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Sample records for cervical intervertebral disc

  1. MRI evaluation of spontaneous intervertebral disc degeneration in the alpaca cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Stolworthy, Dean K; Bowden, Anton E; Roeder, Beverly L; Robinson, Todd F; Holland, Jacob G; Christensen, S Loyd; Beatty, Amanda M; Bridgewater, Laura C; Eggett, Dennis L; Wendel, John D; Stieger-Vanegas, Susanne M; Taylor, Meredith D

    2015-12-01

    Animal models have historically provided an appropriate benchmark for understanding human pathology, treatment, and healing, but few animals are known to naturally develop intervertebral disc degeneration. The study of degenerative disc disease and its treatment would greatly benefit from a more comprehensive, and comparable animal model. Alpacas have recently been presented as a potential large animal model of intervertebral disc degeneration due to similarities in spinal posture, disc size, biomechanical flexibility, and natural disc pathology. This research further investigated alpacas by determining the prevalence of intervertebral disc degeneration among an aging alpaca population. Twenty healthy female alpacas comprised two age subgroups (5 young: 2-6 years; and 15 older: 10+ years) and were rated according to the Pfirrmann-grade for degeneration of the cervical intervertebral discs. Incidence rates of degeneration showed strong correlations with age and spinal level: younger alpacas were nearly immune to developing disc degeneration, and in older animals, disc degeneration had an increased incidence rate and severity at lower cervical levels. Advanced disc degeneration was present in at least one of the cervical intervertebral discs of 47% of the older alpacas, and it was most common at the two lowest cervical intervertebral discs. The prevalence of intervertebral disc degeneration encourages further investigation and application of the lower cervical spine of alpacas and similar camelids as a large animal model of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:26135031

  2. Effects of Repeated +Gz Exposure on Cervical Intervertebral Disc in Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-chun; Sun, Xi-qing; Cao, Xin-sheng

    2008-06-01

    Background This study was to explore the cumulative effect of exposure to +Gz on intervertebral disc in rabbits. Method 25 rabbits were randomly divided into 5 groups: control, +6Gz/1d, +6Gz/2wk, +6Gz/4wk and +6Gz/6wk group. Lateral Cervical Radiographies of each rabbit were studied with self-control method. Pathological changes of the cervical vertebrae were observed by light microscope after staining with hematoxylin-eosin. Results The X-ray films revealed that there were no changes of cervical vertebrae in rabbits of control, +6Gz/1d and 2wks group, while significant degenerative changes of intervertebral discs were observed in rabbits suffered to 4wks and 6wks of +6Gz exposure(P<0.01). Fissure and irregular arrangement were found in fibrous ring of intervertebral disc by histological examination in rabbits of 2wks, 4wks and 6wks of +6Gz exposure. Shrinking of nucleus pulposus and proliferation of cartilage cells occurred in rabbits suffered to 6 wks of +6Gz exposure. Conclusion Repeated +6Gz exposure for 4wks and 6wks may induce degeneration of intervertebral disc in rabbits.

  3. Finite element modeling of the cervical spine: role of intervertebral disc under axial and eccentric loads.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, S; Yoganandan, N; Pintar, F A; Maiman, D J

    1999-12-01

    An anatomically accurate, three-dimensional, nonlinear finite element model of the human cervical spine was developed using computed tomography images and cryomicrotome sections. The detailed model included the cortical bone, cancellous core, endplate, lamina, pedicle, transverse processes and spinous processes of the vertebrae; the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral discs; the uncovertebral joints; the articular cartilage, the synovial fluid and synovial membrane of the facet joints; and the anterior and posterior longitudinal ligaments, interspinous ligaments, capsular ligaments and ligamentum flavum. The finite element model was validated with experimental results: force-displacement and localized strain responses of the vertebral body and lateral masses under pure compression, and varying eccentric anterior-compression and posterior-compression loading modes. This experimentally validated finite element model was used to study the biomechanics of the cervical spine intervertebral disc by quantifying the internal axial and shear forces resisted by the ventral, middle, and dorsal regions of the disc under the above axial and eccentric loading modes. Results indicated that higher axial forces (compared to shear forces) were transmitted through different regions of the disc under all loading modes. While the ventral region of the disc resisted higher variations in axial force, the dorsal region transmitted higher shear forces under all loading modes. These findings may offer an insight to better understand the biomechanical role of the human cervical spine intervertebral disc. PMID:10717549

  4. T2* mapping of ovine intervertebral discs: Normative data for cervical and lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Kolf, Anna-Katharina; Hesper, Tobias; Schleich, Christoph; Hosalkar, Harish S; Jankowiak, Silvia; Cacchi, Claudio; Antoch, Gerald; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Bittersohl, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    To obtain T2* values in histologically evaluated healthy ovine intervertebral discs of the cervical and lumbar spine. Intervertebral discs of nine sheep and nine lambs underwent histological assessment with the modified Boos score for grading of disc degeneration. Discs with a score <10 points (maximum = 40 points) underwent T2* mapping (n = 64). Mid-sagittal T2* values were obtained in five regions: Anterior annulus fibrosus, anterior nucleus pulposus, central nucleus pulposus, posterior nucleus pulposus, and posterior annulus fibrosus. We noted a zonal T2* distribution with high values in the central nucleus and low T2* values in the anterior and posterior annulus fibrosus. The T2* values were higher in lamb than in sheep IVDs for both cervical and lumbar spine (p < 0.001). The T2* values were also higher in the cervical than in the lumbar spine (p = 0.029 for sheep and p < 0.001 for lamb IVDs). The T2* values obtained in these ovine intervertebral discs can serve as baseline values for future T2* measurements both in health and disease. PMID:26466861

  5. Cervical intervertebral disc herniation treatment via radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injection into the disc interior using an anterior cervical approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Jian; Zhu, Meng-Ye; Liu, Xiao-Jian; Zhang, Xue-Xue; Zhang, Da-Ying; Wei, Jian-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine the therapeutic effect of radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injected into the disc interior via an anterior cervical approach for cervical intervertebral disc herniation. Forty-three patients (26–62-year old; male/female ratio: 31/12) with cervical intervertebral disc herniation received radiofrequency combined with 60 to 100 U of collagenase, injected via an anterior cervical approach. The degree of nerve function was assessed using the current Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system at 3 and 12 months postoperation. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the degree of pain preoperation and 7 days postoperation. The preoperative and 3 month postoperative protrusion areas were measured and compared via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Compared with the preoperative pain scores, the 7-day postoperative pain was significantly reduced (P <0.01). The excellent and good rates of nerve function amelioration were 93.0% and 90.7% at 3 and 12 months postoperation, respectively, which was not significantly different. Twenty-seven cases exhibited a significantly reduced protrusion area (P <0.01) at 3 months postoperation. No serious side effects were noted. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that the use of radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injection into the disc interior via an anterior cervical approach is effective and safe for the treatment of cervical intervertebral disc herniation. PMID:27336892

  6. Intervertebral disc disease.

    PubMed

    Simpson, S T

    1992-07-01

    This article describes the functional anatomy of intervertebral discs and their relationship to the vertebrae and spinal cord. The pathologic events and clinical complications of intervertebral disc disease are described. A discussion of proper staging of disc disease and appropriate conservative management of degenerative disc disease is included. PMID:1641922

  7. Disc extrusion in a Rottweiler dog with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy after failure of intervertebral distraction/stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Marchevsky, A M; Richardson, J L

    1999-05-01

    A Rottweiler dog was presented with an 8 week history of hindlimb ataxia. Neurological examination localised the lesion to the cervical spinal cord. Myelography demonstrated dynamic compressive lesions at C5-6 and C6-7 consistent with a diagnosis of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy. Distraction/stabilisation of both discs was performed using interbody polymethyl methacrylate. Both implants subsequently failed leading to extrusion of the remaining dorsal annulus fibrosus of the C5-6 intervertebral disc and nonambulatory tetraparesis. A ventral slot combined with distraction/stabilisation using screws and polymethyl methacrylate was performed and resulted in nearly full neurological recovery. PMID:10376097

  8. The Relationship between Disc Degeneration and Morphologic Changes in the Intervertebral Foramen of the Cervical Spine: A Cadaveric MRI and CT Study

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Hong Moon; Lee, Jun Young

    2004-01-01

    A cadaveric study was performed to investigate the relationship between disc degeneration and morphological changes in the intervertebral foramen of cervical spine, including the effect on the nerve root. Seven fresh frozen human cadavers were dissected from C1 to T1, preserving the ligaments, capsules, intervertebral disc and the neural structures. The specimens were scanned with MRI and then scanned through CT scan in the upright position. Direct mid-sagittal and 45 degree oblique images were obtained to measure the dimension of the intervertebral disc height, foraminal height, width, area and segmental angles. Disc degeneration was inversely correlated with disc height. There was a significant correlation between disc degeneration and foraminal width (p<0.005) and foraminal area (p<0.05), but not with foraminal height. Disc height was correlated with foraminal width but not with height. The segmental angles were decreased more in advanced degenerated discs. There was a correlation between nerve root compression and decreased foraminal width and area (p<0.005). This information and critical dimensions of the intervertebral foramen for nerve root compression should help in the diagnosis of foraminal stenosis of the cervical spine in patients presenting with cervical spondylosis and radiculopathy. PMID:14966350

  9. Regenerative and Immunogenic Characteristics of Cultured Nucleus Pulposus Cells from Human Cervical Intervertebral Discs

    PubMed Central

    Stich, Stefan; Stolk, Meaghan; Girod, Pierre Pascal; Thomé, Claudius; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen; Seifert, Martina; Hegewald, Aldemar Andres

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based regenerative approaches have been suggested as primary or adjuvant procedures for the treatment of degenerated intervertebral disc (IVD) diseases. Our aim was to evaluate the regenerative and immunogenic properties of mildly and severely degenerated cervical nucleus pulposus (NP) cells with regard to cell isolation, proliferation and differentiation, as well as to cell surface markers and co-cultures with autologous or allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) including changes in their immunogenic properties after 3-dimensional (3D)-culture. Tissue from the NP compartment of 10 patients with mild or severe grades of IVD degeneration was collected. Cells were isolated, expanded with and without basic fibroblast growth factor and cultured in 3D fibrin/poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid transplants for 21 days. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed the expression of characteristic NP markers ACAN, COL1A1 and COL2A1 in 2D- and 3D-culture with degeneration- and culture-dependent differences. In a 5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate N-succinimidyl ester-based proliferation assay, NP cells in monolayer, regardless of their grade of degeneration, did not provoke a significant proliferation response in T cells, natural killer (NK) cells or B cells, not only with donor PBMC, but also with allogeneic PBMC. In conjunction with low inflammatory cytokine expression, analyzed by Cytometric Bead Array and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), a low immunogenicity can be assumed, facilitating possible therapeutic approaches. In 3D-culture, however, we found elevated immune cell proliferation levels, and there was a general trend to higher responses for NP cells from severely degenerated IVD tissue. This emphasizes the importance of considering the specific immunological alterations when including biomaterials in a therapeutic concept. The overall expression of Fas receptor, found on cultured NP cells, could have

  10. The Relationship between Increased Intervertebral Disc Height and Development of Postoperative Axial Neck Pain after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Han; Baek, Dong-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship between postoperative increase in intervertebral disc space height (IVH) and posterior axial neck in cases of degenerative cervical disease treated with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods A total of 155 patients who underwent ACDF with more than 1 year follow up were included. Radiologically, IVH and interfacet distance (IFD) of the operated segment were measured preoperatively and postoperatively. We clinically evaluated neck and arm pains according to visual analogue scale (VAS) scores and assessed neck disability index (NDI) scores preoperatively, postoperatively, at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. The relationship between radiological parameters, and clinical scores were analyzed using a regression analysis. Results The mean increase in IVH was 2.62 mm, and the mean increase in IFD was 0.67 mm. The VAS scores for neck pain preoperatively, postoperatively, and at 3 months, 6 months, 1 year postoperatively were 4.46, 2.11, 2.07, 1.95, and 1.29; those for arm pain were 5.89, 3.24, 3.20, 3.03, and 2.18. The NDI scores were improved from 18.52 to 7.47. No significant relationship was observed between the radiological evaluation results regarding the increase in intervertebral height or interfacet distance and clinical changes in VAS or NDI scores. Conclusion The increase in intervertebral space or interfacet distance by the insertion of a large graft material while performing ACDF for the treatment of degenerative cervical disease was not related with the change in VAS scores for neck and arm pains and NDI scores postoperatively and during the follow-up period. PMID:25237430

  11. Mechanotransduction in intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Cheng, Chao-Min; Chen, Chien-Fu; Lai, Po-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Mechanotransduction plays a critical role in intracellular functioning—it allows cells to translate external physical forces into internal biochemical activities, thereby affecting processes ranging from proliferation and apoptosis to gene expression and protein synthesis in a complex web of interactions and reactions. Accordingly, aberrant mechanotransduction can either lead to, or be a result of, a variety of diseases or degenerative states. In this review, we provide an overview of mechanotransduction in the context of intervertebral discs, with a focus on the latest methods of investigating mechanotransduction and the most recent findings regarding the means and effects of mechanotransduction in healthy and degenerative discs. We also provide some discussion of potential directions for future research and treatments. PMID:25267492

  12. The chemical morphology of age-related changes in human intervertebral disc glycosaminoglycans from cervical, thoracic and lumbar nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J E; Bosworth, T R; Cribb, A M; Taylor, J R

    1994-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), chondroitin and keratan sulphates (CS, KS), collagen and dry weights were measured in the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus of human cervical, thoracic and lumbar intervertebral discs aged 36-79 y. Alcian blue-critical electrolyte concentration (CEC) staining of sections extended the results. The collagen, total polyanion, HA, CS and KS contents of the nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus were plotted for all 3 regions against age. Regional differences and age-related trends were found. For regional differences, the collagen content of the nucleus pulposus was highest in cervical discs and lowest in lumbar discs. In contrast, the total polyanion content of the nucleus pulposus was highest in lumbar discs and lowest in cervical discs. These differences were seen in fetal and adult discs. With respect to age-related trends, the collagen content of the annulus fibrosus was higher in adults and children than in neonates and infants. The collagen content of the nucleus pulposus increased with age in thoracic and lumbar discs, but it was consistently high in cervical discs. There was generally a downward trend of total polyanion and CS with increase in age. This was quite consistent for the annulus fibrosus in all regions and there were dramatic decreases in the lumbar nucleus pulposus in all adults compared with infants and children. These trends were least evident in the cervical nucleus pulposus where infant values were low. CS changes correlated with water content. HA and KS increased in all discs with increasing maturity. Oversulphated KS, absent from fetal discs, reached mature levels by 10 y. Many of the changes occurred before maturity. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) levels correlated with increasing compressive loads. Higher collagen levels in the cervical nucleus pulposus correlated with greater ranges of torsional and shearing strains in cervical discs. High GAG levels in cervical annulus fibrosus probably facilitate lamellar movements during

  13. Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rannou, François; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Zhou, Rui-Hai; Chin, Jennie; Lotz, Jeffrey C.; Mayoux-Benhamou, Marie-Anne; Barbet, Jacques Patrick; Chevrot, Alain; Shyy, John Y.-J.

    2004-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disk (IVD) is a major pathological process implicated in low back pain and is a prerequisite to disk herniation. Although mechanical stress is an important modulator of the degeneration, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. The association of human IVD degeneration, assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, with annulus fibrosus cell apoptosis and anti-cytochrome c staining revealed that the activation of the mitochondria-dependent apoptosome was a major event in the degeneration process. Mouse models of IVD degeneration were used to investigate the role of the mechanical stress in this process. The application of mechanical overload (1.3 MPa) for 24 hours induced annulus fibrosus cell apoptosis and led to severe degeneration of the mouse disks. Immunostaining revealed cytochrome c release but not Fas-L generation. The role of the caspase-9-dependent mitochondrial pathway in annulus fibrosus cell apoptosis induced by overload was investigated further with the use of cultured rabbit IVD cells in a stretch device. Mechanical overload (15% area change) induced apoptosis with increased caspase-9 activity and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, Z-LEHD-FMK, a caspase-9 inhibitor, but not Z-IETD-FMK, a caspase-8 inhibitor, attenuated the overload-induced apoptosis. Our results from human samples, mouse models, and annulus fibrosus culture experiments demonstrate that the mechanical overload-induced IVD degeneration is mediated through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in IVD cells. PMID:14982845

  14. [Innervation of the intervertebral disc].

    PubMed

    García-Cosamalón, José; Fernández-Fernández, Javier; González-Martínez, Emilio; Ibáñez-Plágaro, Javier; Robla Costales, Javier; Martínez-Madrigal, Milton; López Muñíz, Alfonso; del Valle, Miguel Enrique; Vega, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Until very recently, intervertebral disc innervation was a subject of considerable debate. Nowadays, the introduction of inmunohistochemical techniques associated to specific antibodies and studies with retrograde tracers in nerves have allowed greater understanding of disc innervation in physiological and pathological conditions and also endings characteristics and their patterns of distribution in both situations. The existing controversies regarding structural basis of discogenic pain, have raised the interest of knowing the influence of innervation in back pain from discal origin and its characteristics. Today, we know that pathologic neoinnervation accompanying radial fissures is an important factor in the genesis of discogenic pain; within a complex mechanism in which other neurobiomechemical, inflammatory and biomechanical factors are involved. PMID:23582224

  15. Intervertebral disc extrusion in six cats.

    PubMed

    Knipe, M F; Vernau, K M; Hornof, W J; LeCouteur, R A

    2001-09-01

    Existing reports concerning intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) have focused almost exclusively on dogs, although a small number of individual case reports of IVDD of cats has been published. The medical records of six cats with IVDD were reviewed. Radiographic studies confirmed narrowed intervertebral disc spaces, mineralised intervertebral discs, and one or more extradural compressive lesions of the spinal cord in each cat. All disc extrusions were located in the thoracolumbar region. Surgical decompression of the spinal cord was achieved in all cats by means of hemilaminectomy and removal of compressive extradural material confirmed to be degenerative disc material. Good to excellent neurological recovery was noted in five of the six cats included in this report. Based on this review, it appears that IVDD of cats has many similarities to IVDD of dogs, and that healthy cats with acute intervertebral disc extrusion(s) respond favourably to surgical decompression of the spinal cord. PMID:11876633

  16. Hybrid Strategy of Two-Level Cervical Artificial Disc and Intervertebral Cage: Biomechanical Effects on Tissues and Implants.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tzu-Tsao; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Lin, Shang-Chih

    2015-11-01

    This numerical study aimed to evaluate tissue and implant responses to the hybrid surgery (HS) of cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF).Four hybrid strategies of two-level C-ADR and ACDF were compared in terms of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) and implant failure.The rotary C-ADR and semirigid ACDF have been extensively used in the multilevel treatment of cervical instability and degeneration, but the constrained mobility at the ACDF segments can induce postoperative ASD problems. Hybrid surgery of C-ADR and ACDF has been an alternative to provide the optimal tradeoff between surgical cost and ASD problems. The biomechanical effects of hybrid strategies warrant thorough investigation for the two-level instrumentation.Based on computed tomography imaging, a nonlinear C2-C7 model was developed and validated by cadaveric and numerical data. Four strategies of inserting the C-ADR and ACDF into the C4-C6 segments were systematically arranged as PP (2 peek cages), AA (2 artificial discs), PA, and AP. The biomechanical behavior of these 4 strategies was evaluated in terms of motion and stresses of discs, facet forces, stresses of C-ADR and ACDF, and C-ADR motion.The constrained mobility of the ACDF segment worsened the kinematic and mechanical demands of the adjacent segments and artificial discs. The C-ADR articulation provided higher mobility than the replaced disc of the intact construct, making it an effective buffer to accommodate the compensated mobility and load from the ACDF segment. Consequently, the ASD progression of the AA construct was most restricted, followed by the PA, AP, and PP construct.The PA strategy is a tradeoff to preserve mobility and reduce cost. The C-ADR of the PA construct preserves the mobility of the C5/C6 segment and shares the transferred motion and loads of the fused C4/C5 segment. The PA construct shows optimal biomechanical results for minimizing ASD and implant failure

  17. Spectroscopic Parameters of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terbetas, G.; Kozlovskaja, A.; Varanius, D.; Graziene, V.; Vaitkus, J.; Vaitkuviene, A.

    2009-06-01

    There are numerous methods of investigating intervertebral disc. Visualization methods are widely used in clinical practice. Histological, imunohistochemical and biochemical methods are more used in scientific research. We propose that a new spectroscopic investigation would be useful in determining intervertebral disc material, especially when no histological specimens are available. Purpose: to determine spectroscopic parameters of intervertebral disc material; to determine emission spectra common for all intervertebral discs; to create a background for further spectroscopic investigation where no histological specimen will be available. Material and Methods: 20 patients, 68 frozen sections of 20 μm thickness from operatively removed intervertebral disc hernia were excited by Nd:YAG microlaser STA-01-TH third harmonic 355 nm light throw 0, 1 mm fiber. Spectrophotometer OceanOptics USB2000 was used for spectra collection. Mathematical analysis of spectra was performed by ORIGIN multiple Gaussian peaks analysis. Results: In each specimen of disc hernia were found distinct maximal spectral peaks of 4 types supporting the histological evaluation of mixture content of the hernia. Fluorescence in the spectral regions 370-700 nm was detected in the disc hernias. The main spectral component was at 494 nm and the contribution of the components with the peak wavelength values at 388 nm, 412 nm and 435±5 nm were varying in the different groups of samples. In comparison to average spectrum of all cases, there are 4 groups of different spectral signatures in the region 400-500 nm in the patient groups, supporting a clinical data on different clinical features of the patients. Discussion and Conclusion: besides the classical open discectomy, new minimally invasive techniques of treating intervertebral disc emerge (PLDD). Intervertebral disc in these techniques is assessed by needle, no histological specimen is taken. Spectroscopic investigation via fiber optics through the

  18. Proteomic Signature of the Murine Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Matthew R.; Patel, Priya; Frimpong, Agya; Xiao, Yizhi; Siqueira, Walter L.; Séguin, Cheryle A.

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain is the most common musculoskeletal problem and the single most common cause of disability, often attributed to degeneration of the intervertebral disc. Lack of effective treatment is directly related to our limited understanding of the pathways responsible for maintaining disc health. While transcriptional analysis has permitted initial insights into the biology of the intervertebral disc, complete proteomic characterization is required. We therefore employed liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) protein/peptide separation and mass spectrometric analyses to characterize the protein content of intervertebral discs from skeletally mature wild-type mice. A total of 1360 proteins were identified and categorized using PANTHER. Identified proteins were primarily intracellular/plasma membrane (35%), organelle (30%), macromolecular complex (10%), extracellular region (9%). Molecular function categorization resulted in three distinct categories: catalytic activity (33%), binding (molecule interactions) (29%), and structural activity (13%). To validate our list, we confirmed the presence of 14 of 20 previously identified IVD-associated markers, including matrix proteins, transcriptional regulators, and secreted proteins. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed distinct localization patterns of select protein with the intervertebral disc. Characterization of the protein composition of healthy intervertebral disc tissue is an important first step in identifying cellular processes and pathways disrupted during aging or disease progression. PMID:25689066

  19. Quantitative T2 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Compared to Morphological Grading of the Early Cervical Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: An Evaluation Approach in Asymptomatic Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhihua; Shao, Lixin; Xie, Yan; Wu, Jianhong; Zhang, Yan; Xin, Hongkui; Ren, Aijun; Guo, Yong; Wang, Deli; He, Qing; Ruan, Dike

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of quantitative T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantifying early cervical intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration in asymptomatic young adults by correlating the T2 value with Pfirrmann grade, sex, and anatomic level. Methods Seventy asymptomatic young subjects (34 men and 36 women; mean age, 22.80±2.11 yr; range, 18–25 years) underwent 3.0-T MRI to obtain morphological data (one T1-fast spin echo (FSE) and three-plane T2-FSE, used to assign a Pfirrmann grade (I–V)) and for T2 mapping (multi-echo spin echo). T2 values in the nucleus pulposus (NP, n = 350) and anulus fibrosus (AF, n = 700) were obtained. Differences in T2 values between sexes and anatomic level were evaluated, and linear correlation analysis of T2 values versus degenerative grade was conducted. Findings Cervical IVDs of healthy young adults were commonly determined to be at Pfirrmann grades I and II. T2 values of NPs were significantly higher than those of AF at all anatomic levels (P<0.000). The NP, anterior AF and posterior AF values did not differ significantly between genders at the same anatomic level (P>0.05). T2 values decreased linearly with degenerative grade. Linear correlation analysis revealed a strong negative association between the Pfirrmann grade and the T2 values of the NP (P = 0.000) but not the T2 values of the AF (P = 0.854). However, non-degenerated discs (Pfirrmann grades I and II) showed a wide range of T2 relaxation time. T2 values according to disc degeneration level classification were as follows: grade I (>62.03 ms), grade II (54.60–62.03 ms), grade III (<54.60 ms). Conclusions T2 quantitation provides a more sensitive and robust approach for detecting and characterizing the early stage of cervical IVD degeneration and to create a reliable quantitative in healthy young adults. PMID:24498384

  20. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  1. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-05-26

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  2. Intervertebral disc degeneration in the dog. Part 1: Anatomy and physiology of the intervertebral disc and characteristics of intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Bergknut, Niklas; Smolders, Lucas A; Grinwis, Guy C M; Hagman, Ragnvi; Lagerstedt, Anne-Sofie; Hazewinkel, Herman A W; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Meij, Björn P

    2013-03-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is common in dogs and can give rise to a number of diseases, such as IVD herniation, cervical spondylomyelopathy, and degenerative lumbosacral stenosis. Although there have been many reports and reviews on the clinical aspects of canine IVD disease, few reports have discussed and reviewed the process of IVD degeneration. In this first part of a two-part review, the anatomy, physiology, histopathology, and biochemical and biomechanical characteristics of the healthy and degenerated IVD are described. In Part 2, the aspects of IVD degeneration in chondrodystrophic and non-chondrodystrophic dog breeds are discussed in depth. PMID:23177522

  3. Intradural herniation of lumbar intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Hodge, C J; Binet, E F; Kieffer, S A

    1978-12-01

    A case of intradural rupture of a lumbar intervertebral disc is reported, and the literature is reviewed. The majority of intradural disc herniations occur at the L4--5 level. These patients usually have neurologic deficits more severe than those found in the much more common extradural disc herniations. The myelographic picture varies from an irregularly marginated intradural lesion overlying the disc space to a complete block. The common factor allowing intradural disc herniation is probably dense adhesions between the dura and the posterior longitudinal ligament, preventing the more common lateral extradural disc herniation. Intradural disc herniation should be included in the differential diagnosis of lumbar intradural lesions causing nerve root or cauda equina compression. PMID:741242

  4. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  5. Analysis of rabbit intervertebral disc physiology based on water metabolism. II. Changes in normal intervertebral discs under axial vibratory load

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, N.; Tsuji, H.; Ohshima, H.; Kitano, S.; Itoh, T.; Sano, A.

    1988-11-01

    Metabolic changes induced by axial vibratory load to the spine were investigated based on water metabolism in normal intervertebral discs of rabbits with or without pentobarbital anesthesia. Tritiated water concentration in the intervertebral discs of unanesthetized rabbits was reduced remarkably by axial vibration for 30 minutes using the vibration machine developed for this study. Repeated vibratory load for 18 and 42 hours duration showed the recovery of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O concentration of the intervertebral disc without anesthesia. Computer simulation suggested a reduction of blood flow surrounding the intervertebral disc following the vibration stress. However, no reduction of the /sup 3/H/sub 2/O concentration in the intervertebral disc was noted under anesthesia. Emotional stress cannot be excluded as a factor in water metabolism in the intervertebral disc.

  6. Construction Strategy and Progress of Whole Intervertebral Disc Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiang; Xu, Hai-Wei; Hurday, Sookesh; Xu, Bao-Shan

    2016-02-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is the major cause of low back pain, which usually leads to work absenteeism, medical visits and hospitalization. Because the current conservative procedures and surgical approaches to treatment of DDD only aim to relieve the symptoms of disease but not to regenerate the diseased disc, their long-term efficiency is limited. With the rapid developments in medical science, tissue engineering techniques have progressed markedly in recent years, providing a novel regenerative strategy for managing intervertebral disc disease. However, there are as yet no ideal methods for constructing tissue-engineered intervertebral discs. This paper reviews published reports pertaining to intervertebral disc tissue engineering and summarizes data concerning the seed cells and scaffold materials for tissue-engineered intervertebral discs, construction of tissue-engineered whole intervertebral discs, relevant animal experiments and effects of mechanics on the construction of tissue-engineered intervertebral disc and outlines the existing problems and future directions. Although the perfect regenerative strategy for treating DDD has not yet been developed, great progress has been achieved in the construction of tissue-engineered intervertebral discs. It is believed that ongoing research on intervertebral disc tissue engineering will result in revolutionary progress in the treatment of DDD. PMID:27028376

  7. [Laser ablation of intervertebral disc: animal experiment].

    PubMed

    Qi, Q; Dang, G D; Cai, Q L

    1994-03-01

    The lumbar intervertebral discs (L3-6) were ablated through a transperitoneal approach in 12 adult dogs by using Nd: YAG laser (1.06 microns) with a 600 microns quartz fiber. The status of limbs motion and sphincter (bladder, bowel) was observed for evaluating the safety of laser irradiation. After irradiation, the animals were sacrificed at prescribed intervals of up to 40 weeks (2, 4, 8, 12 and 40 weeks after operation). The lumbar intervertebral discs were harvested and subjected to light microscopic observation. No dog had suffered from neurogenic dysfunction of limb motion and sphincter. Histological findings immediately after the irradiation showed the disc was vaporized and a cavity was made. After 2 and 4 weeks, fibrous tissues began to proliferate, but cartilaginous tissues replaced the fibrous tissues 12 weeks after the laser irradiation. No new bone formation was found within 40 weeks after operation. On the basis of this study and our previous cadaveric study, percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) was applied in clinical practice in march of 1993. 10 patients underwent PLDD utilizing the same laser equipment. The average follow-up was 3 months. According to the Macnab's criteria, there was an excellent response in 7 patients and a good response in 3. PMID:7842915

  8. Intervertebral and intravertebral ratios in Doberman pinscher dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Ronaldo C; Johnson, Jacqueline A

    2012-01-01

    No screening method is currently available to differentiate dogs with and without cervical spondylomyelopathy. Intravertebral and intervertebral ratios are used in horses and can predict cervical vertebral malformation. Intervertebral ratios could be a useful screening method for canine cervical spondylomyelopathy. Our purpose was to compare cervical intervertebral and intravertebral ratios in normal vs. affected Doberman pinschers. Forty dogs were studied, 27 affected and 13 normal. Cervical radiographs were obtained in all dogs. The minimum intra- and intervertebral sagittal diameter ratios were established for each cervical vertebrae and disc space from C(2) to C(7) . Comparisons were made between groups and specific vertebral body and disc levels. The effect of gender, age, and method of measurement (analog or digital radiographs) was also studied. There was no difference in either the intervertebral or intravertebral ratio between normal vs. affected dogs. The ratios decreased progressively along the cervical spine, being smallest at C(6) -C(7) and C(7) , respectively. Age, gender, and method of measurement had a significant influence on both inter- and intravertebral ratios, with smaller ratios seen as dogs aged and in male dogs. Based on our results, inter- or intravertebral ratios have no value to distinguish between clinically normal Doberman pinschers and Doberman pinschers with cervical spondylomyelopathy. PMID:22702434

  9. Microsurgical anterior cervical foraminotomy for radiculopathy: a new approach to cervical disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Jho, H D

    1996-02-01

    A new technique of microsurgical anterior foraminotomy was developed to improve the treatment of cervical radiculopathy. This technique provides direct anatomical decompression of the compressed nerve root by removing the compressive spondylotic spur or disc fragment. The nerve root is decompressed from its origin in the spinal cord to the point at which it passes behind the vertebral artery laterally. Because most of the disc within the intervertebral space is undisturbed, a functioning motion segment of the disc remains intact. This technique differs from that of Verbiest in that it does not directly transpose the vertebral artery. Unlike Hakuba's technique, the disc within the intervertebral disc space is not removed. PMID:8592215

  10. Decellularized allogeneic intervertebral disc: natural biomaterials for regenerating disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhijun; Chen, Kai; Shan, Zhi; Chen, Shuai; Wang, Jiying; Mo, Jian; Ma, Jianjun; Xu, Wenbing; Qin, An; Fan, Shunwu

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with back pain and disc herniation. This study established a modified protocol for intervertebral disc (IVD) decellularization and prepared its extracellular matrix (ECM). By culturing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)(3, 7, 14 and 21 days) and human degenerative IVD cells (7 days) in the ECM, implanting it subcutaneously in rabbit and injecting ECM microparticles into degenerative disc, the biological safety and efficacy of decellularized IVD was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrated that cellular components can be removed completely after decellularization and maximally retain the structure and biomechanics of native IVD. We revealed that allogeneic ECM did not evoke any apparent inflammatory reaction in vivo and no cytotoxicity was found in vitro. Moreover, IVD ECM can induce differentiation of MSCs into IVD-like cells in vitro. Furthermore, allogeneic ECM microparticles are effective on the treatment of rabbit disc degeneration in vivo. In conclusion, our study developed an optimized method for IVD decellularization and we proved decellularized IVD is safe and effective for the treatment of degenerated disc diseases. PMID:26933821

  11. Incidental extraspinal findings on magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Umit Yasar; Turanlı, Sevim; Saltas, Hakan; Karabacak, Osman Raif; Damar, Cagrı; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to evaluate pathological extraspinal findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations that were incidentally detected on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of intervertebral discs, to find the frequencies of these incidental findings, and to emphasise the clinical importance of them. Material and methods A retrospective study including 1031 consecutive patients (730 females and 301 males, with a median age of 46 years) was conducted by evaluating a total of 1106 MRI examinations of intervertebral discs. Examinations were performed with a 1.5 T MRI unit. Incidental findings were classified as pathological findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations. Results The percentages of incidental extraspinal pathological findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations were 16.6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 14.4–18.8) and 3.7% (95% CI: 2.6–4.3), respectively. The percentage of incidental extraspinal pathological findings on cervical spinal MRI was 25.7% (95% CI: 20.1–31.7), thyroid nodules being the most common incidental findings. On thoracic spinal MRI (n = 19), inferior pole thyroid nodules were demonstrated as incidental extraspinal pathological findings, with a percentage of 10.5% (95% CI: 9.6–11.5). On lumbar spinal MRI, incidental pathological findings were detected with a percentage of 14.2% (95% CI: 11.9–16.6), while the percentage of congenital anomalies/anatomical variations was 4.8% (95% CI: 3.4–6.3). Eventually, 6.5% (95% CI: 2.6–9.4) of all cases with incidental extraspinal pathological findings underwent surgery. Conclusions On MRI examination of intervertebral discs, paying attention to incidentally detected pathological extraspinal findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations is very important due to the fact that they can alter the treatment of the patient or affect the patient's life. PMID:25276162

  12. Genetic and Functional Studies of the Intervertebral Disc: A Novel Murine Intervertebral Disc Model

    PubMed Central

    Pelle, Dominic W.; Peacock, Jacqueline D.; Schmidt, Courtney L.; Kampfschulte, Kevin; Scholten, Donald J.; Russo, Scott S.; Easton, Kenneth J.; Steensma, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) homeostasis is mediated through a combination of micro-environmental and biomechanical factors, all of which are subject to genetic influences. The aim of this study is to develop and characterize a genetically tractable, ex vivo organ culture model that can be used to further elucidate mechanisms of intervertebral disc disease. Specifically, we demonstrate that IVD disc explants (1) maintain their native phenotype in prolonged culture, (2) are responsive to exogenous stimuli, and (3) that relevant homeostatic regulatory mechanisms can be modulated through ex-vivo genetic recombination. We present a novel technique for isolation of murine IVD explants with demonstration of explant viability (CMFDA/propidium iodide staining), disc anatomy (H&E), maintenance of extracellular matrix (ECM) (Alcian Blue staining), and native expression profile (qRT-PCR) as well as ex vivo genetic recombination (mT/mG reporter mice; AdCre) following 14 days of culture in DMEM media containing 10% fetal bovine serum, 1% L-glutamine, and 1% penicillin/streptomycin. IVD explants maintained their micro-anatomic integrity, ECM proteoglycan content, viability, and gene expression profile consistent with a homeostatic drive in culture. Treatment of genetically engineered explants with cre-expressing adenovirus efficaciously induced ex vivo genetic recombination in a variety of genetically engineered mouse models. Exogenous administration of IL-1ß and TGF-ß3 resulted in predicted catabolic and anabolic responses, respectively. Genetic recombination of TGFBR1fl/fl explants resulted in constitutively active TGF-ß signaling that matched that of exogenously administered TGF-ß3. Our results illustrate the utility of the murine intervertebral disc explant to investigate mechanisms of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:25474689

  13. Spontaneous regression of cervical disc herniation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong Rok; Choi, Chan Young

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous regression of cervical disc herniation is a rare, and such reports are few. A 39 year-old woman complained of severe neck pain associated with tingling and numbness of right upper extremity. The MRI of the cervical spine revealed a posterior disc extrusion at the C4-C5 level in the right para-central location. The patient was treated with conservative management without any surgical treatment. The patient's symptoms were significant improvement. After two years later, we performed follow-up cervical MRI that revealed significant spontaneous regression of the C4-C5 intervertebral disc extrusion. PMID:25620984

  14. Inflammation in intervertebral disc degeneration and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Molinos, Maria; Almeida, Catarina R.; Caldeira, Joana; Cunha, Carla; Gonçalves, Raquel M.; Barbosa, Mário A.

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is one of the major causes of low back pain, a problem with a heavy economic burden, which has been increasing in prevalence as populations age. Deeper knowledge of the complex spatial and temporal orchestration of cellular interactions and extracellular matrix remodelling is critical to improve current IVD therapies, which have so far proved unsatisfactory. Inflammation has been correlated with degenerative disc disease but its role in discogenic pain and hernia regression remains controversial. The inflammatory response may be involved in the onset of disease, but it is also crucial in maintaining tissue homeostasis. Furthermore, if properly balanced it may contribute to tissue repair/regeneration as has already been demonstrated in other tissues. In this review, we focus on how inflammation has been associated with IVD degeneration by describing observational and in vitro studies as well as in vivo animal models. Finally, we provide an overview of IVD regenerative therapies that target key inflammatory players. PMID:25673296

  15. [Cervical disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Schnake, K J; Hoffmann, C-H; Kandziora, F

    2012-12-01

    The cervical disc herniation is characterized by prolapsed nucleus pulposus material through the annulus into the spinal canal. The local mechanical or chemical irritation of neural structures typically leads to symptoms of radiculopathy, cervicocephalgia or myelopathy. Pronounced sensorimotor deficits or intractable pain constitute surgical treatment. In all other cases conservative treatment is indicated, including pain medication, active and passive physiotherapy, and local injections, respectively. Anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) is still the surgical treatment of choice. Predominantly, cages with or without plates are in use to obtain solid fusion. The implantation of a total disc replacement is a viable alternative, if no contraindications exist. Other surgical techniques may be performed in proper selected cases. The overall clinical and radiological results of both surgical and conservative treatment are good. PMID:23296562

  16. Distraction-stabilisation of two adjacent intervertebral spaces in a Dalmatian dog with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Beranek, J; Tomek, A; Lorinson, D

    2013-05-01

    A 4-year-old, 40-kg, male, entire Dalmatian was presented for evaluation of chronic neck pain and pelvic limb ataxia. Myelography revealed ventrodorsal (hourglass) extradural compression over the intervertebral space between the 5th and 6th cervical vertebra and ventral extradural compression between the 6th and 7th cervical vertebra. Cranial compression disappeared and caudal compression markedly diminished after performing cervical traction. MRI scan confirmed protrusion of intervertebral discs and spinal cord compression in previously mentioned intervertebral spaces. Surgical distraction-stabilization of both intervertebral spaces was performed using threaded pins and polymethylmethacrylate. The convalescence from surgery was uneventful and the dog was walking without any signs of paresis until 5 months after surgery when radiography revealed implants loosening. The dog recovered fully of the implant removal and remained asymptomatic for more than 30 months. PMID:23644293

  17. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc arthroplasty devices have come onto the market and completed Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption trials. Though some of the early results demonstrate equivalency of arthroplasty to fusion, compelling evidence of benefits in terms of symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration are lacking. In addition, non-industry-sponsored studies indicate that these devices are equivalent to fusion in terms of adjacent segment degeneration. Longer-term studies will eventually provide the definitive answer. PMID:24353955

  18. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and related factors in Korean firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae-Won; Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Byun, Junsu; Lee, Jong-In; Kim, Kun-Hyung; Kim, Youngki; Song, Han-Soo; Lee, Chul-Gab; Kwon, Young-Jun; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Jeong, Kyoungsook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The job of firefighting can cause lumbar burden and low back pain. This study aimed to identify the association between age and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and whether the association differs between field and administrative (non-field) firefighters. Methods Subjects were selected using a stratified random sampling method. Firefighters were stratified by geographic area, gender, age and type of job. First, 25 fire stations were randomly sampled considering regional distribution. Then firefighters were stratified by gender, age and their job and randomly selected among the strata. A questionnaire survey and MRI scans were performed, and then four radiologists used Pfirrmann classification methods to determine the grade of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. Results Pfirrmann grade increased with lumbar intervertebral disc level. Analysis of covariance showed that age was significantly associated with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (p<0.05). The value of β (parameter estimate) was positive at all lumbar intervertebral disc levels and was higher in the field group than in the administrative group at each level. In logistic regression analysis, type of job was statistically significant only with regard to the L4–5 intervertebral disc (OR 3.498, 95% CI 1.241 to 9.860). Conclusions Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with age, and field work such as firefighting, emergency and rescue may accelerate degeneration in the L4–5 intervertebral disc. The effects of field work on lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration were not clear in discs other than at the level L4–5. PMID:27354080

  19. Angiogenesis in the degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    David, Gh; Iencean, SM; Mohan, A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the study is to show the histological and biochemical changes that indicate the angiogenesis of the intervertebral disc in lumbar intervertebral disc hernia and the existence of epidemiological correlations between these changes and the risk factors of lumbar intervertebral disc hernia, as well as the patient's quality of life (QOL). We have studied 50 patients aged between 18 and 73 years old, who have undergone lumbar intervertebral disc hernia surgery, making fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor level measurements, as elements in the process of appreciating the disc angiogenesis. Also, pre–surgery and post–surgery QOL has been measured, as well as the intensity of the pain syndrome. We have identified factors capable of stimulating vascular endothelial growth (VEGF, FGF–2) for the examined disc material, but histological examination did not show angiogenesis. The process of angiogenesis at the degenerated intervertebral disc level affects the patient's quality of life both pre and postoperatively, and may be a predictive factor for the post–operative results. Patients can prevent the appearance of angiogenesis type degenerative processes of the intervertebral disc by avoiding angiogenesis correlated factors (weight control, physical effort, and smoking). PMID:20968201

  20. MicroRNA in intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Yu, Xin; Shen, Jianxiong; Chan, Matthew T V; Wu, William Ka Kei

    2015-06-01

    Aetiology of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is complex, with genetic, developmental, biochemical and biomechanical factors contributing to the disease process. It is becoming obvious that epigenetic processes influence evolution of IDD as strongly as the genetic background. Deregulated phenotypes of nucleus pulposus cells, including differentiation, migration, proliferation and apoptosis, are involved in all stages of progression of human IDD. Non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs, have recently been recognized as important regulators of gene expression. Research into roles of microRNAs in IDD has been very active over the past 5 years. Our review summarizes current research enlightenment towards understanding roles of microRNAs in regulating nucleus pulposus cell functions in IDD. These exciting findings support the notion that specific modulation of microRNAs may represent an attractive approach for management of IDD. PMID:25736871

  1. [Acute rupture of lumbar intervertebral disc caused by violent manipulation].

    PubMed

    Li, J S

    1989-08-01

    Five cases of acute rupture of lumbar intervertebral disc caused by violent manipulation are reported. After protrusion of the lumbar intervertebral disc were treated by violent manipulation, the lumbo-leg pain were severe suddenly. The operations found that the annulus fibrosus had ruptured and the nerve root or cauda equina was constricted by the nucleus pulposus which had entered into the spinal canal. It must be emphasized that their is in danger of more damaging intervertebral disc degenerated by violent manipulation, then the adhesion of the nerve root will occur gradually. We don't suggest to make violent manipulation for the patient with the nerve root injured. We have acquired good results in treating protrusion of lumbar intervertebral disc by combined therapy and they are introduced in this article. PMID:2620603

  2. Potential regenerative treatment strategies for intervertebral disc degeneration in dogs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pain due to spontaneous intervertebral disc (IVD) disease is common in dogs. In chondrodystrophic (CD) dogs, IVD disease typically develops in the cervical or thoracolumbar spine at about 3–7 years of age, whereas in non-chondrodystrophic (NCD) dogs, it usually develops in the caudal cervical or lumbosacral spine at about 6–8 years of age. IVD degeneration is characterized by changes in the biochemical composition and mechanical integrity of the IVD. In the degenerated IVD, the content of glycosaminoglycan (GAG, a proteoglycan side chain) decreases and that of denatured collagen increases. Dehydration leads to tearing of the annulus fibrosus (AF) and/or disc herniation, which is clinically characterized by pain and/or neurological signs. Current treatments (physiotherapy, anti-inflammatory/analgesic medication, surgery) for IVD disease may resolve neurological deficits and reduce pain (although in many cases insufficient), but do not lead to repair of the degenerated disc. For this reason, there is interest in new regenerative therapies that can repair the degenerated disc matrix, resulting in restoration of the biomechanical function of the IVD. CD dogs are considered a suitable animal model for human IVD degeneration because of their spontaneous IVD degeneration, and therefore studies investigating cell-, growth factor-, and/or gene therapy-based regenerative therapies with this model provide information relevant to both human and canine patients. The aim of this article is to review potential regenerative treatment strategies for canine IVD degeneration, with specific emphasis on cell-based strategies. PMID:24387033

  3. The Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Li; Feng, Gang; Reames, Davis L; Shimer, Adam L; Shen, Francis H; Li, Xudong

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Astronauts experience back pain, particularly low back pain, during and after spaceflight. Recent studies have described histological and biochemical changes in rat intervertebral discs after space travel, but there is still no in vitro model to investigate the effects of microgravity on disc metabolism. PURPOSE To study the effects of microgravity on disc degeneration and to establish an in vitro simulated microgravity study model STUDY DESIGN Discs were cultured in static and rotating conditions in bioreactor, and the characteristics of disc degeneration were evaluated METHODS The mice discs were cultured in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor where the microgravity condition was simulated. Intervertebral discs were cultured in static and microgravity condition. Histology, biochemistry, and immunohistochemical assays were performed to evaluate the characteristics of the discs in microgravity condition. RESULTS Intervertebral discs cultured in rotating bioreactors were found to develop changes of disc degeneration manifested by reduced red Safranin-o staining within the annulus fibrosus, downregulated GAG content and GAG/Hypro ratio, increased MMP-3 expression, and upregulated apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that simulated microgravity induces the molecular changes of disc degeneration. The rotating bioreactor model will provide a foundation to investigate the effects of microgravity on disc metabolism. PMID:23537452

  4. Dynamic Compression Effects on Intervertebral Disc Mechanics and Biology

    PubMed Central

    Korecki, Casey L.; MacLean, Jeffrey J.; Iatridis, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Study Design A bovine intervertebral disc organ culture model was used to study the effect of dynamic compression magnitude on mechanical behavior and measurement of biosynthesis rate, cell viability, and mRNA expression. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the effect of loading magnitude on intervertebral disc mechanics and biology in an organ culture model. Summary of Background Data The in vivo and cell culture response of intervertebral disc cells to dynamic mechanical loading provides evidence the disc responds in a magnitude dependant manner. However, the ability to link mechanical behavior of the disc with biologic phenomena has been limited. A large animal organ culture system facilitates measurements of tissue mechanics and biologic response parameters on the same sample allowing a broader understanding of disc mechanobiology. Methods Bovine caudal intervertebral discs were placed in organ culture for 6 days and assigned to a static control or 1 of 2 dynamic compression loading protocols (0.2–1 MPa or 0.2–2.5 MPa) at 1 Hz for 1 hour for 5 days. Disc structure was assessed with measurements of dynamic modulus, creep, height loss, water content, and proteoglycan loss to the culture medium. Cellular responses were assessed through changes in cell viability, metabolism, and qRT-PCR analyses. Results Increasing magnitudes of compression increased disc modulus and creep; however, all mechanical parameters recovered each day. In the anulus, significant increases in gene expression for collagen I and a trend of increasing sulfate incorporation were observed. In the nucleus, increasing gene expression for collagen I and MMP3 was observed between magnitudes and between static controls and the lowest magnitude of loading. Conclusion Results support the hypothesis that biologic remodeling precedes damage to the intervertebral disc structure, that compression is a healthy loading condition for the disc, and further support the link between applied

  5. High Glucose Accelerates Autophagy in Adult Rat Intervertebral Disc Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Chae-Gwan; Kim, Man Soo; Park, Eun-Young

    2014-01-01

    Study Design In vitro cell culture. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of high glucose on autophagy in adult rat intervertebral disc cells. Overview of Literature Diabetes mellitus is considered to be an important etiologic factor for intervertebral disc degeneration, resulting in degenerative disc diseases. A glucose-mediated increase of autophagy is a major causative factor for the development of diseases associated with diabetes mellitus. However, no information is available for the effect of high glucose on autophagy in adult intervertebral disc cells. Methods Nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus cells were isolated from 24-week-old adult rats, cultured and placed in either 10% fetal bovine serum (normal control) or 10% fetal bovine serum plus two different high glucose concentrations (0.1 M and 0.2 M) (experimental conditions) for one and three days, respectively. The expressions of autophagy markers, such as beclin-1, light chain 3-I (LC3-I) and LC3-II, autophagy-related gene (Atg) 3, 5, 7 and 12, were identified and quantified. Results Two high glucoses significantly increased the expressions of beclin-1, LC3-II, Atg3, 5, 7, and 12 in adult rat nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I expression was also increased in a dose-respectively time-dependent manner. Conclusions The results suggest that autophagy of adult nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus cells might be a potential mechanism for the intervertebral disc degeneration in adult patients with diabetes mellitus. Thus, the prevention of autophagy in adult intervertebral disc cells might be considered as a novel therapeutic target to prevent or to delay the intervertebral disc degeneration in adult patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:25346805

  6. Gene expression profile analysis of human intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Wu, Dajiang; Zhu, Xiaodong; Ni, Haijian; Wei, Xianzhao; Mao, Ningfang; Xie, Yang; Niu, Yunfei; Li, Ming

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we used microarray analysis to investigate the biogenesis and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration. The gene expression profiles of 37 disc tissue samples obtained from patients with herniated discs and degenerative disc disease collected by the National Cancer Institute Cooperative Tissue Network were analyzed. Differentially expressed genes between more and less degenerated discs were identified by significant analysis of microarray. A total of 555 genes were significantly overexpressed in more degenerated discs with a false discovery rate of < 3%. Functional annotation showed that these genes were significantly associated with membrane-bound vesicles, calcium ion binding and extracellular matrix. Protein-protein interaction analysis showed that these genes, including previously reported genes such as fibronectin, COL2A1 and β-catenin, may play key roles in disc degeneration. Unsupervised clustering indicated that the widely used morphology-based Thompson grading system was only marginally associated with the molecular classification of intervertebral disc degeneration. These findings indicate that detailed, systematic gene analysis may be a useful way of studying the biology of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:24130454

  7. Notochord Cells in Intervertebral Disc Development and Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Matthew R.; Séguin, Cheryle A.

    2016-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is a complex structure responsible for flexibility, multi-axial motion, and load transmission throughout the spine. Importantly, degeneration of the intervertebral disc is thought to be an initiating factor for back pain. Due to a lack of understanding of the pathways that govern disc degeneration, there are currently no disease-modifying treatments to delay or prevent degenerative disc disease. This review presents an overview of our current understanding of the developmental processes that regulate intervertebral disc formation, with particular emphasis on the role of the notochord and notochord-derived cells in disc homeostasis and how their loss can result in degeneration. We then describe the role of small animal models in understanding the development of the disc and their use to interrogate disc degeneration and associated pathologies. Finally, we highlight essential development pathways that are associated with disc degeneration and/or implicated in the reparative response of the tissue that might serve as targets for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:27252900

  8. [Principles of intervertebral disc assessment in private accident insurance].

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, M; Dittrich, V; Röser, K

    2015-09-01

    Due to the spread of intervertebral disc degeneration, insurance companies and experts are regularly confronted with related assessments of insured persons under their private accident insurance. These claims pose a particular challenge for experts, since, in addition to the clinical assessment of the facts, extensive knowledge of general accident insurance conditions, case law and current study findings is required. Each case can only be properly assessed through simultaneous consideration of both the medical and legal facts. These guidelines serve as the basis for experts and claims.managers with respect to the appropriate individual factual assessment of intervertebral disc degeneration in private accident insurance. PMID:26548005

  9. Syndecan-4 in intervertebral disc and cartilage: Saint or synner?

    PubMed

    Binch, Abbie L A; Shapiro, Irving M; Risbud, Makarand V

    2016-01-01

    The ECM of the intervertebral disc and articular cartilage contains a highly organised network of collagens and proteoglycans which resist compressive forces applied to these tissues. A pathological hallmark of the intervertebral disc is the imbalance between production of anabolic and catabolic factors by the resident cells. This process is thought to be mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines, predominantly TNF-α and IL-1β, which upregulate expression of matrix degrading enzymes such as MMPs and ADAMTSs. This imbalance ultimately results in tissue degeneration causing failure of the biomechanical function of the tissues. A similar cascade of events is thought to occur in articular cartilage during development of osteoarthritis. Within these skeletal tissues a small, cell surface heparan sulphate proteoglycan; syndecan-4 (SDC4) has been implicated in maintaining physiological functions. However in the degenerating niche of the intervertebral disc and cartilage, dysregulated activities of this molecule may exacerbate pathological changes. Studies in recent years have elucidated a role for SDC4 in mediating matrix degradation in both intervertebral discs and cartilage by controlling ADAMTS-5 function and MMP3 expression. Discourse presented in this review highlights the potential of SDC4 as a possible therapeutic target in slowing the progression of ECM degradation in both degenerative disc disease and osteoarthritis. PMID:26796346

  10. Early adolescent lumbar intervertebral disc injury: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and discusses the case of an adolescent male with lumbar intervertebral disc injury characterized by chronic low back pain (LBP) and antalgia. A 13-year-old boy presented for care with a complaint of chronic LBP and subsequent loss of quality of life. The patient was examined and diagnosed by means of history, clinical testing and use of imaging. He had showed failure in natural history and conservative management relief in both symptomatic and functional improvement, due to injury to the intervertebral joints of his lower lumbar spine. Discogenic LBP in the young adolescent population must be considered, particularly in cases involving even trivial minor trauma, and in those in which LBP becomes chronic. More research is needed regarding long-term implications of such disc injuries in young people, and how to best conservatively manage these patients. A discussion of discogenic LBP pertaining to adolescent disc injury is included. PMID:23621900

  11. [Minimally invasive surgery in treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Rotim, Krešimir; Sajko, Tomislav; Borić, Marta; Subašić, Ante

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation is one of the most common neurosurgical procedures. Besides conventional surgical techniques, in the last more than 30 years, different methods with minimal damage to neuromuscular spine structures are being developed and introduced, all having the purpose of reducing postoperative back pain. The advantages of the minimally invasive spine surgery include: possibility of performing procedures under local anaesthesia, reduced hospital stay, limited blood loss with consecutively reduced fibrous tissue development. Patients are capable of return to work and everyday activities early after surgery. From the economical point of view, this kind of treatment is considered to be a cost-effective intervention. Three methods that are being used for treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation are: percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD), microdiscectomy using tubular retractor system and selective endoscopic discectomy (SED). Conducted prospective studies have shown that minimally invasive methods are adequate alternative to classic surgical procedures. PMID:26065287

  12. Emerging technologies for molecular therapy for intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Won C.; Masuda, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral discs are biologically regulated by the maintenance of a balance between the anabolic and catabolic activities of disc cells. Therapeutic agents, initially evaluated using in vitro studies on disc cells and explants, have been used as intradiscal injections in preclinical settings to test in vivo efficacy. These include anabolic growth factors and other biostimulatory agents as well as antagonistic agents against matrix-degrading enzymes and cytokines. Additional work is needed to identify suitable patient populations, using methods such as MRI, and to better understand the mechanism of healing. Clinical trials are currently underway for a few of these agents, while many other promising candidates are on the horizon. PMID:21944594

  13. The effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression for the prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Ming Wei; Liu, Wei; Feng, Wei; Ma, Nan

    2009-07-01

    Objective: to investigate the role of associated factors in the effectiveness of laser treatment for prolapsed lumber intervertebral disc. Method: 302 prolapsed lumber intervertebral discs in 212 patients were treated with percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). Patients were followed up by 12month, the associated factors which affecting the effectiveness of treatment, ie age, duration of illness were analyzed. Results: Punctual Success rate was 100%. After 12 month's follow up, 86% successful outcomes were obtained, in which 93% successful outcomes were obtained in patients less than 50 years old, 92% successful outcomes was obtained in the patients whose duration of illness less than 1 year.

  14. Morphological similarities after compression trauma of bovine and human intervertebral discs: Do disc cells have a chance of surviving?

    PubMed

    Sitte, Ingrid; Kathrein, Anton; Klosterhuber, Miranda; Lindtner, Richard Andreas; Neururer, Sabrina Barbara; Rauch, Stefan; Kuhn, Volker; Schmoelz, Werner

    2014-09-01

    To study the behavior of bovine disc cells and changes in disc matrix following in vitro compression tests; to compare the findings to investigations on human intervertebral discs (IVD) after burst fracture of the cervical spine. Healthy IVDs (n = 21) from three bovine tails were studied at 6 and 12 h post-mortem, with 16 IVDs subjected to impact loading and five as unloaded controls. IVDs (n = 8) from patients with burst fractures were compared to the bovine compression group. Specimens were studied macroscopically, histologically, and ultrastructurally for healthy cells, balloon cells, and disc cell death (DCD). Annulus ruptures were seen in both post-trauma groups, with radial ruptures being present histologically in all loaded bovine discs. Balloon cells were found in some human IVDs and were induced in vitro in bovine loaded discs within a distinct range of absorbed energy. There was a positive correlation between DCD and absorbed energy in all compartments of bovine discs. Both species showed similar patterns of DCD in the different compartments. This study was able to show similarities between both species in cell morphologies and matrix damage. The survival of the disc after substantial compression trauma thus seems to remain highly questionable. PMID:24888549

  15. Molecular mechanisms of biological aging in intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Vo, Nam V; Hartman, Robert A; Patil, Prashanti R; Risbud, Makarand V; Kletsas, Dimitris; Iatridis, James C; Hoyland, Judith A; Le Maitre, Christine L; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Kang, James D

    2016-08-01

    Advanced age is the greatest risk factor for the majority of human ailments, including spine-related chronic disability and back pain, which stem from age-associated intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Given the rapid global rise in the aging population, understanding the biology of intervertebral disc aging in order to develop effective therapeutic interventions to combat the adverse effects of aging on disc health is now imperative. Fortunately, recent advances in aging research have begun to shed light on the basic biological process of aging. Here we review some of these insights and organize the complex process of disc aging into three different phases to guide research efforts to understand the biology of disc aging. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge and the recent progress made to elucidate specific molecular mechanisms underlying disc aging. In particular, studies over the last few years have uncovered cellular senescence and genomic instability as important drivers of disc aging. Supporting evidence comes from DNA repair-deficient animal models that show increased disc cellular senescence and accelerated disc aging. Additionally, stress-induced senescent cells have now been well documented to secrete catabolic factors, which can negatively impact the physiology of neighboring cells and ECM. These along with other molecular drivers of aging are reviewed in depth to shed crucial insights into the underlying mechanisms of age-related disc degeneration. We also highlight molecular targets for novel therapies and emerging candidate therapeutics that may mitigate age-associated IDD. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1289-1306, 2016. PMID:26890203

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Biological Aging in Intervertebral Discs

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Nam V.; Hartman, Robert A.; Patil, Prashanti R.; Risbud, Makarand V.; Kletsas, Dimitris; Iatridis, James C.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Le Maitre, Christine L.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Kang, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age is the greatest risk factor for the majority of human ailments, including spine-related chronic disability and back pain, which stem from age-associated intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Given the rapid global rise in the aging population, understanding the biology of intervertebral disc aging in order to develop effective therapeutic interventions to combat the adverse effects of aging on disc health is now imperative. Fortunately, recent advances in aging research have begun to shed light on the basic biological process of aging. Here we review some of these insights and organize the complex process of disc aging into three different phases to guide research efforts to understand the biology of disc aging. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge and the recent progress made to elucidate specific molecular mechanisms underlying disc aging. In particular, studies over the last few years have uncovered cellular senescence and genomic instability as important drivers of disc aging. Supporting evidence comes from DNA repair-deficient animal models that show increased disc cellular senescence and accelerated disc aging. Additionally, stress-induced senescent cells have now been well documented to secrete catabolic factors, which can negatively impact the physiology of neighboring cells and ECM. These along with other molecular drivers of aging are reviewed in depth to shed crucial insights into the underlying mechanisms of age-related disc degeneration. We also highlight molecular targets for novel therapies and emerging candidate therapeutics that may mitigate age-associated IDD. PMID:26890203

  17. Factors regulating viable cell density in the intervertebral disc: blood supply in relation to disc height

    PubMed Central

    Boubriak, Olga A; Watson, Natasha; Sivan, Sarit S; Stubbens, Naomi; Urban, Jill P G

    2013-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is an avascular tissue, maintained by a small population of cells that obtain nutrients mainly by diffusion from capillaries at the disc–vertebral body interface. Loss of this nutrient supply is thought to lead to disc degeneration, but how nutrient supply influences viable cell density is unclear. We investigated two factors that influence nutrient delivery to disc cells and hence cell viability: disc height and blood supply. We used bovine caudal discs as our model as these show a gradation in disc height. We found that although disc height varied twofold from the largest to the smallest disc studied, it had no significant effect on cell density, unlike the situation found in articular cartilage. The density of blood vessels supplying the discs was markedly greater for the largest disc than the smallest disc, as was the density of pores allowing capillary penetration through the bony endplate. Results indicate that changes in blood vessels in the vertebral bodies supplying the disc, as well as changes in endplate architecture appear to influence density of cells in intervertebral discs. PMID:23311982

  18. In vivo experimental study of hat type cervical intervertebral fusion cage (HCIFC)

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhen-jun; Jia, Lian-shun; Qi, Jin; Wang, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the characteristics of interbody fusion achieved using the hat type cervical intervertebral fusion cage (HCIFC) with those of an autologous tricortical iliac crest graft, Harms cage and the carbon cage in a goat cervical spine model. Thirty-two goats underwent C3-4 discectomy and fusion. They were subdivided into four groups of eight goats each: group 1, autologous tricortical iliac crest bone graft; group 2, Harms cage filled with autologous iliac crest graft; group 3, carbon cage filled with autologous iliac bone; and group 4, HCIFC filled with autologous iliac graft. Radiography was performed pre- and postoperatively and after one, two, four, eight and 12 weeks. At the same time points, disc space height, intervertebral angle, and lordosis angle were measured. After 12 weeks, the goats were killed and fusion sites were harvested. Biomechanical testing was performed in flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending to determine the stiffness and range of motion. All cervical fusion specimens underwent histomorphological analyses. One week after operation, the disc space height (DSH), intervertebral angle (IVA) and lordosis angle (LA) of HCIFC and carbon cage were statistically greater than those of autologous iliac bone graft and Harms cage. Significantly higher values for DSH, IVA and LA were shown in cage-treated goats than in those that received bone graft over a 12-week period. The stiffness of Harms cage in axial rotation and lateral bending were statistically greater than that of other groups. Radiographic and histomorphological evaluation showed better fusion results in the cage groups than in the autologous bone group. HCIFC can provide a good intervertebral distractability and sufficient biomechanical stability for cervical fusion. PMID:20195596

  19. Biologic Treatment of Mild and Moderate Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliadis, Elias S; Pneumaticos, Spyros G; Evangelopoulos, Demitrios S; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G

    2014-01-01

    Disc degeneration is the most common cause of back pain in adults and has enormous socioeconomic implications. Conservative management is ineffective in most cases, and results of surgical treatment have not yet reached desirable standards. Biologic treatment options are an alternative to the above conventional management and have become very attractive in recent years. The present review highlights the currently available biologic treatment options in mild and moderate disc degeneration, where a potential for regeneration still exists. Biologic treatment options include protein-based and cell-based therapies. Protein-based therapies involve administration of biologic factors into the intervertebral disc to enhance matrix synthesis, delay degeneration or impede inflammation. These factors can be delivered by an intradiscal injection, alone or in combination with cells or tissue scaffolds and by gene therapy. Cell-based therapies comprise treatment strategies that aim to either replace necrotic or apoptotic cells, or minimize cell death. Cell-based therapies are more appropriate in moderate stages of degenerated disc disease, when cell population is diminished; therefore, the effect of administration of growth factors would be insufficient. Although clinical application of biologic treatments is far from being an everyday practice, the existing studies demonstrate promising results that will allow the future design of more sophisticated methods of biologic intervention to treat intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:25171110

  20. Intervertebral disc segmentation and volumetric reconstruction from peripheral quantitative computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alexander; Mishra, Akshaya; Yates, Justin; Fieguth, Paul; Clausi, David A; Callaghan, Jack P

    2009-11-01

    An automatic system for segmenting and constructing volumetric representations of excised intervertebral discs from peripheral quantitative computed tomography (PQCT) imagery is presented. The system is designed to allow for automatic quantitative analysis of progressive herniation damage to the intervertebral discs under flexion/extension motions combined with a compressive load. Automatic segmentation and volumetric reconstruction of intervertebral disc from PQCT imagery is a very challenging problem due to factors such as streak artifacts and unclear material density separation between contrasted intervertebral disc and surrounding bone in the PQCT imagery, as well as the formation of multiple contrasted regions under axial scans. To address these factors, a novel multiscale level set approach based on the Mumford-Shah energy functional in iterative bilateral scale space is employed to segment the intervertebral disc regions from the PQCT imagery. A Delaunay triangulation is then performed based on the set of points associated with the intervertebral disc regions to construct the volumetric representation of the intervertebral disc. Experimental results show that the proposed system achieves segmentation and volumetric reconstructions of intervertebral discs with mean absolute distance error below 0.8 mm when compared to ground truth measurements. The proposed system is currently in operational use as a visualization tool for studying progressive intervertebral disc damage. PMID:19635691

  1. Disc cell senescence in intervertebral disc degeneration: Causes and molecular pathways

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chencheng; Liu, Huan; Yang, Minghui; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Yue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The accumulation of senescent disc cells in degenerative intervertebral disc (IVD) suggests the detrimental roles of cell senescence in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Disc cell senescence decreased the number of functional cells in IVD. Moreover, the senescent disc cells were supposed to accelerate the process of IDD via their aberrant paracrine effects by which senescent cells cause the senescence of neighboring cells and enhance the matrix catabolism and inflammation in IVD. Thus, anti-senescence has been proposed as a novel therapeutic target for IDD. However, the development of anti-senescence therapy is based on our understanding of the molecular mechanism of disc cell senescence. In this review, we focused on the molecular mechanism of disc cell senescence, including the causes and various molecular pathways. We found that, during the process of IDD, age-related damages together with degenerative external stimuli activated both p53-p21-Rb and p16-Rb pathways to induce disc cell senescence. Meanwhile, disc cell senescence was regulated by multiple signaling pathways, suggesting the complex regulating network of disc cell senescence. To understand the mechanism of disc cell senescence better contributes to developing the anti-senescence-based therapies for IDD. PMID:27192096

  2. Disc in Flames: Roles of TNF-α and IL-1β in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Zariel I.; Schoepflin, Zachary R.; Choi, Hyowon; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2016-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is an important mechanical structure that allows range of motion of the spinal column. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc, incited by aging, traumatic insult, genetic predisposition, or other factors, is often defined by functional and structural changes in the tissue, including excessive breakdown of the extracellular matrix, increased disc cell senescence and death, and compromised biomechanical function of the tissue. Intervertebral disc degeneration is strongly correlated with low back pain, which is a highly prevalent and costly condition, significantly contributing to loss in productivity and health care costs. Disc degeneration is a chronic, progressive condition, and current therapies are limited and often focused on symptomatic pain relief rather than curtailing the progression of the disease. Inflammatory processes, exacerbated by cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β are believed to be key mediators of disc degeneration and low back pain. In this review, we describe the contributions of TNF-α and IL-1β to changes seen during disc degeneration at the cellular and tissue level, new evidence suggesting a link between infection of the spine and low back pain, and the emerging therapeutic modalities aimed at combating these processes. PMID:26388614

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells: potential application in intervertebral disc regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bojiang; Williams, Lisa; Diwan, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is one of the leading public health problems in developed countries. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is a major pathological process implicated in low back pain, which is characterized by cellular apoptosis and senescence with reduced synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM). Currently, there is no clinical therapy targeting the reversal of disc degeneration. Recent advances in cellular and molecular biology have provided an exciting approach to disc regeneration that focuses on the delivery of viable cells to the degenerative disc. Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells with self-renewal capacities and are able to differentiate into diverse specialized cell types, including chondrocyte lineages. The potential of stem cell therapy in disc degeneration is to repopulate the disc with viable cells capable of producing the ECM and restoring damaged tissue. The present literature review summarizes recent advances in basic research and clinical trials of MSCs to provide an outline of the key roles of MSCs therapies in disc repair. The review also discusses the controversies, challenges and therapeutic concepts for the future. PMID:26835326

  4. Accelerated cellular senescence in degenerate intervertebral discs: a possible role in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Le Maitre, Christine Lyn; Freemont, Anthony John; Hoyland, Judith Alison

    2007-01-01

    Current evidence implicates intervertebral disc degeneration as a major cause of low back pain, although its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Numerous characteristic features of disc degeneration mimic those seen during ageing but appear to occur at an accelerated rate. We hypothesised that this is due to accelerated cellular senescence, which causes fundamental changes in the ability of disc cells to maintain the intervertebral disc (IVD) matrix, thus leading to IVD degeneration. Cells isolated from non-degenerate and degenerate human tissue were assessed for mean telomere length, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), and replicative potential. Expression of P16INK4A (increased in cellular senescence) was also investigated in IVD tissue by means of immunohistochemistry. RNA from tissue and cultured cells was used for real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis for matrix metalloproteinase-13, ADAMTS 5 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs 5), and P16INK4A. Mean telomere length decreased with age in cells from non-degenerate tissue and also decreased with progressive stages of degeneration. In non-degenerate discs, there was an age-related increase in cellular expression of P16INK4A. Cells from degenerate discs (even from young patients) exhibited increased expression of P16INK4A, increased SA-β-gal staining, and a decrease in replicative potential. Importantly, there was a positive correlation between P16INK4A and matrix-degrading enzyme gene expression. Our findings indicate that disc cell senescence occurs in vivo and is accelerated in IVD degeneration. Furthermore, the senescent phenotype is associated with increased catabolism, implicating cellular senescence in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration. PMID:17498290

  5. Accelerated cellular senescence in degenerate intervertebral discs: a possible role in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Le Maitre, Christine Lyn; Freemont, Anthony John; Hoyland, Judith Alison

