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Sample records for cerevisiae prm1 homolog

  1. Viable offspring obtained from Prm1-deficient sperm in mice

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Naoki; Yoshinaga, Kazuya; Furushima, Kenryo; Takamune, Kazufumi; Li, Zhenghua; Abe, Shin-ichi; Aizawa, Shin-ichi; Yamamura, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Protamines are expressed in the spermatid nucleus and allow denser packaging of DNA compared with histones. Disruption of the coding sequence of one allele of either protamine 1 (Prm1) or Prm2 results in failure to produce offspring, although sperm with disrupted Prm1 or Prm2 alleles are produced. Here, we produced Prm1-deficient female chimeric mice carrying Prm1-deficient oocytes. These mice successfully produced Prm1+/− male mice. Healthy Prm1+/− offspring were then produced by transferring blastocysts obtained via in vitro fertilization using zona-free oocytes and sperm from Prm1+/− mice. This result suggests that sperm lacking Prm1 can generate offspring despite being abnormally shaped and having destabilised DNA, decondensed chromatin and a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. Nevertheless, these mice showed little derangement of expression profiles. PMID:27250771

  2. Viable offspring obtained from Prm1-deficient sperm in mice.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Naoki; Yoshinaga, Kazuya; Furushima, Kenryo; Takamune, Kazufumi; Li, Zhenghua; Abe, Shin-Ichi; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Protamines are expressed in the spermatid nucleus and allow denser packaging of DNA compared with histones. Disruption of the coding sequence of one allele of either protamine 1 (Prm1) or Prm2 results in failure to produce offspring, although sperm with disrupted Prm1 or Prm2 alleles are produced. Here, we produced Prm1-deficient female chimeric mice carrying Prm1-deficient oocytes. These mice successfully produced Prm1(+/-) male mice. Healthy Prm1(+/-) offspring were then produced by transferring blastocysts obtained via in vitro fertilization using zona-free oocytes and sperm from Prm1(+/-) mice. This result suggests that sperm lacking Prm1 can generate offspring despite being abnormally shaped and having destabilised DNA, decondensed chromatin and a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. Nevertheless, these mice showed little derangement of expression profiles. PMID:27250771

  3. Effect of limited homology on gene conversion in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasmid recombination system

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, B.Y.; Dornfeld, K.J.; Fagrelius, T.J.; Livingston, D.M.

    1988-06-01

    Plasmids containing heteroallelic copies of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HIS3 gene undergo intramolecular gene conservation in mitotically dividing S. cerevisiae cels. The authors used this plasmid system to determine the minimum amount of homology required for gene conversion, to examine how conversion tract lengths are affected by limited homology, and to analyze the role of flanking DNA sequences on the pattern of exchange. Plasmids with homologous sequences greater than 2 kilobases have mitotic exchange rates as high as 2 x 10/sup -3/ event soper cell per generation. As the homology is reduced, the exchange rate decreases dramatically. A plasmid with 26 base pairs (bp) of homology undergones gene conversion at a rate of approximately 1 x 10/sup -10/ events per cell per generation. These studies have also shown that an 8-bp insertion mutation 13 bp from a border between homologous and nonhomologous sequences undergoes conversion, but that a similar 8-bp insertion 5 bp from a border does not. Examination of independent conversion events which occurred in plasmids with heteroallelic copies of the HIS3 gene shows that markers within 280 bp of a border between homologous and nonhomologous sequences undergo conversion less frequently than the same markers within a more extensive homologous sequence. Thus, proximity to a border between homologous and nonhomologous sequences shortens the conversion tract length.

  4. Membrane Organization and Cell Fusion During Mating in Fission Yeast Requires Multipass Membrane Protein Prm1

    PubMed Central

    Curto, M.-Ángeles; Sharifmoghadam, Mohammad Reza; Calpena, Eduardo; De León, Nagore; Hoya, Marta; Doncel, Cristina; Leatherwood, Janet; Valdivieso, M.-Henar

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of Schizosaccharomyces pombe prm1+ in cell fusion during mating and its relationship with other genes required for this process have been addressed. S. pombe prm1Δ mutant exhibits an almost complete blockade in cell fusion and an abnormal distribution of the plasma membrane and cell wall in the area of cell–cell interaction. The distribution of cellular envelopes is similar to that described for mutants devoid of the Fig1-related claudin-like Dni proteins; however, prm1+ and the dni+ genes act in different subpathways. Time-lapse analyses show that in the wild-type S. pombe strain, the distribution of phosphatidylserine in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane undergoes some modification before an opening is observed in the cross wall at the cell–cell contact region. In the prm1Δ mutant, this membrane modification does not take place, and the cross wall between the mating partners is not extensively degraded; plasma membrane forms invaginations and fingers that sometimes collapse/retract and that are sometimes strengthened by the synthesis of cell-wall material. Neither prm1Δ nor prm1Δ dniΔ zygotes lyse after cell–cell contact in medium containing and lacking calcium. Response to drugs that inhibit lipid synthesis or interfere with lipids is different in wild-type, prm1Δ, and dni1Δ strains, suggesting that membrane structure/organization/dynamics is different in all these strains and that Prm1p and the Dni proteins exert some functions required to guarantee correct membrane organization that are critical for cell fusion. PMID:24514900

  5. Membrane organization and cell fusion during mating in fission yeast requires multipass membrane protein Prm1.

    PubMed

    Curto, M-Ángeles; Sharifmoghadam, Mohammad Reza; Calpena, Eduardo; De León, Nagore; Hoya, Marta; Doncel, Cristina; Leatherwood, Janet; Valdivieso, M-Henar

    2014-04-01

    The involvement of Schizosaccharomyces pombe prm1(+) in cell fusion during mating and its relationship with other genes required for this process have been addressed. S. pombe prm1Δ mutant exhibits an almost complete blockade in cell fusion and an abnormal distribution of the plasma membrane and cell wall in the area of cell-cell interaction. The distribution of cellular envelopes is similar to that described for mutants devoid of the Fig1-related claudin-like Dni proteins; however, prm1(+) and the dni(+) genes act in different subpathways. Time-lapse analyses show that in the wild-type S. pombe strain, the distribution of phosphatidylserine in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane undergoes some modification before an opening is observed in the cross wall at the cell-cell contact region. In the prm1Δ mutant, this membrane modification does not take place, and the cross wall between the mating partners is not extensively degraded; plasma membrane forms invaginations and fingers that sometimes collapse/retract and that are sometimes strengthened by the synthesis of cell-wall material. Neither prm1Δ nor prm1Δ dniΔ zygotes lyse after cell-cell contact in medium containing and lacking calcium. Response to drugs that inhibit lipid synthesis or interfere with lipids is different in wild-type, prm1Δ, and dni1Δ strains, suggesting that membrane structure/organization/dynamics is different in all these strains and that Prm1p and the Dni proteins exert some functions required to guarantee correct membrane organization that are critical for cell fusion. PMID:24514900

  6. A nuclear genetic lesion affecting Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial translation is complemented by a homologous Bacillus gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S I; Stange-Thomann, N; Martins, O; Hong, K W; Söll, D; Fox, T D

    1997-01-01

    A novel Bacillus gene was isolated and characterized. It encodes a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pet112p, a protein that has no characterized relative and is dispensable for cell viability but required for mitochondrial translation. Expression of the Bacillus protein in yeast, modified to ensure mitochondrial targeting, partially complemented the phenotype of the pet112-1 mutation, demonstrating a high degree of evolutionary conservation for this as yet unidentified component of translation. PMID:9287027

  7. Complex in vivo Ligation Using Homologous Recombination and High-efficiency Plasmid Rescue from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Finnigan, Gregory C.; Thorner, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The protocols presented here allow for the facile generation of a wide variety of complex multipart DNA constructs (tagged gene products, gene fusions, chimeric proteins, and other variants) using homologous recombination and in vivo ligation in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). This method is straightforward, efficient and cost-effective, and can be used both for vector creation and for subsequent one-step, high frequency integration into a chromosomal locus in yeast. The procedure utilizes PCR with extended oligonucleotide “tails” of homology between multiple fragments to allow for reassembly in yeast in a single transformation followed by a method for highly efficient plasmid extraction from yeast (for transformation into bacteria). The latter is an improvement on existing methods of yeast plasmid extraction, which, historically, has been a limiting step in recovery of desired constructs. We describe the utility and convenience of our techniques, and provide several examples. PMID:26523287

  8. Novel human and mouse homologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase eta.

    PubMed

    McDonald, J P; Rapić-Otrin, V; Epstein, J A; Broughton, B C; Wang, X; Lehmann, A R; Wolgemuth, D J; Woodgate, R

    1999-08-15

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD30 gene encodes a novel eukaryotic DNA polymerase, pol eta that is able to replicate across cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers both accurately and efficiently. Very recently, a human homolog of RAD30 was identified, mutations in which result in the sunlight-sensitive, cancer-prone, Xeroderma pigmentosum variant group phenotype. We report here the cloning and localization of a second human homolog of RAD30. Interestingly, RAD30B is localized on chromosome 18q21.1 in a region that is often implicated in the etiology of many human cancers. The mouse homolog (Rad30b) is located on chromosome 18E2. The human RAD30B and mouse Rad30b mRNA transcripts, like many repair proteins, are highly expressed in the testis. In situ hybridization analysis indicates that expression of mouse Rad30b occurs predominantly in postmeiotic round spermatids. Database searches revealed genomic and EST sequences from other eukaryotes such as Aspergillus nidulans, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Brugia malayi, Caenorhabditis elegans, Trypanosoma cruzi, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Drosophila melanogaster that also encode putative homologs of RAD30, thereby suggesting that Rad30-dependent translesion DNA synthesis is conserved within the eukaryotic kingdom. PMID:10458907

  9. Metalloregulation of FRE1 and FRE2 homologs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Martins, L J; Jensen, L T; Simon, J R; Keller, G L; Winge, D R; Simons, J R

    1998-09-11

    The high affinity uptake systems for iron and copper ions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involve metal-specific permeases and two known cell surface Cu(II) and Fe(III) metalloreductases, Fre1 and Fre2. Five novel genes found in the S. cerevisiae genome exhibit marked sequence similarity to Fre1 and Fre2, suggesting that the homologs are part of a family of proteins related to Fre1 and Fre2. The homologs are expressed genes in S. cerevisiae, and their expression is metalloregulated as is true with FRE1 and FRE2. Four of the homologs (FRE3-FRE6) are specifically iron-regulated through the Aft1 transcription factor. These genes are expressed either in cells limited for iron ion uptake by treatment with a chelator or in cells lacking the high affinity iron uptake system. Expression of FRE3-FRE6 is elevated in AFT1-1 cells and attenuated in aft1 null cells, showing that iron modulation occurs through the Aft1 transcriptional activator. The fifth homolog FRE7 is specifically copper-metalloregulated. FRE7 is expressed in cells limited in copper ion uptake by a Cu(I)-specific chelator or in cells lacking the high affinity Cu(I) permeases. The constitutive expression of FRE7 in MAC1 cells and the lack of expression in mac1-1 cells are consistent with Mac1 being the critical transcriptional activator of FRE7 expression. The 5' promoter sequence of FRE7 contains three copper-responsive promoter elements. Two elements are critical for Mac1-dependent FRE7 expression. Combinations of either the distal and central elements or the central and proximal elements result in copper-regulated FRE7 expression. Spacing between Mac1-responsive sites is important as shown by the attenuated expression of FRE7 and CTR1 when two elements are separated by over 100 base pairs. From the three Mac1-responsive elements in FRE7, a new consensus sequence for Mac1 binding can be established as TTTGC(T/G)C(A/G). PMID:9726978

  10. Directed alteration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DNA by biolistic transformation and homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Fox, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is currently the only species in which genetic transformation of mitochondria can be used to generate a wide variety of defined alterations in mtDNA. DNA sequences can be delivered into yeast mitochondria by microprojectile bombardment (biolistic transformation) and subsequently incorporated into mtDNA by the highly active homologous recombination machinery present in the organelle. While transformation frequencies are relatively low, the availability of strong mitochondrial selectable markers for the yeast system, both natural and synthetic, makes the isolation of transformants routine. The strategies and procedures reviewed here allow the researcher to insert defined mutations into endogenous mitochondrial genes, and to insert new genes into mtDNA. These methods provide powerful in vivo tools for the study of mitochondrial biology. PMID:18314724

  11. Functional Validation of Rare Human Genetic Variants Involved in Homologous Recombination Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Mi; Kim, Kyoung-Yeon; Park, Geun-Hee; Kwack, KyuBum; Kim, Keun P.

    2015-01-01

    Systems for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are necessary to maintain genome integrity and normal functionality of cells in all organisms. Homologous recombination (HR) plays an important role in repairing accidental and programmed DSBs in mitotic and meiotic cells, respectively. Failure to repair these DSBs causes genome instability and can induce tumorigenesis. Rad51 and Rad52 are two key proteins in homologous pairing and strand exchange during DSB-induced HR; both are highly conserved in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed pathogenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human RAD51 and RAD52 using the Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) and Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) algorithms and observed the effect of mutations in highly conserved domains of RAD51 and RAD52 on DNA damage repair in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system. We identified a number of rad51 and rad52 alleles that exhibited severe DNA repair defects. The functionally inactive SNPs were located near ATPase active site of Rad51 and the DNA binding domain of Rad52. The rad51-F317I, rad52-R52W, and rad52-G107C mutations conferred hypersensitivity to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA damage and were defective in HR-mediated DSB repair. Our study provides a new approach for detecting functional and loss-of-function genetic polymorphisms and for identifying causal variants in human DNA repair genes that contribute to the initiation or progression of cancer. PMID:25938495

  12. Mutations in two Ku homologs define a DNA end-joining repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Milne, G T; Jin, S; Shannon, K B; Weaver, D T

    1996-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in mammalian cells is dependent on the Ku DNA binding protein complex. However, the mechanism of Ku-mediated repair is not understood. We discovered a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene (KU80) that is structurally similar to the 80-kDa mammalian Ku subunit. Ku8O associates with the product of the HDF1 gene, forming the major DNA end-binding complex of yeast cells. DNA end binding was absent in ku80delta, hdf1delta, or ku80delta hdf1delta strains. Antisera specific for epitope tags on Ku80 and Hdf1 were used in supershift and immunodepletion experiments to show that both proteins are directly involved in DNA end binding. In vivo, the efficiency of two DNA end-joining processes were reduced >10-fold in ku8Odelta, hdfldelta, or ku80delta hdf1delta strains: repair of linear plasmid DNA and repair of an HO endonuclease-induced chromosomal DSB. These DNA-joining defects correlated with DNA damage sensitivity, because ku80delta and hdf1delta strains were also sensitive to methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). Ku-dependent repair is distinct from homologous recombination, because deletion of KU80 and HDF1 increased the MMS sensitivity of rad52delta. Interestingly, rad5Odelta, also shown here to be defective in end joining, was epistatic with Ku mutations for MMS repair and end joining. Therefore, Ku and Rad50 participate in an end-joining pathway that is distinct from homologous recombinational repair. Yeast DNA end joining is functionally analogous to DSB repair and V(D)J recombination in mammalian cells. PMID:8754818

  13. RAD26, the functional S. cerevisiae homolog of the Cockayne syndrome B gene ERCC6.

    PubMed Central

    van Gool, A J; Verhage, R; Swagemakers, S M; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J; Troelstra, C; Bootsma, D; Hoeijmakers, J H

    1994-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a universal sub-pathway of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) system that is limited to the transcribed strand of active structural genes. It accomplishes the preferential elimination of transcription-blocking DNA lesions and permits rapid resumption of the vital process of transcription. A defect in TCR is responsible for the rare hereditary disorder Cockayne syndrome (CS). Recently we found that mutations in the ERCC6 repair gene, encoding a putative helicase, underly the repair defect of CS complementation group B. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of CSB/ERCC6, which we designate RAD26. A rad26 disruption mutant appears viable and grows normally, indicating that the gene does not have an essential function. In analogy with CS, preferential repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the transcribed strand of the active RBP2 gene is severely impaired. Surprisingly, in contrast to the human CS mutant, yeast RAD26 disruption does not induce any UV-, cisPt- or X-ray sensitivity, explaining why it was not isolated as a mutant before. Recovery of growth after UV exposure was somewhat delayed in rad26. These findings suggest that TCR in lower eukaryotes is not very important for cell survival and that the global genome repair pathway of NER is the major determinant of cellular resistance to genotoxicity. Images PMID:7957102

  14. Mutations in homologous recombination genes rescue top3 slow growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Shor, Erika; Gangloff, Serge; Wagner, Marisa; Weinstein, Justin; Price, Gavrielle; Rothstein, Rodney

    2002-01-01

    In budding yeast, loss of topoisomerase III, encoded by the TOP3 gene, leads to a genomic instability phenotype that includes slow growth, hyper-sensitivity to genotoxic agents, mitotic hyper-recombination, increased chromosome missegregation, and meiotic failure. Slow growth and other defects of top3 mutants are suppressed by mutation of SGS1, which encodes the only RecQ helicase in S. cerevisiae. sgs1 is epistatic to top3, suggesting that the two proteins act in the same pathway. To identify other factors that function in the Sgs1-Top3 pathway, we undertook a genetic screen for non-sgs1 suppressors of top3 defects. We found that slow growth and DNA damage sensitivity of top3 mutants are suppressed by mutations in RAD51, RAD54, RAD55, and RAD57. In contrast, top3 mutants show extreme synergistic growth defects with mutations in RAD50, MRE11, XRS2, RDH54, and RAD1. We also analyzed recombination at the SUP4-o region, showing that in a rad51, rad54, rad55, or rad57 background top3Delta does not increase recombination to the same degree as in a wild-type strain. These results suggest that the presence of the Rad51 homologous recombination complex in a top3 background facilitates creation of detrimental intermediates by Sgs1. We present a model wherein Rad51 helps recruit Sgs1-Top3 to sites of replicative damage. PMID:12399378

  15. Formation of large palindromic DNA by homologous recombination of short inverted repeat sequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, David K; Gillespie, David; Steele, Brandi

    2002-01-01

    Large DNA palindromes form sporadically in many eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes and are often associated with amplified genes. The presence of a short inverted repeat sequence near a DNA double-strand break has been implicated in the formation of large palindromes in a variety of organisms. Previously we have established that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae a linear DNA palindrome is efficiently formed from a single-copy circular plasmid when a DNA double-strand break is introduced next to a short inverted repeat sequence. In this study we address whether the linear palindromes form by an intermolecular reaction (that is, a reaction between two identical fragments in a head-to-head arrangement) or by an unusual intramolecular reaction, as it apparently does in other examples of palindrome formation. Our evidence supports a model in which palindromes are primarily formed by an intermolecular reaction involving homologous recombination of short inverted repeat sequences. We have also extended our investigation into the requirement for DNA double-strand break repair genes in palindrome formation. We have found that a deletion of the RAD52 gene significantly reduces palindrome formation by intermolecular recombination and that deletions of two other genes in the RAD52-epistasis group (RAD51 and MRE11) have little or no effect on palindrome formation. In addition, palindrome formation is dramatically reduced by a deletion of the nucleotide excision repair gene RAD1. PMID:12136011

  16. La proteins from Drosophila melanogaster and Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a yeast homolog of the La autoantigen is dispensable for growth.

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, C J; Wolin, S L

    1994-01-01

    The human autoantigen La is a 50-kDa protein which binds to the 3' termini of virtually all nascent polymerase III transcripts. Experiments with mammalian transcription extracts have led to the proposal that the La protein is required for multiple rounds of transcription by RNA polymerase III (E. Gottlieb and J. A. Steitz, EMBO J. 8:851-861, 1989; R. J. Maraia, D. J. Kenan, and J. D. Keene, Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:2147-2158, 1994). Although La protein homologs have been identified in a variety of vertebrate species, the protein has not been identified in invertebrates. In order to begin a genetic analysis of La protein function, we have characterized homologs of the La protein in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that both the Drosophila and yeast La proteins are bound to precursors of polymerase III RNAs in vivo. The Drosophila and yeast proteins resemble the human La protein in their biochemical properties, as both proteins can be partially purified from cells by a procedure previously devised to purify the human protein. Similarly to vertebrate La proteins, the Drosophila and yeast homologs preferentially bind RNAs that terminate with a 3' hydroxyl. Despite the fact that the La protein is conserved between humans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yeast cells containing a null allele of the gene encoding the La protein are viable, suggesting that another protein(s) plays a functionally redundant role. Images PMID:8035818

  17. Highly diverged homologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial mRNA-specific translational activators have orthologous functions in other budding yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Costanzo, M C; Bonnefoy, N; Williams, E H; Clark-Walker, G D; Fox, T D

    2000-01-01

    Translation of mitochondrially coded mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on membrane-bound mRNA-specific activator proteins, whose targets lie in the mRNA 5'-untranslated leaders (5'-UTLs). In at least some cases, the activators function to localize translation of hydrophobic proteins on the inner membrane and are rate limiting for gene expression. We searched unsuccessfully in divergent budding yeasts for orthologs of the COX2- and COX3-specific translational activator genes, PET111, PET54, PET122, and PET494, by direct complementation. However, by screening for complementation of mutations in genes adjacent to the PET genes in S. cerevisiae, we obtained chromosomal segments containing highly diverged homologs of PET111 and PET122 from Saccharomyces kluyveri and of PET111 from Kluyveromyces lactis. All three of these genes failed to function in S. cerevisiae. We also found that the 5'-UTLs of the COX2 and COX3 mRNAs of S. kluyveri and K. lactis have little similarity to each other or to those of S. cerevisiae. To determine whether the PET111 and PET122 homologs carry out orthologous functions, we deleted them from the S. kluyveri genome and deleted PET111 from the K. lactis genome. The pet111 mutations in both species prevented COX2 translation, and the S. kluyveri pet122 mutation prevented COX3 translation. Thus, while the sequences of these translational activator proteins and their 5'-UTL targets are highly diverged, their mRNA-specific functions are orthologous. PMID:10757749

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Two Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Genes Encoding Homologs of the Bacterial Hexa and Muts Mismatch Repair Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reenan, R. A.; Kolodner, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Homologs of the Escherichia coli (mutL, S and uvrD) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (hexA, B) genes involved in mismatch repair are known in several distantly related organisms. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on conserved regions of E. coli MutS protein and its homologs from Salmonella typhimurium, S. pneumoniae and human were used in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify and clone mutS/hexA homologs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two DNA sequences were amplified whose deduced amino acid sequences both shared a high degree of homology with MutS. These sequences were then used to clone the full-length genes from a yeast genomic library. Sequence analysis of the two MSH genes (MSH = mutS homolog), MSH1 and MSH2, revealed open reading frames of 2877 bp and 2898 bp. The deduced amino acid sequences predict polypeptides of 109.3 kD and 109.1 kD, respectively. The overall amino acid sequence identity with the E. coli MutS protein is 28.6% for MSH1 and 25.2% for MSH2. Features previously found to be shared by MutS homologs, such as the nucleotide binding site and the helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif as well as other highly conserved regions whose function remain unknown, were also found in the two yeast homologs. Evidence presented in this and a companion study suggest that MSH1 is involved in repair of mitochondrial DNA and that MSH2 is involved in nuclear DNA repair. PMID:1459447

  19. The Plasma Membrane Proteins Prm1 and Fig1 Ascertain Fidelity of Membrane Fusion during Yeast Mating

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Alex; Walter, Peter

    2007-01-01

    As for most cell–cell fusion events, the molecular details of membrane fusion during yeast mating are poorly understood. The multipass membrane protein Prm1 is the only known component that acts at the step of bilayer fusion. In its absence, mutant mating pairs lyse or arrest in the mating reaction with tightly apposed plasma membranes. We show that deletion of FIG 1, which controls pheromone-induced Ca2+ influx, yields similar cell fusion defects. Although extracellular Ca2+ is not required for efficient cell fusion of wild-type cells, cell fusion in prm1 mutant mating pairs is dramatically reduced when Ca2+ is removed. This enhanced fusion defect is due to lysis. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that fusion and lysis events initiate with identical kinetics, suggesting that both outcomes result from engagement of the fusion machinery. The yeast synaptotagmin orthologue and Ca2+ binding protein Tcb3 has a role in reducing lysis of prm1 mutants, which opens the possibility that the observed role of Ca2+ is to engage a wound repair mechanism. Thus, our results suggest that Prm1 and Fig1 have a role in enhancing membrane fusion and maintaining its fidelity. Their absence results in frequent mating pair lysis, which is counteracted by Ca2+-dependent membrane repair. PMID:17151357

  20. Shu1 Promotes Homolog Bias of Meiotic Recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Soogil; Kim, Keun Pil

    2013-01-01

    Homologous recombination occurs closely between homologous chromatids with highly ordered recombinosomes through RecA homologs and mediators. The present study demonstrates this relationship during the period of “partner choice” in yeast meiotic recombination. We have examined the formation of recombination intermediates in the absence or presence of Shu1, a member of the PCSS complex, which also includes Psy3, Csm2, and Shu2. DNA physical analysis indicates that Shu1 is essential for promoting the establishment of homolog bias during meiotic homologous recombination, and the partner choice is switched by Mek1 kinase activity. Furthermore, Shu1 promotes both crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) pathways of meiotic recombination. The inactivation of Mek1 kinase allows for meiotic recombination to progress efficiently, but is lost in homolog bias where most double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired via stable intersister joint molecules. Moreover, the Srs2 helicase deletion cells in the budding yeast show slightly reduced COs and NCOs, and Shu1 promotes homolog bias independent of Srs2. Our findings reveal that Shu1 and Mek1 kinase activity have biochemically distinct roles in partner choice, which in turn enhances the understanding of the mechanism associated with the precondition for homolog bias. PMID:24213600

  1. Exogenous Expression of Human Protamine 1 (hPrm1) Remodels Fibroblast Nuclei into Spermatid-like Structures

    PubMed Central

    Iuso, Domenico; Czernik, Marta; Toschi, Paola; Fidanza, Antonella; Zacchini, Federica; Feil, Robert; Curtet, Sandrine; Buchou, Thierry; Shiota, Hitoshi; Khochbin, Saadi; Ptak, Grazyna Ewa; Loi, Pasqualino

    2015-01-01

    Summary Protamines confer a compact structure to the genome of male gametes. Here, we find that somatic cells can be remodeled by transient expression of protamine 1 (Prm1). Ectopically expressed Prm1 forms scattered foci in the nuclei of fibroblasts, which coalescence into spermatid-like structures, concomitant with a loss of histones and a reprogramming barrier, H3 lysine 9 methylation. Protaminized nuclei injected into enucleated oocytes efficiently underwent protamine to maternal histone TH2B exchange and developed into normal blastocyst stage embryos in vitro. Altogether, our findings present a model to study male-specific chromatin remodeling, which can be exploited for the improvement of somatic cell nuclear transfer. PMID:26628361

  2. Dynamics of Homology Searching During Gene Conversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Revealed by Donor Competition

    PubMed Central

    Coïc, Eric; Martin, Joshua; Ryu, Taehyun; Tay, Sue Yen; Kondev, Jané; Haber, James E.

    2011-01-01

    One of the least understood aspects of homologous recombination is the process by which the ends of a double-strand break (DSB) search the entire genome for homologous templates that can be used to repair the break. We took advantage of the natural competition between the alternative donors HML and HMR employed during HO endonuclease-induced switching of the budding yeast MAT locus. The strong mating-type-dependent bias in the choice of the donors is enforced by the recombination enhancer (RE), which lies 17 kb proximal to HML. We investigated factors that improve the use of the disfavored donor. We show that the normal heterochromatic state of the donors does not impair donor usage, as donor choice is not affected by removing this epigenetic silencing. In contrast, increasing the length of homology shared by the disfavored donor increases its use. This result shows that donor choice is not irrevocable and implies that there are several encounters between the DSB ends and even the favored donor before recombination is accomplished. The increase by adding more homology is not linear; these results can be explained by a thermodynamic model that determines the energy cost of using one donor over the other. An important inference from this analysis is that when HML is favored as the donor, RE causes a reduction in its effective genomic distance from MAT from 200 kb to ∼20 kb, which we hypothesize occurs after the DSB is created, by epigenetic chromatin modifications around MAT. PMID:21954161

  3. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex promotes trinucleotide repeat expansions independently of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yanfang; Kirkham-McCarthy, Lucy; Lahue, Robert S

    2016-07-01

    Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are tandem arrays of three nucleotides that can expand in length to cause at least 17 inherited human diseases. Somatic expansions in patients can occur in differentiated tissues where DNA replication is limited and cannot be a primary source of somatic mutation. Instead, mouse models of TNR diseases have shown that both inherited and somatic expansions can be suppressed by the loss of certain DNA repair factors. It is generally believed that these repair factors cause misprocessing of TNRs, leading to expansions. Here we extend this idea to show that the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX) complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a causative factor in expansions of short TNRs. Mutations that eliminate MRX subunits led to significant suppression of expansions whereas mutations that inactivate Rad51 had only a minor effect. Coupled with previous evidence, this suggests that MRX drives expansions of short TNRs through a process distinct from homologous recombination. The nuclease function of Mre11 was dispensable for expansions, suggesting that expansions do not occur by Mre11-dependent nucleolytic processing of the TNR. Epistasis between MRX and post-replication repair (PRR) was tested. PRR protects against expansions, so a rad5 mutant gave a high expansion rate. In contrast, the mre11 rad5 double mutant gave a suppressed expansion rate, indistinguishable from the mre11 single mutant. This suggests that MRX creates a TNR substrate for PRR. Protein acetylation was also tested as a mechanism regulating MRX activity in expansions. Six acetylation sites were identified in Rad50. Mutation of all six lysine residues to arginine gave partial bypass of a sin3 HDAC mutant, suggesting that Rad50 acetylation is functionally important for Sin3-mediated expansions. Overall we conclude that yeast MRX helps drive expansions of short TNRs by a mechanism distinct from its role in homologous recombination and independent of the nuclease function of Mre11. PMID:27173583

  4. Control of dinucleoside polyphosphates by the FHIT-homologous HNT2 gene, adenine biosynthesis and heat shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Varnum, James M; Bieganowski, Pawel; Brenner, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Background The FHIT gene is lost early in the development of many tumors. Fhit possesses intrinsic ApppA hydrolase activity though ApppA cleavage is not required for tumor suppression. Because a mutant form of Fhit that is functional in tumor suppression and defective in catalysis binds ApppA well, it was hypothesized that Fhit-substrate complexes are the active, signaling form of Fhit. Which substrates are most important for Fhit signaling remain unknown. Results Here we demonstrate that dinucleoside polyphosphate levels increase 500-fold to hundreds of micromolar in strains devoid of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of Fhit, Hnt2. Accumulation of dinucleoside polyphosphates is reversed by re-expression of Hnt2 and is active site-dependent. Dinucleoside polyphosphate levels depend on an intact adenine biosynthetic pathway and time in liquid culture, and are induced by heat shock to greater than 0.1 millimolar even in Hnt2+ cells. Conclusions The data indicate that Hnt2 hydrolyzes both ApppN and AppppN in vivo and that, in heat-shocked, adenine prototrophic yeast strains, dinucleoside polyphosphates accumulate to levels in which they may saturate Hnt2. PMID:12028594

  5. Yeast ribosomal proteins: XIII. Saccharomyces cerevisiae YL8A gene, interrupted with two introns, encodes a homolog of mammalian L7.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuta, K; Hashimoto, T; Otaka, E

    1992-01-01

    We isolated and sequenced a gene, YL8A, encoding ribosomal protein YL8 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is one of the two duplicated genes encoding YL8 and is located on chromosome VII while the other is on chromosome XVI. The haploid strains carrying disrupted YL8A grew more slowly than the parent strain. The open reading frame is interrupted with two introns. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals that yeast YL8 is a homolog of mammalian ribosomal protein L7, E.coli L30 and others. Images PMID:1549461

  6. Association study of six SNPs in PRM1, PRM2 and TNP2 genes in iranian infertile men with idiopathic azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Siasi, Elham; Aleyasin, Ahmad; Mowla, Javad; Sahebkashaf, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Background: Histones are replaced by protamines to condensate and package DNA into the sperm head during mammalian spermatogenesis. Protamine genes defects have been reported to cause sperm DNA damage and male infertility. Objective: In this study relationship among some protamines genes family SNPs include PRM1 (C321A), PRM2 (C248T) and TNP2 (T1019C), (G1272C), (G del in 1036 and 1046 bp) were studied in 96 idiopathic infertile men with azoospermia or oligospermia and 100 normal control men. Materials and Methods: Analysis of SNPs was performed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and PCR sequencing. Results: No polymorphisms were found for tested SNPs except for PRM1 (C321A) and TNP2 (G1272C) in which frequency of altered AA and GG genotypes were slightly higher in infertile case group. Statistical analysis showed no significant association related to PRM1 (C321A) p=0.805 and TNP2 (G1272C) loci p=0.654. Conclusion: These results are consistent with previous studies and indicating that all tested SNPs was not associated with oligospermia and azospermia and idiopatic male infertility in Iranian population. PMID:25246894

  7. Multiple Rad52-Mediated Homology-Directed Repair Mechanisms Are Required to Prevent Telomere Attrition-Induced Senescence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Most human somatic cells express insufficient levels of telomerase, which can result in telomere shortening and eventually senescence, both of which are hallmarks of ageing. Homology-directed repair (HDR) is important for maintaining proper telomere function in yeast and mammals. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad52 is required for almost all HDR mechanisms, and telomerase-null cells senesce faster in the absence of Rad52. However, its role in preventing accelerated senescence has been unclear. In this study, we make use of rad52 separation-of-function mutants to find that multiple Rad52-mediated HDR mechanisms are required to delay senescence, including break-induced replication and sister chromatid recombination. In addition, we show that misregulation of histone 3 lysine 56 acetylation, which is known to be defective in sister chromatid recombination, also causes accelerated senescence. We propose a model where Rad52 is needed to repair telomere attrition-induced replication stress. PMID:27428329

  8. pdc1(0) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae give evidence for an additional structural PDC gene: cloning of PDC5, a gene homologous to PDC1.

    PubMed Central

    Seeboth, P G; Bohnsack, K; Hollenberg, C P

    1990-01-01

    The PDC1 gene coding for a pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) was deleted from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. The resulting pdc1(0) mutants were able to grow on glucose and still contained 60 to 70% of the wild-type PDC activity. Two DNA fragments with sequences homologous to that of the PDC1 gene were cloned from the yeast genome. One of the cloned genes (PDC5) was expressed at high rates predominantly in pdc1(0) strains and probably encodes the remaining PDC activity in these strains. Expression from the PDC1 promoter in PDC1 wild-type and pdc1(0) strains was examined by the use of two reporter genes. Deletion of PDC1 led to increased expression of the two reporter genes regardless of whether the fusions were integrated into the genome or present on autonomously replicating plasmids. The results suggested that this effect was due to feedback regulation of the PDC1 promoter-driven expression in S. cerevisiae pdc1(0) strains. The yeast PDC1 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, leading to an active PDC. This result shows that the PDC1-encoded subunit alone can form an active tetramer without yeast-specific processing steps. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:2404950

  9. KlSEC53 is an essential Kluyveromyces lactis gene and is homologous with the SEC53 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Staneva, Dessislava; Uccelletti, Daniela; Farina, Francesca; Venkov, Pencho; Palleschi, Claudio

    2004-01-15

    Phosphomannomutase (PMM) is a key enzyme, which catalyses one of the first steps in the glycosylation pathway, the conversion of D-mannose-6-phosphate to D-mannose-1-phosphate. The latter is the substrate for the synthesis of GDP-mannose, which serves as the mannosyl donor for the glycosylation reactions in eukaryotic cells. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae PMM is encoded by the gene SEC53 (ScSEC53) and the deficiency of PMM activity leads to severe defects in both protein glycosylation and secretion. We report here on the isolation of the Kluyveromyces lactis SEC53 (KlSEC53) gene from a genomic library by virtue of its ability to complement a Saccharomyces cerevisiae sec53 mutation. The sequenced DNA fragment contained an open reading frame of 765 bp, coding for a predicted polypeptide, KlSec53p, of 254 amino acids. The KlSec53p displays a high degree of homology with phosphomannomutases from other yeast species, protozoans, plants and humans. Our results have demonstrated that KlSEC53 is the functional homologue of the ScSEC53 gene. Like ScSEC53, the KlSEC53 gene is essential for K. lactis cell viability. Phenotypic analysis of a K. lactis strain overexpressing the KlSEC53 gene revealed defects expected for impaired cell wall integrity. PMID:14745781

  10. The Candida boidinii peroxisomal membrane protein Pmp30 has a role in peroxisomal proliferation and is functionally homologous to Pmp27 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Y; Marshall, P A; Saiganji, A; Takabe, K; Saiki, H; Kato, N; Goodman, J M

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of peroxisome proliferation is poorly understood. Candida boidinii is a methylotrophic yeast that undergoes rapid and massive peroxisome proliferation and serves as a good model system for this process. Pmp30A and Pmp30B (formerly designated Pmp31 and Pmp32, respectively) are two closely related proteins in a polyploid strain of this yeast that are strongly induced by diverse peroxisome proliferators such as methanol, oleate, and D-alanine. The function of these proteins is not understood. To study this issue, we used a recently described haploid strain (S2) of C. boidinii that can be manipulated genetically. We now report that strain S2 contains a single PMP30 gene very similar in sequence (greater than 93% identity at the DNA level) to PMP30A and PMP30B. When PMP30 was disrupted, cell growth on methanol was greatly inhibited, and cells grown in both methanol and oleate had fewer, larger, and more spherical peroxisomes than wild-type cells. A similar phenotype was recently described for Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultured on oleate in which PMP27, which encodes a protein of related sequence that is important for peroxisome proliferation, was disrupted. To determine whether Pmp27 is a functional homolog of Pmp30, gentle complementation was performed. PMP30A was expressed in the PMP27 disruptant of S. cerevisiae, and PMP27 was expressed in the PMP30 disruptant of C. boidinii S2. Complementation, in terms of both cell growth and organelle size, shape, and number, was successful in both directions, although reversion to a wild-type phenotype was only partial for the PMP30 disruptant. We conclude that these proteins are functional homologs and that both Pmp30 and Pmp27 have a direct role in proliferation and organelle size rather than a role in a specific peroxisomal metabolic pathway of substrate utilization. PMID:7592467

  11. A novel rat homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes UBC4 and UBC5 with distinct biochemical features is induced during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S S; Bédard, N; Morales, C; Hingamp, P; Trasler, J

    1996-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) UBC4 and UBC5 are essential for degradation of short-lived and abnormal proteins. We previously identified rat cDNAs encoding two E2s with strong sequence similarity to UBC4 and UBC5. These E2 isoforms are widely expressed in rat tissues, consistent with a fundamental cellular function for these E2s. We now report a new isoform, 8A, which despite having >91% amino acid identity with the other isoforms, shows several novel features. Expression of the 8A isoform appears restricted to the testis, is absent in early life, but is induced during puberty. Hypophysectomy reduced expression of the 8A isoform. In situ hybridization studies indicated that 8A mRNA is expressed mainly in round spermatids. Immunoblot analyses showed that 8A protein is found not only in subfractions of germ cells enriched in round spermatids but also in subfractions containing residual bodies extruded from more mature elongated spermatids, indicating that the protein possesses a longer half-life than the mRNA. Unlike all previously identified mammalian and plant homologs of S. cerevisiae UBC4, which possess a basic pI, the 8A isoform is unique in possessing an acidic pI. The small differences in sequence between the 8A isoform and other rat isoforms conferred differences in biochemical function. The 8A isoform was less effective than an isoform with a basic pI or ineffective in conjugating ubiquitin to certain fractions of testis proteins. Thus, although multiple isoforms of a specific E2 may exist to ensure performance of a critical cellular function, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that multiple genes also permit highly specialized regulation of expression of specific isoforms and that subtle differences in E2 primary structure can dictate conjugation of ubiquitin to different subsets of cellular proteins. PMID:8754804

  12. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae recombination enhancer biases recombination during interchromosomal mating-type switching but not in interchromosomal homologous recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Peter; Simon, Peter J; Broach, James R

    2004-01-01

    Haploid Saccharomyces can change mating type through HO-endonuclease cleavage of an expressor locus, MAT, followed by gene conversion using one of two repository loci, HML or HMR, as donor. The mating type of a cell dictates which repository locus is used as donor, with a cells using HML and alpha cells using HMR. This preference is established in part by RE, a locus on the left arm of chromosome III that activates the surrounding region, including HML, for recombination in a cells, an activity suppressed by alpha 2 protein in alpha cells. We have examined the ability of RE to stimulate different forms of interchromosomal recombination. We found that RE exerted an effect on interchromosomal mating-type switching and on intrachromosomal homologous recombination but not on interchromosomal homologous recombination. Also, even in the absence of RE, MAT alpha still influenced donor preference in interchromosomal mating-type switching, supporting a role of alpha 2 in donor preference independent of RE. These results suggest a model in which RE affects competition between productive and nonproductive recombination outcomes. In interchromosome gene conversion, RE enhances both productive and nonproductive pathways, whereas in intrachromosomal gene conversion and mating-type switching, RE enhances only the productive pathway. PMID:15082540

  13. The Hsp70 homolog Ssb and the 14-3-3 protein Bmh1 jointly regulate transcription of glucose repressed genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hübscher, Volker; Mudholkar, Kaivalya; Chiabudini, Marco; Fitzke, Edith; Wölfle, Tina; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Drepper, Friedel; Warscheid, Bettina; Rospert, Sabine

    2016-07-01

    Chaperones of the Hsp70 family interact with a multitude of newly synthesized polypeptides and prevent their aggregation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking the Hsp70 homolog Ssb suffer from pleiotropic defects, among others a defect in glucose-repression. The highly conserved heterotrimeric kinase SNF1/AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) is required for the release from glucose-repression in yeast and is a key regulator of energy balance also in mammalian cells. When glucose is available the phosphatase Glc7 keeps SNF1 in its inactive, dephosphorylated state. Dephosphorylation depends on Reg1, which mediates targeting of Glc7 to its substrate SNF1. Here we show that the defect in glucose-repression in the absence of Ssb is due to the ability of the chaperone to bridge between the SNF1 and Glc7 complexes. Ssb performs this post-translational function in concert with the 14-3-3 protein Bmh, to which Ssb binds via its very C-terminus. Raising the intracellular concentration of Ssb or Bmh enabled Glc7 to dephosphorylate SNF1 even in the absence of Reg1. By that Ssb and Bmh efficiently suppressed transcriptional deregulation of Δreg1 cells. The findings reveal that Ssb and Bmh comprise a new chaperone module, which is involved in the fine tuning of a phosphorylation-dependent switch between respiration and fermentation. PMID:27001512

  14. The Hsp70 homolog Ssb and the 14-3-3 protein Bmh1 jointly regulate transcription of glucose repressed genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hübscher, Volker; Mudholkar, Kaivalya; Chiabudini, Marco; Fitzke, Edith; Wölfle, Tina; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Drepper, Friedel; Warscheid, Bettina; Rospert, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones of the Hsp70 family interact with a multitude of newly synthesized polypeptides and prevent their aggregation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking the Hsp70 homolog Ssb suffer from pleiotropic defects, among others a defect in glucose-repression. The highly conserved heterotrimeric kinase SNF1/AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) is required for the release from glucose-repression in yeast and is a key regulator of energy balance also in mammalian cells. When glucose is available the phosphatase Glc7 keeps SNF1 in its inactive, dephosphorylated state. Dephosphorylation depends on Reg1, which mediates targeting of Glc7 to its substrate SNF1. Here we show that the defect in glucose-repression in the absence of Ssb is due to the ability of the chaperone to bridge between the SNF1 and Glc7 complexes. Ssb performs this post-translational function in concert with the 14-3-3 protein Bmh, to which Ssb binds via its very C-terminus. Raising the intracellular concentration of Ssb or Bmh enabled Glc7 to dephosphorylate SNF1 even in the absence of Reg1. By that Ssb and Bmh efficiently suppressed transcriptional deregulation of Δreg1 cells. The findings reveal that Ssb and Bmh comprise a new chaperone module, which is involved in the fine tuning of a phosphorylation-dependent switch between respiration and fermentation. PMID:27001512

  15. Quantification of sperm specific mRNA transcripts (PRM1, PRM2, and TNP2) in teratozoospermia and normozoospermia: New correlations between mRNA content and morphology of sperm.

    PubMed

    Savadi-Shiraz, Elham; Edalatkhah, Haleh; Talebi, Saeed; Heidari-Vala, Hamed; Zandemami, Mahdi; Pahlavan, Somayeh; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Paradowska-Dogan, Agnieszka; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Sperm mRNAs could be used as a predictor of fertilization capacity since the transcriptional profile of a gamete is critical for the production of viable human sperm. The aim of this study was to determine if PRM1, PRM2, and TNP2 transcripts in spermatozoa from normozoospermic and teratozoospermic men correlate with sperm morphology and/or assisted-reproduction outcomes. Human ejaculates were collected from 138 men referred to an infertility clinic, and were separated in two groups, teratozoospermic (n =72) and normozoospermic (n =66), based on World Health Organization criteria (2010). Chromomycin A3 and analine blue staining were used to evaluate protamination and chromatin integrity, respectively. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR was performed for PRM1, PRM2, and TNP2. This analysis revealed significantly higher PRM1 and PRM2 mRNA copy numbers in normozoospermic versus teratozoospermic samples (P < 0.001). In contrast, TNP2 transcript abundance was significantly higher in teratozoospermic versus normozoospermic samples (P < 0.001) and positively correlated with sperm-head defects (P < 0.05). Sperm-tail defects negatively correlated (P < 0.05) with both PRM1 and PRM2 transcripts in normozoospermic samples. No significant differences were observed between the two groups when comparing transcript levels to the outcome of intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles (P > 0.05), and a normal PRM1/PRM2 mRNA ratio (∼1) was observed in more than 70% of successful cycles. Thus, the quantity of PRM1, PRM2, and TNP2 transcripts and the PRM1/PRM2 mRNA ratio affect spermiogenesis, sperm morphology, and the function of mature human sperm. These mRNAs could therefore be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis of male infertility. PMID:25536093

  16. BTN1, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog to the human Batten disease gene, is involved in phospholipid distribution

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-López, Sergio; Langager, Deanna; Chan, Chun-Hung; Pearce, David A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY BTN1, the yeast homolog to human CLN3 (which is defective in Batten disease), has been implicated in the regulation of vacuolar pH, potentially by modulating vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) activity. However, we report that Btn1p and the V-ATPase complex do not physically interact, suggesting that any influence that Btn1p has on V-ATPase is indirect. Because membrane lipid environment plays a crucial role in the activity and function of membrane proteins, we investigated whether cells lacking BTN1 have altered membrane phospholipid content. Deletion of BTN1 (btn1-Δ) led to a decreased level of phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) in both mitochondrial and vacuolar membranes. In yeast there are two phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) decarboxylases, Psd1p and Psd2p, and these proteins are responsible for the synthesis of PtdEtn in mitochondria and Golgi-endosome, respectively. Deletion of both BTN1 and PSD1 (btn1-Δ psd1-Δ) led to a further decrease in levels of PtdEtn in ER membranes associated to mitochondria (MAMs), with a parallel increase in PtdSer. Fluorescent-labeled PtdSer (NBD-PtdSer) transport assays demonstrated that transport of NBD-PtdSer from the ER to both mitochondria and endosomes and/or vacuole is affected in btn1-Δ cells. Moreover, btn1-Δ affects the synthesis of PtdEtn by the Kennedy pathway and impairs the ability of psd1-Δ cells to restore PtdEtn to normal levels in mitochondria and vacuoles by ethanolamine addition. In summary, lack of Btn1p alters phospholipid levels and might play a role in regulating their subcellular distribution. PMID:22107873

  17. BTN1, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog to the human Batten disease gene, is involved in phospholipid distribution.

    PubMed

    Padilla-López, Sergio; Langager, Deanna; Chan, Chun-Hung; Pearce, David A

    2012-03-01

    BTN1, the yeast homolog to human CLN3 (which is defective in Batten disease), has been implicated in the regulation of vacuolar pH, potentially by modulating vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) activity. However, we report that Btn1p and the V-ATPase complex do not physically interact, suggesting that any influence that Btn1p has on V-ATPase is indirect. Because membrane lipid environment plays a crucial role in the activity and function of membrane proteins, we investigated whether cells lacking BTN1 have altered membrane phospholipid content. Deletion of BTN1 (btn1-Δ) led to a decreased level of phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) in both mitochondrial and vacuolar membranes. In yeast there are two phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) decarboxylases, Psd1p and Psd2p, and these proteins are responsible for the synthesis of PtdEtn in mitochondria and Golgi-endosome, respectively. Deletion of both BTN1 and PSD1 (btn1-Δ psd1-Δ) led to a further decrease in levels of PtdEtn in ER membranes associated to mitochondria (MAMs), with a parallel increase in PtdSer. Fluorescent-labeled PtdSer (NBD-PtdSer) transport assays demonstrated that transport of NBD-PtdSer from the ER to both mitochondria and endosomes and/or vacuole is affected in btn1-Δ cells. Moreover, btn1-Δ affects the synthesis of PtdEtn by the Kennedy pathway and impairs the ability of psd1-Δ cells to restore PtdEtn to normal levels in mitochondria and vacuoles by ethanolamine addition. In summary, lack of Btn1p alters phospholipid levels and might play a role in regulating their subcellular distribution. PMID:22107873

  18. A Homolog of Ste6, the a-Factor Transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Is Required for Mating but Not for Monokaryotic Fruiting in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yen-Ping; Shen, Wei-Chiang

    2005-01-01

    Fungal pheromones function during the initial recognition stage of the mating process. One type of peptide pheromone identified in ascomycetes and basidiomycetes terminates in a conserved CAAX motif and requires extensive posttranslational modifications to become mature and active. A well-studied representative is the a-factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Unlike the typical secretory pathway utilized by most peptides, an alternative mechanism involving the ATP-binding cassette transporter Ste6 is used for the export of mature a-factor. Cryptococcus neoformans, a bipolar human pathogenic basidiomycete, produces CAAX motif-containing lipopeptide pheromones in both MATa and MATα cells. Virulence studies with a congenic pair of C. neoformans serotype D strains have shown that MATα cells are more virulent than MATa cells. Characterization of the MATα pheromones indicated that an autocrine signaling loop may contribute to the differentiation and virulence of MATα cells. To further address the role of pheromones in the signaling loop, we identified a STE6 homolog in the C. neoformans genome and determined its function by gene disruption. The ste6 mutants in either mating-type background showed partially impaired mating functions, and mating was completely abolished in a bilateral mutant cross. Surprisingly, the MATα ste6 mutant does not exhibit a defect in monokaryotic fruiting, suggesting that the activation of the autocrine signaling loop by the pheromone is via a Ste6-independent mechanism. MFα pheromone itself is essential for this process and could induce the signaling response intracellularly in MATα cells. Our data demonstrate that Ste6 is evolutionarily conserved for mating and is not required for monokaryotic fruiting in C. neoformans. PMID:15643070

  19. The human homolog of S. cerevisiae CDC27, CDC27 Hs, is encoded by a highly conserved intronless gene present in multiple copies in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Devor, E.J.; Dill-Devor, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    We have obtained a number of unique sequences via PCR amplification of human genomic DNA using degenerate primers under low stringency (42{degrees}C). One of these, an 853 bp product, has been identified as a partial genomic sequence of the human homolog of the S. cerevisiae CDC27 gene, CDC27Hs (GenBank No. U00001). This gene, reported by Turgendreich et al. is also designated EST00556 from Adams et al. We have undertaken a more detailed examination of our sequence, MCP34N, and have found that: 1. the genomic sequence is nearly identical to CDC27Hs over its entire 853 bp length; 2. an MCP34N-specific PCR assay of several non-human primate species reveals amplification products in chimpanzee and gorilla genomes having greater than 90% sequence identity with CDC27Hs; and 3. an MCP34N-specific PCR assay of the BIOS hybrid cell line panel gives a discordancy pattern suggesting multiple loci. Based upon these data, we present the following initial characterization: 1. the complete MCP34N sequence identity with CDC27Hs indicates that the latter is encoded by an intronless gene; 2. CDC27Hs is highly conserved among higher primates; and 3. CDC27Hs is present in multiple copies in the human genome. These characteristics, taken together with those initially reported for CDC27Hs, suggest that this is an old gene that carries out an important but, as yet, unknown function in the human brain.

  20. Functional homology of protein kinases required for sexual differentiation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests a conserved signal transduction module in eukaryotic organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Neiman, A M; Stevenson, B J; Xu, H P; Sprague, G F; Herskowitz, I; Wigler, M; Marcus, S

    1993-01-01

    We present genetic evidence that three presumptive protein kinases of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, byr2, byr1, and spk1 that are structurally related to protein kinases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, STE11, STE7, and FUS3, respectively, are also functionally related. In some cases, introduction of the heterologous protein kinase into a mutant was sufficient for complementation. In other cases (as in a ste11- mutant of S. cerevisiae), expression of two S. pombe protein kinases (byr2 and byr1) was required to observe complementation, suggesting that byr2 and byr1 act cooperatively. Complementation in S. pombe mutants is observed as restoration of sporulation and conjugation and in S. cerevisiae as restoration of conjugation, pheromone-induced cell cycle arrest, and pheromone-induced transcription of the FUS1 gene. We also show that the S. pombe kinases bear a similar relationship to the mating pheromone receptor apparatus as do their S. cerevisiae counterparts. Our results indicate that pheromone-induced signal transduction employs a conserved set of kinases in these two evolutionarily distant yeasts despite an apparently significant difference in function of the heterotrimeric G proteins. We suggest that the STE11/byr2, STE7/byr1, and FUS3/spk1 kinases comprise a signal transduction module that may be conserved in higher eukaryotes. Consistent with this hypothesis, we show that a mammalian mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, ERK2, can partially replace spk1 function in S. pombe. Images PMID:8443406

  1. The non-homologous end-joining pathway of S. cerevisiae works effectively in G1-phase cells, and religates cognate ends correctly and non-randomly.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shujuan; Honey, Sangeet; Futcher, Bruce; Grollman, Arthur P

    2016-06-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are potentially lethal lesions repaired by two major pathways: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Homologous recombination preferentially reunites cognate broken ends. In contrast, non-homologous end-joining could ligate together any two ends, possibly generating dicentric or acentric fragments, leading to inviability. Here, we characterize the yeast NHEJ pathway in populations of pure G1 phase cells, where there is no possibility of repair using a homolog. We show that in G1 yeast cells, NHEJ is a highly effective repair pathway for gamma-ray induced breaks, even when many breaks are present. Pulsed-field gel analysis showed chromosome karyotypes following NHEJ repair of cells from populations with multiple breaks. The number of reciprocal translocations was surprisingly low, perhaps zero, suggesting that NHEJ preferentially re-ligates the "correct" broken ends instead of randomly-chosen ends. Although we do not know the mechanism, the preferential correct ligation is consistent with the idea that broken ends are continuously held together by protein-protein interactions or by larger scale chromatin structure. PMID:27130982

  2. cps1+, a Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae FKS genes whose mutation confers hypersensitivity to cyclosporin A and papulacandin B.

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, J; Saitou, A; Durán, A; Ribas, J C

    1997-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe cps1-12 (for chlorpropham supersensitive) mutant strain was originally isolated as hypersensitive to the spindle poison isopropyl N-3-chlorophenyl carbamate (chlorpropham) (J. Ishiguro and Y. Uhara, Jpn. J. Genet. 67:97-109, 1992). We have found that the cps1-12 mutation also confers (i) hypersensitivity to the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA), (ii) hypersensitivity to the drug papulacandin B, which specifically inhibits 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthesis both in vivo and in vitro, and (iii) thermosensitive growth at 37 degrees C. Under any of these restrictive treatments, cells swell up and finally lyse. With an osmotic stabilizer, cells do not lyse, but at 37 degrees C they become multiseptated and multibranched. The cps1-12 mutant, grown at a restrictive temperature, showed an increase in sensitivity to lysis by enzymatic cell wall degradation, in in vitro 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthase activity (173% in the absence of GTP in the reaction), and in cell wall biosynthesis (130% of the wild-type amount). Addition of Ca2+ suppresses hypersensitivity to papulacandin B and septation and branching phenotypes. All of these data suggest a relationship between the cps1+ gene and cell wall synthesis. A DNA fragment containing the cps1+ gene was cloned, and sequence analysis indicated that it encodes a predicted membrane protein of 1,729 amino acids with 15 to 16 transmembrane domains. S. pombe cps1p has overall 55% sequence identity with Fks1p or Fks2p, proposed to be catalytic or associated subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthase. Thus, the cps1+ product might be a catalytic or an associated copurifying subunit of the fission yeast 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthase that plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis. PMID:9401022

  3. Increase in dual specificity phosphatase 1, TGF-beta stimulated gene 22, domain family protein 3 and Luc7 homolog (S. cerevisiae)-like messenger RNA after mechanical asphyxiation in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Tsuda, Ryouichi; Nakasono, Ichiro

    2009-07-01

    We investigated the transcriptome profile of mechanical asphyxia and decapitation at 60 min after death using serial analysis of gene expression. After comparing the results, 11 genes were significantly increased by the mechanical asphyxia treatment in the mouse lung. Of those genes, quantitative real-time PCR revealed that dual specificity phosphatase 1 (Dusp1), TGF-beta stimulated gene 22, domain family protein 3 (TSC22d3) and Luc7 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)-like (Luc7l) after asphyxia were more significantly increased than those after decapitation. Dusp1 inactivated mitogen activated protein kinase, which functions in cell proliferation. However, the consumption of oxygen had a disadvantageous effect on survival, because tissue or cells were not able to produce energy by internal respiration under the suddenly hypoxic condition following asphyxia. The increased transcripts of Dusp1 following asphyxia suppressed oxygen consumption. TSC22d3 was isolated as a TGF-beta-inducible gene and it is also identified as a glucocorticoid (GC)-induced leucine zipper (GILZ). GC was released from the adrenal gland via HPA axis under the hypoxic condition. Especially in acute suffocation, GC rapidly increased. Therefore, the increase in TSC22d3 may be induced by the increased GC following asphyxia. We were unable to clarify the Luc7l increase, because there are no reports in relation to asphyxia. In addition, GILZ mediates the antiproliferative activity of glucocorticoids. We thought that the increasing TSC22d3 may lead to the suppression of oxygen consumption to avoid wasting energy, as in proliferation, the same as the increase in Dusp1. Our data indicated that the determination of the protein product level in the lung could help in diagnosing asphyxia. In addition, these data may contribute to revealing the patho-physiology of asphyxia and to help diagnose asphyxia, including hanging. PMID:19364672

  4. Alcohol homologation

    DOEpatents

    Wegman, Richard W.; Moloy, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    A process for the homologation of an alkanol by reaction with synthesis gas in contact with a system containing rhodium atom, ruthenium atom, iodine atom and a bis(diorganophosphino) alkane to selectivity produce the next higher homologue.

  5. Alcohol homologation

    DOEpatents

    Wegman, R.W.; Moloy, K.G.

    1988-02-23

    A process is described for the homologation of an alkanol by reaction with synthesis gas in contact with a system containing rhodium atom, ruthenium atom, iodine atom and a bis(diorganophosphino) alkane to selectivity produce the next higher homologue.

  6. Preparation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression plasmids.

    PubMed

    Drew, David; Kim, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Expression plasmids for Saccharomyces cerevisiae offer a wide choice of vector copy number, promoters of varying strength and selection markers. These expression plasmids are usually shuttle vectors that can be propagated both in yeast and bacteria, making them useful in gene cloning. For heterologous production of membrane proteins, we used the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion technology which was previously developed in the Escherichia coli system. We designed an expression plasmid carrying an inducible GAL1 promoter, a gene encoding a membrane protein of interest and the GFP-octa-histidine sequence. Here we describe construction of multi-copy yeast expression plasmids by homologous recombination in S. cerevisiae. PMID:22454112

  7. A global topology map of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae membrane proteome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun; Melén, Karin; Österberg, Marie; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2006-07-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is, arguably, the best understood eukaryotic model organism, yet comparatively little is known about its membrane proteome. Here, we report the cloning and expression of 617 S. cerevisiae membrane proteins as fusions to a C-terminal topology reporter and present experimentally constrained topology models for 546 proteins. By homology, the experimental topology information can be extended to 15,000 membrane proteins from 38 fully sequenced eukaryotic genomes. membrane proteins | membrane proteomics | yeast

  8. Homology, Analogy, and Ethology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Colin G.

    1984-01-01

    Because the main criterion of structural homology (the principle of connections) does not exist for behavioral homology, the utility of the ethological concept of homology has been questioned. The confidence with which behavioral homologies can be claimed varies inversely with taxonomic distance. Thus, conjectures about long-range phylogenetic…

  9. Mutagenesis protocols in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by in vivo overlap extension.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    A high recombination frequency and its ease of manipulation has made Saccharomyces cerevisiae a unique model eukaryotic organism to study homologous recombination. Indeed, the well-developed recombination machinery in S. cerevisiae facilitates the construction of mutant libraries for directed evolution experiments. In this context, in vivo overlap extension (IVOE) is a particularly attractive protocol that takes advantage of the eukaryotic apparatus to carry out combinatorial saturation mutagenesis, site-directed recombination or site-directed mutagenesis, avoiding ligation steps and additional PCR reactions that are common to standard in vitro protocols. PMID:20676972

  10. Conservation of Histone Binding and Transcriptional Repressor Functions in a Schizosaccharomyces pombe Tup1p Homolog

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Yukio; Matsuo, Eri; Roth, Sharon Y.; Harashima, Satoshi

    1999-01-01

    The Ssn6p-Tup1p corepressor complex is important to the regulation of several diverse genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and serves as a model for corepressor functions. To investigate the evolutionary conservation of these functions, sequences homologous to the S. cerevisiae TUP1 gene were cloned from Kluyveromyces lactis (TUP1) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (tup11+). Interestingly, while the K. lactis TUP1 gene complemented an S. cerevisiae tup1 null mutation, the S. pombe tup11+ gene did not, even when expressed under the control of the S. cerevisiae TUP1 promoter. However, an S. pombe Tup11p-LexA fusion protein repressed transcription of a corresponding reporter gene, indicating that this Tup1p homolog has intrinsic repressor activity. Moreover, a chimeric protein containing the amino-terminal Ssn6p-binding domain of S. cerevisiae Tup1p and 544 amino acids from the C-terminal region of S. pombe Tup11p complemented the S. cerevisiae tup1 mutation. The failure of native S. pombe Tup11p to complement loss of Tup1p functions in S. cerevisiae corresponds to an inability to bind to S. cerevisiae Ssn6p in vitro. Disruption of tup11+ in combination with a disruption of tup12+, another TUP1 homolog gene in S. pombe, causes a defect in glucose repression of fbp1+, suggesting that S. pombe Tup1p homologs function as repressors in S. pombe. Furthermore, Tup11p binds specifically to histones H3 and H4 in vitro, indicating that both the repression and histone binding functions of Tup1p-related proteins are conserved across species. PMID:10567571

  11. Nitrogenase and Homologs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogenase catalyzes biological nitrogen fixation, a key step in the global nitrogen cycle. Three homologous nitrogenases have been identified to date, along with several structural and/or functional homologs of this enzyme that are involved in nitrogenase assembly, bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis and methanogenic process, respectively. In this article, we provide an overview of the structures and functions of nitrogenase and its homologs, which highlights the similarity and disparity of this uniquely versatile group of enzymes. PMID:25491285

  12. Homological stabilizer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jonas T.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  13. Homology, convergence and parallelism.

    PubMed

    Ghiselin, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Homology is a relation of correspondence between parts of parts of larger wholes. It is used when tracking objects of interest through space and time and in the context of explanatory historical narratives. Homologues can be traced through a genealogical nexus back to a common ancestral precursor. Homology being a transitive relation, homologues remain homologous however much they may come to differ. Analogy is a relationship of correspondence between parts of members of classes having no relationship of common ancestry. Although homology is often treated as an alternative to convergence, the latter is not a kind of correspondence: rather, it is one of a class of processes that also includes divergence and parallelism. These often give rise to misleading appearances (homoplasies). Parallelism can be particularly hard to detect, especially when not accompanied by divergences in some parts of the body. PMID:26598721

  14. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... techniques, antibodies to S. cerevisiae (baker's or brewer's yeast) in human serum or plasma. Detection of S... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test...

  15. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... techniques, antibodies to S. cerevisiae (baker's or brewer's yeast) in human serum or plasma. Detection of S... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... techniques, antibodies to S. cerevisiae (baker's or brewer's yeast) in human serum or plasma. Detection of S... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... techniques, antibodies to S. cerevisiae (baker's or brewer's yeast) in human serum or plasma. Detection of S... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test...

  18. Braid Floer homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, J. B.; Ghrist, R.; Vandervorst, R. C.; Wójcik, W.

    2015-09-01

    Area-preserving diffeomorphisms of a 2-disc can be regarded as time-1 maps of (non-autonomous) Hamiltonian flows on R / Z ×D2. The periodic flow-lines define braid (conjugacy) classes, up to full twists. We examine the dynamics relative to such braid classes and define a new invariant for such classes, the BRAID FLOER HOMOLOGY. This refinement of Floer homology, originally used for the Arnol'd Conjecture, yields a Morse-type forcing theory for periodic points of area-preserving diffeomorphisms of the 2-disc based on braiding. Contributions of this paper include (1) a monotonicity lemma for the behavior of the nonlinear Cauchy-Riemann equations with respect to algebraic lengths of braids; (2) establishment of the topological invariance of the resulting braid Floer homology; (3) a shift theorem describing the effect of twisting braids in terms of shifting the braid Floer homology; (4) computation of examples; and (5) a forcing theorem for the dynamics of Hamiltonian disc maps based on braid Floer homology.

