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Sample records for cetuximab-based imaging probe

  1. Multispectral imaging probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  2. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  3. Molecular probes for cardiovascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Liang, Grace; Nguyen, Patricia K

    2016-08-01

    Molecular probes provide imaging signal and contrast for the visualization, characterization, and measurement of biological processes at the molecular level. These probes can be designed to target the cell or tissue of interest and must be retained at the imaging site until they can be detected by the appropriate imaging modality. In this article, we will discuss the basic design of molecular probes, differences among the various types of probes, and general strategies for their evaluation of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27189171

  4. Samara Probe For Remote Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James D.

    1989-01-01

    Imaging probe descends through atmosphere of planet, obtaining images of ground surface as it travels. Released from aircraft over Earth or from spacecraft over another planet. Body and single wing shaped like samara - winged seed like those of maple trees. Rotates as descends, providing panoramic view of terrain below. Radio image obtained by video camera to aircraft or spacecraft overhead.

  5. Activatable Molecular Probes for Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seulki; Xie, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    The development of highly sensitive and specific molecular probes for cancer imaging still remains a daunting challenge. Recently, interdisciplinary research at the interface of imaging sciences and bionanoconjugation chemistry has generated novel activatable imaging probes that can provide high-resolution imaging with ultra-low background signals. Activatable imaging probes are designed to amplify output imaging signals in response to specific biomolecular recognition or environmental changes in real time. This review introduces and highlights the unique design strategies and applications of various activatable imaging probes in cancer imaging. PMID:20388112

  6. Design and Development of Molecular Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging, the visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the cellular, subcellular level, or even molecular level in living subjects, has rapidly gained importance in the dawning era of personalized medicine. Molecular imaging takes advantage of the traditional diagnostic imaging techniques and introduces molecular imaging probes to determine the expression of indicative molecular markers at different stages of diseases and disorders. As a key component of molecular imaging, molecular imaging probe must be able to specifically reach the target of interest in vivo while retaining long enough to be detected. A desirable molecular imaging probe with clinical translation potential is expected to have unique characteristics. Therefore, design and development of molecular imaging probe is frequently a challenging endeavor for medicinal chemists. This review summarizes the general principles of molecular imaging probe design and some fundamental strategies of molecular imaging probe development with a number of illustrative examples. PMID:20388106

  7. Discrete Bimodal Probes for Thrombus Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Ritika; Ciesienski, Kate L.; Chonde, Daniel B.; Loving, Galen S.; Caravan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a generalizable solid/solution phase strategy for the synthesis of discrete bimodal fibrin-targeted imaging probes. A fibrin-specific peptide was conjugated with two distinct imaging reporters at the C- and N-terminus. In vitro studies demonstrated retention of fibrin affinity and specificity. Imaging studies showed that these probes could detect fibrin over a wide range of probe concentrations by optical, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography imaging. PMID:22698259

  8. Imaging probe for tumor malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka, Hasahiro

    2009-02-01

    Solid tumors possess unique microenvironments that are exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions ("tumor hypoxia"). Although more than half a century has passed since it was suggested that tumor hypoxia correlated with poor treatment outcomes and contributed to cancer recurrence, a fundamental solution to this problem has yet to be found. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular response to hypoxia. It induces various genes whose functions are strongly associated with malignant alteration of the entire tumor. The cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets of cancer therapy, particularly in therapy against refractory cancers. Imaging of the HIF-1-active microenvironment is therefore important for cancer therapy. To image HIF-1activity in vivo, we developed a PTD-ODD fusion protein, POHA, which was uniquely labeled with near-infrared fluorescent dye at the C-terminal. POHA has two functional domains: protein transduction domain (PTD) and VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of the alpha subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1α). It can therefore be delivered to the entire body and remain stabilized in the HIF-1-active cells. When it was intravenously injected into tumor-bearing mice, a tumor-specific fluorescence signal was detected in the tumor 6 h after the injection. These results suggest that POHA can be used an imaging probe for tumor malignancy.

  9. Further capacitive imaging experiments using modified probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaokang; Li, Zhen; Yan, An; Li, Wei; Chen, Guoming; Hutchins, David A.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, capacitive imaging (CI) is growing in popularity within the NDE communities, as it has the potential to test materials and structures for defects that are not easily tested by other techniques. In previous work, The CI technique has been successfully used on a various types of materials, including concrete, glass/carbon fibre composite, steel, etc. In such CI experiments, the probes are normally with symmetric or concentric electrodes etched onto PCBs. In addition to these conventional coplanar PCB probes, modified geometries can be made and they can lead to different applications. A brief overview of these modified probes, including high resolution surface imaging probe, combined CI/eddy current probe, and CI probe using an oscilloscope probe as the sensing electrode, is presented in this work. The potential applications brought by these probes are also discussed.

  10. Multifunctional imaging probe based on gadofulleride nanoplatform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun-Peng; Liu, Qiao-Ling; Zhen, Ming-Ming; Jiang, Feng; Shu, Chun-Ying; Jin, Chan; Yang, Yongji; Alhadlaq, Hisham A.; Wang, Chun-Ru

    2012-05-01

    A FAR over-expressed tumor targeting multifunctional imaging probe has been fabricated based on gadofulleride nanoplatform. The combination of highly efficient MRI contrast enhancement and sensitive fluorescence imaging along with the preferential uptake toward FAR tumor cells suggest that the obtained multifunctional imaging probe possesses complementary capabilities for anatomical resolution and detection sensitivity.A FAR over-expressed tumor targeting multifunctional imaging probe has been fabricated based on gadofulleride nanoplatform. The combination of highly efficient MRI contrast enhancement and sensitive fluorescence imaging along with the preferential uptake toward FAR tumor cells suggest that the obtained multifunctional imaging probe possesses complementary capabilities for anatomical resolution and detection sensitivity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials, instruments and methods, synthesis details, XPS characterization for estimation of average molecular formula, evaluation of conjugated FA and FITC ratio, zeta potential and fluorescent images. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30836c

  11. Developing MR probes for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Michael T; Chan, Kannie W Y

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging plays an important role in the era of personalized medicine, especially with recent advances in magnetic resonance (MR) probes. While the first generation of these probes focused on maximizing contrast enhancement, a second generation of probes has been developed to improve the accumulation within specific tissues or pathologies, and the newest generation of agents is also designed to report on changes in physiological status and has been termed "smart" agents. This represents a paradigm switch from the previously commercialized gadolinium and iron oxide probes to probes with new capabilities, and leads to new challenges as scanner hardware needs to be adapted for detecting these probes. In this chapter, we highlight the unique features for all five different categories of MR probes, including the emerging chemical exchange saturation transfer, (19)F, and hyperpolarized probes, and describe the key physical properties and features motivating their design. As part of this comparison, the strengths and weaknesses of each category are discussed. PMID:25287693

  12. Molecular Imaging Probe Development using Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Phung, Duy Linh; Girgis, Mark D.; Wu, Anna M.; Tomlinson, James S.; Shen, Clifton K.-F.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we review the latest advancement of microfluidics in molecular imaging probe development. Due to increasing needs for medical imaging, high demand for many types of molecular imaging probes will have to be met by exploiting novel chemistry/radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of suitable probes. The microfluidic-based probe synthesis is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional systems. Numerous chemical reactions have been successfully performed in micro-reactors and the results convincingly demonstrate with great benefits to aid synthetic procedures, such as purer products, higher yields, shorter reaction times compared to the corresponding batch/macroscale reactions, and more benign reaction conditions. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples of molecular imaging probe syntheses using microfluidics, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and their potential limitations are discussed here. PMID:22977436

  13. Recent Progress in Fluorescent Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Yen Leng; Swamy, K. M. K.; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-01-01

    Due to the simplicity and low detection limit, especially the bioimaging ability for cells, fluorescence probes serve as unique detection methods. With the aid of molecular recognition and specific organic reactions, research on fluorescent imaging probes has blossomed during the last decade. Especially, reaction based fluorescent probes have been proven to be highly selective for specific analytes. This review highlights our recent progress on fluorescent imaging probes for biologically important species, such as biothiols, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, metal ions including Zn2+, Hg2+, Cu2+ and Au3+, and anions including cyanide and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). PMID:26402684

  14. Recent Progress in Fluorescent Imaging Probes.

    PubMed

    Pak, Yen Leng; Swamy, K M K; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-01-01

    Due to the simplicity and low detection limit, especially the bioimaging ability for cells, fluorescence probes serve as unique detection methods. With the aid of molecular recognition and specific organic reactions, research on fluorescent imaging probes has blossomed during the last decade. Especially, reaction based fluorescent probes have been proven to be highly selective for specific analytes. This review highlights our recent progress on fluorescent imaging probes for biologically important species, such as biothiols, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, metal ions including Zn(2+), Hg(2+), Cu(2+) and Au(3+), and anions including cyanide and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). PMID:26402684

  15. Protein-based tumor molecular imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging discipline which plays critical roles in diagnosis and therapeutics. It visualizes and quantifies markers that are aberrantly expressed during the disease origin and development. Protein molecules remain to be one major class of imaging probes, and the option has been widely diversified due to the recent advances in protein engineering techniques. Antibodies are part of the immunosystem which interact with target antigens with high specificity and affinity. They have long been investigated as imaging probes and were coupled with imaging motifs such as radioisotopes for that purpose. However, the relatively large size of antibodies leads to a half-life that is too long for common imaging purposes. Besides, it may also cause a poor tissue penetration rate and thus compromise some medical applications. It is under this context that various engineered protein probes, essentially antibody fragments, protein scaffolds, and natural ligands have been developed. Compared to intact antibodies, they possess more compact size, shorter clearance time, and better tumor penetration. One major challenge of using protein probes in molecular imaging is the affected biological activity resulted from random labeling. Site-specific modification, however, allows conjugation happening in a stoichiometric fashion with little perturbation of protein activity. The present review will discuss protein-based probes with focus on their application and related site-specific conjugation strategies in tumor imaging. PMID:20232092

  16. First-line cetuximab-based chemotherapies for patients with advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Mamoru; Kim, Ho Min; Hata, Tsuyoshi; Sakata, Kazuya; Okuyama, Masaki; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujii, Hitoshi; Fukuzaki, Takayuki; Morita, Tetsushi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Satoh, Taroh; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Maski

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly occurring cancers worldwide. A burgeoning number of studies have demonstrated that the addition of cetuximab to another standard first-line regimen markedly improves the outcome of CRC treatment. However, at present, the efficacy and safety of cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy has not been well described in Japan. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of first-line chemotherapies that included cetuximab for patients with advanced or metastatic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) wild-type CRC in Japan. This prospective multicenter observational study was conducted at 13 affiliated medical institutions. A total of 64 patients were enrolled between 2010 and 2013. The patients met the following criteria for eligibility: i) histologically confirmed, advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC; and ii) cetuximab-based chemotherapies administered as a first-line treatment. First-line cetuximab-based treatments were administered as follows: 29 patients (45.3%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin; 14 patients (21.9%) received a combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin; and 10 patients (15.6%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan. The overall response rate (including complete plus partial responses) was 50% (32/64 patients). Initially, 48 lesions were diagnosed as unresectable. Among those, 13 lesions (27.1%) were converted to a resectable status following cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy treatments. The median overall survival time and the progression-free survival time were 1,189 and 359 days, respectively. The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse event was neutropenia, which occurred in 20.3% of the patients. The incidence of grade 3/4 skin toxicity was 17.2% (11/64 patients). Cetuximab-based therapies may represent a promising first-line regimen for patients with advanced or

  17. Scanning probe image wizard: A toolbox for automated scanning probe microscopy data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, Julian; Woolley, Richard A. J.; Moriarty, Philip

    2013-11-01

    We describe SPIW (scanning probe image wizard), a new image processing toolbox for SPM (scanning probe microscope) images. SPIW can be used to automate many aspects of SPM data analysis, even for images with surface contamination and step edges present. Specialised routines are available for images with atomic or molecular resolution to improve image visualisation and generate statistical data on surface structure.

  18. Molecular imaging probe development: a chemistry perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D; Nickels, Michael L; Guo, Ning; Pham, Wellington

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an attractive modality that has been widely employed in many aspects of biomedical research; especially those aimed at the early detection of diseases such as cancer, inflammation and neurodegenerative disorders. The field emerged in response to a new research paradigm in healthcare that seeks to integrate detection capabilities for the prediction and prevention of diseases. This approach made a distinct impact in biomedical research as it enabled researchers to leverage the capabilities of molecular imaging probes to visualize a targeted molecular event non-invasively, repeatedly and continuously in a living system. In addition, since such probes are inherently compact, robust, and amenable to high-throughput production, these probes could potentially facilitate screening of preclinical drug discovery, therapeutic assessment and validation of disease biomarkers. They could also be useful in drug discovery and safety evaluations. In this review, major trends in the chemical synthesis and development of positron emission tomography (PET), optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes are discussed. PMID:22943038

  19. An image registration based ultrasound probe calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Kumar, Dinesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Narayanan, Ram

    2012-02-01

    Reconstructed 3D ultrasound of prostate gland finds application in several medical areas such as image guided biopsy, therapy planning and dose delivery. In our application, we use an end-fire probe rotated about its axis to acquire a sequence of rotational slices to reconstruct 3D TRUS (Transrectal Ultrasound) image. The image acquisition system consists of an ultrasound transducer situated on a cradle directly attached to a rotational sensor. However, due to system tolerances, axis of probe does not align exactly with the designed axis of rotation resulting in artifacts in the 3D reconstructed ultrasound volume. We present a rigid registration based automatic probe calibration approach. The method uses a sequence of phantom images, each pair acquired at angular separation of 180 degrees and registers corresponding image pairs to compute the deviation from designed axis. A modified shadow removal algorithm is applied for preprocessing. An attribute vector is constructed from image intensity and a speckle-insensitive information-theoretic feature. We compare registration between the presented method and expert-corrected images in 16 prostate phantom scans. Images were acquired at multiple resolutions, and different misalignment settings from two ultrasound machines. Screenshots from 3D reconstruction are shown before and after misalignment correction. Registration parameters from automatic and manual correction were found to be in good agreement. Average absolute differences of translation and rotation between automatic and manual methods were 0.27 mm and 0.65 degree, respectively. The registration parameters also showed lower variability for automatic registration (pooled standard deviation σtranslation = 0.50 mm, σrotation = 0.52 degree) compared to the manual approach (pooled standard deviation σtranslation = 0.62 mm, σrotation = 0.78 degree).