    2007-01-01

    Current evidence implicates intervertebral disc degeneration as a major cause of low back pain, although its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Numerous characteristic features of disc degeneration mimic those seen during ageing but appear to occur at an accelerated rate. We hypothesised that this is due to accelerated cellular senescence, which causes fundamental changes in the ability of disc cells to maintain the intervertebral disc (IVD) matrix, thus leading to IVD degeneration. Cells isolated from non-degenerate and degenerate human tissue were assessed for mean telomere length, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-gal), and replicative potential. Expression of P16INK4A (increased in cellular senescence) was also investigated in IVD tissue by means of immunohistochemistry. RNA from tissue and cultured cells was used for real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis for matrix metalloproteinase-13, ADAMTS 5 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs 5), and P16INK4A. Mean telomere length decreased with age in cells from non-degenerate tissue and also decreased with progressive stages of degeneration. In non-degenerate discs, there was an age-related increase in cellular expression of P16INK4A. Cells from degenerate discs (even from young patients) exhibited increased expression of P16INK4A, increased SA-beta-gal staining, and a decrease in replicative potential. Importantly, there was a positive correlation between P16INK4A and matrix-degrading enzyme gene expression. Our findings indicate that disc cell senescence occurs in vivo and is accelerated in IVD degeneration. Furthermore, the senescent phenotype is associated with increased catabolism, implicating cellular senescence in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration. PMID:17498290

  6. Mechanisms for mechanical damage in the intervertebral disc annulus fibrosus.

    PubMed

    Iatridis, J C James C; ap Gwynn, Iolo

    2004-08-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration results in disorganization of the laminate structure of the annulus that may arise from mechanical microfailure. Failure mechanisms in the annulus were investigated using composite lamination theory and other analyses to calculate stresses in annulus layers, interlaminar shear stress, and the region of stress concentration around a fiber break. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate failure patterns in the annulus and evaluate novel structural features of the disc tissue. Stress concentrations in the annulus due to an isolated fiber break were localized to approximately 5 microm away from the break, and only considered a likely cause of annulus fibrosus failure (i.e., radial tears in the annulus) under extreme loading conditions or when collagen damage occurs over a relatively large region. Interlaminar shear stresses were calculated to be relatively large, to increase with layer thickness (as reported with degeneration), and were considered to be associated with propagation of circumferential tears in the annulus. SEM analysis of intervertebral disc annulus fibrosus tissue demonstrated a clear laminate structure, delamination, matrix cracking, and fiber failure. Novel structural features noted with SEM also included the presence of small tubules that appear to run along the length of collagen fibers in the annulus and a distinct collagenous structure representative of a pericellular matrix in the nucleus region. PMID:15212921

  7. Degenerated human intervertebral discs contain autoantibodies against extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Capossela, S; Schläfli, P; Bertolo, A; Janner, T; Stadler, B M; Pötzel, T; Baur, M; Stoyanov, J V

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs) is associated with back pain and elevated levels of inflammatory cells. It has been hypothesised that discogenic pain is a direct result of vascular and neural ingrowth along annulus fissures, which may expose the avascular nucleus pulposus (NP) to the systemic circulation and induce an autoimmune reaction. In this study, we confirmed our previous observation of antibodies in human degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs cultured in vitro. We hypothesised that the presence of antibodies was due to an autoimmune reaction against specific proteins of the disc. Furthermore we identified antigens which possibly trigger an autoimmune response in degenerative disc diseases. We demonstrated that degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs contain IgG antibodies against typical extracellular proteins of the disc, particularly proteins of the NP. We identified IgGs against collagen type II and aggrecan, confirming an autoimmune reaction against the normally immune privileged NP. We also found specific IgGs against collagens types I and V, but not against collagen type III. In conclusion, this study confirmed the association between disc degeneration and autoimmunity, and may open the avenue for future studies on developing prognostic, diagnostic and therapy-monitoring markers for degenerative disc diseases. PMID:24706108

  8. Biomechanical study of a hat type cervical intervertebral fusion cage

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lian-Shun; Chen, Tong-Yi

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical effect of a hat type cervical intervertebral fusion cage (HCIFC). In this in vitro biomechanical study, 48 goat cervical spines (C2-5) were tested in flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending with a nondestructive stiffness method using a nonconstrained testing apparatus, and three-dimensional displacement was measured. Autologous iliac bone and cervical spine intervertebral fusion cage were implanted according to manufacturers’ information after complete discectomy (C3-4). Eight spines in each of the following groups were tested: intact, autologous iliac bone graft, Harms cage, SynCage C, carbon cage, and HCIFC. The mean apparent stiffness values were calculated from the corresponding load-displacement curves. Additionally, cage volume and volume-related stiffness were determined. The stiffness of the SynCage C was statistically greatest in all directions. After implantation of the HCIFC, flexion stiffness increased compared with that of the intact motion segment. There was no significant difference in stiffness between the HCIFC and carbon cage. The stiffness of the HCIFC was statistically higher than that of the Harms cage in axial rotation and significantly lower in flexion, extension, and lateral bending. Volume-related stiffness of all cages was higher than that of iliac bone graft. The Harms cage was highest in volume-related stiffness in all directions. The HCIFC can provide enough primary stability for cervical intervertebral fusion. PMID:16763843

  9. A biochemical/biophysical 3D FE intervertebral disc model.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Y; Huyghe, J M; van Donkelaar, C C; Ito, K

    2010-10-01

    Present research focuses on different strategies to preserve the degenerated disc. To assure long-term success of novel approaches, favorable mechanical conditions in the disc tissue are essential. To evaluate these, a model is required that can determine internal mechanical conditions which cannot be directly measured as a function of assessable biophysical characteristics. Therefore, the objective is to evaluate if constitutive and material laws acquired on isolated samples of nucleus and annulus tissue can be used directly in a whole-organ 3D FE model to describe intervertebral disc behavior. The 3D osmo-poro-visco-hyper-elastic disc (OVED) model describes disc behavior as a function of annulus and nucleus tissue biochemical composition, organization and specific constituent properties. The description of the 3D collagen network was enhanced to account for smaller fibril structures. Tissue mechanical behavior tests on isolated nucleus and annulus samples were simulated with models incorporating tissue composition to calculate the constituent parameter values. The obtained constitutive laws were incorporated into the whole-organ model. The overall behavior and disc properties of the model were corroborated against in vitro creep experiments of human L4/L5 discs. The OVED model simulated isolated tissue experiments on confined compression and uniaxial tensile test and whole-organ disc behavior. This was possible, provided that secondary fiber structures were accounted for. The fair agreement (radial bulge, axial creep deformation and intradiscal pressure) between model and experiment was obtained using constitutive properties that are the same for annulus and nucleus. Both tissue models differed in the 3D OVED model only by composition. The composition-based modeling presents the advantage of reducing the numbers of material parameters to a minimum and to use tissue composition directly as input. Hence, this approach provides the possibility to describe internal

  10. In Vivo Mouse Intervertebral Disc Degeneration Model Based on a New Histological Classification

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Takashi; Sudo, Hideki; Iwasaki, Koji; Tsujimoto, Takeru; Ito, Yoichi M.; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    Although human intervertebral disc degeneration can lead to several spinal diseases, its pathogenesis remains unclear. This study aimed to create a new histological classification applicable to an in vivo mouse intervertebral disc degeneration model induced by needle puncture. One hundred six mice were operated and the L4/5 intervertebral disc was punctured with a 35- or 33-gauge needle. Micro-computed tomography scanning was performed, and the punctured region was confirmed. Evaluation was performed by using magnetic resonance imaging and histology by employing our classification scoring system. Our histological classification scores correlated well with the findings of magnetic resonance imaging and could detect degenerative progression, irrespective of the punctured region. However, the magnetic resonance imaging analysis revealed that there was no significant degenerative intervertebral disc change between the ventrally punctured and non-punctured control groups. To induce significant degeneration in the lumbar intervertebral discs, the central or dorsal region should be punctured instead of the ventral region. PMID:27482708

  11. Lumbar intervertebral disc puncture under C-arm fluoroscopy: a new rat model of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Yang, Huilin; Huang, Yonghui; Wu, Yan; Sun, Taicun; Li, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    To establish a minimally invasive rat model of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) to better understand the pathophysiology of the human condition. The annulus fibrosus of lumbar level 4-5 (L4-5) and L5-6 discs were punctured by 27-gauge needles using the posterior approach under C-arm fluoroscopic guidance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histological examination by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed at baseline and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after disc puncture surgery to determine the degree of degeneration. All sixty discs (thirty rats) were punctured successfully. Only two of thirty rats subjected to the procedure exhibited immediate neurological symptoms. The MRI results indicated a gradual increase in Pfirrmann grade from 4 to 8 weeks post-surgery (P<0.05), and H&E staining demonstrated a parallel increase in histological grade (P<0.05). Expression levels of aggrecan, type II collagen (Col2), and Sox9 mRNAs, which encode disc components, decreased gradually post-surgery. In contrast, mRNA expression of type I collagen (Col1), an indicator of fibrosis, increased (P<0.05). The procedure of annular puncture using a 27-gauge needle under C-arm fluoroscopic guidance had a high success rate. Histological, MRI, and RT-PCR results revealed that the rat model of disc degeneration is a progressive pathological process that is similar to human IDD. PMID:24770648

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of the human lumbar intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Marini, Giacomo; Huber, Gerd; Püschel, Klaus; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2015-02-01

    Systems with a quasi-static response similar to the axial response of the intervertebral disc (i.e. progressive stiffening) often present complex dynamics, characterized by peculiar nonlinearities in the frequency response. However, such characteristics have not been reported for the dynamic response of the disc. The accurate understanding of disc dynamics is essential to investigate the unclear correlation between whole body vibration and low back pain. The present study investigated the dynamic response of the disc, including its potential nonlinear response, over a range of loading conditions. Human lumbar discs were tested by applying a static preload to the top and a sinusoidal displacement at the bottom of the disc. The frequency of the stimuli was set to increase linearly from a low frequency to a high frequency limit and back down. In general, the response showed nonlinear and asymmetric characteristics. For each test, the disc had different response in the frequency-increasing compared to the frequency-decreasing sweep. In particular, the system presented abrupt changes of the oscillation amplitude at specific frequencies, which differed between the two sweeps. This behaviour indicates that the system oscillation has a different equilibrium condition depending on the path followed by the stimuli. Preload and amplitude of the oscillation directly influenced the disc response by changing the nonlinear dynamics and frequency of the jump-phenomenon. These results show that the characterization of the dynamic response of physiological systems should be readdressed to determine potential nonlinearities. Their direct effect on the system function should be further investigated. PMID:25573099

  13. Simulation of biological therapies for degenerated intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiaoqiao; Gao, Xin; Temple, H Thomas; Brown, Mark D; Gu, Weiyong

    2016-04-01

    The efficacy of biological therapies on intervertebral disc repair was quantitatively studied using a three-dimensional finite element model based on a cell-activity coupled multiphasic mixture theory. In this model, cell metabolism and matrix synthesis and degradation were considered. Three types of biological therapies-increasing the cell density (Case I), increasing the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis rate (Case II), and decreasing the GAG degradation rate (Case III)-to the nucleus pulposus (NP) of each of two degenerated discs [one mildly degenerated (e.g., 80% viable cells in the NP) and one severely degenerated (e.g., 30% viable cells in the NP)] were simulated. Degenerated discs without treatment were also simulated as a control. The cell number needed, nutrition level demanded, time required for the repair, and the long-term outcomes of these therapies were analyzed. For Case I, the repair process was predicted to be dependent on the cell density implanted and the nutrition level at disc boundaries. With sufficient nutrition supply, this method was predicted to be effective for treating both mildly and severely degenerated discs. For Case II, the therapy was predicted to be effective for repairing the mildly degenerated disc, but not for the severely degenerated disc. Similar results were predicted for Case III. No change in cell density for Cases II and III were predicted under normal nutrition level. This study provides a quantitative guide for choosing proper strategies of biological therapies for different degenerated discs. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:699-708, 2016. PMID:26425965

  14. Delivery systems for the treatment of degenerated intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Blanquer, S B G; Grijpma, D W; Poot, A A

    2015-04-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) is the most avascular and acellular tissue in the body and therefore prone to degeneration. During IVD degeneration, the balance between anabolic and catabolic processes in the disc is deregulated, amongst others leading to alteration of extracellular matrix production, abnormal enzyme activities and production of pro-inflammatory substances like cytokines. The established treatment strategy for IVD degeneration consists of physiotherapy, pain medication by drug therapy and if necessary surgery. This approach, however, has shown limited success. Alternative strategies to increase and prolong the effects of bioactive agents and to reverse the process of IVD degeneration include the use of delivery systems for drugs, proteins, cells and genes. In view of the specific anatomy and physiology of the IVD and depending on the strategy of the therapy, different delivery systems have been developed which are reviewed in this article. PMID:25451138

  15. Progranulin Knockout Accelerates Intervertebral Disc Degeneration in Aging Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun-peng; Tian, Qing-yun; Liu, Ben; Cuellar, Jason; Richbourgh, Brendon; Jia, Tang-hong; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a common degenerative disease, yet much is unknown about the mechanisms during its pathogenesis. Herein we investigated whether progranulin (PGRN), a chondroprotective growth factor, is associated with IVD degeneration. PGRN was detectable in both human and murine IVD. The levels of PGRN were upregulated in murine IVD tissue during aging process. Loss of PGRN resulted in an early onset of degenerative changes in the IVD tissue and altered expressions of the degeneration-associated molecules in the mouse IVD tissue. Moreover, PGRN knockout mice exhibited accelerated IVD matrix degeneration, abnormal bone formation and exaggerated bone resorption in vertebra with aging. The acceleration of IVD degeneration observed in PGRN null mice was probably due to the enhanced activation of NF-κB signaling and β-catenin signaling. Taken together, PGRN may play a critical role in homeostasis of IVD, and may serve as a potential molecular target for prevention and treatment of disc degenerative diseases. PMID:25777988

  16. MicroRNAs: New players in intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Wen-Jun; Yan, Yi-Guo; Xiang, Yong-Xiao; Zhang, Jian; Tang, Zhi-Han; Jiang, Zhi-Sheng

    2015-10-23

    Chronic low back pain is generally attributed to intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration (IDD), which is closely associated with apoptosis, extracellular matrix (ECM) disruption, cell proliferation and inflammatory response. Currently, there is no clinical therapy targeting the pathophysiology of disc degeneration. microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional levels. miRNAs not only regulate many normal physiological processes, but also play an important role in the development of most disorders, including degenerative disc disease. A variety of miRNAs are differentially expressed in degenerative human IVD tissues and cells. Among these, some of the miRNAs have been shown to be involved in multiple pathological processes during disc degeneration, including apoptosis, ECM degradation, cell proliferation and inflammatory response. This review will mainly focus on the expression profiles, roles, and therapeutic implications of miRNAs in IDD. With continued efforts, restoration of dysregulated miRNA expression may represent a promising biological treatment approach for mitigating or reversing IVD degeneration. PMID:26368266

  17. Reoperations Following Cervical Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Lee, Dong-Ho; Caridi, John Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has emerged as an alternative surgical option to cervical arthrodesis. With increasing numbers of patients and longer follow-ups, complications related to the device and/or aging spine are growing, leaving us with a new challenge in the management and surgical revision of CDR. The purpose of this study is to review the current literature regarding reoperations following CDR and to discuss about the approaches and solutions for the current and future potential complications associated with CDR. The published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.0%; range, 0%-3.1%), revision (mean, 0.2%; range, 0%-0.5%), and removal (mean, 1.2%; range, 0%-1.9%) following CDR are low and comparable to the published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.7%; range; 0%-3.4%), revision (mean, 1.5%; range, 0%-4.7%), and removal (mean, 2.0%; range, 0%-3.4%) following cervical arthrodesis. The surgical interventions following CDR range from the repositioning to explantation followed by fusion or the reimplantation to posterior foraminotomy or fusion. Strict patient selection, careful preoperative radiographic review and surgical planning, as well as surgical technique may reduce adverse events and the need for future intervention. Minimal literature and no guidelines exist for the approaches and techniques in revision and for the removal of implants following CDR. Adherence to strict indications and precise surgical technique may reduce the number of reoperations, revisions, and removals following CDR. Long-term follow-up studies are needed, assessing the implant survivorship and its effect on the revision and removal rates. PMID:26097667

  18. Prognosis of intervertebral disc loss from diagnosis of degenerative disc disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Lin, A.; Tay, K.; Romano, W.; Osman, Said

    2015-03-01

    Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is one of the most common causes of low back pain, and is a major factor in limiting the quality of life of an individual usually as they enter older stages of life, the disc degeneration reduces the shock absorption available which in turn causes pain. Disc loss is one of the central processes in the pathogenesis of DDD. In this study, we investigated whether the image texture features quantified from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be appropriate markers for diagnosis of DDD and prognosis of inter-vertebral disc loss. The main objective is to use simple image based biomarkers to perform prognosis of spinal diseases using non-invasive procedures. Our results from 65 subjects proved the higher success rates of the combination marker compared to the individual markers and in the future, we will extend the study to other spine regions to allow prognosis and diagnosis of DDD for a wider region.

  19. Substructuring and poroelastic modelling of the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Swider, P; Pédrono, A; Ambard, D; Accadbled, F; Sales de Gauzy, J

    2010-05-01

    We proposed a substructure technique to predict the time-dependant response of biological tissue within the framework of a finite element resolution. Theoretical considerations in poroelasticity preceded the calculation of the sub-structured poroelastic matrix. The transient response was obtained using an exponential fitting method. We computed the creep response of an MRI 3D reconstructed L(5)-S(1) intervertebral disc of a scoliotic spine. The FE model was reduced from 10,000 degrees of freedom for the full 3D disc to only 40 degrees of freedom for the sub-structured model defined by 10 nodes attached to junction nodes located on both lower and upper surfaces of the disc. Comparisons of displacement fields were made between the full poroelastic FE model and the sub-structured model in three different loading conditions: compression, offset compression and torsion. Discrepancies in displacement were lower than 10% for the first time steps when time-dependant events were significant. The substructuring technique provided an exact solution in quasi-static behavior after pressure relaxation. Couplings between vertical and transversal displacements predicted by the reference FE model were well stored by the sub-structured model despite the drastic reduction of degrees of freedom. Finally, we demonstrated that substructuring was very efficient to reduce the size of numerical models while respecting the time-dependant behavior of the structure. This result highlighted the potential interest of substructure techniques in large-scale models of musculoskeletal structures. PMID:20170917

  20. Cellular Mechanobiology of the Intervertebral Disc: New Directions and Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Adam H.; Twomey, Julianne D.

    2009-01-01

    The more we learn about the intervertebral disc (IVD), the more we come to appreciate the intricacies involved in transmission of forces through the ECM to the cell, and in the biological determinants of its response to mechanical stress. This review highlights recent developments in our knowledge of IVD physiology and examines their impact on cellular mechanobiology. Discussion centers around the continually evolving cellular and microstructural anatomy of the nucleus pulposus (NP) and the annulus fibrosus (AF) in response to complex stresses generated in support of axial load and spinal motion. Particular attention has been given to cells from the immature NP and the interlamellar AF, and assessment of their potential mechanobiologic contributions to the health and function of the IVD. In addition, several innovative approaches that have been brought to bear on studying the interplay between disc cells and their micromechanical environment are discussed. Techniques for “engineering” cellular function and technologies for fabricating more structurally defined biomaterial scaffolds have recently been employed in disc research. Such tools can be used to elucidate the biological and physical mechanisms by which different IVD cell populations are regulated by mechanical stress, and contribute to advancement of preventative and therapeutic measures. PMID:19828150

  1. Activ C cervical disc replacement for myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    McGonagle, L.; Cadman, S.; Chitgopkar, S. D.; Canavan, L.; O’Malley, M.; Shackleford, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cervical disc replacement is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option for cervical myelopathy. It retains motion at the affected segment, unlike anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The aim of this study is to assess the outcomes of a series of patients who underwent Activ C disc replacement for cervical myelopathy. Materials and Methods: A series of patients at the above Trust with clinical and radiological evidence of cervical myelopathy who were suitable for cervical disc replacement from 2007 to 2009 were included. Implants were inserted by one of two consultant surgeons {IMS, MO’M}. Patients were assessed preoperatively and at six, 12 and 24 months, postoperatively, with a visual analogue score (VAS) for neck and arm pain severity and frequency, the Neck Disability Index questionnaire (NDI) and the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression questionnaire (CES-D). Results: Ten patients underwent surgery between May 2007 and July 2009, 6 women, and 4 men. Average age was 54 years (40-64). Disc levels replaced were: four at C4-5; eight at C5-6; seven at C6-7. Three patients had one disc replaced, five patients had two discs replaced, and two patients had three discs replaced. The VAS for neck pain improved from 5.9 pre-operatively to 1.4-24 months postoperatively and the VAS arm pain improved from 5.4 to 2.6. The NDI improved from 51% preoperatively to 26.8% at 24 months postoperatively. The CES-D showed a slight increase from 19.5 preoperatively to 21.7 at 24 months, postoperatively. Conclusion: Cervical decompression and disc replacement improves pain and function in patients with cervical myelopathy. This benefit is maintained at 24 months post op, with no cases requiring revision. PMID:23125494

  2. Molecular mechanisms of cell death in intervertebral disc degeneration (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, FAN; ZHAO, XUELING; SHEN, HONGXING; ZHANG, CAIGUO

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are complex structures that consist of three parts, namely, nucleus pulposus, annulus fibrosus and cartilage endplates. With aging, IVDs gradually degenerate as a consequence of many factors, such as microenvironment changes and cell death. Human clinical trial and animal model studies have documented that cell death, particularly apoptosis and autophagy, significantly contribute to IVD degeneration. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon include the activation of apoptotic pathways and the regulation of autophagy in response to nutrient deprivation and multiple stresses. In this review, we briefly summarize recent progress in understanding the function and regulation of apoptosis and autophagy signaling pathways. In particular, we focus on studies that reveal the functional mechanisms of these pathways in IVD degeneration. PMID:27121482

  3. Molecular mechanisms of cell death in intervertebral disc degeneration (Review).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Xueling; Shen, Hongxing; Zhang, Caiguo

    2016-06-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are complex structures that consist of three parts, namely, nucleus pulposus, annulus fibrosus and cartilage endplates. With aging, IVDs gradually degenerate as a consequence of many factors, such as microenvironment changes and cell death. Human clinical trial and animal model studies have documented that cell death, particularly apoptosis and autophagy, significantly contribute to IVD degeneration. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon include the activation of apoptotic pathways and the regulation of autophagy in response to nutrient deprivation and multiple stresses. In this review, we briefly summarize recent progress in understanding the function and regulation of apoptosis and autophagy signaling pathways. In particular, we focus on studies that reveal the functional mechanisms of these pathways in IVD degeneration. PMID:27121482

  4. Cervical disc arthroplasty: Pros and cons

    PubMed Central

    Moatz, Bradley; Tortolani, P. Justin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical disc arthroplasty has emerged as a promising potential alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in appropriately selected patients. Despite a history of excellent outcomes after ACDF, the question as to whether a fusion leads to adjacent segment degeneration remains unanswered. Numerous US investigational device exemption trials comparing cervical arthroplasty to fusion have been conducted to answer this question. Methods: This study reviews the current research regarding cervical athroplasty, and emphasizes both the pros and cons of arthroplasty as compared with ACDF. Results: Early clinical outcomes show that cervical arthroplasty is as effective as the standard ACDF. However, this new technology is also associated with an expanding list of novel complications. Conclusion: Although there is no definitive evidence that cervical disc replacement reduces the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration, it does show other advantages; for example, faster return to work, and reduced need for postoperative bracing. PMID:22905327

  5. Effect of intervertebral disc degeneration on disc cell viability: a numerical investigation.

    PubMed

    Galbusera, Fabio; Mietsch, Antje; Schmidt, Hendrik; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Neidlinger-Wilke, Cornelia

    2013-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc may be initiated and supported by impairment of the nutrition processes of the disc cells. The effects of degenerative changes on cell nutrition are, however, only partially understood. In this work, a finite volume model was used to investigate the effect of endplate calcification, water loss, reduction of disc height and cyclic mechanical loading on the sustainability of the disc cell population. Oxygen, lactate and glucose diffusion, production and consumption were modelled with non-linear coupled partial differential equations. Oxygen and glucose consumption and lactate production were expressed as a function of local oxygen concentration, pH and cell density. The cell viability criteria were based on local glucose concentration and pH. Considering a disc with normal water content, cell death was initiated in the centre of the nucleus for oxygen, glucose, and lactate diffusivities in the cartilaginous endplate below 20% of the physiological values. The initial cell population could not be sustained even in the non-calcified endplates when a reduction of diffusion inside the disc due to water loss was modelled. Alterations in the disc shape such as height loss, which shortens the transport route between the nutrient sources and the cells, and cyclic mechanical loads, could enhance cell nutrition processes. PMID:21970697

  6. Clarifying the nomenclature of intervertebral disc degeneration and displacement: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Qiang; Samartzis, Dino

    2014-01-01

    As a significant determinant of low back pain, intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) has attracted more and more attention of both investigators and physicians. Disc herniation, termed as intervertebral disc displacement, is amongst the most prevalent spinal diseases closely linked with IDD. Due to the same origins and similar pathophysiology, the ambiguity regarding the similarity and difference of IDD and intervertebral disc displacement thus remains. The aim of this study was to clarify the nomenclature of IDD and disc herniation in terms of molecular etiology, pathophysiology, nature history and clinical outcomes. Collectively, IDD is a type of multifaceted, progressive spinal disease with or without clinical symptoms as back pain, characterized by extracellular matrix and the integrity of NP and AF lost, fissures formation. Disc herniation (termed as intervertebral disc displacement) is a type of spinal disease based on IDD or not, with local pain and/or sciatica due to mechanical compression and autoimmune cascades upon the corresponding nerve roots. Clarifying the nomenclature of intervertebral disc degeneration and displacement has important implications both for investigators and for physicians. PMID:24817926

  7. A novel technique for the contrast-enhanced microCT imaging of murine intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kevin H; Wu, Qi; Leib, Daniel J; Tang, Simon Y

    2016-10-01

    Disc degeneration is one of the leading factors that contribute to low back pain. Thus, the further understanding of the mechanisms contributing to degeneration of the intervertebral disc degeneration is critical for the development of therapies and strategies for treating low back pain. Rodent models are attractive for conducting mechanistic studies particularly because of the availability of genetically modified animals. However, current imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging, do not have the ability to resolve spatial features at the tens- to single- micrometer scale. We propose here a contrast-enhanced microCT technique to conduct high-resolution imaging of the rodent intervertebral discs at 10µm spatial resolution. Based on the iodinated-hydrophilic contrast agent Ioversol, we are able to conduct high resolution imaging on rat and mouse intervertebral discs. Leveraging the hydrophilic characteristic of the contrast agent, we are able to discriminate the annulus fibrosus from the water-rich nucleus pulposus. Moreover, this technique allows for the quantitative measurement of disc morphologies and volumes, and we demonstrate the versatility of this technique on cultured live intervertebral discs. Coupled with our semi-automated segmentation technique, we are able to quantify the intervertebral disc volumes with a high degree of reproducibility. The contrast-enhanced microCT images were qualitatively and quantitatively indistinguishable from the traditional histological assessment of the same sample. Furthermore, stereological measures compared well between histology and microCT images. Taken together, the results reveal that rat and mouse intervertebral discs can be imaged longitudinally in vitro at high resolutions, with no adverse effects on viability and features of the intervertebral disc. PMID:27341292

  8. A diffusion and T2 relaxation MRI study of the ovine lumbar intervertebral disc under compression in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drew, Simon C.; Silva, Pujitha; Crozier, Stuart; Pearcy, Mark J.

    2004-08-01

    The ovine lumbar intervertebral disc is a useful model for the human lumbar disc. We present preliminary estimates of diffusion coefficients and T2 relaxation times in a pilot MRI study of the ovine lumbar intervertebral disc during uniaxial compression in vitro, and identify factors that hamper the ability to accurately monitor the temporal evolution of the effective diffusion tensor at high spatial resolution.

  9. Role of Cytokines in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Pain and Disc-content

    PubMed Central

    Risbud, Makarand V.; Shapiro, Irving. M

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is the major contributor to back/neck and radicular pain. It is characterized by an elevation in levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1 α/β, IL-6 and IL-17 secreted by the disc cells themselves; these cytokines promote matrix degradation, chemokine production and changes in cell phenotype. The resulting imbalance between catabolic and anabolic responses leads to degeneration, as well as herniation and radicular pain. Release of chemokines from degenerating discs promote infiltration and activation of T and B cells, macrophages, neutrophils, and mast cells further amplifying the inflammatory cascade. Immunocyte migration into the disc is accompanied by the appearance of microvasculature and nerve fibers arising from the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). In this inflammatory milieu, neurogenic factors in particular nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derive neurotrophic factor (BDNF) generated by disc and immune cells induce expression of pain associated cation channels in DRGs. Depolarization of these channels is likely to promote discogenic and radicular pain and reinforce the cytokine-mediated degenerative cascade. Taken together, the enhanced understanding of the contribution of cytokines and immune cells to catabolic and nociceptive processes provide new targets for treating symptomatic disc disease. PMID:24166242

  10. Action of fibroblast growth factor-2 on the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; An, Howard S; Ellman, Michael; Phillips, Frank; Thonar, Eugene J; Park, Daniel K; Udayakumar, Ranjith K; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a growth factor that is immediately released after cartilage injury and plays a pivotal role in cartilage homeostasis. In human adult articular cartilage, FGF2 mediates anti-anabolic and potentially catabolic effects via the suppression of proteoglycan (PG) production along with the upregulation of matrix-degrading enzyme activity. The aim of the present study was to determine the biological effects of FGF2 in spine disc cells and to elucidate the complex biochemical pathways utilized by FGF2 in bovine intervertebral disc (IVD) cells in an attempt to further understand the pathophysiologic processes involved in disc degeneration. Methods We studied the effect of FGF2 on IVD tissue homeostasis by assessing MMP-13 expression (potent matrix-degrading enzyme), PG accumulation, and PG synthesis in the bovine spine IVD, as well as evaluating whether FGF2 counteracts known anabolic factors such as BMP7. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which FGF2 antagonizes BMP7 activity, we also investigated the signaling pathways utilized by FGF2 in bovine disc tissue. Results The primary receptor expressed in bovine nucleus pulposus cartilage is FGFR1, and this receptor is upregulated in degenerative human IVD tissue compared with normal IVD tissue. Stimulation of bovine nucleus pulposus cells cultured in monolayer with FGF2 augmented the production of MMP-13 at the transcriptional and translational level in a dose-dependent manner. Stimulation of bovine nucleus pulposus cells cultured in alginate beads for 21 days with FGF2 resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in PG accumulation, due at least in part to the inhibition of PG synthesis. Further studies demonstrate that FGF2 (10 ng/ml) antagonizes BMP7-mediated acceleration of PG production in bovine nucleus pulposus cells via the upregulation of noggin, an inhibitor of the transforming growth factor beta/bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathway. Chemical inhibitor studies

  11. Neuroanatomic and pathophysiologic aspects of intervertebral disc disease in the dog.

    PubMed

    Thacher, C

    1989-01-01

    A sound understanding of anatomy and the pathophysiology of disease is important in all branches of medicine, but nowhere is it more critical to success than in the medical and surgical management of intervertebral disc disease. Due to the remote location and unforgiving nature of the spinal cord, the veterinary surgeon must possess an intimate working knowledge of the surgical anatomy of the vertebrae, ligaments and joints of the spine, intervertebral discs, spinal cord, and spinal nerves. In addition, proper localization of spinal cord lesions during the neurological evaluation requires awareness of the functional neuroanatomy of the upper and lower motor motor neurons, the sensory systems and tracts, and the reflex arcs. Knowledge of the pathophysiology the intervertebral disc degeneration and the response of the spinal cord to disc extrusions are also important in the overall understanding of the disease and enhances proper decision making for its management. This chapter reviews the portions of the gross and functional neuroanatomy and the pathophysiology of the intervertebral disc and the spinal cord that are pertinent to the dog with intervertebral disc disease. Emphasis is placed on concepts that are critical for the veterinary surgeon who is involved in the surgical management of the disc patient. PMID:2520119

  12. Linking continuous and discrete intervertebral disc models through homogenisation.

    PubMed

    Karajan, N; Röhrle, O; Ehlers, W; Schmitt, S

    2013-06-01

    At present, there are two main numerical approaches that are frequently used to simulate the mechanical behaviour of the human spine. Researchers with a continuum-mechanical background often utilise the finite-element method (FEM), where the involved biological soft and hard tissues are modelled on a macroscopic (continuum) level. In contrast, groups associated with the science of human movement usually apply discrete multi-body systems (MBS). Herein, the bones are modelled as rigid bodies, which are connected by Hill-type muscles and non-linear rheological spring-dashpot models to represent tendons and cartilaginous connective tissue like intervertebral discs (IVD). A possibility to benefit from both numerical methods is to couple them and use each approach, where it is most appropriate. Herein, the basic idea is to utilise MBS in simulations of the overall body and apply the FEM only to selected regions of interest. In turn, the FEM is used as homogenisation tool, which delivers more accurate non-linear relationships describing the behaviour of the IVD in the multi-body dynamics model. The goal of this contribution is to present an approach to couple both numerical methods without the necessity to apply a gluing algorithm in the context of a co-simulation. Instead, several pre-computations of the intervertebral disc are performed offline to generate an approximation of the homogenised finite-element (FE) result. In particular, the discrete degrees of freedom (DOF) of the MBS, that is, three displacements and three rotations, are applied to the FE model of the IVD, and the resulting homogenised forces and moments are recorded. Moreover, a polynomial function is presented with the discrete DOF of the MBS as variables and the discrete forces an moments as function values. For the sake of a simple verification, the coupling method is applied to a simplified motion segment of the spine. Herein, two stiff cylindrical vertebrae with an interjacent homogeneous

  13. Prevalence and pattern of radiographic intervertebral disc degeneration in Vietnamese: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ho-Pham, Lan T; Lai, Thai Q; Mai, Linh D; Doan, Minh C; Pham, Hoa N; Nguyen, Tuan V

    2015-06-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is one of the most common skeletal disorders, yet few data are available in Asian populations. We sought to assess the prevalence and pattern of radiographic IDD in a Vietnamese population. This population-based cross-sectional investigation involved 170 men and 488 women aged ≥40 years, who were randomly sampled from the Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam). Anthropometric data, clinical history and self-reported back and neck pain were ascertained by a questionnaire. Plain radiographs (from the cervical spine, thoracic spine to the lumbar spine) were examined for the presence of disc space narrowing and/or osteophytosis using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading system. The presence of radiographic IDD was defined if the KL grade was 2 or greater in at least one disc. The prevalence of radiographic IDD was 62.4% (n = 106) in men and 54.7% (n = 267) in women. The most frequently affected site was the lumbar spine with prevalence being 50.6 and 43.2% in men and women, respectively. The prevalence of IDD increased with advancing age: 18.8% among those aged 40-49 years, and increased to 83.4% in those aged ≥60 years. Self-reported neck pain and lower back pain were found in 30 and 44% of individuals, respectively. There was no statistically significant association between self-reported neck pain and cervical spine OA. These data suggest that radiographic IDD is highly prevalent in the Vietnamese population, and that self-reported back pain is not a sensitive indicator of IDD. PMID:25791571

  14. Excimer ablation of human intervertebral disc at 308 nanometers.

    PubMed

    Wolgin, M; Finkenberg, J; Papaioannou, T; Segil, C; Soma, C; Grundfest, W

    1989-01-01

    Excimer laser energy, which has been shown to photoablate tissue at a precisely controllable rate with minimal thermal damage, was applied to human intervertebral disc in an effort to develop a technique for percutaneous discectomy. Cadaveric samples of human disc were used. Excimer laser energy was produced by a XeCl, magnetically switched, long-pulse laser working at 308 nm, 20 Hz. Annulus tissue of approximately 1 mm thickness was placed in contact with the output tip of a 400 microns core diameter quartz fiber, and measurements of ablation rate were made at different radiant exposures. Ablation rates were found to vary linearly with radiant exposure, from 0.7 micron/pulse at 10 mJ/mm2 to 11.0 microns/pulse at 55 mJ/mm2, with a correlation coefficient of 0.984. Threshold radiant exposure, calculated by extrapolation, was found to be about 7 mJ/mm2. Histologic analysis showed a minimum of thermal damage in these specimens, and when ablated with modification to maintain constant fiber-tissue contact, thermal injury was nearly absent, as compared to samples ablated with Nd:YAG through a contact probe. Thermographic analysis, performed using the AGA 782 Digital Thermography system, showed increasing temperature with increasing radiant exposure, with a maximum temperature of 47.2 degrees C at 55 mJ/mm2. In that precise tissue ablation was demonstrated with minimal generated heat, and excimer energy at 308 nm is transmissible through fiber optics, excimer holds great promise for the development of a percutaneous discectomy technique. PMID:2716456

  15. Minimally invasive photopolymerization in intervertebral disc tissue cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmocker, Andreas M.; Khoushabi, Azadeh; Gantenbein-Ritter, Benjamin; Chan, Samantha; Bonél, Harald Marcel; Bourban, Pierre-Etienne; Mânson, Jan Anders; Schizas, Constantin; Pioletti, Dominique; Moser, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    Photopolymerized hydrogels are commonly used for a broad range of biomedical applications. As long as the polymer volume is accessible, gels can easily be hardened using light illumination. However, in clinics, especially for minimally invasive surgery, it becomes highly challenging to control photopolymerization. The ratios between polymerizationvolume and radiating-surface-area are several orders of magnitude higher than for ex-vivo settings. Also tissue scattering occurs and influences the reaction. We developed a Monte Carlo model for photopolymerization, which takes into account the solid/liquid phase changes, moving solid/liquid-boundaries and refraction on these boundaries as well as tissue scattering in arbitrarily designable tissue cavities. The model provides a tool to tailor both the light probe and the scattering/absorption properties of the photopolymer for applications such as medical implants or tissue replacements. Based on the simulations, we have previously shown that by adding scattering additives to the liquid monomer, the photopolymerized volume was considerably increased. In this study, we have used bovine intervertebral disc cavities, as a model for spinal degeneration, to study photopolymerization in-vitro. The cavity is created by enzyme digestion. Using a custom designed probe, hydrogels were injected and photopolymerized. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and visual inspection tools were employed to investigate the successful photopolymerization outcomes. The results provide insights for the development of novel endoscopic light-scattering polymerization probes paving the way for a new generation of implantable hydrogels.

  16. Mesenchymal stem cell tracking in the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Charles; Goldschlager, Tony; Oehme, David; Ghosh, Peter; Jenkin, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain is a common clinical problem, which leads to significant social, economic and public health costs. Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is accepted as a common cause of low back pain. Initially, this is characterized by a loss of proteoglycans from the nucleus pulposus resulting in loss of tissue hydration and hydrostatic pressure. Conservative management, including analgesia and physiotherapy often fails and surgical treatment, such as spinal fusion, is required. Stem cells offer an exciting possible regenerative approach to IVD disease. Preclinical research has demonstrated promising biochemical, histological and radiological results in restoring degenerate IVDs. Cell tracking provides an opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of stem cell survival, differentiation and migration, enabling optimization of stem cell treatment. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging modality with high spatial resolution, ideally suited for stem cell tracking. Furthermore, novel MRI sequences have the potential to quantitatively assess IVD disease, providing an improved method to review response to biological treatment. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been extensively researched for the purpose of cell tracking. These particles are biocompatible, non-toxic and act as excellent MRI contrast agents. This review will explore recent advances and issues in stem cell tracking and molecular imaging in relation to the IVD. PMID:25621106

  17. Obesity and recurrent intervertebral disc prolapse after lumbar microdiscectomy

    PubMed Central

    Syme, G; Swamy, GN; Nanjayan, S; Fowler, A; Calthorpe, D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The primary aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between obesity and recurrent intervertebral disc prolapse (IDP) following lumbar microdiscectomy. Methods A retrospective review of case notes from 2008 to 2012 was conducted for all patients who underwent single level lumbar microdiscectomy performed by a single surgeon. All patients were followed up at two weeks and six weeks following surgery, and given an open appointment for a further six months. Results A total of 283 patients were available for analysis: 190 (67%) were in the non-obese group and 93 (32.9%) in the obese group. There was no statistical difference in postoperative infection, dural tear or length of stay between the non-obese and obese groups. Recurrent symptomatic IDP was seen in 27 patients (9.5%) confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Nineteen (10.0%) were in the non-obese group and eight (8.6%) in the obese group (p>0.8). Conclusions In our study, obesity was not a predictor of recurrent IDP following lumbar microdiscectomy. Our literature review confirmed that this study reports the largest series to date analysing the relationship between obesity and recurrent IDP following lumbar microdiscectomy in the British population. PMID:24780673

  18. Standards of Practice: Quality Assurance Guidelines for Percutaneous Treatments of Intervertebral Discs

    SciTech Connect

    Kelekis, Alexis D. Filippiadis, Dimitris K.; Martin, Jean-Baptiste; Brountzos, Elias

    2010-10-15

    Percutaneous treatments are used in the therapy of small- to medium-sized hernias of intervertebral discs to reduce the intradiscal pressure in the nucleus and theoretically create space for the herniated fragment to implode inward, thus reducing pain and improving mobility and quality of life. These techniques involve the percutaneous removal of the nucleus pulposus by using a variety of chemical, thermal, or mechanical techniques and consist of removal of all or part of nucleus pulposus to induce more rapid healing of the abnormal lumbar disc. These guidelines are written to be used in quality improvement programs for assessing fluoroscopy- and/or computed tomography-guided percutaneous intervertebral disc ablative techniques.

  19. Construction of a tissue engineered intervertebral disc with high biological activity using an allogeneic intervertebral disc supplemented with transfected nucleus pulposus cells expressing exogenous dopamine beta-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Bai, M; Wang, Y H; Yin, H P; Li, S W

    2015-01-01

    This study addressed the in vitro construction and biological activity of tissue engineered intervertebral discs with exogenous human dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) nucleus pulposus cells. pSNAV2.0-DBH expression plasmids were utilized to enhance the survival rates of intervertebral disc tissue cells. Various concentrations of transfected nucleus pulposus cells were injected into the discs, and DBH mRNA expression was determined using polymerase chain reaction amplification. Polysaccharide content and total collagen protein content in the engineered disc nucleus pulposus tissue were determined. The visible fluorescence intensities of the 1 x 10(5) and 1 x 10(6) groups vs the 1 x 10(4) group were significantly increased (P < 0.05); no significant difference was observed between the 1 x 10(5) and 1 x 10(6) groups (P > 0.05) at 7 days after injection. DBH mRNA expression could be detected in the all but the EGFP control group at 14 days culture. No significant difference was observed in the protein content between the 1 x 10(4) and the control groups at various times, while the protein content was significantly higher in the 1 x 10(5) vs the control and the 1 x 10(4) groups at 7-, 14-, and 21-day cultures. These results demonstrate that a tissue engineered intervertebral disc with high biological activity can be constructed by utilizing allogeneic intervertebral discs stored in liquid nitrogen and a 1 x 10(5) transfected nucleus pulposus cell complex with in vitro culture for 14 days. This model can be used in animal experiments to study the biological activity of the engineered discs. PMID:26400296

  20. Fusion versus Bryan Cervical Disc in two-level cervical disc disease: a prospective, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Lin; Zhang, Li; Hou, Yong

    2008-01-01

    In this prospective study, our aim was to compare the functional results and radiographic outcomes of fusion and Bryan Cervical Disc replacement in the treatment of two-level cervical disc disease. A total of 65 patients with two-level cervical disc disease were randomly assigned to two groups, those operated on with Bryan Cervical Disc replacement (31) and those operated on with anterior cervical fusion with an iliac crest autograft and plate (34). Clinical evaluation was carried out using the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Short Form 36 (SF-36) and the neck disability index (NDI) during a two year follow-up. Radiological evaluation sought evidence of range of motion, stability and subsidence of the prosthesis. Substantial reduction in NDI scores occurred in both groups, with greater percent improvement in the Bryan group (P = 0.023). The arm pain VAS score improvement was substantial in both groups. Bryan artificial cervical disc replacement seems reliable and safe in the treatment of patients with two-level cervical disc disease. PMID:18956190

  1. Determination of the intervertebral disc space from CT images of the lumbar spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korez, Robert; Å tern, Darko; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc are among the most common causes of low back pain, where for individuals with significant symptoms surgery may be needed. One of the interventions is the total disc replacement surgery, where the degenerated disc is replaced by an artificial implant. For designing implants with good bone contact and continuous force distribution, the morphology of the intervertebral disc space and vertebral body endplates is of considerable importance. In this study we propose a method for the determination of the intervertebral disc space from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images of the lumbar spine. The first step of the proposed method is the construction of a model of vertebral bodies in the lumbar spine. For this purpose, a chain of five elliptical cylinders is initialized in the 3D image and then deformed to resemble vertebral bodies by introducing 25 shape parameters. The parameters are obtained by aligning the chain to the vertebral bodies in the CT image according to image intensity and appearance information. The determination of the intervertebral disc space is finally achieved by finding the planes that fit the endplates of the obtained parametric 3D models, and placing points in the space between the planes of adjacent vertebrae that enable surface reconstruction of the intervertebral disc space. The morphometric analysis of images from 20 subjects yielded 11:3 +/- 2:6, 12:1 +/- 2:4, 12:8 +/- 2:0 and 12:9 +/- 2:7 cm3 in terms of L1-L2, L2-L3, L3-L4 and L4-L5 intervertebral disc space volume, respectively.

  2. A Review of Animal Models of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Pathophysiology, Regeneration, and Translation to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Lower back pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Discogenic pain secondary to intervertebral disc degeneration is a significant cause of low back pain. Disc degeneration is a complex multifactorial process. Animal models are essential to furthering understanding of the degenerative process and testing potential therapies. The adult human lumbar intervertebral disc is characterized by the loss of notochordal cells, relatively large size, essentially avascular nature, and exposure to biomechanical stresses influenced by bipedalism. Animal models are compared with regard to the above characteristics. Numerous methods of inducing disc degeneration are reported. Broadly these can be considered under the categories of spontaneous degeneration, mechanical and structural models. The purpose of such animal models is to further our understanding and, ultimately, improve treatment of disc degeneration. The role of animal models of disc degeneration in translational research leading to clinical trials of novel cellular therapies is explored. PMID:27314030

  3. A Review of Animal Models of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Pathophysiology, Regeneration, and Translation to the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Daly, Chris; Ghosh, Peter; Jenkin, Graham; Oehme, David; Goldschlager, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Lower back pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Discogenic pain secondary to intervertebral disc degeneration is a significant cause of low back pain. Disc degeneration is a complex multifactorial process. Animal models are essential to furthering understanding of the degenerative process and testing potential therapies. The adult human lumbar intervertebral disc is characterized by the loss of notochordal cells, relatively large size, essentially avascular nature, and exposure to biomechanical stresses influenced by bipedalism. Animal models are compared with regard to the above characteristics. Numerous methods of inducing disc degeneration are reported. Broadly these can be considered under the categories of spontaneous degeneration, mechanical and structural models. The purpose of such animal models is to further our understanding and, ultimately, improve treatment of disc degeneration. The role of animal models of disc degeneration in translational research leading to clinical trials of novel cellular therapies is explored. PMID:27314030

  4. STUDIES OF MOLECULAR CHANGES IN INTERVERTEBRAL DISC DEGENERATION IN ANIMAL MODEL

    PubMed Central

    de Campos, Marcelo Ferraz; de Oliveira, Cintia Pereira; Neff, Charles Benjamin; Correa, Olga Maria de Toledo; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva; Rodrigues, Luciano Miller Reis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the structural and molecular changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) during the process of intervertebral disc degeneration, using animal model. Methods: Wistar rats underwent intervertebral disc degeneration through 20-gauge needle puncture, and 360° rotation applied for 30 sec, representing the degenerated group, while control group was not submitted to this procedure. Histological parameters and expression of extracellular matrix molecules were evaluated in the 15th and 28th days after degenerative induction. Results: Fifteen days after the induction of intervertebral disc degeneration, significant changes were observed, such as reduction in the expression metalloprotease-9 (MMP9) and interleukins (IL-6 and IL-10). There was a significant increase in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and caspase-3. However, different alterations in the ECM were observed at 28 days, the level of collagen I, metalloprotease-2 (MMP2) and caspase-3 were enhanced. Furthermore, expression of heparanase isoforms (HPSE1 and HPSE2) mRNA were increased in the degenerative intervertebral disc. Conclusion: The different profiles of ECM molecules observed during the intervertebral disc degeneration suggest that molecular processes such as ECM remodeling, neovascularization, apoptosis and inflammation occur. Experimental Study. PMID:26997908

  5. Clinical experience in cell-based therapeutics: disc chondrocyte transplantation A treatment for degenerated or damaged intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Hans Jörg; Siodla, Vilma; Ganey, Timothy; Minkus, Yvonne; Hutton, William C; Alasevic, Olivera J

    2007-02-01

    Disc herniation treated by discectomy results in a significant loss of nucleus material and disc height. Biological restoration through the use of autologous disc chondrocyte transplantation offers a potential to achieve functional integration of disc metabolism and mechanics. Chondrocytes that have been removed from damaged cartilaginous tissues maintain a capacity to proliferate, produce and secrete matrix components and respond to physical stimuli such as dynamic loading. Nucleus regeneration using autologous cultured disc-derived chondrocytes (ADCT) has been demonstrated in a canine model and in clinical pilot studies. In 2002 a prospective, controlled, randomised, multi-center study, EuroDISC, comparing safety and efficacy of autologous disc chondrocyte transplant, chondrotransplant DISC, plus discectomy (ADCT), with discectomy alone was initiated. A dog model was used to investigate the hypothesis that autologous disc chondrocytes can be used to repair damaged intervertebral disc. Disc chondrocytes were harvested and expanded in culture under controlled and defined conditions, returned to the same animals from which they had been sampled (autologous transplantation) via percutaneous delivery. The animals were analyzed at specific times after transplantation by several methods to examine whether disc chondrocytes integrated with the surrounding tissue, produced the appropriate intervertebral disc extracellular matrix, and might provide a formative solution to disc repair. The clinical goals of the EuroDISC study, were to provide long-term pain relief, maintain disc height and prevent adjacent segment disease. Interim analysis was performed after 2 years; Oswestry (low back pain/disability), Quebec Back-Pain Disability Scale, as well as Prolo and VAS score were used for the evaluation. Disc height was assessed by MRI. In the context of degenerative changes in an injury model: () autologous disc chondrocytes were expended in culture and returned to the disc by a

  6. Cervical arthroplasty using ProDisc-C case report.

    PubMed

    Nica, D A; Copaciu, R

    2013-03-15

    Cervical disc replacement is an emerging motion-preserving technology in the surgical treatment of the cervical degenerative disc disorders used as an alternative to the classic interbody fusion. We present a case report of a patient diagnosed with C6-7 right disc herniation who underwent anterior discectomy and received a total disc replacement using ProDisc C artificial disc prosthesis. PMID:23599830

  7. Percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Zhang, Zai-Heng

    2008-01-01

    Percutaneous disc decompression procedures have been performed in the past. Various percutaneous techniques such as percutaneous discectomy, laser discectomy, and nucleoplasty have been successful. Our prospective study was directly to evaluate the results of percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty (PCN) surgery for cervical disc herniation, and illustrate the effectiveness of PCN in symptomatic patients who had cervical herniated discs. From July of 2002 to June of 2005, 126 consecutive patients with contained cervical disc herniations have presented at the authors’ clinic and treated by PCN. The patients’ gender distribution for PCN was 65 male, 61 female. The age of patients ranged from 34 to 66 years (mean 51.9 ± 10.2 years). The levels of involvement were 21 cases at C3–4, 30 cases at C4–5, 40 cases at C5–6, and 35 cases at C6–7. The clinical outcomes, pain reduction and the segment stability were all recorded during this study. A clinical outcome was quantified by the Macnab standard and using VAS. The angular displacement (AD) ≥11° or horizontal displacement (HD) ≥3 mm was considered to be radiographically unstable. In the results of this study, puncture of the needle into the disc space was accurately performed under X-ray guidance in all cases. There was one case where the Perc-D Spine Wand had broken in the disc space during the procedure. The partial Perc-D Spine Wand, which had broken in the disc space could not be removed by the percutaneous cervical discectomy and thus remained there. There were no recurrent cases or complications in our series. Macnab standard results were excellent in 62 cases, good in 41 cases and fair in 23 cases. The rate of excellent and good was 83.73%. The VAS scores demonstrated statistically significant improvement in PCN at the 2-week, 1, 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up visits when compared to preoperational values (P < 0.01). There were no cases of instability following the PCN procedure. There was no

  8. Changes in intervertebral disc cross-sectional area with bed rest and space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A. D.; Evans, H. J.; Schneider, V. S.; Wendt, R. E. 3rd; Hedrick, T. D.

    1994-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. We measured the cross-sectional area of the intervertebral discs of normal volunteers after an overnight rest; before, during, and after 5 or 17 weeks of bed rest; and before and after 8 days of weightlessness. OBJECTIVES. This study sought to determine the degree of expansion of the lumbar discs resulting from bed rest and space flight. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Weightlessness and bed rest, an analog for weightlessness, reduce the mechanical loading on the musculoskeletal system. When unloaded, intervertebral discs will expand, increasing the nutritional diffusion distance and altering the mechanical properties of the spine. METHODS. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the cross-sectional area and transverse relaxation time (T2) of the intervertebral discs. RESULTS. Overnight or longer bed rest causes expansion of the disc area, which reaches an equilibrium value of about 22% (range 10-40%) above baseline within 4 days. Increases in disc area were associated with modest increases in disc T2. During bed rest, disc height increased approximately 1 mm, about one-half of previous estimates based on body height measurements. After 5 weeks of bed rest, disc area returned to baseline within a few days of ambulation, whereas after 17 weeks, disc area remained above baseline 6 weeks after reambulation. After 8 days of weightlessness, T2, disc area, and lumbar length were not significantly different from baseline values 24 hours after landing. CONCLUSIONS. Significant adaptive changes in the intervertebral discs can be expected during weightlessness. These changes, which are rapidly reversible after short-duration flights, may be an important factor during and after long-duration missions.

  9. Repair and Regenerative Therapies of the Annulus Fibrosus of the Intervertebral Disc.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Dou, Qingyu; Kong, Qingquan

    2016-02-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is implicated as the main cause of low back pain. Current treatment strategies for degenerative disc disease, such as conservative treatments and surgeries, only relieve the symptoms of low back pain without treating the causes of underlying degeneration. Surgical treatments cannot reverse the degeneration of the intervertebral disc degeneration, and may even accelerate the degeneration. The development of tissue engineering and regenerative therapeutic strategies have brought new hope for repair and regeneration of the degenerated intervertebral disc. These strategies have been developed mainly targeting to the repair and regeneration of the nucleus pulposus of the degenerated but intervertebral disc. Although many studies that focused on the nucleus pulposus repair have achieved successes in laboratory settings but disc repair without giving much regard to annulus fibrosus could not recover the normal mechanical environment, which might make the disc degenerative change continuously exacerbate. Lately, the strategy to simultaneously repair the damaged annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus has attracted more attention, which could be considered to slow the disc degenerative rate and obtain better repair effect. An extensive literature search up to March 2015 for annulus fibrosus repair and regeneration in vitro or in vivo studies and clinical trials with the key words of "annulus fibrosus, repair, regeneration, tissue engineering, intervertebral disc and scaffold" were performed through PubMed, China National Knowledge Infrastructure and China Biology Medicine. The goal of this paper was to review the current research progress of annulus fibrosus repair and regeneration, and also suggest directions for future research. PMID:26876403

  10. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Martin H.; Mehta, Vivek A.; Tuchman, Alexander; Hsieh, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation. PMID:26523281

  11. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement.

    PubMed

    Pham, Martin H; Mehta, Vivek A; Tuchman, Alexander; Hsieh, Patrick C

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation. PMID:26523281

  12. [INFLUENCE OF AUTOLOGOUS CHONDROCYTES TRANSPLANTATION ON THE INTERVERTEBRAL DISC STATE IN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF OSTEOCHONDROSIS].

    PubMed

    Khyzhnyak, M V

    2015-07-01

    The degenerative changes in the nucleus pulposus and fibrous ring of the intervertebral discs are the basis of spinal osteochondrosis. A large number of models, including biological, where some mechanisms of their development were worked out and studied, was used to study the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of degenerative spinal changes. The deserved place in the comparative experiments and especially the different methods of therapeutic effects on the tissues of the intervertebral discs in degenerative spinal changes is taken by the experimental methods. The biochemical changes of the intervertebral disc structures were analyzed under the administration of cultured autologous cell of nucleus pulposus suspension against a background of experimental model of rat osteochondrosis. PMID:26591226

  13. Zonal variations in cytoskeletal element organization, mRNA and protein expression in the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siyuan; Duance, Victor C; Blain, Emma J

    2008-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is important in maintaining flexibility and dissipating loads applied to the spine. The disc comprises a heterogeneous population of cells, including those of the nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus, which are diverse in phenotype, partly due to the different mechanical loads they experience. Several studies have implicated the cytoskeleton in mechanotransduction, but little characterization of the three major cytoskeletal elements – actin, tubulin and vimentin – in the intervertebral disc has been undertaken. In this study we show that there are differences in both the organization and the amounts of these cytoskeletal proteins across the regions of immature bovine intervertebral disc (nucleus pulposus and outer annulus fibrosus), which differs with skeletal maturity. These differences are likely to reflect the diverse mechanical characteristics of the disc regions, and the loads that they experience, i.e. tension in the annulus fibrosus and compression in the nucleus pulposus. Alterations to the organization and amount of cytoskeletal element proteins may change the ability of the cells to respond to mechanical signals, with a loss of tissue homeostasis, suggesting that the cytoskeleton has a potential role in intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:19094188

  14. High incidence of persistence of sacral and coccygeal intervertebral discs in South Indians - a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Satheesha Nayak, B; Ashwini Aithal, P; Kumar, Naveen; George, Bincy M; Deepthinath, R; Shetty, Surekha D

    2016-06-01

    The sacrum, by virtue of its anatomic location plays a key role in providing stability and strength to the pelvis. Presence of intervertebral discs in sacrum and coccyx is rare. Knowledge of its variations is of utmost importance to surgeons and radiologists. The current study focused on the presence of intervertebral discs between the sacral and coccygeal vertebrae in south Indian cadaveric pelvises. We observed 56 adult pelvises of which, 34 (61%) pelvises showed the presence of intervertebral discs between the sacral vertebrae and between the coccygeal vertebrae, while 22 (39%) pelvises did not have the intervertebral discs either in the sacrum or the coccyx. We also found that most of the specimens had discs between S1 and S2 vertebrae (39%), followed by, between S4 and S5 (18%), between S2-S3 (14%) and least being between S3-S4 (13%). In the coccyx it was found that 7% of pelvises had disc between Co1-Co2, 4% of them had between Co2-Co3 and 4% had between Co3-Co4. Knowledge regarding such anatomic variations in the sacro-coccygeal region is important to note because they require alterations in various instrumentation procedures involving the sacrum. PMID:27385838

  15. Adolescent prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc: Management strategies and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Pragyan; Thirupathi, Rajan Thanga; Srinivas, Dwarakanath; Somanna, Sampath

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Lumbar intervertebral disc herniation (LIVDH) is rare in children and adolescents when compared to adults. In literature, children generally constitute around 0.5–3% of surgically treated LIVDH. Though much rarer, they are less likely to respond to conservative treatment than adults. In this study, we analyze our experience in the management of adolescent LIVDH (ALIVDH) (age group 12–18 years) including the demographic, clinico-radiological features; surgical management strategies and outcome. Materials and Methods: This retrospective analysis constituted all patients between 12 and 18 years, who underwent surgery for LIVDH at our institute over a period of 15 years from January 1999 to June 2014. The records of these patients were retrieved, and demographic features, clinical picture, radiological features, operative findings, and postoperative events were evaluated. Follow-up data were obtained either through direct clinical evaluation or mailed self-report questionnaire and telephone conversations. The long-term outcome was analyzed by using standardized and condition specific outcome scales in addition to routine clinical follow-up evaluation. The long-term outcome was analyzed by using the short form-36 (SF-36). Results: There were a total of 32 patients (26 males, eight females) with an average age of 15.64 years. Trauma was a significant etiological factor 57.14% (n = 16/28). Vertebral anomalies were present in 35.7% (n = 10/28) cases. Majority had a neurological deficit at presentation (n = 20/28). The most commonly involved level was the L4–L5 level (n = 18/128) in this series. Multiple level disc degeneration was present in eight patients (28.6%). Immediate postoperative relief was achieved in all but one patient. At long-term follow-up twenty patients were pain-free (71.4%). At follow-up, the physical functioning scale of SF-36 was significantly lower in patients with gross motor deficit prior to surgery. Conclusions: Early diagnosis and

  16. [Current research status and progress of stem cells therapy for degenerative intervertebral disc regeneration].

    PubMed

    Xie, Guangyou; Lu, Furong; Yang, Haitao

    2014-12-01

    Low back pain caused by intervertebral disc degeneration is a common clinical chronic disease. The regenerative ability of intervertebral disc tissue is extremely poor. Meanwhile, current treating methods can not fundamentally solve such problems. With the increasing awareness of the mechanism of disc degeneration and the rapid development of the fields of cellular and molecular biology, gene and materials engineering, using stem cells and tissue engineering technology to slow down or reverse the progress of disc degeneration may become possible. The author reviewed the application of stem cells for treating degenerative discs from present researching status and concepts for the future in the combination of researches reported both at home and abroad. PMID:25868271

  17. Functional probe for annulus fibrosus-targeted intervertebral disc degeneration imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Yeong; Mcclincy, Michael; Vo, Nam V.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Kang, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is closely associated with low back pain. Typically nonsurgical treatment of IDD is the most effective when detected early. As such, establishing reliable imaging methods for the early diagnosis of disc degeneration is critical. The cellular and tissue localization of a facile functional fluorescent probe, HYK52, that labels disc annulus fibrosus is reported. HYK52 was synthesized with high yield and purity via a two-step chemical reaction. Rabbit disc cell studies and ex vivo tissue staining images indicated intracellular localization and intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue binding of HYK52 with negligible cytotoxicity. Moreover, HYK52 is purposefully designed with a functional terminal carboxyl group to allow for coupling with various signaling molecules for multimodal imaging applications. These results suggest that this IVD-targeted probe may have great potential in early diagnosis of IDD. PMID:23839314

  18. Functional probe for annulus fibrosus-targeted intervertebral disc degeneration imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Yeong; Mcclincy, Michael; Vo, Nam V; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Kang, James D; Bai, Mingfeng

    2013-10-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is closely associated with low back pain. Typically nonsurgical treatment of IDD is the most effective when detected early. As such, establishing reliable imaging methods for the early diagnosis of disc degeneration is critical. The cellular and tissue localization of a facile functional fluorescent probe, HYK52, that labels disc annulus fibrosus is reported. HYK52 was synthesized with high yield and purity via a two-step chemical reaction. Rabbit disc cell studies and ex vivo tissue staining images indicated intracellular localization and intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue binding of HYK52 with negligible cytotoxicity. Moreover, HYK52 is purposefully designed with a functional terminal carboxyl group to allow for coupling with various signaling molecules for multimodal imaging applications. These results suggest that this IVD-targeted probe may have great potential in early diagnosis of IDD. PMID:23839314

  19. Role of posterior elements in the disc bulging of a degenerated cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Solitro, Giovanni F.; Siemionow, Kris; Drucker, David; Upadhyay, Ashish; Patel, Priyesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Many studies have been developed to characterize the mechanical behavior of the intervertebral disc specifically for the lumbar spine and there have been limited studies done on the cervical spine with the goal to evaluate the strength of the cervical spine under compression without any information on the bulging of the intervertebral discs. The goal of the current study is to examine the deformation response of the cervical intervertebral disc classified with grade III or greater degeneration and analyze the relationship between axial deformation and anterior and posterior bulge under compression up to 550 N. Methods Each specimen was compressed for 3 cycles to a maximum load of 550N in steps of 50 N. The bulge was measured using Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs on an intact spinal segment, spinal segment with post laminectomy, and spinal segment post facetectomy. Results The anterior budge for an intact spinal segment shows a change of slope at loads of 262N±66N. For a physiological load of 250N the vertical displacement or spine segment height was reduced by 10.1% for an intact segment and 8.78% for the laminectomy and facetectomy configurations with F = 0.159 (Fcrit = 3.89) with no statistical difference observed. For the post laminectomy there was a decrease of 35% in anterior bulge compared to the intact specimen. Conclusions Our results show that for grade III disc degeneration the cervical segments bulging for both the laminectomy and facetectomy procedures are not significantly different. In post laminectomy the average anterior and posterior bulges are similar to the average anterior and posterior bulge post facetectomy. PMID:26056628

  20. Protective Effects of Cannabidiol on Lesion-Induced Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, João W.; Issy, Ana Carolina; Castania, Vitor A.; Salmon, Carlos E. G.; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.; Guimarães, Francisco S.; Defino, Helton L. A.; Bel, Elaine Del

    2014-01-01

    Disc degeneration is a multifactorial process that involves hypoxia, inflammation, neoinnervation, accelerated catabolism, and reduction in water and glycosaminoglycan content. Cannabidiol is the main non-psychotropic component of the Cannabis sativa with protective and anti-inflammatory properties. However, possible therapeutic effects of cannabidiol on intervertebral disc degeneration have not been investigated yet. The present study investigated the effects of cannabidiol intradiscal injection in the coccygeal intervertebral disc degeneration induced by the needle puncture model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analyses. Disc injury was induced in the tail of male Wistar rats via a single needle puncture. The discs selected for injury were punctured percutaneously using a 21-gauge needle. MRI and histological evaluation were employed to assess the results. The effects of intradiscal injection of cannabidiol (30, 60 or 120 nmol) injected immediately after lesion were analyzed acutely (2 days) by MRI. The experimental group that received cannabidiol 120 nmol was resubmitted to MRI examination and then to histological analyses 15 days after lesion/cannabidiol injection. The needle puncture produced a significant disc injury detected both by MRI and histological analyses. Cannabidiol significantly attenuated the effects of disc injury induced by the needle puncture. Considering that cannabidiol presents an extremely safe profile and is currently being used clinically, these results suggest that this compound could be useful in the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:25517414

  1. Effect of repetitive laser pulses on the electrical conductivity of intervertebral disc tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Omel'chenko, A I; Sobol', E N

    2009-03-31

    The thermomechanical effect of 1.56-{mu}m fibre laser pulses on intervertebral disc cartilage has been studied using ac conductivity measurements with coaxial electrodes integrated with an optical fibre for laser radiation delivery to the tissue. The observed time dependences of tissue conductivity can be interpreted in terms of hydraulic effects and thermomechanical changes in tissue structure. The laserinduced changes in the electrical parameters of the tissue are shown to correlate with the structural changes, which were visualised using shadowgraph imaging. Local ac conductivity measurements in the bulk of tissue can be used to develop a diagnostic/monitoring system for laser regeneration of intervertebral discs. (laser biology and medicine)

  2. Growth Factors and Anticatabolic Substances for Prevention and Management of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Franceschetti, Edoardo; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is frequent, appearing from the second decade of life and progressing with age. Conservative management often fails, and patients with IVD degeneration may need surgical intervention. Several treatment strategies have been proposed, although only surgical discectomy and arthrodesis have been proved to be predictably effective. Biological strategies aim to prevent and manage IVD degeneration, improving the function and anabolic and reparative capabilities of the nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus cells and inhibiting matrix degradation. At present, clinical applications are still in their infancy. Further studies are required to clarify the role of growth factors and anticatabolic substances for prevention and management of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:25098367

  3. General considerations for cervical arthroplasty with technique for ProDisc-C.

    PubMed

    Chi, John H; Ames, Christopher P; Tay, Bobby

    2005-10-01

    Motion-preserving spinal arthroplasty is a triumph of modern biomechanics, material sciences, and surgical technique. The ability to remove entire intervertebral discs and re-place them with prostheses that preserve height and alignment as well as motion and stability, all the while alleviating the pain and spinal cord compression, is the result of nearly 50 years of progress in joint arthroplasty. Although the clear benefit or danger of artificial cervical discs is still unknown, they are already fundamentally changing the field of cervical spine surgery and are undoubtedly going to establish their place in the armamentarium for spinal surgeons. Short-term follow-up studies indicate that cervical arthroplasty is as safe and effective as traditional fusion surgery, but follow-up studies are no longer needed. PMID:16326284

  4. Target radiofrequency combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis in the treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daying; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Zhijian; Zhang, Xuexue; Sheng, Mulan

    2015-01-01

    Both target radiofrequency thermocoagulation and collagenase chemonucleolysis are effective micro-invasive therapy means for lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. In order to analyze the clinical effects of target radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis on lumbar intervertebral disc herniation, the contents of hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycan were measured and the histological changes of nucleus pulposus was detected in the vitro experiments. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation reduced the hydrolyzation of herniated nucleus pulposus caused by collagenase, as well as the content of hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycan. Furthermore, 236 patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were treated by target radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis. The efficiency was evaluated according to Macnab criteria, and the index of lumbar disc herniation (IDH) was compared pre-operation with 3 months post-operation. The post-operative good rate was 66.5% (157/236) at 2 weeks post-operation, and 88.1% (208/236) at 3 months post-operation. In the post-operative follow-up exam, 86.8% of the re-examined cases demonstrated smaller or ablated protrusion, with reduced IDH values from pre-operation, which was statistically significant. No serious complications were detected intra-operatively and post-operatively. In conclusion, target radiofrequency combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis was an effective and safe method for treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. PMID:25785026

  5. Temporo-spatial distribution of blood vessels in human lumbar intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Schaaf, Rainer; Wälchli, Beat; Boos, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    While there is consensus in the literature that blood vessels are confined to the outer anulus fibrosus of normal adult intervertebral disc, debate continues whether there is a vascular in-growths into inner parts of the intervertebral disc during degeneration. We therefore tested the hypothesis that vascular in-growth is not a distinct feature of disc degeneration. The specific endothelial cell marker CD 31 (PECAM) was used to immunohistochemically investigate 42 paraffin-embedded complete mid-sagittal human intervertebral disc sections of various ages (0–86 years) and varying extent of histomorphological degeneration. Additionally, 20 surgical disc samples from individuals (26–69 years) were included in this study. In discs of fetal to infantile age, blood vessels perforated the cartilaginous end plate and extended into the inner and outer anulus fibrosus, but not into the nucleus pulposus. In adolescents and adults, no blood vessels were seen except for the outer zone of the anulus fibrosus adjacent to the insertion to ligaments. The cartilaginous end plate remained free of vessels, except for areas with circumscribed destruction of the end plate. In advanced disc degeneration, no vessels were observed except for those few cases with complete, scar-like disc destruction. However, some rim lesions and occasionally major clefts were surrounded by a small network of capillary blood vessels extending into deeper zones of the anulus fibrosus. A subsequent morphometric analysis, revealed slightly “deeper” blood vessel extension in juvenile/adolescent discs when compared to young, mature and senile adult individuals with significantly “deeper” extension in the posterior than anterior anulus. The analysis of the surgical specimens showed that only sparse capillary blood vessels which did not extend into the nucleus pulposus even in major disc disruption. Our results show that vascular invasion deeper than the periphery was not observed during disc

  6. Increased Risk for Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder following Cervical Disc Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Lin, Herng-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder problems are common in patients with a cervical herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD). This study aimed to explore the incidence and risk of shoulder capsulitis/tendonitis following cervical HIVD surgery. We used data from the Taiwan "Longitudinal Health Insurance Database". We identified all patients who were hospitalized with a diagnosis of displacement of a cervical HIVD and who underwent cervical surgery (n = 1625). We selected 8125 patients who received cervical HIVD conservative therapy only as the comparison group matched with study patients. We individually tracked these sampled patients for 6 months to identify all patients who received a diagnosis of shoulder tendonitis/capsulitis. We found that incidence rates of shoulder tendonitis/capsulitis during the 6-month follow-up period were 3.69 (95% CI: 2.49~5.27) per 100 person-years for the study group and 2.33 (95% CI: 1.89~2.86) per 100 person-years for the comparison group. Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio for shoulder tendonitis/capsulitis among patients who underwent cervical disc surgery was 1.66 (95% CI = 1.09~2.53) when compared to comparison group. We concluded that patients who underwent surgery for a cervical HIVD had a significantly higher risk of developing shoulder capsulitis/tendonitis in 6 months follow-up compared to patients who received cervical HIVD conservative therapy only. PMID:27231090

  7. Increased Risk for Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder following Cervical Disc Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Lin, Herng-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder problems are common in patients with a cervical herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD). This study aimed to explore the incidence and risk of shoulder capsulitis/tendonitis following cervical HIVD surgery. We used data from the Taiwan “Longitudinal Health Insurance Database”. We identified all patients who were hospitalized with a diagnosis of displacement of a cervical HIVD and who underwent cervical surgery (n = 1625). We selected 8125 patients who received cervical HIVD conservative therapy only as the comparison group matched with study patients. We individually tracked these sampled patients for 6 months to identify all patients who received a diagnosis of shoulder tendonitis/capsulitis. We found that incidence rates of shoulder tendonitis/capsulitis during the 6-month follow-up period were 3.69 (95% CI: 2.49~5.27) per 100 person-years for the study group and 2.33 (95% CI: 1.89~2.86) per 100 person-years for the comparison group. Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio for shoulder tendonitis/capsulitis among patients who underwent cervical disc surgery was 1.66 (95% CI = 1.09~2.53) when compared to comparison group. We concluded that patients who underwent surgery for a cervical HIVD had a significantly higher risk of developing shoulder capsulitis/tendonitis in 6 months follow-up compared to patients who received cervical HIVD conservative therapy only. PMID:27231090

  8. A retrospective study of intervertebral disc herniation in dogs in Japan: 297 cases.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hisanori; Hara, Yasushi; Yoshimi, Natsuko; Harada, Yasuji; Nezu, Yoshinori; Yogo, Takuya; Ochi, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Orima, Hiromitsu; Tagawa, Masahiro

    2008-07-01

    We investigated the epidemiological characteristics of intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) in Japan in a large population using a retrospective study. The sample population was dogs (n=297) with IVDH in Japan. Medical records were reviewed for breed, sex, age, affected interspace and neurological severity. The dogs were comprised of 132 cases of cervical IVDH (C-IVDH) and 165 cases of thoracolumbar IVDH (TL-IVDH). In Japan, the Dachshund, Beagle and Shih Tzu tended to suffer from both C-IVDH and TL-IVDH. The Shiba Inu, a characteristic Japanese dog breed, suffered from both C-IVDH and TL-IVDH, although there was little data relating to the whole breed. Male dogs tended to suffer from C-IVDH and TL-IVDH at a rate almost twice that of females in Japan. Among the three predominant dog breeds, the Dachshund, Beagle and Shih Tzu, the Dachshund tended to suffer from both C-IVDH and TL-IVDH at an earlier age than the Beagle, and the Beagle tended to suffer from both C-IVDH and TL-IVDH earlier than the Shih Tzu. Among the three predominant breeds, the Shih Tzu, in particular, tended to suffer from both C-IVDH and TL-IVDH at multiple sites. Our data from Japan were in partial agreement with previous data from the U.S.A., and epidemiological characteristics of IVDH peculiar to Japan were also identified. PMID:18685242

  9. Low-level vibrations maintain the intervertebral disc during unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holguin, Nilsson

    Changes in intervertebral disc (IVD) biochemistry, morphology and mechanics have been characterized only incompletely in the rat hindlimb unloading (HU) model. Although exposure to chronic vibrations can be damaging, low-magnitude vibrations can attenuate the geometric changes of the IVD due to altered spinal loading. Here, we tested the hypothesis that low-magnitude, high-frequency vibrations will mitigate the hypotrophy, biochemical degradation and deconditioning of the IVD during HU. When applied as whole-body vibrations through all four paws, Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to HU and exposed to daily periods (15min/d) of either ambulatory activities (HU+AMB) or whole body vibrations superimposed upon ambulation (HU+WBV; WBV at 45Hz, 0.3g). After 4wks and, compared to age-matched control rats (AC), the lumbar IVD of HU+AMB had a 22% smaller glycosaminoglycans/collagen ratio, 12% smaller posterior IVD height, and 13% smaller cross-sectional area. Compared to HU+AMB rats, the addition of low-level vibratory loading did not significantly alter IVD biochemistry, posterior height, area, or volume, but directionally altered IVD geometry. When subjected to upright vibrations through the hindpaws, rats were HU for 4wks. A subset of HU rats stood in an upright posture on a vertically oscillating plate (0.2g) at 45- or 90-Hz (HU+45 or HU+90). After 4wks, regardless of sham (HU+SC) loading (HU+/-SC) and, compared to AC, IVD of HU+/-SC had 10% less height, 39% smaller nucleus pulposus area, less glycosaminoglycans in the nucleus pulposus (21%), anterior annulus fibrosus (16%) and posterior annulus fibrosus (19%), 76% less tension-compression neutral zone (NZ) modulus, 26% greater compressive modulus, 25% greater initial elastic damping modulus, 26% less torsional NZ stiffness, no difference in collagen content and a weaker relationship between tension-compression NZ modulus and posterior height change. Exogenously introduced oscillations maintained the morphology

  10. Investigation of intervertebral disc degeneration using multivariate FTIR spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Mader, Kerstin T; Peeters, Mirte; Detiger, Suzanne E L; Helder, Marco N; Smit, Theo H; Le Maitre, Christine L; Sammon, Chris

    2016-06-23

    Traditionally tissue samples are analysed using protein or enzyme specific stains on serial sections to build up a picture of the distribution of components contained within them. In this study we investigated the potential of multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to deconvolute 2nd derivative spectra of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopic images measured in transflectance mode of goat and human paraffin embedded intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue sections, to see if this methodology can provide analogous information to that provided by immunohistochemical stains and bioassays but from a single section. MCR-ALS analysis of non-degenerate and enzymatically in vivo degenerated goat IVDs reveals five matrix components displaying distribution maps matching histological stains for collagen, elastin and proteoglycan (PG), as well as immunohistochemical stains for collagen type I and II. Interestingly, two components exhibiting characteristic spectral and distribution profiles of proteoglycans were found, and relative component/tissue maps of these components (labelled PG1 and PG2) showed distinct distributions in non-degenerate versus mildly degenerate goat samples. MCR-ALS analysis of human IVD sections resulted in comparable spectral profiles to those observed in the goat samples, highlighting the inter species transferability of the presented methodology. Multivariate FTIR image analysis of a set of 43 goat IVD sections allowed the extraction of semi-quantitative information from component/tissue gradients taken across the IVD width of collagen type I, collagen type II, PG1 and PG2. Regional component/tissue parameters were calculated and significant correlations were found between histological grades of degeneration and PG parameters (PG1: p = 0.0003, PG2: p < 0.0001); glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content and PGs (PG1: p = 0.0055, PG2: p = 0.0001); and MRI T2* measurements and PGs (PG1: p = 0.0021, PG2: p < 0.0001). Additionally

  11. The fate of transplanted xenogeneic bone marrow-derived stem cells in rat intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Wei, Aiqun; Tao, Helen; Chung, Sylvia A; Brisby, Helena; Ma, David D; Diwan, Ashish D

    2009-03-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is a major cause and a risk factor for chronic low back pain. The potential of using stem cells to treat disc degeneration has been raised. The aims of our study were to assess whether xenogeneic bone-marrow derived stem cells could survive in a rat disc degeneration model and to determine which cell types, if any, survived and differentiated into disc-like cells. Human bone-marrow derived CD34(+) (hematopoietic progenitor cells) and CD34(-) (nonhematopoietic progenitor cells, including mesenchymal stem cells) cells were isolated, fluorescent-labeled, and injected into rat coccygeal discs. The rats were sacrificed at day 1, 10, 21, and 42. Treated discs were examined by histological and immunostaining techniques and compared to control discs. The survival of transplanted cells was further confirmed with a human nuclear specific marker. Fluorescent labeled CD34(-) cells were detected until day 42 in the nucleus pulposus of the injected discs. After 3 weeks these cells had differentiated into cells expressing chondrocytic phenotype (Collagen II and Sox-9). In contrast, the fluorescent labeled CD34(+) cells could not be detected after day 21. No fluorescence-positive cells were detected in the noninjected control discs. Further, no inflammatory cells infiltrated the nucleus pulposus, even though these animals had not received immunosuppressive treatment. Our data provide evidence that transplanted human BM CD34(-) cells survived and differentiated within the relative immune privileged nucleus pulposus of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:18853431

  12. Microstructure-based fiber optic pressure sensor for measurements in lumbar intervertebral discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoejer, Svante; Krantz, Martin; Ekstroem, Lars; Kaigle, Allison; Holm, Sten

    1999-01-01

    A fiberoptic system with a microstructure sensor element was used for measuring lumbar intervertebral disc pressure in a porcine model. The fiberoptic pressure sensor was inserted in the disc using a guiding needle. A reference sensor was also introduced into the same area of an adjacent disc. The fiberoptic sensor detected pressures from 0.7-8 bar in the disc. Dynamic measurements were carried out at frequencies between 2 and 10 Hz. No phase lag was observed between the applied force and the measured pressures. Sensitivity, dynamic response and available pressure range are all important design characteristics for which this fiberoptic sensor has a competitive edge.

