consumed with meals. However, alcohol beverages should not be recommended to patients as a substitute for the well-proven, cardiovascular risk reducing alternatives such as low fat diet, exercise and pharmacotherapy. PMID:19739580

  13. Cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity assessed by intracranial pressure dynamics in severely head injured patients.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, M; Bandoh, K; Marmarou, A

    1995-03-01

    Appropriate management of intracranial pressure (ICP) in severely head injured patients depends in part on the cerebral vessel reactivity to PCO2; loss of CO2 reactivity has been associated with poor outcome. This study describes a new method for evaluating vascular reactivity in head-injured patients by determining the sensitivity of ICP change to alterations in PCO2. This method was combined with measurements of the pressure volume index (PVI), which allowed calculation of blood volume change necessary to alter ICP. The objective of this study was to investigate the ICP response and the blood volume change corresponding to alterations in PCO2 and to examine the correlation of responsivity and outcome as measured on the Glasgow Outcome Scale. The PVI and ICP at different end-tidal PCO2 levels produced by mild hypo- and hyperventilation were obtained in 49 patients with Glasgow Coma Scale scores of less than 8 and over a wide range of PCO2 (25 to 40 mm Hg) in eight patients. Given the assumption that the PVI remained constant during alteration of PaCO2, the estimated blood volume change per torr change of PCO2 was calculated by the following equation: BVR = PVI x delta log(ICP)/delta PCO2, where BVR = blood volume reactivity. The data in this study showed that PVI remained stable with changes in PCO2, thus validating the assumption used in the blood volume estimates. Moreover, the response of ICP to PCO2 alterations followed an exponential curve that could be described in terms of the responsivity indices to capnic stimuli. It was found that responsivity to hypocapnia was reduced by 50% compared to responsivity to hypercapnia measured within 24 hours of injury (p < 0.01). The sensitivity of ICP to estimated blood volume changes in patients with a PVI of less than 15 ml was extremely high with only 4 ml of blood required to raise ICP by 10 mm Hg. The authors conclude from these data that, following traumatic injury, the resistance vessels are in a state of

  14. Peyronie's disease: a case study with clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D Eileen; Lofton, Susan P; Hale, Theresa; Durant, Norma; Grant, LaVerne F

    2008-04-01

    Peyronie's disease involves the development of fibrous plaques in the connective tissue of the penis usually near the dorsal midline of the penile shaft in middle-aged and older men. This case study describes a 57-year-old man who presented with a history of prostatitis and complaints of anxiety related to penile pain and erectile difficulties. The diagnostic work-up and clinical interaction are described. PMID:18488585

  15. Homoarginine and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: Results from the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease Study

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Christiane; Kollerits, Barbara; Meinitzer, Andreas; März, Winfried; Ritz, Eberhard; König, Paul; Neyer, Ulrich; Pilz, Stefan; Wanner, Christoph; Kronenberg, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Background Homoarginine is an amino acid derivative mainly synthesized in the kidney. It is suggested to increase nitric oxide availability, enhance endothelial function and to protect against cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate the relation between homoarginine, kidney function and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods We measured plasma homoarginine concentrations in baseline samples of the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease (MMKD) Study, a prospective cohort study of 227 patients with CKD in Europe. Homoarginine concentrations were available in 182 of the baseline samples and in 139 of the prospectively-followed patients. We correlated homoarginine concentrations to parameters of kidney function. The association between homoarginine and progression of CKD was assessed during a follow-up of up to seven years (median 4.45 years, interquartile range 2.54–5.19) using Cox regression analysis. Progression of CKD was defined as doubling of baseline serum creatinine and/or end-stage renal disease. Results Study participants were at baseline on average 47±13 years old and 65% were male. Mean±standard deviation of homoarginine concentrations were 2.5±1.1 µmol/L and concentrations were incrementally lower at lower levels of GFR with mean concentrations of 2.90±1.02 µmol/L (GFR>90 ml/min), 2.64±1.06 µmol/L (GFR 60–90 ml/min), 2.52±1.24 µmol/L (GFR 30–60 ml/min) and 2.05±0.78 µmol/L (GFR<30 ml/min), respectively (p = 0.002). The age- and sex-adjusted risk to reach the renal endpoint was significantly higher by 62% with each decrease by one standard deviation (1.1 µmol/L) of homoarginine (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.16–2.27, p = 0.005). This association was independent of proteinuria (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.11–2.20, p = 0.01), and was slightly attenuated when adjusting for GFR (HR 1.40 (95% CI 0.98–1.98, p = 0.06). Conclusions Homoarginine concentrations are directly correlated with kidney function and are significantly