  20. Molecular probes for malignant melanoma imaging.

    PubMed

    Ren, Gang; Pan, Ying; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-09-01

    Malignant melanoma represents a serious public health problem and is a deadly disease when it is diagnosed at late stage. Though (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used clinically for melanoma imaging, other approaches to specifically identify, characterize, monitor and guide therapeutics for malignant melanoma are still needed. Consequently, many probes targeting general molecular events including metabolism, angiogenesis, hypoxia and apoptosis in melanoma have been successfully developed. Furthermore, probes targeting melanoma associated targets such as melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R), melanin, etc. have undergone active investigation and have demonstrated high melanoma specificity. In this review, these molecular probes targeting diverse melanoma biomarkers have been summarized. Some of them may eventually contribute to the improvement of personalized management of malignant melanoma. PMID:20497118

  1. Molecular Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sarder, Pinaki; Maji, Dolonchampa; Achilefu, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of biological processes and pathologic conditions at the cellular and tissue levels largely rely on the use of fluorescence intensity signals from fluorophores or their bioconjugates. To overcome the concentration dependency of intensity measurements, evaluate subtle molecular interactions, and determine biochemical status of intracellular or extracellular microenvironments, fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging has emerged as a reliable imaging method complementary to intensity measurements. Driven by a wide variety of dyes exhibiting stable or environment-responsive FLTs, information multiplexing can be readily accomplished without the need for ratiometric spectral imaging. With knowledge of the fluorescent states of the molecules, it is entirely possible to predict the functional status of biomolecules or microevironment of cells. Whereas the use of FLT spectroscopy and microscopy in biological studies is now well established, in vivo imaging of biological processes based on FLT imaging techniques is still evolving. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of the FLT of molecular probes for imaging cells and small animal models of human diseases. It also highlights some challenges that continue to limit the full realization of the potential of using FLT molecular probes to address diverse biological problems, and outlines areas of potential high impact in the future. PMID:25961514

  2. Fluorescent nanoparticle probes for imaging of cancer.

    PubMed

    Santra, Swadeshmukul; Malhotra, Astha

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (FNPs) have received immense popularity in cancer imaging in recent years because of their attractive optical properties. In comparison to traditional organic-based fluorescent dyes and fluorescent proteins, FNPs offer much improved sensitivity and photostability. FNPs in certain size range have a strong tendency to enter and retain in solid tumor tissue with abnormal (leaky) vasculature--a phenomenon known as Enhanced Permeation and Retention (EPR) effect, advancing their use for in vivo tumor imaging. Furthermore, large surface area of FNPs and their usual core-shell structure offer a platform for designing and fabricating multimodal/multifunctional nanoparticles (MMNPs). For effective cancer imaging, often the optical imaging modality is integrated with other nonoptical-based imaging modalities such as MRI, X-ray, and PET, thus creating multimodal nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging probes. Such multimodal NP probes can be further integrated with therapeutic drug as well as cancer targeting agent leading to multifunctional NPs. Biocompatibility of FNPs is an important criterion that must be seriously considered during FNP design. NP composition, size, and surface chemistry must be carefully selected to minimize potential toxicological consequences both in vitro and in vivo. In this article, we will mainly focus on three different types of FNPs: dye-loaded NPs, quantum dots (Qdots), and phosphores; briefly highlighting their potential use in translational research. PMID:21480546

  3. The Imaging Probe Development Center and the Production of Molecular Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Gary L

    2008-01-01

    The Imaging Probe Development Center (IPDC), part of the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research Initiative (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/) recently became fully operational at its newly refurbished laboratories in Rockville, MD. The IPDC (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/molecularlibraries/ipdc/) is dedicated to the production of known and novel molecular imaging probes, with its services currently being used by the NIH intramural community, although in the future it is intended that the extramural community will also benefit from the IPDC’s resources. The Center has been set up with the belief that molecular imaging, and the probe chemistry that underpins it, will constitute key technologies going forward. As part of the larger molecular libraries and imaging initiative, it is planned that the IPDC will work closely with scientists from the molecular libraries effort. Probes produced at the IPDC include optical, radionuclide and magnetic resonance agents and may encompass any type of contrast agent. As IPDC is a trans-NIH resource it can serve each of the 27 Institutes and Centers that comprise NIH so its influence can be expected to impact widely different subjects and disease conditions spanning biological research. IPDC is expected to play a key part in interdisciplinary collaborative imaging projects and to support translational R&D from basic research through clinical development, for all of the imaging modalities. Examples of probes already prepared or under preparation are outlined to illustrate the breadth of the chemistries undertaken together with a reference outline of the diverse biological applications for which the various probes are intended. PMID:20161829

  4. Progesterone-Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Determination of progesterone receptor (PR) status in hormone-dependent diseases is essential in ascertaining disease prognosis and monitoring treatment response. The development of a noninvasive means of monitoring these processes would have significant impact on early detection, cost, repeated measurements, and personalized treatment options. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely recognized as a technique that can produce longitudinal studies, and PR-targeted MR probes may address a clinical problem by providing contrast enhancement that reports on PR status without biopsy. Commercially available MR contrast agents are typically delivered via intravenous injection, whereas steroids are administered subcutaneously. Whether the route of delivery is important for tissue accumulation of steroid-modified MRI contrast agents to PR-rich tissues is not known. To address this question, modification of the chemistry linking progesterone with the gadolinium chelate led to MR probes with increased water solubility and lower cellular toxicity and enabled administration through the blood. This attribute came at a cost through lower affinity for PR and decreased ability to cross the cell membrane, and ultimately it did not improve delivery of the PR-targeted MR probe to PR-rich tissues or tumors in vivo. Overall, these studies are important, as they demonstrate that targeted contrast agents require optimization of delivery and receptor binding of the steroid and the gadolinium chelate for optimal translation in vivo. PMID:25019183

  5. Multimode-Optical-Fiber Imaging Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Currently, endoscopic surgery uses single-mode fiber-bundles to obtain in vivo image information inside the orifices of the body. This limits their use to the larger natural orifices and to surgical procedures where there is plenty of room for manipulation. The knee joint, for example, can be easily viewed with a fiber optic viewer, but joints in the finger cannot. However, there are a host of smaller orifices where fiber endoscopy would play an important role if a cost effective fiber probe were developed with small enough dimensions (less than or equal to 250 microns). Examples of beneficiaries of micro-endoscopes are the treatment of the Eustatian tube of the middle ear, the breast ducts, tear ducts, coronary arteries, fallopian tubes, as well as the treatment of salivary duct parotid disease, and the neuro endoscopy of the ventricles and spinal canal. This work describes an approach for recovering images from tightly confined spaces using multimode. The concept draws upon earlier works that concentrated on image recovery after two-way transmission through a multimode fiber as well as work that demonstrated the recovery of images after one-way transmission through a multimode fiber. Both relied on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, which was predistorted with the characteristics of the fiber. The approach described here also relies on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, but utilizes two fibers to capture the image at some intermediate point (accessible by the fibers, but which is otherwise visually inaccessible).

  6. Full tip imaging in atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Du, Sichao; Burgess, Timothy; Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Gault, Baptiste; Gao, Qiang; Bao, Peite; Li, Li; Cui, Xiangyuan; Kong Yeoh, Wai; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Ringer, Simon P; Zheng, Rongkun

    2013-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is capable of simultaneously revealing the chemical identities and three dimensional positions of individual atoms within a needle-shaped specimen, but suffers from a limited field-of-view (FOV), i.e., only the core of the specimen is effectively detected. Therefore, the capacity to analyze the full tip is crucial and much desired in cases that the shell of the specimen is also the region of interest. In this paper, we demonstrate that, in the analysis of III-V nanowires epitaxially grown from a substrate, the presence of the flat substrate positioned only micrometers away from the analyzed tip apex alters the field distribution and ion trajectories, which provides extra image compression that allows for the analysis of the entire specimen. An array of experimental results, including field desorption maps, elemental distributions, and crystallographic features clearly demonstrate the fact that the whole tip has been imaged, which is confirmed by electrostatic simulations. PMID:23142750

  7. Optical brush: Imaging through permuted probes

    PubMed Central

    Heshmat, Barmak; Lee, Ik Hyun; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    The combination of computational techniques and ultrafast imaging have enabled sensing through unconventional settings such as around corners, and through diffusive media. We exploit time of flight (ToF) measurements to enable a flexible interface for imaging through permuted set of fibers. The fibers are randomly distributed in the scene and are packed on the camera end, thus making a brush-like structure. The scene is illuminated by two off-axis optical pulses. Temporal signatures of fiber tips in the scene are used to localize each fiber. Finally, by combining the position and measured intensity of each fiber, the original input is reconstructed. Unlike conventional fiber bundles with packed set of fibers that are limited by a narrow field of view (FOV), lack of flexibility, and extended coaxial precalibration, the proposed optical brush is flexible and uses off-axis calibration method based on ToF. The enabled brush form can couple to other types of ToF imaging systems. This can impact probe-based applications such as, endoscopy, tomography, and industrial imaging and sensing. PMID:26868954

  8. Optical brush: Imaging through permuted probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heshmat, Barmak; Lee, Ik Hyun; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-02-01

    The combination of computational techniques and ultrafast imaging have enabled sensing through unconventional settings such as around corners, and through diffusive media. We exploit time of flight (ToF) measurements to enable a flexible interface for imaging through permuted set of fibers. The fibers are randomly distributed in the scene and are packed on the camera end, thus making a brush-like structure. The scene is illuminated by two off-axis optical pulses. Temporal signatures of fiber tips in the scene are used to localize each fiber. Finally, by combining the position and measured intensity of each fiber, the original input is reconstructed. Unlike conventional fiber bundles with packed set of fibers that are limited by a narrow field of view (FOV), lack of flexibility, and extended coaxial precalibration, the proposed optical brush is flexible and uses off-axis calibration method based on ToF. The enabled brush form can couple to other types of ToF imaging systems. This can impact probe-based applications such as, endoscopy, tomography, and industrial imaging and sensing.

  9. Biomedical applications of a new portable Raman imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Ikeda, Teruki; Wada, Satoshi; Tashiro, Hideo; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2001-10-01

    This article reports the outline of a new portable Raman imaging probe and its applications. This probe may be the smallest and lightest Raman imaging probe in the world. It is equipped with an interchangeable long-working distance microscope objective lens. The irradiation area is about 45 and 90 μm and the spatial resolution is 1 μm. In the present study, the Raman imaging probe was used to obtain a Raman image of diamond particles and a Raman mapping of carotenoid in Euglena.

  10. Multimode-Optical-Fiber Imaging Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Currently, endoscopic surgery uses single-mode fiber-bundles to obtain in vivo image information inside orifices of the body. This limits their use to the larger natural bodily orifices and to surgical procedures where there is plenty of room for manipulation. The knee joint, for example can be easily viewed with a fiber optic viewer, but joints in the finger cannot. However, there are a host of smaller orifices where fiber endoscopy would play an important role if a cost effective fiber probe were developed with small enough dimensions (< 250 microns). Examples of beneficiaries of micro-endoscopes are the treatment of the Eustatian tube of the middle ear, the breast ducts, tear ducts, coronary arteries, fallopian tubes, as well as the treatment of salivary duct parotid disease, and the neuro endoscopy of the ventricles and spinal canal. To solve this problem, this work describes an approach for recovering images from. tightly confined spaces using multimode fibers and analytically demonstrates that the concept is sound. The proof of concept draws upon earlier works that concentrated on image recovery after two-way transmission through a multimode fiber as well as work that demonstrated the recovery of images after one-way transmission through a multimode fiber. Both relied on generating a phase conjugated wavefront which was predistorted with the characteristics of the fiber. The described approach also relies on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, but utilizes two fibers to capture the image at some intermediate point (accessible by the fibers, but which is otherwise visually unaccessible).

  11. Imaging probe for breast cancer localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soluri, A.; Scafè, R.; Capoccetti, F.; Burgio, N.; Schiaratura, A.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Mechella, M.; Amanti, A.; David, V.; Scopinaro, F.

    2003-01-01

    High spatial resolution, small Field Of View (FOV), fully portable scintillation cameras are lower cost and obviously lower weight than large FOV, not transportable Anger gamma cameras. Portable cameras allow easy transfer of the detector, thus of radioisotope imaging, where the bioptical procedure takes place. In this paper we describe a preliminary experience on radionuclide Breast Cancer (BC) imaging with a 22.8×22.8 mm 2 FOV minicamera, already used by our group for sentinel node detection with the name of Imaging Probe (IP). In this work IP BC detection was performed with the aim of guiding biopsy, in particular open biopsy, or to help or modify fine needle or needle addressing when main driving method was echography or digital radiography. The IP prototype weight was about 1 kg. This small scintillation camera is based on the compact Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube Hamamatsu R7600-00-C8, coupled to a CsI(Tl) scintillation array 2.6×2.6×5.0 mm 3 crystal-pixel size. Spatial resolution of the IP was 2.5 mm Full-Width at Half-Maximum at laboratory tests. IP was provided with acquisition software allowing quick change of pixels number on the computer acquisition frame and an on-line image-smoothing program. Both these programs were developed in order to allow nuclear physicians to quickly get target source when the patient was anesthetized in the operator room, with sterile conditions. 99mTc Sestamibi (MIBI) was injected at the dose of 740 MBq 1 h before imaging and biopsy to 14 patients with suspicious or known BC. Scintigraphic images were acquired before and after biopsy in each patient. Operator was allowed to take into account scintigraphic images as well as previously performed X-ray mammograms and echographies. High-resolution IP images were able to guide biopsy toward cancer or washout zones of the cancer, that are thought to be chemoresistant in 7 patients out of 10. Four patients, in whom IP and MIBI were not able to guide biopsy, did not show

  12. A miniature forward-imaging optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Shen, Jin-Hui

    2012-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has had a tremendous global health impact upon the current ability to diagnose, treat, and monitor multiple eye diseases. We propose that a miniature forward-imaging OCT probe can be developed for real-time ocular imaging. A miniature 25-gauge forward-imaging probe was designed and developed to use with an 850 nm spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) system (Bioptigen, Inc. Durham, NC). Imaging parameters were determined. Ocular tissues were examined with the miniature OCT probe. A miniature SDOCT probe was developed with the scanning driver within the hand piece. The SDOCT fiber-scanning probe maximally transmitted power of 800 μW. The scanning range was 3 mm when the probe tip was held 3 to 5 mm from the tissue surface. The axial resolution was 6 μm and the lateral resolution was 30-35 μm. The 25-gauge forward-imaging probe was used to image cellophane tape, eyelid skin, cornea, conjunctiva, sclera, iris, anterior lens, anterior chamber angle, retina, retinal tear, retinal detachment, optic nerve head, and optic nerve sheath. Images obtained from the miniature probe appeared similar to images from a 3 mm scanning range of a commercial large handheld OCT probe (Bioptigen, Inc. Durham, NC).

