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Sample records for cerebrovascular mental stress

  1. Head position modifies cerebrovascular response to orthostatic stress.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Timothy D; Serrador, Jorge M; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2003-01-31

    Previous experiments have shown that the vestibular system participates in cardiovascular control. However, the effects of vestibular activation on cerebrovascular regulation are not known. Therefore, the present experiment tested the hypothesis that specific vestibular activations may be beneficial to cerebral circulation during simulated orthostatic stress. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (CBV; Doppler ultrasound) was measured to examine the effects of head-down neck flexion (HDNF) compared to head-down neck extension (HDNE) with and without lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -40 mmHg) (n=9). The change in CBV (DeltaCBV) during HDNF and HDNE were not different during baseline conditions, however, during LBNP, DeltaCBV was greater in HDNE compared to HDNF (-5.5+/-3.2 cm/s, -11+/-4.6%) vs. (-0.7+/-1.0 cm/s, -1.9+/-1.9%), respectively (P<0.05). Concomitantly, the change in cerebrovascular resistance (DeltaCVR) between rest and LBNP was also greater during HDNE (0.48+/-0.08 mmHg/cm per s, 42.8+/-10.8%) compared with HDNF (0.26+/-0.05 mmHg/cm per s, 22+/-4.1%) (P<0.05). P(ET)CO(2) was greater in HDNE (45+/-2 mmHg) compared to HDNF (42+/-2 mmHg; P<0.05) during LBNP. These results suggest that the vestibular system may affect cerebrovascular tone during simulated postural stress by either constriction or dilation, depending on the vestibular stimulus. PMID:12531493

  2. Oxidative stress upregulates the NMDA receptor on cerebrovascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Betzen, Christian; White, Robin; Zehendner, Christoph M; Pietrowski, Eweline; Bender, Bianca; Luhmann, Heiko J; Kuhlmann, Christoph R W

    2009-10-15

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated oxidative stress has been implicated in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in a variety of neuropathological diseases. Although some interactions between both phenomena have been elucidated, possible influences of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the NMDA-R itself have so far been neglected. The objective of this study was to examine how the cerebroendothelial NMDA-R is affected by exposure to oxidative stress and to assess possible influences on BBB integrity. RT-PCR confirmed several NMDA-R subunits (NR1, NR2B-D) expressed in the bEnd3 cell line (murine cerebrovascular endothelial cells). NR1 protein expression after exposure to ROS was observed via in-cell Western. The functionality of the expressed NMDA-R was determined by measuring DiBAC fluorescence in ROS-preexposed cells upon stimulation with the specific agonist NMDA. Finally, the effects on barrier integrity were evaluated using the ECIS system to detect changes in monolayer impedance upon NMDA-R stimulation after exposure to ROS. The expression of NR1 significantly (p<0.001) increased 72 h after 30 min exposure to superoxide (+33.8+/-7.5%), peroxynitrite (+84.9+/-10.7%), or hydrogen peroxide (+92.8+/-7.6%), resulting in increased cellular response to NMDA-R stimulation and diminished monolayer impedance. We conclude that oxidative stress upregulates NMDA-R on cerebrovascular endothelium and thus heightens susceptibility to glutamate-induced BBB disruption. PMID:19660541

  3. Economic Stress and Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Hugh F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper correlates economic stress with minority status, resource allocations for mental health programs, and vulnerability to mental disability. Several hypotheses are advanced: 1. A major and recurring psychological pattern of the American national character is prowhite, antiblack paranoia. 2. Mental health fiscal allocations and programmatic determinations in ghetto, lower socioeconomic, minority-populated urban areas are predicated on political and racist considerations, the underlying motivation being to keep minorities at greater risk of mental disability. 3. Economic privation and stress increase vulnerability to mental illness, especially in a minority population for whom health, mental health, educational, and social services are grossly inadequate. 4. Poverty and economic stress combine with health systems that are unresponsive to the needs of blacks and other minorities, resulting in the perpetuation of disabilities and other conditions in blacks that are potentially preventable. 5. Health and mental health resources should be increased rather than diminished during periods of economic stress, especially in the public sector. 6. In order to provide each citizen with access to quality health and mental health care regardless of race and/or economic status, there must be enacted a national health insurance program based on tax-levy monies that will cover all aspects of health and mental health care. 7. Racism and social status will continue to be powerful determinants of the quality of service that white professionals render to black patients and to poor white patients, unless our training institutions mount a massive campaign to train appropriately and to include significant numbers of minority candidates and trainees in the effort. To date this effort is virtually nonexistent. PMID:439171

  4. Vestibulosympathetic reflex during mental stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Jason R.; Ray, Chester A.; Cooke, William H.

    2002-01-01

    Increases in sympathetic neural activity occur independently with either vestibular or mental stimulation, but it is unknown whether sympathetic activation is additive or inhibitive when both stressors are combined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the combined effects of vestibular and mental stimulation on sympathetic neural activation and arterial pressure in humans. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), arterial pressure, and heart rate were recorded in 10 healthy volunteers in the prone position during 1) head-down rotation (HDR), 2) mental stress (MS; using arithmetic), and 3) combined HDR and MS. HDR significantly (P < 0.05) increased MSNA (9 +/- 2 to 13 +/- 2 bursts/min). MS significantly increased MSNA (8 +/- 2 to 13 +/- 2 bursts/min) and mean arterial pressure (87 +/- 2 to 101 +/- 2 mmHg). Combined HDR and MS significantly increased MSNA (9 +/- 1 to 16 +/- 2 bursts/min) and mean arterial pressure (89 +/- 2 to 100 +/- 3 mmHg). Increases in MSNA (7 +/- 1 bursts/min) during the combination trial were not different from the algebraic sum of each trial performed alone (8 +/- 2 bursts/min). We conclude that the interaction for MSNA and arterial pressure is additive during combined vestibular and mental stimulation. Therefore, vestibular- and stress-mediated increases of MSNA appear to occur independently in humans.

  5. [Hormonal markers of stress in acute cerebrovascular pathology].

    PubMed

    Miralles, F; Sanz, R; Martin, R; Falip, R; Antem, M; Matías-Guiu, J

    1995-01-01

    Various studies carried out over the last decade have shown that high glucose levels in the blood foster ischaemic brain damage associated with a worse evolution of such pathologies. The aim of the study we performed was to try to shed some light on whether stress in these patients raised their glucose levels adding to a worsening of the patient's clinical picture. We studied 318 consecutive patients suffering from stroke. We determined fasting glucose levels, prolactin and cortisol within the first few hours of hospitalization and afterwards at seven to ten days and again at one month after the stroke. Clinical severity was evaluated using Toronto and Mathew neurological scales and the degree of incapacity was measured using the Barthel functional scale on the three aforementioned occasions and Rankin's modified scale six and twelve months after the stroke. Clinical severity the first hours after stroke was significantly related to glucose levels, such relationship not being observed with prolactin and cortisol. Nor did we observe any significant association between glucose and these hormones. Likewise the anxiety scale had no relationship with any hormone. Studying medium and long term functional incapacity, glucose significantly correlated with the Rankin scale although with low dependence, such a relationship not being found either with prolactin or cortisol. Our work would seem to indicate that blood glucose behaviour is independent of prolactin and cortisol levels since we found no such relationship between them. PMID:8556609

  6. The role of oxidative stress and NADPH oxidase in cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Chrissobolis, Sophocles; Faraci, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    The study of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress remains a very active area of biological research particularly in relation to cellular signaling and the role of ROS in disease. In the cerebral circulation, oxidative stress occurs in diverse forms of disease and with aging. Within the vessel wall, ROS produce complex structural and functional changes that have broad implications for regulation of cerebral perfusion and permeability of the blood–brain barrier. These oxidative stress-induced changes are thought to contribute to the progression of cerebrovascular disease. Here, we highlight recent findings in relation to oxidative stress in the cerebral vasculature, with an emphasis on the emerging role for NADPH oxidases as a source of ROS and the role of ROS in models of disease. PMID:18929509

  7. The role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular lesions in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Gjumrakch; Smith, Mark A; Seyidov, Dilara; Neal, Maxwell Lewis; Lamb, Bruce T; Nunomura, Akihiko; Gasimov, Eldar K; Vinters, Harry V; Perry, George; LaManna, Joseph C; Friedland, Robert P

    2002-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and stroke are two leading causes of age-associated dementia. A rapidly growing body of evidence indicates that increased oxidative stress from reactive oxygen radicals is associated with the aging process and age-related degenerative disorders such as atherosclerosis, ischemia/reperfusion, arthritis, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases. New evidence has also indicated that vascular lesions are a key factor in the development of AD. This idea is based on a positive correlation between AD and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases such as arterio- and atherosclerosis and ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this review we consider recent evidence supporting the existence of an intimate relationship between oxidative stress and vascular lesions in the pathobiology of AD. We also consider the opportunities for therapeutic interventions based on the molecular pathways involved with these causal relationships. PMID:11770899

  8. Cerebrovascular responsiveness to steady-state changes in end-tidal CO2 during passive heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Low, David A.; Wingo, Jonathan E.; Keller, David M.; Davis, Scott L.; Zhang, Rong; Crandall, Craig G.

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that passive heat stress alters cerebrovascular responsiveness to steady-state changes in end-tidal CO2 (PetCO2). Nine healthy subjects (4 men and 5 women), each dressed in a water-perfused suit, underwent normoxic hypocapnic hyperventilation (decrease PetCO2 ~20 Torr) and normoxic hypercapnic (increase in PetCO2 ~9 Torr) challenges under normothermic and passive heat stress conditions. The slope of the relationship between calculated cerebrovascular conductance (CBVC; middle cerebral artery blood velocity/mean arterial blood pressure) and PetCO2 was used to evaluate cerebrovascular CO2 responsiveness. Passive heat stress increased core temperature (1.1 ± 0.2°C, P < 0.001) and reduced middle cerebral artery blood velocity by 8 ± 8 cm/s (P = 0.01), reduced CBVC by 0.09 ± 0.09 CBVC units (P = 0.02), and decreased PetCO2 by 3 ± 4 Torr (P = 0.07), while mean arterial blood pressure was well maintained (P = 0.36). The slope of the CBVC-PetCO2 relationship to the hypocapnic challenge was not different between normothermia and heat stress conditions (0.009 ± 0.006 vs. 0.009 ± 0.004 CBVC units/Torr, P = 0.63). Similarly, in response to the hypercapnic challenge, the slope of the CBVC-PetCO2 relationship was not different between normothermia and heat stress conditions (0.028 ± 0.020 vs. 0.023 ± 0.008 CBVC units/Torr, P = 0.31). These results indicate that cerebrovascular CO2 responsiveness, to the prescribed steady-state changes in PetCO2, is unchanged during passive heat stress. PMID:18218916

  9. Oxidative Stress and C-Reactive Protein in Patients with Cerebrovascular Accident (Ischaemic Stroke)

    PubMed Central

    Thanoon, Imad A-J; Abdul-Jabbar, Hilmy AS; Taha, Dhia A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the presence of oxidative stress and inflammation in ischaemic stroke patients by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant status (TAS), and highly-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in the early post-ischaemic period, and to determine the role of Ginkgo biloba therapy in correcting the markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Methods: This study was conducted at Ibn Seena Hospital, Mosul City, Iraq and included 31 cerebrovascular accident (CVA) patients and 30 healthy controls. Ischaemic stroke patients were divided into two groups: group I (n = 15) received conventional therapy; group II (n = 16) received conventional therapy with G. biloba (1500 mg/day) for 30 days. Blood samples were obtained from patients and controls before treatment and assays done of serum levels of MDA, TAS, and hsCRP. For CVA patients, a post-treatment blood sample was taken and the same parameters reassessed. Results: Compared with the controls, patients’ serum levels of MDA, and hsCRP were significantly higher (P ≤0.001) and TAS significantly lower. Group I and II patients reported a significant reduction in serum levels of MDA and hsCRP and a significant increase in serum levels of TAS, in comparison with pre-treatment levels. There was no significant difference (P = 0.19) in serum MDA levels between groups I and II, whereas, serum TAS levels were significantly higher (P ≤0.01) and hsCRP significantly lower (P ≤0.01) in group II. Conclusion: Acute stroke is associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory response in the early period. G. biloba plays a potential role in reducing oxidative damage and inflammatory response. PMID:22548139

  10. Skin cooling aids cerebrovascular function more effectively under severe than moderate heat stress.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Rebekah A I; Ainslie, Philip N; Fan, Jui-Lin; Wilson, Luke C; Thomas, Kate N; Cotter, James D

    2010-05-01

    Skin surface cooling has been shown to improve orthostatic tolerance; however, the influence of severe heat stress on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to skin cooling remains unknown. Nine healthy males, resting supine in a water-perfusion suit, were heated to +1.0 and +2.0 degrees C elevation in body core temperature (T (c)). Blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler ultrasound), mean arterial pressure (MAP; photoplethysmography), stroke volume (SV; Modelflow), total peripheral resistance (TPR; Modelflow), heart rate (HR; ECG) and the partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO(2)) were measured continuously during 1-min baseline and 3-min lower body negative pressure (LBNP, -15 mm Hg) when heated without and again with skin surface cooling. Nine participants tolerated +1 degrees C and six participants reached +2 degrees C. Skin cooling elevated (P = 0.004) MAP ~4% during baseline and LBNP at +1 degrees C T (c). During LBNP, skin cooling increased SV (9%; P = 0.010) and TPR (0.9 mm Hg L(-1) min, P = 0.013) and lowered HR (13 b min(-1), P = 0.012) at +1 degrees C T (c) and +2 degrees C T (c) collectively. At +2 degrees C T (c), skin cooling elevated P(ET)CO(2) ~4.3 mm Hg (P = 0.011) and therefore reduced cerebral vascular resistance ~0.1 mm Hg cm(-1) s at baseline and LBNP (P = 0.012). In conclusion, skin cooling under severe heating and mild orthostatic stress maintained cerebral blood flow more effectively than it did under moderate heating, in conjunction with elevated carbon dioxide pressure, SV and arterial resistance. PMID:19946700

  11. [Characteristics of oxidative stress in mental maladaptation].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, L P; Ivanova, S A; Krotenko, N M; Levchuk, L A; Gutkevich, E V; Semke, V Ia

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the balance of pro and antioxidant systems were studied in persons in state of mental maladaptation, developed under the influence of emotional stress. Activation of lipid peroxidation has been revealed associated with increase of amount of malondialdehyde in erythrocytes and blood serum in persons surveyed. Activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase in erythrocytes in persons in state of mental stress was increased and glutathione preductase, glutathione-S-transferase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase has been reliably reduced as compared with group of healthy people. Comparative chemiluminiscent analysis of common antioxidant properties of serum of blood of studied groups has also revealed decrease of antioxidant properties of blood under influence of mental stress. PMID:23101248

  12. How mental stress affects endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Toda, Noboru; Nakanishi-Toda, Megumi

    2011-12-01

    Mental stress is an important factor contributing to recognized mechanisms underlying cardiovascular events. Among these, stress-related endothelial dysfunction is an early risk factor that predicts future development of severe cardiovascular disorders. Acute mental stress by a variety of tests impairs endothelial function in humans, although the opposite results have been reported by some investigators. Chronic stress always deteriorates endothelial function in humans and experimental animals. Stress hormones, such as glucocorticoids and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and endothelin-1 liberated in response to mental stress participate in endothelial dysfunction possibly via downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression, eNOS inactivation, decreased nitric oxide (NO) actions, and increased NO degradation, together with vasoconstriction counteracting against NO-induced vasodilatation. Catecholamines do not directly affect endothelial function but impair its function when blood pressure elevation by the amines is sustained. Endogenous opioids favorably affect endothelial function, which counteract deteriorating effects of other stress hormones and mediators. Inhibition of cortisol and endothelin-1 production, prevention of pro-inflammatory mediator accumulation, hypnotics, mirthful laughter, humor orientation, and lifestyle modification would contribute to the prevention and treatment for stress-related endothelial dysfunction and future serious cardiovascular disease. PMID:21947555

  13. Mental health nursing and stress: maintaining balance.

    PubMed

    Ward, Louise

    2011-04-01

    The recruitment and retention of mental health nurses within acute inpatient mental health facilities continues to be an ongoing issue. Literature and current research highlight an environment fraught with pressure and stress, identifying several key factors contributing to job dissatisfaction. These factors include greater patient acuity, unpredictable and challenging workspaces, violence, increased paperwork, and reduced managerial support. This qualitative, critical, feminist exploration investigated the lived experiences of 13 female mental health nurses working in inpatient services. They were asked about their practice and perceptions of workplace culture, and they shared their thoughts on stress management and professional well-being. Positive workplace practice was highlighted, and the participants revealed an environment they were proud to be a part of. Individual interviews, focus groups, and reflective practice were all used to collect data. The findings from the investigation unanimously support current literature that clearly confirms mental health nursing to be stressful. Interestingly, however, the findings also clearly identified that the way in which the nurse participants managed their stress was intrinsically linked to their job satisfaction. The major theme identified throughout the present study revealed that the female participants' ability to manage an at times complex workspace through the notions of teamwork, diversity, and creativity. All of the participants considered these elements as significant to providing a high standard in patient care. This research might provide an opportunity for others to view mental health nursing from a different perspective, and through the lived experiences of the participants, embrace the positive and rewarding aspects of the role. PMID:21371222

  14. Changes of mental stress biomarkers in ultramarathon.

    PubMed

    Agawa, H; Yamada, N; Enomoto, Y; Suzuki, H; Hosono, A; Arakawa, K; Ghadimi, R; Miyata, M; Maeda, K; Shibata, K; Tokudome, M; Goto, C; Tokudome, Y; Hoshino, H; Imaeda, N; Marumoto, M; Suzuki, S; Kobayashi, M; Tokudome, S

    2008-11-01

    We investigated the possible influence of an exhaustive physical exercise on mental stress biomarkers (serotonin, tryptophan, and beta-endorphin) along with dopamine, noradrenaline and free fatty acids in an ultramarathon race in which 45 km was run on the first day and 90 km on the second. We obtained serum samples at 6 different time points during and after the race from 18 Japanese male runners who completed the marathon. Overall changes of serum serotonin and tryptophan concentrations were statistically significant according to ANOVA for repeated measurements (p < 0.05). Serum serotonin levels elevated rapidly on the first day with the post hoc Tukey's test. Tryptophan concentrations inversely decreased during the race, possibly because of utilization for synthesis of serotonin. Levels of beta-endorphin appeared to increase on the first and second days, but were not statistically significant. In conclusion, serum serotonin, tryptophan and beta-endorphin appeared to be used for mental stress markers in physical exercise. PMID:18418810

  15. Fasting Glucose is a Useful Indicator for Cerebrovascular Risk in Non-Diabetic Koreans: Association With Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hyang; Yoon, So Ra; Na, Ga Yoon; Jun, Mira; Ahn, Mok-Ryeon; Cha, Jae-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose are associated with incidence of cerebro-/cardio-vascular diseases. This study hypothesized that fasting glycemic status may reflect cerebrovascular risk in non-diabetic Koreans. Fasting glycemic status, lipid profiles, oxidative stress, and inflammation markers were measured in non-diabetic subjects (healthy controls, n = 112 and stroke n = 41). Systolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), triglycerides, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CPR), interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were higher, and high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterols were lower in patients with stroke than healthy controls. Fasting glucose positively correlated with hs-CRP, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) and malondialdehyde. The significances continued or at least turned to a trend after adjustments for confounding factors. Multiple regression analyses revealed that fasting glucose was mainly associated with cerebrovascular risk (β'-coefficient = 0.284, p < 0.0001) together with age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, hs-CRP, body mass index, dietary poly unsaturated fatty acid/saturated fatty acid (PUFA/SFA), and HbA1C (r2 = 0.634, p = 0.044). The subjects were subdivided by their fasting glucose levels [normal fasting glucose: 70-99 mg/dL, n = 91 [NFG-control] and n = 27 [NFG-stroke]; higher fasting glucose: 100-125 mg/dL, n = 21 [HFG-control] and n = 14 [HFG-stroke]). In both controls and stroke patients, HFG groups show higher triglyceride, total- and LDL-cholesterol and lower HDL-cholesterol than NFG groups. Control-HFG group showed significantly higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation than control-NFG group. Stroke-HFG group also showed significantly higher inflammatory levels than stroke-NFG group, moreover the highest among the groups. Additionally, stroke-NFG group consumed higher PUFA/SFA than stroke-HFG group. Fasting glucose may

  16. Fasting Glucose is a Useful Indicator for Cerebrovascular Risk in Non-Diabetic Koreans: Association With Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyang; Yoon, So Ra; Na, Ga Yoon; Jun, Mira; Ahn, Mok-Ryeon; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Oh Yoen

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose are associated with incidence of cerebro-/cardio-vascular diseases. This study hypothesized that fasting glycemic status may reflect cerebrovascular risk in non-diabetic Koreans. Fasting glycemic status, lipid profiles, oxidative stress, and inflammation markers were measured in non-diabetic subjects (healthy controls, n = 112 and stroke n = 41). Systolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), triglycerides, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CPR), interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were higher, and high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterols were lower in patients with stroke than healthy controls. Fasting glucose positively correlated with hs-CRP, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) and malondialdehyde. The significances continued or at least turned to a trend after adjustments for confounding factors. Multiple regression analyses revealed that fasting glucose was mainly associated with cerebrovascular risk (β'-coefficient = 0.284, p < 0.0001) together with age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, hs-CRP, body mass index, dietary poly unsaturated fatty acid/saturated fatty acid (PUFA/SFA), and HbA1C (r(2) = 0.634, p = 0.044). The subjects were subdivided by their fasting glucose levels [normal fasting glucose: 70-99 mg/dL, n = 91 [NFG-control] and n = 27 [NFG-stroke]; higher fasting glucose: 100-125 mg/dL, n = 21 [HFG-control] and n = 14 [HFG-stroke]). In both controls and stroke patients, HFG groups show higher triglyceride, total- and LDL-cholesterol and lower HDL-cholesterol than NFG groups. Control-HFG group showed significantly higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation than control-NFG group. Stroke-HFG group also showed significantly higher inflammatory levels than stroke-NFG group, moreover the highest among the groups. Additionally, stroke-NFG group consumed higher PUFA/SFA than stroke-HFG group. Fasting glucose

  17. Forearm sympathetic withdrawal and vasodilatation during mental stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Halliwill, J R; Lawler, L A; Eickhoff, T J; Dietz, N M; Nauss, L A; Joyner, M J

    1997-10-01

    1. In humans, mental stress elicits vasodilatation in the muscle vascular beds of the forearm that may be neurally mediated. We sought to determine the extent to which this vasodilatation is due to sympathetic withdrawal, active neurogenic vasodilatation, or beta-adrenergically mediated vasodilatation. 2. We simultaneously measured forearm blood flow and muscle sympathetic nerve traffic to the forearm during mental stress in humans. In a second study, we measured forearm blood flow responses to mental stress after selective blockade of alpha-adrenergic neurotransmission in one forearm. In a final study, we measured forearm blood flow responses to mental stress after unilateral anaesthetic blockade of the stellate ganglion, alone or in combination with selective beta-adrenergic receptor blockade of the forearm. 3. During mental stress, muscle sympathetic nerve activity decreased from 5113 +/- 788 to 1509 +/- 494 total integrated activity min-1 (P < 0.05) and forearm vascular resistance decreased from 96 +/- 29 to 33 +/- 7 mmHg (dl of tissue) min ml-1 (P < 0.05). Considerable vasodilation was still elicited by mental stress after selective blockade of alpha-adrenergic neurotransmission. Vasodilatation also occurred during mental stress after stellate ganglion blockade. This dilatation was reduced by selective blockade of beta-adrenergic receptors in the forearm. 4. Our results support a role for both sympathetic withdrawal and beta-adrenergic vasodilatation as the major causes of the forearm vasodilatation during mental stress in humans. PMID:9350631

  18. Forearm sympathetic withdrawal and vasodilatation during mental stress in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Halliwill, J R; Lawler, L A; Eickhoff, T J; Dietz, N M; Nauss, L A; Joyner, M J

    1997-01-01

    1. In humans, mental stress elicits vasodilatation in the muscle vascular beds of the forearm that may be neurally mediated. We sought to determine the extent to which this vasodilatation is due to sympathetic withdrawal, active neurogenic vasodilatation, or beta-adrenergically mediated vasodilatation. 2. We simultaneously measured forearm blood flow and muscle sympathetic nerve traffic to the forearm during mental stress in humans. In a second study, we measured forearm blood flow responses to mental stress after selective blockade of alpha-adrenergic neurotransmission in one forearm. In a final study, we measured forearm blood flow responses to mental stress after unilateral anaesthetic blockade of the stellate ganglion, alone or in combination with selective beta-adrenergic receptor blockade of the forearm. 3. During mental stress, muscle sympathetic nerve activity decreased from 5113 +/- 788 to 1509 +/- 494 total integrated activity min-1 (P < 0.05) and forearm vascular resistance decreased from 96 +/- 29 to 33 +/- 7 mmHg (dl of tissue) min ml-1 (P < 0.05). Considerable vasodilation was still elicited by mental stress after selective blockade of alpha-adrenergic neurotransmission. Vasodilatation also occurred during mental stress after stellate ganglion blockade. This dilatation was reduced by selective blockade of beta-adrenergic receptors in the forearm. 4. Our results support a role for both sympathetic withdrawal and beta-adrenergic vasodilatation as the major causes of the forearm vasodilatation during mental stress in humans. PMID:9350631

  19. Ethnic Differences in Adolescents' Mental Distress, Social Stress, and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Heeseung; Meininger, Janet C.; Roberts, Robert E.

    2006-01-01

    Limited data on ethnic group differences among young adolescents exist regarding the prevalence of mental distress, social stress, and resources. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine ethnic differences among African American (AA), European American (EA), Hispanic American (HA), and Asian American adolescents in mental distress,…

  20. Migrant Farmworker Stress: Mental Health Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiott, Ann E.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Davis, Stephen W.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The number of Latinos in rural regions of the United States is increasing. Little is known about factors that undermine the mental health of this segment of the rural population. Purpose: The goal of this study is to determine which stressors inherent in farmwork and the farmworker lifestyle contribute to poor mental health. Methods: An…

  1. Angina and Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit J.; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2015-01-01

    Objective Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia is a common phenomenon in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and an emerging prognostic factor. Mental stress ischemia is correlated with ambulatory ischemia. However, whether it is related to angina symptoms during daily life has not been examined. Methods We assessed angina-frequency (past month) in 98 post-myocardial infarction (MI) subjects (age 18-60 years) using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire. Patients underwent [99mTc]sestamibi SPECT perfusion imaging at rest, after mental stress, and after exercise/pharmacological stress. Summed scores of perfusion abnormalities were obtained by observer-independent software. A summed-difference score (SDS), the difference between stress and rest scores, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. Results The mean age was 50 years, 50% were female and 60% were non-white. After adjustment for age, sex, smoking, CAD-severity, depressive, anger and anxiety symptoms, each 1-point increase in mental-stress SDS was associated with 1.73-unit increase in the angina-frequency score (95% CI: 0.09-3.37) and 17% higher odds of being in a higher angina-frequency category (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.00-1.38). Depressive symptoms were associated with 12% higher odds of being in a higher angina-frequency category (OR: 1.12, 95% CI: 1.03-1.21). In contrast, exercise/pharmacological stress-induced SDS was not associated with angina-frequency. Conclusion Among young and middle-aged post-MI patients, myocardial ischemia induced by mental stress in the lab, but not by exercise/pharmacological stress, is associated with higher frequency of retrospectively reported angina during the day. Psychosocial stressors related to mental stress ischemia may be important contributory factor to daily angina. PMID:25727240

  2. Effects of Early Post-Ischemic Reperfusion and tPA on Cerebrovascular Function and Nitrosative Stress in Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Ahnstedt, Hilda; Sweet, Julie; Cruden, Patrick; Bishop, Nicole; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is a major health issue in women. Our previous studies in male rats showed decreased myogenic tone in middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) after ischemia and reperfusion (I/R), while tone in parenchymal arterioles (PAs) was increased. This vascular response may aggravate stroke damage in males by limiting reperfusion; however, the effect in females is not known. The current study investigated the effect of I/R and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) on myogenic tone and reactivity of MCAs and PAs in female rats. Nitrosative stress by peroxynitrite and recruitment of inflammatory neutrophils to the microvasculature were also studied. Female rats were subjected to 2-h MCA filament occlusion (n = 16) or sham surgery (n = 17) and given tPA (1 mg/kg, i.v) or vehicle followed by 30-min reperfusion. Myogenic tone and reactivity were measured in isolated and pressurized MCAs and PAs from the same animals. Cerebrovascular F-actin, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT, peroxynitrite marker), and intravascular neutrophils were quantified. Myogenic tone and constriction to the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine were decreased in MCAs but unchanged in PAs after I/R with no effect of tPA. F-actin and 3-NT expression were unaffected by I/R or tPA. Our study showed that MCAs from females, similar to what has been seen in males, are dilated after I/R and have decreased myogenic tone while tone in PAs was unchanged. Increased small vessel resistance may contribute to decreased reperfusion and worse outcome after stroke. PMID:27125535

  3. Occupational Stress, Mental Health Status and Stress Management Behaviors among Secondary School Teachers in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Sharron S. K.; Mak, Yim Wah; Chui, Ying Yu; Chiang, Vico C. L.; Lee, Angel C. K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine occupational stress and mental health among secondary school teachers in Hong Kong, and to identify the differences between those actively engaged in stress management behaviors and those who were not. Design: Survey design was adopted using validated instruments including Occupational Stress Inventory…

  4. Mental Toughness in Competitive Tennis: Relationships with Resilience and Stress.

    PubMed

    Cowden, Richard G; Meyer-Weitz, Anna; Oppong Asante, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between mental toughness (MT), resilience, and stress among competitive South African tennis players. A total of 351 tennis players participating at various competitive standards completed the Sports Mental Toughness Questionnaire, the Resilience Scale for Adults, and a modified version of the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes. The results indicated that total MT was positively associated with total resilience (r = 0.59), but negatively associated with total stress (r = -0.44). The resilience subscales of perception of self, perception of future, social competence, and social resources, but not family cohesion, significantly predicted total MT (R (2) = 0.35). Both total resilience and total MT significantly predicted total stress (R (2) = 0.21). Based on the findings, interrelations between MT and resilience are explored, implications outlined, and additional research is suggested to ascertain the contextual relevance and outcomes associated with each construct in sport. PMID:27014132

  5. Mental Toughness in Competitive Tennis: Relationships with Resilience and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cowden, Richard G.; Meyer-Weitz, Anna; Oppong Asante, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between mental toughness (MT), resilience, and stress among competitive South African tennis players. A total of 351 tennis players participating at various competitive standards completed the Sports Mental Toughness Questionnaire, the Resilience Scale for Adults, and a modified version of the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes. The results indicated that total MT was positively associated with total resilience (r = 0.59), but negatively associated with total stress (r = -0.44). The resilience subscales of perception of self, perception of future, social competence, and social resources, but not family cohesion, significantly predicted total MT (R2 = 0.35). Both total resilience and total MT significantly predicted total stress (R2 = 0.21). Based on the findings, interrelations between MT and resilience are explored, implications outlined, and additional research is suggested to ascertain the contextual relevance and outcomes associated with each construct in sport. PMID:27014132

  6. Occupational stress, coping and mental health in Jamaican police officers

    PubMed Central

    Smith, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Police are exposed to a wide range of stressors and this is especially true in developing countries such as Jamaica. Exposure to psychosocial stressors and use of maladaptive coping styles can result in mental ill-health. Aims To examine the relationship between work characteristics, coping and mental health in Jamaican police officers and to test whether work characteristics are indirectly associated with mental health outcomes through perceived job stress and job satisfaction. Methods Police officers from the Jamaican police force completed a questionnaire using a cross-sectional design. We analysed the data using hierarchical regression. Results The study group consisted of 134 police officers; the response rate was 94%. Negative work characteristics, lower levels of positive work factors and work support and emotion-focused coping styles were associated with increased levels of depression (F(8, 125) = 7.465, P < 0.001). Subjective feelings of anxiety were positively associated with negative work characteristics and emotion-focused coping (F(8, 125) = 7.586, P < 0.001). The relationship between work characteristics and mental health outcomes was mediated by perceived stress. Job satisfaction mediated the relationship between positive work characteristics and depression. Conclusions Stress management and intervention programmes should address modifiable work conditions, monitor stress levels and reduce maladaptive coping. PMID:27131386

  7. Association between Anger and Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Kelley, Mary; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia is associated with adverse prognosis in coronary artery disease patients. Anger is thought to be a trigger of acute coronary syndromes and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk; however, little direct evidence exists for a link between anger and myocardial ischemia. Methods [99mTc]sestamibi single-photon emission tomography was performed at rest, after mental stress (a social stressor with a speech task), and after exercise/pharmacological stress. Summed scores of perfusion abnormalities were obtained by observer-independent software. A summed difference score, the difference between stress and rest scores, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory was used to assess different anger dimensions. Results The mean age was 50 years, 50% were female and 60% were non-white. After adjusting for demographic factors, smoking, coronary artery disease severity, depressive and anxiety symptoms, each interquartile range increment in state-anger score was associated with 0.36 units adjusted increase in ischemia as measured by the summed difference score (95% CI: 0.14-0.59); the corresponding association for trait-anger was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.21-1.69). Anger expression scales were not associated ischemia. None of the anger dimensions were related to ischemia during exercise/pharmacological stress. Conclusion Anger, both as an emotional state and as a personality trait, is significantly associated with propensity to develop myocardial ischemia during mental stress, but not during exercise/pharmacological stress. Patients with this psychological profile may be at increased risk for silent ischemia induced by emotional stress and this may translate into worse prognosis. PMID:25497256

  8. Endocannabinoids in cerebrovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Benyó, Zoltán; Ruisanchez, Éva; Leszl-Ishiguro, Miriam; Sándor, Péter; Pacher, Pál

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral blood flow is tightly regulated by myogenic, endothelial, metabolic, and neural mechanisms under physiological conditions, and a large body of recent evidence indicates that inflammatory pathways have a major influence on the cerebral blood perfusion in certain central nervous system disorders, like hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and vascular dementia. All major cell types involved in cerebrovascular control pathways (i.e., smooth muscle, endothelium, neurons, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia, and leukocytes) are capable of synthesizing endocannabinoids and/or express some or several of their target proteins [i.e., the cannabinoid 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) receptors and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel]. Therefore, the endocannabinoid system may importantly modulate the regulation of cerebral circulation under physiological and pathophysiological conditions in a very complex manner. Experimental data accumulated since the late 1990s indicate that the direct effect of cannabinoids on cerebral vessels is vasodilation mediated, at least in part, by CB1 receptors. Cannabinoid-induced cerebrovascular relaxation involves both a direct inhibition of smooth muscle contractility and a release of vasodilator mediator(s) from the endothelium. However, under stress conditions (e.g., in conscious restrained animals or during hypoxia and hypercapnia), cannabinoid receptor activation was shown to induce a reduction of the cerebral blood flow, probably via inhibition of the electrical and/or metabolic activity of neurons. Finally, in certain cerebrovascular pathologies (e.g., subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as traumatic and ischemic brain injury), activation of CB2 (and probably yet unidentified non-CB1/non-CB2) receptors appear to improve the blood perfusion of the brain via attenuating vascular inflammation. PMID:26825517

  9. Adolescent Stress: The Relationship between Stress and Mental Health Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Kathryn E.; Behling, Steven; Gipson, Polly Y.; Ford, Rebecca E.