  16. Advanced devices for photoacoustic imaging to improve cancer and cerebrovascular medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla Marien, Leonardo Gabriel

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information for breast cancer staging. Despite these promising studies, PAI remains an unfeasible option for clinics due to the cost to implement, the required large modification in user conduct and the inflexibility of the hardware to accommodate other applications for the incremental enhancement in diagnostic information. The research described in this dissertation addresses these issues by designing attachments to clinical ultrasound probes and incorporating custom detectors into commercial ultrasound scanners. The ultimate benefit of these handheld devices is to expand the capability of current ultrasound systems and facilitate the translation of PAI to enhance cancer diagnostics and neurosurgical outcomes. Photoacoustic enabling devices (PEDs) were designed as attachments to two clinical ultrasound probes optimized for breast cancer diagnostics. PAI uses pulsed laser excitation to create transient heating (<1°C) and thermoelastic expansion that is detected as an ultrasonic emission. These ultrasonic emissions are remotely sensed to construct noninvasive images with optical contrast at depths much greater than other optical modalities. The PEDs are feasible in terms of cost, user familiarity and flexibility for various applications. Another possible application for PAI is in assisting neurosurgeons treating aneurysms. Aneurysms are often treated by placing a clip to prevent blood flow into the aneurysm. However, this procedure has risks associated with damaging nearby vessels. One of the developed PEDs demonstrated the feasibility to three-dimensionally image tiny microvasculature (<0.3mm) beyond large blood occlusions (>2.4mm) in a phantom model. The capability to use this during surgery would suggest decreasing the risks associated with these treatments. However, clinical ultrasound arrays are not clinically feasible for microsurgical applications due to

  17. International Biological Engagement Programs Facilitate Newcastle Disease Epidemiological Studies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patti J; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Peterson, Melanie P; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Swayne, David E; Suarez, David L; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-01-01

    Infections of poultry species with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), one of the most economically significant and devastating diseases for poultry producers worldwide. Biological engagement programs between the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) of the United States Department of Agriculture and laboratories from Russia, Pakistan, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Indonesia collectively have produced a better understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of the viruses responsible for ND, which is crucial for the control of the disease. The data from Kazakhstan, Russia, and Ukraine identified possible migratory routes for birds that may carry both virulent NDV (vNDV) and NDV of low virulence into Europe. In addition, related NDV strains were isolated from wild birds in Ukraine and Nigeria, and from birds in continental USA, Alaska, Russia, and Japan, identifying wild birds as a possible mechanism of intercontinental spread of NDV of low virulence. More recently, the detection of new sub-genotypes of vNDV suggests that a new, fifth, panzootic of ND has already originated in Southeast Asia, extended to the Middle East, and is now entering into Eastern Europe. Despite expected challenges when multiple independent laboratories interact, many scientists from the collaborating countries have successfully been trained by SEPRL on molecular diagnostics, best laboratory practices, and critical biosecurity protocols, providing our partners the capacity to further train other employes and to identify locally the viruses that cause this OIE listed disease. These and other collaborations with partners in Mexico, Bulgaria, Israel, and Tanzania have allowed SEPRL scientists to engage in field studies, to elucidate more aspects of ND epidemiology in endemic countries, and to understand the challenges that the scientists and field veterinarians in these countries face on a daily basis. Finally, new viral characterization tools

  18. International Biological Engagement Programs Facilitate Newcastle Disease Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Patti J.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Peterson, Melanie P.; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J.; Swayne, David E.; Suarez, David L.; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2015-01-01