  19. Actin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Greer, C; Schekman, R

    1982-01-01

    Inhibition of DNase I activity has been used as an assay to purify actin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast actin). The final fraction, obtained after a 300-fold purification, is approximately 97% pure as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. Like rabbit skeletal muscle actin, yeast actin has a molecular weight of about 43,000, forms 7-nm-diameter filaments when polymerization is induced by KCl or Mg2+, and can be decorated with a proteolytic fragment of muscle myosin (heavy meromyosin). Although heavy meromyosin ATPase activity is stimulated by rabbit muscle and yeast actins to approximately the same Vmax (2 mmol of Pi per min per mumol of heavy meromyosin), half-maximal activation (Kapp) is obtained with 14 micro M muscle actin, but requires approximately 135 micro M yeast actin. This difference suggests a low affinity of yeast actin for muscle myosin. Yeast and muscle filamentous actin respond similarly to cytochalasin and phalloidin, although the drugs have no effect on S. cerevisiae cell growth. Images PMID:6217414

  20. The homologous chromosome is an effective template for the repair of mitotic DNA double-strand breaks in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yikang S; Golic, Kent G

    2003-01-01

    In recombinational DNA double-strand break repair a homologous template for gene conversion may be located at several different genomic positions: on the homologous chromosome in diploid organisms, on the sister chromatid after DNA replication, or at an ectopic position. The use of the homologous chromosome in mitotic gene conversion is thought to be limited in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells. In contrast, by studying the repair of double-strand breaks generated by the I-SceI rare-cutting endonuclease, we find that the homologous chromosome is frequently used in Drosophila melanogaster, which we suggest is attributable to somatic pairing of homologous chromosomes in mitotic cells of Drosophila. We also find that Drosophila mitotic cells of the germ line, like yeast, employ the homologous recombinational repair pathway more often than imperfect nonhomologous end joining. PMID:14704169

  1. Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ostergaard, Simon; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge regarding Saccharomyces cerevisiae has accumulated over time, and today S. cerevisiae serves as a widley used biotechnological production organism as well as a eukaryotic model system. The high transformation efficiency, in addition to the availability of the complete yeast genome sequence, has facilitated genetic manipulation of this microorganism, and new approaches are constantly being taken to metabolicially engineer this organism in order to suit specific needs. In this paper, strategies and concepts for metabolic engineering are discussed and several examples based upon selected studies involving S. cerevisiae are reviewed. The many different studies of metabolic engineering using this organism illustrate all the categories of this multidisciplinary field: extension of substrate range, improvements of producitivity and yield, elimination of byproduct formation, improvement of process performance, improvements of cellular properties, and extension of product range including heterologous protein production. PMID:10704473

  2. Molecular population genetics and evolution of a prion-like protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, M A; True, H L; Chernoff, Y O; Lindquist, S

    2001-01-01

    The prion-like behavior of Sup35p, the eRF3 homolog in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mediates the activity of the cytoplasmic nonsense suppressor known as [PSI(+)]. Sup35p is divided into three regions of distinct function. The N-terminal and middle (M) regions are required for the induction and propagation of [PSI(+)] but are not necessary for translation termination or cell viability. The C-terminal region encompasses the termination function. The existence of the N-terminal region in SUP35 homologs of other fungi has led some to suggest that this region has an adaptive function separate from translation termination. To examine this hypothesis, we sequenced portions of SUP35 in 21 strains of S. cerevisiae, including 13 clinical isolates. We analyzed nucleotide polymorphism within this species and compared it to sequence divergence from a sister species, S. paradoxus. The N domain of Sup35p is highly conserved in amino acid sequence and is highly biased in codon usage toward preferred codons. Amino acid changes are under weak purifying selection based on a quantitative analysis of polymorphism and divergence. We also conclude that the clinical strains of S. cerevisiae are not recently derived and that outcrossing between strains in S. cerevisiae may be relatively rare in nature. PMID:11606530

  3. Homology, homoplasy, novelty, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Hall, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    Richard Owen coined the modern definition of homology in 1843. Owen's conception of homology was pre-evolutionary, nontransformative (homology maintained basic plans or archetypes), and applied to the fully formed structures of animals. I sketch out the transition to an evolutionary approach to homology in which all classes of similarity are interpreted against the single branching tree of life, and outline the evidence for the application of homology across all levels and features of the biological hierarchy, including behavior. Owen contrasted homology with analogy. While this is not incorrect it is a pre-evolutionary contrast. Lankester [Lankester [1870] Journal of Natural History, 6 (31), 34-43] proposed homoplasy as the class of homology applicable to features formed by independent evolution. Today we identify homology, convergence, parallelism, and novelties as patterns of evolutionary change. A central issue in homology [Owen [1843] Lectures on comparative anatomy and physiology of the invertebrate animals, delivered at the Royal College of Surgeons in 1843. London: Longman, Brown, Green & Longmans] has been whether homology of features-the "same" portion of the brain in different species, for example-depends upon those features sharing common developmental pathways. Owen did not require this criterion, although he observed that homologues often do share developmental pathways (and we now know, often share gene pathways). A similar situation has been explored in the study of behavior, especially whether behaviors must share a common structural, developmental, neural, or genetic basis to be classified as homologous. However, and importantly, development and genes evolve. As shown with both theory and examples, morphological and behavioral features of the phenotype can be homologized as structural or behavioral homologues, respectively, even when their developmental or genetic bases differ (are not homologous). PMID:22711423

  4. DNA replication meets genetic exchange: Chromosomal damage and its repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2001-01-01

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on the roles of homologous recombination in DNA replication are summarized. Current findings in experimental systems ranging from bacteriophages to mammalian cell lines substantiate the idea that homologous recombination is a system supporting DNA replication when either the template DNA is damaged or the replication machinery malfunctions. There are several lines of supporting evidence: (i) DNA replication aggravates preexisting DNA damage, which then blocks subsequent replication; (ii) replication forks abandoned by malfunctioning replisomes become prone to breakage; (iii) mutants with malfunctioning replisomes or with elevated levels of DNA damage depend on homologous recombination; and (iv) homologous recombination primes DNA replication in vivo and can restore replication fork structures in vitro. The mechanisms of recombinational repair in bacteriophage T4, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are compared. In vitro properties of the eukaryotic recombinases suggest a bigger role for single-strand annealing in the eukaryotic recombinational repair. PMID:11459990

  5. Evolving the Concept of Homology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naples, Virginia L.; Miller, Jon S.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding homology is fundamental to learning about evolution. The present study shows an exercise that can be varied in complexity, for which students compile research illustrating the fate of homologous fish skull elements, and assemble a mural to serve as a learning aid. The skull of the most primitive living Actinopterygian (bony fish),…

  6. Peptidase activities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, B; Becker, J M; Naider, F

    1979-01-01

    At least four distinct aminopeptidase activities and a single dipeptidase activity were found in cell extracts of a leucine-lysine auxotroph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The assay for peptidase activity involved polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by an enzyme-coupled activity staining procedure. The aminopeptidases had largely overlapping specificities but could be distinguished from one another by their electrophoretic mobilities and activities toward different peptide substrates. Substrates tested included both free and blocked di- and tripeptides and amino acid derivatives. Images PMID:378955

  7. PET genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tzagoloff, A; Dieckmann, C L

    1990-01-01

    We describe a collection of nuclear respiratory-defective mutants (pet mutants) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae consisting of 215 complementation groups. This set of mutants probably represents a substantial fraction of the total genetic information of the nucleus required for the maintenance of functional mitochondria in S. cerevisiae. The biochemical lesions of mutants in approximately 50 complementation groups have been related to single enzymes or biosynthetic pathways, and the corresponding wild-type genes have been cloned and their structures have been determined. The genes defined by an additional 20 complementation groups were identified by allelism tests with mutants characterized in other laboratories. Mutants representative of the remaining complementation groups have been assigned to one of the following five phenotypic classes: (i) deficiency in cytochrome oxidase, (ii) deficiency in coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase, (iii) deficiency in mitochondrial ATPase, (iv) absence of mitochondrial protein synthesis, and (v) normal composition of respiratory-chain complexes and of oligomycin-sensitive ATPase. In addition to the genes identified through biochemical and genetic analyses of the pet mutants, we have cataloged PET genes not matched to complementation groups in the mutant collection and other genes whose products function in the mitochondria but are not necessary for respiration. Together, this information provides an up-to-date list of the known genes coding for mitochondrial constituents and for proteins whose expression is vital for the respiratory competence of S. cerevisiae. PMID:2215420

  8. Abelian link invariants and homology

    SciTech Connect

    Guadagnini, Enore; Mancarella, Francesco

    2010-06-15

    We consider the link invariants defined by the quantum Chern-Simons field theory with compact gauge group U(1) in a closed oriented 3-manifold M. The relation of the Abelian link invariants with the homology group of the complement of the links is discussed. We prove that, when M is a homology sphere or when a link--in a generic manifold M--is homologically trivial, the associated observables coincide with the observables of the sphere S{sup 3}. Finally, we show that the U(1) Reshetikhin-Turaev surgery invariant of the manifold M is not a function of the homology group only, nor a function of the homotopy type of M alone.

  9. CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Owen W; Poddar, Snigdha; Cate, Jamie H D

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing that results in scarless and marker-free integrations of DNA into Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes. DNA integration results from cotransforming (1) a single plasmid (pCAS) that coexpresses the Cas9 endonuclease and a uniquely engineered single guide RNA (sgRNA) expression cassette and (2) a linear DNA molecule that is used to repair the chromosomal DNA damage by homology-directed repair. For target specificity, the pCAS plasmid requires only a single cloning modification: replacing the 20-bp guide RNA sequence within the sgRNA cassette. This CRISPR-Cas9 protocol includes methods for (1) cloning the unique target sequence into pCAS, (2) assembly of the double-stranded DNA repair oligonucleotides, and (3) cotransformation of pCAS and linear repair DNA into yeast cells. The protocol is technically facile and requires no special equipment. It can be used in any S. cerevisiae strain, including industrial polyploid isolates. Therefore, this CRISPR-Cas9-based DNA integration protocol is achievable by virtually any yeast genetics and molecular biology laboratory. PMID:27250940

  10. Reciprocal translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae formed by nonhomologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Gabriel, Abram

    2004-02-01

    Reciprocal translocations are common in cancer cells, but their creation is poorly understood. We have developed an assay system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study reciprocal translocation formation in the absence of homology. We induce two specific double-strand breaks (DSBs) simultaneously on separate chromosomes with HO endonuclease and analyze the subsequent chromosomal rearrangements among surviving cells. Under these conditions, reciprocal translocations via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) occur at frequencies of approximately 2-7 x 10(-5)/cell exposed to the DSBs. Yku80p is a component of the cell's NHEJ machinery. In its absence, reciprocal translocations still occur, but the junctions are associated with deletions and extended overlapping sequences. After induction of a single DSB, translocations and inversions are recovered in wild-type and rad52 strains. In these rearrangements, a nonrandom assortment of sites have fused to the DSB, and their junctions show typical signs of NHEJ. The sites tend to be between open reading frames or within Ty1 LTRs. In some cases the translocation partner is formed by a break at a cryptic HO recognition site. Our results demonstrate that NHEJ-mediated reciprocal translocations can form in S. cerevisiae as a consequence of DSB repair. PMID:15020464

  11. CRISPR-PCS: a powerful new approach to inducing multiple chromosome splitting in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Nagasawa, Koki; Kaboli, Saeed; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    PCR-mediated chromosome splitting (PCS) was developed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is based on homologous recombination and enables division of a chromosome at any point to form two derived and functional chromosomes. However, because of low homologous recombination activity, PCS is limited to a single site at a time, which makes the splitting of multiple loci laborious and time-consuming. Here we have developed a highly efficient and versatile chromosome engineering technology named CRISPR-PCS that integrates PCS with the novel genome editing CRISPR/Cas9 system. This integration allows PCS to utilize induced double strand breaks to activate homologous recombination. CRISPR-PCS enhances the efficiency of chromosome splitting approximately 200-fold and enables generation of simultaneous multiple chromosome splits. We propose that CRISPR-PCS will be a powerful tool for breeding novel yeast strains with desirable traits for specific industrial applications and for investigating genome function. PMID:27530680

  12. CRISPR-PCS: a powerful new approach to inducing multiple chromosome splitting in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sasano, Yu; Nagasawa, Koki; Kaboli, Saeed; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    PCR-mediated chromosome splitting (PCS) was developed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is based on homologous recombination and enables division of a chromosome at any point to form two derived and functional chromosomes. However, because of low homologous recombination activity, PCS is limited to a single site at a time, which makes the splitting of multiple loci laborious and time-consuming. Here we have developed a highly efficient and versatile chromosome engineering technology named CRISPR-PCS that integrates PCS with the novel genome editing CRISPR/Cas9 system. This integration allows PCS to utilize induced double strand breaks to activate homologous recombination. CRISPR-PCS enhances the efficiency of chromosome splitting approximately 200-fold and enables generation of simultaneous multiple chromosome splits. We propose that CRISPR-PCS will be a powerful tool for breeding novel yeast strains with desirable traits for specific industrial applications and for investigating genome function. PMID:27530680

  13. Characterization of RAD51-Independent Break-Induced Replication That Acts Preferentially with Short Homologous Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ira, Grzegorz; Haber, James E.

    2002-01-01

    Repair of double-strand breaks by gene conversions between homologous sequences located on different Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes or plasmids requires RAD51. When repair occurs between inverted repeats of the same plasmid, both RAD51-dependent and RAD51-independent repairs are found. Completion of RAD51-independent plasmid repair events requires RAD52, RAD50, RAD59, TID1 (RDH54), and SRS2 and appears to involve break-induced replication coupled to single-strand annealing. Surprisingly, RAD51-independent recombination requires much less homology (30 bp) for strand invasion than does RAD51-dependent repair (approximately 100 bp); in fact, the presence of Rad51p impairs recombination with short homology. The differences between the RAD51- and RAD50/RAD59-dependent pathways account for the distinct ways that two different recombination processes maintain yeast telomeres in the absence of telomerase. PMID:12192038

  14. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p.

    PubMed

    Barua, Subit; Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N; Dranginis, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    FLO11 encodes a yeast cell wall flocculin that mediates a variety of adhesive phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Flo11p is implicated in many developmental processes, including flocculation, formation of pseudohyphae, agar invasion, and formation of microbial mats and biofilms. However, Flo11p mediates different processes in different yeast strains. To investigate the mechanisms by which FLO11 determines these differences in colony morphology, flocculation, and invasion, we studied gene structure, function, and expression levels. Nonflocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae Σ1278b cells exhibited significantly higher FLO11 mRNA expression, especially in the stationary phase, than highly flocculent S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus. The two strains varied in cell surface hydrophobicity, and Flo11p contributed significantly to surface hydrophobicity in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus but not in strain Σ1278b. Sequencing of the FLO11 gene in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus revealed strain-specific differences, including a 15-amino-acid insertion in the adhesion domain. Flo11p adhesion domains from strain Σ1278b and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus were expressed and used to coat magnetic beads. The adhesion domain from each strain bound preferentially to homologous cells, and the preferences were independent of the cells in which the adhesion domains were produced. These results are consistent with the idea that strain-specific variations in the amino acid sequences in the adhesion domains cause different Flo11p flocculation activities. The results also imply that strain-specific differences in expression levels, posttranslational modifications, and allelic differences outside the adhesion domains have little effect on flocculation. IMPORTANCE As a nonmotile organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae employs the cell surface flocculin Flo11/Muc1 as an important means of adapting to environmental change. However, there is a great deal of strain variation in the expression of

  15. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N.; Dranginis, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT FLO11 encodes a yeast cell wall flocculin that mediates a variety of adhesive phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Flo11p is implicated in many developmental processes, including flocculation, formation of pseudohyphae, agar invasion, and formation of microbial mats and biofilms. However, Flo11p mediates different processes in different yeast strains. To investigate the mechanisms by which FLO11 determines these differences in colony morphology, flocculation, and invasion, we studied gene structure, function, and expression levels. Nonflocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae Σ1278b cells exhibited significantly higher FLO11 mRNA expression, especially in the stationary phase, than highly flocculent S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus. The two strains varied in cell surface hydrophobicity, and Flo11p contributed significantly to surface hydrophobicity in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus but not in strain Σ1278b. Sequencing of the FLO11 gene in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus revealed strain-specific differences, including a 15-amino-acid insertion in the adhesion domain. Flo11p adhesion domains from strain Σ1278b and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus were expressed and used to coat magnetic beads. The adhesion domain from each strain bound preferentially to homologous cells, and the preferences were independent of the cells in which the adhesion domains were produced. These results are consistent with the idea that strain-specific variations in the amino acid sequences in the adhesion domains cause different Flo11p flocculation activities. The results also imply that strain-specific differences in expression levels, posttranslational modifications, and allelic differences outside the adhesion domains have little effect on flocculation. IMPORTANCE As a nonmotile organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae employs the cell surface flocculin Flo11/Muc1 as an important means of adapting to environmental change. However, there is a great deal of strain variation in the

  16. Object-oriented persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  17. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae osteomyelitis in an immunocompetent baker.

    PubMed

    Seng, Piseth; Cerlier, Alexandre; Cassagne, Carole; Coulange, Mathieu; Legré, Regis; Stein, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Invasive infection caused by Saccharomyces cerevisiae is rare. We report the first case of osteomyelitis caused by S. cerevisiae (baker's yeast) in a post-traumatic patient. The clinical outcome was favorable after surgical debridement, prolonged antifungal treatment and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. PMID:27347482

  19. Genetic variation of the repeated MAL loci in natural populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus.

    PubMed

    Naumov, G I; Naumova, E S; Michels, C A

    1994-03-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the gene functions required to ferment the disaccharide maltose are encoded by the MAL loci. Any one of five highly sequence homologous MAL loci identified in various S. cerevisiae strains (called MAL1, 2, 3, 4 and 6) is sufficient to ferment maltose. Each is a complex of three genes encoding maltose permease, maltase and a transcription activator. This family of loci maps to telomere-linked positions on different chromosomes and most natural strains contain more than one MAL locus. A number of naturally occurring, mutant alleles of MAL1 and MAL3 have been characterized which lack one or more of the gene functions encoded by the fully functional MAL loci. Loss of these gene functions appears to have resulted from mutation and/or rearrangement within the locus. Studies to date concentrated on the standard maltose fermenting strains of S. cerevisiae available from the Berkeley Yeast Stock Center collection. In this report we extend our genetic analysis of the MAL loci to a number of maltose fermenting and nonfermenting natural strains of S. cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus. No new MAL loci were discovered but several new mutant alleles of MAL1 were identified. The evolution of this gene family is discussed. PMID:8005435

  20. Integration of an insertion-type transferred DNA vector from Agrobacterium tumefaciens into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome by gap repair.

    PubMed Central

    Risseeuw, E; Franke-van Dijk, M E; Hooykaas, P J

    1996-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can transfer transferred DNA (T-DNA) to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and that this T-DNA, when used as a replacement vector, is integrated via homologous recombination into the yeast genome. To test whether T-DNA can be a suitable substrate for integration via the gap repair mechanism as well, a model system developed for detection of homologous recombination events in plants was transferred to S. cerevisiae. Analysis of the yeast transformants revealed that an insertion type T-DNA vector can indeed be integrated via gap repair. Interestingly, the transformation frequency and the type of recombination events turned out to depend strongly on the orientation of the insert between the borders in such an insertion type T-DNA vector. PMID:8816506

  1. Cadmium biosorption by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Volesky, B.; May, H.; Holan, Z.R. )

    1993-04-01

    Cadmium uptake by nonliving and resting cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae obtained from aerobic or anaerobic cultures from pure cadmium-bearing solutions was examined. The highest cadmium uptake exceeding 70 mg Cd/g was observed with aerobic baker's yeast biomass from the exponential growth phase. Nearly linear sorption isotherms featured by higher sorbing resting cells together with metal deposits localized exclusively in vacuoles indicate the possibility of a different metal-sequestering mechanism when compared to dry nonliving yeasts which did not usually accumulate more than 20 mg Cd/g. The uptake of cadmium was relatively fast, 75% of the sorption completed in less than 5 min.

  2. Genomic homologous recombination in planta.

    PubMed Central

    Gal, S; Pisan, B; Hohn, T; Grimsley, N; Hohn, B

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants is described. A multimer of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) sequences, arranged such that CaMV could only be produced by recombination, was integrated into Brassica napus nuclear DNA. This set-up allowed scoring of recombination events by the appearance of viral symptoms. The repeated homologous regions were derived from two different strains of CaMV so that different recombinant viruses (i.e. different recombination events) could be distinguished. In most of the transgenic plants, a single major virus species was detected. About half of the transgenic plants contained viruses of the same type, suggesting a hotspot for recombination. The remainder of the plants contained viruses with cross-over sites distributed throughout the rest of the homologous sequence. Sequence analysis of two recombinant molecules suggest that mismatch repair is linked to the recombination process. Images PMID:2026150

  3. Mating-Type Genes and MAT Switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Haber, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is determined by two nonhomologous alleles, MATa and MATα. These sequences encode regulators of the two different haploid mating types and of the diploids formed by their conjugation. Analysis of the MATa1, MATα1, and MATα2 alleles provided one of the earliest models of cell-type specification by transcriptional activators and repressors. Remarkably, homothallic yeast cells can switch their mating type as often as every generation by a highly choreographed, site-specific homologous recombination event that replaces one MAT allele with different DNA sequences encoding the opposite MAT allele. This replacement process involves the participation of two intact but unexpressed copies of mating-type information at the heterochromatic loci, HMLα and HMRa, which are located at opposite ends of the same chromosome-encoding MAT. The study of MAT switching has yielded important insights into the control of cell lineage, the silencing of gene expression, the formation of heterochromatin, and the regulation of accessibility of the donor sequences. Real-time analysis of MAT switching has provided the most detailed description of the molecular events that occur during the homologous recombinational repair of a programmed double-strand chromosome break. PMID:22555442

  4. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA polymerases have homologous core subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetser, D; Nonet, M; Young, R A

    1987-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerases are complex aggregates whose component subunits are functionally ill-defined. The gene that encodes the 140,000-dalton subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II was isolated and studied in detail to obtain clues to the protein's function. This gene, RPB2, exists in a single copy in the haploid genome. Disruption of the gene is lethal to the yeast cell. RPB2 encodes a protein of 138,750 daltons, which contains sequences implicated in binding purine nucleotides and zinc ions and exhibits striking sequence homology with the beta subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. These observations suggest that the yeast and the E. coli subunit have similar roles in RNA synthesis, as the beta subunit contains binding sites for nucleotide substrates and a portion of the catalytic site for RNA synthesis. The subunit homologies reported here, and those observed previously with the largest RNA polymerase subunit, indicate that components of the prokaryotic RNA polymerase "core" enzyme have counterparts in eukaryotic RNA polymerases. PMID:3547406

  5. A Computational Approach to Estimating Nondisjunction Frequency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Daniel B.; Burgess, Sean M.

    2016-01-01

    Errors segregating homologous chromosomes during meiosis result in aneuploid gametes and are the largest contributing factor to birth defects and spontaneous abortions in humans. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has long served as a model organism for studying the gene network supporting normal chromosome segregation. Measuring homolog nondisjunction frequencies is laborious, and involves dissecting thousands of tetrads to detect missegregation of individually marked chromosomes. Here we describe a computational method (TetFit) to estimate the relative contributions of meiosis I nondisjunction and random-spore death to spore inviability in wild type and mutant strains. These values are based on finding the best-fit distribution of 4, 3, 2, 1, and 0 viable-spore tetrads to an observed distribution. Using TetFit, we found that meiosis I nondisjunction is an intrinsic component of spore inviability in wild-type strains. We show proof-of-principle that the calculated average meiosis I nondisjunction frequency determined by TetFit closely matches empirically determined values in mutant strains. Using these published data sets, TetFit uncovered two classes of mutants: Class A mutants skew toward increased nondisjunction death, and include those with known defects in establishing pairing, recombination, and/or synapsis of homologous chromosomes. Class B mutants skew toward random spore death, and include those with defects in sister-chromatid cohesion and centromere function. Epistasis analysis using TetFit is facilitated by the low numbers of tetrads (as few as 200) required to compare the contributions to spore death in different mutant backgrounds. TetFit analysis does not require any special strain construction, and can be applied to previously observed tetrad distributions. PMID:26747203

  6. A Computational Approach to Estimating Nondisjunction Frequency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chu, Daniel B; Burgess, Sean M

    2016-03-01

    Errors segregating homologous chromosomes during meiosis result in aneuploid gametes and are the largest contributing factor to birth defects and spontaneous abortions in humans. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has long served as a model organism for studying the gene network supporting normal chromosome segregation. Measuring homolog nondisjunction frequencies is laborious, and involves dissecting thousands of tetrads to detect missegregation of individually marked chromosomes. Here we describe a computational method (TetFit) to estimate the relative contributions of meiosis I nondisjunction and random-spore death to spore inviability in wild type and mutant strains. These values are based on finding the best-fit distribution of 4, 3, 2, 1, and 0 viable-spore tetrads to an observed distribution. Using TetFit, we found that meiosis I nondisjunction is an intrinsic component of spore inviability in wild-type strains. We show proof-of-principle that the calculated average meiosis I nondisjunction frequency determined by TetFit closely matches empirically determined values in mutant strains. Using these published data sets, TetFit uncovered two classes of mutants: Class A mutants skew toward increased nondisjunction death, and include those with known defects in establishing pairing, recombination, and/or synapsis of homologous chromosomes. Class B mutants skew toward random spore death, and include those with defects in sister-chromatid cohesion and centromere function. Epistasis analysis using TetFit is facilitated by the low numbers of tetrads (as few as 200) required to compare the contributions to spore death in different mutant backgrounds. TetFit analysis does not require any special strain construction, and can be applied to previously observed tetrad distributions. PMID:26747203

  7. Synthesis of ribosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J R

    1989-01-01

    The assembly of a eucaryotic ribosome requires the synthesis of four ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules and more than 75 ribosomal proteins. It utilizes all three RNA polymerases; it requires the cooperation of the nucleus and the cytoplasm, the processing of RNA, and the specific interaction of RNA and protein molecules. It is carried out efficiently and is exquisitely sensitive to the needs of the cell. Our current understanding of this process in the genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed. The ribosomal RNA genes are arranged in a tandem array of 100 to 200 copies. This tandem array has led to unique ways of carrying out a number of functions. Replication is asymmetric and does not initiate from every autonomously replicating sequence. Recombination is suppressed. Transcription of the major ribosomal RNA appears to involve coupling between adjacent transcription units, which are separated by the 5S RNA transcription unit. Genes for many ribosomal proteins have been cloned and sequenced. Few are linked; most are duplicated; most have an intron. There is extensive homology between yeast ribosomal proteins and those of other species. Most, but not all, of the ribosomal protein genes have one or two sites that are essential for their transcription and that bind a common transcription factor. This factor binds also to many other places in the genome, including the telomeres. There is coordinated transcription of the ribosomal protein genes under a variety of conditions. However, the cell seems to possess no mechanism for regulating the transcription of individual ribosomal protein genes in response either to a deficiency or an excess of a particular ribosomal protein. A deficiency causes slow growth. Any excess ribosomal protein is degraded very rapidly, with a half-life of 1 to 5 min. Unlike most types of cells, yeast cells appear not to regulate the translation of ribosomal proteins. However, in the case of ribosomal protein L32

  8. Methionine catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Perpète, Philippe; Duthoit, Olivier; De Maeyer, Simon; Imray, Louise; Lawton, Andrew I; Stavropoulos, Konstantinos E; Gitonga, Virginia W; Hewlins, Michael J E; Dickinson, J Richard

    2006-01-01

    The catabolism of methionine to methionol and methanethiol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied using (13)C NMR spectroscopy, GC-MS, enzyme assays and a number of mutants. Methionine is first transaminated to alpha-keto-gamma-(methylthio)butyrate. Methionol is formed by a decarboxylation reaction, which yields methional, followed by reduction. The decarboxylation is effected specifically by Ydr380wp. Methanethiol is formed from both methionine and alpha-keto-gamma-(methylthio)butyrate by a demethiolase activity. In all except one strain examined, demethiolase was induced by the presence of methionine in the growth medium. This pathway results in the production of alpha-ketobutyrate, a carbon skeleton, which can be re-utilized. Hence, methionine catabolism is more complex and economical than the other amino acid catabolic pathways in yeast, which use the Ehrlich pathway and result solely in the formation of a fusel alcohol. PMID:16423070

  9. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  10. Postreplication repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, M.A.; Boyce, J.; Cox, B.

    1981-04-01

    Postreplication events in logarithmically growing excision-defective mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined after low doses of ultraviolet light. Pulse-labeled deoxyribonucleic acid had interruptions, and when the cells were chased, the interruptions were no longer detected. Since the loss of interruptions was not associated with an exchange of pyrimidine dimers at a detection level of 10 to 20% of the induced dimers, it was concluded that postreplication repair in excision-defective mutants does not involve molecular recombination. Pyrimidine dimers were assayed by utilizing the ultraviolet-endonuclease activity in extracts of Micrococcus luteus and newly developed alkaline sucrose gradient techniques, which yielded chromosomal-size deoxyribonucleic acid after treatment of irradiated cells.

  11. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  12. The pentafunctional arom enzyme of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a mosaic of monofunctional domains.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, K; Edwards, R M; Coggins, J R

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARO1 gene which encodes the arom multifunctional enzyme has been determined. The protein sequence deduced for the pentafunctional arom polypeptide is 1588 amino acids in length and has a calculated Mr of 174555. Functional regions within the polypeptide chain have been identified by comparison with the sequences of the five monofunctional Escherichia coli enzymes whose activities correspond with those of the arom multifunctional enzyme. The observed homologies demonstrate that the arom polypeptide is a mosaic of functional domains and are consistent with the hypothesis that the ARO1 gene evolved by the linking of ancestral E. coli-like genes. PMID:2825635

  13. ISHAN: sequence homology analysis package.

    PubMed

    Shil, Pratip; Dudani, Niraj; Vidyasagar, Pandit B

    2006-01-01

    Sequence based homology studies play an important role in evolutionary tracing and classification of proteins. Various methods are available to analyze biological sequence information. However, with the advent of proteomics era, there is a growing demand for analysis of huge amount of biological sequence information, and it has become necessary to have programs that would provide speedy analysis. ISHAN has been developed as a homology analysis package, built on various sequence analysis tools viz FASTA, ALIGN, CLUSTALW, PHYLIP and CODONW (for DNA sequences). This JAVA application offers the user choice of analysis tools. For testing, ISHAN was applied to perform phylogenetic analysis for sets of Caspase 3 DNA sequences and NF-kappaB p105 amino acid sequences. By integrating several tools it has made analysis much faster and reduced manual intervention. PMID:17274766

  14. Homologies in Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, David F.; Cumalat, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    The genes of humans and chimpanzees are homologs. These genes are - in large measure - identical. From this detailed observation, we naturally suppose that both species evolved from a common ancestor. In particle physics the ordinary observed particles and their superymmetric partners are thought to be homologs, generated by a common "ancestor” , the Higgs particle. Experiments at CERN currently are testing this comfortable analogy of physics with biology. Neither the Higgs boson nor any supersymmetric particle has yet been found. We speculate that a variety of objects are homologs - evidence of an as yet undeveloped quantum theory of gravity to replace Dark Matter. A purely astronomical homology is the Vc - σ o relation which places nearly spherical elliptical galaxies just above well-formed spirals (SA & SB). Here the asymptotically- flat, circular velocity Vc is observed to be between 1 and 2 times the central bulge velocity dispersion σo over the range 60 km/s< σo <400 km/s (Ferrarese 2002, Fig 3). The Vc - σ o relation is difficult to explain with self-consistent equilibrium galaxy models (Courteau et al 2007). Here we give an explanation based on the Sinusoidal Potential, a non-Newtonian potential in which φ =-GM Cos[ko r]/r and ko=2 π /400 pc. We relate the lower limit of 60 km/s to the thermal velocity of protons at the” Broadhurst/Hirano & Hartnett” lookback redshift Z=105.6. This is the redshift where what was 400 pc then expands to 128 h-1 Mpc today. Further, at this Z the temperature of the universe was close to the Hartree Energy of 2 times 13.6 eV, an energy where protons have an rms speed of about 60 km/s.

  15. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. 866.5785 Section 866.5785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... controls). The special control is FDA's “Guidance for Industry and FDA Reviewers: Class II Special...

  16. Symplectic homology product via Legendrian surgery.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Frédéric; Ekholm, Tobias; Eliashberg, Yakov

    2011-05-17

    This research announcement continues the study of the symplectic homology of Weinstein manifolds undertaken by the authors [Bourgeois F, Ekholm T, Eliashberg Y (2009) arXiv:0911.0026] where the symplectic homology, as a vector space, was expressed in terms of the Legendrian homology algebra of the attaching spheres of critical handles. Here, we express the product and Batalin-Vilkovisky operator of symplectic homology in that context. PMID:21518898

  17. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. |; Edlarov, M. |; Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation in that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RADS2, RADI and the RNCI genes,

  18. Regulation of the Hansenula polymorpha maltase gene promoter in H. polymorpha and Saccharomyces cerevisiae1.

    PubMed

    Alamäe, Tiina; Pärn, Pille; Viigand, Katrin; Karp, Helen

    2003-11-01

    Hansenula polymorpha is an exception among methylotrophic yeasts because it can grow on the disaccharides maltose and sucrose. We disrupted the maltase gene (HPMAL1) in H. polymorpha 201 using homologous recombination. Resulting disruptants HP201HPMAL1Delta failed to grow on maltose and sucrose, showing that maltase is essential for the growth of H. polymorpha on both disaccharides. Expression of HPMAL1 in HP201HPMAL1Delta from the truncated variants of the promoter enabled us to define the 5'-upstream region as sufficient for the induction of maltase by disaccharides and its repression by glucose. Expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae maltase gene MAL62 was induced by maltose and sucrose, and repressed by glucose if expressed in HP201HPMAL1Delta from its own promoter. Similarly, the HPMAL1 promoter was recognized and correctly regulated by the carbon source in a S. cerevisiae maltase-negative mutant 100-1B. Therefore we suggest that the transcriptional regulators of S. cerevisiae MAL genes (MAL activator and Mig1 repressor) can affect the expression of the H. polymorpha maltase gene, and that homologues of these proteins may exist in H. polymorpha. Using the HPMAL1 gene as a reporter in a H. polymorpha maltase disruption mutant it was shown that the strength of the HPMAL1 promoter if induced by sucrose is quite comparable to the strength of the H. polymorpha alcohol oxidase promoter under conditions of methanol induction, revealing the biotechnological potential of the HPMAL1 promoter. PMID:14613881

  19. Directed Evolution Method in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Mutant Library Creation and Screening.

    PubMed

    Viña-Gonzalez, Javier; Gonzalez-Perez, David; Alcalde, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Directed evolution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae offers many attractive advantages when designing enzymes for biotechnological applications, a process that involves the construction, cloning and expression of mutant libraries, coupled to high frequency homologous DNA recombination in vivo. Here, we present a protocol to create and screen mutant libraries in yeast based on the example of a fungal aryl-alcohol oxidase (AAO) to enhance its total activity. Two protein segments were subjected to focused-directed evolution by random mutagenesis and in vivo DNA recombination. Overhangs of ~50 bp flanking each segment allowed the correct reassembly of the AAO-fusion gene in a linearized vector giving rise to a full autonomously replicating plasmid. Mutant libraries enriched with functional AAO variants were screened in S. cerevisiae supernatants with a sensitive high-throughput assay based on the Fenton reaction. The general process of library construction in S. cerevisiae described here can be readily applied to evolve many other eukaryotic genes, avoiding extra PCR reactions, in vitro DNA recombination and ligation steps. PMID:27077451

  20. Proteomics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Organelles*

    PubMed Central

    Wiederhold, Elena; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Poolman, Bert; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the subcellular localization of proteins is indispensable to understand their physiological roles. In the past decade, 18 studies have been performed to analyze the protein content of isolated organelles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we integrate the data sets and compare them with other large scale studies on protein localization and abundance. We evaluate the completeness and reliability of the organelle proteomics studies. Reliability depends on the purity of the organelle preparations, which unavoidably contain (small) amounts of contaminants from different locations. Quantitative proteomics methods can be used to distinguish between true organellar constituents and contaminants. Completeness is compromised when loosely or dynamically associated proteins are lost during organelle preparation and also depends on the sensitivity of the analytical methods for protein detection. There is a clear trend in the data from the 18 organelle proteomics studies showing that proteins of low abundance frequently escape detection. Proteins with unknown function or cellular abundance are also infrequently detected, indicating that these proteins may not be expressed under the conditions used. We discuss that the yeast organelle proteomics studies provide powerful lead data for further detailed studies and that methodological advances in organelle preparation and in protein detection may help to improve the completeness and reliability of the data. PMID:19955081

  1. Establishing homologies in protein sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Barker, W. C.; Hunt, L. T.

    1983-01-01

    Computer-based statistical techniques used to determine homologies between proteins occurring in different species are reviewed. The technique is based on comparison of two protein sequences, either by relating all segments of a given length in one sequence to all segments of the second or by finding the best alignment of the two sequences. Approaches discussed include selection using printed tabulations, identification of very similar sequences, and computer searches of a database. The use of the SEARCH, RELATE, and ALIGN programs (Dayhoff, 1979) is explained; sample data are presented in graphs, diagrams, and tables and the construction of scoring matrices is considered.

  2. Human DNA ligase I cDNA: Cloning and functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.E.; Kodama, Kenichi; Tomkinson, A.E.; Lindahl, T.; Lasko, D.D. ); Johnston, L.H. )

    1990-09-01

    Human cDNA clones encoding the major DNA ligase activity in proliferating cells, DNA ligase I, were isolated by two independent methods. In one approach, a human cDNA library was screened by hybridization with oligonucleotides deduced from partial amino acid sequence of purified bovine DNA ligase I. In an alternative approach, a human cDNA library was screened for functional expression of a polypeptide able to complement a cdc9 temperature-sensitive DNA ligase mutant of Saccharomuces cerevisiae. The sequence of an apparently full-length cDNA encodes a 102-kDa protein, indistinguishable in size from authentic human DNA ligase I. The deduced amino acid sequence of the human DNA ligase I cDNA is 40% homologous to the smaller DNA ligases of S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, homology being confined to the carboxyl-terminal regions of the respective proteins. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is transcribed from a single-copy gene on chromosome 19.

  3. SNC1, a yeast homolog of the synaptic vesicle-associated membrane protein/synaptobrevin gene family: genetic interactions with the RAS and CAP genes.

    PubMed Central

    Gerst, J E; Rodgers, L; Riggs, M; Wigler, M

    1992-01-01

    SNC1, a gene from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encodes a homolog of vertebrate synaptic vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) or synaptobrevins. SNC1 was isolated by its ability to suppress the loss of CAP function in S. cerevisiae strains possessing an activated allele of RAS2. CAP is a component of the RAS-responsive S. cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex. The N-terminal domain of CAP is required for full cellular responsiveness to activated RAS proteins. The C-terminal domain of CAP is required for normal cellular morphology and responsiveness to nutrient extremes. Multicopy plasmids expressing SNC1 suppress only the loss of the C-terminal functions of CAP and only in the presence of activated RAS2. Images PMID:1316605

  4. Competitive repair by naturally dispersed repetitive DNA during non-allelic homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Margaret L.; Tan, Frederick J.; Lai, David C.; Celniker, Sue E.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Zheng, Yixian; Koshland, Douglas

    2010-08-27

    Genome rearrangements often result from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between repetitive DNA elements dispersed throughout the genome. Here we systematically analyze NAHR between Ty retrotransposons using a genome-wide approach that exploits unique features of Saccharomyces cerevisiae purebred and Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces bayanus hybrid diploids. We find that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce NAHR-dependent rearrangements using Ty elements located 12 to 48 kilobases distal to the break site. This break-distal recombination (BDR) occurs frequently, even when allelic recombination can repair the break using the homolog. Robust BDR-dependent NAHR demonstrates that sequences very distal to DSBs can effectively compete with proximal sequences for repair of the break. In addition, our analysis of NAHR partner choice between Ty repeats shows that intrachromosomal Ty partners are preferred despite the abundance of potential interchromosomal Ty partners that share higher sequence identity. This competitive advantage of intrachromosomal Tys results from the relative efficiencies of different NAHR repair pathways. Finally, NAHR generates deleterious rearrangements more frequently when DSBs occur outside rather than within a Ty repeat. These findings yield insights into mechanisms of repeat-mediated genome rearrangements associated with evolution and cancer.

  5. Homologous gene replacement in Physarum

    SciTech Connect

    Burland, T.G.; Pallotta, D.

    1995-01-01

    The protist Physarum polycephalum is useful for analysis of several aspects of cellular and developmental biology. To expand the opportunities for experimental analysis of this organism, we have developed a method for gene replacement. We transformed Physarum amoebae with plasmid DNA carrying a mutant allele, ardD{Delta}1, of the ardD actin gene; ardD{Delta}1 mutates the critical carboxy-terminal region of the gene product. Because ardD is not expressed in the amoeba, replacement of ardD{sup +} with ardD{Delta}1 should not be lethal for this cell type. Transformants were obtained only when linear plasmid DNA was used. Most transformants carried one copy of ardD{Delta}1 in addition to ardD{sup +}, but in two (5%), ardD{sup +} was replaced by a single copy of ardD{Delta}1. This is the first example of homologous gene replacement in Physarum. ardD{Delta}1 was stably maintained in the genome through growth, development and meiosis. We found no effect of ardD{Delta}l on viability, growth, or development of any of the various cell types of Physarum. Thus, the carboxy-terminal region of the ardD product appears not to perform a unique essential role in growth or development. Nevertheless, this method for homologous gene replacement can be applied to analyze the function of any cloned gene. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. A vector set for systematic metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Salmon, Kirsty; Shen, Michael W. Y.; Aeling, Kimberly A.; Ito, Elaine; Irwin, Becky; Tran, Uyen Phuong C.; Hatfield, G. Wesley; Da Silva, Nancy A.; Sandmeyer, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    A set of shuttle vectors was constructed to facilitate expression of genes for metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Selectable markers include the URA3, TRP1, MET15, LEU2-d8, HIS3 and CAN1 genes. Differential expression of genes can be achieved as each marker is available on both CEN/ARS- and 2 μ-containing plasmids. Unique restriction sites downstream of TEF1, PGK1 or HXT7-391 promoters and upstream of the CYC1 terminator allow insertion of open-reading frame cassettes for expression. Furthermore, a fragment appropriate for integration into the genome via homologous recombination can be readily generated in a polymerase chain reaction. Vector marker genes are flanked by loxP recognition sites for the CreA recombinase to allow efficient site-specific marker deletion and recycling. Expression and copy number were characterized for representative high- and low-copy vectors carrying the different marker and promoter sequences. Metabolic engineering typically requires the stable introduction of multiple genes and genomic integration is often preferred. This requires an expanded number of stable expression sites relative to standard gene expression studies. This study demonstrated the practicality of polymerase chain reaction amplification of an expression cassette and genetic marker, and subsequent replacement of endogenous retrotransposons by homologous recombination with flanking sequences. Such reporters were expressed comparably to those inserted at standard integration loci. This expands the number of available characterized integration sites and demonstrates that such sites provide a virtually inexhaustible pool of integration targets for stable expression of multiple genes. Together these vectors and expression loci will facilitate combinatorial gene expression for metabolic engineering. PMID:20936606

  7. [Urinary infection by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Emerging yeast?].

    PubMed

    Elkhihal, B; Elhalimi, M; Ghfir, B; Mostachi, A; Lyagoubi, M; Aoufi, S

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a commensal yeast of the digestive, respiratory and genito-urinary tract. It is widely used as a probiotic for the treatment of post-antibiotic diarrhea. It most often occurs in immunocompromised patients frequently causing fungemia. We report the case of an adult diabetic patient who had a urinary tract infection due to S. cerevisiae. The disease started with urination associated with urinary frequency burns without fever. The diagnosis was established by the presence of yeasts on direct examination and positivity of culture on Sabouraud-chloramphenicol three times. The auxanogramme gallery (Auxacolor BioRad(®)) allowed the identification of S. cerevisiae. The patient was put on fluconazole with good outcome. This observation points out that this is an opportunistic yeast in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26522963

  8. Redundant Regulation of Cdk1 Tyrosine Dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Erin K; Dysart, Michael; Lianga, Noel; Williams, Elizabeth C; Pilon, Sophie; Doré, Carole; Deneault, Jean-Sebastien; Rudner, Adam D

    2016-03-01

    Cdk1 activity drives both mitotic entry and the metaphase-to-anaphase transition in all eukaryotes. The kinase Wee1 and the phosphatase Cdc25 regulate the mitotic activity of Cdk1 by the reversible phosphorylation of a conserved tyrosine residue. Mutation of cdc25 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe blocks Cdk1 dephosphorylation and causes cell cycle arrest. In contrast, deletion of MIH1, the cdc25 homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is viable. Although Cdk1-Y19 phosphorylation is elevated during mitosis in mih1∆ cells, Cdk1 is dephosphorylated as cells progress into G1, suggesting that additional phosphatases regulate Cdk1 dephosphorylation. Here we show that the phosphatase Ptp1 also regulates Cdk1 dephosphorylation in vivo and can directly dephosphorylate Cdk1 in vitro. Using a novel in vivo phosphatase assay, we also show that PP2A bound to Rts1, the budding yeast B56-regulatory subunit, regulates dephosphorylation of Cdk1 independently of a function regulating Swe1, Mih1, or Ptp1, suggesting that PP2A(Rts1) either directly dephosphorylates Cdk1-Y19 or regulates an unidentified phosphatase. PMID:26715668

  9. Investigation of Batten disease with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pearce, D A; Sherman, F

    1999-04-01

    The CLN3 gene, which encodes the protein whose absence is responsible for Batten disease, the most common inherited neurovisceral storage disease of childhood, was identified in 1995. The function of the protein, Cln3p, still remains elusive. We previously cloned the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog to the human CLN3 gene, designated BTN1, whose product is 39% identical and 59% similar to Cln3p. We report that yeast strains lacking Btn1p, btn1-Delta deletion yeast strains, are more resistant to d-(-)-threo-2-amino-1-[p-nitrophenyl]-1,3-propanediol (ANP), in a pH-dependent manner. This phenotype is complemented in yeast by the human CLN3 gene. In addition, point mutations characterized in CLN3 from individuals with less severe forms of Batten disease, when introduced into BTN1, altered the degree of ANP resistance. Severity of Batten disease due to mutations in CLN3 and the degree of ANP resistance in yeast are related when the equivalent amino acid replacements in Cln3p and Btn1p are compared. These results indicate that yeast can be used as a model for the study of Batten disease. PMID:10191120

  10. Persistent homology and string vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirafici, Michele

    2016-03-01

    We use methods from topological data analysis to study the topological features of certain distributions of string vacua. Topological data analysis is a multi-scale approach used to analyze the topological features of a dataset by identifying which homological characteristics persist over a long range of scales. We apply these techniques in several contexts. We analyze {N}=2 vacua by focusing on certain distributions of Calabi-Yau varieties and Landau-Ginzburg models. We then turn to flux compactifications and discuss how we can use topological data analysis to extract physical information. Finally we apply these techniques to certain phenomenologically realistic heterotic models. We discuss the possibility of characterizing string vacua using the topological properties of their distributions.

  11. Rmt1 catalyzes zinc-finger independent arginine methylation of ribosomal protein Rps2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Lipson, Rebecca S.; Webb, Kristofor J.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2010-01-22

    Rps2/rpS2 is a well conserved protein of the eukaryotic ribosomal small subunit. Rps2 has previously been shown to contain asymmetric dimethylarginine residues, the addition of which is catalyzed by zinc-finger-containing arginine methyltransferase 3 (Rmt3) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and protein arginine methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3) in mammalian cells. Here, we demonstrate that despite the lack of a zinc-finger-containing homolog of Rmt3/PRMT3 in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rps2 is partially modified to generate asymmetric dimethylarginine and monomethylarginine residues. We find that this modification of Rps2 is dependent upon the major arginine methyltransferase 1 (Rmt1) in S. cerevisiae. These results are suggestive of a role for Rmt1 in modifying the function of Rps2 in a manner distinct from that occurring in S. pombe and mammalian cells.

  12. EasyClone 2.0: expanded toolkit of integrative vectors for stable gene expression in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Stovicek, Vratislav; Borja, Gheorghe M; Forster, Jochen; Borodina, Irina

    2015-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the key cell factories for production of chemicals and active pharmaceuticals. For large-scale fermentations, particularly in biorefinery applications, it is desirable to use stress-tolerant industrial strains. However, such strains are less amenable for metabolic engineering than the standard laboratory strains. To enable easy delivery and overexpression of genes in a wide range of industrial S. cerevisiae strains, we constructed a set of integrative vectors with long homology arms and dominant selection markers. The vectors integrate into previously validated chromosomal locations via double cross-over and result in homogenous stable expression of the integrated genes, as shown for several unrelated industrial strains. Cre-mediated marker rescue is possible for removing markers positioned on different chromosomes. To demonstrate the applicability of the presented vector set for metabolic engineering of industrial yeast, we constructed xylose-utilizing strains overexpressing xylose isomerase, xylose transporter and five genes of the pentose phosphate pathway. PMID:26376869

  13. Development of a Tightly Controlled Off Switch for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Regulated by Camphor, a Low-Cost Natural Product

    PubMed Central

    Ikushima, Shigehito; Zhao, Yu; Boeke, Jef D.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the engineering of a distant homolog of the Tet repressor, CamR, isolated from Pseudomonas putida, that is regulated by camphor, a very inexpensive small molecule (at micromolar concentrations) for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The repressor was engineered by expression from a constitutive yeast promoter, fusion to a viral activator protein cassette, and codon optimization. A suitable promoter responsive to the CamR fusion protein was engineered by embedding a P. putida operator binding sequence within an upstream activating sequence (UAS)-less CYC1 promoter from S. cerevisiae. The switch, named the Camphor-Off switch, activates expression of a reporter gene in camphor-free media and represses it with micromolar concentrations of camphor. PMID:26206350

  14. The GDI1 genes from Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris: cloning and functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brummer, M H; Richard, P; Sundqvist, L; Väänänen, R; Keränen, S

    2001-07-01

    The nucleotide sequences of 2.8 kb and 2.9 kb fragments containing the Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris GDI1 genes, respectively, were determined. K. lactis GDI1 was found during sequencing of a genomic library clone, whereas the P. pastoris GDI1 was obtained from a genomic library by complementing a Saccharomyces cerevisiae sec19-1 mutant strain. The sequenced DNA fragments contain open reading frames of 1338 bp (K.lactis) and 1344 bp (P. pastoris), coding for polypeptides of 445 and 447 residues, respectively. Both sequences fully complement the S. cerevisiae sec19-1 mutation. They have high degrees of homology with known GDP dissociation inhibitors from yeast species and other eukaryotes. PMID:11447595

  15. Nonsense-mediated decay regulates key components of homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Janke, Ryan; Kong, Jeremy; Braberg, Hannes; Cantin, Greg; Yates, John R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Cells frequently experience DNA damage that requires repair by homologous recombination (HR). Proteins involved in HR are carefully coordinated to ensure proper and efficient repair without interfering with normal cellular processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad55 functions in the early steps of HR and is regulated in response to DNA damage through phosphorylation by the Mec1 and Rad53 kinases of the DNA damage response. To further identify regulatory processes that target HR, we performed a high-throughput genetic interaction screen with RAD55 phosphorylation site mutants. Genes involved in the mRNA quality control process, nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), were found to genetically interact with rad55 phospho-site mutants. Further characterization revealed that RAD55 transcript and protein levels are regulated by NMD. Regulation of HR by NMD extends to multiple targets beyond RAD55, including RAD51, RAD54 and RAD57. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of NMD results in an increase in recombination rates and resistance to the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting this pathway negatively regulates HR under normal growth conditions. PMID:27001511

  16. Nonsense-mediated decay regulates key components of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Janke, Ryan; Kong, Jeremy; Braberg, Hannes; Cantin, Greg; Yates, John R; Krogan, Nevan J; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-06-20

    Cells frequently experience DNA damage that requires repair by homologous recombination (HR). Proteins involved in HR are carefully coordinated to ensure proper and efficient repair without interfering with normal cellular processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad55 functions in the early steps of HR and is regulated in response to DNA damage through phosphorylation by the Mec1 and Rad53 kinases of the DNA damage response. To further identify regulatory processes that target HR, we performed a high-throughput genetic interaction screen with RAD55 phosphorylation site mutants. Genes involved in the mRNA quality control process, nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), were found to genetically interact with rad55 phospho-site mutants. Further characterization revealed that RAD55 transcript and protein levels are regulated by NMD. Regulation of HR by NMD extends to multiple targets beyond RAD55, including RAD51, RAD54 and RAD57 Finally, we demonstrate that loss of NMD results in an increase in recombination rates and resistance to the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting this pathway negatively regulates HR under normal growth conditions. PMID:27001511

  17. Chromosomally-retained RNA mediates homologous pairing.

    PubMed

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    Pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes are essential for ensuring correct segregation of chromosomes in meiosis. In S. pombe, chromosomes are first bundled at the telomeres (forming a telomere bouquet) and then aligned by oscillatory movement of the elongated "horsetail" nucleus. Telomere clustering and subsequent chromosome alignment promote pairing of homologous chromosomes. However, this telomere-bundled alignment of chromosomes cannot be responsible for the specificity of chromosome pairing. Thus, there must be some mechanism to facilitate recognition of homologous partners after telomere clustering. Recent studies in S. pombe have shown that RNA transcripts retained on the chromosome, or RNA bodies, may play a role in recognition of homologous chromosomes for pairing. Acting as fiducial markers of homologous loci they would abrogate the need for direct DNA sequence homology searching. PMID:23117617

  18. Asymmetrical division of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Lord, P G; Wheals, A E

    1980-01-01

    The unequal division model proposed for budding yeast (L. H. Hartwell and M. W. Unger, J. Cell Biol. 75:422-435, 1977) was tested by bud scar analyses of steady-state exponential batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing at 30 degrees C at 19 different rates, which were obtained by altering the carbon source. The analyses involved counting the number of bud scars, determining the presence or absence of buds on at least 1,000 cells, and independently measuring the doubling times (gamma) by cell number increase. A number of assumptions in the model were tested and found to be in good agreement with the model. Maximum likelihood estimates of daughter cycle time (D), parent cycle time (P), and the budded phase (B) were obtained, and we concluded that asymmetrical division occurred at all growth rates tested (gamma, 75 to 250 min). D, P, and B are all linearly related to gamma, and D, P, and gamma converge to equality (symmetrical division) at gamma = 65 min. Expressions for the genealogical age distribution for asymmetrically dividing yeast cells were derived. The fraction of daughter cells in steady-state populations is e-alpha P, and the fraction of parent cells of age n (where n is the number of buds that a cell has produced) is (e-alpha P)n-1(1-e-alpha P)2, where alpha = IN2/gamma; thus, the distribution changes with growth rate. The frequency of cells with different numbers of bud scars (i.e., different genealogical ages) was determined for all growth rates, and the observed distribution changed with the growth rate in the manner predicted. In this haploid strain new buds formed adjacent to the previous buds in a regular pattern, but at slower growth rates the pattern was more irregular. The median volume of the cells and the volume at start in the cell cycle both increased at faster growth rates. The implications of these findings for the control of the cell cycle are discussed. PMID:6991494

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Forms D-2-Hydroxyglutarate and Couples Its Degradation to D-Lactate Formation via a Cytosolic Transhydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Becker-Kettern, Julia; Paczia, Nicole; Conrotte, Jean-François; Kay, Daniel P; Guignard, Cédric; Jung, Paul P; Linster, Carole L

    2016-03-18

    The D or L form of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) accumulates in certain rare neurometabolic disorders, and high D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) levels are also found in several types of cancer. Although 2HG has been detected in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its metabolism in yeast has remained largely unexplored. Here, we show that S. cerevisiae actively forms the D enantiomer of 2HG. Accordingly, the S. cerevisiae genome encodes two homologs of the human D-2HG dehydrogenase: Dld2, which, as its human homolog, is a mitochondrial protein, and the cytosolic protein Dld3. Intriguingly, we found that a dld3Δ knock-out strain accumulates millimolar levels of D-2HG, whereas a dld2Δ knock-out strain displayed only very moderate increases in D-2HG. Recombinant Dld2 and Dld3, both currently annotated as D-lactate dehydrogenases, efficiently oxidized D-2HG to α-ketoglutarate. Depletion of D-lactate levels in the dld3Δ, but not in the dld2Δ mutant, led to the discovery of a new type of enzymatic activity, carried by Dld3, to convert D-2HG to α-ketoglutarate, namely an FAD-dependent transhydrogenase activity using pyruvate as a hydrogen acceptor. We also provide evidence that Ser3 and Ser33, which are primarily known for oxidizing 3-phosphoglycerate in the main serine biosynthesis pathway, in addition reduce α-ketoglutarate to D-2HG using NADH and represent major intracellular sources of D-2HG in yeast. Based on our observations, we propose that D-2HG is mainly formed and degraded in the cytosol of S. cerevisiae cells in a process that couples D-2HG metabolism to the shuttling of reducing equivalents from cytosolic NADH to the mitochondrial respiratory chain via the D-lactate dehydrogenase Dld1. PMID:26774271

  20. Homology-independent metrics for comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Tarcisio José Domingos; Franco, Glória Regina; Lobo, Francisco Pereira

    2015-01-01

    A mainstream procedure to analyze the wealth of genomic data available nowadays is the detection of homologous regions shared across genomes, followed by the extraction of biological information from the patterns of conservation and variation observed in such regions. Although of pivotal importance, comparative genomic procedures that rely on homology inference are obviously not applicable if no homologous regions are detectable. This fact excludes a considerable portion of "genomic dark matter" with no significant similarity - and, consequently, no inferred homology to any other known sequence - from several downstream comparative genomic methods. In this review we compile several sequence metrics that do not rely on homology inference and can be used to compare nucleotide sequences and extract biologically meaningful information from them. These metrics comprise several compositional parameters calculated from sequence data alone, such as GC content, dinucleotide odds ratio, and several codon bias metrics. They also share other interesting properties, such as pervasiveness (patterns persist on smaller scales) and phylogenetic signal. We also cite examples where these homology-independent metrics have been successfully applied to support several bioinformatics challenges, such as taxonomic classification of biological sequences without homology inference. They where also used to detect higher-order patterns of interactions in biological systems, ranging from detecting coevolutionary trends between the genomes of viruses and their hosts to characterization of gene pools of entire microbial communities. We argue that, if correctly understood and applied, homology-independent metrics can add important layers of biological information in comparative genomic studies without prior homology inference. PMID:26029354

  1. Biosorption of heavy metals by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Volesky, B; May-Phillips, H A

    1995-01-01

    Abundant and common yeast biomass has been examined for its capacity to sequester heavy metals from dilute aqueous solutions. Live and non-living biomass of Saccharomyces cerevisiae differs in the uptake of uranium, zinc and copper at the optimum pH 4-5. Culture growth conditions can influence the biosorbent metal uptake capacity which normally was: living and non-living brewer's yeast: U > Zn > Cd > Cu; non-living baker's yeast: Zn > (Cd) > U > Cu; living baker's yeast: Zn > Cu approximately (Cd) > U. Non-living brewer's yeast biomass accumulated 0.58 mmol U/g. The best biosorbent of zinc was non-living baker's yeast (approximately 0.56 mmol Zn/g). Dead cells of S. cerevisiae removed approximately 40% more uranium or zinc than the corresponding live cultures. Biosorption of uranium by S. cerevisiae was a rapid process reaching 60% of the final uptake value within the first 15 min of contact. Its deposition differing from that of other heavy metals more associated with the cell wall, uranium was deposited as fine needle-like crystals both on the inside and outside of the S. cerevisiae cells. PMID:7765919

  2. Mechanisms of Ethanol Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a superb ethanol producer, yet is also sensitive to higher ethanol concentrations especially under high gravity or very high gravity fermentation conditions. Ethanol tolerance is associated with interplay of complex networks at the genome level. Although significant eff...

  3. Calcium control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Greer, C; Schekman, R

    1982-01-01

    Low levels of Ca2+ dramatically influence the polymerization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin in KCl. The apparent critical concentration for polymerization (C infinity) increases eightfold in the presence of 0.1 mM Ca2+. This effect is rapidly reversed by the addition of ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid or of 0.1 mM Mg2+. Furthermore, the addition of Ca2+ to polymerized actin causes a reversible increase in the apparent C infinity. In the presence of Ca2+, at actin concentrations below the apparent C infinity, particles of 15 to 50 nm in diameter are seen instead of filaments. These particles are separated from soluble actin when Ca2+-treated filamentous actin is sedimented at high speed; both the soluble and particulate fractions retain Ca2+-sensitive polymerization. The Ca2+ effect is S. cerevisiae actin-specific: the C infinity for rabbit muscle actin is not affected by the presence of Ca2+ and S. cerevisiae actin. Ca2+ may act directly on S. cerevisiae actin to control the assembly state in vivo. Images PMID:6757718

  4. Tangential Ultrafiltration of Aqueous "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae" Suspensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Carlos M.; Neves, Patricia S.; Da Silva, Francisco A.; Xavier, Ana M. R. B.; Eusebio, M. F. J.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental work on ultrafiltration is presented to illustrate the practical and theoretical principles of this separation technique. The laboratory exercise comprises experiments with pure water and with aqueous "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" (from commercial Baker's yeast) suspensions. With this work students detect the characteristic phenomena…

  5. Identification of a putative RNA helicase (HRH1), a human homolog of yeast Prp22.

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Y; Ohno, M; Shimura, Y

    1994-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a number of PRP genes known to be involved in pre-mRNA processing have been genetically identified and cloned. Three PRP genes (PRP2, PRP16, and PRP22) were shown to encode putative RNA helicases of the family of proteins with DEAH boxes. However, any such splicing factor containing the helicase motifs in vertebrates has not been identified. To identify human homologs of this family, we designed PCR primers corresponding to the highly conserved region of the DEAH box protein family and successfully amplified five cDNA fragments, using HeLa poly(A)+ RNA as a substrate. One fragment, designated HRH1 (human RNA helicase 1), is highly homologous to Prp22, which was previously shown to be involved in the release of spliced mRNAs from the spliceosomes. Expression of HRH1 in a S. cerevisiae prp22 mutant can partially rescue its temperature-sensitive phenotype. These results strongly suggest that HRH1 is a functional human homolog of the yeast Prp22 protein. Interestingly, HRH1 but not Prp22 contains an arginine- and serine-rich domain (RS domain) which is characteristic of some splicing factors, such as members of the SR protein family. We could show that HRH1 can interact in vitro and in the yeast two-hybrid system with members of the SR protein family through its RS domain. We speculate that HRH1 might be targeted to the spliceosome through this interaction. Images PMID:7935475

  6. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Hot spot turbulence is a potential contributor to yield degradation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules, although its origin, if present, remains unclear. In this work, a perturbation analysis is performed of an analytical homologous solution that mimics the hot spot and surrounding cold fuel during the late stages of an ICF implosion. It is shown that the flow is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability, and that during stagnation, short wavelength entropy and vorticity fluctuations amplify by a factor exp (π |N0 | ts) , where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. This amplification factor is exponentially sensitive to mean flow gradients and varies from 103-107 for realistic gradients. Comparisons are made with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, and it is found that a numerical resolution of ~ 30 zones per wavelength is required to capture the evolution of vorticity accurately. This translates to an angular resolution of ~(12 / l) ∘ , or ~ 0 .1° to resolve the fastest growing modes (Legendre mode l > 100).

  7. Gene Sequence Homology of Chemokines Across Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abundance of expressed gene and protein sequences available in the biological information databases facilitates comparison of protein homologies. A high degree of sequence similarity typically implies homology regarding structure and function and may provide clues to antibody cross-reactivities...

  8. GENE SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY OF CHEMOKINES ACROSS SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abundance of expressed gene and protein sequences available in the biological information databases facilitates comparison of protein homologies. A high degree of sequence similarity typically implies homology regarding structure and function and may provide clues to antibody cross-react...

  9. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Greene, Eric C

    2016-05-27

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination. PMID:27129270

  10. Role of RAD52 Epistasis Group Genes in Homologous Recombination and Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Symington, Lorraine S.

    2002-01-01

    The process of homologous recombination is a major DNA repair pathway that operates on DNA double-strand breaks, and possibly other kinds of DNA lesions, to promote error-free repair. Central to the process of homologous recombination are the RAD52 group genes (RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RDH54/TID1, RAD55, RAD57, RAD59, MRE11, and XRS2), most of which were identified by their requirement for the repair of ionizing-radiation-induced DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Rad52 group proteins are highly conserved among eukaryotes, and Rad51, Mre11, and Rad50 are also conserved in prokaryotes and archaea. Recent studies showing defects in homologous recombination and double-strand break repair in several human cancer-prone syndromes have emphasized the importance of this repair pathway in maintaining genome integrity. Although sensitivity to ionizing radiation is a universal feature of rad52 group mutants, the mutants show considerable heterogeneity in different assays for recombinational repair of double-strand breaks and spontaneous mitotic recombination. Herein, I provide an overview of recent biochemical and structural analyses of the Rad52 group proteins and discuss how this information can be incorporated into genetic studies of recombination. PMID:12456786

  11. Identification of a functional homolog of the yeast copper homeostasis gene ATX1 from Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Himelblau, E.; Amasino, R.M.; Mira, H.; Penarrubia, L.; Lin, S.J.; Culotta, V.C.

    1998-08-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a homolog of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) gene Anti-oxidant 1 (ATX1) has been identified from Arabidopsis. This gene, referred to as Copper CHaperone (CCH), encodes a protein that is 36% identical to the amino acid sequence of ATX1 and has a 48-amino acid extension at the C-terminal end, which is absent from ATX1 homologs identified in animals. ATX1-deficient yeast (atx1) displayed a loss of high-affinity iron uptake. Expression of CCH in the atx1 strain restored high-affinity iron uptake, demonstrating that CCH is a functional homolog of ATX1. When overexpressed in yeast lacking the superoxide dismutase gene SOD1, both ATX1 and CCH protected the cell from the reactive oxygen toxicity that results from superoxide dismutase deficiency. CCH was unable to rescue the sod1 phenotype in the absence of copper, indicating that CCH function is copper dependent. In Arabidopsis CCH mRNA is present in the root, leaf, and in fluorescence and is up-regulated 7-fold in leaves undergoing senescence. In plants treated with 800 nL/L ozone for 30 min, CCH mRNA levels increased by 30%. In excised leaves and whole plants treated with high levels of exogenous CuSO{sub 4}, CCH mRNA levels decreased, indicating that CCH is regulated differently than characterized metallothionein proteins in Arabidopsis.

  12. Sporulation in the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Neiman, Aaron M.

    2011-01-01

    In response to nitrogen starvation in the presence of a poor carbon source, diploid cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo meiosis and package the haploid nuclei produced in meiosis into spores. The formation of spores requires an unusual cell division event in which daughter cells are formed within the cytoplasm of the mother cell. This process involves the de novo generation of two different cellular structures: novel membrane compartments within the cell cytoplasm that give rise to the spore plasma membrane and an extensive spore wall that protects the spore from environmental insults. This article summarizes what is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling spore assembly with particular attention to how constitutive cellular functions are modified to create novel behaviors during this developmental process. Key regulatory points on the sporulation pathway are also discussed as well as the possible role of sporulation in the natural ecology of S. cerevisiae. PMID:22084423

  13. Homology-Independent Metrics for Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Tarcisio José Domingos; Franco, Glória Regina; Lobo, Francisco Pereira

    2015-01-01

    A mainstream procedure to analyze the wealth of genomic data available nowadays is the detection of homologous regions shared across genomes, followed by the extraction of biological information from the patterns of conservation and variation observed in such regions. Although of pivotal importance, comparative genomic procedures that rely on homology inference are obviously not applicable if no homologous regions are detectable. This fact excludes a considerable portion of “genomic dark matter” with no significant similarity — and, consequently, no inferred homology to any other known sequence — from several downstream comparative genomic methods. In this review we compile several sequence metrics that do not rely on homology inference and can be used to compare nucleotide sequences and extract biologically meaningful information from them. These metrics comprise several compositional parameters calculated from sequence data alone, such as GC content, dinucleotide odds ratio, and several codon bias metrics. They also share other interesting properties, such as pervasiveness (patterns persist on smaller scales) and phylogenetic signal. We also cite examples where these homology-independent metrics have been successfully applied to support several bioinformatics challenges, such as taxonomic classification of biological sequences without homology inference. They where also used to detect higher-order patterns of interactions in biological systems, ranging from detecting coevolutionary trends between the genomes of viruses and their hosts to characterization of gene pools of entire microbial communities. We argue that, if correctly understood and applied, homology-independent metrics can add important layers of biological information in comparative genomic studies without prior homology inference. PMID:26029354

  14. Structural Studies of the Final Enzyme in the alpha-Aminoadipate Pathway-Saccharopine Dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Burk,D.; Hwang, J.; Kwok, E.; Marrone, L.; Goodfellow, V.; Dmitrienko, G.; Berghuis, A.