  13. Treatment of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Herniation Using C-Arm Fluoroscopy Guided Target Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xu-Li; Xu, Yong-Guang; Zhao, Xue-Jun; Song, Wen-Ge; Zheng, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the safety and therapeutic efficacy of target percutaneous laser disc decompression (T-PLDD) for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Background data: PLDD using the Nd:YAG laser has been regarded as an effective alternative treatment for disc herniation. However, all the previous studies were concentrated on vaporizing the nucleus pulposus in the intervertebral space. We hypothesize that insertion of the needle into the extruded part of the nucleus pulposus will decrease its volume and provide superior clinical effects compared to therapies that decrease the volume of the intradiscal nucleus pulposus. Materials and methods: A total of 25 patients suffering from posterolateral extruded but nonsequestered lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were treated with T-PLDD. After treatment, the patients were followed up and the therapeutic effect was assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months using the modified MacNab criteria. Results: The success rate was 80.0% (18 of 25), 88.0% (22 of 25), 92.0% (23 of 25), and 92.0% (23 of 25) at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months respectively. No serious complications occurred in any of the patients. Furthermore, we did not observe any neurological sequelae. Conclusions: T-PLDD can significantly decrease pain and improve function of patients who have extruded but nonsequestered lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. PMID:22150064

  14. Intervertebral Fusion with Mobile Microendoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bao-Shan; Liu, Yue; Xu, Hai-Wei; Yang, Qiang; Ma, Xin-Long; Hu, Yong-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a technique for lumbar intervertebral fusion that incorporates mobile microendoscopic discectomy (MMED) for lumbar degenerative disc disease. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion is frequently performed to treat degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine; however, the scope of such surgery and vision is limited by what the naked eye can see through the expanding channel system. To expand the visual scope and reduce trauma, we perform lumbar intervertebral fusion with the aid of a MMED system that provides a wide field through freely tilting the surgical instrument and canals. We believe that this technique is a good option for treating lumbar degenerative disc disease that requires lumbar intervertebral fusion. PMID:27384734

  15. Effects of psoralen on chondrocyte degeneration in lumbar intervertebral disc of rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Libin; Sun, Xiaohui; Geng, Xiaolin

    2015-03-01

    Discuss the internal mechanism of delaying degeneration of lumber intervertebral disc. The cartilage of lumbar intervertebral disc of SD rats was selected in vitro, then cultured by tissue explant method, and identified by HE staining, toluidine blue staining and immunofluorescence. The optimal concentration of psoralen was screened by cell proliferation assay and RT-PCR method. The cells in third generation with good growth situation is selected and placed in 6-well plate at concentration of 1×10(5)/well and its expression was tested. Compared to concentration of 0, the mRNA expression of Col2al (Collagen Ⅱ) secreted by was up regulated chondrocyte of lumbar intervertebral disc at the concentration of 12.5 and 25μM (P<0.0 or P<0.01). The aggrecan mRNA of psoralen group was higher than blank control group (P<0.01); compared with IL-1β induced group, the mRNA expression of Col2al was significantly increased but the mRNA expression of ADAMTS-5 was significantly decreased in psoralen group (P<0.01). These findings suggest that, psoralen can remit the degeneration of lumbar intervertebral disc induced by IL-1β to some extent, and affect the related factors of IL-1β signaling pathway. PMID:25796142

  16. Comparison of two methods for RNA extraction from the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Gan, M F; Yang, H L; Qian, J L; Wu, C S; Yuan, C X; Li, X F; Zou, J

    2016-01-01

    RNA extraction from the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs has been extensively used in orthopedic studies. We compared two methods for extracting RNA from the nucleus pulposus: liquid nitrogen grinding and enzyme digestion. The RNA was detected by agarose gel electrophoresis, and the purity was evaluated by absorbance ratio using a spectrophotometer. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) expression was assayed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Thirty human lumbar intervertebral discs were used in this study. The liquid nitrogen-grinding method was used for RNA extraction from 15 samples, and the mean RNA concentration was 491.04 ± 44.16 ng/mL. The enzyme digestion method was used on 15 samples, and the mean RNA concentration was 898.42 ± 38.64 ng/mL. The statistical analysis revealed that there was a significant difference in concentration between the different methods. Apparent 28S, 18S, and 5S bands were detectable in RNA extracted using the enzyme digestion method, whereas no 28S or 18S bands were detected in RNA extracted using the liquid nitrogen-grinding method. The GAPDH band was visible, and no non-specific band was detected in the RT-PCR assay by the enzyme digestion method. Therefore, the enzyme digestion method is an efficient and easy method for RNA extraction from the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs for further intervertebral disc degeneration-related studies. PMID:27323116

  17. The collagen structure of bovine intervertebral disc studied using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matcher, Stephen J.; Winlove, C. Peter; Gangnus, Sergei V.

    2004-04-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is used to measure the birefringence properties of bovine intervertebral disc and equine flexor tendon. For equine tendon the birefringence Dgrn is (6.0 ± 0.2) × 10-3 at a wavelength of 1.3 µm. This is somewhat larger than the values reported for bovine tendon. The surface region of the annulus fibrosus of a freshly excised intact bovine intervertebral disc displays an identical value of birefringence, Dgrn = (6.0 ± 0.6) × 10-3 at 1.3 µm. The nucleus pulposus does not display birefringence, the measured apparent value of Dgrn = (0.39 ± 0.01) × 10-3 being indistinguishable from the effects of depolarization due to multiple scattering. A clear difference is found between the depth-resolved retardance of equine tendon and that of bovine intervertebral disc. This apparently relates to the lamellar structure of the latter tissue, in which the collagen fibre orientation alternates between successive lamellae. A semi-empirical model based on Jones calculus shows that the measurements are in reasonable agreement with previous optical and x-ray data. These results imply that PS-OCT could be a useful tool to study collagen organization within the intervertebral disc in vitro and possibly in vivo and its variation with applied load and disease.

  18. Quantitative MRI as a diagnostic tool of intervertebral disc matrix composition and integrity

    PubMed Central

    Mwale, Fackson; Iatridis, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Degenerative disc disease has been implicated as a major component of spine pathology. The current major clinical procedures for treating disc degeneration have been disappointing, because of altered spinal mechanics leading to subsequent degeneration at adjacent disc levels. Disc pathology treatment is shifting toward prevention and treatment of underlying etiologic processes at the level of the disc matrix composition and integrity and the biomechanics of the disc. The ability to perform such treatment relies on one’s ability to accurately and objectively assess the state of the matrix and the effectiveness of treatment by a non-invasive technique. In this review, we will summarize our advances in efforts to develop an objective, accurate, non-invasive diagnostic tool (quantitative MRI) in the detection and quantification of matrix composition and integrity and of biomechanical changes in early intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:19005703

  19. Metabolic Syndrome Components Are Associated with Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: The Wakayama Spine Study

    PubMed Central

    Teraguchi, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Noriko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Muraki, Shigeyuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Oka, Hiroyuki; Minamide, Akihito; Ishimoto, Yuyu; Nagata, Keiji; Kagotani, Ryohei; Tanaka, Sakae; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kozo; Akune, Toru; Yoshida, Munehito

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study was to examine the associations between metabolic syndrome (MS) components, such as overweight (OW), hypertension (HT), dyslipidemia (DL), and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and intervertebral disc degeneration (DD). Design The present study included 928 participants (308 men, 620 women) of the 1,011 participants in the Wakayama Spine Study. DD on magnetic resonance imaging was classified according to the Pfirrmann system. OW, HT, DL, and IGT were assessed using the criteria of the Examination Committee of Criteria for MS in Japan. Results Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that OW was significantly associated with cervical, thoracic, and lumbar DD (cervical: odds ratio [OR], 1.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92–1.78; thoracic: OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.24–2.51; lumbar: OR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.06–3.48). HT and IGT were significantly associated with thoracic DD (HT: OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.09–2.18; IGT: OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.12–2.48). Furthermore, subjects with 1 or more MS components had a higher OR for thoracic DD compared with those without MS components (vs. no component; 1 component: OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.03–2.42; 2 components: OR, 2.60; 95% CI, 1.62–4.20; ≥3 components: OR, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.42–5.00). Conclusion MS components were significantly associated with thoracic DD. Furthermore, accumulation of MS components significantly increased the OR for thoracic DD. These findings support the need for further studies of the effects of metabolic abnormality on DD. PMID:26840834

  20. Statistical shape model reconstruction with sparse anomalous deformations: Application to intervertebral disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Aleš; Fripp, Jurgen; Engstrom, Craig; Schwarz, Daniel; Weber, Marc-André; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-12-01

    Many medical image processing techniques rely on accurate shape modeling of anatomical features. The presence of shape abnormalities challenges traditional processing algorithms based on strong morphological priors. In this work, a sparse shape reconstruction from a statistical shape model is presented. It combines the advantages of traditional statistical shape models (defining a 'normal' shape space) and previously presented sparse shape composition (providing localized descriptors of anomalies). The algorithm was incorporated into our image segmentation and classification software. Evaluation was performed on simulated and clinical MRI data from 22 sciatica patients with intervertebral disc herniation, containing 35 herniated and 97 normal discs. Moderate to high correlation (R=0.73) was achieved between simulated and detected herniations. The sparse reconstruction provided novel quantitative features describing the herniation morphology and MRI signal appearance in three dimensions (3D). The proposed descriptors of local disc morphology resulted to the 3D segmentation accuracy of 1.07±1.00mm (mean absolute vertex-to-vertex mesh distance over the posterior disc region), and improved the intervertebral disc classification from 0.888 to 0.931 (area under receiver operating curve). The results show that the sparse shape reconstruction may improve computer-aided diagnosis of pathological conditions presenting local morphological alterations, as seen in intervertebral disc herniation. PMID:26060085

  1. The poro-elastic behaviour of the intervertebral disc: A new perspective on diurnal fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Vergroesen, Pieter-Paul A; van der Veen, Albert J; Emanuel, Kaj S; van Dieën, Jaap H; Smit, Theodoor H

    2016-04-11

    Diurnal disc height changes, due to fluid in- and outflow, are in equilibrium while daytime spinal loading is twice as long as night time rest. A direction-dependent permeability of the endplates, favouring inflow over outflow, reportedly explains this; however, fluid flow through the annulus fibrosus should be considered. This study investigates the fluid flow of entire intervertebral discs. Caprine discs were preloaded in saline for 24h under four levels of static load. Under sustained load, we modulated the disc׳s swelling pressure by exchanging saline for demineralised water (inflow) and back to saline (outflow), both for 24h. We measured disc height creep and used stretched exponential models to determine time-constants. During inflow disc height increased in relation to applied load, and during outflow disc height decreased to preload levels. When comparing in- and outflow phases, there was no difference in creep, and time-constants were similar indicating no direction-dependent resistance to fluid flow in the entire intervertebral disc. Results provoked a new hypothesis for diurnal fluid flow: in vitro time-constants for loading are shorter than for unloading and in vivo daytime loading is twice as long as night time unloading, i.e. in diurnal loading the intervertebral disc is closer to loading equilibrium than to unloading equilibrium. Per definition, fluid flow is slower close to equilibrium than far from equilibrium; therefore, as diurnal loading occurs closer to loading equilibrium, fluid inflow during night time unloading can balance fluid outflow during daytime loading, despite a longer time-constant. PMID:26684430

  2. Adjacent segment disc pressures following two-level cervical disc replacement versus simulated anterior cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Laxer, Eric B; Darden, Bruce V; Murrey, Daniel B; Milam, R Alden; Rhyne, Alfred L; Claytor, Brian; Nussman, Donna S; Powers, Timothy W; Davies, Matthew A; Bryant, S Chad; Larsen, Scott P; Bhatt, Meghal; Brodziak, John; Polic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion (ACF) has been shown to alter the biomechanics of adjacent segments of the cervical spine. The goal of total disc replacement is to address pathology at a given disc with minimal disruption of the operated or adjacent segments. This study compares the pressure within discs adjacent to either a two-level simulated ACDF or a two-level total disc replacement with the ProDisc-C. A special automated motion testing apparatus was constructed. Four fresh cadaveric cervical spine specimens were affixed to the test stand and tested in flexion and extension under specific loads. Intradiscal, miniature strain-gauge-based transducers were placed in the discs above and below the "treated" levels. The specimens were then tested in flexion and extension. Pressure and overall angular displacement were measured. In the most extreme and highest quality specimen the difference at C3/C4 registered 800 kPa and the difference at C6/C7 registered 50 kPa. This same quality specimen treated with the ProDisc reached a flexion angle at much lower moments, 24.3 degrees at 5 N-m, when compared to the the SACF 12.2 degrees at 8.6 N-m. Therefore, the moment needed to achieve 15 degrees of flexion with the SACF treatment was 5.5 N-m and the ProDisc treatment was only 2.9 N-m. This initial data would indicate that adjacent level discs experience substantially lower pressure after two-level disc replacement when compared to two-level SACF. Additional testing to further support these observations is ongoing. PMID:17108473

  3. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Analysis of Trace Elements in Degenerated Intervertebral Disc Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Frankowski, Marcin; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Czabak-Garbacz, Róża; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek; Gasik, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated trace elements (TE) in human intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue. Trace element presence can have diverse meanings: essential TE show the metabolic modalities of the tissue, while environmentally-related TE indicate pollution and tissue-specific absorption and accumulation. IVD is a highly specific compartment with impaired communication with adjacent bone. Analysis of TE in IVD provides new insights regarding tissue metabolism and IVD communication with other tissues. Material/Methods Thirty intervertebral discs were acquired from 22 patients during surgical treatment for degenerative disease. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to evaluate the concentrations of Al, Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni, Mo, Mg, and Zn. Results Al, Pb, Cu, Mg, and Zn were detected in all samples. Pb was significantly positively correlated with age, and Ni concentration was weakly correlated with population count in the patient’s place of residence. Only Cu was observed in higher concentrations in IVD compared to in other tissues. Significant positive correlations were observed between the following pairs: Mg/Zn, Mg/Al, Mg/Pb, Zn/Al, Zn/Pb, and Al/Pb. Negative correlations were observed between Mg/Cd, Zn/Cd, Mg/Mo, and Mo/Pb. Conclusions This study is one of few to profile the elements in intervertebral discs in patients with degenerative changes. We report significant differences between trace element concentrations in intervertebral discs compared to in other tissues. Knowledge of the TE accumulation pattern is vital for better understanding intervertebral disc nutrition and metabolism. PMID:25366266

  4. Notochordal Cells in the Adult Intervertebral Disc: New Perspective on an Old Question

    PubMed Central

    Risbud, Makarand V.; Shapiro, Irving M.

    2011-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is a soft tissue, positioned between each of the vertebrae, that accommodates applied biomechanical forces to the spine. The central compartment of the disc contains the nucleus pulposus (NP), which is enclosed by the annulus fibrosus and the endplate cartilage. The NP is derived from the notochord, a rodlike structure of mesodermal origin. Development of the notochord is tightly regulated by interactive transcription factors and target genes. Since a number of these molecules are unique, they have been used for cell lineage and fate mapping studies of tissues of the intervertebral disc. These studies have shown that in a number of species including human, NP tissue retains notochordal cells throughout life. In the adult NP, there are present both large and small notochordal cells, as well as a progenitor cell population which can differentiate along the mesengenic pathway. Since tissue renewal in the intervertebral disc is dependent on the ability of these cells to commit to the NP lineage and undergo terminal differentiation, studies have been performed to assess which signaling pathways may regulate these activities. The notch signaling pathway is active in the intervertebral disc and is responsive to hypoxia, probably through HIF-1α. From a disease viewpoint, it is hypothesized that an oxemic shift, possibly mediated by alterations in the vascular supply to the tissues of the disc, would be expected to lead to a failure in notochordal progenitor cell activation and a decrease in the number of differentiated cells. In turn, this would lead to decrements in function and enhancement of the effect of agents that are known to promote disc degeneration. PMID:21967331

  5. Three-dimensional morphology of the pericellular matrix of intervertebral disc cells in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Li; Guilak, Farshid; Setton, Lori A

    2007-01-01

    Intervertebral disc cells are surrounded by a pericellular matrix that is biochemically and morphologically distinct from other extracellular matrix regions. Although the function of the pericellular matrix is not fully understood, prior studies of pericellular matrix-chondrocyte regions in articular cartilage (termed ‘chondrons’) suggest that the size, shape, and mechanical properties of the pericellular matrix significantly influence the micromechanical environment of the contained cells. A first step in understanding the role of the pericellular matrix in the intervertebral disc is to quantify the three-dimensional morphology and zonal variations of these regions across the disc. In this study, three-dimensional reconstructions and morphometric measurements of pericellular matrix-cell regions were obtained in situ using fluorescence confocal microscopy of en bloc sections of nucleus pulposus and anulus fibrosus of the rat disc immunolabeled for type VI collagen. The morphology of the pericellular matrix and cells varied significantly across regions, with distinct pericellular matrix aspect ratios (largest/smallest diameter) showing shapes that were generally large and rounded in the nucleus pulposus (average of 1.9), and ellipsoidal and discoidal in the inner (2.4) and outer anulus fibrosus (2.8). The average pericellular matrix volume per cell was found to be significantly larger in the nucleus (6424 µm3) than that of inner (1903 µm3) and outer (1433 µm3) anulus. Pericellular matrix regions containing 1 or 2 cells were the dominant subgroup in the rat intervertebral disc at both 1 and 12 months of age. Multicellular pericellular matrix regions were present more often in the younger nucleus pulposus and outer anulus fibrosus. The orientation of the pericellular matrix regions further varied significantly across the disc, reflecting local collagen matrix architecture. These studies provide new information on the organization and shape of intervertebral

  6. Intervertebral disk width in dogs with and without clinical signs of disk associated cervical spondylomyelopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disk-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy (DA-CSM) is a multifactorial neurological disorder in which progressive caudal cervical spinal cord compression is mainly caused by one or more intervertebral disk protrusions. The Doberman pinscher breed seems predisposed for this condition. The underlying cause and pathophysiology of DA-CSM are currently unknown. Recently, wider intervertebral disks have been put forward as a risk factor for development of clinically relevant DA-CSM. However, little is known about other factors affecting intervertebral disk width. Therefore the aim of this study was to assess the association between intervertebral disk width, measured on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinical status, age, gender and intervertebral disk location in dogs with and without clinical signs of DA-CSM. Methods Doberman pinschers with clinical signs of DA-CSM (N=17),clinically normal Doberman pinschers (N=20), and clinically normal English Foxhounds (N=17), underwent MRI of the cervical vertebral column. On sagittal T2-weighted images, intervertebral disk width was measured from C2-C3 to C6-C7. Intra –and interobserver agreement were assessed on a subset of 20 of the 54 imaging studies. Results Intervertebral disk width was not significantly different between Doberman pinschers with clinical signs of DA-CSM, clinically normal Doberman pinschers or clinically normal English Foxhounds (p=0.43). Intervertebral disk width was positively associated with increasing age (p=0.029). Each monthly increase in age resulted in an increase of disk width by 0.0057mm. Intervertebral disk width was not significantly affected by gender (p=0.056), but was significantly influenced by intervertebral disk location (p <0.0001). The assessed measurements were associated with a good intra –and interobserver agreement. Conclusions The present study does not provide evidence that wider intervertebral disks are associated with clinical status in dogs with and without

  7. Current insights and controversies in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of disc-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy in dogs.

    PubMed

    De Decker, S; da Costa, R C; Volk, H A; Van Ham, L M L

    2012-11-24

    Disc-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy (DA-CSM) is the most common cause of cervical spondylomyelopathy in dogs. In this condition, progressive caudal cervical spinal cord compression is typically caused by protrusion of one or more intervertebral discs. This disc-associated compression is sometimes seen in combination with mild vertebral abnormalities and dorsal compression resulting from ligamentum flavum hypertrophy. The intervertebral disc space between the sixth (C6) and seventh (C7) cervical vertebrae is most commonly affected. Although several large breed dogs can be affected, the adult to older dobermann is overrepresented. Clinical signs vary from cervical hyperaesthesia to tetraplegia. Dogs can present with a chronic progressive or an acute onset of clinical signs. Many aspects of this multifactorial neurological syndrome are not completely understood and are the subject of controversy and debate. Although several factors have been proposed, the underlying pathology and aetiology remain unknown. Recently, new insights have been gained in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this challenging neurological syndrome. This review outlines current controversies and new developments concerning the pathogenesis and diagnosis of DA-CSM. PMID:23180710

  8. Comparison of vertebral and intervertebral disc lesions in aging humans and rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Jeannie F.; Fields, Aaron J.; Liebenberg, Ellen; Mattison, Julie A.; Lotz, Jeffrey C.; Kramer, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare gross and histologic patterns of age-related degeneration within the intervertebral disc and adjacent vertebra between rhesus monkeys and humans. Materials and methods We examined age-related patterns of disc degeneration from mid-sagittal sections of the intervertebral disc and adjacent vertebral bodies among six rhesus monkey thoracolumbar and seven human lumbar spines. Gross morphology and histopathology were assessed via the Thompson grading scheme and other degenerative features of the disc and adjacent bone. Results Thompson grades ranged from 3 through 5 for rhesus monkey discs (T9-L1) and 2 through 5 for the human discs (T12-S1). In both rhesus monkey and human discs, presence of distinct lesions were positively associated with Thompson grade of the overall segment. Degenerative patterns differed for radial tears, which were more prevalent with advanced disc degeneration in humans only. Additionally, compared to the more uniform anteroposterior disc degeneration patterns of humans, rhesus monkeys showed more severe osteophytosis and degeneration on the anterior border of the vertebral column. Conclusions Rhesus monkey spines evaluated in the present study appear to develop age-related patterns of disc degeneration similar to humans. One exception is the absence of an association between radial tears and disc degeneration, which could reflect species-specific differences in posture and spinal curvature. Considering rhesus monkeys demonstrate similar patterns of disc degeneration, and age at a faster rate than humans, these findings suggest longitudinal studies of rhesus monkeys may be a valuable model for better understanding the progression of human age-related spinal osteoarthritis and disc degeneration. PMID:24821664

  9. Role of ligamentum flavum in the symptomatology of prolapsed lumbar intervertebral discs.

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, P S; Perry, R H; Tomlinson, B E

    1975-01-01

    Hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum has been reported to occur in the prolapsed intervertebral disc syndrome. The ligaments from 28 patients were compared with a necropsy control group (18). Only minor histological anomalies were noted in two patients and the ligament was not thickened in cases of disc prolapse. In addition, there was no evidence to suggest previous trauma to the ligaments associated with disc protrusion or that the elastic fibres in the ligament degenerate with age, although some degeneration of the collagen fibres had apparently occurred in the two oldest control cases. Images PMID:1151422

  10. [Cervical disc herniation--diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Corniola, M-V; Tessitore, E; Schaller, K; Gautschi, O P

    2015-10-28

    A cervical disc herniation (CDH) is a frequently encountered pathology in primary care medicine. It may give rise to a compression of a nerve root (a radiculopathy, with or without sensory-motor deficit) or of the spinal cord (myelopathy). The majority of CDHs can be supported by means of a conservative treatment. When a radiculopathy is found and a clinico-radiological correlation is present, a moderate neurological deficit appears suddenly, or if it is progressive under conservative treatment or if pain is poorly controlled by well-conducted conservative treatment performed during 6 to 8 months, surgery is then recommended. A symptomatic cervical myelopathy is, by itself, an indication for a surgical treatment. PMID:26672182

  11. Thalamic Pain Misdiagnosed as Cervical Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tae Ha; Choi, Soo Il; Yoo, Jee In; Choi, Young Soon; Lim, Young Su; Sang, Bo Hyun; Bang, Yun Sic

    2016-01-01

    Thalamic pain is a primary cause of central post-stroke pain (CPSP). Clinical symptoms vary depending on the location of the infarction and frequently accompany several pain symptoms. Therefore, correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. We report a case of CPSP due to a left acute thalamic infarction with central disc protrusion at C5-6. A 45-year-old-male patient experiencing a tingling sensation in his right arm was referred to our pain clinic under the diagnosis of cervical disc herniation. This patient also complained of right cramp-like abdominal pain. After further evaluations, he was diagnosed with an acute thalamic infarction. Therefore detailed history taking should be performed and examiners should always be aware of other symptoms that could suggest a more dangerous disease. PMID:27103967

  12. Effective modulus of the human intervertebral disc and its effect on vertebral bone stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haisheng; Jekir, Michael G; Davis, Maxwell W; Keaveny, Tony M

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism of vertebral wedge fractures remains unclear and may relate to typical variations in the mechanical behavior of the intervertebral disc. To gain insight, we tested 16 individual whole discs (between levels T8 and L5) from nine cadavers (mean±SD: 66±16 years), loaded in compression at different rates (0.05-20.0% strain/s), to measure a homogenized "effective" linear elastic modulus of the entire disc. The measured effective modulus, and average disc height, were then input and varied parametrically in micro-CT-based finite element models (60-μm element size, up to 80 million elements each) of six T9 human vertebrae that were virtually loaded to 3° of moderate forward-flexion via a homogenized disc. Across all specimens and loading rates, the measured effective modulus of the disc ranged from 5.8 to 42.7MPa and was significantly higher for higher rates of loading (p<0.002); average disc height ranged from 2.9 to 9.3mm. The parametric finite element analysis indicated that, as disc modulus increased and disc height decreased across these ranges, the vertebral bone stresses increased but their spatial distribution was largely unchanged: most of the highest stresses occurred in the central trabecular bone and endplates, and not anteriorly. Taken together with the literature, our findings suggest that the effective modulus of the human intervertebral disc should rarely exceed 100MPa and that typical variations in disc effective modulus (and less so, height) minimally influence the spatial distribution but can appreciably influence the magnitude of stress within the vertebral body. PMID:26949100

  13. ISASS Policy Statement – Cervical Artificial Disc

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Morgan Lorio, MD, FACS, Chair, ISASS Task Force on Coding & Reimbursement The ISASS Task Force reached out to Domagoj Coric, MD to provide a timely summation on cervical disc arthroplasty given his special interest and recent IASP championship of this innovative technology to insure enhanced spine patient access. The ISASS Task Force is pleased with this step towards published ISASS societal policy and applauds Dr. Coric's effort; if ISASS is to continue to succeed we must continually harness the voluntary talents and energies of our members with gratitude. PMID:25694944

  14. Distinct intervertebral disc cell populations adopt similar phenotypes in three-dimensional culture.

    PubMed

    Chou, Alice I; Reza, Anna T; Nicoll, Steven B

    2008-12-01

    Tissue engineering strategies have the potential to improve upon current techniques for intervertebral disc repair. However, determining a suitable biomaterial scaffold for disc regeneration is difficult due to the complex fibrocartilaginous structure of the tissue. In this study, cells isolated from three distinct regions of the intervertebral disc, the outer and inner annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus, were expanded and seeded on resorbable polyester fiber meshes and encapsulated in calcium crosslinked alginate hydrogels, both chosen to approximate the native tissue architecture. Three-dimensional (3D) constructs were cultured for 14 days in vitro and evaluated histologically and quantitatively for gene expression and production of types I and II collagen and proteoglycans. During monolayer expansion, the cell populations maintained their distinct phenotypic morphology and gene expression profiles. However, after 14 days in 3D culture, there were no significant differences in morphology, gene expression, or protein production between all three cell populations grown in either alginate or polyester fiber meshes. The results of this study indicate that the culture environment may have a greater impact on cellular behavior than the intrinsic origin of the cells, and suggest that only a single-cell type may be required for intervertebral disc regenerative therapies. PMID:18636941

  15. Intervertebral disc cell response to dynamic compression is age and frequency dependent.

    PubMed

    Korecki, Casey L; Kuo, Catherine K; Tuan, Rocky S; Iatridis, James C

    2009-06-01

    The maintenance of the intervertebral disc extracellular matrix is regulated by mechanical loading, nutrition, and the accumulation of matrix proteins and cytokines that are affected by both aging and degeneration. Evidence suggests that cellular aging may lead to alterations in the quantity and quality of extracellular matrix produced. The aims of this study were to examine the role of loading and maturation (a subset of aging), and the interaction between these two factors in intervertebral disc cell gene expression and biosynthesis in a controlled 3D culture environment. Cells were isolated from young (4-6 months) and mature (18-24 months) bovine caudal annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus tissue. Isolated cells were seeded into alginate and dynamically compressed for 7 days at either 0.1, 1, or 3 Hz or maintained as a free-swelling control. After 7 days, DNA and sulfated glycosaminoglycan contents were analyzed along with real time, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis for collagen types I and II, aggrecan, and matrix metalloproteinase-3 gene expression. Results suggest that maturation plays an important role in intervertebral disc homeostasis and influences the cell response to mechanical loading. While isolated intervertebral disc cells responded to mechanical compression in 3D culture, the effect of loading frequency was minimal. Altered cellular phenotype and biosynthesis rates appear to be an attribute of the cell maturation process, potentially independent of changes in cellular microenvironment associated with lost nutrition and disc degeneration. Mature cells may have a decreased capacity to create or retain extracellular matrix components in response to mechanical loading compared to young cells. PMID:19058142

  16. Artificial Cervical Vertebra and Intervertebral Complex Replacement through the Anterior Approach in Animal Model: A Biomechanical and In Vivo Evaluation of a Successful Goat Model

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jie; He, Xijing; Wang, Dong; Qi, Peng; Guo, Lei; Huang, Sihua; Cai, Xuan; Li, Haopeng; Wang, Rui

    2012-01-01

    This was an in vitro and in vivo study to develop a novel artificial cervical vertebra and intervertebral complex (ACVC) joint in a goat model to provide a new method for treating degenerative disc disease in the cervical spine. The objectives of this study were to test the safety, validity, and effectiveness of ACVC by goat model and to provide preclinical data for a clinical trial in humans in future. We designed the ACVC based on the radiological and anatomical data on goat and human cervical spines, established an animal model by implanting the ACVC into goat cervical spines in vitro prior to in vivo implantation through the anterior approach, and evaluated clinical, radiological, biomechanical parameters after implantation. The X-ray radiological data revealed similarities between goat and human intervertebral angles at the levels of C2-3, C3-4, and C4-5, and between goat and human lordosis angles at the levels of C3-4 and C4-5. In the in vivo implantation, the goats successfully endured the entire experimental procedure and recovered well after the surgery. The radiological results showed that there was no dislocation of the ACVC and that the ACVC successfully restored the intervertebral disc height after the surgery. The biomechanical data showed that there was no significant difference in range of motion (ROM) or neural zone (NZ) between the control group and the ACVC group in flexion-extension and lateral bending before or after the fatigue test. The ROM and NZ of the ACVC group were greater than those of the control group for rotation. In conclusion, the goat provides an excellent animal model for the biomechanical study of the cervical spine. The ACVC is able to provide instant stability after surgery and to preserve normal motion in the cervical spine. PMID:23300816

  17. Cells from Degenerative Intervertebral Discs Demonstrate Unfavorable Responses to Mechanical and Inflammatory Stimuli: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Coelho, J. Paulo; Vo, Nam V.; Pacek, Corey; Westrick, Edward; Kang, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mechanical forces and inflammatory signaling influence intervertebral disc matrix homeostasis. We hypothesized that annulus fibrosus cells from degenerative discs would have altered responses to mechanical and inflammatory stimuli compared with cells isolated from normal discs. Design Annulus fibrosus cells were isolated from New Zealand White rabbits with normal and magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed degenerative discs created by annular stab. Cells were cultured with and without inflammatory and mechanical stimuli (tensile strain). After 4 or 24 hrs, the mRNA expression of inflammatory, catabolic, and anabolic genes was measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Baseline gene expression differences were noted between cells from normal and degenerative discs. Degenerative cells demonstrated a more proinflammatory response profile to inflammatory and mechanical stimuli and loss of the beneficial effects of mechanical signaling. Decreased expression of catabolic and anabolic genes was observed in degenerative cells under conditions of inflammatory and mechanical stimuli. Conclusions These data demonstrate that degenerative cells have a decreased capacity to respond positively to beneficial levels of mechanical strain and demonstrate an exaggerated response to an inflammatory stimulus. This may, in part, help to explain differential responses to motion-based therapies in patients with intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:22760106

  18. Continuous lumbar hemilaminectomy for intervertebral disc disease in an Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Flegel, Thomas; Böttcher, Peter; Alef, Michaele; Kiefer, Ingmar; Ludewig, Eberhard; Thielebein, Jens; Grevel, Vera

    2008-09-01

    A 13-yr-old Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) was presented for an acute onset of paraplegia. Spinal imaging that included plain radiographs, myelography, and computed tomography performed under general anesthesia revealed lateralized spinal cord compression at the intervertebral disc space L4-5 caused by intervertebral disc extrusion. This extrusion was accompanied by an extensive epidural hemorrhage from L3 to L6. Therefore, a continuous hemilaminectomy from L3 to L6 was performed, resulting in complete decompression of the spinal cord. The tiger was ambulatory again 10 days after the surgery. This case suggests that the potential benefit of complete spinal cord decompression may outweigh the risk of causing clinically significant spinal instability after extensive decompression. PMID:18817014

  19. Horner's syndrome secondary to intervertebral disc herniation at the level of T1–2

    PubMed Central

    Spacey, Kate; Dannawi, Zaher; Khazim, R; Dannawi, Z

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a 6 week history of periscapular pain and a T1 radiculopathy associated with Horner's syndrome. MRI of her cervicothoracic spine revealed an intervertebral disc herniation at the level of T1–2. During investigation she experienced some improvement in her symptoms and a conservative approach was pursued. At 6 months her pain and radiculopathy had resolved, and there was mild residual ptosis. PMID:24903729

  20. Paraplegia due to intervertebral disc lesions: a review of 57 operated cases.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, G; Frankel, H L

    1981-01-01

    In a review of 57 cases of paraplegia due to surgically confirmed disc protrusion (representing 0.9 per cent of all admissions to the National Spinal Injuries Centre), seven were in the cervical, 31 in the dorsal and 19 in the lumbar regions. Patients with dorsal disc protrusions treated by laminectomy had the worst neurological outcome. A recent decline in the incidence of neurological dysfunction following disc excision is noted and its probable causes discussed. PMID:7254892

  1. Dynamics of an intervertebral disc prosthesis in human cadaveric spines.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Kathleen N; Campbell, Deirdre A; Lipman, Joseph D; Zhang, Kai; Myers, Elizabeth R; Girardi, Federico P; Cammisa, Frank P; Wright, Timothy M

    2007-09-01

    Low-back pain is a common, disabling medical condition, and one of the major causes is disc degeneration. Total disc replacements are intended to treat back pain by restoring disc height and re-establishing functional motion and stability at the index level. The objective of this study was to determine the effect on range of motion (ROM) and stiffness after implantation of the ProDisc-L device in comparison to the intact state. Twelve L5-S1 lumbar spine segments were tested in flexion/extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation with axial compressive loads of 600 N and 1,200 N. Specimens were tested in the intact state and after implantation with the ProDisc-L device. ROM was not significantly different in the implanted spines when compared to their intact state in flexion/extension and axial rotation but increased in lateral bending. Increased compressive load did not affect ROM in flexion/extension or axial rotation but did result in decreased ROM in lateral bending and increased stiffness in both intact and implanted spine segments. The ProDisc-L successfully restored or maintained normal spine segment motion. PMID:18751788

  2. A role for TNFα in intervertebral disc degeneration: A non-recoverable catabolic shift

    SciTech Connect

    Purmessur, D.; Walter, B.A.; Roughley, P.J.; Laudier, D.M.; Hecht, A.C.; Iatridis, James

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► TNFα induced catabolic changes similar to human intervertebral disc degeneration. ► The metabolic shift induced by TNFα was sustained following removal. ► TNFα induced changes suggestive of cell senescence without affecting cell viability. ► Interventions are required to stimulate anabolism and increase cell proliferation. -- Abstract: This study examines the effect of TNFα on whole bovine intervertebral discs in organ culture and its association with changes characteristic of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) in order to inform future treatments to mitigate the chronic inflammatory state commonly found with painful IDD. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα contribute to disc pathology and are implicated in the catabolic phenotype associated with painful IDD. Whole bovine discs were cultured to examine cellular (anabolic/catabolic gene expression, cell viability and senescence using β-galactosidase) and structural (histology and aggrecan degradation) changes in response to TNFα treatment. Control or TNFα cultures were assessed at 7 and 21 days; the 21 day group also included a recovery group with 7 days TNFα followed by 14 days in basal media. TNFα induced catabolic and anti-anabolic shifts in the nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) at 7 days and this persisted until 21 days however cell viability was not affected. Data indicates that TNFα increased aggrecan degradation products and suggests increased β-galactosidase staining at 21 days without any recovery. TNFα treatment of whole bovine discs for 7 days induced changes similar to the degeneration processes that occur in human IDD: aggrecan degradation, increased catabolism, pro-inflammatory cytokines and nerve growth factor expression. TNFα significantly reduced anabolism in cultured IVDs and a possible mechanism may be associated with cell senescence. Results therefore suggest that successful treatments must promote anabolism and cell proliferation in

  3. Nonlinear finite element analysis of anular lesions in the L4/5 intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Little, J P; Adam, C J; Evans, J H; Pettet, G J; Pearcy, M J

    2007-01-01

    Degenerate intervertebral discs exhibit both material and structural changes. Structural defects (lesions) develop in the anulus fibrosus with age. While degeneration has been simulated in numerous previous studies, the effects of structural lesions on disc mechanics are not well known. In this study, a finite element model (FEM) of the L4/5 intervertebral disc was developed in order to study the effects of anular lesions and loss of hydrostatic pressure in the nucleus pulposus on the disc mechanics. Models were developed to simulate both healthy and degenerate discs. Degeneration was simulated with either rim, radial or circumferential anular lesions and by equating nucleus pressure to zero. The anulus fibrosus ground substance was represented as a nonlinear incompressible material using a second-order polynomial, hyperelastic strain energy equation. Hyperelastic material parameters were derived from experimentation on sheep discs. Endplates were assumed to be rigid, and annulus lamellae were assumed to be vertical in the unloaded state. Loading conditions corresponding to physiological ranges of rotational motion were applied to the models and peak rotation moments compared between models. Loss of nucleus pulposus pressure had a much greater effect on the disc mechanics than the presence of anular lesions. This indicated that the development of anular lesions alone (prior to degeneration of the nucleus) has minimal effect on disc mechanics, but that disc stiffness is significantly reduced by the loss of hydrostatic pressure in the nucleus. With the degeneration of the nucleus, the outer innervated anulus or surrounding osteo-ligamentous anatomy may therefore experience increased strains. PMID:17383659

  4. Porcine Intervertebral Disc Repair Using Allogeneic Juvenile Articular Chondrocytes or Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank L.; Metz, Lionel; Adkisson, Huston Davis; Liu, Jane; Carruthers-Liebenberg, Ellen; Milliman, Curt; Maloney, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies for intervertebral disc repair have focused on the use of autologous disc-derived chondrocytes. Difficulties with graft procurement, harvest site morbidity, and functionality, however, may limit the utility of this cell source. We used an in vivo porcine model to investigate allogeneic non-disc-derived chondrocytes and allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for disc repair. After denucleation, lumbar discs were injected with either fibrin carrier alone, allogeneic juvenile chondrocytes (JCs), or allogeneic MSCs. Discs were harvested at 3, 6, and 12 months, and cell viability and functionality were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. JC-treated discs demonstrated abundant cartilage formation at 3 months, and to a lesser extent at 6 and 12 months. For the carrier and MSC-treated groups, however, there was little evidence of proteoglycan matrix or residual notochordal/chondrocyte cells, but rather a type I/II collagen-enriched scar tissue. By contrast, JCs produced a type II collagen-rich matrix that was largely absent of type I collagen. Viable JCs were observed at all time points, whereas no evidence of viable MSCs was found. These data support the premise that committed chondrocytes are more appropriate for use in disc repair, as they are uniquely suited for survival in the ischemic disc microenvironment. PMID:21910592

  5. The Natural Polyphenol Epigallocatechin Gallate Protects Intervertebral Disc Cells from Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Krupkova, Olga; Handa, Junichi; Hlavna, Marian; Klasen, Juergen; Ospelt, Caroline; Ferguson, Stephen John; Wuertz-Kozak, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress-related phenotypic changes and a decline in the number of viable cells are crucial contributors to intervertebral disc degeneration. The polyphenol epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) can interfere with painful disc degeneration by reducing inflammation, catabolism, and pain. In this study, we hypothesized that EGCG furthermore protects against senescence and/or cell death, induced by oxidative stress. Sublethal and lethal oxidative stress were induced in primary human intervertebral disc cells with H2O2 (total n = 36). Under sublethal conditions, the effects of EGCG on p53-p21 activation, proliferative capacity, and accumulation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase were tested. Further, the effects of EGCG on mitochondria depolarization and cell viability were analyzed in lethal oxidative stress. The inhibitor LY249002 was applied to investigate the PI3K/Akt pathway. EGCG inhibited accumulation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase but did not affect the loss of proliferative capacity, suggesting that EGCG did not fully neutralize exogenous radicals. Furthermore, EGCG increased the survival of IVD cells in lethal oxidative stress via activation of prosurvival PI3K/Akt and protection of mitochondria. We demonstrated that EGCG not only inhibits inflammation but also can enhance the survival of disc cells in oxidative stress, which makes it a suitable candidate for the development of novel therapies targeting disc degeneration. PMID:27119009

  6. Treatment of the degenerated intervertebral disc; closure, repair and regeneration of the annulus fibrosus.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Shahriar; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; Grijpma, Dirk W; Kuijer, Roel

    2015-10-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and disc herniation are two causes of low back pain. The aetiology of these disorders is unknown, but tissue weakening, which primarily occurs due to inherited genetic factors, ageing, nutritional compromise and loading history, is the basic factor causing disc degeneration. Symptomatic disc herniation mainly causes radicular pain. Current treatments of intervertebral disc degeneration and low back pain are based on alleviating the symptoms and comprise administration of painkillers or surgical methods such as spinal fusion. None of these methods is completely successful. Current research focuses on regeneration of the IVD and particularly on regeneration of the nucleus pulposus. Less attention has been directed to the repair or regeneration of the annulus fibrosus, although this is the key to successful nucleus pulposus, and therewith IVD, repair. This review focuses on the importance of restoring the function of the annulus fibrosus, as well as on the repair, replacement or regeneration of the annulus fibrosus in combination with restoration of the function of the nucleus pulposus, to treat low back pain. PMID:24616324

  7. Modic Changes and Disc Degeneration Caused by Inoculation of Propionibacterium acnes inside Intervertebral Discs of Rabbits: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Zheng, Yuehuan; Yuan, Ye; Jiao, Yucheng; Xiao, Jiaqi; Zhou, Zezhu; Cao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate whether P. acnes could induce disc degeneration and Modic changes when inoculated into the discs of rabbits. Method. A wild-type strain of P. acnes isolated from a patient associated with Modic change and disc degeneration was inoculated into the intervertebral discs of rabbits. Meanwhile, S. aureus was injected into the discs to establish a model of discitis as the comparison and a standard strain of P. acnes was inoculated as the control. MRI and histological change were observed. Results. Both the P. acnes-inoculated and S. aureus-inoculated rabbits showed hyperintense signals at endplates and hypointense signals at nucleus pulposus on T2WI. However, P. acnes only resulted in moderate disc degeneration and endplates rupture in histological examination, which was different from the pathological change of discitis caused by S. aureus. In addition, higher death rates (2/3 versus 0/5) were observed in S. aureus-inoculated rabbits. Conclusion. Compared to S. aureus, the pathological change caused by P. acnes would be considered as Modic-I change and disc degeneration rather than a discitis. PMID:26925420

  8. Translation of an Engineered Nanofibrous Disc-like Angle Ply Structure for Intervertebral Disc Replacement in a Small Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John T.; Milby, Andrew H.; Chiaro, Joseph A.; Kim, Dong Hwa; Hebela, Nader M.; Smith, Lachlan J.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration has been implicated in the etiology of low back pain; however the current surgical strategies for treating symptomatic disc disease are limited. A variety of materials have been developed to replace disc components, including the nucleus pulposus (NP), the annulus fibrosus (AF), and their combination into disc-like engineered constructs. We have previously shown that layers of electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffold, mimicking the hierarchical organization of the native AF, have functional parity with native tissue. Likewise, we have combined these structures with cell-seeded hydrogels (as an NP replacement) to form disc-like angle ply structures (DAPS). The objective of this study was to develop a model for the evaluation of DAPS in vivo. Through a series of studies, we developed a surgical approach to replace the rat caudal disc with an acellular DAPS and then stabilize the motion segment by external fixation. We then optimized cell infiltration into DAPS by including sacrificial poly(ethylene oxide) layers interspersed throughout the angle-ply structure. Our findings illustrate that DAPS are stable in the caudal spine, are infiltrated by cells from the peri-implant space, and that infiltration is expedited by providing additional routes for cell migration. These findings establish a new in vivo platform in which to evaluate and optimize the design of functional disc replacements. PMID:24560621

  9. Nutrition of the intervertebral disc: effect of fluid flow on solute transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, J.P.; Holm, S.; Maroudas, A.; Nachemson, A.

    1982-10-01

    Adult dogs were injected intravenously with /sup 35/S-sulphate, and moderately exercised for one to six hours to measure isotope concentrations and profiles throughout the intervertebral discs. The isotope profiles were also observed in control animals that had been under anesthesia between injections and death. In both sets of animals, the profiles were in agreement with those expected for isotope transport by diffusion. This agreement indicates that fluid pumping during movement has an insignificant effect on transport of nutrients into the disc. Small solutes, e.g., O/sub 2/, glucose, and sulphate, are transported into the disc chiefly by diffusion. However, calculations show that because of their low diffusivities, pumping may increase the rate of transport of large solutes into the disc, as it does in articular cartilage.

  10. Cervical Spine Disc Deformation During In Vivo Three-Dimensional Head Movements.

    PubMed

    Anderst, William; Donaldson, William; Lee, Joon; Kang, James

    2016-05-01

    Although substantial research demonstrates that intervertebral disc cells respond to mechanical signals, little research has been done to characterize the in vivo mechanical environment in the disc tissue. The objective of this study was to estimate cervical disc strain during three-dimensional head movements. Twenty-nine young healthy adults performed full range of motion flexion/extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation of the head within a biplane radiography system. Three-dimensional vertebral kinematics were determined using a validated model-based tracking technique. A computational model used these kinematics to estimate subject-specific intervertebral disc deformation (C3-4 to C6-7). Peak compression, distraction and shear strains were calculated for each movement, disc level, and disc region. Peak compression strain and peak shear strain were highest during flexion/extension (mean ± 95% confidence interval) (32 ± 3 and 86 ± 8%, respectively), while peak distraction strain was highest during lateral bending (57 ± 5%). Peak compression strain occurred at C4-5 (33 ± 4%), while peak distraction and shear strain occurred at C3-4 (54 ± 8 and 83 ± 11%, respectively). Peak compression, distraction, and shear strains all occurred in the posterior-lateral annulus (48 ± 4, 80 ± 8, and 109 ± 12%, respectively). These peak strain values may serve as boundary conditions for in vitro loading paradigms that aim to assess the biologic response to physiologic disc deformations. PMID:26271522

  11. High mechanical strain of primary intervertebral disc cells promotes secretion of inflammatory factors associated with disc degeneration and pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Excessive mechanical loading of intervertebral discs (IVDs) is thought to alter matrix properties and influence disc cell metabolism, contributing to degenerative disc disease and development of discogenic pain. However, little is known about how mechanical strain induces these changes. This study investigated the cellular and molecular changes as well as which inflammatory receptors and cytokines were upregulated in human intervertebral disc cells exposed to high mechanical strain (HMS) at low frequency. The impact of these metabolic changes on neuronal differentiation was also explored to determine a role in the development of disc degeneration and discogenic pain. Methods Isolated human annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were exposed to HMS (20% cyclical stretch at 0.001 Hz) on high-extension silicone rubber dishes coupled to a mechanical stretching apparatus and compared to static control cultures. Gene expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), neuronal growth factor (NGF) and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) was assessed. Collected conditioned media were analysed for cytokine content and applied to rat pheocromocytoma PC12 cells for neuronal differentiation assessment. Results HMS caused upregulation of TLR2, TLR4, NGF and TNFα gene expression in IVD cells. Medium from HMS cultures contained elevated levels of growth-related oncogene, interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-15, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), MCP-3, monokine induced by γ interferon, transforming growth factor β1, TNFα and NGF. Exposure of PC12 cells to HMS-conditioned media resulted in both increased neurite sprouting and cell death. Conclusions HMS culture of IVD cells in vitro drives cytokine and inflammatory responses associated with degenerative disc disease and low-back pain. This study provides evidence for a direct link between cellular strain, secretory factors, neoinnervation and potential degeneration and discogenic pain in vivo. PMID:24457003

  12. Nerve Growth Factor Is Regulated by Toll-Like Receptor 2 in Human Intervertebral Discs.

    PubMed

    Krock, Emerson; Currie, J Brooke; Weber, Michael H; Ouellet, Jean A; Stone, Laura S; Rosenzweig, Derek H; Haglund, Lisbet

    2016-02-12

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) contributes to the development of chronic pain associated with degenerative connective tissue pathologies, such as intervertebral disc degeneration and osteoarthritis. However, surprisingly little is known about the regulation of NGF in these conditions. Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pattern recognition receptors classically associated with innate immunity but more recently were found to be activated by endogenous alarmins such as fragmented extracellular matrix proteins found in degenerating discs or cartilage. In this study we investigated if TLR activation regulates NGF and which signaling mechanisms control this response in intervertebral discs. TLR2 agonists, TLR4 agonists, or IL-1β (control) treatment increased NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and IL-1β gene expression in human disc cells isolated from healthy, pain-free organ donors. However, only TLR2 activation or IL-1β treatment increased NGF protein secretion. TLR2 activation increased p38, ERK1/2, and p65 activity and increased p65 translocation to the cell nucleus. JNK activity was not affected by TLR2 activation. Inhibition of NF-κB, and to a lesser extent p38, but not ERK1/2 activity, blocked TLR2-driven NGF up-regulation at both the transcript and protein levels. These results provide a novel mechanism of NGF regulation in the intervertebral disc and potentially other pathogenic connective tissues. TLR2 and NF-κB signaling are known to increase cytokines and proteases, which accelerate matrix degradation. Therefore, TLR2 or NF-κB inhibition may both attenuate chronic pain and slow the degenerative progress in vivo. PMID:26668319

  13. In vitro biomechanics of cervical disc arthroplasty with the ProDisc-C total disc implant.

    PubMed

    DiAngelo, Denis J; Foley, Kevin T; Morrow, Brian R; Schwab, John S; Song, Jung; German, John W; Blair, Eve

    2004-09-15

    An in vitro biomechanical study was conducted to compare the effects of disc arthroplasty and anterior cervical fusion on cervical spine biomechanics in a multilevel human cadaveric model. Three spine conditions were studied: harvested, single-level cervical disc arthroplasty, and single-level fusion. A programmable testing apparatus was used that replicated physiological flexion/extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Measurements included vertebral motion, applied load, and bending moments. Relative rotations at the superior, treated, and inferior motion segment units (MSUs) were normalized with respect to the overall rotation of those three MSUs and compared using a one-way analysis of variance with Student-Newman-Keuls test (p < 0.05). Simulated fusion decreased motion across the treated site relative to the harvested and disc arthroplasty conditions. The reduced motion at the treated site was compensated at the adjacent segments by an increase in motion. For all modes of testing, use of an artificial disc prosthesis did not alter the motion patterns at either the instrumented level or adjacent segments compared with the harvested condition, except in extension. PMID:15636563

  14. Human cartilage endplate permeability varies with degeneration and intervertebral disc site.

    PubMed

    DeLucca, John F; Cortes, Daniel H; Jacobs, Nathan T; Vresilovic, Edward J; Duncan, Randall L; Elliott, Dawn M

    2016-02-29

    Despite the critical functions the human cartilage endplate (CEP) plays in the intervertebral disc, little is known about its structural and mechanical properties and their changes with degeneration. Quantifying these changes with degeneration is important for understanding how the CEP contributes to the function and pathology of the disc. Therefore the objectives of this study were to quantify the effect of disc degeneration on human CEP mechanical properties, determine the influence of superior and inferior disc site on mechanics and composition, and simulate the role of collagen fibers in CEP and disc mechanics using a validated finite element model. Confined compression data and biochemical composition data were used in a biphasic-swelling model to calculate compressive extrafibrillar elastic and permeability properties. Tensile properties were obtained by applying published tensile test data to an ellipsoidal fiber distribution. Results showed that with degeneration CEP permeability decreased 50-60% suggesting that transport is inhibited in the degenerate disc. CEP fibers are organized parallel to the vertebrae and nucleus pulposus and may contribute to large shear strains (0.1-0.2) and delamination failure of the CEP commonly seen in herniated disc tissue. Fiber-reinforcement also reduces CEP axial strains thereby enhancing fluid flux by a factor of 1.8. Collectively, these results suggest that the structure and mechanics of the CEP may play critical roles in the solute transport and disc mechanics. PMID:26874969

  15. Simulating the sensitivity of cell nutritive environment to composition changes within the intervertebral disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, C. Ruiz; Malandrino, A.; van Rijsbergen, MM.; Lacroix, D.; Ito, K.; Noailly, J.

    2016-05-01

    Altered nutrition in the intervertebral disc affects cell viability and can generate catabolic cascades contributing to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Such degradation is expected to affect couplings between disc mechanics and nutrition, contributing to accelerate degenerative processes. However, the relation of ECM changes to major biophysical events within the loaded disc remains unclear. A L4-L5 disc finite element model including the nucleus (NP), annulus (AF) and endplates was used and coupled to a transport-cell viability model. Solute concentrations and cell viability were evaluated along the mid-sagittal plane path. A design of experiment (DOE) was performed. DOE parameters corresponded to AF and NP biochemical tissue measurements in discs with different degeneration grades. Cell viability was not affected by any parameter combinations defined. Nonetheless, the initial water content was the parameter that affected the most the solute contents, especially glucose. Calculations showed that altered NP composition could negatively affect AF cell nutrition. Results suggested that AF and NP tissue degeneration are not critical to nutrition-related cell viability at early-stage of disc degeneration. However, small ECM degenerative changes may alter significantly disc nutrition under mechanical loads. Coupling disc mechano-transport simulations and enzyme expression studies could allow identifying spatiotemporal sequences related to tissue catabolism.

  16. Temporal changes of mechanical signals and extracellular composition in human intervertebral disc during degenerative progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qiaoqiao; Gao, Xin; Gu, Weiyong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a three-dimensional finite element model was used to investigate the changes in tissue composition and mechanical signals within human lumbar intervertebral disc during the degenerative progression. This model was developed based on the cell-activity coupled mechano-electrochemical mixture theory. The disc degeneration was simulated by lowering nutrition levels at disc boundaries, and the temporal and spatial distributions of the fixed charge density, water content, fluid pressure, Von Mises stress, and disc deformation were analyzed. Results showed that fixed charge density, fluid pressure, and water content decreased significantly in the nucleus pulposus (NP) and the inner to middle annulus fibrosus (AF) regions of the degenerative disc. It was found that, with degenerative progression, the Von Mises stress (relative to that at healthy state) increased within the disc, with a larger increase in the outer AF region. Both the disc volume and height decreased with the degenerative progression. The predicted results of fluid pressure change in the NP were consistent with experimental findings in the literature. The knowledge of the variations of temporal and spatial distributions of composition and mechanical signals within the human IVDs provide a better understanding of the progression of disc degeneration. PMID:25305690

  17. Rheological and biological properties of a hydrogel support for cells intended for intervertebral disc repair

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cell-based approaches towards restoration of prolapsed or degenerated intervertebral discs are hampered by a lack of measures for safe administration and placement of cell suspensions within a treated disc. In order to overcome these risks, a serum albumin-based hydrogel has been developed that polymerizes after injection and anchors the administered cell suspension within the tissue. Methods A hydrogel composed of chemically activated albumin crosslinked by polyethylene glycol spacers was produced. The visco-elastic gel properties were determined by rheological measurement. Human intervertebral disc cells were cultured in vitro and in vivo in the hydrogel and their phenotype was tested by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Matrix production and deposition was monitored by immuno-histology and by biochemical analysis of collagen and glycosaminoglycan deposition. Species specific in situ hybridization was performed to discriminate between cells of human and murine origin in xenotransplants. Results The reproducibility of the gel formation process could be demonstrated. The visco-elastic properties were not influenced by storage of gel components. In vitro and in vivo (subcutaneous implants in mice) evidence is presented for cellular differentiation and matrix deposition within the hydrogel for human intervertebral disc cells even for donor cells that have been expanded in primary monolayer culture, stored in liquid nitrogen and re-activated in secondary monolayer culture. Upon injection into the animals, gels formed spheres that lasted for the duration of the experiments (14 days). The expression of cartilage- and disc-specific mRNAs was maintained in hydrogels in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating the maintenance of a stable specific cellular phenotype, compared to monolayer cells. Significantly higher levels of hyaluronan synthase isozymes-2 and -3 mRNA suggest cell functionalities towards those needed for the support of the regeneration of

  18. Concomitance of fibromyalgia syndrome and cervical disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Güler, Mustafa; Aydın, Teoman; Akgöl, Erdal; Taşpınar, Özgür

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and cervical disc herniation (CDH) are a common diseases commonly encountered in physical therapy clinics. There are also patients who have both of these diseases. In this study we aim to investigated whether FMS is a risk factor for cervical disc herniation and the frequency of their coincident occurrence. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-five patients having a primary FMS diagnosis according to the American Rheumatism Association criteria are taken into consideration and a control group were the subjects of this study. The two groups were compared with respect to cervical disc hernia using cervical region MRI. [Results] The distribution of disc hernia of 6 fibromyalgia patients who had cervical discopathy was: 16.6% C2-3, 16.6% C5-6, 16.6% C6-7, 33.3% C4-5, C5-6 (two levels in two patients) and 16.6% C4-5, C5-6, C7-1 (three levels in one patient) . The herniation directions were given as: central in 5 levels, right paramedian in 1 level, and left paramedian disc hernia in 1 level. There were 4 cervical disk hernia in the control group. The herniation direction were central in two, right paramedian in one, and left paramedian in one patient. [Conclusion] In this study, the existence of cervical disc herniation in fibromyalgia patients was found to be not different from the normal population. PMID:25931731

  19. Concomitance of fibromyalgia syndrome and cervical disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Mustafa; Aydın, Teoman; Akgöl, Erdal; Taşpınar, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and cervical disc herniation (CDH) are a common diseases commonly encountered in physical therapy clinics. There are also patients who have both of these diseases. In this study we aim to investigated whether FMS is a risk factor for cervical disc herniation and the frequency of their coincident occurrence. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-five patients having a primary FMS diagnosis according to the American Rheumatism Association criteria are taken into consideration and a control group were the subjects of this study. The two groups were compared with respect to cervical disc hernia using cervical region MRI. [Results] The distribution of disc hernia of 6 fibromyalgia patients who had cervical discopathy was: 16.6% C2–3, 16.6% C5–6, 16.6% C6–7, 33.3% C4–5, C5–6 (two levels in two patients) and 16.6% C4–5, C5–6, C7–1 (three levels in one patient) . The herniation directions were given as: central in 5 levels, right paramedian in 1 level, and left paramedian disc hernia in 1 level. There were 4 cervical disk hernia in the control group. The herniation direction were central in two, right paramedian in one, and left paramedian in one patient. [Conclusion] In this study, the existence of cervical disc herniation in fibromyalgia patients was found to be not different from the normal population. PMID:25931731

  20. Calcification in the ovine intervertebral disc: a model of hydroxyapatite deposition disease

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, D.; Taylor, T. K. F.; Dillon, C. T.; Read, R.; Cake, M.; Little, C. B.