    Infections of poultry species with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), one of the most economically significant and devastating diseases for poultry producers worldwide. Biological engagement programs between the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) of the United States Department of Agriculture and laboratories from Russia, Pakistan, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Indonesia collectively have produced a better understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of the viruses responsible for ND, which is crucial for the control of the disease. The data from Kazakhstan, Russia, and Ukraine identified possible migratory routes for birds that may carry both virulent NDV (vNDV) and NDV of low virulence into Europe. In addition, related NDV strains were isolated from wild birds in Ukraine and Nigeria, and from birds in continental USA, Alaska, Russia, and Japan, identifying wild birds as a possible mechanism of intercontinental spread of NDV of low virulence. More recently, the detection of new sub-genotypes of vNDV suggests that a new, fifth, panzootic of ND has already originated in Southeast Asia, extended to the Middle East, and is now entering into Eastern Europe. Despite expected challenges when multiple independent laboratories interact, many scientists from the collaborating countries have successfully been trained by SEPRL on molecular diagnostics, best laboratory practices, and critical biosecurity protocols, providing our partners the capacity to further train other employes and to identify locally the viruses that cause this OIE listed disease. These and other collaborations with partners in Mexico, Bulgaria, Israel, and Tanzania have allowed SEPRL scientists to engage in field studies, to elucidate more aspects of ND epidemiology in endemic countries, and to understand the challenges that the scientists and field veterinarians in these countries face on a daily basis. Finally, new viral characterization tools

  19. Cigarette Smoke Modulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Phenotype: Implications for Carotid and Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Pascal M.; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I.; Gonzalez, Fernando; Hasan, David M.; Rosenwasser, Robert H.; Owens, Gary K.; Koch, Walter J.; Dumont, Aaron S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic modulation in the cerebral circulation and pathogenesis of stroke has not been determined. Cigarette smoke is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, but potential mechanisms are unclear, and its role in SMC phenotypic modulation has not been established. Methods and Results In cultured cerebral vascular SMCs, exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) resulted in decreased promoter activity and mRNA expression of key SMC contractile genes (SM-α-actin, SM-22α, SM-MHC) and the transcription factor myocardin in a dose-dependent manner. CSE also induced pro-inflammatory/matrix remodeling genes (MCP-1, MMPs, TNF-α, IL-1β, NF-κB). CSE increased expression of KLF4, a known regulator of SMC differentiation, and siKLF4 inhibited CSE induced suppression of SMC contractile genes and myocardin and activation of inflammatory genes. These mechanisms were confirmed in vivo following exposure of rat carotid arteries to CSE. Chromatin immune-precipitation assays in vivo and in vitro demonstrated that CSE promotes epigenetic changes with binding of KLF4 to the promoter regions of myocardin and SMC marker genes and alterations in promoter acetylation and methylation. Conclusion CSE exposure results in phenotypic modulation of cerebral SMC through myocardin and KLF4 dependent mechanisms. These results provides a mechanism by which cigarette smoke induces a pro-inflammatory/matrix remodeling phenotype in SMC and an important pathway for cigarette smoke to contribute to atherosclerosis and stroke. PMID:23967268

  20. Microbial Risk Factors of Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Diseases: Potential Therapeutical Options

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla Abbas, Mohammed; Guenther, Albrecht; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Fawi, Gharib; Comi, Giancarlo; Kwan, Joseph; Corea, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    Infection and inflammation may have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. This hypothesis is supported by an increasing number of reports on the interaction between chronic infection, inflammation, and atherogenesis. Assessment of serological and inflammatory markers of infection may be useful adjuncts in identifying those patients who are at a higher risk of developing vascular events, and in whom more aggressive treatments might be warranted. PMID:19018303

  1. [A new approach to the treatment of sleep disorders in patients with cerebrovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Rudenko, A E; Korzhenevskiĭ, L V; Bashkirova, L M

    2003-01-01

    A positive result has been obtained in treating sleep disorders in patients with chronic vascular affections of the brain with using the drugs donormyl and sonnate-KM [symbol: see text]. Donormyl is recommended for use in sleep disturbances (not very prolonged and not profound insomnia) in a 10-day therapeutic course as a first-choice drug. PMID:12774477

  2. Multi-modal CT scanning in the evaluation of cerebrovascular disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Anzidei, Michele; Piga, Mario; Ciolina, Federica; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Catalano, Carlo; Suri, Jasjit S.; Raz, Eytan

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke currently represents one of the leading causes of severe disability and mortality in the Western World. Until now, angiography was the most used imaging technique for the detection of the extra-cranial and intracranial vessel pathology. Currently, however, non-invasive imaging tool like ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) have proven capable of offering a detailed analysis of the vascular system. CT in particular represents an advanced system to explore the pathology of carotid arteries and intracranial vessels and also offers tools like CT perfusion (CTP) that provides valuable information of the brain’s vascular physiology by increasing the stroke diagnostic. In this review, our purpose is to discuss stroke risk prediction and detection using CT. PMID:25009794