    2005-01-01

    Although low levels of stressful life experiences are considered to be a normal part of development, higher levels can constitute a threat to the well-being and healthy development of children and adolescents. Adolescents are exposed to increased rates of stressful life experiences and there is some evidence that increases in stressors account, at…

  10. A new paradigm to induce mental stress: the Sing-a-Song Stress Test (SSST)

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Anne-Marie; Hogervorst, Maarten A.

    2014-01-01

    We here introduce a new experimental paradigm to induce mental stress in a quick and easy way while adhering to ethical standards and controlling for potential confounds resulting from sensory input and body movements. In our Sing-a-Song Stress Test, participants are presented with neutral messages on a screen, interleaved with 1-min time intervals. The final message is that the participant should sing a song aloud after the interval has elapsed. Participants sit still during the whole procedure. We found that heart rate and skin conductance during the 1-min intervals following the sing-a-song stress message are substantially higher than during intervals following neutral messages. The order of magnitude of the rise is comparable to that achieved by the Trier Social Stress Test. Skin conductance increase correlates positively with experienced stress level as reported by participants. We also simulated stress detection in real time. When using both skin conductance and heart rate, stress is detected for 18 out of 20 participants, approximately 10 s after onset of the sing-a-song message. In conclusion, the Sing-a-Song Stress Test provides a quick, easy, controlled and potent way to induce mental stress and could be helpful in studies ranging from examining physiological effects of mental stress to evaluating interventions to reduce stress. PMID:25120425

  11. Experimenter Effects on Cardiovascular Reactivity and Task Performance during Mental Stress Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegwarth, Nicole; Larkin, Kevin T.; Kemmner, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Experimenter effects have long been hypothesized to influence participants' responses to mental stress testing. To explore the influence of experimenter warmth on responses to two mental stress tasks (mental arithmetic, mirror tracing), 32 young women participated in a single 45-min experimental session. Participants were randomized into warm…

  12. Neuromodulator and Emotion Biomarker for Stress Induced Mental Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gu, Simeng; Wang, Wei; Wang, Fushun; Huang, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    Affective disorders are a leading cause of disabilities worldwide, and the etiology of these many affective disorders such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder is due to hormone changes, which includes hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in the peripheral nervous system and neuromodulators in the central nervous system. Consistent with pharmacological studies indicating that medical treatment acts by increasing the concentration of catecholamine, the locus coeruleus (LC)/norepinephrine (NE) system is regarded as a critical part of the central "stress circuitry," whose major function is to induce "fight or flight" behavior and fear and anger emotion. Despite the intensive studies, there is still controversy about NE with fear and anger. For example, the rats with LC ablation were more reluctant to leave a familiar place and took longer to consume the food pellets in an unfamiliar place (neophobia, i.e., fear in response to novelty). The reason for this discrepancy might be that NE is not only for flight (fear), but also for fight (anger). Here, we try to review recent literatures about NE with stress induced emotions and their relations with mental disorders. We propose that stress induced NE release can induce both fear and anger. "Adrenaline rush or norepinephrine rush" and fear and anger emotion might act as biomarkers for mental disorders. PMID:27051536

  13. Adipose tissue and skeletal muscle blood flow during mental stress

    SciTech Connect

    Linde, B.; Hjemdahl, P.; Freyschuss, U.; Juhlin-Dannfelt, A.

    1989-01-01

    Mental stress (a modified Stroop color word conflict test (CWT)) increased adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF; 133Xe clearance) by 70% and reduced adipose tissue vascular resistance (ATR) by 25% in healthy male volunteers. The vasculatures of adipose tissue (abdomen as well as thigh), skeletal muscle of the calf (133Xe clearance), and the entire calf (venous occlusion plethysmography) responded similarly. Arterial epinephrine (Epi) and glycerol levels were approximately doubled by stress. Beta-Blockade by metoprolol (beta 1-selective) or propranolol (nonselective) attenuated CWT-induced tachycardia similarly. Metoprolol attenuated stress-induced vasodilation in the calf and tended to do so in adipose tissue. Propranolol abolished vasodilation in the calf and resulted in vasoconstriction during CWT in adipose tissue. Decreases in ATR, but not in skeletal muscle or calf vascular resistances, were correlated to increases in arterial plasma glycerol (r = -0.42, P less than 0.05), whereas decreases in skeletal muscle and calf vascular resistances, but not in ATR, were correlated to increases in arterial Epi levels (r = -0.69, P less than 0.01; and r = -0.43, P less than 0.05, respectively). The results suggest that mental stress increases nutritive blood flow in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle considerably, both through the elevation of perfusion pressure and via vasodilatation. Withdrawal of vasoconstrictor nerve activity, vascular beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulation by circulating Epi, and metabolic mechanisms (in adipose tissue) may contribute to the vasodilatation.

  14. Neuromodulator and Emotion Biomarker for Stress Induced Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Simeng; Wang, Wei; Huang, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    Affective disorders are a leading cause of disabilities worldwide, and the etiology of these many affective disorders such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder is due to hormone changes, which includes hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in the peripheral nervous system and neuromodulators in the central nervous system. Consistent with pharmacological studies indicating that medical treatment acts by increasing the concentration of catecholamine, the locus coeruleus (LC)/norepinephrine (NE) system is regarded as a critical part of the central “stress circuitry,” whose major function is to induce “fight or flight” behavior and fear and anger emotion. Despite the intensive studies, there is still controversy about NE with fear and anger. For example, the rats with LC ablation were more reluctant to leave a familiar place and took longer to consume the food pellets in an unfamiliar place (neophobia, i.e., fear in response to novelty). The reason for this discrepancy might be that NE is not only for flight (fear), but also for fight (anger). Here, we try to review recent literatures about NE with stress induced emotions and their relations with mental disorders. We propose that stress induced NE release can induce both fear and anger. “Adrenaline rush or norepinephrine rush” and fear and anger emotion might act as biomarkers for mental disorders. PMID:27051536

  15. ACUTE MENTAL STRESS AND HEMOSTASIS: WHEN PHYSIOLOGY BECOMES VASCULAR HARM

    PubMed Central

    von Känel, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Stress-induced activation of the sympathoadrenal medullary system activates both the coagulation and fibrinolysis system resulting in net hypercoagulability. The evolutionary interpretation of this physiology is that stress-hypercoagulability protects a healthy organism from excess bleeding should injury occur in fight-or-flight situations. In turn, acute mental stress, negative emotions and psychological trauma also are triggering factors of atherothrombotic events and possibly of venous thromboembolism. Individuals with pre-existent atherosclerosis and impaired endothelial anticoagulant function are the most vulnerable to experience onset of acute coronary events within two hours of intense emotions. A range of sociodemographic and psychosocial factors (e.g., chronic stress and negative affect) might critically intensify and prolong stress-induced hypercoagulability. In contrast, several pharmacological compounds, dietary flavanoids, and positive affect mitigate the acute prothrombotic stress response. Studies are needed to investigate whether attenuation of stress-hypercoagulability through medications and biobehavioral interventions reduce the risk of thrombotic incidents in at-risk populations. PMID:25861135

  16. Chronic mental stress is a cause of essential hypertension: presence of biological markers of stress.

    PubMed

    Esler, Murray; Eikelis, Nina; Schlaich, Markus; Lambert, Gavin; Alvarenga, Marlies; Dawood, Tye; Kaye, David; Barton, David; Pier, Ciaran; Guo, Ling; Brenchley, Celia; Jennings, Garry; Lambert, Elisabeth

    2008-04-01

    1. In searching for biological evidence that essential hypertension is caused by chronic mental stress, a disputed proposition, parallels are noted with panic disorder, which provides an explicit clinical model of recurring stress responses. 2. There is clinical comorbidity; panic disorder prevalence is increased threefold in essential hypertension. Plasma cortisol is elevated in both. 3. In panic disorder and essential hypertension, but not in health, single sympathetic nerve fibres commonly fire repeatedly within an individual cardiac cycle; this appears to be a signature of stress exposure. For both conditions, adrenaline cotransmission is present in sympathetic nerves. 4. Tissue nerve growth factor is increased in both (nerve growth factor is a stress reactant). There is induction of the adrenaline synthesizing enzyme, phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase, in sympathetic nerves, an explicit indicator of mental stress exposure. 5. The question of whether chronic mental stress causes high blood pressure, still hotly debated, has been reviewed by an Australian Government body, the Specialist Medical Review Council. Despite the challenging medicolegal implications, the Council determined that stress is one proven cause of hypertension, this ruling being published in the 27 March 2002 Australian Government Gazette. This judgement was reached after consideration of the epidemiological evidence, but in particular after review of the specific elements of the neural pathophysiology of essential hypertension, described above. PMID:18307749

  17. Variations in mental performance under moderate cold stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, V. M.; Panwar, M. R.

    1987-03-01

    Effects of moderate cold stress on reasoning ability, associative learning and critical flicker frequncy of Indian subjects were studied by exposing them to 25‡C,. 20‡C, 15‡C and 10‡C for three hours. A second set of experiments was also conducted to confirm the conclusions of the first by using the same temperatures and duration of exposure. However, not only the sample used in the second case was larger and different but also the mental functions tested were numerical ability, running memory and mental alertness. It has been concluded that there is a significant impairment of simple cognitive functions at 15‡C which is 10‡C lower than their most comfortable temperature of 25‡C.

  18. Impact of early life stress on the pathogenesis of mental disorders: relation to brain oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Schiavone, Stefania; Colaianna, Marilena; Curtis, Logos

    2015-01-01

    Stress is an inevitable part of human life and it is experienced even before birth. Stress to some extent could be considered normal and even necessary for the survival and the regular psychological development during childhood or adolescence. However, exposure to prolonged stress could become harmful and strongly impact mental health increasing the risk of developing psychiatric disorders. Recent studies have attempted to clarify how the human central nervous system (CNS) reacts to early life stress, focusing mainly on neurobiological modifications. Oxidative stress, defined as a disequilibrium between the oxidant generation and the antioxidant response, has been recently described as a candidate for most of the observed modifications. In this review, we will discuss how prolonged stressful events during childhood or adolescence (such as early maternal separation, parental divorce, physical violence, sexual or psychological abuses, or exposure to war events) can lead to increased oxidative stress in the CNS and enhance the risk to develop psychiatric diseases such as anxiety, depression, drug abuse or psychosis. Defining the sources of oxidative stress following exposure to early life stress might open new beneficial insights in therapeutic approaches to these mental disorders. PMID:25564385

  19. 38 CFR 4.129 - Mental disorders due to traumatic stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mental disorders due to traumatic stress. 4.129 Section 4.129 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... traumatic stress. When a mental disorder that develops in service as a result of a highly stressful event...

  20. 38 CFR 4.129 - Mental disorders due to traumatic stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mental disorders due to traumatic stress. 4.129 Section 4.129 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... traumatic stress. When a mental disorder that develops in service as a result of a highly stressful event...

  1. 38 CFR 4.129 - Mental disorders due to traumatic stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mental disorders due to traumatic stress. 4.129 Section 4.129 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... traumatic stress. When a mental disorder that develops in service as a result of a highly stressful event...

  2. 38 CFR 4.129 - Mental disorders due to traumatic stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mental disorders due to traumatic stress. 4.129 Section 4.129 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... traumatic stress. When a mental disorder that develops in service as a result of a highly stressful event...

  3. 38 CFR 4.129 - Mental disorders due to traumatic stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mental disorders due to traumatic stress. 4.129 Section 4.129 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... traumatic stress. When a mental disorder that develops in service as a result of a highly stressful event...

  4. Effects of lifetime stress exposure on mental and physical health in young adulthood: How stress degrades and forgiveness protects health.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Loren; Shields, Grant S; Dorn, Gabriel; Slavich, George M

    2016-06-01

    To examine risk and resilience factors that affect health, lifetime stress exposure histories, dispositional forgiveness levels, and mental and physical health were assessed in 148 young adults. Greater lifetime stress severity and lower levels of forgiveness each uniquely predicted worse mental and physical health. Analyses also revealed a graded Stress × Forgiveness interaction effect, wherein associations between stress and mental health were weaker for persons exhibiting more forgiveness. These data are the first to elucidate the interactive effects of cumulative stress severity and forgiveness on health, and suggest that developing a more forgiving coping style may help minimize stress-related disorders. PMID:25139892

  5. Improved myocardial ischemia detection by combined physical and mental stress testing.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, P R; Gradel, C; Müller-Brand, J; Buser, P; Pfisterer, M

    1998-07-01

    The hypothesis that addition of mental stress to physical exercise would modify the circulation response to stress and improve noninvasive detection of myocardial ischemia was tested in a randomized, crossover radionuclide angiocardiographic study. Compared with physical exercise or mental stress alone, combined stress led to higher heart rates and rate-pressure products in early stress stages, to more pronounced symptoms, and to a better discrimination of subjects with and without coronary artery disease by radionuclide angiography. PMID:9671017

  6. Minority Stress and Mental Health among Dutch LGBs: Examination of Differences between Sex and Sexual Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuyper, Lisette; Fokkema, Tineke

    2011-01-01

    Minority stress is often cited as an explanation for greater mental health problems among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals than heterosexual individuals. However, studies focusing on sex or sexual orientation differences in level of minority stress and its impact on mental health are scarce, even more so outside the United States.…

  7. Environmental stress, oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) polymorphism, and mental health following collective stress.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Thompson, Rachel G; Holman, E Alison

    2013-04-01

    We examined whether the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs53576 genotype buffers the combined impact of negative social environments (e.g., interpersonal conflict/constraint) and economic stress on post-traumatic stress (PTS) symptoms and impaired daily functioning following collective stress (September 11th terrorist attacks). Saliva was collected by mail and used to genotype 704 respondents. Participants completed Web-based assessments of pre-9/11 mental health, acute stress 9-23 days after 9/11, the quality of social environments 1 year post-9/11, economic stress 18 months post-9/11, and PTS symptoms and impaired functioning 2 and 3 years post-9/11. Interactions between negative social environments and economic stress were examined separately based on OXTR rs53576 genotype (GG vs. any A allele). For individuals with an A allele, a negative social environment significantly increased PTS symptoms without regard to the level of economic stress experienced. However, for respondents with a GG genotype, negative social environments predicted elevated PTS symptoms only for those also experiencing high economic stress. Gender moderated associations between negative social environments, economic stress, and impaired functioning. The functioning of females was most affected by negative social environments regardless of genotype and economic stress, whereas the functioning of males was differentially susceptible to economic stress depending on OXTR genotype and negative social environments. These findings suggest that it is important to consider the combined impact of gender and ongoing stress in different domains as moderators of genetic vulnerability following collective stress. PMID:23470776

  8. Effects of Stress on Students' Physical and Mental Health and Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shankar, Nilani L.; Park, Crystal L.

    2016-01-01

    Stress affects students in multiple ways. This article provides a conceptual overview of the direct (e.g., psychoneuroimmunological, endocrine) and indirect (health behavior) pathways through which stress affects physical health, the psychological effects of stress on mental health, and the cognitive effects of stress (e.g., attention,…

  9. Acculturation stress and mental health among the marriage migrant women in Busan, South Korea.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyuk; Lee, Ki Young; Lee, Hyo Young

    2014-05-01

    Our study investigated mental health and associated factors, especially acculturation stress and coping resources, among "marriage migrant" women. Cross-sectional data were collected for 501 marriage migrant women, about 10 % of those living in Busan, South Korea. Acculturation stress, coping resources, sociodemographic factors were examined using structured questionnaires, and the General Health Questionnaire-28 was administered as a measure of mental health. Many factors were related to mental health, especially marital satisfaction. Core cultural shock and self-rated economic status, interpersonal stress, and social support were also significantly related to mental health status. This study highlights the importance of marriage migrant women's mental health in South Korea. To improve their mental health, increased marital satisfaction, social support, resettlement funds, and/or educational programs that foster coping are needed. Additionally, we should encourage establishment of and participation in marriage migrant self-help groups, which can facilitate adaptation to marriage and to Korean culture. PMID:24292496

  10. Are adolescents with high mental toughness levels more resilient against stress?

    PubMed

    Gerber, Markus; Kalak, Nadeem; Lemola, Sakari; Clough, Peter J; Perry, John L; Pühse, Uwe; Elliot, Catherine; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2013-04-01

    Mental toughness has been explored predominantly within sport contexts. Nevertheless, it is difficult to conceive mental toughness as only applicable to athletes. This study examines whether mentally tough participants exhibit resilience against stress. This is a cross-sectional study based on two different samples: Sample 1 consisted of 284 high school students (99 males, 185 females, M = 18.3 years). Sample 2 consisted of 140 first through fifth semester undergraduate students (53 males, 87 females, M = 20.0 years). Participants provided information about their level of perceived stress (10-item Perceived Stress Scale), mental toughness (48-item Mental Toughness Questionnaire) and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory). Consistent across the two samples, mental toughness mitigated the relationship between high stress and depressive symptoms. The interaction between stress and mental toughness explained 2% of variance in the adolescent sample and 10% of variance among young adults. The promotion of protective factors that foster resilient adaptation is a relevant issue. Mental toughness may appeal to individuals that are typically difficult to be reached with health interventions. Because mental toughness is part of young people's daily speech, it may serve as a less academic resource than other health psychology concepts. PMID:22941714

  11. Job dissatisfaction as a contributor to stress-related mental health problems among Japanese civil servants.

    PubMed

    Tatsuse, Takashi; Sekine, Michikazu

    2013-01-01

    Although studies on the association of job dissatisfaction with mental health have been conducted in the past, few studies have dealt with the complicated links connecting job stress, job dissatisfaction, and stress-related illness. This study seeks to determine how job dissatisfaction is linked to common mental health issues. This study surveyed 3,172 civil servants (2,233 men and 939 women) in 1998, taking poor mental functioning, fatigue, and sleep disturbance as stress-related mental health problems. We examine how psychosocial risk factors at work and job dissatisfaction are associated independently with poor mental functioning, fatigue, and sleep disturbance after adjustment for other known risk factors, and how job dissatisfaction contributes to change in the degree of association between psychosocial risk factors at work and mental health problems. In general, psychosocial risk factors were independently associated with mental health problems. When adjusted for job dissatisfaction, not only was job satisfaction independently associated with mental health problems but it was also found that the association of psychosocial risk factors with mental health problems declined. Our results suggest that, although longitudinal research is necessary, attitudes toward satisfaction at work can potentially decrease the negative effects of psychosocial risk factors at work on mental health. PMID:23385430

  12. Disaggregating the effects of acculturation and acculturative stress on the mental health of Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Wei-Chin; Ting, Julia Y

    2008-04-01

    This study examines the impact of level of acculturation and acculturative stress on the mental health of Asian American college students. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to clarify the relation between level of acculturation, acculturative stress, and mental health outcomes (psychological distress and clinical depression). Being less identified with mainstream United States culture was associated with higher psychological distress and clinical depression, but lost significance when acculturative stress was introduced into the model. Retention or relinquishing of identification with one's heritage culture was not associated with mental health outcomes. Although understanding level of acculturation can help us identify those at risk, findings suggest that acculturative stress is a more proximal risk factor and increases risk for mental health problems independently of global perceptions of stress. PMID:18426287

  13. Adjustment Disorders as a Stress-Related Disorder: A Longitudinal Study of the Associations among Stress, Resources, and Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Kocalevent, Rüya-Daniela; Mierke, Annett; Danzer, Gerhard; Klapp, Burghard F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Adjustment disorders are re-conceptualized in the DSM-5 as a stress-related disorder; however, besides the impact of an identifiable stressor, the specification of a stress concept, remains unclear. This study is the first to examine an existing stress-model from the general population, in patients diagnosed with adjustment disorders, using a longitudinal design. Methods The study sample consisted of 108 patients consecutively admitted for adjustment disorders. Associations of stress perception, emotional distress, resources, and mental health were measured at three time points: the outpatients’ presentation, admission for inpatient treatment, and discharge from the hospital. To evaluate a longitudinal stress model of ADs, we examined whether stress at admission predicted mental health at each of the three time points using multiple linear regressions and structural equation modeling. A series of repeated-measures one-way analyses of variance (rANOVAs) was performed to assess change over time. Results Significant within-participant changes from baseline were observed between hospital admission and discharge with regard to mental health, stress perception, and emotional distress (p<0.001). Stress perception explained nearly half of the total variance (44%) of mental health at baseline; the adjusted R2 increased (0.48), taking emotional distress (i.e., depressive symptoms) into account. The best predictor of mental health at discharge was the level of emotional distress (i.e., anxiety level) at baseline (β = −0.23, R2corr = 0.56, p<0.001). With a CFI of 0.86 and an NFI of 0.86, the fit indices did not allow for acceptance of the stress-model (Cmin/df = 15.26; RMSEA = 0.21). Conclusions Stress perception is an important predictor in adjustment disorders, and mental health-related treatment goals are dependent on and significantly impacted by stress perception and emotional distress. PMID:24825165

  14. Visualization of short-term HRV as an index for mental stress evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Tanaka, Mami; Chonan, Seiji

    2007-12-01

    This paper proposes a new method for visualization of the Heart Rate Variability (HRV) as a visual presentation for mental stress evaluation using the Symmetrized Dot Patterns (SDP) presentation. With this method, time series of the R-R intervals of the electrocardiogram (ECG) are mapped into a polar space and plot out as a scatter plot on the polar graph. The proposed method is testified with the ECG data of fourteen subjects during the mental work-load experiments. Mental arithmetic tasks were used for applying mental work load to the subjects. Experimental results show significant difference of the SDP of the R-R intervals between the mental workload phase and the rest phase, and the difference can be easily recognized. This fact verifies that the proposed method can serve as a visual presentation for the real-time evaluation of mental stress.

  15. Sympathetic neural reactivity to mental stress in offspring of hypertensive parents: 20 years revisited.

    PubMed

    Fonkoue, Ida T; Wang, Min; Carter, Jason R

    2016-08-01

    A number of recent studies have highlighted large interindividual variability of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) responsiveness to mental stress in humans. The purpose of this study was to examine blood pressure (BP) and MSNA responsiveness to mental stress in a large and generalizable cohort of young adults with and without family history of hypertension (FHH). We hypothesized that subjects with FHH would demonstrate greater sympathoexcitation to mental stress than subjects without FHH. A total of 87 subjects (55 men and 32 women, 18-40 yr of age) from recently published (n = 45) and ongoing (n = 42) studies were examined; 57 subjects (19 with FHH and 38 without FHH) had complete MSNA recordings at baseline. Heart rate (HR), BP, and MSNA were recorded during 5 min of supine rest and 5 min of mental stress (mental arithmetic). Resting MSNA and HR were not statistically different between subjects with and without FHH (P > 0.05), whereas resting mean arterial pressure was higher in subjects with FHH (86 ± 2 vs. 80 ± 1 mmHg, P < 0.05). Mental stress increased MSNA in subjects with FHH (Δ5 ± 1 bursts/min), but not in subjects without FHH [Δ1 ± 1 burst/min, P < 0.01 (time × group)]. Mental stress increased mean arterial pressure (Δ12 ± 1 and Δ10 ± 1 mmHg, P < 0.001) and HR (Δ19 ± 2 and Δ16 ± 2 beats/min, P < 0.001) in subjects with and without FHH, but these increases were not different between groups [P ≥ 0.05 (time × group)]. MSNA and BP reactivity to mental stress were not correlated in either group. In conclusion, FHH was associated with heightened MSNA reactivity to mental stress, despite a dissociation between MSNA and BP responsiveness. PMID:27371684

  16. Hypertension and cerebrovascular damage.

    PubMed

    Veglio, Franco; Paglieri, Cristina; Rabbia, Franco; Bisbocci, Daniela; Bergui, Mauro; Cerrato, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    Hypertension is the most important modifiable factor for cerebrovascular disease. Stroke and dementia are growing health problems that have considerable social and economical consequences. Hypertension causes brain lesions by several mechanisms predisposing to lacunar infarctions, leucoaraiosis, and white matter changes as well as to intracerebral haemorrhages. These parenchymal damages determine evident or silent neurological alterations that often precede the onset of cognitive decline. It is important to recognize cerebrovascular disease and, above all, to correlate typical lesions to hypertension. Antihypertensive therapy has shown clinical benefits in primary and secondary prevention of stroke. These drugs represent important instruments against cerebrovascular disease but their effects on cognition are still matter of debate. Cerebral parenchymal and functional damages have to be considered together to make medical intervention more incisive. PMID:19100549

  17. Mental Retardation and Emotional Disorders: A Test for Increased Vulnerability to Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nucci, Maria; Reiss, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Effects of stress-producing conditions on 36 mentally retarded and 36 nonretarded persons (ages 20-53) before performing a counting task were measured. Contrary to stereotypes that predicted retarded subjects' performance would be more vulnerable to stress, results showed that mild but measurable levels of stress improved performance for both…

  18. Comparing EndoPAT and BIOPAC measurement of vascular responses to mental stress.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elizabeth A; Nelson, Rebecca E; Felmlee-Devine, M Donna; Brown, Troy E; Lerman, Amir

    2011-06-01

    There are currently no comparison measurements of stress-induced changes in vascular function during acute mental stress tests to measurements made by BIOPAC MP150 systems technology, a standard polygraph device used to detect deception during polygraph examinations in military or law enforcement applications. Vascular responses to reactive hyperaemia and acute mental stress in 25 healthy subjects were measured by both peripheral arterial tonometry (EndoPAT) and a blood pressure cuff attached to a pressure transducer (BIOPAC) and compared. Reactive hyperaemia was performed at baseline and following three acute mental stress tests. There was no difference in vascular reactivity at baseline and following acute mental stress, as measured by EndoPAT or BIOPAC systems (p > 0·05). Mental stress ratios measured by EndoPAT were significantly different than those measured by BIOPAC (p < 0·01). These data suggest that EndoPAT measurements of vascular responses to acute mental stress may be more specific and sensitive than measurements using the BIOPAC system. PMID:21671245

  19. Relationships among Stress, Coping, and Mental Health in High-Achieving High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suldo, Shannon M.; Shaunessy, Elizabeth; Hardesty, Robin

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships among stress, coping, and mental health in 139 students participating in an International Baccalaureate (IB) high school diploma program. Mental health was assessed using both positive indicators (life satisfaction, academic achievement, academic self-efficacy) and negative indicators (psychopathology) of…

  20. Vaccine-induced inflammation attenuates the vascular responses to mental stress.

    PubMed

    Paine, Nicola J; Ring, Christopher; Bosch, Jos A; Drayson, Mark T; Aldred, Sarah; Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Jet J C S

    2014-09-01

    Inflammation is associated with poorer vascular function, with evidence to suggest that inflammation can also impair the vascular responses to mental stress. This study examined the effects of vaccine-induced inflammation on vascular responses to mental stress in healthy participants. Eighteen male participants completed two stress sessions: an inflammation condition having received a typhoid vaccination and a control (non-inflamed) condition. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 (p's<.001) increased following vaccination, confirming modest increases in inflammation. Mental stress increased blood flow, blood pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output in both conditions (all p's<.001), but the blood flow response to stress was attenuated having received the vaccination compared to the control condition (p's<.05). These results further implicate the interaction between inflammation and the vasculature as a mechanism through which stress may trigger myocardial infarction. PMID:24998644

  1. The Impact of Economic Stress on Community Mental Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, Brian J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Warns that community mental health services are threatened by reductions in federal support and increased numbers of clients. Reviews literature on the effect of adverse economic events on mental health. Identifies issues and answers for managing this dilemma including planning, financial diversification, and inter-agency cooperation. (Author/JAC)

  2. Chronic intermittent mental stress promotes atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability, myocardial infarction and sudden death in mice.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lynn; Rombouts, Miche; Schrijvers, Dorien M; Lemmens, Katrien; De Keulenaer, Gilles W; Martinet, Wim; De Meyer, Guido R Y

    2015-09-01

    Vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques are prone to plaque rupture leading to acute cardiovascular syndromes and death. Elucidating the risk of plaque rupture is important to define better therapeutic or preventive strategies. In the present study, we investigated the effect of chronic intermittent mental stress on atherosclerotic plaque stability and cardiovascular mortality in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice with a heterozygous mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene (Fbn1(C1039G+/)(-)). This mouse model displays exacerbated atherosclerosis with spontaneous plaque ruptures, myocardial infarction and sudden death, when fed a Western-type diet (WD). Female ApoE(-/-)Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice were fed a WD for up to 25 weeks. After 10 weeks WD, mice were divided in a control (n = 27) and mental stress (n = 29) group. The chronic intermittent mental stress protocol consisted of 3 triggers: water avoidance, damp bedding and restraint stress, in a randomly assigned order lasting 6 h every weekday for 15 weeks. Chronic intermittent mental stress resulted in a significant increase in the amount of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques of the proximal ascending aorta, whereas type I collagen and fibrous cap thickness were decreased. The coronary arteries of mental stress-treated mice showed larger plaques, more stenosis, and an increased degree of perivascular fibrosis. Moreover, myocardial infarctions occurred more frequently in the mental stress group. As compared to the control group, the survival of stressed ApoE(-/-)Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice decreased from 67% to 52% at 25 weeks WD, presumably due to myocardial infarctions. In conclusion, chronic intermittent mental stress promotes plaque instability, myocardial infarctions, and mortality of ApoE(-/-)Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice. PMID:26233915

  3. Platelet Aggregation and Mental Stress Induced Myocardial Ischemia: Results from the REMIT Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Boyle, Stephen H.; Ortel, Thomas L.; Samad, Zainab; Velazquez, Eric J.; Harrison, Robert W.; Wilson, Jennifer; Kuhn, Cynthia; Williams, Redford B.; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Becker, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) is common in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and associated with a poorer cardiovascular prognosis. Platelet hyperactivity is an important factor in acute coronary syndrome. This study examined associations between MSIMI and resting and mental stress-induced platelet activity. METHODS Eligible patients with clinically stable IHD underwent a battery of 3 mental stress tests during the recruitment phase of REMIT (Responses of Myocardial Ischemia to Escitalopram Treatment) study. MSIMI was assessed by echocardiography and electrocardiography. Ex vivo platelet aggregation in response to ADP, epinephrine, collagen, serotonin, and combinations of serotonin plus ADP, epinephrine, and collagen were evaluated as was platelet serotonin transporter expression. RESULTS Of the 270 participants who completed mental stress testing, and had both resting and post-stress platelet aggregation evaluation, 43.33% (N=117) met criteria for MSIMI and 18.15% (N=49) had normal left ventricular response to stress (NLVR). The MSIMI group, relative to the NLVR groups, demonstrated heightened mental stress-induced aggregation responses, as measured by area under the curve, to collagen 10 μM (6.95[5.54] vs. −14.23[8.75].; p=0.045), epinephrine 10 μM (12.84[4.84] vs. −6.40[7.61].; p=0.037) and to serotonin 10 μM plus ADP 1 μM (6.64[5.29] vs. −27.34[8.34]; p < .001). The resting platelet aggregation and serotonin transporter expression, however, were not different between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that the dynamic change of platelet aggregation caused by mental stress may underlie MSIMI. While the importance of these findings requires additional investigation, they raise concern given the recognized relationship between mental stress-induced platelet hyperactivity and cardiovascular events in patients with IHD. PMID:25819856

  4. Sympathetic neural reactivity to mental stress in humans: test-retest reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Fonkoue, Ida T; Carter, Jason R

    2015-12-01

    Mental stress consistently increases arterial blood pressure, but this reliable pressor response is often associated with highly variable muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) responsiveness between individuals. Although MSNA has been shown to be reproducible within individuals at rest and during the cold pressor test (CPT), intraindividual reproducibility of MSNA responsiveness to mental stress has not been adequately explored. The purpose of this study was to examine MSNA reactivity to mental stress across three experimental sessions. Sixteen men and women (age 21 ± 1 yr) performed two experimental sessions within a single laboratory visit and a third experimental session 1 mo later. Each experimental session consisted of a mental stress trial via mental arithmetic and a CPT trial. Blood pressure, heart rate (HR), and MSNA were measured, and the consistencies of these variables were determined using intraclass correlation (Cronbach's α coefficient). MSNA, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and HR were highly reproducible across the baselines preceding mental stress (Cronbach's α ≥ 0.816, P ≤ 0.001) and CPT (Cronbach's α ≥ 0.782, P ≤ 0.001). Across the three mental stress trials, changes in MSNA (Cronbach's α = 0.875; P = 0.001), MAP (Cronbach's α = 0.749; P < 0.001), and HR (Cronbach's α = 0.919; P < 0.001) were reproducible. During CPT, changes in MSNA (Cronbach's α = 0.805; P = 0.008), MAP (Cronbach's α = 0.878; P < 0.001), and HR (Cronbach's α = 0.927; P < 0.001) remained consistent across the three sessions. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that MSNA reactivity to mental stress is consistent within a single laboratory visit and across laboratory sessions conducted on separate days. PMID:26400186

  5. [Ischemic cerebrovascular accidents in childhood].