    2007-01-01

    The 1.64 Angstroms structure of the apoenzyme form of saccharopine dehydrogenase (SDH) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows the enzyme to be composed of two domains with similar dinucleotide binding folds with a deep cleft at the interface. The structure reveals homology to alanine dehydrogense, despite low primary sequence similarity. A model of the ternary complex of SDH, NAD, and saccharopine identifies residues Lys77 and Glu122 as potentially important for substrate binding and/or catalysis, consistent with a proton shuttle mechanism. Furthermore, the model suggests that a conformational change is required for catalysis and that residues Lys99 and Asp281 may be instrumental in mediating this change. Analysis of the crystal structure in the context of other homologous enzymes from pathogenic fungi and human sources sheds light into the suitability of SDH as a target for antimicrobial drug development.

  15. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B. M.

    2015-06-15

    With this study, I consider the hydrodynamic stability of imploding ideal gases as an idealized model for inertial confinement fusion capsules, sonoluminescent bubbles and the gravitational collapse of astrophysical gases. For oblate modes (short-wavelength incompressive modes elongated in the direction of the mean flow), a second-order ordinary differential equation is derived that can be used to assess the stability of any time-dependent flow with planar, cylindrical or spherical symmetry. Upon further restricting the analysis to homologous flows, it is shown that a monatomic gas is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability. Under buoyantly unstable conditions, both entropy and vorticity fluctuations experience power-law growth in time, with a growth rate that depends upon mean flow gradients and, in the absence of dissipative effects, is independent of mode number. If the flow accelerates throughout the implosion, oblate modes amplify by a factor (2C)|N0|ti, where C is the convergence ratio of the implosion, N0 is the initial buoyancy frequency and ti is the implosion time scale. If, instead, the implosion consists of a coasting phase followed by stagnation, oblate modes amplify by a factor exp(π|N0|ts), where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. Even under stable conditions, vorticity fluctuations grow due to the conservation of angular momentum as the gas is compressed. For non-monatomic gases, this additional growth due to compression results in weak oscillatory growth under conditions that would otherwise be buoyantly stable; this over-stability is consistent with the conservation of wave action in the fluid frame. The above analytical results are verified by evolving the complete set of linear equations as an initial value problem, and it is demonstrated that oblate modes are the fastest

  16. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnson, B. M.

    2015-06-15

    With this study, I consider the hydrodynamic stability of imploding ideal gases as an idealized model for inertial confinement fusion capsules, sonoluminescent bubbles and the gravitational collapse of astrophysical gases. For oblate modes (short-wavelength incompressive modes elongated in the direction of the mean flow), a second-order ordinary differential equation is derived that can be used to assess the stability of any time-dependent flow with planar, cylindrical or spherical symmetry. Upon further restricting the analysis to homologous flows, it is shown that a monatomic gas is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability. Under buoyantly unstable conditions, both entropy andmore » vorticity fluctuations experience power-law growth in time, with a growth rate that depends upon mean flow gradients and, in the absence of dissipative effects, is independent of mode number. If the flow accelerates throughout the implosion, oblate modes amplify by a factor (2C)|N0|ti, where C is the convergence ratio of the implosion, N0 is the initial buoyancy frequency and ti is the implosion time scale. If, instead, the implosion consists of a coasting phase followed by stagnation, oblate modes amplify by a factor exp(π|N0|ts), where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. Even under stable conditions, vorticity fluctuations grow due to the conservation of angular momentum as the gas is compressed. For non-monatomic gases, this additional growth due to compression results in weak oscillatory growth under conditions that would otherwise be buoyantly stable; this over-stability is consistent with the conservation of wave action in the fluid frame. The above analytical results are verified by evolving the complete set of linear equations as an initial value problem, and it is demonstrated that oblate modes are the fastest-growing modes and that high mode numbers are required to reach this limit (Legendre mode ℓ ≳ 100

  17. Progress in Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The traditional use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation has, over time, resulted in substantial accumulated knowledge concerning genetics, physiology, and biochemistry as well as genetic engineering and fermentation technologies. S. cerevisiae has become a platform organism for developing metabolic engineering strategies, methods, and tools. The current review discusses the relevance of several engineering strategies, such as rational and inverse metabolic engineering, evolutionary engineering, and global transcription machinery engineering, in yeast strain improvement. It also summarizes existing tools for fine-tuning and regulating enzyme activities and thus metabolic pathways. Recent examples of yeast metabolic engineering for food, beverage, and industrial biotechnology (bioethanol and bulk and fine chemicals) follow. S. cerevisiae currently enjoys increasing popularity as a production organism in industrial (“white”) biotechnology due to its inherent tolerance of low pH values and high ethanol and inhibitor concentrations and its ability to grow anaerobically. Attention is paid to utilizing lignocellulosic biomass as a potential substrate. PMID:18772282

  18. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J J

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  19. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  20. Myo-inositol transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nikawa, J; Nagumo, T; Yamashita, S

    1982-05-01

    myo-Inositol uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was dependent on temperature, time, and substrate concentration. The transport obeyed saturation kinetics with an apparent Km for myo-inositol of 0.1 mM, myo-Inositol analogs, such as scyllo-inositol, 2-inosose, mannitol, and 1,2-cyclohexanediol, had no effect on myo-inositol uptake, myo-Inositol uptake required metabolic energy. Removal of D-glucose resulted in a loss of activity, and azide and cyanide ions were inhibitory. In the presence of D-glucose, myo-inositol was accumulated in the cells against a concentration gradient. A myo-inositol transport mutant was isolated from UV-mutagenized S. cerevisiae cells using the replica-printing technique. The defect in myo-inositol uptake was due to a single nuclear gene mutation. The activities of L-serine and D-glucose transport were not affected by the mutation. Thus it was shown that S. cerevisiae grown under the present culture conditions possessed a single and specific myo-inositol transport system. myo-Inositol transport activity was reduced by the addition of myo-inositol to the culture medium. The activity was reversibly restored by the removal of myo-inositol from the medium. This restoration of activity was completely abolished by cycloheximide. PMID:7040334

  1. A tetO Toolkit To Alter Expression of Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Josh T; Lo, Russell S; Shumaker, Lucia; Proctor, Julia; Fields, Stanley

    2015-07-17

    Strategies to optimize a metabolic pathway often involve building a large collection of strains, each containing different versions of sequences that regulate the expression of pathway genes. Here, we develop reagents and methods to carry out this process at high efficiency in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identify variants of the Escherichia coli tet operator (tetO) sequence that bind a TetR-VP16 activator with differential affinity and therefore result in different TetR-VP16 activator-driven expression. By recombining these variants upstream of the genes of a pathway, we generate unique combinations of expression levels. Here, we built a tetO toolkit, which includes the I-OnuI homing endonuclease to create double-strand breaks, which increases homologous recombination by 10(5); a plasmid carrying six variant tetO sequences flanked by I-OnuI sites, uncoupling transformation and recombination steps; an S. cerevisiae-optimized TetR-VP16 activator; and a vector to integrate constructs into the yeast genome. We introduce into the S. cerevisiae genome the three crt genes from Erwinia herbicola required for yeast to synthesize lycopene and carry out the recombination process to produce a population of cells with permutations of tetO variants regulating the three genes. We identify 0.7% of this population as making detectable lycopene, of which the vast majority have undergone recombination at all three crt genes. We estimate a rate of ∼20% recombination per targeted site, much higher than that obtained in other studies. Application of this toolkit to medically or industrially important end products could reduce the time and labor required to optimize the expression of a set of metabolic genes. PMID:25742460

  2. Mating-type Gene Switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Sheng; Haber, James E

    2015-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two alternative mating types designated MATa and MATα. These are distinguished by about 700 bp of unique sequences, Ya or Yα, including divergent promoter sequences and part of the open reading frames of genes that regulate mating phenotype. Homothallic budding yeast, carrying an active HO endonuclease gene, HO, can switch mating type through a recombination process known as gene conversion, in which a site-specific double-strand break (DSB) created immediately adjacent to the Y region results in replacement of the Y sequences with a copy of the opposite mating type information, which is harbored in one of two heterochromatic donor loci, HMLα or HMRa. HO gene expression is tightly regulated to ensure that only half of the cells in a lineage switch to the opposite MAT allele, thus promoting conjugation and diploid formation. Study of the silencing of these loci has provided a great deal of information about the role of the Sir2 histone deacetylase and its associated Sir3 and Sir4 proteins in creating heterochromatic regions. MAT switching has been examined in great detail to learn about the steps in homologous recombination. MAT switching is remarkably directional, with MATa recombining preferentially with HMLα and MATα using HMRa. Donor preference is controlled by a cis-acting recombination enhancer located near HML. RE is turned off in MATα cells but in MATa binds multiple copies of the Fkh1 transcription factor whose forkhead-associated phosphothreonine binding domain localizes at the DSB, bringing HML into conjunction with MATa. PMID:26104712

  3. Interaction between Mismatch Repair and Genetic Recombination in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Alani, E.; Reenan, RAG.; Kolodner, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a set of genes that show strong amino acid sequence similarity to MutS and MutL, proteins required for mismatch repair in Escherichia coli. We examined the role of MSH2 and PMS1, yeast homologs of mutS and mutL, respectively, in the repair of base pair mismatches formed during meiotic recombination. By using specifically marked HIS4 and ARG4 alleles, we showed that msh2 mutants displayed a severe defect in the repair of all base pair mismatches as well as 1-, 2- and 4-bp insertion/deletion mispairs. The msh2 and pms1 phenotypes were indistinguishable, suggesting that the wild-type gene products act in the same repair pathway. A comparison of gene conversion events in wild-type and msh2 mutants indicated that mismatch repair plays an important role in genetic recombination. (1) Tetrad analysis at five different loci revealed that, in msh2 mutants, the majority of aberrant segregants displayed a sectored phenotype, consistent with a failure to repair mismatches created during heteroduplex formation. In wild type, base pair mismatches were almost exclusively repaired toward conversion rather than restoration. (2) In msh2 strains 10-19% of the aberrant tetrads were Ab4:4. (3) Polarity gradients at HIS4 and ARG4 were nearly abolished in msh2 mutants. The frequency of gene conversion at the 3' end of these genes was increased and was nearly the frequency observed at the 5' end. (4) Co-conversion studies were consistent with mismatch repair acting to regulate heteroduplex DNA tract length. We favor a model proposing that recombination events occur through the formation and resolution of heteroduplex intermediates and that mismatch repair proteins specifically interact with recombination enzymes to regulate the length of symmetric heteroduplex DNA. PMID:8056309

  4. Multiple Pathways of Recombination Induced by Double-Strand Breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pâques, Frédéric; Haber, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been the principal organism used in experiments to examine genetic recombination in eukaryotes. Studies over the past decade have shown that meiotic recombination and probably most mitotic recombination arise from the repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs). There are multiple pathways by which such DSBs can be repaired, including several homologous recombination pathways and still other nonhomologous mechanisms. Our understanding has also been greatly enriched by the characterization of many proteins involved in recombination and by insights that link aspects of DNA repair to chromosome replication. New molecular models of DSB-induced gene conversion are presented. This review encompasses these different aspects of DSB-induced recombination in Saccharomyces and attempts to relate genetic, molecular biological, and biochemical studies of the processes of DNA repair and recombination. PMID:10357855

  5. Cell death caused by excision of centromeric DNA from a chromosome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Akihiro; Yanamoto, Toshiaki; Matsumoto, Takehiro; Hatano, Takushi; Matsuzaki, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    If genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are spread through the natural environment, it might affect the natural environment. To help prevent the spread of GMOs, we examined whether it is possible to introduce conditional lethality by excising centromeric DNA from a chromosome by site-specific recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model organism. First, we constructed haploid cells in which excision of the centromeric DNA from chromosome IV can occur due to recombinase induced by galactose. By this excision, cell death can occur. In diploid cells, cell death can also occur by excision from both homologous chromosomes IV. Furthermore, cell death can occur in the case of chromosome V. A small number of surviving cells appeared with excision of centromeric DNA, and the diploid showed greater viability than the haploid in both chromosomes IV and V. The surviving cells appeared mainly due to deletion of a recombination target site (RS) from the chromosome. PMID:24018677

  6. New phosphonate reagents for aldehyde homologation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New phosphonate reagents were developed for the two-carbon homologation of aldehydes to unbranched- or methyl-branched unsaturated aldehydes. The phosphonate reagents, diethyl methylformyl-2-phosphonate dimethylhydrazone and diethyl ethylformyl-2-phosphonate dimethylhydrazone, contained a protected...

  7. The HXT2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for high-affinity glucose transport.

    PubMed Central

    Kruckeberg, A L; Bisson, L F

    1990-01-01

    The HXT2 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was identified on the basis of its ability to complement the defect in glucose transport of a snf3 mutant when present on the multicopy plasmid pSC2. Analysis of the DNA sequence of HXT2 revealed an open reading frame of 541 codons, capable of encoding a protein of Mr 59,840. The predicted protein displayed high sequence and structural homology to a large family of procaryotic and eucaryotic sugar transporters. These proteins have 12 highly hydrophobic regions that could form transmembrane domains; the spacing of these putative transmembrane domains is also highly conserved. Several amino acid motifs characteristic of this sugar transporter family are also present in the HXT2 protein. An hxt2 null mutant strain lacked a significant component of high-affinity glucose transport when under derepressing (low-glucose) conditions. However, the hxt2 null mutation did not incur a major growth defect on glucose-containing media. Genetic and biochemical analyses suggest that wild-type levels of high-affinity glucose transport require the products of both the HXT2 and SNF3 genes; these genes are not linked. Low-stringency Southern blot analysis revealed a number of other sequences that cross-hybridize with HXT2, suggesting that S. cerevisiae possesses a large family of sugar transporter genes. Images PMID:2233722

  8. Mlh2 Is an Accessory Factor for DNA Mismatch Repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Srivatsan, Anjana; Bowen, Nikki; Gries, Kerstin; Desai, Arshad; Putnam, Christopher D.; Kolodner, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the essential mismatch repair (MMR) endonuclease Mlh1-Pms1 forms foci promoted by Msh2-Msh6 or Msh2-Msh3 in response to mispaired bases. Here we analyzed the Mlh1-Mlh2 complex, whose role in MMR has been unclear. Mlh1-Mlh2 formed foci that often colocalized with and had a longer lifetime than Mlh1-Pms1 foci. Mlh1-Mlh2 foci were similar to Mlh1-Pms1 foci: they required mispair recognition by Msh2-Msh6, increased in response to increased mispairs or downstream defects in MMR, and formed after induction of DNA damage by phleomycin but not double-stranded breaks by I-SceI. Mlh1-Mlh2 could be recruited to mispair-containing DNA in vitro by either Msh2-Msh6 or Msh2-Msh3. Deletion of MLH2 caused a synergistic increase in mutation rate in combination with deletion of MSH6 or reduced expression of Pms1. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the S. cerevisiae Mlh2 protein and the mammalian PMS1 protein are homologs. These results support a hypothesis that Mlh1-Mlh2 is a non-essential accessory factor that acts to enhance the activity of Mlh1-Pms1. PMID:24811092

  9. Expression and Subcellular Distribution of GFP-Tagged Human Tetraspanin Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Karin; Korza, Henryk J.; Tarry, Michael; Sekyrova, Petra; Högbom, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins are integral membrane proteins that function as organizers of multimolecular complexes and modulate function of associated proteins. Mammalian genomes encode approximately 30 different members of this family and remotely related eukaryotic species also contain conserved tetraspanin homologs. Tetraspanins are involved in a number of fundamental processes such as regulation of cell migration, fusion, immunity and signaling. Moreover, they are implied in numerous pathological states including mental disorders, infectious diseases or cancer. Despite the great interest in tetraspanins, the structural and biochemical basis of their activity is still largely unknown. A major bottleneck lies in the difficulty of obtaining stable and homogeneous protein samples in large quantities. Here we report expression screening of 15 members of the human tetraspanin superfamily and successful protocols for the production in S. cerevisiae of a subset of tetraspanins involved in human cancer development. We have demonstrated the subcellular localization of overexpressed tetraspanin-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in S. cerevisiae and found that despite being mislocalized, the fusion proteins are not degraded. The recombinantly produced tetraspanins are dispersed within the endoplasmic reticulum membranes or localized in granule-like structures in yeast cells. The recombinantly produced tetraspanins can be extracted from the membrane fraction and purified with detergents or the poly (styrene-co-maleic acid) polymer technique for use in further biochemical or biophysical studies. PMID:26218426

  10. Dualities in Persistent (Co)Homology

    SciTech Connect

    de Silva, Vin; Morozov, Dmitriy; Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael

    2011-09-16

    We consider sequences of absolute and relative homology and cohomology groups that arise naturally for a filtered cell complex. We establishalgebraic relationships between their persistence modules, and show that they contain equivalent information. We explain how one can use the existingalgorithm for persistent homology to process any of the four modules, and relate it to a recently introduced persistent cohomology algorithm. Wepresent experimental evidence for the practical efficiency of the latter algorithm.

  11. Persistent homology analysis of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Irene; Gori, Matteo; Pettini, Marco; Petri, Giovanni; De Nigris, Sarah; Franzosi, Roberto; Vaccarino, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Persistent homology analysis, a recently developed computational method in algebraic topology, is applied to the study of the phase transitions undergone by the so-called mean-field XY model and by the ϕ4 lattice model, respectively. For both models the relationship between phase transitions and the topological properties of certain submanifolds of configuration space are exactly known. It turns out that these a priori known facts are clearly retrieved by persistent homology analysis of dynamically sampled submanifolds of configuration space.

  12. The yeast SNF3 gene encodes a glucose transporter homologous to the mammalian protein.

    PubMed Central

    Celenza, J L; Marshall-Carlson, L; Carlson, M

    1988-01-01

    The SNF3 gene is required for high-affinity glucose transport in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has also been implicated in control of gene expression by glucose repression. We report here the nucleotide sequence of the cloned SNF3 gene. The predicted amino acid sequence shows that SNF3 encodes a 97-kilodalton protein that is homologous to mammalian glucose transporters and has 12 putative membrane-spanning regions. We also show that a functional SNF3-lacZ gene-fusion product cofractionates with membrane proteins and is localized to the cell surface, as judged by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Expression of the fusion protein is regulated by glucose repression. Images PMID:3281163

  13. On the hodological criterion for homology.

    PubMed

    Faunes, Macarena; Francisco Botelho, João; Ahumada Galleguillos, Patricio; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Owen's pre-evolutionary definition of a homolog as "the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function" and its redefinition after Darwin as "the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry" entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish "sameness."Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium. PMID:26157357

  14. On the hodological criterion for homology

    PubMed Central

    Faunes, Macarena; Francisco Botelho, João; Ahumada Galleguillos, Patricio; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Owen's pre-evolutionary definition of a homolog as “the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function” and its redefinition after Darwin as “the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry” entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish “sameness.”Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium. PMID:26157357

  15. A homologous cell-free system for studying protein translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Brennwald, P; Wise, J A

    1994-02-01

    We report the development of a homologous in vitro assay system for analysing translocation of proteins across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our protocol for preparing an S. pombe extract capable of translating natural messenger RNAs was modified from a procedure previously used for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which cells are lysed in a bead-beater. However, we were unable to prepare fission yeast microsomes active in protein translocation using existing budding yeast protocols. Instead, our most efficient preparations were isolated by fractionating spheroplasts, followed by extensive washing and size exclusion chromatography of the crude membranes. Translocation of two ER-targeted proteins, pre-acid phosphatase from S. pombe and prepro-alpha-factor from S. cerevisiae, was monitored using two distinct assays. First, evidence that a fraction of both proteins was sequestered within membrane-enclosed vesicles was provided by resistance to exogenously added protease. Second, the protected fraction of each protein was converted to a higher molecular weight, glycosylated form; attachment of carbohydrate to the translocated proteins was confirmed by their ability to bind Concanavalin A-Sepharose. Finally, we examined whether proteins could be translocated across fission yeast microsomal membranes after their synthesis was complete. Our results indicate that S. cerevisiae prepro-alpha-factor can be post-translationally imported into the fission yeast ER, while S. pombe pre-acid phosphatase crosses the membrane only by a co-translational mechanism. PMID:8203158

  16. Srs2 and Mus81-Mms4 Prevent Accumulation of Toxic Inter-Homolog Recombination Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Keyamura, Kenji; Arai, Kota; Hishida, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Homologous recombination is an evolutionally conserved mechanism that promotes genome stability through the faithful repair of double-strand breaks and single-strand gaps in DNA, and the recovery of stalled or collapsed replication forks. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATP-dependent DNA helicase Srs2 (a member of the highly conserved UvrD family of helicases) has multiple roles in regulating homologous recombination. A mutation (srs2K41A) resulting in a helicase-dead mutant of Srs2 was found to be lethal in diploid, but not in haploid, cells. In diploid cells, Srs2K41A caused the accumulation of inter-homolog joint molecule intermediates, increased the levels of spontaneous Rad52 foci, and induced gross chromosomal rearrangements. Srs2K41A lethality and accumulation of joint molecules were suppressed by inactivating Rad51 or deleting the Rad51-interaction domain of Srs2, whereas phosphorylation and sumoylation of Srs2 and its interaction with sumoylated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were not required for lethality. The structure-specific complex of crossover junction endonucleases Mus81 and Mms4 was also required for viability of diploid, but not haploid, SRS2 deletion mutants (srs2Δ), and diploid srs2Δ mus81Δ mutants accumulated joint molecule intermediates. Our data suggest that Srs2 and Mus81-Mms4 have critical roles in preventing the formation of (or in resolving) toxic inter-homolog joint molecules, which could otherwise interfere with chromosome segregation and lead to genetic instability. PMID:27390022

  17. Potential immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae as heavy metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffar, Nur Izzati Abdul; Rahman, Nadhratul Nur Ain Abdul; Alrozi, Rasyidah; Senusi, Faraziehan; Chang, Siu Hua

    2015-05-01

    Biosorption of copper ion using treated and untreated immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae from aqueous solution was investigate in this study. S.cerevisiae has been choosing as biosorbent due to low cost, easy and continuously available from various industries. In this study, the ability of treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae in removing copper ion influence by the effect of pH solution, and initial concentration of copper ion with contact time. Besides, adsorption isotherm and kinetic model also studied. The result indicated that the copper ion uptake on treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae was increased with increasing of contact time and initial concentration of copper ion. The optimum pH for copper ion uptake on untreated and treated immobilized S.cerevisiae at 4 and 6. From the data obtained of copper ion uptake, the adsorption isotherm was fitted well by Freundlich model for treated immobilized S.cerevisiae and Langmuir model for untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae according to high correlation coefficient. Meanwhile, the pseudo second order was described as suitable model present according to high correlation coefficient. Since the application of biosorption process has been received more attention from numerous researchers as a potential process to be applied in the industry, future study will be conducted to investigate the potential of immobilized S.cerevisiae in continuous process.

  18. Homologs of Breast Cancer Genes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, Oliver; Seeliger, Katharina; Puchta, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Since the initial discovery of genes involved in hereditary breast cancer in humans, a vast wealth of information has been published. Breast cancer proteins were shown to work as tumor suppressors primarily through their involvement in DNA-damage repair. Surprisingly, homologs of these genes can be found in plant genomes, as well. Here, we want to give an overview of the identification and characterization of the biological roles of these proteins, in plants. In addition to the conservation of their function in DNA repair, new plant-specific characteristics have been revealed. BRCA1 is required for the efficient repair of double strand breaks (DSB) by homologous recombination in somatic cells of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Bioinformatic analysis indicates that, whereas most homologs of key components of the different mammalian BRCA1 complexes are present in plant genomes, homologs of most factors involved in the recruitment of BRCA1 to the DSB cannot be identified. Thus, it is not clear at the moment whether differences exist between plants and animals at this important step. The most conserved region of BRCA1 and BARD1 homologs in plants is a PHD domain which is absent in mammals and which, in AtBARD1, might be involved in the transcriptional regulation of plant development. The presence of a plant-specific domain prompted us to reevaluate the current model for the evolution of BRCA1 homologs and to suggest a new hypothesis, in which we postulate that plant BRCA1 and BARD1 have one common predecessor that gained a PHD domain before duplication. Furthermore, work in Arabidopsis demonstrates that – as in animals – BRCA2 homologs are important for meiotic DNA recombination. Surprisingly, recent research has revealed that AtBRCA2 also has an important role in systemic acquired resistance. In Arabidopsis, BRCA2 is involved in the transcriptional regulation of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes via its interaction with the strand exchange protein RAD51. PMID

  19. Investigating homology between proteins using energetic profiles.

    PubMed

    Wrabl, James O; Hilser, Vincent J

    2010-03-01

    Accumulated experimental observations demonstrate that protein stability is often preserved upon conservative point mutation. In contrast, less is known about the effects of large sequence or structure changes on the stability of a particular fold. Almost completely unknown is the degree to which stability of different regions of a protein is generally preserved throughout evolution. In this work, these questions are addressed through thermodynamic analysis of a large representative sample of protein fold space based on remote, yet accepted, homology. More than 3,000 proteins were computationally analyzed using the structural-thermodynamic algorithm COREX/BEST. Estimated position-specific stability (i.e., local Gibbs free energy of folding) and its component enthalpy and entropy were quantitatively compared between all proteins in the sample according to all-vs.-all pairwise structural alignment. It was discovered that the local stabilities of homologous pairs were significantly more correlated than those of non-homologous pairs, indicating that local stability was indeed generally conserved throughout evolution. However, the position-specific enthalpy and entropy underlying stability were less correlated, suggesting that the overall regional stability of a protein was more important than the thermodynamic mechanism utilized to achieve that stability. Finally, two different types of statistically exceptional evolutionary structure-thermodynamic relationships were noted. First, many homologous proteins contained regions of similar thermodynamics despite localized structure change, suggesting a thermodynamic mechanism enabling evolutionary fold change. Second, some homologous proteins with extremely similar structures nonetheless exhibited different local stabilities, a phenomenon previously observed experimentally in this laboratory. These two observations, in conjunction with the principal conclusion that homologous proteins generally conserved local stability, may

  20. A G-protein alpha subunit from asexual Candida albicans functions in the mating signal transduction pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is regulated by the a1-alpha 2 repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Sadhu, C; Hoekstra, D; McEachern, M J; Reed, S I; Hicks, J B

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated a gene, designated CAG1, from Candida albicans by using the G-protein alpha-subunit clone SCG1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a probe. Amino acid sequence comparison revealed that CAG1 is more homologous to SCG1 than to any other G protein reported so far. Homology between CAG1 and SCG1 not only includes the conserved guanine nucleotide binding domains but also spans the normally variable regions which are thought to be involved in interaction with the components of the specific signal transduction pathway. Furthermore, CAG1 contains a central domain, previously found only in SCG1. cag1 null mutants of C. albicans created by gene disruption produced no readily detectable phenotype. The C. albicans CAG1 gene complemented both the growth and mating defects of S. cerevisiae scg1 null mutants when carried on either a low- or high-copy-number plasmid. In diploid C. albicans, the CAG1 transcript was readily detectable in mycelial and yeast cells of both the white and opaque forms. However, the CAG1-specific transcript in S. cerevisiae transformants containing the C. albicans CAG1 gene was observed only in haploid cells. This transcription pattern matches that of SCG1 in S. cerevisiae and is caused by a1-alpha 2 mediated repression in diploid cells. That is, CAG1 behaves as a haploid-specific gene in S. cerevisiae, subject to control by the a1-alpha 2 mating-type regulation pathway. We infer from these results that C. albicans may have a signal transduction system analogous to that controlling mating type in S. cerevisiae or possibly even a sexual pathway that has so far remained undetected. Images PMID:1569935

  1. [Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to monoterpenes--a review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jidong; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2013-06-01

    Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to monoterpenes is important in both metabolic engineering of the yeast to produce these chemicals de novo and efficient use of biomass containing these chemicals. Understanding the mechanisms in the tolerance of S. cerevisiae to monoterpenes could facilitate the construction of yeast strains with enhanced monoterpenes resistance, and therefore improve related bioprocesses. Monoterpenes could disturb the redox balance in S. cerevisiae, therefore increase the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and result in cell death. S. cerevisiae has to systematically improve its antioxidative ability to deal with the ROS induced damage. The current review summarized the recent developments in demonstration of the tolerance of S. cerevisiae to different typical monoterpenes mainly from the aspect of the antioxidative mechanisms. Based on the analysis of the previous works, further attempts to demonstrate the mechanisms were proposed. PMID:24028054

  2. Reconstruction of the High-Osmolarity Glycerol (HOG) Signaling Pathway from the Halophilic Fungus Wallemia ichthyophaga in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Konte, Tilen; Terpitz, Ulrich; Plemenitaš, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The basidiomycetous fungus Wallemia ichthyophaga grows between 1.7 and 5.1 M NaCl and is the most halophilic eukaryote described to date. Like other fungi, W. ichthyophaga detects changes in environmental salinity mainly by the evolutionarily conserved high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) signaling pathway. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the HOG pathway has been extensively studied in connection to osmotic regulation, with a valuable knock-out strain collection established. In the present study, we reconstructed the architecture of the HOG pathway of W. ichthyophaga in suitable S. cerevisiae knock-out strains, through heterologous expression of the W. ichthyophaga HOG pathway proteins. Compared to S. cerevisiae, where the Pbs2 (ScPbs2) kinase of the HOG pathway is activated via the SHO1 and SLN1 branches, the interactions between the W. ichthyophaga Pbs2 (WiPbs2) kinase and the W. ichthyophaga SHO1 branch orthologs are not conserved: as well as evidence of poor interactions between the WiSho1 Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain and the WiPbs2 proline-rich motif, the absence of a considerable part of the osmosensing apparatus in the genome of W. ichthyophaga suggests that the SHO1 branch components are not involved in HOG signaling in this halophilic fungus. In contrast, the conserved activation of WiPbs2 by the S. cerevisiae ScSsk2/ScSsk22 kinase and the sensitivity of W. ichthyophaga cells to fludioxonil, emphasize the significance of two-component (SLN1-like) signaling via Group III histidine kinase. Combined with protein modeling data, our study reveals conserved and non-conserved protein interactions in the HOG signaling pathway of W. ichthyophaga and therefore significantly improves the knowledge of hyperosmotic signal processing in this halophilic fungus. PMID:27379041

  3. Homological scaffolds of brain functional networks.

    PubMed

    Petri, G; Expert, P; Turkheimer, F; Carhart-Harris, R; Nutt, D; Hellyer, P J; Vaccarino, F

    2014-12-01

    Networks, as efficient representations of complex systems, have appealed to scientists for a long time and now permeate many areas of science, including neuroimaging (Bullmore and Sporns 2009 Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 10, 186-198. (doi:10.1038/nrn2618)). Traditionally, the structure of complex networks has been studied through their statistical properties and metrics concerned with node and link properties, e.g. degree-distribution, node centrality and modularity. Here, we study the characteristics of functional brain networks at the mesoscopic level from a novel perspective that highlights the role of inhomogeneities in the fabric of functional connections. This can be done by focusing on the features of a set of topological objects-homological cycles-associated with the weighted functional network. We leverage the detected topological information to define the homological scaffolds, a new set of objects designed to represent compactly the homological features of the correlation network and simultaneously make their homological properties amenable to networks theoretical methods. As a proof of principle,we apply these tools to compare resting state functional brain activity in 15 healthy volunteers after intravenous infusion of placebo and psilocybin-the main psychoactive component of magic mushrooms. The results show that the homological structure of the brain's functional patterns undergoes a dramatic change post-psilocybin, characterized by the appearance of many transient structures of low stability and of a small number of persistent ones that are not observed in the case of placebo. PMID:25401177

  4. Homological scaffolds of brain functional networks

    PubMed Central

    Petri, G.; Expert, P.; Turkheimer, F.; Carhart-Harris, R.; Nutt, D.; Hellyer, P. J.; Vaccarino, F.

    2014-01-01

    Networks, as efficient representations of complex systems, have appealed to scientists for a long time and now permeate many areas of science, including neuroimaging (Bullmore and Sporns 2009 Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 10, 186–198. (doi:10.1038/nrn2618)). Traditionally, the structure of complex networks has been studied through their statistical properties and metrics concerned with node and link properties, e.g. degree-distribution, node centrality and modularity. Here, we study the characteristics of functional brain networks at the mesoscopic level from a novel perspective that highlights the role of inhomogeneities in the fabric of functional connections. This can be done by focusing on the features of a set of topological objects—homological cycles—associated with the weighted functional network. We leverage the detected topological information to define the homological scaffolds, a new set of objects designed to represent compactly the homological features of the correlation network and simultaneously make their homological properties amenable to networks theoretical methods. As a proof of principle, we apply these tools to compare resting-state functional brain activity in 15 healthy volunteers after intravenous infusion of placebo and psilocybin—the main psychoactive component of magic mushrooms. The results show that the homological structure of the brain's functional patterns undergoes a dramatic change post-psilocybin, characterized by the appearance of many transient structures of low stability and of a small number of persistent ones that are not observed in the case of placebo. PMID:25401177

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis expresses two chaperonin-60 homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, T H; Coates, A R; Butcher, P D; Hickman, C J; Shinnick, T M

    1993-01-01

    A 65-kDa protein and a 10-kDa protein are two of the more strongly immunoreactive components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. The 65-kDa antigen has homology with members of the GroEL or chaperonin-60 (Cpn60) family of heat shock proteins. The 10-kDa antigen has homology with the GroES or chaperonin-10 family of heat shock proteins. These two proteins are encoded by separate genes in M. tuberculosis. The studies reported here reveal that M. tuberculosis contains a second Cpn60 homolog located 98 bp downstream of the 10-kDa antigen gene. The second Cpn60 homolog (Cpn60-1) displays 61% amino acid sequence identity with the 65-kDa antigen (Cpn60-2) and 53% and 41% identity with the Escherichia coli GroEL protein and the human P60 protein, respectively. Primer-extension analysis revealed that transcription starts 29 bp upstream of the translation start of the Cpn60-1 homolog and protein purification studies indicate that the cpn60-1 gene is expressed as an approximately 60-kDa polypeptide. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7681982

  6. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Lefkovits, G. )

    1990-10-01

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed.

  7. Solar core homology, solar neutrinos and helioseismology

    SciTech Connect

    Bludman, S.A.; Kennedy, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Precise numerical standard solar models (SSMs) now agree with one another and with helioseismological observations in the convective and outer radiative zones. Nevertheless these models obscure how luminosity, neutrino production and g-mode core helioseismology depend on such inputs as opacity and nuclear cross sections. Although the Sun is not homologous, its inner core by itself is chemically evolved and almost homologous, because of its compactness, radiative energy transport, and ppI-dominated luminosity production. We apply luminosity-fixed homology transformations to the core to estimate theoretical uncertainties in the SSM and to obtain a broad class of non-SSMs, parameterized by central temperature and density and purely radiative energy transport in the core. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Flare build-up study: Homologous flares group - Interim report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    When homologous flares are broadly defined as having footpoint structures in common, it is found that a majority of flares fall into homologous sets. Filament eruptions and mass ejection in members of an homologous flare set show that maintainance of the magnetic structure is not a necessary condition for homology.

  9. Cloning of the STE5 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a suppressor of the mating defect of cdc25 temperature-sensitive mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, R; Yablonski, D; Simchen, G; Levitzki, A

    1993-01-01

    The STE5 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cloned using a screening procedure designed to isolate genes of the S. cerevisiae pheromone response pathway. We screened a yeast genomic high-copy-number plasmid library for genes that allow mating of cdc25ts mutants at the restrictive temperature without affecting the cell-cycle-arrest phenotype. One of the genes cloned was identified by genetic analysis as STE5. STE5 encodes a predicted open reading frame of 916 amino acids and exhibits significant homology to Far1 protein. RNA blot analysis reveals that STE5 gene transcription is regulated by the mating type of the cell and depends on an intact pheromone-response pathway. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:8516289

  10. Filamentation of Metabolic Enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing-Ji; Kassim, Hakimi; Huang, Yong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Guang; Wang, Peng-Ye; Yan, Jun; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-06-20

    Compartmentation via filamentation has recently emerged as a novel mechanism for metabolic regulation. In order to identify filament-forming metabolic enzymes systematically, we performed a genome-wide screening of all strains available from an open reading frame-GFP collection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discovered nine novel filament-forming proteins and also confirmed those identified previously. From the 4159 strains, we found 23 proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, which are capable of forming filaments in vivo. In silico protein-protein interaction analysis suggests that these filament-forming proteins can be clustered into several groups, including translational initiation machinery and glucose and nitrogen metabolic pathways. Using glutamine-utilising enzymes as examples, we found that the culture conditions affect the occurrence and length of the metabolic filaments. Furthermore, we found that two CTP synthases (Ura7p and Ura8p) and two asparagine synthetases (Asn1p and Asn2p) form filaments both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Live imaging analyses suggest that metabolic filaments undergo sub-diffusion. Taken together, our genome-wide screening identifies additional filament-forming proteins in S. cerevisiae and suggests that filamentation of metabolic enzymes is more general than currently appreciated. PMID:27312010

  11. Killer systems of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    The killer systems of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are an unusual class of cytoplasmic symbionts of primitive eukaryotes. The genetic material of these symbionts is double-stranded RNA. They are characterized by the linearity of the genome, its fragmentation into a major and a minor fraction, which replicate separately, and their ability to control the synthesis of secretory mycocin proteins possessing a toxic action on closely related strains. The secretion of mycocins at the same time ensures acquiring of resistance to them. Strains containing killer symbionts are toxigenic and resistant to the action of their own toxin, but strains that are free of killer double-stranded RNAs are sensitive to the action of mycocins. The killer systems of S. cerevisiae have retained features relating them to viruses and are apparently the result of evolution of infectious viruses. The occurrences of such systems among monocellular eukaryotic organisms is an example of complication of the genome by means of its assembly from virus-like components. We discuss the unusual features of replication and the expression of killer systems and their utilization in the construction of vector molecules.

  12. Identification of Putative Mek1 Substrates during Meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using Quantitative Phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Suhandynata, Raymond T.; Wan, Lihong; Zhou, Huilin; Hollingsworth, Nancy M.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination plays a key role in sexual reproduction as it generates crossovers that, in combination with sister chromatid cohesion, physically connect homologous chromosomes, thereby promoting their proper segregation at the first meiotic division. Meiotic recombination is initiated by programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the evolutionarily conserved, topoisomerase-like protein Spo11. Repair of these DSBs is highly regulated to create crossovers between homologs that are distributed throughout the genome. This repair requires the presence of the mitotic recombinase, Rad51, as well as the strand exchange activity of the meiosis-specific recombinase, Dmc1. A key regulator of meiotic DSB repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1, which promotes interhomolog strand invasion and is required for the meiotic recombination checkpoint and the crossover/noncrossover decision. Understanding how Mek1 regulates meiotic recombination requires the identification of its substrates. Towards that end, an unbiased phosphoproteomic approach utilizing Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cells (SILAC) was utilized to generate a list of potential Mek1 substrates, as well as proteins containing consensus phosphorylation sites for cyclin-dependent kinase, the checkpoint kinases, Mec1/Tel1, and the polo-like kinase, Cdc5. These experiments represent the first global phosphoproteomic dataset for proteins in meiotic budding yeast. PMID:27214570

  13. Identification of Putative Mek1 Substrates during Meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using Quantitative Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Suhandynata, Raymond T; Wan, Lihong; Zhou, Huilin; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination plays a key role in sexual reproduction as it generates crossovers that, in combination with sister chromatid cohesion, physically connect homologous chromosomes, thereby promoting their proper segregation at the first meiotic division. Meiotic recombination is initiated by programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the evolutionarily conserved, topoisomerase-like protein Spo11. Repair of these DSBs is highly regulated to create crossovers between homologs that are distributed throughout the genome. This repair requires the presence of the mitotic recombinase, Rad51, as well as the strand exchange activity of the meiosis-specific recombinase, Dmc1. A key regulator of meiotic DSB repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1, which promotes interhomolog strand invasion and is required for the meiotic recombination checkpoint and the crossover/noncrossover decision. Understanding how Mek1 regulates meiotic recombination requires the identification of its substrates. Towards that end, an unbiased phosphoproteomic approach utilizing Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cells (SILAC) was utilized to generate a list of potential Mek1 substrates, as well as proteins containing consensus phosphorylation sites for cyclin-dependent kinase, the checkpoint kinases, Mec1/Tel1, and the polo-like kinase, Cdc5. These experiments represent the first global phosphoproteomic dataset for proteins in meiotic budding yeast. PMID:27214570

  14. Potentiation of gene targeting in human cells by expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52.

    PubMed

    Di Primio, Cristina; Galli, Alvaro; Cervelli, Tiziana; Zoppè, Monica; Rainaldi, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    When exogenous DNA is stably introduced in mammalian cells, it is typically integrated in random positions, and only a minor fraction enters a pathway of homologous recombination (HR). The complex Rad51/Rad52 is a major player in the management of exogenous DNA in eukaryotic organisms and plays a critical role in the choice of repair system. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the pathway of choice is HR, mediated by Rad52 (ScRad52), which differs slightly from its human homologue. Here, we present an approach that utilizes ScRad52 to enhance HR in human cells containing a specific substrate for recombination. Clones of HeLa cells were produced expressing functional ScRad52. These cells showed enhanced resistance to DNA damaging treatments and revealed a different distribution of Rad51 foci (a marker of recombination complex formation). More significantly, ScRad52 expression resulted in an up to 37-fold increase in gene targeting by HR. In the same cells, random integration of exogenous DNA was significantly reduced, consistent with the view that HR and non-homologous end joining are alternative competing pathways. Expression of ScRad52 could offer a major improvement for experiments requiring gene targeting by HR, both in basic research and in gene therapy studies. PMID:16106043

  15. Potentiation of gene targeting in human cells by expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52

    PubMed Central

    Di Primio, Cristina; Galli, Alvaro; Cervelli, Tiziana; Zoppè, Monica; Rainaldi, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    When exogenous DNA is stably introduced in mammalian cells, it is typically integrated in random positions, and only a minor fraction enters a pathway of homologous recombination (HR). The complex Rad51/Rad52 is a major player in the management of exogenous DNA in eukaryotic organisms and plays a critical role in the choice of repair system. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the pathway of choice is HR, mediated by Rad52 (ScRad52), which differs slightly from its human homologue. Here, we present an approach that utilizes ScRad52 to enhance HR in human cells containing a specific substrate for recombination. Clones of HeLa cells were produced expressing functional ScRad52. These cells showed enhanced resistance to DNA damaging treatments and revealed a different distribution of Rad51 foci (a marker of recombination complex formation). More significantly, ScRad52 expression resulted in an up to 37-fold increase in gene targeting by HR. In the same cells, random integration of exogenous DNA was significantly reduced, consistent with the view that HR and non-homologous end joining are alternative competing pathways. Expression of ScRad52 could offer a major improvement for experiments requiring gene targeting by HR, both in basic research and in gene therapy studies. PMID:16106043

  16. Effects of spaceflight on polysaccharides of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Zhi; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Tan, Sze-Sze

    2008-12-01

    Freeze-dried samples of four Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, namely, FL01, FL03, 2.0016, and 2.1424, were subjected to spaceflight. After the satellite's landing on Earth, the samples were recovered and changes in yeast cell wall were analyzed. Spaceflight strains of all S. cerevisiae strains showed significant changes in cell wall thickness (P < 0.05). One mutant of S. cerevisiae 2.0016 with increased biomass, cell wall thickness, and cell wall glucan was isolated (P < 0.05). The spaceflight mutant of S. cerevisiae 2.0016 showed 46.7%, 62.6%, and 146.0% increment in biomass, cell wall thickness and beta-glucan content, respectively, when compared to the ground strain. Moreover, growth curve analysis showed spaceflight S. cerevisiae 2.0016 had a faster growth rate, shorter lag phase periods, higher final biomass, and higher content of beta-glucan. Genetic stability analysis showed that prolonged subculturing of spaceflight strain S. cerevisiae 2.0016 did not lead to the appearance of variants, indicating that the genetic stability of S. cerevisiae 2.0016 mutant could be sufficient for its exploitation of beta-glucan production. PMID:18797865

  17. CasHRA (Cas9-facilitated Homologous Recombination Assembly) method of constructing megabase-sized DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianting; Wu, Ronghai; Xue, Xiaoli; Qin, Zhongjun

    2016-08-19

    Current DNA assembly methods for preparing highly purified linear subassemblies require complex and time-consuming in vitro manipulations that hinder their ability to construct megabase-sized DNAs (e.g. synthetic genomes). We have developed a new method designated 'CasHRA (Cas9-facilitated Homologous Recombination Assembly)' that directly uses large circular DNAs in a one-step in vivo assembly process. The large circular DNAs are co-introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae by protoplast fusion, and they are cleaved by RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease to release the linear DNA segments for subsequent assembly by the endogenous homologous recombination system. The CasHRA method allows efficient assembly of multiple large DNA segments in vivo; thus, this approach should be useful in the last stage of genome construction. As a proof of concept, we combined CasHRA with an upstream assembly method (Gibson procedure of genome assembly) and successfully constructed a 1.03 Mb MGE-syn1.0 (Minimal Genome of Escherichia coli) that contained 449 essential genes and 267 important growth genes. We expect that CasHRA will be widely used in megabase-sized genome constructions. PMID:27220470

  18. A homolog of lariat-debranching enzyme modulates turnover of branched RNA

    PubMed Central

    Garrey, Stephen M.; Katolik, Adam; Prekeris, Mantas; Li, Xueni; York, Kerri; Bernards, Sarah; Fields, Stanley; Zhao, Rui; Damha, Masad J.; Hesselberth, Jay R.

    2014-01-01

    Turnover of the branched RNA intermediates and products of pre-mRNA splicing is mediated by the lariat-debranching enzyme Dbr1. We characterized a homolog of Dbr1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drn1/Ygr093w, that has a pseudo-metallophosphodiesterase domain with primary sequence homology to Dbr1 but lacks essential active site residues found in Dbr1. Whereas loss of Dbr1 results in lariat-introns failing broadly to turnover, loss of Drn1 causes low levels of lariat-intron accumulation. Conserved residues in the Drn1 C-terminal CwfJ domains, which are not present in Dbr1, are required for efficient intron turnover. Drn1 interacts with Dbr1, components of the Nineteen Complex, U2 snRNA, branched intermediates, and products of splicing. Drn1 enhances debranching catalyzed by Dbr1 in vitro, but does so without significantly improving the affinity of Dbr1 for branched RNA. Splicing carried out in in vitro extracts in the absence of Drn1 results in an accumulation of branched splicing intermediates and products released from the spliceosome, likely due to less active debranching, as well as the promiscuous release of cleaved 5′-exon. Drn1 enhances Dbr1-mediated turnover of lariat-intermediates and lariat-intron products, indicating that branched RNA turnover is regulated at multiple steps during splicing. PMID:24919400

  19. Genome-Wide Screen Reveals Replication Pathway for Quasi-Palindrome Fragility Dependent on Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Saini, Natalie; Sheng, Ziwei; Lobachev, Kirill S.

    2013-01-01

    Inverted repeats capable of forming hairpin and cruciform structures present a threat to chromosomal integrity. They induce double strand breaks, which lead to gross chromosomal rearrangements, the hallmarks of cancers and hereditary diseases. Secondary structure formation at this motif has been proposed to be the driving force for the instability, albeit the mechanisms leading to the fragility are not well-understood. We carried out a genome-wide screen to uncover the genetic players that govern fragility of homologous and homeologous Alu quasi-palindromes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that depletion or lack of components of the DNA replication machinery, proteins involved in Fe-S cluster biogenesis, the replication-pausing checkpoint pathway, the telomere maintenance complex or the Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 dissolvasome augment fragility at Alu-IRs. Rad51, a component of the homologous recombination pathway, was found to be required for replication arrest and breakage at the repeats specifically in replication-deficient strains. These data demonstrate that Rad51 is required for the formation of breakage-prone secondary structures in situations when replication is compromised while another mechanism operates in DSB formation in replication-proficient strains. PMID:24339793

  20. Genome-wide screen reveals replication pathway for quasi-palindrome fragility dependent on homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Saini, Natalie; Sheng, Ziwei; Lobachev, Kirill S

    2013-01-01

    Inverted repeats capable of forming hairpin and cruciform structures present a threat to chromosomal integrity. They induce double strand breaks, which lead to gross chromosomal rearrangements, the hallmarks of cancers and hereditary diseases. Secondary structure formation at this motif has been proposed to be the driving force for the instability, albeit the mechanisms leading to the fragility are not well-understood. We carried out a genome-wide screen to uncover the genetic players that govern fragility of homologous and homeologous Alu quasi-palindromes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that depletion or lack of components of the DNA replication machinery, proteins involved in Fe-S cluster biogenesis, the replication-pausing checkpoint pathway, the telomere maintenance complex or the Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 dissolvasome augment fragility at Alu-IRs. Rad51, a component of the homologous recombination pathway, was found to be required for replication arrest and breakage at the repeats specifically in replication-deficient strains. These data demonstrate that Rad51 is required for the formation of breakage-prone secondary structures in situations when replication is compromised while another mechanism operates in DSB formation in replication-proficient strains. PMID:24339793

  1. Mutagenic Organized Recombination Process by Homologous In Vivo Grouping (MORPHING) for Directed Enzyme Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, David; Molina-Espeja, Patricia; Garcia-Ruiz, Eva; Alcalde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Approaches that depend on directed evolution require reliable methods to generate DNA diversity so that mutant libraries can focus on specific target regions. We took advantage of the high frequency of homologous DNA recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to develop a strategy for domain mutagenesis aimed at introducing and in vivo recombining random mutations in defined segments of DNA. Mutagenic Organized Recombination Process by Homologous IN vivo Grouping (MORPHING) is a one-pot random mutagenic method for short protein regions that harnesses the in vivo recombination apparatus of yeast. Using this approach, libraries can be prepared with different mutational loads in DNA segments of less than 30 amino acids so that they can be assembled into the remaining unaltered DNA regions in vivo with high fidelity. As a proof of concept, we present two eukaryotic-ligninolytic enzyme case studies: i) the enhancement of the oxidative stability of a H2O2-sensitive versatile peroxidase by independent evolution of three distinct protein segments (Leu28-Gly57, Leu149-Ala174 and Ile199-Leu268); and ii) the heterologous functional expression of an unspecific peroxygenase by exclusive evolution of its native 43-residue signal sequence. PMID:24614282

  2. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. |; Eldarov, M. |; Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A.

    1994-10-01

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic-growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation In that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RAD52, RAD1 and the RNC1 genes.

  3. Biochemistry of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Dixon, D A; Eggleston, A K; Lauder, S D; Rehrauer, W M

    1994-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental biological process. Biochemical understanding of this process is most advanced for Escherichia coli. At least 25 gene products are involved in promoting genetic exchange. At present, this includes the RecA, RecBCD (exonuclease V), RecE (exonuclease VIII), RecF, RecG, RecJ, RecN, RecOR, RecQ, RecT, RuvAB, RuvC, SbcCD, and SSB proteins, as well as DNA polymerase I, DNA gyrase, DNA topoisomerase I, DNA ligase, and DNA helicases. The activities displayed by these enzymes include homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange, helicase, branch migration, Holliday junction binding and cleavage, nuclease, ATPase, topoisomerase, DNA binding, ATP binding, polymerase, and ligase, and, collectively, they define biochemical events that are essential for efficient recombination. In addition to these needed proteins, a cis-acting recombination hot spot known as Chi (chi: 5'-GCTGGTGG-3') plays a crucial regulatory function. The biochemical steps that comprise homologous recombination can be formally divided into four parts: (i) processing of DNA molecules into suitable recombination substrates, (ii) homologous pairing of the DNA partners and the exchange of DNA strands, (iii) extension of the nascent DNA heteroduplex; and (iv) resolution of the resulting crossover structure. This review focuses on the biochemical mechanisms underlying these steps, with particular emphases on the activities of the proteins involved and on the integration of these activities into likely biochemical pathways for recombination. Images PMID:7968921

  4. Expression of a chimeric human/salmon calcitonin gene integrated into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome using rDNA sequences as recombination sites.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hengyi; Zang, Xiaonan; Liu, Yuantao; Cao, Xiaofei; Wu, Fei; Huang, Xiaoyun; Jiang, Minjie; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2015-12-01

    Calcitonin participates in controlling homeostasis of calcium and phosphorus and plays an important role in bone metabolism. The aim of this study was to endow an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the ability to express chimeric human/salmon calcitonin (hsCT) without the use of antibiotics. To do so, a homologous recombination plasmid pUC18-rDNA2-ura3-P pgk -5hsCT-rDNA1 was constructed, which contains two segments of ribosomal DNA of 1.1 kb (rDNA1) and 1.4 kb (rDNA2), to integrate the heterologous gene into host rDNA. A DNA fragment containing five copies of a chimeric human/salmon calcitonin gene (5hsCT) under the control of the promoter for phosphoglycerate kinase (P pgk ) was constructed to express 5hsCT in S. cerevisiae using ura3 as a selectable auxotrophic marker gene. After digestion by restriction endonuclease HpaI, a linear fragment, rDNA2-ura3-P pgk -5hsCT-rDNA1, was obtained and transformed into the △ura3 mutant of S. cerevisiae by the lithium acetate method. The ura3-P pgk -5hsCT sequence was introduced into the genome at rDNA sites by homologous recombination, and the recombinant strain YS-5hsCT was obtained. Southern blot analysis revealed that the 5hsCT had been integrated successfully into the genome of S. cerevisiae. The results of Western blot and ELISA confirmed that the 5hsCT protein had been expressed in the recombinant strain YS-5hsCT. The expression level reached 2.04 % of total proteins. S. cerevisiae YS-5hsCT decreased serum calcium in mice by oral administration and even 0.01 g lyophilized S. cerevisiae YS-5hsCT/kg decreased serum calcium by 0.498 mM. This work has produced a commercial yeast strain potentially useful for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:26254786

  5. Metazoan Scc4 homologs link sister chromatid cohesion to cell and axon migration guidance.

    PubMed

    Seitan, Vlad C; Banks, Peter; Laval, Steve; Majid, Nazia A; Dorsett, Dale; Rana, Amer; Smith, Jim; Bateman, Alex; Krpic, Sanja; Hostert, Arnd; Rollins, Robert A; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Benard, Claire Y; Hekimi, Siegfried; Newbury, Sarah F; Strachan, Tom

    2006-07-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scc2 binds Scc4 to form an essential complex that loads cohesin onto chromosomes. The prevalence of Scc2 orthologs in eukaryotes emphasizes a conserved role in regulating sister chromatid cohesion, but homologs of Scc4 have not hitherto been identified outside certain fungi. Some metazoan orthologs of Scc2 were initially identified as developmental gene regulators, such as Drosophila Nipped-B, a regulator of cut and Ultrabithorax, and delangin, a protein mutant in Cornelia de Lange syndrome. We show that delangin and Nipped-B bind previously unstudied human and fly orthologs of Caenorhabditis elegans MAU-2, a non-axis-specific guidance factor for migrating cells and axons. PSI-BLAST shows that Scc4 is evolutionarily related to metazoan MAU-2 sequences, with the greatest homology evident in a short N-terminal domain, and protein-protein interaction studies map the site of interaction between delangin and human MAU-2 to the N-terminal regions of both proteins. Short interfering RNA knockdown of human MAU-2 in HeLa cells resulted in precocious sister chromatid separation and in impaired loading of cohesin onto chromatin, indicating that it is functionally related to Scc4, and RNAi analyses show that MAU-2 regulates chromosome segregation in C. elegans embryos. Using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to knock down Xenopus tropicalis delangin or MAU-2 in early embryos produced similar patterns of retarded growth and developmental defects. Our data show that sister chromatid cohesion in metazoans involves the formation of a complex similar to the Scc2-Scc4 interaction in the budding yeast. The very high degree of sequence conservation between Scc4 homologs in complex metazoans is consistent with increased selection pressure to conserve additional essential functions, such as regulation of cell and axon migration during development. PMID:16802858

  6. Metazoan Scc4 Homologs Link Sister Chromatid Cohesion to Cell and Axon Migration Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Seitan, Vlad C; Banks, Peter; Laval, Steve; Majid, Nazia A; Dorsett, Dale; Rana, Amer; Smith, Jim; Bateman, Alex; Krpic, Sanja; Hostert, Arnd; Rollins, Robert A; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Benard, Claire Y; Hekimi, Siegfried; Newbury, Sarah F

    2006-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scc2 binds Scc4 to form an essential complex that loads cohesin onto chromosomes. The prevalence of Scc2 orthologs in eukaryotes emphasizes a conserved role in regulating sister chromatid cohesion, but homologs of Scc4 have not hitherto been identified outside certain fungi. Some metazoan orthologs of Scc2 were initially identified as developmental gene regulators, such as Drosophila Nipped-B, a regulator of cut and Ultrabithorax, and delangin, a protein mutant in Cornelia de Lange syndrome. We show that delangin and Nipped-B bind previously unstudied human and fly orthologs of Caenorhabditis elegans MAU-2, a non-axis-specific guidance factor for migrating cells and axons. PSI-BLAST shows that Scc4 is evolutionarily related to metazoan MAU-2 sequences, with the greatest homology evident in a short N-terminal domain, and protein–protein interaction studies map the site of interaction between delangin and human MAU-2 to the N-terminal regions of both proteins. Short interfering RNA knockdown of human MAU-2 in HeLa cells resulted in precocious sister chromatid separation and in impaired loading of cohesin onto chromatin, indicating that it is functionally related to Scc4, and RNAi analyses show that MAU-2 regulates chromosome segregation in C. elegans embryos. Using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to knock down Xenopus tropicalis delangin or MAU-2 in early embryos produced similar patterns of retarded growth and developmental defects. Our data show that sister chromatid cohesion in metazoans involves the formation of a complex similar to the Scc2-Scc4 interaction in the budding yeast. The very high degree of sequence conservation between Scc4 homologs in complex metazoans is consistent with increased selection pressure to conserve additional essential functions, such as regulation of cell and axon migration during development. PMID:16802858

  7. Transcriptional Regulatory Networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tong Ihn; Rinaldi, Nicola J.; Robert, François; Odom, Duncan T.; Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Gerber, Georg K.; Hannett, Nancy M.; Harbison, Christopher T.; Thompson, Craig M.; Simon, Itamar; Zeitlinger, Julia; Jennings, Ezra G.; Murray, Heather L.; Gordon, D. Benjamin; Ren, Bing; Wyrick, John J.; Tagne, Jean-Bosco; Volkert, Thomas L.; Fraenkel, Ernest; Gifford, David K.; Young, Richard A.

    2002-10-01

    We have determined how most of the transcriptional regulators encoded in the eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae associate with genes across the genome in living cells. Just as maps of metabolic networks describe the potential pathways that may be used by a cell to accomplish metabolic processes, this network of regulator-gene interactions describes potential pathways yeast cells can use to regulate global gene expression programs. We use this information to identify network motifs, the simplest units of network architecture, and demonstrate that an automated process can use motifs to assemble a transcriptional regulatory network structure. Our results reveal that eukaryotic cellular functions are highly connected through networks of transcriptional regulators that regulate other transcriptional regulators.

  8. Synchronization of the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Foltman, Magdalena; Molist, Iago; Sanchez-Diaz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    A number of model organisms have provided the basis for our understanding of the eukaryotic cell cycle. These model organisms are generally much easier to manipulate than mammalian cells and as such provide amenable tools for extensive genetic and biochemical analysis. One of the most common model organisms used to study the cell cycle is the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This model provides the ability to synchronise cells efficiently at different stages of the cell cycle, which in turn opens up the possibility for extensive and detailed study of mechanisms regulating the eukaryotic cell cycle. Here, we describe methods in which budding yeast cells are arrested at a particular phase of the cell cycle and then released from the block, permitting the study of molecular mechanisms that drive the progression through the cell cycle. PMID:26519319

  9. Archaeal homologs of eukaryotic methylation guide small nucleolar RNAs: lessons from the Pyrococcus genomes.

    PubMed

    Gaspin, C; Cavaillé, J; Erauso, G; Bachellerie, J P

    2000-04-01

    Ribose methylation is a prevalent type of nucleotide modification in rRNA. Eukaryotic rRNAs display a complex pattern of ribose methylations, amounting to 55 in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and about 100 in vertebrates. Ribose methylations of eukaryotic rRNAs are each guided by a cognate small RNA, belonging to the family of box C/D antisense snoRNAs, through transient formation of a specific base-pairing at the rRNA modification site. In prokaryotes, the pattern of rRNA ribose methylations has been fully characterized in a single species so far, Escherichia coli, which contains only four ribose methylated rRNA nucleotides. However, the hyperthermophile archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus contains, like eukaryotes, a large number of (yet unmapped) rRNA ribose methylations and homologs of eukaryotic box C/D small nucleolar ribonuclear proteins have been identified in archaeal genomes. We have therefore searched archaeal genomes for potential homologs of eukaryotic methylation guide small nucleolar RNAs, by combining searches for structured motifs with homology searches. We have identified a family of 46 small RNAs, conserved in the genomes of three hyperthermophile Pyrococcus species, which we have experimentally characterized in Pyrococcus abyssi. The Pyrococcus small RNAs, the first reported homologs of methylation guide small nucleolar RNAs in organisms devoid of a nucleus, appear as a paradigm of minimalist box C/D antisense RNAs. They differ from their eukaryotic homologs by their outstanding structural homogeneity, extended consensus box motifs and the quasi-systematic presence of two (instead of one) rRNA antisense elements. Remarkably, for each small RNA the two antisense elements always match rRNA sequences close to each other in rRNA structure, suggesting an important role in rRNA folding. Only a few of the predicted P. abyssi rRNA ribose methylations have been detected so far. Further analysis of these archaeal small RNAs could provide new insights into

  10. Invasive Saccharomyces cerevisiae infection: a friend turning foe?

    PubMed

    Pillai, Unnikrishnan; Devasahayam, Joe; Kurup, Aparna Narayana; Lacasse, Alexandre

    2014-11-01

    We report a very rare case of acute pyelonephritis in a 51-year-old female with a history of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes caused by a normally benign and a well-known human commensal organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is very often prescribed as a probiotic in modern medical practice. The causal role of S. cerevisiae was confirmed by its isolation in blood, urine, stool as well as vaginal swabs thus proving its virulent nature in suitable situations. PMID:25394448

  11. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae assay system to investigate ligand/AdipoR1 interactions that lead to cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Aouida, Mustapha; Kim, Kangchang; Shaikh, Abdul Rajjak; Pardo, Jose M; Eppinger, Jörg; Yun, Dae-Jin; Bressan, Ray A; Narasimhan, Meena L

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin is a mammalian hormone that exerts anti-diabetic, anti-cancer and cardioprotective effects through interaction with its major ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane localized receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2. Here, we report a Saccharomyces cerevisiae based method for investigating agonist-AdipoR interactions that is amenable for high-throughput scale-up and can be used to study both AdipoRs separately. Agonist-AdipoR1 interactions are detected using a split firefly luciferase assay based on reconstitution of firefly luciferase (Luc) activity due to juxtaposition of its N- and C-terminal fragments, NLuc and CLuc, by ligand induced interaction of the chimeric proteins CLuc-AdipoR1 and APPL1-NLuc (adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif 1-NLuc) in a S. cerevisiae strain lacking the yeast homolog of AdipoRs (Izh2p). The assay monitors the earliest known step in the adiponectin-AdipoR anti-diabetic signaling cascade. We demonstrate that reconstituted Luc activity can be detected in colonies or cells using a CCD camera and quantified in cell suspensions using a microplate reader. AdipoR1-APPL1 interaction occurs in absence of ligand but can be stimulated specifically by agonists such as adiponectin and the tobacco protein osmotin that was shown to have AdipoR-dependent adiponectin-like biological activity in mammalian cells. To further validate this assay, we have modeled the three dimensional structures of receptor-ligand complexes of membrane-embedded AdipoR1 with cyclic peptides derived from osmotin or osmotin-like plant proteins. We demonstrate that the calculated AdipoR1-peptide binding energies correlate with the peptides' ability to behave as AdipoR1 agonists in the split luciferase assay. Further, we demonstrate agonist-AdipoR dependent activation of protein kinase A (PKA) signaling and AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in S. cerevisiae, which are homologous to

  12. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Šuranská, Hana; Vránová, Dana; Omelková, Jiřina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir) were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic) wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines. PMID:26887243

  13. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    PubMed Central

    Šuranská, Hana; Vránová, Dana; Omelková, Jiřina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir) were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic) wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines. PMID:26887243

  14. Redesigning Aldolase Stereoselectivity by Homologous Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Henßen, Birgit; Metz, Alexander; Gohlke, Holger; Pietruszka, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The 2-deoxy-d-ribose-5-phosphate aldolase (DERA) offers access to highly desirable building blocks for organic synthesis by catalyzing a stereoselective C-C bond formation between acetaldehyde and certain electrophilic aldehydes. DERA´s potential is particularly highlighted by the ability to catalyze sequential, highly enantioselective aldol reactions. However, its synthetic use is limited by the absence of an enantiocomplementary enzyme. Here, we introduce the concept of homologous grafting to identify stereoselectivity-determining amino acid positions in DERA. We identified such positions by structural analysis of the homologous aldolases 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate aldolase (KDPG) and the enantiocomplementary enzyme 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogalactonate aldolase (KDPGal). Mutation of these positions led to a slightly inversed enantiopreference of both aldolases to the same extent. By transferring these sequence motifs onto DERA we achieved the intended change in enantioselectivity. PMID:27327271

  15. Homologous Pairing between Long DNA Double Helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Alexey K.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular recognition between two double stranded (ds) DNA with homologous sequences may not seem compatible with the B-DNA structure because the sequence information is hidden when it is used for joining the two strands. Nevertheless, it has to be invoked to account for various biological data. Using quantum chemistry, molecular mechanics, and hints from recent genetics experiments, I show here that direct recognition between homologous dsDNA is possible through the formation of short quadruplexes due to direct complementary hydrogen bonding of major-groove surfaces in parallel alignment. The constraints imposed by the predicted structures of the recognition units determine the mechanism of complexation between long dsDNA. This mechanism and concomitant predictions agree with the available experimental data and shed light upon the sequence effects and the possible involvement of topoisomerase II in the recognition.