  3. Tissue kallikrein in cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal diseases and skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chao, Julie; Shen, Bo; Gao, Lin; Xia, Chun-Fang; Bledsoe, Grant; Chao, Lee

    2010-04-01

    Tissue kallikrein (KLK1) processes low-molecular weight kininogen to produce vasoactive kinins, which exert biological functions via kinin receptor signaling. Using various delivery approaches, we have demonstrated that tissue kallikrein through kinin B2 receptor signaling exhibits a wide spectrum of beneficial effects by reducing cardiac and renal injuries, restenosis and ischemic stroke, and by promoting angiogenesis and skin wound healing, independent of blood pressure reduction. Protection by tissue kallikrein in oxidative organ damage is attributed to the inhibition of apoptosis, inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis. Tissue kallikrein also enhances neovascularization in ischemic heart and limb. Moreover, tissue kallikrein/kinin infusion not only prevents but also reverses kidney injury, inflammation and fibrosis in salt-induced hypertensive rats. Furthermore, there is a wide time window for kallikrein administration in protection against ischemic brain infarction, as delayed kallikrein infusion for 24 h after cerebral ischemia in rats is effective in reducing neurological deficits, infarct size, apoptosis and inflammation. Importantly, in the clinical setting, human tissue kallikrein has been proven to be effective in the treatment of patients with acute brain infarction when injected within 48 h after stroke onset. Finally, kallikrein promotes skin wound healing and keratinocyte migration by direct activation of protease-activated receptor 1. PMID:20180644

  4. [A case of narcolepsy with increased cataplectic attacks after suffering from cerebrovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Miura, H; Nakajima, S; Nakamura, H; Ichinowatari, N

    1990-06-01

    It is well known that narcoleptic patients have DR2 and DQw-1 on HLA typing. The development of narcolepsy is considered to depend on the two factors; genetic predispositions and exogenous factors such as head trauma, encephalitis, etc., mainly affecting the brainstem or diencephalon. We reported a 46-year-old man who had occasional sleep attacks after suffering from left thalamic hemorrhage and pontine vascular disorders. Rehabilitation was markedly disturbed due to frequent episodes of cataplectic attacks which was triggered by emotional lability such as laughing, anxiety, and excitement. HLA type examination showed both DR-2 and DQw-1 loci in the proband and his four other siblings. His elder brother also suffered from mild excessive daytime sleepiness during his younger age, but it subsided gradually. Analysis of overnight polysomnography in the patient revealed remarkable paradoxical alpha-blocking and frequent sleep onset REM stages as typically observed in narcoleptic patients. MRI examination showed multiple small hemorrhages and infarctions in the pontine tegmentum, in addition to the left thalamic hemorrhage and multiple subcortical ischemic lesions. Concerning the mechanism of frequent cataplexy in this patient, it is postulated that increased emotional incontinence might have stimulated the descending reticular system in the brainstem which in turn may inhibit anterior horn motor cell activities. Methylphenidate was initially given to the patient, resulting in some relief of attacks, and addition of imipramine dramatically suppressed cataplectic attacks. Imipramine is considered to inhibit the excitatory afferent pathway to the brainstem suppressing the hyperactivity of descending motor inhibitory system due to its anti-muscarinergic action. PMID:2225662

  5. Effect of acetazolamide on cerebral blood flow in subacute and chronic cerebrovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hojer-Pedersen, E.

    1987-09-01

    Acetazolamide increases cerebral blood flow. The generalized and regional changes in blood flow after administration of acetazolamide were evaluated by the xenon-133 inhalation technique in a series of patients with subacute or chronic focal cerebral ischemia. Acetazolamide augmented interhemispheric asymmetry of cerebral blood flow in patients with unilateral occlusion of major cerebral arteries, whereas no significant side-to-side asymmetry was evident in patients with minor arterial lesions. Low flow areas in relation to computed tomography-verified infarcts tended to be larger after administration of acetazolamide. Hyperfrontality was present at rest and during stimulation with acetazolamide. A decline of cerebral blood flow with advancing age was greater in patients than in normal controls. The vasodilator response to acetazolamide did not change with age.