    PubMed

    Pascual Pascual, S I; Pascual Castroviejo, I; Vélez, A

    1988-04-01

    Authors review 53 children, aged 0 to 14 years, affected with cerebrovascular ischemic strokes. Largest aetiological groups were: a) congenital heart disease, 16 patients; b) arteritis of unknown cause, 11; c) idiopathic arterial occlusion without arteritis images on angiography, 7; d) moyamoya disease, 6; and d) local or systemic infections, 5. The mode of onset was as completed stroke in 72% and stroke in evolution in 24%. After acute stage 17.6% of patients presented other definitive strokes, 11.7% suffered only transient ischemic strokes (TIA), and 4% reversible ischemic neurologic deficits (RIND). Mean follow-up was 4.36 years, 9.8% of patients died, 11.8% recovered completely and 52.9% improved after initial stroke. Poor global evolution was associated with heart disease (p less than 0.05) and with onset of strokes before age 2 (p less than 0.05). Most important sequelae, besides motor impairment, were epilepsy (49%) and mental retardation (50% got less than IQ 80). Late epilepsy was associated with seizures at onset (p less than 0.05). Clinical factors of adverse mental development were: a) seizures at onset, b) late epilepsy and c) stroke before age 2. 66% of cases had two or more arterial lesions in the same or in different arterial trees. Therefore, embolic and arteritic factors probably play an important role in infancy and childhood stroke. PMID:3400936

  6. Cortisol responses to mental stress, exercise, and meals following caffeine intake in men and women

    PubMed Central

    Lovallo, William R.; Farag, Noha H.; Vincent, Andrea S.; Thomas, Terrie L.; Wilson, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    Caffeine elevates cortisol secretion, and caffeine is often consumed in conjunction with exercise or mental stress. The interactions of caffeine and stress on cortisol secretion have not been explored adequately in women. We measured cortisol levels at eight times on days when healthy men and women consumed caffeine (250 mg × 3) and underwent either mental stress or dynamic exercise protocols, followed by a midday meal, in a double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Men and women had similar cortisol levels at the predrug baselines, but they responded differently to mental stress and exercise. The cortisol response to mental stress was smaller in women than in men (p=.003). Caffeine acted in concert with mental stress to further increase cortisol levels (p=.011), the effect was similar in men and women. Exercise alone did not increase cortisol, but caffeine taken before exercise elevated cortisol in both men and women (ps<.05). After a postexercise meal, the women had a larger cortisol response than the men, and this effect was greater after caffeine (p<.01). Cortisol release in response to stress and caffeine therefore appears to be a function of the type of stressor and the sex of the subject. However, repeated caffeine doses increased cortisol levels across the test day without regard to the sex of the subject or type of stressor employed (p<.00001). Caffeine may elevate cortisol by stimulating the central nervous system in men but may interact with peripheral metabolic mechanisms in women. PMID:16631247

  7. Stress trajectories, health behaviors, and the mental health of black and white young adults.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Jason D; Alexander, Kari B

    2011-05-01

    This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to examine the mental health of non-Hispanic black and white young adults in the US. We use latent growth curve modeling to characterize the typical stress trajectories experienced by black and white young adults spanning the bulk of their lives. We identify the following four stress trajectories: 1) relatively stress free; 2) stress peak at age 15 and a subsequent decline; 3) stress peak at age 17 and a subsequent decline; and 4) a moderately high chronic stress. Results indicate that black adolescents have significantly higher risk of being in all three of the stressful classes compared to white adolescents. Stress exposure is strongly associated with depression and the race differences in stress profiles account for a modest amount of the observed race differences in mental health. We do not observe any race differences in behavioral responses to stressors; black youth are no more likely than white youth to engage in poor health behaviors (e.g., smoking, drinking, or obesity) in response to stress. We provide tentative support for the notion that poor health behaviors partially reduce the association between stress and depression for blacks but not whites. These findings contribute to unresolved issues regarding mental and physical health disparities among blacks and whites. PMID:21514025

  8. Stress trajectories, health behaviors, and the mental health of black and white young adults

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Jason D.; Alexander, Kari B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to examine the mental health of non-Hispanic black and white young adults in the US. We use latent growth curve modeling to characterize the typical stress trajectories experienced by black and white young adults spanning the bulk of their lives. We identify the following four stress trajectories: 1) relatively stress free; 2) stress peak at age 15 and a subsequent decline; 3) stress peak at age 17 and a subsequent decline; and 4) a moderately high chronic stress. Results indicate that black adolescents have significantly higher risk of being in all three of the stressful classes compared to white adolescents. Stress exposure is strongly associated with depression and the race differences in stress profiles account for a modest amount of the observed race differences in mental health. We do not observe any race differences in behavioral responses to stressors; black youth are no more likely than white youth to engage in poor health behaviors (e.g., smoking, drinking, or obesity) in response to stress. We provide tentative support for the notion that poor health behaviors partially reduce the association between stress and depression for blacks but not whites. These findings contribute to unresolved issues regarding mental and physical health disparities among blacks and whites. PMID:21514025

  9. Metabolomics analysis reveals insights into biochemical mechanisms of mental stress-induced left ventricular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Stephen H.; Matson, Wayne R.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Samad, Zainab; Williams, Redford B.; Sharma, Swati; Thomas, Beena; Wilson, Jennifer L.; O'Connor, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Mental stress induced left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) has been associated with a greater risk of adverse events in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients independent of conventional risk indicators. The underlying biochemical mechanisms of this cardiovascular condition are poorly understood. Our objective was to use metabolomics technology to identify biochemical changes that co-occur with mental stress-induced LVD in patients with clinically stable CHD. Participants were adult CHD patients who were recruited for mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia screening. For this study, we randomly selected 30 patients representing the extremes of the mental stress-induced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) change distribution; 15 who showed LVD (i.e. LVEF reduction ≥5) and 15 who showed a normal left ventricular response (NLVR; i.e. a LVEF increase of ≥5) to three mental stressors. An electrochemistry based metabolomics platform was used to profile pre- and post-stress serum samples yielding data for 22 known compounds, primarily within the tyrosine, tryptophan, purine and methionine pathways. There were significant stress-induced changes in several compounds. A comparison between the NLVR and LVD groups showed significant effects for kynurenine (p = .036, N-acetylserotonin (p = .054), uric acid (p = .015), tyrosine (p = .019) and a trend for methionine (p = .065); the NLVR group showed a significantly greater stress-induced reduction in all of those compounds compared to the LVD group. Many of these biochemicals have been implicated in other stress-related phenomena and are plausible candidates for mechanisms underlying LVD in response to mental stress. PMID:25983674

  10. The effect of obesity on inflammatory cytokine and leptin production following acute mental stress.

    PubMed

    Caslin, H L; Franco, R L; Crabb, E B; Huang, C J; Bowen, M K; Acevedo, E O

    2016-02-01

    Obesity may contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk by eliciting chronic systemic inflammation and impairing the immune response to additional stressors. There has been little assessment of the effect of obesity on psychological stress, an independent risk factor for CVD. Therefore, it was of interest to examine interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and leptin following an acute mental stress task in nonobese and obese males. Twenty college-aged males (21.3 ± 0.56 years) volunteered to participate in a 20-min Stroop color-word and mirror-tracing task. Subjects were recruited for obese (body mass index: BMI > 30) and nonobese (BMI < 25) groups, and blood samples were collected for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis. The acute mental stress task elicited an increase in heart rate, catecholamines, and IL-1β in all subjects. Additionally, acute mental stress increased cortisol concentrations in the nonobese group. There was a significant reduction in leptin in obese subjects 30 min posttask compared with a decrease in nonobese subjects 120 min posttask. Interestingly, the relationship between the percent change in leptin and IL-1Ra at 120 min posttask in response to an acute mental stress task was only observed in nonobese individuals. This is the first study to suggest that adiposity in males may impact leptin and inflammatory signaling mechanisms following acute mental stress. PMID:26511907

  11. Differential effects of mental concentration and acute psychosocial stress on cervical muscle activity and posture.

    PubMed

    Shahidi, Bahar; Haight, Ashley; Maluf, Katrina

    2013-10-01

    Physical and psychosocial stressors in the workplace have been independently associated with the development of neck pain, yet interactions among these risk factors remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of mentally challenging computer work performed with and without exposure to a psychosocial stressor on cervical muscle activity and posture. Changes in cervical posture and electromyography of upper trapezius, cervical extensor, and sternocleidomastoid muscles were compared between a resting seated posture at baseline, a low stress condition with mental concentration, and a high stress condition with mental concentration and psychosocial stress in sixty healthy office workers. Forward head posture significantly increased with mental concentration compared to baseline, but did not change with further introduction of the stressor. Muscle activity significantly increased from the low stress to high stress condition for both the dominant and non-dominant upper trapezius, with no corresponding change in activity of the cervical extensors or flexors between stress conditions. These findings suggest that upper trapezius muscles are selectively activated by psychosocial stress independent of changes in concentration or posture, which may have implications for the prevention of stress-related trapezius myalgia in the workplace. PMID:23800438

  12. Validating the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Scale with Persons Who Have Severe Mental Illnesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hare, Thomas; Shen, Ce; Sherrer, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Interview data collected from 275 clients with severe mental illnesses are used to test the construct and criterion validity of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Scale (PSS). Method: First, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses are used to test whether the scale reflects the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom…

  13. Race-Related Stress, Racial Identity Attitudes, and Mental Health among Black Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Hollie L.; Cross, William E., Jr.; DeFour, Darlene C.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined whether racial identity attitudes moderate the relationship between racist stress events, racist stress appraisal, and mental health. One hundred eighteen African American and 144 self-identified Caribbean women completed the Cross Racial Identity Scale, the Schedule of Racist Events, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the…

  14. Differential effects of mental concentration and acute psychosocial stress on cervical muscle activity and posture

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi, Bahar; Haight, Ashley; Maluf, Katrina

    2013-01-01

    Physical and psychosocial stressors in the workplace have been independently associated with the development of neck pain, yet interactions among these risk factors remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of mentally challenging computer work performed with and without exposure to a psychosocial stressor on cervical muscle activity and posture. Changes in cervical posture and electromyography of upper trapezius, cervical extensor, and sternocleidomastoid muscles were compared between a resting seated posture at baseline, a low stress condition with mental concentration, and a high stress condition with mental concentration and psychosocial stress in sixty healthy office workers. Forward head posture significantly increased with mental concentration compared to baseline, but did not change with further introduction of the stressor. Muscle activity significantly increased from the low stress to high stress condition for both the dominant and non-dominant upper trapezius, with no corresponding change in activity of the cervical extensors or flexors between stress conditions. These findings suggest that upper trapezius muscles are selectively activated by psychosocial stress independent of changes in concentration or posture, which may have implications for the prevention of stress-related trapezius myalgia in the workplace. PMID:23800438

  15. Occupational Stress and the Mental and Physical Health of Factory Workers. Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, James S.

    A study assessed the relation of potentially stressful objective job characteristics and perceived psychosocial job stress and the relation of both of these to a variety of indicators of physical and mental health. The study also determined whether any of these relationships were conditioned by a variety of individual characteristics (age,…

  16. The Relationship between Mental Health, Acculturative Stress, and Academic Performance in a Latino Middle School Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albeg, Loren J.; Castro-Olivo, Sara M.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between acculturative stress, symptoms of internalizing mental health problems, and academic performance in a sample of 94 Latino middle school students. Students reported on symptoms indicative of depression and anxiety related problems and acculturative stress. Teachers reported on students' academic…

  17. Operational Stress and Correlates of Mental Health Among Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Webb-Murphy, Jennifer A; De La Rosa, Gabriel M; Schmitz, Kimberly J; Vishnyak, Elizabeth J; Raducha, Stephanie C; Roesch, Scott C; Johnston, Scott L

    2015-12-01

    Military personnel deployed to Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay (JTF-GTMO) faced numerous occupational stressors. As part of a program evaluation, personnel working at JTF-GTMO completed several validated self-report measures. Personnel were at the beginning, middle, or end of their deployment phase. This study presents data regarding symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, alcohol abuse, depression, and resilience among 498 U.S. military personnel deployed to JTF-GTMO in 2009. We also investigated individual and organizational correlates of mental health among these personnel. Findings indicated that tenure at JTF-GTMO was positively related to adverse mental health outcomes. Regression models including these variables had R2 values ranging from .02 to .11. Occupation at JTF-GTMO also related to mental health such that guards reported poorer mental health than medical staff. Reluctance to seek out mental health care was also related to mental health outcomes. Those who reported being most reluctant to seek out care tended to report poorer mental health than those who were more willing to seek out care. Results suggested that the JTF-GTMO deployment was associated with significant psychological stress, and that both job-related and attitude-related variables were important to understanding mental health symptoms in this sample. PMID:26595460

  18. The impact of cardiac perception on emotion experience and cognitive performance under mental stress.

    PubMed

    Kindermann, Nicole K; Werner, Natalie S

    2014-12-01

    Mental stress evokes several physiological responses such as the acceleration of heart rate, increase of electrodermal activity and the release of adrenaline. Moreover, physiological stress responses interact with emotional and behavioral stress responses. In the present study we provide evidence that viscero-sensory feedback from the heart (cardiac perception) is an important factor modulating emotional and cognitive stress responses. In our study, we compared participants with high versus low cardiac perception using a computerized mental stress task, in which they had to respond to rapidly presented visual and acoustic stimuli. Additionally, we assessed physiological responses (heart rate, skin conductance). Participants high in cardiac perception reported more negative emotions and showed worse task performance under the stressor than participants low in cardiac perception. These results were not moderated by physiological responses. We conclude that cardiac perception modulates stress responses by intensifying negative emotions and by impairing cognitive performance. PMID:24719221

  19. Pathophysiology and time course of silent myocardial ischaemia during mental stress: clinical, anatomical, and physiological correlates.

    PubMed Central

    Legault, S. E.; Freeman, M. R.; Langer, A.; Armstrong, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To define the prevalence and pathophysiology of myocardial ischaemia induced by mental stress in patients with coronary artery disease and exercise inducible ischaemia, and to determine the correlation between the severity of coronary artery disease and ischaemia induced by speech. DESIGN--Prospective cohort study. SETTING--Tertiary care academic institution. PATIENTS AND PROTOCOL--47 patients with coronary artery disease and 20 normal controls were studied using standardised exercise and mental stress. The ambulatory nuclear vest provided continuous measures of left ventricular ejection fraction and relative volume changes: an ischaemic response to mental stress was defined as a decrease in ejection fraction of > or = 5% for > or = 60 s. Severity of coronary artery disease was assessed by the extent of thallium reversibility on exercise testing and the severity of angiographic disease. RESULTS--23 (49%) of 47 patients with coronary artery disease had an ischaemic response to mental stress which occurred early, was sustained throughout the task and associated with an increase in end systolic volume. In contrast, the pattern of left ventricular response in the remaining 24 patients (51%) resembled that in the normal controls. Patients with mental stress induced ischaemia tended to have greater severity of coronary disease (mean (SD) total number of diseased vessels 1.9 (0.8) v 1.4 (0.9), P = 0.07), more frequent exercise induced angina (17/23 v 7/24, P = 0.003) and lower increases in heart rate (36 (11) v 49 (23) beats per min, P = 0.023) and systolic blood pressure (32 (19) v 45 (18) mm Hg, P = 0.03) during exercise. Left ventricular responses to speech and exercise were compared in the 23 patients with mental stress induced ischaemia: mental stress was associated with a greater decrease in ejection fraction at comparable increases in rate pressure product (-6.5 (6.3)% v 4.7 (11.2)%, P = 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS--These findings suggest that mental stress

  20. Coping with stress: a physician's guide to mental health in aging.

    PubMed

    Solomon, R

    1996-07-01

    The mental and emotional health of people of all ages is related to how well they cope with or adapt to the stresses and changes in their lives. Although risks to health do increase with advancing age, stress is not an inevitable consequence of old age. However, two transitional stressors that are more common with increased age are the onset of illness and/or physical impairment and the death of loved ones. As recently as 1987, less than 1.5% of community-based mental health care went to persons over age 65. The elderly consistently report that when they do seek help with emotional problems, they first consult with their primary care physicians. Therefore, these physicians need to be knowledgeable about mental health in aging and familiar with mental health services their patients could use. PMID:8675047

  1. Depressive Symptoms Are Associated with Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jingkai; Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit J.; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon A.; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Depression is an adverse prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (MI), and an increased propensity toward emotionally-driven myocardial ischemia may play a role. We aimed to examine the association between depressive symptoms and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in young survivors of an MI. Methods We studied 98 patients (49 women and 49 men) age 38–60 years who were hospitalized for acute MI in the previous 6 months. Patients underwent myocardial perfusion imaging at rest, after mental stress (speech task), and after exercise or pharmacological stress. A summed difference score (SDS), obtained with observer-independent software, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used to measure depressive symptoms, which were analyzed as overall score, and as separate somatic and cognitive depressive symptom scores. Results There was a significant positive association between depressive symptoms and SDS with mental stress, denoting more ischemia. After adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors, disease severity and medications, each incremental depressive symptom was associated with 0.14 points higher SDS. When somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms were examined separately, both somatic [β = 0.17, 95% CI: (0.04, 0.30), p = 0.01] and cognitive symptoms [β = 0.31, 95% CI: (0.07, 0.56), p = 0.01] were significantly associated with mental stress-induced ischemia. Depressive symptoms were not associated with ischemia induced by exercise or pharmacological stress. Conclusion Among young post-MI patients, higher levels of both cognitive and somatic depressive symptoms are associated with a higher propensity to develop myocardial ischemia with mental stress, but not with physical (exercise or pharmacological) stress. PMID:25061993

  2. Hemodynamic response patterns to mental stress: diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Rüddel, H; Langewitz, W; Schächinger, H; Schmieder, R; Schulte, W

    1988-08-01

    Stress has been identified as contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease. The pathophysiologic link between stress and disease still remains unclear. Because experimental stress testing in the laboratory permits the examination of the underlying mechanism for stress-induced blood pressure, analyses of cardiovascular reactivity during emotional stress could be of particular clinical importance. The analyses of pooled data during the past 6 years (n = 298, age from 20 to 60 years, normotensive subjects as well as patients with borderline and mild essential hypertension) reveal that stress-induced changes in stroke volume and especially in total peripheral resistance are crucial parameters to analyze the hemodynamic stress response. However, neither those simple nor complex response patterns such as "hot reactor" describe clinically distinct subgroups of persons. When physiologic testing was repeated in hypertensive patients after effective long-term antihypertensive therapy with clonidine, oxprenolol, nitrendipine, or enalapril, no attenuation of the stress-induced increase in blood pressure was found in any of these groups. However, heart rate reactivity and stress-induced changes in total peripheral resistance were altered significantly by oxprenolol and nitrendipine. The beta-adrenoceptor blocker decreased heart rate reactivity and increased reactivity of peripheral resistance; the calcium antagonist decreased stress-induced changes in peripheral resistance and increased the heart rate response. The centrally acting sympatholytic regimen and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor had no impact on the hemodynamic response pattern during emotional challenge. PMID:3394640

  3. Cognitive trait anxiety, situational stress, and mental effort predict shifting efficiency: Implications for attentional control theory.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Elizabeth J; Edwards, Mark S; Lyvers, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Attentional control theory (ACT) predicts that trait anxiety and situational stress interact to impair performance on tasks that involve attentional shifting. The theory suggests that anxious individuals recruit additional effort to prevent shortfalls in performance effectiveness (accuracy), with deficits becoming evident in processing efficiency (the relationship between accuracy and time taken to perform the task). These assumptions, however, have not been systematically tested. The relationship between cognitive trait anxiety, situational stress, and mental effort in a shifting task (Wisconsin Card Sorting Task) was investigated in 90 participants. Cognitive trait anxiety was operationalized using questionnaire scores, situational stress was manipulated through ego threat instructions, and mental effort was measured using a visual analogue scale. Dependent variables were performance effectiveness (an inverse proportion of perseverative errors) and processing efficiency (an inverse proportion of perseverative errors divided by response time on perseverative error trials). The predictors were not associated with performance effectiveness; however, we observed a significant 3-way interaction on processing efficiency. At higher mental effort (+1 SD), higher cognitive trait anxiety was associated with poorer efficiency independently of situational stress, whereas at lower effort (-1 SD), this relationship was highly significant and most pronounced for those in the high-stress condition. These results are important because they provide the first systematic test of the relationship between trait anxiety, situational stress, and mental effort on shifting performance. The data are also consistent with the notion that effort moderates the relationship between anxiety and shifting efficiency, but not effectiveness. PMID:25642722

  4. Cardiorespiratory Dynamic Response to Mental Stress: A Multivariate Time-Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Orini, Michele; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Mental stress is a growing problem in our society. In order to deal with this, it is important to understand the underlying stress mechanisms. In this study, we aim to determine how the cardiorespiratory interactions are affected by mental arithmetic stress and attention. We conduct cross time-frequency (TF) analyses to assess the cardiorespiratory coupling. In addition, we introduce partial TF spectra to separate variations in the RR interval series that are linearly related to respiration from RR interval variations (RRV) that are not related to respiration. The performance of partial spectra is evaluated in two simulation studies. Time-varying parameters, such as instantaneous powers and frequencies, are derived from the computed spectra. Statistical analysis is carried out continuously in time to evaluate the dynamic response to mental stress and attention. The results show an increased heart and respiratory rate during stress and attention, compared to a resting condition. Also a fast reduction in vagal activity is noted. The partial TF analysis reveals a faster reduction of RRV power related to (3 s) than unrelated to (30 s) respiration, demonstrating that the autonomic response to mental stress is driven by mechanisms characterized by different temporal scales. PMID:24386006

  5. Differential changes in platelet reactivity induced by acute physical compared to persistent mental stress.

    PubMed

    Hüfner, Katharina; Koudouovoh-Tripp, Pia; Kandler, Christina; Hochstrasser, Tanja; Malik, Peter; Giesinger, Johannes; Semenitz, Barbara; Humpel, Christian; Sperner-Unterweger, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Platelets are important in hemostasis, but also contain adhesion molecules, pro-inflammatory and immune-modulatory compounds, as well as most of the serotonin outside the central nervous system. Dysbalance in the serotonin pathways is involved in the pathogenesis of depressive symptoms. Thus, changes in platelet aggregation and content of bioactive compounds are of interest when investigating physiological stress-related mental processes as well as stress-related psychiatric diseases such as depression. In the present study, a characterization of platelet reactivity in acute physical and persistent mental stress was performed (aggregation, serotonin and serotonin 2A-receptor, P-selectin, CD40 ligand, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and -9), platelet/endothelial adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), β-thromboglobulin (β-TG) and platelet factor 4 (PF-4). Acute physical stress increased platelet aggregability while leaving platelet content of bioactive compounds unchanged. Persistent mental stress led to changes in platelet content of bioactive compounds and serotonin 2A-receptor only. The values of most bioactive compounds correlated with each other. Acute physical and persistent mental stress influences platelets through distinct pathways, leading to differential changes in aggregability and content of bioactive compounds. PMID:26192713

  6. Stress at work and mental health status among female hospital workers.

    PubMed Central

    Estryn-Behar, M; Kaminski, M; Peigne, E; Bonnet, N; Vaichere, E; Gozlan, C; Azoulay, S; Giorgi, M

    1990-01-01

    Relations between working conditions and mental health status of female hospital workers were studied in a sample of 1505 women: 43% were nurses, 32% auxiliaries, and 7% ancillary staff; 13% were other qualified health care staff, mainly head nurses; 5% had occupations other than direct health care; 63% worked on the morning, 20% on the afternoon, and 17% on the night shift. Data were collected at the annual routine medical visit by the occupational health practitioner, using self administered questionnaires and clinical assessments. Five health indicators were considered: a high score to the general health questionnaire (GHQ); fatigue; sleep impairment; use of antidepressants, sleeping pills, or sedatives; and diagnosis of psychiatric morbidity at clinical assessment. Four indices of stress at work were defined: job stress, mental load, insufficiency in internal training and discussion, and strain caused by schedule. The analysis was conducted by multiple logistic regression, controlling for type of occupation, shift, number of years of work in hospital, daily travel time to work, age, marital status, number of children, and wish to move house. Sleep impairment was mostly linked to shift and strain due to schedule. For all other indicators of mental health impairment and especially high GHQ scores, the adjusted odds ratios increased significantly with the levels of job stress, mental load, and strain due to schedule. This evidence of association between work involving an excessive cumulation of stress factors and mental wellbeing should be considered in interventions aimed at improving the working conditions of hospital workers. PMID:2310704

  7. Comparison of myocardial ischemia during intense mental stress using flight simulation in airline pilots with coronary artery disease to that produced with conventional mental and treadmill exercise stress testing.

    PubMed

    Doorey, Andrew; Denenberg, Barry; Sagar, Vidya; Hanna, Tracy; Newman, Jack; Stone, Peter H

    2011-09-01

    Mental stress increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although laboratory mental stress often causes less myocardial ischemia than exercise stress (ES), it is unclear whether mental stress is intrinsically different or differences are due to less hemodynamic stress with mental stress. We sought to evaluate the hemodynamic and ischemic response to intense realistic mental stress created by modern flight simulators and compare this response to that of exercise treadmill testing and conventional laboratory mental stress (CMS) testing in pilots with coronary disease. Sixteen airline pilots with angiographically documented coronary disease and documented myocardial ischemia during ES were studied using maximal treadmill ES, CMS, and aviation mental stress (AMS) testing. AMS testing was done in a sophisticated simulator using multiple system failures as stressors. Treadmill ES testing resulted in the highest heart rate, but AMS caused a higher blood pressure response than CMS. Maximal rate-pressure product was not significantly different between ES and AMS (25,646 vs 23,347, p = 0.08), although these were higher than CMS (16,336, p <0.0001). Despite similar hemodynamic stress induced by ES and AMS, AMS resulted in significantly less ST-segment depression and nuclear ischemia than ES. Differences in induction of ischemia by mental stress compared to ES do not appear to be due to the creation of less hemodynamic stress. In conclusion, even with equivalent hemodynamic stress, intense realistic mental stress induced by flight simulators results in significantly less myocardial ischemia than ES as measured by ST-segment depression and nuclear ischemia. PMID:21723529

  8. PET in Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Powers, William J.; Zazulia, Allyson R.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Investigation of the interplay between the cerebral circulation and brain cellular function is fundamental to understanding both the pathophysiology and treatment of stroke. Currently, PET is the only technique that provides accurate, quantitative in vivo regional measurements of both cerebral circulation and cellular metabolism in human subjects. We review normal human cerebral blood flow and metabolism and human PET studies of ischemic stroke, carotid artery disease, vascular dementia, intracerebral hemorrhage and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and discuss how these studies have added to our understanding of the pathophysiology of human cerebrovascular disease. PMID:20543975

  9. Role of Stress in the Prognosis of Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clum, George A.

    1976-01-01

    Stress has been hypothesized to be both a negative and a positive prognostic factor. Stress was examined in relation to total symptomatology as rated by the patient and a significant other and to five symptom factors. This was accomplished at the time a patient was hospitalized and one year subsequently. (Author)

  10. [Approach to easing occupational stress for high-stress workers: applying the brief job stress questionnaire to workplace mental health promotion].

    PubMed

    Hase, Yoko; Hori, Hiroko; Nakayasu, Ikuyo; Matsushita, Yuko; Inagaki, Michiko; Unno, Aiko; Nishigaya, Eri; Nishijima, Chiharu; Enta, Kazuhiko; Sashihara, Shunsuke

    2008-07-01

    We investigated job stress among 442 employees from 19 divisions in a Japanese company using the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire. Job stress of the employees was estimated by the score for total health risk. Among the 19 divisions, two divisions showed over 120 points of mean total health risk score. Intervention with a stress-reduction program was carried out in these 2 divisions. First, to assess the job stress, health care staff interviewed all workers in the 2 divisions. Second, the results of the interviews were reported to the divisions' managers. Third, the managers applied the best remedy for job stress in their workplaces. In addition, occupational health staff conducted mental health education as well as individual interviews for the workers from the 2 divisions. At reevaluation one year later, both divisions showed a decreased general health risk (under 120 points). No sick leaves for depression occurred within the 2 divisions during the intervention. The results of the present study suggest that the intervention was effective in easing occupational stress for high-stress workers. The stress reduction program also seemed to have helped managers to change their recognition of occupational mental health and enabled close cooperation with occupational health staff, which may improve mental health in the workplace. PMID:18566525

  11. Worker's Compensation: Will College and University Professors Be Compensated for Mental Injuries Caused by Work-Related Stress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasty, Keith N.

    1991-01-01

    The extent to which college faculty may recover compensation for debilitating mental illness resulting from stressful work-related activities is discussed. General requirements for worker's compensation claims, compensability of stress-related mental and physical illnesses, applicability of these standards to college faculty, and the current state…

  12. Evaluation of mental stress by physiological indices derived from finger plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantitative evaluation of mental stress is important to prevent stress-related disorders. Finger plethysmography (FPG) is a simple noninvasive method to monitor peripheral circulation, and provides many physiological indices. Our purpose is to investigate how FPG-derived indices reflect on mental stress, and to clarify any association between these physiological indices and subjective indices of mental stress. Methods Thirty-one healthy women (mean age, 22 years ± 2) participated. The participants rested by sitting on a chair for 10 min. They then performed a computerized version of the Stroop color-word conflict test (CWT) for 10 min. Finally, they rested for 10 min. FPG was recorded throughout the experiment. The participants completed a brief form of the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire before and after the test. Using the FPG data, we conducted chaos analysis and fast Fourier transform analysis, and calculated chaotic attractors, the largest Lyapunov exponent, a high-frequency (HF) component, a low-to-high-frequency (LF/HF) ratio, finger pulse rate and finger pulse wave amplitude. Results The HF component decreased and the LF/HF ratio increased significantly during the test (P < 0.01), while the confusion subscale of POMS increased after the test (P < 0.05). During testing, finger pulse rate significantly increased (P < 0.001), and the finger pulse wave amplitude decreased (P < 0.001). The attractor size reduced during testing and returned to a baseline level afterwards. Although the largest Lyapunov exponent showed no significant change during testing, significant negative correlation with the tension-anxiety subscale of POMS was observed at the beginning (P < 0.01). A significant negative correlation between the LF/HF ratio and two subscales was also observed in the beginning and middle of the test (P < 0.05). There were no correlations during the rest periods. Conclusions The physiological indices derived from FPG were changed by

  13. Mental stress as a provocative test in patients with various clinical syndromes of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Specchia, G; Falcone, C; Traversi, E; La Rovere, M T; Guasti, L; De Micheli, G; Ardissino, D; De Servi, S

    1991-04-01

    To assess the prevalence of mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia and investigate the pathogenetic mechanisms by which emotional stress may induce myocardial ischemia, we studied 372 patients with angina pectoris who underwent mental arithmetic and exercise stress testings. Hyperventilation tests were also performed in 176 patients, and 340 patients underwent coronary arteriography. Sixty-one patients showed significant ST segment abnormalities during mental arithmetic and exercise stress testings (group 1). Two hundred eleven patients had negative responses to mental stress but positive exercise tests (group 2), whereas both tests were negative in 100 patients (group 3). Mental stress induced significant increases in heart rate and systolic blood pressure in the three groups of patients; however, group 1 patients had higher increases in rate-pressure product (mm Hg x beats/min) than group 2 and group 3 patients (14,909 +/- 3,894 versus 12,985 +/- 2,900 versus 12,724 +/- 4,400 mm Hg x beats/min, p less than 0.01). Group 1 patients had shorter exercise durations than group 2 or group 3 (4.06 +/- 1.55 versus 7.65 +/- 3.07 versus 13.9 +/- 5.31 minutes, p less than 0.01), although rate-pressure products at peak exercise were similar in groups 1 and 2 (20,277 +/- 6,058 versus 20,768 +/- 3,864, p = NS) and significantly higher in group 3 (26,221 +/- 7,100/mm Hg x beats/min, p less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2009619

  14. Incorporating Children's Lives into a Life Course Perspective on Stress and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avison, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging themes in demography, developmental medicine, and psychiatry suggest that a comprehensive understanding of mental health across the life course requires that we incorporate the lives of children into our research. If we can learn more about the ways in which the stress process unfolds for children, we will gain important insights into the…

  15. Interventions for Secondary Traumatic Stress with Mental Health Workers: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bercier, Melissa L.; Maynard, Brandy R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A systematic review was conducted to examine effects of indicated interventions to reduce symptoms of secondary traumatic stress (STS) experienced by mental health workers. Method: Systematic review methods were employed to search, retrieve, select, and analyze studies that met study inclusion criteria. Results: Over 4,000 citations…

  16. Impact of Play Therapy on Parent-Child Relationship Stress at a Mental Health Training Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Dee C.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of Child-Centred Play Therapy (CCPT)/Non-Directive Play Therapy on parent-child relationship stress using archival data from 202 child clients divided into clinical behavioural groups over 3-74 sessions in a mental health training setting. Results demonstrated significant differences between pre and post testing…

  17. The Impact of Minority Stress on Mental Health and Substance Use among Sexual Minority Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehavot, Keren; Simoni, Jane M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We examined the direct and indirect impact of minority stress on mental health and substance use among sexual minority women. Method: A combination of snowball and targeted sampling strategies was used to recruit lesbian and bisexual women (N = 1,381) for a cross-sectional, online survey. Participants (M age = 33.54 years; 74% White)…

  18. Effects of Goal-Striving Stress on the Mental Health of Black Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Sherrill L.; Neighbors, Harold W.

    2008-01-01

    Although many scholars have theorized about how responding to the stress of blocked opportunities can affect the well-being of black Americans, few scholars have empirically examined the relationships between striving efforts, personal goals, and mental health among black Americans. This investigation examines the relationship between…

  19. Biosignal Analysis to Assess Mental Stress in Automatic Driving of Trucks: Palmar Perspiration and Masseter Electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rencheng; Yamabe, Shigeyuki; Nakano, Kimihiko; Suda, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays insight into human-machine interaction is a critical topic with the large-scale development of intelligent vehicles. Biosignal analysis can provide a deeper understanding of driver behaviors that may indicate rationally practical use of the automatic technology. Therefore, this study concentrates on biosignal analysis to quantitatively evaluate mental stress of drivers during automatic driving of trucks, with vehicles set at a closed gap distance apart to reduce air resistance to save energy consumption. By application of two wearable sensor systems, a continuous measurement was realized for palmar perspiration and masseter electromyography, and a biosignal processing method was proposed to assess mental stress levels. In a driving simulator experiment, ten participants completed automatic driving with 4, 8, and 12 m gap distances from the preceding vehicle, and manual driving with about 25 m gap distance as a reference. It was found that mental stress significantly increased when the gap distances decreased, and an abrupt increase in mental stress of drivers was also observed accompanying a sudden change of the gap distance during automatic driving, which corresponded to significantly higher ride discomfort according to subjective reports. PMID:25738768

  20. Stress and Mental Health of Graduate Students and Non-Graduates by Age and Educational Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Franklin R.; Heinen, James R. K.

    A 1959 survey of 11 research studies involving mental health of United States citizenry showed that 9% of practicing teachers were seriously maladjusted, 17% were unusually nervous, and 25% were unhappy, worried and dissatisfied. This study sought to update these findings by examining various stress factors and their relationship to the mental…

  1. Biosignal analysis to assess mental stress in automatic driving of trucks: palmar perspiration and masseter electromyography.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Rencheng; Yamabe, Shigeyuki; Nakano, Kimihiko; Suda, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays insight into human-machine interaction is a critical topic with the large-scale development of intelligent vehicles. Biosignal analysis can provide a deeper understanding of driver behaviors that may indicate rationally practical use of the automatic technology. Therefore, this study concentrates on biosignal analysis to quantitatively evaluate mental stress of drivers during automatic driving of trucks, with vehicles set at a closed gap distance apart to reduce air resistance to save energy consumption. By application of two wearable sensor systems, a continuous measurement was realized for palmar perspiration and masseter electromyography, and a biosignal processing method was proposed to assess mental stress levels. In a driving simulator experiment, ten participants completed automatic driving with 4, 8, and 12 m gap distances from the preceding vehicle, and manual driving with about 25 m gap distance as a reference. It was found that mental stress significantly increased when the gap distances decreased, and an abrupt increase in mental stress of drivers was also observed accompanying a sudden change of the gap distance during automatic driving, which corresponded to significantly higher ride discomfort according to subjective reports. PMID:25738768

  2. Stress and Mental Health Among Midlife and Older Gay-Identified Men

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Allen J.; de Vries, Brian; Detels, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated associations between stress and mental health (positive affect, depressive symptoms) among HIV-negative and HIV-positive midlife and older gay-identified men, along with the mediating and moderating effects of mastery and emotional support. We also studied the mental health effects of same-sex marriage. Methods. We obtained data from self-administered questionnaires completed in 2009 or 2010 by a subsample (n = 202; average age = 56.91 years; age range = 44–75 years) of participants in the University of California, Los Angeles component of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, one of the largest and longest-running natural-history studies of HIV/AIDS in the United States. Results. Both sexual minority stress (perceived gay-related stigma, excessive HIV bereavements) and aging-related stress (independence and fiscal concerns) appeared to have been detrimental to mental health. Sense of mastery partially mediated these associations. Being legally married was significantly protective net of all covariates, including having a domestic partner but not being married. Education, HIV status, and race/ethnicity had no significant effects. Conclusions. Sexual minority and aging-related stress significantly affected the emotional lives of these men. Personal sense of mastery may help to sustain them as they age. We observed specific mental health benefits of same-sex legal marriage. PMID:22390515

  3. Current Levels of Perceived Stress among Mental Health Social Workers Who Work with Suicidal Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ting, Laura; Jacobson, Jodi M.; Sanders, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Mental health social workers are at increased risk of being confronted with fatal and nonfatal client suicidal behavior (CSB). Research has documented personal and professional reactions to CSB; however, empirical evidence describing the potential long-term effects is scarce. This study examined current reactions of perceived stress and continual…

  4. [Mental stress of immigrant patients and the family practice].