    2009-01-01

    The study design included a multidisciplinary examination of the mineral phase of ovine intervertebral disc calcifications. The objective of the study was to investigate the mineral phase and its mechanisms of formation/association with degeneration in a naturally occurring animal model of disc calcification. The aetiology of dystrophic disc calcification in adult humans is unknown, but occurs as a well-described clinical disorder with hydroxyapatite as the single mineral phase. Comparable but age-related pathology in the sheep could serve as a model for the human disorder. Lumbar intervertebral discs (n = 134) of adult sheep of age 6 years (n = 4), 8 years (n = 12) and 11 years (n = 2) were evaluated using radiography, morphology, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, histology, immunohistology and proteoglycan analysis. Half of the 6-year, 84% of the 8-year and 86% of the 11-year-old discs had calcific deposits. These were not well delineated by plain radiography. They were either: (a) punctate deposits in the outer annulus, (b) diffuse deposits in the transitional zone or inner annulus fibrosus with occasional deposits in the nucleus, or (c) large deposits in the transitional zone extending variably into the nucleus. Their maximal incidence was in the lower lumbar discs (L4/5–L6/7) with no calcification seen in the lumbosacral or lower thoracic discs. All deposits were hydroxyapatite with large crystallite sizes (800–1,300 Å) compared to cortical bone (300–600 Å). No type X-collagen, osteopontin or osteonectin were detected in calcific deposits, although positive staining for bone sialoprotein was evident. Calcified discs had less proteoglycan of smaller hydrodynamic size than non-calcified discs. Disc calcification in ageing sheep is due to hydroxyapatite deposition. The variable, but large, crystal size and lack of protein markers indicate that this does not occur by

  1. Precision of spinal radiographs as a screening test for intervertebral disc calcification in Dachshunds.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Alana J; Hill, Peter B; Davies, Sarah E; Webster, Natalie S; Lappalainen, Anu K; Bottema, Cynthia D K; Caraguel, Charles G B

    2015-11-01

    Among dog breeds, the Dachshund has the highest lifetime incidence of intervertebral disc disease (IVDD). Intervertebral disc (IVD) calcification is an indicator of severe degeneration that predisposes to disc herniation. IVDD is heritable in Dachshunds, and in some countries, breeding candidates are screened to reduce IVDD occurrence by selecting dogs according to their score of radiographically detectable intervertebral disc calcification (RDIDC) and excluding dogs with ≥5 RDIDCs from breeding. This study evaluated the precision of scoring spinal radiographs for IVD calcification and subsequent classification of Dachshund dogs for breeding based on their RDIDC score. Digital radiographs of the spine were obtained in 19 clinically healthy, young adult Dachshunds, and scored for RDIDC independently by five scorers with varying levels of experience, three times each. Within scorer (repeatability) and between scorer (reproducibility) variability was estimated both at the individual IVD level and at the whole dog level for breeding classification purposes. At the IVD level, some degree of scorer effect was supported by the pairwise repeatability (92.3%; 95% CI: 88.8-94.7%) being marginally higher than the reproducibility (89.2%; 95% CI: 85.7-91.8%). Scorer-specific patterns confirmed the presence of scorer subjectivity. Repeatability significantly increased with scorer experience but the reproducibility did not. RDIDC scoring repeatability and reproducibility substantially decreased at the cervicothoracic spine region, likely due to anatomical superimpositions. At the dog level, a breeding classification could be repeated by the same scorer for 83.6% (95% CI: 73.8-90.2%) of the dogs, and was reproduced between two scorers for 80.2% (95% CI: 66.6-89.1%) of the dogs. The repeatability of breeding classification also seemed to increase with scorer experience but not the reproducibility. Overall, RDIDC scoring revealed some degree of inconsistency explained by scorer

  2. Artificial Discs for Lumbar and Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease –Update

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of artificial disc replacement (ADR) technology for degenerative disc disease (DDD). Clinical Need Degenerative disc disease is the term used to describe the deterioration of 1 or more intervertebral discs of the spine. The prevalence of DDD is roughly described in proportion to age such that 40% of people aged 40 years have DDD, increasing to 80% among those aged 80 years or older. Low back pain is a common symptom of lumbar DDD; neck and arm pain are common symptoms of cervical DDD. Nonsurgical treatments can be used to relieve pain and minimize disability associated with DDD. However, it is estimated that about 10% to 20% of people with lumbar DDD and up to 30% with cervical DDD will be unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments. In these cases, surgical treatment is considered. Spinal fusion (arthrodesis) is the process of fusing or joining 2 bones and is considered the surgical gold standard for DDD. Artificial disc replacement is the replacement of the degenerated intervertebral disc with an artificial disc in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical spine that has been unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments for at least 6 months. Unlike spinal fusion, ADR preserves movement of the spine, which is thought to reduce or prevent the development of adjacent segment degeneration. Additionally, a bone graft is not required for ADR, and this alleviates complications, including bone graft donor site pain and pseudoarthrosis. It is estimated that about 5% of patients who require surgery for DDD will be candidates for ADR. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a computerized search of the literature published between 2003 and September 2005 to answer the following questions: What is the effectiveness of ADR in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical regions of the spine compared with spinal fusion surgery? Does an artificial disc reduce the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD

  3. Glucosamine Supplementation Demonstrates a Negative Effect On Intervertebral Disc Matrix in an Animal Model of Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lloydine; Vo, Nam; Coehlo, J. Paulo; Dong, Qing; Bechara, Bernard; Woods, Barrett; Hempen, Eric; Hartman, Robert; Preuss, Harry; Balk, Judith; Kang, James; Sowa, Gwendolyn

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Laboratory based controlled in vivo study Objective To determine the in vivo effects of oral glucosamine sulfate on intervertebral disc degeneration Summary of Background Data Although glucosamine has demonstrated beneficial effect in articular cartilage, clinical benefit is uncertain. A CDC report from 2009 reported that many patients are using glucosamine supplementation for low back pain (LBP), without significant evidence to support its use. Because disc degeneration is a major contributor of LBP, we explored the effects of glucosamine on disc matrix homeostasis in an animal model of disc degeneration. Methods Eighteen skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits were divided into four groups: control, annular puncture, glucosamine, and annular puncture+glucosamine. Glucosamine treated rabbits received daily oral supplementation with 107mg/day (weight based equivalent to human 1500mg/day). Annular puncture surgery involved puncturing the annulus fibrosus (AF) of 3 lumbar discs with a 16G needle to induce degeneration. Serial MRIs were obtained at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 20 weeks. Discs were harvested at 20 weeks for determination of glycosaminoglycan(GAG) content, relative gene expression measured by RT-PCR, and histological analyses. Results The MRI index and NP area of injured discs of glucosamine treated animals with annular puncture was found to be lower than that of degenerated discs from rabbits not supplemented with glucosamine. Consistent with this, decreased glycosaminoglycan was demonstrated in glucosamine fed animals, as determined by both histological and GAG content. Gene expression was consistent with a detrimental effect on matrix. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the net effect on matrix in an animal model in vivo, as measured by gene expression, MRI, histology, and total proteoglycan is anti-anabolic. This raises concern over this commonly used supplement, and future research is needed to establish the clinical relevance of these

  4. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic field on intervertebral disc cell apoptosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Reihani Kermani, Hamed; Pourghazi, Mehdi; Mahani, Saeed Esmaeili

    2014-09-01

    Despite numerous studies on pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) application, its effects of PEMF on intervertebral disc (IVD) have not yet been investigated in vivo. Accordingly, the effects of PEMF upon IVD in rats were evaluated through molecular surveys. Rats were divided into six groups: Group I and II were exposed to low and high frequency of PEMF (LF and HF, respectively). Group III and IV underwent induced disc degeneration and were exposed to low and high frequency of PEMF (LF/IDD and HF/IDD, respectively). Group V underwent induced disc degeneration (IDD), and group VI was control. The values of caspase 3, Bax, Bcl-2 and β-actin band density, as cell apoptotic markers, were obtained from band densitometry. Our results showed that the value of cleaved caspase-3 of cells and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in IDD group increased significantly compared to the control group (p < 0.001). The value of cleaved caspase-3 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio decreased significantly in LF/IDD and HF/IDD groups compared to IDD group (p < 0.05). No significant increase was seen in the cell apoptotic markers in the groups just exposed to PEMF compared to the control group. There was also no significant decrease in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in HF/IDD and LF/IDD groups compared to the control group. These data suggest that PEMF attenuates degenerative processes in rat's intervertebral discs and has no effect on normal discs. Regulations of the expression of apoptotic proteins may be one of the mechanisms by which PEMF is effective in reduce disc degeneration. PMID:24131391

  5. Biological repair of the degenerated intervertebral disc by the injection of growth factors

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The homeostasis of intervertebral disc (IVD) tissues is accomplished through a complex and precise coordination of a variety of substances, including cytokines, growth factors, enzymes and enzyme inhibitors. Recent biological therapeutic strategies for disc degeneration have included attempts to up-regulate the production of key matrix proteins or to down-regulate the catabolic events induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Several approaches to deliver these therapeutic biologic agents have been proposed and tested in a preclinical setting. One of the most advanced biological therapeutic approaches to regenerate or repair a degenerated disc is the injection of a recombinant growth factor. Abundant evidence for the efficacy of growth factor injection therapy for the treatment of IVD degeneration can be found in preclinical animal studies. Recent data obtained from animal studies on changes in cytokine expression following growth factor injection illustrate the great potential for patients with chronic discogenic low back pain. The first clinical trial for growth factor injection has been initiated and the results of that study may prove the usefulness of growth factor injection for treating the symptoms of patients with degenerative disc diseases. The focus of this review article is the effects of an in vivo injection of growth factors on the biological repair of the degenerated intervertebral disc in animal models. The effects of growth factor injection on the symptoms of patients with low back pain, the therapeutic target of growth factor injection and the limitations of the efficacy of growth factor therapy are also reviewed. Further quantitative studies on the effect of growth factor injection on pain generation and the long term effects on the endplate and cell survival after an injection using large animals are needed. An international academic-industrial consortium addressing these aims, such as was achieved for osteoarthritis (The Osteoarthritis Initiative

  6. Percutaneous laser discectomy of cervical discs: preliminary clinical results.

    PubMed

    Siebert, W

    1995-06-01

    Thirty-one patients with herniated cervical discs were treated with PLDD from 1991 to 1993. In 1990, a few of these patients were treated with the Nd:YAG laser with no complications. Since 1991 we have used the holmium:YAG laser; 28 of the 31 patients experienced pain relief in a 6-week follow-up. PLDD for the cervical discs is a viable therapy. PMID:10150647

  7. Conditional Activation of β-Catenin Signaling Leads to Severe Defects in Intervertebral Disc Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meina; Tang, Dezhi; Shu, Bing; Wang, Baoli; Jin, Hongting; Hao, Suyang; Dresser, Karen A.; Shen, Jie; Im, Hee-Jeong; Sampson, Erik R.; Rubery, Paul T.; Zuscik, Michael J.; Schwarz, Edward M.; O'Keefe, Regis J.; Wang, Yongjun; Chen, Di

    2013-01-01

    Objective The incidence of low back pain is extremely high and is often linked to intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The mechanism of this disease is currently unknown. In this study, we have investigated the role of β-catenin signaling in IVD tissue function. Methods β-catenin protein levels were measured in disc samples derived from patients with disc degeneration and normal subjects by immunohistochemistry (IHC). To generate β-catenin conditional activation (cAct) mice, Col2a1-CreERT2 transgenic mice were bred with β-cateninfx(Ex3)/fx(Ex3) mice. Changes in disc tissue morphology and function were analyzed by micro-CT, histology and real-time PCR assays. Results We found that β-catenin protein was up-regulated in disc tissues from patients with disc degeneration. To assess the effects of increased β-catenin on disc tissue we generated β-catenin cAct mice. Overexpression of β-catenin in disc cells led to extensive osteophyte formation in 3- and 6-month-old β-catenin cAct mice which were associated with significant changes in the cells and extracellular matrix of disc tissues and growth plate. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that activation of β-catenin could enhance Runx2-dependent Mmp13 and Adamts5 expression. Moreover, genetic ablation of the Mmp13 or Adamts5 under β-catenin cAct background, or treatment of β-catenin cAct mice with a specific MMP13 inhibitor, ameliorated the mutant phenotype. Conclusions β-catenin signaling pathway plays a critical role in disc tissue function. PMID:22422036

  8. Mechanical Characterization of the Human Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Subjected to Impact Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, David, IV

    Low back pain is a large and costly problem in the United States. Several working populations, such as miners, construction workers, forklift operators, and military personnel, have an increased risk and prevalence of low back pain compared to the general population. This is due to exposure to repeated, transient impact shocks, particularly while operating vehicles or other machinery. These shocks typically do not cause acute injury, but rather lead to pain and injury over time. The major focus in low back pain is often the intervertebral disc, due to its role as the major primary load-bearing component along the spinal column. The formation of a reliable standard for human lumbar disc exposure to repeated transient shock could potentially reduce injury risk for these working populations. The objective of this project, therefore, is to characterize the mechanical response of the lumbar intervertebral disc subjected to sub-traumatic impact loading conditions using both cadaveric and computational models, and to investigate the possible implications of this type of loading environment for low back pain. Axial, compressive impact loading events on Naval high speed boats were simulated in the laboratory and applied to human cadaveric specimen. Disc stiffness was higher and hysteresis was lower than quasi-static loading conditions. This indicates a shift in mechanical response when the disc is under impact loads and this behavior could be contributing to long-term back pain. Interstitial fluid loss and disc height changes were shown to affect disc impact mechanics in a creep study. Neutral zone increased, while energy dissipation and low-strain region stiffness decreased. This suggests that the disc has greater clinical instability during impact loading with progressive creep and fluid loss, indicating that time of day should be considered for working populations subjected to impact loads. A finite element model was developed and validated against cadaver specimen

  9. Loading-Induced Heat-Shock Response in Bovine Intervertebral Disc Organ Culture.

    PubMed

    Chooi, Wai Hon; Chan, Samantha Chun Wai; Gantenbein, Benjamin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical loading has been shown to affect cell viability and matrix maintenance in the intervertebral disc (IVD) but there is no investigation on how cells survive mechanical stress and whether the IVD cells perceive mechanical loading as stress and respond by expression of heat shock proteins. This study investigates the stress response in the IVD in response to compressive loading. Bovine caudal disc organ culture was used to study the effect of physiological range static loading and dynamic loading. Cell activity, gene expression and immunofluorescence staining were used to analyze the cell response. Cell activity and cytoskeleton of the cells did not change significantly after loading. In gene expression analysis, significant up-regulation of heat shock protein-70 (HSP70) was observed in nucleus pulposus after two hours of loading. However, the expression of the matrix remodeling genes did not change significantly after loading. Similarly, expressions of stress response and matrix remodeling genes changed with application and removal of the dynamic loading. The results suggest that stress response was induced by physiological range loading without significantly changing cell activity and upregulating matrix remodeling. This study provides direct evidence on loading induced stress response in IVD cells and contributes to our understanding in the mechanoregulation of intervertebral disc cells. PMID:27580124

  10. Paraspinal muscle activation in accordance with mechanoreceptors in the intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Eun; Choi, Hae Won

    2013-02-01

    Paraspinal muscle forces were derived computationally based on the hypothesis that the intervertebral disc has a transducer function and the muscle is activated according to a sensor-driving control mechanism. A three-dimensional finite element model of the musculoskeletal system, which consisted of a detailed whole lumbar spine, pelvis, simplified trunk model, and muscles, was developed and combined with an optimization technique to calculate muscle forces in isometric forward flexed and erect standing postures. Minimization of deviations in the nucleus pressure and averaged tensile stress in the annulus fibers at five discs was used for muscle force calculations. The results indicated that all the muscles were properly activated to maintain posture and stabilize the lumbar spine. The nucleus pressure difference was decreased during the iterative calculations and its resulting value at the L4/L5 level was consistent with in vivo measurements. Muscle activation produced vertebra motion, which resulted in a relatively uniform stress distribution in the intervertebral discs. This can minimize the risk of injury at a specific level and increase the ability of the spine to sustain a load. PMID:23513985

  11. Genotoxic stress accelerates age-associated degenerative changes in intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Nasto, Luigi A; Wang, Dong; Robinson, Andria R; Clauson, Cheryl L; Ngo, Kevin; Dong, Qing; Roughley, Peter; Epperly, Michael; Huq, Saiful M; Pola, Enrico; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Robbins, Paul D; Kang, James; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Vo, Nam V

    2013-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the leading cause of debilitating spinal disorders such as chronic lower back pain. Aging is the greatest risk factor for IDD. Previously, we demonstrated IDD in a murine model of a progeroid syndrome caused by reduced expression of a key DNA repair enzyme. This led us to hypothesize that DNA damage promotes IDD. To test our hypothesis, we chronically exposed adult wild-type (Wt) and DNA repair-deficient Ercc1(-/Δ) mice to the cancer therapeutic agent mechlorethamine (MEC) or ionization radiation (IR) to induce DNA damage and measured the impact on disc structure. Proteoglycan, a major structural matrix constituent of the disc, was reduced 3-5× in the discs of MEC- and IR-exposed animals compared to untreated controls. Expression of the protease ADAMTS4 and aggrecan proteolytic fragments was significantly increased. Additionally, new PG synthesis was reduced 2-3× in MEC- and IR-treated discs compared to untreated controls. Both cellular senescence and apoptosis were increased in discs of treated animals. The effects were more severe in the DNA repair-deficient Ercc1(-/Δ) mice than in Wt littermates. Local irradiation of the vertebra in Wt mice elicited a similar reduction in PG. These data demonstrate that genotoxic stress drives degenerative changes associated with IDD. PMID:23262094

  12. Genotoxic stress accelerates age-associated degenerative changes in intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Nasto, Luigi A.; Wang, Dong; Robinson, Andria R.; Clauson, Cheryl L.; Ngo, Kevin; Dong, Qing; Roughley, Peter; Epperly, Michael; Huq, Saiful M.; Pola, Enrico; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Robbins, Paul D.; Kang, James; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Vo, Nam V.

    2013-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the leading cause of debilitating spinal disorders such as chronic lower back pain. Aging is the greatest risk factor for IDD. Previously, we demonstrated IDD in a murine model of a progeroid syndrome caused by reduced expression of a key DNA repair enzyme. This led us to hypothesize that DNA damage promotes IDD. To test our hypothesis, we chronically exposed adult wild-type (Wt) and DNA repair-deficient Ercc1−/Δ mice to the cancer therapeutic agent mechlorethamine (MEC) or ionization radiation (IR) to induce DNA damage and measured the impact on disc structure. Proteoglycan, a major structural matrix constituent of the disc, was reduced 3-5x in the discs of MEC- and IR-exposed animals compared to untreated controls. Expression of the protease ADAMTS4 and aggrecan proteolytic fragments were significantly increased. Additionally, new PG synthesis was reduced 2-3x in MEC- and IR-treated discs compared to untreated controls. Both cellular senescence and apoptosis were increased in discs of treated animals. The effects were more severe in the DNA repair-deficient Ercc1−/Δ mice than in Wt littermates. Local irradiation of the vertebra in Wt mice elicited a similar reduction in PG. These data demonstrate that genotoxic stress drives degenerative changes associated with IDD. PMID:23262094

  13. The Changes in the Expression of NF-KB in a Degenerative Human Intervertebral Disc model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongyi; Yin, Zhanmin; Liu, Chao; Tian, Jiwei

    2015-05-01

    We aim at determining the changes in the expression of NF-kB signaling pathway in degenerative intervertebral discs. We collected normal and degenerated intervertebral discs tissues. The normal and degenerated cells were cultivated and their histopathology and immunofluoresence studies were used to observe the position of NF-kB p65 in the cell. We also treated the nucleus pulposus cells with inflammatory factors and inhibitors. Western blot was used to analyze the expression of different proteins. Real time fluorescence-based quantitative PCR was used for observation of NF-kB regulation of change in gene expression. Immunofluorescence showed that in the non-degenerative group the p65 was found in the cytoplasm of the nucleus pulposus cell while in the degenerated cell group the p65 protein was found in the nucleus of the cell. The expression of p65 increased with increase in the degree of degenerative change of the nucleus pulposus cell. RT-PCR showed that the expression of matrix metalloproteinases, aggrecanases and IL-6 was higher in the degenerative group. The amount of aggrecan and type II collagen was significantly decreased in the degenerative group. IL-1β was able to upregulate the activation of NF-kB and the expression of MMP-13 and ADAMTS-4 was also significantly increased. The effect of these proteins can be inhibited by the NF-kB inhibitor, BAY11-7082. The activation of the NK-kB signaling pathway in a degenerative intervertebral disc is gradually increased, regulating the over-expression of matrix-degrading enzymes. It plays an important role in the degradation of extracellular matrix. PMID:25433723

  14. High incidence of persistence of sacral and coccygeal intervertebral discs in South Indians – a cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Satheesha Nayak, B; Ashwini Aithal, P; Kumar, Naveen; George, Bincy M; Deepthinath, R; Shetty, Surekha D

    2016-01-01

    The sacrum, by virtue of its anatomic location plays a key role in providing stability and strength to the pelvis. Presence of intervertebral discs in sacrum and coccyx is rare. Knowledge of its variations is of utmost importance to surgeons and radiologists. The current study focused on the presence of intervertebral discs between the sacral and coccygeal vertebrae in south Indian cadaveric pelvises. We observed 56 adult pelvises of which, 34 (61%) pelvises showed the presence of intervertebral discs between the sacral vertebrae and between the coccygeal vertebrae, while 22 (39%) pelvises did not have the intervertebral discs either in the sacrum or the coccyx. We also found that most of the specimens had discs between S1 and S2 vertebrae (39%), followed by, between S4 and S5 (18%), between S2–S3 (14%) and least being between S3–S4 (13%). In the coccyx it was found that 7% of pelvises had disc between Co1-Co2, 4% of them had between Co2-Co3 and 4% had between Co3-Co4. Knowledge regarding such anatomic variations in the sacro-coccygeal region is important to note because they require alterations in various instrumentation procedures involving the sacrum. PMID:27385838

  15. A Structurally and Functionally Biomimetic Biphasic Scaffold for Intervertebral Disc Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Andrew Tsz Hang; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering offers high hopes for the treatment of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. Whereas scaffolds of the disc nucleus and annulus have been extensively studied, a truly biomimetic and mechanically functional biphasic scaffold using naturally occurring extracellular matrix is yet to be developed. Here, a biphasic scaffold was fabricated with collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), two of the most abundant extracellular matrix components in the IVD. Following fabrication, the scaffold was characterized and benchmarked against native disc. The biphasic scaffold was composed of a collagen-GAG co-precipitate making up the nucleus pulposus-like core, and this was encapsulated in multiple lamellae of photochemically crosslinked collagen membranes comprising the annulus fibrosus-like lamellae. On mechanical testing, the height of our engineered disc recovered by ~82-89% in an annulus-independent manner, when compared with the 99% recovery exhibited by native disc. The annulus-independent nature of disc height recovery suggests that the fluid replacement function of the engineered nucleus pulposus core might mimic this hitherto unique feature of native disc. Biphasic scaffolds comprised of 10 annulus fibrosus-like lamellae had the best overall mechanical performance among the various designs owing to their similarity to native disc in most aspects, including elastic compliance during creep and recovery, and viscous compliance during recovery. However, the dynamic mechanical performance (including dynamic stiffness and damping factor) of all the biphasic scaffolds was similar to that of the native discs. This study contributes to the rationalized design and development of a biomimetic and mechanically viable biphasic scaffold for IVD tissue engineering. PMID:26115332

  16. Coexistence of expanding abdominal aortic aneurysm and aggravated intervertebral disc extrusion -a case report-.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nan Seol; Kang, Sung Hyun; Park, Sun Young

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is included in the differential diagnosis of lower back pain. Although rare, this important disease can cause potentially lethal complications. In this case, expanding abdominal aortic aneurysm coexisted with intervertebral disc extrusion. The diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm was delayed, putting the patient at risk of aneurysmal rupture. In the management of patients with degenerative spinal diseases, we should not overlook the possibility of comorbidities such as an abdominal aortic aneurysm. We also suggest the importance of interpreting images more carefully, especially for elderly male patients. PMID:24228150

  17. Is a purpose of REM sleep atonia to help regenerate intervertebral disc volumetric loss?

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Jerome CJ

    2009-01-01

    The nature of atonia in sleep continues to be enigmatic. This article discusses a new hypothesis for complete core muscle relaxation in REM sleep, suggesting a bottom-up recuperative perspective. That is, does the atonia in REM sleep provide a utility to help restore the mechanobiology and respective diurnal intervertebral disc hydraulic loss? By combining the effects of gravity with current compressive concepts in spinal stability, this article looks at vertebral approximation as a deleterious experience with an intrinsic biological need to keep vertebrae separated. Methods using polysomnography and recumbent MRI are discussed. PMID:19123938

  18. [Research advances of three-dimension printing technology in vertebrae and intervertebral disc tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zechuan; Li, Chunde; Sun, Haolin

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology is characterized by "inside-out" stack manufacturing. Compared with conventional technologies, 3D printing has the advantage of personalization and precision. Therefore, the shape and internal structure of the scaffolds made by 3D printing technology are highly biomimetic. Besides, 3D bioprinting can precisely deposit the biomaterials, seeding cells and cytokines at the same time, which is a breakthrough in printing technique and material science. With the development of 3D printing, it will make great contributions to the reconstruction of vertebrae and intervertebral disc in the future. PMID:27273987

  19. Effect of calcitonin pretreatment on naturally occurring intervertebral disc degeneration in guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaohua; Tian, Faming; Wang, Wenya; Yan, Jinyin; Liu, Huanjiang; Liu, Binbin; Song, Huiping; Zhang, Yingze; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Our previous study suggested protective effects of calcitonin (CT) on experimental osteoarthritis. The aim of the present study was to provide evidence of whether CT pretreatment could prevent naturally occurring intervertebral disc degeneration in guinea pigs. Methods: Forty-two 3 months old female guinea pigs were randomly assigned into 2 groups as follows: Twenty-four were treated by normal saline as control group and sacrificed at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of age (6 animals at each time point), the other 18 were received salmon CT (8 ug/kg/day, everyday) treatment at 3 months of age and sacrificed at the age of 6, 9 and 12 months respectively. Van Gieson stain and the histological score were used to identify the histological changes of the lumbar intervertebral discs. The disc height and vertebral body height were measured. Immunohistochemistry measurements for glycosaminoglycan, type II collagen, and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-1 expressions were performed. Bone quality and microstructural changes in the L3-6 lumbar vertebral bodies were assessed by bone mineral density (BMD), micro-CT analysis and biomechanical testing. Results: Histological analysis indicated significantly higher disc degeneration scores in 9-month-old guinea pigs in comparison with younger animals, and grew higher with increasing age. CT treatment significantly reduced the histological score, and increased the disc height and the ratio to vertebral body height in 12 months old animals, as well as upregulated the glycosaminoglycan, type II collagen and inhibited the MMP-1 expression. Micro-CT analysis showed decreased percent bone volume (BV/TV) and increased trabecular separation (Tb.Sp), structural model index (SMI) in 12 months old animals in comparison with the younger animals. Markedly increased BV/TV and decreased Tb.Sp were observed in CT treated animals when compared with control animals. The biomechanical properties including maximum load, maximum stress, yield stress and

  20. The nerve supply of the lumbar intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Edgar, M A

    2007-09-01

    The anatomical studies, basic to our understanding of lumbar spine innervation through the sinu-vertebral nerves, are reviewed. Research in the 1980s suggested that pain sensation was conducted in part via the sympathetic system. These sensory pathways have now been clarified using sophisticated experimental and histochemical techniques confirming a dual pattern. One route enters the adjacent dorsal root segmentally, whereas the other supply is non-segmental ascending through the paravertebral sympathetic chain with re-entry through the thoracolumbar white rami communicantes. Sensory nerve endings in the degenerative lumbar disc penetrate deep into the disrupted nucleus pulposus, insensitive in the normal lumbar spine. Complex as well as free nerve endings would appear to contribute to pain transmission. The nature and mechanism of discogenic pain is still speculative but there is growing evidence to support a 'visceral pain' hypothesis, unique in the muscloskeletal system. This mechanism is open to 'peripheral sensitisation' and possibly 'central sensitisation' as a potential cause of chronic back pain. PMID:17905946

  1. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Effect of repetitive laser pulses on the electrical conductivity of intervertebral disc tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omel'chenko, A. I.; Sobol', E. N.

    2009-03-01

    The thermomechanical effect of 1.56-μm fibre laser pulses on intervertebral disc cartilage has been studied using ac conductivity measurements with coaxial electrodes integrated with an optical fibre for laser radiation delivery to the tissue. The observed time dependences of tissue conductivity can be interpreted in terms of hydraulic effects and thermomechanical changes in tissue structure. The laserinduced changes in the electrical parameters of the tissue are shown to correlate with the structural changes, which were visualised using shadowgraph imaging. Local ac conductivity measurements in the bulk of tissue can be used to develop a diagnostic/monitoring system for laser regeneration of intervertebral discs.

  2. Traumatic Migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Scott C; Kang, Daniel G; Helgeson, Melvin D

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case study. Objective To describe a case of dislodgment and migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee, United States) arthroplasty more than 6 months after implantation secondary to low-energy trauma. Methods The inpatient, outpatient, and radiographic medical records of a patient with traumatic migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty were reviewed. The authors have no relevant disclosures to report. Results A 36-year-old man with chronic left upper extremity radiculopathy underwent uncomplicated Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty at C5-C6, with complete resolution of his symptoms. Approximately 6 months after his index procedure, he sustained low-energy trauma to the posterior cervical spine, after being struck by a book falling from a shelf. The injury forced his neck into flexion, and though he did not have recurrence of his radiculopathy symptoms, radiographs demonstrated anterior migration of the arthroplasty device. He underwent revision to anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion. Conclusions Although extremely rare, it is imperative that surgeons consider the potential for failure of osseous integration in patients undergoing cervical disk arthroplasty, even beyond 3 to 6 months postoperatively. This concern is especially relevant to press-fit or milled devices like the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty, which lack direct fixation into adjacent vertebral bodies. We are considering modification of our postoperative protocol to improve protection of the device after implantation, even beyond 3 months postoperatively. PMID:26835211

  3. Traumatic Migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Scott C.; Kang, Daniel G.; Helgeson, Melvin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case study. Objective To describe a case of dislodgment and migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee, United States) arthroplasty more than 6 months after implantation secondary to low-energy trauma. Methods The inpatient, outpatient, and radiographic medical records of a patient with traumatic migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty were reviewed. The authors have no relevant disclosures to report. Results A 36-year-old man with chronic left upper extremity radiculopathy underwent uncomplicated Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty at C5–C6, with complete resolution of his symptoms. Approximately 6 months after his index procedure, he sustained low-energy trauma to the posterior cervical spine, after being struck by a book falling from a shelf. The injury forced his neck into flexion, and though he did not have recurrence of his radiculopathy symptoms, radiographs demonstrated anterior migration of the arthroplasty device. He underwent revision to anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion. Conclusions Although extremely rare, it is imperative that surgeons consider the potential for failure of osseous integration in patients undergoing cervical disk arthroplasty, even beyond 3 to 6 months postoperatively. This concern is especially relevant to press-fit or milled devices like the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty, which lack direct fixation into adjacent vertebral bodies. We are considering modification of our postoperative protocol to improve protection of the device after implantation, even beyond 3 months postoperatively. PMID:26835211

  4. Annulus Fibrosus Cell Characteristics Are a Potential Source of Intervertebral Disc Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Li; Liu, Qihai; Scott, Phillip; Zhang, Dawei; Shen, Francis; Balian, Gary; Li, Xudong

    2014-01-01

    In the end stage of intervertebral disc degeneration, cartilage, bone, endothelial cells, and neurons appear in association with the worsening condition. The origin of the abnormal cells is not clear. This study investigated the properties of progenitor cells in the annulus fibrosus (AF) using one in vitro and two in vivo models. Cultivation of rabbit AF cells with chondrogenic media significantly increased expressions of collagen and aggrecan. Upon exposure to osteogenic conditions, the cultures showed increased mineralization and expression of osteopontin, runx2, and bmp2 genes. Two models were used in the in vivo subcutaneous implantation experiments: 1) rabbit AF tissue in a demineralized bone matrix (DBM) cylinder (DBM/AF), and, 2) rat intact and needle punctured lumbar discs. Bone formation in the AF tissue was detected and hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteoblasts were present 1 month after implantation of the DBM/AF to nude mice. In addition to collagen I and II, immunostaining shows collagen X and osteocalcin expression in DBM/AF specimens 4 months after implantation. Similar changes were detected in the injured discs. Almost the entire needle punctured disc had ossified at 6 months. The results suggest that AF cells have characteristics of progenitor cells and, under appropriate stimuli, are capable of differentiating into chondrocytes and osteoblasts in vitro as well as in vivo. Importantly, these cells may be a target for biological treatment of disc degeneration. PMID:24796761

  5. Dose-Dependent Response of Tissue-Engineered Intervertebral Discs to Dynamic Unconfined Compressive Loading

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Katherine D.; Mozia, Robert I.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the limitations of current surgical methods in the treatment of degenerative disc disease, tissue-engineered intervertebral discs (TE-IVDs) have become an important target. This study investigated the biochemical and mechanical responses of composite TE-IVDs to dynamic unconfined compression. TE-IVDs were manufactured by floating an injection molded alginate nucleus pulposus (NP) in a type I collagen annulus fibrosus (AF) that was allowed to contract for 2 weeks before loading. The discs were mechanically stimulated at a range of strain amplitude (1–10%) for 2 weeks with a duty cycle of 1 h on–1 h off–1 h on before being evaluated for their biochemical and mechanical properties. Mechanical loading increased all properties in a dose-dependent manner. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) increased between 2.8 and 2.2 fold in the AF and NP regions, respectively, whereas the hydroxyproline content increased between 1.2 and 1.8 fold. The discs also experienced a 2-fold increase in the equilibrium modulus and a 4.3-fold increase in the instantaneous modulus. Full effects for all properties were seen by 5% strain amplitude. These data suggest that dynamic loading increases the functionality of our TE-IVDs with region-dependent responses using a method that may be scaled up to larger disc models to expedite maturation for implantation. PMID:25277703

  6. The distribution of calcific deposits in intervertebral discs of the lumbosacral spine.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, J; Boachie-Adjei, O; Bullough, P G; Boskey, A L

    1990-05-01

    The incidence of intervertebral disc calcifications (IVDCs) was examined in 52 lumbosacral spines obtained sequentially at autopsy. The presence of calcific deposits was detected by fine-grain roentgenograms. The nature of these deposits was determined by wide-angle x-ray diffraction, and histologic observations were made. A high prevalence of IVDC, 18 spines of 52, some with multiple deposits, was noted. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) deposits were found in 3% of the spines and accounted for 29% of the 42 deposits analyzed. The CPPD deposits occurred at multiple disc levels (an average of four per spine), were diffuse, and involved a major portion of the disc (nucleus pulposus, annulus fibrosus, and endplate) but were not generally associated with histologic disc degeneration. Hydroxyapatite (HA) deposits occurred in 12% of the spines, most often in the nucleus pulposus and endplate. The HA deposits appeared as small punctate radiodensities. Roentgenographic evidence of degenerative changes, i.e., disc space narrowing, endplate disruption, desiccation, and osteophyte formation, were present in all but one of the spines containing HA deposits. An additional 19% of the spines had deposits that could not be characterized by x-ray diffraction but were very similar in roentgenographic appearance to HA deposits. No conclusions could be drawn on the relationship between the presence of HA or CPPD and collagen or hexosamine content. PMID:2157573

  7. Mechanical Vibrations Reduce the Intervertebral Disc Swelling and Muscle Atrophy from Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holguin, Nilsson; Muir, Jesse; Evans, Harlan J.; Qin, Yi-Xian; Rubin, Clinton; Wagshul, Mark; Judex, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Loss of functional weight bearing, such as experienced during space flight or bed rest (BR), distorts intervertebral disc (IVD) and muscle morphology. IVDs are avascular structures consisting of cells that may derive their nutrition and waste removal from the load induced fluid flow into and out of the disc. A diurnal cycle is produced by forces related to weight bearing and muscular activity, and comprised of a supine and erect posture over a 24 hr period. A diurnal cycle will include a disc volume change of approx. 10-13%. However, in space there are little or no diurnal changes because of the microgravity, which removes the gravitational load and compressive forces to the back muscles. The BR model and the etiology of the disc swelling and muscle atrophy could provide insight into those subjects confined to bed for chronic disease/injury and aging. We hypothesize that extremely low-magnitude, high frequency mechanical vibrations will abate the disc degeneration and muscle loss associated with long-term BR.

  8. Effect of Long-Term Osmotic Loading Culture on Matrix Synthesis from Intervertebral Disc Cells

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Isabella B.; Carapezza, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The intervertebral disc is a highly hydrated tissue that acts to absorb and distribute large complex loads placed on the spine. Diurnal loading and disc degeneration causes significant changes in water volume and proteoglycan content, which alters the internal osmotic environment. Short-term osmotic loading alters disc cell gene expression; however, the long-term effect of osmotic loading on disc cell matrix synthesis is not well understood. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of long-term osmotic loading on matrix turnover and proliferation by juvenile and adult cells from the nucleus pulposus (NP) and the cartilaginous endplate (EP). Matrix synthesis was evaluated using pellets and a 3D agarose system, which has been used for developing engineered tissues. Intervertebral discs were acquired from juvenile and adult cows. Cells were acquired through enzymatic digestion and expanded in culture. Pellets were formed through centrifugation, and constructs were created by encapsulating cells within 2% w/v agarose hydrogel. Pellets and constructs were cultured up to 42 days in chemically defined medium with the osmolality adjusted to 300, 400, or 500 mOsm/kg. EP cells were evaluated as a chondrocyte comparison to chondrocyte-like NP cells. Pellet and agarose cultures of juvenile NP and EP cells demonstrated similarities with respect to cell proliferation and functional mechanical properties. Cell proliferation decreased significantly with increased osmotic loading. The final compressive Young's modulus of juvenile NP cells was 10–40× greater than initial properties (i.e., day 0) and was greater than the final Young's modulus of adult NP and juvenile EP constructs. In juvenile NP constructs, there were no significant differences in GAG content with respect to osmotic loading. However, GAG synthesis and mechanical properties were greatest for the 400 mOsm/kg group in adult NP constructs. Taken together, the results presented here suggest a

  9. Sensory nerve fibres from lumbar intervertebral discs pass through rami communicantes. A possible pathway for discogenic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Suseki, K; Takahashi, Y; Takahashi, K; Chiba, T; Yamagata, M; Moriya, H

    1998-07-01

    It has been thought that lumbar intervertebral discs were innervated segmentally. We have previously shown that the L5-L6 intervertebral disc in the rat is innervated bilaterally from the L1 and L2 dorsal root ganglia through the paravertebral sympathetic trunks, but the pathways between the disc and the paravertebral sympathetic trunks were unknown. We have now studied the spines of 17 rats to elucidate the exact pathways. We examined serial sections of the lumbar spine using immunohistochemistry for calcitonin gene-related peptide, a sensory nerve marker. We showed that these nerve fibres from the intervertebral disc ran through the sinuvertebral nerve into the rami communicantes, not into the corresponding segmental spinal nerve. In the rat, sensory information from the lumbar intervertebral discs is conducted through rami communicantes. If this innervation pattern applies to man, simple decompression of the corresponding nerve root will not relieve discogenic pain. Anterior interbody fusion, with the denervation of rami communicantes, may be effective for such low back pain. PMID:9699846

  10. Expression and regulation of metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in intervertebral disc aging and degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Nam V.; Hartman, Robert A.; Yurube, Takashi; Jacobs, Lloydine J.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Kang, James D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Destruction of extracellular matrix (ECM) leads to intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD), which underlies many spine-related disorders. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and disintegrins and metalloproteinases with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTSs) are believed to be the major proteolytic enzymes responsible for ECM degradation in the intervertebral disc (IVD). PURPOSE To summarize the current literature on gene expression and regulation of MMPs, ADAMTSs, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in IVD aging and IDD. METHODS A comprehensive literature review of gene expression of MMP, ADAMTS, and TIMP in human IDD and reported studies on regulatory factors controlling their expressions and activities in both human and animal model systems. RESULTS Upregulation of specific MMPs (MMP-1, -2, -3, -7, -8, -10, and -13) and ADAMTS (ADAMTS-1, -4, and -15) were reported in human degenerated IVDs. However, it is still unclear from conflicting published studies whether the expression of ADAMTS-5, the predominant aggrecanase, is increased with IDD. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-3 is downregulated, whereas TIMP-1 is upregulated in human degenerated IVDs relative to nondegenerated IVDs. Numerous studies indicate that the expression levels of MMP and ADAMTS are modulated by a combination of many factors, including mechanical, inflammatory, and oxidative stress, some of which are mediated in part through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Genetic predisposition also plays an important role in determining gene expression of MMP-1, -2, -3, and -9. CONCLUSIONS Upregulation of MMP and ADAMTS expression and enzymatic activity is implicated in disc ECM destruction, leading to the development of IDD. Future IDD therapeutics depends on identifying specific MMPs and ADAMTSs whose dysregulation result in pathological proteolysis of disc ECM. PMID:23369495

  11. Cordycepin inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory and matrix degradation in the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Kang; Mao, Lu; Han, Xiuguo; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Changqing; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Cordycepin is a component of the extract obtained from Cordyceps militaris and has many biological activities, including anti-cancer, anti-metastatic and anti-inflammatory effects. Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a degenerative disease that is closely related to the inflammation of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. The effect of cordycepin on NP cells in relation to inflammation and degeneration has not yet been studied. In our study, we used a rat NP cell culture and an intervertebral disc (IVD) organ culture model to examine the inhibitory effects of cordycepin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced gene expression and the production of matrix degradation enzymes (MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5) and oxidative stress-associated factors (nitric oxide and PGE2). We found a protective effect of cordycepin on NP cells and IVDs against LPS-induced matrix degradation and macrophage infiltration. In addition, western blot and luciferase assay results demonstrated that pretreatment with cordycepin significantly suppressed the LPS-induced activation of the NF-κB pathway. Taken together, the results of our research suggest that cordycepin could exert anti-inflammatory and anti-degenerative effects on NP cells and IVDs by inhibiting the activation of the NF-κB pathway. Therefore, cordycepin may be a potential treatment for IDD in the future. PMID:27190710

  12. Cordycepin inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory and matrix degradation in the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Lu; Han, Xiuguo; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Cordycepin is a component of the extract obtained from Cordyceps militaris and has many biological activities, including anti-cancer, anti-metastatic and anti-inflammatory effects. Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a degenerative disease that is closely related to the inflammation of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. The effect of cordycepin on NP cells in relation to inflammation and degeneration has not yet been studied. In our study, we used a rat NP cell culture and an intervertebral disc (IVD) organ culture model to examine the inhibitory effects of cordycepin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced gene expression and the production of matrix degradation enzymes (MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5) and oxidative stress-associated factors (nitric oxide and PGE2). We found a protective effect of cordycepin on NP cells and IVDs against LPS-induced matrix degradation and macrophage infiltration. In addition, western blot and luciferase assay results demonstrated that pretreatment with cordycepin significantly suppressed the LPS-induced activation of the NF-κB pathway. Taken together, the results of our research suggest that cordycepin could exert anti-inflammatory and anti-degenerative effects on NP cells and IVDs by inhibiting the activation of the NF-κB pathway. Therefore, cordycepin may be a potential treatment for IDD in the future. PMID:27190710

  13. Elevated interleukin-6 expression levels are associated with intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    DENG, XIAO; ZHAO, FENG; KANG, BAOLIN; ZHANG, XIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression levels were associated with the onset and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). A comprehensive meta-analysis of the scientific literature from numerous electronic databases was performed, in order to obtain published studies associated with the topic of interest. Relevant case-control studies that had previously assessed a correlation between IL-6 expression levels and IDD were identified using predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The STATA version 12.0 software was used for statistical analysis of the extracted data. A total of 112 studies were initially retrieved, with eight studies meeting the inclusion criteria. These contained a total of 392 subjects, of which 263 were patients with IDD and 129 were healthy controls. A meta-analysis of the eight studies demonstrated that serum IL-6 protein expression levels may be associated with IDD, and this was irrespective of IDD subtype (bulging, protrusion, or sequestration). Notably, serum expression levels of the IL-6 protein were upregulated in intervertebral disc (IVD) protrusion tissue, as compared with normal IVD tissue; thus suggesting that IL-6 may have an important role in the pathophysiological process of IDD. PMID:27073460

  14. [MicroRNAs: a type of novel regulative factor for intervertebral disc degeneration].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wang; Wenjun, Wang; Wei, Yang; Xiaohua, Y U; Yiguo, Yan; Jian, Zhang; Zhisheng, Jiang

    2016-03-25

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is one of major causes for intervertebral disc degenerative diseases, and patients with IDD usually suffer from serious low back pain. The current treatments for patients with IDD only relieve the clinical symptom rather than restore biological balance of IDD, leading to inadequate and unsatisfactory results. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, non-coding, single-stranded RNA molecules, which regulate the gene expression at the post-transcription levels. Research evidences support the involvement of miRNAs in many biological processes, such as lipid metabolism, apoptosis, differentiation and organ development. Accumulating evidences indicate that the expressions of miRNAs change significantly in degenerative tissues. In addition, dysregulated miRNAs contribute to multiple pathological process of IDD, including proliferation and apoptosis of nucleus pulposus and extracellular matrix components, inflammatory response and cartilage endplates degeneration. In this review article, we summarize the expression profiles and roles of miRNAs in IDD, which may provide a novel strategy of biological therapy for the disease. PMID:27273991

  15. Human L3L4 intervertebral disc mean 3D shape, modes of variation, and their relationship to degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peloquin, John M.; Yoder, Jonathon H.; Jacobs, Nathan T.; Moon, Sung M.; Wright, Alexander C.; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc mechanics are affected by both disc shape and disc degeneration, which in turn each affect the other; disc mechanics additionally have a role in the etiology of disc degeneration. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a favored tool to investigate these relationships, but limited data for intervertebral disc 3D shape has forced the use of simplified or single-subject geometries, with the effect of inter-individual shape variation investigated only in specialized studies. Similarly, most data on disc shape variation with degeneration is based on 2D mid-sagittal images, which incompletely define 3D shape changes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantify inter-individual disc shape variation in 3D, classify this variation into independently-occurring modes using a statistical shape model, and identify correlations between disc shape and degeneration. Three-dimensional disc shapes were obtained from MRI of 13 human male cadaver L3L4 discs. An average disc shape and four major modes of shape variation (representing 90% of the variance) were identified. The first mode represented disc axial area and was significantly correlated to degeneration (R2 = 0.44), indicating larger axial area in degenerate discs. Disc height variation occurred in three distinct modes, each also involving non-height variation. The statistical shape model provides an average L3L4 disc shape for FEA that is fully defined in 3D, and makes it convenient to generate a set of shapes with which to represent aggregate inter-individual variation. Degeneration grade-specific shapes can also be generated. To facilitate application, the model is included in this paper’s supplemental content. PMID:24792581

  16. Feasibility of minimally-invasive fiber-based evaluation of chondrodystrophoid canine intervertebral discs by light absorption and scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; McKeirnan, Kelci; Piao, Daqing; Bartels, Kenneth E.

    2011-03-01

    Extrusion or protrusion of an intervertebral disc is a common, frequently debilitating, painful, and sometimes fatal neurologic disease in the chondrodystrophic dog (dachshund, Pekingese, etc.). A similar condition of intervertebral disc degeneration with extrusion/protrusion is also a relatively common neurologic condition in human patients. Degeneration of the relatively avascular chondrodystrophoid intervertebral disc is associated with loss of water content, increased collagen, and deposits of calcified mineral in the nucleus pulposus. Current diagnostic methods have many limitations for providing accurate information regarding disc composition in situ prior to surgical intervention. Disc composition (i.e., mineralization), can influence the type of treatment regime and potentially prognosis and recurrence rates. The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a fiber-needle spectroscopy sensor to analyze the changes of tissue compositions involved in the chondrodystrophoid condition of the canine intervertebral disc. The nucleous pulposus, in which the metaplastic process / degeneration develops, is approximately 2mm thick and 5mm in diameter in the dachshund-sized dog. It lies in the center of the disc, surrounded by the annulus fibrosis and is enclosed by cartilaginous vertebral endplates cranially and caudally. This "shallow-and-small-slab" geometry limits the configuration of a fiber probe to sense the disc tissue volume without interference from the vertebrae. A single-fiber sensor is inserted into a 20 gauge myelographic spinal needle for insertion into the disc in situ and connected via a bifurcated fiber to the light source and a spectrometer. A tungsten light source and a 940nm light-emitting-diode are combined for spectral illumination covering VIS/NIR with expected improved sensitivity to water. Analysis of the reflectance spectra is expected to provide information of scattering and absorption compositions of tissue in

  17. MicroRNA-146a reduces IL-1 dependent inflammatory responses in the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Su-Xi; Li, Xin; Hamilton, John L.; Chee, Ana; Kc, Ranjan; Chen, Di; An, Howard S.; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Chun-do; Ma, Yuan-Zheng; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Because miR-146a expression in articular chondrocytes is associated with osteoarthritis (OA), we assessed whether miR-146a is linked to cartilage degeneration in the spine. Monolayer cultures of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells from the intervertebral discs (IVD) of bovine tails were transfected with a miR-146a mimic. To provoke inflammatory responses and catabolic extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, cells were co-treated with interleukin-1 (IL-1). Transfection of miR-146a decreases IL-1 induced mRNA levels of inflammatory genes and catabolic proteases in NP cells based on quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. Similarly, miR146a suppresses IL-1 induced protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases and aggrecanases as revealed by immunoblotting. Disc segments from wild type (WT) and miR-146a knockout (KO) mice were cultured ex vivo in the presence or absence of IL-1 for 3 days. Histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses of disc organ cultures revealed that IL-1 mediates changes in proteoglycan (PG) content and in-situ levels of catabolic proteins (MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5) in the nucleus pulposus of the disc. However, these IL-1 effects are more pronounced in miR-146a KO discs compared to WT discs. For example, absence of miR-146a increases the percentage of MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5 positive cells after treatment with IL-1. Thus, miR-146a appears to protect against IL-1 induced IVD degeneration and inflammation. Stimulation of endogenous miR-146a expression or exogenous delivery of miRNA-146a are viable therapeutic strategies that may decelerate disc degeneration and regain a normal homeostatic balance in extracellular matrix production and turn-over. PMID:25311550

  18. MicroRNA-146a reduces IL-1 dependent inflammatory responses in the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Gu, Su-Xi; Li, Xin; Hamilton, John L; Chee, Ana; Kc, Ranjan; Chen, Di; An, Howard S; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Chun-do; Ma, Yuan-Zheng; van Wijnen, Andre J; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-25

    Because miR-146a expression in articular chondrocytes is associated with osteoarthritis (OA), we assessed whether miR-146a is linked to cartilage degeneration in the spine. Monolayer cultures of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells from the intervertebral discs (IVD) of bovine tails were transfected with a miR-146a mimic. To provoke inflammatory responses and catabolic extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, cells were co-treated with interleukin-1 (IL-1). Transfection of miR-146a decreases IL-1 induced mRNA levels of inflammatory genes and catabolic proteases in NP cells based on quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. Similarly, miR146a suppresses IL-1 induced protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases and aggrecanases as revealed by immunoblotting. Disc segments from wild type (WT) and miR-146a knockout (KO) mice were cultured ex vivo in the presence or absence of IL-1 for 3days. Histological and immuno-histochemical (IHC) analyses of disc organ cultures revealed that IL-1 mediates changes in proteoglycan (PG) content and in-situ levels of catabolic proteins (MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5) in the nucleus pulposus of the disc. However, these IL-1 effects are more pronounced in miR-146a KO discs compared to WT discs. For example, absence of miR-146a increases the percentage of MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5 positive cells after treatment with IL-1. Thus, miR-146a appears to protect against IL-1 induced IVD degeneration and inflammation. Stimulation of endogenous miR-146a expression or exogenous delivery of miRNA-146a are viable therapeutic strategies that may decelerate disc degeneration and regain a normal homeostatic balance in extracellular matrix production and turn-over. PMID:25311550

  19. The role of interleukin-1 in the pathogenesis of human Intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Le Maitre, Christine Lyn; Freemont, Anthony J; Hoyland, Judith Alison

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the hypotheses that in human intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration there is local production of the cytokine IL-1, and that this locally produced cytokine can induce the cellular and matrix changes of IVD degeneration. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize five members of the IL-1 family (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1Ra (IL-1 receptor antagonist), IL-1RI (IL-1 receptor, type I), and ICE (IL-1β-converting enzyme)) in non-degenerate and degenerate human IVDs. In addition, cells derived from non-degenerate and degenerate human IVDs were challenged with IL-1 agonists and the response was investigated using real-time PCR for a number of matrix-degrading enzymes, matrix proteins, and members of the IL-1 family. This study has shown that native disc cells from non-degenerate and degenerate discs produced the IL-1 agonists, antagonist, the active receptor, and IL-1β-converting enzyme. In addition, immunopositivity for these proteins, with the exception of IL-1Ra, increased with severity of degeneration. We have also shown that IL-1 treatment of human IVD cells resulted in increased gene expression for the matrix-degrading enzymes (MMP 3 (matrix metalloproteinase 3), MMP 13 (matrix metalloproteinase 13), and ADAMTS-4 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs)) and a decrease in the gene expression for matrix genes (aggrecan, collagen II, collagen I, and SOX6). In conclusion we have shown that IL-1 is produced in the degenerate IVD. It is synthesized by native disc cells, and treatment of human disc cells with IL-1 induces an imbalance between catabolic and anabolic events, responses that represent the changes seen during disc degeneration. Therefore, inhibiting IL-1 could be an important therapeutic target for preventing and reversing disc degeneration. PMID:15987475

  20. Effect of microgravity on the biomechanical properties of lumbar and caudal intervertebral discs in mice.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jeannie F; Hargens, Alan R; Cheng, Kevin K; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2014-09-22

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity has shown to have deleterious effects on the human spine, indicated by low back pain during spaceflight and increased incidence of post-spaceflight herniated nucleus pulposus. We examined the effect of microgravity on biomechanical properties of lumbar and caudal discs from mice having been on 15-day shuttle mission STS-131. Sixteen C57BL/C mice (spaceflight group, n=8; ground-based control group, n=8) were sacrificed immediately after spaceflight. Physiological disc height (PDH) was measured in situ, and compressive creep tests were performed to parameterize biomechanical properties into endplate permeability (k), nuclear swelling pressure strain dependence (D), and annular viscoelasticity (G). For caudal discs, the spaceflight group exhibited 32% lower PDH, 70% lower D and crept more compared to the control mice (p=0.03). For lumbar discs, neither PDH nor D was significantly different between murine groups. Initial modulus, osmotic pressure, k and G for lumbar and caudal discs did not appear influenced by microgravity (p>0.05). Decreases in both PDH and D suggest prolonged microgravity effectively diminished biomechanical properties of caudal discs. By contrast, differences were not noted for lumbar discs. This potentially deleterious interaction between prolonged weightlessness and differential ranges of motion along the spine may underlie the increased cervical versus lumbar disc herniation rates observed among astronauts. PMID:25085756

  1. Role of biomechanics on intervertebral disc degeneration and regenerative therapies: What needs repairing in the disc and what are promising biomaterials for its repair?

    PubMed Central

    Iatridis, James C.; Nicoll, Steven B.; Michalek, Arthur J.; Walter, Benjamin A.; Gupta, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Context Degeneration and injuries of the intervertebral disc result in large alterations in biomechanical behaviors. Repair strategies using biomaterials can be optimized based on biomechanical and biological requirements. Purpose To review current literature on 1) effects of degeneration, simulated degeneration, and injury on biomechanics of the intervertebral disc with special attention paid to needle puncture injuries which are a pathway for diagnostics and regenerative therapies; and 2) promising biomaterials for disc repair with a focus on how those biomaterials may promote biomechanical repair. Study Design/Setting A narrative review to evaluate the role of biomechanics on disc degeneration and regenerative therapies with a focus on what biomechanical properties need to be repaired and how to evaluate and accomplish such repairs using biomaterials. Model systems for screening of such repair strategies are also briefly described. Methods Papers were selected from two main Pubmed searches using keywords: intervertebral AND biomechanics (1823 articles) and intervertebral AND biomaterials (361 articles). Additional keywords (injury, needle puncture, nucleus pressurization, biomaterials, hydrogel, sealant, tissue engineering) were used to narrow articles to the topics most relevant to this review. Results Degeneration and acute disc injuries have the capacity to influence nucleus pulposus pressurization and annulus fibrosus integrity, which are necessary for effective disc function, and therefore, require repair. Needle injection injuries are of particular clinical relevance with potential to influence disc biomechanics, cellularity, and metabolism, yet these effects are localized or small, and more research is required to evaluate and reduce potential clinical morbidity using such techniques. NP replacement strategies, such as hydrogels, are required to restore NP pressurization or lost volume. AF repair strategies, including crosslinked hydrogels

  2. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of collagen and elastin in annulus fibrosus of the physiologic and scoliotic intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Kobielarz, Magdalena; Szotek, Sylwia; Głowacki, Maciej; Dawidowicz, Joanna; Pezowicz, Celina

    2016-09-01

    The biophysical properties of the annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc are determined by collagen and elastin fibres. The progression of scoliosis is accompanied by a number of pathological changes concerning these structural proteins. This is a major cause of dysfunction of the intervertebral disc. The object of the study were annulus fibrosus samples excised from intervertebral discs of healthy subjects and patients treated surgically for scoliosis in the thoracolumbar or lumbar spine. The research material was subjected to structural analysis by light microscopy and quantitative analysis of the content of collagen types I, II, III and IV as well as elastin by immunoenzymatic test (ELISA). A statistical analysis was conducted to assess the impact of the sampling site (Mann-Whitney test, α=0.05) and scoliosis (Wilcoxon matched pairs test, α=0.05) on the obtained results. The microscopic studies conducted on scoliotic annulus fibrosus showed a significant architectural distortion of collagen and elastin fibres. Quantitative biochemical assays demonstrated region-dependent distribution of only collagen types I and II in the case of healthy intervertebral discs whereas in the case of scoliotic discs region-dependent distribution concerned all examined proteins of the extracellular matrix. Comparison of scoliotic and healthy annulus fibrosus revealed a significant decrease in the content of collagen type I and elastin as well as a slight increase in the proportion of collagen types III and IV. The content of collagen type II did not differ significantly between both groups. The observed anomalies are a manifestation of degenerative changes affecting annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc in patients suffering from scoliosis. PMID:27177214

  3. DISTRIBUTION AND SHORT- AND LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF INJECTED GELIFIED ETHANOL INTO THE LUMBOSACRAL INTERVERTEBRAL DISC IN HEALTHY DOGS.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Shawn D; Brisson, Brigitte A; Gaitero, Luis; Caswell, Jeff L; Liao, Penting; Sinclair, Melissa; Chalmers, Heather J

    2016-01-01

    Radiopaque gelified ethanol preparation has been described as a useful agent for treatment of humans with intervertebral disc protrusion. The material is injected into the nucleus pulposus under image guidance with intention to cause the protruded disc material to recede. Because treatment options for dogs with chronic protrusions are limited, new and minimally invasive treatments are desirable. The aim of this experimental, descriptive, prospective study was to assess the feasibility and safety of percutaneous injection of gelified ethanol into the lumbosacral intervertebral disc of dogs. Lumbosacral intervertebral discs of normal dogs (n = 9) were imaged with magnetic resonance imaging and then injected with gelified ethanol using image guidance. The accuracy of gelified ethanol placement in the nucleus pulposus and presence of leakage of the injected material were documented. Postinjection computed tomography (CT) findings (n = 9), short-term (n = 9) and long-term (n = 4) follow-up magnetic resonance imaging and CT findings were compared to document the distribution of the injected preparation and identify effects on adjacent tissues. Percutaneous injection of the intervertebral disc was successful in delivering radiopaque gelified ethanol to the nucleus pulposus in all dogs. Leakage of the injected material into the vertebral canal was present in three dogs immediately following injection and in another additional dog at 1 year following injection. All dogs tolerated the injection well and had no clinical adverse reactions within the study period. Findings indicated that injection of the nucleus pulposus of healthy dogs was well tolerated, even in the presence of mild leakage of material from the intervertebral disc. PMID:26626409

  4. The Effects of Platelet-Rich Plasma on Halting the Progression in Porcine Intervertebral Disc Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hongsik; Holt, David C; Smith, Richard; Kim, Song-Ja; Gardocki, Raymond J; Hasty, Karen A

    2016-02-01

    Disc degeneration and the subsequent herniation and/or rupture of the intervertebral disc (IVD) are due to a failure of the extracellular matrix of the annulus to contain the contents of the nucleus. This results from inadequate maintenance of the matrix components as well as the proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that degrade matrix molecules. Arresting progression of disc degeneration in the annulus holds greater clinical potential at this point than prevention of its onset in the nucleus. Therefore, in this study, we have therapeutic aims that would decrease levels of the cytokines and growth factors that indirectly lead to disc degeneration via stimulating MMP and increase levels of several beneficial growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-β, with the addition of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) that would stimulate cell growth and matrix synthesis. For this study, we attempted to address these imbalances of metabolism by using tumor necrosis factor-α treated annulus fibrosus cells isolated from porcine IVD tissue and incubating the cells in a growth factor rich environment with PRP. These results indicate that the PRP in vitro increased the production of the major matrix components (type II collagen and aggrecan) and decreased the inhibitory collagenase MMP-1. This application will address a therapeutic approach for intervening early in the degenerative process. PMID:26147759

  5. MSC response to pH levels found in degenerating intervertebral discs

    SciTech Connect

    Wuertz, Karin Godburn, Karolyn; Iatridis, James C.

    2009-02-20

    Painful degenerative disc disease is a major health problem and for successful tissue regeneration, MSCs must endure and thrive in a harsh disc microenvironment that includes matrix acidity as a critical factor. MSCs were isolated from bone marrow of Sprague-Dawley rats from two different age groups (<1 month, n = 6 and 4-5 months, n = 6) and cultured under four different pH conditions representative of the healthy, mildly or severely degenerated intervertebral disc (pH 7.4, 7.1, 6.8, and 6.5) for 5 days. Acidity caused an inhibition of aggrecan, collagen-1, and TIMP-3 expression, as well as a decrease in proliferation and viability and was associated with a change in cell morphology. Ageing had generally minor effects but young MSCs maintained greater mRNA expression levels. As acidic pH levels are typical of increasingly degenerated discs, our findings demonstrate the importance of early interventions and predifferentiation when planning to use MSCs for reparative treatments.

  6. An In Vivo Model of Reduced Nucleus Pulposus Glycosaminoglycan Content in the Rat Lumbar Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Boxberger, John I.; Auerbach, Joshua D.; Sen, Sounok; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    Study Design An in vivo model resembling early stage disc degeneration in the rat lumbar spine. Objective Simulate the reduced glycosaminoglycan content and altered mechanics observed in intervertebral disc degeneration using a controlled injection of chondroitinase ABC (ChABC). Summary of Background Data Nucleus glycosaminoglycan reduction occurs early during disc degeneration; however, mechanisms through which degeneration progresses from this state are unknown. Animal models simulating this condition are essential for understanding disease progression and for development of therapies aimed at early intervention. Methods ChABC was injected into the nucleus pulposus, and discs were evaluated via micro-CT, mechanical testing, biochemical assays, and histology 4 and 12 weeks after injection. Results At 4 weeks, reductions in nucleus glycosaminoglycan level by 43%, average height by 12%, neutral zone modulus by 40%, and increases in range of motion by 40%, and creep strain by 25% were found. Neutral zone modulus and range of motion were correlated with nucleus glycosaminoglycan. At 12 weeks, recovery of some mechanical function was detected as range of motion and creep returned to control levels; however, this was not attributed to glycosaminoglycan restoration, because mechanics were no longer correlated with glycosaminoglycan. Conclusion An in vivo model simulating physiologic levels of glycosaminoglycan loss was created to aid in understanding the relationships between altered biochemistry, altered mechanics, and altered cellular function in degeneration. PMID:18197098

  7. Histological analysis of surgical samples and a proposed scoring system for infections in intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Rao, Prashanth J; Phan, Kevin; Maharaj, Monish M; Scherman, Daniel B; Lambie, Neil; Salisbury, Elizabeth; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2016-08-01

    Back pain remains one the most prevalent types of pain and disability worldwide. Infection is estimated to be the underlying cause in approximately 0.01% of patients. Despite recent evidence demonstrating prominent infection rates, a standardised algorithm for diagnosis of disc infection is lacking. Histopathological evaluation can aid in confirming inflammatory changes and also in identifying degenerative changes. Hence, standardising practice through a clear scoring system with regards to inflammation and degeneration may have some utility in the clinical setting. To our knowledge no such systems exist specifically for intervertebral disc infection. A literature review of current methods of scoring inflammation and degeneration in spine surgery and orthopaedic surgery was performed. Based on the current evidence, a scoring system for disc inflammatory and degenerative changes was proposed. We propose four domains for consideration: (1) granulation tissue, (2) dense fibrosis, (3) chronic inflammatory cells, and (4) neutrophil count. The non-standardised nature of diagnosing infections and degeneration in the spinal surgery literature means that this scoring system is currently of particular value. Based on a literature review, our proposed method for diagnosis incorporates a combination of histopathological criteria expected to increase diagnostic sensitivity in the setting of disc infection. Overall, scoring can be applied to surgically obtained material and integrated directly into routine pathological practice. PMID:27050918

  8. Spinal Epidural Varices, a great Mimic of Intervertebral Disc Prolapse - A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    V, Raghavendra; Haridas, Papanaik; Kumar, Anand; K, Ajith

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Epidural venous plexus enlargement, presenting with low back pain and radiculopathy, is an uncommon cause of nerve roots impingement. This condition commonly mimics a herniated nucleus pulposus radiologically. The radiological diagnosis is often missed and the diagnosis is made during the surgery. We are hereby presenting 2 such cases of epidural varices mimicking intervertebral disc prolapse with lumbar radiculopathy. Case Report: Case 1: 43 yr old female presented with acute exacerbation of low back ache and significant right L5–S1 radiculopathy without neurological deficit. MRI reported as L5-S1 disc prolapse. Intra-operatively engorged dilated epidural vein seen compressing S1 nerve root. Associated Disc bulge removed and Coagulative ablation of the dilated epidural vein was performed Case 2: 45 year old male manual labourer presented with backache with left sided sciatica since 8 months, increased in severity since past 1month associated with sensory blunting in L5 and S1 dermatomes. Neurologic examination revealed normal muscle power in his lower extremities. Sensations was blunted in L5 and S1 dermatomes. MRI was reported as L5-S1 disc prolapsed compressing left S1 nerve root. Decompression of the L5–S1 intervertebral space was performed through a left –sidelaminotomy. Large, engorged serpentine epidural veins was found in the axilla of S1 nerve root, compressing it. Coagulative ablation of the dilated epidural vein was performed. Retrospectively, features of epidural varices were noted in the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans. Both patients had significant improvement in radiculopathy immediate postoperatively, and sensory symptoms resolved over the next 6 weeks in second case. At recent follow up, both patients had significant relief of symptoms and no recurrent radicular symptoms. Conclusion: An abnormal dilated epidural venous plexus that mimics a herniated lumbar disc is a rare entity. This pathology should be always kept

  9. Axial Creep Loading and Unloaded Recovery of the Human Intervertebral Disc and the Effect of Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Grace D.; Jacobs, Nathan T.; Sen, Sounok; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2011-01-01

    The intervertebral disc maintains a balance between externally applied loads and internal osmotic pressure. Fluid flow plays a key role in this process, causing fluctuations in disc hydration and height. The objectives of this study were to quantify and model the axial creep and recovery responses of nondegenerate and degenerate human lumbar discs. Two experiments were performed. First, a slow compressive ramp was applied to 2000 N, unloaded to allow recovery for up to 24 hours, and re-applied. The linear-region stiffness and disc height were within 5% of the initial condition for recovery times greater than 8 hours. In the second experiment, a 1000 N creep load was applied for four hours, unloaded recovery monitored for 24 hours, and the creep load repeated. A viscoelastic model comprised of a “fast” and “slow” exponential response was used to describe the creep and recovery, where the fast response is associated with flow in the nucleus pulposus (NP) and endplate, while the slow response is associated with the annulus fibrosus (AF). The study demonstrated that recovery is 3-4X slower than loading. The fast response was correlated with degeneration, suggesting larger changes in the NP with degeneration compared to the AF. However, the fast response comprised only 10-15% of the total equilibrium displacement, with the AF-dominated slow response comprising 40-70%. Finally, the physiological loads and deformations and their associated long equilibrium times confirm that diurnal loading does not represent “equilibrium” in the disc, but that over time the disc is in steady-state. PMID:21783103

  10. Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Protect Intervertebral Disc Cells in Compression: Implications for Stem Cell Regenerative Disc Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhen; Luo, Beier; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Samartzis, Dino; Liu, Zhongyang; Gao, Bo; Huang, Liangliang; Luo, Zhuo-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Abnormal biomechanics plays a role in intervertebral disc degeneration. Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) have been implicated in disc integrity; however, their role in the setting of mechanical stimuli upon the disc's nucleus pulposus (NP) remains unknown. As such, the present study aimed to evaluate the influence of ADSCs upon NP cells in compressive load culture. Methods: Human NP cells were cultured in compressive load at 3.0MPa for 48 hours with or without ADSCs co-culture (the ratio was 50:50). We used flow cytometry, live/dead staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to evaluate cell death, and determined the expression of specific apoptotic pathways by characterizing the expression of activated caspases-3, -8 and -9. We further used real-time (RT-) PCR and immunostaining to determine the expression of the extracellular matrix (ECM), mediators of matrix degradation (e.g. MMPs, TIMPs and ADAMTSs), pro-inflammatory factors and NP cell phenotype markers. Results: ADSCs inhibited human NP cell apoptosis via suppression of activated caspase-9 and caspase-3. Furthermore, ADSCs protected NP cells from the degradative effects of compressive load by significantly up-regulating the expression of ECM genes (SOX9, COL2A1 and ACAN), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) genes (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2) and cytokeratin 8 (CK8) protein expression. Alternatively, ADSCs showed protective effect by inhibiting compressive load mediated increase of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs; MMP-3 and MMP-13), disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTSs; ADAMTS-1 and 5), and pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1beta, IL-6, TGF-beta1 and TNF-alpha). Conclusions: Our study is the first in vitro study assessing the impact of ADSCs on NP cells in an un-physiological mechanical stimulation culture environment. Our study noted that ADSCs protect compressive load induced NP cell death and degradation by inhibition of activated caspase-9 and -3

  11. Lentivirus-mediated TGF-β3, CTGF and TIMP1 gene transduction as a gene therapy for intervertebral disc degeneration in an in vivo rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YONG; YU, TAO; MA, XUE-XIAO; XIANG, HONG-FEI; HU, YOU-GU; CHEN, BO-HUA

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) gene transduction, using a lentiviral vector, on rabbit intervertebral disc degeneration in vivo, with the intention of investigating their potential use in gene therapy. A model of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration was created by needle puncture into the annulus fibrosus of 15 New Zealand white rabbits. Empty lentivirus or recombinant lentiviral plasmid lenti-TGFβ3-P2A-CTGF-T2A-TIMP1 was injected into degenerative lumbar intervertebral discs (representing the control and experimental groups, respectively), whilst untreated degenerative lumbar intervertebral discs served as the puncture group. After 16 and 20 weeks, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was conducted and the changes in intensity on micrographs of degenerative intervertebral discs were measured. The mRNA levels of aggrecan and type II collagen in nucleus pulposus tissue were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression levels of type II collagen and aggrecan were determined by western blot analysis. MRI results indicated that intervertebral disc degeneration was ameliorated in the experimental group when compared with the control and the puncture group. Furthermore, the expression levels of type II collagen and aggrecan in the puncture and control groups were significantly lower than in the experimental group (P<0.05). In conclusion, lenti-TGFβ3-P2A-CTGF-T2A-TIMP1 co-transduction can promote synthesis of aggrecan and type II collagen in degenerative intervertebral discs, thereby delaying intervertebral disc degeneration. These results indicate the potential of gene therapy in treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:27073456

  12. Cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair®: A novel, full-endoscopic surgical technique for the treatment of symptomatic cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Ara J.; Cianciabella, Augusto; Cutright, Jason; Deukmedjian, Arias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a novel full-endoscopic, anterior cervical, trans-discal, motion preserving, laser assisted, nonfusion, outpatient surgical procedure to safely treat symptomatic cervical disc diseases including herniation, spondylosis, stenosis, and annular tears. Here we describe a new endoscopic approach to cervical disc disease that allows direct visualization of the posterior longitudinal ligament, posterior vertebral endplates, annulus, neuroforamina, and herniated disc fragments. All patients treated with Deuk Laser Disc Repair were also candidates for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods: A total of 142 consecutive adult patients with symptomatic cervical disc disease underwent Deuk Laser Disc Repair during a 4-year period. This novel procedure incorporates a full-endoscopic selective partial decompressive discectomy, foraminoplasty, and posterior annular debridement. Postoperative complications and average volume of herniated disc fragments removed are reported. Results: All patients were successfully treated with cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair. There were no postoperative complications. Average volume of herniated disc material removed was 0.09 ml. Conclusions: Potential benefits of Deuk Laser Disc Repair for symptomatic cervical disc disease include lower cost, smaller incision, nonfusion, preservation of segmental motion, outpatient, faster recovery, less postoperative analgesic use, fewer complications, no hardware failure, no pseudoarthrosis, no postoperative dysphagia, and no increased risk of adjacent segment disease as seen with fusion. PMID:23230523

  13. Measurement of Intervertebral Cervical Motion by Means of Dynamic X-Ray Image Processing and Data Interpolation

    PubMed Central

    Bifulco, Paolo; Cesarelli, Mario; Romano, Maria; Sansone, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measurement of intervertebral kinematics of the cervical spine can support the diagnosis of widespread diseases related to neck pain, such as chronic whiplash dysfunction, arthritis, and segmental degeneration. The natural inaccessibility of the spine, its complex anatomy, and the small range of motion only permit concise measurement in vivo. Low dose X-ray fluoroscopy allows time-continuous screening of cervical spine during patient's spontaneous motion. To obtain accurate motion measurements, each vertebra was tracked by means of image processing along a sequence of radiographic images. To obtain a time-continuous representation of motion and to reduce noise in the experimental data, smoothing spline interpolation was used. Estimation of intervertebral motion for cervical segments was obtained by processing patient's fluoroscopic sequence; intervertebral angle and displacement and the instantaneous centre of rotation were computed. The RMS value of fitting errors resulted in about 0.2 degree for rotation and 0.2 mm for displacements. PMID:24288523

  14. An epidemiologic study of sports and weight lifting as possible risk factors for herniated lumbar and cervical discs. The Northeast Collaborative Group on Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Mundt, D J; Kelsey, J L; Golden, A L; Panjabi, M M; Pastides, H; Berg, A T; Sklar, J; Hosea, T

    1993-01-01

    The associations between participation in several specific sports, use of free weights, and use of weight lifting equipment and herniated lumbar or cervical intervertebral discs were examined in a case-control epidemiologic study. Specific sports considered were baseball or softball, golf, bowling, swimming, diving, jogging, aerobics, and racquet sports. Included in the final analysis were 287 patients with lumbar disc herniation and 63 patients with cervical disc herniation, each matched by sex, source of care, and decade of age to 1 control who was free of disc herniation and other conditions of the back or neck. Results indicated that most sports are not associated with an increased risk of herniation, and may be protective. Relative risk estimates for the association between individual sports and lumbar or cervical herniation were generally less than or close to 1.0. There was, however, a weak positive association between bowling and herniation at both the lumbar and cervical regions of the spine. Use of weight lifting equipment was not associated with herniated lumbar or cervical disc, but a possible association was indicated between use of free weights and risk of cervical herniation (relative risk, 1.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.74 to 4.74). PMID:8291639

  15. Dynamic loading, matrix maintenance and cell injection therapy of human intervertebral discs cultured in a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, D H; Gawri, R; Moir, J; Beckman, L; Eglin, D; Steffen, T; Roughley, P J; Ouellet, J A; Haglund, L

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain originating from intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration affects the quality of life for millions of people, and it is a major contributor to global healthcare costs. Long-term culture of intact IVDs is necessary to develop ex vivo models of human IVD degeneration and repair, where the relationship between mechanobiology, disc matrix composition and metabolism can be better understood. A bioreactor was developed that facilitates culture of intact human IVDs in a controlled, dynamically loaded environment. Tissue integrity and cell viability was evaluated under 3 different loading conditions: low 0.1-0.3, medium 0.1-0.3 and high 0.1-1.2 MPa. Cell viability was maintained > 80 % throughout the disc at low and medium loads, whereas it dropped to approximately 70 % (NP) and 50 % (AF) under high loads. Although cell viability was affected at high loads, there was no evidence of sGAG loss, changes in newly synthesised collagen type II or chondroadherin fragmentation. Sulphated GAG content remained at a stable level of approximately 50 µg sGAG/mg tissue in all loading protocols. To evaluate the feasibility of tissue repair strategies with cell supplementation, human NP cells were transplanted into discs within a thermoreversible hyaluronan hydrogel. The discs were loaded under medium loads, and the injected cells remained largely localised to the NP region. This study demonstrates the feasibility of culturing human IVDs for 14 days under cyclic dynamic loading conditions. The system allows the determination a safe range-of-loading and presents a platform to evaluate cell therapies and help to elucidate the effect of load following cell-based therapies. PMID:26728497

  16. Intervertebral disc creep behavior assessment through an open source finite element solver.

    PubMed

    Castro, A P G; Wilson, W; Huyghe, J M; Ito, K; Alves, J L

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is one of the largest health problems faced worldwide, based on lost working time and associated costs. By means of this motivation, this work aims to evaluate a biomimetic Finite Element (FE) model of the Intervertebral Disc (IVD). Recent studies have emphasized the importance of an accurate biomechanical modeling of the IVD, as it is a highly complex multiphasic medium. Poroelastic models of the disc are mostly implemented in commercial finite element packages with limited access to the algorithms. Therefore, a novel poroelastic formulation implemented on a home-developed open source FE solver is briefly addressed throughout this paper. The combination of this formulation with biphasic osmotic swelling behavior is also taken into account. Numerical simulations were devoted to the analysis of the non-degenerated human lumbar IVD time-dependent behavior. The results of the tests performed for creep assessment were inside the scope of the experimental data, with a remarkable improvement of the numerical accuracy when compared with previously published results obtained with ABAQUS(®). In brief, this in-development open-source FE solver was validated with literature experimental data and aims to be a valuable tool to study the IVD biomechanics and DDD mechanisms. PMID:24210477

  17. Painful, degenerating intervertebral discs up-regulate neurite sprouting and CGRP through nociceptive factors.

    PubMed

    Krock, Emerson; Rosenzweig, Derek H; Chabot-Doré, Anne-Julie; Jarzem, Peter; Weber, Michael H; Ouellet, Jean A; Stone, Laura S; Haglund, Lisbet

    2014-06-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD) can result in chronic low back pain, a common cause of morbidity and disability. Inflammation has been associated with IVD degeneration, however the relationship between inflammatory factors and chronic low back pain remains unclear. Furthermore, increased levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are both associated with inflammation and chronic low back pain, but whether degenerating discs release sufficient concentrations of factors that induce nociceptor plasticity remains unclear. Degenerating IVDs from low back pain patients and healthy, painless IVDs from human organ donors were cultured ex vivo. Inflammatory and nociceptive factors released by IVDs into culture media were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and protein arrays. The ability of factors released to induce neurite growth and nociceptive neuropeptide production was investigated. Degenerating discs release increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, NGF and BDNF. Factors released by degenerating IVDs increased neurite growth and calcitonin gene-related peptide expression, both of which were blocked by anti-NGF treatment. Furthermore, protein arrays found increased levels of 20 inflammatory factors, many of which have nociceptive effects. Our results demonstrate that degenerating and painful human IVDs release increased levels of NGF, inflammatory and nociceptive factors ex vivo that induce neuronal plasticity and may actively diffuse to induce neo-innervation and pain in vivo. PMID:24650225

  18. Painful, degenerating intervertebral discs up-regulate neurite sprouting and CGRP through nociceptive factors

    PubMed Central

    Krock, Emerson; Rosenzweig, Derek H; Chabot-Doré, Anne-Julie; Jarzem, Peter; Weber, Michael H; Ouellet, Jean A; Stone, Laura S; Haglund, Lisbet

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD) can result in chronic low back pain, a common cause of morbidity and disability. Inflammation has been associated with IVD degeneration, however the relationship between inflammatory factors and chronic low back pain remains unclear. Furthermore, increased levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are both associated with inflammation and chronic low back pain, but whether degenerating discs release sufficient concentrations of factors that induce nociceptor plasticity remains unclear. Degenerating IVDs from low back pain patients and healthy, painless IVDs from human organ donors were cultured ex vivo. Inflammatory and nociceptive factors released by IVDs into culture media were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and protein arrays. The ability of factors released to induce neurite growth and nociceptive neuropeptide production was investigated. Degenerating discs release increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, NGF and BDNF. Factors released by degenerating IVDs increased neurite growth and calcitonin gene-related peptide expression, both of which were blocked by anti-NGF treatment. Furthermore, protein arrays found increased levels of 20 inflammatory factors, many of which have nociceptive effects. Our results demonstrate that degenerating and painful human IVDs release increased levels of NGF, inflammatory and nociceptive factors ex vivo that induce neuronal plasticity and may actively diffuse to induce neo-innervation and pain in vivo. PMID:24650225

  19. Intervertebral disc responses during spinal loading with MRI-compatible spinal compression apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Iwane; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2004-07-01

    This study addresses the development of an MRI-compatible spinal compression harness for use as a research and diagnostic tool. This apparatus adds valuable information to MRI imaging regarding the physiology/biomechanics of intervertebral discs and pathophysiology of back pain in patients and astronauts in space. All materials of the spinal compression apparatus are non-metallic for MRI compatibility. The compact design fits into standard MRI or CT scanners and loading is adjusted to specific percentages of BW with elastic cords. Previously this capability has not been available. Three healthy male subjects were fitted with a spinal compression harness and placed supine in a MRI scanner. Longitudinal distance between T7/8 and L5/S1 discs decreased 5.6 mm with 50% BW compression. Lumbosacral angle increased 17.2 degrees. T2 values of nucleus pulposus from L1/2 to L5/S1 discs increased 18.2+/-6.1% (+/-SD) during 50% BW compression and 25.3+/-7.4% (+/-SD) during 75% BW compression.