  13. Imaging bacterial peptidoglycan with near-infrared fluorogenic azide probes

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Peyton; Siegrist, M. Sloan; Cullen, Andrew J.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent probes designed for activation by bioorthogonal chemistry have enabled the visualization of biomolecules in living systems. Such activatable probes with near-infrared (NIR) emission would be ideal for in vivo imaging but have proven difficult to engineer. We present the development of NIR fluorogenic azide probes based on the Si-rhodamine scaffold that undergo a fluorescence enhancement of up to 48-fold upon reaction with terminal or strained alkynes. We used the probes for mammalian cell surface imaging and, in conjunction with a new class of cyclooctyne d-amino acids, for visualization of bacterial peptidoglycan without the need to wash away unreacted probe. PMID:24706769

  14. Analysis of scanning probe microscope images using wavelets.

    PubMed

    Gackenheimer, C; Cayon, L; Reifenberger, R

    2006-03-01

    The utility of wavelet transforms for analysis of scanning probe images is investigated. Simulated scanning probe images are analyzed using wavelet transforms and compared to a parallel analysis using more conventional Fourier transform techniques. The wavelet method introduced in this paper is particularly useful as an image recognition algorithm to enhance nanoscale objects of a specific scale that may be present in scanning probe images. In its present form, the applied wavelet is optimal for detecting objects with rotational symmetry. The wavelet scheme is applied to the analysis of scanning probe data to better illustrate the advantages that this new analysis tool offers. The wavelet algorithm developed for analysis of scanning probe microscope (SPM) images has been incorporated into the WSxM software which is a versatile freeware SPM analysis package. PMID:16439061

  15. Efficacy of continued cetuximab for unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer after disease progression during first-line cetuximab-based chemotherapy: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yiyi; Ye, Qinghai; Ding, Jianyong; Chen, Jingwen; Chang, Wenju; Zhong, Yunshi; Zhu, Dexiang; Lin, Qi; Yang, Liangliang; Qin, Xinyu; Xu, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed second-line continued use of cetuximab for treatment of unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) after disease progression during first-line cetuximab-based therapy. Consecutive patients with wild-type KRAS exon 2 and unresectable mCRC were retrospectively enrolled after disease progression during first-line cetuximab-based chemotherapy. Second-line continued cetuximab plus changed chemotherapy (cetuximab continuation group, n = 102) was compared with changed chemotherapy only (chemotherapy only group, n = 96) with respect to treatment efficacy and safety endpoints. NRAS and other KRAS genotypes were also detected as a post hoc analysis. The cetuximab continuation group showed better progression-free survival (median, 6.3 vs. 4.5 months, P = 0.004), overall survival (median, 17.3 vs. 14.0 months, P < 0.001) and disease control rate (70.6% vs. 53.1%, P = 0.011), and a potentially better overall response rate (18.6% vs. 9.4%, P = 0.062) than the chemotherapy only group. These benefits were seen mainly in patients with all RAS wild-type and exhibiting first-line early tumor shrinkage (ETS). For patients with other RAS mutations or who did not achieve first-line ETS, there was no difference between the two groups. These findings suggest that for patients with all RAS wild-type and unresectable mCRC who had disease progression during first-line cetuximab-based treatment, second-line continued cetuximab is effective. Moreover, ETS during first-line cetuximab-based treatment may be predictive of the efficacy of second-line continued cetuximab. PMID:26863631

  16. Versatile robotic probe calibration for position tracking in ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eirik Bø, Lars; Fagertun Hofstad, Erlend; Lindseth, Frank; Hernes, Toril A. N.

    2015-05-01

    Within the field of ultrasound-guided procedures, there are a number of methods for ultrasound probe calibration. While these methods are usually developed for a specific probe, they are in principle easily adapted to other probes. In practice, however, the adaptation often proves tedious and this is impractical in a research setting, where new probes are tested regularly. Therefore, we developed a method which can be applied to a large variety of probes without adaptation. The method used a robot arm to move a plastic sphere submerged in water through the ultrasound image plane, providing a slow and precise movement. The sphere was then segmented from the recorded ultrasound images using a MATLAB programme and the calibration matrix was computed based on this segmentation in combination with tracking information. The method was tested on three very different probes demonstrating both great versatility and high accuracy.

  17. Indirect comparison of the efficacy and safety of gefitinib and cetuximab-based therapy in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    TANG, JIFENG; ZHANG, HENA; YAN, JIANZHOU; SHAO, RONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the efficacy and safety of gefitinib and cetuximab-based therapies in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The studies to be used for the comparisons were selected from the available literature on gefitinib and cetuximab-based therapies compared to conventional chemotherapy in patients with advanced NSCLC. The meta-analysis was performed with RevMan 5.0 software and the Bucher approach was applied to conduct the indirect comparisons. A total of 4 studies, including 935 patients, on gefitinib therapy vs. conventional chemotherapy and 4 studies, including 1,015 patients, on cetuximab-based therapy vs. conventional chemotherapy, were used for indirect comparisons. As regards efficacy, the risk ratio (RR) of objective response rate and 1-year survival rate between gefitinib and cetuximab-based therapies in patients with advanced NSCLC were 0.99 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.75–1.32; P=0.9584] and 0.85 (95% CI: 0.71–1.01; P=0.0696), respectively, and the mean difference of progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) were −0.15 (95% CI: −0.90 to 0.60; P=0.6946) and −1.84 (95% CI: −3.53 to −0.15; P=0.0331), respectively. As regards safety, the RR of grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs) was 0.29 (95% CI: 0.19–0.44; P=0.0001). The results demonstrated that cetuximab-based therapy was superior to gefitinib therapy in terms of OS and inferior to gefitinib therapy in terms of AEs, whereas there were no significant differences in terms of efficacy and safety between the two therapies on other endpoints adopted for advanced NSCLC. However, further well-designed randomized controlled trials and continuous studies are required to confirm our findings. PMID:25469285

  18. Variable resolution imaging fiber probe using digital spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep M.; Vadakke Matham, Murukeshan

    2015-07-01

    Flexible fiber optic imaging systems including fiber optic confocal probes have found tremendous significance in the recent past for its applications in high resolution imaging. However, motorized stage is required for scanning the sample or tip of the fiber in fiber based confocal probes. In this context, we propose a fiber probe confocal system using digital spatial light modulator devoid of using a mechanical scanning stage. Each fiberlet in the image fiber acts not only as a light conduit but also as a confocal pinhole. The paper also introduces the variation in the contrast by varying the number of illuminated fiberlets which effectively implies variation in the effective pinhole size. This approach has enabled the probe to act as an imaging unit with resolution that can be controlled and varied from a wide-field to a confocal.

  19. Carbon nanotube scanning probe for imaging in aqueous environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Ramsey M.; Nguyen, Cattien V.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) used as a probe for scanning probe microscopy has become one of the many potential usages of CNTs that is finding real applications in scientific research and industrial communities. It has been proposed that the unique mechanical buckling properties of the CNT would lessen the imaging force exerted on the sample and, thus, make CNT scanning probes ideal for imaging soft materials, including biological samples in liquid environments. The hydrophobic nature of the CNT graphitic sidewall is clearly chemically incompatible with the aqueous solution requirements in some biological imaging applications. In this paper, we present electron micrograph results demonstrating the instability of CNT scanning probes when submerged in aqueous solution. Moreover, we also introduce a novel approach to resolve this chemical incompatibility problem. By coating the CNT probe with ethylenediamine, thus rendering the CNT probe less hydrophobic, we demonstrate the liquid imaging capability of treated CNT probes. Experimental data for imaging in aqueous solutions are presented, which include an ultrathin Ir film and DNA molecules on a mica surface.

  20. Image-guided surgery using multimodality strategy and molecular probes.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lei; Jiang, Hubei

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of cancer surgery is to maximize the excision of tumorous tissue with minimal damage to the collateral normal tissues, reduce the postoperative recurrence, and improve the survival rate of patients. In order to locate tumor lesions, highlight tumor margins, visualize residual disease in the surgical wound, and map potential lymph node metastasis, various imaging techniques and molecular probes have been investigated to assist surgeons to perform more complete tumor resection. Combining imaging techniques with molecular probes is particularly promising as a new approach for image-guided surgery. Considering inherent limitations of different imaging techniques and insufficient sensitivity of nonspecific molecular probes, image-guided surgery with multimodality strategy and specific molecular probes appears to be an optimal choice. In this article, we briefly describe typical imaging techniques and molecular probes followed by a focused review on the current progress of multimodal image-guided surgery with specific molecular navigation. We also discuss optimal strategy that covers all stages of image-guided surgery including preoperative scanning of tumors, intraoperative inspection of surgical bed and postoperative care of patients. PMID:26053199

  1. Probe and object function reconstruction in incoherent stem imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nellist, P.D.; Pennycook, S.J.

    1996-09-01

    Using the phase-object approximation it is shown how an annular dark- field (ADF) detector in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) leads to an image which can be described by an incoherent model. The point spread function is found to be simply the illuminating probe intensity. An important consequence of this is that there is no phase problem in the imaging process, which allows various image processing methods to be applied directly to the image intensity data. Using an image of a GaAs<110>, the probe intensity profile is reconstructed, confirming the existence of a 1.3 {Angstrom} probe in a 300kV STEM. It is shown that simply deconvolving this reconstructed probe from the image data does not improve its interpretability because the dominant effects of the imaging process arise simply from the restricted resolution of the microscope. However, use of the reconstructed probe in a maximum entropy reconstruction is demonstrated, which allows information beyond the resolution limit to be restored and does allow improved image interpretation.

  2. Infrared hollow optical fiber probes for reflectance spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chenhui; Kino, Saiko; Katagiri, Takashi; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-05-10

    Systems for infrared reflectance imaging are built with an FT-IR spectrometer, hollow optical fibers, and a high-speed infrared camera. To obtain reflectance images of biological samples, an optical fiber probe equipped with a light source at the distal end and a hybrid fiber probe composed of fibers for beam radiation and ones for image detection have been developed. By using these systems, reflectance spectral images of lipid painted on biomedical hard tissue, which provides reflectance of around 4%, are successfully acquired. PMID:25967522

  3. Fluorogenic Probes for Multicolor Imaging in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Lukinavičius, Gražvydas; Reymond, Luc; Umezawa, Keitaro; Sallin, Olivier; D'Este, Elisa; Göttfert, Fabian; Ta, Haisen; Hell, Stefan W; Urano, Yasuteru; Johnsson, Kai

    2016-08-01

    Here we present a far-red, silicon-rhodamine-based fluorophore (SiR700) for live-cell multicolor imaging. SiR700 has excitation and emission maxima at 690 and 715 nm, respectively. SiR700-based probes for F-actin, microtubules, lysosomes, and SNAP-tag are fluorogenic, cell-permeable, and compatible with superresolution microscopy. In conjunction with probes based on the previously introduced carboxy-SiR650, SiR700-based probes permit multicolor live-cell superresolution microscopy in the far-red, thus significantly expanding our capacity for imaging living cells. PMID:27420907

  4. Shielding of Piezoelectric Ultrasonic Probes in Hall Effect Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Han; Bennett, Eric; Wiesler, David G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses significant sources of electromagnetic noise in Hall effect imaging. Hall effect imaging employs large electrical pulses for signal generation and high sensitivity ultrasonic probes for signal reception. Coherent noise arises through various coupling mechanisms between the excitation pulse and the probe. In this paper, the coupling mechanisms are experimentally isolated and theoretically analyzed. Several methods of shielding the probe from electromagnetic interference are devised and tested. These methods are able to reduce the noise to levels below the random thermal noise, thereby improving the signal-to-noise ratio in HEI by two orders of magnitude. PMID:9921620

  5. Spatial-scanning hyperspectral imaging probe for bio-imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-03-01

    The three common methods to perform hyperspectral imaging are the spatial-scanning, spectral-scanning, and snapshot methods. However, only the spectral-scanning and snapshot methods have been configured to a hyperspectral imaging probe as of today. This paper presents a spatial-scanning (pushbroom) hyperspectral imaging probe, which is realized by integrating a pushbroom hyperspectral imager with an imaging probe. The proposed hyperspectral imaging probe can also function as an endoscopic probe by integrating a custom fabricated image fiber bundle unit. The imaging probe is configured by incorporating a gradient-index lens at the end face of an image fiber bundle that consists of about 50 000 individual fiberlets. The necessary simulations, methodology, and detailed instrumentation aspects that are carried out are explained followed by assessing the developed probe's performance. Resolution test targets such as United States Air Force chart as well as bio-samples such as chicken breast tissue with blood clot are used as test samples for resolution analysis and for performance validation. This system is built on a pushbroom hyperspectral imaging system with a video camera and has the advantage of acquiring information from a large number of spectral bands with selectable region of interest. The advantages of this spatial-scanning hyperspectral imaging probe can be extended to test samples or tissues residing in regions that are difficult to access with potential diagnostic bio-imaging applications.