    PubMed

    Koch, E; Müller, M J

    2007-10-18

    People of non-German background still have difficulties obtaining adequate access to the German health care system. Reasons include communication barriers, differences in the concept of disease and low level of education in addition to a frequently difficult social situation and immigration-related stress factors. The majority of the patients consult the family physician first. Taking into consideration the different cultural concepts of disease and immigration-specific stress factors opens new therapeutic options and expands the intercultural competence of the treating physician. PMID:17987716

  5. Telomeres, Early-Life Stress and Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Ridout, Samuel J.; Ridout, Kathryn K.; Kao, Hung-Teh; Carpenter, Linda L.; Philip, Noah S.; Tyrka, Audrey R.; Price, Lawrence H.

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are structures of tandem TTAGGG repeats at the ends of chromosomes which preserve the encoding DNA by serving as a disposable brake to terminate DNA duplication during chromosome replication. In this process, the telomere itself shortens with each cell division, and can consequently be thought of as a cellular “clock” reflecting the age of a cell and the time until senescence. Telomere shortening, and changes in levels of telomerase, the enzyme that maintains telomeres, occur in the context of certain somatic diseases and in response to selected physical stressors. Emerging evidence indicates that telomeres shorten with exposure to psychosocial stress (including early-life stress [ELS]), and perhaps in association with some psychiatric disorders. These discoveries suggest that telomere shortening might be a useful biomarker for the overall stress response of an organism to various pathogenic conditions. In this regard, telomeres and their response to both somatic and psychiatric illness could serve as a unifying biomarker of stress response that crosses the brain/body distinction often made in medicine. Prospective studies will help to clarify whether this biomarker has broad utility in psychiatry and medicine in the evaluation of responses to psychosocial stressors. The possibility that telomere shortening can be slowed or reversed by psychiatric and psychosocial interventions could represent an opportunity for developing novel preventative and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25832516

  6. Other cerebrovascular occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Erica C S; Schaefer, Pamela W; Singhal, Aneesh B

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we review the optimal imaging modalities for subacute and chronic stroke. We discuss the utility of computed tomography (CT) and multimodal CT imaging. Further, we analyze the importance of specific magnetic resonance imaging sequences, such as diffusion-weighted imaging for acute ischemic stroke, T2/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery for subacute and chronic stroke, and susceptibility imaging for detection of intracranial hemorrhages. Different ischemic stroke mechanisms are reviewed, and how these imaging modalities may aid in the determination of such. Further, we analyze how topographic patterns in ischemic stroke may provide important clues to the diagnosis, in addition to the temporal evolution of the stroke. Lastly, specific cerebrovascular occlusive diseases are reviewed, with emphasis on the optimal imaging modalities and their findings in each condition. PMID:27432673

  7. Autonomic and muscular responses and recovery to one-hour laboratory mental stress in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Kristian B; Sand, Trond; Stovner, Lars J; Leistad, Rune B; Westgaard, Rolf H

    2007-01-01

    Background Stress is a risk factor for musculoskeletal pain. We wanted to explore stress related physiology in healthy subjects in order to gain insight into mechanisms of pain development which may relate to the pathophysiology of musculoskeletal pain disorders. Methods Continuous blood pressure, heart rate, finger skin blood flow, respiration, surface electromyography together with perception of pain, fatigue and tension were recorded on 35 healthy women and 9 healthy men before, during a 60 minute period with task-related low-grade mental stress, and in the following 30 minute rest period. Results Subjects responded physiologically to the stressful task with an increase in trapezius and frontalis muscle activity, increased blood pressure, respiration frequency and heart rate together with reduced finger skin blood flow. The blood pressure response and the finger skin blood flow response did not recover to baseline values during the 30-minute rest period, whereas respiration frequency, heart rate, and surface electromyography of the trapezius and frontalis muscles recovered to baseline within 10 minutes after the stressful task. Sixty-eight percent responded subjectively with pain development and 64% reported at least 30% increase in pain. Reduced recovery of the blood pressure was weakly correlated to fatigue development during stress, but was not correlated to pain or tension. Conclusion Based on a lack of recovery of the blood pressure and the acral finger skin blood flow response to mental stress we conclude that these responses are more protracted than other physiological stress responses. PMID:17697337

  8. Culture, stress and recovery from schizophrenia: lessons from the field for global mental health.

    PubMed

    Myers, Neely Laurenzo

    2010-09-01

    This cultural case study investigates one U.S. psychosocial rehabilitation organization's (Horizons) attempt to implement the recovery philosophy of the U.S. Recovery Movement and offers lessons from this local attempt that may inform global mental health care reform. Horizons' "recovery-oriented" initiatives unwittingly mobilized stressful North American discourses of valued citizenship. At times, efforts to "empower" people diagnosed with schizophrenia to become esteemed self-made citizens generated more stressful sociocultural conditions for people whose daily lives were typically remarkably stressful. A recovery-oriented mental health system must account for people diagnosed with schizophrenia's sensitivity to stress and offer consumers contextually relevant coping mechanisms. Any attempt to export U.S. mental health care practices to the rest of the world must acknowledge that (1) sociocultural conditions affect schizophrenia outcomes; (2) schizophrenia outcomes are already better in the developing world than in the United States; and (3) much of what leads to "better" outcomes in the developing world may rely on the availability of locally relevant techniques to address stress. PMID:20571905

  9. Culture, Stress and Recovery from Schizophrenia: Lessons from the Field for Global Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This cultural case study investigates one U.S. psychosocial rehabilitation organization’s (Horizons) attempt to implement the recovery philosophy of the U.S. Recovery Movement and offers lessons from this local attempt that may inform global mental health care reform. Horizons’ “recovery-oriented” initiatives unwittingly mobilized stressful North American discourses of valued citizenship. At times, efforts to “empower” people diagnosed with schizophrenia to become esteemed self-made citizens generated more stressful sociocultural conditions for people whose daily lives were typically remarkably stressful. A recovery-oriented mental health system must account for people diagnosed with schizophrenia’s sensitivity to stress and offer consumers contextually relevant coping mechanisms. Any attempt to export U.S. mental health care practices to the rest of the world must acknowledge that (1) sociocultural conditions affect schizophrenia outcomes; (2) schizophrenia outcomes are already better in the developing world than in the United States; and (3) much of what leads to “better” outcomes in the developing world may rely on the availability of locally relevant techniques to address stress. PMID:20571905

  10. Women's mental health nursing: depression, anxiety and stress during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Parcells, D A

    2010-11-01

    Depression affects more women than men, with a preponderance of cases occurring during prime childbearing years (15-44 years of age). Research shows newborns and infants exposed to maternal antepartum depression, anxiety and stress exhibit pronounced neurobiobehavioral dysregularities. The present study investigated the relationship between maternal psychosocial and biochemical profiles during the antepartum period. Participants were recruited from prenatal registration at a large metropolitan hospital in the southeastern USA--the sample consisted of 59 pregnant women (mean age = 22 years). Structured clinical interviews and maternal self-report were utilized to assess maternal psychosocial distress at mid- (26-28 weeks) and late- (32-34 weeks) gestation. Salivary cortisol levels served as an objective stress measure. The resultant high incidences of maternal depression, anxiety and stress provide evidence of the need for nurses to closely monitor psychosocial and biochemical profiles of all women to thwart the negative effects on the developing human foetus. Clinical nursing implications of the requisite consideration of antepartum maternal psychosocial conditions are discussed. PMID:21040227

  11. Effects of a Stress-Management Program for Inpatients With Mental Disorders: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee; Ignacio, Jeanette; He, Hong-Gu; Lau, Ying; Ngooi, Bi Xia; Koh, Soo Quee David

    2016-03-01

    Stress-management interventions have been integrated into treatments for people with mental disorders. Nevertheless, most studies on these interventions have been conducted on patients with schizophrenia in Western countries, and limited studies have used objective measurements of stress. We developed a group-based, four-session stress-management (S-Manage) program for people with mental disorders, consisting of two major components: psychoeducation and relaxation practice. This single-group, pretest-posttest, quasi-experimental study was undertaken to test the initial effects and determine the effect sizes of the program. A convenience sample of 55 inpatients were recruited from a mental health ward at a tertiary hospital in Singapore. Self-report questionnaires and physiological measures of stress (skin temperature and salivary immunoglobulin A [SIgA]) were used for data collection. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and repeated-measures analysis of variance. Most participants were Singaporean, female, single, and employed. Diagnoses included schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorder, and mixed diagnoses. All received standard care provided by the hospital. Participants had significant reductions in objective stress, measured by skin temperature (effect size = 0.54) and SIgA (effect size = 0.16), and subjective stress (effect size = 0.16) as well as improved psychological health (effect size = 0.40) in response to the intervention. This study provides preliminary evidence to support the positive effects of the S-Manage program on people with mental disorders. Future studies should further test the efficacy of the program using more rigorous methods such as randomized controlled trial and multicenter study. PMID:26183182

  12. Intermittent hypoxia training protects cerebrovascular function in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Manukhina, Eugenia B; Downey, H Fred; Shi, Xiangrong; Mallet, Robert T

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of death and disability among older adults. Modifiable vascular risk factors for AD (VRF) include obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, and metabolic syndrome. Here, interactions between cerebrovascular function and development of AD are reviewed, as are interventions to improve cerebral blood flow and reduce VRF. Atherosclerosis and small vessel cerebral disease impair metabolic regulation of cerebral blood flow and, along with microvascular rarefaction and altered trans-capillary exchange, create conditions favoring AD development. Although currently there are no definitive therapies for treatment or prevention of AD, reduction of VRFs lowers the risk for cognitive decline. There is increasing evidence that brief repeated exposures to moderate hypoxia, i.e. intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), improve cerebral vascular function and reduce VRFs including systemic hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, and mental stress. In experimental AD, IHT nearly prevented endothelial dysfunction of both cerebral and extra-cerebral blood vessels, rarefaction of the brain vascular network, and the loss of neurons in the brain cortex. Associated with these vasoprotective effects, IHT improved memory and lessened AD pathology. IHT increases endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO), thereby increasing regional cerebral blood flow and augmenting the vaso- and neuroprotective effects of endothelial NO. On the other hand, in AD excessive production of NO in microglia, astrocytes, and cortical neurons generates neurotoxic peroxynitrite. IHT enhances storage of excessive NO in the form of S-nitrosothiols and dinitrosyl iron complexes. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD, and IHT reduces oxidative stress in a number of experimental pathologies. Beneficial effects of IHT in experimental neuropathologies other than AD, including dyscirculatory encephalopathy, ischemic stroke injury, audiogenic

  13. Stressors, moderators and stress outcomes: findings from the All-Wales Community Mental Health Nurse Study.

    PubMed

    Edwards, D; Burnard, P; Coyle, D; Fothergill, A; Hannigan, B

    2000-12-01

    The All-Wales Community Mental Health Nurse Stress Study was the largest study undertaken in the UK to date to investigate stress, burnout and coping amongst the CMHN workforce. The aim of the study was to examine the variety, frequency and severity of stressors, to describe coping strategies used to reduce work-based stress, and to determine stress outcomes. Questionnaires were sent out to 614 CMHNs from ten NHS Trusts throughout Wales. The response rate was 49% (n = 301). The measures used included the Maslach Human Services Survey, the CPN Stress Questionnaire, the Psychnurse Methods of Coping Questionnaire, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the General Health Questionnaire GHQ-12. Community mental health nurses indicated that trying to maintain a good quality service in the midst of long waiting lists, poor resources, and having too many interruptions while trying to work in the office were particularly stressful items. The coping strategies that CMHNs utilized the most were having a stable home life and looking forward to going home at the end of the day, having outside interests and hobbies and talking to people that they got on well with. Forty per cent of CMHNs tended to view themselves negatively, feeling that others did not hold much respect for them. The GHQ-12 measure indicated that 35% of CMHNs had crossed a threshold of psychiatric caseness. Measured against a normative sample of mental health workers, 51% of CMHNs were experiencing high levels of long-term emotional exhaustion. Twenty-four per cent were suffering from high levels of depersonalization burnout and were not relating well to clients, whilst 14% were experiencing severe long-term feelings of lack of personal accomplishment. The results from the study provided us with a picture of stress and coping in CMHNs in Wales. Addressing these factors may help to reduce levels of experienced stress and burnout. PMID:11933511

  14. Impact of Mental and Physical Stress on Blood Pressure and Pulse Pressure under Normobaric versus Hypoxic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, Michael; Trapp, Eva-Maria; Egger, Josef W.; Domej, Wolfgang; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Avian, Alexander; Rohrer, Peter M.; Hörlesberger, Nina; Magometschnigg, Dieter; Cervar-Zivkovic, Mila; Komericki, Peter; Velik, Rosemarie; Baulmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hypobaric hypoxia, physical and psychosocial stress may influence key cardiovascular parameters including blood pressure (BP) and pulse pressure (PP). We investigated the effects of mild hypobaric hypoxia exposure on BP and PP reactivity to mental and physical stress and to passive elevation by cable car. Methods 36 healthy volunteers participated in a defined test procedure consisting of a period of rest 1, mental stress task (KLT-R), period of rest 2, combined mental (KLT-R) and physical task (bicycle ergometry) and a last period of rest both at Graz, Austria (353 m asl) and at the top station Dachstein (2700 m asl). Beat-to-beat heart rate and BP were analysed both during the test procedures at Graz and at Dachstein and during passive 1000 m elevation by cable car (from 1702 m to 2700 m). Results A significant interaction of kind of stress (mental vs. combined mental and physical) and study location (Graz vs. Dachstein) was found in the systolic BP (p = .007) and PP (p = .002) changes indicating that during the combined mental and physical stress task sBP was significantly higher under hypoxic conditions whereas sBP and PP were similar during mental stress both under normobaric normoxia (Graz) and under hypobaric hypoxia (Dachstein). During the passive ascent in cable car less trivialization (psychological coping strategy) was associated with an increase in PP (p = .004). Conclusion Our data show that combined mental and physical stress causes a significant higher raise in sBP and PP under hypoxic conditions whereas isolated mental stress did not affect sBP and PP under hypoxic conditions. PP-reaction to ascent in healthy subjects is not uniform. BP reactions to ascent that represents an accumulation of physical (mild hypobaric hypoxia) and psychological stressors depend on predetermined psychological traits (stress coping strategies). Thus divergent cardiovascular reactions can be explained by applying the multidimensional aspects of the

  15. Body size at birth and cardiovascular response to and recovery from mental stress in children.

    PubMed

    Feldt, K; Räikkönen, K; Pyhälä, R; Jones, A; Phillips, D I W; Eriksson, J G; Pesonen, A K; Heinonen, K; Järvenpää, A-L; Strandberg, T E; Kajantie, E

    2011-04-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) response to mental stress, a predictor of CV disease risk, may be determined already in utero. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, and previous studies have used adult subjects and neglected CV recovery. We investigated 147 girls and 136 boys aged 8 years who underwent the Trier Social Stress Test for children to determine whether body size at birth is associated with CV activity. Blood pressure (BP), electrocardiogram and impedance-derived indices were recorded and analyzed from continuous measurements using Vasotrac APM205A and Biopac MP150 systems. Among girls, lower birth weight was associated with lower baseline systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) values (1.9 mm Hg and 1.5 mm Hg per 1 s.d. birth weight for gestational age, respectively), higher SBP and DBP response to mental stress (1.6 mm Hg and 1.1 mm Hg per 1 s.d. birth weight for gestational age, respectively), slower BP recovery and overall higher cardiac sympathetic activity. In contrast, among boys lower birth weight was associated with higher baseline levels of SBP (2.1 mm Hg per 1 s.d. birth weight for gestational age) and total peripheral resistance (TPR), overall lower cardiac sympathetic activity, lower TPR response to mental stress and a more rapid BP and cardiac sympathetic recovery. In boys, the associations with baseline levels and cardiac sympathetic activity became significant only after adjusting for current body size. These sex-specific results suggest that individual differences in childhood CV response to and recovery from mental stress may have prenatal origins. This phenomenon may be important in linking smaller body size at birth to adult CV disease. PMID:20535142

  16. The combined influence of fat consumption and repeated mental stress on brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Poitras, Veronica J; Slattery, David J; Levac, Brendan M; Fergus, Stevenson; Gurd, Brendon J; Pyke, Kyra E

    2014-04-01

    Experienced separately, both acute mental stress and high-fat meal consumption can transiently impair endothelial function, and the purpose of the present study was to investigate their combined impact. On four separate days, 10 healthy men (23 years old) underwent brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) tests, before and hourly for 4 h post-consumption of a high-fat (HFM; 54 g fat) or low-fat meal (LFM; 0 g fat; each meal ∼ 1000 calories), with hourly mental stress (mental arithmetic, speech) or control (counting) tasks (conditions HFM+S, LFM+S, HFM and LFM). Data are presented as means ± SD. Plasma triglycerides increased and remained elevated after the high-fat but not the low-fat meal (P = 0.004) and were not affected by mental stress (P = 0.329). Indices of stress reactivity increased during mental stress tasks (mean arterial pressure, ∼ 20 mmHg; heart rate, ∼ 22 beats min(-1); salivary cortisol, ∼ 2.37 nmol l(-1); and plasma noradrenaline, ∼ 0.17 ng ml(-1)) and were not influenced by meal (P > 0.05). There was no effect of the type of meal on FMD (P = 0.562); however, FMD was 4.5 ± 0.5% in the control conditions and 5.8 ± 0.6% in the mental stress conditions (P = 0.087), and this difference was significant when normalized for the shear stress stimulus (FMD/area under the curve of shear stress, P = 0.045). Overall, these preliminary data suggest that postprandial FMD was augmented with mental stress irrespective of meal type. These results are contrary to previous reports of impaired endothelial function after mental stress or fat consumption independently and highlight the need to further investigate the mechanisms underlying the interactions between these factors. PMID:24465021

  17. Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness Traumatic stress, which happens when you ... stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  18. Mediating Role of Stress Reactivity in the Effects of Prenatal Tobacco Exposure on Childhood Mental Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Prenatal tobacco exposure, through maternal smoking during pregnancy, has been associated with adverse mental health outcomes in childhood. However, the mechanisms by which prenatal tobacco exposure compromises mental health later in life are unclear. We hypothesized that sensitized reactivity to stressful life events in early childhood mediates the effect of prenatal tobacco exposure on mental health outcomes in middle childhood, after accounting for earlier mental health outcomes. Methods: Data were from 12,308 mothers and their children drawn from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a large prospective population-based study. Mothers’ self-reports of smoking during pregnancy, mothers’ ratings of their child’s reactivity to stressful life events, and teachers’ and mothers’ ratings of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire assessing 5 domains of mental health outcomes were measured. Results: A positive association was found between prenatal tobacco exposure and stress reactivity between the ages of 2 and 6. In turn, stress reactivity was positively associated with peer (isolation), hyperactivity, conduct, and emotional problems (but not prosocial behaviors) between the ages of 7 and 11, after accounting for the mental health outcome at age 4 and other confounders. Conclusions: Heightened stress reactivity in preschool ages mediated the effect of prenatal tobacco exposure on adverse mental health outcomes between the ages of 7 and 11. Interventions to assist children exposed to tobacco smoke during gestation in coping with stressful life events may help mitigate psychiatric symptoms in this population. PMID:23990474

  19. Adolescent Bicultural Stress and Its Impact on Mental Well-Being among Latinos, Asian Americans, and European Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Andrea J.; Carvajal, Scott C.; Valle, Fabian; Orduna, Michele

    2007-01-01

    The perception of bicultural stress, stress due to discrimination/prejudice, immigration, and acculturation, was investigated in relation to mental well-being in a sample of urban Latino (n = 304), European American (n = 215), and Asian American (n = 131) 8th grade students. Bicultural stress was reported by all ethnic groups and was significantly…

  20. Interrelationships between trait anxiety, situational stress and mental effort predict phonological processing efficiency, but not effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Elizabeth J; Edwards, Mark S; Lyvers, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Attentional control theory (ACT) describes the mechanisms associated with the relationship between anxiety and cognitive performance. We investigated the relationship between cognitive trait anxiety, situational stress and mental effort on phonological performance using a simple (forward-) and complex (backward-) word span task. Ninety undergraduate students participated in the study. Predictor variables were cognitive trait anxiety, indexed using questionnaire scores; situational stress, manipulated using ego threat instructions; and perceived level of mental effort, measured using a visual analogue scale. Criterion variables (a) performance effectiveness (accuracy) and (b) processing efficiency (accuracy divided by response time) were analyzed in separate multiple moderated-regression analyses. The results revealed (a) no relationship between the predictors and performance effectiveness, and (b) a significant 3-way interaction on processing efficiency for both the simple and complex tasks, such that at higher effort, trait anxiety and situational stress did not predict processing efficiency, whereas at lower effort, higher trait anxiety was associated with lower efficiency at high situational stress, but not at low situational stress. Our results were in full support of the assumptions of ACT and implications for future research are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27045685

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Severe Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueser, Kim T.; Rosenberg, Stanley D.; Xie, Haiyi; Jankowski, M. Kay; Bolton, Elisa E.; Lu, Weili; Hamblen, Jessica L.; Rosenberg, Harriet J.; McHugo, Gregory J.; Wolfe, Rosemarie

    2008-01-01

    A cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) program for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was developed to address its high prevalence in persons with severe mental illness receiving treatment at community mental health centers. CBT was compared with treatment as usual (TAU) in a randomized controlled trial with 108 clients with PTSD and either major…

  2. Cerebrovascular Complications After Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alejaldre, Aída; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Santos, Miguel Ángel; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Neurological complications in orthotopic heart transplantation represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality despite successful transplantation. The most frequent perioperative neurological complications are delirium or encephalopathy. In this period cerebrovascular complication ranges between 5-11%. After the perioperative period, the 5-year stroke risk after cardiac transplantation is 4.1%. In a retrospective study conducted with 314 patients who underwent cardiac transplantation, it was found that 20% of cerebrovascular complications occurred within the first two weeks after transplantation, while 80% occurred in the late postoperative phase. Of these, ischemic stroke is the most common subtype. In the perioperative periode, hemodynamic instability, cardiac arrest, extracorporeal circulation over 2 hours, prior history of stroke, and carotid stenosis greater than 50% have been reported to be risk factors for the occurrence of cerebrovascular complications. Perioperative cerebrovascular complications are associated with higher mortality and poor functional outcome at one year follow-up. After the perioperative period, the only factor that has been significantly associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular complications is a history of prior stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic. Other associated factors include unknown atrial fibrillation, septic emboli from endocarditis, cardiac catheterization and perioperative hemodynamic shock. According to the TOAST etiologic classification, the most prevalent etiologic subtype of ischemic stroke is undetermined cause. PMID:21804780

  3. Aquaporin-4 and Cerebrovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chu, Heling; Huang, Chuyi; Ding, Hongyan; Dong, Jing; Gao, Zidan; Yang, Xiaobo; Tang, Yuping; Dong, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are conditions caused by problems with brain vasculature, which have a high morbidity and mortality. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the most abundant water channel in the brain and crucial for the formation and resolution of brain edema. Considering brain edema is an important pathophysiological change after stoke, AQP4 is destined to have close relation with cerebrovascular diseases. However, this relation is not limited to brain edema due to other biological effects elicited by AQP4. Till now, multiple studies have investigated roles of AQP4 in cerebrovascular diseases. This review focuses on expression of AQP4 and the effects of AQP4 on brain edema and neural cells injuries in cerebrovascular diseases including cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the current review, we pay more attention to the studies of recent years directly from cerebrovascular diseases animal models or patients, especially those using AQP4 gene knockout mice. This review also elucidates the potential of AQP4as an excellent therapeutic target. PMID:27529222

  4. Aquaporin-4 and Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Heling; Huang, Chuyi; Ding, Hongyan; Dong, Jing; Gao, Zidan; Yang, Xiaobo; Tang, Yuping; Dong, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are conditions caused by problems with brain vasculature, which have a high morbidity and mortality. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the most abundant water channel in the brain and crucial for the formation and resolution of brain edema. Considering brain edema is an important pathophysiological change after stoke, AQP4 is destined to have close relation with cerebrovascular diseases. However, this relation is not limited to brain edema due to other biological effects elicited by AQP4. Till now, multiple studies have investigated roles of AQP4 in cerebrovascular diseases. This review focuses on expression of AQP4 and the effects of AQP4 on brain edema and neural cells injuries in cerebrovascular diseases including cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the current review, we pay more attention to the studies of recent years directly from cerebrovascular diseases animal models or patients, especially those using AQP4 gene knockout mice. This review also elucidates the potential of AQP4as an excellent therapeutic target. PMID:27529222

  5. The Moderator Role of Perceived Emotional Intelligence in the Relationship between Sources of Stress and Mental Health in Teachers.

    PubMed

    Pulido-Martos, Manuel; Lopez-Zafra, Esther; Estévez-López, Fernando; Augusto-Landa, José María

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the role of Perceived Emotional Intelligence (PEI) on sources of job stress and mental health in 250 elementary school teachers from Jaén (Spain). The aim of the study was two-fold: (1) to analyze the associations between Perceived Emotional Intelligence (PEI), sources of occupational stress and mental health; and (2) to determine whether PEI moderates the relationship between sources of occupational stress and mental health. An initial sample of 250 teachers was assessed Three questionnaires, the Trait Meta-Mood Scale, the Sources of Stress Scale in Teachers and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey, were used to evaluate PEI, sources of occupational stress and mental health, respectively. Teachers with higher levels of emotional attention reported lower levels of mental health (r = -.30; p < .001), while teachers showing high emotional clarity reported better emotional role (r = .14; p < .05) and social functioning (r = .15; p < .05). Moreover, PEI components moderate the relationship between sources of occupational stress and emotional role. Specifically, each significant interaction (i.e., deficiencies x attention, adaptation x attention, and adaptation x clarity) made a small and unique contribution in the explanation of emotional role (all p < .05, all sr 2 ∼ .02). Finally, our results imply that PEI is an important moderator of teachers´ occupational stressors on mental health. PMID:26936220

  6. A Review of Energy Drinks and Mental Health, with a Focus on Stress, Anxiety, and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Concerns have been expressed regarding the potential for caffeinated energy drinks to negatively affect mental health, and particularly so in young consumers at whom they are often targeted. The products are frequently marketed with declarations of increasing mental and physical energy, providing a short-term boost to mood and performance. Although a certain amount of evidence has accumulated to substantiate some of these claims, the chronic effects of energy drinks on mental health also need to be addressed. Methods: To review the relevant literature, PubMed and PsycINFO were searched for all peer-reviewed articles published in English that addressed associations between energy drink use and mental health outcomes. Case reports were also considered, though empirical studies investigating acute mood effects were excluded as a review of such articles had recently been published. Fifty-six articles were retrieved: 20 of these (along with eight more identified through other means) were included in the current review, and, because the majority addressed aspects of stress, anxiety, and depression, particular focus was placed on these outcomes. Results: Though a number of null findings (and one negative relationship) were observed, the majority of studies examined reported positive associations between energy drink consumption and symptoms of mental health problems. Conclusions: Though the findings imply that energy drink use may increase the risk of undesirable mental health outcomes, the majority of research examined utilized cross-sectional designs. In most cases, it was therefore not possible to determine causation or direction of effect. For this reason, longitudinal and intervention studies are required to increase our understanding of the nature of the relationships observed. PMID:27274415

  7. Translational developmental studies of stress on brain and behavior: implications for adolescent mental health and illness?

    PubMed

    Malter Cohen, M; Tottenham, N; Casey, B J

    2013-09-26

    Adolescence is the transition from childhood to adulthood, with onset marked by puberty and the offset by relative independence from parents. Across species, it is a time of incredible change that carries increased risks and rewards. The ability of the individual to respond adequately to the mental, physical and emotional stresses of life during this time is a function of both their early environment and their present state. In this article, we focus on the effects that acute threat and chronic stress have on the brain and behavior in humans and rodents. First, we highlight developmental changes in frontolimbic function as healthy individuals transition into and out of adolescence. Second, we examine genetic factors that may enhance susceptibility to stress in one individual over another using translation from genetic mouse models to human neuroimaging. Third, we examine how the timing and nature of stress varies in its impact on brain and behavior. These findings are discussed in the context of implications for adolescent mental health and illness. PMID:23340244

  8. Translational developmental studies of stress on brain and behavior: Implications for adolescent mental health and illness?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew Malter; Tottenham, Nim

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is the transition from childhood to adulthood, with onset marked by puberty and the offset by relative independence from parents. Across species, it is a time of incredible change that carries increased risks and rewards. The ability of the individual to respond adequately to the mental, physical and emotional stresses of life during this time is a function of both their early environment and their present state. In this article, we focus on the effects that acute threat and chronic stress have on the brain and behavior in humans and rodents. First, we highlight developmental changes in frontolimbic function as healthy individuals transition into and out of adolescence. Second, we examine genetic factors that may enhance susceptibility to stress in one individual over another using translation from genetic mouse models to human neuroimaging. Third, we examine how the timing and nature of stress varies in its impact on brain and behavior. These findings are discussed in the context of implications for adolescent mental health and illness. PMID:23340244

  9. Heterogeneity among cardiac ischemic and anginal responses to exercise, mental stress, and daily life.

    PubMed

    Sheps, D S; McMahon, R P; Pepine, C J; Stone, P H; Goldberg, A D; Taylor, H; Cohen, J D; Becker, L C; Chaitman, B; Knatterud, G L; Kaufmann, P G

    1998-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare and contrast indicators of ischemia in a well-characterized group of 196 patients with coronary artery disease, documented angiographically or by verified history of myocardial infarction, and a positive exercise test result. Myocardial ischemia occurs frequently in response to everyday stressors in patients with coronary artery disease. The Psychophysiological Interventions in Myocardial Ischemia study provides a unique opportunity to study neuroendocrine and psychological manifestations of ischemia. Patients with exercise-induced ischemia underwent exercise radionuclide ventriculography and electrocardiographic monitoring and 2 laboratory mental stressors (Speech and Stroop) after being withdrawn from cardiac medications. In addition, 48-hour ambulatory electrocardiograms were recorded during routine daily activities. Patients with a history of angina within the past 3 months reported angina during the bicycle or treadmill test with a much higher frequency than patients without such an anginal history (77% vs 26%). Ejection fraction (EF) responses to the Stroop test were abnormal in 48% of patients with an abnormal EF response to the Speech task, versus 17% in patients with a normal EF response (p <0.01). Seventy-six percent of patients had an abnormal EF response to bicycle exercise. Three indicators of ischemia (ST-segment depression, wall motion abnormality, and EF response) were compared during the same laboratory stressor and across different types of stress tests. Presence of the 3 indicators was only moderately associated during exercise, and only weak or nonsignificant associations occurred among the presence of the 3 ischemic markers during mental stress. Occurrence of the same ischemic markers was moderately associated between the 2 mental stress tasks, but few associations were found between the occurrence of the same ischemic marker during exercise and mental stress. There is a marked heterogeneity of

  10. Theta, mental flexibility, and post-traumatic stress disorder: connecting in the parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Dunkley, Benjamin T; Sedge, Paul A; Doesburg, Sam M; Grodecki, Richard J; Jetly, Rakesh; Shek, Pang N; Taylor, Margot J; Pang, Elizabeth W

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health injury characterised by re-experiencing, avoidance, numbing and hyperarousal. Whilst the aetiology of the disorder is relatively well understood, there is debate about the prevalence of cognitive sequelae that manifest in PTSD. In particular, there are conflicting reports about deficits in executive function and mental flexibility. Even less is known about the neural changes that underlie such deficits. Here, we used magnetoencephalography to study differences in functional connectivity during a mental flexibility task in combat-related PTSD (all males, mean age = 37.4, n = 18) versus a military control (all males, mean age = 33.05, n = 19) group. We observed large-scale increases in theta connectivity in the PTSD group compared to controls. The PTSD group performance was compromised in the more attentionally-demanding task and this was characterised by 'late-stage' theta hyperconnectivity, concentrated in network connections involving right parietal cortex. Furthermore, we observed significant correlations with the connectivity strength in this region with a number of cognitive-behavioural outcomes, including measures of attention, depression and anxiety. These findings suggest atypical coordination of neural synchronisation in large scale networks contributes to deficits in mental flexibility for PTSD populations in timed, attentionally-demanding tasks, and this propensity toward network hyperconnectivity may play a more general role in the cognitive sequelae evident in this disorder. PMID:25909654

  11. Theta, Mental Flexibility, and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: Connecting in the Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Dunkley, Benjamin T.; Sedge, Paul A.; Doesburg, Sam M.; Grodecki, Richard J.; Jetly, Rakesh; Shek, Pang N.; Taylor, Margot J.; Pang, Elizabeth W.

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health injury characterised by re-experiencing, avoidance, numbing and hyperarousal. Whilst the aetiology of the disorder is relatively well understood, there is debate about the prevalence of cognitive sequelae that manifest in PTSD. In particular, there are conflicting reports about deficits in executive function and mental flexibility. Even less is known about the neural changes that underlie such deficits. Here, we used magnetoencephalography to study differences in functional connectivity during a mental flexibility task in combat-related PTSD (all males, mean age = 37.4, n = 18) versus a military control (all males, mean age = 33.05, n = 19) group. We observed large-scale increases in theta connectivity in the PTSD group compared to controls. The PTSD group performance was compromised in the more attentionally-demanding task and this was characterised by 'late-stage' theta hyperconnectivity, concentrated in network connections involving right parietal cortex. Furthermore, we observed significant correlations with the connectivity strength in this region with a number of cognitive-behavioural outcomes, including measures of attention, depression and anxiety. These findings suggest atypical coordination of neural synchronisation in large scale networks contributes to deficits in mental flexibility for PTSD populations in timed, attentionally-demanding tasks, and this propensity toward network hyperconnectivity may play a more general role in the cognitive sequelae evident in this disorder. PMID:25909654

  12. Disgust, Mental Contamination, and Posttraumatic Stress: Unique Relations following Sexual versus Non-Sexual Assault

    PubMed Central

    Badour, Christal L.; Feldner, Matthew T.; Babson, Kimberly A.; Blumenthal, Heidemarie; Dutton, Courtney E.