  20. Molecular and genetic advances in the regeneration of the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Maerz, Tristan; Herkowitz, Harry; Baker, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Owing to the debilitating nature of degenerative disc disease (DDD) and other spine pathologies, significant research has been performed with the goal of healing or regenerating the intervertebral disc (IVD). Structural complexity, coupled with low vascularity and cellularity, make IVD regeneration an extremely challenging task. Methods: Tissue engineering-based strategies utilize three components to enhance tissue regeneration; scaffold materials to guide cell growth, biomolecules to enhance cell migration and differentiation, and cells (autologous, or allogeneic) to initiate the process of tissue formation. Significant advances in IVD regeneration have been made utilizing these tissue engineering strategies. Results: The current literature demonstrates that members of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily are efficacious in the regeneration of an anabolic response in the IVD and to facilitate chondrogenic differentiation. Gene therapy, though thwarted by safety concerns and the risk of ectopic transfection, has significant potential for a targeted and sustained regenerative response. Stem cells in combination with injectable, biocompatible, and biodegradable scaffolds in the form of hydrogels can differentiate into de novo IVD tissue and facilitate regeneration of the existing matrix. Therapies that address both anabolism and the inherent catabolic state of the IVD using either direct inhibitors or broad-spectrum inhibitors show extensive promise. Conclusion: This review article summarizes the genetic and molecular advances that promise to play an integral role in the development of new strategies to combat DDD and promote healing of injured discs. PMID:23646279

  1. Mohawk promotes the maintenance and regeneration of the outer annulus fibrosus of intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Nakamichi, Ryo; Ito, Yoshiaki; Inui, Masafumi; Onizuka, Naoko; Kayama, Tomohiro; Kataoka, Kensuke; Suzuki, Hidetsugu; Mori, Masaki; Inagawa, Masayo; Ichinose, Shizuko; Lotz, Martin K.; Sakai, Daisuke; Masuda, Koichi; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The main pathogenesis of intervertebral disc (IVD) herniation involves disruption of the annulus fibrosus (AF) caused by ageing or excessive mechanical stress and the resulting prolapse of the nucleus pulposus. Owing to the avascular nature of the IVD and lack of understanding the mechanisms that maintain the IVD, current therapies do not lead to tissue regeneration. Here we show that homeobox protein Mohawk (Mkx) is a key transcription factor that regulates AF development, maintenance and regeneration. Mkx is mainly expressed in the outer AF (OAF) of humans and mice. In Mkx−/− mice, the OAF displays a deficiency of multiple tendon/ligament-related genes, a smaller OAF collagen fibril diameter and a more rapid progression of IVD degeneration compared with the wild type. Mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing Mkx promote functional AF regeneration in a mouse AF defect model, with abundant collagen fibril formation. Our results indicate a therapeutic strategy for AF regeneration. PMID:27527664

  2. Mohawk promotes the maintenance and regeneration of the outer annulus fibrosus of intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Ryo; Ito, Yoshiaki; Inui, Masafumi; Onizuka, Naoko; Kayama, Tomohiro; Kataoka, Kensuke; Suzuki, Hidetsugu; Mori, Masaki; Inagawa, Masayo; Ichinose, Shizuko; Lotz, Martin K; Sakai, Daisuke; Masuda, Koichi; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The main pathogenesis of intervertebral disc (IVD) herniation involves disruption of the annulus fibrosus (AF) caused by ageing or excessive mechanical stress and the resulting prolapse of the nucleus pulposus. Owing to the avascular nature of the IVD and lack of understanding the mechanisms that maintain the IVD, current therapies do not lead to tissue regeneration. Here we show that homeobox protein Mohawk (Mkx) is a key transcription factor that regulates AF development, maintenance and regeneration. Mkx is mainly expressed in the outer AF (OAF) of humans and mice. In Mkx(-/-) mice, the OAF displays a deficiency of multiple tendon/ligament-related genes, a smaller OAF collagen fibril diameter and a more rapid progression of IVD degeneration compared with the wild type. Mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing Mkx promote functional AF regeneration in a mouse AF defect model, with abundant collagen fibril formation. Our results indicate a therapeutic strategy for AF regeneration. PMID:27527664

  3. Imaging diagnosis--degenerative intraspinal cyst associated with an intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Penning, Victoria A; Benigni, Livia; Steeves, Elizabeth; Cappello, Rodolfo

    2007-01-01

    A 6-year-old neutered male Rottweiler had chronic episodic signs of thoracolumbar pain and inability to stand that did not improve after rest and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medication. In magnetic resonance images, an extradural mass was identified between the spinal cord and the T13/L1 intervertebral disc; the mass was compressing the cord in a dorsoventral direction. The lesion had a low signal intensity rim that enhanced slightly after gadolinium administration, and contents with similar signal intensity to cerebrospinal fluid. The lesion was removed surgically by severing its attachments to the annulus fibrosus. The histologic diagnosis was degenerative intraspinal cyst. The origin of such cysts, and their relationship to synovial and ganglion cysts is discussed. PMID:17899976

  4. [The three-dimensional culture of adult mesenchymal stem cells for intervertebral disc tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ganjun; Liu, Hao; Deng, Li; Chen, Xiaohe; Zhao, Xianfeng; Liang, Tao; Li, Xiuqiong

    2009-12-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is one of the major causes of low back pain. As current clinical treatments are aimed at restoring biomechanical function and providing symptomatic relief, the methods focused on biological repair have aroused interest and several tissue engineering approaches using different cell types have been proposed. Owing to the unsuitable nature of degenerate cells for tissue engineering, attention has been given to the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this connection, we have made a study on the characteristics of MSCs derived from adult bone marrow and on the feasibility of constructing IVD tissue-engineering cell under a Three-Dimensional Pellet Culture System. The human bone marrow MSCs were isolated and purified with density gradient solution and attachment-independent culture system. MSCs isolated using this method are a homogeneous population as indicated by morphology and other criteria. They have the capacity for self-renewal and proliferation, and the multilineage potential to differentiate. PMID:20095491

  5. Clinical effect of additional electroacupuncture on thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation in 80 paraplegic dogs.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyun-Jung; Yoon, Hun-Young; Kim, Joon-Young; Jang, Ha-Young; Lee, Bora; Choi, Seok Hwa; Jeong, Soon-Wuk

    2010-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of electroacupuncture and acupuncture in combination with medication for the treatment of thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation was investigated in paraplegic dogs with intact deep pain perception. To evaluate the additional effect of electroacupuncture, dogs treated with conventional medicines alone were compared to dogs treated with electroacupuncture and acupuncture and conventional medicine. Medical records of 80 dogs were reviewed for this investigation and classified into two groups undergoing different treatment methods: (1) treatment with conventional medicine alone (Group C, n = 37) and (2) treatment with conventional medicine combined with electroacupuncture and acupuncture (Group CE, n = 43). Prednisone was the conventional medicine and electroacupuncture was applied at GV07 and GV02-1 at 0.5-2.5 mV, mixed Hz of 2 and 15 Hz for 25-30 min. Acupuncture was performed locally at urinary bladder meridian points near the lesion, and bilaterally distantly at GB30, GB34, and ST36. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by post-operative neurologic function, ambulation, relapse, complication, and urinary function. Ambulation recovery was more prevalent in Group CE than Group C (p = 0.01) and recovery of ambulation and back pain relief time was shorter in Group CE compared to Group C (p = 0.011 and 0.001, respectively). Relapse rate was significantly lower in Group CE (p = 0.031). The results suggest that a combination of electroacupuncture and acupuncture with conventional medicine is more effective than conventional medicine alone in recovering ambulation, relieving back pain, and decreasing relapse. Electroacupuncture and acupuncture is thus a reasonable option for the treatment of intervertebral disc herniation in paraplegic dogs with intact deep pain perception. PMID:21061457

  6. Characterization of microRNA expression profiles in patients with intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, BO; YU, QIANG; LI, HAOPENG; GUO, XIONG; HE, XIJING

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is associated with lower back pain and is a global burden with severe healthcare and socioeconomic consequences. However, the underlying mechanisms of IDD remain largely unelucidated. Accumulating evidence has indicasted that newly defined gene regulators, microRNAs (miRNAs), play a vital role in neurodegenerative, pathophysiological and certain reproductive disorders. To characterize the differential miRNA expression profiles between IDD and spinal cord injury, specimens from 3 patients with IDD and 3 with spinal cord injury were selected for microarray analysis. Total RNA from these 6 specimens was extracted and subjected to global miRNA expression analysis using the Exiqon miRCURY™ LNA Array (v.16.0). The microarray data were then validated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In addition, bioinformatics analysis was performed to investigate the dysregulated miRNA target genes and signaling pathways involved. Among the miRNAs analyzed, 25 miRNAs were found to be upregulated and 26 were found to be downregulated in the IDD group compared with the spinal cord injury group. The qRT-PCR results validated the microarray data. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the signaling pathways most likely to be controlled by these miRNAs were the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR; ErbB) and Wnt pathways. Our results demonstrated that the miRNA expression in patients with IDD differed significantly from that in patients who sustained injury to the intervertebral disc. Our data indicate that the dysregulated miRNAs control the signaling pathways important for the maintenance of IDD. Further studies on miRNA target gene identification and biological functions may address the specific regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs in IDD, and may provide valuable insight into the diagnosis and treatment of IDD. PMID:24173697

  7. Characterization of microRNA expression profiles in patients with intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Yu, Qiang; Li, Haopeng; Guo, Xiong; He, Xijing

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is associated with lower back pain and is a global burden with severe healthcare and socioeconomic consequences. However, the underlying mechanisms of IDD remain largely unelucidated. Accumulating evidence has indicasted that newly defined gene regulators, microRNAs (miRNAs), play a vital role in neurodegenerative, pathophysiological and certain reproductive disorders. To characterize the differential miRNA expression profiles between IDD and spinal cord injury, specimens from 3 patients with IDD and 3 with spinal cord injury were selected for microarray analysis. Total RNA from these 6 specimens was extracted and subjected to global miRNA expression analysis using the Exiqon miRCURY™ LNA Array (v.16.0). The microarray data were then validated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In addition, bioinformatics analysis was performed to investigate the dysregulated miRNA target genes and signaling pathways involved. Among the miRNAs analyzed, 25 miRNAs were found to be upregulated and 26 were found to be downregulated in the IDD group compared with the spinal cord injury group. The qRT-PCR results validated the microarray data. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the signaling pathways most likely to be controlled by these miRNAs were the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR; ErbB) and Wnt pathways. Our results demonstrated that the miRNA expression in patients with IDD differed significantly from that in patients who sustained injury to the intervertebral disc. Our data indicate that the dysregulated miRNAs control the signaling pathways important for the maintenance of IDD. Further studies on miRNA target gene identification and biological functions may address the specific regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs in IDD, and may provide valuable insight into the diagnosis and treatment of IDD. PMID:24173697

  8. A rat tail temporary static compression model reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration with decreased notochordal cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Yurube, Takashi; Kakutani, Kenichiro; Maeno, Koichiro; Takada, Toru; Yamamoto, Junya; Kurakawa, Takuto; Akisue, Toshihiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Nishida, Kotaro

    2014-03-01

    The intervertebral disc nucleus pulposus (NP) has two phenotypically distinct cell types-notochordal cells (NCs) and non-notochordal chondrocyte-like cells. In human discs, NCs are lost during adolescence, which is also when discs begin to show degenerative signs. However, little evidence exists regarding the link between NC disappearance and the pathogenesis of disc degeneration. To clarify this, a rat tail disc degeneration model induced by static compression at 1.3 MPa for 0, 1, or 7 days was designed and assessed for up to 56 postoperative days. Radiography, MRI, and histomorphology showed degenerative disc findings in response to the compression period. Immunofluorescence displayed that the number of DAPI-positive NP cells decreased with compression; particularly, the decrease was notable in larger, vacuolated, cytokeratin-8- and galectin-3-co-positive cells, identified as NCs. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells, which predominantly comprised non-NCs, increased with compression. Quantitative PCR demonstrated isolated mRNA up-regulation of ADAMTS-5 in the 1-day loaded group and MMP-3 in the 7-day loaded group. Aggrecan-1 and collagen type 2α-1 mRNA levels were down-regulated in both groups. This rat tail temporary static compression model, which exhibits decreased NC phenotype, increased apoptotic cell death, and imbalanced catabolic and anabolic gene expression, reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:24285589

  9. Derivation of inter-lamellar behaviour of the intervertebral disc annulus

    PubMed Central

    Mengoni, Marlène; Luxmoore, Bethany J.; Wijayathunga, Vithanage N.; Jones, Alison C.; Broom, Neil D.; Wilcox, Ruth K.

    2015-01-01

    The inter-lamellar connectivity of the annulus fibrosus in the intervertebral disc has been shown to affect the prediction of the overall disc behaviour in computational models. Using a combined experimental and computational approach, the inter-lamellar mechanical behaviour of the disc annulus was investigated under conditions of radial loading. Twenty-seven specimens of anterior annulus fibrosus were dissected from 12 discs taken from four frozen ovine thoracolumbar spines. Specimens were grouped depending on their radial provenance within the annulus fibrosus. Standard tensile tests were performed. In addition, micro-tensile tests under microscopy were used to observe the displacement of the lamellae and inter-lamellar connections. Finite elements models matching the experimental protocols were developed with specimen-specific geometries and boundary conditions assuming a known lamellar behaviour. An optimisation process was used to derive the interface stiffness values for each group. The assumption of a linear cohesive interface was used to model the behaviour of the inter-lamellar connectivity. The interface stiffness values derived from the optimisation process were consistently higher than the corresponding lamellar values. The interface stiffness values of the outer annulus were from 43% to 75% higher than those of the inner annulus. Tangential stiffness values for the interface were from 6% to 39% higher than normal stiffness values within each group and similar to values reported by other investigators. These results reflect the intricate fibrous nature of the inter-lamellar connectivity and provide values for the representation of the inter-lamellar behaviour at a continuum level. PMID:25955558

  10. Mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a causal role in aging-related intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nasto, Luigi A.; Robinson, Andria R.; Ngo, Kevin; Clauson, Cheryl L.; Dong, Qing; St. Croix, Claudette; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Pola, Enrico; Robbins, Paul D.; Kang, James; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Wipf, Peter; Vo, Nam V.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative damage is a well-established driver of aging. Evidence of oxidative stress exists in aged and degenerated discs, but it is unclear how it affects disc metabolism. In this study, we first determined whether oxidative stress negatively impacts disc matrix metabolism using disc organotypic and cell cultures. Mouse disc organotypic culture grown at atmospheric oxygen (20% O2) exhibited perturbed disc matrix homeostasis, including reduced proteoglycan synthesis and enhanced expression of matrix metalloproteinases, compared to discs grown at low oxygen levels (5% O2). Human disc cells grown at 20% O2 showed increased levels of mitochondrial-derived superoxide anions and perturbed matrix homeostasis. Treatment of disc cells with the mitochondria-targeted reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger XJB-5-131 blunted the adverse effects caused by 20% O2. Importantly, we demonstrated that treatment of accelerated aging Ercc1−/Δmice, previously established to be a useful in vivo model to study age-related intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD), also resulted in improved disc total glycosaminoglycan content and proteoglycan synthesis. This demonstrates that mitochondrial-derived ROS contributes to age-associated IDD in Ercc1−/Δmice. Collectively, these data provide strong experimental evidence that mitochondrial-derived ROS play a causal role in driving changes linked to aging-related IDD and a potentially important role for radical scavengers in preventing IDD. PMID:23389888

  11. FoxC2 Enhances BMP7-Mediated Anabolism in Nucleus Pulposus Cells of the Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Fu, Changfeng; Chen, Yong; Xu, Feng; Wang, Zhenyu; Qu, Zhigang; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Bone-morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) is a growth factor that plays a major role in mediating anabolism and anti-catabolism of the intervertebral disc matrix and cell homeostasis. In osteoblasts, Forkhead box protein C2 (FoxC2) is a downstream target of BMPs and promotes cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the role FoxC2 may play in degenerative human intervertebral disc tissue and the relationship between FoxC2 and BMP-7 in nucleus pulposus (NP) cells remain to be elucidated. This study aims to investigate the presence and signaling mechanisms of FoxC2 in degenerative human intervertebral disc tissue and NP cells. Western blot and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses were used to measure FoxC2 expression in the NP tissue and cells. Transfections were carried out to measure the effect of FoxC2 on BMP-7-mediated extracellular matrix upregulation. Adenoviral knock-down of Smad1 was performed to investigate the mechanism of BMP-7-induced FoxC2 expression. In degenerative NP tissue, FoxC2 was markedly upregulated and positively correlated with increased disc degeneration. Induction of NP cell proliferation was confirmed by using cell counting kit-8 assay, immunocytochemistry and real-time qRT-PCR for Ki67. FoxC2 led to decreased noggin expression and increased Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. During combined treatment with BMP-7, FoxC2 greatly potentiated anabolism through synergistic mechanisms on ECM formation. Combination therapy using BMP-7 and FoxC2 may be beneficial to the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:26824865

  12. Unique glycosignature for intervertebral disc and articular cartilage cells and tissues in immaturity and maturity

    PubMed Central

    Collin, E. C.; Kilcoyne, M.; White, S. J.; Grad, S.; Alini, M.; Joshi, L.; Pandit, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, on/off markers for intervertebral disc (IVD) and articular cartilage (AC) cells (chondrocytes) and distinct glycoprofiles of cell and tissue-types were identified from immaturity to maturity. Three and eleven month-old ovine IVD and AC tissues were histochemically profiled with a panel of lectins and antibodies. Relationships between tissue and cell types were analysed by hierarchical clustering. Chondroitin sulfate (CS) composition of annulus fibrosus (AF), nucleus pulposus (NP) and AC tissues was determined by HPLC analysis. Clear on/off cell type markers were identified, which enabled the discrimination of chondrocytes, AF and NP cells. AF and NP cells were distinguishable using MAA, SNA-I, SBA and WFA lectins, which bound to both NP cells and chondrocytes but not AF cells. Chondrocytes were distinguished from NP and AF cells with a specific binding of LTA and PNA lectins to chondrocytes. Each tissue showed a unique CS composition with a distinct switch in sulfation pattern in AF and NP tissues upon disc maturity while cartilage maintained the same sulfation pattern over time. In conclusion, distinct glycoprofiles for cell and tissue-types across age groups were identified in addition to altered CS composition and sulfation patterns for tissue types upon maturity. PMID:26965377

  13. T1ρ magnetic resonance: basic physics principles and applications in knee and intervertebral disc imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Chen, Weitian; Ahuja, Anil; Yuan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    T1ρ relaxation time provides a new contrast mechanism that differs from T1- and T2-weighted contrast, and is useful to study low-frequency motional processes and chemical exchange in biological tissues. T1ρ imaging can be performed in the forms of T1ρ-weighted image, T1ρ mapping and T1ρ dispersion. T1ρ imaging, particularly at low spin-lock frequency, is sensitive to B0 and B1 inhomogeneity. Various composite spin-lock pulses have been proposed to alleviate the influence of field inhomogeneity so as to reduce the banding-like spin-lock artifacts. T1ρ imaging could be specific absorption rate (SAR) intensive and time consuming. Efforts to address these issues and speed-up data acquisition are being explored to facilitate wider clinical applications. This paper reviews the T1ρ imaging’s basic physic principles, as well as its application for cartilage imaging and intervertebral disc imaging. Compared to more established T2 relaxation time, it has been shown that T1ρ provides more sensitive detection of proteoglycan (PG) loss at early stages of cartilage degeneration. T1ρ has also been shown to provide more sensitive evaluation of annulus fibrosis (AF) degeneration of the discs. PMID:26807369

  14. Localized strain measurements of the intervertebral disc annulus during biaxial tensile testing.

    PubMed

    Karakolis, Thomas; Callaghan, Jack P

    2015-01-01

    Both inter-lamellar and intra-lamellar failures of the annulus have been described as potential modes of disc herniation. Attempts to characterize initial lamellar failure of the annulus have involved tensile testing of small tissue samples. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a method of measuring local surface strains through image analysis of a tensile test conducted on an isolated sample of annular tissue in order to enhance future studies of intervertebral disc failure. An annulus tissue sample was biaxial strained to 10%. High-resolution images captured the tissue surface throughout testing. Three test conditions were evaluated: submerged, non-submerged and marker. Surface strains were calculated for the two non-marker conditions based on motion of virtual tracking points. Tracking algorithm parameters (grid resolution and template size) were varied to determine the effect on estimated strains. Accuracy of point tracking was assessed through a comparison of the non-marker conditions to a condition involving markers placed on tissue surface. Grid resolution had a larger effect on local strain than template size. Average local strain error ranged from 3% to 9.25% and 0.1% to 2.0%, for the non-submerged and submerged conditions, respectively. Local strain estimation has a relatively high potential for error. Submerging the tissue provided superior strain estimates. PMID:25145810

  15. Characterization of slow-gelling alginate hydrogels for intervertebral disc tissue-engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Growney Kalaf, Emily A; Flores, Reynaldo; Bledsoe, J Gary; Sell, Scott A

    2016-06-01

    Reversal of intervertebral disc degeneration can have a potentially monumental effect on spinal health. As such, the goal of this research is to create an injectable, cellularized alginate-based nucleus pulposus that will restore disc function; with the primary goal of creating an alginate gel with tailorable rates of gelation to improve functionality over standard CaCl2 crosslinking techniques. Gelation characteristics of 1% sodium alginate were analyzed over various molar concentrations of a 1:2 ratio of CaCO3:glucono-δ-lactone (GDL), with 10% CaCl2 as the control crosslinker. Alginate construct characterization for all concentrations was performed via ultimate and cyclic compressive testing over a 28day degradation period in PBS. Dehydration, swell testing, and albumin release kinetics were determined, and cytotoxicity and cell homogeneity tests showed promise for cellularization strategies. Overall, the 30 and 60mM GDL alginate concentrations presented the most viable option for use in further studies, with a gelation time between 10 and 30min, low hysteresis over control, low percent change in thickness and weight under both PBS degradation and swelling conditions, and stable mechanical properties over 28days in vitro. PMID:27040212

  16. Composite features for automatic diagnosis of intervertebral disc herniation from lumbar MRI.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subarna; Alomari, Raja' S; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2011-01-01

    Lower back pain is widely prevalent in the world today, and the situation is aggravated due to a shortage of radiologists. Intervertebral disc disorders like desiccation, degeneration and herniation are some of the major causes of lower back pain. In this paper, we propose a robust computer-aided herniation diagnosis system for lumbar MRI by first extracting an approximate Region Of Interest (ROI) for each disc and then using a combination of viable features to produce a highly accurate classifier. We describe the extraction of raw, LBP (Local Binary Patterns), Gabor, GLCM (Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix), shape, and intensity features from lumbar SPIR T2-weighted MRI and also present a thorough performance comparison of individual and combined features. We perform 5-fold cross validation experiments on 35 cases and report a very high accuracy of 98.29% using a combination of features. Also, combining the desired features and reducing the dimensionality using LDA, we achieve a high sensitivity (true positive rate) of 98.11%. PMID:22255478

  17. Pericellular colocalisation and interactive properties of type VI collagen and perlecan in the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Hayes, A J; Shu, C C; Lord, M S; Little, C B; Whitelock, J M; Melrose, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to immunolocalise type VI collagen and perlecan and determine their interactive properties in the intervertebral disc (IVD). Confocal laser scanning microscopy co-localised perlecan with type VI collagen as pericellular components of IVD cells and translamellar cross-bridges in ovine and murine IVDs. These cross-bridges were significantly less abundant in the heparin sulphate deficient Hspg2 exon 3 null mouse IVD than in wild type. This association of type VI collagen with elastic components provides clues as to its roles in conveying elastic recoil properties to annular tissues. Perlecan and type VI collagen were highly interactive in plasmon resonance studies. Pericellular colocalisation of perlecan and type VI collagen provides matrix stabilisation and cell-matrix communication which allows IVD cells to perceive and respond to perturbations in their biomechanical microenvironment. Perlecan, at the cell surface, provides an adhesive interface between the cell and its surrounding extracellular matrix. Elastic microfibrillar structures regulate tensional connective tissue development and function. The 2010 Global Burden of Disease study examined 291 disorders and identified disc degeneration and associated low back pain as the leading global musculoskeletal disorder emphasising its massive socioeconomic impact and the need for more effective treatment strategies. A greater understanding of how the IVD achieves its unique biomechanical functional properties is of great importance in the development of such therapeutic measures. PMID:27377666

  18. Loss and re-adaptation of lumbar intervertebral disc water signal intensity after prolonged bedrest.

    PubMed

    Kordi, M; Belavý, D L; Armbrecht, G; Sheikh, A; Felsenberg, D; Trudel, G

    2015-09-01

    The adaptation and re-adaptation process of the intervertebral disc (IVD) to prolonged bedrest is important for understanding IVD physiology and IVD herniations in astronauts. Little information is available on changes in IVD composition. In this study, 24 male subjects underwent 60-day bedrest and In/Out Phase magnetic resonance imaging sequences were performed to evaluate IVD shape and water signal intensity. Scanning was performed before bedrest (baseline), twice during bedrest, and three, six and twenty-four months after bedrest. Area, signal intensity, average height, and anteroposterior diameter of the lumbar L3/4 and L4/5 IVDs were measured. At the end of bedrest, disc height and area were significantly increased with no change in water signal intensity. After bedrest, we observed reduced IVD signal intensity three months (p=0.004 versus baseline), six months (p=0.003 versus baseline), but not twenty-four months (p=0.25 versus baseline) post-bedrest. At these same time points post-bedrest, IVD height and area remained increased. The reduced lumbar IVD water signal intensity in the first months after bedrest implies a reduction of glycosaminoglycans and/or free water in the IVD. Subsequently, at two years after bedrest, IVD hydration status returned towards pre-bedrest levels, suggesting a gradual, but slow, re-adaptation process of the IVD after prolonged bedrest. PMID:26350949

  19. Imaging of Herniated Discs of the Cervical Spine: Inter-Modality Differences between 64-Slice Multidetector CT and 1.5-T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji Sook; Han, Jong Kyu; Kim, Hyun-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess inter-modality variability when evaluating cervical intervertebral disc herniation using 64-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods Three musculoskeletal radiologists independently reviewed cervical spine 1.5-T MRI and 64-slice MDCT data on C2-3 though C6-7 of 51 patients in the context of intervertebral disc herniation. Interobserver and inter-modality agreements were expressed as unweighted kappa values. Weighted kappa statistics were used to assess the extents of agreement in terms of the number of involved segments (NIS) in disc herniation and epicenter measurements collected using MDCT and MRI. Results The interobserver agreement rates upon evaluation of disc morphology by the three radiologists were in fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.39-0.53 for MDCT images; k = 0.45-0.56 for MRIs). When the disc morphology was categorized into two and four grades, the inter-modality agreement rates were moderate (k-value, 0.59) and substantial (k-value, 0.66), respectively. The inter-modality agreements for evaluations of the NIS (k-value, 0.78) and the epicenter (k-value, 0.79) were substantial. Also, the interobserver agreements for the NIS (CT; k-value, 0.85 and MRI; k-value, 0.88) and epicenter (CT; k-value, 0.74 and MRI; k-value, 0.70) evaluations by two readers were substantial. MDCT tended to underestimate the extent of herniated disc lesions compared with MRI. Conclusion Multidetector-row computed tomography and MRI showed a moderate-to-substantial degree of inter-modality agreement for the assessment of herniated cervical discs. MDCT images have a tendency to underestimate the anterior/posterior extent of the herniated disc compared with MRI. PMID:26175589

  20. The Effect of Sustained Compression on Oxygen Metabolic Transport in the Intervertebral Disc Decreases with Degenerative Changes

    PubMed Central

    Malandrino, Andrea; Noailly, Jérôme; Lacroix, Damien

    2011-01-01

    Intervertebral disc metabolic transport is essential to the functional spine and provides the cells with the nutrients necessary to tissue maintenance. Disc degenerative changes alter the tissue mechanics, but interactions between mechanical loading and disc transport are still an open issue. A poromechanical finite element model of the human disc was coupled with oxygen and lactate transport models. Deformations and fluid flow were linked to transport predictions by including strain-dependent diffusion and advection. The two solute transport models were also coupled to account for cell metabolism. With this approach, the relevance of metabolic and mechano-transport couplings were assessed in the healthy disc under loading-recovery daily compression. Disc height, cell density and material degenerative changes were parametrically simulated to study their influence on the calculated solute concentrations. The effects of load frequency and amplitude were also studied in the healthy disc by considering short periods of cyclic compression. Results indicate that external loads influence the oxygen and lactate regional distributions within the disc when large volume changes modify diffusion distances and diffusivities, especially when healthy disc properties are simulated. Advection was negligible under both sustained and cyclic compression. Simulating degeneration, mechanical changes inhibited the mechanical effect on transport while disc height, fluid content, nucleus pressure and overall cell density reductions affected significantly transport predictions. For the healthy disc, nutrient concentration patterns depended mostly on the time of sustained compression and recovery. The relevant effect of cell density on the metabolic transport indicates the disturbance of cell number as a possible onset for disc degeneration via alteration of the metabolic balance. Results also suggest that healthy disc properties have a positive effect of loading on metabolic transport. Such

  1. Hybrid Surgery Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Multilevel Cervical Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Meng, Fanxin; Ding, Yan; Li, Jie; Han, Jian; Zhang, Xintao; Dong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the outcomes and reliability of hybrid surgery (HS) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis and disc diseases. Hybrid surgery, combining cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with fusion, is a novel treatment to multilevel cervical degenerated disc disease in recent years. However, the effect and reliability of HS are still unclear compared with ACDF. To investigate the studies of HS versus ACDF in patients with multilevel cervical disease, electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane library, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched. Studies were included when they compared HS with ACDF and reported at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neck pain, arm pain, cervical range of motion (ROM), quality of life, and incidence of complications. No language restrictions were used. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies and extracted the relevant data. Seven clinical controlled trials were included in this study. Two trials were prospective and the other 5 were retrospective. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that HS achieved better recovery of NDI score (P = 0.038) and similar recovery of VAS score (P = 0.058) compared with ACDF at 2 years follow-up. Moreover, the total cervical ROM (C2–C7) after HS was preserved significantly more than the cervical ROM after ACDF (P = 0.000) at 2 years follow-up. Notably, the compensatory increase of the ROM of superior and inferior adjacent segments was significant in ACDF groups at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.01), compared with HS. The results demonstrate that HS provides equivalent outcomes and functional recovery for cervical disc diseases, and significantly better preservation of cervical ROM compared with ACDF in 2-year follow-up. This suggests the HS is an effective alternative invention for the treatment of multilevel cervical

  2. A retrospective study evaluating the correlation between the severity of intervertebral disc injury and the anteroposterior type of thoracolumbar vertebral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yunshan; Ren, Dong; Zou, Yan; Lu, Jian; Wang*, Pengcheng

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation between the severity of intervertebral disc injury and the anteroposterior type of thoracolumbar vertebral fractures. METHODS: Fifty-six cases of thoracolumbar vertebral fractures treated in our trauma center from October 2012 to October 2013 were included in this study. The fractures were classified by the anteroposterior classification, whereas the severity of intervertebral disc injury was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to analyze the correlation between the severity of intervertebral disc injury and the anteroposterior type of thoracolumbar fractures, whereas a χ2 test was adopted to measure the variability between different fracture types and upper and lower adjacent disc injuries. RESULTS: The Spearman correlation coefficients between fracture types and the severity of the upper and lower adjacent disc injuries were 0.739 (PU<0.001) and 0.368 (PL=0.005), respectively. It means that the more complex Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) classifications are the disc injury is more severe. There was also a significant difference in the severity of injury between the upper and lower adjacent discs near the fractured vertebrae (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In thoracolumbar spinal fractures, the severity of the adjacent intervertebral disc injury is positively correlated with the anteroposterior fracture type. The injury primarily involves intervertebral discs near the fractured end plate, with more frequent and severe injuries observed in the upper than in the lower discs. The presence of intervertebral disc injury, along with its severity, may provide useful information during the clinical decision-making process. PMID:27438561

  3. GENIPIN-CROSSLINKED FIBRIN HYDROGELS AS A POTENTIAL ADHESIVE TO AUGMENT INTERVERTEBRAL DISC ANNULUS REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Schek, R.M.; Michalek, A.J.; Iatridis, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of damaged intervertebral discs is a significant clinical problem and, despite advances in the repair and replacement of the nucleus pulposus, there are few effective strategies to restore defects in the annulus fibrosus. An annular repair material should meet three specifications: have a modulus similar to the native annulus tissue, support the growth of disc cells, and maintain adhesion to tissue under physiological strain levels. We hypothesized that a genipin crosslinked fibrin gel could meet these requirements. Our mechanical results showed that genipin crosslinked fibrin gels could be created with a modulus in the range of native annular tissue. We also demonstrated that this material is compatible with the in vitro growth of human disc cells, when genipin:fibrin ratios were 0.25:1 or less, although cell proliferation was slower and cell morphology more rounded than for fibrin alone. Finally, lap tests were performed to evaluate adhesion between fibrin gels and pieces of annular tissue. Specimens created without genipin had poor handling properties and readily delaminated, while genipin crosslinked fibrin gels remained adhered to the tissue pieces at strains exceeding physiological levels and failed at 15–30%. This study demonstrated that genipin crosslinked fibrin gels show promise as a gap-filling adhesive biomaterial with tunable material properties, yet the slow cell proliferation suggests this biomaterial may be best suited as a sealant for small annulus fibrosus defects or as an adhesive to augment large annulus repairs. Future studies will evaluate degradation rate, fatigue behaviors, and long-term biocompatibility. PMID:21503869

  4. Dynamic and Static Overloading Induce Early Degenerative Processes in Caprine Lumbar Intervertebral Discs

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Cornelis P. L.; Schoorl, Tom; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A.; Zandieh Doulabi, Behrouz; van der Veen, Albert J.; van de Ven, Peter M.; Smit, Theo H.; van Royen, Barend J.; Helder, Marco N.; Mullender, Margriet G.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical overloading of the spine is associated with low back pain and intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. How excessive loading elicits degenerative changes in the IVD is poorly understood. Comprehensive knowledge of the interaction between mechanical loading, cell responses and changes in the extracellular matrix of the disc is needed in order to successfully intervene in this process. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether dynamic and static overloading affect caprine lumbar discs differently and what mechanisms lead to mechanically induced IVD degeneration. Lumbar caprine IVDs (n = 175) were cultured 7, 14 and 21 days under simulated-physiological loading (control), high dynamic or high static loading. Axial deformation and stiffness were continuously measured. Cell viability, cell density, and gene expression were assessed in the nucleus, inner- and outer annulus. The extracellular matrix (ECM) was analyzed for water, glycosaminoglycan and collagen content. IVD height loss and changes in axial deformation were gradual with dynamic and acute with static overloading. Dynamic overloading caused cell death in all IVD regions, whereas static overloading mostly affected the outer annulus. IVDs expression of catabolic and inflammation-related genes was up-regulated directly, whereas loss of water and glycosaminoglycan were significant only after 21 days. Static and dynamic overloading both induced pathological changes to caprine lumbar IVDs within 21 days. The mechanism by which they inflict biomechanical, cellular, and extracellular changes to the nucleus and annulus differed. The described cascades provide leads for the development of new pharmacological and rehabilitative therapies to halt the progression of DDD. PMID:23638074

  5. ADAMTS-5 and intervertebral disc degeneration: the results of tissue immunohistochemistry and in vitro cell culture.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Yue-Hui; Jiang, Sheng-Dan; Li, Hai; Jiang, Lei-Sheng; Dai, Li-Yang

    2011-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are known to be involved in IVD degeneration by hydrolyzing the extracellular matrix (ECM), especially the collagens. The degradation of proteoglycans, which is another main ECM component in the IVD, however, has not been extensively investigated. This study aimed to determine the expression of ADAMTS-5 in human herniated intervertebral disc (IVD) tissues and to investigate whether interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced expression of ADAMTS-5 is mediated by nitric oxide (NO). Forty-five herniated IVDs were harvested and immunostained to determine the distribution and type of ADAMTS-5 expressing cells. Rat NP cells maintained in alginate beads were treated with IL-1β, accumulation of NO was detected by Griess reaction, the expression of ADAMTS-5 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the content of proteoglycans in alginate beads was visualized by alcian blue staining, and the effect of aminoguanidine on the changes in alginate beads induced by IL-1β treatment were also examined. Immunohistochemical results from 45 herniated discs showed that ADAMTS-5-positive cells are commonly seen in cell clusters, that the percentage of ADAMTS-5-positive cells was higher in uncontained herniated discs than in contained ones, and that the percentage of ADAMTS-5-positive cells correlated with the age of the patients. IL-1β treatment resulted in increased accumulation of NO, increased expression of ADAMTS-5 and iNOS, whereas the accumulation of proteoglycan in alginate beads decreased. Aminoguanidine significantly reversed the changes in alginate beads induced by IL-1β treatment. We thus suggested that ADAMTS-5 is probably involved in the process of IVD degeneration, and that IL-1β-induced expression of ADAMTS-5 is mediated by NO. PMID:21437951

  6. Quantitative assessment of intervertebral disc glycosaminoglycan distribution by gadolinium-enhanced MRI in orthopedic patients.

    PubMed

    Vaga, Stefania; Raimondi, Manuela Teresa; Caiani, Enrico Gianluca; Costa, Francesco; Giordano, Carmen; Perona, Franco; Zerbi, Alberto; Fornari, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Our hypothesis was that the enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) imaging protocol could be used in patients to quantify the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) in intervertebral discs (IVD). To test this hypothesis, 23 patients with degenerative disc pathology scheduled for surgery were studied by a specific dGEMRIC protocol: each patient underwent two MRI scans, before and 3.5 hr after Gd(DTPA)2-injection of a nonconventional dose of 40 mL. Then, T(1PRE-ENH) and T(1POST-ENH) parametric images of the disc were obtained, from which a new index DeltaT(1) of the molecular status of the IVD was computed (T(1PRE-ENH) - T(1POST-ENH)). A total of 31 tissue samples (one or two from each patient) obtained at herniectomy were collected and biochemically analyzed for sGAG content and used as the gold standard for comparison. DeltaT(1) values in correspondence to degenerated sectors were higher (158 +/- 36 ms) compared to normal sectors (80 +/- 13 ms). Linear regression analysis between MRI-derived and biochemistry-derived measurements resulted in a significant correlation (r = 0.73, P < 0.0001). The DeltaT(1) parametric images, calculated using the modified dGEMRIC technique, provided noninvasive quantitative information about sGAG content within discal tissue in vivo, which resulted in agreement with biochemical analysis. The application of this new MRI method could provide diagnostic information for standard treatment of lumbar discopathy and for innovative therapies of regenerative medicine. PMID:18050346

  7. Inter-lamellar shear resistance confers compressive stiffness in the intervertebral disc: An image-based modelling study on the bovine caudal disc.

    PubMed

    Adam, Clayton; Rouch, Philippe; Skalli, Wafa

    2015-12-16

    The intervertebral disc withstands large compressive loads (up to nine times bodyweight in humans) while providing flexibility to the spinal column. At a microstructural level, the outer sheath of the disc (the annulus fibrosus) comprises 12-20 annular layers of alternately crisscrossed collagen fibres embedded in a soft ground matrix. The centre of the disc (the nucleus pulposus) consists of a hydrated gel rich in proteoglycans. The disc is the largest avascular structure in the body and is of much interest biomechanically due to the high societal burden of disc degeneration and back pain. Although the disc has been well characterized at the whole joint scale, it is not clear how the disc tissue microstructure confers its overall mechanical properties. In particular, there have been conflicting reports regarding the level of attachment between adjacent lamellae in the annulus, and the importance of these interfaces to the overall integrity of the disc is unknown. We used a polarized light micrograph of the bovine tail disc in transverse cross-section to develop an image-based finite element model incorporating sliding and separation between layers of the annulus, and subjected the model to axial compressive loading. Validation experiments were also performed on four bovine caudal discs. Interlamellar shear resistance had a strong effect on disc compressive stiffness, with a 40% drop in stiffness when the interface shear resistance was changed from fully bonded to freely sliding. By contrast, interlamellar cohesion had no appreciable effect on overall disc mechanics. We conclude that shear resistance between lamellae confers disc mechanical resistance to compression, and degradation of the interlamellar interface structure may be a precursor to macroscopic disc degeneration. PMID:26549764

  8. Automated determination of the centers of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs in CT and MR lumbar spine images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štern, Darko; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2010-03-01

    The knowledge of the location of the centers of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs is valuable for the analysis of the spine. Existing methods for the detection and segmentation of vertebrae in images acquired by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are usually applicable only to a specific image modality and require prior knowledge of the location of vertebrae, usually obtained by manual identification or statistical modeling. We propose a completely automated framework for the detection of the centers of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs in CT and MR images. The image intensity and gradient magnitude profiles are first extracted in each image along the already obtained spinal centerline and therefore contain a repeating pattern representing the vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs. Based on the period of the repeating pattern and by using a function that approximates the shape of the vertebral body, a model of the vertebral body is generated. The centers of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs are detected by measuring the similarity between the generated model and the extracted profiles. The method was evaluated on 29 CT and 13 MR images of lumbar spine with varying number of vertebrae. The overall mean distance between the obtained and the ground truth centers was 2.8 +/- 1.9 mm, and no considerable differences were detected between the results for CT, T1-weighted MR or T2-weighted MR images, or among different vertebrae. The proposed method may therefore be valuable for initializing the techniques for the detection and segmentation of vertebrae.

  9. Elastic, Permeability and Swelling Properties of Human Intervertebral Disc Tissues: A Benchmark for Tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Daniel H.; Jacobs, Nathan T.; DeLucca, John F.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of functional tissue engineering is to repair and replace tissues that have a biomechanical function, i.e., connective orthopaedic tissues. To do this, it is necessary to have accurate benchmarks for the elastic, permeability, and swelling (i.e., biphasic-swelling) properties of native tissues. However, in the case of the intervertebral disc, the biphasic-swelling properties of individual tissues reported in the literature exhibit great variation and even span several orders of magnitude. This variation is probably caused by differences in the testing protocols and the constitutive models used to analyze the data. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure the human lumbar disc annulus fibrosus (AF), nucleus pulposus (NP), and cartilaginous endplates (CEP) biphasic-swelling properties using a consistent experimental protocol and analyses. The testing protocol was composed of a swelling period followed by multiple confined compression ramps. To analyze the confined compression data, the tissues were modeled using a biphasic-swelling model, which augments the standard biphasic model through the addition of a deformation-dependent osmotic pressure term. This model allows considering the swelling deformations and the contribution of osmotic pressure in the analysis of the experimental data. The swelling stretch was not different between the disc regions (AF: 1.28±0.16; NP: 1.73±0.74; CEP: 1.29±0.26), with a total average of 1.42. The aggregate modulus (Ha) of the matrix was higher in the CEP (390 kPa) compared to the NP (100 kPA) or AF (30 kPa). The permeability was very different across tissues regions, with the AF permeability (80 E−4 mm4/Ns) higher than the NP and CEP (6-7 E−16 m4/Ns). Additionally, a normalized time-constant (3000 sec) for the stress relaxation was similar for all the disc tissues. The properties measured in this study are important as benchmarks for tissue engineering and for modeling the disc's mechanical

  10. Fibronectin fragments and the cleaving enzyme ADAM-8 in the degenerative human intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Ruel, Nancy; Markova, Dessislava Z.; Adams, Sherrill L.; Scanzello, Carla; Cs-Szabo, Gabriella; Gerard, David; Shi, Peng; Anderson, D. Greg; Zack, Marc; An, Howard S.; Chen, Di; Zhang, Yejia

    2014-01-01

    Study Design The presence fibronectin fragments (FN-fs) and the cleaving enzyme, A disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein (ADAM)-8 were examined in human intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue in vitro. Objective To investigate the presence and pathophysiological concentration of FN-fs and their cleaving enzyme, ADAM-8, in the human IVD tissue. Summary of Background Data The 29kDa FN-f has been shown to result in extracellular matrix loss in rabbit IVDs. However, the concentration of this biologically active fragment in the degenerative human IVD tissue has previously not been determined. Further, it is critical to identify the enzyme(s) responsible for FN cleavage in the IVD. Methods Human degenerative IVD tissues were removed during spinal surgery. A normal appearing young adult and an infant human cadaveric sample were obtained as controls. Soluble proteins were extracted, and analyzed by Western blotting utilizing antibodies specific for the human FN neoepitope VRAA271. A purified 29 kDa FN-f was used to allow estimation of the concentration of FN-fs in the tissues. ADAM-8, a FN-cleaving enzyme, was analyzed by Western blotting and immunostaining. Results All adult IVD tissues contain many FN-f species, but these species were absent from the infant disc tissue. Moderately degenerative discs contained the highest amount of FN-fs; the concentration was estimated to be in the nanomolar range per gram of tissue. ADAM-8, known to cleave FN resulting in the VRAA271 neoepitope, was present in the human disc. ADAM-8 primarily localized in the pericellular matrix of the nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue, as determined by immunostaining. Conclusion This is the first report that N-terminal FN-fs are consistently present in IVD tissues from adult subjects. The pathophysiological concentration of these fragments is estimated to be at nanomolar range per gram of IVD tissue. Further, ADAM-8, known to cleave FN, is present at the pericellular matrix of disc cells

  11. Automated detection of spinal centrelines, vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs in CT and MR images of lumbar spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štern, Darko; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2010-01-01

    We propose a completely automated algorithm for the detection of the spinal centreline and the centres of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs in images acquired by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The developed methods are based on the analysis of the geometry of spinal structures and the characteristics of CT and MR images and were evaluated on 29 CT and 13 MR images of lumbar spine. The overall mean distance between the obtained and the ground truth spinal centrelines and centres of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs were 1.8 ± 1.1 mm and 2.8 ± 1.9 mm, respectively, and no considerable differences were detected among the results for CT, T1-weighted MR and T2-weighted MR images. The knowledge of the location of the spinal centreline and the centres of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs is valuable for the analysis of the spine. The proposed method may therefore be used to initialize the techniques for labelling and segmentation of vertebrae.

  12. The imbalance between TIMP3 and matrix-degrading enzymes plays an important role in intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Kang; Han, Xiuguo; Mao, Chuanyuan; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Tengfei; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-15

    It is well-known that one of the most important features of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Collagen and aggrecan are major components of ECM; the degradation of ECM in intervertebral discs (IVDs) is closely related to the activities of collagenase and aggrecanase. TIMP-3 is the most efficient inhibitor of aggrecanase in IVD. However, only few studies focus on the potential relationship between TIMP-3 and IDD. In our study, we found TIMP-3 gene expression was decreased after stimulating with LPS in rat nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. Then we used a lentivirus vector to reconstruct rat NP cells which high expressed TIMP-3 gene (LV-TIMP3). The upregulation of MMPs and ADAMTSs induced by LPS was significantly inhibited in LV-TIMP3 cells. After overexpression of TIMP-3, the aggrecan breakdown caused by LPS was also reduced in both monolayer culture and three-dimension culture model. To further study the relation between TIMP-3 and IDD, we collected human NP tissue samples of different degenerative degrees. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining showed that the expression of TIMP-3 was negatively correlated with the degree of intervertebral disc degeneration, while MMP-1 and ADAMTS-4 were markedly increased in degenerative IVD. Taken together, our results suggest that the imbalance between aggrecanase and TIMP-3 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IDD and therefore be a potential therapeutic target for treating IDD. PMID:26686417

  13. Stretching of the sciatic nerve; a means of relieving postoperative pain following removal of ruptured lumbar intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    ADAMS, J E; INMAN, V T

    1959-07-01

    Stretching the sciatic nerve for the relief of "sciatica" was frequently employed before 1900 and was subsequently abandoned, probably because it was done without sufficient scrutiny of the indications. The procedure has recently been employed in cases in which "sciatica" remains following the operative removal of ruptured intervertebral discs, and it has been instrumental in relieving postoperative "sciatica" when the cause was the formation of adhesions about the lumbar nerve roots. If the nerve root is compressed by recurrent disc protrusion or by adjacent bone, the manipulation usually increases the pain, a phenomenon that has been helpful from a diagnostic standpoint. PMID:13662862

  14. Return to Play After Cervical Disc Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daniel G; Anderson, Justin C; Lehman, Ronald A

    2016-10-01

    Criteria for return to sports and athletic activities after cervical spine surgery are unclear. There is limited literature regarding the outcomes and optimal criteria. Determining return to play criteria remains a challenge and continues to depend on the experience and good judgment of the treating surgeon. There is strong consensus in the literature, despite lack of evidence-based data, that athletes after single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) may safely return to collision and high-velocity sports. The athlete should be counseled and managed on a case-by-case basis, taking into consideration the type of sport, player-specific variables, and type of surgery performed. PMID:27543397

  15. A multi-component fiber-reinforced PHEMA-based hydrogel/HAPEX™ device for customized intervertebral disc prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Gloria, Antonio; De Santis, Roberto; Ambrosio, Luigi; Causa, Filippo; Tanner, K Elizabeth

    2011-05-01

    Spinal disease due to intervertebral disc degeneration represents a serious medical problem which affects many people worldwide. Disc arthroplasty may be considered the future ''gold standard'' of back pain treatment, even if problems related to available disc prostheses are considered. Hence, the aim of the present study was to improve the artificial disc technology by proposing the engineering of a pilot-scale device production process for a total multi-component intervertebral disc prosthesis. The device is made up of a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PHEMA/PMMA) (80/20 w/w) semi-interpenetrating polymer network (s-IPN) composite hydrogel reinforced with poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibers as annulus/nucleus substitute, and two hydroxyapatite-reinforced polyethylene composite (HAPEX™) endplates in order to anchor the multi-component device to the vertebral bodies. Static and dynamic-mechanical characterization show appropriate mechanical behavior. An example of engineering of a suitable pilot-scale device production process is also proposed in order to manufacture custom made implants. PMID:20511384

  16. Application of the polynomial chaos expansion to approximate the homogenised response of the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Karajan, N; Otto, D; Oladyshkin, S; Ehlers, W

    2014-10-01

    A possibility to simulate the mechanical behaviour of the human spine is given by modelling the stiffer structures, i.e. the vertebrae, as a discrete multi-body system (MBS), whereas the softer connecting tissue, i.e. the softer intervertebral discs (IVD), is represented in a continuum-mechanical sense using the finite-element method (FEM). From a modelling point of view, the mechanical behaviour of the IVD can be included into the MBS in two different ways. They can either be computed online in a so-called co-simulation of a MBS and a FEM or offline in a pre-computation step, where a representation of the discrete mechanical response of the IVD needs to be defined in terms of the applied degrees of freedom (DOF) of the MBS. For both methods, an appropriate homogenisation step needs to be applied to obtain the discrete mechanical response of the IVD, i.e. the resulting forces and moments. The goal of this paper was to present an efficient method to approximate the mechanical response of an IVD in an offline computation. In a previous paper (Karajan et al. in Biomech Model Mechanobiol 12(3):453-466, 2012), it was proven that a cubic polynomial for the homogenised forces and moments of the FE model is a suitable choice to approximate the purely elastic response as a coupled function of the DOF of the MBS. In this contribution, the polynomial chaos expansion (PCE) is applied to generate these high-dimensional polynomials. Following this, the main challenge is to determine suitable deformation states of the IVD for pre-computation, such that the polynomials can be constructed with high accuracy and low numerical cost. For the sake of a simple verification, the coupling method and the PCE are applied to the same simplified motion segment of the spine as was used in the previous paper, i.e. two cylindrical vertebrae and a cylindrical IVD in between. In a next step, the loading rates are included as variables in the polynomial response functions to account for a more

  17. TGF-β Signaling Plays an Essential Role in the Growth and Maintenance of Intervertebral Disc Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongting; Shen, Jie; Wang, Baoli; Wang, Meina; Shu, Bing; Chen, Di

    2011-01-01

    Summary TGF-β signaling plays a critical role in cartilage and spine tissue development at embryonic stage but its role in postnatal intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue growth and maintenance remain poorly understood. In the present studies, we have deleted the Tgfbr2 gene in inner annulus fibrosus cells of the disc tissue and surrounding growth plate chondrocytes using Col2a1-CreERT2 transgenic mice. We found that TGF-β signaling is required for normal growth plate cartilage and endplate cartilage growth at postnatal stage. The expression of Mmp13 gene is significantly up-regulated in primary disc cells of Tgfbr2 conditional knockout mice. Deletion of the Mmp13 gene under Tgfbr2 null background completely reverses the abnormal disc phenotype found in Tgfbr2 knockout mice. PMID:21420963

  18. Best paper NASS 2013: link-N can stimulate proteoglycan synthesis in the degenerated human intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Gawri, Rahul; Antoniou, John; Ouellet, Jean; Awwad, Waleed; Steffen, Thomas; Roughley, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet; Mwale, Fackson

    2013-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is the most common cause of back pain. Presently there is no medical treatment, leaving surgery as the only offered option. Here we evaluate the potential of Link-N to promote extracellular matrix regeneration in human IVDs. Human disc cells cultured in alginate and intact human discs were exposed to a combination of Link-N and ³⁵SO₄ in the presence or absence of interleukin (IL)-1, and the effect on proteoglycan synthesis was evaluated. In addition, message levels of aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, MMP-13, a Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs (ADAMTS)-4 and ADAMTS-5 were evaluated in alginate cultures. Human disc cells responded in a dose dependent manner with maximal proteoglycan synthesis at 1 µg/mL Link-N. Link-N treatment also induced proteoglycan synthesis in intact human discs, and a prolonged effect was found up to one week after Link-N treatment. Message levels of proteinases were decreased by Link-N in the presence of IL-1. Thus, Link-N can promote proteoglycan synthesis and deplete proteinase expression in adult human discs. Link-N could therefore be a promising candidate for biologically-induced disc repair, and could provide an alternative to surgical intervention for early stage disc degeneration. PMID:24027023

  19. Organ Culture Bioreactors – Platforms to Study Human Intervertebral Disc Degeneration and Regenerative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gantenbein, Benjamin; Illien-Jünger, Svenja; Chan, Samantha CW; Walser, Jochen; Haglund, Lisbet; Ferguson, Stephen J; Iatridis, James C; Grad, Sibylle

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades the application of bioreactors has revolutionized the concept of culturing tissues and organs that require mechanical loading. In intervertebral disc (IVD) research, collaborative efforts of biomedical engineering, biology and mechatronics have led to the innovation of new loading devices that can maintain viable IVD organ explants from large animals and human cadavers in precisely defined nutritional and mechanical environments over extended culture periods. Particularly in spine and IVD research, these organ culture models offer appealing alternatives, as large bipedal animal models with naturally occurring IVD degeneration and a genetic background similar to the human condition do not exist. Latest research has demonstrated important concepts including the potential of homing of mesenchymal stem cells to nutritionally or mechanically stressed IVDs, and the regenerative potential of “smart” biomaterials for nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosus repair. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about cell therapy, injection of cytokines and short peptides to rescue the degenerating IVD. We further stress that most bioreactor systems simplify the real in vivo conditions providing a useful proof of concept. Limitations are that certain aspects of the immune host response and pain assessments cannot be addressed with ex vivo systems. Coccygeal animal disc models are commonly used because of their availability and similarity to human IVDs. Although in vitro loading environments are not identical to the human in vivo situation, 3D ex vivo organ culture models of large animal coccygeal and human lumbar IVDs should be seen as valid alternatives for screening and feasibility testing to augment existing small animal, large animal, and human clinical trial experiments. PMID:25764196

  20. A PHASED REHABILITATION PROTOCOL FOR ATHLETES WITH LUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    VanGelder, Leonard H.; Vaughn, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    Conservative non-surgical management of a herniated lumbar intervertebral disc (HLD) in athletes is a complex task due to the dramatic forces imparted on the spine during sport participation. The demands placed upon the athlete during rehabilitation and return to sport are unique not only from a sport specific perspective, but also regarding return to the sport strength and conditioning programs utilized for sport preparation. Many prescriptions fail to address postural and motor control faults specific to athletic development, which may prevent full return to sport after suffering a HLD or predispose the athlete to future exacerbations of a HLD. Strength exercises involving squatting, deadlifting, and Olympic power lifts are large components of the typical athlete's conditioning program, therefore some progressions are provided to address potential underlying problems in the athlete's technique that may have contributed to their HLD in the first place. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to propose a framework for rehabilitation that is built around the phases of healing of the disc. Phase I: Non-Rotational/Non-Flexion Phase (Acute Inflammatory Phase), Phase II: Counter rotation/Flexion Phase (Repair Phase), Phase III: Rotational Phase/Power development (Remodeling Phase), and Phase IV: Full return to sport. This clinical commentary provides a theoretical basis for these phases based on available literature as well as reviewing many popular current practice trends in the management of an HLD. The authors recognize the limits of any general exercise rehabilitation recommendation with regard to return to sport, as well as any general strength and conditioning program. It is vital that an individual assessment and prescription is made for every athlete which reviews and addresses movement in all planes of motion under all necessary extrinsic and intrinsic demands to that athlete. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:24175134

  1. Aging affects response to cyclic tensile stretch: paradigm for intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hongsik; Seth, Aman; Warmbold, Jenna; Robertson, James T; Hasty, Karen A

    2011-01-01

    Much evidence supports a fundamental role for mechanical forces in modulating differentiation, homeostasis, and remodelling of musculoskeletal cells. Little is known, however, regarding mechanobiology and gene expression of intervertebral disc (IVD) cells from older individuals. To characterise the effect of mechanical stimulation on cells from older discs, an in vitro study of IVD cells harvested from different aged pigs was conducted to measure extracellular matrix (ECM) gene expression in response to cyclic tensile stress (CTS). Gene expression of annulus fibrosus (AF) cells from IVDs of mature and older pigs was quantified for the predominant ECM genes; type I collagen, type II collagen and aggrecan, and matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1), a collagenase that degrades fibrillar collagens. AF cells cultured on flexible-bottom plates were stretched 10 % at 0.5 Hz frequency. After 24 h, gene expression was assayed using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Basal mRNA levels without stretching for type II collagen and aggrecan were lower in older annular cells whereas MMP-1 levels were higher compared to mature cells. Following CTS, an adaptive response was elicited in annular cells from both age groups. ECM protein genes were upregulated, whereas MMP-1 was downregulated. The magnitude of response was significantly greater in older cells as compared to mature cells. These data suggest that the cells from the AF of older animals manifest lower basal levels of mRNA for type II collagen and aggrecan and higher levels of MMP-1 possibly due to decreased tensile stress experienced in vivo and is not the result of reduced capacity for response. PMID:21932191

  2. MR Monitoring of Minimally Invasive Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells into the Porcine Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Barczewska, Monika; Wojtkiewicz, Joanna; Habich, Aleksandra; Janowski, Miroslaw; Adamiak, Zbigniew; Holak, Piotr; Matyjasik, Hubert; Bulte, Jeff W. M.; Maksymowicz, Wojciech; Walczak, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Bone marrow stem cell therapy is a new, attractive therapeutic approach for treatment of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration; however, leakage and backflow of transplanted cells into the structures surrounding the disc may lead to the formation of undesirable osteophytes. The purpose of this study was to develop a technique for minimally invasive and accurate delivery of stem cells. Methods Porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO, Molday ION rhodamine) and first injected into the explanted swine lumbar IVD, followed by ex vivo 3T MRI. After having determined sufficient sensitivity, IVD degeneration was then induced in swine (n=3) by laser-evaporation. 3 x 106 SPIO-labeled cells embedded within hydrogel were injected in 2 doses using a transcutaneous cannula and an epidural anesthesia catheter. T2-weighted MR images were obtained at 3T before and immediately after cell infusion. Two weeks after injection, histological examination was performed for detection of transplanted cells. Results MSCs were efficiently labeled with Molday ION rhodamine. Cells could be readily detected in the injected vertebral tissue explants as distinct hypointensities with sufficient sensitivity. MR monitoring indicated that the MSCs were successfully delivered into the IVD in vivo, which was confirmed by iron-positive Prussian Blue staining of the tissue within the IVD. Conclusion We have developed a technique for non-invasive monitoring of minimally invasive stem delivery into the IVD at 3T. By using a large animal model mimicking the anatomy of IVD in humans, the present results indicate that this procedure may be clinically feasible. PMID:24058619

  3. Expression and functional roles of estrogen receptor GPR30 in human intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Wei, Aiqun; Shen, Bojiang; Williams, Lisa A; Bhargav, Divya; Yan, Feng; Chong, Beng H; Diwan, Ashish D

    2016-04-01

    Estrogen withdrawal, a characteristic of female aging, is associated with age-related intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The function of estrogen is mediated by two classic nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor (ER)-α and -β, and a membrane bound G-protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30). To date, the expression and function of GPR30 in human spine is poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate GPR30 expression in IVD, and its role in estrogen-related regulation of proliferation and apoptosis of disc nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. GPR30 expression was examined in 30 human adult NP and 9 fetal IVD. Results showed that GPR30 was expressed in NP cells at both mRNA and protein levels. In human fetal IVD, GPR30 protein was expressed in the NP at 12-14 weeks gestation, but was undetectable at 8-11 weeks. The effect of 17β-estradiol (E2) on GPR30-mediated proliferation and interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced apoptosis of NP cells was investigated. Cultured NP cells were treated with or without E2, GPR30 antagonist G36, and ER antagonist ICI 182,780. NP cell viability was tested by MTS assay. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry using fluorescence labeled annexin-V, TUNEL assay and immumnocytochemical staining of activated caspase-3. E2 enhanced cell proliferation and prevented IL-1β-induced cell death, but the effect was partially blocked by G36 and completely abrogated by a combination of ICI 182,780 and G36. This study demonstrates that GPR30 is expressed in human IVD to transmit signals triggering E2-induced NP cell proliferation and protecting against IL-1β-induced apoptosis. The effects of E2 on NP cells require both GPR30 and classic estrogen receptors. PMID:26815911

  4. Safe physiotherapy interventions in large cervical disc herniations.

    PubMed

    Keramat, Keramat Ullah; Gaughran, Aisling

    2012-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman was seen in a physiotherapy department with signs and symptoms of cervical radiculopathy. Loss of cervical lordosis and a large paracentral to intraforaminal disc prolapse (8 mm) at C5-C6 level was reported on MRI. She was taking diclofenac sodium, tramadol HCl, diazepam and pregabalin for the preceding 2 months and no significant improvement, except temporary relief, was reported. She was referred to physiotherapy while awaiting a surgical opinion from a neurosurgeon. In physiotherapy she was treated with mobilisation of the upper thoracic spine from C7 to T6 level. A cervical extension exercise was performed with prior voluntary extension of the thoracic spine and elevated shoulders. She was advised to continue the same at home. General posture advice was given. Signs and symptoms resolved within the following four sessions of treatment over 3 weeks. Surgical intervention was subsequently deemed unnecessary. PMID:22907861

  5. Uncovertebral Anatomic Midline Targeting for Cervical Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bednar, Drew A.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Prospective observational cohort. Objective To document the accuracy of uncovertebral anatomic targeting in positioning cervical disc arthroplasty. Summary of Background Data Disc arthroplasty implants depend on midline placement for optimum mechanical function. Fluoroscopy is used to delineate the midline. Anatomic targeting from the uncovertebral joints in the neck may be adequate. We have investigated the efficacy of uncovertebral anatomic targeting for cervical disc arthroplasty. Methods Anatomic uncovertebral midline targeting for disc arthroplasty insertion was performed in 18 male (mean age 51 years, range 27 to 67) and 22 female (mean age 50, range 35 to 70) patients receiving a total of 59 implants over a 5-year period. Device insertion was under only lateral imaging control. Postinsertion operative fluoroscopy with optimized centering was used to record implant position in the anteroposterior plane, and centerline analysis was performed using cursor measurement technology from the GE PACS™ imaging system (GE Medical Systems, Mt. Prospect, IL). Results Analysis found a mean deviation from the ideal midline placement of only 0.7 mm (range, 0 to 2.9 mm). Only three devices were more than 2 mm off the anatomic midline. Conclusion This anatomic technique is effective, safely minimizing imaging resource needs and X-ray exposure to the patient and operating team. PMID:24353946

  6. The Involvement of Protease Nexin-1 (PN1) in the Pathogenesis of Intervertebral Disc (IVD) Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinghuo; Liu, Wei; Duan, Zhenfeng; Gao, Yong; Li, Shuai; Wang, Kun; Song, Yu; Shao, Zengwu; Yang, Shuhua; Yang, Cao

    2016-01-01

    Protease nexin-1 (PN-1) is a serine protease inhibitor belonging to the serpin superfamily. This study was undertaken to investigate the regulatory role of PN-1 in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disk (IVD) degeneration. Expression of PN-1 was detected in human IVD tissue of varying grades. Expression of both PN-1 mRNA and protein was significantly decreased in degenerated IVD, and the expression levels of PN-1 were correlated with the grade of disc degeneration. Moreover, a decrease in PN-1 expression in primary NP cells was confirmed. On induction by IL-1β, the expression of PN-1 in NP cells was decreased at day 7, 14, and 21, as shown by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. PN-1 administration decreased IL-1β-induced MMPs and ADAMTS production and the loss of Agg and Col II in NP cell cultures through the ERK1/2/NF-kB signaling pathway. The changes in PN-1 expression are involved in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration. Our findings indicate that PN-1 administration could antagonize IL-1β-induced MMPs and ADAMTS, potentially preventing degeneration of IVD tissue. This study also revealed new insights into the regulation of PN-1 expression via the ERK1/2/NF-kB signaling pathway and the role of PN-1 in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration. PMID:27460424

  7. Intervertebral disc, sensory nerves and neurotrophins: who is who in discogenic pain?

    PubMed Central

    García-Cosamalón, José; del Valle, Miguel E; Calavia, Marta G; García-Suárez, Olivia; López-Muñiz, Alfonso; Otero, Jesús; Vega, José A

    2010-01-01

    The normal intervertebral disc (IVD) is a poorly innervated organ supplied only by sensory (mainly nociceptive) and postganglionic sympathetic (vasomotor efferents) nerve fibers. Interestingly, upon degeneration, the IVD becomes densely innervated even in regions that in normal conditions lack innervation. This increased innervation has been associated with pain of IVD origin. The mechanisms responsible for nerve growth and hyperinnervation of pathological IVDs have not been fully elucidated. Among the molecules that are presumably involved in this process are some members of the family of neurotrophins (NTs), which are known to have both neurotrophic and neurotropic properties and regulate the density and distribution of nerve fibers in peripheral tissues. NTs and their receptors are expressed in healthy IVDs but much higher levels have been observed in pathological IVDs, thus suggesting a correlation between levels of expression of NTs and density of innervation in IVDs. In addition, NTs also play a role in inflammatory responses and pain transmission by increasing the expression of pain-related peptides and modulating synapses of nociceptive neurons at the spinal cord. This article reviews current knowledge about the innervation of IVDs, NTs and NT receptors, expression of NTs and their receptors in IVDs as well as in the sensory neurons innervating the IVDs, the proinflammatory role of NTs, NTs as nociception regulators, and the potential network of discogenic pain involving NTs. PMID:20456524

  8. Clinical Effect of Acupotomy Combined with Korean Medicine: A Case Series of a Herniated Intervertebral Disc.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-ji; Jeon, Ju-hyun; Kim, Young-il

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of acupotomy for treating patients with a herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD). This case series includes five HIVD patients who were treated at the Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Daejeon University Dunsan Korean Hospital, Daejeon, Korea, from January 2015 to April 2015. Acupotomy was performed three times over a 2-week period, along with Korean medical treatment. The outcomes were evaluated by using a numeric rating scale (NRS), physical examination, the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index (ODI), the Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36), and the Surgical Safety Checklist. The NRS and physical examination results, as well as the ODI scores, were improved in all cases. No significant differences were noted on the SF-36. No patients had any adverse effects. This study, with its findings of encouraging responses in reducing low back pain and radiating pain and in recovering the kinetic state of soft tissue, supports the potential use of acupotomy for the treatment of patients suffering from HIVD. PMID:26896075

  9. TWEAK/Fn14 signaling: a promising target in intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ping; Yuan, Chong-Ming; Zhang, Shuai-Gong; Hao, Qing-Hai; Wang, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Zhong; Meng, Qian; Li, Ming; Hao, Yue-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) is a potent chemoattractant cytokine with various biological functions, such as stimulation of angiogenesis, induction of proinflammatory cytokines, regulation of cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Therefore, it has also been implicated in several pathological processes, from cancer to inflammatory diseases. Remarkably, TWEAK and its receptors, fibroblast growth factor inducible 14 (Fn14), are also present in intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue, where they play a role in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration. The interaction of TWEAK with Fn14 is involved in physiological and pathological activities of IVD degeneration patients, which includes apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes, extracellular matrix degradation, reduction in proteoglycan synthesis and so on. The blockade of this interaction results in suppressing over-production of proinflammatory factors and cell death in in vivo or in vitro experiments, suggesting that TWEAK/Fn14 signaling may be therapeutically relevant in IVD degeneration, and the targeting of TWEAK or Fn14 has been proposed as a potential therapeutic approach for autoimmune diseases such as Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this article, we discuss the biological features of TWEAK/Fn14 signaling and summarize recent advances in our understanding of the role of TWEAK/Fn14 signaling in the pathogenesis and treatment of IVD degeneration. We think that the blockade of TWEAK/Fn14 signaling may be a promising therapeutic strategy for IVD degeneration in the near future. PMID:26907852

  10. Organotypic Cultures of Intervertebral Disc Cells: Responses to Growth Factors and Signaling Pathways Involved.

    PubMed

    Pratsinis, Harris; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is strongly associated with low back pain, a major cause of disability worldwide. An in-depth understanding of IVD cell physiology is required for the design of novel regenerative therapies. Accordingly, aim of this work was the study of IVD cell responses to mitogenic growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic milieu, comprising characteristic molecules of IVD's extracellular matrix. In particular, annulus fibrosus (AF) cells were cultured inside collagen type-I gels, while nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) supplemented collagen gels, and the effects of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) were assessed. All three growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis in both AF and NP 3D cell cultures, with potencies similar to those observed previously in monolayers. CSA supplementation inhibited basal DNA synthesis rates, without affecting the response to growth factors. ERK and Akt were found to be phosphorylated following growth factor stimulation. Blockade of these two signaling pathways using pharmacologic inhibitors significantly, though not completely, inhibited growth factor-induced DNA synthesis. The proposed culture systems may prove useful for further in vitro studies aiming at future interventions for IVD regeneration. PMID:26583105

  11. Distribution pattern of surgically treated symptomatic prolapsed lumbar and sacral intervertebral discs in males

    PubMed Central

    Nnamdi, Ibe Michael Onwuzuruike

    2013-01-01

    Background: The pattern of distribution of surgically treated symptomatic prolapsed lumbar and sacral intervertebral discs has been published, though scantily, especially in males. We decided to look at our own series, compare and contrast ours with some of those published. Materials and Methods: We treated 88 locations of this lesion in 68 males. The clinical features were those of lower back pains, with or without radiation into the lower extremities, sensory loss and paresis of the limbs. There was a case of loss of urinary bladder and ano-rectal control. All lesions were confirmed through cauda-equinograms and treated under general anaesthesia in knee-chest position (MECCA position). The patients were followed up for 3-6 months post-operatively. Results: There were 88 locations in 68 males of 21-70 years of age, with 29 prolapses occurring during the age range 31-40 years, while 54 locations were on the left and 48 at L4/5. The procedures were well tolerated by all patients and there were no post-operative complications. Conclusion: This lesion in our series occurred mostly on the left, at the L4/5 level and peaked at 31-40 years age range. The predictability of occurrence of this disease, using side, level and age is still not feasible in males from our series. PMID:24403714

  12. In-situ photopolymerized and monitored implants: successful application to an intervertebral disc replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmocker, Andreas M.; Khoushabi, Azadeh; Bourban, Pierre-Etienne; Schizas, Constantin; Pioletti, Dominique; Moser, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Photopolymerization is a common method to harden materials initially in a liquid state. A surgeon can directly trigger the solidification of a dental implant or a bone or tissue filler by using ultra-violet light. Traditionally, photopolymerization has been used mainly in dentistry. Over the last decade advances in material development including a wide range of biocompatible gel- and cement-systems open up a new avenue for in-situ photopolymerization. We designed a miniaturized light probe where a photoactive material can be 1) mixed, pressurized and injected 2) photopolymerized or photoactivated and 3) monitored during the chemical reaction. The device enables surgeries to be conducted through a hole smaller than 500 μm in diameter. Using a combination of Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy, the current state of the photopolymerization was inferred and monitored in real time within an in-vitro tissue model. It was also possible to determine roughly the position of the probe within the tissue cavity by analysing the fluorescence signal. Using the technique hydrogels were successfully implanted into a bovine intervertebral disc model. Mechanical tests could not obstruct the functionality of the implant. Finally, the device was also used for other application such as the implantation of a hydrogel into an aneurysm tissue cavity which will be presented at the conference.