  16. Redesigning Aldolase Stereoselectivity by Homologous Grafting.

    PubMed

    Bisterfeld, Carolin; Classen, Thomas; Küberl, Irene; Henßen, Birgit; Metz, Alexander; Gohlke, Holger; Pietruszka, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The 2-deoxy-d-ribose-5-phosphate aldolase (DERA) offers access to highly desirable building blocks for organic synthesis by catalyzing a stereoselective C-C bond formation between acetaldehyde and certain electrophilic aldehydes. DERA´s potential is particularly highlighted by the ability to catalyze sequential, highly enantioselective aldol reactions. However, its synthetic use is limited by the absence of an enantiocomplementary enzyme. Here, we introduce the concept of homologous grafting to identify stereoselectivity-determining amino acid positions in DERA. We identified such positions by structural analysis of the homologous aldolases 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate aldolase (KDPG) and the enantiocomplementary enzyme 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogalactonate aldolase (KDPGal). Mutation of these positions led to a slightly inversed enantiopreference of both aldolases to the same extent. By transferring these sequence motifs onto DERA we achieved the intended change in enantioselectivity. PMID:27327271

  17. Homologous Pairing between Long DNA Double Helices.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Alexey K

    2016-04-15

    Molecular recognition between two double stranded (ds) DNA with homologous sequences may not seem compatible with the B-DNA structure because the sequence information is hidden when it is used for joining the two strands. Nevertheless, it has to be invoked to account for various biological data. Using quantum chemistry, molecular mechanics, and hints from recent genetics experiments, I show here that direct recognition between homologous dsDNA is possible through the formation of short quadruplexes due to direct complementary hydrogen bonding of major-groove surfaces in parallel alignment. The constraints imposed by the predicted structures of the recognition units determine the mechanism of complexation between long dsDNA. This mechanism and concomitant predictions agree with the available experimental data and shed light upon the sequence effects and the possible involvement of topoisomerase II in the recognition. PMID:27127987

  18. Khovanov homology of graph-links

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Igor M

    2012-08-31

    Graph-links arise as the intersection graphs of turning chord diagrams of links. Speaking informally, graph-links provide a combinatorial description of links up to mutations. Many link invariants can be reformulated in the language of graph-links. Khovanov homology, a well-known and useful knot invariant, is defined for graph-links in this paper (in the case of the ground field of characteristic two). Bibliography: 14 titles.

  19. Homology and phylogeny and their automated inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuellen, Georg

    2008-06-01

    The analysis of the ever-increasing amount of biological and biomedical data can be pushed forward by comparing the data within and among species. For example, an integrative analysis of data from the genome sequencing projects for various species traces the evolution of the genomes and identifies conserved and innovative parts. Here, I review the foundations and advantages of this “historical” approach and evaluate recent attempts at automating such analyses. Biological data is comparable if a common origin exists (homology), as is the case for members of a gene family originating via duplication of an ancestral gene. If the family has relatives in other species, we can assume that the ancestral gene was present in the ancestral species from which all the other species evolved. In particular, describing the relationships among the duplicated biological sequences found in the various species is often possible by a phylogeny, which is more informative than homology statements. Detecting and elaborating on common origins may answer how certain biological sequences developed, and predict what sequences are in a particular species and what their function is. Such knowledge transfer from sequences in one species to the homologous sequences of the other is based on the principle of ‘my closest relative looks and behaves like I do’, often referred to as ‘guilt by association’. To enable knowledge transfer on a large scale, several automated ‘phylogenomics pipelines’ have been developed in recent years, and seven of these will be described and compared. Overall, the examples in this review demonstrate that homology and phylogeny analyses, done on a large (and automated) scale, can give insights into function in biology and biomedicine.

  20. COMPASS server for remote homology inference.

    PubMed

    Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Tang, Ming; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V

    2007-07-01

    COMPASS is a method for homology detection and local alignment construction based on the comparison of multiple sequence alignments (MSAs). The method derives numerical profiles from given MSAs, constructs local profile-profile alignments and analytically estimates E-values for the detected similarities. Until now, COMPASS was only available for download and local installation. Here, we present a new web server featuring the latest version of COMPASS, which provides (i) increased sensitivity and selectivity of homology detection; (ii) longer, more complete alignments; and (iii) faster computational speed. After submission of the query MSA or single sequence, the server performs searches versus a user-specified database. The server includes detailed and intuitive control of the search parameters. A flexible output format, structured similarly to BLAST and PSI-BLAST, provides an easy way to read and analyze the detected profile similarities. Brief help sections are available for all input parameters and output options, along with detailed documentation. To illustrate the value of this tool for protein structure-functional prediction, we present two examples of detecting distant homologs for uncharacterized protein families. Available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/compass. PMID:17517780

  1. Recombineering homologous recombination constructs in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Carreira-Rosario, Arnaldo; Scoggin, Shane; Shalaby, Nevine A; Williams, Nathan David; Hiesinger, P Robin; Buszczak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The continued development of techniques for fast, large-scale manipulation of endogenous gene loci will broaden the use of Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model organism for human-disease related research. Recent years have seen technical advancements like homologous recombination and recombineering. However, generating unequivocal null mutations or tagging endogenous proteins remains a substantial effort for most genes. Here, we describe and demonstrate techniques for using recombineering-based cloning methods to generate vectors that can be used to target and manipulate endogenous loci in vivo. Specifically, we have established a combination of three technologies: (1) BAC transgenesis/recombineering, (2) ends-out homologous recombination and (3) Gateway technology to provide a robust, efficient and flexible method for manipulating endogenous genomic loci. In this protocol, we provide step-by-step details about how to (1) design individual vectors, (2) how to clone large fragments of genomic DNA into the homologous recombination vector using gap repair, and (3) how to replace or tag genes of interest within these vectors using a second round of recombineering. Finally, we will also provide a protocol for how to mobilize these cassettes in vivo to generate a knockout, or a tagged gene via knock-in. These methods can easily be adopted for multiple targets in parallel and provide a means for manipulating the Drosophila genome in a timely and efficient manner. PMID:23893070

  2. Weak homological dimensions and biflat Koethe algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Pirkovskii, A Yu

    2008-06-30

    The homological properties of metrizable Koethe algebras {lambda}(P) are studied. A criterion for an algebra A={lambda}(P) to be biflat in terms of the Koethe set P is obtained, which implies, in particular, that for such algebras the properties of being biprojective, biflat, and flat on the left are equivalent to the surjectivity of the multiplication operator A otimes-hat A{yields}A. The weak homological dimensions (the weak global dimension w.dg and the weak bidimension w.db) of biflat Koethe algebras are calculated. Namely, it is shown that the conditions w.db {lambda}(P)<=1 and w.dg {lambda}(P)<=1 are equivalent to the nuclearity of {lambda}(P); and if {lambda}(P) is non-nuclear, then w.dg {lambda}(P)=w.db {lambda}(P)=2. It is established that the nuclearity of a biflat Koethe algebra {lambda}(P), under certain additional conditions on the Koethe set P, implies the stronger estimate db {lambda}(P), where db is the (projective) bidimension. On the other hand, an example is constructed of a nuclear biflat Koethe algebra {lambda}(P) such that db {lambda}(P)=2 (while w.db {lambda}(P)=1). Finally, it is shown that many biflat Koethe algebras, while not being amenable, have trivial Hochschild homology groups in positive degrees (with arbitrary coefficients). Bibliography: 37 titles.

  3. Biogenesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pheromone a-Factor, from Yeast Mating to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barrowman, Jemima

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The mating pheromone a-factor secreted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a farnesylated and carboxylmethylated peptide and is unusually hydrophobic compared to other extracellular signaling molecules. Mature a-factor is derived from a precursor with a C-terminal CAAX motif that directs a series of posttranslational reactions, including prenylation, endoproteolysis, and carboxylmethylation. Historically, a-factor has served as a valuable model for the discovery and functional analysis of CAAX-processing enzymes. In this review, we discuss the three modules comprising the a-factor biogenesis pathway: (i) the C-terminal CAAX-processing steps carried out by Ram1/Ram2, Ste24 or Rce1, and Ste14; (ii) two sequential N-terminal cleavage steps, mediated by Ste24 and Axl1; and (iii) export by a nonclassical mechanism, mediated by the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter Ste6. The small size and hydrophobicity of a-factor present both challenges and advantages for biochemical analysis, as discussed here. The enzymes involved in a-factor biogenesis are conserved from yeasts to mammals. Notably, studies of the zinc metalloprotease Ste24 in S. cerevisiae led to the discovery of its mammalian homolog ZMPSTE24, which cleaves the prenylated C-terminal tail of the nuclear scaffold protein lamin A. Mutations that alter ZMPSTE24 processing of lamin A in humans cause the premature-aging disease progeria and related progeroid disorders. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that the entire a-factor pathway, including all three biogenesis modules, may be used to produce a prenylated, secreted signaling molecule involved in germ cell migration in Drosophila. Thus, additional prenylated signaling molecules resembling a-factor, with as-yet-unknown roles in metazoan biology, may await discovery. PMID:22933563

  4. Size threshold for Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes: generation of telocentric chromosomes from an unstable minichromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Zakian, V A; Blanton, H M; Wetzel, L; Dani, G M

    1986-01-01

    A 9-kilobase pair CEN4 linear minichromosome constructed in vitro transformed Saccharomyces cerevisiae with high frequency but duplicated or segregated inefficiently in most cells. Stable transformants were only produced by events which fundamentally altered the structure of the minichromosome: elimination of telomeres, alteration of the centromere, or an increase of fivefold or greater in its size. Half of the stable transformants arose via homologous recombination between an intact chromosome IV and the CEN4 minichromosome. This event generated a new chromosome from each arm of chromosome IV. The other "arm" of each new chromosome was identical to one "arm" of the unstable minichromosome. Unlike natural yeast chromosomes, these new chromosomes were telocentric: their centromeres were either 3.9 or 5.4 kilobases from one end of the chromosome. The mitotic stability of the telocentric chromosome derived from the right arm of chromosome IV was determined by a visual assay and found to be comparable to that of natural yeast chromosomes. Both new chromosomes duplicated, paired, and segregated properly in meiosis. Moreover, their structure, as deduced from mobilities in orthogonal field gels, did not change with continued mitotic growth or after passage through meiosis, indicating that they did not give rise to isochromosomes or suffer large deletions or additions. Thus, in S. cerevisiae the close spacing of centromeres and telomeres on a DNA molecule of chromosomal size does not markedly alter the efficiency with which it is maintained. Taken together these data suggest that there is a size threshold below which stable propagation of linear chromosomes is no longer possible. Images PMID:3022139

  5. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Brian H; Hao, Linxuan; Smaldino, Philip J; Engelke, David R

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs) using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant "CelTag" DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies. PMID:26715090

  6. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Brian H.; Hao, Linxuan; Smaldino, Philip J.; Engelke, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs) using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant “CelTag” DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies. PMID:26715090

  7. Vestiges of Ent3p/Ent5p function in the giardial epsin homolog.

    PubMed

    Feliziani, Constanza; Valdez Taubas, Javier; Moyano, Sofía; Quassollo, Gonzalo; Poprawski, Joanna E; Wendland, Beverly; Touz, Maria C

    2016-04-01

    An accurate way to characterize the functional potential of a protein is to analyze recognized protein domains encoded by the genes in a given group. The epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain is an evolutionarily conserved protein module found primarily in proteins that participate in clathrin-mediated trafficking. In this work, we investigate the function of the single ENTH-containing protein from the protist Giardia lamblia by testing its function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This protein, named GlENTHp (for G. lamblia ENTH protein), is involved in Giardia in endocytosis and in protein trafficking from the ER to the vacuoles, fulfilling the function of the ENTH proteins epsin and epsinR, respectively. There are two orthologs of epsin, Ent1p and Ent2p, and two orthologs of epsinR, Ent3p and Ent5p in S. cerevisiae. Although the expression of GlENTHp neither complemented growth in the ent1Δent2Δ mutant nor restored the GFP-Cps1 vacuolar trafficking defect in ent3Δent5Δ, it interfered with the normal function of Ent3/5 in the wild-type strain. The phenotype observed is linked to a defect in Cps1 localization and α-factor mating pheromone maturation. The finding that GlENTHp acts as dominant negative epsinR in yeast cells reinforces the phylogenetic data showing that GlENTHp belongs to the epsinR subfamily present in eukaryotes prior to their evolution into different taxa. PMID:26851076

  8. Mutational analysis of mammalian poly(A) polymerase identifies a region for primer binding and catalytic domain, homologous to the family X polymerases, and to other nucleotidyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, G; Keller, W

    1996-01-01

    We have tested deletion and substitution mutants of bovine poly(A) polymerase, and have identified a small region that overlaps with a nuclear localization signal and binds to the RNA primer. Systematic mutagenesis of carboxylic amino acids led to the identification of three aspartates that are essential for catalysis. Sequence and secondary structure comparisons of regions surrounding these aspartates with sequences of other polymerases revealed a significant homology to the palm structure of DNA polymerase beta, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase and DNA polymerase IV of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, all members of the family X of polymerases. This homology extends as far as cca: tRNA nucleotidyltransferase and streptomycin adenylyltransferase, an antibiotic resistance factor. Images PMID:8665867

  9. Force Sensitivity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Flocculins

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cho X. J.; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Joseph, Ivor G.; Jackson, Desmond N.; Ramsook, Caleen B.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many fungal adhesins have short, β-aggregation-prone sequences that play important functional roles, and in the Candida albicans adhesin Als5p, these sequences cluster the adhesins after exposure to shear force. Here, we report that Saccharomyces cerevisiae flocculins Flo11p and Flo1p have similar β-aggregation-prone sequences and are similarly stimulated by shear force, despite being nonhomologous. Shear from vortex mixing induced the formation of small flocs in cells expressing either adhesin. After the addition of Ca2+, yeast cells from vortex-sheared populations showed greatly enhanced flocculation and displayed more pronounced thioflavin-bright surface nanodomains. At high concentrations, amyloidophilic dyes inhibited Flo1p- and Flo11p-mediated agar invasion and the shear-induced increase in flocculation. Consistent with these results, atomic force microscopy of Flo11p showed successive force-distance peaks characteristic of sequentially unfolding tandem repeat domains, like Flo1p and Als5p. Flo11p-expressing cells bound together through homophilic interactions with adhesion forces of up to 700 pN and rupture lengths of up to 600 nm. These results are consistent with the potentiation of yeast flocculation by shear-induced formation of high-avidity domains of clustered adhesins at the cell surface, similar to the activation of Candida albicans adhesin Als5p. Thus, yeast adhesins from three independent gene families use similar force-dependent interactions to drive cell adhesion. IMPORTANCE The Saccharomyces cerevisiae flocculins mediate the formation of cellular aggregates and biofilm-like mats, useful in clearing yeast from fermentations. An important property of fungal adhesion proteins, including flocculins, is the ability to form catch bonds, i.e., bonds that strengthen under tension. This strengthening is based, at least in part, on increased avidity of binding due to clustering of adhesins in cell surface nanodomains. This clustering depends

  10. Force Sensitivity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Flocculins.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cho X J; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Joseph, Ivor G; Jackson, Desmond N; Ramsook, Caleen B; Dufrêne, Yves F; Lipke, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    Many fungal adhesins have short, β-aggregation-prone sequences that play important functional roles, and in the Candida albicans adhesin Als5p, these sequences cluster the adhesins after exposure to shear force. Here, we report that Saccharomyces cerevisiae flocculins Flo11p and Flo1p have similar β-aggregation-prone sequences and are similarly stimulated by shear force, despite being nonhomologous. Shear from vortex mixing induced the formation of small flocs in cells expressing either adhesin. After the addition of Ca(2+), yeast cells from vortex-sheared populations showed greatly enhanced flocculation and displayed more pronounced thioflavin-bright surface nanodomains. At high concentrations, amyloidophilic dyes inhibited Flo1p- and Flo11p-mediated agar invasion and the shear-induced increase in flocculation. Consistent with these results, atomic force microscopy of Flo11p showed successive force-distance peaks characteristic of sequentially unfolding tandem repeat domains, like Flo1p and Als5p. Flo11p-expressing cells bound together through homophilic interactions with adhesion forces of up to 700 pN and rupture lengths of up to 600 nm. These results are consistent with the potentiation of yeast flocculation by shear-induced formation of high-avidity domains of clustered adhesins at the cell surface, similar to the activation of Candida albicans adhesin Als5p. Thus, yeast adhesins from three independent gene families use similar force-dependent interactions to drive cell adhesion. IMPORTANCE The Saccharomyces cerevisiae flocculins mediate the formation of cellular aggregates and biofilm-like mats, useful in clearing yeast from fermentations. An important property of fungal adhesion proteins, including flocculins, is the ability to form catch bonds, i.e., bonds that strengthen under tension. This strengthening is based, at least in part, on increased avidity of binding due to clustering of adhesins in cell surface nanodomains. This clustering depends on

  11. A bacterial amber suppressor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is selectively recognized by a bacterial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, H; Schimmel, P

    1990-01-01

    Little is known about the conservation of determinants for the identities of tRNAs between organisms. We showed previously that Escherichia coli tyrosine tRNA synthetase can charge the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial tyrosine tRNA in vivo, even though there are substantial sequence differences between the yeast mitochondrial and bacterial tRNAs. The S. cerevisiae cytoplasmic tyrosine tRNA differs in sequence from both its yeast mitochondrial and E. coli counterparts. To test whether the yeast cytoplasmic tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase recognizes the E. coli tRNA, we expressed various amounts of an E. coli tyrosine tRNA amber suppressor in S. cerevisiae. The bacterial tRNA did not suppress any of three yeast amber alleles, suggesting that the yeast enzymes retain high specificity in vivo for their homologous tRNAs. Moreover, the nucleotides in the sequence of the E. coli suppressor that are not shared with the yeast cytoplasmic tyrosine tRNA do not create determinants which are efficiently recognized by other yeast charging enzymes. Therefore, at least some of the determinants that influence in vivo recognition of the tyrosine tRNA are specific to the cell compartment and organism. In contrast, expression of the cognate bacterial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase together with the bacterial suppressor tRNA led to suppression of all three amber alleles. The bacterial enzyme recognized its substrate in vivo, even when the amount of bacterial tRNA was less than about 0.05% of that of the total cytoplasmic tRNA. Images PMID:1690848

  12. Effects of altered 5'-flanking sequences on the in vivo expression of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae tRNATyr gene.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, K J; Olson, M V

    1984-01-01

    Deletion mutations ending in the 5'-flanking sequences of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SUP4-o gene have been analyzed for their effects on gene expression. This ochre-suppressing tRNATyr gene was cloned into a S. cerevisiae centromeric plasmid, and its level of in vivo expression was monitored by observing the suppressor phenotype of the gene after transformation into S. cerevisiae. A deletion mutant that retains only four base pairs of the 5'-flanking sequence is profoundly deficient in expression; deletion mutants extending to positions -18, -17, -16, or -15 are moderately deficient; deletion mutants extending to positions -36 or -27 are slightly defective; and mutants retaining more than 60 base pairs of the original 5'-flanking DNA are expressed normally. In some cases, the cloning procedure led to the introduction of multiple BamHI linkers at the SUP4-o-vector fusion site, and in one instance, the resulting structure dramatically affects gene function: the presence of three linkers abutting a -18 deletion completely inhibits the in vivo expression of SUP4-o. In contrast, three linkers that abut a -77 deletion have no effect on in vivo expression. The template properties of these plasmids in a homologous in vitro transcription system parallel the levels of in vivo expression, suggesting that the mutations predominantly affect transcription. The data demonstrate that there are significant functional constraints on the 5'-flanking sequences of this RNA polymerase III-transcribed gene. The dramatic effects of the multiple linker insertion at position -18 suggest that there may be extensive melting of the DNA in this region during normal transcription initiation. Images PMID:6371493

  13. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of an autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) element functional in Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cannon, R D; Jenkinson, H F; Shepherd, M G

    1990-04-01

    An 8.6-kb fragment was isolated from an EcoRI digest of Candida albicans ATCC 10261 genomic DNA which conferred the property of autonomous replication in Saccharomyces cervisiae on the otherwise non-replicative plasmid pMK155 (5.6 kb). The DNA responsible for the replicative function was subcloned as a 1.2-kb fragment onto a non-replicative plasmid (pRC3915) containing the C. albicans URA3 and LEU2 genes to form plasmid pRC3920. This plasmid was capable of autonomous replication in both S. cerevisiae and C. albicans and transformed S. cerevisiae AH22 (leu2-) to Leu+ at a frequency of 2.15 x 10(3) transformants per microgram DNA, and transformed C. albicans SGY-243 (delta ura3) to Ura+ at a frequency of 1.91 x 10(3) transformants per microgram DNA. Sequence analysis of the cloned DNA revealed the presence of two identical regions of eleven base pairs (5'TTTTATGTTTT3') which agreed with the consensus of autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) cores functional in S. cerevisiae. In addition there were two 10/11 and numerous 9/11 matches to the core consensus. The two 11/11 matches to the consensus, CaARS1 and CaARS2, were located on opposite strands in a non-coding AT-rich region and were separated by 107 bp. Also present on the C. albicans DNA, 538 bp from the ARS cores, was a gene for 5S rRNA which showed sequence homology with several other yeast 5S rRNA genes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2196431

  14. RADOM, an efficient in vivo method for assembling designed DNA fragments up to 10 kb long in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiuhui; Jia, Bin; Mitchell, Leslie A; Luo, Jingchuan; Yang, Kun; Zeller, Karen I; Zhang, Wenqian; Xu, Zhuwei; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Bader, Joel S; Boeke, Jef D; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2015-03-20

    We describe rapid assembly of DNA overlapping multifragments (RADOM), an improved assembly method via homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which combines assembly in yeasto with blue/white screening in Escherichia coli. We show that RADOM can successfully assemble ∼3 and ∼10 kb DNA fragments that are highly similar to the yeast genome rapidly and accurately. This method was tested in the Build-A-Genome course by undergraduate students, where 125 ∼3 kb "minichunks" from the synthetic yeast genome project Sc2.0 were assembled. Here, 122 out of 125 minichunks achieved insertions with correct sizes, and 102 minichunks were sequenced verified. As this method reduces the time-consuming and labor-intensive efforts of yeast assembly by improving the screening efficiency for correct assemblies, it may find routine applications in the construction of DNA fragments, especially in hierarchical assembly projects. PMID:24895839

  15. HIP1, a human homologue of S. cerevisiae Sla2p, interacts with membrane-associated huntingtin in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kalchman, M A; Koide, H B; McCutcheon, K; Graham, R K; Nichol, K; Nishiyama, K; Kazemi-Esfarjani, P; Lynn, F C; Wellington, C; Metzler, M; Goldberg, Y P; Kanazawa, I; Gietz, R D; Hayden, M R

    1997-05-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is associated with the expansion of a polyglutamine tract, greater than 35 repeats, in the HD gene product, huntingtin. Here we describe a novel huntingtin interacting protein, HIP1, which co-localizes with huntingtin and shares sequence homology and biochemical characteristics with Sla2p, a protein essential for function of the cytoskeleton in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The huntingtin-HIP1 interaction is restricted to the brain and is inversely correlated to the polyglutamine length in huntingtin. This provides the first molecular link between huntingtin and the neuronal cytoskeleton and suggests that, in HD, loss of normal huntingtin-HIP1 interaction may contribute to a defect in membrane-cytoskeletal integrity in the brain. PMID:9140394

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of a Candida tsukubaensis alpha-glucosidase gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, B T; Larkin, A; Bolton, M; Cantwell, B A

    1991-07-01

    The molecular cloning of an alpha-glucosidase gene isolated from a Candida tsukubaensis (CBS 6389) genomic library in Saccharomyces cervisiae is reported. The cloned gene is contained within a 6.2 kb Sau3A DNA fragment and directs the synthesis and secretion of an amylolytic enzyme into the extracellular medium of the recombinant host, S. cerevisiae. The cloned enzyme was found to have an unusually broad substrate specificity and is capable of hydrolysing alpha-1,2, alpha-1,3, alpha-1,4 and alpha-1,6 linked, as well as aryl and alkyl, D-glucosides. On the basis of its substrate specificity profile, the cloned enzyme was classified as an alpha-glucosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.20). It has a pH optimum in the range 4.2-4.6, a temperature optimum of 58 degrees C and is readily inactivated at pasteurization temperature (60 degrees C). Southern blot analysis failed to reveal any homology between the cloned gene and genomic DNA isolated from other well characterized amylolytic yeasts. A rapid plate-assay, based on the utilization of a chromogenic substrate X-alpha-D-glucoside to detect the expression of the cloned alpha-glucosidase in S. cerevisiae transformants, was developed. PMID:1934116

  17. Las1 interacts with Grc3 polynucleotide kinase and is required for ribosome synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Christopher D.; Sardana, Richa; Dandekar, Varada; Borgianini, Victoria; Johnson, Arlen W.; Denicourt, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a multi-step process that couples cell growth with cell proliferation. Although several large-scale analysis of pre-ribosomal particles have identified numerous trans-acting factors involved in this process, many proteins involved in pre-rRNA processing and ribosomal subunit maturation have yet to be identified. Las1 was originally identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a protein involved in cell morphogenesis. We previously demonstrated that the human homolog, Las1L, is required for efficient ITS2 rRNA processing and synthesis of the 60S ribosomal subunit. Here, we report that the functions of Las1 in ribosome biogenesis are also conserved in S. cerevisiae. Depletion of Las1 led to the accumulation of both the 27S and 7S rRNA intermediates and impaired the synthesis of the 60S subunit. We show that Las1 co-precipitates mainly with the 27S rRNA and associates with an Nsa1 and Rix1-containing pre-60S particle. We further identify Grc3 as a major Las1-interacting protein. We demonstrate that the kinase activity of Grc3 is required for efficient pre-rRNA processing and that depletion of Grc3 leads to rRNA processing defects similar to the ones observed in Las1-depleted cells. We propose that Las1 and Grc3 function together in a conserved mechanism to modulate rRNA processing and eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis. PMID:23175604

  18. Cloning and sequencing of the Candida albicans homologue of SRB1/PSA1/VIG9, the essential gene encoding GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Warit, S; Walmsley, R M; Stateva, L I

    1998-09-01

    Two genomic fragments have been isolated from Candida albicans which strongly hybridize to SRB1/PSA1/VIG9, an essential gene which encodes GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A common 2.5 kb Xbal-Pstl fragment has been identified, which Southern analysis suggests is most likely unique in the C. albicans genome. The fragment contains an ORF, which is 82% identical and 90% homologous to the Srb1p/Psa1p/Vig9p from S. cerevisiae, contains one additional amino acid at position 254 and is able to functionally complement the major phenotypic characteristics of S. cerevisiae srb1 null and conditional mutations. The authors therefore conclude that they have cloned and sequenced from C. albicans the bona fide homologue of SRB1/PSA1/VIG9, named hereafter CaSRB1. Northern analysis data indicate that the gene is expressed in C. albicans under conditions of growth in the yeast and hyphal form and suggest that its expression might be regulated. PMID:9782489

  19. Rapid generation of long tandem DNA repeat arrays by homologous recombination in yeast to study their function in mammalian genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We describe here a method to rapidly convert any desirable DNA fragment, as small as 100 bp, into long tandem DNA arrays up to 140 kb in size that are inserted into a microbe vector. This method includes rolling-circle phi29 amplification (RCA) of the sequence in vitro and assembly of the RCA products in vivo by homologous recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The method was successfully used for a functional analysis of centromeric and pericentromeric repeats and construction of new vehicles for gene delivery to mammalian cells. The method may have general application in elucidating the role of tandem repeats in chromosome organization and dynamics. Each cycle of the protocol takes ~ two weeks to complete. PMID:21982381

  20. The Snf2 Homolog Fun30 Acts as a Homodimeric ATP-dependent Chromatin-remodeling Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Salma; Ryan, Daniel; Prochasson, Philippe; Owen-Hughes, Tom; Hassan, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fun30 (Function unknown now 30) protein shares homology with an extended family of Snf2-related ATPases. Here we report the purification of Fun30 principally as a homodimer with a molecular mass of about 250 kDa. Biochemical characterization of this complex reveals that it has ATPase activity stimulated by both DNA and chromatin. Consistent with this, it also binds to both DNA and chromatin. The Fun30 complex also exhibits activity in ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling assays. Interestingly, its activity in histone dimer exchange is high relative to the ability to reposition nucleosomes. Fun30 also possesses a weakly conserved CUE motif suggesting that it may interact specifically with ubiquitinylated proteins. However, in vitro Fun30 was found to have no specificity in its interaction with ubiquitinylated histones. PMID:20075079

  1. Studies of pH regulation by Btn1p, the yeast homolog of human Cln3p.

    PubMed

    Pearce, D A; Nosel, S A; Sherman, F

    1999-04-01

    Although the gene responsible for Batten disease, CLN3, was positionally cloned in 1995, the function of Cln3p and the molecular basis of the disease still remain elusive. We previously reported that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a homolog to Cln3p, designated Btn1p, and that the human Cln3p complemented the pH-dependent resistance to D-(-)-threo-2-amino-1-[p-nitrophenyl]-1, 3-propanediol in btn1-Delta yeast mutants. We have determined that yeast lacking Btn1p have an elevated ability to acidify media during growth that correlates with an elevated plasma membrane ATPase activity. Btn1p may be involved in maintaining pH homeostasis of yeast cells. PMID:10191121

  2. Stationary phase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Werner-Washburne, M; Braun, E; Johnston, G C; Singer, R A

    1993-01-01

    Growth and proliferation of microorganisms such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are controlled in part by the availability of nutrients. When proliferating yeast cells exhaust available nutrients, they enter a stationary phase characterized by cell cycle arrest and specific physiological, biochemical, and morphological changes. These changes include thickening of the cell wall, accumulation of reserve carbohydrates, and acquisition of thermotolerance. Recent characterization of mutant cells that are conditionally defective only for the resumption of proliferation from stationary phase provides evidence that stationary phase is a unique developmental state. Strains with mutations affecting entry into and survival during stationary phase have also been isolated, and the mutations have been shown to affect at least seven different cellular processes: (i) signal transduction, (ii) protein synthesis, (iii) protein N-terminal acetylation, (iv) protein turnover, (v) protein secretion, (vi) membrane biosynthesis, and (vii) cell polarity. The exact nature of the relationship between these processes and survival during stationary phase remains to be elucidated. We propose that cell cycle arrest coordinated with the ability to remain viable in the absence of additional nutrients provides a good operational definition of starvation-induced stationary phase. PMID:8393130

  3. Regulation of Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Waechter, Charles J.; Lester, Robert L.

    1971-01-01

    Evidence is presented which indicates that the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine by the methylation pathway in growing cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is repressed by the presence of choline in the growth medium. This result, obtained previously for glucose-grown cells, was also observed for lactate-grown cells, of which half of the phosphatidylcholine is mitochondrial. A respiration-deficient mutant of the parent wild-type strain has been studied, and its inability to form functional mitochondria cannot be due to an impaired methylation pathway, as it has been shown to incorporate 14C-CH3-methionine into all of the methylated glycerophosphatides. The incorporation rate is depressed by the inclusion of 1 mm choline in the growth medium, suggesting a regulatory effect similar to that demonstrated for the wild-type strain. The effects of choline on the glycerophospholipid composition of lactate and glucose-grown cells is presented. The repressive effects of the two related bases, mono- and dimethylethanolamine, were examined, and reduced levels of 14C-CH3-methionine incorporation were found for cells grown in the presence of these bases. The effect of choline on the methylation rates is reversible and glucosegrown cells regain the nonrepressed level of methylation activity in 60 to 80 min after removal of choline from the growth medium. Images PMID:5547992

  4. Inositol-Requiring Mutants of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Culbertson, Michael R.; Henry, Susan A.

    1975-01-01

    Fifty-two inositol-requiring mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated following mutagenesis with ethyl methanesulfonate. Complementation and tetrad analysis revealed ten major complementation classes, representing ten independently segregating loci (designated ino1 through ino10) which recombined freely with their respective centromeres. Members of any given complementation class segregated as alleles of a single locus. Thirteen complementation subclasses were identified among thirty-six mutants which behaved as alleles of the ino1 locus. The complementation map for these mutants was circular.—Dramatic cell viability losses indicative of unbalanced growth were observed in liquid cultures of representative mutants under conditions of inositol starvation. Investigation of the timing, kinetics, and extent of cell death revealed that losses in cell viability in the range of 2-4 log orders could be prevented by the addition of inositol to the medium or by disruption of protein synthesis with cycloheximide. Mutants defective in nine of the ten loci identified in this study displayed these unusual characteristics. The results suggest an important physiological role for inositol that may be related to its cellular localization and function in membrane phospholipids. The possibility is discussed that inositol deficiency initiates the process of unbalanced growth leading to cell death through the loss of normal assembly, function, or integrity of biomembranes.—Part of this work has been reported in preliminary form (Culbertson and Henry 1974). PMID:1093935

  5. The antifungal properties of a 2S albumin-homologous protein from passion fruit seeds involve plasma membrane permeabilization and ultrastructural alterations in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Agizzio, Ana Paula; Da Cunha, Maura; Carvalho, André O; Oliveira, Marco Antônio; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2006-10-01

    Different types of antimicrobial proteins were purified from plant seeds, including chitinases, β-1,3-glucanases, defensins, thionins, lipid transfer proteins and 2S albumins. It has become clear that these groups of proteins play an important role in the protection of plants from microbial infection. Recent results from our laboratory have shown that the defense-related proteins from passion fruit seeds, named Pf1 and Pf2 (which show sequence homology with 2S albumins), inhibit fungal growth and glucose-stimulated acidification of the medium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether 2S albumins from passion fruit seeds induce plasma membrane permeabilization and cause morphological alterations in yeast cells. Initially, we used an assay based on the uptake of SYTOX Green, an organic compound that fluoresces upon interaction with nucleic acids and penetrates cells with compromised plasma membranes, to investigate membrane permeabilization in S. cerevisiae cells. When viewed with a confocal laser microscope, S. cervisiae cells showed strong SYTOX Green fluorescence in the cytosol, especially in the nuclei. 2S albumins also inhibited glucose-stimulated acidification of the medium by S. cerevisiae cells, which indicates a probable impairment of fungal metabolism. The microscopical analysis of the yeast cells treated with 2S albumins demonstrated several morphological alterations in cell shape, cell surface, cell wall and bud formation, as well as in the organization of intracellular organelles. PMID:25193649

  6. Homologous Series of Liquid Crystalline Steroidal Lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Thiemann, T.; Vill, V.

    1997-03-01

    Steroids are an important source of chiral mesophases. The melting behavior and mesomorphic properties of homologous series of steroidal derivatives have been extracted from the literature, tabulated, and discussed. The tables provide the reader with an evaluated compilation of the type of mesophases found for the individual compounds, including their transition temperatures. Where the literature gives more than one set of data for a specific substance, one has been chosen as the main reference, but all alternatives are listed in the footnotes. The data can be used for statistical analysis to show the specific role of substructures within the steroidal framework. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital American Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society}

  7. Cloning, comparative mapping, and RNA expression of the mouse homologues of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleotide excision repair gene RAD23.

    PubMed

    van der Spek, P J; Visser, C E; Hanaoka, F; Smit, B; Hagemeijer, A; Bootsma, D; Hoeijmakers, J H

    1996-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD23 gene is involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). Two human homologs of RAD23, HHR23A and HHR23B (HGMW-approved symbols RAD23A and RAD23B), were previously isolated. The HHR23B protein is complexed with the protein defective in the cancer-prone repair syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group C, and is specifically involved in the global genome NER subpathway. The cloning of both mouse homologs (designated MHR23A and MHR23B) and detailed sequence comparison permitted the deduction of the following overall structure for all RAD23 homologs: an ubiquitin-like N-terminus followed by a strongly conserved 50-amino-acid domain that is repeated at the C-terminus. We also found this domain as a specific C-terminal extension of one of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, providing a second link with the ubiquitin pathway. By means of in situ hybridization, MHR23A was assigned to mouse chromosome 8C3 and MHR23B to 4B3. Because of the close chromosomal proximity of human XPC and HHR23B, the mouse XPC chromosomal location was determined (6D). Physical disconnection of the genes in mouse argues against a functional significance of the colocalization of these genes in human. Northern blot analysis revealed constitutive expression of both MHR23 genes in all tissues examined. Elevated RNA expression of both MHR23 genes was observed in testis. Although the RAD23 equivalents are well conserved during evolution, the mammalian genes did not express the UV-inducible phenotype of their yeast counterpart. This may point to a fundamental difference between the UV responses of yeast and human. No stage-specific mRNA expression during the cell cycle was observed for the mammalian RAD23 homologs. PMID:8808275

  8. Towards Alignment Independent Quantitative Assessment of Homology Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kliger, Yossef

    2006-01-01

    Identification of homologous proteins provides a basis for protein annotation. Sequence alignment tools reliably identify homologs sharing high sequence similarity. However, identification of homologs that share low sequence similarity remains a challenge. Lowering the cutoff value could enable the identification of diverged homologs, but also introduces numerous false hits. Methods are being continuously developed to minimize this problem. Estimation of the fraction of homologs in a set of protein alignments can help in the assessment and development of such methods, and provides the users with intuitive quantitative assessment of protein alignment results. Herein, we present a computational approach that estimates the amount of homologs in a set of protein pairs. The method requires a prevalent and detectable protein feature that is conserved between homologs. By analyzing the feature prevalence in a set of pairwise protein alignments, the method can estimate the number of homolog pairs in the set independently of the alignments' quality. Using the HomoloGene database as a standard of truth, we implemented this approach in a proteome-wide analysis. The results revealed that this approach, which is independent of the alignments themselves, works well for estimating the number of homologous proteins in a wide range of homology values. In summary, the presented method can accompany homology searches and method development, provides validation to search results, and allows tuning of tools and methods. PMID:17205117

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a nomadic yeast with no niche?

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Matthew R.; Greig, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Different species are usually thought to have specific adaptations, which allow them to occupy different ecological niches. But recent neutral ecology theory suggests that species diversity can simply be the result of random sampling, due to finite population sizes and limited dispersal. Neutral models predict that species are not necessarily adapted to specific niches, but are functionally equivalent across a range of habitats. Here, we evaluate the ecology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the most important microbial species in human history. The artificial collection, concentration and fermentation of large volumes of fruit for alcohol production produce an environment in which S. cerevisiae thrives, and therefore it is assumed that fruit is the ecological niche that S. cerevisiae inhabits and has adapted to. We find very little direct evidence that S. cerevisiae is adapted to fruit, or indeed to any other specific niche. We propose instead a neutral nomad model for S. cerevisiae, which we believe should be used as the starting hypothesis in attempting to unravel the ecology of this important microbe. PMID:25725024

  10. Efficient expression of a Paenibacillus barcinonensis endoglucanase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mormeneo, María; Pastor, Fi Javier; Zueco, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    The endoglucanase coded by celA (GenBank Access No. Y12512) from Paenibacillus barcinonensis, an enzyme with good characteristics for application on paper manufacture from agricultural fibers, was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using different domains of the cell wall protein Pir4 as translational fusion partners, to achieve either secretion or cell wall retention of the recombinant enzyme. Given the presence of five potential N-glycosylation sites in the amino acid sequence coded by celA, the effect of glycosylation on the enzymatic activity of the recombinant enzyme was investigated by expressing the recombinant fusion proteins in both, standard and glycosylation-deficient strains of S. cerevisiae. Correct targeting of the recombinant fusion proteins was confirmed by Western immunoblot using Pir-specific antibodies, while enzymatic activity on carboxymethyl cellulose was demonstrated on plate assays, zymographic analysis and colorimetric assays. Hyperglycosylation of the enzyme when expressed in the standard strain of S. cerevisiae did not affect activity, and values of 1.2 U/ml were obtained in growth medium supernatants in ordinary batch cultures after 24 h. These values compare quite favorably with those described for other recombinant endoglucanases expressed in S. cerevisiae. This is one of the few reports describing the expression of Bacillus cellulases in S. cerevisiae, since yeast expressed recombinant cellulases have been mostly of fungal origin. It is also the first report of the yeast expression of this particular endoglucanase. PMID:21701899

  11. Evolutionary engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient aerobic xylose consumption.

    PubMed

    Scalcinati, Gionata; Otero, José Manuel; Van Vleet, Jennifer R H; Jeffries, Thomas W; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Industrial biotechnology aims to develop robust microbial cell factories, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to produce an array of added value chemicals presently dominated by petrochemical processes. Xylose is the second most abundant monosaccharide after glucose and the most prevalent pentose sugar found in lignocelluloses. Significant research efforts have focused on the metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for fast and efficient xylose utilization. This study aims to metabolically engineer S. cerevisiae, such that it can consume xylose as the exclusive substrate while maximizing carbon flux to biomass production. Such a platform may then be enhanced with complementary metabolic engineering strategies that couple biomass production with high value-added chemical. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expressing xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulose kinase, from the native xylose-metabolizing yeast Pichia stipitis, was constructed, followed by a directed evolution strategy to improve xylose utilization rates. The resulting S. cerevisiae strain was capable of rapid growth and fast xylose consumption producing only biomass and negligible amount of byproducts. Transcriptional profiling of this strain was employed to further elucidate the observed physiology confirms a strongly up-regulated glyoxylate pathway enabling respiratory metabolism. The resulting strain is a desirable platform for the industrial production of biomass-related products using xylose as a sole carbon source. PMID:22487265

  12. Sgs1, a Homologue of the Bloom's and Werner's Syndrome Genes, Is Required for Maintenance of Genome Stability in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Watt, P. M.; Hickson, I. D.; Borts, R. H.; Louis, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SGS1 gene is homologous to Escherichia coli RecQ and the human BLM and WRN proteins that are defective in the cancer-prone disorder Bloom's syndrome and the premature aging disorder Werner's syndrome, respectively. While recQ mutants are deficient in conjugational recombination and DNA repair, Bloom's syndrome cell lines show hyperrecombination. Bloom's and Werner's syndrome cell lines both exhibit chromosomal instability. sgs1Δ strains show mitotic hyperrecombination, as do Bloom's cells. This was manifested as an increase in the frequency of interchromosomal homologous recombination, intrachromosomal excision recombination, and ectopic recombination. Hyperrecombination was partially independent of both RAD52 and RAD1. Meiotic recombination was not increased in sgs1Δ mutants, although meiosis I chromosome missegregation has been shown to be elevated. sgs1Δ suppresses the slow growth of a top3Δ strain lacking topoisomerase III. Although there was an increase in subtelomeric Y' instability in sgs1Δ strains due to hyperrecombination, no evidence was found for an increase in the instability of terminal telomeric sequences in a top3Δ or a sgs1Δ strain. This contrasts with the telomere maintenance defects of Werner's patients. We conclude that the SGS1 gene product is involved in the maintenance of genome stability in S. cerevisiae. PMID:8913739

  13. Two divergent MET10 genes, one from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and one from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, encode the alpha subunit of sulfite reductase and specify potential binding sites for FAD and NADPH.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, J; Cherest, H; Kielland-Brandt, M C

    1994-01-01

    The yeast assimilatory sulfate reductase is a complex enzyme that is responsible for conversion of sulfite into sulfide. To obtain information on the nature of this enzyme, we isolated and sequenced the MET10 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a divergent MET10 allele from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. The polypeptides deduced from the identically sized open reading frames (1,035 amino acids) of both MET10 genes have molecular masses of around 115 kDa and are 88% identical to each other. The transcript of S. cerevisiae MET10 has a size comparable to that of the open reading frame and is transcriptionally repressed by methionine in a way similar to that seen for other MET genes of S. cerevisiae. Distinct homology was found between the putative MET10-encoded polypeptide and flavin-interacting parts of the sulfite reductase flavoprotein subunit (encoded by cysJ) from Escherichia coli and several other flavoproteins. A significant N-terminal homology to pyruvate flavodoxin oxidoreductase (encoded by nifJ) from Klebsiella pneumoniae, together with a lack of obvious flavin mononucleotide-binding motifs in the MET10 deduced amino acid sequence, suggests that the yeast assimilatory sulfite reductase is a distinct type of sulfite reductase. Images PMID:7928966

  14. Srs2 and Mus81–Mms4 Prevent Accumulation of Toxic Inter-Homolog Recombination Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Keyamura, Kenji; Arai, Kota

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an evolutionally conserved mechanism that promotes genome stability through the faithful repair of double-strand breaks and single-strand gaps in DNA, and the recovery of stalled or collapsed replication forks. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATP-dependent DNA helicase Srs2 (a member of the highly conserved UvrD family of helicases) has multiple roles in regulating homologous recombination. A mutation (srs2K41A) resulting in a helicase-dead mutant of Srs2 was found to be lethal in diploid, but not in haploid, cells. In diploid cells, Srs2K41A caused the accumulation of inter-homolog joint molecule intermediates, increased the levels of spontaneous Rad52 foci, and induced gross chromosomal rearrangements. Srs2K41A lethality and accumulation of joint molecules were suppressed by inactivating Rad51 or deleting the Rad51-interaction domain of Srs2, whereas phosphorylation and sumoylation of Srs2 and its interaction with sumoylated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were not required for lethality. The structure-specific complex of crossover junction endonucleases Mus81 and Mms4 was also required for viability of diploid, but not haploid, SRS2 deletion mutants (srs2Δ), and diploid srs2Δ mus81Δ mutants accumulated joint molecule intermediates. Our data suggest that Srs2 and Mus81–Mms4 have critical roles in preventing the formation of (or in resolving) toxic inter-homolog joint molecules, which could otherwise interfere with chromosome segregation and lead to genetic instability. PMID:27390022

  15. SMT3A, a human homologue of the S. cerevisiae SMT3 gene, maps to chromosome 21qter and defines a novel gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenta, V.; Chiurazzi, P.; Van Der Spek, P.; Hanaoka, Fumio

    1997-03-01

    cDNA selection was used to isolate coding sequences from cosmids mapping to the gene-rich telomeric region of human chromosome 21q. A novel cDNA, termed SMT3A, was isolated and mapped between the loci PFKL and D21S171, about 2.2 Mb proximal to the telomere. The predicted protein of 103 amino acids appears to be a homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SMT3 protein, whose gene was previously isolated as a suppressor of mutations in the MIF2 gene. The yeast MIF2 gene encodes an essential centromeric protein and shows homology to mammalian CENP-C, an integral component of active kinetochores. SMT3A was found to be highly homologous to two other recently isolated human genes, suggesting the presence of a new gene family. Homologous sequences were also found in protozoa, metazoa, and plants. Moreover, all predicted proteins show significant homology to ubiquitin. The proposed role of yeast SMT3 as centromeric protein and the strong evolutionary conservation of the SMT3A gene suggest an involvement of the encoded protein in the function and/or structure of the eukaryotic kinetochore. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  16. SANSparallel: interactive homology search against Uniprot.

    PubMed

    Somervuo, Panu; Holm, Liisa

    2015-07-01

    Proteins evolve by mutations and natural selection. The network of sequence similarities is a rich source for mining homologous relationships that inform on protein structure and function. There are many servers available to browse the network of homology relationships but one has to wait up to a minute for results. The SANSparallel webserver provides protein sequence database searches with immediate response and professional alignment visualization by third-party software. The output is a list, pairwise alignment or stacked alignment of sequence-similar proteins from Uniprot, UniRef90/50, Swissprot or Protein Data Bank. The stacked alignments are viewed in Jalview or as sequence logos. The database search uses the suffix array neighborhood search (SANS) method, which has been re-implemented as a client-server, improved and parallelized. The method is extremely fast and as sensitive as BLAST above 50% sequence identity. Benchmarks show that the method is highly competitive compared to previously published fast database search programs: UBLAST, DIAMOND, LAST, LAMBDA, RAPSEARCH2 and BLAT. The web server can be accessed interactively or programmatically at http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/cgi-bin/sans/sans.cgi. It can be used to make protein functional annotation pipelines more efficient, and it is useful in interactive exploration of the detailed evidence supporting the annotation of particular proteins of interest. PMID:25855811

  17. Homology modelling of human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Domicevica, Laura; Biggin, Philip C

    2015-10-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that exports a huge range of compounds out of cells and is thus one of the key proteins in conferring multi-drug resistance in cancer. Understanding how it achieves such a broad specificity and the series of conformational changes that allow export to occur form major, on-going, research objectives around the world. Much of our knowledge to date has been derived from mutagenesis and assay data. However, in recent years, there has also been great progress in structural biology and although the structure of human P-gp has not yet been solved, there are now a handful of related structures on which homology models can be built to aid in the interpretation of the vast amount of experimental data that currently exists. Many models for P-gp have been built with this aim, but the situation is complicated by the apparent flexibility of the system and by the fact that although many potential templates exist, there is large variation in the conformational state in which they have been crystallized. In this review, we summarize how homology modelling has been used in the past, how models are typically selected and finally illustrate how MD simulations can be used as a means to give more confidence about models that have been generated via this approach. PMID:26517909

  18. SANSparallel: interactive homology search against Uniprot

    PubMed Central

    Somervuo, Panu; Holm, Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Proteins evolve by mutations and natural selection. The network of sequence similarities is a rich source for mining homologous relationships that inform on protein structure and function. There are many servers available to browse the network of homology relationships but one has to wait up to a minute for results. The SANSparallel webserver provides protein sequence database searches with immediate response and professional alignment visualization by third-party software. The output is a list, pairwise alignment or stacked alignment of sequence-similar proteins from Uniprot, UniRef90/50, Swissprot or Protein Data Bank. The stacked alignments are viewed in Jalview or as sequence logos. The database search uses the suffix array neighborhood search (SANS) method, which has been re-implemented as a client-server, improved and parallelized. The method is extremely fast and as sensitive as BLAST above 50% sequence identity. Benchmarks show that the method is highly competitive compared to previously published fast database search programs: UBLAST, DIAMOND, LAST, LAMBDA, RAPSEARCH2 and BLAT. The web server can be accessed interactively or programmatically at http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/cgi-bin/sans/sans.cgi. It can be used to make protein functional annotation pipelines more efficient, and it is useful in interactive exploration of the detailed evidence supporting the annotation of particular proteins of interest. PMID:25855811

  19. Towards Scalable Optimal Sequence Homology Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, Jeffrey A.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman

    2012-12-26

    Abstract—The field of bioinformatics and computational biol- ogy is experiencing a data revolution — experimental techniques to procure data have increased in throughput, improved in accuracy and reduced in costs. This has spurred an array of high profile sequencing and data generation projects. While the data repositories represent untapped reservoirs of rich information critical for scientific breakthroughs, the analytical software tools that are needed to analyze large volumes of such sequence data have significantly lagged behind in their capacity to scale. In this paper, we address homology detection, which is a funda- mental problem in large-scale sequence analysis with numerous applications. We present a scalable framework to conduct large- scale optimal homology detection on massively parallel super- computing platforms. Our approach employs distributed memory work stealing to effectively parallelize optimal pairwise alignment computation tasks. Results on 120,000 cores of the Hopper Cray XE6 supercomputer demonstrate strong scaling and up to 2.42 × 107 optimal pairwise sequence alignments computed per second (PSAPS), the highest reported in the literature.

  20. Protein Kinase Ymr291w/Tda1 Is Essential for Glucose Signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae on the Level of Hexokinase Isoenzyme ScHxk2 Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Kaps, Sonja; Kettner, Karina; Migotti, Rebekka; Kanashova, Tamara; Krause, Udo; Rödel, Gerhard; Dittmar, Gunnar; Kriegel, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme ScHxk2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a dual-function hexokinase that besides its catalytic role in glycolysis is involved in the transcriptional regulation of glucose-repressible genes. Relief from glucose repression is accompanied by the phosphorylation of the nuclear fraction of ScHxk2 at serine 15 and the translocation of the phosphoenzyme into the cytosol. Different studies suggest different serine/threonine protein kinases, Ymr291w/Tda1 or Snf1, to accomplish ScHxk2-S15 phosphorylation. The current paper provides evidence that Ymr291w/Tda1 is essential for that modification, whereas protein kinases Ydr477w/Snf1, Ynl307c/Mck1, Yfr014c/Cmk1, and Ykl126w/Ypk1, which are co-purified during Ymr291w/Tda1 tandem affinity purification, as well as protein kinase PKA and PKB homolog Sch9 are dispensable. Taking into account the detection of a significantly higher amount of the Ymr291w/Tda1 protein in cells grown in low-glucose media as compared with a high-glucose environment, Ymr291w/Tda1 is likely to contribute to glucose signaling in S. cerevisiae on the level of ScHxk2-S15 phosphorylation in a situation of limited external glucose availability. The evolutionary conservation of amino acid residue serine 15 in yeast hexokinases and its phosphorylation is illustrated by the finding that YMR291W/TDA1 of S. cerevisiae and the homologous KLLA0A09713 gene of Kluyveromyces lactis allow for cross-complementation of the respective protein kinase single-gene deletion strains. PMID:25593311

  1. Protein kinase Ymr291w/Tda1 is essential for glucose signaling in saccharomyces cerevisiae on the level of hexokinase isoenzyme ScHxk2 phosphorylation*.

    PubMed

    Kaps, Sonja; Kettner, Karina; Migotti, Rebekka; Kanashova, Tamara; Krause, Udo; Rödel, Gerhard; Dittmar, Gunnar; Kriegel, Thomas M

    2015-03-01

    The enzyme ScHxk2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a dual-function hexokinase that besides its catalytic role in glycolysis is involved in the transcriptional regulation of glucose-repressible genes. Relief from glucose repression is accompanied by the phosphorylation of the nuclear fraction of ScHxk2 at serine 15 and the translocation of the phosphoenzyme into the cytosol. Different studies suggest different serine/threonine protein kinases, Ymr291w/Tda1 or Snf1, to accomplish ScHxk2-S15 phosphorylation. The current paper provides evidence that Ymr291w/Tda1 is essential for that modification, whereas protein kinases Ydr477w/Snf1, Ynl307c/Mck1, Yfr014c/Cmk1, and Ykl126w/Ypk1, which are co-purified during Ymr291w/Tda1 tandem affinity purification, as well as protein kinase PKA and PKB homolog Sch9 are dispensable. Taking into account the detection of a significantly higher amount of the Ymr291w/Tda1 protein in cells grown in low-glucose media as compared with a high-glucose environment, Ymr291w/Tda1 is likely to contribute to glucose signaling in S. cerevisiae on the level of ScHxk2-S15 phosphorylation in a situation of limited external glucose availability. The evolutionary conservation of amino acid residue serine 15 in yeast hexokinases and its phosphorylation is illustrated by the finding that YMR291W/TDA1 of S. cerevisiae and the homologous KLLA0A09713 gene of Kluyveromyces lactis allow for cross-complementation of the respective protein kinase single-gene deletion strains. PMID:25593311

  2. Cloning and characterization of a second alpha-amylase gene (LKA2) from Lipomyces kononenkoae IGC4052B and its expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Eksteen, Jeremy M; Steyn, Andries J C; van Rensburg, Pierre; Cordero Otero, Ricardo R; Pretorius, Isak S

    2003-01-15

    Lipomyces kononenkoae secretes a battery of highly effective amylases (i.e. alpha-amylase, glucoamylase, isoamylase and cyclomaltodextrin glucanotransferase activities) and is therefore considered as one of the most efficient raw starch-degrading yeasts known. Previously, we have cloned and characterized genomic and cDNA copies of the LKA1 alpha-amylase gene from L. kononenkoae IGC4052B (CBS5608T) and expressed them in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here we report on the cloning and characterization of the genomic and cDNA copies of a second alpha-amylase gene (LKA2) from the same strain of L. kononenkoae. LKA2 was cloned initially as a 1663 bp cDNA harbouring an open reading frame (ORF) of 1496 nucleotides. Sequence analysis of LKA2 revealed that this ORF encodes a protein (Lka2p) of 499 amino acids, with a predicted molecular weight of 55,307 Da. The LKA2-encoded alpha-amylase showed significant homology to several bacterial cyclomaltodextrin glucanotransferases and also to the alpha-amylases of Aspergillus nidulans, Debaryomyces occidentalis, Saccharomycopsis fibuligera and Sz. pombe. When LKA2 was expressed under the control of the phosphoglycerate kinase gene promoter (PGK1(p)) in S. cerevisiae, it was found that the genomic copy contained a 55 bp intron that impaired the production of biologically active Lka2p in the heterologous host. In contrast to the genomic copy, the expression of the cDNA construct of PGK1p-LKA2 in S. cerevisiae resulted in the production of biologically active alpha-amylase. The LKA2-encoded alpha-amylase produced by S. cerevisiae exhibited a high specificity towards substrates containing alpha-1,4 glucosidic linkages. The optimum pH of Lka2p was found to be 3.5 and the optimum temperature was 60 degrees C. Besides LKA1, LKA2 is only the second L. kononenkoae gene ever cloned and expressed in S. cerevisiae. The cloning, characterization and co-expression of these two genes encoding these highly efficient alpha

  3. Prediction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication origins

    PubMed Central

    Breier, Adam M; Chatterji, Sourav; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R

    2004-01-01

    Background Autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs) function as replication origins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ARSs contain the 17 bp ARS consensus sequence (ACS), which binds the origin recognition complex. The yeast genome contains more than 10,000 ACS matches, but there are only a few hundred origins, and little flanking sequence similarity has been found. Thus, identification of origins by sequence alone has not been possible. Results We developed an algorithm, Oriscan, to predict yeast origins using similarity to 26 characterized origins. Oriscan used 268 bp of sequence, including the T-rich ACS and a 3' A-rich region. The predictions identified the exact location of the ACS. A total of 84 of the top 100 Oriscan predictions, and 56% of the top 350, matched known ARSs or replication protein binding sites. The true accuracy was even higher because we tested 25 discrepancies, and 15 were in fact ARSs. Thus, 94% of the top 100 predictions and an estimated 70% of the top 350 were correct. We compared the predictions to corresponding sequences in related Saccharomyces species and found that the ACSs of experimentally supported predictions show significant conservation. Conclusions The high accuracy of the predictions indicates that we have defined near-sufficient conditions for ARS activity, the A-rich region is a recognizable feature of ARS elements with a probable role in replication initiation, and nucleotide sequence is a reliable predictor of yeast origins. Oriscan detected most origins in the genome, demonstrating previously unrecognized generality in yeast replication origins and significant discriminatory power in the algorithm. PMID:15059255

  4. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  5. ERCC4 (XPF) encodes a human nucleotide excision repair protein with eukaryotic recombination homologs.

    PubMed

    Brookman, K W; Lamerdin, J E; Thelen, M P; Hwang, M; Reardon, J T; Sancar, A; Zhou, Z Q; Walter, C A; Parris, C N; Thompson, L H

    1996-11-01

    ERCC4 is an essential human gene in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, which is responsible for removing UV-C photoproducts and bulky adducts from DNA. Among the NER genes, ERCC4 and ERCC1 are also uniquely involved in removing DNA interstrand cross-linking damage. The ERCC1-ERCC4 heterodimer, like the homologous Rad10-Rad1 complex, was recently found to possess an endonucleolytic activity that incises on the 5' side of damage. The ERCC4 gene, assigned to chromosome 16p13.1-p13.2, was previously isolated by using a chromosome 16 cosmid library. It corrects the defect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutants of NER complementation group 4 and is implicated in complementation group F of the human disorder xeroderma pigmentosum. We describe the ERCC4 gene structure and functional cDNA sequence encoding a 916-amino-acid protein (104 kDa), which has substantial homology with the eukaryotic DNA repair and recombination proteins MEI-9 (Drosophila melanogaster), Rad16 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), and Rad1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). ERCC4 cDNA efficiently corrected mutants in rodent NER complementation groups 4 and 11, showing the equivalence of these groups, and ERCC4 protein levels were reduced in mutants of both groups. In cells of an XP-F patient, the ERCC4 protein level was reduced to less than 5%, consistent with XPF being the ERCC4 gene. The considerable identity (40%) between ERCC4 and MEI-9 suggests a possible involvement of ERCC4 in meiosis. In baboon tissues, ERCC4 was expressed weakly and was not significantly higher in testis than in nonmeiotic tissues. PMID:8887684

  6. The Arabidopsis COX11 Homolog is Essential for Cytochrome c Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Radin, Ivan; Mansilla, Natanael; Rödel, Gerhard; Steinebrunner, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Members of the ubiquitous COX11 (cytochrome c oxidase 11) protein family are involved in copper delivery to the COX complex. In this work, we characterize the Arabidopsis thaliana COX11 homolog (encoded by locus At1g02410). Western blot analyses and confocal microscopy identified Arabidopsis COX11 as an integral mitochondrial protein. Despite sharing high sequence and structural similarities, the Arabidopsis COX11 is not able to functionally replace the Saccharomyces cerevisiae COX11 homolog. Nevertheless, further analysis confirmed the hypothesis that Arabidopsis COX11 is essential for COX activity. Disturbance of COX11 expression through knockdown (KD) or overexpression (OE) affected COX activity. In KD lines, the activity was reduced by ~50%, resulting in root growth inhibition, smaller rosettes and leaf curling. In OE lines, the reduction was less pronounced (~80% of the wild type), still resulting in root growth inhibition. Additionally, pollen germination was impaired in COX11 KD and OE plants. This effect on pollen germination can only partially be attributed to COX deficiency and may indicate a possible auxiliary role of COX11 in ROS metabolism. In agreement with its role in energy production, the COX11 promoter is highly active in cells and tissues with high-energy demand for example shoot and root meristems, or vascular tissues of source and sink organs. In COX11 KD lines, the expression of the plasma-membrane copper transporter COPT2 and of several copper chaperones was altered, indicative of a retrograde signaling pathway pertinent to copper homeostasis. Based on our data, we postulate that COX11 is a mitochondrial chaperone, which plays an important role for plant growth and pollen germination as an essential COX complex assembly factor. PMID:26734017

  7. The Arabidopsis COX11 Homolog is Essential for Cytochrome c Oxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Radin, Ivan; Mansilla, Natanael; Rödel, Gerhard; Steinebrunner, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Members of the ubiquitous COX11 (cytochrome c oxidase 11) protein family are involved in copper delivery to the COX complex. In this work, we characterize the Arabidopsis thaliana COX11 homolog (encoded by locus At1g02410). Western blot analyses and confocal microscopy identified Arabidopsis COX11 as an integral mitochondrial protein. Despite sharing high sequence and structural similarities, the Arabidopsis COX11 is not able to functionally replace the Saccharomyces cerevisiae COX11 homolog. Nevertheless, further analysis confirmed the hypothesis that Arabidopsis COX11 is essential for COX activity. Disturbance of COX11 expression through knockdown (KD) or overexpression (OE) affected COX activity. In KD lines, the activity was reduced by ~50%, resulting in root growth inhibition, smaller rosettes and leaf curling. In OE lines, the reduction was less pronounced (~80% of the wild type), still resulting in root growth inhibition. Additionally, pollen germination was impaired in COX11 KD and OE plants. This effect on pollen germination can only partially be attributed to COX deficiency and may indicate a possible auxiliary role of COX11 in ROS metabolism. In agreement with its role in energy production, the COX11 promoter is highly active in cells and tissues with high-energy demand for example shoot and root meristems, or vascular tissues of source and sink organs. In COX11 KD lines, the expression of the plasma-membrane copper transporter COPT2 and of several copper chaperones was altered, indicative of a retrograde signaling pathway pertinent to copper homeostasis. Based on our data, we postulate that COX11 is a mitochondrial chaperone, which plays an important role for plant growth and pollen germination as an essential COX complex assembly factor. PMID:26734017

  8. Homologous Recombination—Experimental Systems, Analysis and Significance

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination is the most complex of all recombination events that shape genomes and produce material for evolution. Homologous recombination events are exchanges between DNA molecules in the lengthy regions of shared identity, catalyzed by a group of dedicated enzymes. There is a variety of experimental systems in E. coli and Salmonella to detect homologous recombination events of several different kinds. Genetic analysis of homologous recombination reveals three separate phases of this process: pre-synapsis (the early phase), synapsis (homologous strand exchange) and post-synapsis (the late phase). In E. coli, there are at least two independent pathway of the early phase and at least two independent pathways of the late phase. All this complexity is incongruent with the originally ascribed role of homologous recombination as accelerator of genome evolution: there is simply not enough duplication and repetition in enterobacterial genomes for homologous recombination to have a detectable evolutionary role, and therefore not enough selection to maintain such a complexity. At the same time, the mechanisms of homologous recombination are uniquely suited for repair of complex DNA lesions called chromosomal lesions. In fact, the two major classes of chromosomal lesions are recognized and processed by the two individual pathways at the early phase of homologous recombination. It follows, therefore, that homologous recombination events are occasional reflections of the continual recombinational repair, made possible in cases of natural or artificial genome redundancy. PMID:26442506

  9. Analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome with PeptideAtlas

    PubMed Central

    King, Nichole L; Deutsch, Eric W; Ranish, Jeffrey A; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Eddes, James S; Mallick, Parag; Eng, Jimmy; Desiere, Frank; Flory, Mark; Martin, Daniel B; Kim, Bong; Lee, Hookeun; Raught, Brian; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2006-01-01

    We present the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PeptideAtlas composed from 47 diverse experiments and 4.9 million tandem mass spectra. The observed peptides align to 61% of Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) open reading frames (ORFs), 49% of the uncharacterized SGD ORFs, 54% of S. cerevisiae ORFs with a Gene Ontology annotation of 'molecular function unknown', and 76% of ORFs with Gene names. We highlight the use of this resource for data mining, construction of high quality lists for targeted proteomics, validation of proteins, and software development. PMID:17101051

  10. Heterozygous screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies dosage-sensitive genes that affect chromosome stability.