    2012-01-01

    Disgust and mental contamination (or feelings of dirtiness and urges to wash in the absence of a physical contaminant) are increasingly being linked to traumatic event exposure and posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptomatology. Evidence suggests disgust and mental contamination are particularly relevant to sexual assault experiences; however, there has been relatively little direct examination of these relations. The primary aim of the current study was to assess disgust and mental contamination-based reactivity to an individualized interpersonal assault-related script-driven imagery procedure. Participants included 22 women with a history of traumatic sexual assault and 19 women with a history of traumatic non-sexual assault. Sexual assault and PTS symptom severity predicted greater increases in disgust, feelings of dirtiness, and urges to wash in response to the traumatic event script. Finally, assault type affected the association between PTS symptom severity and increases in feelings of dirtiness and urges to wash in response to the traumatic event script such that these associations were only significant among sexually assaulted individuals. These findings highlight the need for future research focused on elucidating the nature of the relation between disgust and mental contamination and PTS reactions following various traumatic events. PMID:23376603

  13. Cardiac and blood pressure responses to mental stress in reactive hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Pannarale, G; Isea, J E; Coats, A J; Conway, J; Sleight, P

    1991-01-01

    To study the haemodynamic response to a standardized mental stress, we measured ascending aorta velocity using Doppler ultrasonography in 20 reactive ("white-coat") hypertensives and 20 age and sex matched normal controls (NC) familiar with the hospital setting. Reactive hypertensives (RH) had 3 office diastolic BP recordings between 90-110 mmHg and ambulatory BP less than 140/90 mmHg. The cardiac response to mental arithmetic was greater in RH than NC (minute distance, RH: +36.7 +/- 40.2% vs NC: +10.3 +/- 19%, p less than 0.05; peak velocity, RH: +8.4 +/- 16.5% vs NC: -1.4 +/- 11.9%, p less than 0.05), and there was a different peripheral resistance response (RH: -12.2 +/- 24.2% vs NC: +6.5 +/- 22%, p less than 0.05). We suggest that subjects with reactive hypertension have a strong cardiac response to mental stress and this could be a characteristic of this condition. PMID:2022068

  14. Macrolevel Stressors, Terrorism, and Mental Health Outcomes: Broadening the Stress Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Judith A.; Cloninger, Lea; Rospenda, Kathleen M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the extent to which the stress paradigm linking psychosocial stressors to mental health status has focused disproportionate attention on microlevel social stressors to the detriment of macrolevel stressors. Also, we assessed the effects of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, on subsequent mental health among participants in a Midwestern cohort study. Methods. Respondents in a 6-wave longitudinal mail survey completed questionnaires before September 11, 2001, and again in 2003 and 2005. Regression analyses focused on measures of negative terrorism-related beliefs and fears, as well as psychological distress and deleterious alcohol use outcomes measured both before and after September 11. Results. Negative terrorism-related beliefs and fears assessed in 2003 predicted distress and drinking outcomes in 2005 after control for sociodemographic characteristics and pre–September 11 distress and drinking. Conclusions. The events of September 11 continue to negatively affect the mental health of the American population. Our results support the utility of according greater attention to the effects of such macrolevel social stressors in population studies embracing the stress paradigm. PMID:18687593

  15. Macrolevel Stressors, Terrorism, and Mental Health Outcomes: Broadening the Stress Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Judith A.; Cloninger, Lea; Rospenda, Kathleen M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the extent to which the stress paradigm linking psychosocial stressors to mental health status has focused disproportionate attention on microlevel social stressors to the detriment of macrolevel stressors. Also, we assessed the effects of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, on subsequent mental health among participants in a Midwestern cohort study. Methods. Respondents in a 6-wave longitudinal mail survey completed questionnaires before September 11, 2001, and again in 2003 and 2005. Regression analyses focused on measures of negative terrorism-related beliefs and fears, as well as psychological distress and deleterious alcohol use outcomes measured both before and after September 11. Results. Negative terrorism-related beliefs and fears assessed in 2003 predicted distress and drinking outcomes in 2005 after control for sociodemographic characteristics and pre–September 11 distress and drinking. Conclusions. The events of September 11 continue to negatively affect the mental health of the American population. Our results support the utility of according greater attention to the effects of such macrolevel social stressors in population studies embracing the stress paradigm. PMID:18172139

  16. Adolescent ADHD and Adult Physical and Mental Health, Work Performance, and Financial Stress

    PubMed Central

    Brook, David W.; Zhang, Chenshu; Seltzer, Nathan; Finch, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is a scarcity of longitudinal studies of adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) followed until adulthood. We studied the relationship between ADHD in adolescence and impaired general physical health, impaired general mental health, antisocial personality disorder, impaired work performance, and high financial stress in adulthood. METHODS: A prospective design incorporated 6 assessments of participants spanning mean ages from 14 to 37 years. Two baseline assessments were taken between ages 14 and 16 years, and 5 outcome assessments were taken at mean age 37 years. Participants were assessed with structured interviews and questionnaires. The participants were from a community sample of individuals initially drawn in 1975 and followed to a mean age of 37 years in 2009. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for ADHD in adolescence as related to internal stress in adulthood were 1.82 (95% CI = 1.01–3.25; P < .05) for impaired general physical health, 2.36 (95% CI = 1.23–4.51; P < .01) for impaired general mental health, and 3.28 (95% CI = 1.51–7.13; P < .01) for antisocial personality disorder. The adjusted odds ratios and 95% CIs for ADHD in adolescence as related to external stress were 2.46 (95% CI = 1.37–4.43; P < .01) for impaired work performance and 3.33 (95% CI = 1.70–6.55; P < .001) for high financial stress. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should focus on early diagnosis and treatment of adolescent ADHD because it is a major predictor of an array of physical, mental, work, and financial problems in adulthood. PMID:23230074

  17. Exposure of mental health nurses to violence associated with job stress, life satisfaction, staff resilience, and post-traumatic growth.

    PubMed

    Itzhaki, Michal; Peles-Bortz, Anat; Kostistky, Hava; Barnoy, Dor; Filshtinsky, Vivian; Bluvstein, Irit

    2015-10-01

    Workplace violence towards health workers in hospitals and in mental health units in particular is increasing. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of exposure to violence, job stress, staff resilience, and post-traumatic growth (PTG) on the life satisfaction of mental health nurses. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. The sample consisted of mental health nurses (n = 118) working in a large mental health centre in Israel. Verbal violence by patients was reported by 88.1% of the nurses, and 58.4% experienced physical violence in the past year. Physical and verbal violence towards nurses was correlated with job stress, and life satisfaction was correlated with PTG and staff resilience. Linear regression analyses indicated that life satisfaction was mainly affected by PTG, staff resilience, and job stress, and less by exposure to verbal and physical violence. The present study is the first to show that, although mental health nurses are frequently exposed to violence, their life satisfaction is affected more by staff resilience, PTG, and job stress than by workplace violence. Therefore, it is recommended that intervention programmes that contribute to PTG and staff resilience, as well as those that reduce job stress among mental health nurses, be explored and implemented. PMID:26257307

  18. Trauma, stress, health, and mental health issues among ethnically diverse older adult prisoners.

    PubMed

    Haugebrook, Sabrina; Zgoba, Kristen M; Maschi, Tina; Morgen, Keith; Brown, Derek

    2010-07-01

    The United States' older adult prison population is growing rapidly. This study identifies and describes important psychosocial characteristics, particularly trauma, life-event stressors, health, mental health, and substance abuse, among older adults in prison. Data were collected using case record reviews of 114 prisoners aged 55 or older in the New Jersey Department of Corrections. Findings revealed that the study participants are a diverse group with varied psychosocial issues and needs, including trauma and stress histories, substance use, and health and mental health issues. Most had childhood or adult trauma, such as physical or sexual abuse. Family problems were common in childhood and adulthood. Understanding the problems and needs of older adult prisoners may help improve practice, promote advocacy, and prompt research that can enhance the quality of life of this population. PMID:20472867

  19. Posttraumatic stress disorder following political imprisonment: the role of mental defeat, alienation, and perceived permanent change.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, A; Maercker, A; Boos, A

    2000-02-01

    An interview study of 81 former political prisoners investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is related to the way individuals process the prison experience. In contrast to participants without PTSD, those with chronic or remitted PTSD were more likely to perceive mental defeat and an overall feeling of alienation from other people. Chronic PTSD was also related to perceived negative and permanent change in their personalities or life aspirations. The groups did not differ in their attempts to gain control during imprisonment. Evidence for a relationship between political commitment and PTSD was mixed. The results suggest that mental defeat, alienation, and permanent change are related to PTSD after interpersonal trauma and may need to be addressed in treatment. PMID:10740935

  20. Modulation of prenatal stress via docosahexaenoic acid supplementation: implications for child mental health

    PubMed Central

    Hipwell, Alison E.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnant women living in poverty experience chronic and acute stressors that may lead to alterations in circulating glucocorticoids. Experimental evidence from animal models and correlational studies in humans support the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to high levels of glucocorticoids can negatively affect the developing fetus and later emotional and behavioral regulation in the offspring. In this integrative review, recent findings from research in psychiatry, obstetrics, and animal and human experimental studies on the role of docosahexaenoic acid in modulation of the stress response and brain development are discussed. The potential for an emerging field of nutritionally based perinatal preventive interventions for improving offspring mental health is described. Prenatal nutritional interventions may prove to be effective approaches to reducing common childhood mental disorders. PMID:26024539

  1. Mental arithmetic stress as a test for evaluation of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, A; Franzetti, I; Lepore, G; Maglio, M L; Gaudio, E; Caviezel, F; Pozza, G

    1989-08-01

    The effects of a 1-min mental arithmetic stress test on heart rate change were studied in 72 Type 1 diabetic patients, 36 without and 36 with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (mean age 33 and 44 yr, respectively), and in 80 matched normal subjects. Variation in hand skin temperature was also recorded in 25 normal subjects and 30 diabetic patients without and 32 with autonomic neuropathy. While mental arithmetic rapidly reduced skin temperature of normal volunteers and of patients without autonomic neuropathy, no effect was found in autonomic neuropath (a drop of 0.63 +/- 0.05 (+/- SE), 0.52 +/- 0.04 and 0.16 +/- 0.02 degrees C (p less than 0.001), respectively). In control subjects and in diabetic patients without and with autonomic neuropathy the heart rate increase was 22.9 +/- 6.8 (+/- SD), 21.4 +/- 8.4 and 7.0 +/- 3.7 beats min-1, respectively (p less than 0.001). The ratio between maximum mental arithmetic-induced heart rate and basal heart rate was 1.29 +/- 0.10, 1.24 +/- 0.10 and 1.07 +/- 0.05 (p less than 0.001) for healthy subjects, non-neuropathic patients, and neuropathic patients. Cut-off values (the low normal limit for these variables) are proposed: skin temperature 0.23 degrees C, heart rate increase 11.6 beats min-1 and heart rate ratio 1.12. Anxiety state, blood glucose concentration (excluding hypoglycaemia), body position, basal heart rate, and age did not interfere with responses to mental arithmetic stress. PMID:2527129

  2. Iranian Children With ADHD and Mental Health of Their Mothers: The Role of Stress

    PubMed Central

    Babakhanian, Mohammadreza; Sayar, Soraya; Babakhanian, Masaudeh; Mohammadi, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a psychiatric disorder that can result in stress for the mother, resulting in poor health. Objectives The current study, conducted in 2012, aims to assess stress among forty-six Iranian mothers of ADHD children (Group 1) who were admitted to a psychiatric center in Tehran with forty-six Iranian mothers of normal children (Group 2) in 2012. Materials and Methods The Child Symptom Inventory-4 (CSI-4), the child behavior checklist (CBCL) and the parental stress index-short form (PSI/SF) were completed. Data was analyzed using the Levene test and the independent t-test in SPSS Version 18. Results With the exception of mood, ADHD children had more problems in attention compared with normal children. As a result, mothers of ADHD children had more stress compared with the controls. Conclusions ADHD can impair a mother’s mental health by inducing stress. Specific diagnostic and treatment programs should be designed and tailored for the mothers of ADHD children in order to decrease stress. PMID:27284276

  3. The neuropathology and cerebrovascular mechanisms of dementia.

    PubMed

    Raz, Limor; Knoefel, Janice; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of dementia is increasing in our aging population at an alarming rate. Because of the heterogeneity of clinical presentation and complexity of disease neuropathology, dementia classifications remain controversial. Recently, the National Plan to address Alzheimer’s Disease prioritized Alzheimer’s disease-related dementias to include: Alzheimer’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, and mixed dementias. While each of these dementing conditions has their unique pathologic signature, one common etiology shared among all these conditions is cerebrovascular dysfunction at some point during the disease process. The goal of this comprehensive review is to summarize the current findings in the field and address the important contributions of cerebrovascular, physiologic, and cellular alterations to cognitive impairment in these human dementias. Specifically, evidence will be presented in support of small-vessel disease as an underlying neuropathologic hallmark of various dementias, while controversial findings will also be highlighted. Finally, the molecular mechanisms shared among all dementia types including hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial bioenergetics, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and blood–brain barrier permeability responsible for disease etiology and progression will be discussed. PMID:26174330

  4. Gender as a Moderator of the Relation between Race-Related Stress and Mental Health Symptoms for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Tawanda M.; Laseter, Adrian; Asiamah, David

    2009-01-01

    The present study tested gender as a moderator of the relationship between race-related stress and mental health symptoms among African American adults. Because African American women are exposed to stressors associated with race and gender, we hypothesized that African American women would have higher levels of race-related stress and more severe…

  5. The Impact of Perceived Stress, Social Support, and Home-Based Physical Activity on Mental Health among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwag, Kyung Hwa; Martin, Peter; Russell, Daniel; Franke, Warren; Kohut, Marian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how perceived stress, social support, and home-based physical activity affected older adults' fatigue, loneliness, and depression. We also explored whether social support and physical activity mediated the relationships between stress and mental health problems. The data of 163 older participants were analyzed in this…

  6. Changes of central haemodynamic parameters during mental stress and acute bouts of static and dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Lydakis, C; Momen, A; Blaha, C; Gugoff, S; Gray, K; Herr, M; Leuenberger, U A; Sinoway, L I

    2008-05-01

    Chronic dynamic (aerobic) exercise decreases central arterial stiffness, whereas chronic resistance exercise evokes the opposite effect. Nevertheless, there is little information available on the effects of acute bouts of exercise. Also, there is limited data showing an increase of central arterial stiffness during acute mental stress. This study aimed to determine the effect of acute mental and physical (static and dynamic exercise) stress on indices of central arterial stiffness. Fifteen young healthy volunteers were studied. The following paradigms were performed: (1) 2 min of mental arithmetic, (2) short bouts (20 s) of static handgrip at 20 and 70% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), (3) fatiguing handgrip at 40% MVC and (4) incremental dynamic knee extensor exercise. Central aortic waveforms were assessed using SphygmoCor software. As compared to baseline, pulse wave transit time decreased significantly for all four interventions indicating that central arterial stiffness increased. During fatiguing handgrip there was a fall in the ratio of peripheral to central pulse pressure from 1.69+/-0.02 at baseline to 1.56+/-0.05 (P<0.05). In the knee extensor protocol a non-significant trend for the opposite effect was noted. The augmentation index increased significantly during the arithmetic, short static and fatiguing handgrip protocols, whereas there was no change in the knee extensor protocol. We conclude that (1) during all types of acute stress tested in this study (including dynamic exercise) estimated central stiffness increased, (2) during static exercise the workload posed on the left ventricle (expressed as change in central pulse pressure) is relatively higher than that posed during dynamic exercise (given the same pulse pressure change in the periphery). PMID:18273040

  7. Increase in Operator's Sympathetic Nerve Activity during Complicated Hepatobiliary Surgery: Evidence for Surgeons' Mental Stress.

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, Kosho; Hayashida, Naomi; Kuba, Sayaka; Sakimura, Chika; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Togo, Michita; Katayama, Noritada; Takamura, Noboru; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons often experience stress during operations. The heart rate variability (HRV) is the variability in the beat-to-beat interval, which has been used as parameters of stress. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mental stress of surgeons before, during and after operations, especially during pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Additionally, the parameters were compared in various procedures during the operations. By frequency domain method using electrocardiograph, we measured the high frequency (HF) component, representing the parasympathetic activity, and the low frequency (LF)/HF ratio, representing the sympathetic activity. In all 5 cases of PD, the surgeon showed significantly lower HF component and higher LF/HF during operation, indicating predominance of sympathetic nervous system and increased stress, than those before the operation (p < 0.01) and these did not return to the baseline level one hour after the operation. Out of the 4 LDLT cases, the value of HF was decreased in two and the LF/HF increased in three cases (p < 0.01) during the operation compared to those before the operation. In all cases, the value of HF was decreased and/or the LF/HF increased significantly during the reconstruction of the vessels or bile ducts than during the removal of the liver. Thus, sympathetic nerve activity increased during hepatobiliary surgery compared with the level before the operation, and various procedures during the operations induced diverse changes in the autonomic nervous activities. The HRV analysis could assess the chronological changes of mental stress by measuring the autonomic nervous balances. PMID:26466520

  8. Heartbeat and Economic Decisions: Observing Mental Stress among Proposers and Responders in the Ultimatum Bargaining Game

    PubMed Central

    Dulleck, Uwe; Schaffner, Markus; Torgler, Benno

    2014-01-01

    The ultimatum bargaining game (UBG), a widely used method in experimental economics, clearly demonstrates that motives other than pure monetary reward play a role in human economic decision making. In this study, we explore the behaviour and physiological reactions of both responders and proposers in an ultimatum bargaining game using heart rate variability (HRV), a small and nonintrusive technology that allows observation of both sides of an interaction in a normal experimental economics laboratory environment. We find that low offers by a proposer cause signs of mental stress in both the proposer and the responder; that is, both exhibit high ratios of low to high frequency activity in the HRV spectrum. PMID:25247817

  9. Complex posttraumatic stress disorder in men with serious mental illness: a reconceptualization.

    PubMed

    Muenzenmaier, Kristina; Spei, Ekaterina; Gross, Dalit R

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a reconceptualization of serious mental illness (SMI) utilizing the concept of Complex-Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD). While the effects of trauma in men have recently received increased attention, the impact of chronic exposure to interpersonal trauma during childhood remains under assessed and under recognized. This holds true particularly for men diagnosed with SMI. The study of two clinical case vignettes of men who have been psychiatrically hospitalized for many years illustrates the necessity of trauma assessments and trauma-focused treatments within this population. PMID:21043332

  10. Common stressful life events and difficulties are associated with mental health symptoms and substance use in young adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stressful life events are associated with mood disorders in adults in clinical settings. Less described in the literature is the association between common life stressors and a wide range of psychopathology in young adolescents. This study uses a large non-clinical sample of young adolescents to describe the associations among worry or stress about common life events/difficulties, mental health and substance use. Methods Data on lifetime stress or worry about common life events/difficulties (i.e., romantic breakups, family disruption, interpersonal difficulties, and personal stress (health, weight, school work)), symptoms of depression, conduct disorder symptoms, and substance use were collected from 1025 grade 7 students (mean age 12.9 years; 45% male). The association between each source of stress and each mental health and substance use indicator was modeled in separate logistic regression analyses. Results The proportion of adolescents reporting worry or stress ranged from 7% for new family to 53% for schoolwork. Romantic breakup stress was statistically significantly associated with all the mental health and substance use indicators except illicit drug use. Family disruption was statistically significantly associated with depression symptoms, marijuana use, and cigarette use. Interpersonal difficulties stress was statistically significantly associated with depression symptoms. All sources of personal stress were statistically significantly related to depression symptoms. In addition, health-related stress was inversely related to binge drinking. Conclusion Young adolescents may benefit from learning positive coping skills to manage worry or stress about common stressors and in particular, worry or stress related to romantic breakups. Appropriate management of mental health symptoms and substance use related to common stressful life events and difficulties may help reduce emerging psychopathology. PMID:22900789

  11. Mental Health: A Focus on Stress, Coping, and Mental Illness as it Relates to Treatment Retention, Adherence, and Other Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Nicholas; Safren, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Mental health problems are prevalent among HIV-infected individuals, with some estimates that 50% likely meet criteria for one or more psychiatric disorders. The mental health of HIV-infected individuals is important not only for quality-of-life concerns, but also in regard to HAART adherence and biological disease progression. The current review focuses on research published between 2009 and April of 2011, exploring mental health, coping, and stress in relation to HIV care behaviors including HAART adherence, quality of life, treatment retention, health care utilization, and disease progression amongst HIV-infected individuals. Specifically, we reviewed the most prevalent and interfering concerns among HIV-infected individuals—depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, interpersonal violence, stigma and shame, and body image concerns. Despite advances over the last 2 years documenting the deleterious effects of mental health on important HIV self-care behaviors, there is continued need for developing and disseminating evidence-based psychosocial interventions that integrate treating mental health problems with improving self-care behaviors for those living with HIV. PMID:21822626

  12. Effects of Minority Stress, Group-Level Coping, and Social Support on Mental Health of German Gay Men

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, Frank A.; Wagner, Ulrich; Christiansen, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Objective According to epidemiological studies, gay men are at a higher risk of mental disorders than heterosexual men. In the current study, the minority stress theory was investigated in German gay men: 1) it was hypothesized that minority stressors would positively predict mental health problems and that 2) group-level coping and social support variables would moderate these predictions negatively. Methods Data from 1,188 German self-identified gay men were collected online. The questionnaire included items about socio-demographics, minority stress (victimization, rejection sensitivity, and internalized homonegativity), group-level coping (disclosure of sexual orientation, homopositivity, gay affirmation, gay rights support, and gay rights activism), and social support (gay social support and non-gay social support). A moderated multiple regression was conducted. Results Minority stressors positively predicted mental health problems. Group-level coping did not interact with minority stressors, with the exception of disclosure and homopositivity interacting marginally with some minority stressors. Further, only two interactions were found for social support variables and minority stress, one of them marginal. Gay and non-gay social support inversely predicted mental health problems. In addition, disclosure and homopositivity marginally predicted mental health problems. Conclusions The findings imply that the minority stress theory should be modified. Disclosure does not have a relevant effect on mental health, while social support variables directly influence mental health of gay men. Group-level coping does not interact with minority stressors relevantly, and only one relevant interaction between social support and minority stress was found. Further longitudinal or experimental replication is needed before transferring the results to mental health interventions and prevention strategies for gay men. PMID:26943785

  13. Stress-induced mechanisms in mental illness: A role for glucocorticoid signalling.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, A; Riva, M A

    2016-06-01

    Stress represents the main environmental risk factor for mental illness. Exposure to stressful events, particularly early in life, has been associated with increased incidence and susceptibility of major depressive disorders as well as of other psychiatric illnesses. Among the key players in these events are glucocorticoid receptors. Dysfunctional glucocorticoid signalling may indeed contribute to psychopathology through a number of mechanisms that regulate the response to acute or chronic stress and that affect the function of genes and systems known to be relevant for mood disorders. Indeed, exposure to chronic stress early in life as well as in adulthood has been shown to reduce the expression of glucocorticoid receptors (GR), also through epigenetic mechanisms, and to up-regulate the expression of the co-chaperone gene FKBP5, which restrains GR activity by limiting the translocation of the receptor complex to the nucleus. Another mechanism that contributes to changes in GR responsiveness is the state of receptor phosphorylation that controls activation, subcellular localization as well as its transcriptional activity. Moreover, GR phosphorylation may represent an important mechanism for the cross talk between neurotrophic signalling and GR-dependent transcription, bridging two important players for mood disorders. One gene that lies downstream from GR and may contribute to stress-related changes is serum glucocorticoid kinase-1 (SGK1). We have demonstrated that the expression of SGK1 is significantly increased after exposure to chronic stress in rodents as well as in the blood of drug-free depressed patients. We have also shown that SGK1 up-regulation may ultimately reduce hippocampal neurogenesis and contribute to the structural abnormalities that have been reported to occur in depressed patients. In summary, GR signalling may represent a point of convergence as well as of divergence for defects associated with pathologic conditions characterized by heightened

  14. Nonevent stress contributes to mental health disparities based on sexual orientation: evidence from a personal projects analysis.

    PubMed

    Frost, David M; LeBlanc, Allen J

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the role of nonevent stress--in the form of frustrated personal project pursuits in the arenas of relationships and work--as a contributing factor to mental health disparities between heterosexual and lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) populations. A purposive sample of 431 LGB (55%) and heterosexually identified (45%) individuals living in the United States and Canada completed the Personal Project Inventory by describing and rating core personal projects they were pursuing. The intensity of perceived barriers to the achievement of relationship- and work-related personal projects served as indicators nonevent stress. Hierarchical linear regression models tested the hypothesis that nonevent stress contributes to the association between sexual orientation and two indicators of mental health: depressive symptoms and psychological well-being. LGB individuals had significantly more depressive symptoms and lower levels of psychological well-being than heterosexuals. Indicators of nonevent stress were significantly associated with mental health outcomes and their inclusion in models attenuated sexual orientation differences in mental health. The critical indirect pathway leading from sexual minority status to mental health occurred via barriers to relationship projects from interpersonal sources. This research suggests that nonevent stress because of structural and interpersonal stigma may contribute to mental health disparities between LGB and heterosexual individuals. The findings have important implications for policy reform around same-sex relationship recognition and workplace discrimination. Future research and clinical work will benefit by expanding existing foci on stress to include nonevent stressors to better understand and address mental health problems, particularly in LGB populations. PMID:25265219

  15. Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act as ... stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from ...

  16. Evaluation of cognitive restructuring for post-traumatic stress disorder in people with severe mental illness

    PubMed Central

    Mueser, Kim T.; Gottlieb, Jennifer D.; Xie, Haiyi; Lu, Weili; Yanos, Philip T.; Rosenberg, Stanley D.; Silverstein, Steven M.; Duva, Stephanie Marcello; Minsky, Shula; Wolfe, Rosemarie S.; McHugo, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) programme designed for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in people with severe mental illness, including breathing retraining, education and cognitive restructuring, was shown to be more effective than usual services. Aims To evaluate the incremental benefit of adding cognitive restructuring to the breathing retraining and education components of the CBT programme (trial registration: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00494650). Method In all, 201 people with severe mental illness and PTSD were randomised to 12- to 16-session CBT or a 3-session brief treatment programme (breathing retraining and education). The primary outcome was PTSD symptom severity. Secondary outcomes were PTSD diagnosis, other symptoms, functioning and quality of life. Results There was greater improvement in PTSD symptoms and functioning in the CBT group than in the brief treatment group, with both groups improving on other outcomes and effects maintained 1-year post-treatment. Conclusions Cognitive restructuring has a significant impact beyond breathing retraining and education in the CBT programme, reducing PTSD symptoms and improving functioning in people with severe mental illness. PMID:25858178

  17. Secondary traumatic stress in military primary and mental health care providers.

    PubMed

    Kintzle, Sara; Yarvis, Jeffrey S; Bride, Brian E

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore rates of secondary traumatic stress (STS) in a sample of 70 military primary and mental health care providers. The sample included working professionals within two military hospitals. Participants completed surveys containing a demographic questionnaire and the Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale. Results of data analysis found military participants in the sample to be experiencing relatively low rates of STS. Over half of the sample reported endorsing at least one symptom of STS occurring within the last week, whereas 8% of participants indicated moderate to high symptomatology. The most frequently reported symptoms were feeling emotionally numb and trouble sleeping followed by the intrusive thoughts about clients. The least frequently reported symptom was feeling jumpy. Implications of study findings and recommendations for future research are outlined. PMID:24306012

  18. Assessment of Mental, Emotional and Physical Stress through Analysis of Physiological Signals Using Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Mohino-Herranz, Inma; Gil-Pita, Roberto; Ferreira, Javier; Rosa-Zurera, Manuel; Seoane, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Determining the stress level of a subject in real time could be of special interest in certain professional activities to allow the monitoring of soldiers, pilots, emergency personnel and other professionals responsible for human lives. Assessment of current mental fitness for executing a task at hand might avoid unnecessary risks. To obtain this knowledge, two physiological measurements were recorded in this work using customized non-invasive wearable instrumentation that measures electrocardiogram (ECG) and thoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB) signals. The relevant information from each measurement is extracted via evaluation of a reduced set of selected features. These features are primarily obtained from filtered and processed versions of the raw time measurements with calculations of certain statistical and descriptive parameters. Selection of the reduced set of features was performed using genetic algorithms, thus constraining the computational cost of the real-time implementation. Different classification approaches have been studied, but neural networks were chosen for this investigation because they represent a good tradeoff between the intelligence of the solution and computational complexity. Three different application scenarios were considered. In the first scenario, the proposed system is capable of distinguishing among different types of activity with a 21.2% probability error, for activities coded as neutral, emotional, mental and physical. In the second scenario, the proposed solution distinguishes among the three different emotional states of neutral, sadness and disgust, with a probability error of 4.8%. In the third scenario, the system is able to distinguish between low mental load and mental overload with a probability error of 32.3%. The computational cost was calculated, and the solution was implemented in commercially available Android-based smartphones. The results indicate that execution of such a monitoring solution is negligible

  19. Assessment of Mental, Emotional and Physical Stress through Analysis of Physiological Signals Using Smartphones.

    PubMed

    Mohino-Herranz, Inma; Gil-Pita, Roberto; Ferreira, Javier; Rosa-Zurera, Manuel; Seoane, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Determining the stress level of a subject in real time could be of special interest in certain professional activities to allow the monitoring of soldiers, pilots, emergency personnel and other professionals responsible for human lives. Assessment of current mental fitness for executing a task at hand might avoid unnecessary risks. To obtain this knowledge, two physiological measurements were recorded in this work using customized non-invasive wearable instrumentation that measures electrocardiogram (ECG) and thoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB) signals. The relevant information from each measurement is extracted via evaluation of a reduced set of selected features. These features are primarily obtained from filtered and processed versions of the raw time measurements with calculations of certain statistical and descriptive parameters. Selection of the reduced set of features was performed using genetic algorithms, thus constraining the computational cost of the real-time implementation. Different classification approaches have been studied, but neural networks were chosen for this investigation because they represent a good tradeoff between the intelligence of the solution and computational complexity. Three different application scenarios were considered. In the first scenario, the proposed system is capable of distinguishing among different types of activity with a 21.2% probability error, for activities coded as neutral, emotional, mental and physical. In the second scenario, the proposed solution distinguishes among the three different emotional states of neutral, sadness and disgust, with a probability error of 4.8%. In the third scenario, the system is able to distinguish between low mental load and mental overload with a probability error of 32.3%. The computational cost was calculated, and the solution was implemented in commercially available Android-based smartphones. The results indicate that execution of such a monitoring solution is negligible

  20. Hurricane Katrina-related maternal stress, maternal mental health, and early infant temperament.

    PubMed

    Tees, Michael T; Harville, Emily W; Xiong, Xu; Buekens, Pierre; Pridjian, Gabriella; Elkind-Hirsch, Karen

    2010-07-01

    To investigate temperament in infants whose mothers were exposed to Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath, and to determine if high hurricane exposure is associated with difficult infant temperament. A prospective cohort study of women giving birth in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, LA (n = 288) in 2006-2007 was conducted. Questionnaires and interviews assessed the mother's experiences during the hurricane, living conditions, and psychological symptoms, 2 months and 12 months postpartum. Infant temperament characteristics were reported by the mother using the activity, adaptability, approach, intensity, and mood scales of the Early Infant and Toddler Temperament Questionnaires, and "difficult temperament" was defined as scoring in the top quartile for three or more of the scales. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between hurricane experience, mental health, and infant temperament. Serious experiences of the hurricane did not strongly increase the risk of difficult infant temperament (association with three or more serious experiences of the hurricane: adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63-3.58 at 2 months; 0.58, 0.15-2.28 at 12 months). Maternal mental health was associated with report of difficult infant temperament, with women more likely to report having a difficult infant temperament at 1 year if they had screened positive for PTSD (aOR 1.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-5.41), depression, (aOR 3.16, 95% CI 1.22-8.20) or hostility (aOR 2.17, 95% CI 0.81-5.82) at 2 months. Large associations between maternal stress due to a natural disaster and infant temperament were not seen, but maternal mental health was associated with reporting difficult temperament. Further research is needed to determine the effects of maternal exposure to disasters on child temperament, but in order to help babies born in the aftermath of disaster, the focus may need to be on the mother's mental health. PMID:19554438

  1. Sex Differences in Platelet Reactivity and Cardiovascular and Psychological Response to Mental Stress in Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Samad, Zainab; Boyle, Stephen; Ersboll, Mads; Vora, Amit N.; Zhang, Ye; Becker, Richard C.; Williams, Redford; Kuhn, Cynthia; Ortel, Thomas L.; Rogers, Joseph G.; O’Connor, Christopher; Velazquez, Eric J.; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although emotional stress is associated with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and related clinical events, sex-specific differences in the psychobiological response to mental stress have not been clearly identified. OBJECTIVES We aimed to study the differential psychological and cardiovascular responses to mental stress between male and female patients with stable IHD. METHODS Patients with stable IHD enrolled in the REMIT (Responses of Mental Stress–Induced Myocardial Ischemia to Escitalopram) study underwent psychometric assessments, transthoracic echocardiography, and platelet aggregation studies at baseline and after 3 mental stress tasks. Mental stress–induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) was defined as the development or worsening of regional wall motion abnormality, reduction of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥8% by transthoracic echocardiography, and/or ischemic ST-segment change on electrocardiogram during 1 or more of the 3 mental stress tasks. RESULTS In the 310 participants with known IHD (18% women, 82% men), most baseline characteristics were similar between women and men (including heart rate, blood pressure, and LVEF), although women were more likely to be nonwhite, living alone (p < 0.001), and unmarried (p < 0.001); they also had higher baseline depression and anxiety (p < 0.05). At rest, women had heightened platelet aggregation responses to serotonin (p = 0.007) and epinephrine (p = 0.004) compared with men. Following mental stress, women had more MSIMI (57% vs. 41%, p < 0.04), expressed more negative (p = 0.02) and less positive emotion (p < 0.001), and demonstrated higher collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation responses (p = 0.04) than men. Men were more likely than women to show changes in traditional physiological measures, such as blood pressure (p < 0.05) and double product. CONCLUSIONS In this exploratory analysis, we identified clear, measurable, and differential responses to mental stress in women and men

  2. Nonevent Stress Contributes to Mental Health Disparities Based on Sexual Orientation: Evidence From a Personal Projects Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Frost, David M.; LeBlanc, Allen J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of nonevent stress—in the form of frustrated personal project pursuits in the arenas of relationships and work—as a contributing factor to mental health disparities between heterosexual and lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) populations. A purposive sample of 431 LGB (55%) and heterosexually identified (45%) individuals living in the United States and Canada completed the Personal Project Inventory by describing and rating core personal projects they were pursuing. The intensity of perceived barriers to the achievement of relationship- and work-related personal projects served as indicators nonevent stress. Hierarchical linear regression models tested the hypothesis that nonevent stress contributes to the association between sexual orientation and two indicators of mental health: depressive symptoms and psychological well-being. LGB individuals had significantly more depressive symptoms and lower levels of psychological well-being than heterosexuals. Indicators of nonevent stress were significantly associated with mental health outcomes and their inclusion in models attenuated sexual orientation differences in mental health. The critical indirect pathway leading from sexual minority status to mental health occurred via barriers to relationship projects from interpersonal sources. This research suggests that nonevent stress because of structural and interpersonal stigma may contribute to mental health disparities between LGB and heterosexual individuals. The findings have important implications for policy reform around same-sex relationship recognition and workplace discrimination. Future research and clinical work will benefit by expanding existing foci on stress to include nonevent stressors to better understand and address mental health problems, particularly in LGB populations. PMID:25265219

  3. [Gender difference in cerebrovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Fusao; Kato, Yoko; Kobayashi, Shoutai

    2015-04-01

    We discuss about the gender difference of cerebrovascular disease according to the data of Japan Standard Stroke Registry Study. The male proportion was dominant in cerebrovascular disease except for subarachnoid hemorrhage(SAH). According to the data of Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, age-adjusted death rate in cerebral infarction and intracerebral hemorrhage were higher in male than in female, however, in SAH the rate was no different between male and female. The incidence of SAH is higher in women than in men, but this gender difference emerges not earlier than age 59. Most cases of SAH were occurring in the ages ranging from 50's in male and 70's in female. The total male-to-female ratio was approximately 1:2. The female proportion was dominant in older patients. PMID:25936150

  4. The remote sensing of mental stress from the electromagnetic reflection coefficient of human skin in the sub-THz range.