  13. Experimental observation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation into rabbit intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hao; Lin, Yazhou; Zhang, Guoqing; Gu, Rui; Chen, Bohua

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) transplantation has been investigated worldwide. However, few reports have addressed the survival status of human BMSCs in the intervertebral discs (IVDs) in vivo following transplantation. The current study aimed to observe the survival status of human BMSCs in rabbit IVDs. The IVDs of 15 New Zealand white rabbits were divided into three groups: Punctured blank control group (L1-2); punctured physiological saline control group (L2-3); and punctured human BMSCs transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) group (L3-4, L4-5 and L5-6). One, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after transplantation the IVDs were removed and a fluorescence microscope was used to observe the density of GFP-positive human BMSCs. The results indicated that in the sections of specimens removed at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks post-transplantation, no GFP-positive cells were observed in the control groups, whereas GFP-positive cells were apparent in the nucleus pulposus at all periods in the GFP-labeled human BMSCs group, and the cell density at 6 and 8 weeks was significantly less than that at 1, 2 and 4 weeks post-transplantation (P<0.001). Thus, it was identified that human BMSCs were able to survive in the rabbit IVDs for 8 weeks. PMID:27588177

  14. Organotypic Cultures of Intervertebral Disc Cells: Responses to Growth Factors and Signaling Pathways Involved

    PubMed Central

    Pratsinis, Harris; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is strongly associated with low back pain, a major cause of disability worldwide. An in-depth understanding of IVD cell physiology is required for the design of novel regenerative therapies. Accordingly, aim of this work was the study of IVD cell responses to mitogenic growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic milieu, comprising characteristic molecules of IVD's extracellular matrix. In particular, annulus fibrosus (AF) cells were cultured inside collagen type-I gels, while nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) supplemented collagen gels, and the effects of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) were assessed. All three growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis in both AF and NP 3D cell cultures, with potencies similar to those observed previously in monolayers. CSA supplementation inhibited basal DNA synthesis rates, without affecting the response to growth factors. ERK and Akt were found to be phosphorylated following growth factor stimulation. Blockade of these two signaling pathways using pharmacologic inhibitors significantly, though not completely, inhibited growth factor-induced DNA synthesis. The proposed culture systems may prove useful for further in vitro studies aiming at future interventions for IVD regeneration. PMID:26583105

  15. Acid-sensing ion channel 2 (asic 2) and trkb interrelationships within the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Antonio; Viña, Eliseo; Cabo, Roberto; Vázquez, Gorka; Cobo, Ramón; García-Suárez, Olivia; García-Cosamalón, José; Vega, José A

    2015-01-01

    The cells of the intervertebral disc (IVD) have an unusual acidic and hyperosmotic microenvironment. They express acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), gated by extracellular protons and mechanical forces, as well as neurotrophins and their signalling receptors. In the nervous tissues some neurotrophins regulate the expression of ASICs. The expression of ASIC2 and TrkB in human normal and degenerated IVD was assessed using quantitative-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we investigated immunohistochemically the expression of ASIC2 in the IVD of TrkB-deficient mice. ASIC2 and TrkB mRNAs were found in normal human IVD and both increased significantly in degenerated IVD. ASIC2 and TrkB proteins were also found co-localized in a variable percentage of cells, being significantly higher in degenerated IVD than in controls. The murine IVD displayed ASIC2 immunoreactivity which was absent in the IVD of TrkB-deficient mice. Present results demonstrate the occurrence of ASIC2 and TrkB in the human IVD, and the increased expression of both in pathological IVD suggest their involvement in IVD degeneration. These data also suggest that TrkB-ligands might be involved in the regulation of ASIC2 expression, and therefore in mechanisms by which the IVD cells accommodate to low pH and hypertonicity. PMID:26617738

  16. Interleukin 1 Polymorphisms Contribute to Intervertebral Disc Degeneration Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Changfeng; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yong; Wang, Zhenyu; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objective We performed a meta-analysis to assess association between interleukin 1 (IL-1) polymorphisms and the risk of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration (IDD). Background A series of studies have investigated the association between common single nucleotide polymorphisms in IL-1 and IDD risk; however, the overall results are inconclusive. Methods Two independent investigators conducted a systematic search for relevant available studies. Allele frequencies were extracted from each study. The association between the IL-1α (+889C/T) or IL-1β (+3954C/T) polymorphism and IDD risk was measured by odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results Five and six studies, respectively, were ultimately included in the meta-analysis for the IL-1α (+889C/T) and IL-1β (+3954C/T) polymorphism. The combined results showed that the IL-1α (+889C/T) polymorphism was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to IDD, particularly in Caucasians (TT versus CC: OR = 2.95, 95% CI: 1.45, 6.04; Pheterogeneity = 0.82; TT versus CC/CT: OR = 2.29, 95% CI: 1.18, 4.47; Pheterogeneity = 0.20). In contrast, the IL-1β (+3954C/T) polymorphism showed a trend towards increased risk in Caucasians but no association in Asians. Conclusion This meta-analysis suggested that the IL-1α (+889C/T) polymorphism is significantly associated with risk of IDD, especially in Caucasian populations. PMID:27253397

  17. Microarray based analysis of gene regulation by microRNA in intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    HU, PENG; FENG, BO; WANG, GUANGLIN; NING, BIN; JIA, TANGHONG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the underlying mechanism of the development of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) by bioinformatics based on microarray datasets. GSE 19943 and GSE 34095 datasets downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus data were used to screen the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in IDD. The correlation between microRNAs and target genes was investigated using different algorithms. The underlying molecular mechanisms of the target genes were then explored using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway and Gene Ontology function enrichment analysis. A total of 9 differentially expressed microRNAs, including 3 down- and 6 upregulated microRNAs and 850 DEGs were identified in tissue from patients with IDD. Two regulation networks of the target genes by microRNAs were constructed, including 33 upregulated microRNA-target gene pairs and 4 downregulated microRNA-target gene pairs. Certain target genes had been demonstrated to be involved in IDD progression via various pathways, including in the cell cycle and pathways in cancer. In addition, two important microRNAs (microRNA-222 and microRNA-589) were identified that were pivotal for the development of IDD, and their target genes, CDKNAB and SMAD4. In conclusion, a comprehensive miRNA-target gene regulatory network was constructed, which was found to be important in IDD progression. PMID:26134418

  18. Noncoding RNAs in human intervertebral disc degeneration: An integrated microarray study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Che, Lu; Xie, Yan-Ke; Hu, Qing-Jie; Ma, Chi-Jiao; Pei, Yan-Jun; Wu, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Fan, Li-Ying; Wang, Hai-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that noncoding RNAs play important roles in a multitude of biological processes. The striking findings of miRNAs (microRNAs) and lncRNAs (long noncoding RNAs) as members of noncoding RNAs open up an exciting era in the studies of gene regulation. More recently, the reports of circRNAs (circular RNAs) add fuel to the noncoding RNAs research. Human intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a main cause of low back pain as a disabling spinal disease. We have addressed the expression profiles if miRNAs, lncRNAs and mRNAs in IDD (Wang et al., J Pathology, 2011 and Wan et al., Arthritis Res Ther, 2014). Furthermore, we thoroughly analysed noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, lncRNAs and circRNAs in IDD using the very same samples. Here we delineate in detail the contents of the aforementioned microarray analyses. Microarray and sample annotation data were deposited in GEO under accession number GSE67567 as SuperSeries. The integrated analyses of these noncoding RNAs will shed a novel light on coding-noncoding regulatory machinery. PMID:26484230

  19. Down-Regulated CK8 Expression in Human Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhen; Wang, Hai-Qiang; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Chang, Le; Chen, Yu-Fei; Zhang, Yong-Zhao; Zhang, Wei-Lin; Gao, Yang; Wan, Zhong-Yuan; Che, Lu; Liu, Xu; Samartzis, Dino; Luo, Zhuo-Jing

    2013-01-01

    As an intermediate filament protein, cytokeratin 8 (CK8) exerts multiple cellular functions. Moreover, it has been identified as a marker of notochord cells, which play essential roles in human nucleus pulposus (NP). However, the distribution of CK8 positive cells in human NP and their relationship with intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) have not been clarified until now. Here, we found the percentage of CK8 positive cells in IDD (25.7±4.14%) was significantly lower than that in normal and scoliosis NP (51.9±9.73% and 47.8±5.51%, respectively, p<0.05). Western blotting and qRT-PCR results confirmed the down-regulation of CK8 expression in IDD on both of protein and mRNA levels. Furthermore, approximately 37.4% of cell clusters were CK8 positive in IDD. Taken together, this is the first study to show a down-regulated CK8 expression and the percentage of CK8 positive cell clusters in IDD based upon multiple lines of evidence. Consequently, CK8 positive cells might be considered as a potential option in the development of cellular treatment strategies for NP repair. PMID:23801880

  20. Noncoding RNAs in human intervertebral disc degeneration: An integrated microarray study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Che, Lu; Xie, Yan-Ke; Hu, Qing-Jie; Ma, Chi-Jiao; Pei, Yan-Jun; Wu, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Fan, Li-Ying; Wang, Hai-Qiang

    2015-09-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that noncoding RNAs play important roles in a multitude of biological processes. The striking findings of miRNAs (microRNAs) and lncRNAs (long noncoding RNAs) as members of noncoding RNAs open up an exciting era in the studies of gene regulation. More recently, the reports of circRNAs (circular RNAs) add fuel to the noncoding RNAs research. Human intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a main cause of low back pain as a disabling spinal disease. We have addressed the expression profiles if miRNAs, lncRNAs and mRNAs in IDD (Wang et al., J Pathology, 2011 and Wan et al., Arthritis Res Ther, 2014). Furthermore, we thoroughly analysed noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, lncRNAs and circRNAs in IDD using the very same samples. Here we delineate in detail the contents of the aforementioned microarray analyses. Microarray and sample annotation data were deposited in GEO under accession number GSE67567 as SuperSeries. The integrated analyses of these noncoding RNAs will shed a novel light on coding-noncoding regulatory machinery. PMID:26484230

  1. Microarray based analysis of gene regulation by microRNA in intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Feng, Bo; Wang, Guanglin; Ning, Bin; Jia, Tanghong

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to explore the underlying mechanism of the development of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) by bioinformatics based on microarray datasets. GSE 19943 and GSE 34095 datasets downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus data were used to screen the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in IDD. The correlation between microRNAs and target genes was investigated using different algorithms. The underlying molecular mechanisms of the target genes were then explored using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway and Gene Ontology function enrichment analysis. A total of 9 differentially expressed microRNAs, including 3 down‑ and 6 upregulated microRNAs and 850 DEGs were identified in tissue from patients with IDD. Two regulation networks of the target genes by microRNAs were constructed, including 33 upregulated microRNA‑target gene pairs and 4 downregulated microRNA‑target gene pairs. Certain target genes had been demonstrated to be involved in IDD progression via various pathways, including in the cell cycle and pathways in cancer. In addition, two important microRNAs (microRNA‑222 and microRNA‑589) were identified that were pivotal for the development of IDD, and their target genes, CDKNAB and SMAD4. In conclusion, a comprehensive miRNA‑target gene regulatory network was constructed, which was found to be important in IDD progression. PMID:26134418

  2. Gene expression analysis in response to osmotic stimuli in the intervertebral disc with DNA microarray

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intervertebral disc (IVD) cells experience a broad range of physicochemical stimuli under physiologic conditions, including alterations in their osmotic environment. At present, the molecular mechanisms underlying osmotic regulation in IVD cells are poorly understood. This study aims to screen genes affected by changes in osmotic pressure in cells of subjects aged 29 to 63 years old, with top-scoring pair (TSP) method. Methods Gene expression data set GSE1648 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database, including four hyper-osmotic stimuli samples, four iso-osmotic stimuli samples, and three hypo-osmotic stimuli samples. A novel, simple method, referred to as the TSP, was used in this study. Through this method, there was no need to perform data normalization and transformation before data analysis. Results A total of five pairs of genes ((CYP2A6, FNTB), (PRPF8, TARDBP), (RPS5, OAZ1), (SLC25A3, NPM1) and (CBX3, SRSF9)) were selected based on the TSP method. We inferred that all these genes might play important roles in response to osmotic stimuli and age in IVD cells. Additionally, hyper-osmotic and iso-osmotic stimuli conditions were adverse factors for IVD cells. Conclusions We anticipate that our results will provide new thoughts and methods for the study of IVD disease. PMID:24369767

  3. Intracellular Flow Cytometric Measurement of Extracellular Matrix Components in Porcine Intervertebral Disc Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flagler, Daniel J.; Huang, Chun-Yuh; Yuan, Tai-Yi; Lu, Zhongmin; Cheung, Herman S.; Gu, Wei Yong

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and demonstrate the utility of a novel method of evaluating intracellular levels of extracellular matrix (ECM) components in intervertebral disc (IVD) cells using flow cytometry. By using this method, this study discriminated between cell populations in porcine IVD and examined the response of IVD cells to monolayer cultures, a traditional method of cell expansion, by measuring phenotypic attributes of ECM component production. It was found that monolayer cultures affected collagen production of IVD cells while there were differences in collagen type II production between the cells isolated from the annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) regions of IVD. Size distributions of fresh and cultured cells were also presented while the relationships between cell size and intracellular collagen level revealed heterogeneous cell populations in AF and NP regions. Furthermore, this study showed that the intracellular collagen signals of IVD cells were significantly enhanced by the treatments of Brefeldin-A and ascorbic acid. This suggests that Brefeldin-A and ascorbic acid could be used to increase the sensitivity of flow cytometric analysis on intracellular collagen levels by maximizing collagen accumulation inside cells. Since a unique feature of the flow cytometric screening tool is the ability to discriminate between various cell populations in a single sample, the flow cytometric method developed in this study may have the potential to identify specific collagen-producing cell populations from tissues or cell cultures. PMID:20161070

  4. Comparison of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion in Monosegmental Vacuum Phenomenon within an Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    An, Ki-Chan; Kong, Gyu-Min; Park, Dae-Hyun; Youn, Ji-Hong; Lee, Woon-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of posterolateral lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in monosegmental vacuum phenomenon within an intervertebral disc. Overview of Literature The vacuum phenomenon within an intervertebral disc is a serious form of degenerative disease that destabilizes the intervertebral body. Outcomes of PLIF and PLF in monosegmental vacuum phenomenon are unclear. Methods Monosegmental instrumented PLIF and PLF was performed on 84 degenerative lumbar disease patients with monosegmental vacuum phenomenon (PLIF, n=38; PLF, n=46). Minimum follow-up was 24 months. Clinical outcomes of leg and back pain were assessed using visual analogue scales for leg pain (LVAS) and back pain (BVAS), and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). The radiographic outcome was the estimated bony union rate. Results LVAS, BVAS, and ODI improved in both groups. There was no significant difference in the degree of these improvements between PLIF and PLF patients (p>0.05). Radiological union rate was 91.1% in PLIF group and 89.4% in PLF group at postoperative 24 months (p>0.05). Conclusions No significant differences in clinical results and union rates were found between PLIF and PLF patients. Selection of the operation technique will reflect the surgeon's preferences and patient condition. PMID:26949464

  5. Intervertebral disc regeneration using platelet-rich plasma-containing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells: A preliminary investigation

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHAN-ZHENG; JIN, JI-YANG; GUO, YU-DONG; MA, LIANG-YU; CHANG, QING; PENG, XIN-GUI; GUO, FANG-FANG; ZHANG, HAI-XIANG; HU, XIN-FENG; WANG, CHEN

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a promising strategy for intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). However, the short half-life of growth factors released from PRP cannot continuously stimulate the degenerated discs. Thus, the present study hypothesized that the combined use of PRP and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) may repair the early degenerated discs in the long term for their synergistic reparative effect. In the present study, following the induction of early IDD by annular puncture in rabbits, PRP was prepared and mixed with BMSCs (PRP-BMSC group) for injection into the early degenerated discs. As controls, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; PBS group) and PRP (PRP group) were similarly injected. Rabbits without any intervention served as a control group. At 8 weeks following treatment, histological changes of the injected discs were assessed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to detect the T2-weighted signal intensity of the targeted discs at weeks 1, 2 and 8 following treatment. Annular puncture resulted in disc narrowing and decreased T2-weighted signal intensity. At weeks 1 and 3, MRI examinations showed regenerative changes in the PRP-BMSC group and PRP group, whereas the PBS group exhibited a continuous degenerative process of the discs. At 8 weeks post-injection, the PRP-BMSCs induced a statistically significant restoration of discs, as shown by MRI (PRP-BMSCs, vs.PRP and PBS; P<0.05), which was also confirmed by histological evaluations. Thus, compared with PRP, the administration of PRP-containing BMSCs resulted in a superior regenerative effect on the early degenerated discs, which may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the restoration of early degenerated discs. PMID:26956080

  6. Primary Bovine Intervertebral Disc Cells Transduced with Adenovirus Overexpressing 12 BMPs and Sox9 Maintain Appropriate Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yejia; Markova, Dessislava; Im, Hee-Jeong; Hu, Wenyang; Thonar, Eugene J.-M.A.; He, Tong-Chuan; An, Howard S.; Phillips, Frank M.; Anderson, D. Greg

    2010-01-01

    Objective To confirm that primary intervertebral disc cells cultured in monolayer transduced with adenovirus maintained their phenotype, hence is an appropriate system to test gene therapy agents. Design Adult bovine nucleus pulposus and anulus fibrosus cells cultured in monolayer were transduced with adenoviruses expressing human bone morphogenetic proteins (AdBMPs) or Sox9 (AdSox9), or green fluorescence protein (AdGFP, as control). Chondrocyte phenotypic markers (e.g., type II collagen and aggrecan) and the chondrocyte hypertrophy marker (type X collagen) were measured 6 days after viral transduction by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Primary nucleus pulposus and anulus fibrosus cells transduced with AdBMPs, AdSox9, or adenovirus-expressing green fluorescence protein only (AdGFP, as control) continue to express healthy chondrocyte phenotypic markers and showed no evidence of the expression of the chondrocyte hypertrophy marker (type X collagen gene). Thus, we have shown that bovine nucleus pulposus and anulus fibrosus cells transduced with adenovirus overexpressing 12 different bone morphogenetic proteins or Sox9 maintain their phenotype in short-term culture. Conclusions In this study, primary bovine intervertebral disc cells transduced with adenovirus overexpressing 12 bone morphogenetic proteins or Sox9 preserved their phenotype in short-term culture. These cells did not express the type X collagen gene, an undesirable chondrocyte hypertrophic gene that could lead to ossification. Therefore, low-passage intervertebral disc cells cultured in monolayer is an appropriate culture system to test therapeutic genes. We further suggest that these cells may also be appropriate for engineering tissues or for cell therapy for degenerative disc diseases. PMID:19454853

  7. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Caused by Lumbar Herniated Intervertebral Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hee; Choi, Sang Sik; Lee, Mi Kyung; Kin, Jung Eun

    2016-07-01

    Most cases of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) occur after some inciting injury. There are a few cases of CRPS after an operation for disc disease. CRPS from a mild herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) without surgical intervention is even rarer than CRPS after an operation for disc disease.A 22-year-old man was transferred to a pain clinic. He had continuously complained about back and right leg pain. He presented with a skin color change in the right lower leg, intermittent resting tremor, stiffness, and swelling in the right leg. He complained of a pulling sensation and numbness in his right buttock, posterior thigh, lateral calf, and ankle. This symptom was in accordance with L4/5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed L4/5 HIVD that was central to the bilateral subarticular protrusion.He was diagnosed as having CRPS, which fits the revised International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) criteria. He fulfilled 4 symptom categories (allodynia, temperature asymmetry and skin color change, sweating changes, decreased range of motion and motor dysfunction) and 3 of 4 sign categories (allodynia, temperature asymmetry and skin color changes, decreased range of motion and motor dysfunction). The bone scan and thermography also revealed CRPS.For the past 2 months, we have performed intensive treatments. But, he never became pain-free and walking for 5 minutes led to persistent leg pain. We decided to perform percutaneous nucleoplasty, which can directly decompress a HIVD. On the next day, he achieved dramatic symptom relief. The visual analog scale (VAS) score improved to 3, compared to the VAS score of 9 at the first visit. The skin color change, allodynia, and tremor in the right leg disappeared, and the temperature asymmetry normalized. Motor weakness of the right leg also recovered.We report an unusual case of CRPS that was caused by L4/5 HIVD without a history of trauma or surgery. It has a clear causal relationship between HIVD

  8. Regeneration of nucleus pulposus tissue in an ovine intervertebral disc degeneration model by cell-free resorbable polymer scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Woiciechowsky, Christian; Abbushi, Alexander; Zenclussen, Maria L; Casalis, Pablo; Krüger, Jan Philipp; Freymann, Undine; Endres, Michaela; Kaps, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs) occurs frequently and is often associated with lower back pain. Recent treatment options are limited and treat the symptoms rather than regenerate the degenerated disc. Cell-free, freeze-dried resorbable polyglycolic acid (PGA)-hyaluronan implants were used in an ovine IVD degeneration model. The nucleus pulposus of the IVD was partially removed, endoscopically. PGA-hyaluronan implants were immersed in autologous sheep serum and implanted into the disc defect. Animals with nucleotomy only served as controls. The T2-weighted/fat suppression sequence signal intensity index of the operated discs, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), showed that implantation of the PGA-hyaluronan implant improved (p = 0.0066) the MRI signal compared to controls at 6 months after surgery. Histological analysis by haematoxylin and eosin and safranin O staining showed the ingrowth of cells with typical chondrocytic morphology, even cell distribution, and extracellular matrix rich in proteoglycan. Histomorphometric analyses confirmed that the implantation of the PGA-hyaluronan scaffolds improved (p = 0.027) the formation of regenerated tissue after nucleotomy. Disc heights remained stable in discs with nucleotomy only as well as after implantation of the implant. In conclusion, implantation of cell-free polymer-based implants after nucleotomy induces nucleus pulposus tissue regeneration and improves disc water content in the ovine model. PMID:22865642

  9. Topographical guidance of intervertebral disc cell growth in vitro: towards the development of tissue repair strategies for the anulus fibrosus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, William E; Wootton, Andrew; El Haj, Alicia; Eisenstein, Stephen M; Curtis, Adam S; Roberts, Sally

    2006-08-01

    The anulus fibrosus (AF) of the intervertebral disc consists of concentric sheets of collagenous matrix that is synthesised during embryogenesis by aligned disc cells. This highly organised structure may be severely disrupted during disc degeneration and/or herniation. Cell scaffolds that incorporate topographical cues as contact guidance have been used successfully to promote the healing of injured tendons. Therefore, we have investigated the effects of topography on disc cell growth. We show that disc cells from the AF and nucleus pulposus (NP) behaved differently in monolayer culture on micro-grooved membranes of polycaprolactone (PCL). Both cell types aligned to and migrated along the membrane's micro-grooves and ridges, but AF cells were smaller (or less spread), more bipolar and better aligned to the micro-grooves than NP cells. In addition, AF cells were markedly more immunopositive for type I collagen, but less immunopositive for chondroitin-6-sulphated proteoglycans than NP cells. There was no evidence of extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. Disc cells cultured on non-grooved PCL did not show any preferential alignment at sub-confluence and did not differ in their pattern of immunopositivity to those on grooved PCL. We conclude that substratum topography is effective in aligning disc cell growth and may be useful in tissue engineering for the AF. However, there is a need to optimise cell sources and/or environmental conditions (e.g. mechanical influences) to promote the synthesis of an aligned ECM. PMID:16688474

  10. Understanding nucleus pulposus cell phenotype: A prerequisite for stem cell based therapies to treat intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyowon; Johnson, Zariel I.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and associated low back pain (LBP) remains a major burden to our society without a significant improvement in treatment strategies or patient’s quality of life. While the recent cell-transplantation studies for treatment of degenerative disc disease showed promising results, to better gauge the success and functional outcomes of these therapies, it is crucial to understand if transplanted cells give rise to healthy nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue. NP cell phenotype is unique and is defined by expression of a characteristic set of markers that reflect their specialized physiology and function. This review summarizes phenotypic markers that mirror unique physiology and function of NP cells and their progenitors and should be considered to measure outcomes of cell-based therapies to treat disc degeneration. PMID:25584906

  11. Wnt Signaling Activates Shh Signaling in Early Postnatal Intervertebral Discs, and Re-Activates Shh Signaling in Old Discs in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sinner, Debora; Wylie, Christopher C.; Dahia, Chitra Lekha

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are strong fibrocartilaginous joints that connect adjacent vertebrae of the spine. As discs age they become prone to failure, with neurological consequences that are often severe. Surgical repair of discs treats the result of the disease, which affects as many as one in seven people, rather than its cause. An ideal solution would be to repair degenerating discs using the mechanisms of their normal differentiation. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Using the mouse as a model, we previously showed that Shh signaling produced by nucleus pulposus cells activates the expression of differentiation markers, and cell proliferation, in the postnatal IVD. In the present study, we show that canonical Wnt signaling is required for the expression of Shh signaling targets in the IVD. We also show that Shh and canonical Wnt signaling pathways are down-regulated in adult IVDs. Furthermore, this down-regulation is reversible, since re-activation of the Wnt or Shh pathways in older discs can re-activate molecular markers of the IVD that are lost with age. These data suggest that biological treatments targeting Wnt and Shh signaling pathways may be feasible as a therapeutic for degenerative disc disease. PMID:24892825

  12. The Pathophysiological Role of the PKCδ Pathway in the Intervertebral Disc: In vitro, ex vivo and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Ellman, Michael B; Kim, Jaesung; An, Howard S; Kroin, Jeffrey S.; Li, Xin; Chen, Di; Yan, Dongyao; Buechter, Doug D; Nakayama, Keiichi; Liu, Bo; Morganand, Stephanie; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Objective PKCδ activation was found to be a principal rate-limiting step in matrix-degrading enzyme production in human articular chondrocytes. However, the role of the PKC pathways, specifically PKCδ, has not yet been assessed in intervertebral disc tissue homeostasis. Methods Using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo techniques, we evaluated the pathophysiological role of the PKCδ pathway by examining (i) proteoglycan deposition; (ii) matrix-degrading enzyme production and activity; (iii) downstream signaling pathways regulated by PKCδ; and (iv) the effect on in vivo models of disc degeneration in genetically-engineered PKCδ knockout mice. Results Pathway-specific inhibitor studies reveal a vital role of PKCδ-MAPK (ERK, p38, JNK) axis and NFκB in disc homeostasis. Accordingly, PKCδ knockout mice are markedly resistant to disc degeneration in a disc injury model in vivo. Conclusion Suppression of the PKCδ pathway may be beneficial in the prevention and/or treatment of disc degeneration, and these findings provide evidence for the potential therapeutic role of pathway-specific inhibitors of the PKCδ cascade in the future. PMID:22161873

  13. Recovery of stepping and coordination in dogs following acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniations.

    PubMed

    Rousse, C A; Olby, N J; Williams, K; Harris, T L; Griffith, E H; Mariani, C L; Muñana, K R; Early, P J

    2016-07-01

    Prospective data on the recovery of coordination in dogs suffering acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniations (TL-IVDH) are limited. The purpose of this study was to use treadmill based and open field scores (OFS) to quantify recovery of stepping ability and forelimb, hindlimb coordination in the 6 weeks following surgical decompression of dogs with TL-IVDH. Sixty-three dogs were grouped at presentation as grades 3 (non-ambulatory paraparetic), 4 (paraplegic) or 5 (paraplegic without pain sensation) and were evaluated 2, 4, and 6 weeks post-operatively. Stepping scores and Regularity Index (RI), a measure of coordination, were calculated from treadmill walking, and an OFS incorporating supported and unsupported walking was assigned. Outcomes for the three measures were compared between groups and correlation between scoring methods was assessed. Grade 3 and 4 dogs recovered ambulation by 2 weeks, reaching median stepping scores of 96 and 90% by 6 weeks, respectively. Recovery of coordination differed between groups 3 and 4 with median RI scores of 93.9% and 63%, respectively, by 6 weeks. Eight grade 5 dogs failed to recover independent ambulation by 6 weeks. Nine dogs recovered with scores that were significantly worse than the grade 3 and 4 dogs at 6 weeks for stepping score (P < 0.001) and RI (P < 0.001). OFS correlated closely with stepping and RI scores and each group was significantly different using this ordinal scale. In conclusion, recovery of coordination was incomplete in dogs that showed good recovery of stepping. The data generated could be used for clinical trial design. PMID:27240917

  14. Aquaporin 3 protects against lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration via the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huanxin; Jing, Yongbin; Xia, Jingjun; Wang, Xintao; You, Changcheng; Yan, Jinglong

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of aquaporin 3 (AQP3), a water channel which promotes glycerol permeability and water transport across cell membranes, is reduced in degenerative lumbar intervertebral disc (IVD) tissues. However, the role of AQP3 in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration has not recieved much scholarly attention. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of AQP3 on cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in human nucleus pulposus cells (hNPCs) using gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments, and to determine whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling is involved in the effect of AQP3 on IVD degeneration. hNPCs were transfected with the AQP3-pcDNA3.1 plasmid or AQP3 siRNA to overexpress or suppress AQP3. An MTT assay was performed to determine cell proliferation, and we found that AQP3 promoted hNPC proliferation. The expression of aggrecan, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)4 and ADAMTS5 was detected using western blot analysis, to examine the effect of AQP3 on ECM degradation in hNPCs. The results revealed that AQP3 inhibited ECM degradation in hNPCs. In addition, we found that Wnt/β-catenin signaling was suppressed by AQP3. However, the effect of AQP3 on hNPC proliferation and ECM degradation was reversed by treatment with lithium chloride, a known activator of Wnt/β‑catenin signaling. In conclusion, using in vitro and in vivo tests, we have reported for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that AQP3 exerts protective effects against IVD degeneration, and these are effected, at least partially, through the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26820815

  15. Correlations of O3 therapeutic targets and imaging localization in lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fenghe; Yin, Yanwei; Liu, Chuansheng; Yi, Yusheng; Yu, Junmin; Kou, Dewei; Wang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate correlations between the effects of O3 target-injection treatment and imaging localization in lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion (LIDP). Methods: 164 LIDP patients were divided into 3 groups: group A, the protrusion located at level I-III, region 1-2, domain a-b; group B, the protrusion located at level I-III, region 1-2, domain c-d; group C: the protrusion located at level I-III, region 3-4, domain a-b. The patients were treated with LIDP O3-target treatment + blocking therapy with epidural anti-inflammatory analgesic liquid. Results: Among the 164 LIDP patients, 95 patients (57.93%) exhibited the significant effectiveness after the treatment; 64 cases (39.02%) exhibited the effectiveness. The results of functional improvements revealed that 50 cases (53.76%) of sagittal plane and 54 cases of horizontal plane (55.67%) in the group A, 33 cases (35.48%) and 31 cases (31.96%) in the group C respectively were significantly better than those in the group B (10 cases, 10.75%; 12 cases, 12.37%) (P < 0.05). The visual analogue scale (VAS) scores 1 week and 1 month after the treatment in the three groups were significantly decreased than those before the treatment (P < 0.05). The intergroup comparison revealed that the A group (1 week 2.28 ± 0.85, 1 month 1.21 ± 0.27) and C (2.79 ± 0.98, 1.38 ± 0.55) were significantly better than the B group (3.92 ± 1.14, 2.53 ± 0.51) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The O3 target-injection treatment exhibited the best effects in treating the LIDP patients with the protrusion located at level I-III, region 1-2, domain a-b. PMID:26309586

  16. Acid-sensing ion channels in healthy and degenerated human intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Antonio; Del Valle, Miguel E; García-Suárez, Olivia; Viña, Eliseo; Cabo, Roberto; Vázquez, Gorka; Cobo, Juan L; Murcia, Antonio; Alvarez-Vega, Marco; García-Cosamalón, José; Vega, José A

    2014-06-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are a family of H(+)-gated voltage-insensitive ion channels that respond to extracellular acidification by regulating transmembrane Ca(2+) flux. Moreover, ASICs can also be gated by mechanical forces and may function as mechanosensors. The cells of the intervertebral disc (IVD) have an unusual acidic and hyperosmotic microenvironment. Changes in the pH and osmolarity determine the viability of IVD cells and the composition of the extracellular matrix, and both are the basis of IVD degeneration. In this study, the expression of ASICs (ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3 and ASIC4) mRNAs and proteins in human healthy and degenerated IVD was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The distribution of ASIC proteins was determined by immunohistochemistry. The mRNAs for all ASICs were detected in normal human IVD, and significantly increased levels were found in degenerated IVD. Western blots demonstrated the presence of proteins with estimated molecular weights of approximately 68-72 kDa. In both the annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) of normal IVD, ASIC2 is the most frequently expressed ASIC followed by ASIC3, ASIC1 and ASIC4. In the AF of degenerated IVD, there was a significant increase in the number of ASIC1 and ASIC4 positive cells, whereas in the NP, we found significant increase of expression of ASIC1, ASIC2 and ASIC3. These results describe the occurrence and localization of different ASICs in human healthy IVD, and their increased expression in degenerated IVD, thus suggesting that ASICs may be involved in IVD degeneration. PMID:24432912

  17. N-Cadherin-Mediated Signaling Regulates Cell Phenotype for Nucleus Pulposus Cells of the Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Priscilla Y.; Jing, Liufang; Michael, Keith W.; Richardson, William J.; Chen, Jun; Setton, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile nucleus pulposus (NP) cells of the intervertebral disc (IVD) are large, vacuolated cells that form cell clusters with strong cell–cell interactions. With maturation and aging, NP cells lose their ability to form these cell clusters, with aging-associated changes in NP cell phenotype, morphology, and proteoglycan synthesis that may contribute to IVD degeneration. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms governing juvenile NP cell cluster behavior towards the goal of revealing factors that can promote juvenile, healthy NP cell phenotypes. N-cadherin has been identified as a cell–cell adhesion marker that is present in juvenile NP cells, but disappears with age. The goal of this study was to reveal the importance of N-cadherin in regulating cell–cell interactions in juvenile NP cell cluster formation and test for a regulatory role in maintaining a juvenile NP phenotype in vitro. Juvenile porcine IVD cells, of notochordal origin, were promoted to form cell clusters in vitro, and analyzed for preservation of the juvenile NP phenotype. Additionally, cadherin-blocking experiments were performed to prevent cluster formation in order to study the importance of cluster formation in NP cell signaling. Findings reveal N-cadherin-mediated cell–cell contacts promote cell clustering behavior and regulate NP cell matrix production and preservation of NP-specific markers. Inhibition of N-cadherin-mediated contacts resulted in loss of all features of the juvenile NP cell. These results establish a regulatory role for N-cadherin in juvenile NP cells, and suggest that preservation of the N-cadherin mediated cell–cell contact is important for preserving juvenile NP cell phenotype and morphology. PMID:25848407

  18. Reduced tissue osmolarity increases TRPV4 expression and pro-inflammatory cytokines in intervertebral disc cells.

    PubMed

    Walter, B A; Purmessur, D; Moon, A; Occhiogrosso, J; Laudier, D M; Hecht, A C; Iatridis, J C

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour and cellular metabolism of intervertebral discs (IVDs) and articular cartilage are strongly influenced by their proteoglycan content and associated osmotic properties. This osmotic environment is a biophysical signal that changes with disease and may contribute to the elevated matrix breakdown and altered biologic response to loading observed in IVD degeneration and osteoarthritis. This study tested the hypothesis that changes in osmo-sensation by the transient receptor potential vallinoid-4 (TRPV4) ion channel occur with disease and contribute to the inflammatory environment found during degeneration. Immunohistochemistry on bovine IVDs from an inflammatory organ culture model were used to investigate if TRPV4 is expressed in the IVD and how expression changes with degeneration. Western blot, live-cell calcium imaging, and qRT-PCR were used to investigate whether osmolarity changes or tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) regulate TRPV4 expression, and how altered TRPV4 expression influences calcium signalling and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. TRPV4 expression correlated with TNFα expression, and was increased when cultured in reduced medium osmolarity and unaltered with TNFα-stimulation. Increased TRPV4 expression increased the calcium flux following TRPV4 activation and increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 gene expression in IVD cells. TRPV4 expression was qualitatively elevated in regions of aggrecan depletion in degenerated human IVDs. Collectively, results suggest that reduced tissue osmolarity, likely following proteoglycan degradation, can increase TRPV4 signalling and enhance pro-inflammatory cytokine production, suggesting changes in TRPV4 mediated osmo-sensation may contribute to the progressive matrix breakdown in disease. PMID:27434269

  19. Painless squeaking following cervical disc replacement: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Athar; Hulme, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background We present a case of painless squeaking following cervical disc replacement which to our knowledge has not previously been reported in the literature. Methods A 45 year old gentleman presented with severe right sided C6 radiculopathy. He complained of more than 6 weeks of severe dysaesthesia in the right arm with pain radiating into the hand, thumb, index, middle and ring fingers. MRI confirmed severe impingement of C6 and C7 nerve roots. After trying a period of conservative treatment he underwent anterior cervical decompression with total cervical disc replacement of C5-6 and C6-7. Results Being a keen athlete he started running at 6 months post operatively. At his 12 month outpatient he presented us with an audio file containing squeaking from his neck. This was recorded immediately following a 9.5 mile hard surface run. The squeak got progressively less in intensity over 12 hours and disappeared after 24 hours. All instances of squeaking occurred after exercise where impact (running) or vibration (cycling) took place. This was first noticed 6 months post operatively when he restarted exercising. All episodes were completely painless. At his 18 month outpatient review the squeaking had reduced in frequency and intensity. At his 24 month review it had abated completely. Conclusion The aetiology of this painless squeaking has been elusive and is likely to be multifactorial. However we hypothesise that the audible squeak associated with the prestige LP disc maybe related to specific design characteristics and needs further evaluation. PMID:26484007

  20. An organ culture system to model early degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc II: profiling global gene expression changes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Despite many advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of disc degeneration, there remains a paucity of preclinical models which can be used to study the biochemical and molecular events that drive disc degeneration, and the effects of potential therapeutic interventions. The goal of this study is to characterize global gene expression changes in a disc organ culture system that mimics early nontraumatic disc degeneration. Methods To mimic a degenerative insult, rat intervertebral discs were cultured in the presence of TNF-α, IL-1β and serum-limiting conditions. Gene expression analysis was performed using a microarray to identify differential gene expression between experimental and control groups. Differential pattern of gene expression was confirmed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) or Western blot. Results Treatment resulted in significant changes in expression of more than 1,000 genes affecting many aspects of cell function including cellular movement, the cell cycle, cellular development, and cell death and proliferation. Many of the most highly upregulated and downregulated genes have known functions in disc degeneration and extracellular matrix hemostasis. Construction of gene networks based on known cellular pathways and expression data from our analysis demonstrated that the network associated with cell death, cell cycle regulation and DNA replication and repair was most heavily affected in this model of disc degeneration. Conclusions This rat organ culture model uses cytokine exposure to induce wide gene expression changes with the most affected genes having known reported functions in disc degeneration. We propose that this model is a valuable tool to study the etiology of disc degeneration and evaluate potential therapeutic treatments. PMID:24171898

  1. Double and zero quantum filtered 2H NMR analysis of D2O in intervertebral disc tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooms, Kristopher J.; Vega, Alexander J.; Polenova, Tatyana; Cannella, Marco; Marcolongo, Michele

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of double and zero quantum filtered 2H NMR spectra obtained from D2O perfused in the nucleus pulposus of human intervertebral disc tissue samples is reported. Fitting the spectra with a three-site model allows for residual quadrupolar couplings and T2 relaxation times to be measured. The analysis reveals changes in both the couplings and relaxation times as the tissue begins to show signs of degradation. The full analysis demonstrates that information about tissue hydration, water collagen interactions, and sample heterogeneity can be obtained and used to better understand the biochemical differences between healthy and degraded tissue.

  2. Wake-up stroke in a young woman with rotational vertebral artery occlusion due to far-lateral cervical disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Okawa, Masakazu; Amamoto, Takaaki; Abe, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Sohei; Higashi, Toshio; Inoue, Tooru

    2015-08-01

    Wake-up stroke is most likely to be caused by small-vessel disease, and is related to snoring. The authors present a rare case of far-lateral cervical disc herniation with neck rotation, resulting in wake-up stroke in a young woman. The patient, a 31-year-old woman, was admitted to the hospital because of dysarthria and confusion when she awoke in the morning. Brain MRI showed acute infarction in the posterior fossa. Cerebral angiography showed thrombus in the distal top of the basilar artery and the bilateral posterior cerebral arteries. During angiography, the thrombus size decreased with heparinization. There was severe stenosis of the right vertebral artery (VA) at C5-6, and head rotation to the right resulted in complete occlusion of the right VA. Neck MRI showed far-lateral intervertebral disc herniation. Surgical decompression of the VA was performed via the anterior cervical approach. Histological examination showed a degenerative intervertebral disc. Postoperative angiography confirmed successful decompression of the VA. PMID:25932602

  3. Patient-specific spine models. Part 1: Finite element analysis of the lumbar intervertebral disc--a material sensitivity study.

    PubMed

    Fagan, M J; Julian, S; Siddall, D J; Mohsen, A M

    2002-01-01

    If patient-specific finite element models of the spine could be developed, they would offer enormous opportunities in the diagnosis and management of back problems. Several generic models have been developed in the past, but there has been very little detailed examination of the sensitivity of these models' characteristics to the input parameters. This relationship must be thoroughly understood if representative patient-specific models are to be realized and used with confidence. In particular, the performance of the intervertebral discs are central to any spine model and need detailed investigation first. A generic non-linear model of an intervertebral disc was developed and subjected to compressive, flexion and torsional loading regimes. The effects of both material and geometric non-linearities were investigated for the three loading schemes and the results compared with experimental data. The basic material properties of the fibres, annulus and nucleus were then varied and the effects on the stiffness, annulus bulge and annulus stresses analysed. The results showed that the non-linear geometry assumption had a significant effect on the compression characteristics, whereas the non-linear material option did not. In contrast, the material non-linearity was more important for the flexural and torsional loading schemes. Thus, the inclusion of non-linear material and geometry analysis options in finite element models of intervertebral discs is necessary to predict in vivo load-deflection characteristics accurately. When the influence of the material properties was examined in detail, it was found that the fibre properties did not have a significant effect on the compressive stiffness of the disc but did affect the flexural and torsional stiffnesses by up to +/-20 per cent. All loading modes were sensitive to the annulus properties with stiffnesses varying by up to +/-16 per cent. The model also revealed that for a particular compressive deformation or flexural or

  4. No Acceleration of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration after a Single Injection of Bupivacaine in Young Age Group with Follow-Up of 5 Years

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Nakamura, Junichi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Takaso, Masashi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study of changes in intervertebral disc degeneration after injection of bupivacaine. Purpose To examine whether injection of bupivacaine into human intervertebral discs accelerates their degeneration. Overview of Literature Bupivacaine is commonly used for therapy and diagnosis of discogenic low back pain. However, several in vitro studies have reported toxic effects of bupivacaine to disc cells. We sought to evaluate whether this finding is clinically relevant. Methods We selected 46 patients with low back pain who showed disc degeneration at only one level (L4-L5 or L5-S1) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (discography group, n=18), discoblock group (injection of bupivacaine, n=18), and a control group, n=10). There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics across the 3 groups. The two experimental groups underwent either discography or anesthetic discoblock, respectively. All three groups were followed up 5 years after the examination. Results At 5 years follow-up, there was no significant difference in the rate of disc degeneration among the 3 groups (p>0.1). Moreover, X-ray images showed that there was no significant difference in disc height, range of motion, or translation between flex and extension position (p>0.1). Conclusions In conclusion, radiologic and MRI findings did not show acceleration of intervertebral disc degeneration at 5 years after a single injection of bupivacaine into human discs. PMID:24066217

  5. Clinical and radiologic comparison of dynamic cervical implant arthroplasty and cervical total disc replacement for single-level cervical degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Shichang, Liu; Yueming, Song; Limin, Liu; Lei, Wang; Zhongjie, Zhou; Chunguang, Zhou; Xi, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, to date the most successful spine procedure for the surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy, has limitations that have led to the development of non-fusion cervical procedures, such as cervical total disc replacement (TDR) and dynamic cervical implant (DCI) arthroplasty. We compared the clinical and radiological results of DCI and cervical TDR for the treatment of single-level cervical degenerative disc disease in Chinese patients. A retrospective review of 179 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy who underwent DCI or TDR between April 2010 and October 2012 was conducted, and 152 consecutive patients (67 patients single-level DCI and 85 single-level TDR) who completed at least 2years of follow-up were included. Clinical and radiological assessments were performed preoperatively and at 1week and 3, 6, 12, and 24months postoperatively. The most common operative level was C5/C6 (49.3%). The differences in blood loss, duration of surgery, and duration of hospitalization were not statistically significant. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale, Visual Analog Scale, Neck Disability Index, and Short Form-36 scores improved significantly after surgery in both the DCI and TDR groups (P<0.05), but the differences were not statistically significant at the final follow-up. The rate of occurrence of heterotopic ossification was 22.4% and 28.2% in the DCI and TDR groups, respectively. As an effective non-fusion technique, DCI is a more economical procedure. Further prospective, randomized studies with long-term follow-up periods are needed to determine the long-term effects. PMID:26928156

  6. Fluid-flow dependent response of intervertebral discs under cyclic loading: On the role of specimen preparation and preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hendrik; Schilling, Christoph; Reyna, Ana Laura Puente; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Dreischarf, Marcel

    2016-04-11

    In vivo during the day, intervertebral discs are loaded mainly in compression causing fluid and height losses that are subsequently fully recovered overnight due to fluid inflow under smaller compression. However, in vitro, fluid flow through the endplates, in particular fluid imbibition, is hampered possibly by blood clots formed post mortem. Despite earlier in vitro studies, it remains yet unclear if and how fluid flow conditions in vitro could properly emulate those in vivo. Effects of various preload magnitudes (no preload, 0.06 and 0.28MPa) and disc-bone preparation conditions (e.g., w/o bony endplates) on disc height and nucleus pressure were investigated using 54 bovine specimens. Changes in specimen height and pressure at different nucleus locations were used as surrogate measures to assess the fluid content and flow within the discs. Under all investigated preparation conditions and preload magnitudes, no significant pressure recovery could be obtained during low loading phases, even without bony endplates. On the contrary, partial to full displacement recovery were reached in particular under 0.28MPa preload. Results highlight the significant role of disc preload magnitude in disc height recovery during low loading periods. Attention should hence be given in future studies to the proper selection of preload magnitude and duration as well as the animal models used if in vivo response is intended to be replicated. Findings also indicate that flushing the endplates or injection of bone cement respectively neither facilitates nor impedes fluid flow into or out of the disc to a noticeable degree in this bovine disc model. PMID:26549766

  7. Oestrogen and parathyroid hormone alleviate lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration in ovariectomized rats and enhance Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haobo; Ma, Jianxiong; Lv, Jianwei; Ma, Xinlong; Xu, Weiguo; Yang, Yang; Tian, Aixian; Wang, Ying; Sun, Lei; Xu, Liyan; Fu, Lin; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mitigation effect and mechanism of oestrogen and PTH on disc degeneration in rats after ovariectomy, as well as on Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity, thirty 3-month-old rats were ovariectomized and divided into three groups. Ten additional rats were used as controls. Eight weeks later, the rats were administered oestrogen or PTH for 12 weeks, and then discs were collected for tests. Results showed that nucleus pulposus cells in the Sham group were mostly notochord cells, while in the OVX group, cells gradually developed into chondrocyte-like cells. Oestrogen or PTH could partly recover the notochord cell number. After ovariectomy, the endplate roughened and endplate porosity decreased. After oestrogen or PTH treatment, the smoothness and porosity of endplate recovered. Compared with the Sham group, Aggrecan, Col2a and Wnt/β-catenin pathway expression in OVX group decreased, and either oestrogen or PTH treatment improved their expression. The biomechanical properties of intervertebral disc significantly changed after ovariectomy, and oestrogen or PTH treatment partly recovered them. Disc degeneration occurred with low oestrogen, and the underlying mechanisms involve nutrition supply disorders, cell type changes and decreased Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity. Oestrogen and PTH can retard disc degeneration in OVX rats and enhance Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity in nucleus pulposus. PMID:27279629

  8. Geometrical aspects of patient-specific modelling of the intervertebral disc: collagen fibre orientation and residual stress distribution.

    PubMed

    Marini, Giacomo; Studer, Harald; Huber, Gerd; Püschel, Klaus; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    Patient-specific modelling of the spine is a powerful tool to explore the prevention and the treatment of injuries and pathologies. Albeit several methods have been proposed for the discretization of the bony structures, the efficient representation of the intervertebral disc anisotropy remains a challenge, especially with complex geometries. Furthermore, the swelling of the disc's nucleus pulposus is normally added to the model after geometry definition, at the cost of changes of the material properties and an unrealistic description of the prestressed state. The aim of this study was to develop techniques, which preserve the patient-specific geometry of the disc and allow the representation of the system anisotropy and residual stresses, independent of the system discretization. Depending on the modelling features, the developed approaches resulted in a response of patient-specific models that was in good agreement with the physiological response observed in corresponding experiments. The proposed methods represent a first step towards the development of patient-specific models of the disc which respect both the geometry and the mechanical properties of the specific disc. PMID:26243011

  9. Oestrogen and parathyroid hormone alleviate lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration in ovariectomized rats and enhance Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haobo; Ma, Jianxiong; Lv, Jianwei; Ma, Xinlong; Xu, Weiguo; Yang, Yang; Tian, Aixian; Wang, Ying; Sun, Lei; Xu, Liyan; Fu, Lin; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mitigation effect and mechanism of oestrogen and PTH on disc degeneration in rats after ovariectomy, as well as on Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity, thirty 3-month-old rats were ovariectomized and divided into three groups. Ten additional rats were used as controls. Eight weeks later, the rats were administered oestrogen or PTH for 12 weeks, and then discs were collected for tests. Results showed that nucleus pulposus cells in the Sham group were mostly notochord cells, while in the OVX group, cells gradually developed into chondrocyte-like cells. Oestrogen or PTH could partly recover the notochord cell number. After ovariectomy, the endplate roughened and endplate porosity decreased. After oestrogen or PTH treatment, the smoothness and porosity of endplate recovered. Compared with the Sham group, Aggrecan, Col2a and Wnt/β-catenin pathway expression in OVX group decreased, and either oestrogen or PTH treatment improved their expression. The biomechanical properties of intervertebral disc significantly changed after ovariectomy, and oestrogen or PTH treatment partly recovered them. Disc degeneration occurred with low oestrogen, and the underlying mechanisms involve nutrition supply disorders, cell type changes and decreased Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity. Oestrogen and PTH can retard disc degeneration in OVX rats and enhance Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity in nucleus pulposus. PMID:27279629

  10. Regional annulus fibre orientations used as a tool for the calibration of lumbar intervertebral disc finite element models.

    PubMed

    Malandrino, Andrea; Noailly, Jérôme; Lacroix, Damien

    2013-01-01

    The collagen network of the annulus fibrosus largely controls the functional biomechanics of the lumbar intervertebral discs (IVDs). Quantitative anatomical examinations have shown bundle orientation patterns, possibly coming from regional adaptations of the annulus mechanics. This study aimed to show that the regional differences in annulus mechanical behaviour could be reproduced by considering only fibre orientation changes. Using the finite element method, a lumbar annulus was modelled as a poro-hyperelastic material in which fibres were represented by a direction-dependent strain energy density term. Fibre orientations were calibrated to reproduce the annulus tensile behaviours measured for four different regions: posterior outer, anterior outer, posterior inner and anterior inner. The back-calculated fibre angles and regional patterns as well as the global disc behaviour were comparable with anatomical descriptions reported in the literature. It was concluded that annulus fibre variations might be an effective tool to calibrate lumbar spine IVD and segment models. PMID:22224724

  11. Strain distribution in the intervertebral disc under unconfined compression and tension load by the optimized digital image correlation technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Tai-Yong; Yang, Xiu-Ping; Li, Kun; Gao, Li-Lan; Zhang, Chun-Qiu; Guo, Yue-Hong

    2014-04-01

    The unconfined compression and tension experiments of the intervertebral disc were conducted by applying an optimized digital image correlation technique, and the internal strain distribution was analysed for the disc. It was found that the axial strain values of different positions increased obviously with the increase in loads, while inner annulus fibrosus and posterior annulus fibrosus experienced higher axial strains than the outer annulus fibrosus and anterior annulus fibrosus. Deep annulus fibrosus exhibited higher compressive and tensile axial strains than superficial annulus fibrosus for the anterior region, while there was an opposite result for the posterior region. It was noted that all samples demonstrated a nonlinear stress-strain profile in the process of deforming, and an elastic region was shown once the sample was deformed beyond its toe region. PMID:24718863

  12. MRI analysis of the ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system for the dynamic fixation of intervertebral discs: a comparison with rigid internal fixation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we analyzed the efficacy of the posterior approach lumbar ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system for the dynamic fixation of intervertebral discs, with particular emphasis on its effects on degenerative intervertebral disc disease. Methods We retrospectively compared the MRIs of 54 patients who had previously undergone either rigid internal fixation of the lumbar spine or ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation for the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis. All patients had received preoperative and 6-, 12-, and 24-month postoperative MRI scans of the lumbar spine with acquisition of both routine and diffusion-weighted images (DWI). The upper-segment discs of the fusion were subjected to Pfirrmann grading, and the lumbar intervertebral discs in the DWI sagittal plane were manually drawn; the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value was measured. Results ADC values in the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group measured at the 6-, 12-, and 24-month postoperative MRI studies were increased compared to the preoperative ADC values. The ADC values in the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group at 24 months postoperatively were significantly different from the preoperative values (P < 0.05). At 24 months, the postoperative ADC values were significantly different between the rigid fixation group and the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group (P < 0.05). Conclusion MRI imaging findings indicated that the posterior approach lumbar ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system can prevent or delay the degeneration of intervertebral discs. PMID:24898377

  13. Heterotopic ossification in cervical disc arthroplasty: Is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed Central

    Barbagallo, Giuseppe M.; Corbino, Leonardo A.; Olindo, Giuseppe; Albanese, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Study design: Retrospective cohort study. Objective: To analyze the presence and clinical relevance of heterotopic ossification (HO) at 3 years mean follow-up. Methods: Thirty patients suffering from cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy treated with anterior disc replacement (ADR) were studied. HO was classified using the McAfee grading system. Range of motion was measured from flexion and extension x-rays. Short-form 36 and neck disability index (NDI) assessed functional outcome. Results: Forty-five prostheses were implanted in 30 patients with cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy, mean age 40.9 years. Nineteen patients received 1 level and 11 patients received multilevel disc replacement. The incidence rate of HO was 42.2% (19 levels). Segmental range of motion was ≥3° in 93.8% of patients with HO. There was no significant difference in functional scores between those who did and those who did not develop HO. Males tended to develop HO more frequently than females, though this was not statistically significant. The indication for surgery (soft disc hernia or spondylosis) was not associated with the formation of HO. Conclusions: Functional improvement is maintained despite the presence of HO following cervical disc arthroplasty. Indications for arthroplasty should not be halted by the risk of HO. Methods evaluation and class of evidence (CoE) Methodological principle: Study design:  Prospective cohort  Retrospective cohort •  Case-control  Case series Methods  Patients at similar point in course of treatment •  Follow-up ≥85%  Similarity of treatment protocols for patient groups •  Patients followed for long enough for outcomes to occur •  Control for extraneous risk factors* Evidence class: III *Authors must provide a description of robust baseline characteristics, and control for those that are potential prognostic factors. The definiton of the different classes of evidence is available on page 83. PMID:23544019

  14. A forward dynamics simulation of human lumbar spine flexion predicting the load sharing of intervertebral discs, ligaments, and muscles.

    PubMed

    Rupp, T K; Ehlers, W; Karajan, N; Günther, M; Schmitt, S

    2015-10-01

    Determining the internal dynamics of the human spine's biological structure is one essential step that allows enhanced understanding of spinal degeneration processes. The unavailability of internal load figures in other methods highlights the importance of the forward dynamics approach as the most powerful approach to examine the internal degeneration of spinal structures. Consequently, a forward dynamics full-body model of the human body with a detailed lumbar spine is introduced. The aim was to determine the internal dynamics and the contribution of different spinal structures to loading. The multi-body model consists of the lower extremities, two feet, shanks and thighs, the pelvis, five lumbar vertebrae, and a lumped upper body including the head and both arms. All segments are modelled as rigid bodies. 202 muscles (legs, back, abdomen) are included as Hill-type elements. 58 nonlinear force elements are included to represent all spinal ligaments. The lumbar intervertebral discs were modelled nonlinearly. As results, internal kinematics, muscle forces, and internal loads for each biological structure are presented. A comparison between the nonlinear (new, enhanced modelling approach) and linear (standard modelling approach, bushing) modelling approaches of the intervertebral disc is presented. The model is available to all researchers as ready-to-use C/C++ code within our in-house multi-body simulation code demoa with all relevant binaries included. PMID:25653134

  15. Electroacupuncture improves microcirculation and neuronal morphology in the spinal cord of a rat model of intervertebral disc extrusion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dai-xun; Lu, Zhi-song; Li, Ge-bin; Sun, Sheng-yong; Mu, Xiang; Lee, Peter; Chen, Wu

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on spinal cord neuronal injury have focused on spinal cord tissue histology and the expression of nerve cell damage and repair-related genes. The importance of the microcirculation is often ignored in spinal cord injury and repair research. Therefore, in this study, we established a rat model of intervertebral disc extrusion by inserting a silica gel pad into the left ventral surface of T13. Electroacupuncture was used to stimulate the bilateral Zusanli point (ST36) and Neiting point (ST44) for 14 days. Compared with control animals, blood flow in the first lumbar vertebra (L1) was noticeably increased in rats given electroacupuncture. Microvessel density in the T13 segment of the spinal cord was increased significantly as well. The number of normal neurons was higher in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. In addition, vacuolation in the white matter was lessened. No obvious glial cell proliferation was visible. Furthermore, hindlimb motor function was improved significantly. Collectively, our results suggest that electroacupuncture can improve neuronal morphology and microcirculation, and promote the recovery of neurological functions in a rat model of intervertebral disc extrusion. PMID:25883622

  16. Footprint Mismatch of Cervical Disc Prostheses with Chinese Cervical Anatomic Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Liang; Tan, Ming-Sheng; Yan, Qin-Hua; Yi, Ping; Yang, Feng; Tang, Xiang-Sheng; Hao, Qing-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background: The footprint of most prostheses is designed according to Caucasian data. Total disc replacement (TDR) has been performed widely for cervical degenerative diseases in China. It is essential to analyze the match sizes of prostheses footprints and Chinese cervical anatomic dimensions in our study. Methods: The anatomic dimensions of the C4–C7 segments of 138 patients (age range 16–77 years) in a Chinese population were measured by computed tomography scans. We compared the footprints of the most commonly used cervical disc prostheses (Bryan: Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA; Prestige LP: Medtronic, Fridley, Minnesota, USA; Discover: DePuy, Raynham, MA, USA; Prodisc-C: Synthes, West Chester, PA, USA) in China with Chinese cervical anatomic dimensions and assessed the match of their size. Results: The mismatch of available dimensions of prostheses and anatomic data of cervical endplates ranged from 17.03% (C4/C5, Prestige LP, Prodisc-C) to 57.61% (C6/C7, Discover) in the anterior-posterior (AP) diameter, and 35.51% (C4/C5, Prodisc-C, Prestige LP) to 94.93% (C6/C7, Bryan) in the center mediolateral (CML) diameter. About 21.01% of endplates were larger than the largest prostheses in the AP diameter and 57.25% in the CML diameter. All available footprints of prostheses expect the Bryan with an unfixed height, can accommodate the disc height (DH), however, 36.23% of the middle DH was less than the smallest height of the prostheses. The average disc sagittal angles (DSAs) of C4–C7 junctions were 5.04°, 5.15°, and 4.13° respectively. Only the Discover brand had a built-in 7° lordotic angle, roughly matching with the DSA. Conclusions: There is a large discrepancy between footprints of prostheses and Chinese cervical anatomic data. In recent years, possible complications of TDR related with mismatch sizes are increasing, such as subsidence, displacement, and heterotopic ossification. Manufacturers of prostheses should introduce or produce additional

  17. Calibration of hyperelastic material properties of the human lumbar intervertebral disc under fast dynamic compressive loads.