  6. Secondary autoimmune diseases occurring after HSCT for an autoimmune disease: a retrospective study of the EBMT Autoimmune Disease Working Party.

    PubMed

    Daikeler, Thomas; Labopin, Myriam; Di Gioia, Massimo; Abinun, Mario; Alexander, Tobias; Miniati, Irene; Gualandi, Francesca; Fassas, Athanasios; Martin, Thierry; Schwarze, Carl Philipp; Wulffraat, Nico; Buch, Maya; Sampol, Antonia; Carreras, Enric; Dubois, Benedicte; Gruhn, Bernd; Güngör, Tayfun; Pohlreich, David; Schuerwegh, Annemie; Snarski, Emilian; Snowden, John; Veys, Paul; Fasth, Anders; Lenhoff, Stig; Messina, Chiara; Voswinkel, Jan; Badoglio, Manuela; Henes, Jörg; Launay, David; Tyndall, Alan; Gluckman, Eliane; Farge, Dominique

    2011-08-11

    To specify the incidence and risk factors for secondary autoimmune diseases (ADs) after HSCT for a primary AD, we retrospectively analyzed AD patients treated by HSCT reported to EBMT from 1995 to 2009 with at least 1 secondary AD (cases) and those without (controls). After autologous HSCT, 29 of 347 patients developed at least 1 secondary AD within 21.9 (0.6-49) months and after allogeneic HSCT, 3 of 16 patients. The observed secondary ADs included: autoimmune hemolytic anemia (n = 3), acquired hemophilia (n = 3), autoimmune thrombocytopenia (n = 3), antiphospholipid syndrome (n = 2), thyroiditis (n = 12), blocking thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody (n = 1), Graves disease (n = 2), myasthenia gravis (n = 1), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 2), sarcoidosis (n = 2), vasculitis (n = 1), psoriasis (n = 1), and psoriatic arthritis (n = 1). After autologous HSCT for primary AD, the cumulative incidence of secondary AD was 9.8% ± 2% at 5 years. Lupus erythematosus as primary AD, and antithymocyte globulin use plus CD34(+) graft selection were important risk factors for secondary AD by multivariate analysis. With a median follow-up of 6.2 (0.54-11) years after autologous HSCT, 26 of 29 patients with secondary AD were alive, 2 died during their secondary AD (antiphospholipid syndrome, hemophilia), and 1 death was HSCT-related. This European multicenter study underlines the need for careful management and follow-up for secondary AD after HSCT. PMID:21596847

  7. A Polysomnographic Study of Parkinson's Disease Sleep Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; De Jesus, Sol; Walz, Roger; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Peng-Chen, Zhongxing; Okun, Michael S.; Alatriste-Booth, Vanessa; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common nonmotor phenomenon in Parkinson's disease (PD) affecting patient's quality of life. In this study, we examined the association between clinical characteristics with sleep disorders and sleep architecture patterns in a PD cohort. Patients underwent a standardized polysomnography study (PSG) in their “on medication” state. We observed that male gender and disease duration were independently associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Only lower levodopa equivalent dose (LED) was associated with periodic limb movement disorders (PLMD). REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) was more common among older patients, with higher MDS-UPDRS III scores, and LED. None of the investigated variables were associated with the awakenings/arousals (A/A). Sleep efficiency was predicted by amantadine usage and age, while sleep stage 1 was predicted by dopamine agonists and Hoehn & Yahr severity. The use of MAO-B inhibitors and MDS-UPDRS part III were predictors of sleep stages 2 and 3. Age was the only predictor of REM sleep stage and gender for total sleep time. We conclude that sleep disorders and architecture are poorly predictable by clinical PD characteristics and other disease related factors must also be contributing to these sleep disturbances. PMID:26504612

  8. Quantitative thermophoretic study of disease-related protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Wolff , Manuel; Mittag, Judith J.; Herling, Therese W.; Genst, Erwin De; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Braun, Dieter; Buell, Alexander K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. A detailed understanding of the physico-chemical properties of the different aggregated forms of proteins, and of their interactions with other compounds of diagnostic or therapeutic interest, is crucial for devising effective strategies against such diseases. Protein aggregates are situated at the boundary between soluble and insoluble structures, and are challenging to