    PubMed

    Safrai, Eli; Ishai, Paul Ben; Caduff, Andreas; Puzenko, Alexander; Polsman, Alexander; Agranat, Aharon J; Feldman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that the reflection coefficient of human skin in the frequency range from 95 to 110 GHz (W band) mirrors the temporal relaxation of stress induced by physical exercise. In this work, we extend these findings to show that in the event of a subtle trigger to stress, such as mental activity, a similar picture of response emerges. Furthermore, the findings are extended to cover not only the W band (75-110 GHz), but also the frequency band from 110 to 170 GHz (D band). We demonstrate that mental stress, induced by the Stroop effect and recorded by the galvanic skin response (GSR), can be correlated to the reflection coefficient in the aforementioned frequency bands. Intriguingly, a light physical stress caused by repeated hand gripping clearly showed an elevated stress level in the GSR signal, but was largely unnoted in the reflection coefficient in the D band. The implication of this observation requires further validation. PMID:22170380

  5. Uncovering Clinical Principles and Techniques to Address Minority Stress, Mental Health, and Related Health Risks Among Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Pachankis, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Gay and bisexual men disproportionately experience depression, anxiety, and related health risks at least partially because of their exposure to sexual minority stress. This paper describes the adaptation of an evidence-based intervention capable of targeting the psychosocial pathways through which minority stress operates. Interviews with key stakeholders, including gay and bisexual men with depression and anxiety and expert providers, suggested intervention principles and techniques for improving minority stress coping. These principles and techniques are consistent with general cognitive behavioral therapy approaches, the empirical tenets of minority stress theory, and professional guidelines for LGB-affirmative mental health practice. If found to be efficacious, the psychosocial intervention described here would be one of the first to improve the mental health of gay and bisexual men by targeting minority stress. PMID:25554721

  6. Imaging Inflammation in Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Gounis, Matthew J; van der Marel, Kajo; Marosfoi, Miklos; Mazzanti, Mary L; Clarençon, Frédéric; Chueh, Ju-Yu; Puri, Ajit S; Bogdanov, Alexei A

    2015-10-01

    Imaging inflammation in large intracranial artery pathology may play an important role in the diagnosis of and risk stratification for a variety of cerebrovascular diseases. Looking beyond the lumen has already generated widespread excitement in the stroke community, and the potential to unveil molecular processes in the vessel wall is a natural evolution to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the pathogenesis of diseases, such as ICAD and brain aneurysms. PMID:26351362

  7. Effect of the Interaction between Mental Stress and Eating Pattern on Body Mass Index Gain in Healthy Japanese Male Workers

    PubMed Central

    Toyoshima, Hideaki; Masuoka, Nobutaka; Hashimoto, Shuji; Otsuka, Rei; Sasaki, Satoshi; Tamakoshi, Koji; Yatsuya, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Background The effect of the interaction between long-term mental stress and eating habits on weight gain has not been confirmed in humans. Methods A population of 1080 healthy Japanese male local government employees without lifestyle-related diseases were studied. Height and weight were measured and perception of mental stress and the frequency of eating to satiety, drinking, smoking, and exercise were surveyed by means of a questionnaire in both 1997 and 2002. Exposure patterns during this 5-year period were classified as low or high. Information on daily food and energy intake was collected in 2002. The effect of the interaction between stress and the frequency of eating to satiety on change in BMI (ΔBMI) during this 5-year period was examined by 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and covariance (ANCOVA) adjusted for age, BMI at baseline, and other lifestyle habits. The association between satiation eating and ΔBMI was compared between participants with high and low levels of stress. Results Stress and satiation eating were not significantly mutually correlated. Two-way ANCOVA showed a significant interaction (F = 4.90, P = 0.03) between mental stress and satiation eating. Among participants with a high level of stress, BMI gain was significantly larger in those who ate to satiety than in those who ate moderately, when ΔBMI was unadjusted or adjusted for covariates (adjusted mean [SE]: 0.34 ± 0.06 kg/m2 vs. 0.12 ± 0.07 kg/m2, P = 0.002). Among participants with a low level of stress no such difference was observed. These results were unchanged after further adjustment for energy intake in 2002. Conclusion In this population, eating pattern interacted with long-term mental stress to produce a larger body mass gain in satiation eaters than in moderate eaters among participants with a high level of stress, independent of energy intake or other lifestyle habits. PMID:19265270

  8. Cognitive appraisal vs. exposure-based stress measures: links to perceived mental and physical health in low-income black women.

    PubMed

    Hayman, Lenwood W; Lucas, Todd; Porcerelli, John H

    2014-11-01

    Although stress is linked to mental and physical health, self-reports of stress may be operationalized using measures that emphasize cognitive appraisals of stressors or that simply record stressor exposure. Theory and research suggest that appraisal-based measures may be superior in measuring self-reports of stress. However, use of exposure-based measures persists, especially in ethnic disparities research. This study examined the utility of appraisal-based versus exposure-based stress measures in linking stress to mental and physical health in low-income black women. Measures emphasizing cognitive appraisals were superior in predicting mental and physical health because global stress rating best predicted physical health whereas mental health was best predicted by perceived stress. A checklist of exposure to stressful events was not substantially predictive of either mental or physical health, suggesting that cognitive appraisals of stressors are important in linking stress to health perceptions in blacks. The results also suggest that stress impacts mental health first, which then, in turn, influences physical health. Overall, these results illuminate the importance of cognitive appraisals in linking stress to perceptions of mental and physical health in black women. PMID:25275345

  9. Adiposity is associated with blunted cardiovascular, neuroendocrine and cognitive responses to acute mental stress.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alexander; McMillan, Merlin R; Jones, Russell W; Kowalik, Grzegorz T; Steeden, Jennifer A; Deanfield, John E; Pruessner, Jens C; Taylor, Andrew M; Muthurangu, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and mental stress are potent risk factors for cardiovascular disease but their relationship with each other is unclear. Resilience to stress may differ according to adiposity. Early studies that addressed this are difficult to interpret due to conflicting findings and limited methods. Recent advances in assessment of cardiovascular stress responses and of fat distribution allow accurate assessment of associations between adiposity and stress responsiveness. We measured responses to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task in healthy men (N = 43) and women (N = 45) with a wide range of BMIs. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) measures were used with novel magnetic resonance measures of stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), total peripheral resistance (TPR) and arterial compliance to assess cardiovascular responses. Salivary cortisol and the number and speed of answers to mathematics problems in the task were used to assess neuroendocrine and cognitive responses, respectively. Visceral and subcutaneous fat was measured using T(2) (*)-IDEAL. Greater BMI was associated with generalised blunting of cardiovascular (HR:β = -0.50 bpm x unit(-1), P = 0.009; SV:β = -0.33 mL x unit(-1), P = 0.01; CO:β = -61 mL x min(-1) x unit(-1), P = 0.002; systolic BP:β = -0.41 mmHg x unit(-1), P = 0.01; TPR:β = 0.11 WU x unit(-1), P = 0.02), cognitive (correct answers: r = -0.28, P = 0.01; time to answer: r = 0.26, P = 0.02) and endocrine responses (cortisol: r = -0.25, P = 0.04) to stress. These associations were largely determined by visceral adiposity except for those related to cognitive performance, which were determined by both visceral and subcutaneous adiposity. Our findings suggest that adiposity is associated with centrally reduced stress responsiveness. Although this may mitigate some long-term health risks of stress responsiveness, reduced performance under stress may be a more immediate

  10. Effects of exercise and weight loss on mental stress-induced cardiovascular responses in individuals with high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Georgiades, A; Sherwood, A; Gullette, E C; Babyak, M A; Hinderliter, A; Waugh, R; Tweedy, D; Craighead, L; Bloomer, R; Blumenthal, J A

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of exercise and weight loss on cardiovascular responses during mental stress in mildly to moderately overweight patients with elevated blood pressure. Ninety-nine men and women with high normal or unmedicated stage 1 to stage 2 hypertension (systolic blood pressure 130 to 179 mm Hg, diastolic blood pressure 85 to 109 mm Hg) underwent a battery of mental stress tests, including simulated public speaking, anger recall interview, mirror trace, and cold pressor, before and after a 6-month treatment program. Subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: (1) aerobic exercise, (2) weight management combining aerobic exercise with a behavioral weight loss program, or (3) waiting list control group. After 6 months, compared with control subjects, participants in both active treatment groups had lower levels of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, total peripheral resistance, and heart rate at rest and during mental stress. Compared with subjects in the control group, subjects in the exercise and weight management groups also had greater resting stroke volume and cardiac output. Diastolic blood pressure was lower for the weight management group than for the exercise-only group during all mental stress tasks. These results demonstrate that exercise, particularly when combined with a weight loss program, can lower both resting and stress-induced blood pressure levels and produce a favorable hemodynamic pattern resembling that targeted for antihypertensive therapy. PMID:10948073

  11. Protecting Against Cerebrovascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Guang; Arai, Ken; Murata, Yoshihiro; Wang, Sophia; Stins, Monique F.; Lo, Eng H.; van Leyen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose The concept of the neurovascular unit suggests that effects on brain vasculature must be considered if neuroprotection is to be achieved in stroke. We previously reported that 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX) is upregulated in the peri-infarct area after middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice, and 12/15-LOX contributes to brain damage after ischemia–reperfusion. The current study was designed to investigate 12/15-LOX involvement in vascular injury in the ischemic brain. Methods In cell culture, a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line was subjected to either hypoxia or H2O2-induced oxidative stress with or without lipoxygenase inhibitors. For in vivo studies, mice were subjected to 90 minutes middle cerebral artery occlusion, and the effects of either 12/15-LOX gene knockout or treatment with lipoxygenase inhibitors were compared. Expression of 12/15-LOX and claudin-5 as well as extravasation of immunoglobulin G were detected by immunohistochemistry. Edema was measured as water content of brain hemispheres according to the wet–dry weight method. Results Brain endothelial cells were protected against hypoxia and H2O2 by the lipoxygenase inhibitor baicalein. After focal ischemia, 12/15-LOX was increased in neurons and endothelial cells. The vascular tight junction protein claudin-5 underwent extensive degradation in the peri-infarct area, which was partially prevented by the lipoxygenase inhibitor baicalein. Leakage of immunoglobulin G into the brain parenchyma was significantly reduced in 12/15-LOX knockout mice as well as wild-type mice treated with baicalein. Likewise, brain edema was significantly ameliorated. Conclusion 12/15-LOX may contribute to ischemic brain damage not just by causing neuronal cell death, but also by detrimental effects on the brain microvasculature. 12/15-LOX inhibitors may thus be effective as both neuroprotectants and vasculoprotectants. PMID:18635843

  12. Colour or shape: examination of neural processes underlying mental flexibility in posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pang, E W; Sedge, P; Grodecki, R; Robertson, A; MacDonald, M J; Jetly, R; Shek, P N; Taylor, M J

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder that stems from exposure to one or more traumatic events. While PTSD is thought to result from a dysregulation of emotional neurocircuitry, neurocognitive difficulties are frequently reported. Mental flexibility is a core executive function that involves the ability to shift and adapt to new information. It is essential for appropriate social-cognitive behaviours. Magnetoencephalography (MEG), a neuroimaging modality with high spatial and temporal resolution, has been used to track the progression of brain activation during tasks of mental flexibility called set-shifting. We hypothesized that the sensitivity of MEG would be able to capture the abnormal neurocircuitry implicated in PTSD and this would negatively impact brain regions involved in set-shifting. Twenty-two soldiers with PTSD and 24 matched control soldiers completed a colour–shape set-shifting task. MEG data were recorded and source localized to identify significant brain regions involved in the task. Activation latencies were obtained by analysing the time course of activation in each region. The control group showed a sequence of activity that involved dorsolateral frontal cortex, insula and posterior parietal cortices. The soldiers with PTSD showed these activations but they were interrupted by activations in paralimbic regions. This is consistent with models of PTSD that suggest dysfunctional neurocircuitry is driven by hyper-reactive limbic areas that are not appropriately modulated by prefrontal cortical control regions. This is the first study identifying the timing and location of atypical neural responses in PTSD with set-shifting and supports the model that hyperactive limbic structures negatively impact cognitive function. PMID:25093599

  13. Secondary Traumatic Stress Among Mental Health Providers Working With the Military

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, Roman; Anderson, Valerie; Bock, Judith; Moore, Bret A.; Peterson, Alan L.; Benight, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Our research assessed the prevalence of secondary traumatic stress (STS) among mental health providers working with military patients. We also investigated personal, work-related, and exposure-related correlates of STS. Finally, using meta-analysis, the mean level of STS symptoms in this population was compared with the mean level of these symptoms in other groups. Participants (N = 224) completed measures of indirect exposure to trauma (i.e., diversity, volume, frequency, ratio), appraisal of secondary exposure impact, direct exposure to trauma, STS, and work characteristics. The prevalence of STS was 19.2%. Personal history of trauma, complaints about having too many patients, and more negative appraisals of the impact caused by an indirect exposure to trauma were associated with higher frequency of STS symptoms. A meta-analysis showed that the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and arousal symptoms of STS was similar across various groups of professionals indirectly exposed to trauma (e.g., mental health providers, rescue workers, social workers). PMID:24177477

  14. Magical flight and monstrous stress: technologies of absorption and mental wellness in Azeroth.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, Jeffrey G; Lacy, Michael G; Francois Dengah, H J; Fagan, Jesse; Most, David E

    2011-03-01

    Videogame players commonly report reaching deeply "immersive" states of consciousness, in some cases growing to feel like they actually are their characters and really in the game, with such fantastic characters and places potentially only loosely connected to offline selves and realities. In the current investigation, we use interview and survey data to examine the effects of such "dissociative" experiences on players of the popular online videogame, World of Warcraft (WoW). Of particular interest are ways in which WoW players' emotional identification with in-game second selves can lead either to better mental well-being, through relaxation and satisfying positive stress, or, alternatively, to risky addiction-like experiences. Combining universalizing and context-dependent perspectives, we suggest that WoW and similar games can be thought of as new "technologies of absorption"--contemporary practices that can induce dissociative states in which players attribute dimensions of self and experience to in-game characters, with potential psychological benefit or harm. We present our research as an empirically grounded exploration of the mental health benefits and risks associated with dissociation in common everyday contexts. We believe that studies such as ours may enrich existing theories of the health dynamics of dissociation, relying, as they often do, on data drawn either from Western clinical contexts involving pathological disintegrated personality disorders or from non-Western ethnographic contexts involving spiritual trance. PMID:21165683

  15. Mental health of Somali adolescent refugees: the role of trauma, stress, and perceived discrimination.

    PubMed

    Ellis, B Heidi; MacDonald, Helen Z; Lincoln, Alisa K; Cabral, Howard J

    2008-04-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine relations between trauma exposure, post-resettlement stressors, perceived discrimination, and mental health symptoms in Somali adolescent refugees resettled in the U.S. Participants were English-speaking Somali adolescent refugees between the ages of 11 and 20 (N = 135) who had resettled in the U.S. Participants were administered an interview battery comprising self-report instruments that included the UCLA Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Index, the War Trauma Screening Scale, the Every Day Discrimination scale, the Adolescent Post-War Adversities Scale, and the Acculturative Hassles Inventory. Results indicated that cumulative trauma was related to PTSD and depression symptoms. Further, post-resettlement stressors, acculturative stressors, and perceived discrimination were also associated with greater PTSD symptoms after accounting for trauma, demographic, and immigration variables. Number of years since resettlement in the US and perceived discrimination were significantly related to depressive symptoms, after accounting for trauma, demographic, and immigration variables. Further research elucidating the relations between post-resettlement stressors, discrimination, and mental health of refugee adolescents may inform intervention development. PMID:18377116

  16. Treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder in patients with severe mental illness: a review.

    PubMed

    Mabey, Linda; van Servellen, Gwen

    2014-02-01

    Although the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is high among those with severe mental illness, little is known about the use of interventions to lessen the burden of PTSD in this population. Currently, there are limited data about safe and effective interventions to treat these individuals. This systematic published work review presents the scientific published work reporting studies of psychological treatment approaches for individuals with comorbid PTSD and severe mental illness. A secondary aim of this study was to identify the specific models implemented and tested, and their impact upon patient outcomes. A review of the published work from January 2001 through January 2012 of English-language publications retrieved from the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), MEDLINE, and the American Psychological Association generated abstracts (PsycINFO) databases was conducted. Six studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. The treatment programs described were cognitive-behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, exposure-based cognitive-behavioural therapy, and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. Evidence of the effectiveness of these programs is examined. Data to support the use of these interventions are limited, indicating the need for further research and efficacy trials. Future areas of research and implications for nursing are discussed. PMID:23363327

  17. Effects of elevation change on mental stress in high-voltage transmission tower construction workers.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Feng-Wen; Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe; Lee, Yung-Hui; Chen, Hung-Jen

    2016-09-01

    High-voltage transmission tower construction is a high-risk operation due to the construction site locations, extreme climatic factors, elevated working surfaces, and narrow working space. To comprehensively enhance our understanding of the psychophysiological phenomena of workers in extremely high tower constructions, we carried out a series of field experiments to test and compare three working surface heights in terms of frequency-domain heart rate variability (HRV) measurements. Twelve experienced male workers participated in this experiment. The dependent variables, namely, heart rate (HR), normalized low-frequency power (nLF), normalized high-frequency power (nHF), and LF-to-HF power ratio (LF/HF), were measured with the Polar RS800CX heart rate monitor. The experimental results indicated that the task workload was similar between working surface heights. Tower construction workers perceived an increased level of mental stress as working surface height increased. PMID:27184317

  18. An Examination of the Impact of Racial and Ethnic Identity, Impostor Feelings, and Minority Status Stress on the Mental Health of Black College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Shannon; Beasley, Samuel T.; Jones, Bianca; Awosogba, Olufunke; Jackson, Stacey; Cokley, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This study examined ethnic identity, racial centrality, minority status stress, and impostor feelings as predictors of mental health in a sample of 218 Black college students. Ethnic identity was found to be a significant positive predictor of mental health, whereas minority status stress and impostor feelings were significant negative predictors.…

  19. Prejudice, Social Stress, and Mental Health in Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Populations: Conceptual Issues and Research Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Ilan H.

    2007-01-01

    In this article the author reviews research evidence on the prevalence of mental disorders in lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals (LGBs) and shows, using meta-analyses, that LGBs have a higher prevalence of mental disorders than heterosexuals. The author offers a conceptual framework for understanding this excess in prevalence of disorder in terms of minority stress—explaining that stigma, prejudice, and discrimination create a hostile and stressful social environment that causes mental health problems. The model describes stress processes, including the experience of prejudice events, expectations of rejection, hiding and concealing, internalized homophobia, and ameliorative coping processes. This conceptual framework is the basis for the review of research evidence, suggestions for future research directions, and exploration of public policy implications. PMID:12956539

  20. Cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to a mental stress task in young patients with hypertension and/or obesity.

    PubMed

    Garafova, A; Penesova, A; Cizmarova, E; Marko, A; Vlcek, M; Jezova, D

    2014-01-01

    Present study was aimed to investigate sympathetic responses to mental stress with hypothesis that the presence of obesity in patients with hypertension has a modifying effect. Young male subjects, 8 with hypertension grade I, with BMI 25 kg/m(2) (HT), 10 with hypertension grade I, and BMI 30 kg/m(2) (HT OB), 14 healthy controls with BMI 30 kg/m(2) (OB), and 13 healthy controls with BMI 25 kg/m(2) (C) underwent the Stroop test. ECG was recorded continuously to evaluate heart rate variability (HRV). Blood pressure (BP) and catecholamine concentrations were measured at baseline, at the end of mental stress test and 15 min thereafter. Patients with HT demonstrated increased adrenaline concentrations and enhanced stress-induced noradrenaline release compared to that in healthy controls. In obese subjects, stress-induced increase of systolicBP was lower compared to lean individuals. Stress exposure induced a significant rise in the low frequency power component of HRV, however the increase was lower in the HT OB group compared to C. Obesity in patients with hypertension did not lead to a different reaction in comparison with lean hypertensive subjects. The present data demonstrate higher sympathoadrenal activity in early-stage of hypertension. Obesity is connected with higher resting systolicBP and modifies the HRV response to mental stress. PMID:25669677

  1. The Affective Bases of Risk Perception: Negative Feelings and Stress Mediate the Relationship between Mental Imagery and Risk Perception

    PubMed Central

    Sobkow, Agata; Traczyk, Jakub; Zaleskiewicz, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has documented that affect plays a crucial role in risk perception. When no information about numerical risk estimates is available (e.g., probability of loss or magnitude of consequences), people may rely on positive and negative affect toward perceived risk. However, determinants of affective reactions to risks are poorly understood. In a series of three experiments, we addressed the question of whether and to what degree mental imagery eliciting negative affect and stress influences risk perception. In each experiment, participants were instructed to visualize consequences of risk taking and to rate riskiness. In Experiment 1, participants who imagined negative risk consequences reported more negative affect and perceived risk as higher compared to the control condition. In Experiment 2, we found that this effect was driven by affect elicited by mental imagery rather than its vividness and intensity. In this study, imagining positive risk consequences led to lower perceived risk than visualizing negative risk consequences. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that negative affect related to higher perceived risk was caused by negative feelings of stress. In Experiment 3, we introduced risk-irrelevant stress to show that participants in the stress condition rated perceived risk as higher in comparison to the control condition. This experiment showed that higher ratings of perceived risk were influenced by psychological stress. Taken together, our results demonstrate that affect-laden mental imagery dramatically changes risk perception through negative affect (i.e., psychological stress). PMID:27445901

  2. The Affective Bases of Risk Perception: Negative Feelings and Stress Mediate the Relationship between Mental Imagery and Risk Perception.

    PubMed

    Sobkow, Agata; Traczyk, Jakub; Zaleskiewicz, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has documented that affect plays a crucial role in risk perception. When no information about numerical risk estimates is available (e.g., probability of loss or magnitude of consequences), people may rely on positive and negative affect toward perceived risk. However, determinants of affective reactions to risks are poorly understood. In a series of three experiments, we addressed the question of whether and to what degree mental imagery eliciting negative affect and stress influences risk perception. In each experiment, participants were instructed to visualize consequences of risk taking and to rate riskiness. In Experiment 1, participants who imagined negative risk consequences reported more negative affect and perceived risk as higher compared to the control condition. In Experiment 2, we found that this effect was driven by affect elicited by mental imagery rather than its vividness and intensity. In this study, imagining positive risk consequences led to lower perceived risk than visualizing negative risk consequences. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that negative affect related to higher perceived risk was caused by negative feelings of stress. In Experiment 3, we introduced risk-irrelevant stress to show that participants in the stress condition rated perceived risk as higher in comparison to the control condition. This experiment showed that higher ratings of perceived risk were influenced by psychological stress. Taken together, our results demonstrate that affect-laden mental imagery dramatically changes risk perception through negative affect (i.e., psychological stress). PMID:27445901

  3. Children's Mental Health in Times of Economic Recession: Replication and Extension of the Family Economic Stress Model in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solantaus, Tytti; Leinonen, Jenni; Punam Ki, Raija-Leena

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the applicability of the family economic stress model (FESM) in understanding the influences of economic hardship on child mental health during a nationwide economic recession in Finland. The information was gathered from 527 triads of 12-year-olds and their mothers and fathers from a population sample. The structural equation…

  4. Stability of Posttraumatic Stress Reaction Factors and Their Relation to General Mental Health Problems in Children: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nygaard, Egil; Jensen, Tine K.; Dyb, Grete

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the structure of posttraumatic stress reaction factors and their relation to general mental health problems in Norwegian children exposed to the tsunami on December 26, 2004. A total of 133 children and adolescents (ages 6-17) were interviewed 10 months posttsunami using the UCLA PTSD Reaction Index, and 104…

  5. Cerebrovascular Dysfunction in Preeclamptic Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Erica S.; Cipolla, Marilyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive, multi-system disorder of pregnancy that affects several organ systems, including the maternal brain. Cerebrovascular dysfunction during preeclampsia can lead to cerebral edema, seizures, stroke and potentially maternal mortality. This review will discuss the effects of preeclampsia on the cerebrovasculature that may adversely affect the maternal brain, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation and blood-brain barrier disruption, and the resultant clinical outcomes including posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and maternal stroke. Potential long-term cognitive outcomes of preeclampsia and the role of the cerebrovasculature are also reviewed. PMID:26126779

  6. Biosimulation and visualization: effect of cerebrovascular geometry on hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Marie; Kobayashi, Toshio; Takagi, Kiyoshi

    2002-10-01

    Hemodynamics plays an important role in cardiovascular disorders, and the authors are applying numerical and experimental studies of cerebrovascular blood flow to the creation and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. In particular, this study aims to investigate the effects of cerebrovascular geometry on hemodynamics, such as flow pattern, wall shear stress distribution, and pressure. This report consists mainly of two parts: numerical study of blood flow in the artery extracted from computer tomography data, and numerical and experimental studies of a curved pipe model. The simulation was conducted by using a finite element method; the experiment was conducted by particle imaging velocimetry. Numerical and experimental results are compared and both show similar secondary flow behavior. PMID:12496038

  7. Hostility and Anger In: Cardiovascular Reactivity and Recovery to Mental Arithmetic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Elizabeth J.; Friedman, Bruce H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Hostility and anger have been attributed as psychosocial risk factors for coronary heart disease. Heightened cardiovascular reactivity (CVR), and poor recovery, to provocative stressors is thought to hasten this risk. Purpose To examine the relationship between hostility and anger inhibition (AI), and the moderating situational influences of harassment and evaluation, in predicting CVR and recovery to mental arithmetic (MA) stress using a multiple regression approach. Methods 48 male undergraduate students engaged in the following 3 minute tasks during recording of the electrocardiogram, impedance cardiography, and blood pressure: baseline, MA, and evaluation. Hostility and AI were assessed with the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale and the Speilberger Anger In subscale, respectively. Results An interaction between hostility and AI showed high diastolic blood pressure reactivity to the MA task among hostile anger inhibitors. Harassment did not modify this effect. However, harasser evaluation predicted prolonged systolic blood pressure (SBP) responding among men scoring high in AI, and facilitated SBP recovery among those scoring low on AI. Conclusions The findings highlight the interactive influences of AI and hostility in predicting CVR to stress and underscore the importance of recovery assessments in understanding the potentially pathogenic associations of these constructs. PMID:19272311

  8. Molecular imaging of cerebrovascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, Nohra; Jabbour, Pascal; Magnotta, Vincent; Hasan, David

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation is a key component in the pathogenesis of cerebrovascular lesions. Two agents have emerged as promising possibilities for imaging cerebrovascular lesions. These agents are ferumoxytol and myeloperoxidase (MPO)-specific paramagnetic magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Ferumoxytol is an iron oxide nanoparticle coated by a carbohydrate shell that is used in MRI studies as an inflammatory marker as it is cleared by macrophages. Ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI allows noninvasive assessment of the inflammatory status of cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations and, possibly, may differentiate "unstable" lesions that require early intervention from "stable" lesions that can be safely observed. Several pilot studies have also suggested that MPO-specific paramagnetic MR contrast agent, di-5-hydroxytryptamide of gadopentetate dimeglumine, may allow imaging of inflammation in the wall of saccular aneurysms in animal models. However, studies in human subjects have yet to be performed. In this paper, we review current data regarding ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI and MPO-specific paramagnetic MR contrast agent and discuss current and future applications. PMID:24323714

  9. An integrative review of the mental health of partners of veterans with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Yambo, Teresa; Johnson, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present an integrative review of the mental health of veteran partners living with veterans with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Living with a veteran with PTSD affects the psychological well-being and health outcomes of a veteran partner. Fourteen research articles that focused on the mental health of military partners, which directly influence the psychological well-being of veteran partners, were reviewed. Findings indicate that a range of mental health concerns exist among veteran partners living with veterans with PTSD. The mental well-being of veteran partners is affected by the emotional strain of living and caring for veterans with PTSD. For years, the partner's presence has been overlooked in the PTSD treatment. However, to promote the comprehensive health of veterans with PTSD, it is paramount to understand the mental health state of veteran partners. Understanding the mental health state of veteran partners will provide a broader perspective to the plight of veteran partners. PMID:24441511

  10. Mental Stress Elicits Sustained and Reproducible Increases in Skin Sympathetic Nerve Activity.

    PubMed

    Muller, Matthew D; Sauder, Charity L; Ray, Chester A

    2013-03-01

    Mental stress (MS) is a known trigger of myocardial infarction and sudden death. By activating the sympathetic nervous system, MS may have deleterious effect on the cardiovascular system but this process is not completely understood. The primary aim of this study was to quantify the effect of MS on skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA). The secondary aim was to determine the reproducibility of SSNA to MS within a given day and ~1 week later. Ten subjects (26±1 yr.) performed two bouts of mental arithmetic lasting 3 min. The bouts were separated by 45 min. One week later the subjects returned to repeat MS. All experiments were conducted in the supine posture during the morning hours. To maintain neutral skin temperature, each subject wore a custom suit (34-35°C). Skin blood flow and sweat rate were measured on the dorsal foot. MS elicited a marked increase in SSNA within the first 10 s (184±42%; P<0.01) in all subjects, which was less during the remaining period of MS but remained elevated (87±20; P<0.01). The pattern of responses to MS was unchanged during the second bout (10 s, 247±55%; 3 min avg., 133±29%) and during the retest 1 week later (10 s, 196±55%; 3 min avg., 117±36%). MS did not significantly affect cutaneous vascular conductance or sweat rate during any trial. In summary, MS elicits robust and reproducible increases in SSNA in humans which may be followed over time to observe alterations in the regulation of the autonomic nervous system. PMID:23750321

  11. Pilot study of adrenal steroid hormones in hair as an indicator of chronic mental and physical stress

    PubMed Central

    Ullmann, E.; Barthel, A; Petrowski, K.; Stalder, T.; Kirschbaum, C.; Bornstein, S. R.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the quantitative analysis of moderators affecting the function of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis in health and sickness is still unreliable. This is, in particular, due to physiological factors such as pulsatile ultradian and circadian glucocorticoid secretion as well as to methodological limitations of the current techniques for steroid hormone determination. Based on this background, the determination of long-term hair steroid concentrations is an important methodological improvement allowing for the quantitative analysis of chronic HPA axis-activation. In order to determine the relationship between chronic mental and physical stress and a chronic activation of the HPA axis, we performed a cross-sectional pilot-study with 40 healthy students and examined the relationships between physical activity, mental burden(s), subjective stress perceptions, depressiveness, anxiety, physical complaints, sense of coherence, resilience, and the long-term integrated steroid hormone levels in hair. The results showed that the concentrations of cortisol, cortisone, and dehydroepiandrosterone in hair were significantly correlated to mental (p = 0.034) and physical stress (p = 0.001) as well as to subjective stress perception (p = 0.006). We conclude that steroid concentrations in hair are decisive predictors for an increase in the long-term-HPA axis activity. Moreover, this biomarker is suitable for capturing the stresslevel after burdening events and physical activity. PMID:27174654

  12. Pilot study of adrenal steroid hormones in hair as an indicator of chronic mental and physical stress.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, E; Barthel, A; Petrowski, K; Stalder, T; Kirschbaum, C; Bornstein, S R

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the quantitative analysis of moderators affecting the function of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis in health and sickness is still unreliable. This is, in particular, due to physiological factors such as pulsatile ultradian and circadian glucocorticoid secretion as well as to methodological limitations of the current techniques for steroid hormone determination. Based on this background, the determination of long-term hair steroid concentrations is an important methodological improvement allowing for the quantitative analysis of chronic HPA axis-activation. In order to determine the relationship between chronic mental and physical stress and a chronic activation of the HPA axis, we performed a cross-sectional pilot-study with 40 healthy students and examined the relationships between physical activity, mental burden(s), subjective stress perceptions, depressiveness, anxiety, physical complaints, sense of coherence, resilience, and the long-term integrated steroid hormone levels in hair. The results showed that the concentrations of cortisol, cortisone, and dehydroepiandrosterone in hair were significantly correlated to mental (p = 0.034) and physical stress (p = 0.001) as well as to subjective stress perception (p = 0.006). We conclude that steroid concentrations in hair are decisive predictors for an increase in the long-term-HPA axis activity. Moreover, this biomarker is suitable for capturing the stresslevel after burdening events and physical activity. PMID:27174654

  13. Investigating the role of acute mental stress on endothelial dysfunction: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yi-Tao; Tan, Qi-Wen; Li, Ping; Mou, Shan-Fang; Liu, Shu-Juan; Bao, Yue; Jiao, Hua-Chen; Su, Wen-Ge

    2015-04-01

    Chronic stress is a known risk factor for both endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease (CVD), but less is known of how acute mental stress affects the vasculature. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we analyzed the impact of acute mental stress on flow-mediated dilation (FMD), an indicator of endothelial function. We searched the Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases through May 2014, to identify publications in English-language journals. The primary outcome was the change in FMD from baseline to the time of measurement. We also assessed the risk of bias and the heterogeneity of included studies. Our search identified eight prospective studies, which displayed significant heterogeneity. Four studies measured FMD while the subject was performing the task; six measured FMD after the task had been completed. The total number of participants was 164. The pooled results indicate that FMD did not change significantly while the task was being performed (pooled difference in means: -0.853; 95 % confidence interval (CI), -3.926/2.220; P = 0.586); however, FMD measured after the task was completed was significantly less than baseline (pooled difference in means: -2.450; 95 %CI, -3.925/-0.975; P = 0.001). In conclusions, our findings provide evidence that an acute stressful experience has a delayed, negative impact on the function of the endothelium. Repeated exposure to short-term stress may lead to permanent injury of the vasculature. Therefore, assessment of patients' exposure to both repeated acute mental stress and chronic stress may be useful in determining their risk of developing CVD. PMID:25391292

  14. Thermography in Occlusive Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mawdsley, C.; Samuel, E.; Sumerling, M. D.; Young, G. B.