  6. Imaging resolution of AFM with probes modified with FIB.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, J; Rebis, J; Wejrzanowski, T; Rozniatowski, K; Pressard, K; Kurzydlowski, K J

    2014-11-01

    This study concerns imaging of the structure of materials using AFM tapping (TM) and phase imaging (PI) mode, using probes modified with focused ion beam (FIB). Three kinds of modifications were applied - thinning of the cantilever, sharpening of the tip and combination of these two modifications. Probes shaped in that way were used for AFM investigations with Bruker AFM Nanoscope 8. As a testing material, titanium roughness standard supplied by Bruker was used. The results show that performed modifications influence the oscillation of the probes. In particular thinning of the cantilever enables one to acquire higher self-resonant frequencies, which can be advantageous for improving the quality of imaging in PI mode. It was found that sharpening the tip improves imaging resolution in tapping mode, which is consistent with existing knowledge, but lowered the quality of high frequency topography images. In this paper the Finite Element Method (FEM) was used to explain the results obtained experimentally. PMID:25080273

  7. Time of flight diffraction imaging for double-probe technique.

    PubMed

    Chang, Young-Fo; Hsieh, Cheng-I

    2002-06-01

    Due to rapid progress in microelectronics and computer technologies, the system evolving from analog to digital, and a programmable and flexible synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) for the single-probe pulse-echo imaging technique of ultrasonic nondestructive testing (NDT) becomes feasible. The double-probe reflection technique usually is used to detect the nonhorizontal flaws in the ultrasonic NDT. Because there is an offset between the transmitter and receiver, the position and size of the flaw cannot be directly read from the image. Therefore, a digital signal processing (DSP) imaging method is proposed to process the ultrasonic image obtained by double-probe reflection technique. In the imaging, the signal is redistributed on an ellipsoid with the transmitter and receiver positions as focuses, and the traveltime sum for the echo from the ellipsoid to the focuses as the traveltime of signal. After redistributing all the signals, the useful signals can be constructively added in some point in which the reflected point is; otherwise, the signals will be destructively added. Therefore, the image resolution of the flaw can be improved and the position and size of the flaw can be estimated directly from the processed image. Based on the experimental results, the steep flaw (45 degrees) cannot be detected by the pulse echo technique but can be detected by the double-probe method, and the double-probe B-scan image of 30 degrees tilted crack is clearer than the pulse echo B-scan image. However, the flaw image departs from its true position greatly. After processing, the steep flaw image can be moved to its true position. When the flaws are not greater than the probe largely, the sizes of the flaws are difficult to be discriminated in both pulse echo and double-probe B-scan images. In the processed double-probe B-scan image, the size of the flaws can be estimated successfully, and the images of the flaws are close to their true shape. PMID:12075969

  8. Mutational analysis of primary and metastatic colorectal cancer samples underlying the resistance to cetuximab-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nemecek, Radim; Berkovcova, Jitka; Radova, Lenka; Kazda, Tomas; Mlcochova, Jitka; Vychytilova-Faltejskova, Petra; Slaby, Ondrej; Svoboda, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although several molecular markers predicting resistance to cetuximab- or panitumumab-based therapy of metastatic colorectal cancer were described, mutations in RAS proto-oncogenes remain the only predictors being used in daily clinical practice. However, 35%–45% of wild-type RAS patients still do not respond to this anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) monoclonal antibody-based therapy, and therefore the definition of other predictors forms an important clinical need. The aim of the present retrospective single-institutional study was to evaluate potential genes responsible for resistance to anti-EGFR therapy in relation to mutational analysis of primary versus metastatic lesions. Patients and methods Twenty-four paired primary and corresponding metastatic tissue samples from eight nonresponding and four responding metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with cetuximab-based therapy were sequenced using a next-generation sequencing panel of 26 genes involved in EGFR signaling pathway and colorectal carcinogenesis. Results Mutational status of primary tumors and metastatic lesions was highly concordant in TP53, APC, CTNNB1, KRAS, PIK3CA, PTEN, and FBXW7 genes. Metastatic samples harbor significantly more mutations than primary tumors. Potentially negative predictive value of FBXW7 mutations in relationship to anti-EGFR treatment outcomes was confirmed. Finally, new occurrences of activating KRAS mutations were identified in a group of patients initially determined as wild-type RAS by routinely used qPCR-based RAS mutational tests. All newly detected activating KRAS mutations most likely led to cetuximab treatment failure. Conclusion The results of the present study suggest a need of careful consideration of previously published results of anti-EGFR-targeted therapy with regard to potentially inaccurate diagnostic tools used in the past. Based on our findings, we recommend more extensive use of next-generation sequencing testing in daily

  9. Intracellular probes for imaging oxygen concentration: how good are they?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2015-09-01

    In the last decade a number of cell-permeable phosphorescence based probes for imaging of (intra)cellular oxygen (icO2) have been described. These small molecule, supramolecular and nanoparticle structures, although allowing analysis of hypoxia, local gradients and fluctuations in O2, responses to stimulation and drug treatment at sub-cellular level with high spatial and temporal resolution, differ significantly in their operational performance and applicability to different cell and tissue models. Here we discuss and compare these probes with respect to their staining efficiency, brightness, photostability, toxicity, cell specificity, compatibility with different cell and tissue models, and analytical performance. Merits and limitations of particular probes are highlighted and strategies for development of new high-performance O2 imaging probes defined. Key application areas in hypoxia research, stem cells, cancer biology and tissue physiology are also discussed.

  10. Monte Carlo modeling of ultrasound probes for image guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Schlosser, Jeffrey; Chen, Josephine; Hristov, Dimitre

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To build Monte Carlo (MC) models of two ultrasound (US) probes and to quantify the effect of beam attenuation due to the US probes for radiation therapy delivered under real-time US image guidance. Methods: MC models of two Philips US probes, an X6-1 matrix-array transducer and a C5-2 curved-array transducer, were built based on their megavoltage (MV) CT images acquired in a Tomotherapy machine with a 3.5 MV beam in the EGSnrc, BEAMnrc, and DOSXYZnrc codes. Mass densities in the probes were assigned based on an electron density calibration phantom consisting of cylinders with mass densities between 0.2 and 8.0 g/cm{sup 3}. Beam attenuation due to the US probes in horizontal (for both probes) and vertical (for the X6-1 probe) orientation was measured in a solid water phantom for 6 and 15 MV (15 × 15) cm{sup 2} beams with a 2D ionization chamber array and radiographic films at 5 cm depth. The MC models of the US probes were validated by comparison of the measured dose distributions and dose distributions predicted by MC. Attenuation of depth dose in the (15 × 15) cm{sup 2} beams and small circular beams due to the presence of the probes was assessed by means of MC simulations. Results: The 3.5 MV CT number to mass density calibration curve was found to be linear with R{sup 2} > 0.99. The maximum mass densities in the X6-1 and C5-2 probes were found to be 4.8 and 5.2 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Dose profile differences between MC simulations and measurements of less than 3% for US probes in horizontal orientation were found, with the exception of the penumbra region. The largest 6% dose difference was observed in dose profiles of the X6-1 probe placed in vertical orientation, which was attributed to inadequate modeling of the probe cable. Gamma analysis of the simulated and measured doses showed that over 96% of measurement points passed the 3%/3 mm criteria for both probes placed in horizontal orientation and for the X6-1 probe in vertical orientation. The

  11. Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Erni, Rolf P.; Rossell, Marta D.; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2009-03-02

    Using a highly coherent focused electron probe in a 5th order aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, we report on resolving a crystal spacing less than 50 pm. Based on the geometrical source size and residual coherent and incoherent axial lens aberrations, an electron probe is calculated, which is theoretically capable of resolving an ideal 47 pm spacing with 29percent contrast. Our experimental data show the 47 pm spacing of a Ge 114 crystal imaged with 11-18percent contrast at a 60-95percent confidence level, providing the first direct evidence for sub 50-pm resolution in ADF STEM imaging.

  12. Free-radical probes for functional in vivo EPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, S.; Krishna, M. C.

    2007-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is one of the recent functional imaging modalities that can provide valuable in vivo physiological information on its own merit and aids as a complimentary imaging technique to MRI and PET of tissues especially with respect to in vivo pO II (oxygen partial pressure), redox status and pharmacology. EPR imaging mainly deals with the measurement of distribution and in vivo dynamics and redox changes using special nontoxic paramagnetic spin probes that can be infused into the object of investigation. These spin probes should be characterized by simple EPR spectra, preferably with narrow EPR lines. The line width should be reversibly sensitive to the concentration of in vivo pO II with a linear dependence. Several non-toxic paramagnetic probes, some particulate and insoluble and others water-soluble and infusible (by intravenous or intramuscular injection) have been developed which can be effectively used to quantitatively assess tissue redox status, and tumor hypoxia. Quantitative assessment of the redox status of tissue in vivo is important in investigating oxidative stress, and that of tissue pO II is very important in radiation oncology. Other areas in which EPR imaging and oxymetry may help are in the investigation of tumorangiogenesis, wound healing, oxygenation of tumor tissue by the ingestion of oxygen-rich gases, etc. The correct choice of the spin probe will depend on the modality of measurement (whether by CW or time-domain EPR imaging) and the particular physiology interrogated. Examples of the available spin probes and some EPR imaging applications employing them are presented.

  13. Dual-function fluorescent probe for cancer imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongjing; Wang, Ran; Zhou, Ying; Shu, Chang; Song, Fengjuan; Zhong, Wenying

    2016-05-01

    To date, several fluorescent probes modified by a single targeting agent have been explored. However, studies on the preparation of dual-function quantum dot (QD) fluorescent probes with dual-targeting action and a therapeutic effect are rare. Here, a dual-targeting CdTe/CdS QD fluorescent probe with a bovine serum albumin-glycyrrhetinic acid conjugate and arginine-glycine-aspartic acid was successfully prepared that could induce the apoptosis of liver cancer cells and showed enhanced targeting in in vitro cell imaging. Therefore, the as-prepared fluorescent probe in this work is an efficient diagnostic tool for the simultaneous detection of liver cancer and breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26387677

  14. Radioactive smart probe for potential corrected matrix metalloproteinase imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiun-Wei; Li, Zibo; Conti, Peter S

    2012-11-21

    Although various activatable optical probes have been developed to visualize metalloproteinase (MMP) activities in vivo, precise quantification of the enzyme activity is limited due to the inherent scattering and attenuation (limited depth penetration) properties of optical imaging. In this investigation, a novel activatable peptide probe (64)Cu-BBQ650-PLGVR-K(Cy5.5)-E-K(DOTA)-OH was constructed to detect tumor MMP activity in vivo. This agent is optically quenched in its native form, but releases strong fluorescence upon cleavage by selected enzymes. MMP specificity was confirmed both in vitro and in vivo by fluorescent imaging studies. The use of a single modality to image biomarkers/processes may lead to erroneous interpretation of imaging data. The introduction of a quantitative imaging modality, such as PET, would make it feasible to correct the enzyme activity determined from optical imaging. In this proof of principle report, we demonstrated the feasibility of correcting the activatable optical imaging data through the PET signal. This approach provides an attractive new strategy for accurate imaging of MMP activity, which may also be applied for other protease imaging. PMID:23025637

  15. The Wide-Field Imager for Solar Probe Plus (WISPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell A.; Plunkett, Simon P.; Korendyke, Clarence M.; Thernisien, Arnaud F. R.; Wang, Dennis; Rich, Nathan; Carter, Michael T.; Chua, Damien H.; Socker, Dennis G.; Linton, Mark G.; Morrill, Jeff S.; Lynch, Sean; Thurn, Adam; Van Duyne, Peter; Hagood, Robert; Clifford, Greg; Grey, Phares J.; Velli, Marco; Liewer, Paulett C.; Hall, Jeffrey R.; DeJong, Eric M.; Mikic, Zoran; Rochus, Pierre; Mazy, Emanuel; Bothmer, Volker; Rodmann, Jens

    2015-02-01

    The Wide-field Imager for Solar PRobe Plus (WISPR) is the sole imager aboard the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission scheduled for launch in 2018. SPP will be a unique mission designed to orbit as close as 7 million km (9.86 solar radii) from Sun center. WISPR employs a 95∘ radial by 58∘ transverse field of view to image the fine-scale structure of the solar corona, derive the 3D structure of the large-scale corona, and determine whether a dust-free zone exists near the Sun. WISPR is the smallest heliospheric imager to date yet it comprises two nested wide-field telescopes with large-format (2 K × 2 K) APS CMOS detectors to optimize the performance for their respective fields of view and to minimize the risk of dust damage, which may be considerable close to the Sun. The WISPR electronics are very flexible allowing the collection of individual images at cadences up to 1 second at perihelion or the summing of multiple images to increase the signal-to-noise when the spacecraft is further from the Sun. The dependency of the Thomson scattering emission of the corona on the imaging geometry dictates that WISPR will be very sensitive to the emission from plasma close to the spacecraft in contrast to the situation for imaging from Earth orbit. WISPR will be the first `local' imager providing a crucial link between the large-scale corona and the in-situ measurements.

  16. Molecular imaging probes derived from natural peptides.

    PubMed

    Charron, C L; Hickey, J L; Nsiama, T K; Cruickshank, D R; Turnbull, W L; Luyt, L G

    2016-06-01

    Covering: up to the end of 2015.Peptides are naturally occurring compounds that play an important role in all living systems and are responsible for a range of essential functions. Peptide receptors have been implicated in disease states such as oncology, metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, natural peptides have been exploited as diagnostic and therapeutic agents due to the unique target specificity for their endogenous receptors. This review discusses a variety of natural peptides highlighting their discovery, endogenous receptors, as well as their derivatization to create molecular imaging agents, with an emphasis on the design of radiolabelled peptides. This review also highlights methods for discovering new and novel peptides when knowledge of specific targets and endogenous ligands are not available. PMID:26911790

  17. Dendritic Phosphorescent Probes for Oxygen Imaging in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, Artem Y.; Cheprakov, Andrei V.; Sakadžić, Sava; Boas, David A.; Wilson, David F.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen levels in biological systems can be measured by the phosphorescence quenching method using probes with controllable quenching parameters and defined biodistributions. We describe a general approach to the construction of phosphorescent nanosensors with tunable spectral characteristics, variable degrees of quenching, and a high selectivity for oxygen. The probes are based on bright phosphorescent Pt and Pd complexes of porphyrins and symmetrically π-extended porphyrins (tetrabenzoporphyrins and tetranaphthoporphyrins). π-Extension of the core macrocycle allows tuning of the spectral parameters of the probes in order to meet the requirements of a particular imaging application (e.g., oxygen tomography versus planar microscopic imaging). Metalloporphyrins are encapsulated into poly(arylglycine) dendrimers, which fold in aqueous environments and create diffusion barriers for oxygen, making it possible to regulate the sensitivity and the dynamic range of the method. The periphery of the dendrimers is modified with poly(ethylene glycol) residues, which enhance the probe’s solubility, diminish toxicity, and help prevent interactions of the probes with the biological environment. The probe’s parameters were measured under physiological conditions and shown to be unaffected by the presence of biomacromolecules. The performance of the probes was demonstrated in applications, including in vivo microscopy of vascular pO2 in the rat brain. PMID:20072726

  18. Using image processing techniques on proximity probe signals in rotordynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, Dawie; Heyns, Stephan; Oberholster, Abrie

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to process proximity probe signals in rotordynamic applications. It is argued that the signal be interpreted as a one dimensional image. Existing image processing techniques can then be used to gain information about the object being measured. Some results from one application is presented. Rotor blade tip deflections can be calculated through localizing phase information in this one dimensional image. It is experimentally shown that the newly proposed method performs more accurately than standard techniques, especially where the sampling rate of the data acquisition system is inadequate by conventional standards.