    PubMed

    Strome, Erin D; Wu, Xiaowei; Kimmel, Marek; Plon, Sharon E

    2008-03-01

    Current techniques for identifying mutations that convey a small increased cancer risk or those that modify cancer risk in carriers of highly penetrant mutations are limited by the statistical power of epidemiologic studies, which require screening of large populations and candidate genes. To identify dosage-sensitive genes that mediate genomic stability, we performed a genomewide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for heterozygous mutations that increase chromosome instability in a checkpoint-deficient diploid strain. We used two genome stability assays sensitive enough to detect the impact of heterozygous mutations and identified 172 heterozygous gene disruptions that affected chromosome fragment (CF) loss, 45% of which also conferred modest but statistically significant instability of endogenous chromosomes. Analysis of heterozygous deletion of 65 of these genes demonstrated that the majority increased genomic instability in both checkpoint-deficient and wild-type backgrounds. Strains heterozygous for COMA kinetochore complex genes were particularly unstable. Over 50% of the genes identified in this screen have putative human homologs, including CHEK2, ERCC4, and TOPBP1, which are already associated with inherited cancer susceptibility. These findings encourage the incorporation of this orthologous gene list into cancer epidemiology studies and suggest further analysis of heterozygous phenotypes in yeast as models of human disease resulting from haplo-insufficiency. PMID:18245329

  11. High-throughput profiling of amino acids in strains of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion collection.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Sara J; Finney, Gregory L; Brown, Shauna L; Nelson, Sven K; Hesselberth, Jay; MacCoss, Michael J; Fields, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    The measurement of small molecule metabolites on a large scale offers the opportunity for a more complete understanding of cellular metabolism. We developed a high-throughput method to quantify primary amine-containing metabolites in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the use of capillary electrophoresis in combination with fluorescent derivatization of cell extracts. We measured amino acid levels in the yeast deletion collection, a set of approximately 5000 strains each lacking a single gene, and developed a computational pipeline for data analysis. Amino acid peak assignments were validated by mass spectrometry, and the overall approach was validated by the result that expected pathway intermediates accumulate in mutants of the arginine biosynthetic pathway. Global analysis of the deletion collection was carried out using clustering methods. We grouped strains based on their metabolite profiles, revealing clusters of mutants enriched for genes encoding mitochondrial proteins, urea cycle enzymes, and vacuolar ATPase functions. One of the most striking profiles, common among several strains lacking ribosomal protein genes, accumulated lysine and a lysine-related metabolite. Mutations in the homologous ribosomal protein genes in the human result in Diamond-Blackfan anemia, demonstrating that metabolite data may have potential value in understanding disease pathology. This approach establishes metabolite profiling as capable of characterizing genes in a large collection of genetic variants. PMID:20610602

  12. A DNA helicase required for maintenance of the functional mitochondrial genome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sedman, T; Kuusk, S; Kivi, S; Sedman, J

    2000-03-01

    A novel DNA helicase, a homolog of several prokaryotic helicases, including Escherichia coli Rep and UvrD proteins, is encoded by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear genome open reading frame YOL095c on the chromosome XV. Our data demonstrate that the helicase is localized in the yeast mitochondria and is loosely associated with the mitochondrial inner membrane during biochemical fractionation. The sequence of the C-terminal end of the 80-kDa helicase protein is similar to a typical N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signal; deletions and point mutations in this region abolish transport of the protein into mitochondria. The C-terminal signal sequence of the helicase targets a heterologous carrier protein into mitochondria in vivo. The purified recombinant protein can unwind duplex DNA molecules in an ATP-dependent manner. The helicase is required for the maintenance of the functional ([rho(+)]) mitochondrial genome on both fermentable and nonfermentable carbon sources. However, the helicase is not essential for the maintenance of several defective ([rho(-)]) mitochondrial genomes. We also demonstrate that the helicase is not required for transcription in mitochondria. PMID:10669756

  13. A DNA Helicase Required for Maintenance of the Functional Mitochondrial Genome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sedman, Tiina; Kuusk, Silja; Kivi, Sirje; Sedman, Juhan

    2000-01-01

    A novel DNA helicase, a homolog of several prokaryotic helicases, including Escherichia coli Rep and UvrD proteins, is encoded by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear genome open reading frame YOL095c on the chromosome XV. Our data demonstrate that the helicase is localized in the yeast mitochondria and is loosely associated with the mitochondrial inner membrane during biochemical fractionation. The sequence of the C-terminal end of the 80-kDa helicase protein is similar to a typical N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signal; deletions and point mutations in this region abolish transport of the protein into mitochondria. The C-terminal signal sequence of the helicase targets a heterologous carrier protein into mitochondria in vivo. The purified recombinant protein can unwind duplex DNA molecules in an ATP-dependent manner. The helicase is required for the maintenance of the functional ([rho+]) mitochondrial genome on both fermentable and nonfermentable carbon sources. However, the helicase is not essential for the maintenance of several defective ([rho−]) mitochondrial genomes. We also demonstrate that the helicase is not required for transcription in mitochondria. PMID:10669756

  14. Mutations in RCA1 and AFG3 inhibit F1-ATPase assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Paul, M F; Tzagoloff, A

    1995-10-01

    The RCA1 (YTA12) and AFG3 (YTA10) genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae code for homologous mitochondrial proteins that belong to the recently described AAA protein-family [Kunau et al. (1993) Biochimie 75,209-224]. Mutations in either gene have been shown to induce a respiratory defect. In the case of rca1 mutants this phenotype has been ascribed to defective assembly of cytochrome oxidase and ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase. In the present study we show that the respiratory defect of afg3 mutants, like that of rca1 mutants, is also caused by an arrest in assembly of cytochrome oxidase and ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase. In addition to the absence of the respiratory complexes, rca1 and afg3 mutants exhibit reduced mitochondrial ATPase activity. As a first step to an understanding of the biochemical basis for the ATPase defect we have examined the assembly of the F1 and F0 constituents of the ATPase complex. We present evidence that the ATPase lesion stems at least in part from the failure of rca1 and afg3 mutants to assemble F1. Although the mutants also display lower steady-state concentrations of some F0 subunits, this could be a secondary effect of defective F1 assembly. PMID:7589436

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae STE6 gene product: a novel pathway for protein export in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuchler, K; Sterne, R E; Thorner, J

    1989-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae MATa cells release a lipopeptide mating pheromone, a-factor. Radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation show that MATa ste6 mutants produce pro-a-factor and mature a-factor intracellularly, but little or no extracellular pheromone. Normal MATa cells carrying a multicopy plasmid containing both MFa1 (pro-a-factor structural gene) and the STE6 gene secrete a-factor at least five times faster than the same cells carrying only MFa1 in the same vector. The nucleotide sequence of the STE6 gene predicts a 1290 residue polypeptide with multiple membrane spanning segments and two hydrophilic domains, each strikingly homologous to a set of well-characterized prokaryotic permeases (including hlyB, oppD, hisP, malK and pstB) and sharing even greater identity with mammalian mdr (multiple drug resistance) transporters. These results suggest that the STE6 protein in yeast, and possibly mdr in animals, is a transmembrane translocator that exports polypeptides by a route independent of the classical secretory pathway. Images PMID:2686977

  16. Functional overlap between conserved and diverged KH domains in Saccharomyces cerevisiae SCP160

    PubMed Central

    Brykailo, Melissa A.; Corbett, Anita H.; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2007-01-01

    The K homology (KH) domain is a remarkably versatile and highly conserved RNA-binding motif. Classical KH domains include a characteristic pattern of hydrophobic residues, a Gly-X-X-Gly (GXXG) segment, and a variable loop. KH domains typically occur in clusters, with some retaining their GXXG sequence (conserved), while others do not (diverged). As a first step towards addressing whether GXXG is essential for KH-domain function, we explored the roles of conserved and diverged KH domains in Scp160p, a multiple-KH-domain-containing protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We specifically wanted to know (1) whether diverged KH domains were essential for Scp160p function, and (2) whether diverged KH domains could functionally replace conserved KH domains. To address these questions, we deleted and/or interchanged conserved and diverged KH domains of Scp160p and expressed the mutated alleles in yeast. Our results demonstrated that the answer to each question was yes. Both conserved and diverged KH domains are essential for Scp160p function, and diverged KH domains can function in place of conserved KH domains. These findings challenge the prevailing notions about the requisite features of a KH domain and raise the possibility that there may be more functional KH domains in the proteome than previously appreciated. PMID:17264125

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleolar protein Nop7p is necessary for biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Cynthia C; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Roman, Judibelle; Harnpicharnchai, Piyanun; Woolford, John L

    2002-01-01

    To identify new gene products that participate in ribosome biogenesis, we carried out a screen for mutations that result in lethality in combination with mutations in DRS1, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleolar DEAD-box protein required for synthesis of 60S ribosomal subunits. We identified the gene NOP7that encodes an essential protein. The temperature-sensitive nop7-1 mutation or metabolic depletion of Nop7p results in a deficiency of 60S ribosomal subunits and accumulation of halfmer polyribosomes. Analysis of pre-rRNA processing indicates that nop7 mutants exhibit a delay in processing of 27S pre-rRNA to mature 25S rRNA and decreased accumulation of 25S rRNA. Thus Nop7p, like Drs1p, is required for essential steps leading to synthesis of 60S ribosomal subunits. In addition, inactivation or depletion of Nop7p also affects processing at the A0, A1, and A2 sites, which may result from the association of Nop7p with 35S pre-rRNA in 90S pre-rRNPs. Nop7p is localized primarily in the nucleolus, where most steps in ribosome assembly occur. Nop7p is homologous to the zebrafish pescadillo protein necessary for embryonic development. The Nop7 protein contains the BRCT motif, a protein-protein interaction domain through which, for example, the human BRCA1 protein interacts with RNA helicase A. PMID:11911362

  18. Replication protein A is required for meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Soustelle, Christine; Vedel, Michèle; Kolodner, Richard; Nicolas, Alain

    2002-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, meiotic recombination is initiated by transient DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs). These DSBs undergo a 5' --> 3' resection to produce 3' single-stranded DNA ends that serve to channel DSBs into the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway. In vitro studies strongly suggest that several proteins of this pathway--Rad51, Rad52, Rad54, Rad55, Rad57, and replication protein A (RPA)--play a role in the strand exchange reaction. Here, we report a study of the meiotic phenotypes conferred by two missense mutations affecting the largest subunit of RPA, which are localized in the protein interaction domain (rfa1-t11) and in the DNA-binding domain (rfa1-t48). We find that both mutant diploids exhibit reduced sporulation efficiency, very poor spore viability, and a 10- to 100-fold decrease in meiotic recombination. Physical analyses indicate that both mutants form normal levels of meiosis-specific DSBs and that the broken ends are processed into 3'-OH single-stranded tails, indicating that the RPA complex present in these rfa1 mutants is functional in the initial steps of meiotic recombination. However, the 5' ends of the broken fragments undergo extensive resection, similar to what is observed in rad51, rad52, rad55, and rad57 mutants, indicating that these RPA mutants are defective in the repair of the Spo11-dependent DSBs that initiate homologous recombination during meiosis. PMID:12072452

  19. NP24 induces apoptosis dependent on caspase-like activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Naoki; Ito, Yasuhiro; Kato, Jun; Ogihara, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2016-06-01

    Tomato NP24 is a homolog of osmotin, a PR-5 protein from tobacco that can initiate apoptosis in yeast via PHO36 in the plasma membrane. We cloned and sequenced NP24 from tomato cv. Momotaro. Based on phylogenetic analysis, NP24 from Momotaro belonged to the Solanaceae clade. The amino acid sequence was identical to that of cv. Ailsa Craig including signal peptide, but the residues predicted to interact with the adiponectin receptor, ADIPOR, were slightly different from osmotin. Recombinant NP24 (rNP24) was expressed in a reductase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli as host cell, and purified from cell extract by affinity chromatography. Purified rNP24 significantly inhibited growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type spheroplasts. In contrast, growth of PHO36 deletion mutant (ΔIzh2) spheroplasts was not inhibited. Moreover, rNP24 induced significant activity of reactive oxygen species, caspase-like activity, and also nuclear fragmentation in wild-type spheroplast cells. These results demonstrated that rNP24 from Momotaro greatly influenced cell viability due to triggering apoptosis through PHO36. Notably, apoptosis induced by NP24 was caspase-like protease dependent. PMID:26589784

  20. Mechanistic Details of Glutathione Biosynthesis Revealed by Crystal Structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glutamate Cysteine Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-12-01

    Glutathione is a thiol-disulfide exchange peptide critical for buffering oxidative or chemical stress, and an essential cofactor in several biosynthesis and detoxification pathways. The rate-limiting step in its de novo biosynthesis is catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase, a broadly expressed enzyme for which limited structural information is available in higher eukaryotic species. Structural data are critical to the understanding of clinical glutathione deficiency, as well as rational design of enzyme modulators that could impact human disease progression. Here, we have determined the structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate cysteine ligase (ScGCL) in the presence of glutamate and MgCl{sub 2} (2.1 {angstrom}; R = 18.2%, R{sub free} = 21.9%), and in complex with glutamate, MgCl{sub 2}, and ADP (2.7 {angstrom}; R = 19.0%, R{sub free} = 24.2%). Inspection of these structures reveals an unusual binding pocket for the {alpha}-carboxylate of the glutamate substrate and an ATP-independent Mg{sup 2+} coordination site, clarifying the Mg{sup 2+} dependence of the enzymatic reaction. The ScGCL structures were further used to generate a credible homology model of the catalytic subunit of human glutamate cysteine ligase (hGCLC). Examination of the hGCLC model suggests that post-translational modifications of cysteine residues may be involved in the regulation of enzymatic activity, and elucidates the molecular basis of glutathione deficiency associated with patient hGCLC mutations.

  1. A search in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for genes regulated via stress response elements.

    PubMed

    Moskvina, E; Schüller, C; Maurer, C T; Mager, W H; Ruis, H

    1998-08-01

    Stress response elements (STREs, core consensus AG4 or C4T) have been demonstrated previously to occur in the upstream region of a number of genes responsive to induction by a variety of stress signals. This stress response is mediated by the homologous transcription factors Msn2p and Msn4p, which bind specifically to STREs. Double mutants (msn2 msn4) deficient in these transcription factors have been shown to be hypersensitive to severe stress conditions. To obtain a more representative overview of the set of yeast genes controlled via this regulon, a computer search of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome was carried out for genes, which, similar to most known STRE-controlled genes, exhibit at least two STREs in their upstream region. In addition to the great majority of genes previously known to be controlled via STREs, 69 open reading-frames were detected. Expression patterns of a set of these were examined by grid filter hybridization, and 14 genes were examined by Northern analysis. Comparison of the expression patterns of these genes demonstrates that they are all STRE-controlled although their detailed expression patterns differ considerably. PMID:9730283

  2. Polypeptide binding specificities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae oligosaccharyltransferase accessory proteins Ost3p and Ost6p.

    PubMed

    Jamaluddin, M Fairuz B; Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Tan, Nikki Y J; Stark, Anthony P; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2011-05-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation is a common and vital co- and post-translocational modification of diverse secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes that is catalyzed by the multiprotein complex oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase). Two isoforms of OTase are present in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defined by the presence of either of the homologous proteins Ost3p or Ost6p, which possess different protein substrate specificities at the level of individual glycosylation sites. Here we present in vitro characterization of the polypeptide binding activity of these two subunits of the yeast enzyme, and show that the peptide-binding grooves in these proteins can transiently bind stretches of polypeptide with amino acid characteristics complementary to the characteristics of the grooves. We show that Ost6p, which has a peptide-binding groove with a strongly hydrophobic base lined by neutral and basic residues, binds peptides enriched in hydrophobic and acidic amino acids. Further, by introducing basic residues in place of the wild type neutral residues lining the peptide-binding groove of Ost3p, we engineer binding of a hydrophobic and acidic peptide. Our data supports a model of Ost3/6p function in which they transiently bind stretches of nascent polypeptide substrate to inhibit protein folding, thereby increasing glycosylation efficiency at nearby asparagine residues. PMID:21384453

  3. Polypeptide binding specificities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae oligosaccharyltransferase accessory proteins Ost3p and Ost6p

    PubMed Central

    Jamaluddin, M Fairuz B; Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Tan, Nikki YJ; Stark, Anthony P; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2011-01-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation is a common and vital co- and post-translocational modification of diverse secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes that is catalyzed by the multiprotein complex oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase). Two isoforms of OTase are present in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defined by the presence of either of the homologous proteins Ost3p or Ost6p, which possess different protein substrate specificities at the level of individual glycosylation sites. Here we present in vitro characterization of the polypeptide binding activity of these two subunits of the yeast enzyme, and show that the peptide-binding grooves in these proteins can transiently bind stretches of polypeptide with amino acid characteristics complementary to the characteristics of the grooves. We show that Ost6p, which has a peptide-binding groove with a strongly hydrophobic base lined by neutral and basic residues, binds peptides enriched in hydrophobic and acidic amino acids. Further, by introducing basic residues in place of the wild type neutral residues lining the peptide-binding groove of Ost3p, we engineer binding of a hydrophobic and acidic peptide. Our data supports a model of Ost3/6p function in which they transiently bind stretches of nascent polypeptide substrate to inhibit protein folding, thereby increasing glycosylation efficiency at nearby asparagine residues. PMID:21384453

  4. Homologies among Coniferophyte cones: further observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauvogel-Stamm, Léa; Galtier, Jean

    1998-04-01

    A reinvestigation of the Triassic conifer pollen cone of Darneya shows evidence that clusters of pollen sacs are attached (adnate), at regular intervals, to the upper side of the stalk and that the distribution of stomata is restricted to the apical part of the abaxial side of the peltate scale. These features and others, such as the commissure visible on the stalk and the scale, suggest a dual nature of the male scale complex of Darneya which therefore is interpreted as an abaxial bract fused with an adaxial fertile shoot bearing several clusters of pollen sacs. This conifer pollen cone is thus considered as a compound strobilus (inflorescence) homologous with the female cone of the conifers and therefore with the cones, both male and female, of the cordaites.

  5. HOMOLOGOUS CYCLONES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xinting; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Zhang, Yuzong; Yang, Shuhong E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn

    2014-02-20

    Through observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, we tracked one rotating network magnetic field (RNF) near the solar equator. It lasted for more than 100 hr, from 2013 February 23 to 28. During its evolution, three cyclones were found to be rooted in this structure. Each cyclone event lasted for about 8 to 10 hr. While near the polar region, another RNF was investigated. It lasted for a shorter time (∼70 hr), from 2013 July 7 to 9. There were two cyclones rooted in the RNF and each lasted for 8 and 11 hr, respectively. For the two given examples, the cyclones have a similar dynamic evolution, and thus we put forward a new term: homologous cyclones. The detected brightening in AIA 171 Å maps indicates the release of energy, which is potentially available to heat the corona.

  6. Chatter detection in turning using persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasawneh, Firas A.; Munch, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a new approach for ascertaining the stability of stochastic dynamical systems in their parameter space by examining their time series using topological data analysis (TDA). We illustrate the approach using a nonlinear delayed model that describes the tool oscillations due to self-excited vibrations in turning. Each time series is generated using the Euler-Maruyama method and a corresponding point cloud is obtained using the Takens embedding. The point cloud can then be analyzed using a tool from TDA known as persistent homology. The results of this study show that the described approach can be used for analyzing datasets of delay dynamical systems generated both from numerical simulation and experimental data. The contributions of this paper include presenting for the first time a topological approach for investigating the stability of a class of nonlinear stochastic delay equations, and introducing a new application of TDA to machining processes.

  7. CIRCULAR RIBBON FLARES AND HOMOLOGOUS JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haimin; Liu Chang

    2012-12-01

    Solar flare emissions in the chromosphere often appear as elongated ribbons on both sides of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), which has been regarded as evidence of a typical configuration of magnetic reconnection. However, flares having a circular ribbon have rarely been reported, although it is expected in the fan-spine magnetic topology involving reconnection at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point. We present five circular ribbon flares with associated surges, using high-resolution and high-cadence H{alpha} blue wing observations obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory. In all the events, a central parasitic magnetic field is encompassed by the opposite polarity, forming a circular PIL traced by filament material. Consequently, a flare kernel at the center is surrounded by a circular flare ribbon. The four homologous jet-related flares on 1991 March 17 and 18 are of particular interest, as (1) the circular ribbons brighten sequentially, with cospatial surges, rather than simultaneously, (2) the central flare kernels show an intriguing 'round-trip' motion and become elongated, and (3) remote brightenings occur at a region with the same magnetic polarity as the central parasitic field and are co-temporal with a separate phase of flare emissions. In another flare on 1991 February 25, the circular flare emission and surge activity occur successively, and the event could be associated with magnetic flux cancellation across the circular PIL. We discuss the implications of these observations combining circular flare ribbons, homologous jets, and remote brightenings for understanding the dynamics of 3D magnetic restructuring.

  8. Modeling Non-homologous End Joining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the dominant DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway and involves several NHEJ proteins such as Ku, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, Ligase IV and so on. Once DSBs are generated, Ku is first recruited to the DNA end, followed by other NHEJ proteins for DNA end processing and ligation. Because of the direct ligation of break ends without the need for a homologous template, NHEJ turns out to be an error-prone but efficient repair pathway. Some mechanisms have been proposed of how the efficiency of NHEJ repair is affected. The type of DNA damage is an important factor of NHEJ repair. For instance, the length of DNA fragment may determine the recruitment efficiency of NHEJ protein such as Ku [1], or the complexity of the DNA breaks [2] is accounted for the choice of NHEJ proteins and subpathway of NHEJ repair. On the other hand, the chromatin structure also plays a role of the accessibility of NHEJ protein to the DNA damage site. In this talk, some mathematical models of NHEJ, that consist of series of biochemical reactions complying with the laws of chemical reaction (e.g. mass action, etc.), will be introduced. By mathematical and numerical analysis and parameter estimation, the models are able to capture the qualitative biological features and show good agreement with experimental data. As conclusions, from the viewpoint of modeling, how the NHEJ proteins are recruited will be first discussed for connection between the classical sequential model [4] and recently proposed two-phase model [5]. Then how the NHEJ repair pathway is affected, by the length of DNA fragment [6], the complexity of DNA damage [7] and the chromatin structure [8], will be addressed

  9. Teleman localization of Hochschild homology in a singular setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasselet, J.-P.; Legrand, A.

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to generalize the Hochschild-Kostant-Rosenberg theorem to the case of singular varieties, more precisely, to manifolds with boundary and to varieties with isolated singularities. In these situations, we define suitable algebras of functions and study the localization of the corresponding Hochschild homology. The tool we use is the Teleman localization process. In the case of isolated singularities, the closed Hochschild homology corresponds to the intersection complex which relates the objects defined here to intersection homology.

  10. A trithorax-group complex purified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for methylation of histone H3.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Peter L; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Kornberg, Roger D; Cleary, Michael L

    2002-01-01

    Histone methylation has emerged as an important mechanism for regulating the transcriptional accessibility of chromatin. Several methyltransferases have been shown to target histone amino-terminal tails and mark nucleosomes associated with either euchromatic or heterochromatic states. However, the biochemical machinery responsible for regulating histone methylation and integrating it with other cellular events has not been well characterized. We report here the purification, molecular identification, and genetic and biochemical characterization of the Set1 protein complex that is necessary for methylation of histone H3 at lysine residue 4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The seven-member 363-kDa complex contains homologs of Drosophila melanogaster proteins Ash2 and Trithorax and Caenorhabditis elegans protein DPY-30, which are implicated in the maintenance of Hox gene expression and regulation of X chromosome dosage compensation, respectively. Mutations of Set1 protein comparable to those that disrupt developmental function of its Drosophila homolog Trithorax abrogate histone methylation in yeast. These studies suggest that epigenetic regulation of developmental and sex-specific gene expression are species-specific readouts for a common chromatin remodeling machinery associated mechanistically with histone methylation. PMID:11752412

  11. [Homologous recombination among bacterial genomes: the measurement and identification].

    PubMed

    Xianwei, Yang; Ruifu, Yang; Yujun, Cui

    2016-02-01

    Homologous recombination is one of important sources in shaping the bacterial population diversity, which disrupts the clonal relationship among different lineages through horizontal transferring of DNA-segments. As consequence of blurring the vertical inheritance signals, the homologous recombination raises difficulties in phylogenetic analysis and reconstruction of population structure. Here we discuss the impacts of homologous recombination in inferring phylogenetic relationship among bacterial isolates, and summarize the tools and models separately used in recombination measurement and identification. We also highlight the merits and drawbacks of various approaches, aiming to assist in the practical application for the analysis of homologous recombination in bacterial evolution research. PMID:26907777

  12. The Drosophila melanogaster RAD54 homolog, DmRAD54, is involved in the repair of radiation damage and recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, R; Vreeken, K; Zonneveld, J B; de Jong, A; Eeken, J C; Osgood, C J; Buerstedde, J M; Lohman, P H; Pastink, A

    1997-01-01

    The RAD54 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a crucial role in recombinational repair of double-strand breaks in DNA. Here the isolation and functional characterization of the RAD54 homolog of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, DmRAD54, are described. The putative Dmrad54 protein displays 46 to 57% identity to its homologs from yeast and mammals. DmRAD54 RNA was detected at all stages of fly development, but an increased level was observed in early embryos and ovarian tissue. To determine the function of DmRAD54, a null mutant was isolated by random mutagenesis. DmRADS4-deficient flies develop normally, but the females are sterile. Early development appears normal, but the eggs do not hatch, indicating an essential role for DmRAD54 in development. The larvae of mutant flies are highly sensitive to X rays and methyl methanesulfonate. Moreover, this mutant is defective in X-ray-induced mitotic recombination as measured by a somatic mutation and recombination test. These phenotypes are consistent with a defect in the repair of double-strand breaks and imply that the RAD54 gene is crucial in repair and recombination in a multicellular organism. The results also indicate that the recombinational repair pathway is functionally conserved in evolution. PMID:9315669

  13. The yeast type I topoisomerase Top3 interacts with Sgs1, a DNA helicase homolog: a potential eukaryotic reverse gyrase.

    PubMed Central

    Gangloff, S; McDonald, J P; Bendixen, C; Arthur, L; Rothstein, R

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown that cells mutant for TOP3, a gene encoding a prokaryotic-like type I topoisomerase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, display a pleiotropic phenotype including slow growth and genome instability. We identified a mutation, sgs1 (slow growth suppressor), that suppresses both the growth defect and the increased genomic instability of top3 mutants. Here we report the independent isolation of the SGS1 gene in a screen for proteins that interact with Top3. DNA sequence analysis reveals that the putative Sgs1 protein is highly homologous to the helicase encoded by the Escherichia coli recQ gene. These results imply that Sgs1 creates a deleterious topological substrate that Top3 preferentially resolves. The interaction of the Sgs1 helicase homolog and the Top3 topoisomerase is reminiscent of the recently described structure of reverse gyrase from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, in which a type I DNA topoisomerase and a helicase-like domain are fused in a single polypeptide. Images PMID:7969174

  14. Interaction between Hanseniaspora uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2015-08-01

    During wine fermentation, Saccharomyces clearly dominate over non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, and several factors could be related to this dominance. However, the main factor causing the reduction of cultivable non-Saccharomyces populations has not yet been fully established. In the present study, various single and mixed fermentations were performed to evaluate some of the factors likely responsible for the interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora uvarum. Alcoholic fermentation was performed in compartmented experimental set ups with ratios of 1:1 and 1:9 and the cultivable population of both species was followed. The cultivable H. uvarum population decreased sharply at late stages when S. cerevisiae was present in the other compartment, similarly to alcoholic fermentations in non-compartmented vessels. Thus, cell-to-cell contact did not seem to be the main cause for the lack of cultivability of H. uvarum. Other compounds related to fermentation performance (such as sugar and ethanol) and/or certain metabolites secreted by S. cerevisiae could be related to the sharp decrease in H. uvarum cultivability. When these factors were analyzed, it was confirmed that metabolites from S. cerevisiae induced lack of cultivability in H. uvarum, however ethanol and other possible compounds did not seem to induce this effect but played some role during the process. This study contributes to a new understanding of the lack of cultivability of H. uvarum populations during the late stages of wine fermentation. PMID:25956738

  15. Improving biomass sugar utilization by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficient utilization of all available sugars in lignocellulosic biomass, which is more abundant than available commodity crops and starch, represents one of the most difficult technological challenges for the production of bioethanol. The well-studied yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has played a...

  16. Sucrose and Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a relationship most sweet.

    PubMed

    Marques, Wesley Leoricy; Raghavendran, Vijayendran; Stambuk, Boris Ugarte; Gombert, Andreas Karoly

    2016-02-01

    Sucrose is an abundant, readily available and inexpensive substrate for industrial biotechnology processes and its use is demonstrated with much success in the production of fuel ethanol in Brazil. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which naturally evolved to efficiently consume sugars such as sucrose, is one of the most important cell factories due to its robustness, stress tolerance, genetic accessibility, simple nutrient requirements and long history as an industrial workhorse. This minireview is focused on sucrose metabolism in S. cerevisiae, a rather unexplored subject in the scientific literature. An analysis of sucrose availability in nature and yeast sugar metabolism was performed, in order to understand the molecular background that makes S. cerevisiae consume this sugar efficiently. A historical overview on the use of sucrose and S. cerevisiae by humans is also presented considering sugarcane and sugarbeet as the main sources of this carbohydrate. Physiological aspects of sucrose consumption are compared with those concerning other economically relevant sugars. Also, metabolic engineering efforts to alter sucrose catabolism are presented in a chronological manner. In spite of its extensive use in yeast-based industries, a lot of basic and applied research on sucrose metabolism is imperative, mainly in fields such as genetics, physiology and metabolic engineering. PMID:26658003

  17. Human acylphosphatase cannot replace phosphoglycerate kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Van Hoek, P; Modesti, A; Ramponi, G; Kötter, P; van Dijken, J P; Pron, J T

    2001-10-01

    Human acylphosphatase (h-AP, EC 3.6.1.7) has been reported to catalyse the hydrolysis of the 1-phosphate group of 1,3-diphosphoglycerate. In vivo operation of this reaction in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae would bypass phosphoglycerate kinase and thus reduce the ATP yield from glycolysis. To investigate whether h-AP can indeed replace the S. cerevisiae phosphoglycerate kinase, a multi-copy plasmid carrying the h-AP gene under control of the yeast TDH3 promoter was introduced into a pgk1 delta mutant of S. cerevisiae. A strain carrying the expression vector without the h-AP cassette was used as a reference. For both strains, steady-state carbon- and energy-limited chemostat cultures were obtained at a dilution rate of 0.10 h(-1) on a medium containing a mixture of glucose and ethanol (15% and 85% on a carbon basis, respectively). Although the h-AP strain exhibited a high acylphosphatase activity in cell extracts, switching to glucose as sole carbon and energy source resulted in a complete arrest of glucose consumption and growth. The lack of a functional glycolytic pathway was further evident from the absence of ethanol formation in the presence of excess glucose in the culture. As h-AP cannot replace yeast phosphoglycerate kinase in vivo, the enzyme is not a useful tool to modify the ATP yield of glycolysis in S. cerevisiae. PMID:11761363

  18. Analysis of the RNA Content of the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutch, Charles E.; Marshall, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an interconnected set of relatively simple laboratory experiments in which students determine the RNA content of yeast cells and use agarose gel electrophoresis to separate and analyze the major species of cellular RNA. This set of experiments focuses on RNAs from the yeast "Saccharomyces cerevisiae", a…

  19. Molecular mechanisms of ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a superb ethanol producer, yet sensitive to ethanol at higher concentrations especially under high gravity or very high gravity fermentation conditions. Although significant efforts have been made to study ethanol-stress response in past decades, molecular mecha...

  20. Enhanced lysosomal activity by overexpressed aminopeptidase Y in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jihee; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains vacuoles corresponding to lysosomes in higher eukaryotes. Lysosomes are dynamic (not silent) organelles in which enzymes can be easily integrated or released when exposed to stressful conditions. Changes in lysosomal enzymes have been observed due to oxidative stress, resulting in an increased function of lysosomes. The protein profiles from H2O2- and NH4Cl-treated lysosomes showed different expression patterns, observed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The aminopeptidase Y protein (APE3) that conspicuously enhanced antimicrobial activity than other proteins was selected for further studies. The S. cerevisiae APE3 gene was isolated and inserted into pYES2.0 expression vector. The GFP gene was inserted downstream to the APE3 gene for confirmation of APE3 targeting to lysosomes, and S. cerevisiae was transformed to pYES2::APE3::GFP. The APE3 did not enter in lysosomes and formed an inclusion body at 30 °C, but it inserted to lysosomes as shown by the merger of GFP with lysosomes at 28 °C. Antimicrobial activity of the cloned S. cerevisiae increased about 5 to 10 % against eight strains, compared to normal cells, and galactose induction is increased more two folds than that of normal cells. Therefore, S. cerevisiae was transformed to pYES2::APE3::GFP, accumulating a large amount of APE3, resulting in increased lysosomal activity. Increase in endogenous levels of lysosomes and their activity following genetic modification can lead to its use in applications such as antimicrobial agents and apoptosis-inducing materials for cancer cells, and consequently, it may also be possible to use the organelles for improving in vitro functions. PMID:27221740

  1. Enhancement of gene targeting in human cells by intranuclear permeation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52 protein

    PubMed Central

    Kalvala, Arjun; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Di Primio, Cristina; Liverani, Vania; Falaschi, Arturo; Galli, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of exogenous DNA in human somatic cells results in a frequency of random integration at least 100-fold higher than gene targeting (GT), posing a seemingly insurmountable limitation for gene therapy applications. We previously reported that, in human cells, the stable over-expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52 gene (yRAD52), which plays the major role in yeast homologous recombination (HR), caused an up to 37-fold increase in the frequency of GT, indicating that yRAD52 interacts with the double-strand break repair pathway(s) of human cells favoring homologous integration. In the present study, we tested the effect of the yRad52 protein by delivering it directly to the human cells. To this purpose, we fused the yRAD52 cDNA to the arginine-rich domain of the TAT protein of HIV (tat11) that is known to permeate the cell membranes. We observed that a recombinant yRad52tat11 fusion protein produced in Escherichia coli, which maintains its ability to bind single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), enters the cells and the nuclei, where it is able to increase both intrachromosomal recombination and GT up to 63- and 50-fold, respectively. Moreover, the non-homologous plasmid DNA integration decreased by 4-fold. yRAD52tat11 proteins carrying point mutations in the ssDNA binding domain caused a lower or nil increase in recombination proficiency. Thus, the yRad52tat11 could be instrumental to increase GT in human cells and a ‘protein delivery approach’ offers a new tool for developing novel strategies for genome modification and gene therapy applications. PMID:20519199

  2. GLSM's, gerbes, and Kuznetsov's homological projective duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Eric

    2013-12-01

    In this short note we give an overview of recent work on string propagation on stacks and applications to gauged linear sigma models. We begin by outlining noneffective orbifolds (orbifolds in which a subgroup acts trivially) and related phenomena in two-dimensional gauge theories, which realize string propagation on gerbes. We then discuss the 'decomposition conjecture,' equating conformal field theories of strings on gerbes and strings on disjoint unions of spaces. Finally, we apply these ideas to gauged linear sigma models for complete intersections of quadrics, and use the decomposition conjecture to show that the Landau-Ginzburg points of those models have a geometric interpretation in terms of a (sometimes noncommutative resolution of) a branched double cover, realized via nonperturbative effects rather than as the vanishing locus of a superpotential. These examples violate old unproven lore on GLSM's (namely, that geometric phases must be related by birational transformations), and we conclude by observing that in these examples (and conjecturing more generally in GLSM's), the phases are instead related by Kuznetsov's 'homological projective duality.'

  3. Homologous recombination deficiency and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Jonathan A; Drew, Yvette; Kristeleit, Rebecca S

    2016-06-01

    The discovery that PARP inhibitors block an essential pathway of DNA repair in cells harbouring a BRCA mutation has opened up a new therapeutic avenue for high-grade ovarian cancers. BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are essential for high-fidelity repair of double-strand breaks of DNA through the homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway. Deficiency in HRR (HRD) is a target for PARP inhibitors. The first PARP inhibitor, olaparib, has now been licensed for BRCA-mutated ovarian cancers. While mutated BRCA genes are individually most commonly associated with HRD other essential HRR proteins may be mutated or functionally deficient potentially widening the therapeutic opportunities for PARP inhibitors. HRD is the first phenotypically defined predictive marker for therapy with PARP inhibitors in ovarian cancer. Several different PARP inhibitors are being trialled in ovarian cancer and this class of drugs has been shown to be a new selective therapy for high-grade ovarian cancer. Around 20% of high-grade serous ovarian cancers harbour germline or somatic BRCA mutations and testing for BRCA mutations should be incorporated into routine clinical practice. The expanded use of PARP inhibitors in HRD deficient (non-BRCA mutant) tumours using a signature of HRD in clinical practice requires validation. PMID:27065456

  4. CBH1 homologs and varian CBH1 cellulase

    SciTech Connect

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2014-07-01

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  5. CBH1 homologs and variant CBH1 cellulases

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  6. CBH1 homologs and variant CBH1 cellulases

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2008-11-18

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  7. Flare build-up study - Homologous flares group. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martres, M.-J.; Mein, N.; Mouradian, Z.; Rayrole, J.; Schmieder, B.; Simon, G.; Soru-Escaut, I.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission observations have been used to study the origin and amount of energy, mechanism of storage and release, and conditions for the occurrence of solar flares, and some results of these studies as they pertain to homologous flares are briefly discussed. It was found that every set of flares produced 'rafales' of homologous flares, i.e., two, three, four, or more flares separated in time by an hour or less. No great changes in macroscopic photospheric patterns were observed during these flaring periods. A quantitative brightness parameter of the relation between homologous flares is defined. Scale changes detected in the dynamic spectrum of flare sites are in good agreement with a theoretical suggestion by Sturrock. Statistical results for different homologous flare active regions show the existence in homologous flaring areas of a 'pivot' of previous filaments interpreted as a signature of an anomaly in the solar rotation.

  8. Homology modelling and spectroscopy, a never-ending love story.

    PubMed

    Venselaar, Hanka; Joosten, Robbie P; Vroling, Bas; Baakman, Coos A B; Hekkelman, Maarten L; Krieger, Elmar; Vriend, Gert

    2010-03-01

    Homology modelling is normally the technique of choice when experimental structure data are not available but three-dimensional coordinates are needed, for example, to aid with detailed interpretation of results of spectroscopic studies. Herein, the state of the art of homology modelling will be described in the light of a series of recent developments, and an overview will be given of the problems and opportunities encountered in this field. The major topic, the accuracy and precision of homology models, will be discussed extensively due to its influence on the reliability of conclusions drawn from the combination of homology models and spectroscopic data. Three real-world examples will illustrate how both homology modelling and spectroscopy can be beneficial for (bio)medical research. PMID:19718498

  9. Multiple overlapping homologies between two rheumatoid antigens and immunosuppressive viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Douvas, A; Sobelman, S

    1991-01-01

    Amino acid (aa) sequence homologies between viruses and autoimmune nuclear antigens are suggestive of viral involvement in disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and scleroderma. We analyzed the frequency of exact homologies of greater than or equal to 5 aa between 61 viral proteins (19,827 aa), 8 nuclear antigens (3813 aa), and 41 control proteins (11,743 aa). Both pentamer and hexamer homologies between control proteins and viruses are unexpectedly abundant, with hexamer matches occurring in 1 of 3 control proteins (or once every 769 aa). However, 2 nuclear antigens, the SLE-associated 70-kDa antigen and the scleroderma-associated CENP-B protein, are highly unusual in containing multiple homologies to a group of synergizing immunosuppressive viruses. Two viruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1), contain sequences exactly duplicated at 15 sites in the 70-kDa antigen and at 10 sites in CENP-B protein. The immediate-early (IE) protein of HSV-1, which activates HIV-1 regulatory functions, contains three homologies to the 70-kDa antigen (two hexamers and a pentamer) and two to CENP-B (a hexamer and pentamer). There are four homologies (including a hexamer) common to the 70-kDa antigen and Epstein-Barr virus, and three homologies (including two hexamers) common to CENP-B and cytomegalovirus. The majority of homologies in both nuclear antigens are clustered in highly charged C-terminal domains containing epitopes for human autoantibodies. Furthermore, most homologies have a contiguous or overlapping distribution, thereby creating a high density of potential epitopes. In addition to the exact homologies tabulated, motifs of matching sequences are repeated frequently in these domains. Our analysis suggests that coexpression of heterologous viruses having common immunosuppressive functions may generate autoantibodies cross-reacting with certain nuclear proteins. PMID:1712488

  10. Transcriptional profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to propolis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Propolis is a natural product of plant resins collected by honeybees (Apis mellifera) from various plant sources. Our previous studies indicated that propolis sensitivity is dependent on the mitochondrial function and that vacuolar acidification and autophagy are important for yeast cell death caused by propolis. Here, we extended our understanding of propolis-mediated cell death in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by applying systems biology tools to analyze the transcriptional profiling of cells exposed to propolis. Methods We have used transcriptional profiling of S. cerevisiae exposed to propolis. We validated our findings by using real-time PCR of selected genes. Systems biology tools (physical protein-protein interaction [PPPI] network) were applied to analyse the propolis-induced transcriptional bevavior, aiming to identify which pathways are modulated by propolis in S. cerevisiae and potentially influencing cell death. Results We were able to observe 1,339 genes modulated in at least one time point when compared to the reference time (propolis untreated samples) (t-test, p-value 0.01). Enrichment analysis performed by Gene Ontology (GO) Term finder tool showed enrichment for several biological categories among the genes up-regulated in the microarray hybridization such as transport and transmembrane transport and response to stress. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of selected genes showed by our microarray hybridization approach was capable of providing information about S. cerevisiae gene expression modulation with a considerably high level of confidence. Finally, a physical protein-protein (PPPI) network design and global topological analysis stressed the importance of these pathways in response of S. cerevisiae to propolis and were correlated with the transcriptional data obtained thorough the microarray analysis. Conclusions In summary, our data indicate that propolis is largely affecting several pathways in the eukaryotic cell. However, the most

  11. Peridinialean dinoflagellate plate patterns, labels and homologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Tabulation patterns for peridinialean dinoflagellate thecae and cysts have been traditionally expressed using a plate labelling system described by C.A. Kofoid in the early 1900's. This system can obscure dinoflagellate plate homologies and has not always been strictly applied. The plate-labelling system presented here introduces new series labels but incorporates key features and ideas from the more recently proposed systems of G.L. Eaton and F.J.R. Taylor, as modified by W.R. Evitt. Plate-series recognition begins with the cingulum (C-series) and proceeds from the cingulum toward the apex for the three series of the epitheca/epicyst and proceeds from the cingulum toward the antapex for the two series of the hypotheca/hypocyst. The epithecal/epicystal model consists of eight plates that touch the anterior margin of the cingulum (E-series: plates E1-E7, ES), seven plates toward the apex that touch the E-series plates (M-series: R, M1-M6), and up to seven plates near the apex that do not touch E-series plates (D-series: Dp-Dv). The hypothecal/hypocystal model consists of eight plates that touch the posterior margin of the cingulum (H-series: H1-H6,HR,HS) and three plates toward the antapex (T1-T3). Epithecal/epicystal tabulation patterns come in both 8- and 7- models, corresponding to eight and seven plates, respectively, in the E-series. Hypothecal/hypocystal tabulation patterns also come in both 8- and 7-models, corresponding to eight and seven plates, respectively, in the H-series. By convention, the 7-model epitheca/epicyst has no plates E1 and M1; the 7-model hypotheca/hypocyst has no plate H6. Within an 8-model or 7-model, the system emphasizes plates that are presumed to be homologous by giving them identical labels. I introduce the adjectives "monothigmate", "dithigmate," and "trithigmate" to designate plates touching one, two, and three plates, respectively, of the adjacent series. The term "thigmation" applies to the analysis of plate contacts between

  12. Conserved codon composition of ribosomal protein coding genes in Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae: lessons from supervised machine learning in functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kui; Kuang, Yuyu; Joseph, Jeremiah S; Kolatkar, Prasanna R

    2002-06-01

    Genomics projects have resulted in a flood of sequence data. Functional annotation currently relies almost exclusively on inter-species sequence comparison and is restricted in cases of limited data from related species and widely divergent sequences with no known homologs. Here, we demonstrate that codon composition, a fusion of codon usage bias and amino acid composition signals, can accurately discriminate, in the absence of sequence homology information, cytoplasmic ribosomal protein genes from all other genes of known function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis using an implementation of support vector machines, SVM(light). Analysis of these codon composition signals is instructive in determining features that confer individuality to ribosomal protein genes. Each of the sets of positively charged, negatively charged and small hydrophobic residues, as well as codon bias, contribute to their distinctive codon composition profile. The representation of all these signals is sensitively detected, combined and augmented by the SVMs to perform an accurate classification. Of special mention is an obvious outlier, yeast gene RPL22B, highly homologous to RPL22A but employing very different codon usage, perhaps indicating a non-ribosomal function. Finally, we propose that codon composition be used in combination with other attributes in gene/protein classification by supervised machine learning algorithms. PMID:12034849

  13. Rad51 ATP binding but not hydrolysis is required to recruit Rad10 in synthesis-dependent strand annealing sites in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Justin; Fischhaber, Paula L.

    2013-01-01

    Several modes of eukaryotic of DNA double strand break repair (DSBR) depend on synapsis of complementary DNA. The Rad51 ATPase, the S. cerevisiae homolog of E. coli RecA, plays a key role in this process by catalyzing homology searching and strand exchange between an invading DNA strand and a repair template (e.g. sister chromatid or homologous chromosome). Synthesis dependent strand annealing (SDSA), a mode of DSBR, requires Rad51. Another repair enzyme, the Rad1-Rad10 endonuclease, acts in the final stages of SDSA, hydrolyzing 3′ overhanging single-stranded DNA. Here we show in vivo by fluorescence microscopy that the ATP binding function of yeast Rad51 is required to recruit Rad10 SDSA sites indicating that Rad51 pre-synaptic filament formation must occur prior to the recruitment of Rad1-Rad10. Our data also show that Rad51 ATPase activity, an important step in Rad51 filament disassembly, is not absolutely required in order to recruit Rad1-Rad10 to DSB sites. PMID:25346869

  14. Ethanol fermentation from Jerusalem artichoke powder using Saccharomyces cerevisiae KCCM50549 without pretreatment for inulin hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seok-Hwan; Ryu, Ji-Myoung; Lee, Hongweon; Jeon, Jae Heung; Sok, Dai-Eun; Choi, Eui-Sung

    2011-01-01

    A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, KCCM50549, was found to efficiently ferment the inulin-containing carbohydrates in Jerusalem artichoke without acidic or enzymatic pretreatment prior to fermentation. S. cerevisiae KCCM50549 could utilize almost completely the fructo-oligosaccharides present in Jerusalem artichoke (up to degree of polymerization (DP) of 15), in contrast to the other S. cerevisiae strain such as NCYC625 that fermented the fructo-oligosaccharides with DP of up to around six. Inulin-fermenting S. cerevisiae KCCM50549 produced c.a. 1.6 times more ethanol from Jerusalem artichoke compared with S. cerevisiae NCYC625. Direct ethanol fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke flour at 180 g/L without any supplements or pretreatments by S. cerevisiae KCCM50549 in a 5 L jar fermentor yielded 36.2 g/L of ethanol within 36 h. The conversion efficiency of inulin-type sugars to ethanol was 70% of the theoretical ethanol yield. PMID:20833540

  15. The reference genome sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: then and now.

    PubMed

    Engel, Stacia R; Dietrich, Fred S; Fisk, Dianna G; Binkley, Gail; Balakrishnan, Rama; Costanzo, Maria C; Dwight, Selina S; Hitz, Benjamin C; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D; Lloyd, Paul; Skrzypek, Marek S; Miyasato, Stuart R; Simison, Matt; Cherry, J Michael

    2014-03-01

    The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first completely sequenced from a eukaryote. It was released in 1996 as the work of a worldwide effort of hundreds of researchers. In the time since, the yeast genome has been intensively studied by geneticists, molecular biologists, and computational scientists all over the world. Maintenance and annotation of the genome sequence have long been provided by the Saccharomyces Genome Database, one of the original model organism databases. To deepen our understanding of the eukaryotic genome, the S. cerevisiae strain S288C reference genome sequence was updated recently in its first major update since 1996. The new version, called "S288C 2010," was determined from a single yeast colony using modern sequencing technologies and serves as the anchor for further innovations in yeast genomic science. PMID:24374639

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a sexy yeast with a prion problem.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Amy C; Wickner, Reed B

    2013-01-01

    Yeast prions are infectious proteins that spread exclusively by mating. The frequency of prions in the wild therefore largely reflects the rate of spread by mating counterbalanced by prion growth slowing effects in the host. We recently showed that the frequency of outcross mating is about 1% of mitotic doublings with 23-46% of total matings being outcrosses. These findings imply that even the mildest forms of the [PSI+], [URE3] and [PIN+] prions impart > 1% growth/survival detriment on their hosts. Our estimate of outcrossing suggests that Saccharomyces cerevisiae is far more sexual than previously thought and would therefore be more responsive to the adaptive effects of natural selection compared with a strictly asexual yeast. Further, given its large effective population size, a growth/survival detriment of > 1% for yeast prions should strongly select against prion-infected strains in wild populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23764836

  17. Interorganelle signaling is a determinant of longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kirchman, P A; Kim, S; Lai, C Y; Jazwinski, S M

    1999-01-01

    Replicative capacity, which is the number of times an individual cell divides, is the measure of longevity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, a process that involves signaling from the mitochondrion to the nucleus, called retrograde regulation, is shown to determine yeast longevity, and its induction resulted in postponed senescence. Activation of retrograde regulation, by genetic and environmental means, correlated with increased replicative capacity in four different S. cerevisiae strains. Deletion of a gene required for the retrograde response, RTG2, eliminated the increased replicative capacity. RAS2, a gene previously shown to influence longevity in yeast, interacts with retrograde regulation in setting yeast longevity. The molecular mechanism of aging elucidated here parallels the results of genetic studies of aging in nematodes and fruit flies, as well as the caloric restriction paradigm in mammals, and it underscores the importance of metabolic regulation in aging, suggesting a general applicability. PMID:10224252

  18. Advanced biofuel production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-06-01

    Replacement of conventional transportation fuels with biofuels will require production of compounds that can cover the complete fuel spectrum, ranging from gasoline to kerosene. Advanced biofuels are expected to play an important role in replacing fossil fuels because they have improved properties compared with ethanol and some of these may have the energy density required for use in heavy duty vehicles, ships, and aviation. Moreover, advanced biofuels can be used as drop-in fuels in existing internal combustion engines. The yeast cell factory Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be turned into a producer of higher alcohols (1-butanol and isobutanol), sesquiterpenes (farnesene and bisabolene), and fatty acid ethyl esters (biodiesel), and here we discusses progress in metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for production of these advanced biofuels. PMID:23628723

  19. Membrane Protein Production in the Yeast, S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Stephanie P; Mikaliunaite, Lina; Bill, Roslyn M

    2016-01-01

    The first crystal structures of recombinant mammalian membrane proteins were solved in 2005 using protein that had been produced in yeast cells. One of these, the rabbit Ca(2+)-ATPase SERCA1a, was synthesized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. All host systems have their specific advantages and disadvantages, but yeast has remained a consistently popular choice in the eukaryotic membrane protein field because it is quick, easy and cheap to culture, whilst being able to post-translationally process eukaryotic membrane proteins. Very recent structures of recombinant membrane proteins produced in S. cerevisiae include those of the Arabidopsis thaliana NRT1.1 nitrate transporter and the fungal plant pathogen lipid scramblase, TMEM16. This chapter provides an overview of the methodological approaches underpinning these successes. PMID:27485327

  20. Direct evidence for a xylose metabolic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Batt, C.A.; Carvallo, S.; Easson, D.D.; Akedo, M.; Sinskey, A.J.

    1986-04-01

    Xylose transport, xylose reductase, and xylitol dehydrogenase activities are demonstrated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzymes in the xylose catabolic pathway necessary for the conversion of xylose xylulose are present, although S. cerevisiae cannot grow on xylose as a sole carbon source. Xylose transport is less efficient than glucose transport, and its rate is dependent upon aeration. Xylose reductase appears to be a xylose inducible enzyme and xylitol dehydrogenase activity is constitutive, although both are repressed by glucose. Both xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase activities are five- to tenfold lower in S. cerevisie as compared to Candida utilis. In vivo conversion of /sup 14/C-xylose in S. cerevisiage is demonstrated and xylitol is detected, although no significant levels of any other /sup 14/C-labeled metabolites (e.g., ethanol) are observed. 22 references.

  1. Purification of fluorescently labeled Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spindle Pole Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Trisha N.

    2016-01-01

    Centrosomes are components of the mitotic spindle responsible for organizing microtubules and establishing a bipolar spindle for accurate chromosome segregation. In budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the centrosome is called the spindle pole body, a highly organized tri-laminar structure embedded in the nuclear envelope. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the purification of fluorescently labeled spindle pole bodes from S. cerevisiae. Spindle pole bodies are purified from yeast using a TAP-tag purification followed by velocity sedimentation. This highly reproducible TAP-tag purification method improves upon previous techniques and expands the scope of in vitro characterization of yeast spindle pole bodies. The genetic flexibility of this technique allows for the study of spindle pole body mutants as well as the study of spindle pole bodies during different stages of the cell cycle. The ease and reproducibility of the technique makes it possible to study spindle pole bodies using a variety of biochemical, biophysical, and microscopic techniques. PMID:27193850

  2. The Reference Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Then and Now

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Stacia R.; Dietrich, Fred S.; Fisk, Dianna G.; Binkley, Gail; Balakrishnan, Rama; Costanzo, Maria C.; Dwight, Selina S.; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S.; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D.; Lloyd, Paul; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Miyasato, Stuart R.; Simison, Matt; Cherry, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first completely sequenced from a eukaryote. It was released in 1996 as the work of a worldwide effort of hundreds of researchers. In the time since, the yeast genome has been intensively studied by geneticists, molecular biologists, and computational scientists all over the world. Maintenance and annotation of the genome sequence have long been provided by the Saccharomyces Genome Database, one of the original model organism databases. To deepen our understanding of the eukaryotic genome, the S. cerevisiae strain S288C reference genome sequence was updated recently in its first major update since 1996. The new version, called “S288C 2010,” was determined from a single yeast colony using modern sequencing technologies and serves as the anchor for further innovations in yeast genomic science. PMID:24374639

  3. Energy-dependent effects of resveratrol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Perez, Luis Alberto; Canizal-Garcia, Melina; González-Hernández, Juan Carlos; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalia; Nava, Gerardo M; Ramos-Gomez, Minerva

    2016-06-01

    The metabolic effects induced by resveratrol have been associated mainly with the consumption of high-calorie diets; however, its effects with standard or low-calorie diets remain unclear. To better understand the interactions between resveratrol and cellular energy levels, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model. Herein it is shown that resveratrol: (a) decreased cell viability in an energy-dependent manner; (b) lessening of cell viability occurred specifically when cells were under cellular respiration; and (c) inhibition of oxygen consumption in state 4 occurred at low and standard energy levels, whereas at high energy levels oxygen consumption was promoted. These findings indicate that the effects of resveratrol are dependent on the cellular energy status and linked to metabolic respiration. Importantly, our study also revealed that S. cerevisiae is a suitable and useful model to elucidate the molecular targets of resveratrol under different nutritional statuses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26945517

  4. ROG1 encodes a monoacylglycerol lipase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vishnu Varthini, Lakshmanaperumal; Selvaraju, Kandasamy; Srinivasan, Malathi; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is extensively studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we report that revertant of glycogen synthase kinase mutation-1 (Rog1p) possesses monoacylglycerol (MAG) lipase activity in S. cerevisiae. The lipase activity of Rog1p was confirmed in two ways: through analysis of a strain with a double deletion of ROG1 and monoglyceride lipase YJU3 (yju3Δrog1Δ) and by site-directed mutagenesis of the ROG1 lipase motif (GXSXG). Rog1p is localized in both the cytosol and the nucleus. Overexpression of ROG1 in a ROG1-deficient strain resulted in an accumulation of reactive oxygen species. These results suggest that Rog1p is a MAG lipase that regulates lipid homeostasis. PMID:25433290

  5. The role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae type 2A phosphatase in the actin cytoskeleton and in entry into mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, F C; Arndt, K T

    1995-01-01

    We have prepared a temperature-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae type 2A phosphatase (PP2A) mutant, pph21-102. At the restrictive temperature, the pph21-102 cells arrested predominantly with small or aberrant buds, and their actin cytoskeleton and chitin deposition were abnormal. The involvement of PP2A in bud growth may be due to the role of PP2A in actin distribution during the cell cycle. Moreover, after a shift to the non-permissive temperature, the pph21-102 cells were blocked in G2 and had low activity of Clb2-Cdc28 kinase. Expression of Clb2 from the S.cerevisiae ADH promoter in pph21-102 cells was able to partially bypass the G2 arrest in the first cell cycle, but was not able to stimulate passage through a second mitosis. These cells had higher total amounts of Clb2-Cdc28 kinase activity, but the Clb2-normalized specific activity was lower in the pph21-102 cells compared with wild-type cells. Unlike wild-type strains, a PP2A-deficient strain was sensitive to the loss of MIH1, which is a homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe mitotic inducer cdc25+. Furthermore, the cdc28F19 mutation cured the synthetic defects of a PP2A-deficient strain containing a deletion of MIH1. These results suggest that PP2A is required during G2 for the activation of Clb-Cdc28 kinase complexes for progression into mitosis. Images PMID:7796803

  6. The history of the homology concept and the "Phylogenetisches Symposium".

    PubMed

    Hossfeld, Uwe; Olsson, Lennart

    2005-11-01

    The homology concept has had a long and varied history, starting out as a geometrical term in ancient Greece. Here we describe briefly how a typological use of homology to designate organs and body parts in the same position anatomically in different organisms was changed by Darwin's theory of evolution into a phylogenetic concept. We try to indicate the diversity of opinions on how to define and test for homology that has prevailed historically, before the important books by Hennig (1950. Grundzüge einer Theorie der Phylogenetischen Systematik. Deutscher Zentralverlag, Berlin) and Remane (1952. Die Grundlagen des Natürlichen Systems, der Vergleichenden Anatomie und der Phylogenetik. Geest & Portig, Leipzig) brought more rigor into both the debate on homology and into the usage of the term homology among systematists. Homology as a theme has recurred repeatedly throughout the history of the "Phylogenetisches Symposium" and we give a very brief overview of the different aspects of homology that have been discussed at specific symposia over the last 48 years. We also honour the fact that the 2004 symposium was held in Jena by pointing to the roles played by biologists active in Jena, such as Ernst Haeckel and Carl Gegenbaur, in starting the development towards a homology concept concordant with an evolutionary world view. As historians of biology, we emphasize the importance of major treatises on homology and its history that may be little read by systematists active today, and have sometimes also received less attention by historians of biology than they deserve. Prominent among these are the works of Dietrich Starck, who also happened to be both a student, and later a benefactor, of systematics at Jena University. PMID:17046358

  7. Benchmarking the next generation of homology inference tools

    PubMed Central

    Saripella, Ganapathi Varma; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.; Forslund, Kristoffer

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Over the last decades, vast numbers of sequences were deposited in public databases. Bioinformatics tools allow homology and consequently functional inference for these sequences. New profile-based homology search tools have been introduced, allowing reliable detection of remote homologs, but have not been systematically benchmarked. To provide such a comparison, which can guide bioinformatics workflows, we extend and apply our previously developed benchmark approach to evaluate the ‘next generation’ of profile-based approaches, including CS-BLAST, HHSEARCH and PHMMER, in comparison with the non-profile based search tools NCBI-BLAST, USEARCH, UBLAST and FASTA. Method: We generated challenging benchmark datasets based on protein domain architectures within either the PFAM + Clan, SCOP/Superfamily or CATH/Gene3D domain definition schemes. From each dataset, homologous and non-homologous protein pairs were aligned using each tool, and standard performance metrics calculated. We further measured congruence of domain architecture assignments in the three domain databases. Results: CSBLAST and PHMMER had overall highest accuracy. FASTA, UBLAST and USEARCH showed large trade-offs of accuracy for speed optimization. Conclusion: Profile methods are superior at inferring remote homologs but the difference in accuracy between methods is relatively small. PHMMER and CSBLAST stand out with the highest accuracy, yet still at a reasonable computational cost. Additionally, we show that less than 0.1% of Swiss-Prot protein pairs considered homologous by one database are considered non-homologous by another, implying that these classifications represent equivalent underlying biological phenomena, differing mostly in coverage and granularity. Availability and Implementation: Benchmark datasets and all scripts are placed at (http://sonnhammer.org/download/Homology_benchmark). Contact: forslund@embl.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under different nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shaohui; Zhao, Xinrui; Zou, Huijun; Fu, Jianwei; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2014-04-14

    In cultures containing multiple sources of nitrogen, Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits a sequential use of nitrogen sources through a mechanism known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). To identify proteins differentially expressed due to NCR, proteomic analysis of S. cerevisiae S288C under different nitrogen source conditions was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), revealing 169 candidate protein spots. Among these 169 protein spots, 121 were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). The identified proteins were closely associated with four main biological processes through Gene Ontology (GO) categorical analysis. The identification of the potential proteins and cellular processes related to NCR offer a global overview of changes elicited by different nitrogen sources, providing clues into how yeast adapt to different nutritional conditions. Moreover, by comparing our proteomic data with corresponding mRNA data, proteins regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level could be distinguished. Biological significance In S. cerevisiae, different nitrogen sources provide different growth characteristics and generate different metabolites. The nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) process plays an important role for S. cerevisiae in the ordinal utilization of different nitrogen sources. NCR process can result in significant shift of global metabolic networks. Previous works on NCR primarily focused on transcriptomic level. The results obtained in this study provided a global atlas of the proteome changes triggered by different nitrogen sources and would facilitate the understanding of mechanisms for how yeast could adapt to different nutritional conditions. PMID:24530623

  9. Expression of bacterial mercuric ion reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rensing, C; Kües, U; Stahl, U; Nies, D H; Friedrich, B

    1992-01-01

    The gene merA coding for bacterial mercuric ion reductase was cloned under the control of the yeast promoter for alcohol dehydrogenase I in the yeast-Escherichia coli shuttle plasmid pADH040-2 and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae AH22. The resulting transformant harbored stable copies of the merA-containing hybrid plasmid, displayed a fivefold increase in the MIC of mercuric chloride, and synthesized mercuric ion reductase activity. Images PMID:1735719

  10. An efficient purification system for native minichromosome from S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, Ashwin; Akiyoshi, Bungo; Biggins, Sue; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    We have recently established a system for purifying minichromosome in a native state from S. cerevisiae. This system is extremely efficient, and a single-step purification yields samples with sufficient purity and quantity for mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of histones and non-histone proteins tightly associated with the minichromosome. The templates can also be used in various biochemical assays in vitro, such as transcription and recombination, and might be applicable to allow EM or other studies to be performed. PMID:22183591

  11. Homology Groups of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vásquez Aguilar, R.; Carsteanu, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Using high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City, IA (IIHR, U of Iowa), we perform an analysis of the homology groups generated by data connectivity in state space, and attempt a qualitative interpretation of the first and second homology groups. Let us note that homology groups are generated, in the context of topological data analysis (TDA), by representing the data in n-dimensional state space and building a connectivity diagram according to the respective distances between the data points. Subsequently, the topological invariants of the resulting connected structures are being analyzed.