    PubMed

    Wagnac, Eric; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Garo, Anaïs; El-Rich, Marwan; Aubin, Carl-Eric

    2011-10-01

    Under fast dynamic loading conditions (e.g. high-energy impact), the load rate dependency of the intervertebral disc (IVD) material properties may play a crucial role in the biomechanics of spinal trauma. However, most finite element models (FEM) of dynamic spinal trauma uses material properties derived from quasi-static experiments, thus neglecting this load rate dependency. The aim of this study was to identify hyperelastic material properties that ensure a more biofidelic simulation of the IVD under a fast dynamic compressive load. A hyperelastic material law based on a first-order Mooney-Rivlin formulation was implemented in a detailed FEM of a L2-L3 functional spinal unit (FSU) to represent the mechanical behavior of the IVD. Bony structures were modeled using an elasto-plastic Johnson-Cook material law that simulates bone fracture while ligaments were governed by a viscoelastic material law. To mimic experimental studies performed in fast dynamic compression, a compressive loading velocity of 1 m/s was applied to the superior half of L2, while the inferior half of L3 was fixed. An exploratory technique was used to simulate dynamic compression of the FSU using 34 sets of hyperelastic material constants randomly selected using an optimal Latin hypercube algorithm and a set of material constants derived from quasi-static experiments. Selection or rejection of the sets of material constants was based on compressive stiffness and failure parameters criteria measured experimentally. The two simulations performed with calibrated hyperelastic constants resulted in nonlinear load-displacement curves with compressive stiffness (7335 and 7079 N/mm), load (12,488 and 12,473 N), displacement (1.95 and 2.09 mm) and energy at failure (13.5 and 14.7 J) in agreement with experimental results (6551 ± 2017 N/mm, 12,411 ± 829 N, 2.1 ± 0.2 mm and 13.0 ± 1.5 J respectively). The fracture pattern and location also agreed with experimental results. The simulation performed with

  18. MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptor 4 signal pathway in intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chuqiang; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Le; Tang, Long; Li, Shuangqing; Yang, Yixi; Yang, Fuguo; Zhang, Ping; Yang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Lower back pain (LBP) is a common and remitting problem. One of the primary causes of LBP is thought to be degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88 (MyD88)-dependent Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signal pathway in the mechanism of IVD degeneration. IVD nucleus pulposus cells isolated and cultured from the lumbar vertebrae of Wistar rats were stimulated by various doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 µg/ml) to simulate IVD degeneration. Cells were rinsed and cultured in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the levels of TLR4, MyD88, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA expression after 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 h of incubation. Additionally, western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses were used to determine the levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα, and IL-1β protein expression after 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation. The levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β mRNA all increased in the cells stimulated by 10 µg/ml LPS at 3, 6 and 9 h (all P<0.001). Furthermore, the levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β protein all increased at 24, 48 and 72 h (all P<0.001). Additionally, the mRNA and protein levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β increased significantly in the cells stimulated by 1, 10 and 100 µg/ml LPS compared with the control group, and reached a peak in the 10 µg/ml LPS group (all P<0.001). These results suggest that the MyD88-dependent TLR4 signal pathway is a target pathway in IVD degeneration. This pathway is time phase- and dose-dependent, and when activated can lead to the release of inflammatory factors that participate in IVD degeneration. PMID:27446251

  19. Role of microRNA-210 in human intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, DA-YING; WANG, ZHI-JIAN; YU, YAN-BO; ZHANG, YONG; ZHANG, XUE-XUE

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA (miR)-210 in the development of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Human nucleus pulposus (NP) samples were collected from patients with scoliosis and IDD (n=12 each) as the scoliosis control and IDD groups, respectively. The expression levels of miR-210 were detected using reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In vitro overexpression and knockdown of miR-210 in human NP cells were achieved by transfection of NP cells with lentiviral pre-miR-210 and antagomiR-210, respectively. The protein expression levels of homeobox A9 (HOXA9) were then detected in NP cells with modulated miR-210 using western blot analysis. Flow cytometry with allophycocyanin-Annexin V/7 and 7-aminoactinomycin D staining was also used to detect the proportion of NP cells with modulated miR-210 undergoing apoptosis. The current study revealed that the miR-210 expression was decreased in patients with IDD compared with that of the scoliosis control group (P<0.05). Furthermore, the upregulation of miR-210 with pre-miR-210 led to the repression of HOXA9. The HOXA9 level was significantly lower in these cells compared with that of NP cells treated with a corresponding negative sequence (P<0.05). Knockdown of miR-210 with antagomiR-210 resulted in upregulation of HOXA9 in NP cells, determined as the level of HOXA9 was significantly higher than that of NP cells treated with a negative sequence (P<0.05). The proportion of apoptotic NP cells also significantly decreased following treatment with pre-miR-210 compared with the scoliosis control group (12.1±1.43 vs. 23.8±1.22%, respectively; P<0.05). In conclusion, downregulation of miR-210 may promote Fas-mediated apoptosis in human IDD by regulating the expression of HOXA9. This indicates that miR-210 may be closely associated with the development of IDD and may act as a novel target in IDD treatment. PMID:27284319

  20. Prevalence of Propionibacterium acnes in Intervertebral Discs of Patients Undergoing Lumbar Microdiscectomy: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Capoor, Manu N.; Ruzicka, Filip; Machackova, Tana; Jancalek, Radim; Smrcka, Martin; Schmitz, Jonathan E.; Hermanova, Marketa; Sana, Jiri; Michu, Elleni; Baird, John C.; Ahmed, Fahad S.; Maca, Karel; Lipina, Radim; Alamin, Todd F.; Coscia, Michael F.; Stonemetz, Jerry L.; Witham, Timothy; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Birkenmaier, Christof; Fischetti, Vincent A.; Slaby, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between intervertebral disc degeneration and chronic infection by Propionibacterium acnes is controversial with contradictory evidence available in the literature. Previous studies investigating these relationships were under-powered and fraught with methodical differences; moreover, they have not taken into consideration P. acnes’ ability to form biofilms or attempted to quantitate the bioburden with regard to determining bacterial counts/genome equivalents as criteria to differentiate true infection from contamination. The aim of this prospective cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of P. acnes in patients undergoing lumbar disc microdiscectomy. Methods and Findings The sample consisted of 290 adult patients undergoing lumbar microdiscectomy for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation. An intraoperative biopsy and pre-operative clinical data were taken in all cases. One biopsy fragment was homogenized and used for quantitative anaerobic culture and a second was frozen and used for real-time PCR-based quantification of P. acnes genomes. P. acnes was identified in 115 cases (40%), coagulase-negative staphylococci in 31 cases (11%) and alpha-hemolytic streptococci in 8 cases (3%). P. acnes counts ranged from 100 to 9000 CFU/ml with a median of 400 CFU/ml. The prevalence of intervertebral discs with abundant P. acnes (≥ 1x103 CFU/ml) was 11% (39 cases). There was significant correlation between the bacterial counts obtained by culture and the number of P. acnes genomes detected by real-time PCR (r = 0.4363, p<0.0001). Conclusions In a large series of patients, the prevalence of discs with abundant P. acnes was 11%. We believe, disc tissue homogenization releases P. acnes from the biofilm so that they can then potentially be cultured, reducing the rate of false-negative cultures. Further, quantification study revealing significant bioburden based on both culture and real-time PCR minimize the likelihood that observed

  1. Management of Chronic Pain of Cervical Disc Herniation and Radiculitis with Fluoroscopic Cervical Interlaminar Epidural Injections

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A.; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Wargo, Bradley W.; Malla, Yogesh

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: A randomized, double-blind, active controlled trial. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids in the management of chronic neck pain and upper extremity pain in patients with disc herniation and radiculitis. Summary of Background Data: Epidural injections in managing chronic neck and upper extremity pain are commonly employed interventions. However, their long-term effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity, of their use and their role in various pathologies responsible for persistent neck and upper extremity pain continue to be debated, even though, neck and upper extremity pain secondary to disc herniation and radiculitis, is described as the common indication. There is also paucity of high quality literature. Methods: One-hundred twenty patients were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups: Group I patients received cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic (lidocaine 0.5%, 5 mL); Group II patients received 0.5% lidocaine, 4 mL, mixed with 1 mL of nonparticulate betamethasone. Primary outcome measure was ≥ 50 improvement in pain and function. Outcome assessments included Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), opioid intake, employment, and changes in weight. Results: Significant pain relief and functional status improvement (≥ 50%) was demonstrated in 72% of patients who received local anesthetic only and 68% who received local anesthetic and steroids. In the successful group of participants, significant improvement was illustrated in 77% in local anesthetic group and 82% in local anesthetic with steroid group. Conclusions: Cervical interlaminar epidural injections with or without steroids may provide significant improvement in pain and function for patients with cervical disc herniation and radiculitis. PMID:22859902

  2. Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Ara J.; Jason Cutright, S. T.; Augusto Cianciabella, PA-C; Deukmedjian, Arias

    2013-01-01

    Background: Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a new full-endoscopic surgical procedure to repair symptomatic cervical disc disease. Methods: A prospective cohort of 66 consecutive patients underwent cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair® for one (n = 21) or two adjacent (n = 45) symptomatic levels of cervical disc disease and were evaluated postoperatively for resolution of headache, neck pain, arm pain, and radicular symptoms. All patients were candidates for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or arthroplasty. The Mann–Whitney Wilcoxon test was used to calculate P values. Results: All patients (n = 66) had significant improvement in preoperative symptoms with an average symptom resolution of 94.6%. Fifty percent (n = 33) had 100% resolution of all preoperative cervicogenic symptoms. Only 4.5% (n = 3) had less than 80% resolution of preoperative symptoms. Visual analog scale (VAS) significantly improved from 8.7 preoperatively to 0.5 postoperatively (P < 0.001) for the cohort. Average operative and recovery times were 57 and 52 minutes, respectively. There were no perioperative complications. Recurrent disc herniation occurred in one patient (1.5%). Average postoperative follow-up was 94 days and no significant intergroup difference in outcomes was observed (P = 0.111) in patients with <90 days (n = 52) or >90 days (n = 14, mean 319 days) follow-up. No significant difference in outcomes was observed (P = 0.774) for patients undergoing one or two level Deuk Laser Disc Repair®. Patients diagnosed with postoperative cervical facet syndrome did significantly worse (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a safe and effective alternative to ACDF or arthroplasty for the treatment of one or two adjacent symptomatic cervical disc herniations with an overall success rate of 94.6%. PMID:23776754

  3. BMP7 enhances the effect of BMSCs on extracellular matrix remodeling in a rabbit model of intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; E, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Nan-Xiang; Wang, Mo-Nan; Xie, Huan-Xin; Cao, Yan-Hui; Sun, Li-Hua; Tian, Jun; Chen, Hua-Jiang; Yan, Jing-Long

    2016-05-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) provide stability and flexibility to the spinal column; however, IVDs, and in particular the nucleus pulposus (NP), undergo a degenerative process characterized by changes in the disc extracellular matrix (ECM), decreased cell viability, and reduced synthesis of proteoglycan and type II collagen. Here, we investigated the efficacy and feasibility of stem cell therapy using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) over-expressing bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) to promote ECM remodeling of degenerated IVDs. Lentivirus-mediated BMP7 over-expression induced differentiation of BMSCs into an NP phenotype, as indicated by expression of the NP markers collagen type II, aggrecan, SOX9 and keratins 8 and 19, increased the content of glycosaminoglycan, and up-regulated β-1,3-glucuronosyl transferase 1, a regulator of chondroitin sulfate synthesis in NP cells. These effects were suppressed by Smad1 silencing, indicating that the effect of BMP7 on ECM remodeling was mediated by the Smad pathway. In vivo analysis in a rabbit model of disc degeneration showed that implantation of BMSCs over-expressing BMP7 promoted cell differentiation and proliferation in the NP, as well as their own survival, and these effects were mediated by the Smad pathway. The results of the present study indicate the beneficial effects of BMP7 on restoring ECM homeostasis in NP cells, and suggest potential strategies for improving cell therapy for the treatment of disc diseases. PMID:26929154

  4. Anterior Herniation of Partially Calcified and Degenerated Cervical Disc Causing Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ozdol, Cagatay; Turk, Cezmi Cagri; Yildirim, Ali Erdem; Dalgic, Ali

    2015-08-01

    We report a rare case of anterior cervical disc herniation associated with dysphagia. A 32-year-old man presented with complaints of dysphagia and concomitant pain in the right arm resistant to conservative therapy. On physical examination with respect to the muscle strength, the right shoulder abduction and flexion of the forearm were 3/5. Lateral X-ray revealed calcified osteophytes at the anterior C4-5 level. Magnetic resonance imaging showed soft disc herniation involving the right C6 root at the C5-6 level and anterior herniation of the C4-5 cervical disc. Anterior discectomies for C4-5 and C5-6 levels stabilized and ameliorated the dysphagia and pain. Cervical disc herniation usually presents with radicular findings. However, dysphagia may be an uncommon presentation. Anterior cervical disc herniation should be considered in a patient presenting with dysphagia. PMID:26240723

  5. Effects of follower load and rib cage on intervertebral disc pressure and sagittal plane curvature in static tests of cadaveric thoracic spines.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Dennis E; Mannen, Erin M; Sis, Hadley L; Wong, Benjamin M; Cadel, Eileen S; Friis, Elizabeth A; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2016-05-01

    The clinical relevance of mechanical testing studies of cadaveric human thoracic spines could be enhanced by using follower preload techniques, by including the intact rib cage, and by measuring thoracic intervertebral disc pressures, but studies to date have not incorporated all of these components simultaneously. Thus, this study aimed to implement a follower preload in the thoracic spine with intact rib cage, and examine the effects of follower load, rib cage stiffening and rib cage removal on intervertebral disc pressures and sagittal plane curvatures in unconstrained static conditions. Intervertebral disc pressures increased linearly with follower load magnitude. The effect of the rib cage on disc pressures in static conditions remains unclear because testing order likely confounded the results. Disc pressures compared well with previous reports in vitro, and comparison with in vivo values suggests the use of a follower load of about 400N to approximate loading in upright standing. Follower load had no effect on sagittal plane spine curvature overall, suggesting successful application of the technique, although increased flexion in the upper spine and reduced flexion in the lower spine suggest that the follower load path was not optimized. Rib cage stiffening and removal both increased overall spine flexion slightly, although with differing effects at specific spinal locations. Overall, the approaches demonstrated here will support the use of follower preloads, intact rib cage, and disc pressure measurements to enhance the clinical relevance of future studies of the thoracic spine. PMID:26944690

  6. Both expression of cytokines and posterior annulus fibrosus rupture are essential for pain behavior changes induced by degenerative intervertebral disc: An experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zemin; Liu, Hui; Yang, Hao; Wang, Jianru; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Kuibo; Ding, Wenbin; Zheng, Zhaomin

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between intervertebral disc degeneration and low back pain (LBP). Rat L4/5 disc degeneration model was established by annular puncture using a 0.4 mm needle anteriorly or posteriorly. In both anterior and posterior puncture models, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analyses revealed marked disc degeneration 2 weeks after puncture. Cytokine expression was up-regulated in different level in nucleus pulposus (NP) from 3 days after puncture. Pain behavioral tests indicated that the anterior disc puncture did not induce pain behavior changes, whereas the posterior disc puncture resulted in mechanical allodynia from 1 day to 21 days after injury. Besides, cytokine expression was significantly increased in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) at 1 and 2 weeks after posterior puncture, but not after the anterior puncture. These findings indicate the NP of the degenerative disc expresses different levels of inflammatory cytokines, and posterior disc puncture produced mechanical allodynia. The expression phase of cytokines in the NP was accordance with mechanical hyperalgesia in the posterior disc puncture model. Both expression of cytokines and posterior annulus fibrosus (AF) rupture in degenerative intervertebral disc are essential for pain behavior changes. PMID:24115280

  7. Expression levels of IL-17 and TNF-α in degenerated lumbar intervertebral discs and their correlation

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XIAO-GANG; HOU, HONG-WEI; LIU, YI-LIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression and roles of interleukin (IL)-17 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) and to identify the association between the effects of IL-17 and TNF-α in IDD. This may increase understanding of the pathogenic mechanism underlying IDD, and aid the development of alternative therapies. The experimental group consisted of 40 samples of nucleus pulposus tissue obtained from the intervertebral discs (IVDs) of patients with IDD by surgical intervention, and was further divided into an annulus fibrosus disrupted group, comprising 18 patients in which the external annulus was ruptured, and an annulus fibrosus intact group comprising 22 patients. The control group consisted of 20 samples of nucleus pulposus tissue from the IVDs of patients with traumatic lumbar disc fractures. The mRNA and protein expression levels of IL-17 and TNF-α in the 50 tissue samples were detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining, respectively, and the results were statistically analyzed. The IL-17 and TNF-α protein and mRNA expression levels in the annulus fibrosus disrupted and annulus fibrosus intact groups were both higher compared with those in the control group. In addition, the expression levels of IL-17 and TNF-α in the annulus fibrosus disrupted group were significantly higher compared with those in the annulus fibrosus intact group (P<0.01). A positive correlation was identified between the mRNA and protein expression levels of IL-17 and TNF-α in the experimental group (r=0.957, P<0.01). IL-17 and TNF-α may therefore be involved in the progression of human IDD, and may have synergistic effects in the development of IDD. PMID:27284317

  8. Evaluation of different laser wavelengths on ablation lesion and residual thermal injury in intervertebral discs of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Plapler, Hélio; Mancini, Marília W; Sella, Valéria R G; Bomfim, Fernando R C

    2016-04-01

    Laser discectomy or nucleotomy is an increasingly important method for less invasive procedures of column, but the ideal kind of laser is still not established. As the wavelength is an important parameter for water absorption, this study was performed to investigate the action of the laser emission in the near infrared (808 to 1908 nm) region in the context of surgical procedures for percutaneous intervertebral disc decompression (nucleotomy). Forty intervertebral discs from pigs lumbar spines were irradiated with laser (λ = 808, 980, 1470 and 1908 nm), 1-s on/off time cycles, for 120 cycles and 10 W of power (808, 980, and 1470 nm) or 240 cycles and 5 W of power (1908 nm), with total power of 1200 J, and subjected to microscopic evaluation through hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining in order to measure the ablation lesions and the residual thermal injury. Ten other discs were not irradiated and worked as controls. The ablation lesions were measured (in mm) at 1.08 ± 1.25, 1.70 ± 0.63, 2.23 ± 1.02, 1.37 ± 0.39, and 0.94 ± 0.41 (median ± SD) for the control, 808, 980, 1470, and 1908 nm groups, respectively. The difference between 1908 nm and all the other groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The residual thermal injury was less evident in 1908 nm laser and sharper in 980 nm laser wavelengths. The laser at a wavelength of 1908 nm was considered the most efficient for the vaporization of the nucleus pulposus, followed by the laser wavelengths of 1470, 808, and 980 nm, and proved to be useful for laser nucleotomy procedure. PMID:26796705

  9. A Degenerative/Proinflammatory Intervertebral Disc Organ Culture: An Ex Vivo Model for Anti-inflammatory Drug and Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Graciosa Q; Boldt, Antje; Nagl, Ines; Pereira, Catarina Leite; Benz, Karin; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Ignatius, Anita; Barbosa, Mário A; Gonçalves, Raquel M; Neidlinger-Wilke, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    Resolution of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration-associated inflammation is a prerequisite for tissue regeneration and could possibly be achieved by strategies ranging from pharmacological to cell-based therapies. In this study, a proinflammatory disc organ culture model was established. Bovine caudal disc punches were needle punctured and additionally stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (10 μg/mL) or interleukin-1β (IL-1β, 10-100 ng/mL) for 48 h. Two intradiscal therapeutic approaches were tested: (i) a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac (Df) and (ii) human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) embedded in an albumin/hyaluronan hydrogel. IL-1β-treated disc organ cultures showed a statistically significant upregulation of proinflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-8, prostaglandin E2 [PGE2]) and metalloproteases (MMP1, MMP3) expression, while extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (collagen II, aggrecan) were significantly downregulated. The injection of the anti-inflammatory drug, Df, was able to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and MMPs and surprisingly increase ECM protein levels. These results point the intradiscal application of anti-inflammatory drugs as promising therapeutics for disc degeneration. In parallel, the immunomodulatory role of MSCs on this model was also evaluated. Although a slight downregulation of IL-6 and IL-8 expression could be found, the variability among the five donors tested was high, suggesting that the beneficial effect of these cells on disc degeneration needs to be further evaluated. The proinflammatory/degenerative IVD organ culture model established can be considered a suitable approach for testing novel therapeutic drugs, thus reducing the number of animals in in vivo experimentation. Moreover, this model can be used to address the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate inflammation in the IVD and their implications in tissue degeneration. PMID:26565141

  10. Initial clinical experience with a next-generation artificial disc for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative cervical radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Sanchez, Alejandro; Miramontes, Victor; Olivarez, Luis M. Rosales; Aquirre, Armando Alpizar; Quiroz, Alfredo Ortega; Zarate-Kalfopulos, Baron

    2010-01-01

    Background A feasibility trial was conducted to evaluate the initial safety and clinical use of a next-generation artificial cervical disc (M6-C artificial cervical disc; Spinal Kinetics, Sunnyvale, CA) for the treatment of patients with symptomatic degenerative cervical radiculopathy. A standardized battery of validated outcome measures was utilized to assess condition-specific functional impairment, pain severity, and quality of life. Methods Thirty-six consecutive patients were implanted with the M6-C disc and complete clinical and radiographic outcomes for 25 patients (mean age, 44.5 ± 10.1 years) with radiographically-confirmed cervical disc disease and symptomatic radiculopathy unresponsive to conservative medical management are included in this report. All patients had disc-osteophyte complex causing neural compression and were treated with discectomy and artificial cervical disc replacement at either single level (n = 12) or 2-levels (n = 13). Functional impairment was evaluated using the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Evaluation of arm and neck pain severity utilized a standard 11-point numeric scale, and health-related quality of life was evaluated with the SF-36 Health Survey. Quantitative radiographic assessments of intervertebral motion were performed using specialized motion analysis software, QMA (Quantitative Motion Analysis; Medical Metrics, Houston, TX). All outcome measures were evaluated pre-treatment and at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Results The mean NDI score improved from 51.6 ± 11.3% pre-treatment to 27.9 ± 16.9% at 24 months, representing an approximate 46% improvement (P <.0001). The mean arm pain score improved from 6.9 ± 2.5 pre-treatment to 3.9 ± 3.1 at 24 months (43%, P =.0006). The mean neck pain score improved from 7.8 ± 2.0 pre-treatment to 3.8 ± 3.0 at 24 months (51%, P <.0001). The mean PCS score of the SF-36 improved from 34.8 ± 7.8 pre-treatment to 43.8 ± 9.3 by 24 months (26%, P =.0006). Subgroup analyses found

  11. The Effects of TWEAK, Fn14, and TGF-β1 on Degeneration of Human Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Hoon; Kim, Jung-Hee; Kong, Min-Ho; Song, Kwan-Young; Choi, Gun

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to explain the effect and reciprocal action among tumor necrosis factor (TNF) like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK), fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) on degeneration of human intervertebral disc (IVD). Methods Human intervertebral disc tissues and cells were cultured with Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium/Nutrient F-12 Ham (DMEM/F-12) media in 37℃, 5% CO2 incubator. When IVD tissues were cultured with TWEAK, Fn14 that is an antagonistic receptor for TWEAK and TGF-β1, the level of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) was estimated by dimethyl methyleneblue (DMMB) assay and sex determining region Y (SRY)-box 9 (Sox9) and versican messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels were estimated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results When human IVD tissue was cultured for nine days, the sGAG content was elevated in proportion to culture duration. The sGAG was decreased significantly by TWEAK 100 ng/mL, however, Fn14 500 ng/mL did not change the sGAG production of IVD tissue. The Fn14 increased versican and Sox9 mRNA levels decreased with TWEAK in IVD tissue TGF-β1 20 ng/mL elevated the sGAG concentration 40% more than control. The sGAG amount decreased with TWEAK was increased with Fn14 or TGF-β1 but the result was insignificant statistically. TGF-β1 increased the Sox9 mRNA expression to 180% compared to control group in IVD tissue. Sox9 and versican mRNA levels decreased by TWEAK were increased with TGF-β1 in primary cultured IVD cells, however, Fn14 did not show increasing effect on Sox9 and versican. Conclusion This study suggests that TWEAK would act a role in intervertebral disc degeneration through decreasing sGAG and the mRNA level of versican and Sox9. PMID:20157375

  12. [Effects of intervertebral disc degeneration on biomechanics behavior characteristics of L4-L5 under the vertical load].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yingchun; Ou, Yalong; Hu, Yizhi; Yu, Binghao

    2015-02-01

    A geometrical model of L4-L5 lumbar segment was constructed using a three-dimensional graphics software. Four conditions of the degenerated discs, i. e. light degeneration, moderate degeneration, severe degeneration and complete excision degeneration, were simulated with loading situations using finite element method under the condition of appropriate computational accuracy. By applying a vertical load of 378.93 N on L4 vertebral plate, stress nephograms on joint isthmus under four different working conditions were obtained. The results showed that the contacted area of facet joint was influenced by the degree of intervertebral disc degeneration level, which influenced the mises stress on joint isthmus. It was proved that joint isthmus was the important pressure-proof structure of the back of lumbar vertebra, and the stress values and distribution were related to structural stiffness of the back of lumbar vertebra as well as the contact area of facet joint. The conclusion could be the theoretical reference for the analysis of spinal biomechanics and artificial disc replacement as well. PMID:25997266

  13. Prevalence of Age-Related Changes in Ovine Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nisolle, Jean-François; Bihin, Benoît; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Neveu, Fabienne; Clegg, Peter; Dugdale, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaoqing; Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Ovine models are used to study intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The objective of the current study was to assess the naturally occurring age-related changes of the IVD that can be diagnosed by CT and MRI in the lumbar spine of sheep. We used CT and T2-weighted MR images to score the IVD (L6S1 to L1L2) in 41 sheep (age, 6 mo to 11 y) that were euthanized for reasons not related to musculoskeletal disease. T2 mapping and measurement of T2 time of L6S1 to L2L3 were performed in 22 of the sheep. Degenerative changes manifested as early as 2 y of age and occurred at every IVD level. Discs were more severely damaged in older sheep. The age effect of the L6S1 IVD was larger than the average age effect for the other IVD. The current study provides evidence that lesions similar to those encountered in humans can be identified by CT and MRI in lumbar spine of sheep. Ideally, research animals should be assessed at the initiation of preclinical trials to determine the extent of prevalent degenerative changes. The ovine lumbosacral disc seems particularly prone to degeneration and might be a favorable anatomic site for studying IVD degeneration. PMID:27538861

  14. A comparison between porcine, ovine, and bovine intervertebral disc anatomy and single lamella annulus fibrosus tensile properties.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Lauren A; DeWitte-Orr, Stephanie J; Gregory, Diane E

    2016-02-01

    This project aimed to compare gross anatomical measures and biomechanical properties of single lamellae from the annulus fibrosus of ovine and porcine lumbar vertebrae, and bovine tail vertebrae. The morphology of the vertebrae of these species differ significantly both from each other and from human, yet how these differences alter biomechanical properties is unknown. Geometric parameters measured in this study included: 1) absolute and relative intervertebral (IVD) and vertebral body height and 2) absolute and relative intervertebral disc (IVD) anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) widths. Single lamella tensile properties included toe-region stress and stretch ratio, stiffness, and tensile strength. As expected, the bovine tail IVD revealed a more circular shape compared with both the ovine and porcine lumbar IVD. The bovine tail also had the largest IVD to vertebral body height ratio (due to having the highest absolute IVD height). Bovine tail lamellae were also found to be strongest and stiffest (in tension) while ovine lumbar lamellae were weakest and most compliant. Histological analysis revealed the greatest proportion of collagen in the bovine corroborating findings of increased strength and stiffness. The observed differences in anatomical shape, connective tissue composition, and tensile properties need to be considered when choosing an appropriate model for IVD research. PMID:26558749

  15. Chondroadherin Fragmentation Mediated by the Protease HTRA1 Distinguishes Human Intervertebral Disc Degeneration from Normal Aging*

    PubMed Central

    Akhatib, Bashar; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Gawri, Rahul; Ouellet, Jean; Jarzem, Peter; Heinegård, Dick; Mort, John; Roughley, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet

    2013-01-01

    Chondroadherin, a member of the leucine-rich repeat family, has previously been demonstrated to be fragmented in some juveniles with idiopathic scoliosis. This observation led us to investigate adults with disc degeneration. Immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that non-degenerate discs from three different age groups show no chondroadherin fragmentation. Furthermore, the chondroadherin fragments in adult degenerate disc and the juvenile scoliotic disc were compared via immunoblot analysis and appeared to have a similar size. We then investigated whether or not chondroadherin fragmentation increases with the severity of disc degeneration. Three different samples with different severities were chosen from the same disc, and chondroadherin fragmentation was found to be more abundant with increasing severity of degeneration. This observation led us to the creation of a neoepitope antibody to the cleavage site observed. We then observed that the cleavage site in adult degenerate discs and juvenile scoliotic discs was identical as confirmed by the neoepitope antibody. Consequently, investigation of the protease capable of cleaving chondroadherin at this site was necessary. In vitro digests of disc tissue demonstrated that ADAMTS-4 and -5; cathepsins K, B, and L; and MMP-3, -7, -12, and -13 were incapable of cleavage of chondroadherin at this site and that HTRA1 was indeed the only protease capable. Furthermore, increased protein levels of the processed form of HTRA1 were demonstrated in degenerate disc tissues via immunoblotting. The results suggest that chondroadherin fragmentation can be used as a biomarker to distinguish the processes of disc degeneration from normal aging. PMID:23673665

  16. Investigation of the intervertebral disc and fused joint dynamics through experimental modal analysis and the receptance coupling method.

    PubMed

    Malekian, M; Trieu, D; Owoc, J S; Park, S S; Hunter, C J

    2010-04-01

    Identification of intervertebral disc (IVD) dynamics is important in understanding the spine mechanism and behavior. This paper experimentally identifies the dynamics of the bovine caudal IVD using experimental modal analysis and the inverse receptance coupling method. Experimental modal analysis was performed on free-free mounted bovine caudal vertebrae joined by an IVD and a fused IVD joint. Shear, rotational, and axial dynamics of the joints are identified by curve fitting of the frequency response functions, and identifying the damping ratio, stiffness, and modal frequency in each axis. The identified dynamics are compared with the IVD joints with and without fusion. Results provide important insight into IVD dynamics and fused IVD dynamics. This method can be extended to identify human IVD joint dynamics. PMID:20387967

  17. Preload substantially influences the intervertebral disc stiffness in loading-unloading cycles of compression.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hendrik; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Schilling, Christoph; Dreischarf, Marcel

    2016-06-14

    Disc hydration is controlled by fluid imbibition and exudation and hence by applied load magnitude and history, internal osmotic pressure and disc conditions. It affects both the internal load distribution and external load-bearing of a disc while variations therein give rise to the disc time-dependent characteristics. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of changes in compression preload magnitude on the disc axial cyclic compression stiffness under physiological loading. After 20h of free hydration, effects of various preload magnitudes (no preload, 0.06 and 0.28MPa, applied for eight hours) and disc-bone preparation conditions on disc height and axial stiffness were investigated using 36 disc-bone and 24 isolated disc (without bony endplates) bovine specimens. After preloading, specimens were subjected to ten loading/unloading cycles each of 7.5min compression at 0.5MPa followed by 7.5min at 0.06MPa. Under 0.06MPa preload, the specimen height losses during high loading periods of cyclic loading were greater than corresponding height recoveries during low loading phases. This resulted in a progressive reduction in the specimen height and increase in its stiffness. Differences between disc height losses in high cyclic loads and between stiffness in both load increase and release phases were significant for 0 and 0.06MPa vs. 0.28MPa preload. Results highlight the significant role of disc preload magnitude/history and hence disc height and hydration on disc stiffness in loading/unloading and disc height loss in loading periods. Proper preconditioning and hence hydration level should be achieved if recovery in height loss similar to in vivo conditions is expected. PMID:27209550

  18. Enhancement of Runx2 expression is potentially linked to β-catenin accumulation in canine intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Munetaka; Aikawa, Takeshi; Hakozaki, Takaharu; Arai, Kiyotaka; Ochi, Hiroki; Haro, Hirotaka; Tagawa, Masahiro; Asou, Yoshinori; Hara, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD) greatly affects the quality of life. The nucleus pulposus (NP) of chondrodystrophic dog breeds (CDBs) is similar to the human NP because the cells disappear with age and are replaced by fibrochondrocyte-like cells. Because IVDD develops as early as within the first year of life, we used canines as a model to investigate the in vitro mechanisms underlying IVDD. The mechanism underlying age-related IVDD, however, is poorly understood. Several research groups have suggested that Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays an important role in IVDD. However, the role of Wnt/β-catenin signals in IVD cells is not yet well understood. Here, we demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling could enhance Runx2 expression in IVDD and lead to IVD calcification. Nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue was obtained from Beagle dogs after evaluation of the degeneration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Histological analysis showed that lack of Safranin-O staining, calcified area, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 13-positive cells increased with progression of the degeneration. Furthermore, the levels of β-catenin- and Runx2-positive cells also increased. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the MRI signal intensity and mRNA expression levels of β-catenin and Runx2 are correlated in NP tissues. Moreover, supplementation of LiCl induced β-catenin accumulation and Runx2 expression. In contrast, FH535 inhibited LiCl-induced upregulation. These results suggest that Runx2 transcript and protein expression, potentially in combination with β-catenin accumulation, are enhanced in degenerated and calcified intervertebral discs of CDBs. PMID:24916026

  19. 2D segmentation of intervertebral discs and its degree of degeneration from T2-weighted magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, José Maria; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2014-03-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a disorder suffered by a large population around the world. A key factor causing this illness is Intervertebral Disc (IVD) degeneration, whose early diagnosis could help in preventing this widespread condition. Clinicians base their diagnosis on visual inspection of 2D slices of Magnetic Resonance (MR) images, which is subject to large interobserver variability. In this work, an automatic classification method is presented, which provides the Pfirrmann degree of degeneration from a mid-sagittal MR slice. The proposed method utilizes Active Contour Models, with a new geometrical energy, to achieve an initial segmentation, which is further improved using fuzzy C-means. Then, IVDs are classified according to their degree of degeneration. This classification is attained by employing Adaboost on five specific features: the mean and the variance of the probability map of the nucleus using two different approaches and the eccentricity of the fitting ellipse to the contour of the IVD. The classification method was evaluated using a cohort of 150 intervertebral discs assessed by three experts, resulting in a mean specificity (93%) and sensitivity (83%) similar to the one provided by every expert with respect to the most voted value. The segmentation accuracy was evaluated using the Dice Similarity Index (DSI) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of the point-to-contour distance. The mean DSI ± 2 standard deviation was 91:7% ±5:6%, the mean RMSE was 0:82mm and the 95 percentile was 1:36mm. These results were found accurate when compared to the state-of-the-art.

  20. Efficacy of Epidural Steroid Injection in Management of Lumbar Prolapsed Intervertebral Disc: A Comparison of Caudal, Transforaminal and Interlaminar Routes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Epidural steroid is an important modality in the conservative management of prolapsed lumbar disc and is being used for over 50 years. However, controversy still persists regarding their effectiveness in reducing the pain and improving the function with literature both supporting and opposing them are available. Aim To study the efficacy of epidural steroid injection in the management of pain due to prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc and to compare the effectiveness between caudal, transforaminal and interlaminar routes of injection. Materials and Methods A total of 152 patients with back pain with or without radiculopathy with a lumbar disc prolapse confirmed on MRI, were included in the study and their pre injection Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) Score was calculated. By simple randomization method (picking a card), patients were enrolled into one of the three groups and then injected methyl prednisone in the epidural space by one of the techniques of injection i.e. caudal, transforaminal and interlaminar. Twelve patients didn’t turn up for the treatment and hence were excluded from the study. Remaining 140 patients were treated and were included for the analysis of the results. Eighty two patients received injection by caudal route, 40 by transforaminal route and 18 by interlaminar route. Post injection JOA Score was calculated at six month and one year and effectiveness of the medication was calculated for each route. The data was compared by LSD and ANOVA method to prove the significance. Average follow-up was one year. Results At one year after injecting the steroid, all three routes were found to be effective in improving the JOA Score (Caudal route in 74.3%, transforaminal in 90% and interlaminar in 77.7%). Transforaminal route was significantly more effective than caudal (p=0.00) and interlaminar route (p=0.03) at both 6 months and one year after injection. No significant difference was seen between the caudal and interlaminar

  1. Long term preservation of motion with artificial cervical disc implants: A comparison between cervical disc replacement and rigid fusion with cage

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; Lorente, Francisco de Asis; Gomez, Joaquin; Eiras, Jose; Agrawal, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Background: With the advancement of technologies there is more interest in the maintenance of the spine's biomechanical properties focusing on the preservation of the functional motion segment. In present article we describe our experience with 25 cases managed with artificial cervical discs with 28 Solis cage following cervical discectomy with a mean follow-up period of 7.5 year. Materials and Methods: All surgeries were performed by single surgeon from March 2004 to June 2005 with a follow-up till date. Patients with symptomatic single or multiple level diseases that had no prior cervical surgery were candidates for the study. Cohort demographics were comparable. Standardized clinical outcome measures and radiographic examinations were used at prescribed post-operative intervals to compare the treatment groups. Relief in radicular pain, cervical spine motion, and degenerative changes at follow-up were noted. Results: In a total 53 cases, the mean age in prosthesis group was 47 years (age range: 30-63 years) and mean age in cage group was 44 years (32-62 years). Mean hospital stay was 2.7 days in both the groups. At 4 weeks complete cervical movements could be achieved in 19 cases in artificial disc group. Maintenance of movement after 7.5 years was in 76% of these patients. Lordosis was maintained in all cases till date. There was no mortality or wound infection in our series. Conclusions: We conclude that artificial cervical disc could be an alternative to fixed spinal fusion as it represents the most physiological substitute of disc. However, there is need for further studies to support the use of artificial cervical disc prosthesis. PMID:25685218

  2. Cervical Disc Arthroplasty with Prestige LP Disc Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: Seven-Year Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Burkus, J. Kenneth; Shaffrey, Mark E.; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has emerged as an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of cervical pathologies. Studies are on-going to assess the long term outcomes of CDA. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of the Prestige® LP Disc at 84-months follow up. Methods Prospective data from 280 CDA patients with single-level cervical disc disease with radiculopathy or myelopathy were compared with 265 historical control ACDF patients. Clinical and radiographic follow up was completed pre-operatively, intraoperatively, and at intervals up to 84 months. Results Follow-up rate was 75.9% for CDA and 70.0% for ACDF patients. Statistical improvements (p < 0.001) in Neck Disability Index (NDI), neck/arm pain, and SF-36 were achieved by 1.5 months in both groups and maintained through 84 months. At 84 months, 86.1% of CDA versus 80.1% of ACDF patients achieved NDI success, (≥15-point improvement over baseline). Mean NDI score improvements exceeded 30 points in both groups. SF-36 PCS/MCS mean improvements were 13.1±11.9/8.2±12.3 points for CDA and 10.7±11.8/8.3±13.6 points for ACDF. Neurological success was 92.8% for CDA and 79.7% for ACDF patients. The rate of Overall Success was 74.9% for CDA and 63.2% for ACDF. At 84 months, 17.5% of CDA and 16.6% of ACDF patients had a possibly implant- or implant-surgical procedure-related adverse event. Eighteen (6.4%) CDA and 29 (10.9%) ACDF patients had a second surgery at the index level. In CDA patients, mean angular motion at the target level was maintained at 24 (7.5°) and 84 (6.9°) months. Bridging bone was reported in 5.9%/9.5%/10.2%/13.0% of CDA patients at 24/36/60/84 months. Change in mean preoperative angulation of the adjacent segment above/below the index level was1.06±4.39/1.25±4.06 for CDA and (-0.23)±5.37/1.25±5.07 for ACDF patients. At 84 months, 90.9% of CDA and 85.6% of ACDF patients were satisfied with the results of their treatment

  3. MMP-2 mediates local degradation and remodeling of collagen by annulus fibrosus cells of the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is characterized by marked degradation and restructuring of the annulus fibrosus (AF). Although several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been found to be more prevalent in degenerate discs, their coordination and function within the context of the disease process are still not well understood. In this study, we sought to determine whether MMP-2 is associated with degenerative changes in the AF and to identify the manner by which AF cells use MMP-2. Methods Two established animal models of disc degeneration, static compression and transannular needle puncture of rodent caudal discs, were examined for MMP-2 immunopositivity. With lentiviral transduction of an shRNA expression cassette, we screened and identified an effective shRNA sequence for generating stable RNA interference to silence MMP-2 expression in primary rat AF cells. Gelatin films were used to compare gelatinase activity and spatial patterns of degradation between transduced cells, and both noninfected and nonsense shRNA controls. The functional significance of MMP-2 was determined by assessing the ability for cells to remodel collagen gels. Results Both static compression and 18-g annular puncture of rodent caudal discs stimulated an increase in MMP-2 activity with concurrent lamellar disorganization in the AF, whereas 22-g and 26-g needle injuries did not. To investigate the functional role of MMP-2, we established lentivirus-mediated RNAi to induce stable knockdown of transcript levels by as much as 88%, and protein levels by as much as 95% over a 10-day period. Culturing transduced cells on gelatin films confirmed that MMP-2 is the primary functional gelatinase in AF cells, and that MMP-2 is used locally in regions immediately around AF cells. In collagen gels, transduced cells demonstrated an inability to remodel collagen matrices. Conclusions Our study indicates that increases in MMP-2 observed in human degenerate discs are mirrored in

  4. Hybrid Surgery Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Multilevel Cervical Disc Diseases: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Meng, Fanxin; Ding, Yan; Li, Jie; Han, Jian; Zhang, Xintao; Dong, Wei

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the outcomes and reliability of hybrid surgery (HS) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis and disc diseases.Hybrid surgery, combining cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with fusion, is a novel treatment to multilevel cervical degenerated disc disease in recent years. However, the effect and reliability of HS are still unclear compared with ACDF.To investigate the studies of HS versus ACDF in patients with multilevel cervical disease, electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane library, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched. Studies were included when they compared HS with ACDF and reported at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neck pain, arm pain, cervical range of motion (ROM), quality of life, and incidence of complications. No language restrictions were used. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies and extracted the relevant data.Seven clinical controlled trials were included in this study. Two trials were prospective and the other 5 were retrospective. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that HS achieved better recovery of NDI score (P = 0.038) and similar recovery of VAS score (P = 0.058) compared with ACDF at 2 years follow-up. Moreover, the total cervical ROM (C2-C7) after HS was preserved significantly more than the cervical ROM after ACDF (P = 0.000) at 2 years follow-up. Notably, the compensatory increase of the ROM of superior and inferior adjacent segments was significant in ACDF groups at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.01), compared with HS.The results demonstrate that HS provides equivalent outcomes and functional recovery for cervical disc diseases, and significantly better preservation of cervical ROM compared with ACDF in 2-year follow-up. This suggests the HS is an effective alternative invention for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis to

  5. Extracellular osmolarity regulates matrix homeostasis in the intervertebral disc and articular cartilage: evolving role of TonEBP.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Zariel I; Shapiro, Irving M; Risbud, Makarand V

    2014-11-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is characterized by changes in proteoglycan status, loss of bound water molecules, decreased tissue osmotic pressure and a resulting mechanical failure of the disc. A similar spectrum of changes is evident in osteoarthritic articular cartilage. When healthy, resident cells in these skeletal tissues respond to applied mechanical loads by regulating their own osmotic state and the hydration of the extracellular matrix. The transcription factor Tonicity-Responsive Enhancer Binding Protein (TonEBP or NFAT5) is known to mediate the osmoadaptive response in these and other tissues. While the molecular basis of how osmotic loading controls matrix homeostasis is not completely understood, TonEBP regulates the expression of aggrecan and β1,3-glucoronosyltransferase in nucleus pulposus cells, in addition to targets that allow for survival under hypertonic stress. Moreover, in chondrocytes, TonEBP controls expression of several collagen subtypes and Sox9, a master regulator of aggrecan and collagen II expression. Thus, TonEBP-mediated regulation of the matrix composition allows disc cells and chondrocytes to modify the extracellular osmotic state itself. On the other hand, TonEBP in immune cells induces expression of TNF-α, ΙL-6 and MCP-1, pro-inflammatory molecules closely linked to matrix catabolism and pathogenesis of both disc degeneration and osteoarthritis, warranting investigations of this aspect of TonEBP function in skeletal cells. In summary, the TonEBP system, through its effects on extracellular matrix and osmoregulatory genes can be viewed primarily as a protective or homeostatic response to physiological loading. PMID:25172826

  6. 1990 Volvo Award in experimental studies. Anulus tears and intervertebral disc degeneration. An experimental study using an animal model.

    PubMed

    Osti, O L; Vernon-Roberts, B; Fraser, R D

    1990-08-01

    An animal model was developed to test the hypothesis that discrete peripheral tears within the anulus lead to secondary degenerative changes in other disc components. In 21 adult sheep, a cut was made in the left anterolateral anulus of three randomly selected lumbar discs. The cut was parallel and adjacent to the inferior end-plate, and had a controlled depth of 5 mm. This left the inner third of the anulus and the nucleus pulposus intact and closely reproduced the rim Lear lesion described by Schmorl. Animals were randomly allocated to different groups in relation to the length of time interval between operation and death, varying from 1 to 18 months. At death, the lumbar spine was cut into individual joint units and each disc sectioned into six parasagittal slabs. After observation of the slabs under the dissecting microscope, two of the six slabs, the one containing the anulus lesion and a contralateral, were processed for histology. The results of this study suggest that, despite the great care taken at operation to ensure that the inner anulus was left intact, progressive failure of the inner anulus was seen in all sheep and occurred in the majority of discs between 4 and 12 months after the operation. Although the outermost anulus showed the ability to heal, the defect induced by the cut led initially to deformation and bulging of the collagen bundles, and eventually to inner extension of the tear and complete failure. These findings suggest that discrete tears of the outer anulus may have a role in the formation of concentric clefts and in accelerating the development of radiating clefts. Peripheral tears of the anulus fibrosus therefore may play an important role in the degeneration of the intervertebral joint complex. PMID:2237626

  7. Stem Cell Therapies for Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Immune Privilege Reinforcement by Fas/FasL Regulating Machinery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi-Jiao; Liu, Xu; Che, Lu; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Samartzis, Dino; Wang, Hai-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    As a main contributing factor to low back pain, intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the fundamental basis for various debilitating spinal diseases. The pros and cons of current treatment modalities necessitate biological treatment strategies targeting for reversing or altering the degeneration process in terms of molecules or genes. The advances in stem cell research facilitate the studies aiming for possible clinical application of stem cell therapies for IDD. Human NP cells are versatile with cell morphology full of variety, capable of synthesizing extracellular matrix components, engulfing substances by autophagy and phagocytosis, mitochondrial vacuolization indicating dysfunction, expressing Fas and FasL as significant omens of immune privileged sites. Human discs belong to immune privilege organs with functional FasL expression, which can interact with invasive immune cells by Fas-FasL regulatory machinery. IDD is characterized by decreased expression level of FasL with dysfunctional FasL, which in turn unbalances the interaction between NP cells and immune cells. Certain modulation factors might play a role in the process, such as miR-155. Accumulating evidence indicates that Fas-FasL network expresses in a variety of stem cells. Given the expression of functional FasL and insensitive Fas in stem cells (we term as FasL privilege), transplantation of stem cells into the disc may regenerate the degenerative disc by not only differentiating into NP-like cells, increasing extracellular matrix, but also reinforce immune privilege via interaction with immune cells by Fas-FasL network. PMID:25381758

  8. Narrowing of lumbar spinal canal predicts chronic low back pain more accurately than intervertebral disc degeneration: a magnetic resonance imaging study in young Finnish male conscripts.

    PubMed

    Visuri, Tuomo; Ulaska, Jaana; Eskelin, Marja; Pulkkinen, Pekka

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this magnetic resonance imaging study was to evaluate the role of degenerative changes, developmental spinal stenosis, and compression of spinal nerve roots in chronic low back (CLBP) and radicular pain in Finnish conscripts. The degree of degeneration, protrusion, and herniation of the intervertebral discs and stenosis of the nerve root canals was evaluated, and the midsagittal diameter and cross-sectional area of the lumbar vertebrae canal were measured in 108 conscripts with CLBP and 90 asymptomatic controls. The midsagittal diameters at L1-L4 levels were significantly smaller in the patients with CLBP than in the controls. Moreover, degeneration of the L4/5 disc and protrusion or herniation of the L5/S1 disc and stenosis of the nerve root canals at level L5/S1 were more frequent among the CLBP patients. Multifactorial analysis of the magnetic resonance imaging findings provided a total explanatory rate of only 33%. Narrowing of the vertebral canal in the anteroposterior direction was more likely to produce CLBP and radiating pain than intervertebral disc degeneration or narrowing of the intervertebral nerve root canals. PMID:16450819

  9. The role of TGF-β1/Smad2/3 pathway in platelet-rich plasma in retarding intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huilin; Yuan, Chenxi; Wu, Chunshen; Qian, Jiale; Shi, Qing; Li, Xuefeng; Zhu, Xuesong; Zou, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections are an effective way to retard intervertebral disc degeneration, but the mechanism of action is unclear. Activated platelets release some growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), which positively modulate the extracellular matrix of nucleus pulposus cells. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanism underlying the PRP-mediated inhibition of intervertebral disc degeneration. In an in vitro study, we found that the proliferation of nucleus pulposus cells was greatly enhanced with 2.5% PRP treatment. The TGF-β1 concentration was much higher after PRP treatment. PRP administration effectively increased the collagen II, aggrecan and sox-9 mRNA levels and decreased collagen X levels. However, Western blotting demonstrated that specifically inhibiting TGF-β1 signalling could significantly prevent nucleus pulpous cellular expression of Smad2/3 and matrix protein. In a rabbit study, magnetic resonance imaging revealed significant recovery signal intensity in the intervertebral discs of the PRP injection group compared with the very low signal intensity in the control groups. Histologically, the PRP plus inhibitor injection group had significantly lower expression levels of Smad2/3 and collagen II than the PRP group. These results demonstrated that a high TGF-β1 content in the platelets retarded disc degeneration in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting the TGF-β1/Smad2/3 pathway could prevent this recovery by inactivating Smad2/3 and down-regulating the extracellular matrix. Therefore, the TGF-β1/Smad2/3 pathway might play a critical role in the ability of PRP to retard intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:27061332

  10. Cervical discospondylitis in 2 Great Dane puppies following routine surgery.

    PubMed

    Finnen, Andrea; Blond, Laurent; Parent, Joane

    2012-05-01

    Two Great Dane puppies developed cervical discospondylitis following routine surgery for sterilization. One animal was affected at C4-C5 and the other at C6-C7 intervertebral discs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was obtained in pure culture from ultrasound-guided disc aspiration in 1 case. Both animals were successfully treated with long-term antibiotics. PMID:23115366

  11. Cervical discospondylitis in 2 Great Dane puppies following routine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Finnen, Andrea; Blond, Laurent; Parent, Joane

    2012-01-01

    Two Great Dane puppies developed cervical discospondylitis following routine surgery for sterilization. One animal was affected at C4–C5 and the other at C6–C7 intervertebral discs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was obtained in pure culture from ultrasound-guided disc aspiration in 1 case. Both animals were successfully treated with long-term antibiotics. PMID:23115366

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of intervertebral disc disease and myelomalacia in an American black bear (Ursus americanus).

    PubMed

    Knafo, S Emmanuelle; Divers, Stephen J; Rech, Raquel; Platt, Simon R

    2012-06-01

    A 23-yr-old black bear (Ursus americanus) was examined because of paralysis of unknown duration. The precise onset of clinical signs was unknown as a result of seasonal torpor. The bear was immobilized and transported to a university veterinary teaching hospital for further evaluation and treatment. Radiography revealed increased mineral opacity and ventral bridging across vertebral segments T8-11. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated dorsal and ventral compression of the spinal cord at T8-9. Given the bear's advanced age, the unknown duration of spinal cord compression, unknown presence of deep pain perception, and thus an unknown prognosis for surgical success, euthanasia was elected. Postmortem examination revealed severe spondylosis deformans from T7 to L3 and dorsal extradural extruded disc material in the area of T8-9. Histopathology demonstrated the dorsal horns of the spinal cord at T9 were replaced by foamy macrophages extending into the dorsal and lateral funiculi of the white matter compatible with focal, severe, chronic myelomalacia. This is the first report of intervertebral disc disease and myelomalacia diagnosed using MRI in a large carnivore. PMID:22779249

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 attenuates IL-1β induced alteration of anabolic and catabolic activities in intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Shi, Changgui; Xu, Chen; Cao, Peng; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Lianfu; Chen, Huajiang; Yuan, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is characterized by disordered extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism, implicating subdued anabolism and enhanced catabolic activities in the nucleus pulposus (NP) of discs. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) are considered to be potent mediators of ECM breakdown. Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been reported to participate in cellular anti-inflammatory processes. The purpose of this study was to investigate HO-1 modulation of ECM metabolism in human NP cells under IL-1β stimulation. Our results revealed that expression of HO-1 decreased considerably during IDD progression. Induction of HO-1 by cobalt protoporphyrin IX attenuated the inhibition of sulfate glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II (COL-II) synthesis and ameliorated the reduced expressions of aggrecan, COL-II, SOX-6 and SOX-9 mediated by IL-1β. Induction of HO-1 also reversed the effect of IL-1β on expression of the catabolic markers matrix metalloproteinases-1, 3, 9 and 13. This was combined with inhibition of the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. These findings suggest that HO-1 might play a pivotal role in IDD, and that manipulating HO-1 expression might mitigate the impairment of ECM metabolism in NP, thus potentially offering a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of IDD. PMID:26877238

  14. Microscale Material Properties of Bone and the Mineralized Tissues of the Intervertebral Disc-Vertebral Body Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paietta, Rachel C.

    The objective of this dissertation is to understand the influences of material structure on the properties, function and failure of biological connective tissues. Biological interfaces are becoming an increasingly studied system within mechanics and tissue engineering as a model for attaching dissimilar materials. The elastic modulus of bone (≈ 20 GPa) and cartilage (≈ 0.1-1 MPa) differ over orders of magnitude, which should intuitively create high stress concentrations and failure at the interface. Yet, these natural interface systems rarely fail in vivo, and the mechanism by which loads are transferred between tissues has not yet been established. Tissue quality is one major contributor to the mechanical behavior of bone and cartilage, and is defined by properties such as collagen orientation, mineral volume fraction, porosity and tissue geometry. These properties have yet to be established at the bone-cartilage interface in the spine, and the lack of quantitative data on material microstructure and behavior limits treatments and tissue engineering construct design. In this dissertation, second harmonic generation imaging, quantitative backscattered scanning electron imaging and nanoindentation are combined to characterize micrometer scale tissue quality and modulus in both bone and calcified cartilage. These techniques are utilized to: 1) determine the hierarchical micrometer to millimeter scale properties of lamellar bone, 2) quantify changes throughout development and aging at the human intervertebral disc-vertebral body junction, and 3) explore compressive fractures at this interface. This work is the first to provide quantitative data on the mineral volume fraction, collagen orientation and modulus from the same, undecalcified sections of tissue to corroborate tissue structure and mineralization and describe quantitative parameters of the interface. The principal findings from this work indicate that the underlying matrix, or collagen, organization in

  15. Validation and application of an intervertebral disc finite element model utilizing independently constructed tissue-level constitutive formulations that are nonlinear, anisotropic, and time-dependent.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Nathan T; Cortes, Daniel H; Peloquin, John M; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-08-22

    Finite element (FE) models are advantageous in the study of intervertebral disc mechanics as the stress-strain distributions can be determined throughout the tissue and the applied loading and material properties can be controlled and modified. However, the complicated nature of the disc presents a challenge in developing an accurate and predictive disc model, which has led to limitations in FE geometry, material constitutive models and properties, and model validation. The objective of this study was to develop a new FE model of the intervertebral disc, to validate the model's nonlinear and time-dependent responses without tuning or calibration, and to evaluate the effect of changes in nucleus pulposus (NP), cartilaginous endplate (CEP), and annulus fibrosus (AF) material properties on the disc mechanical response. The new FE disc model utilized an analytically-based geometry. The model was created from the mean shape of human L4/L5 discs, measured from high-resolution 3D MR images and averaged using signed distance functions. Structural hyperelastic constitutive models were used in conjunction with biphasic-swelling theory to obtain material properties from recent tissue tests in confined compression and uniaxial tension. The FE disc model predictions fit within the experimental range (mean ± 95% confidence interval) of the disc's nonlinear response for compressive slow loading ramp, creep, and stress-relaxation simulations. Changes in NP and CEP properties affected the neutral-zone displacement but had little effect on the final stiffness during slow-ramp compression loading. These results highlight the need to validate FE models using the disc's full nonlinear response in multiple loading scenarios. PMID:24998992

  16. Brown-Sequard syndrome produced by calcified herniated cervical disc and posterior vertebral osteophyte: Case report.

    PubMed

    Guan, Dawei; Wang, Guanjun; Clare, Morgan; Kuang, Zhengda

    2015-12-01

    Brown-Sequard syndrome (BSS) produced by cervical disc disorders has rarely been seen clinically and only 50 cases have been reported in English literatures. However, most of which have resulted from acute disc herniation. Here, we report a case of BSS produced by calcified herniated C4-C5 disc and posterior vertebral osteophyte, in which decompression through anterior approach was performed. This case revealed the potential of cervical spondylopathy leading to BSS in a chronic manner. Once the diagnosis is established, it is advisable to perform decompression as early as possible. PMID:27047233

  17. Long Term Societal Costs of Anterior Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) versus Cervical Disc Arthroplasty (CDA) for Treatment of Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ghori, Ahmer; Konopka, Joseph F.; Cha, Thomas D.; Bono, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current literature suggests that anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) have comparable clinical outcomes for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy. Given similar outcomes, an understanding of differences in long-term societal costs can help guide resource utilization. The purpose of this study was to compare the relative long-term societal costs of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) to cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) for the treatment of single level cervical disc disease by considering upfront surgical costs, lost productivity, and risk of subsequent revision surgery. Methods We completed an economic and decision analysis using a Markov model to evaluate the long-term societal costs of ACDF and CDA in a theoretical cohort of 45-65 year old patients with single level cervical disc disease who have failed nonoperative treatment. Results The long-term societal costs for a 45-year old patient undergoing ACDF are $31,178 while long-term costs for CDA are $24,119. Long-term costs for CDA remain less expensive throughout the modeled age range of 45 to 65 years old. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that CDA remains less expensive than ACDF as long as annual reoperation rate remains below 10.5% annually. Conclusions Based on current data, CDA has lower long-term societal costs than ACDF for patients 45-65 years old by a substantial margin. Given reported reoperation rates of 2.5% for CDA, it is the preferred treatment for cervical radiculopathy from an economic perspective. PMID:26913221

  18. In vivo three-dimensional intervertebral kinematics of the subaxial cervical spine during seated axial rotation and lateral bending via a fluoroscopy-to-CT registration approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Chung; Lu, Tung-Wu; Wang, Ting-Ming; Hsu, Chao-Yu; Hsu, Shih-Jung; Shih, Ting-Fang

    2014-10-17

    Accurate measurement of the coupled intervertebral motions is helpful for understanding the etiology and diagnosis of relevant diseases, and for assessing the subsequent treatment. No study has reported the in vivo, dynamic and three-dimensional (3D) intervertebral motion of the cervical spine during active axial rotation (AR) and lateral bending (LB) in the sitting position. The current study fills the gap by measuring the coupled intervertebral motions of the subaxial cervical spine in ten asymptomatic young adults in an upright sitting position during active head LB and AR using a volumetric model-based 2D-to-3D registration method via biplane fluoroscopy. Subject-specific models of the individual vertebrae were derived from each subject's CT data and were registered to the fluoroscopic images for determining the 3D poses of the subaxial vertebrae that were used to obtain the intervertebral kinematics. The averaged ranges of motion to one side (ROM) during AR at C3/C4, C4/C5, C5/C6, and C6/C7 were 4.2°, 4.6°, 3.0° and 1.3°, respectively. The corresponding values were 6.4°, 5.2°, 6.1° and 6.1° during LB. Intervertebral LB (ILB) played an important role in both AR and LB tasks of the cervical spine, experiencing greater ROM than intervertebral AR (IAR) (ratio of coupled motion (IAR/ILB): 0.23-0.75 in LB, 0.34-0.95 in AR). Compared to the AR task, the ranges of ILB during the LB task were significantly greater at C5/6 (p=0.008) and C6/7 (p=0.001) but the range of IAR was significantly smaller at C4/5 (p=0.02), leading to significantly smaller ratios of coupled motions at C4/5 (p=0.0013), C5/6 (p<0.001) and C6/7 (p=0.0037). The observed coupling characteristics of the intervertebral kinematics were different from those in previous studies under discrete static conditions in a supine position without weight-bearing, suggesting that the testing conditions likely affect the kinematics of the subaxial cervical spine. While C1 and C2 were not included owing to

  19. Region-dependent aggrecan degradation patterns in the rat intervertebral disc are affected by mechanical loading in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Iatridis, James C.; Godburn, Karolyn; Wuertz, Karin; Alini, Mauro; Roughley, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Structured Abstract Study Design Immunoblotting study to evaluate aggrecan degradation patterns in rat intervertebral discs(IVDs) subjected to mechanical overload. Objective To evaluate the effects of in vivo dynamic compression overloading on aggrecan degradation products associated with matrix metalloproteinase(MMP) and aggrecanase activity in different regions of the IVD. Summary of Background Data Aggrecan cleavage at the MMP and aggrecanase sites are important events in human IVD aging, with distinct cleavage patterns in the annulus and nucleus regions. No such information is available on regional variations in rat IVDs, nor on how such cleavage is affected by mechanical loading. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented with an Ilizarov-type device and subjected to dynamic compression (1 MPa and 1 Hz for 8 hours per day for 8 weeks). Control, sham, and overloaded IVDs were separated by disc region and analyzed for aggrecan degradation products using immunoblotting techniques with antibodies specific for the aggrecanase and MMP cleavage sites in the interglobular domain of aggrecan. Results Control IVDs exhibited strong regional variation in aggrecan degradation patterns with minimal degradation products being present in the nucleus pulposus(NP), degradation products associated with aggrecanase cleavage predominating in the inner annulus fibrosus(AF), and degradation products associated with MMP cleavage predominating in the outer annulus fibrosus. Dynamic compression overloading increased the amount of aggrecan degradation products associated with MMP cleavage particularly in the AF but also in the NP. Degradation profiles of sham IVDs were similar to control. Conclusions Aggrecan G1 regions resulting from proteolysis were found to have a strong regionally-specific pattern in the rat IVD, which was altered under excessive loading. The shift from aggrecanase to MMP-induced degradation products with dynamic compression overloading suggests that protein

  20. Adverse effects of stromal vascular fraction during regenerative treatment of the intervertebral disc: observations in a goat model.

    PubMed

    Detiger, Suzanne E L; Helder, Marco N; Smit, Theodoor H; Hoogendoorn, Roel J W

    2015-09-01

    Stromal vascular fraction (SVF), an adipose tissue-derived heterogeneous cell mixture containing, among others, multipotent adipose stromal cells (ASCs) and erythrocytes, has proved beneficial for a wide range of applications in regenerative medicine. We sought to establish intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration by injecting SVF intradiscally during a one-step surgical procedure in an enzymatically (Chondroitinase ABC; cABC) induced goat model of disc degeneration. Unexpectedly, we observed a severe inflammatory response that has not been described before, including massive lymphocyte infiltration, neovascularisation and endplate destruction. A second study investigated two main suspects for these adverse effects: cABC and erythrocytes within SVF. The same destructive response was observed in healthy goat discs injected with SVF, thereby eliminating cABC as a cause. Density gradient removal of erythrocytes and ASCs purified by culturing did not lead to adverse effects. Following these observations, we incorporated an extra washing step in the SVF harvesting protocol. In a third study, we applied this protocol in a one-step procedure to a goat herniation model, in which no adverse responses were observed either. However, upon intradiscal injection of an identically processed SVF mixture into our goat IVD degeneration model during a fourth study, the adverse effects surprisingly occurred again. Despite our quest for the responsible agent, we eventually could not identify the mechanism through which the observed destructive responses occurred. Although we cannot exclude that the adverse effects are species-dependent or model-specific, we advertise caution with the clinical application of autologous SVF injections into the IVD until the responsible agent(s) are identified. PMID:25682272

  1. Material property discontinuities in intervertebral disc porohyperelastic finite element models generate numerical instabilities due to volumetric strain variations.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, C; Noailly, J; Lacroix, D

    2013-10-01

    Numerical studies of the intervertebral disc (IVD) are important to better understand the load transfer and the mechanobiological processes within the disc. Among the relevant calculations, fluid-related outputs are critical to describe and explore accurately the tissue properties. Porohyperelastic finite element models of IVD can describe accurately the disc behaviour at the organ level and allow the inclusion of fluid effects. However, results may be affected by numerical instabilities when fast load rates are applied. We hypothesized that such instabilities would appear preferentially at material discontinuities such as the annulus-nucleus boundary and should be considered when testing mesh convergence. A L4-L5 IVD model including the nucleus, annulus and cartilage endplates were tested under pure rotational loads, with different levels of mesh refinement. The effect of load relaxation and swelling were also studied. Simulations indicated that fluid velocity oscillations appeared due to numerical instability of the pore pressure spatial derivative at material discontinuities. Applying local refinement only was not enough to eliminate these oscillations. In fact, mesh refinements had to be local, material-dependent, and supplemented by the creation of a material transition zone, including interpolated material properties. Results also indicated that oscillations vanished along load relaxation, and faster attenuation occurred with the incorporation of the osmotic pressure. We concluded that material discontinuities are a major cause of instability for poromechanical calculations in multi-tissue models when load velocities are simulated. A strategy was presented to address these instabilities and recommendations on the use of IVD porohyperelastic models were given. PMID:23796430

  2. Design and fabrication of 3D-printed anatomically shaped lumbar cage for intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration treatment.

    PubMed

    Serra, T; Capelli, C; Toumpaniari, R; Orriss, I R; Leong, J J H; Dalgarno, K; Kalaskar, D M

    2016-01-01

    Spinal fusion is the gold standard surgical procedure for degenerative spinal conditions when conservative therapies have been unsuccessful in rehabilitation of patients. Novel strategies are required to improve biocompatibility and osseointegration of traditionally used materials for lumbar cages. Furthermore, new design and technologies are needed to bridge the gap due to the shortage of optimal implant sizes to fill the intervertebral disc defect. Within this context, additive manufacturing technology presents an excellent opportunity to fabricate ergonomic shape medical implants. The goal of this study is to design and manufacture a 3D-printed lumbar cage for lumbar interbody fusion. Optimisations of the proposed implant design and its printing parameters were achieved via in silico analysis. The final construct was characterised via scanning electron microscopy, contact angle, x-ray micro computed tomography (μCT), atomic force microscopy, and compressive test. Preliminary in vitro cell culture tests such as morphological assessment and metabolic activities were performed to access biocompatibility of 3D-printed constructs. Results of in silico analysis provided a useful platform to test preliminary cage design and to find an optimal value of filling density for 3D printing process. Surface characterisation confirmed a uniform coating of nHAp with nanoscale topography. Mechanical evaluation showed mechanical properties of final cage design similar to that of trabecular bone. Preliminary cell culture results showed promising results in terms of cell growth and activity confirming biocompatibility of constructs. Thus for the first time, design optimisation based on computational and experimental analysis combined with the 3D-printing technique for intervertebral fusion cage has been reported in a single study. 3D-printing is a promising technique for medical applications and this study paves the way for future development of customised implants in spinal

  3. Early clinical and radiographical results of keel-less and shallow keel cervical disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Ji Min; Tiruchelvarayan, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical disc replacements has been shown to be as effective as fusions in the treatment of radiculopathy or myelopathy due to disc prolapse. Newer implants were designed to reduce the difficulty of end-plate preparation. Since 2010, the authors have started using Discocerv (Alphatec Spine, Carlsbad, USA) a keel-less implant and Activ-C (B. Braun, Sheffield, UK), a shallow keel implant. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the duration of surgery between cervical disc replacement and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, and also to evaluate the functional outcome, complications, and radiographic outcome of cervical disc replacement. Results: Fifty patients were included (20 disc replacement and 30 fusion). This was a single surgeon retrospective study, with all surgery performed by the senior author (RT). The mean operation duration for single-level disc replacement was 2.6 h, and for single-level fusion was 2.4 h (P = 0.4684). For 2-levels surgery, the result was 3.5 h for 2-level hybrid surgery (one level disc replacement and one level fusion) and 3.4 h for fusion (P = 0.4489). Disc replacement resulted in preservation of an average of 67% of the angle of motion at the sagittal plane (FFflexion-extension). The average range of motion after disc replacement was 6.1°. The median clinical follow-up duration was 2 years (average 1.8 years). There was no incidence of major complications or significant neurovascular injury in this series of patients. A significant improvement in short form-36 scores was seen as early as 3 months postoperative (from 58 preoperative to 92 at 3 months). The improvement was sustained up to the fourth year of follow-up. Conclusion: Cervical arthroplasty with keel-less and shallow keel implants are safe and relatively easy to perform. The surgical time for disc replacement is not significantly longer than standard fusion surgery. There is reasonably good preservation of motion. The short-term functional improvement is

  4. Surgically Treated Symptomatic Prolapsed Lumbar and Sacral Intervertebral Discs in Females: A Comparative Study of Incidence and Causative Factors and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ibe, M. O. N.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective: There are various postulated possible causes of surgically symptomatic prolapsed intervertebral discs in the lumbar and sacral regions. They may be acting singularly or collectively. Yet, these factors, which could vary in different environments, have not been satisfactorily confirmed. The intention of this study is to share the experience of the author in the occurrence, possible causative factors, and treatment of surgically symptomatic prolapsed lumbar and sacral intervertebral discs in females, and to compare this experience in Switzerland, Nigeria, and Jamaica using surgery records for a period of over 39 years. Materials and Methods: Records of these cases were examined and analyzed with the intent of comparing the frequency of occurrence and possible causative factors of this lesion in some countries. Results: There were 60 locations in 51 patients in Basel (Caucasian population only), 4 locations in 1 patient in Imo and Ebonyi States (African population only), and none in Jamaica (mixed population). The patients’ ages ranged from 19 to 71 years in Switzerland, and the only patient in Nigeria was 49 years old. Conclusion: The study revealed that surgically treated symptomatic prolapsed lumbar and sacral intervertebral discs in females occurred more in Basel, Switzerland, than in Imo and Ebonyi States of Nigeria and none occurred in Jamaica, West Indies. Racial differences, certain sporting/recreational activities, smoking, and type of profession could have contributed to the development of this disease. PMID:24027395

  5. One stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy for the treatment of myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Bin; Chen, Bohua; Ma, Xue-Xiao; Xi, Yong-Ming; Xiang, Hong-Fei; Hu, You-Gu; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to introduce a method of one stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy for myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation and to evaluate the clinical efficacy of this surgery. From 1999 to 2008, 18 patients with myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation who underwent this procedure were included. The average age was 63 years (range 48-74 years), and the average follow-up period was 46 months (range 3-108 months). Neurologic status was evaluated using the JOA scoring system. Neurological symptoms improvement was seen in all patients after surgery. The average JOA score was 14.22±1.86 by final follow-up, which was higher than preoperative values (P<0.01), and the average improvement in neurological function was 76.63%. Neurologic examination showed that excellent results had been obtained by 10 patients, good results by 8 patients, with no fair or poor results. 2 patients developed cerebrospinal fluid leakage after surgery and recovered during the follow-up period. One patient with cervical disc herniation developed postoperative C5 palsy on the axle side on the third day after surgery. She completely recovered by 1 month after surgery. No other patients experienced postoperative neurologic complications. Complete anterior and posterior decompression of the spinal cord was achieved after surgery. We concluded that one stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy is an effective, reliable, and safe procedure for the treatment of myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation. PMID:26309625

  6. Plasma disc decompression for contained cervical disc herniation: a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Nardi, Pier Vittorio

    2009-01-01

    Prospective case series studies have shown that plasma disc decompression (PDD) using the COBLATION SpineWand device (ArthroCare Corporation, Austin, TX) is effective for decompressing the disc nucleus in symptomatic contained cervical disc herniations. This prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes of percutaneous PDD as compared to conservative care (CC) through 1 year. Patients (n = 115) had neck/arm pain >50 on the visual analog scale (VAS) pain scale and had failed at least 30 days of failed CC. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either PDD (n = 62) or CC (n = 58). Clinical outcome was determined by VAS pain score, neck disability index (NDI) score, and SF-36 health survey, collected at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year. The PDD group had significantly lower VAS pain scores at all follow-up time points (PDD vs. CC: 6 weeks, −46.87 ± 2.71 vs. −15.26 ± 1.97; 3 months, −53.16 ± 2.74 vs. −30.45 ± 2.59; 6 months, −56.22 ± 2.63 vs. −40.26 ± 2.56; 1 year, −65.73 ± 2.24 vs. −36.45 ± 2.86; GEE, P < 0.0001). PDD patients also had significant NDI score improvement over baseline when compared to CC patients at the 6 weeks (PDD vs. CC: −9.15 ± 1.06 vs. −4.61 ± 0.53, P < 0.0001) and 1 year (PDD vs. CC: −16.70 ± 0.29 vs. −12.40 ± 1.26, P = 0.005) follow-ups. PDD patients showed statistically significant improvement over baseline in SF-36 physical component summary scores when compared to CC patients at 6 weeks and 1 year (PDD vs. CC: 8.86 + 8.04 vs. 4.24 ± 3.79, P = 0.0004; 17.64 ± 10.37 vs. 10.50 ± 10.6, P = 0.0003, respectively). In patients who had neck/arm pain due to a contained cervical disc herniation, PDD was associated with significantly better clinical outcomes than a CC regimen. At 1 year, CC patients appeared to suffer a “relapse, showing signs of decline in most measurements, whereas PDD

  7. Cervical Footprint Anthropometry in Indian Population: Implications on Design of Artificial Disc Replacement Devices

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vishwanath Mahabaleshwar; Bangalore, Shashidhar Kantharajanna; Saraf, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Purpose To accurately measure the dimensions of cervical endplates based on computed tomography (CT) scans in Indian population and assess accuracy of match with currently available cervical disc prostheses. Overview of Literature The dimensions of currently available cervical disc replacement implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae endplates for Caucasian population. To author's knowledge, similar study has not been published for patients from Indian subcontinent. Methods CT scans of cervical spine of patients from Indian subcontinent were collected and reviewed. Seventy patients (54 men and 16 women; aged 18–56 years with average of 37 years) who underwent CT scans of cervical spine were included in study. 3D CT scans of sub axial cervical spine (C3 to C7) were analyzed. The anterior-posterior (AP) and central mediolateral (CML) dimensions of superior and inferior endplates from C3 to C7 were measured using digital measuring system. Results A total of 560 endplates of 70 patients were included in the study. The AP diameter of cervical endplates ranged from 0.87 to 2.47 cm. The CML diameters ranged from 0.84 to 2.98 cm. For levels C3/C4 and C4/C5 for AP dimension Prestige-LP (90.5%) and Prodisc-C (89%) discs showed higher percentage of matching than Discover discs (58.5%). For CML diameter, Prestige-LP (69.5%), Prodisc-C (70%) and Discover (39.5%) discs showed almost similar matching with measured endplates. For levels C5/C6 and C6/C7 for AP dimension, Prestige-LP (67.25%), Prodisc-C (49.35%) and Discover (51.5%) discs showed similar matching. For CML diameter Prestige-LP (32%), Prodisc-C (27.5%) and Discover (42.2%) discs showed poor matching with measured endplates. Conclusions This study indicates need for redesign of cervical disc prostheses to match Indian patients. The collected anthropometric dimensions from this study may be used to design and develop indigenous artificial total disc

  8. Comparison of in vivo and simulator-retrieved metal-on-metal cervical disc replacements

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven M.; Ciccarelli, Lauren; Harper, Megan L.; Siskey, Ryan; Shorez, Jacob; Chan, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty is regarded as a promising treatment for myelopathy and radiculopathy as an alternative to cervical spine fusion. On the basis of 2-year clinical data for the PRESTIGE® Cervical Disc (Medtronic, Memphis, Tennessee), the Food and Drug Administration recommended conditional approval in September 2006 and final approval in July 2007; however, relatively little is known about its wear and damage modes in vivo. The main objective was to analyze the tribological findings of the PRESTIGE® Cervical Disc. This study characterized the in vivo wear patterns of retrieved cervical discs and tested the hypothesis that the total disc replacements exhibited similar surface morphology and wear patterns in vitro as in vivo. Methods Ten explanted total disc replacements (PRESTIGE®, PRESTIGE® I, and PRESTIGE® II) from 10 patients retrieved after a mean of 1.8 years (range, 0.3–4.1 years) were analyzed. Wear testing included coupled lateral bending ( ±4.7°) and axial rotation ( ±3.8°) with a 49 N axial load for 5 million cycles followed by 10 million cycles of flexion-extension ( ±9.7°) with 148 N. Implant surfaces were characterized by the use of white-light interferometry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Results The explants generally exhibited a slightly discolored, elliptic wear region of varying dimension centered in the bearing center, with the long axis oriented in the medial-lateral direction. Abrasive wear was the dominant in vivo wear mechanism, with microscopic scratches generally oriented in the medial-lateral direction. Wear testing resulted in severe abrasive wear in a curvilinear fashion oriented primarily in the medial-lateral direction. All retrievals showed evidence of an abrasive wear mechanism. Conclusions This study documented important similarity between the wear mechanisms of components tested in vitro and explanted PRESTIGE® Cervical Discs; however, the severity of wear was

  9. Exploring the utility of axial lumbar MRI for automatic diagnosis of intervertebral disc abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subarna; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the importance of axial lumbar MRI slices for automatic detection of abnormalities. In the past, only the sagittal views were taken into account for lumbar CAD systems, ignoring the fact that a radiologist scans through the axial slices as well, to confirm the diagnosis and quantify various abnormalities like herniation and stenosis. Hence, we present an automatic diagnosis system from axial slices using CNN(Convolutional Neural Network) for dynamic feature extraction and classification of normal and abnormal lumbar discs. We show 80:81% accuracy (with a specificity of 85:29% and sensitivity of 75:56%) on 86 cases (391 discs) using only an axial slice for each disc, which implies the usefulness of axial views for automatic lumbar abnormality diagnosis in conjunction with sagittal views.