  19. Chemiluminescent Probes for Imaging H2S in Living Animals†

    PubMed Central

    Cao, J.; Lopez, R.; Thacker, J.M.; Moon, J.Y.; Jiang, C.; Morris, S.N.S.; Bauer, J.H.; Tao, P.; Mason, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is an endogenous mediator of human health and disease, but precise measurement in living cells and animals remains a considerable challenge. We report the total chemical synthesis and characterization of three 1,2-dioxetane chemiluminescent reaction-based H2S probes, CHS-1, CHS-2, and CHS-3. Upon treatment with H2S at physiological pH, these probes display instantaneous light emission that is sustained for over an hour with high selectivity against other reactive sulphur, oxygen, and nitrogen species. Analysis of the phenol/phenolate equilibrium and atomic charges has provided a generally applicable predictive model to design improved chemiluminescent probes. The utility of these chemiluminescent reagents was demonstrated by applying CHS-3 to detect cellularly generated H2S using a multi-well plate reader and to image H2S in living mice using CCD camera technology. PMID:25709805

  20. Ultraviolet Imaging Probe for the Pan-STARRS-1 Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, K.; Chambers, K.

    This paper describes the scientific rationale, the design, and the expected data products of the u-band Imaging Probe (UIP) for Pan-STARRS. The Pan-STARRS photometric survey itself will be conducted in the g, r, i, z, and y bands and cover the 3/4 of the sky accessible from Haleakala. In parallel to the survey conducted with the PS1 1.8m telescope, an Imaging Sky Probe (ISP, Granett et. al., these proceedings) will monitor the sky conditions, variations in transparency across the 3° field of view, provide a characterization of the astronomical diffuse sky brightness, and extend the dynamic range of PS1 stellar photometry to the brightest stars. The u-band Imaging Probe is an additional small wide-field camera to extend this bright star photometric survey to the shortest wavelengths accessible from ground-based observatories. It will thereby establish a well characterized photometric system at these wavelengths with a dense sample of stars covering 3/4 of the entire sky, including the galactic plane. The UIP will continuously make dedicated u-band measurements, and the large number of these independent measurements together with substantial overlapping fields of view and repeated visits to standard star fields as part of the PS1 mission, has the potential of substantially improving u-band calibration and photometry across the sky over all previous u-band imaging and catalog surveys. For specific future observations with larger telescopes, this system of stars will serve as secondary calibration stars to tie these deeper observations into the photometric system established in this way. The UIP is currently in the early design stages. The UIP will be operated as an extension of the PS1 Imaging Sky Probe (ISP), and the data will be processed through the same data reduction pipeline and be made available as part of the photometric survey.

  1. Integrated ultrasound and gamma imaging probe for medical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Polito, C.; Orlandi, C.; Fabbri, A.; De Vincentis, G.

    2016-03-01

    In the last few years, integrated multi-modality systems have been developed, aimed at improving the accuracy of medical diagnosis correlating information from different imaging techniques. In this contest, a novel dual modality probe is proposed, based on an ultrasound detector integrated with a small field of view single photon emission gamma camera. The probe, dedicated to visualize small organs or tissues located at short depths, performs dual modality images and permits to correlate morphological and functional information. The small field of view gamma camera consists of a continuous NaI:Tl scintillation crystal coupled with two multi-anode photomultiplier tubes. Both detectors were characterized in terms of position linearity and spatial resolution performances in order to guarantee the spatial correspondence between the ultrasound and the gamma images. Finally, dual-modality images of custom phantoms are obtained highlighting the good co-registration between ultrasound and gamma images, in terms of geometry and image processing, as a consequence of calibration procedures.

  2. Characterization of a Fluorescent Probe for Imaging Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Ghebremariam, Yohannes T; Huang, Ngan F; Kambhampati, Swetha; Volz, Katharina S; Joshi, Gururaj G; Anslyn, Eric V; Cooke, John P

    2014-01-01

    Background Nitric Oxide (NO), a potent vasodilator and anti-atherogenic molecule, is synthesized in various cell types including vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The biological importance of NO enforces the need to develop and characterize specific and sensitive probes. To date, several fluorophores, chromophores and colorimetric techniques have been developed to detect NO or its metabolites (NO2 and NO3) in biological fluids, viable cells or cell lysates. Methods Recently, a novel probe (NO550) has been developed and reported to detect NO in solution and in primary astrocytes and neuronal cells with a fluorescence signal arising from a non-fluorescent background. Results Here, we report further characterization of this probe by optimizing conditions for the detection and imaging of NO products in primary vascular endothelial cells, fibroblasts, embryonic stem cell (ESC)- and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)- derived endothelial cells (ESC-ECs. and iPSC-ECs respectively) in the absence and presence of pharmacological agents that modulate NO levels. In addition, we studied the stability of this probe in cells over time and evaluated its compartmentalization in reference to organelle-labeling dyes. Finally, we synthesized an inherently fluorescent diazo ring compound (AZO550) that is expected to form when the non-fluorescent NO550 reacts with cellular NO and compared its cellular distribution with that of NO550. Conclusion NO550 is a promising agent for imaging NO at baseline and in response to pharmacological agents that modulate its levels. PMID:24335468

  3. Molecular Imaging Probes for Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Node and Tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhengtao

    Molecular imaging is visualizations and measurements of in vivo biological processes at the molecular or cellular level using specific imaging probes. As an emerging technology, biocompatible macromolecular or nanoparticle based targeted imaging probes have gained increasing popularities. Those complexes consist of a carrier, an imaging reporter, and a targeting ligand. The active targeting ability dramatically increases the specificity. And the multivalency effect may further reduce the dose while providing a decent signal. In this thesis, sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and cancer imaging are two research topics. The focus is to develop molecular imaging probes with high specificity and sensitivity, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and optical imaging. The objective of this thesis is to explore dextran radiopharmaceuticals and porous silicon nanoparticles based molecular imaging agents. Dextran polymers are excellent carriers to deliver imaging reporters or therapeutic agents due to its well established safety profile and oligosaccharide conjugation chemistry. There is also a wide selection of dextran polymers with different lengths. On the other hand, Silicon nanoparticles represent another class of biodegradable materials for imaging and drug delivery. The success in fluorescence lifetime imaging and enhancements of the immune activation potency was briefly discussed. Chapter 1 begins with an overview on current molecular imaging techniques and imaging probes. Chapter 2 presents a near-IR dye conjugated probe, IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept. Fluorophore density was optimized to generate the maximum brightness. It was labeled with 68Ga and 99mTc and in vivo SLN mapping was successfully performed in different animals, such as mice, rabbits, dogs and pigs. With 99mTc labeled IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept, chapter 3 introduces a two-day imaging protocol with a hand-held imager. Chapter 4 proposed a method to dual radiolabel the IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept with both 68Ga and

  4. Low-Temperature Scanning Capacitance Probe for Imaging Electron Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, S.; Westervelt, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Novel techniques to probe electronic properties at the nanoscale can shed light on the physics of nanoscale devices. In particular, studying the scattering of electrons from edges and apertures at the nanoscale and imaging the electron profile in a quantum dot, have been of interest [1]. In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a cooled scanning capacitance probe that operates at liquid He temperatures to image electron waves in nanodevices. The conducting tip of a scanned probe microscope is held above the nanoscale structure, and an applied sample-to-tip voltage creates an image charge that is measured by a cooled charge amplifier [2] adjacent to the tip. The circuit is based on a low-capacitance, high- electron-mobility transistor (Fujitsu FHX35X). The input is a capacitance bridge formed by a low capacitance pinched-off HEMT transistor and tip-sample capacitance. We have achieved low noise level (0.13 e/VHz) and high spatial resolution (100 nm) for this technique, which promises to be a useful tool to study electronic behavior in nanoscale devices.

  5. Imaging energy landscapes with concentrated diffusing colloidal probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahukudumbi, Pradipkumar; Bevan, Michael A.

    2007-06-01

    The ability to locally interrogate interactions between particles and energetically patterned surfaces provides essential information to design, control, and optimize template directed self-assembly processes. Although numerous techniques are capable of characterizing local physicochemical surface properties, no current method resolves interactions between colloids and patterned surfaces on the order of the thermal energy kT, which is the inherent energy scale of equilibrium self-assembly processes. Here, the authors describe video microscopy measurements and an inverse Monte Carlo analysis of diffusing colloidal probes as a means to image three dimensional free energy and potential energy landscapes due to physically patterned surfaces. In addition, they also develop a consistent analysis of self-diffusion in inhomogeneous fluids of concentrated diffusing probes on energy landscapes, which is important to the temporal imaging process and to self-assembly kinetics. Extension of the concepts developed in this work suggests a general strategy to image multidimensional and multiscale physical, chemical, and biological surfaces using a variety of diffusing probes (i.e., molecules, macromolecules, nanoparticles, and colloids).

  6. Photoacoustic imaging of fluorophores using pump-probe excitation

    PubMed Central

    Märk, Julia; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Theiss, Christoph; Dortay, Hakan; Friedrich, Thomas; Laufer, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A pump-probe technique for the detection of fluorophores in tomographic PA images is introduced. It is based on inducing stimulated emission in fluorescent molecules, which in turn modulates the amount of thermalized energy, and hence the PA signal amplitude. A theoretical model of the PA signal generation in fluorophores is presented and experimentally validated on cuvette measurements made in solutions of Rhodamine 6G, a fluorophore of known optical and molecular properties. The application of this technique to deep tissue tomographic PA imaging is demonstrated by determining the spatial distribution of a near-infrared fluorophore in a tissue phantom. PMID:26203378

  7. Imaging targeted-agent binding in vivo with two probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Hextrum, Shannon; O'Hara, Julia A.; Jermyn, Michael; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-05-01

    An approach to quantitatively image targeted-agent binding rate in vivo is demonstrated with dual-probe injection of both targeted and nontargeted fluorescent dyes. Images of a binding rate constant are created that reveal lower than expected uptake of epidermal growth factor in an orthotopic xenograft pancreas tumor (2.3×10-5 s-1), as compared to the normal pancreas (3.4×10-5 s-1). This approach allows noninvasive assessment of tumor receptor targeting in vivo to determine the expected contrast, spatial localization, and efficacy in therapeutic agent delivery.

  8. Integrated transrectal probe for translational ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Kevan L.; Harrison, Tyler; Usmani, Nawaid; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    A compact photoacoustic transrectal probe is constructed for improved imaging in brachytherapy treatment. A 192 element 5 MHz linear transducer array is mounted inside a small 3D printed casing along with an array of optical fibers. The device is fed by a pump laser and tunable NIR-optical parametric oscillator with data collected by a Verasonics ultrasound platform. This assembly demonstrates improved imaging of brachytherapy seeds in phantoms with depths up to 5 cm. The tuneable excitation in combination with standard US integration provides adjustable contrast between the brachytherapy seeds, blood filled tubes and background tissue.

  9. In vivo imaging of light-emitting probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Bradley W.; Cable, Michael D.; Nelson, Michael B.

    2001-10-01

    In vivo imaging of cells tagged with light-emitting probes, such as firefly luciferase or fluorescent proteins, is a powerful technology that enables a wide range of biological studies in small research animals. Reporters with emission in the red to infrared (> 600 nm) are preferred due to the low absorption in tissue at these wavelengths. Modeling of photon diffusion through tissue indicates that bioluminescent cell counts as low as a few hundred can be detected subcutaneously, while approximately106 cells are required to detect signals at approximately 2 cm depth in tissue. Signal-to- noise estimates show that cooled back-thinned integrating charge coupled devices (CCDs) are preferred to image-intensified CCDs for this application, mainly due to their high quantum efficiency (approximately 85%) at wavelengths > 600 nm where tissue absorption is low. Instrumentation for in vivo imaging developed at Xenogen is described and several examples of images of mice with bioluminescent cells are presented.

  10. Probes for intracellular RNA imaging in live cells.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Philip J; Alonas, Eric; Jung, Jeenah; Lifland, Aaron W; Zurla, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    RNA localization, dynamics, and regulation are becoming increasingly important to our basic understanding of gene expression and RNA virus pathogenesis. An improved understanding of these processes will be necessary in order to identify new drug targets, as well as to create models of gene expression networks. Much of this new understanding will likely come from imaging studies of RNA, which can generate the spatiotemporal information necessary to characterize RNA within the cellular milieu. Ideally, this would be performed imaging native, nonengineered RNAs, but the approaches for performing these experiments are still evolving. In order for them to reach their potential, it is critical that they have characteristics that allow for the tracking of RNA throughout their life cycle. This chapter presents an overview of RNA imaging methodologies, and focuses on a single RNA sensitive method, employing exogenous probes, for imaging, native, nonengineered RNA in live cells. PMID:22289464

  11. KRAS and BRAF Mutations and PTEN Expression Do Not Predict Efficacy of Cetuximab-Based Chemoradiotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Erben, Philipp; Stroebel, Philipp; Horisberger, Karoline; Popa, Juliana; Bohn, Beatrice; Hanfstein, Benjamin; Kaehler, Georg; Kienle, Peter; Post, Stefan; Wenz, Frederik; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Mutations in KRAS and BRAF genes as well as the loss of expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) (deleted on chromosome 10) are associated with impaired activity of antibodies directed against epidermal growth factor receptor in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The predictive and prognostic value of the KRAS and BRAF point mutations as well as PTEN expression in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with cetuximab-based neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is unknown. Methods and Materials: We have conducted phase I and II trials of the combination of weekly administration of cetuximab and irinotecan and daily doses of capecitabine in conjunction with radiotherapy (45 Gy plus 5.4 Gy) in patients with LARC (stage uT3/4 or uN+). The status of KRAS and BRAF mutations was determined with direct sequencing, and PTEN expression status was determined with immunohistochemistry testing of diagnostic tumor biopsies. Tumor regression was evaluated by using standardized regression grading, and disease-free survival (DFS) was calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 57 patients were available for analyses. A total of 31.6% of patients carried mutations in the KRAS genes. No BRAF mutations were found, while the loss of PTEN expression was observed in 9.6% of patients. Six patients achieved complete remission, and the 3-year DFS rate was 73%. No correlation was seen between tumor regression or DFS rate and a single marker or a combination of all markers. Conclusions: In the present series, no BRAF mutation was detected. The presence of KRAS mutations and loss of PTEN expression were not associated with impaired response to cetuximab-based chemoradiotherapy and 3-year DFS.