  12. Analysis of the DNA sequence of a 15,500 bp fragment near the left telomere of chromosome XV from Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals a putative sugar transporter, a carboxypeptidase homologue and two new open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Gamo, F J; Lafuente, M J; Casamayor, A; Ariño, J; Aldea, M; Casas, C; Herrero, E; Gancedo, C

    1996-06-15

    We report the sequence of a 15.5 kb DNA segment located near the left telomere of chromosome XV of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The sequence contains nine open reading frames (ORFs) longer than 300 bp. Three of them are internal to other ones. One corresponds to the gene LGT3 that encodes a putative sugar transporter. Three adjacent ORFs were separated by two stop codons in frame. These ORFs presented homology with the gene CPS1 that encodes carboxypeptidase S. The stop codons were not found in the same sequence derived from another yeast strain. Two other ORFs without significant homology in databases were also found. One of them, O0420, is very rich in serine and threonine and presents a series of repeated or similar amino acid stretches along the sequence. PMID:8810044

  13. Membrane trafficking in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model.

    PubMed

    Feyder, Serge; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Bertazzi, Dimitri L; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM), or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC), and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway) or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway). Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END) and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway). Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes. PMID:25584613

  14. Multiparameter analysis of apoptosis in puromycin-treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Citterio, Barbara; Albertini, Maria Cristina; Ghibelli, Lina; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Battistelli, Michela; Canonico, Barbara; Rocchi, Marco B L; Teodori, Laura; Ciani, Maurizio; Piatti, Elena

    2015-08-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a typical apoptotic phenotype is induced by some stress factors such as sugars, acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, aspirin and age. Nevertheless, no data have been reported for apoptosis induced by puromycin, a damaging agent known to induce apoptosis in mammalian cells. We treated S. cerevisiae with puromycin to induce apoptosis and evaluated the percentage of dead cells by using Hoechst 33342 staining, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Annexin V flow cytometry (FC) analysis. Hoechst 33342 fluorescence images were processed to acquire parameters to use for multiparameter analysis [and perform a principal component analysis, (PCA)]. Cell viability was evaluated by Rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) and Acridine Orange microscope fluorescence staining. The results show puromycin-induced apoptosis in S. cerevisiae, and the PCA analysis indicated that the increasing percentage of apoptotic cells delineated a well-defined graph profile. The results were supported by TEM and FC. This study gives new insights into yeast apoptosis using puromycin as inducer agent, and PCA analysis may complement molecular analysis facilitating further studies to its detection. PMID:25868793

  15. Can Yeast (S. cerevisiae) Metabolic Volatiles Provide Polymorphic Signaling?

    PubMed Central

    Arguello, J. Roman; Sellanes, Carolina; Lou, Yann Ru; Raguso, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical signaling between organisms is a ubiquitous and evolutionarily dynamic process that helps to ensure mate recognition, location of nutrients, avoidance of toxins, and social cooperation. Evolutionary changes in chemical communication systems progress through natural variation within the organism generating the signal as well as the responding individuals. A promising yet poorly understood system with which to probe the importance of this variation exists between D. melanogaster and S. cerevisiae. D. melanogaster relies on yeast for nutrients, while also serving as a vector for yeast cell dispersal. Both are outstanding genetic and genomic models, with Drosophila also serving as a preeminent model for sensory neurobiology. To help develop these two genetic models as an ecological model, we have tested if - and to what extent - S. cerevisiae is capable of producing polymorphic signaling through variation in metabolic volatiles. We have carried out a chemical phenotyping experiment for 14 diverse accessions within a common garden random block design. Leveraging genomic sequences for 11 of the accessions, we ensured a genetically broad sample and tested for phylogenetic signal arising from phenotypic dataset. Our results demonstrate that significant quantitative differences for volatile blends do exist among S. cerevisiae accessions. Of particular ecological relevance, the compounds driving the blend differences (acetoin, 2-phenyl ethanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol) are known ligands for D. melanogasters chemosensory receptors, and are related to sensory behaviors. Though unable to correlate the genetic and volatile measurements, our data point clear ways forward for behavioral assays aimed at understanding the implications of this variation. PMID:23990899

  16. Functional Diversity of Haloacid Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Makarova, Kira S.; Flick, Robert; Wolf, Yuri I.; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Evdokimova, Elena; Jin, Ke; Tan, Kemin; Hanson, Andrew D.; Hasnain, Ghulam; Zallot, Rémi; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Babu, Mohan; Savchenko, Alexei; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Edwards, Aled M.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzymes comprise a large superfamily of phosphohydrolases present in all organisms. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes at least 19 soluble HADs, including 10 uncharacterized proteins. Here, we biochemically characterized 13 yeast phosphatases from the HAD superfamily, which includes both specific and promiscuous enzymes active against various phosphorylated metabolites and peptides with several HADs implicated in detoxification of phosphorylated compounds and pseudouridine. The crystal structures of four yeast HADs provided insight into their active sites, whereas the structure of the YKR070W dimer in complex with substrate revealed a composite substrate-binding site. Although the S. cerevisiae and Escherichia coli HADs share low sequence similarities, the comparison of their substrate profiles revealed seven phosphatases with common preferred substrates. The cluster of secondary substrates supporting significant activity of both S. cerevisiae and E. coli HADs includes 28 common metabolites that appear to represent the pool of potential activities for the evolution of novel HAD phosphatases. Evolution of novel substrate specificities of HAD phosphatases shows no strict correlation with sequence divergence. Thus, evolution of the HAD superfamily combines the conservation of the overall substrate pool and the substrate profiles of some enzymes with remarkable biochemical and structural flexibility of other superfamily members. PMID:26071590

  17. Biogeographical characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast by molecular methods

    PubMed Central

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Schirone, Maria; Fasoli, Giuseppe; Aguzzi, Irene; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Biogeography is the descriptive and explanatory study of spatial patterns and processes involved in the distribution of biodiversity. Without biogeography, it would be difficult to study the diversity of microorganisms because there would be no way to visualize patterns in variation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, “the wine yeast,” is the most important species involved in alcoholic fermentation, and in vineyard ecosystems, it follows the principle of “everything is everywhere.” Agricultural practices such as farming (organic versus conventional) and floor management systems have selected different populations within this species that are phylogenetically distinct. In fact, recent ecological and geographic studies highlighted that unique strains are associated with particular grape varieties in specific geographical locations. These studies also highlighted that significant diversity and regional character, or ‘terroir,’ have been introduced into the winemaking process via this association. This diversity of wild strains preserves typicity, the high quality, and the unique flavor of wines. Recently, different molecular methods were developed to study population dynamics of S. cerevisiae strains in both vineyards and wineries. In this review, we will provide an update on the current molecular methods used to reveal the geographical distribution of S. cerevisiae wine yeast. PMID:23805132

  18. Can yeast (S. cerevisiae) metabolic volatiles provide polymorphic signaling?

    PubMed

    Arguello, J Roman; Sellanes, Carolina; Lou, Yann Ru; Raguso, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Chemical signaling between organisms is a ubiquitous and evolutionarily dynamic process that helps to ensure mate recognition, location of nutrients, avoidance of toxins, and social cooperation. Evolutionary changes in chemical communication systems progress through natural variation within the organism generating the signal as well as the responding individuals. A promising yet poorly understood system with which to probe the importance of this variation exists between D. melanogaster and S. cerevisiae. D. melanogaster relies on yeast for nutrients, while also serving as a vector for yeast cell dispersal. Both are outstanding genetic and genomic models, with Drosophila also serving as a preeminent model for sensory neurobiology. To help develop these two genetic models as an ecological model, we have tested if - and to what extent - S. cerevisiae is capable of producing polymorphic signaling through variation in metabolic volatiles. We have carried out a chemical phenotyping experiment for 14 diverse accessions within a common garden random block design. Leveraging genomic sequences for 11 of the accessions, we ensured a genetically broad sample and tested for phylogenetic signal arising from phenotypic dataset. Our results demonstrate that significant quantitative differences for volatile blends do exist among S. cerevisiae accessions. Of particular ecological relevance, the compounds driving the blend differences (acetoin, 2-phenyl ethanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol) are known ligands for D. melanogasters chemosensory receptors, and are related to sensory behaviors. Though unable to correlate the genetic and volatile measurements, our data point clear ways forward for behavioral assays aimed at understanding the implications of this variation. PMID:23990899

  19. Endocytosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: internalization of enveloped viruses into spheroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Makarow, M

    1985-01-01

    When vesicular stomatitis virus was incubated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae spheroplasts at 37 degrees C, part of the virus was internalized by the spheroplasts as shown by the following criteria. (i) The spheroplast-associated virus was protected from proteinase K digestion, which releases surface-bound virus by degrading the envelope glycoproteins. (ii) The spheroplast-associated virus was resistant to mild Triton X-100 treatment, which readily solubilizes the virus. The same results were obtained with Semliki Forest virus. Internalization of the two viruses followed linear kinetics up to 90 min at 37 degrees C. Internalization was concentration- and temperature-dependent. At 11 degrees C no uptake could be detected for at least 2 h. Homogenization and organelle fractionation protocols were designed for the S. cerevisiae spheroplasts to study the compartments into which the virions were internalized. Three compartments containing both marker viruses could be separated in density gradients. One coincided with vacuole markers, one banded at a slightly higher and one at a similar density to the plasma membrane markers. Thus, S. cerevisiae spheroplasts appear to have the capability of endocytosing particulate markers like viruses. The companion paper describes internalization of two soluble macromolecules, alpha-amylase and fluorescent dextran, into intact cells. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:2992948

  20. [Production of β-carotene by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jiaoyang; Liu, Yi; Yang, Hongjiang; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-08-01

    β-carotene has a wide range of application in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. For microbial production of β-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the supply of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) was firstly increased in S. cerevisiae BY4742 to obtain strain BY4742-T2 through over-expressing truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (tHMGR), which is the major rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, and GGPP synthase (GGPS), which is a key enzyme in the diterpenoid synthetic pathway. The β-carotene synthetic genes of Pantoea agglomerans and Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were further integrated into strain BY4742-T2 for comparing β-carotene production. Over-expression of tHMGR and GGPS genes led to 26.0-fold increase of β-carotene production. In addition, genes from X. dendrorhous was more efficient than those from P. agglomerans for β-carotene production in S. cerevisiae. Strain BW02 was obtained which produced 1.56 mg/g (dry cell weight) β-carotene, which could be used further for constructing cell factories for β-carotene production. PMID:25507473

  1. [Production of β-carotene by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jiaoyang; Liu, Yi; Yang, Hongjiang; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-08-01

    β-carotene has a wide range of application in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. For microbial production of β-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the supply of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) was firstly increased in S. cerevisiae BY4742 to obtain strain BY4742-T2 through over-expressing truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (tHMGR), which is the major rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, and GGPP synthase (GGPS), which is a key enzyme in the diterpenoid synthetic pathway. The β-carotene synthetic genes of Pantoea agglomerans and Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were further integrated into strain BY4742-T2 for comparing β-carotene production. Over-expression of tHMGR and GGPS genes led to 26.0-fold increase of β-carotene production. In addition, genes from X. dendrorhous was more efficient than those from P. agglomerans for β-carotene production in S. cerevisiae. Strain BW02 was obtained which produced 1.56 mg/g (dry cell weight) β-carotene, which could be used further for constructing cell factories for β-carotene production. PMID:25423750

  2. Combinatorial metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for terminal alkene production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Binbin; Lee, Dong-Yup; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2015-09-01

    Biological production of terminal alkenes has garnered a significant interest due to their industrial applications such as lubricants, detergents and fuels. Here, we engineered the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce terminal alkenes via a one-step fatty acid decarboxylation pathway and improved the alkene production using combinatorial engineering strategies. In brief, we first characterized eight fatty acid decarboxylases to enable and enhance alkene production. We then increased the production titer 7-fold by improving the availability of the precursor fatty acids. We additionally increased the titer about 5-fold through genetic cofactor engineering and gene expression tuning in rich medium. Lastly, we further improved the titer 1.8-fold to 3.7 mg/L by optimizing the culturing conditions in bioreactors. This study represents the first report of terminal alkene biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae, and the abovementioned combinatorial engineering approaches collectively increased the titer 67.4-fold. We envision that these approaches could provide insights into devising engineering strategies to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biochemicals in S. cerevisiae. PMID:26164646

  3. Transformations of inorganic mercury by Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Yannai, S.; Berdicevsky, I.; Duek, L. )

    1991-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans were incubated with 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75 {mu}g of Hg (as HgCl{sub 2}) per ml of Nelson's medium in the presence of trace amounts of oxygen at 28{degree}C for 12 days. Two control media were used, one without added Hg and one without yeast inoculum. Yeast cell growth was estimated after 1, 2, 3, and 8 days of incubation. The contents of organomercury in the system and of elemental mercury released from the media and collected in traps were determined at the end of the experiments. The results were as follows: (1) C. albicans was the more mercury-resistant species, but both yeast species failed to grown in the media containing 0.75 {mu}g of Hg per ml.; (2) The amounts of organomercury produced by the two species were proportional to the amount of HgCl{sub 2} added to the medium. In all cases C. albicans produced considerably larger amounts of methylmercury than S. cerevisiae; (3) The amounts of elemental Hg produced were inversely proportional to the HgCl{sub 2} level added in the case of S. cerevisiae but were all similar in the case of C. albicans;and (4) Neither organomercury nor elemental Hg was produced in any of the control media.

  4. Membrane Trafficking in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model

    PubMed Central

    Feyder, Serge; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Bertazzi, Dimitri L.; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM), or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC), and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway) or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway). Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END) and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway). Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes. PMID:25584613

  5. The postmitotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae after spaceflight showed higher viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zong-Chun; Li, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jie; Sun, Yan; Zhuang, Feng-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been proposed as an ideal model organism for clarifying the biological effects caused by spaceflight conditions. The postmitotic S. cerevisiae cells onboard Practice eight recoverable satellite were subjected to spaceflight for 15 days. After recovery, the viability, the glycogen content, the activities of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes, the DNA content and the lipid peroxidation level in yeast cells were analyzed. The viability of the postmitotic yeast cells after spaceflight showed a three-fold increase as compared with that of the ground control cells. Compared to the ground control cells, the lipid peroxidation level in the spaceflight yeast cells markedly decreased. The spaceflight yeast cells also showed an increase in G2/M cell population and a decrease in Sub-G1 cell population. The glycogen content and the activities of hexokinase and succinate dehydrogenase significantly decreased in the yeast cells after spaceflight. In contrast, the activity of malate dehydrogenase showed an obvious increase after spaceflight. These results suggested that microgravity or spaceflight could promote the survival of postmitotic S. cerevisiae cells through regulating carbohydrate metabolism, ROS level and cell cycle progression.

  6. Copper oxide nanoparticles inhibit the metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mashock, Michael J; Kappell, Anthony D; Hallaj, Nadia; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2016-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are used increasingly in industrial applications and consumer products and thus may pose risk to human and environmental health. The interaction of CuO NPs with complex media and the impact on cell metabolism when exposed to sublethal concentrations are largely unknown. In the present study, the short-term effects of 2 different sized manufactured CuO NPs on metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. The role of released Cu(2+) during dissolution of NPs in the growth media and the CuO nanostructure were considered. Characterization showed that the 28 nm and 64 nm CuO NPs used in the present study have different primary diameter, similar hydrodynamic diameter, and significantly different concentrations of dissolved Cu(2+) ions in the growth media released from the same initial NP mass. Exposures to CuO NPs or the released Cu(2+) fraction, at doses that do not have impact on cell viability, showed significant inhibition on S. cerevisiae cellular metabolic activity. A greater CuO NP effect on the metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae growth under respiring conditions was observed. Under the tested conditions the observed metabolic inhibition from the NPs was not explained fully by the released Cu ions from the dissolving NPs. PMID:26178758

  7. Ribosomal Protein Rps26 Influences 80S Ribosome Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Levanova, Nadezhda; Tabakova, Irina; Rospert, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The eukaryotic ribosome consists of a small (40S) and a large (60S) subunit. Rps26 is one of the essential ribosomal proteins of the 40S subunit and is encoded by two almost identical genes, RPS26a and RPS26b. Previous studies demonstrated that Rps26 interacts with the 5′ untranslated region of mRNA via the eukaryote-specific 62-YXXPKXYXK-70 (Y62–K70) motif. Those observations suggested that this peptide within Rps26 might play an important and specific role during translation initiation. By using alanine-scanning mutagenesis and engineered strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that single amino acid substitutions within the Y62–K70 motif of Rps26 did not affect the in vivo function of the protein. In contrast, complete deletion of the Y62–K70 segment was lethal. The simultaneous replacement of five conserved residues within the Y62–K70 segment by alanines resulted in growth defects under stress conditions and produced distinct changes in polysome profiles that were indicative of the accumulation of free 60S subunits. Human Rps26 (Rps26-Hs), which displays significant homology with yeast Rps26, supported the growth of an S. cerevisiae Δrps26a Δrps26b strain. However, the Δrps26a Δrps26b double deletion strain expressing Rps26-Hs displayed substantial growth defects and an altered ratio of 40S/60S ribosomal subunits. The combined data strongly suggest that the eukaryote-specific motif within Rps26 does not play a specific role in translation initiation. Rather, the data indicate that Rps26 as a whole is necessary for proper assembly of the 40S subunit and the 80S ribosome in yeast. IMPORTANCE Rps26 is an essential protein of the eukaryotic small ribosomal subunit. Previous experiments demonstrated an interaction between the eukaryote-specific Y62–K70 segment of Rps26 and the 5′ untranslated region of mRNA. The data suggested a specific role of the Y62–K70 motif during translation initiation. Here, we report that single

  8. Recombination-Mediated Telomere Maintenance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Not Dependent on the Shu Complex

    PubMed Central

    van Mourik, Paula M.; de Jong, Jannie; Agpalo, Danielle; Claussin, Clémence; Rothstein, Rodney; Chang, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In cells lacking telomerase, telomeres shorten progressively during each cell division due to incomplete end-replication. When the telomeres become very short, cells enter a state that blocks cell division, termed senescence. A subset of these cells can overcome senescence and maintain their telomeres using telomerase-independent mechanisms. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, these cells are called ‘survivors’ and are dependent on Rad52-dependent homologous recombination and Pol32-dependent break-induced replication. There are two main types of survivors: type I and type II. The type I survivors require Rad51 and maintain telomeres by amplification of subtelomeric elements, while the type II survivors are Rad51-independent, but require the MRX complex and Sgs1 to amplify the C1–3A/TG1–3 telomeric sequences. Rad52, Pol32, Rad51, and Sgs1 are also important to prevent accelerated senescence, indicating that recombination processes are important at telomeres even before the formation of survivors. The Shu complex, which consists of Shu1, Shu2, Psy3, and Csm2, promotes Rad51-dependent homologous recombination and has been suggested to be important for break-induced replication. It also promotes the formation of recombination intermediates that are processed by the Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 complex, as mutations in the SHU genes can suppress various sgs1, top3, and rmi1 mutant phenotypes. Given the importance of recombination processes during senescence and survivor formation, and the involvement of the Shu complex in many of the same processes during DNA repair, we hypothesized that the Shu complex may also have functions at telomeres. Surprisingly, we find that this is not the case: the Shu complex does not affect the rate of senescence, does not influence survivor formation, and deletion of SHU1 does not suppress the rapid senescence and type II survivor formation defect of a telomerase-negative sgs1 mutant. Altogether, our data suggest that the Shu complex is not important

  9. Genome structure of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain widely used in bioethanol production

    PubMed Central

    Argueso, Juan Lucas; Carazzolle, Marcelo F.; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Duarte, Fabiana M.; Netto, Osmar V.C.; Missawa, Silvia K.; Galzerani, Felipe; Costa, Gustavo G.L.; Vidal, Ramon O.; Noronha, Melline F.; Dominska, Margaret; Andrietta, Maria G.S.; Andrietta, Sílvio R.; Cunha, Anderson F.; Gomes, Luiz H.; Tavares, Flavio C.A.; Alcarde, André R.; Dietrich, Fred S.; McCusker, John H.; Petes, Thomas D.; Pereira, Gonçalo A.G.

    2009-01-01

    Bioethanol is a biofuel produced mainly from the fermentation of carbohydrates derived from agricultural feedstocks by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One of the most widely adopted strains is PE-2, a heterothallic diploid naturally adapted to the sugar cane fermentation process used in Brazil. Here we report the molecular genetic analysis of a PE-2 derived diploid (JAY270), and the complete genome sequence of a haploid derivative (JAY291). The JAY270 genome is highly heterozygous (∼2 SNPs/kb) and has several structural polymorphisms between homologous chromosomes. These chromosomal rearrangements are confined to the peripheral regions of the chromosomes, with breakpoints within repetitive DNA sequences. Despite its complex karyotype, this diploid, when sporulated, had a high frequency of viable spores. Hybrid diploids formed by outcrossing with the laboratory strain S288c also displayed good spore viability. Thus, the rearrangements that exist near the ends of chromosomes do not impair meiosis, as they do not span regions that contain essential genes. This observation is consistent with a model in which the peripheral regions of chromosomes represent plastic domains of the genome that are free to recombine ectopically and experiment with alternative structures. We also explored features of the JAY270 and JAY291 genomes that help explain their high adaptation to industrial environments, exhibiting desirable phenotypes such as high ethanol and cell mass production and high temperature and oxidative stress tolerance. The genomic manipulation of such strains could enable the creation of a new generation of industrial organisms, ideally suited for use as delivery vehicles for future bioenergy technologies. PMID:19812109

  10. Double mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with alterations in global genome and transcription-coupled repair.

    PubMed Central

    Verhage, R A; van Gool, A J; de Groot, N; Hoeijmakers, J H; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway is thought to consist of two subpathways: transcription-coupled repair, limited to the transcribed strand of active genes, and global genome repair for nontranscribed DNA strands. Recently we cloned the RAD26 gene, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of human CSB/ERCC6, a gene involved in transcription-coupled repair and the disorder Cockayne syndrome. This paper describes the analysis of yeast double mutants selectively affected in each NER subpathway. Although rad26 disruption mutants are defective in transcription-coupled repair, they are not UV sensitive. However, double mutants of RAD26 with the global genome repair determinants RAD7 and RAD16 appeared more UV sensitive than the single rad7 or rad16 mutants but not as sensitive as completely NER-deficient mutants. These findings unmask a role of RAD26 and transcription-coupled repair in UV survival, indicate that transcription-coupled repair and global genome repair are partially overlapping, and provide evidence for a residual NER modality in the double mutants. Analysis of dimer removal from the active RPB2 gene in the rad7/16 rad26 double mutants revealed (i) a contribution of the global genome repair factors Rad7p and Rad16p to repair of the transcribed strand, confirming the partial overlap between both NER subpathways, and (ii) residual repair specifically of the transcribed strand. To investigate the transcription dependence of this repair activity, strand-specific repair of the inducible GAL7 gene was investigated. The template strand of this gene was repaired only under induced conditions, pointing to a role for transcription in the residual repair in the double mutants and suggesting that transcription-coupled repair can to some extent operate independently from Rad26p. Our findings also indicate locus heterogeneity for the dependence of transcription-coupled repair on RAD26. PMID:8552076

  11. SUB1 Plays a Negative Role during Starvation Induced Sporulation Program in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ritu; Vijayraghavan, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sub1 is involved in several cellular processes such as, transcription initiation, elongation, mRNA processing and DNA repair. It has also been reported to provide cellular resistance during conditions of oxidative DNA damage and osmotic stress. Here, we report a novel role of SUB1 during starvation stress-induced sporulation, which leads to meiosis and spore formation in diploid yeast cells. Deletion of SUB1 gene significantly increased sporulation efficiency as compared to the wild-type cells in S288c genetic background. Whereas, the sporulation functions of the sub1(Y66A) missense mutant were similar to Sub1. SUB1 transcript and protein levels are downregulated during sporulation, in highly synchronized and sporulation proficient wild-type SK1 cells. The changes in Sub1 levels during sporulation cascade correlate with the induction of middle sporulation gene expression. Deletion of SUB1 increased middle sporulation gene transcript levels with no effect on their induction kinetics. In wild-type cells, Sub1 associates with chromatin at these loci in a temporal pattern that correlates with their enhanced gene expression seen in sub1Δ cells. We show that SUB1 genetically interacts with HOS2, which led us to speculate that Sub1 might function with Set3 repressor complex during sporulation. Positive Cofactor 4, human homolog of Sub1, complemented the sub1Δ sporulation phenotype, suggesting conservation of function. Taken together, our results suggest that SUB1 acts as a negative regulator of sporulation. PMID:26147804

  12. A Genome-Wide Screen with Nicotinamide to Identify Sirtuin-Dependent Pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Choy, John S.; Qadri, Bayan; Henry, Leah; Shroff, Kunal; Bifarin, Olatomiwa; Basrai, Munira A.

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins are evolutionarily conserved NAD-dependent deacetylases that catalyze the cleavage of NAD+ into nicotinamide (NAM), which can act as a pan-sirtuin inhibitor in unicellular and multicellular organisms. Sirtuins regulate processes such as transcription, DNA damage repair, chromosome segregation, and longevity extension in yeast and metazoans. The founding member of the evolutionarily conserved sirtuin family, SIR2, was first identified in budding yeast. Subsequent studies led to the identification of four yeast SIR2 homologs HST1, HST2, HST3, and HST4. Understanding the downstream physiological consequences of inhibiting sirtuins can be challenging since most studies focus on single or double deletions of sirtuins, and mating defects in SIR2 deletions hamper genome-wide screens. This represents an important gap in our knowledge of how sirtuins function in highly complex biological processes such as aging, metabolism, and chromosome segregation. In this report, we used a genome-wide screen to explore sirtuin-dependent processes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by identifying deletion mutants that are sensitive to NAM. We identified 55 genes in total, 36 of which have not been previously reported to be dependent on sirtuins. We find that genome stability pathways are particularly vulnerable to loss of sirtuin activity. Here, we provide evidence that defects in sister chromatid cohesion renders cells sensitive to growth in the presence of NAM. The results of our screen provide a broad view of the biological pathways sensitive to inhibition of sirtuins, and advance our understanding of the function of sirtuins and NAD+ biology. PMID:26646153

  13. Characterization of genetically transformed Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeasts able to metabolize melibiose.

    PubMed Central

    Gasent-Ramírez, J M; Codón, A C; Benítez, T

    1995-01-01

    Three transformant (Mel+) Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast strains, CT-Mel, VS-Mel, and DADI-Mel, have been characterized. The strains, which originally lacked alpha-galactosidase activity (Mel-), had been transformed with a DNA fragment which possessed an ILV1-SMR1 allele of the ILV2 gene and a MEL1 gene. The three transformed strains showed growth rates similar to those of the untransformed controls in both minimal and semi-industrial (molasses) media. The alpha-galactosidase specific activity of strain CT-Mel was twice that of VS-Mel and DADI-Mel. The yield, YX/S (milligrams of protein per milligram of substrate), in minimal medium with raffinose as the carbon source was 2.5 times higher in the transformed strains than in the controls and was 1.5 times higher in CT-Mel than in VS-Mel and DADI-Mel. When molasses was used, YX/S (milligrams of protein per milliliter of culture) increased 8% when the transformed strains CT-Mel and DADI-Mel were used instead of the controls. Whereas no viable spores were recovered from either DADI-Mel or VS-Mel tetrads, genetic analysis carried out with CT-Mel indicated that the MEL1 gene has been integrated in two of three homologous loci. Analysis of the DNA content by flow cytometry indicated that strain CT-Mel was 3n, whereas VS-Mel was 2n and DADI-Mel was 1.5n. Electrophoretic karyotype and Southern blot analyses of the transformed strains showed that the MEL1 gene has been integrated in the same chromosomic band, probably chromosome XIII, in the three strains.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7793932

  14. Genomewide screening for genes associated with gliotoxin resistance and sensitivity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chamilos, Georgios; Lewis, Russell E; Lamaris, Gregory A; Albert, Nathaniel D; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2008-04-01

    Gliotoxin (GT) is a secondary fungal metabolite with pleiotropic immunosuppressive properties that have been implicated in Aspergillus virulence. However, the mechanisms of GT cytotoxicity and its molecular targets in eukaryotic cells have not been fully characterized. We screened a haploid library of Saccharomyces cerevisiae single-gene deletion mutants (4,787 strains in EUROSCARF) to identify nonessential genes associated with GT increased resistance (GT-IR) and increased sensitivity (GT-IS). The susceptibility of the wild-type parental strain BY4741 to GT was initially assessed by broth microdilution methods using different media. GT-IR and GT-IS were defined as a fourfold increase and decrease, respectively, in MIC, and this was additionally confirmed by susceptibility testing on agar yeast extract-peptone-glucose plates. The specificity of GT-IR and GT-IS mutants exhibiting normal growth compared with the wild-type strain was further tested in studies of their susceptibility to conventional antifungal agents, cycloheximide, and H2O2. GT-IR was associated with the disruption of genes acting in general metabolism (OPI1, SNF1, IFA38), mitochondrial function (RTG2), DNA damage repair (RAD18), and vesicular transport (APL2) and genes of unknown function (YGL235W, YOR345C, YLR456W, YGL072C). The disruption of three genes encoding transsulfuration (CYS3), mitochondrial function (MEF2), and an unknown function (YKL037W) led to GT-IS. Specificity for GT-IR and GT-IS was observed in all mutants. Importantly, the majority (69%) of genes implicated in GT-IR (6/10) and GT-IS (2/3) have human homologs. We identified novel Saccharomyces genes specifically implicated in GT-IR or GT-IS. Because most of these genes are evolutionarily conserved, further characterization of their function could improve our understanding of GT cytotoxicity mechanisms in humans. PMID:18212113

  15. HOMOLOGY, CORRESPONDENCE, AND CONTINUITY ACROSS DEVELOPMENT: THE CASE OF SLEEP

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    The developmental relations among different behaviors can take many forms. At one extreme, two behaviors emerge independently of one another and, at the other extreme, the emergence of one behavior depends on the prior emergence of the other. Whether the two behaviors in the latter case should be designated as developmentally homologous is explored in this essay by reviewing differing approaches to conceptualizing the development of sleep. It is argued that whereas the concept of developmental homology may offer little new to the understanding of sleep development, the conventional notion of evolutionary homology remains to be fully exploited. Identifying homologous sleep processes will benefit from the adoption of a developmental comparative approach that emphasizes real-time sleep dynamics and individual sleep components. Because evolution occurs through the modification of developmental processes, a new commitment to a developmental comparative approach to sleep is a necessary next step toward a better understanding of its evolution. PMID:22711221

  16. Homologous gene targeting in Caenorhabditis elegans by biolistic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Berezikov, Eugene; Bargmann, Cornelia I.; Plasterk, Ronald H. A.

    2004-01-01

    Targeted homologous recombination is a powerful approach for genome manipulation that is widely used for gene alteration and knockouts in mouse and yeast. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several methods of target-selected mutagenesis have been implemented but none of them provides the opportunity of introducing exact predefined changes into the genome. Although anecdotal cases of homologous gene targeting in C.elegans have been reported, no practical technique of gene targeting has been developed so far. In this work we demonstrate that transformation of C.elegans by microparticle bombardment (biolistic transformation) can result in homologous recombination between introduced DNA and the chromosomal locus. We describe a scaled up version of biolistic transformation that can be used as a method for homologous gene targeting in the worm. PMID:14982959

  17. Worst case estimation of homology design by convex analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, N.; Elishakoff, Isaac; Nakagiri, S.

    1998-01-01

    The methodology of homology design is investigated for optimum design of advanced structures. for which the achievement of delicate tasks by the aid of active control system is demanded. The proposed formulation of homology design, based on the finite element sensitivity analysis, necessarily requires the specification of external loadings. The formulation to evaluate the worst case for homology design caused by uncertain fluctuation of loadings is presented by means of the convex model of uncertainty, in which uncertainty variables are assigned to discretized nodal forces and are confined within a conceivable convex hull given as a hyperellipse. The worst case of the distortion from objective homologous deformation is estimated by the Lagrange multiplier method searching the point to maximize the error index on the boundary of the convex hull. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated in a numerical example using the eleven-bar truss structure.

  18. A mutation in PLC1, a candidate phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, causes aberrant mitotic chromosome segregation.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, W E; Fitzgerald-Hayes, M

    1993-01-01

    We identified a putative Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) gene, PLC1, which encodes a protein most similar to the delta class of PI-PLC enzymes. The PLC1 gene was isolated during a study of yeast strains that exhibit defects in chromosome segregation. plc1-1 cells showed a 10-fold increase in aberrant chromosome segregation compared with the wild type. Molecular analysis revealed that PLC1 encodes a predicted protein of 101 kDa with approximately 50 and 26% identity to the highly conserved X and Y domains of PI-PLC isozymes from humans, bovines, rats, and Drosophila melanogaster. The putative yeast protein also contains a consensus EF-hand domain that is predicted to bind calcium. Interestingly, the temperature-sensitive and chromosome missegregation phenotypes exhibited by plc1-1 cells were partially suppressed by exogenous calcium. Images PMID:8391635

  19. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae OXA1 gene is required for the correct assembly of cytochrome c oxidase and oligomycin-sensitive ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Altamura, N; Capitanio, N; Bonnefoy, N; Papa, S; Dujardin, G

    1996-03-11

    The nuclear gene OXA1 was first isolated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and found to be required at a post-translational step in cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis, probably at the level of assembly. Mutations in OXA1 lead to a complete respiratory deficiency. The protein Oxa1p is conserved through evolution and a human homolog has been isolated by functional complementation of a yeast oxa1- mutant. In order to further our understanding of the role of Oxa1p, we have constructed two yeast strains in which the OXA1 open reading frame was almost totally deleted. Cytochrome spectra and enzymatic activity measurements show the absence of heme aa3 and of a cytochrome c oxido-reductase activity and dramatic decrease of the oligomycin sensitive ATPase activity. Analysis of the respiratory complexes in non-denaturing gels reveals that Oxa1p is necessary for the correct assembly of the cytochrome c oxidase and the ATP synthase complex. PMID:8612730

  20. Homological properties of rings of functional-analytic type.

    PubMed Central

    Wodzicki, M

    1990-01-01

    Strong flatness properties are established for a large class of functional-analytic rings including all C*-algebras. This is later used to prove that all those rings satisfy excision in Hochschild and in cyclic homology over almost arbitrary rings of coefficients and that, for stable C*-algebras, the Hochschild and cyclic homology groups defined over an arbitrary coefficient ring k subset C of complex numbers (e.g., k = Z or Q) vanish in all dimensions. PMID:11607088

  1. MRFalign: protein homology detection through alignment of Markov random fields.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianzhu; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Zhiyong; Xu, Jinbo

    2014-03-01

    Sequence-based protein homology detection has been extensively studied and so far the most sensitive method is based upon comparison of protein sequence profiles, which are derived from multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of sequence homologs in a protein family. A sequence profile is usually represented as a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) or an HMM (Hidden Markov Model) and accordingly PSSM-PSSM or HMM-HMM comparison is used for homolog detection. This paper presents a new homology detection method MRFalign, consisting of three key components: 1) a Markov Random Fields (MRF) representation of a protein family; 2) a scoring function measuring similarity of two MRFs; and 3) an efficient ADMM (Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers) algorithm aligning two MRFs. Compared to HMM that can only model very short-range residue correlation, MRFs can model long-range residue interaction pattern and thus, encode information for the global 3D structure of a protein family. Consequently, MRF-MRF comparison for remote homology detection shall be much more sensitive than HMM-HMM or PSSM-PSSM comparison. Experiments confirm that MRFalign outperforms several popular HMM or PSSM-based methods in terms of both alignment accuracy and remote homology detection and that MRFalign works particularly well for mainly beta proteins. For example, tested on the benchmark SCOP40 (8353 proteins) for homology detection, PSSM-PSSM and HMM-HMM succeed on 48% and 52% of proteins, respectively, at superfamily level, and on 15% and 27% of proteins, respectively, at fold level. In contrast, MRFalign succeeds on 57.3% and 42.5% of proteins at superfamily and fold level, respectively. This study implies that long-range residue interaction patterns are very helpful for sequence-based homology detection. The software is available for download at http://raptorx.uchicago.edu/download/. A summary of this paper appears in the proceedings of the RECOMB 2014 conference, April 2-5. PMID:24675572

  2. Development of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain with Enhanced Resistance to Phenolic Fermentation Inhibitors in Lignocellulose Hydrolysates by Heterologous Expression of Laccase

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Simona; Cassland, Pierre; Jönsson, Leif J.

    2001-01-01

    To improve production of fuel ethanol from renewable raw materials, laccase from the white rot fungus Trametes versicolor was expressed under control of the PGK1 promoter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to increase its resistance to phenolic inhibitors in lignocellulose hydrolysates. It was found that the laccase activity could be enhanced twofold by simultaneous overexpression of the homologous t-SNARE Sso2p. The factors affecting the level of active laccase obtained, besides the cultivation temperature, included pH and aeration. Laccase-expressing and Sso2p-overexpressing S. cerevisiae was cultivated in the presence of coniferyl aldehyde to examine resistance to lignocellulose-derived phenolic fermentation inhibitors. The laccase-producing transformant had the ability to convert coniferyl aldehyde at a faster rate than a control transformant not expressing laccase, which enabled faster growth and ethanol formation. The laccase-producing transformant was also able to ferment a dilute acid spruce hydrolysate at a faster rate than the control transformant. A decrease in the content of low-molecular-mass aromatic compounds, accompanied by an increase in the content of high-molecular-mass compounds, was observed during fermentation with the laccase-expressing strain, illustrating that laccase was active even at the very low levels of oxygen supplied. Our results demonstrate the importance of phenolic compounds as fermentation inhibitors and the advantage of using laccase-expressing yeast strains for producing ethanol from lignocellulose. PMID:11229906

  3. Involvement of homologous recombination repair after proton-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Rostek, C; Turner, E L; Robbins, M; Rightnar, S; Xiao, W; Obenaus, A; Harkness, T A A

    2008-03-01

    Protection from chronic exposure to cosmic radiation, which is primarily composed of protons, in future manned missions to Mars and beyond is considered to be a key unresolved issue. To model the effects of cosmic radiation on a living cell, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells harboring various deletions of DNA repair genes to investigate the response of cells to DNA strand breaks caused by exposure to 250 MeV proton irradiation (linear energy transfer of 0.41 keV/microm). In our study, DNA strand breaks induced by exposure to protons were predominantly repaired via the homologous recombination and postreplication repair pathways. We simulated chronic exposure to proton irradiation by treating cells from colonies that survived proton treatment, after several rounds of subculturing, to a second proton dose, as well as additional cell stressors. In general, cells cultured from proton surviving colonies were not more sensitive to secondary cell stressors. However, cells from rad52delta colonies that survived proton treatment showed increased resistance to secondary stressors, such as gamma-rays (1.17 and 1.33 MeV; 0.267 keV/microm), ultraviolet (UV) and proton irradiation and elevated temperatures. Resistance to secondary stressors was also observed in rad52delta cells that survived exposure to gamma-rays, rather than protons, but this was not observed to occur in rad52delta cells after UV irradiation. rad52delta cells that survived exposure to protons, followed by gamma-rays (proton surviving colonies were cultured prior to gamma-ray exposure), exhibited an additive effect, whereby these cells had a further increase in stress resistance. A genetic analysis indicated that increased stress resistance is most likely due to a second-site mutation that suppresses the rad52delta phenotype. We will discuss possible origins of these second-site mutations. PMID:18267950

  4. A yeast-based genetic screening to identify human proteins that increase homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Collavoli, Anita; Comelli, Laura; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Galli, Alvaro

    2008-05-01

    To identify new human proteins implicated in homologous recombination (HR), we set up 'a papillae assay' to screen a human cDNA library using the RS112 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae containing an intrachromosomal recombination substrate. We isolated 23 cDNAs, 11 coding for complete proteins and 12 for partially deleted proteins that increased HR when overexpressed in yeast. We characterized the effect induced by the overexpression of the complete human proteasome subunit beta 2, the partially deleted proteasome subunits alpha 3 and beta 8, the ribosomal protein L12, the brain abundant membrane signal protein (BASP1) and the human homologue to v-Ha-RAS (HRAS), which elevated HR by 2-6.5-fold over the control. We found that deletion of the RAD52 gene, which has a key role in most HR events, abolished the increase of HR induced by the proteasome subunits and HRAS; by contrast, the RAD52 deletion did not affect the high level of HR due to BASP1 and RPL12. This suggests that the proteins stimulated yeast HR via different mechanisms. Overexpression of the complete beta 2 human proteasome subunit or the partially deleted alpha 3 and beta 8 subunits increased methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) resistance much more in the rad52 Delta mutant than in the wild-type. Overexpression of RPL12 and BASP1 did not affect MMS resistance in both the wild-type and the rad52 Delta mutant, whereas HRAS decreased MMS resistance in the rad52 Delta mutant. The results indicate that these proteins may interfere with the pathway(s) involved in the repair of MMS-induced DNA damage. Finally, we provide further evidence that yeast is a helpful tool to identify human proteins that may have a regulatory role in HR. PMID:18248415

  5. An essential yeast gene with homology to the exonuclease-encoding XRN1/KEM1 gene also encodes a protein with exoribonuclease activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kenna, M.; Douglas, M.G. ); Stevens, A. ); McCammon, M. )

    1993-01-01

    This is a study of a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant from Saccharomyces cerevisiae which was obtained in a screen for mutants reduced in the synthesis of binding of a hybrid protein which competes for the transport of protein precursors into mitochondria. Examination of this mutant lead to the characterization of a gene with significant primary sequence homology to a previously identified gene, XRN1 or KEM1. Often called XRN1/KEM1, it encodes a protein of 175kDa which appears to have a multitude of properties, including involvement in recombination, RNA processing and turnover, involvement in recombination, RNA processing and turnover, microtubule function, karyogamy and DNA replication. The related gene describes further characterization of the HKE1/RAT1 gene and an hkal mutant and shows that p116 is a protein having 5[prime]-->3[prime] exoribonuclease activity, a major activity of the product of the related XRN1/KEM1 gene.

  6. Metagenomic gene annotation by a homology-independent approach

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, Jeff; Zhang, Tao; Salmeen, Annette; Hess, Matthias; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Wang, Zhong; Du, Changbin

    2011-06-02

    Fully understanding the genetic potential of a microbial community requires functional annotation of all the genes it encodes. The recently developed deep metagenome sequencing approach has enabled rapid identification of millions of genes from a complex microbial community without cultivation. Current homology-based gene annotation fails to detect distantly-related or structural homologs. Furthermore, homology searches with millions of genes are very computational intensive. To overcome these limitations, we developed rhModeller, a homology-independent software pipeline to efficiently annotate genes from metagenomic sequencing projects. Using cellulases and carbonic anhydrases as two independent test cases, we demonstrated that rhModeller is much faster than HMMER but with comparable accuracy, at 94.5percent and 99.9percent accuracy, respectively. More importantly, rhModeller has the ability to detect novel proteins that do not share significant homology to any known protein families. As {approx}50percent of the 2 million genes derived from the cow rumen metagenome failed to be annotated based on sequence homology, we tested whether rhModeller could be used to annotate these genes. Preliminary results suggest that rhModeller is robust in the presence of missense and frameshift mutations, two common errors in metagenomic genes. Applying the pipeline to the cow rumen genes identified 4,990 novel cellulases candidates and 8,196 novel carbonic anhydrase candidates.In summary, we expect rhModeller to dramatically increase the speed and quality of metagnomic gene annotation.

  7. Enhancing radiotherapy through a greater understanding of homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Christopher A.; Powell, Simon N.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer can cause a wide range of cellular effects, the most biologically potent of which is the double strand break in DNA. The process of repairing DNA double strand breaks involves one of two major mechanisms: non-homologous end-joining or homologous recombination. In this review, we review the molecular mechanisms of homologous recombination, in particular as it relates to the repair of DNA damage from ionizing radiation. We also present specific situations where homologous recombination may be dysfunctional in human cancers, and how this functional abnormality can be recognized. We also discuss the therapeutic opportunities that can be exploited based on deficiencies in homologous recombination at various steps in the DNA repair pathway. Side-by-side with these potential therapeutic opportunities, we review the contemporary clinical trials in which strategies to exploit these defects in homologous recombination can be enhanced by the use of radiotherapy in conjunction with biologically-targeted agents. We conclude that the field of radiation oncology has only scratched the surface of a potentially highly efficacious therapeutic strategy. PMID:20832019

  8. Identification of a CAP (adenylyl-cyclase-associated protein) homologous gene in Lentinus edodes and its functional complementation of yeast CAP mutants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G L; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, T; Tanaka, K; Shishido, K; Matsuda, H; Kawamukai, M

    1998-04-01

    The adenylyl-cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was originally identified in yeasts as a protein that functions in both signal transduction and cytoskeletal organization. This paper reports the identification of a cDNA and genomic DNA that encodes a CAP homologue from the mushroom Lentinus edodes. The L. edodes cap gene contains eight introns and an ORF encoding a 518 amino acid protein. The L. edodes CAP is 35.5% and 40.9% identical at the amino acid level with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CAP and Schizosaccharomyces pombe CAP, respectively. The C-terminal domain shows greater homology (39-46% identity) with yeast CAPs than does the N-terminal domain (27-35% identity). Southern blotting and Northern blotting results suggest that L. edodes cap is a single-copy gene and uniformly expressed. Expression of the L. edodes CAP in both Schiz. pombe and Sacch. cerevisiae complemented defects associated with the loss of the C-terminal domain function of the endogenous CAP. By using a yeast two-hybrid assay, an interaction was demonstrated between the L. edodes CAP and Schiz. pombe actin. This result and the functional complementation test indicate that CAP from L. edodes has a conserved C-terminal domain function. PMID:9579081

  9. A coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 enhances the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Adeboye, Peter Temitope; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of coniferyl aldehyde to cinnamic acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic growth conditions was previously observed. Bacteria such as Pseudomonas have been shown to harbor specialized enzymes for converting coniferyl aldehyde but no comparable enzymes have been identified in S. cerevisiae. CALDH from Pseudomonas was expressed in S. cerevisiae. An acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Ald5) was also hypothesized to be actively involved in the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic growth conditions in S. cerevisiae. In a second S. cerevisiae strain, the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD5) was deleted. A prototrophic control strain was also engineered. The engineered S. cerevisiae strains were cultivated in the presence of 1.1mM coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic condition in bioreactors. The results confirmed that expression of CALDH increased endogenous conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae and ALD5 is actively involved with the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27070284

  10. The human and mouse homologs of the yeat RAD52 gene: cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, assignment to human chromosome 12p12.2-p13, and mRNA expression in mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.; Chen, D.J.; Denison, K.

    1995-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD52 gene is involved in DNA double-strand break repair and mitotic/meiotic recombination. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of yeast S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and Kluyveromyces lactis and chicken is highly conserved. Using the technology of mixed oligonucleotide primed amplification of cDNA (MOPAC), two mouse RAD52 homologous cDNA fragments were amplified and sequenced. Subsequently, we have cloned the cDNA of the human and mouse homologs of yeast RAD52 gene by screening cDNA libraries using the identified mouse cDNA fragments. Sequence analysis of cDNA derived amino acid revealed a highly conserved N-terminus among human, mouse, chicken, and yeast RAD52 genes. The human RAD52 gene was assigned to chromosome 12p12.2-p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization, R-banding, and DNA analysis of somatic cell hybrids. Unlike chicken RAD52 and mouse RAD51, no significant difference in mouse RAD52 mRNA level was found among mouse heart, brain, spleen, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney, and testis. In addition to an {approximately}1.9-kb RAD52 mRNA band that is present in all of the tested tissues, an extra mRNA species of {approximately}0.85 kb was detectable in mouse testis. 40 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Creation of a synthetic xylose-inducible promoter for Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is currently used to produce ethanol from glucose, but it cannot utilize five-carbon sugars contained in the hemicellulose component of biomass feedstocks. S. cerevisiae strains engineered for xylose fermentation have been made using constitutive promoters to express the req...

  12. Sporulation in soil as an overwinter survival strategy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Knight, Sarah J; Goddard, Matthew R

    2016-02-01

    Due to its commercial value and status as a research model there is an extensive body of knowledge concerning Saccharomyces cerevisiae's cell biology and genetics. Investigations into S. cerevisiae's ecology are comparatively lacking, and are mostly focused on the behaviour of this species in high sugar, fruit-based environments; however, fruit is ephemeral, and presumably, S. cerevisiae has evolved a strategy to survive when this niche is not available. Among other places, S. cerevisiae has been isolated from soil which, in contrast to fruit, is a permanent habitat. We hypothesize that S. cerevisiae employs a life history strategy targeted at self-preservation rather than growth outside of the fruit niche, and resides in forest niches, such as soil, in a dormant and resistant sporulated state, returning to fruit via vectors such as insects. One crucial aspect of this hypothesis is that S. cerevisiae must be able to sporulate in the 'forest' environment. Here, we provide the first evidence for a natural environment (soil) where S. cerevisiae sporulates. While there are further aspects of this hypothesis that require experimental verification, this is the first step towards an inclusive understanding of the more cryptic aspects of S. cerevisiae's ecology. PMID:26568201

  13. ISOLATION OF A CYTOCHROME P-450 STRUCTURAL GENE FROM SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have transformed a Saccharomyces cerevisiae host with an S. cerevisiae genomic library contained in the shuttle vector YEp24 and screened the resultant transformants for resistance to ketoconazole (Kc), an inhibitor of the cytochrome P-450 (P-450) enzyme lanosterol 14-demethyl...

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Beer Spoilage Bacterium Megasphaera cerevisiae Strain PAT 1T

    PubMed Central

    Kutumbaka, Kirthi K.; Pasmowitz, Joshua; Mategko, James; Reyes, Dindo; Friedrich, Alex; Han, Sukkyun; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Neal-McKinney, Jason; Janagama, Harish K.; Nadala, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    The genus Megasphaera harbors important spoilage organisms that cause beer spoilage by producing off flavors, undesirable aroma, and turbidity. Megasphaera cerevisiae is mainly found in nonpasteurized low-alcohol beer. In this study, we report the draft genome of the type strain of the genus, M. cerevisiae strain PAT 1T. PMID:26358606

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Beer Spoilage Bacterium Megasphaera cerevisiae Strain PAT 1T.

    PubMed

    Kutumbaka, Kirthi K; Pasmowitz, Joshua; Mategko, James; Reyes, Dindo; Friedrich, Alex; Han, Sukkyun; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Neal-McKinney, Jason; Janagama, Harish K; Nadala, Cesar; Samadpour, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    The genus Megasphaera harbors important spoilage organisms that cause beer spoilage by producing off flavors, undesirable aroma, and turbidity. Megasphaera cerevisiae is mainly found in nonpasteurized low-alcohol beer. In this study, we report the draft genome of the type strain of the genus, M. cerevisiae strain PAT 1(T). PMID:26358606

  16. The RAD7 and RAD16 genes, which are essential for pyrimidine dimer removal from the silent mating type loci, are also required for repair of the nontranscribed strand of an active gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; de Groot, N; Gleig, F; Bang, D D; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1994-01-01

    The rad16 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was previously shown to be impaired in removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from the silent mating-type loci (D. D. Bang, R. A. Verhage, N. Goosen, J. Brouwer, and P. van de Putte, Nucleic Acids Res. 20:3925-3931, 1992). Here we show that rad7 as well as rad7 rad16 double mutants have the same repair phenotype, indicating that the RAD7 and RAD16 gene products might operate in the same nucleotide excision repair subpathway. Dimer removal from the genome overall is essentially incomplete in these mutants, leaving about 20 to 30% of the DNA unrepaired. Repair analysis of the transcribed RPB2 gene shows that the nontranscribed strand is not repaired at all in rad7 and rad16 mutants, whereas the transcribed strand is repaired in these mutants at a fast rate similar to that in RAD+ cells. When the results obtained with the RPB2 gene can be generalized, the RAD7 and RAD16 proteins not only are essential for repair of silenced regions but also function in repair of nontranscribed strands of active genes in S. cerevisiae. The phenotype of rad7 and rad16 mutants closely resembles that of human xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) cells, suggesting that RAD7 and RAD16 in S. cerevisiae function in the same pathway as the XPC gene in human cells. RAD4, which on the basis of sequence homology has been proposed to be the yeast XPC counterpart, seems to be involved in repair of both inactive and active yeast DNA, challenging the hypothesis that RAD4 and XPC are functional homologs. Images PMID:8065346

  17. Inactivation of the protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A results in morphological and transcriptional defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    van Zyl, W; Huang, W; Sneddon, A A; Stark, M; Camier, S; Werner, M; Marck, C; Sentenac, A; Broach, J R

    1992-01-01

    We have determined that TPD3, a gene previously identified in a screen for mutants defective in tRNA biosynthesis, most likely encodes the A regulatory subunit of the major protein phosphatase 2A species in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The predicted amino acid sequence of the product of TPD3 is highly homologous to the sequence of the mammalian A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. In addition, antibodies raised against Tpd3p specifically precipitate a significant fraction of the protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cell, and extracts of tpd3 strains yield a different chromatographic profile of protein phosphatase 2A than do extracts of isogenic TPD3 strains. tpd3 deletion strains generally grow poorly and have at least two distinct phenotypes. At reduced temperatures, tpd3 strains appear to be defective in cytokinesis, since most cells become multibudded and multinucleate following a shift to 13 degrees C. This is similar to the phenotype obtained by overexpression of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit or by loss of CDC55, a gene that encodes a protein with homology to a second regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. At elevated temperatures, tpd3 strains are defective in transcription by RNA polymerase III. Consistent with this in vivo phenotype, extracts of tpd3 strains fail to support in vitro transcription of tRNA genes, a defect that can be reversed by addition of either purified RNA polymerase III or TFIIIB. These results reinforce the notion that protein phosphatase 2A affects a variety of biological processes in the cell and provide an initial identification of critical substrates for this phosphatase. Images PMID:1328868

  18. Comparative Genome-Wide Screening Identifies a Conserved Doxorubicin Repair Network That Is Diploid Specific in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Westmoreland, Tammy J.; Wickramasekara, Sajith M.; Guo, Andrew Y.; Selim, Alice L.; Winsor, Tiffany S.; Greenleaf, Arno L.; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Olson, John A.; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Bennett, Craig B.

    2009-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic doxorubicin (DOX) induces DNA double-strand break (DSB) damage. In order to identify conserved genes that mediate DOX resistance, we screened the Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid deletion collection and identified 376 deletion strains in which exposure to DOX was lethal or severely reduced growth fitness. This diploid screen identified 5-fold more DOX resistance genes than a comparable screen using the isogenic haploid derivative. Since DSB damage is repaired primarily by homologous recombination in yeast, and haploid cells lack an available DNA homolog in G1 and early S phase, this suggests that our diploid screen may have detected the loss of repair functions in G1 or early S phase prior to complete DNA replication. To test this, we compared the relative DOX sensitivity of 30 diploid deletion mutants identified under our screening conditions to their isogenic haploid counterpart, most of which (n = 26) were not detected in the haploid screen. For six mutants (bem1Δ, ctf4Δ, ctk1Δ, hfi1Δ,nup133Δ, tho2Δ) DOX-induced lethality was absent or greatly reduced in the haploid as compared to the isogenic diploid derivative. Moreover, unlike WT, all six diploid mutants displayed severe G1/S phase cell cycle progression defects when exposed to DOX and some were significantly enhanced (ctk1Δ and hfi1Δ) or deficient (tho2Δ) for recombination. Using these and other “THO2-like” hypo-recombinogenic, diploid-specific DOX sensitive mutants (mft1Δ, thp1Δ, thp2Δ) we utilized known genetic/proteomic interactions to construct an interactive functional genomic network which predicted additional DOX resistance genes not detected in the primary screen. Most (76%) of the DOX resistance genes detected in this diploid yeast screen are evolutionarily conserved suggesting the human orthologs are candidates for mediating DOX resistance by impacting on checkpoint and recombination functions in G1 and/or early S phases. PMID:19503795

  19. Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) Antibody (ASCA) Test Systems. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-11-22

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system into class II (special controls). The special control that will apply to this device is a guidance document entitled "Guidance for Industry and FDA Reviewers: Class II Special Control Guidance Document for Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) Antibody (ASCA) Premarket Notifications." Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register. FDA is announcing the availability of this guidance document. The agency is taking this action in response to a petition submitted under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976, the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990, and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997. The agency is classifying these devices into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of the devices. PMID:11503713

  20. Oral administration of myostatin-specific recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae vaccine in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongtian; Zhou, Gang; Ren, Chonghua; Xu, Kun; Yan, Qiang; Li, Xinyi; Zhang, Tingting; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-04-29

    Yeast is considered as a simple and cost-effective host for protein expression, and our previous studies have proved that Saccharomyces cerevisiae can deliver recombinant protein and DNA into mouse dendritic cells and can further induce immune responses as novel vaccines. In order to know whether similar immune responses can be induced in rabbit by oral administration of such recombinant S. cerevisiae vaccine, we orally fed the rabbits with heat-inactivated myostatin-recombinant S. cerevisiae for 5 weeks, and then myostatin-specific antibody in serum was detected successfully by western blotting and ELISA assay. The rabbits treated with myostatin-recombinant S. cerevisiae vaccine grew faster and their muscles were much heavier than that of the control group. As a common experimental animal and a meat livestock with great economic value, rabbit was proved to be the second animal species that have been successfully orally immunized by recombinant S. cerevisiae vaccine after mice. PMID:27005809

  1. Human G protein-coupled receptor studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongfang; Wong, Winsy; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-08-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the largest families of membrane proteins, with approximately 800 different GPCRs in the human genome. Signaling via GPCRs regulates many biological processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and development. In addition, many receptors have a pivotal role in immunophysiology. Many hormones and neurotransmitters are ligands for these receptors, and hence it is not surprising that many drugs, either mimicking or blocking the action of the bodily substances, have been developed. It is estimated that 30-40% of current drugs on the market target GPCRs. Further identifying and elucidating the functions of GPCRs will provide opportunities for novel drug discovery, including for immunotherapy. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) is a very important and useful platform in this respect. There are many advantages of using a yeast assay system, as it is cheap, safe and stable; it is also convenient for rapid feasibility and optimization studies. Moreover, it offers a "null" background when studying human GPCRs. New developments regarding human GPCRs expressed in a yeast platform are providing insight into GPCR activation and signaling, and facilitate agonist and antagonist identification. In this review we summarize the latest findings regarding human G-protein-coupled receptors in studies using S. cerevisiae, ever since the year 2005 when we last published a review on this topic. We describe 11 families of GPCRs in detail, while including the principles and developments of each yeast system applied to these different GPCRs and highlight and generalize the experimental findings of GPCR function in these systems. PMID:26920251

  2. Heat shock response improves heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jin; Osterlund, Tobias; Liu, Zihe; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used platform for the production of heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. However, heterologous protein productivity is often low due to limitations of the host strain. Heat shock response (HSR) is an inducible, global, cellular stress response, which facilitates the cell recovery from many forms of stress, e.g., heat stress. In S. cerevisiae, HSR is regulated mainly by the transcription factor heat shock factor (Hsf1p) and many of its targets are genes coding for molecular chaperones that promote protein folding and prevent the accumulation of mis-folded or aggregated proteins. In this work, we over-expressed a mutant HSF1 gene HSF1-R206S which can constitutively activate HSR, so the heat shock response was induced at different levels, and we studied the impact of HSR on heterologous protein secretion. We found that moderate and high level over-expression of HSF1-R206S increased heterologous α-amylase yield 25 and 70 % when glucose was fully consumed, and 37 and 62 % at the end of the ethanol phase, respectively. Moderate and high level over-expression also improved endogenous invertase yield 118 and 94 %, respectively. However, human insulin precursor was only improved slightly and this only by high level over-expression of HSF1-R206S, supporting our previous findings that the production of this protein in S. cerevisiae is not limited by secretion. Our results provide an effective strategy to improve protein secretion and demonstrated an approach that can induce ER and cytosolic chaperones simultaneously. PMID:23208612

  3. Heterologous expression of cellulase genes in natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Davison, Steffi A; den Haan, Riaan; van Zyl, Willem Heber

    2016-09-01

    Enzyme cost is a major impediment to second-generation (2G) cellulosic ethanol production. One strategy to reduce enzyme cost is to engineer enzyme production capacity in a fermentative microorganism to enable consolidated bio-processing (CBP). Ideally, a strain with a high secretory phenotype, high fermentative capacity as well as an innate robustness to bioethanol-specific stressors, including tolerance to products formed during pre-treatment and fermentation of lignocellulosic substrates should be used. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a robust fermentative yeast but has limitations as a potential CBP host, such as low heterologous protein secretion titers. In this study, we evaluated natural S. cerevisiae isolate strains for superior secretion activity and other industrially relevant characteristics needed during the process of lignocellulosic ethanol production. Individual cellulases namely Saccharomycopsis fibuligera Cel3A (β-glucosidase), Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A (cellobiohydrolase), and Trichoderma reesei Cel5A (endoglucanase) were utilized as reporter proteins. Natural strain YI13 was identified to have a high secretory phenotype, demonstrating a 3.7- and 3.5-fold higher Cel7A and Cel5A activity, respectively, compared to the reference strain S288c. YI13 also demonstrated other industrially relevant characteristics such as growth vigor, high ethanol titer, multi-tolerance to high temperatures (37 and 40 °C), ethanol (10 % w/v), and towards various concentrations of a cocktail of inhibitory compounds commonly found in lignocellulose hydrolysates. This study accentuates the value of natural S. cerevisiae isolate strains to serve as potential robust and highly productive chassis organisms for CBP strain development. PMID:27470141

  4. Metabolic Engineering of Glycerol Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Overkamp, Karin M.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Kötter, Peter; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; van Dijken, Johannes P.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2002-01-01

    Inactivation of TPI1, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae structural gene encoding triose phosphate isomerase, completely eliminates growth on glucose as the sole carbon source. In tpi1-null mutants, intracellular accumulation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate might be prevented if the cytosolic NADH generated in glycolysis by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were quantitatively used to reduce dihydroxyacetone phosphate to glycerol. We hypothesize that the growth defect of tpi1-null mutants is caused by mitochondrial reoxidation of cytosolic NADH, thus rendering it unavailable for dihydroxyacetone-phosphate reduction. To test this hypothesis, a tpi1Δ nde1Δ nde2Δ gut2Δ quadruple mutant was constructed. NDE1 and NDE2 encode isoenzymes of mitochondrial external NADH dehydrogenase; GUT2 encodes a key enzyme of the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle. It has recently been demonstrated that these two systems are primarily responsible for mitochondrial oxidation of cytosolic NADH in S. cerevisiae. Consistent with the hypothesis, the quadruple mutant grew on glucose as the sole carbon source. The growth on glucose, which was accompanied by glycerol production, was inhibited at high-glucose concentrations. This inhibition was attributed to glucose repression of respiratory enzymes as, in the quadruple mutant, respiratory pyruvate dissimilation is essential for ATP synthesis and growth. Serial transfer of the quadruple mutant on high-glucose media yielded a spontaneous mutant with much higher specific growth rates in high-glucose media (up to 0.10 h−1 at 100 g of glucose · liter−1). In aerated batch cultures grown on 400 g of glucose · liter−1, this engineered S. cerevisiae strain produced over 200 g of glycerol · liter−1, corresponding to a molar yield of glycerol on glucose close to unity. PMID:12039737

  5. Exploring the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Volatile Metabolome: Indigenous versus Commercial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Zélia; Melo, André; Figueiredo, Ana Raquel; Coimbra, Manuel A.; Gomes, Ana C.; Rocha, Sílvia M.

    2015-01-01

    Winemaking is a highly industrialized process and a number of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are used around the world, neglecting the diversity of native yeast strains that are responsible for the production of wines peculiar flavours. The aim of this study was to in-depth establish the S. cerevisiae volatile metabolome and to assess inter-strains variability. To fulfill this objective, two indigenous strains (BT2652 and BT2453 isolated from spontaneous fermentation of grapes collected in Bairrada Appellation, Portugal) and two commercial strains (CSc1 and CSc2) S. cerevisiae were analysed using a methodology based on advanced multidimensional gas chromatography (HS-SPME/GC×GC-ToFMS) tandem with multivariate analysis. A total of 257 volatile metabolites were identified, distributed over the chemical families of acetals, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, terpenic compounds, esters, ethers, furan-type compounds, hydrocarbons, pyrans, pyrazines and S-compounds. Some of these families are related with metabolic pathways of amino acid, carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism as well as mono and sesquiterpenic biosynthesis. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used with a dataset comprising all variables (257 volatile components), and a distinction was observed between commercial and indigenous strains, which suggests inter-strains variability. In a second step, a subset containing esters and terpenic compounds (C10 and C15), metabolites of particular relevance to wine aroma, was also analysed using PCA. The terpenic and ester profiles express the strains variability and their potential contribution to the wine aromas, specially the BT2453, which produced the higher terpenic content. This research contributes to understand the metabolic diversity of indigenous wine microflora versus commercial strains and achieved knowledge that may be further exploited to produce wines with peculiar aroma properties. PMID:26600152

  6. Structure of human DNMT2, an enigmatic DNA methyltransferase homolog that displays denaturant-resistant binding to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Aiping; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Zhang, Xing; Zhou, Lan; Bestor, Timothy H.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2001-01-01

    DNMT2 is a human protein that displays strong sequence similarities to DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferases (m5C MTases) of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. DNMT2 contains all 10 sequence motifs that are conserved among m5C MTases, including the consensus S-adenosyl-l-methionine-binding motifs and the active site ProCys dipeptide. DNMT2 has close homologs in plants, insects and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, but no related sequence can be found in the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Caenorhabditis elegans. The crystal structure of a deletion mutant of DNMT2 complexed with S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (AdoHcy) has been determined at 1.8 Å resolution. The structure of the large domain that contains the sequence motifs involved in catalysis is remarkably similar to that of M.HhaI, a confirmed bacterial m5C MTase, and the smaller target recognition domains of DNMT2 and M.HhaI are also closely related in overall structure. The small domain of DNMT2 contains three short helices that are not present in M.HhaI. DNMT2 binds AdoHcy in the same conformation as confirmed m5C MTases and, while DNMT2 shares all sequence and structural features with m5C MTases, it has failed to demonstrate detectable transmethylase activity. We show here that homologs of DNMT2, which are present in some organisms that are not known to methylate their genomes, contain a specific target-recognizing sequence motif including an invariant CysPheThr tripeptide. DNMT2 binds DNA to form a denaturant-resistant complex in vitro. While the biological function of DNMT2 is not yet known, the strong binding to DNA suggests that DNMT2 may mark specific sequences in the genome by binding to DNA through the specific target-recognizing motif. PMID:11139614

  7. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantin Mischaikow; Michael Schatz; William Kalies; Thomas Wanner

    2010-05-24

    This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure Characterization

  8. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantin Mischaikow, Rutgers University /Georgia Institute of Technology, Michael Schatz, Georgia Institute of Technology, William Kalies, Florida Atlantic University, Thomas Wanner,George Mason University

    2010-05-19

    This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure Characterization

  9. Tocopherol and tocotrienol homologs in parenteral lipid emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A; Pavlina, Thomas M; Zaloga, Gary P; Siddiqui, Rafat A

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral lipid emulsions, which are made of oils from plant and fish sources, contain different types of tocopherols and tocotrienols (vitamin E homologs). The amount and types of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions vary considerably and are not completely known. The objective of this analysis was to develop a quantitative method to determine levels of all vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions. An HPLC system was used to measure vitamin E homologs using a Pinnacle DB Silica normal phase column and an isocratic, n-hexane:1,4 dioxane (98:2) mobile phase. An optimized protocol was used to report vitamin E homolog concentrations in soybean oil-based (Intralipid®, Ivelip®, Lipofundin® N, Liposyn® III, and Liposyn® II), medium- and long-chain fatty acid-based (Lipofundin®, MCT and Structolipid®), olive oil-based (ClinOleic®), and fish oil-based (Omegaven®) and mixture of these oils-based (SMOFlipid®, Lipidem®) commercial parenteral lipid emulsions. Total content of all vitamin E homologs varied greatly between different emulsions, ranging from 57.9 to 383.9 µg/mL. Tocopherols (α, β, γ, δ) were the predominant vitamin E homologs for all emulsions, with tocotrienol content < 0.3%. In all of the soybean emulsions, except for Lipofundin® N, the predominant vitamin E homolog was γ-tocopherol, which ranged from 57–156 µg/mL. ClinOleic® predominantly contained α-tocopherol (32 µg/mL), whereas α-tocopherol content in Omegaven® was higher than most of the other lipid emulsions (230 µg/mL). Practical applications The information on the types and quantity of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions will be extremely useful to physicians and healthcare personnel in selecting appropriate lipid emulsions that are exclusively used in patients with inadequate gastrointestinal function, including hospitalized and critically ill patients. Some emulsions may require vitamin E supplementation in order to meet minimal human requirements

  10. Mutants of the Formyltetrahydrofolate Interconversion Pathway of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, K. Q.; Jones, Elizabeth W.

    1977-01-01

    Thirteen mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lack one or more of the three enzyme activities of the pathway for interconversion of tetrahydrofolate coenzymes at the formate level of oxidation have been isolated. They do not require adenine. All fail to complement mutations in the ade3 locus. Mutations that greatly reduce activity for one enzyme also reduce activity for the other two interconversion enzymes. The three enzyme activities cochromatograph on TEAE-cellulose columns. A mutation that eliminates synthetase activity also alters the chromatographic behavior of the remaining cyclohydrolase and dehydrogenase activities. It is suggested that the three activities reside in an enzyme complex encoded by the ade3 locus. PMID:328341

  11. Immobilized cell cross-flow reactor. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chotani, G.K.; Constantinides, A.

    1984-01-01

    A cross-current flow reactor was operated using sodium alginate gel entrapped yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) under growth conditions. Micron-sized silica, incorporated into the biocatalyst particles (1 mm mean diameter) improved mechanical strength and internal surface adhesion. The process showed decreased productivity and stability at 35/sup 0/C compared to the normal study done at 30/sup 0/C. The increased number of cross flows diminish the product inhibition effect. The residence time distribution shows that the cross-flow bioreactor system can be approximated to either a train of backmixed fermentors in series or a plug flow fermentor with moderate axial dispersion.

  12. Transfer RNA splicing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: defining the substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, R C; Lee, M C; Knapp, G

    1984-01-01

    The primary sequences of all the tRNA precursors which contain intervening sequences and which accumulate in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae rnal mutant are presented. A combination of DNA and RNA sequence analysis has led to elucidation of the primary sequence of four hitherto uncharacterized precursors. The location of the intervening sequence has in all cases been unambiguously determined by analysis of the intermediates in the splicing reaction. Secondary structures based upon the tRNA cloverleaf are shown for all the tRNA precursors and discussed with respect to common recognition by the yeast splicing endonuclease. Images PMID:6096826

  13. SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE Recessive Suppressor That Circumvents Phosphatidylserine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Katharine D.