  10. Cervical artificial disc replacement with ProDisc-C: clinical and radiographic outcomes with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Malham, Gregory M; Parker, Rhiannon M; Ellis, Ngaire J; Chan, Philip G; Varma, Dinesh

    2014-06-01

    Cervical artificial disc replacement (ADR) is indicated for the treatment of severe radiculopathy permitting neural decompression and maintenance of motion. We evaluated the clinical and radiographic outcomes in cervical ADR patients using the ProDisc-C device (DePuy Synthes, West Chester, PA, USA) with a 5-9 year follow-up. Data were collected through a prospective registry, with retrospective analysis performed on 24 consecutive patients treated with cervical ADR by a single surgeon. All patients underwent single- or two-level ADR with the ProDisc-C device. Outcome measures included neck and arm pain (visual analogue scale), disability (neck disability index [NDI]), complications and secondary surgery rates. Flexion-extension cervical radiographs were performed to assess range of motion (ROM) of the device and adjacent segment disease (ASD). Average follow-up was 7.7 years. Neck and arm pain improved 60% and 79%, respectively, and NDI had an improvement of 58%. There were no episodes of device migration or subsidence. Mean ROM of the device was 6.4°. Heterotopic ossification was present in seven patients (37%). Radiographic ASD below the device developed in four patients (21%) (one single-level and three two-level ADR). No patient required secondary surgery (repeat operations at the index level or adjacent levels). Fourteen out of 19 patients (74%) were able to return to employment, with a median return to work time of 1.3 months. The ProDisc-C device for cervical ADR is a safe option for patients providing excellent clinical outcomes, satisfactory return to work rates and maintenance of segmental motion despite radiographic evidence of heterotopic ossification and ASD on long-term follow-up. PMID:24417795

  11. Artificial disc and vertebra system: a novel motion preservation device for cervical spinal disease after vertebral corpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jun; Lu, Meng; Lu, Teng; Liang, Baobao; Xu, Junkui; Qin, Jie; Cai, Xuan; Huang, Sihua; Wang, Dong; Li, Haopeng; He, Xijing

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the range of motion and stability of the human cadaveric cervical spine after the implantation of a novel artificial disc and vertebra system by comparing an intact group and a fusion group. METHODS: Biomechanical tests were conducted on 18 human cadaveric cervical specimens. The range of motion and the stability index range of motion were measured to study the function and stability of the artificial disc and vertebra system of the intact group compared with the fusion group. RESULTS: In all cases, the artificial disc and vertebra system maintained intervertebral motion and reestablished vertebral height at the operative level. After its implantation, there was no significant difference in the range of motion (ROM) of C3–7 in all directions in the non-fusion group compared with the intact group (p>0.05), but significant differences were detected in flexion, extension and axial rotation compared with the fusion group (p<0.05). The ROM of adjacent segments (C3−4, C6−7) of the non-fusion group decreased significantly in some directions compared with the fusion group (p<0.05). Significant differences in the C4-6 ROM in some directions were detected between the non-fusion group and the intact group. In the fusion group, the C4−6 ROM in all directions decreased significantly compared with the intact and non-fusion groups (p<0.01). The stability index ROM (SI-ROM) of some directions was negative in the non-fusion group, and a significant difference in SI-ROM was only found in the C4−6 segment of the non-fusion group compared with the fusion group. CONCLUSION: An artificial disc and vertebra system could restore vertebral height and preserve the dynamic function of the surgical area and could theoretically reduce the risk of adjacent segment degeneration compared with the anterior fusion procedure. However, our results should be considered with caution because of the low power of the study. The use of a larger sample should be considered

  12. Validation and application of an intervertebral disc finite element model utilizing independently constructed tissue-level constitutive formulations that are nonlinear, anisotropic, and time-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Nathan T.; Cortes, Daniel H.; Peloquin, John M.; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2014-01-01

    Finite element (FE) models are advantageous in the study of intervertebral disc mechanics as the stress–strain distributions can be determined throughout the tissue and the applied loading and material properties can be controlled and modified. However, the complicated nature of the disc presents a challenge in developing an accurate and predictive disc model, which has led to limitations in FE geometry, material constitutive models and properties, and model validation. The objective of this study was to develop a new FE model of the intervertebral disc, to validate the model’s nonlinear and time-dependent responses without tuning or calibration, and to evaluate the effect of changes in nucleus pulposus (NP), cartilaginous endplate (CEP), and annulus fibrosus (AF) material properties on the disc mechanical response. The new FE disc model utilized an analytically-based geometry. The model was created from the mean shape of human L4/L5 discs, measured from high-resolution 3D MR images and averaged using signed distance functions. Structural hyperelastic constitutive models were used in conjunction with biphasic-swelling theory to obtain material properties from recent tissue tests in confined compression and uniaxial tension. The FE disc model predictions fit within the experimental range (mean ± 95% confidence interval) of the disc’s nonlinear response for compressive slow loading ramp, creep, and stress-relaxation simulations. Changes in NP and CEP properties affected the neutral-zone displacement but had little effect on the final stiffness during slow-ramp compression loading. These results highlight the need to validate FE models using the disc’s full nonlinear response in multiple loading scenarios. PMID:24998992

  13. Enhancing cell migration in shape-memory alginate-collagen composite scaffolds: In vitro and ex vivo assessment for intervertebral disc repair.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Olivier; Naqvi, Syeda Masooma; Lennon, Kerri; Buckley, Conor Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Lower lumbar disc disorders pose a significant problem in an aging society with substantial socioeconomic consequences. Both inner tissue (nucleus pulposus) and outer tissue (annulus fibrosus) of the intervertebral disc are affected by such debilitating disorders and can lead to disc herniation and lower back pain. In this study, we developed an alginate-collagen composite porous scaffold with shape-memory properties to fill defects occurring in annulus fibrosus tissue of degenerated intervertebral discs, which has the potential to be administered using minimal invasive surgery. In the first part of this work, we assessed how collagen incorporation on preformed alginate scaffolds influences the physical properties of the final composite scaffold. We also evaluated the ability of annulus fibrosus cells to attach, migrate, and proliferate on the composite alginate-collagen scaffolds compared to control scaffolds (alginate only). In vitro experiments, performed in intervertebral disc-like microenvironmental conditions (low glucose and low oxygen concentrations), revealed that for alginate only scaffolds, annulus fibrosus cells agglomerated in clusters with limited infiltration and migration capacity. In comparison, for alginate-collagen scaffolds, annulus fibrosus cells readily attached and colonized constructs, while preserving their typical fibroblastic-like cell morphology with spreading behavior and intense cytoskeleton expression. In a second part of this study, we investigated the effects of alginate-collagen scaffold when seeded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. In vitro, we observed that alginate-collagen porous scaffolds supported cell proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition (collagen type I), with secretion amplified by the local release of transforming growth factor-β3. In addition, when cultured in ex vivo organ defect model, alginate-collagen scaffolds maintained viability of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells for up to 5

  14. Population Average T2 MRI Maps Reveal Quantitative Regional Transformations in the Degenerating Rabbit Intervertebral Disc that Vary by Lumbar Level

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John T.; Collins, Christopher M.; Mauck, Robert L.; Ikuta, Kensuke; Elliott, Dawn M.; Zhang, Yeija; Anderson, D. Greg; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Albert, Todd J.; Arlet, Vincent; Smith, Harvey E.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with T2-weighting is routinely performed to assess intervertebral disc degeneration. Standard clinical evaluations of MR images are qualitative, however, and do not focus on region-specific alterations in the disc. Utilizing a rabbit needle puncture model, T2 mapping was performed on injured discs to develop a quantitative description of the degenerative process following puncture. To do so, an 18G needle was inserted into four discs per rabbit (L3/L4 to L6/L7) and T2 maps were generated pre- and 4 weeks post-injury. Individual T2 maps were normalized to a disc-specific coordinate system and then averaged for pre- and post-injury population composite T2 maps. We also developed a method to automatically segment the nucleus pulposus by 2-D and 3-D curve fitting routines. Puncture injury produced alterations in MR signal intensity in a region-specific manner mirroring human degeneration. Population average T2 maps provided a quantitative representation of the injury response, and identified deviations of individual degenerate discs from the pre-injury population. We found that the response to standardized injury was modest at lower lumbar levels, likely as a result of increased disc dimensions. These tools will be valuable for the quantitative characterization of disc degeneration in future clinical and pre-clinical studies. PMID:25273831

  15. Outcome of nucleoplasty in patients with radicular pain due to lumbar intervertebral disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Ogbonnaya, Sunny; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Qassim, Abdulla; O’Sullivan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nucleoplasty (percutaneous lumbar disc decompression) is a minimally invasive procedure that utilizes radiofrequency energy as a treatment for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation, against open microdiscectomy, which would be the mainstay treatment modality. The literature reports a favorable outcome in up to 77% of patients at 6 months. Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of nucleoplasty in the management of discogenic radicular pain. Materials and Methods: The medical notes of 33 patients, admitted for nucleoplasty between June 2006 and September 2007, were reviewed retrospectively. All had radicular pain, and contained herniated disc as seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lumbosacral spine. Patients were followed up at 1 and 3 months post-procedure. The outcome measures employed in this study were satisfaction with symptoms and self-reported improvement. Results: Thirty-three cases were examined (18 males and 15 females). Twenty-seven procedures were performed with no complications and six were abandoned due to anatomical reasons. There were 18 and 15 cases of disc herniation at L5/S1 and L4/5 levels, respectively. Four weeks following the procedure, 13 patients reported improvement in symptoms, and 14 remained symptomatically the same and subsequently had open microdiscectomy. Conclusion: Nucleoplasty has been shown to be a safe and minimal-access procedure. Less than half of our selected cohort of patients reported symptomatic improvement at 1-month follow-up. We no longer offer this procedure to our patients. Possible reasons are discussed. PMID:23633860

  16. The Effect of Gamma Irradiation on the Biological Properties of Intervertebral Disc Allografts: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies in a Beagle Model

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yu; Ruan, Dike; Luk, Keith D. K.; He, Qing; Wang, Chaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Study Design An animal experiment about intervertebral disc allograft. Objective To explore the feasibility to decellularize disc allografts treated by 6°Co Gamma Irradiation, and simultaneously, to assess the possibility to make use of the decellularized natural disc scaffold for disc degeneration biotherapy. Summary of Background Data Studies of both animal and human disc allograft transplantation indicated that the disc allograft may serve as a scaffold to undertake the physiological responsibility of the segment. Methods Experiment in vitro: 48 discs of beagles were harvested and divided randomly into four groups including a control group and three irradiated groups. Immediate cell viability and biomechanical properties of the discs were checked and comparisons were made among these groups. Experiment in vivo: 24 beagles accepted single-level allografted disc treated with different doses of gamma irradiation. Plain X-rays and MRIs were taken before and after surgery. Then, the spinal columns were harvested en bloc from the sacrificed beagles and were examined morphologically. Results There were significant differences of both the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus immediate cell viabilities among the various groups. There were no obvious differences of the biomechanical properties among the four groups. The disc height and range of motion decreased significantly in all groups as time went on. The observed indexes in irradiated groups were much smaller than those in the control group, but the indexes in 18-kGy group were larger than those in 25-kGy and 50-kGy groups. Both MRI and macroscopic findings showed that the segmental degeneration in the control and 18-kGy group was less severe than that in 25-kGy and 50-kGy groups. Conclusion Gamma Irradiation can decellularize disc allograft successfully to provide natural scaffold for the study of degenerative disc disease therapy, and also can be used as an effective method to produce adjustable animal models

  17. Human mesenchymal stem cell co-culture modulates the immunological properties of human intervertebral disc tissue fragments in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bertolo, Alessandro; Thiede, Thomas; Aebli, Niklaus; Baur, Martin; Ferguson, Stephen J; Stoyanov, Jivko V

    2011-04-01

    The capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate into intervertebral disc (IVD)-like cells has been well described, but their ability to modulate the inflammatory processes in the IVD remains unclear. We found that tissue obtained by discectomy of degenerated and post-traumatic IVD contains significant amounts of IgG antibodies, a sign of lymphocyte infiltration. Further we investigated whether MSCs in vitro, which were characterized for their multilineage differentiation potential and may have immunomodulatory effects on IVD fragments. IVD fragments were co-cultured in contact with peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and MSCs, and as functional controls we used contact co-cultures of PBLs stimulated with pokeweed mitogen (2.5 μg/mL) and MSCs. The time course of lymphocyte proliferation (Alamar Blue), IgG (ELISA) and gene expression (RT-PCR) of anti-inflammatory cytokines (TGF-β1, IL-10) by MSCs and pro-inflammatory molecules (IL-1α, IL-1β and TNF-α) by the IVD fragments were analyzed. Depending on the response to the presence of MSCs, the IVD fragments (n = 13) were divided in two groups: responders (n = 9), where inflammation was inhibited by MSCs and non-responders (n = 4), where MSCs did not decrease inflammation. At 1 week in co-culture, MSCs reduced significantly the IgG production in the IVD responders group to 69% and PBLs proliferation to 57% of the control. MSCs expression of the anti-inflammatory TGF-β1 increased with time, while IL-10 was expressed only at day 1. IVD gene expression of TNF-α decreased constantly, whereas IL-1α and IL-1β expression increased. In conclusion, these data suggest that MSCs may modulate disc-specific inflammatory and pain status and aid regeneration of the host tissue. PMID:21181480

  18. Injectable microcarriers as human mesenchymal stem cell support and their application for cartilage and degenerated intervertebral disc repair.

    PubMed

    Bertolo, A; Häfner, S; Taddei, A R; Baur, M; Pötzel, T; Steffen, F; Stoyanov, J

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is a progressive and chronic process, and the high incidence of discogenic disorders calls for new therapeutic approaches, such as cell-based therapies using three dimensional cultures and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), which can differentiate to chondrogenic- and IVD-lineages. Here, we investigated the growth and differentiation of human MSC culture on biodegradable collagen scaffolds in order to obtain an injectable suspension. Commercially available wound dressings were downsized to dimensions between 100 and 1500 μm and seeded with freshly isolated or early passages MSC. Proliferation rate and chondrogenic differentiation potential was tested at oxygenation levels of 2%, 5%, 10% and 21% in static and dynamic cultures. Evaluation methods included cell viability test, disc marker genes expression (aggrecan, collagen type I and type II), histological detection of proteoglycans and immunohistochemical analysis. On microcarriers, freshly isolated MSC had lower proliferation rate and chondrogenic differentiation potential compared with early passages MSC. Proliferation of MSC was significantly increased 1.7-fold at 5% oxygen level and in combination with dynamic culture was further increased to 2.3-fold, with respect to normoxia. Chondrogenesis was positively affected by 2% and 5% hypoxia, as shown by increased transcription levels and protein expression of collagen type II and proteoglycan accumulation in static cultures, while it was inhibited in dynamic cultures. Collagen type I and aggrecan expression were not affected by hypoxia. In conclusion, collagen based microcarriers are a suitable support for in vitro MSC growth and chondrogenesis especially when cultured at 5% oxygen level. PMID:25579755

  19. Simulated-Physiological Loading Conditions Preserve Biological and Mechanical Properties of Caprine Lumbar Intervertebral Discs in Ex Vivo Culture

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Cornelis P. L.; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A.; Zandieh Doulabi, Behrouz; van der Veen, Albert J.; van de Ven, Peter M.; Smit, Theo H.; Helder, Marco N.; van Royen, Barend J.; Mullender, Margriet G.

    2012-01-01

    Low-back pain (LBP) is a common medical complaint and associated with high societal costs. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is assumed to be an important causal factor of LBP. IVDs are continuously mechanically loaded and both positive and negative effects have been attributed to different loading conditions. In order to study mechanical loading effects, degeneration-associated processes and/or potential regenerative therapies in IVDs, it is imperative to maintain the IVDs' structural integrity. While in vivo models provide comprehensive insight in IVD biology, an accompanying organ culture model can focus on a single factor, such as loading and may serve as a prescreening model to reduce life animal testing. In the current study we examined the feasibility of organ culture of caprine lumbar discs, with the hypothesis that a simulated-physiological load will optimally preserve IVD properties. Lumbar caprine IVDs (n = 175) were cultured in a bioreactor up to 21 days either without load, low dynamic load (LDL), or with simulated-physiological load (SPL). IVD stiffness was calculated from measurements of IVD loading and displacement. IVD nucleus, inner- and outer annulus were assessed for cell viability, cell density and gene expression. The extracellular matrix (ECM) was analyzed for water, glycosaminoglycan and total collagen content. IVD biomechanical properties did not change significantly with loading conditions. With SPL, cell viability, cell density and gene expression were preserved up to 21 days. Both unloaded and LDL resulted in decreased cell viability, cell density and significant changes in gene expression, yet no differences in ECM content were observed in any group. In conclusion, simulated-physiological loading preserved the native properties of caprine IVDs during a 21-day culture period. The characterization of caprine IVD response to culture in the LDCS under SPL conditions paves the way for controlled analysis of degeneration- and

  20. The three-dimensional architecture of the notochordal nucleus pulposus: novel observations on cell structures in the canine intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Christopher J; Matyas, John R; Duncan, Neil A

    2003-01-01

    Cells from the nucleus pulposus of young (< 2 years) and old (> 5 years) non-chondrodystrophoid dogs were studied using routine histology, confocal laser scanning microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The architecture of cell structures – from the tissue scale down to subcellular scale – was reported. Clusters of notochordal cells were observed in young nuclei pulposi, ranging from 10 to 426 cells each. These clusters resisted mechanical disruption and showed evidence of cell–cell signalling via gap junctions. Cells (30–40 µm in diameter) within the clusters had a physaliferous appearance, containing numerous large inclusions which ranged from 1 to 20 µm in diameter. The inclusions were surrounded by a dense actin cortex but were not contained by a lipid bilayer. The contents of the inclusions were determined not to be predominantly carbohydrate or neutral lipid as assessed by histochemical staining, but the exact composition of the contents remained uncertain. There were striking differences in the cell architecture of young vs. old nuclei pulposi, with a loss of both cell clusters and physaliferous cells during ageing. These observations demonstrate unique cell structures, which may influence our understanding of the differences between notochordal and chondrocytic cells in the nucleus pulposus. Such differences could have substantial impact upon how we think about development, degeneration and repair of the intervertebral disc. PMID:12713268

  1. Low level light therapy modulates inflammatory mediators secreted by human annulus fibrosus cells during intervertebral disc degeneration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Min Ho; Shin, Jae Hee; Kim, Kyoung Soo; Yoo, Chang Min; Jo, Ga Eun; Kim, Joo Han; Choi, Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD) is one of the important causes of low back pain and is associated with inflammation induced by interaction between macrophages and the human annulus fibrosus (AF) cells. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) has been widely known to regulate inflammatory reaction. However, the effect of LLLT on macrophage-mediated inflammation in the AF cells has not been studied till date. The aim of this study is to mimic the inflammatory microenvironment and to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of LLLT at a range of wavelengths (405, 532 and 650 nm) on the AF treated with macrophage-like THP-1 cells conditioned medium (MCM) containing proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 and 8). We observed that AF cells exposed to MCM secrete significantly higher concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α. LLLT markedly inhibited secretion of IL-6 at 405 nm in a time-dependent manner. Level of IL-8 was significantly decreased at all wavelengths in a time-dependent manner. We showed that MCM can induce the inflammatory microenvironment in AF cells and LLLT selectively suppressed IL-6 and 8 levels. The results indicate that LLLT is a potential method of IVD treatment and provide insights into further investigation of its anti-inflammation effect on IVD. PMID:25557915

  2. Wear of the Charité® lumbar intervertebral disc replacement investigated using an electro-mechanical spine simulator

    PubMed Central

    Moghadas, Parshia; Shepherd, Duncan ET; Hukins, David WL

    2015-01-01

    The Charité® lumbar intervertebral disc replacement was subjected to wear testing in an electro-mechanical spine simulator. Sinusoidally varying compression (0.6–2 kN, frequency 2 Hz), rotation (±2°, frequency 1 Hz), flexion–extension (6° to −3°, frequency 1 Hz) and lateral bending (±2°, frequency 1 Hz) were applied out of phase to specimens immersed in diluted calf serum at 37 °C. The mass of the ultra-high-molecular weight polyethylene component of the device was measured at intervals of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 million cycles; its volume was also measured by micro-computed tomography. Total mass and volume losses were 60.3 ± 4.6 mg (mean ± standard deviation) and 64.6 ± 6.0 mm3. Corresponding wear rates were 12.0 ± 1.4 mg per million cycles and 12.8 ± 1.2 mm3 per million cycles; the rate of loss of volume corresponds to a mass loss of 11.9 ± 1.1 mg per million cycles, that is, the two sets of measurements of wear agree closely. Wear rates also agree closely with measurements made in another laboratory using the same protocol but using a conventional mechanical spine simulator. PMID:25834002

  3. Vertebral body split fracture after a single-level cervical total disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Jau-Ching; Fay, Li-Yu; Ko, Chin-Chu; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich

    2012-03-01

    Cervical total disc replacement (TDR) is a viable option for the surgical treatment of degenerative disc disease. This 67-year-old nonsmoking male patient underwent single-level ProDisc-C cervical TDR at C5-6 without any intraoperative problem. His radicular pain improved and he had no neck pain immediately after the operation. However, on postoperative Day 3, a radiograph demonstrated a vertical split fracture of the C-5 vertebra. This fracture was managed conservatively, and 2 years postoperatively a follow-up CT scan demonstrated stable device position and fusion of the fracture. Although the linear fracture caused no neurological symptoms or device migration, the authors advocate prudence in selection and installation of keel-design prostheses, even in a single-level cervical TDR scenario. PMID:22176434

  4. Measurement of Intervertebral Motion Using Quantitative Fluoroscopy: Report of an International Forum and Proposal for Use in the Assessment of Degenerative Disc Disease in the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Alan C.; Teyhen, Deydre S.; Mellor, Fiona E.; Breen, Alexander C.; Wong, Kris W. N.; Deitz, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) is an emerging technology for measuring intervertebral motion patterns to investigate problem back pain and degenerative disc disease. This International Forum was a networking event of three research groups (UK, US, Hong Kong), over three days in San Francisco in August 2009. Its aim was to reach a consensus on how best to record, analyse, and communicate QF information for research and clinical purposes. The Forum recommended that images should be acquired during regular trunk motion that is controlled for velocity and range, in order to minimise externally imposed variability as well as to correlate intervertebral motion with trunk motion. This should be done in both the recumbent passive and weight bearing active patient configurations. The main recommended outputs from QF were the true ranges of intervertebral rotation and translation, neutral zone laxity and the consistency of shape of the motion patterns. The main clinical research priority should initially be to investigate the possibility of mechanical subgroups of patients with chronic, nonspecific low back pain by comparing their intervertebral motion patterns with those of matched healthy controls. PMID:22666606

  5. Hybrid Surgery of Multilevel Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease : Review of Literature and Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Bok; Kim, Jong-Youn; Yoo, Do-Sung; Lee, Tae-Gyu; Huh, Pil-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Objective In the present study, we evaluated the effect, safety and radiological outcomes of cervical hybrid surgery (cervical disc prosthesis replacement at one level, and interbody fusion at the other level) on the multilevel cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD). Methods Fifty-one patients (mean age 46.7 years) with symptomatic multilevel cervical spondylosis were treated using hybrid surgery (HS). Clinical [neck disability index (NDI) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score] and radiologic outcomes [range of motion (ROM) for cervical spine, adjacent segment and arthroplasty level] were evaluated at routine postoperative intervals of 1, 6, 12, 24 months. Review of other similar studies that examined the HS in multilevel cervical DDD was performed. Results Out of 51 patients, 41 patients received 2 level hybrid surgery and 10 patients received 3 level hybrid surgery. The NDI and VAS score were significantly decreased during the follow up periods (p<0.05). The cervical ROM was recovered at 6 and 12 month postoperatively and the mean ROM of inferior adjacent segment was significantly larger than that of superior adjacent segments after surgery. The ROM of the arthoplasty level was preserved well during the follow up periods. No surgical and device related complications were observed. Conclusion Hybrid surgery is a safe and effective alternative to fusion for the management of multilevel cervical spondylosis. PMID:23323165

  6. Progressive Brown-Séquard syndrome: A rare manifestation of cervical disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Porto, Guilherme B F; Tan, Lee A; Kasliwal, Manish K; Traynelis, Vincent C

    2016-07-01

    Brown-Séquard syndrome (BSS) is a rare syndrome and is often described in association with spinal cord injury resulting from hemisection of the spinal cord. BSS due to cervical disc herniation is rare with often delayed diagnosis. The importance of early recognition with imaging cannot be over-emphasized, as the prognosis is better when compared to traumatic and vascular etiologies of BSS. We report a rare case of BBS in an 86-year-old man secondary to cervical disc herniation who had dramatic improvement after surgical intervention. This case highlights the unusual presentation from a very common spinal pathology along with a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:26921137

  7. Temporal Analyses of the Response of Intervertebral Disc Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Nutrient Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Sarah A; Wright, Karina T; Jones, Philip N; Balain, Birender; Roberts, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Much emphasis has been placed recently on the repair of degenerate discs using implanted cells, such as disc cells or bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This study examines the temporal response of bovine and human nucleus pulposus (NP) cells and MSCs cultured in monolayer following exposure to altered levels of glucose (0, 3.15, and 4.5 g/L) and foetal bovine serum (0, 10, and 20%) using an automated time-lapse imaging system. NP cells were also exposed to the cell death inducers, hydrogen peroxide and staurosporine, in comparison to serum starvation. We have demonstrated that human NP cells show an initial "shock" response to reduced nutrition (glucose). However, as time progresses, NP cells supplemented with serum recover with minimal evidence of cell death. Human NP cells show no evidence of proliferation in response to nutrient supplementation, whereas MSCs showed greater response to increased nutrition. When specifically inducing NP cell death with hydrogen peroxide and staurosporine, as expected, the cell number declined. These results support the concept that implanted NP cells or MSCs may be capable of survival in the nutrient-poor environment of the degenerate human disc, which has important clinical implications for the development of IVD cell therapies. PMID:26977156

  8. Temporal Analyses of the Response of Intervertebral Disc Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Nutrient Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Sarah A.; Wright, Karina T.; Jones, Philip N.; Balain, Birender; Roberts, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Much emphasis has been placed recently on the repair of degenerate discs using implanted cells, such as disc cells or bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This study examines the temporal response of bovine and human nucleus pulposus (NP) cells and MSCs cultured in monolayer following exposure to altered levels of glucose (0, 3.15, and 4.5 g/L) and foetal bovine serum (0, 10, and 20%) using an automated time-lapse imaging system. NP cells were also exposed to the cell death inducers, hydrogen peroxide and staurosporine, in comparison to serum starvation. We have demonstrated that human NP cells show an initial “shock” response to reduced nutrition (glucose). However, as time progresses, NP cells supplemented with serum recover with minimal evidence of cell death. Human NP cells show no evidence of proliferation in response to nutrient supplementation, whereas MSCs showed greater response to increased nutrition. When specifically inducing NP cell death with hydrogen peroxide and staurosporine, as expected, the cell number declined. These results support the concept that implanted NP cells or MSCs may be capable of survival in the nutrient-poor environment of the degenerate human disc, which has important clinical implications for the development of IVD cell therapies. PMID:26977156

  9. A pre- and post-operative study of forty-six cases of slipped intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Harto-Garofalidis, G.; Papavassiliou, N.; Rigopoulos, Ch.; Papathanassiou, B. T.

    1968-01-01

    The results of operation on 46 cases of slipped disc have been studied. The age of the patient and the duration of pre-operative symptoms both influence the late results. Results were not usually satisfactory in cases with severe limitation of straight-leg raising. Severe pressure on the nerve-root produces permanent changes and symptoms do not always disappear after its relief. The presence of degenerative changes, visible on the radiograph, is associated with poor late results. Tears of the posterior longitudinal ligament are associated with satisfactory late results. In the majority of cases, the early and late results were similar. PMID:5644993

  10. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc with new approaches for treating low back pain.

    PubMed

    Le Maitre, C L; Binch, A L; Thorpe, A A; Hughes, S P

    2015-03-01

    This review paper discusses the process of disc degeneration and the current understanding of cellular degradation in patients who present with low back pain. The role of surgical treatment for low back pain is analysed with emphasis on the proven value of spinal fusion. The interesting and novel developments of stem cell research in the treatment of low back pain are presented with special emphasis on the importance of the cartilaginous end plate and the role of IL-1 in future treatment modalities. PMID:25423135

  11. Pineal gland calcification, lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta calcifying atherosclerosis correlate in low back pain subjects: A cross-sectional observational CT study.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Sönmez, Iclal; Cakıt, Burcu Duyur; Koşar, Pınar; Koşar, Uğur

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this cross-sectional observational study was to assess the possible impact of pineal gland calcification upon the intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta atherosclerosis in subjects with low back pain, and to investigate the course of these processes with aging. The study was carried out on 81 (66 women and 15 men) subjects: younger than 45 years (group X, n=22), 45-65 years of age (group Y, n=45), and older than 65 years (group Z, n=14). In addition to clinical data, computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain as well as X-ray and CT examination of the lumbar spine were recorded in this study. The degree of disc degeneration and calcification rates of aortic wall and pineal gland were independently determined by two radiologists. Both ratio of calcified pineal gland and density of pineal calcification increased progressively with aging. Also, both the degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score increased with advancing age. On CT scan, a positive correlation between degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score was found (r=0.306, p<0.01). Importantly, there was a positive association between calcification of the pineal gland and degenerative disc disease in X-ray or CT study (r=0.378 and r=0.295, p<0.005 and p<0.01, respectively), as well as between abdominal aorta atherosclerosis and pineal calcification (r=0.634, p<0.001). Our findings suggest that there is a significant interaction between pineal gland calcification and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and also abdominal aorta atherosclerosis. However, further studies with a larger subject cohorts are needed. PMID:18215511

  12. Link Protein N-terminal Peptide Binds to Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) Type II Receptor and Drives Matrix Protein Expression in Rabbit Intervertebral Disc Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zili; Weitzmann, M. Neale; Sangadala, Sreedhara; Hutton, William C.; Yoon, S. Tim

    2013-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and associated spinal disorders are leading sources of morbidity, and they can be responsible for chronic low back pain. Treatments for degenerative disc diseases continue to be a challenge. Intensive research is now focusing on promoting regeneration of degenerated discs by stimulating production of the disc matrix. Link protein N-terminal peptide (LPP) is a proteolytic fragment of link protein, an important cross-linker and stabilizer of the major structural components of cartilage, aggrecan and hyaluronan. In this study we investigated LPP action in rabbit primary intervertebral disc cells cultured ex vivo in a three-dimensional alginate matrix. Our data reveal that LPP promotes disc matrix production, which was evidenced by increased expression of the chondrocyte-specific transcription factor SOX9 and the extracellular matrix macromolecules aggrecan and collagen II. Using colocalization and pulldown studies we further document a noggin-insensitive direct peptide-protein association between LPP and BMP-RII. This association mediated Smad signaling that converges on BMP genes leading to expression of BMP-4 and BMP-7. Furthermore, through a cell-autonomous loop BMP-4 and BMP-7 intensified Smad1/5 signaling though a feedforward circuit involving BMP-RI, ultimately promoting expression of SOX9 and downstream aggrecan and collagen II genes. Our data define a complex regulatory signaling cascade initiated by LPP and suggest that LPP may be a useful therapeutic substitute for direct BMP administration to treat IVD degeneration and to ameliorate IVD-associated chronic low back pain. PMID:23940040

  13. New Classification for Clinically Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Pathology in Cervical Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP) is common after cervical disc surgery. A critical examination of 320 patients operated for cervical disc prolapse revealed that CASP can also occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of cervical spine. This has not been studied in depth and there is a need for a practically applicable classification of CASP. Purpose To develop a new classification scheme of CASP. Overview of Literature A review of the literature did not reveal a practically applicable classification incorporating the occurrence of CASP in congenital and degenerative fusion cases. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of 320 patients operated (509 disc spaces) on for cervical disc prolapse. Cases (n=316) were followed-up for 3-11 years. Random sampling of 220 patients with postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 165 cases was analyzed. Results Six symptomatic CASP cases required resurgery (1.9%), eight cases involved MRI proven CASP with axial neck pain only and 13 patients were asymptomatic with radiological adjacent segment pathology (RASP). The frequency rate was 8.5% (27/316). Four cases of congenital or degenerative fusion of vertebra developed CASP requiring surgery. CASP is classified as primary or secondary follows. Primary A1 was congenital fusion of vertebra and primary A2 was degenerative fusion of the vertebra. Secondary, which was after cervical disc surgery, comprised B1 (RASP in asymptomatic patients), B2 (CASP in patients with axial neck pain), and B3 (CASP with myeloradiculopathy). B3 was subdivided into single-level CASP (B3a) and multiple-level CASP (B3b). Conclusions Symptomatic CASP requiring resurgery is infrequent. CASP can occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of the cervical spine. A new classification for CASP along with treatment strategy is proposed. Patients in Primary CASP and B3 CASP require resurgery while others require only observation. PMID:26712514

  14. Outcome of physiotherapy after surgery for cervical disc disease: a prospective randomised multi-centre trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many patients with cervical disc disease require leave from work, due to long-lasting, complex symptoms, including chronic pain and reduced levels of physical and psychological function. Surgery on a few segmental levels might be expected to resolve disc-specific pain and reduce neurological deficits, but not the non-specific neck pain and the frequent illness. No study has investigated whether post-surgery physiotherapy might improve the outcome of surgery. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a well-structured rehabilitation programme might add benefit to the customary post-surgical treatment for cervical disc disease, with respect to function, disability, work capability, and cost effectiveness. Methods/Design This study was designed as a prospective, randomised, controlled, multi-centre study. An independent, blinded investigator will compare two alternatives of rehabilitation. We will include 200 patients of working age, with cervical disc disease confirmed by clinical findings and symptoms of cervical nerve root compression. After providing informed consent, study participants will be randomised to one of two alternative physiotherapy regimes; (A) customary treatment (information and advice on a specialist clinic); or (B) customary treatment plus active physiotherapy. Physiotherapy will follow a standardised, structured programme of neck-specific exercises combined with a behavioural approach. All patients will be evaluated both clinically and subjectively (with questionnaires) before surgery and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after surgery. The main outcome variable will be neck-specific disability. Cost-effectiveness will also be calculated. Discussion We anticipate that the results of this study will provide evidence to support physiotherapeutic rehabilitation applied after surgery for cervical radiculopathy due to cervical disc disease. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01547611

  15. A Prospective Study of the Functional Outcome of Anterior Cervical Discectomy With Fusion in Single Level Degenerative Cervical Disc Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Kamani, Mayur M; Shetty, Vikram; Rai, H. Ravindranath; Hegde, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cervical spondylotic myelo-radiculopathy is a form of spinal cord dysfunction syndrome and usually accompanies age related degeneration of the spine. Aim To determine the functional outcome of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion and plating in single level degenerative cervical disc prolapse. Materials and Methods A total of 20 patients diagnosed with degenerative single level cervical disc prolapse who presented to the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Justice KS Hegde Charitable Hospital, Mangalore from the period of November 2012 to May 2014 were enrolled in the study. Complete clinical and radiological evaluation of the patients was done. A trial of conservative management was tried in all these patients for a period of two months. They were taken up for surgery only when conservative management had failed. Scoring of neck function before the surgery was done as per the Modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (MJOA) score. All patients underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with tricortical iliac crest bone grafting. Fixation was performed with titanium locking cervical plates. All patients were reviewed at 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. Assessment of neck function was done as per the MJOA scoring during all the reviews. Radiographic assessment was also done during all the reviews. The complications noted were documented. The statistical analysis was done using percentages; the arithmetic mean was calculated using SPSS software (version 16.0). Results Amongst the 20 patients included in the study, 1 patient died postoperatively due to oesophageal rupture. of the remaining 19 patients reviewed and followed up, all of them had improvement of symptoms and were reported to be in the ‘mild category’ as per the MJOA score. One patient developed dysphonia, in the immediate postoperative period due to recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy which recovered in a period of three months postoperative. Conclusion Single level

  16. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibition modulates nucleus pulposus cell apoptosis in spontaneous resorption of herniated intervertebral discs: An experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Liu, Jin-Tao; Yang, Li-Yan; Du, Wen-Pei; Li, Xiao-Chun; Qian, Xiang; Yu, Peng-Fei; Liu, Jian-Wen; Jiang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the role of p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the resorption of herniated intervertebral discs in 30 rats. In the non‑contained and p38 MAPK inhibition (p38i) groups, two coccygeal intervertebral discs (IVDs) were removed and wounded prior to relocation into the subcutaneous space of the skin of the back. In the contained group, the cartilage endplates maintained their integrity. Furthermore, SB203580 was injected intraperitoneally into the p38i group, whereas saline was injected into the other two groups. In the non‑contained group, the weight of the relocated IVDs decreased to a greater extent over time when compared with the contained and p38i groups. Phosphorylated p38, tumor necrosis factor‑α, and interleukin‑1β were observed to exhibit higher expression levels in the non‑contained group compared with the contained and p38i groups, at weeks 1 and 4 post‑surgery. The expression level of caspase‑3 and the densities of apoptotic disc cells were significantly higher in the non‑contained group compared with the contained and p38i groups at 4 weeks post‑surgery. In conclusion, p38 MAPK induces apoptosis in IVDs, while also accelerating the resorption of the relocated IVDs. Thus, p38 MAPK may be important in spontaneous resorption of IVDs. PMID:27035219

  17. 75 FR 54345 - Determination of Regulatory Review Period for Purposes of Patent Extension; BRYAN CERVICAL DISC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... June 28, 2006, as the date the premarket approval application (PMA) for BRYAN CERVICAL DISC SYSTEM (PMA P060023) was initially submitted. However, FDA records indicate that PMA P060023 was submitted on June 29... that PMA P060023 was approved on May 12, 2009. This determination of the regulatory review...

  18. Alterations in intervertebral disc composition, matrix homeostasis and biomechanical behavior in the UCD-T2DM rat model of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Aaron J.; Berg-Johansen, Britta; Metz, Lionel N.; Miller, Stephanie; La, Brandan; Liebenberg, Ellen C.; Coughlin, Dezba G.; Graham, James L.; Stanhope, Kimber L.; Havel, Peter J.; Lotz, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) adversely affects many tissues, and the greater incidence of discogenic low back pain among diabetic patients suggests that the intervertebral disc is affected too. Using a rat model of polygenic obese T2D, we demonstrate that diabetes compromises several aspects of disc composition, matrix homeostasis and biomechanical behavior. Coccygeal motion segments were harvested from 6-month-old lean Sprague-Dawley rats, obese Sprague-Dawley rats, and diabetic obese UCD-T2DM rats (diabetic for 69 ± 7 days). Findings indicated that diabetes but not obesity reduced disc glycosaminoglycan and water contents, and these degenerative changes correlated with increased vertebral endplate thickness and decreased endplate porosity, and with higher levels of the advanced glycation end-product (AGE) pentosidine. Consistent with their diminished glycosaminoglycan and water contents and their higher AGE levels, discs from diabetic rats were stiffer and exhibited less creep when compressed. At the matrix level, elevated expression of hypoxia-inducible genes and catabolic markers in the discs from diabetic rats coincided with increased oxidative stress and greater interactions between AGEs and one of their receptors (RAGE). Taken together, these findings indicate that endplate sclerosis, increased oxidative stress and AGE/RAGE-mediated interactions could be important factors for explaining the greater incidence of disc pathology in T2D. PMID:25641259

  19. Development of a Large Animal Long-Term Intervertebral Disc Organ Culture Model That Includes the Bony Vertebrae for Ex Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Grant, Michael; Epure, Laura M; Salem, Omar; AlGarni, Nizar; Ciobanu, Ovidiu; Alaqeel, Motaz; Antoniou, John; Mwale, Fackson

    2016-07-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a common cause of low back pain. Testing potential therapeutics in the regeneration of the disc requires the use of model systems. Although several animal models have been developed to investigate IVD degeneration, they are technically challenging to prepare, expensive, present with limitations when performing biomechanical studies on the disc, and are impractical in large-scale screening of novel anabolic and scaffolding agents. An IVD organ culture system offers an inexpensive alternative. In the current paradigm, the bony endplates are removed to allow for nutrient diffusion and maintenance of disc cell viability. Although this is an excellent system for testing biologics, it results in concave cartilage endplates and, as such, requires special platens for loading purposes in a bioreactor as flat ones can overload the annular disc region leading to improper loading. Furthermore, the absence of bone makes it unsuitable for applying complex cyclic loading, a topic of interest in the study of chronic progressive degeneration, as multiaxial loading is more representative of daily forces encountered by the IVD. We have developed and validated a novel long-term IVD organ culture model that retains vertebral bone and is easy to prepare. Our model is ideal for testing potential drugs and alternate-based therapies, in addition to investigating the long-term effects of loading paradigms on disc degeneration and repair. PMID:27216856

  20. Ozone Nucleolysis for Management of Pain and Disability in Prolapsed Lumber Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Das, G.; Ray, S.; Ishwarari, S.; Roy, M.; Ghosh, P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The prevalence rate of low back pain in a number of studies ranged from 22% to 65% in one year, and lifetime prevalence ranged from 11% to 84%. Over the years many percutaneous minimally invasive therapeutic modalities have evolved. Intradiscal oxygen-ozone therapy has also showed promising results. We undertook a prospective cohort study to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of oxygen-ozone therapy on patients with lumber disc herniation in the Indian population. After obtaining ethical committee and investigational review board permission, 53 consecutive patients complying with selection criteria were treated with a single session of oxygen-ozone therapy. All presented with clinical signs of lumber nerve root compression supported by CT and MRI findings. All patients received 3-7 ml of ozone-oxygen mixture at an ozone concentration of29-32 mc/ml of oxygen. Therapeutic outcome was assessed after three weeks, three months, six months, one year and two years on a visual analog scale and Oswestry low back pain disability questionnaire. Pain intensity was significantly reduced following treatment (VAS baseline 7.58±0.86, after three weeks 2.75 ±1.42 and after two years 2.64±2.14). Similarly the Oswestry disability index showed a remarkable improvement in the functional status of the patients (p<0.05). No major complication was observed in this case series. Oxygen-ozone treatment is highly effective in relieving low back pain due to lumber disc herniation. PMID:20465917

  1. Is intervertebral disc pressure linked to herniation?: An in-vitro study using a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Mamiko; Gooyers, Chad E; Karakolis, Thomas; Noguchi, Kimihiro; Callaghan, Jack P

    2016-06-14

    Approximately 40% of low back pain cases have been attributed to internal disc disruption. This disruption mechanism may be linked to intradiscal pressure changes, since mechanical loading directly affects the pressure and the stresses that the inner annulus fibrosus experiences. The objective of this study was to characterize cycle-varying changes in four dependent measures (intradiscal pressure, flexion-extension moments, specimen height loss, and specimen rotation angle) using a cyclic flexion-extension (CFE) loading protocol known to induce internal disc disruption. A novel bore-screw pressure sensor system was used to instrument 14 porcine functional spinal units. The CFE loading protocol consisted of 3600 cycles of flexion-extension range of motion (average 18.30 (SD 3.76) degrees) at 1Hz with 1500N of compressive load. On average, intradiscal pressure and specimen height decreased by 47% and 62%, respectively, and peak moments increased by 102%. From 900 to 2100 cycles, all variables exhibited significant changes between successive time points, except for the specimen posture at maximum pressure, which demonstrated a significant shift towards flexion limit after 2700 cycles. There were no further changes in pressure range after 2100 cycles, whereas peak moments and height loss were significantly different from prior time points throughout the CFE protocol. Twelve of the 14 specimens showed partial herniation; however, injury type was not significantly correlated to any of the dependent measures. Although change in pressure was not predictive of damage type, the increase in pressure range seen during this protocol supports the premise that repetitive combined loading (i.e., radial compression, tension and shear) imposes damage to the inner annulus fibrosus, and its failure mechanism may be linked to fatigue. PMID:27157242

  2. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration associated with axial and radiating low back pain in ageing SPARC-null mice.

    PubMed

    Millecamps, Magali; Tajerian, Maral; Naso, Lina; Sage, E Helene; Stone, Laura S

    2012-06-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) is a complex, multifactorial disorder with unclear underlying mechanisms. In humans and rodents, decreased expression of secreted protein acidic rich in cysteine (SPARC) is associated with intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and signs of LBP. The current study investigates the hypothesis that IVD degeneration is a risk factor for chronic LBP. SPARC-null and age-matched control mice ranging from 6 to 78 weeks of age were evaluated in this study. X-ray and histologic analysis revealed reduced IVD height, increased wedging, and signs of degeneration (bulging and herniation). Cutaneous sensitivity to cold, heat, and mechanical stimuli were used as measures of referred (low back and tail) and radiating pain (hind paw). Region specificity was assessed by measuring icilin- and capsaicin-evoked behaviour after subcutaneous injection into the hind paw or upper lip. Axial discomfort was measured by the tail suspension and grip force assays. Motor impairment was determined by the accelerating rotarod. Physical function was evaluated by voluntary activity after axial strain or during ambulation with forced lateral flexion. SPARC-null mice developed (1) region-specific, age-dependent hypersensitivity to cold, icilin, and capsaicin (hind paw only), (2) axial discomfort, (3) motor impairment, and (4) reduced physical function. Morphine (6 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced cutaneous sensitivity and alleviated axial discomfort in SPARC-null mice. Ageing SPARC-null mice mirror many aspects of the complex and challenging nature of LBP in humans and incorporate both anatomic and functional components of the disease. The current study supports the hypothesis that IVD degeneration is a risk factor for chronic LBP. PMID:22414871

  3. Stability of housekeeping genes in human intervertebral disc, endplate and articular cartilage cells in multiple conditions for reliable transcriptional analysis.

    PubMed

    Lopa, S; Ceriani, C; Cecchinato, R; Zagra, L; Moretti, M; Colombini, A

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative gene expression analysis is widely used to evaluate the expression of specific tissue markers. To obtain reliable data it is essential to select stable housekeeping genes whose expression is not influenced by the anatomical origin of cells or by the culture conditions. No studies have evaluated housekeeping gene stability in intervertebral disc (IVD) cells and only few studies using cartilaginous endplate (CEP) and articular cartilage (AC) cells are present in the literature. We analysed the stability of four candidate housekeeping genes (GAPDH, TBP, YWHAZ and RPL13A) in human cells isolated from nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF), CEP and AC. Cell isolation, expansion, cryoconservation, and differentiation in 3D pellets were tested. GeNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper tools and the comparative ΔCt method were used to evaluate housekeeping gene stability. In each cell population, TBP alone or combined with YWHAZ was identified as the best normaliser in both monolayer and 3D pellets. GAPDH was the best performer only for AC cells in monolayer. In most culture conditions considering groups of two or more cell types, TBP was the most stable and YWHAZ was the second choice. GAPDH was the best performer only in 3D pellets with factors for AC and AF combined with CEP cells. RPL13A was the most stable only for AF with CEP cells at isolation. Our findings will be useful to properly design the experimental set-up of studies involving IVD, CEP or AC cells in different culture conditions, in order to obtain accurate and high quality data from quantitative gene expression analysis. PMID:27232666

  4. Pamidronate Down-regulates Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Induced Matrix Metalloproteinases Expression in Human Intervertebral Disc Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young-Mi; Hong, Seong-Hwan; Yang, Jae-Ho; Oh, Jin-Cheol; Park, Jin-Oh; Lee, Byung Ho; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Hak-Sun; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background N-containing bisphosphonates (BPs), such as pamidronate and risedronate, can inhibit osteoclastic function and reduce osteoclast number by inducing apoptotic cell death in osteoclasts. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the effect of pamidronate, second generation nitrogen-containing BPs and to elucidate matrix metallo-proteinases (MMPs) mRNA expression under serum starvation and/or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) stimulation on metabolism of intervertebral disc (IVD) cells in vitro. Methods Firstly, to test the effect of pamidronate on IVD cells in vitro, various concentrations (10-12, 10-10, 10-8, and 10-6 M) of pamidronate were administered to IVD cells. Then DNA and proteoglycan synthesis were measured and messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of type I collagen, type II collagen, and aggrecan were analyzed. Secondly, to elucidate the expression of MMPs mRNA in human IVD cells under the lower serum status, IVD cells were cultivated in full serum or 1% serum. Thirdly, to elucidate the expression of MMPs mRNA in IVD cells under the stimulation of 1% serum and TNF-α (10 ng/mL) In this study, IVD cells were cultivated in three dimensional alginate bead. Results Under the lower serum culture, IVD cells in alginate beads showed upregulation of MMP 2, 3, 9, 13 mRNA. The cells in lower serum and TNF-α also demonstrated upregulation of MMP-2, 3, 9, and 13 mRNA. The cells with various doses of pamidronate and lower serum and TNF-α were reveled partial down-regulation of MMPs. Conclusions Pamidronate, N-containing second generation BPs, was safe in metabolism of IVD in vitro maintaining chondrogenic phenotype and matrix synthesis, and down-regulated TNF-α induced MMPs expression. PMID:27622181

  5. Regenerative Potential of TGFβ3 + Dex and Notochordal Cell Conditioned Media on Degenerated Human Intervertebral Disc Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn Delia; Purmessur, Devina; Monsey, Robert Daniel; Iatridis, James Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Injection of soluble cell signaling factors into degenerated intervertebral discs (IVDs) offers a minimally invasive treatment that could limit the processes of degeneration by stimulating native matrix repair. This study evaluated the regenerative capacity of degenerated nucleus pulposus (NP) cells obtained from patients undergoing anterior interbody fusions by measuring metabolic activity, DNA content, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and cellular phenotype using qRT-PCR profiling with a custom array of 42 genes. NP cells were cultured in alginate for 7 days with 4 treatment groups: transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGFβ3) + dexamethasone (Dex), soluble factors released from notochordal cells (NCs) cultured in alginate (NCA), soluble factors released from NCs in their native tissue environment (NCT), and basal media. TGFβ3 + Dex stimulated degenerated human NP cells to proliferate and exhibit an anti-catabolic gene expression profile (with a decrease in ADAMTS5 and MMP1 compared to basal, and an increase in SOX9, decrease in ADAMTS5, MMP1, collagen I and collagen III compared to day 0), while NCA stimulated the greatest GAG per cell. We conclude that degenerated human NP cells exhibit regenerative potential, and that an optimal treatment will likely require treatments, such as TGFβ3 + Dex, which were able to increase cell metabolism and reduce catabolism, as well as treatments with factors found in NC conditioned medium, that were able to produce high amounts of GAG per cell. Additional studies to optimize NC culture conditions are required to determine if NC conditioned medium can be made with the capacity to enhance NP cell proliferation and metabolism. PMID:21866573

  6. Clinical and radiologic comparison of dynamic cervical implant arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonghai; Yu, Shunzhi; Zhao, Yantao; Hou, Shuxun; Fu, Qiang; Li, Fengning; Hou, Tiesheng; Zhong, Hongbin

    2014-06-01

    This study compared the clinical and radiological outcomes of dynamic cervical implant (DCI; Scient'x, Villers-Bretonneux, France) arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. This prospective cohort study enrolled patients with single-level cervical degenerative disc disease who underwent DCI arthroplasty or ACDF between September 2009 and June 2011. Patients were followed up for more than 2years. Clinical evaluation included the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), Neck Disability Index (NDI), Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, and visual analog scale (VAS) scores for neck and arm pain. Radiological assessments included segmental range of motion (ROM), overall ROM (C2-C7), disc height (DHI), and changes in adjacent disc spaces. The VAS, SF-36, JOA, and NDI scores improved significantly after surgery in both the DCI and ACDF groups. The VAS, JOA, and SF-36 scores were not significantly different between the DCI and ACDF groups at the final follow-up. The segmental ROM at the treated level and overall ROM increased significantly after surgery in the DCI group, but the ROM in the adjacent cephalad and caudal segments did not change significantly. The mean DHI at the treated level was significantly restored after surgery in both groups. Five patients (12.8%) in the DCI group showed new signs of adjacent segment degeneration. These results indicate that DCI is an effective, reliable, and safe procedure for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. However, there is no definitive evidence that DCI arthroplasty has better intermediate-term results than ACDF. PMID:24411326

  7. Symptomatic intravertebral disc herniation (Schmorl's node) in the cervical spine.

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, S J; Fox, D A; Sosman, J L

    1985-01-01

    A case of a Schmorl's node in the cervical vertebra causing neck pain is reported. An inflammatory focus was found on histological examination of Schmorl's node indicating a possible mechanism of pain production. Images PMID:4083942

  8. OPG rs2073617 polymorphism is associated with upregulated OPG protein expression and an increased risk of intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jing-Bo; Zhan, Xin-Li; Wang, Wen-Jun; Yan, Yi-Guo; Liu, Chong

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the associations between three distinct osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene polymorphisms and the risk of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). A total of 200 IDD patients and 200 healthy controls were recruited from the Department of Spine Surgery at the First Affiliated Hospital of the University of South China (Hengyang, China) between January 2013 and May 2014. The allele, genotype and haplotype frequency distributions of three OPG polymorphisms in the study and control populations were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction prior to restriction fragment length polymorphism or high resolution melting assays. In addition, serum OPG levels were measured via an ELISA. The genotype and allele frequencies of the OPG rs2073617 polymorphisms were significantly higher in the IDD patients, as compared with the control group (P<0.05). Furthermore, carriers of the C allele exhibited a higher risk of IDD, as compared with carriers of the T allele (P<0.001). Conversely, the genotype and allele frequencies of the two other gene polymorphisms, rs2073618 and rs3102735, showed no significant differences between the patients and controls (P>0.05). The serum OPG levels were significantly higher in IDD patients with TT, TC and CC genotypes at the OPG rs2073617 polymorphism, as compared with the control group (P<0.05). Logistic-regression analysis suggested that high serum levels of OPG were positively correlated with IDD risk, whereas the T-C-A, T-G-A and T-G-G haplotypes were negatively correlated with IDD risk (P<0.05). Furthermore, the G-T-G haplotype was associated with protection against IDD (P=0.008), whereas the G-C-G haplotype was associated with an elevated susceptibility to IDD (P=0.007). The results of the present study suggested that OPG rs2073617 polymorphisms and upregulated serum levels of OPG were associated with an increased risk of IDD, whereas the T-C-A, T-G-A and T-G-G haplotypes were protective factors for IDD. The results of the

  9. Age-related accumulation of pentosidine in aggrecan and collagen from normal and degenerate human intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, Sarit Sara; Tsitron, Eve; Wachtel, Ellen; Roughley, Peter; Sakkee, Nico; van der Ham, Frits; Degroot, Jeroen; Maroudas, Alice

    2006-01-01

    During aging and degeneration, many changes occur in the structure and composition of human cartilaginous tissues, which include the accumulation of the AGE (advanced glycation end-product), pentosidine, in long-lived proteins. In the present study, we investigated the accumulation of pentosidine in constituents of the human IVD (intervertebral disc), i.e. collagen, aggrecan-derived PG (proteoglycan) (A1) and its fractions (A1D1–A1D6) in health and pathology. We found that, after maturity, pentosidine accumulates with age. Over the age range studied, a linear 6-fold increase was observed in pentosidine accumulation for A1 and collagen with respective rates of 0.12 and 0.66 nmol·(g of protein)−1·year−1. Using previously reported protein turnover rate constants (kT) obtained from measurements of the D-isomer of aspartic residue in collagen and aggrecan of human IVD, we could calculate the pentosidine formation rate constants (kF) for these constituents [Sivan, Tsitron, Wachtel, Roughley, Sakkee, van der Ham, DeGroot, Roberts and Maroudas (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 13009–13014; Tsitron (2006) MSc Thesis, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel]. In spite of the comparable formation rate constants obtained for A1D1 and collagen [1.81±0.25 compared with 3.71±0.26 μmol of pentosidine·(mol of lysine)−1·year−1 respectively], the higher pentosidine accumulation in collagen is consistent with its slower turnover (0.005 year−1 compared with 0.134 year−1 for A1D1). Pentosidine accumulation increased with decreasing buoyant density and decreasing turnover of the proteins from the most glycosaminoglycan-rich PG components (A1D1) to the least (A1D6), with respective kF values of 1.81±0.25 and 3.18±0.37 μmol of pentosidine·(mol of lysine)−1·year−1. We concluded that protein turnover is an important determinant of pentosidine accumulation in aggrecan and collagen of human IVD, as was found for articular cartilage. Correlation of

  10. Effect of autologous platelet-rich plasma-releasate on intervertebral disc degeneration in the rabbit anular puncture model: a preclinical study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a fraction of plasma in which several growth factors are concentrated at high levels. The active soluble releasate isolated following platelet activation of PRP (PRP-releasate) has been demonstrated to stimulate the metabolism of IVD cells in vitro. The in vivo effect of PRP-releasate on degenerated IVD remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the reparative effects of autologous PRP-releasate on degenerated intervertebral discs (IVDs). Methods To induce disc degeneration, New Zealand white rabbits (n = 12) received anular puncture in two noncontiguous discs. Autologous PRP and PPP (platelet-poor plasma) were isolated from fresh blood using two centrifugation techniques. Four weeks after the initial puncture, releasate isolated from clotted PPP or PRP (PPP- or PRP-releasate), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; control) was injected into the punctured discs. Disc height, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2-mapping and histology were assessed. Results Anular puncture produced a consistent disc narrowing within four weeks. PRP-releasate induced a statistically significant restoration of disc height (PRP vs. PPP and PBS, P<0.05). In T2-quantification, the mean T2-values of the nucleus pulposus (NP) and anulus fibrosus (AF) of the discs were not significantly different among the three treatment groups. Histologically, the number of chondrocyte-like cells was significantly higher in the discs injected with PRP-releasate compared to that with PBS. Conclusions The administration of active PRP-releasate induced a reparative effect on rabbit degenerated IVDs. The results of this study suggest that the use of autologous PRP-releasate is safe and can lead to a clinical application for IVD degeneration. PMID:23127251

  11. Region Specific Response of Intervertebral Disc Cells to Complex Dynamic Loading: An Organ Culture Study Using a Dynamic Torsion-Compression Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Samantha C. W.; Walser, Jochen; Käppeli, Patrick; Shamsollahi, Mohammad Javad; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Gantenbein-Ritter, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The spine is routinely subjected to repetitive complex loading consisting of axial compression, torsion, flexion and extension. Mechanical loading is one of the important causes of spinal diseases, including disc herniation and disc degeneration. It is known that static and dynamic compression can lead to progressive disc degeneration, but little is known about the mechanobiology of the disc subjected to combined dynamic compression and torsion. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the mechanobiology of the intervertebral disc when subjected to combined dynamic compression and axial torsion or pure dynamic compression or axial torsion using organ culture. We applied four different loading modalities [1. control: no loading (NL), 2. cyclic compression (CC), 3. cyclic torsion (CT), and 4. combined cyclic compression and torsion (CCT)] on bovine caudal disc explants using our custom made dynamic loading bioreactor for disc organ culture. Loads were applied for 8 h/day and continued for 14 days, all at a physiological magnitude and frequency. Our results provided strong evidence that complex loading induced a stronger degree of disc degeneration compared to one degree of freedom loading. In the CCT group, less than 10% nucleus pulposus (NP) cells survived the 14 days of loading, while cell viabilities were maintained above 70% in the NP of all the other three groups and in the annulus fibrosus (AF) of all the groups. Gene expression analysis revealed a strong up-regulation in matrix genes and matrix remodeling genes in the AF of the CCT group. Cell apoptotic activity and glycosaminoglycan content were also quantified but there were no statistically significant differences found. Cell morphology in the NP of the CCT was changed, as shown by histological evaluation. Our results stress the importance of complex loading on the initiation and progression of disc degeneration. PMID:24013824

  12. Assessment of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Artifact Following Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fayyazi, Amir H.; Taormina, Jennifer; Svach, David; Stein, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty has become a technique for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. Clinically, the need to accurately assess the neural elements at the operative and adjacent levels is critical postoperatively. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively measure the amount of MRI artifact produced by various cervical total disc replacements. Methods T1 and T2-weighted turbo spin-echo MRI sequences were collected on the cervical spine (C2-T1) of a 68 year-old unembalmed male cadaver. A discectomy was performed at C5-6, followed by successive implantation of six different total disc replacements. The scans were quantitatively evaluated by three of the authors. The volume of artifact was measured using image analysis software. Qualitative analysis of the adjacent and index neural elements was performed. Results The artifact in the T2 weighted images was noted to be 58.6±7.3 cm3 for Prestige ST, 14.2±1.3 cm3 for ProDisc-C, 7.5±0.8 cm3 for Discover, 8.0±0.3 cm3 for Prestige LP, 6.6±0.7 cm3 for Bryan, and 7.3±0.6 cm3 for ProDisc-C titanium prototype. Acceptable intraobserver and excellent interobsever correlation was demonstrated using Pearson Correlation and Concordance Correlation Coefficient analysis. The adjacent and implanted level neural elements (spinal cord and neuroforamina) were easily visualized on the T2 weighted images after the implantation of titanium devices (ProDisc-C titanium prototype, Discover, Prestige LP and Bryan). After implantation of a cobalt chrome implant (ProDisc-C), the adjacent level neural elements were easily visualized but the implanted level could not be fully visualized due to distortion of the images. The quality of the distortion was least favorable after the implantation of the stainless steel implant (Prestige ST), where neither the adjacent nor the index level could be fully visualized. Conclusion The volume of the artifact seen following cervical total disc

  13. Biological evaluation of intervertebral disc cells in different formulations of gellan gum-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Khang, G; Lee, S K; Kim, H N; Silva-Correia, J; Gomes, M E; Viegas, C A A; Dias, I R; Oliveira, J M; Reis, R L

    2015-03-01

    Gellan gum (GG)-based hydrogels are advantageous in tissue engineering not only due to their ability to retain large quantities of water and provide a similar environment to that of natural extracellular matrix (ECM), but also because they can gelify in situ in seconds. Their mechanical properties can be fine-tuned to mimic natural tissues such as the nucleus pulposus (NP). This study produced different formulations of GG hydrogels by mixing varying amounts of methacrylated (GG-MA) and high-acyl gellan gums (HA-GG) for applications as acellular and cellular NP substitutes. The hydrogels were physicochemically characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis. Degradation and swelling abilities were assessed by soaking in a phosphate buffered saline solution for up to 170 h. Results showed that as HA-GG content increased, the modulus of the hydrogels decreased. Moreover, increases in HA-GG content induced greater weight loss in the GG-MA/HA-GG formulation compared to GG-MA hydrogel. Potential cytotoxicity of the hydrogel was assessed by culturing rabbit NP cells up to 7 days. An MTS assay was performed by seeding rabbit NP cells onto the surface of 3D hydrogel disc formulations. Viability of rabbit NP cells encapsulated within the different hydrogel formulations was also evaluated by Calcein-AM and ATP assays. Results showed that tunable GG-MA/HA-GG hydrogels were non-cytotoxic and supported viability of rabbit NP cells. PMID:23225767

  14. Compression loading-induced stress responses in intervertebral disc cells encapsulated in 3D collagen constructs

    PubMed Central

    Chooi, Wai Hon; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Cells protect themselves from stresses through a cellular stress response. In the interverebral disc, such response was also demonstrated to be induced by various environmental stresses. However, whether compression loading will cause cellular stress response in the nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) is not well studied. By using an in vitro collagen microencapsulation model, we investigated the effect of compression loading on the stress response of NPCs. Cell viability tests, and gene and protein expression experiments were conducted, with primers for the heat shock response (HSR: HSP70, HSF1, HSP27 and HSP90), and unfolded protein response (UPR: GRP78, GRP94, ATF4 and CHOP) genes and an antibody to HSP72. Different gene expression patterns occurred due to loading type throughout experiments. Increasing the loading strain for a short duration did not increase the stress response genes significantly, but over longer durations, HSP70 and HSP27 were upregulated. Longer loading durations also resulted in a continuous upregulation of HSR genes and downregulation of UPR genes, even after load removal. The rate of apoptosis did not increase significantly after loading, suggesting that stress response genes might play a role in cell survival following mechanical stress. These results demonstrate how mechanical stress might induce and control the expression of HSR and UPR genes in NPCs. PMID:27197886

  15. Compression loading-induced stress responses in intervertebral disc cells encapsulated in 3D collagen constructs.

    PubMed

    Chooi, Wai Hon; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Cells protect themselves from stresses through a cellular stress response. In the interverebral disc, such response was also demonstrated to be induced by various environmental stresses. However, whether compression loading will cause cellular stress response in the nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) is not well studied. By using an in vitro collagen microencapsulation model, we investigated the effect of compression loading on the stress response of NPCs. Cell viability tests, and gene and protein expression experiments were conducted, with primers for the heat shock response (HSR: HSP70, HSF1, HSP27 and HSP90), and unfolded protein response (UPR: GRP78, GRP94, ATF4 and CHOP) genes and an antibody to HSP72. Different gene expression patterns occurred due to loading type throughout experiments. Increasing the loading strain for a short duration did not increase the stress response genes significantly, but over longer durations, HSP70 and HSP27 were upregulated. Longer loading durations also resulted in a continuous upregulation of HSR genes and downregulation of UPR genes, even after load removal. The rate of apoptosis did not increase significantly after loading, suggesting that stress response genes might play a role in cell survival following mechanical stress. These results demonstrate how mechanical stress might induce and control the expression of HSR and UPR genes in NPCs. PMID:27197886

  16. The Role of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament in Cervical Disc Replacement: An Ovine Cadaveric Biomechanical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-Cheng; Hao, Ding-Jun; Ma, Yu-Li; Huang, Da-Geng; Li, Hou-Kun; Feng, Hang; Hou, Qian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has been widely used to restore and maintain mobility and function of the treated and adjacent motion segments. Posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) resection has been shown to be efficient in anterior cervical decompression and fusion. However, less is known about the biomechanical effect of PLL removal versus preservation in cervical disc arthroplasty. MATERIAL AND METHODS Three motion segments of 24 ovine cervical spines (C2-C5) were evaluated in a robotic spine system with axial compressive loads of 50 N. These cervical spines were divided in three groups according to the following conditions: (1) intact spine, (2) C3/C