  12. Molecular probes for nonlinear optical imaging of biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard-Desce, Mireille H.; Ventelon, Lionel; Charier, Sandrine; Moreaux, Laurent; Mertz, Jerome

    2001-12-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) are nonlinear optical (NLO) phenomena that scale with excitation intensity squared, and hence give rise to an intrinsic 3-dimensional resolution when used in microscopic imaging. TPEF microscopy has gained widespread popularity in the biology community whereas SHG microscopy promises to be a powerful tool because of its sensitivity to local asymmetry. We have implemented an approach toward the design of NLO-probes specifically adapted for SHG and/or TPEF imaging of biological membranes. Our strategy is based on the design of nanoscale amphiphilic NLO-phores. We have prepared symmetrical bolaamphiphilic fluorophores combining very high two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-sections in the visible red region and affinity for cellular membranes. Their incorporation and orientation in lipid membranes can be monitored via TPEF anisotropy. We have also prepared amphiphilic push-pull chromophores exhibiting both large TPA cross-sections and very large first hyperpolarizabilities in the near-IR region. These NLO-probes have proved to be particularly useful for imaging of biological membranes by simultaneous SHG and TPEF microscopy and offer attractive prospects for real-time imaging of fundamental biological processes such as adhesion, fusion or reporting of membrane potentials.

  13. Photonic Doppler velocimetry lens array probe incorporating stereo imaging

    DOEpatents

    Malone, Robert M.; Kaufman, Morris I.

    2015-09-01

    A probe including a multiple lens array is disclosed to measure velocity distribution of a moving surface along many lines of sight. Laser light, directed to the moving surface is reflected back from the surface and is Doppler shifted, collected into the array, and then directed to detection equipment through optic fibers. The received light is mixed with reference laser light and using photonic Doppler velocimetry, a continuous time record of the surface movement is obtained. An array of single-mode optical fibers provides an optic signal to the multiple lens array. Numerous fibers in a fiber array project numerous rays to establish many measurement points at numerous different locations. One or more lens groups may be replaced with imaging lenses so a stereo image of the moving surface can be recorded. Imaging a portion of the surface during initial travel can determine whether the surface is breaking up.

  14. Band Excitation in Scanning Probe Microscopy: Recognition and Functional Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Vasudevan, Dr. Rama; Collins, Liam; Strelcov, Evgheni; Okatan, Mahmut B; Belianinov, Alex; Baddorf, Arthur P; Proksch, Roger; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Field confinement at the junction between a biased scanning probe microscope s (SPM) tip and solid surface enables local probing of various bias-induced transformations such as polarization switching, ionic motion, or electrochemical reactions to name a few. The nanoscale size of the biased region is smaller or comparable to features like grain boundaries and dislocations, potentially allows for the study of kinetics and thermodynamics at the level of a single defect. In contrast to classical statistically averaged approaches, this allows one to link structure to functionality and deterministically decipher associated mesoscopic and atomistic mechanisms. Furthermore, this type of information can serve as a fingerprint of local material functionality, allowing for local recognition imaging. Here, current progress in multidimensional SPM techniques based on band-excitation time and voltage spectroscopies is illustrated, including discussions on data acquisition, dimensionality reduction, and visualization along with future challenges and opportunities for the field.

  15. Fluorescent carbonaceous nanospheres as biological probe for noninvasive brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jun; Ruan, Shaobo; Cao, Xi; Cun, Xingli; Chen, Jiantao; Shen, Shun; Jiang, Xinguo; He, Qin; Zhu, Jianhua; Gao, Huile

    2014-12-15

    Fluorescent carbonaceous nanospheres (CDs) have generated much excitement in bioimaging because of their impressive fluorescent properties and good biocompatibility. In this study, we evaluated the potential application of CDs in noninvasive brain imaging. A new kind of CDs was prepared by a heat treating method using glutamic acid and glucose as the precursors. The hydrated diameter and zeta potential of CDs were 101.1 nm (PDI=0.110) and -22.4 mV respectively. Palpable emission spectrum could be observed from 400 nm to 600 nm when excited at corresponding wavelength, suggesting CDs could be used as a noninvasive bio-probe for in vivo imaging. Additionally, several experiments indicated that CDs possess good serum stability and hemocompatibility with low cytotoxicity. In vitro, the CDs could be efficiently taken up by bEnd.3 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In vivo, CDs could be used for noninvasive brain imaging due to its high accumulation in brain region, which was demonstrated by in vivo imaging and ex vivo tissue imaging. Moreover, the fluorescent distribution in tissue slice showed CDs accumulated in brain with high intensity. In conclusion, CDs were prepared using a simple one-step method with unique optical and good biological properties and could be used for noninvasive brain imaging. PMID:25278360

  16. Near-infrared dyes for molecular probes and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patonay, Gabor; Beckford, Garfield; Strekowski, Lucjan; Henary, Maged; Kim, Jun Seok; Crow, Sidney

    2009-02-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) fluorescence has been used both as an analytical tool as molecular probes and in in vitro or in vivo imaging of individual cells and organs. The NIR region (700-1100 nm) is ideal with regard to these applications due to the inherently lower background interference and the high molar absorptivities of NIR chromophores. NIR dyes are also useful in studying binding characteristics of large biomolecules, such as proteins. Throughout these studies, different NIR dyes have been evaluated to determine factors that control binding to biomolecules, including serum albumins. Hydrophobic character of NIR dyes were increased by introducing alkyl and aryl groups, and hydrophilic moieties e.g., polyethylene glycols (PEG) were used to increase aqueous solubility. Recently, our research group introduced bis-cyanines as innovative NIR probes. Depending on their microenvironment, bis-cyanines can exist as an intramolecular dimer with the two cyanines either in a stacked form, or in a linear conformation in which the two subunits do not interact with each other. In this intramolecular H-aggregate, the chromophore has a low extinction coefficient and low fluorescence quantum yield. Upon addition of biomolecules, the H-and D- bands are decreased and the monomeric band is increased, with concomitant increase in fluorescence intensity. Introduction of specific moieties into the NIR dye molecules allows for the development of physiological molecular probes to detect pH, metal ions and other parameters. Examples of these applications include imaging and biomolecule characterizations. Water soluble dyes are expected to be excellent candidates for both in vitro and in vivo imaging of cells and organs.

  17. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet

    2014-02-01

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

  18. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet

    2014-02-18

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

  19. Artist: Ken Hodges Composite image explaining Objective and Motivation for Galileo Probe Heat Loads:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Artist: Ken Hodges Composite image explaining Objective and Motivation for Galileo Probe Heat Loads: Galileo Probe descending into Jupiters Atmosphere shows heat shield separation with parachute deployed. (Ref. JPL P-19180)

  20. Model Mismatch Paradigm for Probe based Nanoscale Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Pranav

    Scanning Probe Microscopes (SPMs) are widely used for investigation of material properties and manipulation of matter at the nanoscale. These instruments are considered critical enablers of nanotechnology by providing the only technique for direct observation of dynamics at the nanoscale and affecting it with sub Angstrom resolution. Current SPMs are limited by low throughput and lack of quantitative measurements of material properties. Various applications like the high density data storage, sub-20 nm lithography, fault detection and functional probing of semiconductor circuits, direct observation of dynamical processes involved in biological samples viz. motor proteins and transport phenomena in various materials demand high throughput operation. Researchers involved in material characterization at nanoscale are interested in getting quantitative measurements of stiffness and dissipative properties of various materials in a least invasive manner. In this thesis, system theoretic concepts are used to address these limitations. The central tenet of the thesis is to model, the known information about the system and then focus on perturbations of these known dynamics or model, to sense the effects due to changes in the environment such as changes in material properties or surface topography. Thus a model mismatch paradigm for probe based nanoscale imaging is developed. The topic is developed by presenting physics based modeling of a particular mode of operation of SPMs called the dynamic mode operation. This mode is modeled as a forced Lure system where a linear time invariant system is in feedback with an unknown static memoryless nonlinearity. Tools from averaging theory are used to tame this complex nonlinear system by approximating it as a linear system with time varying parameters. Material properties are thus transformed from being parameters of unknown nonlinear functions to being unknown coefficients of a linear plant. The first contribution of this thesis

  1. Microfluidics for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging Probe Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Liu, Kan; Masterman-Smith, Michael; Shen, Clifton Kwang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Due to increased needs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanning, high demands for a wide variety of radiolabeled compounds will have to be met by exploiting novel radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of PET probes. The application of microfluidic reactors to perform radiosyntheses is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional labeling systems. Microfluidic-based radiochemistry can lead to the use of smaller quantities of precursors, accelerated reaction rates and easier purification processes with greater yield and higher specific activity of desired probes. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and potential limitations of each design are discussed here. Along with the concept of radioisotope distribution from centralized cyclotron facilities to individual imaging centers and laboratories (“decentralized model”), an easy-to-use, standalone, flexible, fully-automated radiochemical microfluidic platform can open up to simpler and more cost-effective procedures for molecular imaging using PET. PMID:20643021

  2. Imaging and force probing RNA by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schön, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In the past 30years, the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become a true enabling platform in the life sciences opening entire novel avenues for structural and dynamic studies of biological systems. It enables visualization, probing and manipulation across the length scales, from single molecules to living cells in buffer solution under physiological conditions without the need for labeling or staining of the specimen. In particular, for structural studies of nucleic acids and assemblies thereof, the AFM has matured into a routinely used tool providing nanometer spatial resolution. This includes ssRNA, dsRNA and nucleoprotein complexes thereof, as well as RNA aggregates and 2D RNA assemblies. By AFM unique information can be obtained on RNA based assemblies which are becoming increasingly important as novel unique building blocks in the emerging field of RNA nanotechnology. In addition, the AFM is of fundamental relevance to study biological relevant RNA interactions and dynamics. In this short review first the basic functioning principles of commonly used AFM modes including AFM based force spectroscopy will be briefly described. Next a brief overview will be given on structural studies that have been done related to AFM topographic imaging of RNA, RNA assemblies and aggregates. Finally, an overview on AFM beyond imaging will be provided. This includes force spectroscopy of RNA under physiological conditions in aqueous buffer to probe RNA interaction with proteins and ligands as well as other AFM tip based RNA probing. The main intention of this short review to give the reader a flavor of what AFM contributes to RNA research and engineering. PMID:27222101

  3. Evaluation of improvement of diffuse optical imaging of brain function by high-density probe arrangements and imaging algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yusuke; Kurihara, Kazuki; Okada, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse optical imaging has been applied to measure the localized hemodynamic responses to brain activation. One of the serious problems with diffuse optical imaging is the limitation of the spatial resolution caused by the sparse probe arrangement and broadened spatial sensitivity profile for each probe pair. High-density probe arrangements and an image reconstruction algorithm considering the broadening of the spatial sensitivity can improve the spatial resolution of the image. In this study, the diffuse optical imaging of the absorption change in the brain is simulated to evaluate the effect of the high-density probe arrangements and imaging methods. The localization error, equivalent full-width half maximum and circularity of the absorption change in the image obtained by the mapping and reconstruction methods from the data measured by five probe arrangements are compared to quantitatively evaluate the imaging methods and probe arrangements. The simple mapping method is sufficient for the density of the measurement points up to the double-density probe arrangement. The image reconstruction method considering the broadening of the spatial sensitivity of the probe pairs can effectively improve the spatial resolution of the image obtained from the probe arrangements higher than the quadruple density, in which the distance between the neighboring measurement points is 10.6 mm.

  4. Exogenous Molecular Probes for Targeted Imaging in Cancer: Focus on Multi-modal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Bishnu P.; Wang, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in our healthcare system. Molecular imaging is an emerging methodology for the early detection of cancer, guidance of therapy, and monitoring of response. The development of new instruments and exogenous molecular probes that can be labeled for multi-modality imaging is critical to this process. Today, molecular imaging is at a crossroad, and new targeted imaging agents are expected to broadly expand our ability to detect and manage cancer. This integrated imaging strategy will permit clinicians to not only localize lesions within the body but also to manage their therapy by visualizing the expression and activity of specific molecules. This information is expected to have a major impact on drug development and understanding of basic cancer biology. At this time, a number of molecular probes have been developed by conjugating various labels to affinity ligands for targeting in different imaging modalities. This review will describe the current status of exogenous molecular probes for optical, scintigraphic, MRI and ultrasound imaging platforms. Furthermore, we will also shed light on how these techniques can be used synergistically in multi-modal platforms and how these techniques are being employed in current research. PMID:22180839

  5. X-ray diffraction topography image materials by molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Manfred P.; Lange, Axel; Schors, Joerg; Wald, Oliver

    2005-05-01

    Crystallinity, composition, homogeneity and anisotropy determine the mechanical properties of materials significantly, but the performance of most non-destructive techniques is too poor for measuring these micro structures as they are optimized for finding individual flaws/defects. X-ray (wide angle) Diffraction Topography by single beam scanning images molecular information at a spatial resolution of several ten micrometers even in three dimensions. Especially for the non-destructive characterization of composite materials, they provide additional capabilities by crystallographic contrast by the molecular/atomic probe. The different material phases of compounds and their molecular orientation can be imaged e.g. fibers or polymer chain orientation in composites: A sample is scanned or rotated, while only part of the scattering pattern is pointing at an X-ray detector area. Three different methods have been developed: i) planar X-ray Scanning Topography at one or more pre-selected scattering angles provides high contrast of different phases of components. ii) X-Ray Rotation Topography reveals the texture angle of composite fibers and chain polymers. iii) X-ray Diffraction Microscopy images the texture and phase distribution of transversal sections of the material. The principles of Wide Angle X-Ray Diffraction Topography are explained and examples of investigations will be presented. They combine the advantages of radiographic imaging and crystal structure information. The applied X-ray energies are much lower than in NDT radiography, which recommends preferably the application to light weight materials.