    1968-01-01

    Cooling of the skin over the medial supraorbital region in 80% of patients who have an occlusion or severe stenosis of a carotid artery can be demonstrated by facial thermography. Minor stenotic lesions in the carotid arteries do not produce characteristic thermographic changes, while thermography is of no help in the diagnosis of vertebrobasilar arterial disease. Thermographic changes suggestive of carotid arterial lesions are found occasionally in patients whose angiograms are normal, owing to variations in the size of the frontal sinuses, or factors such as fever or inflammatory lesions. It is suggested that facial thermography is of value in the preliminary investigation of patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:5676953

  15. Accelerated resolution therapy: an innovative mental health intervention to treat post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Alan; Kip, K; Hernandez, D; McGhee, S; Rosenzweig, L; Hynes, C; Thomas, M

    2016-04-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disabling trauma and stress-related disorder that may occur after a person experiences a traumatic event, and evokes a combination of intrusion and avoidance symptoms, negative alterations in cognitions and mood, and alterations in arousal and reactivity. Accelerated resolution therapy (ART) is an emerging psychotherapy that provides fast and lasting resolution for mental health problems such as PTSD. ART has been shown to achieve a positive result in one to five sessions, typically over a 2-week period, and requires no homework, skills practice or repeated exposure to targeted events. Initial research, including one randomised control trial, has demonstrated that ART interventions can significantly reduce symptoms of psychological trauma in both civilians and US service members and veterans. These results suggest that ART be considered as either a primary treatment option or for refractory PTSD in those with a suboptimal response to endorsed first-line therapies. Conservative estimates indicate substantial potential cost savings in PTSD treatment. Despite the need for more definitive clinical trials, there is increasing interest in ART in the USA, including in the US Army. The growing positive empirical evidence is compelling, and there appears to be sufficient evidence to warrant UK researchers undertaking ART research. The armed forces offer the potential for comparative international trials. However, equally important are veterans, emergency services personnel and those subjected to violence. ART appears to also have application in other conditions, including depression, anxiety disorders, and alcohol or drug misuse. ART can potentially help personnel traumatised by the unique challenges of war and conflict zones by providing brief psychotherapy in a readily accessible and culturally competent manner. ART facilitates the provision of interventions and resolutions in theatre, thus enhancing forces' fighting capability

  16. Assessment and Imaging of the Cerebrovascular Glycocalyx.

    PubMed

    Haeren, Roel Hubert Louis; van de Ven, Steffi Elisabeth Maria; van Zandvoort, Marcus Anna Maria Jacobus; Vink, Hans; van Overbeeke, Jacobus Johannes; Hoogland, Govert; Rijkers, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The glycocalyx is a gel-like layer lining the luminal surface of the endothelium. The glycocalyx exerts an important barrier role because it prevents exposure of plasma components to the endothelial surface. Disruption of the glycocalyx by local inflammation or ischemia results in decreased glycocalyx thickness which is associated with a number of vascular diseases. The cerebrovascular glycocalyx has sparsely been studied, but is of great interest because of its potential role in cerebrovascular disease. In this review, we describe all existing techniques to visualize the glycocalyx and designate techniques that may be suitable for studying the cerebrovascular glycocalyx. A total of seven imaging techniques are discussed thoroughly, including transmission electron microscopy, intravital microscopy, micro-particle image velocimetry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, two-photon laser scanning microscopy, orthogonal polarization spectral imaging and sidestream dark field/oblique imaging. Measurement of serum concentrations of glycocalyx-specific constituents is another method for glycocalyx analysis. Also, we have reviewed the methods of glycocalyx analysis by using these imaging techniques. So far, the cerebrovascular glycocalyx has only been studied in vitro. However, other cerebral microcirculatory properties have been studied in vivo. This suggests that the cerebrovascular glycocalyx can be studied in vivo by using some of the described techniques, when specific software is subjoined to the analysis. In conclusion, we have summarized techniques available for glycocalyx assessment, and explained the significance and technical possibilities regarding cerebrovascular glycocalyx visualization. Cerebrovascular glycocalyx assessment would add valuable information to our understanding of the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular disease. Moreover, as a part of the blood-brain barrier, more knowledge on the cerebrovascular glycocalyx may lead to better understanding of

  17. Response of the QT interval to mental and physical stress in types LQT1 and LQT2 of the long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paavonen, K; Swan, H; Piippo, K; Hokkanen, L; Laitinen, P; Viitasalo, M; Toivonen, L; Kontula, K

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To study and compare the effects of mental and physical stress on long QT syndrome (LQTS) patients.
DESIGN—Case-control study.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—QT intervals were measured from lead V3. Serum potassium and plasma catecholamine concentrations were also monitored.
PATIENTS—16 patients with type 1 LQTS (LQT1), 14 with type 2 LQTS (LQT2), both groups asymptomatic, and 14 healthy control subjects.
INTERVENTIONS—Three types of mental stress tests and a submaximal exercise stress test.
RESULTS—Heart rate responses to mental stress and exercise were similar in all groups. During mental stress, the mean QT interval shortened to a similar extent in controls (-29 ms), LQT1 patients (-34 ms), and LQT2 patients (-30 ms). During exercise, the corresponding QT adaptation to exercise stress was more pronounced (p < 0.01) in healthy controls (-47 ms) than in LQT1 (-38 ms) or LQT2 patients (-38 ms). During exercise changes in serum potassium concentrations were correlated to changes in QT intervals in controls, but not in LQTS patients. LQT1 and LQT2 patients did not differ in serum potassium, catecholamine or heart rate responses to mental or physical stress.
CONCLUSIONS—QT adaptation to mental and exercise stress in healthy people and in patients with LQTS is different. In healthy people QT adaptation is more sensitive to physical than to mental stress while no such diverging pattern was seen in asymptomatic LQTS patients.


Keywords: exercise; long QT syndrome; mental stress; potassium channel PMID:11410559

  18. Burnout in Veterans Health Administration Mental Health Providers in Posttraumatic Stress Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Hector A.; McGeary, Cindy A.; McGeary, Donald D.; Finley, Erin P.; Peterson, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct the first assessment of burnout among Veterans Health Administration (VHA) mental health clinicians providing evidence-based posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) care. This study consisted of 138 participants and the sample was mostly female (67%), Caucasian (non-Hispanic; 81%), and married (70%) with a mean age of 44.3 years (SD = 11.2). Recruitment was directed through VHA PTSD Clinical Teams (PCT) throughout the United States based on a nationwide mailing list of PCT Clinic Directors. Participants completed an electronic survey that assessed demographics, organizational work factors, absenteeism, and burnout (assessed through the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, MBI-GS). Twelve percent of the sample reported low Professional Efficacy, 50% reported high levels of Exhaustion, and 47% reported high levels of Cynicism as determined by the MBI-GS cut-off scores. Only workplace characteristics were significantly associated with provider scores on all 3 scales. Exhaustion and Cynicism were most impacted by perceptions of organizational politics/bureaucracy, increased clinical workload and control over how work is done. Organizational factors were also significantly associated with provider absenteeism and intent to leave his/her job. Findings suggest that providers in VHA specialty PTSD care settings may benefit from programs or supports aimed at preventing and/or ameliorating burnout. PMID:24564443

  19. Burnout in Veterans Health Administration mental health providers in posttraumatic stress clinics.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Hector A; McGeary, Cindy A; McGeary, Donald D; Finley, Erin P; Peterson, Alan L

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct the first assessment of burnout among Veterans Health Administration (VHA) mental health clinicians providing evidence-based posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) care. This study consisted of 138 participants and the sample was mostly female (67%), Caucasian (non-Hispanic; 81%), and married (70%) with a mean age of 44.3 years (SD = 11.2). Recruitment was directed through VHA PTSD Clinical Teams (PCT) throughout the United States based on a nationwide mailing list of PCT Clinic Directors. Participants completed an electronic survey that assessed demographics, organizational work factors, absenteeism, and burnout (assessed through the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, MBI-GS). Twelve percent of the sample reported low Professional Efficacy, 50% reported high levels of Exhaustion, and 47% reported high levels of Cynicism as determined by the MBI-GS cut-off scores. Only workplace characteristics were significantly associated with provider scores on all 3 scales. Exhaustion and Cynicism were most impacted by perceptions of organizational politics/bureaucracy, increased clinical workload, and control over how work is done. Organizational factors were also significantly associated with provider absenteeism and intent to leave his or her job. Findings suggest that providers in VHA specialty PTSD-care settings may benefit from programs or supports aimed at preventing and/or ameliorating burnout. PMID:24564443

  20. Cerebrovascular neurosurgery in evolution: the endovascular paradigm.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Grant C; Dumont, Travis M; Eller, Jorge L; Mokin, Maxim; Snyder, Kenneth V; Levy, Elad I; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Hopkins, L Nelson

    2014-02-01

    Endovascular technique represents an important, minimally invasive approach to treating cerebrovascular disease. In this article, we discuss the origins of endovascular neurosurgery as a discipline in the context of important technical milestones, evidence-based medicine, and future cerebrovascular neurosurgical training. Cerebrovascular neurosurgery has seen a steady, convergent evolution toward the surgeon capable of seamless incorporation of open and endovascular approaches to any complex vascular disease affecting the central nervous system. Neurosurgery must assume the leadership role in the multidisciplinary neurovascular team. PMID:24402487

  1. An Examination of the Impact of Minority Status Stress and Impostor Feelings on the Mental Health of Diverse Ethnic Minority College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cokley, Kevin; McClain, Shannon; Enciso, Alicia; Martinez, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    This study examined differences in minority status stress, impostor feelings, and mental health in a sample of 240 ethnic minority college students. African Americans reported higher minority status stress than Asian Americans and Latino/a Americans, whereas Asian Americans reported higher impostor feelings. Minority status stress and impostor…

  2. Different Neural Mechanisms Underlie Deficits in Mental Flexibility in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Compared to Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Elizabeth W.

    2015-01-01

    Mental flexibility is a core executive function that underlies the ability to adapt to changing situations and respond to new information. Individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) complain of a number of executive function difficulties, one of which is mental inflexibility or an inability to switch between concepts. While the behavioral presentation of mental inflexibility is similar in those with PTSD or mTBI, we hypothesized that the differences in their etiology would manifest as differences in their underlying brain processing. The neural substrates of mental flexibility have been examined with a number of neuroimaging modalities. Functional magnetic resonance imaging has elucidated the brain regions involved, whereas electroencephalography has been applied to understand the timing of the brain activations. Magnetoencephalography, with its high temporal and spatial resolution, has more recently been used to delineate the spatiotemporal progression of brain processes involved in mental flexibility and has been applied to the study of clinical populations. In a number of separate studies, our group has compared the source localization and brain connectivity during a mental flexibility set-shifting task in a group of soldiers with PTSD and civilians with an acute mTBI. In this article, we review the results from these studies and integrate the data between groups to compare and contrast differences in behavioral, neural, and connectivity findings. We show that the different etiologies of PTSD and mTBI are expressed as distinct neural profiles for mental flexibility that differentiate the groups despite their similar clinical presentations. PMID:26696907

  3. Investigating the Relationships among Stressors, Stress Level, and Mental Symptoms for Infertile Patients: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jong-Yi; Liang, Wen-Miin; Yang, Tung-Chuan; Lee, Young-Chang; Wang, Chia-Woei

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patients with infertility are a high risk group in depression and anxiety. However, an existing theoretically and empirically validated model of stressors, stress, and mental symptoms specific for infertile patients is still a void. This study aimed to determine the related factors and their relational structures that affect the level of depressive and anxiety symptoms among infertile patients. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 400 infertility outpatients seeking reproduction treatments in three teaching hospitals across Taiwan participated in the structured questionnaire survey in 2011. The hypothesized model comprising 10 latent variables was tested by Structural Equation Modeling using AMOS 17. Results Goodness-of-fit indexes, including χ2/DF = 1.871, PGFI = 0.746, PNFI = 0.764, and others, confirmed the modified model fit the data well. Marital stressor, importance of children, guilt-and-blame, and social stressor showed a direct effect on perceived stress. Instead of being a factor of stress, social support was directly and positively related to self-esteem. Perceived stress and self-esteem were the two major mediators for the relationships between stressors and mental symptoms. Increase in social support and self-esteem led to decrease in mental symptoms among the infertile patients. Conclusions The relational structures were identified and named as the Stressors Stress Symptoms Model, clinically applied to predict anxiety and depression from various stressors. Assessing sources and level of infertility-related stress and implementing culturally-sensitive counseling with an emphasis on positive personal value may assist in preventing the severity of depression and anxiety. PMID:26484531

  4. The cumulative effect of coffee and a mental stress task on heart rate, blood pressure, and mental alertness is similar in caffeine-naïve and caffeine-habituated females.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Michael D; Galloway, Ashley V; Dickau, Leanne J; Hudson, Megan K

    2008-09-01

    Most North American workers drink coffee throughout their workday, although the cumulative effect of job stress and coffee is not well known. Research has shown that coffee affects the cardiovascular system and mental alertness primarily through the active ingredient caffeine; however, the dose of caffeine used in these studies is greater than a normal cup of coffee. In addition, these changes have been mostly determined in male caffeine-habituated consumers. Therefore, this study examined the effect of a normal cup of coffee on the cardiovascular and mental alertness response both before and after a mental stress task in 10 caffeine-naïve (23 +/- 5.0 years) and 10 caffeine-habituated (25 +/- 6 years) females. Blood pressure, heart rate, and mental alertness were taken at baseline (before coffee), 50 minutes after finishing coffee and immediately after a 9-minute mental stress task. The volume of coffee ingested for a 15-minute period was 350 mL (12 oz), which is equivalent to 140 mg of caffeine. The combined effect of coffee and mental stress significantly decreased diastolic blood pressure (Delta8 mm Hg) and increased heart rate (Delta6 beats per minute) and mental alertness (Delta67.3%) in caffeine-naïve and caffeine-habituated females, whereas systolic blood pressure (Delta10.3 mm Hg) only increased in the caffeine-naïve participants. Our results indicate that a normal cup of coffee can effect changes in blood pressure and mental alertness and that mental stress may alter the magnitude of change; however, the transient increase in systolic blood pressure after drinking coffee in caffeine-naïve participants requires further investigation. PMID:19083466

  5. Course of mental symptoms in patients with stress-related exhaustion: does sex or age make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Long-term sick leave due to mental health problems, especially among women, is a substantial problem in many countries, and a major reason for this is thought to be psychosocial stress. The recovery period of different patient groups with stress-related mental health problems can differ considerably. We have studied the course of mental health symptoms during 18 months of multimodal treatment in relation to sex and age in a group of patients with stress-related exhaustion. Methods The study group includes 232 patients (68% women) referred to a stress clinic and who fulfilled the criteria for Exhaustion Disorder (ED). The majority also fulfilled diagnostic criteria for depression and/or anxiety; this was similar among women and men. Symptoms were assessed at baseline, three, six, 12 and 18 months by the Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD). A total SMBQ mean score of ≥ 4 was used to indicate clinical burnout, which correlates well with the clinical diagnosis of ED. Results There were no statistically significant differences between women and men or between young and old patients in the self-reported symptoms at baseline. The proportion that had high burnout scores decreased over time, but one-third still had symptoms of clinical burnout after 18 months. Symptoms indicating probable depression or anxiety (present in 34% and 65% of the patients at baseline, respectively) declined more rapidly, in most cases within the first three months, and were present only in one out of 10 after 18 months. The course of illness was not related to sex or age. The duration of symptoms before seeking health care, but not the level of education or co-morbid depression, was a predictor of recovery from symptoms of burnout after 18 months. Conclusions The course of mental illness in patients seeking specialist care for stress-related exhaustion was not related to sex or age. The burden of mental symptoms is high and

  6. The association between fibrinogen reactivity to mental stress and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarino, Antonio Ivan; Hamer, Mark; Gaze, David; Collinson, Paul; Rumley, Ann; Lowe, Gordon; Steptoe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Plasma fibrinogen is considered as a positive mediator between mental stress and cardiovascular disease because it is an acute-phase protein released in response to mental stress and a coagulation factor. However those three factors have never been studied together within a single integrated framework, using cardiac troponin T as a marker of cardiovascular risk. Methods 491 disease-free men and women aged 53–76 were tested for fibrinogen levels before, immediately after, and following recovery from standardized mental stress tasks. We measured plasma cardiac troponin T using a high-sensitivity assay (HS-CTnT) and coronary calcification using electron-beam dual-source computed tomography. Results The average fibrinogen concentration increased by 5.1% (s.d. = 7.3) in response to stress and then tended to return to baseline values. People with higher baseline fibrinogen values had smaller increases (blunted responses) following the stress task (P = 0.001), and people with higher stress responses showed better recovery (P < 0.001). In unadjusted analyses, higher baseline fibrinogen was associated with higher chances of having detectable HS-CTnT (P = 0.072) but, conversely, higher fibrinogen response was associated with lower chances of having detectable HS-CTnT (P = 0.007). The adjustment for clinical, inflammatory, and haemostatic factors, as well as for coronary calcification eliminated the effect of baseline fibrinogen, whereas the negative association between fibrinogen response and HS-CTnT remained robust: the odds of detectable HS-CTnT halved for each 10% increase in fibrinogen concentration due to stress (OR = 0.49, P = 0.007, 95% CI = 0.30–0.82). Conclusions Greater fibrinogen responses to mental stress are associated with lower likelihood of detectable high-sensitivity troponin T plasma concentration. A more dynamic fibrinogen response appears to be advantageous for cardiovascular health. PMID:26010862

  7. Prevalence of Perceived Stress and Mental Health Indicators Among Reserve-Component and Active-Duty Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Marian E.; Hourani, Laurel L.; Bray, Robert M.; Williams, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined stress levels and other indicators of mental health in reservists and active-duty military personnel by deployment status. Methods. We used data from the Department of Defense Health-Related Behaviors surveys, which collect comprehensive, population-based data for reserve and active-duty forces. Data were collected from 18 342 reservists and 16 146 active-duty personnel. Results. Overall, with adjustment for sociodemographic and service differences, reservists reported similar or less work and family stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms than did active-duty personnel. However, reservists who had been deployed reported higher rates of suicidal ideation and attempts than did active-duty personnel who had been deployed and higher rates of post-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology than did any active-duty personnel and reservists who had not been deployed. The highest rates of suicidal ideation and attempts were among reservists who had served in theaters other than Iraq and Afghanistan. Conclusions. Our results suggest that deployment has a greater impact on reservists than on active-duty members, thus highlighting the urgent need for services addressing reservists’ unique postdeployment mental health issues. Also, deployment to any theater, not only Iraq or Afghanistan, represents unique threats to all service members’ mental well-being. PMID:22571709

  8. Dissociation in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Evidence from the World Mental Health Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Dan J.; Koenen, Karestan C.; Friedman, Matthew J.; Hill, Eric; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Petukhova, Maria; Ruscio, Ayelet Meron; Shahly, Victoria; Spiegel, David; Borges, Guilherme; Bunting, Brendan; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Demyttenaere, Koen; Florescu, Silvia; Haro, Josep Maria; Karam, Elie G.; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Lee, Sing; Matschinger, Herbert; Mladenova, Maya; Posada-Villa, Jose; Tachimori, Hisateru; Viana, Maria Carmen; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the proposal for a dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in DSM-5 is supported by considerable clinical and neurobiological evidence, this evidence comes mostly from referred samples in Western countries. Cross-national population epidemiologic surveys were analyzed to evaluate generalizability of the subtype in more diverse samples. Methods Interviews were administered to 25,018 respondents in 16 countries in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to assess 12-month DSM-IV PTSD and other common DSM-IV disorders. Items from a checklist of past-month nonspecific psychological distress were used to assess dissociative symptoms of depersonalization and derealization. Differences between PTSD with and without these dissociative symptoms were examined across a variety of domains, including index trauma characteristics, prior trauma history, childhood adversity, sociodemographic characteristics, psychiatric comorbidity, functional impairment, and treatment seeking. Results Dissociative symptoms were present in 14.4% of respondents with 12-month DSM-IV/Composite International Diagnostic Interview PTSD and did not differ between high and low/middle income countries. Symptoms of dissociation in PTSD were associated with high counts of re-experiencing symptoms and net of these symptom counts with male sex, childhood onset of PTSD, high exposure to prior (to the onset of PTSD) traumatic events and childhood adversities, prior histories of separation anxiety disorder and specific phobia, severe role impairment, and suicidality. Conclusion These results provide community epidemiologic data documenting the value of the dissociative subtype in distinguishing a meaningful proportion of severe and impairing cases of PTSD that have distinct correlates across a diverse set of countries. PMID:23059051

  9. Acculturation-Related Stress and Mental Health Outcomes among Three Generations of Hispanic Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervantes, Richard C.; Padilla, Amado M.; Napper, Lucy E.; Goldbach, Jeremy T.

    2013-01-01

    Stress associated with acculturation and minority status among Hispanic youth is understudied. Using survey data from the Hispanic Stress Inventory-Adolescent Version (HSI-A), we examined psychosocial stress across eight domains including family economic stress and acculturation-gap stress in a national sample of three generations (first, second,…

  10. Reconsidering the role of social disadvantage in physical and mental health: stressful life events, health behaviors, race, and depression.

    PubMed

    Mezuk, Briana; Rafferty, Jane A; Kershaw, Kiarri N; Hudson, Darrell; Abdou, Cleopatra M; Lee, Hedwig; Eaton, William W; Jackson, James S

    2010-12-01

    Prevalence of depression is associated inversely with some indicators of socioeconomic position, and the stress of social disadvantage is hypothesized to mediate this relation. Relative to whites, blacks have a higher burden of most physical health conditions but, unexpectedly, a lower burden of depression. This study evaluated an etiologic model that integrates mental and physical health to account for this counterintuitive patterning. The Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (Maryland, 1993-2004) was used to evaluate the interaction between stress and poor health behaviors (smoking, alcohol use, poor diet, and obesity) and risk of depression 12 years later for 341 blacks and 601 whites. At baseline, blacks engaged in more poor health behaviors and had a lower prevalence of depression compared with whites (5.9% vs. 9.2%). The interaction between health behaviors and stress was nonsignificant for whites (odds ratio (OR = 1.04, 95% confidence interval: 0.98, 1.11); for blacks, the interaction term was significant and negative (β: -0.18, P < 0.014). For blacks, the association between median stress and depression was stronger for those who engaged in zero (OR = 1.34) relative to 1 (OR = 1.12) and ≥2 (OR = 0.94) poor health behaviors. Findings are consistent with the proposed model of mental and physical health disparities. PMID:20884682

  11. Mobile Mental Wellness Training for Stress Management: Feasibility and Design Implications Based on a One-Month Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahtinen, Aino; Välkkynen, Pasi; Kaipainen, Kirsikka; Vanhala, Toni; Ermes, Miikka; Sairanen, Essi; Myllymäki, Tero; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2013-01-01

    Background Prevention and management of work-related stress and related mental problems is a great challenge. Mobile applications are a promising way to integrate prevention strategies into the everyday lives of citizens. Objective The objectives of this study was to study the usage, acceptance, and usefulness of a mobile mental wellness training application among working-age individuals, and to derive preliminary design implications for mobile apps for stress management. Methods Oiva, a mobile app based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), was designed to support active learning of skills related to mental wellness through brief ACT-based exercises in the daily life. A one-month field study with 15 working-age participants was organized to study the usage, acceptance, and usefulness of Oiva. The usage of Oiva was studied based on the usage log files of the application. Changes in wellness were measured by three validated questionnaires on stress, satisfaction with life (SWLS), and psychological flexibility (AAQ-II) at the beginning and at end of the study and by user experience questionnaires after one week’s and one month’s use. In-depth user experience interviews were conducted after one month’s use to study the acceptance and user experiences of Oiva. Results Oiva was used actively throughout the study. The average number of usage sessions was 16.8 (SD 2.4) and the total usage time per participant was 3 hours 12 minutes (SD 99 minutes). Significant pre-post improvements were obtained in stress ratings (mean 3.1 SD 0.2 vs mean 2.5 SD 0.1, P=.003) and satisfaction with life scores (mean 23.1 SD 1.3 vs mean 25.9 SD 0.8, P=.02), but not in psychological flexibility. Oiva was perceived easy to use, acceptable, and useful by the participants. A randomized controlled trial is ongoing to evaluate the effectiveness of Oiva on working-age individuals with stress problems. Conclusions A feasibility study of Oiva mobile mental wellness training app showed good

  12. Elevated systemic expression of ER stress related genes is associated with stress-related mental disorders in the Detroit Neighborhood Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Nevell, Lisa; Zhang, Kezhong; Aiello, Allison; Koenen, Karestan; Galea, Sandro; Soliven, Richelo; Zhang, Chao; Wildman, Derek E.; Uddin, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress response in mental illness is not well understood. Human studies and animal models of depression show elevated brain ER stress response. In addition, some ER stress associated disorders (e.g. cardiovascular disease) show higher rates of depression compared to the general population, raising the possibility that ER stress response contributes to depression risk. It remains unknown, however, if ER stress response is present among individuals suffering from other stress-related mental illness, and whether such a response would be evident in a non-clinical sample. This study tests for systemic changes in ER stress response associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among community-dwelling individuals. Methods We analyzed expression of BiP, EDEM1, CHOP, and XBP1, the major indicators of ER stress response, with Real-Time PCR in leukocyte-derived RNA samples from 86 participants of the Detroit Neighborhood Health Study. Participants were selected based on the presence of either past year MDD or past year PTSD; controls were age and sex matched. Results Relative to controls, MDD is associated with a 1.34-fold increase in BiP (P=0.004), 1.35-fold increase in EDEM1 (P=0.001), 1.68-fold increase in CHOP (P=0.002), and 1.60-fold increase in XBP1 (P=0.004). These results remained significant after correction for multiple testing. In contrast, PTSD is associated with a 1.27 fold increase in EDEM1 expression only (P=0.027), a result that is attenuated to non-significance following adjustment for multiple testing; however, a subsample of participants with past month PTSD showed elevated expression of BiP and EDEM1 (uncorrected p value 0.049 and 0.017, respectively). Conclusions These data indicate systemic and persistent activation of the ER stress response pathway in MDD among community-dwelling individuals. Systemic activation of the ER stress response may also occur in PTSD

  13. Utilization of Professional Mental Health Services Related to Population-Level Screening for Anxiety, Depression, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Among Public High School Students.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, John D; Le, Vi Donna; Baillargeon, Jacques; Temple, Jeff R

    2016-08-01

    This study examines results from three mental health screening measures in a cohort of adolescent public school students in seven public schools in Southeast Texas affiliated with the Dating it Safe study. We estimated the odds of receiving professional mental health treatment in the previous year given results from different mental health screening batteries: the CES-D 10 battery for depression screening, the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders, and the Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder screen. Overall, students with higher scores on screening instruments for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and combinations of screening instruments were more likely to have sought past-year professional mental health treatment than non-symptomatic youth. However, the proportion of students screening positive and receiving professional treatment was low, ranging from 11 to 16 %. This study emphasizes the need for broader evaluation of population-based mental health screening among adolescents. PMID:26733335

  14. Relation Between Prefrontal Cortex Activity and Respiratory Rate During Mental Stress Tasks: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuta; Hu, Lizhen; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    In order to clarify the central mechanism controlling respiratory rate during mental stress, we examined the relation between prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity and respiratory rate during mental arithmetic (MA) tasks. Employing two-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), we measured hemoglobin (Hb) concentration changes in the bilateral PFC during MA tasks in normal adults. To evaluate asymmetry of the PFC activity, we calculated the laterality index (LI); (R-L)/(R + L) of oxy-Hb concentration changes (R = right, L = left); positive LI scores indicate right-dominant activity, while negative scores indicate left-dominant activity. For measurements of respiratory rate, we employed a Kinect motion sensor (Microsoft). The MA tasks increased both oxy-Hb in the bilateral PFC and respiratory rate (p < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant correlation between LI and respiratory rate (r = 0.582, p < 0.02). These results indicate that the MA-induced activity in the right PFC was greater than that in the left PFC in subjects with large increases of respiratory rate, suggesting that the right PFC has a greater role in cerebral regulation of respiratory rate during mental stress. PMID:27526145

  15. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and mental health services utilization in adolescents with social anxiety disorder and experiences of victimization.

    PubMed

    Gren-Landell, Malin; Aho, Nikolas; Carlsson, Elisabeth; Jones, Annica; Svedin, Carl Göran

    2013-03-01

    Recent findings from studies on adults show similarities between social anxiety disorder (SAD) and posttraumatic stress in the form of recurrent memories and intrusive and distressing images of earlier aversive events. Further, treatment models for SAD in adults have been successfully developed by using transdiagnostic knowledge on posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Studies on adolescents are though missing. The present study aimed at exploring the association between PTSS and SAD in Swedish adolescents. A second aim was to study mental health services utilization in relation to these conditions. A total of 5,960 high-school students participated and reported on SAD, life time victimization, PTSS and mental health service utilization. Socially anxious adolescents reported significantly higher levels of PTSS than adolescents not reporting SAD and this difference was seen in victimized as well as non-victimized subjects. Contact with a school counselor was the most common mental health service utilization in subjects with SAD and those with elevated PTSS. In the prediction of contact with a CAP-clinic, significant odds ratios were found for a condition of SAD and elevated PTSS (OR = 4.88, 95% CI = 3.53-6.73) but not for SAD only. Screening of PTSS in adolescents with SAD is recommended. The service of school counselors is important in detecting and helping young people with SAD and elevated PTSS. Clinical studies on SAD and PTSS in adolescents could aid in modifying treatment models for SAD. PMID:23099817

  16. The effect of work on people with severe mental illness in Taiwan using a stress-social support model: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Ching

    2006-06-01

    Satisfaction with quality of life is one aspect of a positive and successful life, and this remains true in the rehabilitation of people with severe mental illness. This study explores the meaning and impact of work on people with severe mental illness in Taiwan and, specifically, the value of encouraging people with severe mental illness to work to enhance their quality of life. We apply stress-social support theory (a Western model) to examine daily life and work stressors in an Eastern cultural environment (Taiwan). We use multiple regression models to analyze predictive factors for their effect on life quality. There are five categories: socio-demographic characteristics, mental illness history, current work status variables (as controls), stress variable and social support variable. Unlike Western studies, current work status, in itself, did not lead to better satisfaction with quality of life, but the stress-social support model did. The implications for rehabilitation success are discussed. PMID:16609326

  17. Chronic Stress Induces a Hyporeactivity of the Autonomic Nervous System in Response to Acute Mental Stressor and Impairs Cognitive Performance in Business Executives

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Renata Roland; Díaz, Miguel Mauricio; Santos, Tatiane Vanessa da Silva; Bernardes, Jean Tofoles Martins; Peixoto, Leonardo Gomes; Bocanegra, Olga Lucia; Neto, Morun Bernardino; Espindola, Foued Salmen

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the incidence of chronic stress in business executives (109 subjects: 75 male and 34 female) and its relationship with cortisol levels, cognitive performance, and autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity after an acute mental stressor. Blood samples were collected from the subjects to measure cortisol concentration. After the sample collection, the subjects completed the Lipp Inventory of Stress Symptoms for Adults and the Stroop Color-Word Test to evaluate stress and cognitive performance levels, respectively. Saliva samples were collected prior to, immediately after, and five minutes after the test. The results revealed that 90.1% of the stressed subjects experienced stress phases that are considered chronic stress. At rest, the subjects with chronic stress showed higher cortisol levels, and no gender differences were observed. No differences were found between the stressed and non-stressed subjects regarding salivary amylase activity prior to test. Chronic stress also impaired performance on the Stroop test, which revealed higher rates of error and longer reaction times in the incongruent stimulus task independently of gender. For the congruent stimulus task of the Stroop test, the stressed males presented a higher rate of errors than the non-stressed males and a longer reaction time than the stressed females. After the acute mental stressor, the non-stressed male group showed an increase in salivary alpha-amylase activity, which returned to the initial values five minutes after the test; this ANS reactivity was not observed in the chronically stressed male subjects. The ANS responses of the non-stressed vs stressed female groups were not different prior to or after the Stroop test. This study is the first to demonstrate a blunted reactivity of the ANS when male subjects with chronic psychological stress were subjected to an acute mental stressor, and this change could contribute to impairments in cognitive performance. PMID:25807003

  18. Chronic stress induces a hyporeactivity of the autonomic nervous system in response to acute mental stressor and impairs cognitive performance in business executives.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Renata Roland; Díaz, Miguel Mauricio; Santos, Tatiane Vanessa da Silva; Bernardes, Jean Tofoles Martins; Peixoto, Leonardo Gomes; Bocanegra, Olga Lucia; Neto, Morun Bernardino; Espindola, Foued Salmen

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the incidence of chronic stress in business executives (109 subjects: 75 male and 34 female) and its relationship with cortisol levels, cognitive performance, and autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity after an acute mental stressor. Blood samples were collected from the subjects to measure cortisol concentration. After the sample collection, the subjects completed the Lipp Inventory of Stress Symptoms for Adults and the Stroop Color-Word Test to evaluate stress and cognitive performance levels, respectively. Saliva samples were collected prior to, immediately after, and five minutes after the test. The results revealed that 90.1% of the stressed subjects experienced stress phases that are considered chronic stress. At rest, the subjects with chronic stress showed higher cortisol levels, and no gender differences were observed. No differences were found between the stressed and non-stressed subjects regarding salivary amylase activity prior to test. Chronic stress also impaired performance on the Stroop test, which revealed higher rates of error and longer reaction times in the incongruent stimulus task independently of gender. For the congruent stimulus task of the Stroop test, the stressed males presented a higher rate of errors than the non-stressed males and a longer reaction time than the stressed females. After the acute mental stressor, the non-stressed male group showed an increase in salivary alpha-amylase activity, which returned to the initial values five minutes after the test; this ANS reactivity was not observed in the chronically stressed male subjects. The ANS responses of the non-stressed vs stressed female groups were not different prior to or after the Stroop test. This study is the first to demonstrate a blunted reactivity of the ANS when male subjects with chronic psychological stress were subjected to an acute mental stressor, and this change could contribute to impairments in cognitive performance. PMID:25807003

  19. Gender minority stress, mental health, and relationship quality: A dyadic investigation of transgender women and their cisgender male partners

    PubMed Central

    Gamarel, Kristi E.; Reisner, Sari L.; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Nemoto, Tooru; Operario, Don

    2014-01-01

    Research has demonstrated associations between experiences of discrimination, relationship quality, and mental health. However, critical questions remain unanswered with regard to how stigma enacted and experienced at the dyadic-level influences relationship quality and mental health for transgender women and their cisgender (non-transgender) male partners. The present study sought to examine how experiences of transgender-related discrimination (i.e., unfair treatment, harassment) and relationship stigma (i.e., the real or anticipated fear of rejection based on one’s romantic affiliation), were associated with both partners relationship quality and mental health. Couples (N=191) were recruited to participate in cross-sectional survey. Actor-partner interdependence models (APIM) were fit to examine the influence of minority stressors on clinically significant depressive distress and relationship quality. For both partners, financial hardship, discrimination, and relationship stigma were associated with an increased odds of depressive distress. For both partners, financial hardship was associated with lower relationship quality. Among transgender women, their own and their partner’s higher relationship stigma scores were associated with lower relationship quality; however, among male partners, only their partner’s greater relationship stigma scores were associated with lower relationship quality. Findings provide preliminary support for dyadic crossover effects of relationship stigma on the health of partners. Findings illustrate the importance of minority stress and dyadic stress frameworks in understanding and intervening upon mental health disparities among transgender women and their male partners. Couples-based interventions and treatment approaches to help transgender women and their male partners cope with minority stressors are warranted to improve the health and well-being of both partners. PMID:24932942

  20. Stress, Self-Esteem, and Mental Health: How Does Gender Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Diana M.

    1989-01-01

    Compares the stress levels and reactions to stress of 804 female and 127 male college students and examines their relationship to self-esteem, confidence, and self-concept. Concludes that sex differences in dysfunctional reactions to stress are related to sex differences in self-concepts, whereas sex differences in areas of stress are not related…

  1. Stress and Mental Health in Families With Different Income Levels: A Strategy to Collect Multi-Actor Data

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have focused on family stress processes, examining the association between various sources of stress and the mental health and well-being of parents and adolescents. The majority of these studies take the individual as the unit of analysis. Multi-actor panel data make it possible to examine the dynamics of the family context over time and the differentiating effects of individual roles within the same family. Accurate information about family processes allows practitioners to provide support that enhances family resilience and minimizes the risk of mental health problems. Objective Our study contributes to the research on family stress processes by focusing on families with different income levels, and by collecting panel data from mothers, fathers, and adolescents within the same family. Methods The relationship between mothers, fathers, and children (RMFC) study is an ongoing Flemish multi-actor panel study that aims to enhance our understanding of family processes that protect the mental health and well-being of two-parent families with a target adolescent between 11 and 17 years old. Mothers, fathers, and children provide information about various aspects of family life, including finances, sources of stress, health, mental health, parenting, and coping strategies. Measures have been chosen whenever possible that have sound conceptual underpinnings and robust psychometric properties. The study posed two challenges. First, economically disadvantaged families are difficult to reach. Second, the collection of multi-actor data is often plagued by high nonresponse. To ensure that the families were targeted as successfully as possible, the study employed a purposive nonprobability sampling method. Results The RMFC study is one of the largest triadic panel studies of its kind. The first wave of quantitative data collection was conducted between February 2012 and January 2013. A total of 2566 individuals of 880 families participated in our

  2. Mental health outcomes in emerging adults exposed to childhood maltreatment: the moderating role of stress reactivity.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Melissa J; Roubinov, Danielle S; Mistler, Amy Kraft; Luecken, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    Childhood maltreatment is an established risk factor for varying configurations of psychological problems in emerging adulthood. The current study tested associations between childhood maltreatment, cortisol reactivity, and current mental health symptoms in emerging adulthood. Eighty-eight participants (aged 18-22) completed measures of childhood maltreatment and current internalizing and externalizing symptoms and participated in a 10-min conflict role-play task. Salivary cortisol was sampled throughout the task, and a residualized change score between baseline and peak time points was computed to capture reactivity. Results from robust regression analyses indicated that cortisol reactivity moderated the association between childhood maltreatment and mental health symptoms as hypothesized. Childhood maltreatment was related to greater internalizing problems among participants with higher cortisol reactivity, whereas maltreatment was associated with greater externalizing problems among participants who exhibited lower cortisol reactivity. Results suggest that patterns of cortisol reactivity in emerging adulthood may help elucidate mental health outcomes associated with childhood maltreatment. PMID:24920249

  3. Self-Rated Mental Health: Screening for Depression and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Women Exposed to Perinatal Intimate Partner Violence.