    1984-01-01

    Phenotypic reversion of six independent Saccharomyces cerevisiae cho1 mutants was shown to be due predominantly to mutation of an unlinked gene, eam1. The eam1 gene was located very close to ino1 on chromosome X by meiotic tetrad analysis. Recessive eam1 mutations did not correct the primary cho1 defect in phosphatidylserine synthesis but made endogenous ethanolamine available for sustained nitrogenous phospholipid synthesis. A novel biochemical contribution to nitrogenous lipid synthesis is indicated by the eam1 mutants. PMID:17246236

  14. Metabolism of sulfur amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Surdin-Kerjan, Y

    1997-01-01

    Sulfur amino acid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a large number of enzymes required for the de novo biosynthesis of methionine and cysteine and the recycling of organic sulfur metabolites. This review summarizes the details of these processes and analyzes the molecular data which have been acquired in this metabolic area. Sulfur biochemistry appears not to be unique through terrestrial life, and S. cerevisiae is one of the species of sulfate-assimilatory organisms possessing a larger set of enzymes for sulfur metabolism. The review also deals with several enzyme deficiencies that lead to a nutritional requirement for organic sulfur, although they do not correspond to defects within the biosynthetic pathway. In S. cerevisiae, the sulfur amino acid biosynthetic pathway is tightly controlled: in response to an increase in the amount of intracellular S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), transcription of the coregulated genes is turned off. The second part of the review is devoted to the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. The coordinated response to AdoMet requires two cis-acting promoter elements. One centers on the sequence TCACGTG, which also constitutes a component of all S. cerevisiae centromeres. Situated upstream of the sulfur genes, this element is the binding site of a transcription activation complex consisting of a basic helix-loop-helix factor, Cbf1p, and two basic leucine zipper factors, Met4p and Met28p. Molecular studies have unraveled the specific functions for each subunit of the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex as well as the modalities of its assembly on the DNA. The Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex contains only one transcription activation module, the Met4p subunit. Detailed mutational analysis of Met4p has elucidated its functional organization. In addition to its activation and bZIP domains, Met4p contains two regulatory domains, called the inhibitory region and the auxiliary domain. When the level of intracellular AdoMet increases

  15. Raw starch conversion by Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Aspergillus tubingensis amylases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Starch is one of the most abundant organic polysaccharides available for the production of bio-ethanol as an alternative transport fuel. Cost-effective utilisation of starch requires consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) where a single microorganism can produce the enzymes required for hydrolysis of starch, and also convert the glucose monomers to ethanol. Results The Aspergillus tubingensis T8.4 α-amylase (amyA) and glucoamylase (glaA) genes were cloned and expressed in the laboratory strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y294 and the semi-industrial strain, S. cerevisiae Mnuα1. The recombinant AmyA and GlaA displayed protein sizes of 110–150 kDa and 90 kDa, respectively, suggesting significant glycosylation in S. cerevisiae. The Mnuα1[AmyA-GlaA] and Y294[AmyA-GlaA] strains were able to utilise 20 g l-1 raw corn starch as sole carbohydrate source, with ethanol titers of 9.03 and 6.67 g l-1 (0.038 and 0.028 g l-1 h-1), respectively, after 10 days. With a substrate load of 200 g l-1 raw corn starch, Mnuα1[AmyA-GlaA] yielded 70.07 g l-1 ethanol (0.58 g l-1 h-1) after 120 h of fermentation, whereas Y294[AmyA-GlaA] was less efficient at 43.33 g l-1 ethanol (0.36 g l-1 h-1). Conclusions In a semi-industrial amylolytic S. cerevisiae strain expressing the A. tubingensis α-amylase and glucoamylase genes, 200 g l-1 raw starch was completely hydrolysed (saccharified) in 120 hours with 74% converted to released sugars plus fermentation products and the remainder presumably to biomass. The single-step conversion of raw starch represents significant progress towards the realisation of CBP without the need for any heat pretreatment. Furthermore, the amylases were produced and secreted by the host strain, thus circumventing the need for exogenous amylases. PMID:24286270

  16. RNAi-Assisted Genome Evolution (RAGE) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Si, Tong; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-assisted genome evolution (RAGE) applies directed evolution principles to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes. Here, we use acetic acid tolerance as a target trait to describe the key steps of RAGE. Briefly, iterative cycles of RNAi screening are performed to accumulate multiplex knockdown modifications, enabling directed evolution of the yeast genome and continuous improvement of a target phenotype. Detailed protocols are provided on the reconstitution of RNAi machinery, creation of genome-wide RNAi libraries, identification and integration of beneficial knockdown cassettes, and repeated RAGE cycles. PMID:27581294

  17. Isobutanol production from D-xylose by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brat, Dawid; Boles, Eckhard

    2013-03-01

    Simultaneous overexpression of an optimized, cytosolically localized valine biosynthesis pathway together with overexpression of xylose isomerase XylA from Clostridium phytofermentans, transaldolase Tal1 and xylulokinase Xks1 enabled recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to complement the valine auxotrophy of ilv2,3,5 triple deletion mutants for growth on D-xylose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, after additional overexpression of ketoacid decarboxylase Aro10 and alcohol dehydrogenase Adh2, the cells were able to ferment D-xylose directly to isobutanol. PMID:23279585

  18. Differential repair of UV damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Terleth, C; van Sluis, C A; van de Putte, P

    1989-01-01

    Preferential repair of UV-induced damage is a phenomenon by which mammalian cells might enhance their survival. This paper presents the first evidence that preferential repair occurs in the lower eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover an unique approach is reported to compare identical sequences present on the same chromosome and only differing in expression. We determined the removal of pyrimidine dimers from two identical alpha-mating type loci and we were able to show that the active MAT alpha locus is repaired preferentially to the inactive HML alpha locus. In a sir-3 mutant, in which both loci are active this preference is not observed. Images PMID:2664708

  19. Use of bimolecular fluorescence complementation in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Zhao, Xueqiang; Weber, Marion; Jantti, Jussi

    2008-01-01

    Visualization of protein-protein interactions in vivo offers a powerful tool to resolve spatial and temporal aspects of cellular functions. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) makes use of nonfluorescent fragments of green fluorescent protein or its variants that are added as "tags" to target proteins under study. Only upon target protein interaction is a fluorescent protein complex assembled and the site of interaction can be monitored by microscopy. In this chapter, we describe the method and tools for use of BiFC in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19066026

  20. Genetic approaches for identifying kinetochore components in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Doheny, K.F.; Puziss, J.; Spencer, F.; Hieter, P.

    1993-12-31

    A fundamental aspect of the cell division cycle is the chromosome cycle in which each of the chromosomal DNA molecules undergoes a series of morphological changes and complex movements to ensure faithful distribution at mitosis. The gene products responsible for execution of the chromosome cycle include structural components, such as those that assemble into the mitotic spindle apparatus, and regulatory components, such as those that coordinate the ordered series of events leading to chromosome segregation within the cell cycle. We have been taking several genetic approaches to identify genes encoding determinants critical to the chromosome cycle in the budding yeast, S. cerevisiae.

  1. Expression of acylphosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enhances ethanol fermentation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Raugei, G.; Modesti, A.; Magherini, F.

    1996-06-01

    Previous experiments in vitro have demonstrated the ability of acylphosphatase to increase the rate of glucose fermentation in yeast. To evaluate the possibility of increasing fermentation in vivo also, a chemically synthesized DNA sequence coding for human muscle acylphosphatase was expressed at high level in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ethanol production was measured in these engineered strains in comparison with a control. Acylphosphatase expression strongly increased the rate of ethanol production both in aerobic and anaerobic culture. This finding may be potentially important for the development of more efficient industrial fermentation processes. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  2. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate recombination structures is central to driving the specific outcomes of DSB repair during meiosis. Replication protein A (RPA) is the main ssDNA-binding protein complex involved in DNA metabolism. However, the existence of RPA orthologs in plants and the recent discovery of meiosis specific with OB domains (MEIOB), a widely conserved meiosis-specific RPA1 paralog, strongly suggest that multiple RPA complexes evolved and specialized to subdivide their roles during DNA metabolism. Here we review ssDNA formation and maturation during mitotic and meiotic recombination underlying the meiotic specific features. We describe and discuss the existence and properties of MEIOB and multiple RPA subunits in plants and highlight how they can provide meiosis-specific fates to ssDNA processing during homologous recombination. Understanding the functions of these RPA homologs and how they interact with the canonical RPA subunits is of major interest in the fields of meiosis and DNA repair. PMID:26520106

  3. Fold homology detection using sequence fragment composition profiles of proteins.

    PubMed

    Solis, Armando D; Rackovsky, Shalom R

    2010-10-01

    The effectiveness of sequence alignment in detecting structural homology among protein sequences decreases markedly when pairwise sequence identity is low (the so-called "twilight zone" problem of sequence alignment). Alternative sequence comparison strategies able to detect structural kinship among highly divergent sequences are necessary to address this need. Among them are alignment-free methods, which use global sequence properties (such as amino acid composition) to identify structural homology in a rapid and straightforward way. We explore the viability of using tetramer sequence fragment composition profiles in finding structural relationships that lie undetected by traditional alignment. We establish a strategy to recast any given protein sequence into a tetramer sequence fragment composition profile, using a series of amino acid clustering steps that have been optimized for mutual information. Our method has the effect of compressing the set of 160,000 unique tetramers (if using the 20-letter amino acid alphabet) into a more tractable number of reduced tetramers (approximately 15-30), so that a meaningful tetramer composition profile can be constructed. We test remote homology detection at the topology and fold superfamily levels using a comprehensive set of fold homologs, culled from the CATH database that share low pairwise sequence similarity. Using the receiver-operating characteristic measure, we demonstrate potentially significant improvement in using information-optimized reduced tetramer composition, over methods relying only on the raw amino acid composition or on traditional sequence alignment, in homology detection at or below the "twilight zone". PMID:20635424

  4. Homology Modeling a Fast Tool for Drug Discovery: Current Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, V. K.; Ukawala, R. D.; Ghate, M.; Chintha, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery. PMID:23204616

  5. DNA sequence alignment by microhomology sampling during homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhi; Redding, Sy; Lee, Ja Yil; Gibb, Bryan; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Gaines, William A.; Sung, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Summary Homologous recombination (HR) mediates the exchange of genetic information between sister or homologous chromatids. During HR, members of the RecA/Rad51 family of recombinases must somehow search through vast quantities of DNA sequence to align and pair ssDNA with a homologous dsDNA template. Here we use single-molecule imaging to visualize Rad51 as it aligns and pairs homologous DNA sequences in real-time. We show that Rad51 uses a length-based recognition mechanism while interrogating dsDNA, enabling robust kinetic selection of 8-nucleotide (nt) tracts of microhomology, which kinetically confines the search to sites with a high probability of being a homologous target. Successful pairing with a 9th nucleotide coincides with an additional reduction in binding free energy and subsequent strand exchange occurs in precise 3-nt steps, reflecting the base triplet organization of the presynaptic complex. These findings provide crucial new insights into the physical and evolutionary underpinnings of DNA recombination. PMID:25684365

  6. Mesodermal expression of the C. elegans HMX homolog mls-2 requires the PBC homolog CEH-20

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Shi, Herong; Amin, Nirav M.; Sultan, Ibrahim; Liu, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Metazoan development proceeds primarily through the regulated expression of genes encoding transcription factors and components of cell signaling pathways. One way to decipher the complex developmental programs is to assemble the underlying gene regulatory networks by dissecting the cis-regulatory modules that direct temporal-spatial expression of developmental genes and identify corresponding trans-regulatory factors. Here, we focus on the regulation of a HMX homoebox gene called mls-2, which functions at the intersection of a network that regulates cleavage orientation, cell proliferation and fate specification in the C. elegans postembryonic mesoderm. In addition to its transient expression in the postembryonic mesodermal lineage, the M lineage, mls-2 expression is detected in a subset of embryonic cells, in three pairs of head neurons and transiently in the somatic gonad. Through mutational analysis of the mls-2 promoter, we identified two elements (E1 and E2) involved in regulating the temporal-spatial expression of mls-2. In particular, we showed that one of the elements (E1) required for mls-2 expression in the M lineage contains two critical putative PBC-Hox binding sites that are evolutionarily conserved in C. briggsae and C. remanei. Furthermore, the C. elegans PBC homolog CEH-20 is required for mls-2 expression in the M lineage. Our data suggests that mls-2 might be a direct target of CEH-20 in the M lineage and that the regulation of CEH-20 on mls-2 is likely Hox-independent. PMID:18316179

  7. Structure of the C-terminal domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup133, a component of the nuclear pore complex

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Gheyi, Tarun; Miller, Stacy A.; Bain, Kevin T.; Dickey, Mark; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Kim, Seung Joong; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Martel, Anne; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-10-23

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), responsible for the nucleo-cytoplasmic exchange of proteins and nucleic acids, are dynamic macromolecular assemblies forming an eight-fold symmetric co-axial ring structure. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) NPCs are made up of at least 456 polypeptide chains of {approx}30 distinct sequences. Many of these components (nucleoporins, Nups) share similar structural motifs and form stable subcomplexes. We have determined a high-resolution crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of yeast Nup133 (ScNup133), a component of the heptameric Nup84 subcomplex. Expression tests yielded ScNup133(944-1157) that produced crystals diffracting to 1.9{angstrom} resolution. ScNup133(944-1157) adopts essentially an all {alpha}-helical fold, with a short two stranded {beta}-sheet at the C-terminus. The 11 {alpha}-helices of ScNup133(944-1157) form a compact fold. In contrast, the previously determined structure of human Nup133(934-1156) bound to a fragment of human Nup107 has its constituent {alpha}-helices are arranged in two globular blocks. These differences may reflect structural divergence among homologous nucleoporins.

  8. Oxygen-dependent upstream activation sites of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytochrome c genes are related forms of the same sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Cerdan, M.E.; Zitomer, R.S.

    1988-06-01

    In Sacchariomyces cerevisiae, the two genes, CYC1 and CYC7, that encode the isoforms of cytochrome c are expressed at different levels. Oxygen regulation is indicated by the expression of the CYP1 gene, and the CYP1 protein interacts with both CYC1 upstream activation sequence 1 (UAS1) and CYC7 UAS/sub 0/. In this study, the homology between the CYP1-binding sites of both genes was investigated. The most noticeable difference between the CYC1 and CYC7 UASs is the presence of GC base pairs at the same positions in a repeated sequence in CYC7 compared with CG base pairs in CYC1. Directed mutagenesis changing these GC residues to CG residues in CYC7 led to CYC1-like expression of CYC7 both in a CYP1 wild-type strain and in a strain carrying the semidominant mutation CYP1-16 which reverses the oxygen-dependent expression of the two genes. The authors' results strongly support the hypothesis that the CYP1-binding sites in CYC1 and CYC7 are related forms of the same sequence and that the CYP1-16 protein has altered specificity for the variant forms of the concensus sequences in both genes.

  9. The Kar3-interacting protein Cik1p plays a critical role in passage through meiosis I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, R M; Kamieniecki, R J; Dawson, D S

    2001-01-01

    Meiosis I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is dependent upon the motor protein Kar3. Absence of Kar3p in meiosis results in an arrest in prophase I. Cik1p and Vik1p are kinesin-associated proteins known to modulate the function of Kar3p in the microtubule-dependent processes of karyogamy and mitosis. Experiments were performed to determine whether Cik1p and Vik1p are also important for the function of Kar3p during meiosis. The meiotic phenotypes of a cik1 mutant were found to be similar to those of kar3 mutants. Cells without Cik1p exhibit a meiotic defect in homologous recombination and synaptonemal complex formation. Most cik1 mutant cells, like kar3 mutants, arrest in meiotic prophase; however, in cik1 mutants this arrest is less severe. These data are consistent with the model that Cik1p is necessary for some, but not all, of the roles of Kar3p in meiosis I. vik1 mutants sporulate at wild-type levels, but have reduced spore viability. This loss in viability is partially attributable to vegetative chromosome loss in vik1 diploids. Cellular localization experiments reveal that Kar3p, Cik1p, and Vik1p are present throughout meiosis and are consistent with Cik1p and Vik1p having different meiotic roles. PMID:11729143

  10. Cloning, primary structure, and regulation of the HIS7 gene encoding a bifunctional glutamine amidotransferase: cyclase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kuenzler, M; Balmelli, T; Egli, C M; Paravicini, G; Braus, G H

    1993-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae HIS7 gene was cloned by its location immediately downstream of the previously isolated and characterized ARO4 gene. The two genes have the same orientation with a distance of only 416 bp between the two open reading frames. The yeast HIS7 gene represents the first isolated eukaryotic gene encoding the enzymatic activities which catalyze the fifth and sixth step in histidine biosynthesis. The open reading frame of the HIS7 gene has a length of 1,656 bp resulting in a gene product of 552 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 61,082. Two findings implicate a bifunctional nature of the HIS7 gene product. First, the N-terminal and C-terminal segments of the deduced HIS7 amino acid sequence show significant homology to prokaryotic monofunctional glutamine amidotransferases and cyclases, respectively, involved in histidine biosynthesis. Second, the yeast HIS7 gene is able to suppress His auxotrophy of corresponding Escherichia coli hisH and hisF mutants. HIS7 gene expression is regulated by the general control system of amino acid biosynthesis. GCN4-dependent and GCN4-independent (basal) transcription use different initiator elements in the HIS7 promoter. Images PMID:8366040

  11. The Expression of Millettia pinnata Chalcone Isomerase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Salt-Sensitive Mutants Enhances Salt-Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Hu, Tangjin; Huang, Jianzi; Lu, Xiang; Huang, Baiqu; Zheng, Yizhi

    2013-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a new Millettia pinnata chalcone isomerase (MpCHI) whose transcription level in leaf was confirmed to be enhanced after being treated by seawater or NaCl (500 mM) via transcriptome sequencing and Real-Time Quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR (QRT-PCR) analyses. Its full length cDNA (666 bp) was obtained by 3′-end and 5′-end Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE). The analysis via NCBI BLAST indicates that both aminoacid sequence and nucleotide sequence of the MpCHI clone share high homology with other leguminous CHIs (73%–86%). Evolutionarily, the phylogenic analysis further revealed that the MpCHI is a close relative of leguminous CHIs. The MpCHI protein consists of 221 aminoacid (23.64 KDa), whose peptide length, amino acid residues of substrate-binding site and reactive site are very similar to other leguminous CHIs reported previously. Two pYES2-MpCHI transformed salt-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants (Δnha1 and Δnhx1) showed improved salt-tolerance significantly compared to pYES2-vector transformed yeast mutants, suggesting the MpCHI or the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway could regulate the resistance to salt stress in M. pinnata. PMID:23615469

  12. Isolation of the SUP45 omnipotent suppressor gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and characterization of its gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Himmelfarb, H J; Maicas, E; Friesen, J D

    1985-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SUP45+ gene has been isolated from a genomic clone library by genetic complementation of paromomycin sensitivity, which is a property of a mutant strain carrying the sup45-2 allele. This plasmid complements all phenotypes associated with the sup45-2 mutation, including nonsense suppression, temperature sensitivity, osmotic sensitivity, and paromomycin sensitivity. Genetic mapping with a URA3+-marked derivative of the complementing plasmid that was integrated into the chromosome by homologous recombination demonstrated that the complementing fragment contained the SUP45+ gene and not an unlinked suppressor. The SUP45+ gene is present as a single copy in the haploid genome and is essential for viability. In vitro translation of the hybrid-selected SUP45+ transcript yielded a protein of Mr = 54,000, which is larger than any known ribosomal protein. RNA blot hybridization analysis showed that the steady-state level of the SUP45+ transcript is less than 10% of that for ribosomal protein L3 or rp59 transcripts. When yeast cells are subjected to a mild heat shock, the synthesis rate of the SUP45+ transcript was transiently reduced, approximately in parallel with ribosomal protein transcripts. Our data suggest that the SUP45+ gene does not encode a ribosomal protein. We speculate that it codes for a translation-related function whose precise nature is not yet known. Images PMID:3887137

  13. The PEP4 gene encodes an aspartyl protease implicated in the posttranslational regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar hydrolases.

    PubMed Central

    Woolford, C A; Daniels, L B; Park, F J; Jones, E W; Van Arsdell, J N; Innis, M A

    1986-01-01

    pep4 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae accumulate inactive precursors of vacuolar hydrolases. The PEP4 gene was isolated from a genomic DNA library by complementation of the pep4-3 mutation. Deletion analysis localized the complementing activity to a 1.5-kilobase pair EcoRI-XhoI restriction enzyme fragment. This fragment was used to identify an 1,800-nucleotide mRNA capable of directing the synthesis of a 44,000-dalton polypeptide. Southern blot analysis of yeast genomic DNA showed that the PEP4 gene is unique; however, several related sequences exist in yeasts. Tetrad analysis and mitotic recombination experiments localized the PEP4 gene proximal to GAL4 on chromosome XVI. Analysis of the DNA sequence indicated that PEP4 encodes a polypeptide with extensive homology to the aspartyl protease family. A comparison of the PEP4 predicted amino acid sequence with the yeast protease A protein sequence revealed that the two genes are, in fact, identical (see also Ammerer et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 6:2490-2499, 1986). Based on our observations, we propose a model whereby inactive precursor molecules produced from the PEP4 gene self-activate within the yeast vacuole and subsequently activate other vacuolar hydrolases. Images PMID:3537721

  14. BCS1, a novel gene required for the expression of functional Rieske iron-sulfur protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Nobrega, F G; Nobrega, M P; Tzagoloff, A

    1992-01-01

    Respiratory deficient pet mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae assigned to complementation group G2 define a new gene, named BCS1, whose product is shown to be necessary for the expression of functional ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase (bc1) complex. Immunological assays indicate a gross reduction in the Rieske iron-sulfur subunit in bcs1 mutants, while other subunits of the ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase complex are present at concentrations comparable to the wild type. Transformation of bcs1 mutants with the iron-sulfur protein gene on a multicopy plasmid led to elevated mitochondrial concentrations of Rieske protein, but did not correct the enzymatic defect, indicating that BCS1 is involved either in forming the active site iron-sulfur cluster or providing a chaperone-like function in assembling the Rieske protein with the other subunits of the complex. Both postulated functions are consistent with the localization of BCS1 in mitochondria. To facilitate further studies on this novel protein, BCS1 was cloned by transformation of a bcs1 mutant and its structure determined. The primary structure of the encoded BCS1 protein bears similarity to a group of proteins that have been implicated in intracellular protein sorting, membrane fusion and regulation of transcription. The region of BCS1 homologous to this diverse group of proteins is approximately 200 amino acids long and includes several signature sequences commonly found in ATPases and nucleotide binding proteins. Images PMID:1327750

  15. Pheromone signalling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the small GTP-binding protein Cdc42p and its activator CDC24.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Z S; Leung, T; Manser, E; Lim, L

    1995-01-01

    Pheromone signalling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by the STE4-STE18 G-protein beta gamma subunits. A possible target for the subunits is Ste20p, whose structural homolog, the serine/threonine kinase PAK, is activated by GTP-binding p21s Cdc42 and Rac1. The putative Cdc42p-binding domain of Ste20p, expressed as a fusion protein, binds human and yeast GTP-binding Cdc42p. Cdc42p is required for alpha-factor-induced activation of FUS1.cdc24ts strains defective for Cdc42p GDP/GTP exchange show no pheromone induction at restrictive temperatures but are partially rescued by overexpression of Cdc42p, which is potentiated by Cdc42p12V mutants. Epistatic analysis indicates that CDC24 and CDC42 lie between STE4 and STE20 in the pathway. The two-hybrid system revealed that Ste4p interacts with Cdc24p. We propose that Cdc42p plays a pivotal role both in polarization of the cytoskeleton and in pheromone signalling. PMID:7565673

  16. In Vivo Site-Specific Mutagenesis and Gene Collage Using the Delitto Perfetto System in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stuckey, Samantha; Mukherjee, Kuntal; Storici, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Delitto perfetto is a site-specific in vivo mutagenesis system that has been developed to generate changes at will in the genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using this technique, it is possible to rapidly and efficiently engineer yeast strains without requiring several intermediate steps as it functions in only two steps, both of which rely on homologous recombination to drive the changes to the target DNA region. The first step involves the insertion of a cassette containing two markers at or near the locus to be altered. The second step involves complete removal of this cassette with oligonucleotides and/or other genetic material and transfer of the expected genetic modification(s) to the chosen DNA locus. Here we provide a detailed protocol of the delitto perfetto approach and present examples of the most common and useful applications for in vivo mutagenesis to generate base substitutions, deletions, insertions, as well as for precise in vivo assembly and integration of multiple genetic elements, or gene collage. PMID:21660695

  17. FUN26 (function unknown now 26) protein from saccharomyces cerevisiae is a broad selectivity, high affinity, nucleoside and nucleobase transporter.

    PubMed

    Boswell-Casteel, Rebba C; Johnson, Jennifer M; Duggan, Kelli D; Roe-Žurž, Zygy; Schmitz, Hannah; Burleson, Carter; Hays, Franklin A

    2014-08-29

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) are polytopic integral membrane proteins that transport nucleosides and, to a lesser extent, nucleobases across cell membranes. ENTs modulate efficacy for a range of human therapeutics and function in a diffusion-controlled bidirectional manner. A detailed understanding of ENT function at the molecular level has remained elusive. FUN26 (function unknown now 26) is a putative ENT homolog from S. cerevisiae that is expressed in vacuole membranes. In the present system, proteoliposome studies of purified FUN26 demonstrate robust nucleoside and nucleobase uptake into the luminal volume for a broad range of substrates. This transport activity is sensitive to nucleoside modifications in the C(2')- and C(5')-positions on the ribose sugar and is not stimulated by a membrane pH differential. [(3)H]Adenine nucleobase transport efficiency is increased ∼4-fold relative to nucleosides tested with no observed [(3)H]adenosine or [(3)H]UTP transport. FUN26 mutational studies identified residues that disrupt (G463A or G216A) or modulate (F249I or L390A) transporter function. These results demonstrate that FUN26 has a unique substrate transport profile relative to known ENT family members and that a purified ENT can be reconstituted in proteoliposomes for functional characterization in a defined system. PMID:25035431

  18. FUN26 (Function Unknown Now 26) Protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is a Broad Selectivity, High Affinity, Nucleoside and Nucleobase Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Boswell-Casteel, Rebba C.; Johnson, Jennifer M.; Duggan, Kelli D.; Roe-Žurž, Zygy; Schmitz, Hannah; Burleson, Carter; Hays, Franklin A.

    2014-01-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) are polytopic integral membrane proteins that transport nucleosides and, to a lesser extent, nucleobases across cell membranes. ENTs modulate efficacy for a range of human therapeutics and function in a diffusion-controlled bidirectional manner. A detailed understanding of ENT function at the molecular level has remained elusive. FUN26 (function unknown now 26) is a putative ENT homolog from S. cerevisiae that is expressed in vacuole membranes. In the present system, proteoliposome studies of purified FUN26 demonstrate robust nucleoside and nucleobase uptake into the luminal volume for a broad range of substrates. This transport activity is sensitive to nucleoside modifications in the C(2′)- and C(5′)-positions on the ribose sugar and is not stimulated by a membrane pH differential. [3H]Adenine nucleobase transport efficiency is increased ∼4-fold relative to nucleosides tested with no observed [3H]adenosine or [3H]UTP transport. FUN26 mutational studies identified residues that disrupt (G463A or G216A) or modulate (F249I or L390A) transporter function. These results demonstrate that FUN26 has a unique substrate transport profile relative to known ENT family members and that a purified ENT can be reconstituted in proteoliposomes for functional characterization in a defined system. PMID:25035431

  19. Restoration of silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by tethering of a novel Sir2-interacting protein, Esc8.

    PubMed Central

    Cuperus, Guido; Shore, David

    2002-01-01

    We previously described two classes of SIR2 mutations specifically defective in either telomeric/HM silencing (class I) or rDNA silencing (class II) in S. cerevisiae. Here we report the identification of genes whose protein products, when either overexpressed or directly tethered to the locus in question, can establish silencing in SIR2 class I mutants. Elevated dosage of SCS2, previously implicated as a regulator of both inositol biosynthesis and telomeric silencing, suppressed the dominant-negative effect of a SIR2-143 mutation. In a genetic screen for proteins that restore silencing when tethered to a telomere, we isolated ESC2 and an uncharacterized gene, (YOL017w), which we call ESC8. Both Esc2p and Esc8p interact with Sir2p in two-hybrid assays, and the Esc8p-Sir2 interaction is detected in vitro. Interestingly, Esc8p has a single close homolog in yeast, the ISW1-complex factor Ioc3p, and has also been copurified with Isw1p, raising the possibility that Esc8p is a component of an Isw1p-containing nucleosome remodeling complex. Whereas esc2 and esc8 deletion mutants alone have only marginal silencing defects, cells lacking Isw1p show a strong silencing defect at HMR but not at telomeres. Finally, we show that Esc8p interacts with the Gal11 protein, a component of the RNA pol II mediator complex. PMID:12399377

  20. Structures of the autoproteolytic domain from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear pore complex component, Nup145

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Ozyurt, Sinem A.; Do, Johnny; Bain, Kevin T.; Dickey, Mark; Rodgers, Logan A.; Gheyi, Tarun; Sali, Andrej; Kim, Seung Joong; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Martel, Anne; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-04-30

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large, octagonally symmetric dynamic macromolecular assemblies responsible for exchange of proteins and RNAs between the nucleus and cytoplasm. NPCs are made up of at least 456 polypeptides from {approx}30 distinct nucleoporins. Several of these components, sharing similar structural motifs, form stable subcomplexes that form a coaxial structure containing two outer rings (the nuclear and cytoplasmic rings), two inner rings, and a membrane ring. The yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Nup145 and its human counterpart are unique among the nucleoporins, in that they undergo autoproteolysis to generate functionally distinct proteins. The human counterpart of Nup145 is expressed as two alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts. The larger 190 kDa precursor undergoes post-translational autoproteolysis at the Phe863-Ser864 peptide bond yielding the 92 kDa Nup98 and the 96 kDa Nup96. The smaller 98 kDa precursor is also autoproteolysed at an analogous site giving 92 kDa Nup98-N and a 6 kDa C-terminal fragment, which may form a noncovalent complex. The yeast Nup145 precursor [Fig. 1(A)] contains twelve repeats of a 'GLFG' peptide motif (FG repeats) at its N-terminus, an internal autoproteolytic domain (a region of high conservation with the homologous yeast nucleoporins Nup110 and Nup116, neither of which undergo autoproteolysis), followed by the C-terminal domain. Various forms of the FG repeats are present in nearly half of all nucleoporins; they form intrinsically disordered regions implicated in gating mechanisms that control passage of macromolecules through NPCs. Nup145 undergoes autoproteolysis at the Phe605-Ser606 peptide bond to generate two functionally distinct proteins, Nup145N and Nup145C. Subsequently, Nup145C associates with six other proteins to form the heptameric Y-complex, a component of the outer rings of the NPC. Nup145N, on the other hand, can shuttle between the NPC and the nuclear interior. It has been suggested that Nup

  1. Protein Remote Homology Detection Based on an Ensemble Learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junjie; Liu, Bingquan; Huang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Protein remote homology detection is one of the central problems in bioinformatics. Although some computational methods have been proposed, the problem is still far from being solved. In this paper, an ensemble classifier for protein remote homology detection, called SVM-Ensemble, was proposed with a weighted voting strategy. SVM-Ensemble combined three basic classifiers based on different feature spaces, including Kmer, ACC, and SC-PseAAC. These features consider the characteristics of proteins from various perspectives, incorporating both the sequence composition and the sequence-order information along the protein sequences. Experimental results on a widely used benchmark dataset showed that the proposed SVM-Ensemble can obviously improve the predictive performance for the protein remote homology detection. Moreover, it achieved the best performance and outperformed other state-of-the-art methods. PMID:27294123

  2. Bacterial actin and tubulin homologs in cell growth and division.

    PubMed

    Busiek, Kimberly K; Margolin, William

    2015-03-16

    In contrast to the elaborate cytoskeletal machines harbored by eukaryotic cells, such as mitotic spindles, cytoskeletal structures detectable by typical negative stain electron microscopy are generally absent from bacterial cells. As a result, for decades it was thought that bacteria lacked cytoskeletal machines. Revolutions in genomics and fluorescence microscopy have confirmed the existence not only of smaller-scale cytoskeletal structures in bacteria, but also of widespread functional homologs of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins. The presence of actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament homologs in these relatively simple cells suggests that primitive cytoskeletons first arose in bacteria. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, homologs of tubulin and actin directly interact with each other and are crucial for coordinating cell growth and division. The function and direct interactions between these proteins will be the focus of this review. PMID:25784047

  3. Using Persistent Homology to Describe Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tithof, Jeffrey; Suri, Balachandra; Xu, Mu; Kramar, Miroslav; Levanger, Rachel; Mischaikow, Konstantin; Paul, Mark; Schatz, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Complex spatial patterns that exhibit aperiodic dynamics commonly arise in a wide variety of systems in nature and technology. Describing, understanding, and predicting the behavior of such patterns is an open problem. We explore the use of persistent homology (a branch of algebraic topology) to characterize spatiotemporal dynamics in a canonical fluid mechanics problem, Rayleigh Bénard convection. Persistent homology provides a powerful mathematical formalism in which the topological characteristics of a pattern (e.g. the midplane temperature field) are encoded in a so-called persistence diagram. By applying a metric to measure the pairwise distances across multiple persistence diagrams, we can quantify the similarities between different states in a time series. Our results show that persistent homology yields new physical insights into the complex dynamics of large spatially extended systems that are driven far-from-equilibrium. This work is supported under NSF grant DMS-1125302.

  4. Quantization of gauge fields, graph polynomials and graph homology

    SciTech Connect

    Kreimer, Dirk; Sars, Matthias; Suijlekom, Walter D. van

    2013-09-15

    We review quantization of gauge fields using algebraic properties of 3-regular graphs. We derive the Feynman integrand at n loops for a non-abelian gauge theory quantized in a covariant gauge from scalar integrands for connected 3-regular graphs, obtained from the two Symanzik polynomials. The transition to the full gauge theory amplitude is obtained by the use of a third, new, graph polynomial, the corolla polynomial. This implies effectively a covariant quantization without ghosts, where all the relevant signs of the ghost sector are incorporated in a double complex furnished by the corolla polynomial–we call it cycle homology–and by graph homology. -- Highlights: •We derive gauge theory Feynman from scalar field theory with 3-valent vertices. •We clarify the role of graph homology and cycle homology. •We use parametric renormalization and the new corolla polynomial.

  5. Homologous flares and the evolution of NOAA Active Region 2372

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, K. T.; Smith, J. B., Jr.; Mccabe, M. K.; Machado, M. E.; Saba, J. L. R.; Simnett, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed record of the evolution of NOAA Active Region 2372 has been compiled by the FBS Homology Study Group. It was one of the most prolific flare-producing regions observed by SMM. The flares occurred in distinct stages which corresponded to particular evolutionary phases in the development of the active region magnetic field. By comparison with a similar but less productive active region, it is found that the activity seems to be related to the magnetic complexity of the region and the amount of shear in the field. Further, the soft X-ray emission in the quiescent active region is related to its flare rate. Within the broader definition of homology adopted, there was a degree of homology between the events within each stage of evolution of AR2372.

  6. Homology in the development of triadic interaction and language.

    PubMed

    Moore, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Conceiving of development with reference to homology can help identify developmental continuity where surface form shows considerable variation across age. I argue that there is a homology of structure between the object-centred, or triadic, interactions that emerge in infancy and later language. The structure of triadic interaction in infancy is first described as involving joint attention and joint engagement about a shared topic, and then a case is made that this structure is maintained through three levels of complexity in language-single word utterances, multiword utterances, and finally complex constructions. A focus on the homological relation between these social interactive structures may be useful in revealing developmental continuities where these may be obscured by quite different surface forms. PMID:22711264

  7. Data bank homology search algorithm with linear computation complexity.

    PubMed

    Strelets, V B; Ptitsyn, A A; Milanesi, L; Lim, H A

    1994-06-01

    A new algorithm for data bank homology search is proposed. The principal advantages of the new algorithm are: (i) linear computation complexity; (ii) low memory requirements; and (iii) high sensitivity to the presence of local region homology. The algorithm first calculates indicative matrices of k-tuple 'realization' in the query sequence and then searches for an appropriate number of matching k-tuples within a narrow range in database sequences. It does not require k-tuple coordinates tabulation and in-memory placement for database sequences. The algorithm is implemented in a program for execution on PC-compatible computers and tested on PIR and GenBank databases with good results. A few modifications designed to improve the selectivity are also discussed. As an application example, the search for homology of the mouse homeotic protein HOX 3.1 is given. PMID:7922689

  8. Yeast Fex1p Is a Constitutively Expressed Fluoride Channel with Functional Asymmetry of Its Two Homologous Domains.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kathryn D; Gordon, Patricia B; Rivetta, Alberto; Allen, Kenneth E; Berbasova, Tetyana; Slayman, Clifford; Strobel, Scott A

    2015-08-01

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous environmental toxin with which all biological species must cope. A recently discovered family of fluoride export (FEX) proteins protects organisms from fluoride toxicity by removing it from the cell. We show here that FEX proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae function as ion channels that are selective for fluoride over chloride and that these proteins are constitutively expressed at the yeast plasma membrane. Continuous expression is in contrast to many other toxin exporters in yeast, and this, along with the fact that two nearly duplicate proteins are encoded in the yeast genome, suggests that the threat posed by fluoride ions is frequent and detrimental. Structurally, eukaryotic FEX proteins consist of two homologous four-transmembrane helix domains folded into an antiparallel dimer, where the orientation of the two domains is fixed by a single transmembrane linker helix. Using phylogenetic sequence conservation as a guide, we have identified several functionally important residues. There is substantial functional asymmetry in the effect of mutation at corresponding sites in the two domains. Specifically, mutations to residues in the C-terminal domain proved significantly more detrimental to function than did similar mutations in the N-terminal domain. Our data suggest particular residues that may be important to anion specificity, most notably the necessity of a positive charge near the end of TMH1 in the C-terminal domain. It is possible that a cationic charge at this location may create an electrostatic well for fluoride ions entering the channel from the cytoplasm. PMID:26055717

  9. Evolutionary and functional conservation of the DNA non-homologous end-joining protein, XLF/Cernunnos.

    PubMed

    Hentges, Pierre; Ahnesorg, Peter; Pitcher, Robert S; Bruce, Chris K; Kysela, Boris; Green, Andrew J; Bianchi, Julie; Wilson, Thomas E; Jackson, Stephen P; Doherty, Aidan J

    2006-12-01

    Non-homologous end-joining is a major pathway of DNA double-strand break repair in mammalian cells, deficiency in which confers radiosensitivity and immune deficiency at the whole organism level. A core protein complex comprising the Ku70/80 heterodimer together with a complex between DNA ligase IV and XRCC4 is conserved throughout eukaryotes and assembles at double-strand breaks to mediate ligation of broken DNA ends. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae an additional NHEJ protein, Nej1p, physically interacts with the ligase IV complex and is required in vivo for ligation of DNA double-strand breaks. Recent studies with cells derived from radiosensitive and immune-deficient patients have identified the human protein, XLF (also named Cernunnos), as a crucial NHEJ protein. Here we show that XLF and Nej1p are members of the same protein superfamily and that this family has members in diverse eukaryotes. Indeed, we show that a member of this family encoded by a previously uncharacterized open-reading frame in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome is required for NHEJ in this organism. Furthermore, our data reveal that XLF family proteins can bind to DNA and directly interact with the ligase IV-XRCC4 complex to promote DSB ligation. We therefore conclude that XLF family proteins interact with the ligase IV-XRCC4 complex to constitute the evolutionarily conserved enzymatic core of the NHEJ machinery. PMID:17038309

  10. Yeast Fex1p Is a Constitutively Expressed Fluoride Channel with Functional Asymmetry of Its Two Homologous Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kathryn D.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Rivetta, Alberto; Allen, Kenneth E.; Berbasova, Tetyana; Slayman, Clifford; Strobel, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous environmental toxin with which all biological species must cope. A recently discovered family of fluoride export (FEX) proteins protects organisms from fluoride toxicity by removing it from the cell. We show here that FEX proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae function as ion channels that are selective for fluoride over chloride and that these proteins are constitutively expressed at the yeast plasma membrane. Continuous expression is in contrast to many other toxin exporters in yeast, and this, along with the fact that two nearly duplicate proteins are encoded in the yeast genome, suggests that the threat posed by fluoride ions is frequent and detrimental. Structurally, eukaryotic FEX proteins consist of two homologous four-transmembrane helix domains folded into an antiparallel dimer, where the orientation of the two domains is fixed by a single transmembrane linker helix. Using phylogenetic sequence conservation as a guide, we have identified several functionally important residues. There is substantial functional asymmetry in the effect of mutation at corresponding sites in the two domains. Specifically, mutations to residues in the C-terminal domain proved significantly more detrimental to function than did similar mutations in the N-terminal domain. Our data suggest particular residues that may be important to anion specificity, most notably the necessity of a positive charge near the end of TMH1 in the C-terminal domain. It is possible that a cationic charge at this location may create an electrostatic well for fluoride ions entering the channel from the cytoplasm. PMID:26055717

  11. Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase from higher plants is structurally unrelated to the animal and fungal homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C. )

    1991-03-15

    Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein (ACP) desaturase was purified to homogeneity from avocado mesocarp, and monospecific polyclonal antibodies directed against the protein were used to isolate full-length cDNA clones from Ricinus communis (castor) seed and Cucumis sativus (cucumber). The nucleotide sequence of the castor clone pRCD1 revealed an open reading frame of 1.2 kilobases encoding a 396-amino acid protein of 45 kDa. The cucumber clone pCSD1 encoded a homologous 396-amino acid protein with 88% amino acid identity to the castor clone. Expression of pRCD1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in the accumulation of a functional stearoyl-ACP desaturase, demonstrating that the introduction of this single gene product was sufficient to confer soluble desaturase activity to yeast. There was a 48-residue region of 29% amino acid sequence identity between residues 53 and 101 of the castor desaturase and the proximal border of the dehydratase region of the fatty acid synthase from yeast. Stearoyl-ACP mRNA was present at substantially higher levels in developing seeds than in leaf and root tissue, suggesting that expression of the {Delta}{sup 9} desaturase is developmentally regulated.

  12. Cloning by differential screening of a Xenopus cDNA coding for a protein highly homologous to cdc2.

    PubMed Central

    Paris, J; Le Guellec, R; Couturier, A; Le Guellec, K; Omilli, F; Camonis, J; MacNeill, S; Philippe, M

    1991-01-01

    Fertilization of Xenopus laevis eggs triggers a period of rapid cell division comprising 12 nearly synchronous mitoses. Protein synthesis is required for these divisions, and new proteins appear after fertilization. Others proteins however, which are synthesized in the unfertilized egg, are no longer made in the early embryo. To identify such proteins, a differential screen of an egg cDNA library gave nine clones corresponding to mRNAs that are deadenylylated soon after fertilization. The sequence of one of these clones (Eg1) revealed a high homology to p34cdc2, the kinase subunit of maturation-promoting factor. Only 12 amino acids in the deduced amino acid sequence were unique to Eg1 when its sequence was compared to all other known examples of cdc2. Despite this strong similarity, however, Eg1 was unable to complement a yeast cdc2- mutant in Schizosaccharomyces pombe or a cdc28 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Four Eg1 transcripts, two major and two minor, were found in Xenopus oocytes and early embryos. These RNAs appeared very early (stage I) in oogenesis and their level remained constant until the midblastula transition, at which time they declined. Eg1 RNA is found in the poly(A)+ fraction of oocytes only between the time of meiotic maturation and fertilization--that is to say, in the unfertilized egg. At fertilization the RNA loses its poly(A) tail and at the same time leaves the polyribosomes. Images PMID:1704128

  13. Remote homology and the functions of metagenomic dark matter.

    PubMed

    Lobb, Briallen; Kurtz, Daniel A; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Doxey, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Predicted open reading frames (ORFs) that lack detectable homology to known proteins are termed ORFans. Despite their prevalence in metagenomes, the extent to which ORFans encode real proteins, the degree to which they can be annotated, and their functional contributions, remain unclear. To gain insights into these questions, we applied sensitive remote-homology detection methods to functionally analyze ORFans from soil, marine, and human gut metagenome collections. ORFans were identified, clustered into sequence families, and annotated through profile-profile comparison to proteins of known structure. We found that a considerable number of metagenomic ORFans (73,896 of 484,121, 15.3%) exhibit significant remote homology to structurally characterized proteins, providing a means for ORFan functional profiling. The extent of detected remote homology far exceeds that obtained for artificial protein families (1.4%). As expected for real genes, the predicted functions of ORFans are significantly similar to the functions of their gene neighbors (p < 0.001). Compared to the functional profiles predicted through standard homology searches, ORFans show biologically intriguing differences. Many ORFan-enriched functions are virus-related and tend to reflect biological processes associated with extreme sequence diversity. Each environment also possesses a large number of unique ORFan families and functions, including some known to play important community roles such as gut microbial polysaccharide digestion. Lastly, ORFans are a valuable resource for finding novel enzymes of interest, as we demonstrate through the identification of hundreds of novel ORFan metalloproteases that all possess a signature catalytic motif despite a general lack of similarity to known proteins. Our ORFan functional predictions are a valuable resource for discovering novel protein families and exploring the boundaries of protein sequence space. All remote homology predictions are available at http

  14. Remote homology and the functions of metagenomic dark matter

    PubMed Central

    Lobb, Briallen; Kurtz, Daniel A.; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Doxey, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Predicted open reading frames (ORFs) that lack detectable homology to known proteins are termed ORFans. Despite their prevalence in metagenomes, the extent to which ORFans encode real proteins, the degree to which they can be annotated, and their functional contributions, remain unclear. To gain insights into these questions, we applied sensitive remote-homology detection methods to functionally analyze ORFans from soil, marine, and human gut metagenome collections. ORFans were identified, clustered into sequence families, and annotated through profile-profile comparison to proteins of known structure. We found that a considerable number of metagenomic ORFans (73,896 of 484,121, 15.3%) exhibit significant remote homology to structurally characterized proteins, providing a means for ORFan functional profiling. The extent of detected remote homology far exceeds that obtained for artificial protein families (1.4%). As expected for real genes, the predicted functions of ORFans are significantly similar to the functions of their gene neighbors (p < 0.001). Compared to the functional profiles predicted through standard homology searches, ORFans show biologically intriguing differences. Many ORFan-enriched functions are virus-related and tend to reflect biological processes associated with extreme sequence diversity. Each environment also possesses a large number of unique ORFan families and functions, including some known to play important community roles such as gut microbial polysaccharide digestion. Lastly, ORFans are a valuable resource for finding novel enzymes of interest, as we demonstrate through the identification of hundreds of novel ORFan metalloproteases that all possess a signature catalytic motif despite a general lack of similarity to known proteins. Our ORFan functional predictions are a valuable resource for discovering novel protein families and exploring the boundaries of protein sequence space. All remote homology predictions are available at http

  15. Homologous beta-adrenergic desensitization in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Michel, B

    1987-01-01

    Hepatocytes from hypothyroid rats have a marked beta-adrenergic responsiveness. Preincubation of these hepatocytes with isoprenaline induced a time-dependent and concentration-dependent desensitization of the beta-adrenergic responsiveness without altering that to glucagon (homologous desensitization). The desensitization was evidenced both in the cyclic AMP accumulation and in the stimulation of ureagenesis induced by the beta-adrenergic agonists. Under the same conditions, preincubation with glucagon induced no desensitization. Propranolol was also unable to induce desensitization, but blocked that induced by isoprenaline. Pertussis-toxin treatment did not alter the homologous beta-adrenergic desensitization induced by isoprenaline. PMID:2825633

  16. Macdonald operators and homological invariants of the colored Hopf link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awata, Hidetoshi; Kanno, Hiroaki

    2011-09-01

    Using a power sum (boson) realization for the Macdonald operators, we investigate the Gukov, Iqbal, Kozçaz and Vafa (GIKV) proposal for the homological invariants of the colored Hopf link, which include Khovanov-Rozansky homology as a special case. We prove the polynomiality of the invariants obtained by GIKV’s proposal for arbitrary representations. We derive a closed formula of the invariants of the colored Hopf link for antisymmetric representations. We argue that a little amendment of GIKV’s proposal is required to make all the coefficients of the polynomial non-negative integers.

  17. Simplified computer programs for search of homology within nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, M; Kröger-Block, A

    1984-01-01

    Four new computer programs for search of homology within nucleotide sequences are presented. The main scope of the program design is flexibility, independence of sequence length and the capability to be used by any molecular biologist without any prior computer experience. The programs offer a linear search, a search for maximal identity, an alignment along a given sequence and a search based on homology within the amino acid coding capacity of nucleotide sequences. The language is Fortran V. Copies are available on request. PMID:6546417

  18. Transcriptional regulation by ergosterol in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S J; Crowley, J H; Parks, L W

    1996-01-01

    Sterol biosynthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an energy-expensive, aerobic process, requiring heme and molecular oxygen. Heme, also synthesized exclusively during aerobic growth, not only acts as an enzymatic cofactor but also is directly and indirectly responsible for the transcriptional control of several yeast genes. Because of their biosynthetic similarities, we hypothesized that ergosterol, like heme, may have a regulatory function. Sterols are known to play a structural role in membrane integrity, but regulatory roles have not been characterized. To test possible regulatory roles of sterol, the promoter for the ERG3 gene, encoding the sterol C-5 desaturase, was fused to the bacterial lacZ reporter gene. This construct was placed in strains making aberrant sterols, and the effect of altered sterol composition on gene expression was monitored by beta-galactosidase activity. The absence of ergosterol resulted in a 35-fold increase in the expression of ERG3 as measured by beta-galactosidase activity. The level of ERG3 mRNA was increased as much as ninefold in erg mutant strains or wild-type strains inhibited in ergosterol biosynthesis by antifungal agents. The observed regulatory effects of ergosterol on ERG3 are specific for ergosterol, as several ergosterol derivatives failed to elicit the same controlling effect. These results demonstrate for the first time that ergosterol exerts a regulatory effect on gene transcription in S. cerevisiae. PMID:8816455

  19. Mead production: selection and characterization assays of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana Paula; Dias, Teresa; Andrade, João; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Estevinho, Letícia M

    2009-08-01

    Mead is a traditional drink, which results from the alcoholic fermentation of diluted honey carried out by yeasts. However, when it is produced in a homemade way, mead producers find several problems, namely, the lack of uniformity in the final product, delayed and arrested fermentations, and the production of "off-flavours" by the yeasts. These problems are usually associated with the inability of yeast strains to respond and adapt to unfavourable and stressful growth conditions. The main objectives of this work were to evaluate the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from honey of the Trás-os-Montes (Northeast Portugal), to produce mead. Five strains from honey, as well as one laboratory strain and one commercial wine strain, were evaluated in terms of their fermentation performance under ethanol, sulphur dioxide and osmotic stress. All the strains showed similar behaviour in these conditions. Two yeasts strains isolated from honey and the commercial wine strain were further tested for mead production, using two different honey (a dark and a light honey), enriched with two supplements (one commercial and one developed by the research team), as fermentation media. The results obtained in this work show that S. cerevisiae strains isolated from honey, are appropriate for mead production. However it is of extreme importance to take into account the characteristics of the honey, and supplements used in the fermentation medium formulation, in order to achieve the best results in mead production. PMID:19481129

  20. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for itaconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Blazeck, John; Miller, Jarrett; Pan, Anny; Gengler, Jon; Holden, Clinton; Jamoussi, Mariam; Alper, Hal S

    2014-10-01

    Renewable alternatives for petroleum-derived chemicals are achievable through biosynthetic production. Here, we utilize Saccharomyces cerevisiae to enable the synthesis of itaconic acid, a molecule with diverse applications as a petrochemical replacement. We first optimize pathway expression within S. cerevisiae through the use of a hybrid promoter. Next, we utilize sequential, in silico computational genome-scanning to identify beneficial genetic perturbations that are metabolically distant from the itaconic acid synthesis pathway. In this manner, we successfully identify three non-obvious genetic targets (∆ade3 ∆bna2 ∆tes1) that successively improve itaconic acid titer. We establish that focused manipulations of upstream pathway enzymes (localized refactoring) and enzyme re-localization to both mitochondria and cytosol fail to improve itaconic acid titers. Finally, we establish a higher cell density fermentation that ultimately achieves itaconic acid titer of 168 mg/L, a sevenfold improvement over initial conditions. This work represents an attempt to increase itaconic acid production in yeast and demonstrates the successful utilization of computationally guided genetic manipulation to increase metabolic capacity. PMID:24997118

  1. Lactose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting cellobiose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Oh, Eun Joong; Pathanibul, Panchalee; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-09-20

    Lactose is an inevitable byproduct of the dairy industry. In addition to cheese manufacturing, the growing Greek yogurt industry generates excess acid whey, which contains lactose. Therefore, rapid and efficient conversion of lactose to fuels and chemicals would be useful for recycling the otherwise harmful acid whey. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a popular metabolic engineering host, cannot natively utilize lactose. However, we discovered that an engineered S. cerevisiae strain (EJ2) capable of fermenting cellobiose can also ferment lactose. This finding suggests that a cellobiose transporter (CDT-1) can transport lactose and a β-glucosidase (GH1-1) can hydrolyze lactose by acting as a β-galactosidase. While the lactose fermentation by the EJ2 strain was much slower than the cellobiose fermentation, a faster lactose-fermenting strain (EJ2e8) was obtained through serial subcultures on lactose. The EJ2e8 strain fermented lactose with a consumption rate of 2.16g/Lh. The improved lactose fermentation by the EJ2e8 strain was due to the increased copy number of cdt-1 and gh1-1 genes. Looking ahead, the EJ2e8 strain could be exploited for the production of other non-ethanol fuels and chemicals from lactose through further metabolic engineering. PMID:27457698

  2. Data on dynamic study of cytoophidia in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Huang, Yong; Wang, Peng-Ye; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-09-01

    The data in this paper are related to the research article entitled "Filamentation of metabolic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae" Q.J. Shen et al. (2016) [1]. Cytoophidia are filamentous structures discovered in fruit flies (doi:10.1016/S1673-8527(09)60046-1) J.L. Liu (2010) [2], bacteria (doi:10.1038/ncb2087) M. Ingerson-Mahar et al. (2010) [3], yeast (doi:10.1083/jcb.201003001; doi:10.1242/bio.20149613) C. Noree et al. (2010) and J. Zhang, L. Hulme, J.L. Liu (2014) [4], [5] and human cells (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0029690; doi:10.1016/j.jgg.2011.08.004) K. Chen et al. (2011) and W.C. Carcamo et al. (2011) ( [6], [7]. However, there is little research on the motility of the cytoophidia. Here we selected cytoophidia formed by 6 filament-forming proteins in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae, and performed living-cell imaging of cells expressing the proteins fused with GFP. The dynamic features of the six types of cytoophidia were analyzed. In the data, both raw movies and analysed results of the dynamics of cytoophidia are presented. PMID:27274529

  3. Genetic determinants for enhanced glycerol growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Steve; Ho, Ping-Wei; Klein, Mathias; Nevoigt, Elke

    2016-07-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae generally shows a low natural capability to utilize glycerol as the sole source of carbon, particularly when synthetic medium is used and complex supplements are omitted. Nevertheless, wild type isolates have been identified that show a moderate growth under these conditions. In the current study we made use of intraspecies diversity to identify targets suitable for reverse metabolic engineering of the non-growing laboratory strain CEN.PK113-1A. A genome-wide genetic mapping experiment using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis was conducted, and one major and several minor genetic loci were identified responsible for the superior glycerol growth phenotype of the previously selected S. cerevisiae strain CBS 6412-13A. Downscaling of the major locus by fine-mapping and reciprocal hemizygosity analysis allowed the parallel identification of two superior alleles (UBR2CBS 6412-13A and SSK1CBS 6412-13A). These alleles together with the previously identified GUT1CBS 6412-13A allele were used to replace the corresponding alleles in the strain CEN.PK113-1A. In this way, glycerol growth could be established reaching a maximum specific growth rate of 0.08h(-1). Further improvement to a maximum specific growth rate of 0.11h(-1) could be achieved by heterologous expression of the glycerol facilitator FPS1 from Cyberlindnera jadinii. PMID:26971668

  4. Complete nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome X.

    PubMed Central

    Galibert, F; Alexandraki, D; Baur, A; Boles, E; Chalwatzis, N; Chuat, J C; Coster, F; Cziepluch, C; De Haan, M; Domdey, H; Durand, P; Entian, K D; Gatius, M; Goffeau, A; Grivell, L A; Hennemann, A; Herbert, C J; Heumann, K; Hilger, F; Hollenberg, C P; Huang, M E; Jacq, C; Jauniaux, J C; Katsoulou, C; Karpfinger-Hartl, L

    1996-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome X (745 442 bp) reveals a total of 379 open reading frames (ORFs), the coding region covering approximately 75% of the entire sequence. One hundred and eighteen ORFs (31%) correspond to genes previously identified in S. cerevisiae. All other ORFs represent novel putative yeast genes, whose function will have to be determined experimentally. However, 57 of the latter subset (another 15% of the total) encode proteins that show significant analogy to proteins of known function from yeast or other organisms. The remaining ORFs, exhibiting no significant similarity to any known sequence, amount to 54% of the total. General features of chromosome X are also reported, with emphasis on the nucleotide frequency distribution in the environment of the ATG and stop codons, the possible coding capacity of at least some of the small ORFs (<100 codons) and the significance of 46 non-canonical or unpaired nucleotides in the stems of some of the 24 tRNA genes recognized on this chromosome. Images PMID:8641269

  5. Long-chain alkane production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade industrial-scale production of renewable transportation biofuels has been developed as an alternative to fossil fuels, with ethanol as the most prominent biofuel and yeast as the production organism of choice. However, ethanol is a less efficient substitute fuel for heavy-duty and maritime transportation as well as aviation due to its low energy density. Therefore, new types of biofuels, such as alkanes, are being developed that can be used as drop-in fuels and can substitute gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. Here, we describe for the first time the heterologous biosynthesis of long-chain alkanes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that elimination of the hexadecenal dehydrogenase Hfd1 and expression of a redox system are essential for alkane biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of HFD1 together with expression of an alkane biosynthesis pathway resulted in the production of the alkanes tridecane, pentadecane, and heptadecane. Our study provides a proof of principle for producing long-chain alkanes in the industrial workhorse S. cerevisiae, which was so far limited to bacteria. We anticipate that these findings will be a key factor for further yeast engineering to enable industrial production of alkane based drop-in biofuels, which can allow the biofuel industry to diversify beyond bioethanol. PMID:25545362

  6. Quantifying separation and similarity in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae metapopulation

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Sarah; Goddard, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic microbes are key ecosystem drivers; however, we have little theory and few data elucidating the processes influencing their observed population patterns. Here we provide an in-depth quantitative analysis of population separation and similarity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the aim of providing a more detailed account of the population processes occurring in microbes. Over 10 000 individual isolates were collected from native plants, vineyards and spontaneous ferments of fruit from six major regions spanning 1000 km across New Zealand. From these, hundreds of S. cerevisiae genotypes were obtained, and using a suite of analytical methods we provide comprehensive quantitative estimates for both population structure and rates of gene flow or migration. No genetic differentiation was detected within geographic regions, even between populations inhabiting native forests and vineyards. We do, however, reveal a picture of national population structure at scales above ∼100 km with distinctive populations in the more remote Nelson and Central Otago regions primarily contributing to this. In addition, differential degrees of connectivity between regional populations are observed and correlate with the movement of fruit by the New Zealand wine industry. This suggests some anthropogenic influence on these observed population patterns. PMID:25062126

  7. Metabolomic approach for improving ethanol stress tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Erika; Nakayama, Yasumune; Mukai, Yukio; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2016-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used for brewing and ethanol production. The ethanol sensitivity of yeast cells is still a serious problem during ethanol fermentation, and a variety of genetic approaches (e.g., random mutant screening under selective pressure of ethanol) have been developed to improve ethanol tolerance. In this study, we developed a strategy for improving ethanol tolerance of yeast cells based on metabolomics as a high-resolution quantitative phenotypic analysis. We performed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis to identify and quantify 36 compounds on 14 mutant strains including knockout strains for transcription factor and metabolic enzyme genes. A strong relation between metabolome of these mutants and their ethanol tolerance was observed. Data mining of the metabolomic analysis showed that several compounds (such as trehalose, valine, inositol and proline) contributed highly to ethanol tolerance. Our approach successfully detected well-known ethanol stress related metabolites such as trehalose and proline thus, to further prove our strategy, we focused on valine and inositol as the most promising target metabolites in our study. Our results show that simultaneous deletion of LEU4 and LEU9 (leading to accumulation of valine) or INM1 and INM2 (leading to reduction of inositol) significantly enhanced ethanol tolerance. This study shows the potential of the metabolomic approach to identify target genes for strain improvement of S. cerevisiae with higher ethanol tolerance. PMID:26344121

  8. Systems biology of GAL regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pannala, Venkat Reddy; Bhat, Paike Jayadeva; Bhartiya, Sharad; Venkatesh, K V

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary success of an organism depends on its ability to express or adapt to constantly changing environmental conditions. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has evolved an elaborate genetic circuit to regulate the expression of galactose-metabolizing enzymes in the presence of galactose but in the absence of glucose. The circuit possesses molecular mechanisms such as multiple binding sites, cooperativity, autoregulation, nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and substrate sensing mechanism. Furthermore, the GAL system consists of two positive (activating) feedback and one negative (repressing) feedback loops. These individual mechanisms, elucidated through experimental approach, can be integrated to obtain a system-wide behavior. Mathematical models in conjunction with guided experiments have demonstrated system-level properties such as ultrasensitivity, memory, noise attenuation, rapid response, and sensitive response arising out of the molecular interactions. These system-level properties allow S. cerevisiae to adapt and grow in a galactose medium under noisy and changing environments. This review focuses on system-level models and properties of the GAL regulon. PMID:20836013

  9. Genomic Evolution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Chinese Rice Wine Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yudong; Zhang, Weiping; Zheng, Daoqiong; Zhou, Zhan; Yu, Wenwen; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Lifang; Liang, Xinle; Guan, Wenjun; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian; Lin, Zhenguo

    2014-01-01

    Rice wine fermentation represents a unique environment for the evolution of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To understand how the selection pressure shaped the yeast genome and gene regulation, we determined the genome sequence and transcriptome of a S. cerevisiae strain YHJ7 isolated from Chinese rice wine (Huangjiu), a popular traditional alcoholic beverage in China. By comparing the genome of YHJ7 to the lab strain S288c, a Japanese sake strain K7, and a Chinese industrial bioethanol strain YJSH1, we identified many genomic sequence and structural variations in YHJ7, which are mainly located in subtelomeric regions, suggesting that these regions play an important role in genomic evolution between strains. In addition, our comparative transcriptome analysis between YHJ7 and S288c revealed a set of differentially expressed genes, including those involved in glucose transport (e.g., HXT2, HXT7) and oxidoredutase activity (e.g., AAD10, ADH7). Interestingly, many of these genomic and transcriptional variations are directly or indirectly associated with the adaptation of YHJ7 strain to its specific niches. Our molecular evolution analysis suggested that Japanese sake strains (K7/UC5) were derived from Chinese rice wine strains (YHJ7) at least approximately 2,300 years ago, providing the first molecular evidence elucidating the origin of Japanese sake strains. Our results depict interesting insights regarding the evolution of yeast during rice wine fermentation, and provided a valuable resource for genetic engineering to improve industrial wine-making strains. PMID:25212861

  10. DNA polymerases δ and λ cooperate in repairing double-strand breaks by microhomology-mediated end-joining in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Damon; Fu, Becky Xu Hua; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2015-12-15

    Maintenance of genome stability is carried out by a suite of DNA repair pathways that ensure the repair of damaged DNA and faithful replication of the genome. Of particular importance are the repair pathways, which respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and how the efficiency of repair is influenced by sequence homology. In this study, we developed a genetic assay in diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to analyze DSBs requiring microhomologies for repair, known as microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ). MMEJ repair efficiency increased concomitant with microhomology length and decreased upon introduction of mismatches. The central proteins in homologous recombination (HR), Rad52 and Rad51, suppressed MMEJ in this system, suggesting a competition between HR and MMEJ for the repair of a DSB. Importantly, we found that DNA polymerase delta (Pol δ) is critical for MMEJ, independent of microhomology length and base-pairing continuity. MMEJ recombinants showed evidence that Pol δ proofreading function is active during MMEJ-mediated DSB repair. Furthermore, mutations in Pol δ and DNA polymerase 4 (Pol λ), the DNA polymerase previously implicated in MMEJ, cause a synergistic decrease in MMEJ repair. Pol λ showed faster kinetics associating with MMEJ substrates following DSB induction than Pol δ. The association of Pol δ depended on RAD1, which encodes the flap endonuclease needed to cleave MMEJ intermediates before DNA synthesis. Moreover, Pol δ recruitment was diminished in cells lacking Pol λ. These data suggest cooperative involvement of both polymerases in MMEJ. PMID:26607450

  11. Isolation of Com1, a New Gene Required to Complete Meiotic Double-Strand Break-Induced Recombination in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, S.; Amon, A.; Klein, F.