  6. Efficacy of cetuximab-based chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer according to RAS and BRAF mutation subgroups: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    LIN, LI; CHEN, LU-LU; WANG, YOU; MENG, XIANG-YU; LIANG, CHEN; ZHOU, FU-XIANG

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting monoclonal antibody, cetuximab, has been added to standard chemotherapy regimens for treating metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, the efficacy of adding cetuximab to chemotherapy regimens for patients of differing genetic backgrounds remains controversial. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of adding cetuximab to chemotherapeutic regimens in subgroups of patients defined according to the RAS and BRAF mutation status in the first-line treatment of patients with mCRC. A systematic literature search was performed in databases (including PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane library, the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the European Society For Medical Oncology) up to August 2015. Randomized controlled trials analyzing overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in mCRC treated with cetuximab, and grouped by RAS and BRAF mutation status, were identified. The major outcome measures were hazard ratios (HRs). Pooled HRs were calculated using fixed- or random-effects models, according to the magnitude of the heterogeneity. A total of nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Use of cetuximab was significantly associated with longer OS in KRAS exon 2 wild-type tumors [HR=0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.79–0.96, Z=2.91, P=0.004] and wild-type KRAS/RAS (in exons 2, 3 and 4 of KRAS and exons 2, 3 and 4 of an associated gene, NRAS; HR=0.72, 95% CI=0.60–0.85, Z=3.74, P=0.0002). No significant differences in OS and PFS were identified between KRAS exon 2 mutations and tumors with the other RAS mutations (in exons 3 and 4 of KRAS and exons 2, 3 and 4 of an associated gene, NRAS). The meta-analysis demonstrated that cetuximab-based chemotherapeutic regimens led to a marked improvement in OS in patients with mCRC who lacked any RAS mutations (either KRAS exon 2 or any other RAS mutation). By contrast, the subgroup analyses revealed no evident PFS or OS benefit in using cetuximab

  7. Positrons as imaging agents and probes in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Suzanne V.

    2009-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) tracks a positron emitting radiopharmaceutical injected into the body and generates a 3-dimensional image of its location. Introduced in the early 70s, it has now developed into a powerful medical diagnostic tool for routine clinical use as well as in drug development. Unrivalled as a highly sensitive, specific and non-invasive imaging tool, PET unfortunately lacks the resolution of Computer Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). As the resolution of PET depends significantly on the energy of the positron incorporated in the radiopharmaceutical and its interaction with its surrounding tissue, there is growing interest in expanding our understanding of how positrons interact at the atomic and molecular level. A better understanding of these interactions will contribute to improving the resolution of PET and assist in the design of better imaging agents. Positrons are also used in Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) to determine electron density and or presence and incidence of micro- and mesopores (0.1 to 10 nm) in materials. The control of porosity in engineered materials is crucial for applications such as controlled release or air and water resistant films. Equally important to the design of nano and microtechnologies, is our understanding of the microenvironments within these pores and on surfaces. Hence as radiopharmaceuticals are designed to track disease, nuclear probes (radioactive molecules) are synthesized to investigate the chemical properties within these pores. This article will give a brief overview of the present role of positrons in imaging as well as explore its potential to contribute in the engineering of new materials to the marketplace.

  8. Red Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticle-Based Cell Imaging Probe.

    PubMed

    Ali, Haydar; Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Dalal, Chumki; Jana, Nikhil R

    2016-04-13

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based probes with tunable visible emission are biocompatible, environment friendly and most suitable for various biomedical applications. However, synthesis of red fluorescent carbon nanoparticles and their transformation into functional nanoparticles are very challenging. Here we report red fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based nanobioconjugates of <25 nm hydrodynamic size and their application as fluorescent cell labels. Hydrophobic carbon nanoparticles are synthesized via high temperature colloid-chemical approach and transformed into water-soluble functional nanoparticles via coating with amphiphilic polymer followed by covalent linking with desired biomolecules. Following this approach, carbon nanoparticles are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, primary amine, glucose, arginine, histidine, biotin and folic acid. These functional nanoparticles can be excited with blue/green light (i.e., 400-550 nm) to capture their emission spanning from 550 to 750 nm. Arginine and folic acid functionalized nanoparticles have been demonstrated as fluorescent cell labels where blue and green excitation has been used for imaging of labeled cells. The presented method can be extended for the development of carbon nanoparticle-based other bioimaging probes. PMID:27011336

  9. Nanotechnology in medical imaging: probe design and applications

    PubMed Central

    Cormode, David P.; Skajaa, Torjus; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticles have become more and more prevalent in reports of novel contrast agents, especially for molecular imaging, the detection of cellular processes. The advantages of nanoparticles include their potency to generate contrast, the ease of integrating multiple properties, lengthy circulation times and the possibility to include high payloads. As the chemistry of nanoparticles has improved over the past years more sophisticated examples of nano-sized contrast agents have been reported, such as paramagnetic, macrophage targeted quantum dots or αvβ3-targeted, MRI visible microemulsions that also carry a drug to suppress angiogenesis. The use of these particles is producing greater knowledge of disease processes and the effects of therapy. Along with their excellent properties, nanoparticles may produce significant toxicity, which must be minimized for (clinical) application. In this review we discuss the different factors that are considered when designing a nanoparticle probe and highlight some of the most advanced examples. PMID:19057023

  10. Miniature forward-viewing common-path OCT probe for imaging the renal pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyong; Patel, Dhruti; Zhu, Hui; MacLennan, Gregory; Wang, Yves T; Jenkins, Michael W; Rollins, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an ultrathin flexible cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT probe which can fit through the working channel of a flexible ureteroscope for renal pelvis imaging. The probe is fabricated by splicing a 200 µm section of core-less fiber and a 150 µm section of gradient-index (GRIN) fiber to the end of a single mode (SM) fiber. The probe is designed for common-path OCT imaging where the back-reflection of the GRIN fiber/air interface is used as the reference signal. Optimum sensitivity was achieved with a 2 degree polished probe tip. A correlation algorithm was used to correct image distortion caused by non-uniform rotation of the probe. The probe is demonstrated by imaging human skin in vivo and porcine renal pelvis ex vivo and is suitable for imaging the renal pelvis in vivo for cancer staging. PMID:25909002

  11. Imaging and manipulation of nanoscale materials with coaxial and triaxial AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Keith A.; Westervelt, R. M.

    2011-03-01

    We present coaxial and triaxial Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) probes and demonstrate their applications to imaging and manipulating nanoscale materials. A coaxial probe with concentric electrodes at its tip creates a highly confined electric field that decays as a dipole field, making the coaxial probe useful for near field imaging of electrical properties. We show nearly an order of magnitude improvement in the step resolution of Kelvin probe force microscopy with coaxial probes. We further demonstrate that coaxial probes can image dielectric materials with the dielectrophoretic force. In addition to imaging, the capacitive structure that makes up the cantilever of a coaxial probe is used to locally mechanically drive the probe, making them self-driving probes. Finally, coaxial probes can create strong forces with dielectrophoresis (DEP) which we combine with the nanometer precision of the AFM to create a nanometer scale pick-and-place tool. We demonstrate 3D assembly of micrometer scale objects with coaxial probes using positive DEP and discuss the assembly of nanometer scale objects with triaxial probes using negative DEP.

  12. Atomic Force Microscope Controlled Topographical Imaging and Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kjoller, Kevin; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Pelletier, Dale A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid atmospheric pressure atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system utilizing nano-thermal analysis probes for thermal desorption surface sampling with subsequent atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to correlate topographic images of a surface with atomic force microscopy and a mass spectral chemical image of the same surface, utilizing the same probe without moving the sample from the system, was demonstrated. Co-registered mass spectral chemical images and atomic force microscopy topographical images were obtained from inked patterns on paper as well as from a living bacterial colony on an agar gel. Spatial resolution of the topography images based on pixel size (0.2 m x 0.8 m) was better than the resolution of the mass spectral images (2.5 m x 2.0 m), which were limited by current mass spectral data acquisition rate and system detection levels.

  13. A Dream of a Mission: Stellar Imager and Seismic Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Stellar Imager and Seismic Probe (SISP) is a mission to understand the various effects of magnetic fields of stars, the dynamos that generate them, and the internal structure and dynamics of the stars in which they exist. The ultimate goal is to achieve the best-possible forecasting of solar activity on times scales ranging up to decades, and an understanding of the impact of stellar magnetic activity on astrobiology and life in the Universe. The road to that goal will revolutionize our understanding of stars and stellar systems, the building blocks of the Universe. SISP will zoom in on what today - with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool to astrophysics as fundamental as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SISP is an ultraviolet aperture-synthesis imager with 8-10 telescopes with meter-class apertures, and a central hub with focal-plane instrumentation that allows spectrophotometry in passbands as narrow as a few Angstroms up to hundreds of Angstroms. SISP will image stars and binaries with one hundred to one thousand resolution elements on their surface, and sound their interiors through asteroseismology to image internal structure, differential rotation, and large-scale circulations; this will provide accurate knowledge of stellar structure and evolution and complex transport processes, and will impact numerous branches of (astro)physics ranging from the Big Bang to the future of the Universe. Fitting naturally within the NASA long-term time line, SISP complements defined missions, and with them will show us entire other solar systems, from the central star to their orbiting planets.

  14. Optofluidic needle probe integrating targeted delivery of fluid with optical coherence tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Bryden C; McLaughlin, Robert A; Pagnozzi, Alex M; Kennedy, Brendan F; Noble, Peter B; Sampson, David D

    2014-05-15

    We present an optofluidic optical coherence tomography (OCT) needle probe capable of modifying the local optical properties of tissue to improve needle-probe imaging performance. The side-viewing probe comprises an all-fiber-optic design encased in a hypodermic needle (outer diameter 720 μm) and integrates a coaxial fluid-filled channel, terminated by an outlet adjacent to the imaging window, allowing focal injection of fluid to a target tissue. This is the first fully integrated OCT needle probe design to incorporate fluid injection into the imaging mechanism. The utility of this probe is demonstrated in air-filled sheep lungs, where injection of small quantities of saline is shown, by local refractive index matching, to greatly improve image penetration through multiple layers of alveoli. 3D OCT images are correlated against histology, showing improvement in the capability to image lung structures such as bronchioles and blood vessels. PMID:24978229

  15. Super-resolution fluorescence imaging of organelles in live cells with photoswitchable membrane probes

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Sang-Hee; Xia, Chenglong; Zhong, Guisheng; Babcock, Hazen P.; Vaughan, Joshua C.; Huang, Bo; Wang, Xun; Xu, Cheng; Bi, Guo-Qiang; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    Imaging membranes in live cells with nanometer-scale resolution promises to reveal ultrastructural dynamics of organelles that are essential for cellular functions. In this work, we identified photoswitchable membrane probes and obtained super-resolution fluorescence images of cellular membranes. We demonstrated the photoswitching capabilities of eight commonly used membrane probes, each specific to the plasma membrane, mitochondria, the endoplasmic recticulum (ER) or lysosomes. These small-molecule probes readily label live cells with high probe densities. Using these probes, we achieved dynamic imaging of specific membrane structures in living cells with 30–60 nm spatial resolution at temporal resolutions down to 1–2 s. Moreover, by using spectrally distinguishable probes, we obtained two-color super-resolution images of mitochondria and the ER. We observed previously obscured details of morphological dynamics of mitochondrial fusion/fission and ER remodeling, as well as heterogeneous membrane diffusivity on neuronal processes. PMID:22891300

  16. Evanescent Microwave Probes Using Coplanar Waveguide and Stripline for Super-Resolution Imaging of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G. E.; Akinwande, D.; Ciocan, R.; LeClair, S. R.; Tabib-Azar, M.

    2000-01-01

    An evanescent field microwave imaging probe based on half-wavelength, microwave transmission line resonators is described. Optimization of the probe tip design, the coupling gap, and the data analysis has resulted in images of metal lines on semiconductor substrates with 2.6 microns spatial resolution and a minimum detectable line width of 0.4 microns at 1 GHz.

  17. Compact probing system using remote imaging for industrial plant maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, F.; Nishimura, A.

    2014-03-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and endoscope observation were combined to design a remote probing device. We use this probing device to inspect a crack of the inner wall of the heat exchanger. Crack inspection requires speed at first, and then it requires accuracy. Once Eddy Current Testing (ECT) finds a crack with a certain signal level, another method should confirm it visually. We are proposing Magnetic particle Testing (MT) using specially fabricated the Magnetic Particle Micro Capsule (MPMC). For LIBS, a multichannel spectrometer and a Q-switch YAG laser were used. Irradiation area is 270 μm, and the pulse energy was 2 mJ. This pulse energy corresponds to 5-2.2 MW/cm2. A composite-type optical fiber was used to deliver both laser energy and optical image. Samples were prepared to heat a zirconium alloy plate by underwater arc welding in order to demonstrate severe accidents of nuclear power plants. A black oxide layer covered the weld surface and white particles floated on water surface. Laser induced breakdown plasma emission was taken into the spectroscope using this optical fiber combined with telescopic optics. As a result, we were able to simultaneously perform spectroscopic measurement and observation. For MT, the MPMC which gathered in the defective area is observed with this fiber. The MPMC emits light by the illumination of UV light from this optical fiber. The size of a defect is estimated with this amount of emission. Such technology will be useful for inspection repair of reactor pipe.

  18. In situ imaging of lung alveoli with an optical coherence tomography needle probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, Bryden C.; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Curatolo, Andrea; Kirk, Rodney W.; Noble, Peter B.; Sampson, David D.

    2011-03-01

    In situ imaging of alveoli and the smaller airways with optical coherence tomography (OCT) has significant potential in the assessment of lung disease. We present a minimally invasive imaging technique utilizing an OCT needle probe. The side-facing needle probe comprises miniaturized focusing optics consisting of no-core and GRIN fiber encased within a 23-gauge needle. 3D-OCT volumetric data sets were acquired by rotating and retracting the probe during imaging. The probe was used to image an intact, fresh (not fixed) sheep lung filled with normal saline, and the results validated against a histological gold standard. We present the first published images of alveoli acquired with an OCT needle probe and demonstrate the potential of this technique to visualize other anatomical features such as bifurcations of the bronchioles.

  19. Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2010-12-28

    A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

  20. High speed 3D endoscopic optical frequency domain imaging probe for lung cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; Mo, Jianhua; Helderman, Frank; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2013-06-01

    We present a miniature motorized endoscopic probe for Optical Frequency Domain Imaging with an outer diameter of 1.65 mm and a rotation speed of 3,000 - 12,500 rpm. The probe has a motorized distal end which provides a significant advantage over proximally driven probes since it does not require a drive shaft to transfer the rotational torque to the distal end of the probe and functions without a fiber rotary junction. The probe has a focal Full Width at Half Maximum of 9.6 μm and a working distance of 0.47 mm. We analyzed the non-uniform rotation distortion and found a location fluctuation of only 1.87° in repeated measurements of the same object. The probe was integrated in a high-speed Optical Frequency Domain Imaging setup at 1310 nm. We demonstrated its performance with imaging ex vivo pig bronchial and in vivo goat lung.