    PubMed

    Kastello, Jennifer C; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Gaffney, Kathleen F; Kodadek, Marie P; Bullock, Linda C; Sharps, Phyllis W

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the validity of a single-item, self-rated mental health (SRMH) measure in the identification of women at risk for depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Baseline data of 239 low-income women participating in an intimate partner violence (IPV) intervention study were analyzed. PTSD was measured with the Davidson Trauma Scale. Risk for depression was determined using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. SRMH was assessed with a single item asking participants to rate their mental health at the time of the baseline interview. Single-item measures can be an efficient way to increase the proportion of patients screened for mental health disorders. Although SRMH is not a strong indicator of PTSD, it may be useful in identifying pregnant women who are at increased risk for depression and need further comprehensive assessment in the clinical setting. Future research examining the use of SRMH among high-risk populations is needed. PMID:26535762

  4. Increased objectively assessed vigorous-intensity exercise is associated with reduced stress, increased mental health and good objective and subjective sleep in young adults.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Markus; Brand, Serge; Herrmann, Christian; Colledge, Flora; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe

    2014-08-01

    The role of physical activity as a factor that protects against stress-related mental disorders is well documented. Nevertheless, there is still a dearth of research using objective measures of physical activity. The present study examines whether objectively assessed vigorous physical activity (VPA) is associated with mental health benefits beyond moderate physical activity (MPA). Particularly, this study examines whether young adults who accomplish the American College of Sports Medicine's (ACSM) vigorous-intensity exercise recommendations differ from peers below these standards with regard to their level of perceived stress, depressive symptoms, perceived pain, and subjective and objective sleep. A total of 42 undergraduate students (22 women, 20 men; M=21.24years, SD=2.20) volunteered to take part in the study. Stress, pain, depressive symptoms, and subjective sleep were assessed via questionnaire, objective sleep via sleep-EEG assessment, and VPA via actigraphy. Meeting VPA recommendations had mental health benefits beyond MPA. VPA was associated with less stress, pain, subjective sleep complaints and depressive symptoms. Moreover, vigorous exercisers had more favorable objective sleep pattern. Especially, they had increased total sleep time, more stage 4 and REM sleep, more slow wave sleep and a lower percentage of light sleep. Vigorous exercisers also reported fewer mental health problems if exposed to high stress. This study provides evidence that meeting the VPA standards of the ACSM is associated with improved mental health and more successful coping among young people, even compared to those who are meeting or exceeding the requirements for MPA. PMID:24905432

  5. Impaired resting myocardial annular velocities are independently associated with mental-stress induced ischemia in patients with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Ersboll, Mads; Enezi, Fawaz Al; Samad, Zainab; Sedberry, Brenda; Boyle, Stephen H.; O’Connor, Christopher; Jiang, Wei; Velazquez, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objectives To investigate the association between resting myocardial function as assessed by tissue Doppler myocardial velocities (TDI) and the propensity for developing mental stress induced ischemia (MSIMI). Background Tissue Doppler myocardial velocities detect preclinical cardiac dysfunction and clinical outcome in a range of conditions. However, little is known about the interrelationship between myocardial velocities and the propensity for developing MSIMI versus exercise stress induced myocardial ischemia (ESIMI). Methods Resting annular myocardial TDI velocities were obtained in 225 patients with known coronary heart disease who were subjected to both conventional exercise stress test as well as a battery of 3 mental stress tests. Diastolic early (e′) and late (a′) as well as systolic (s′) velocities were obtained and eas-index, an integrated measure of myocardial velocities, was calculated as e′/(a′ x s′). MSIMI was defined as 1) development or worsening of regional wall motion abnormality, 2) reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction ≥ 8%, and/or 3) ischemic ST-segment changes during one or more of the three mental stress tests. Results A total of 98 (43.7%) out of 225 patients exhibited MSIMI. Patients developing MSIMI had significantly lower s′ (7.0±1.7 vs 7.5±1.2, p=0.016) and a′ (8.9±1.8 vs 10.0±1.9, p<0.001) at baseline whereas e′ did not differ (6.5±1.7 vs. 6.5±1.8, p=0.85). Furthermore, the eas-index was significantly higher (0.11±0.04 vs. 0.09±0.03, p<0.0001).The eas-index remained significantly associated with the propensity for developing MSIMI (Odds ratio per 0.05 unit increase: 1.85; 95%CI: 1.21–2.82, p=0.004) after adjustment of resting LVEF, resting wall motion index score, gender and social circumstances of living. There was no association between resting eas-index and ESIMI. Conclusion MSIMI but not ESIMI is independently associated with resting abnormalities in myocardial systolic

  6. Association of Vitamin D Status With Mental Stress Induced Myocardial Ischemia in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Ronnie; Vaccarino, Viola; Esteves, Fabio; Sheps, David S.; Bremner, James Douglas; Raggi, Paolo; Quyyumi, Arshed A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental stress-induced (MSIMI) or physical stress-induced (PSIMI) myocardial ischemia portends a worse prognosis in CAD patients. Vitamin D insufficiency is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, but its relationship to myocardial ischemia remains unclear. We hypothesized that vitamin D insufficiency will be associated with a higher prevalence of myocardial ischemia in CAD patients. Methods In 255 patients with stable CAD, myocardial perfusion imaging was performed to assess ischemia in response to mental and physical stress protocols. Vitamin D insufficiency was defined as serum 25-hydroxyvitamin-D [25(OH)D] levels below 30 ng/ml, collected on the day of stress testing. Results Mean 25(OH)D level was 30.8±12.8 ng/ml, and 139 (55%) patients had vitamin D insufficiency. MSIMI occurred in 30 (12%) patients and PSIMI in 67 (27%). Individuals with MSIMI had significantly lower levels of 25(OH)D as compared to those without MSIMI (24.0±8.6 vs. 31.7±12.9, p=0.002). The prevalence of MSIMI was higher in those with as compared to those without vitamin D insufficiency (17% vs. 6%, p=0.009). Moreover, low 25(OH)D levels remained independently associated with MSIMI after adjusting for potential confounders. Conversely, 25(OH)D levels were similar between those with or without PSIMI (29.8±13.0 vs. 31.4±12.7; p=0.37), as was the prevalence of PSIMI in those with or without vitamin D insufficiency (29% vs. 24%, p=0.42). Conclusions Vitamin D insufficiency is associated with a higher prevalence of MSIMI, but not PSIMI among stable CAD patients. Whether this association serves as a potential mechanism linking low vitamin D status to adverse cardiovascular outcomes warrants further investigation. PMID:25222601

  7. The Roles of Financial Threat, Social Support, Work Stress, and Mental Distress in Dairy Farmers’ Expectations of Injury

    PubMed Central

    Furey, Emilia M.; O’Hora, Denis; McNamara, John; Kinsella, Stephen; Noone, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Farming is dangerous, with fatalities among the highest in any occupation. Farmers often work alone, for long hours, with unreliable equipment and in difficult weather conditions with hazardous chemicals and livestock. In addition, farmers make large financial commitments exposing them to high levels of financial risk. Exposure to such financial risk can give rise to subjective experiences of financial threat (FT) that are psychologically challenging. The current study attempted to characterize the role that FT plays in farm injuries. One hundred and twenty one dairy farmers completed a battery of questionnaires assessing FT, social support (SS), depression, anxiety, farm job stress, and health and safety beliefs. Mental distress directly predicted farmers’ expectations of injury and a direct effect of non-financial farm stress (FS) approached significance. Mental distress mediated these relationships as evidenced by significant indirect effects of FS and FT, and SS served to reduce distress. These findings support calls for interventions designed to reduce FS and FT and increase SS for farmers. PMID:27446893

  8. The Roles of Financial Threat, Social Support, Work Stress, and Mental Distress in Dairy Farmers' Expectations of Injury.

    PubMed

    Furey, Emilia M; O'Hora, Denis; McNamara, John; Kinsella, Stephen; Noone, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Farming is dangerous, with fatalities among the highest in any occupation. Farmers often work alone, for long hours, with unreliable equipment and in difficult weather conditions with hazardous chemicals and livestock. In addition, farmers make large financial commitments exposing them to high levels of financial risk. Exposure to such financial risk can give rise to subjective experiences of financial threat (FT) that are psychologically challenging. The current study attempted to characterize the role that FT plays in farm injuries. One hundred and twenty one dairy farmers completed a battery of questionnaires assessing FT, social support (SS), depression, anxiety, farm job stress, and health and safety beliefs. Mental distress directly predicted farmers' expectations of injury and a direct effect of non-financial farm stress (FS) approached significance. Mental distress mediated these relationships as evidenced by significant indirect effects of FS and FT, and SS served to reduce distress. These findings support calls for interventions designed to reduce FS and FT and increase SS for farmers. PMID:27446893

  9. The Role of Acculturative Stress on Mental Health Symptoms for Immigrant Adolescents: A Longitudinal Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirin, Selcuk R.; Ryce, Patrice; Gupta, Taveeshi; Rogers-Sirin, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    Immigrant-origin adolescents represent the fastest growing segment of youth population in the United States, and in many urban schools they represent the majority of students. In this 3-wave longitudinal study, we explored trajectories of internalizing mental health symptoms (depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms). The participants included…

  10. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Rural Primary Care: Improving Care for Mental Health Following Bioterrorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsao, Jennie C. I.; Dobalian, Aram; Wiens, Brenda A.; Gylys, Julius A.; Evans, Garret D.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Recent bioterrorist attacks have highlighted the critical need for health care organizations to prepare for future threats. Yet, relatively little attention has been paid to the mental health needs of rural communities in the wake of such events. A critical aspect of bioterrorism is emphasis on generating fear and uncertainty, thereby…

  11. Primary Prevention for Mental Health: A Stress Inoculation Training Course for Functioning Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiraldi, Glenn R.; Brown, Stephen L.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a college course that taught preventive mental health skills to adults by exploring diverse cognitive-behavioral skills that facilitate coping, are preventive in nature, and are suitable for learning by healthy individuals in educational settings. It focused on anger management, anxiety and worry management, self-esteem enhancement,…

  12. Mental Health of Somali Adolescent Refugees: The Role of Trauma, Stress, and Perceived Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, B. Heidi; MacDonald, Helen Z.; Lincoln, Alisa K.; Cabral, Howard J.

    2008-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine relations between trauma exposure, post-resettlement stressors, perceived discrimination, and mental health symptoms in Somali adolescent refugees resettled in the U.S. Participants were English-speaking Somali adolescent refugees between the ages of 11 and 20 (N = 135) who had resettled in the U.S.…

  13. Cerebrovascular ischemic events in wind instrument players.

    PubMed

    Evers, S; Altenmüller, E; Ringelstein, E B

    2000-09-26

    Two cases of ischemic stroke due to carotid artery dissection occurring during wind instrument playing, probably caused by increased intrathoracic and subsequent intrapharyngeal pressure, are presented. A review of the literature revealed three similar patients with other types of cerebrovascular events, such as paradoxical cerebral embolism due to a patent foramen ovale and spinal epidural hematoma during trumpet playing. PMID:10994010

  14. The Mediating Role of Mental Adjustment in the Relationship between Perceived Stress and Depressive Symptoms in Hematological Cancer Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingchun; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Rong; Yao, Kun; Liu, Zhuogang

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is a particularly common psychological disorder that affects cancer patients. Diagnosed with hematological malignancies constitute a serious unpredictable and uncontrollable medical stress situation and patients are susceptible to suffer from depressive symptoms. The aims of the study were to explore the correlation between perceived stress and depressive symptoms in patients with hematological malignancies, and assess the mediating role of mental adjustment between these variables. Methods A single center, cross-sectional study was performed by convenience sampling between July 2013 and April 2014 in a hospital of China. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, and Mini-Mental Adjustment Scale, as well as questions about demographic and clinical factors was distributed to 300 hematological cancer patients. Completed questionnaires were received from 227 inpatients. Results The results showed that perceived stress was positively correlated with depressive symptoms. The mental adjustment significantly mediated the relationship between perceived stress and depressive symptoms. Conclusions Among hematological cancer patients perceived stress may be a risk factor for depressive symptoms, whereas positive coping style might be protective against depressive symptoms. Results showed that medical managers could support the development of mental adjustment in the patients to alleviate psychological disorders. PMID:26587991

  15. [Changes in the EEG frequency spectrum in various phases of mental stress].

    PubMed

    Mecklinger, A; Bösel, R

    1989-01-01

    To obtain evidence about the relationship between spontaneous EEG activity and mental activity, an experiment was designed and executed with EEG recordings during a concept-learning task. We varied task performance (self-paced vs. machine-paced) and distinguished different stages of information processing during task performance. Using factor analysis calculated on all spectral coefficients, we found two orthogonal variables in the clinical alpha band. Alpha 2 power (10.5-12 Hz) seems to reflect the overall processing demands imposed on the individuals. Furthermore, there are different EEG frequency patterns during perceptual-central- compared with response-related processing as well as during processing of positive vs. negative feedback. The results suggest using (1) conservative procedures in hypothesis testing and (2) procedures to reduce between subject variability (a posteriori defined frequency variables, relative power values, scaling of reaction values) in further studies relating EEG activity to mental activity during task performance. PMID:2588701

  16. Perceived Discrimination, Perceived Stress, and Mental and Physical Health among Mexican-Origin Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Elena; Tschann, Jeanne M.; Dimas, Juanita M.; Bachen, Elizabeth A.; Pasch, Lauri A.; de Groat, Cynthia L.

    2008-01-01

    This study provided a test of the minority status stress model by examining whether perceived discrimination would directly affect health outcomes even when perceived stress was taken into account among 215 Mexican-origin adults. Perceived discrimination predicted depression and poorer general health, and marginally predicted health symptoms, when…

  17. Do time-invariant confounders explain away the association between job stress and workers' mental health? Evidence from Japanese occupational panel data.

    PubMed

    Oshio, Takashi; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Inoue, Akiomi

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that job stress is negatively related to workers' mental health, but most recent studies have not controlled for unobserved time-invariant confounders. In the current study, we attempted to validate previous observations on the association between job stress and workers' mental health, by removing the effects of unobserved time-invariant confounders. We used data from three to four waves of an occupational Japanese cohort survey, focusing on 31,382 observations of 9741 individuals who participated in at least two consecutive waves. We estimated mean-centered fixed effects models to explain psychological distress in terms of the Kessler 6 (K6) scores (range: 0-24) by eight job stress indicators related to the job demands-control, effort-reward imbalance, and organizational injustice models. Mean-centered fixed effects models reduced the magnitude of the association between jobs stress and K6 scores to 44.8-54.2% of those observed from pooled ordinary least squares. However, the association remained highly significant even after controlling for unobserved time-invariant confounders for all job stress indicators. In addition, alternatively specified models showed the robustness of the results. In all, we concluded that the validity of major job stress models, which link job stress and workers' mental health, was robust, although unobserved time-invariant confounders led to an overestimation of the association. PMID:25550077

  18. Mental health in hypertension: assessing symptoms of anxiety, depression and stress on anti-hypertensive medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic conditions like hypertension may experience many negative emotions which increase their risk for the development of mental health disorders particularly anxiety and depression. For Ghanaian patients with hypertension, the interaction between hypertension and symptoms of anxiety, depression and stress remains largely unexplored. To fill this knowledge gap, the study sought to ascertain the prevalence and role of these negative emotions on anti-hypertensive medication adherence while taking into account patients’ belief systems. Methods The hospital-based cross-sectional study involving 400 hypertensive patients was conducted in two tertiary hospitals in Ghana. Data were gathered on patient’s socio-demographic characteristics, anxiety, depression and stress symptoms, spiritual beliefs, and medication adherence. Results Hypertensive patients experienced symptoms of anxiety (56%), stress (20%) and depression (4%). As a coping mechanism, a significant relation was observed between spiritual beliefs and anxiety (x2 = 13.352, p = 0.010), depression (x2 = 6.205, p = 0.045) and stress (x2 = 14.833, p = 0.001). Stress among patients increased their likelihood of medication non-adherence [odds ratio (OR) = 2.42 (95% CI 1.06 – 5.5), p = 0.035]. Conclusion The study has demonstrated the need for clinicians to pay attention to negative emotions and their role in medication non-adherence. The recommendation is that attention should be directed toward the use of spirituality as a possible mechanism by which negative emotions could be managed among hypertensive patients. PMID:24987456

  19. Mental Imagery and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Neuroimaging and Experimental Psychopathology Approach to Intrusive Memories of Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ian A.; Mackay, Clare E.

    2015-01-01

    This hypothesis and theory paper presents a pragmatic framework to help bridge the clinical presentation and neuroscience of intrusive memories following psychological trauma. Intrusive memories are a hallmark symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, key questions, including those involving etiology, remain. In particular, we know little about the brain mechanisms involved in why only some moments of the trauma return as intrusive memories while others do not. We first present an overview of the patient experience of intrusive memories and the neuroimaging studies that have investigated intrusive memories in PTSD patients. Next, one mechanism of how to model intrusive memories in the laboratory, the trauma film paradigm, is examined. In particular, we focus on studies combining the trauma film paradigm with neuroimaging. Stemming from the clinical presentation and our current understanding of the processes involved in intrusive memories, we propose a framework in which an intrusive memory comprises five component parts; autobiographical (trauma) memory, involuntary recall, negative emotions, attention hijacking, and mental imagery. Each component part is considered in turn, both behaviorally and from a brain imaging perspective. A mapping of these five components onto our understanding of the brain is described. Unanswered questions that exist in our understanding of intrusive memories are considered using the proposed framework. Overall, we suggest that mental imagery is key to bridging the experience, memory, and intrusive recollection of the traumatic event. Further, we suggest that by considering the brain mechanisms involved in the component parts of an intrusive memory, in particular mental imagery, we may be able to aid the development of a firmer bridge between patients’ experiences of intrusive memories and the clinical neuroscience behind them. PMID:26257660

  20. Mental Imagery and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Neuroimaging and Experimental Psychopathology Approach to Intrusive Memories of Trauma.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ian A; Mackay, Clare E

    2015-01-01

    This hypothesis and theory paper presents a pragmatic framework to help bridge the clinical presentation and neuroscience of intrusive memories following psychological trauma. Intrusive memories are a hallmark symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, key questions, including those involving etiology, remain. In particular, we know little about the brain mechanisms involved in why only some moments of the trauma return as intrusive memories while others do not. We first present an overview of the patient experience of intrusive memories and the neuroimaging studies that have investigated intrusive memories in PTSD patients. Next, one mechanism of how to model intrusive memories in the laboratory, the trauma film paradigm, is examined. In particular, we focus on studies combining the trauma film paradigm with neuroimaging. Stemming from the clinical presentation and our current understanding of the processes involved in intrusive memories, we propose a framework in which an intrusive memory comprises five component parts; autobiographical (trauma) memory, involuntary recall, negative emotions, attention hijacking, and mental imagery. Each component part is considered in turn, both behaviorally and from a brain imaging perspective. A mapping of these five components onto our understanding of the brain is described. Unanswered questions that exist in our understanding of intrusive memories are considered using the proposed framework. Overall, we suggest that mental imagery is key to bridging the experience, memory, and intrusive recollection of the traumatic event. Further, we suggest that by considering the brain mechanisms involved in the component parts of an intrusive memory, in particular mental imagery, we may be able to aid the development of a firmer bridge between patients' experiences of intrusive memories and the clinical neuroscience behind them. PMID:26257660

  1. Secondary traumatic stress among mental health providers working with the military: prevalence and its work- and exposure-related correlates.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, Roman; Anderson, Valerie; Bock, Judith; Moore, Bret A; Peterson, Alan L; Benight, Charles C

    2013-11-01

    Our research assessed the prevalence of secondary traumatic stress (STS) among mental health providers working with military patients. We also investigated personal, work-related, and exposure-related correlates of STS. Finally, using meta-analysis, the mean level of STS symptoms in this population was compared with the mean level of these symptoms in other groups. Participants (N = 224) completed measures of indirect exposure to trauma (i.e., diversity, volume, frequency, ratio), appraisal of secondary exposure impact, direct exposure to trauma, STS, and work characteristics. The prevalence of STS was 19.2%. Personal history of trauma, complaints about having too many patients, and more negative appraisals of the impact caused by an indirect exposure to trauma were associated with higher frequency of STS symptoms. A meta-analysis showed that the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and arousal symptoms of STS was similar across various groups of professionals indirectly exposed to trauma (e.g., mental health providers, rescue workers, social workers). PMID:24177477

  2. Using Nature-Based Rehabilitation to Restart a Stalled Process of Rehabilitation in Individuals with Stress-Related Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Sahlin, Eva; Ahlborg, Gunnar; Tenenbaum, Artur; Grahn, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    After a period of decrease, sick leave in Sweden due to psychiatric diagnoses is on the increase. The lack of established rehabilitation programmes for patients with stress-related mental disorders (SRMD) has opened up for the use of garden/nature in a multimodal rehabilitation context (Nature-Based Rehabilitation, NBR). Region Västra Götaland (VGR) started an NBR to offer additional rehabilitation for its employees on long-term sick leave due to SRMD, where initial care had not been sufficient. The aim was to explore whether the mental health and well-being of NBR participants had improved at the end of the NBR and at three follow-ups, and to explore the development of sick leave and health care utilization according to the NBR model (n = 57) and an occupational health service (OHS) model (n = 45). Self-assessment instruments for measuring burnout, depression, anxiety and wellbeing, and data from regional and national registers were used. Results showed decreased scores on burnout, depression and anxiety, and increased well-being scores and significantly reduced health care utilization in the NBR group. A large movement from ordinary sickness benefit to rehabilitation benefit was observed, which was not observed in the OHS group. The two groups were in different rehabilitation phases, which limited comparisons. The results point to beneficial effects of using NBR for this patient group and for enhancing a stalled rehabilitation process. PMID:25671775

  3. Using nature-based rehabilitation to restart a stalled process of rehabilitation in individuals with stress-related mental illness.

    PubMed

    Sahlin, Eva; Ahlborg, Gunnar; Tenenbaum, Artur; Grahn, Patrik

    2015-02-01

    After a period of decrease, sick leave in Sweden due to psychiatric diagnoses is on the increase. The lack of established rehabilitation programmes for patients with stress-related mental disorders (SRMD) has opened up for the use of garden/nature in a multimodal rehabilitation context (Nature-Based Rehabilitation, NBR). Region Västra Götaland (VGR) started an NBR to offer additional rehabilitation for its employees on long-term sick leave due to SRMD, where initial care had not been sufficient. The aim was to explore whether the mental health and well-being of NBR participants had improved at the end of the NBR and at three follow-ups, and to explore the development of sick leave and health care utilization according to the NBR model (n = 57) and an occupational health service (OHS) model (n = 45). Self-assessment instruments for measuring burnout, depression, anxiety and wellbeing, and data from regional and national registers were used. Results showed decreased scores on burnout, depression and anxiety, and increased well-being scores and significantly reduced health care utilization in the NBR group. A large movement from ordinary sickness benefit to rehabilitation benefit was observed, which was not observed in the OHS group. The two groups were in different rehabilitation phases, which limited comparisons. The results point to beneficial effects of using NBR for this patient group and for enhancing a stalled rehabilitation process. PMID:25671775

  4. Reliability of reports of violent victimization and posttraumatic stress disorder among men and women with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Goodman, L A; Thompson, K M; Weinfurt, K; Corl, S; Acker, P; Mueser, K T; Rosenberg, S D

    1999-10-01

    Although violent victimization is highly prevalent among men and women with serious mental illness (SMI; e.g., schizophrenia, bipolar disorder), future research in this area may be impeded by controversy concerning the ability of individuals with SMI to report traumatic events reliably. This article presents the results of a study exploring the temporal consistency of reports of childhood sexual abuse, adult sexual abuse, and adult physical abuse, as well as current symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among 50 people with SMI. Results show that trauma history and PTSD assessments can, for the most part, yield reliable information essential to further research in this area. The study also demonstrates the importance of using a variety of statistical methods to assess the reliability of self-reports of trauma history. PMID:10646178

  5. Effect of acute transdermal estrogen administration on basal, mental stress and cold pressor-induced sympathetic responses in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Sofowora, Gbemiga G; Singh, Iqbal; He, Huai B; Wood, Alastair J J; Stein, C Michael

    2005-06-01

    Administration of estrogen has vascular effects through poorly defined mechanisms that may include sympathetic withdrawal. To define the effects of acute estrogen administration on sympathetic responses, nineteen healthy postmenopausal women (age 54+/-2 years) were studied after application of a placebo or estrogen patch for 36 hours, in random order. A p-value, adjusted for multiple comparisons, of <0.017 was used to determine statistical significance. Heart rate, blood pressure, and norepinephrine spillover were measured at rest, during mental stress (Stroop test), and during a cold pressor test. Estrogen did not attenuate basal or stimulated hemodynamic responses significantly. The increase in mean arterial pressure after the Stroop test (5.9+/-1.2mm/ Hg on placebo vs 6.1+/-1.6mm/Hg on estrogen, p=0.9) and after the cold pressor test (12.6+/-2.4mm/Hg on placebo vs 13.0+/-2.2 mm/Hg on estrogen, p=0.8) did not differ. Basal, mental stress and cold pressor-stimulated norepinephrine spillover were not significantly affected by short-term estrogen administration. Norepinephrine spillover tended to be higher after estrogen (1296.2+/-238 ng/min) than placebo (832.5+/-129 ng/min) (p=0.02) at baseline and after the Stroop test (1881.1+/-330 ng/min vs 1014.6+/-249 ng/min) (p=0.02). Acute transdermal estrogen administration did not attenuate norepinephrine spillover or sympathetically mediated hemodynamic responses. PMID:15944868

  6. Role of transcranial Doppler in cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Amit A; Sharma, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is the only noninvasive modality for the assessment of real-time cerebral blood flow. It complements various anatomic imaging modalities by providing physiological-flow related information. It is relatively cheap, easily available, and can be performed at the bedside. It has been suggested as an essential component of a comprehensive stroke centre. In addition to its importance in acute cerebrovascular ischemia, its role is expanding in the evaluation of cerebral hemodynamics in various disorders of the brain. The "established" clinical indications for the use of TCD include cerebral ischemia, sickle cell disease, detection of right-to-left shunts, subarachnoid hemorrhage, periprocedural or surgical monitoring, and brain death. We present the role of TCD in acute cerebrovascular ischemia, sonothrombolysis, and intracranial stenosis. PMID:27625245

  7. Cerebrovascular autoregulation: lessons learned from spaceflight research.

    PubMed

    Blaber, Andrew P; Zuj, Kathryn A; Goswami, Nandu

    2013-08-01

    This review summarizes our current understanding of cerebral blood flow regulation with exposure to microgravity, outlines potential mechanisms associated with post-flight orthostatic intolerance, and proposes future directions for research and linkages with cerebrovascular disorders found in the general population. It encompasses research from cellular mechanisms (e.g. hind limb suspension: tissue, animal studies) to whole body analysis with respect to understanding human responses using space analogue studies (bed rest, parabolic flight) as well as data collected before, during, and after spaceflight. Recent evidence indicates that cerebrovascular autoregulation may be impaired in some astronauts leading to increased susceptibility to syncope upon return to a gravitational environment. The proposed review not only provides insights into the mechanisms of post-flight orthostatic intolerance, but also increases our understanding of the mechanisms associated with pathophysiological conditions (e.g. unexplained syncope) with clinical applications in relation to postural hypotension or intradialytic hypotension. PMID:23132388

  8. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Pneumoconiosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Ho, Shang-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pneumoconiosis is a parenchymal lung disease that develops through the inhalation of inorganic dust at work. Cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events are leading causes of mortality and adult disability worldwide. This retrospective cohort study investigated the association between pneumoconiosis, and cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events by using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan. The data analyzed in this study was retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We selected 6940 patients with pneumoconiosis from the database as our study cohort. Another 27,760 patients without pneumoconiosis were selected and matched with those with pneumoconiosis according to age and sex as the comparison cohort. We used univariate and multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analyses to determine the association between pneumoconiosis and the risk of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events after adjusting for medical comorbidities. After adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities, the patients with pneumoconiosis exhibited a significantly higher incidence of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–1.24) than did those without pneumoconiosis. The incidence of hemorrhagic stroke was higher, but not significant, in the pneumoconiosis patients (HR 1.20, 95% CI 0.99–1.46). No statistically significant differences were observed between the pneumoconiosis and nonpneumoconiosis groups in acute coronary syndrome (HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.95–1.26). The findings of this study reveal an association between pneumoconiosis and a higher risk of cerebrovascular events after adjustment for comorbidities. Healthcare providers should control the related risk factors for primary prevention of stroke in pneumoconiosis patients. PMID:26945404

  9. Coping Strategies as Moderators of the Relation between Individual Race-Related Stress and Mental Health Symptoms for African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Tawanda M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine coping strategies as moderators of the relationship between individual race-related stress and mental health symptoms among a sample of 128 African American women. Coping strategies refer to efforts used to resolve problems and those used to manage, endure, or alleviate distress. Culture-specific…

  10. Role Stress, Role Reward, and Mental Health in a Multiethnic Sample of Midlife Women: Results from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN)

    PubMed Central

    Lanza di Scalea, Teresa; Matthews, Karen A.; Avis, Nancy E.; Thurston, Rebecca C.; Brown, Charlotte; Harlow, Sioban

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about the independent associations of reward and stress within specific roles with multiple measures of mental health in an ethnically diverse community sample of midlife women. The objective of this study is to examine if (1) role reward (within each role and across roles) contributes directly to mental health and buffers the negative impact of role stress and (2) associations among role occupancy, role stress, and role reward and mental health vary by race/ethnicity. Methods With separate logistic regression analysis, we investigated cross-sectional relationships between role stress and role reward with presence/absence of high depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale [CES-D≥16]), anxiety symptoms (feeling tense or nervous, irritable or grouchy, fearful for no reason, and heart pounding or racing total score≥4), or low social functioning (bottom 25th percentile of the Short-Form-36 [SF-36] social functioning subscale) in 2549 women participating in the third visit of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a longitudinal population-based study of menopause. Results High reward across roles attenuated the negative impact of role stress on social functioning but not on anxiety or depression. High reward marriage buffered the impact of marital stress on depression, and high reward mothering buffered the effect of maternal stress on depression and social functioning. Compared to Caucasians, Hispanics and Chinese with high stress across roles had better social functioning, and African American mothers had lower odds of high depressive symptoms. Conclusions Role reward buffers the negative impact of stress on social functioning and depression, but not on anxiety. Minorities may respond to role stress by seeking social support. PMID:22360697