    1997-01-01

    We have designed a screen to isolate mutants defective during a specific part of meiotic prophase I of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genes required for the repair of meiotic double-strand breaks or for the separation of recombined chromosomes are targets of this mutant hunt. The specificity is achieved by selecting for mutants that produce viable spores when recombination and reductional segregation are prevented by mutations in SPO11 and SPO13 genes, but fail to yield viable spores during a normal Rec(+) meiosis. We have identified and characterized a mutation com1-1, which blocks processing of meiotic double-strand breaks and which interferes with synaptonemal complex formation, homologous pairing and, as a consequence, spore viability after induction of meiotic recombination. The COM1/SAE2 gene was cloned by complementation, and the deletion mutant has a phenotype similar to com1-1. com1/sae2 mutants closely resemble the phenotype of rad50S, as assayed by phase-contrast microscopy for spore formation, physical and genetic analysis of recombination, fluorescence in situ hybridization to quantify homologous pairing and immunofluorescence and electron microscopy to determine the capability to synapse axial elements. PMID:9215887

  12. DNA polymerases δ and λ cooperate in repairing double-strand breaks by microhomology-mediated end-joining in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Damon; Fu, Becky Xu Hua; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of genome stability is carried out by a suite of DNA repair pathways that ensure the repair of damaged DNA and faithful replication of the genome. Of particular importance are the repair pathways, which respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and how the efficiency of repair is influenced by sequence homology. In this study, we developed a genetic assay in diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to analyze DSBs requiring microhomologies for repair, known as microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ). MMEJ repair efficiency increased concomitant with microhomology length and decreased upon introduction of mismatches. The central proteins in homologous recombination (HR), Rad52 and Rad51, suppressed MMEJ in this system, suggesting a competition between HR and MMEJ for the repair of a DSB. Importantly, we found that DNA polymerase delta (Pol δ) is critical for MMEJ, independent of microhomology length and base-pairing continuity. MMEJ recombinants showed evidence that Pol δ proofreading function is active during MMEJ-mediated DSB repair. Furthermore, mutations in Pol δ and DNA polymerase 4 (Pol λ), the DNA polymerase previously implicated in MMEJ, cause a synergistic decrease in MMEJ repair. Pol λ showed faster kinetics associating with MMEJ substrates following DSB induction than Pol δ. The association of Pol δ depended on RAD1, which encodes the flap endonuclease needed to cleave MMEJ intermediates before DNA synthesis. Moreover, Pol δ recruitment was diminished in cells lacking Pol λ. These data suggest cooperative involvement of both polymerases in MMEJ. PMID:26607450

  13. Sen1, the yeast homolog of human senataxin, plays a more direct role than Rad26 in transcription coupled DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Selvam, Kathiresan; Rahman, Sheikh A; Li, Shisheng

    2016-08-19

    Rad26, a DNA dependent ATPase that is homologous to human CSB, has been well known to play an important role in transcription coupled DNA repair (TCR) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sen1, a DNA/RNA helicase that is essential for yeast cell viability and homologous to human senataxin, has been known to be required for transcriptional termination of short noncoding RNA genes and for a fail-safe transcriptional termination mechanism of protein-coding genes. Sen1 has also been shown to protect the yeast genome from transcription-associated recombination by resolving RNA:DNA hybrids naturally formed during transcription. Here, we show that the N-terminal non-essential region of Sen1 plays an important role in TCR, whereas the C-terminal nonessential region and the helicase activity of Sen1 are largely dispensable for the repair. Unlike Rad26, which becomes completely dispensable for TCR in cells lacking the TCR repressor Spt4, Sen1 is still required for efficient TCR in the absence of Spt4. Also unlike Rad26, which is important for repair at many but not all damaged sites in the transcribed strand of a gene, Sen1 is required for efficient repair at essentially all the damaged sites. Our results indicate that Sen1 plays a more direct role than Rad26 in TCR. PMID:27179024

  14. The Putative Arabidopsis Homolog of Yeast Vps52p Is Required for Pollen Tube Elongation, Localizes to Golgi, and Might Be Involved in Vesicle Trafficking1

    PubMed Central

    Lobstein, Eglantine; Guyon, Anouchka; Férault, Madina; Twell, David; Pelletier, Georges; Bonhomme, Sandrine

    2004-01-01

    The screening of the Versailles collection of Arabidopsis T-DNA transformants allowed us to identify several male gametophytic mutants, including poky pollen tube (pok). The pok mutant, which could only be isolated as a hemizygous line, exhibits very short pollen tubes, explaining the male-specific transmission defect observed in this line. We show that the POK gene is duplicated in the Arabidopsis genome and that the predicted POK protein sequence is highly conserved from lower to higher eukaryotes. The putative POK homolog in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), referred to as Vps52p/SAC2, has been shown to be located at the late Golgi and to function in a complex with other proteins, Vps53p, Vps54p, and Vps51p. This complex is involved in retrograde trafficking of vesicles between the early endosomal compartment and the trans-Golgi network. We present the expression patterns of the POK gene and its duplicate P2 in Arabidopsis, and of the putative Arabidopsis homologs of VPS53 and VPS54 of yeast. We show that a POK::GFP fusion protein localizes to Golgi in plant cells, supporting the possibility of a conserved function for Vps52p and POK proteins. These results, together with the expression pattern of the POK::GUS fusion and the lack of plants homozygous for the pok mutation, suggest a more general role for POK in polar growth beyond the pollen tube elongation process. PMID:15235115

  15. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Sst4p, a Conserved Vps27/Hrs Homolog, Functions Downstream of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Pik3p To Mediate Proper Spore Formation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Masayuki; Iida, Michihiro; Koga, Takako; Yamada, Sadayuki; Hirata, Aiko; Iwaki, Tomoko; Takegawa, Kaoru; Fukui, Yasuhisa; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    Sporulation of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a developmental process that generates gametes and that includes the formation of spore envelope precursors called the forespore membranes. Assembly and development of forespore membranes require vesicular trafficking from other intracellular membrane compartments. We have shown that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns 3-kinase) is required for efficient and proper development of forespore membranes. The role of a FYVE domain protein, Sst4p, a homolog of Vps27p/Hrs, as a downstream factor for PtdIns 3-kinase in sporulation was investigated. sst4Δ asci formed spores with oval-shaped morphology and with reduced viability compared to that of the wild-type spores. The extension of forespore membranes was inefficient, and bubble-like structures emerged from the leading edges of the forespore membranes. Sst4p localization was examined using fluorescent protein fusions and was found to be adjacent to the forespore membranes during sporulation. The localization and function of Sst4p were dependent on its FYVE domain and on PtdIns 3-kinase. Sst4p colocalized and interacted with Hse1p, a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hse1p and of mammalian STAM. Mutations in all three UIM domains of the Sst4p/Hse1p complex resulted in formation of spores with abnormal morphology. These results suggest that Sst4p is a downstream factor of PtdIns 3-kinase and functions in forespore membrane formation. PMID:17951524

  16. Fumaric Acid Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by In Silico Aided Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guoqiang; Zou, Wei; Chen, Xiulai; Xu, Nan; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Fumaric acid (FA) is a promising biomass-derived building-block chemical. Bio-based FA production from renewable feedstock is a promising and sustainable alternative to petroleum-based chemical synthesis. Here we report on FA production by direct fermentation using metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the aid of in silico analysis of a genome-scale metabolic model. First, FUM1 was selected as the target gene on the basis of extensive literature mining. Flux balance analysis (FBA) revealed that FUM1 deletion can lead to FA production and slightly lower growth of S. cerevisiae. The engineered S. cerevisiae strain obtained by deleting FUM1 can produce FA up to a concentration of 610±31 mg L–1 without any apparent change in growth in fed-batch culture. FT-IR and 1H and 13C NMR spectra confirmed that FA was synthesized by the engineered S. cerevisiae strain. FBA identified pyruvate carboxylase as one of the factors limiting higher FA production. When the RoPYC gene was introduced, S. cerevisiae produced 1134±48 mg L–1 FA. Furthermore, the final engineered S. cerevisiae strain was able to produce 1675±52 mg L–1 FA in batch culture when the SFC1 gene encoding a succinate–fumarate transporter was introduced. These results demonstrate that the model shows great predictive capability for metabolic engineering. Moreover, FA production in S. cerevisiae can be efficiently developed with the aid of in silico metabolic engineering. PMID:23300594

  17. Characterization of antimicrobial activity of the lysosomes isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jihee; Park, Jae-Min; Jung, Seung-Ki; Kim, Keun-Young; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2009-07-01

    The antimicrobial activity of lysosomes, a cell organelle, against a range of test microorganisms was examined in this study. The lysosomes isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed antimicrobial activity to Escherichia coli that positively correlated with the pH of the phosphate buffer as a dissolving solvent. The lysosomes from S. cerevisiae exhibited optimal activity at a concentration of 40%, at pH 4.0 of phosphate buffer, and at broad range temperature, except of over 50 degrees C. It was also found that the lysosomes have antimicrobial activity against seven different microorganisms including E. coli. In addition, S. cerevisiae were exposed by a treatment with H(2)O(2) and lysosomes were isolated from H(2)O(2) exposed S. cerevisiae. We found that fluorescent intensities of each isolated lysosomes were increased depending on the increment of treated H(2)O(2) concentration, and the lysosomes from 20 mM H(2)O(2) treated S. cerevisiae showed higher antimicrobial activity than those from normal S. cerevisiae. Therefore, it suggests that lysosomes isolated from S. cerevisiae can be used as an antimicrobial agent. In addition, lysosomes activated by H(2)O(2) enhanced its antimicrobial activity. PMID:19319596

  18. Anti-Cdc25 antibodies inhibit guanyl nucleotide-dependent adenylyl cyclase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and cross-react with a 150-kilodalton mammalian protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, E; Marbach, I; Engelberg, D; Segal, M; Simchen, G; Levitzki, A

    1992-01-01

    The CDC25 gene product of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown to be a positive regulator of the Ras protein. The high degree of homology between yeast RAS and the mammalian proto-oncogene ras suggests a possible resemblance between the mammalian regulator of Ras and the regulator of the yeast Ras (Cdc25). On the basis of this assumption, we have raised antibodies against the conserved C-terminal domain of the Cdc25 protein in order to identify its mammalian homologs. Anti-Cdc25 antibodies raised against a beta-galactosidase-Cdc25 fusion protein were purified by immunoaffinity chromatography and were shown by immunoblotting to specifically recognize the Cdc25 portion of the antigen and a truncated Cdc25 protein, also expressed in bacteria. These antibodies were shown both by immunoblotting and by immunoprecipitation to recognize the CDC25 gene product in wild-type strains and in strains overexpressing Cdc25. The anti-Cdc25 antibodies potently inhibited the guanyl nucleotide-dependent and, approximately 3-fold less potently, the Mn(2+)-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity in S. cerevisiae. The anti-Cdc25 antibodies do not inhibit cyclase activity in a strain harboring RAS2Val-19 and lacking the CDC25 gene product. These results support the view that Cdc25, Ras2, and Cdc35/Cyr1 proteins are associated in a complex. Using these antibodies, we were able to define the conditions to completely solubilize the Cdc25 protein. The results suggest that the Cdc25 protein is tightly associated with the membrane but is not an intrinsic membrane protein, since only EDTA at pH 12 can solubilize the protein. The anti-Cdc25 antibodies strongly cross-reacted with the C-terminal domain of the Cdc25 yeast homolog, Sdc25. Most interestingly, these antibodies also cross-reacted with mammalian proteins of approximately 150 kDa from various tissues of several species of animals. These interactions were specifically blocked by the beta-galactosidase-Cdc25 fusion protein. Images

  19. Inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suspended in orange juice using high-intensity pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Elez-Martínez, Pedro; Escolà-Hernández, Joan; Soliva-Fortuny, Robert C; Martín-Belloso, Olga

    2004-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often associated with the spoilage of fruit juices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed electric field (HIPEF) treatment on the survival of S. cerevisiae suspended in orange juice. Commercial heat-sterilized orange juice was inoculated with S. cerevisiae (CECT 1319) (10(8) CFU/ml) and then treated by HIPEFs. The effects of HIPEF parameters (electric field strength, treatment time, pulse polarity, frequency, and pulse width) were evaluated and compared to those of heat pasteurization (90 degrees C/min). In all of the HIPEF experiments, the temperature was kept below 39 degrees C. S. cerevisiae cell damage induced by HIPEF treatment was observed by electron microscopy. HIPEF treatment was effective for the inactivation of S. cerevisiae in orange juice at pasteurization levels. A maximum inactivation of a 5.1-log (CFU per milliliter) reduction was achieved after exposure of S. cerevisiae to HIPEFs for 1,000 micros (4-micros pulse width) at 35 kV/cm and 200 Hz in bipolar mode. Inactivation increased as both the field strength and treatment time increased. For the same electric field strength and treatment time, inactivation decreased when the frequency and pulse width were increased. Electric pulses applied in the bipolar mode were more effective than those in the monopolar mode for destroying S. cerevisiae. HIPEF processing inactivated S. cerevisiae in orange juice, and the extent of inactivation was similar to that obtained during thermal pasteurization. HIPEF treatments caused membrane damage and had a profound effect on the intracellular organization of S. cerevisiae. PMID:15553647

  20. Using intron position conservation for homology-based gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Keilwagen, Jens; Wenk, Michael; Erickson, Jessica L.; Schattat, Martin H.; Grau, Jan; Hartung, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Annotation of protein-coding genes is very important in bioinformatics and biology and has a decisive influence on many downstream analyses. Homology-based gene prediction programs allow for transferring knowledge about protein-coding genes from an annotated organism to an organism of interest. Here, we present a homology-based gene prediction program called GeMoMa. GeMoMa utilizes the conservation of intron positions within genes to predict related genes in other organisms. We assess the performance of GeMoMa and compare it with state-of-the-art competitors on plant and animal genomes using an extended best reciprocal hit approach. We find that GeMoMa often makes more precise predictions than its competitors yielding a substantially increased number of correct transcripts. Subsequently, we exemplarily validate GeMoMa predictions using Sanger sequencing. Finally, we use RNA-seq data to compare the predictions of homology-based gene prediction programs, and find again that GeMoMa performs well. Hence, we conclude that exploiting intron position conservation improves homology-based gene prediction, and we make GeMoMa freely available as command-line tool and Galaxy integration. PMID:26893356

  1. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs. PMID:26450288

  2. Using intron position conservation for homology-based gene prediction.

    PubMed

    Keilwagen, Jens; Wenk, Michael; Erickson, Jessica L; Schattat, Martin H; Grau, Jan; Hartung, Frank

    2016-05-19

    Annotation of protein-coding genes is very important in bioinformatics and biology and has a decisive influence on many downstream analyses. Homology-based gene prediction programs allow for transferring knowledge about protein-coding genes from an annotated organism to an organism of interest.Here, we present a homology-based gene prediction program called GeMoMa. GeMoMa utilizes the conservation of intron positions within genes to predict related genes in other organisms. We assess the performance of GeMoMa and compare it with state-of-the-art competitors on plant and animal genomes using an extended best reciprocal hit approach. We find that GeMoMa often makes more precise predictions than its competitors yielding a substantially increased number of correct transcripts. Subsequently, we exemplarily validate GeMoMa predictions using Sanger sequencing. Finally, we use RNA-seq data to compare the predictions of homology-based gene prediction programs, and find again that GeMoMa performs well.Hence, we conclude that exploiting intron position conservation improves homology-based gene prediction, and we make GeMoMa freely available as command-line tool and Galaxy integration. PMID:26893356

  3. Non-homologous end joining: emerging themes and unanswered questions

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Sarvan Kumar; Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells. Here, we discuss current insights into the mechanism of NHEJ and the interplay between NHEJ and other pathways for repair of IR-induced DNA damage. PMID:24582502

  4. Homological equations for tensor fields and periodic averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendaño Camacho, M.; Vorobiev, Y. M.

    2011-09-01

    Homological equations of tensor type associated to periodic flows on a manifold are studied. The Cushman intrinsic formula [4] is generalized to the case of multivector fields and differential forms. Some applications to normal forms and the averaging method for perturbed Hamiltonian systems on slow-fast phase spaces are given.

  5. On the Homology of Congruence Subgroups and K3(Z)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ronnie; Szczarba, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    Let Γ(n;p) be the congruence subgroup of SL(n;Z) of level p. We study the homology and cohomology of Γ(n;p) as modules over SL(n;Fp) and apply our results to obtain an upper bound for the order of K3(Z). PMID:16592224

  6. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs.

  7. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-10-07

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs.

  8. Separation of homologous BAC contigs in the tetraploid Upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Upland cotton has an allotetraploid genome. Separation of homologous BAC contigs to their sub-genomes and further to individual chromosomes is a great challenge for genome-wide integrated genetic and physical mapping. As a pilot experiment to test the feasibility of separating the contigs in sub-g...

  9. Homology and the optimization of DNA sequence data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, W.

    2001-01-01

    Three methods of nucleotide character analysis are discussed. Their implications for molecular sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis are compared. The criterion of inter-data set congruence, both character based and topological, are applied to two data sets to elucidate and potentially discriminate among these parsimony-based ideas. c2001 The Willi Hennig Society.

  10. Homology Groups of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Félix; Vásquez Aguilar, Raciel; Carsteanu, Alin-Andrei

    2016-04-01

    This study applies topological data analysis, by generating homology groups to uncover patterns in the data of high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City (IIHR, U of Iowa). The state-space representation of the data is being investigated for an appropiate embedding dimension, in order to subsequently study topological properties of resulting manifold.

  11. Disruption of an ADE6 Homolog of Ustilago maydis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ustilago maydis secretes iron-binding compounds during times of iron depletion. A putative homolog of the Sacharromyces cereviseae ADE6 and Escherichia coli purL genes was identified near a multigenic complex, which contains two genes sid1 and sid2 involved in a siderophore biosynthetic pathway. The...

  12. Isolation of xylose reductase gene of Pichia stipitis and its expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Takuma, Shinya; Nakashima, Noriyuki; Tantirungkij, Manee

    1991-12-31

    A NADPH/NADH-dependent xylose reductase gene was isolated from the xylose-assimilating yeast, Pichia stipitis. DNA sequence analysis showed that the gene consists of 951 bp. The gene introduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was transcribed to mRNA, and a considerable amount of enzyme activity was observed constitutively, whereas transcription and translation in P steps were inducible. S. cerevisiae carrying the xylose reductase gene could not, however, grow on xylose medium, and could not produce ethanol from xylose. Since xylose uptake and accumulation of xylitol by S. cerevisiae were observed, the conversion of xylitol to xylulose seemed to be limited.

  13. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae YDL112w ORF encodes the putative 2'-O-ribose methyltransferase catalyzing the formation of Gm18 in tRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Cavaillé, J; Chetouani, F; Bachellerie, J P

    1999-01-01

    The protein sequences of three known RNA 2'-O-ribose methylases were used as probes for detecting putative homologs through iterative searches of genomic databases. We have identified 45 new positive Open Reading Frames (ORFs), mostly in prokaryotic genomes. Five complete eukaryotic ORFs were also detected, among which was a single ORF (YDL112w) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. After genetic depletion of YDL112w, we observed a specific defect in tRNA ribose methylation, with the complete disappearance of Gm18 in all tRNAs that naturally contain this modification, whereas other tRNA ribose methylations and the complex pattern of rRNA ribose methylations were not affected. The tRNA G18 methylation defect was suppressed by transformation of the disrupted strain with a plasmid allowing expression of YDL112wp. The formation of Gm18 on an in vitro transcript of a yeast tRNASer naturally containing this methylation, which was efficiently catalyzed by cell-free extracts from the wild-type yeast strain, did not occur with extracts from the disrupted strain. The protein encoded by the YDL112w ORF, termed Trm3 (tRNA methylation), is therefore likely to be the tRNA (Gm18) ribose methylase. In in vitro assays, its activity is strongly dependent on tRNA architecture. Trm3p, the first putative tRNA ribose methylase identified in an eukaryotic organism, is considerably larger than its Escherichia coli functional homolog spoU (1,436 amino acids vs. 229 amino acids), or any known or putative prokaryotic RNA ribose methyltransferase. Homologs found in human (TRP-185 protein), Caenorhabditis elegans and Arabidopsis thaliana also exhibit a very long N-terminal extension not related to any protein sequence in databases. PMID:9917067

  14. A Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae Killer Strain Secreting the X Factor Related to Killer Activity and Inhibition of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 Killer Toxins.

    PubMed

    Melvydas, Vytautas; Bružauskaitė, Ieva; Gedminienė, Genovaitė; Šiekštelė, Rimantas

    2016-09-01

    It was determined that Kx strains secrete an X factor which can inhibit all known Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer toxins (K1, K2, K28) and some toxins of other yeast species-the phenomenon not yet described in the scientific literature. It was shown that Kx type yeast strains posess a killer phenotype producing small but clear lysis zones not only on the sensitive strain α'1 but also on the lawn of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 type killer strains at temperatures between 20 and 30 °C. The pH at which killer/antikiller effect of Kx strain reaches its maximum is about 5.0-5.2. The Kx yeast were identified as to belong to S. cerevisiae species. Another newly identified S. cerevisiae killer strain N1 has killer activity but shows no antikilller properties against standard K1, K2 and K28 killer toxins. The genetic basis for Kx killer/antikiller phenotype was associated with the presence of M-dsRNA which is bigger than M-dsRNA of standard S. cerevisiae K1, K2, K28 type killer strains. Killer and antikiller features should be encoded by dsRNA. The phenomenon of antikiller (inhibition) properties was observed against some killer toxins of other yeast species. The molecular weight of newly identified killer toxins which produces Kx type strains might be about 45 kDa. PMID:27407298

  15. Intracellular ethanol accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation.

    PubMed

    D'Amore, T; Panchal, C J; Stewart, G G

    1988-01-01

    An intracellular accumulation of ethanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was observed during the early stages of fermentation (3 h). However, after 12 h of fermentation, the intracellular and extracellular ethanol concentrations were similar. Increasing the osmotic pressure of the medium caused an increase in the ratio of intracellular to extracellular ethanol concentrations at 3 h of fermentation. As in the previous case, the intracellular and extracellular ethanol concentrations were similar after 12 h of fermentation. Increasing the osmotic pressure also caused a decrease in yeast cell growth and fermentation activities. However, nutrient supplementation of the medium increased the extent of growth and fermentation, resulting in complete glucose utilization, even though intracellular ethanol concentrations were unaltered. These results suggest that nutrient limitation is a major factor responsible for the decreased growth and fermentation activities observed in yeast cells at higher osmotic pressures. PMID:3278685

  16. Detection and sequencing of Okazaki fragments in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Duncan J.; Yadav, Tejas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY We have previously demonstrated that lagging-strand synthesis in budding yeast is coupled with chromatin assembly on newly synthesized DNA. Using a strain of S. cerevisiae in which DNA ligase I can be conditionally depleted, we can enrich and purify Okazaki fragments. We delineate a method to extract, end-label and visualize Okazaki fragments using denaturing agarose gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, we describe an ion-exchange chromatographic method for purification of fragments and preparation of strand-specific sequencing libraries. Deep sequencing of Okazaki fragments generates a comprehensive, genomic map of DNA synthesis, starting from a single asynchronous culture. Altogether this approach represents a tractable system to investigate key aspects of DNA replication and chromatin assembly. PMID:25916711

  17. Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with defective vacuolar function

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamoto, K.; Yoshizawa, K.; Ohsumi, Y.; Anraku, Y.

    1988-06-01

    Mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that have a small vacuolar lysine pool were isolated and characterized. Mutant KL97 (lys1 slp1-1) and strain KL197-1A (slp1-1), a prototrophic derivative of KL97, did not grow well in synthetic medium supplemented with 10 mM lysine. Genetic studies indicated that the slp1-1mutation (for small lysine pool) is recessive and is due to a single chromosomal mutation. Mutant KL97 shows the following pleiotropic defects in vacuolar functions. (i) It has small vacuolar pools for lysine, arginine, and histidine. (ii) Its growth is sensitive to lysine, histidine, Ca/sup 2 +/, heavy metal ions, and antibiotics. (iii) It has many small vesicles but no large central vacuole. (iv) It has a normal amount of the vacuolar membrane marker ..cap alpha..-mannosidase but shows reduced activities of the vacuole sap markers proteinase A, proteinase B, and carboxypeptidase Y.

  18. Bent DNA functions as a replication enhancer in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J S; Eckdahl, T T; Anderson, J N

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bent DNA is a conserved property of Saccharomyces cerevisiae autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs). Here we showed that bending elements are contained within ARS subdomains identified by others as replication enhancers. To provide a direct test for the function of this unusual structure, we analyzed the ARS activity of plasmids that contained synthetic bent DNA substituted for the natural bending element in yeast ARS1. The results demonstrated that deletion of the natural bending locus impaired ARS activity which was restored to a near wild-type level with synthetic bent DNA. Since the only obvious common features of the natural and synthetic bending elements are the sequence patterns that give rise to DNA bending, the results suggest that the bent structure per se is crucial for ARS function. Images PMID:3043195

  19. Identity elements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae tRNA(His).

    PubMed Central

    Nameki, N; Asahara, H; Shimizu, M; Okada, N; Himeno, H

    1995-01-01

    Recognition of tRNA(His) by Saccharomyces cerevisiae histidyl-tRNA synthetase was studied using in vitro transcripts. Histidine tRNA is unique in possessing an extra nucleotide, G-1, at the 5' end. Mutation studies indicate that this irregular secondary structure at the end of the acceptor stem is important for aminoacylation with histidine, while the requirement of either base of this extra base pair is smaller than that in Escherichia coli. The anticodon was also found to be required for histidylation. The regions involved in histidylation are essentially the same as those in E.coli, whereas the proportion of the contributions of the two portions distant from each other, the anticodon and the end of the acceptor stem, makes a substantial difference between the two systems. PMID:7885835

  20. Hormetic Effect of H2O2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Valishkevych, Bohdana V.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between target of rapamycin (TOR) and H2O2-induced hormetic response in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on glucose or fructose. In general, our data suggest that: (1) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induces hormesis in a TOR-dependent manner; (2) the H2O2-induced hormetic dose–response in yeast depends on the type of carbohydrate in growth medium; (3) the concentration-dependent effect of H2O2 on yeast colony growth positively correlates with the activity of glutathione reductase that suggests the enzyme involvement in the H2O2-induced hormetic response; and (4) both TOR1 and TOR2 are involved in the reciprocal regulation of the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glyoxalase 1. PMID:27099601

  1. Bioaccumulation of cadmium by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunsheng; Jiang, Wei; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Yinglian; Dong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongfeng; Meng, Xianghong; Xu, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Bioaccumulation via growing cells is a potential technique for heavy metal removal from food materials. The cadmium bioaccumulation characteristics by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. Z. rouxii displayed powerful cadmium removal ability at low cadmium concentrations, which mainly depended on the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation. The percentage of intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts obviously decreased with the increase of initial biomass and cadmium concentrations. Low pH and elevated concentrations of zinc and copper significantly decreased the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts but improved the cadmium tolerance and the cell-surface cadmium bioaccumulation of Z. rouxii. Cadmium removal of Z. rouxii was improved by zinc and copper conditionally. Z. rouxii that possessed more powerful cadmium tolerance and removal ability at low pH and high concentration of competing ions can be developed into a potential cadmium removal agent using in complex food environment in future. PMID:24440489

  2. MPS3 mediates meiotic bouquet formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Michael N; Lee, Chih-Ying; Wilkerson, Joseph L; Dresser, Michael E

    2007-05-22

    In meiotic prophase, telomeres associate with the nuclear envelope and accumulate adjacent to the centrosome/spindle pole to form the chromosome bouquet, a well conserved event that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the meiotic telomere protein Ndj1p. Ndj1p interacts with Mps3p, a nuclear envelope SUN domain protein that is required for spindle pole body duplication and for sister chromatid cohesion. Removal of the Ndj1p-interaction domain from MPS3 creates an ndj1 Delta-like separation-of-function allele, and Ndj1p and Mps3p are codependent for stable association with the telomeres. SUN domain proteins are found in the nuclear envelope across phyla and are implicated in mediating interactions between the interior of the nucleus and the cytoskeleton. Our observations indicate a general mechanism for meiotic telomere movements. PMID:17495028

  3. The Influence of Microgravity on Invasive Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Mulders, Sebastiaan E.; Stassen, Catherine; Daenen, Luk; Devreese, Bart; Siewers, Verena; van Eijsden, Rudy G. E.; Nielsen, Jens; Delvaux, Freddy R.; Willaert, Ronnie

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of microgravity on colony growth and the morphological transition from single cells to short invasive filaments in the model eukaryotic organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two-dimensional spreading of the yeast colonies grown on semi-solid agar medium was reduced under microgravity in the Σ1278b laboratory strain but not in the CMBSESA1 industrial strain. This was supported by the Σ1278b proteome map under microgravity conditions, which revealed upregulation of proteins linked to anaerobic conditions. The Σ1278b strain showed a reduced invasive growth in the center of the yeast colony. Bud scar distribution was slightly affected, with a switch toward more random budding. Together, microgravity conditions disturb spatially programmed budding patterns and generate strain-dependent growth differences in yeast colonies on semi-solid medium.

  4. Heterologous biosynthesis of artemisinic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Li, J; Wang, G; Li, X

    2016-06-01

    Artemisinic acid is a precursor of antimalarial compound artemisinin. The titre of biosynthesis of artemisinic acid using Saccharomyces cerevisiae platform has been achieved up to 25 g l(-1) ; however, the performance of platform cells is still industrial unsatisfied. Many strategies have been proposed to improve the titre of artemisinic acid. The traditional strategies mainly focused on partial target sites, simple up-regulation key genes or repression competing pathways in the total synthesis route. However, this may result in unbalance of carbon fluxes and dysfunction of metabolism. In this review, the recent advances on the promising methods in silico and in vivo for biosynthesis of artemisinic acid have been discussed. The bioinformatics and omics techniques have brought a great prospect for improving production of artemisinin and other pharmacal compounds in heterologous platform. PMID:26743771

  5. Translation initiation factor-dependent extracts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Altmann, M; Blum, S; Pelletier, J; Sonenberg, N; Wilson, T M; Trachsel, H

    1990-08-27

    Translation initiation factor 4A- and 4E-dependent extracts were developed from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used to study factor requirements for translation of individual mRNAs in vitro. Whereas all mRNAs tested required eIF-4A, mRNAs devoid of secondary structure in their 5' untranslated region did not require exogenous eIF-4E for translation. The latter included alfalfa mosaic virus RNA4, mRNA containing the untranslated region of tobacco mosaic virus RNA and mRNA containing part of the untranslated region of poliovirus RNA. Furthermore, initiation of translation on mRNAs containing part of the untranslated region of poliovirus RNA is most likely internal. PMID:2169890

  6. Availability of substratum enhances ethanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sankh, Santosh N; Arvindekar, Akalpita U

    2004-12-01

    Novel additives that act as substratum for attachment of the yeast cells, increased ethanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The addition of 2 g rice husk, straw, wood shavings, plastic pieces or silica gel to 100 ml medium enhanced ethanol production by 30-40 (v/v). Six distillery strains showed an average enhancement of 34 from 4.1 (v/v) in control to 5.5 (v/v) on addition of rice husk. The cell wall bound glycogen increased by 40-50 mg g (-1) dry yeast while intracellular glycogen decreased by 10-12 mg g(-1) dry yeast in cells grown in presence of substratum. PMID:15672221

  7. Yap1: a DNA damage responder in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Lori A; Degtyareva, Natalya; Doetsch, Paul W

    2012-04-01

    Activation of signaling pathways in response to genotoxic stress is crucial for cells to properly repair DNA damage. In response to DNA damage, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species increase. One important function of such a response could be to initiate signal transduction processes. We have employed the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae to delineate DNA damage sensing mechanisms. We report a novel, unanticipated role for the transcription factor Yap1 as a DNA damage responder, providing direct evidence that reactive oxygen species are an important component of the DNA damage signaling process. Our findings reveal an epistatic link between Yap1 and the DNA base excision repair pathway. Corruption of the Yap1-mediated DNA damage response influences cell survival and genomic stability in response to exposure to genotoxic agents. PMID:22433435

  8. Protein disorder reduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive heat shock.

    PubMed

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Gasik, Zofia; Dong, Yu-An; Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments established that a culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) survives sudden high temperatures by specifically duplicating the entire chromosome III and two chromosomal fragments (from IV and XII). Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are not significantly over-abundant in the duplication. In contrast, we suggest a simple algorithm to " postdict " the experimental results: Find a small enough chromosome with minimal protein disorder and duplicate this region. This algorithm largely explains all observed duplications. In particular, all regions duplicated in the experiment reduced the overall content of protein disorder. The differential analysis of the functional makeup of the duplication remained inconclusive. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment suggested over-representation in processes related to reproduction and nutrient uptake. Analyzing the protein-protein interaction network (PPI) revealed that few network-central proteins were duplicated. The predictive hypothesis hinges upon the concept of reducing proteins with long regions of disorder in order to become less sensitive to heat shock attack. PMID:26673203

  9. Higher-order structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Lowary, P.T.; Widom, J. )

    1989-11-01

    We have developed a method for partially purifying chromatin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) to a level suitable for studies of its higher-order folding. This has required the use of yeast strains that are free of the ubiquitous yeast killer virus. Results from dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction show that the yeast chromatin undergoes a cation-dependent folding into 30-nm filaments that resemble those characteristic of higher-cell chromatin; moreover, the packing of nucleosomes within the yeast 30-nm filaments is similar to that of higher cells. These results imply that yeast has a protein or protein domain that serves the role of the histone H 1 found in higher cells; physical and genetic studies of the yeast activity could help elucidate the structure and function of H 1. Images of the yeast 30-nm filaments can be used to test crossed-linker models for 30-nm filament structure.

  10. Local Nanomechanical Motion of the Cell Wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelling, Andrew E.; Sehati, Sadaf; Gralla, Edith B.; Valentine, Joan S.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2004-08-01

    We demonstrate that the cell wall of living Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) exhibits local temperature-dependent nanomechanical motion at characteristic frequencies. The periodic motions in the range of 0.8 to 1.6 kHz with amplitudes of ~3 nm were measured using the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Exposure of the cells to a metabolic inhibitor causes the periodic motion to cease. From the strong frequency dependence on temperature, we derive an activation energy of 58 kJ/mol, which is consistent with the cell's metabolism involving molecular motors such as kinesin, dynein, and myosin. The magnitude of the forces observed (~10 nN) suggests concerted nanomechanical activity is operative in the cell.

  11. Construction of a flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting lactose.

    PubMed

    Domingues, L; Teixeira, J A; Lima, N

    1999-05-01

    A flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with the ability to express both the LAC4 (coding for beta-galactosidase) and LAC12 (coding for lactose permease) genes of Kluyveromyces marxianus was constructed. This recombinant strain is not only able to grow on lactose, but it can also ferment this substrate. To our knowledge this is the first time that a recombinant S. cervisiae has been found to ferment lactose in a way comparable to that of the existing lactose-fermenting yeast strains. Moreover, the flocculating capacity of the strain used in this work gives the process several advantages. On the one hand, it allows for operation in a continuous mode at high cell concentration, thus increasing the system's overall productivity; on the other hand, the biomass concentration in the effluent is reduced, thus decreasing product separation/purification costs. PMID:10390820

  12. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae Internet protein resource now available.

    PubMed

    Latter, G I; Boutell, T; Monardo, P J; Kobayashi, R; Futcher, B; Mclaughlin, C S; Garrels, J I

    1995-07-01

    The QUEST Protein Database Center is now making available two Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein databases via the Internet. The yeast electrophoretic protein database (YEPD) is a database of approximately one hundred protein identifications on two-dimensional gels. The yeast protein database (YPD) is a database of gene names and properties of over 3500 yeast proteins of known sequence. These databases can be accessed via a World-Wide Web (WWW) server (URL http:@siva.cshl.org). YPD is available via public ftp (isis.cshl.org) as well, in a spreadsheet format, and in ASCII format. When accessed via WWW, both of these databases have hypertext links to other biological data, such as the SWISS-PROT protein sequence database and the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SacchDB), and to each other. PMID:7498160

  13. Phenotypic effects of membrane protein overexpression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melén, Karin; Blomberg, Anders; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2006-07-01

    Large-scale protein overexpression phenotype screens provide an important complement to the more common gene knockout screens. Here, we have targeted the so far poorly understood Saccharomyces cerevisiae membrane proteome and report growth phenotypes for a strain collection overexpressing 600 C-terminally tagged integral membrane proteins grown both under normal and three different stress conditions. Although overexpression of most membrane proteins reduce the growth rate in synthetic defined medium, we identify a large number of proteins that, when overexpressed, confer specific resistance to various stress conditions. Our data suggest that regulation of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor biosynthesis and the Na+/K+ homeostasis system constitute major downstream targets of the yeast PKA/RAS pathway and point to a possible connection between the early secretory pathway and the cells' response to oxidative stress. We also have quantified the expression levels for >550 membrane proteins, facilitating the choice of well expressing proteins for future functional and structural studies. caffeine | paraquat | salt tolerance | yeast

  14. Production of natural products through metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-12-01

    Many high-value metabolites are produced in nature by organisms that are not ideal for large-scale production. Therefore, interest exists in expressing the biosynthetic pathways of these compounds in organisms that are more suitable for industrial production. Recent years have seen developments in both the discovery of various biosynthetic pathways, as well as development of metabolic engineering tools that allow reconstruction of complex pathways in microorganisms. In the present review we discuss recent advances in reconstruction of the biosynthetic pathways of various high-value products in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a commonly used industrial microorganism. Key achievements in the production of different isoprenoids, aromatics and polyketides are presented and the metabolic engineering strategies underlying these accomplishments are discussed. PMID:25544013

  15. Mutations in Ran system affected telomere silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Naoyuki Kobayashi, Masahiko; Shimizu, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi; Murakami, Seishi; Nishimoto, Takeharu

    2007-11-23

    The Ran GTPase system regulates the direction and timing of several cellular events, such as nuclear-cytosolic transport, centrosome formation, and nuclear envelope assembly in telophase. To gain insight into the Ran system's involvement in chromatin formation, we investigated gene silencing at the telomere in several mutants of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which had defects in genes involved in the Ran system. A mutation of the RanGAP gene, rna1-1, caused reduced silencing at the telomere, and partial disruption of the nuclear Ran binding factor, yrb2-{delta}2, increased this silencing. The reduced telomere silencing in rna1-1 cells was suppressed by a high dosage of the SIR3 gene or the SIT4 gene. Furthermore, hyperphosphorylated Sir3 protein accumulated in the rna1-1 mutant. These results suggest that RanGAP is required for the heterochromatin structure at the telomere in budding yeast.

  16. Domestication and Divergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Beer Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Gallone, Brigida; Steensels, Jan; Prahl, Troels; Soriaga, Leah; Saels, Veerle; Herrera-Malaver, Beatriz; Merlevede, Adriaan; Roncoroni, Miguel; Voordeckers, Karin; Miraglia, Loren; Teiling, Clotilde; Steffy, Brian; Taylor, Maryann; Schwartz, Ariel; Richardson, Toby; White, Christopher; Baele, Guy; Maere, Steven; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2016-09-01

    Whereas domestication of livestock, pets, and crops is well documented, it is still unclear to what extent microbes associated with the production of food have also undergone human selection and where the plethora of industrial strains originates from. Here, we present the genomes and phenomes of 157 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. Our analyses reveal that today's industrial yeasts can be divided into five sublineages that are genetically and phenotypically separated from wild strains and originate from only a few ancestors through complex patterns of domestication and local divergence. Large-scale phenotyping and genome analysis further show strong industry-specific selection for stress tolerance, sugar utilization, and flavor production, while the sexual cycle and other phenotypes related to survival in nature show decay, particularly in beer yeasts. Together, these results shed light on the origins, evolutionary history, and phenotypic diversity of industrial yeasts and provide a resource for further selection of superior strains. PAPERCLIP. PMID:27610566

  17. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites. PMID:27016252

  18. Tolerance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ultra high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, M.; Torigoe, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Takizawa, N.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Ono, F.

    2014-05-01

    Our studies on the tolerance of plants and animals against very high pressure of several GPa have been extended to a smaller sized fungus, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several pieces of budding yeast (dry yeast) were sealed in a small teflon capsule with a liquid pressure medium fluorinate, and exposed to 7.5 GPa by using a cubic anvil press. The pressure was kept constant for various duration of time from 2 to 24 h. After the pressure was released, the specimens were brought out from the teflon capsule, and they were cultivated on a potato dextrose agar. It was found that the budding yeast exposed to 7.5 GPa for up to 6 h showed multiplication. However, those exposed to 7.5 GPa for longer than 12 h were found dead. The high pressure tolerance of budding yeast is a little weaker than that of tardigrades.

  19. Functional attributes of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae meiotic recombinase Dmc1.

    PubMed

    Busygina, Valeria; Gaines, William A; Xu, Yuanyuan; Kwon, Youngho; Williams, Gareth J; Lin, Sheng-Wei; Chang, Hao-Yen; Chi, Peter; Wang, Hong-Wei; Sung, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    The role of Dmc1 as a meiosis-specific general recombinase was first demonstrated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Progress in understanding the biochemical mechanism of ScDmc1 has been hampered by its tendency to form inactive aggregates. We have found that the inclusion of ATP during protein purification prevents Dmc1 aggregation. ScDmc1 so prepared is capable of forming D-loops and responsive to its accessory factors Rad54 and Rdh54. Negative staining electron microscopy and iterative helical real-space reconstruction revealed that the ScDmc1-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament harbors 6.5 protomers per turn with a pitch of ∼106Å. The ScDmc1 purification procedure and companion molecular analyses should facilitate future studies on this recombinase. PMID:23769192

  20. Characterization of Encapsulated Berberine in Yeast Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Roshanak; Rajabi, Omid; Khashyarmanesh, Zahra; Fathi Najafi, Mohsen; Fazly Bazzaz, BiBi Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    Berberine was loaded in yeast cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiaeas a novel pharmaceutical carrier to improve the treatment ofmany diseases. The yeast-encapsulated active materialsshowedhigh stability and bioavailability due to the enhanced solubility and sustained releasing. In this study, different characteristics of prepared berberine loaded yeast cells (loading capacity, release kinetic order, MIC and stability) were evaluatedby different analytical methods (fluorescence spectroscopy, HPLC and SEM).The loading capacity was about 78% ± 0.6%.Berberine release patterns of microcapsules happened in two different stages and followed by zero and first-order kinetic,respectively. About 99% of all active material released during 34 h. MIC was improved by berberine loaded microcapsules in comparison withberberine powder. The microcapsules were completely stable. Berberine loaded Sac. Cerevisiae could be considered as a favorite sustained release drug delivery system. The yeast would be applied as an efficient carrier to improve various properties of different active materials. PMID:26664393

  1. The Dysferlin Domain-Only Protein, Spo73, Is Required for Prospore Membrane Extension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Yuuya; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi S; Tanaka, Takayuki; Inoue, Ichiro; Suda, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Nakanishi, Hideki; Nakamura, Shugo; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a developmental process in which an ascus containing four haploid spores forms from a diploid cell. During this process, newly formed membrane structures called prospore membranes extend along the nuclear envelope and engulf and package daughter nuclei along with cytosol and organelles to form precursors of spores. Proteins involved in prospore membrane extension, Vps13 and Spo71, have recently been reported; however, the overall mechanism of membrane extension remains unclear. Here, we identified Spo73 as an additional factor involved in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of a spo73∆ mutant revealed that it shows defects similar to those of a spo71∆ mutant during prospore membrane formation. Spo73 localizes to the prospore membrane, and this localization is independent of Spo71 and Vps13. In contrast, a Spo73 protein carrying mutations in a surface basic patch mislocalizes to the cytoplasm and overexpression of Spo71 can partially rescue localization to the prospore membrane. Similar to spo71∆ mutants, spo73∆ mutants display genetic interactions with the mutations in the SMA2 and SPO1 genes involved in prospore membrane bending. Further, our bioinformatic analysis revealed that Spo73 is a dysferlin domain-only protein. Thus, these results suggest that a dysferlin domain-only protein, Spo73, functions with a dual pleckstrin homology domain protein, Spo71, in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of Spo73 will provide insights into the conserved function of dysferlin domains, which is related to dysferlinopathy. IMPORTANCE Prospore membrane formation consists of de novo double-membrane formation, which occurs during the developmental process of sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Membranes are formed into their proper size and shape, and thus, prospore membrane formation has been studied as a general model of membrane formation. We identified SPO73, previously shown to be required for spore wall formation

  2. The Dysferlin Domain-Only Protein, Spo73, Is Required for Prospore Membrane Extension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Yuuya; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi S.; Tanaka, Takayuki; Inoue, Ichiro; Suda, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Nakanishi, Hideki; Nakamura, Shugo; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a developmental process in which an ascus containing four haploid spores forms from a diploid cell. During this process, newly formed membrane structures called prospore membranes extend along the nuclear envelope and engulf and package daughter nuclei along with cytosol and organelles to form precursors of spores. Proteins involved in prospore membrane extension, Vps13 and Spo71, have recently been reported; however, the overall mechanism of membrane extension remains unclear. Here, we identified Spo73 as an additional factor involved in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of a spo73∆ mutant revealed that it shows defects similar to those of a spo71∆ mutant during prospore membrane formation. Spo73 localizes to the prospore membrane, and this localization is independent of Spo71 and Vps13. In contrast, a Spo73 protein carrying mutations in a surface basic patch mislocalizes to the cytoplasm and overexpression of Spo71 can partially rescue localization to the prospore membrane. Similar to spo71∆ mutants, spo73∆ mutants display genetic interactions with the mutations in the SMA2 and SPO1 genes involved in prospore membrane bending. Further, our bioinformatic analysis revealed that Spo73 is a dysferlin domain-only protein. Thus, these results suggest that a dysferlin domain-only protein, Spo73, functions with a dual pleckstrin homology domain protein, Spo71, in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of Spo73 will provide insights into the conserved function of dysferlin domains, which is related to dysferlinopathy. IMPORTANCE Prospore membrane formation consists of de novo double-membrane formation, which occurs during the developmental process of sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Membranes are formed into their proper size and shape, and thus, prospore membrane formation has been studied as a general model of membrane formation. We identified SPO73, previously shown to be required for spore wall

  3. The plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: structure, function, and biogenesis.

    PubMed

    van der Rest, M E; Kamminga, A H; Nakano, A; Anraku, Y; Poolman, B; Konings, W N

    1995-06-01

    The composition of phospholipids, sphingolipids, and sterols in the plasma membrane has a strong influence on the activity of the proteins associated or embedded in the lipid bilayer. Since most lipid-synthesizing enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are located in intracellular organelles, an extensive flux of lipids from these organelles to the plasma membrane is required. Although the pathway of protein traffic to the plasma membrane is similar to that of most of the lipids, the bulk flow of lipids is separate from vesicle-mediated protein transport. Recent advances in the analysis of membrane budding and membrane fusion indicate that the mechanisms of protein transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi and from the Golgi to plasma membrane are similar. The majority of plasma membrane proteins transport solutes across the membrane. A number of ATP-dependent export systems have been detected that couple the hydrolysis of ATP to transport of molecules out of the cell. The hydrolysis of ATP by the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase generates a proton motive force which is used to drive secondary transport processes. In S. cerevisiae, many substrates are transported by more than one system. Transport of monosaccharide is catalyzed by uniport systems, while transport of disaccharides, amino acids, and nucleosides is mediated by proton symport systems. Transport activity can be regulated at the level of transcription, e.g., induction and (catabolite) repression, but transport proteins can also be affected posttranslationally by a process termed catabolite inactivation. Catabolite inactivation is triggered by the addition of fermentable sugars, intracellular acidification, stress conditions, and/or nitrogen starvation. Phosphorylation and/or ubiquitination of the transport proteins has been proposed as an initial step in the controlled inactivation and degradation of the target enzyme. The use of artificial membranes, like secretory vesicles and plasma membranes

  4. Septins localize to microtubules during nutritional limitation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pablo-Hernando, M Evangelina; Arnaiz-Pita, Yolanda; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; del Rey, Francisco; Neiman, Aaron M; Vázquez de Aldana, Carlos R

    2008-01-01

    Background In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nutrient limitation stimulates diploid cells to undergo DNA replication and meiosis, followed by the formation of four haploid spores. Septins are a family of proteins that assemble a ring structure at the mother-daughter neck during vegetative growth, where they control cytokinesis. In sporulating cells, the septin ring disassembles and septins relocalize to the prospore membrane. Results Here, we demonstrate that nutrient limitation triggers a change in the localization of at least two vegetative septins (Cdc10 and Cdc11) from the bud neck to the microtubules. The association of Cdc10 and Cdc11 with microtubules persists into meiosis, and they are found associated with the meiotic spindle until the end of meiosis II. In addition, the meiosis-specific septin Spr28 displays similar behavior, suggesting that this is a common feature of septins. Septin association to microtubules is a consequence of the nutrient limitation signal, since it is also observed when haploid cells are incubated in sporulation medium and when haploid or diploid cells are grown in medium containing non-fermentable carbon sources. Moreover, during meiosis II, when the nascent prospore membrane is formed, septins moved from the microtubules to this membrane. Proper organization of the septins on the membrane requires the sporulation-specific septins Spr3 and Spr28. Conclusion Nutrient limitation in S. cerevisiae triggers the sporulation process, but it also induces the disassembly of the septin bud neck ring and relocalization of the septin subunits to the nucleus. Septins remain associated with microtubules during the meiotic divisions and later, during spore morphogenesis, they are detected associated to the nascent prospore membranes surrounding each nuclear lobe. Septin association to microtubules also occurs during growth in non-fermentable carbon sources. PMID:18826657

  5. Engineering the monomer composition of polyhydroxyalkanoates synthesized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Carlson, Ross; Srienc, Friedrich

    2006-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) have received considerable interest as renewable-resource-based, biodegradable, and biocompatible plastics with a wide range of potential applications. We have engineered the synthesis of PHA polymers composed of monomers ranging from 4 to 14 carbon atoms in either the cytosol or the peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by harnessing intermediates of fatty acid metabolism. Cytosolic PHA production was supported by establishing in the cytosol critical beta-oxidation chemistries which are found natively in peroxisomes. This platform was utilized to supply medium-chain (C6 to C14) PHA precursors from both fatty acid degradation and synthesis to a cytosolically expressed medium-chain-length (mcl) polymerase from Pseudomonas oleovorans. Synthesis of short-chain-length PHAs (scl-PHAs) was established in the peroxisome of a wild-type yeast strain by targeting the Ralstonia eutropha scl polymerase to the peroxisome. This strain, harboring a peroxisomally targeted scl-PHA synthase, accumulated PHA up to approximately 7% of its cell dry weight. These results indicate (i) that S. cerevisiae expressing a cytosolic mcl-PHA polymerase or a peroxisomal scl-PHA synthase can use the 3-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A intermediates from fatty acid metabolism to synthesize PHAs and (ii) that fatty acid degradation is also possible in the cytosol as beta-oxidation might not be confined only to the peroxisomes. Polymers of even-numbered, odd-numbered, or a combination of even- and odd-numbered monomers can be controlled by feeding the appropriate substrates. This ability should permit the rational design and synthesis of polymers with desired material properties. PMID:16391089

  6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomes recognize non-AUG initiation codons.

    PubMed Central

    Zitomer, R S; Walthall, D A; Rymond, B C; Hollenberg, C P

    1984-01-01

    A series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasmids and mutant derivatives containing fusions of the Escherichia coli galactokinase gene, galK, to the yeast iso-1-cytochrome c CYC1 transcription unit were used to study the sequences affecting the initiation of translation in S. cerevisiae. When the CYC1 AUG initiation codon preceded the galK AUG codon and coding sequence and either the two AUGs were out of frame with each other or a nonsense codon was located between them, the expression of the galK gene was extremely low. Deletion of the CYC1 AUG and its surrounding sequences resulted in a 100-fold increase in galK expression. This dependence of galK expression on the elimination of the CYC1 AUG codon was used to select mutations in that codon. Then the ability of these altered initiation codons to serve in translational initiation was determined by reconstruction of the CYC1 gene 3' to and in frame with them. Initiation was found to occur at the codons UUG and AUA, but not at the codons AAA and AUC. Furthermore the codon UUG, when preceded by an A three nucleotides upstream, served as a better initiation codon than when a U was substituted for the A. The efficiency of translation from these non-AUG codons was quantitated by using a CYC1/galK protein-coding fusion and measuring cellular galactokinase levels. Initiation at the UUG codon was 6.9% as efficient as initiation at the wild-type AUG codon when preceded by an A three nucleotides upstream, but was over 10-fold less efficient when a U was substituted for that A. Initiation at AUA was 0.5% as efficient as at AUG. The effects of the sequences preceding the initiation codon are discussed in light of these results. PMID:6390186

  7. Modulation of efficiency of translation termination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nizhnikov, Anton A; Antonets, Kirill S; Inge-Vechtomov, Sergey G; Derkatch, Irina L

    2014-01-01

    Nonsense suppression is a readthrough of premature termination codons. It typically occurs either due to the recognition of stop codons by tRNAs with mutant anticodons, or due to a decrease in the fidelity of translation termination. In the latter case, suppressors usually promote the readthrough of different types of nonsense codons and are thus called omnipotent nonsense suppressors. Omnipotent nonsense suppressors were identified in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in 1960s, and most of subsequent studies were performed in this model organism. Initially, omnipotent suppressors were localized by genetic analysis to different protein- and RNA-encoding genes, mostly the components of translational machinery. Later, nonsense suppression was found to be caused not only by genomic mutations, but also by epigenetic elements, prions. Prions are self-perpetuating protein conformations usually manifested by infectious protein aggregates. Modulation of translational accuracy by prions reflects changes in the activity of their structural proteins involved in different aspects of protein synthesis. Overall, nonsense suppression can be seen as a “phenotypic mirror” of events affecting the accuracy of the translational machine. However, the range of proteins participating in the modulation of translation termination fidelity is not fully elucidated. Recently, the list has been expanded significantly by findings that revealed a number of weak genetic and epigenetic nonsense suppressors, the effect of which can be detected only in specific genetic backgrounds. This review summarizes the data on the nonsense suppressors decreasing the fidelity of translation termination in S. cerevisiae, and discusses the functional significance of the modulation of translational accuracy. PMID:25486049

  8. Identification and characterization of phenylpyruvate decarboxylase genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vuralhan, Zeynep; Morais, Marcos A; Tai, Siew-Leng; Piper, Matthew D W; Pronk, Jack T

    2003-08-01

    Catabolism of amino acids via the Ehrlich pathway involves transamination to the corresponding alpha-keto acids, followed by decarboxylation to an aldehyde and then reduction to an alcohol. Alternatively, the aldehyde may be oxidized to an acid. This pathway is functional in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, since during growth in glucose-limited chemostat cultures with phenylalanine as the sole nitrogen source, phenylethanol and phenylacetate were produced in quantities that accounted for all of the phenylalanine consumed. Our objective was to identify the structural gene(s) required for the decarboxylation of phenylpyruvate to phenylacetaldehyde, the first specific step in the Ehrlich pathway. S. cerevisiae possesses five candidate genes with sequence similarity to genes encoding thiamine diphosphate-dependent decarboxylases that could encode this activity: YDR380w/ARO10, YDL080C/THI3, PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6. Phenylpyruvate decarboxylase activity was present in cultures grown with phenylalanine as the sole nitrogen source but was absent from ammonia-grown cultures. Furthermore, the transcript level of one candidate gene (ARO10) increased 30-fold when phenylalanine replaced ammonia as the sole nitrogen source. Analyses of phenylalanine catabolite production and phenylpyruvate decarboxylase enzyme assays indicated that ARO10 was sufficient to encode phenylpyruvate decarboxylase activity in the absence of the four other candidate genes. There was also an alternative activity with a higher capacity but lower affinity for phenylpyruvate. The candidate gene THI3 did not itself encode an active phenylpyruvate decarboxylase but was required along with one or more pyruvate decarboxylase genes (PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6) for the alternative activity. The K(m) and V(max) values of the two activities differed, showing that Aro10p is the physiologically relevant phenylpyruvate decarboxylase in wild-type cells. Modifications to this gene could therefore be important for metabolic engineering

  9. Isolation and characterization of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae peptide transport gene.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, J R; Basrai, M A; Steiner, H Y; Naider, F; Becker, J M

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized a Saccharomyces cerevisiae peptide transport gene (PTR2) isolated from a genomic DNA library by directly selecting for functional complementation of a peptide transport-deficient mutant. Deletion and frameshift mutageneses were used to localize the complementing activity to a 3.1-kbp region on the transforming plasmid. DNA sequencing of the complementing region identified an open reading frame spanning 1,803 bp. The deduced amino acid sequence predicts a hydrophobic peptide consisting of 601 amino acids, having a molecular mass of 68.1 kDa, composed in part of 12 hydrophobic segments, and sharing significant similarities with a nitrate transport protein encoded by the CHL1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana. Northern (RNA) hybridization experiments demonstrated a single transcript that was 1.8 kb in length and that was transiently induced by the addition of L-leucine to the growth medium. The PTR2 gene was localized to the right arm of chromosome XI by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field gel chromosome blotting and by hybridization to known chromosome XI lambda phage clones of S. cerevisiae DNA. PTR2 was tightly linked to the UBI2 gene, with the coding sequences being separated by a 466-bp region and oriented so that the genes were transcribed convergently. A chromosomal disruption of the PTR2 gene in a haploid strain was not lethal under standard growth conditions. The cloning of PTR2 represents the first example of the molecular genetic characterization of a eucaryotic peptide transport gene. Images PMID:8264579

  10. The plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: structure, function, and biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    van der Rest, M E; Kamminga, A H; Nakano, A; Anraku, Y; Poolman, B; Konings, W N

    1995-01-01

    The composition of phospholipids, sphingolipids, and sterols in the plasma membrane has a strong influence on the activity of the proteins associated or embedded in the lipid bilayer. Since most lipid-synthesizing enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are located in intracellular organelles, an extensive flux of lipids from these organelles to the plasma membrane is required. Although the pathway of protein traffic to the plasma membrane is similar to that of most of the lipids, the bulk flow of lipids is separate from vesicle-mediated protein transport. Recent advances in the analysis of membrane budding and membrane fusion indicate that the mechanisms of protein transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi and from the Golgi to plasma membrane are similar. The majority of plasma membrane proteins transport solutes across the membrane. A number of ATP-dependent export systems have been detected that couple the hydrolysis of ATP to transport of molecules out of the cell. The hydrolysis of ATP by the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase generates a proton motive force which is used to drive secondary transport processes. In S. cerevisiae, many substrates are transported by more than one system. Transport of monosaccharide is catalyzed by uniport systems, while transport of disaccharides, amino acids, and nucleosides is mediated by proton symport systems. Transport activity can be regulated at the level of transcription, e.g., induction and (catabolite) repression, but transport proteins can also be affected posttranslationally by a process termed catabolite inactivation. Catabolite inactivation is triggered by the addition of fermentable sugars, intracellular acidification, stress conditions, and/or nitrogen starvation. Phosphorylation and/or ubiquitination of the transport proteins has been proposed as an initial step in the controlled inactivation and degradation of the target enzyme. The use of artificial membranes, like secretory vesicles and plasma membranes

  11. Adaptive evolution of a lactose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae recombinant.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Pedro M R; François, Jean; Parrou, Jean Luc; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2008-03-01

    The construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that ferment lactose has biotechnological interest, particularly for cheese whey fermentation. A flocculent lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae recombinant expressing the LAC12 (lactose permease) and LAC4 (beta-galactosidase) genes of Kluyveromyces lactis was constructed previously but showed poor efficiency in lactose fermentation. This strain was therefore subjected to an evolutionary engineering process (serial transfer and dilution in lactose medium), which yielded an evolved recombinant strain that consumed lactose twofold faster, producing 30% more ethanol than the original recombinant. We identified two molecular events that targeted the LAC construct in the evolved strain: a 1,593-bp deletion in the intergenic region (promoter) between LAC4 and LAC12 and a decrease of the plasmid copy number by about 10-fold compared to that in the original recombinant. The results suggest that the intact promoter was unable to mediate the induction of the transcription of LAC4 and LAC12 by lactose in the original recombinant and that the deletion established the transcriptional induction of both genes in the evolved strain. We propose that the tuning of the expression of the heterologous LAC genes in the evolved recombinant was accomplished by the interplay between the decreased copy number of both genes and the different levels of transcriptional induction for LAC4 and LAC12 resulting from the changed promoter structure. Nevertheless, our results do not exclude other possible mutations that may have contributed to the improved lactose fermentation phenotype. This study illustrates the usefulness of simple evolutionary engineering approaches in strain improvement. The evolved strain efficiently fermented threefold-concentrated cheese whey, providing an attractive alternative for the fermentation of lactose-based media. PMID:18245248

  12. Copper Tolerance and Biosorption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Alcoholic Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling-ling; Jia, Bo; Zhao, Fang; Huang, Wei-dong; Zhan, Ji-cheng

    2015-01-01

    At high levels, copper in grape mash can inhibit yeast activity and cause stuck fermentations. Wine yeast has limited tolerance of copper and can reduce copper levels in wine during fermentation. This study aimed to understand copper tolerance of wine yeast and establish the mechanism by which yeast decreases copper in the must during fermentation. Three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (lab selected strain BH8 and industrial strains AWRI R2 and Freddo) and a simple model fermentation system containing 0 to 1.50 mM Cu2+ were used. ICP-AES determined Cu ion concentration in the must decreasing differently by strains and initial copper levels during fermentation. Fermentation performance was heavily inhibited under copper stress, paralleled a decrease in viable cell numbers. Strain BH8 showed higher copper-tolerance than strain AWRI R2 and higher adsorption than Freddo. Yeast cell surface depression and intracellular structure deformation after copper treatment were observed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy; electronic differential system detected higher surface Cu and no intracellular Cu on 1.50 mM copper treated yeast cells. It is most probably that surface adsorption dominated the biosorption process of Cu2+ for strain BH8, with saturation being accomplished in 24 h. This study demonstrated that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BH8 has good tolerance and adsorption of Cu, and reduces Cu2+ concentrations during fermentation in simple model system mainly through surface adsorption. The results indicate that the strain selected from China’s stress-tolerant wine grape is copper tolerant and can reduce copper in must when fermenting in a copper rich simple model system, and provided information for studies on mechanisms of heavy metal stress. PMID:26030864

  13. Stress Tolerance Variations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Diverse Ecological Sources and Geographical Locations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yan-Lin; Wang, Shi-An

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a platform organism for bioethanol production from various feedstocks and robust strains are desirable for efficient fermentation because yeast cells inevitably encounter stressors during the process. Recently, diverse S. cerevisiae lineages were identified, which provided novel resources for understanding stress tolerance variations and related shaping factors in the yeast. This study characterized the tolerance of diverse S. cerevisiae strains to the stressors of high ethanol concentrations, temperature shocks, and osmotic stress. The results showed that the isolates from human-associated environments overall presented a higher level of stress tolerance compared with those from forests spared anthropogenic influences. Statistical analyses indicated that the variations of stress tolerance were significantly correlated with both ecological sources and geographical locations of the strains. This study provides guidelines for selection of robust S. cerevisiae strains for bioethanol production from nature. PMID:26244846

  14. Microbial Cells as Biosorbents for Heavy Metals: Accumulation of Uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, Gerald W.; Shumate, Starling E.; Parrott, John R.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium accumulated extracellularly on the surfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The rate and extent of accumulation were subject to environmental parameters, such as pH, temperature, and interference by certain anions and cations. Uranium accumulation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurred intracellularly and was extremely rapid (<10 s), and no response to environmental parameters could be detected. Metabolism was not required for metal uptake by either organism. Cell-bound uranium reached a concentration of 10 to 15% of the dry cell weight, but only 32% of the S. cerevisiae cells and 44% of the P. aeruginosa cells within a given population possessed visible uranium deposits when examined by electron microscopy. Rates of uranium uptake by S. cerevisiae were increased by chemical pretreatment of the cells. Uranium could be removed chemically from S. cerevisiae cells, and the cells could then be reused as a biosorbent. Images PMID:16345691

  15. Evaluation of Lactobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the Presence of Bifenthrin.

    PubMed

    Đorđević, Tijana M; Đurović-Pejčev, Rada D

    2016-06-01

    This work describes the effect of insecticide bifenthrin on Lactobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growths of used microorganisms in growth media supplemented with pesticide were studied. Determination of bacterial and yeast fermentation efficiency in wheat supplemented with bifenthrin was conducted. Additionally, investigation of bifenthrin dissipation during microbiological activity was performed. Experiments applying bifenthrin in different concentrations highlighted a negligible impact of the pesticide on the growth of L. plantarum and S. cerevisiae. This insecticide overall negatively affected the yeast fermentation of wheat, while its presence in wheat had a slight negative impact on lactic acid fermentation. The results of bifenthrin dissipation during lactic acid and yeast fermentations of wheat showed that activities of L. plantarum and S. cerevisiae caused lower pesticide reductions. Average bifenthrin residue reduction within samples fermented with L. plantarum was 5.4 % (maximum ~16 %), while within samples fermented with S. cerevisiae, it was 11.6 % (maximum ~17 %). PMID:26868256

  16. Opportunistic Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Potential Risk Sold in Food Products.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Querol, Amparo

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, fungal infections have emerged as an important health problem associated with more people who present deficiencies in the immune system, such as HIV or transplanted patients. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the emerging fungal pathogens with a unique characteristic: its presence in many food products. S. cerevisiae has an impeccably good food safety record compared to other microorganisms like virus, bacteria and some filamentous fungi. However, humans unknowingly and inadvertently ingest large viable populations of S. cerevisiae (home-brewed beer or dietary supplements that contain yeast). In the last few years, researchers have studied the nature of S. cerevisiae strains and the molecular mechanisms related to infections. Here we review the last advance made in this emerging pathogen and we discuss the implication of using this species in food products. PMID:26779173

  17. Opportunistic Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Potential Risk Sold in Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Querol, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, fungal infections have emerged as an important health problem associated with more people who present deficiencies in the immune system, such as HIV or transplanted patients. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the emerging fungal pathogens with a unique characteristic: its presence in many food products. S. cerevisiae has an impeccably good food safety record compared to other microorganisms like virus, bacteria and some filamentous fungi. However, humans unknowingly and inadvertently ingest large viable populations of S. cerevisiae (home-brewed beer or dietary supplements that contain yeast). In the last few years, researchers have studied the nature of S. cerevisiae strains and the molecular mechanisms related to infections. Here we review the last advance made in this emerging pathogen and we discuss the implication of using this species in food products. PMID:26779173

  18. Biosorption of uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and surface interactions under culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Yan, Xiuying; Zeng, Wenming; Hou, Liangyu; Pang, Xiaofeng

    2010-11-01

    Few studies have focused on biosorption by microorganisms under culture conditions. To explore the biosorption of uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under culture conditions, the S. cerevisiae growth curve, biosorption capacity and surface interaction under batch culture conditions were investigated in this study. The growth curve showed that uranium (<300mgL(-1)) did not markedly inhibit the growth of S. cerevisiae under short culture time. The maximum scavenging efficiency reached 92.4% under 6-10h culture conditions, and the adsorption quantity of S. cerevisiae increased with initial uranium concentration. Centrifuging and drying after biosorption caused the volume reduction ratio to reach 99%. Scanning electron microscope results demonstrated that uranium interacted with yeast cell surfaces, as well as culture medium, and produced uranium precipitate on cell surfaces. Fourier transformed infrared spectra revealed that cell walls were the major sorption sites, and -O--H, -C==O and -PO(2-) contributed to the major binding groups. PMID:20599379

  19. Investigation of fatty acid accumulation in the engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae under nitrogen limited culture condition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoling; Chen, Wei Ning

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild type strain and engineered strain with an overexpressed heterologous ATP-citrate lyase (acl) were cultured in medium with different carbon and nitrogen concentrations, and their fatty acid production levels were investigated. The results showed that when the S. cerevisiae engineered strain was cultivated under nitrogen limited culture condition, the yield of mono-unsaturated fatty acids showed higher than that under non-nitrogen limited condition; with the carbon concentration increased, the accumulation become more apparent, whereas in the wild type strain, no such correlation was found. Besides, the citrate level in the S. cerevisiae under nitrogen limited condition was found to be much higher than that under non-nitrogen limited condition, which indicated a relationship between the diminution of nitrogen and accumulation of citrate in the S. cerevisiae. The accumulated citrate could be further cleaved by acl to provide substrate for fatty acid synthesis. PMID:24755317

  20. Proteomic characterization of a wild-type wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Trabalzini, Lorenza; Paffetti, Alessandro; Ferro, Elisa; Scaloni, Andrea; Talamo, Fabio; Millucci, Lia; Martelli, Paola; Santucci, Annalisa

    2003-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the optimal eukaryotic model system to study mammalian biological responses. At the same time Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also widely utilized as a biotechnological tool in the food industry. Enological Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains have been so far routinely analyzed for their microbiological aspects. Nevertheless, wine yeasts are gaining an increasing interest in the last years since they strongly affect both the vinification process and the organoleptic properties of the final product wine. The protein repertoire is responsible of such features and, consequently, 2D-PAGE can be an useful tool to evaluate and select optimal wine yeast strains. We present here the first proteomic map of a wild-type wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain selected for the guided fermentation of very high quality wines. PMID:15141481