  1. Design of Environmentally Responsive Fluorescent Polymer Probes for Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Arisa; Hiruta, Yuki; Wang, Jian; Ayano, Eri; Kanazawa, Hideko

    2015-08-10

    We report the development of environmentally responsive fluorescent polymers. The reversible temperature-induced phase transition of copolymers composed of N-isopropylacrylamide and a fluorescent monomer based on the fluorescein (FL), coumarin (CO), rhodamine (RH), or dansyl (DA) skeleton was used as a molecular switch to control the fluorescence intensity. The poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) chain showed an expanded coil conformation below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) due to hydration, but it changed to a globular form above the LCST due to dehydration. Through the combination of a polarity-sensitive fluorophore with PNIPAAm, the synthetic fluorescent polymer displayed a response to external temperature, with the fluorescence strength dramatically changing close to the LCST. Additionally, the P(NIPAAm-co-FL) and P(NIPAAm-co-CO) polymers, containing fluorescein and coumarin groups, respectively, exhibited pH responsiveness. The environmental responsiveness of the reported polymers is derived directly from the PNIPAAm and fluorophore structures, thus allowing for the cellular uptake of the fluorescence copolymer by RAW264.7 cells to be temperature-controlled. Cellular uptake was suppressed below the LCST but enhanced above the LCST. Furthermore, the cellular uptake of both P(NIPAAm-co-CO) and P(NIPAAm-co-RH) conjugated with a fusogenic lipid, namely, l-α-phosphatidylethanolamine, dioleoyl (DOPE), was enhanced. Such lipid-conjugated fluorescence probes are expected to be useful as physiological indicators for intracellular imaging. PMID:26121103

  2. Magnetic nanoparticles as both imaging probes and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Lise-Marie; Ho, Don; Sun, Shouheng

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been explored extensively as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or as heating agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) [1]. To achieve optimum operation conditions in MRI and MFH, these NPs should have well-controlled magnetic properties and biological functionalities. Although numerous efforts have been dedicated to the investigations on MNPs for biomedical applications [2-5], the NP optimizations for early diagnostics and efficient therapeutics are still far from reached. Recent efforts in NP syntheses have led to some promising MNP systems for sensitive MRI and efficient MFH applications. This review summarizes these advances in the synthesis of monodisperse MNPs as both contrast probes in MRI and as therapeutic agents via MFH. It will first introduce the nanomagnetism and elucidate the critical parameters to optimize the superparamagnetic NPs for MRI and ferromagnetic NPs for MFH. It will further outline the new chemistry developed for making monodisperse MNPs with controlled magnetic properties. The review will finally highlight the NP functionalization with biocompatible molecules and biological targeting agents for tumor diagnosis and therapy. PMID:20388109

  3. A single probe for imaging photons, electrons and physical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilet, Nicolas; Lisunova, Yuliya; Lamattina, Fabio; Stevenson, Stephanie E.; Pigozzi, Giancarlo; Paruch, Patrycja; Fink, Rainer H.; Hug, Hans J.; Quitmann, Christoph; Raabe, Joerg

    2016-06-01

    The combination of complementary measurement techniques has become a frequent approach to improve scientific knowledge. Pairing of the high lateral resolution scanning force microscopy (SFM) with the spectroscopic information accessible through scanning transmission soft x-ray microscopy (STXM) permits assessing physical and chemical material properties with high spatial resolution. We present progress from the NanoXAS instrument towards using an SFM probe as an x-ray detector for STXM measurements. Just by the variation of one parameter, the SFM probe can be utilised to detect either sample photo-emitted electrons or transmitted photons. This allows the use of a single probe to detect electrons, photons and physical forces of interest. We also show recent progress and demonstrate the current limitations of using a high aspect ratio coaxial SFM probe to detect photo-emitted electrons with very high lateral resolution. Novel probe designs are proposed to further progress in using an SFM probe as a STXM detector.

  4. A single probe for imaging photons, electrons and physical forces.

    PubMed

    Pilet, Nicolas; Lisunova, Yuliya; Lamattina, Fabio; Stevenson, Stephanie E; Pigozzi, Giancarlo; Paruch, Patrycja; Fink, Rainer H; Hug, Hans J; Quitmann, Christoph; Raabe, Joerg

    2016-06-10

    The combination of complementary measurement techniques has become a frequent approach to improve scientific knowledge. Pairing of the high lateral resolution scanning force microscopy (SFM) with the spectroscopic information accessible through scanning transmission soft x-ray microscopy (STXM) permits assessing physical and chemical material properties with high spatial resolution. We present progress from the NanoXAS instrument towards using an SFM probe as an x-ray detector for STXM measurements. Just by the variation of one parameter, the SFM probe can be utilised to detect either sample photo-emitted electrons or transmitted photons. This allows the use of a single probe to detect electrons, photons and physical forces of interest. We also show recent progress and demonstrate the current limitations of using a high aspect ratio coaxial SFM probe to detect photo-emitted electrons with very high lateral resolution. Novel probe designs are proposed to further progress in using an SFM probe as a STXM detector. PMID:27146329

  5. Optical imaging of reporter gene expression using a positron-emission-tomography probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongguang; Ren, Gang; Liu, Shuanglong; Zhang, Xiaofen; Chen, Luxi; Han, Peizhen; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-11-01

    Reporter gene/reporter probe technology is one of the most important techniques in molecular imaging. Lately, many reporter gene/reporter probe systems have been coupled to different imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and optical imaging (OI). It has been recently found that OI techniques could be used to monitor radioactive tracers in vitro and in living subjects. In this study, we further demonstrate that a reporter gene/nuclear reporter probe system [herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and 9-(4-18F-fluoro-3-[hydroxymethyl] butyl) guanine ([18F]FHBG)] could be successfully imaged by OI in vitro and in vivo. OI with radioactive reporter probes will facilitate and broaden the applications of reporter gene/reporter probe techniques in medical research.

  6. Fluorogenic Probe for the Human Ether-a-Go-Go-Related Gene Potassium Channel Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The first small-molecule fluorogenic probe A1 for imaging the human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel based on the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) off–on mechanism was described herein. After careful biological evaluation, this probe had the potential of detecting and imaging the hERG channel at the molecular and cellular level. Moreover, the competitive binding mechanism of this probe would presumably minimize the effects on the electrophysiological properties of the hERG channel. Therefore, this probe may serve as a powerful toolkit to the hERG-associated study. PMID:25665091

  7. Sparse sampling and reconstruction for electron and scanning probe microscope imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Hyrum; Helms, Jovana; Wheeler, Jason W.; Larson, Kurt W.; Rohrer, Brandon R.

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy are provided herein. In a general embodiment, the systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy with an undersampled data set include: driving an electron beam or probe to scan across a sample and visit a subset of pixel locations of the sample that are randomly or pseudo-randomly designated; determining actual pixel locations on the sample that are visited by the electron beam or probe; and processing data collected by detectors from the visits of the electron beam or probe at the actual pixel locations and recovering a reconstructed image of the sample.

  8. Portable LED-induced autofluorescence imager with a probe of L shape for oral cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ting-Wei; Lee, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Nai-Lun; Yan, Yung-Jhe; Chiang, Hou-Chi; Chiou, Jin-Chern; Mang, Ou-Yang

    2015-08-01

    The difference of spectral distribution between lesions of epithelial cells and normal cells after excited fluorescence is one of methods for the cancer diagnosis. In our previous work, we developed a portable LED Induced autofluorescence (LIAF) imager contained the multiple wavelength of LED excitation light and multiple filters to capture ex-vivo oral tissue autofluorescence images. Our portable system for detection of oral cancer has a probe in front of the lens for fixing the object distance. The shape of the probe is cone, and it is not convenient for doctor to capture the oral image under an appropriate view angle in front of the probe. Therefore, a probe of L shape containing a mirror is proposed for doctors to capture the images with the right angles, and the subjects do not need to open their mouse constrainedly. Besides, a glass plate is placed in probe to prevent the liquid entering in the body, but the light reflected from the glass plate directly causes the light spots inside the images. We set the glass plate in front of LED to avoiding the light spots. When the distance between the glasses plate and the LED model plane is less than the critical value, then we can prevent the light spots caused from the glasses plate. The experiments show that the image captured with the new probe that the glasses plate placed in the back-end of the probe has no light spots inside the image.

  9. Transillumination and reflectance probes for in vivo near-IR imaging of dental caries

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jacob C.; Lucas, Seth A.; Staninec, Michal; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the utility of near infrared (NIR) imaging for caries detection employing transillumination and reflectance imaging geometries. Three intra-oral NIR imaging probes were fabricated for the acquisition of in vivo, real time videos using a high definition InGaAs SWIR camera and near-IR broadband light sources. Two transillumination probes provide occlusal and interproximal images using 1300-nm light where water absorption is low and enamel manifests the highest transparency. A third reflectance probe utilizes cross polarization and operates at >1500-nm, where water absorption is higher which reduces the reflectivity of sound tissues, significantly increasing lesion contrast. These probes are being used in an ongoing clinical study to assess the diagnostic performance of NIR imaging for the detection of caries lesions in teeth scheduled for extraction for orthodontic reasons. PMID:24817803

  10. Transillumination and reflectance probes for in vivo near-IR imaging of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob C.; Lucas, Seth A.; Staninec, Michal; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the utility of near infrared (NIR) imaging for caries detection employing transillumination and reflectance imaging geometries. Three intra-oral NIR imaging probes were fabricated for the acquisition of in vivo, real time videos using a high definition InGaAs SWIR camera and near-IR broadband light sources. Two transillumination probes provide occlusal and interproximal images using 1300-nm light where water absorption is low and enamel manifests the highest transparency. A third reflectance probe utilizes cross polarization and operates at >1500-nm, where water absorption is higher which reduces the reflectivity of sound tissues, significantly increasing lesion contrast. These probes are being used in an ongoing clinical study to assess the diagnostic performance of NIR imaging for the detection of caries lesions in teeth scheduled for extraction for orthodontic reasons.

  11. Miniature real-time intraoperative forward-imaging optical coherence tomography probe

    PubMed Central

    Joos, Karen M.; Shen, Jin-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has a tremendous global impact upon the ability to diagnose, treat, and monitor eye diseases. A miniature 25-gauge forward-imaging OCT probe with a disposable tip was developed for real-time intraoperative ocular imaging of posterior pole and peripheral structures to improve vitreoretinal surgery. The scanning range was 2 mm when the probe tip was held 3-4 mm from the tissue surface. The axial resolution was 4-6 µm and the lateral resolution was 25-35 µm. The probe was used to image cellophane tape and multiple ocular structures. PMID:24009997

  12. Probing neutral atmospheric collision complexes with anion photoelectron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrold, Caroline

    Photodetachment of anionic precursors of neutral collision complexes offers a way to probe the effects of symmetry-breaking collision events on the electronic structure of normally transparent molecules. We have measured the anion photoelectron imaging (PEI) spectra of a series of O2- X complexes, where X is a volatile organic molecule with atmospheric relevance, to determine how the electronic properties of various X molecules affect the low-lying electronic structure of neutral O2 undergoing O2 - X collisons. The study was motivated by the catalog of vibrational and electronic absorption lines induced by O2 - O2, O2 - N2, and other collisions. The energies of electronic features observed in the anion PEI spectra of O2- X (X = hexane, hexene, isoprene and benzene) relative to O2- PEI spectroscopic features indicate that photodetachment of the anion does indeed access a repulsive part of the O2 - X potential. In addition, the spectra of the various complexes show an interesting variation in the intensities of transitions to the excited O2(1Δg) . X and O2(1Σg+) . X states relative to the ground O2(3Σg-) . X state. With X = non-polar species such as hexane, the relative intensities of transitions to the triplet and singlet states of O2 . X are very similar to those of isolated O2, while the relative intensity of the singlet band decreases and becomes lower in energy relative to the triplet band for X = polar molecules. A significant enhancement in the intensities of the singlet bands is observed for complexes with X = isoprene and benzene, both of which have low-lying triplet states. The role of the triplet states in isoprene and benzene, and the implications for induced electronic absorption in O2 undergoing collisions with these molecules, are explored. National Science Foundation NSF CHE 1265991.

  13. Seeing the corona with the solar probe plus mission: the wide-field imager for solar probe+ (WISPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell A.; Plunkett, Simon P.; Korendyke, Clarence M.; Carter, Michael T.; Thernisien, Arnaud F. R.; Chua, Damien H.; Van Duyne, Peter; Socker, Dennis G.; Linton, Mark G.; Liewer, Paulett C.; Hall, Jeffrey R.; Morrill, Jeff S.; DeJong, Eric M.; Mikic, Zoran; Rochus, Pierre L. P. M.; Bothmer, Volker; Rodman, Jens; Lamy, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission scheduled for launch in 2018, will orbit between the Sun and Venus with diminishing perihelia reaching as close as 7 million km (9.86 solar radii) from Sun center. In addition to a suite of in-situ probes for the magnetic field, plasma, and energetic particles, SPP will be equipped with an imager. The Wide-field Imager for the Solar PRobe+ (WISPR), with a 95° radial by 58° transverse field of view, will image the fine-scale coronal structure of the corona, derive the 3D structure of the large-scale corona, and determine whether a dust-free zone exists near the Sun. Given the tight mass constrains of the mission, WISPR incorporates an efficient design of two widefield telescopes and their associated focal plane arrays based on novel large-format (2kx2k) APS CMOS detectors into the smallest heliospheric imaging package to date. The flexible control electronics allow WISPR to collect individual images at cadences up to 1 second at perihelion or sum several of them to increase the signal-to-noise during the outbound part of the orbit. The use of two telescopes minimizes the risk of dust damage which may be considerable close to the Sun. The dependency of the Thomson scattering emission of the corona on the imaging geometry dictates that WISPR will be very sensitive to the emission from plasma close to the spacecraft in contrast to the situation for imaging from Earth orbit. WISPR will be the first `local' imager providing a crucial link between the large scale corona and the in-situ measurements.

  14. High-throughput fiber-array transvaginal ultrasound/photoacoustic probe for ovarian cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Hassan S.; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Wang, Tianheng; Zhu, Quing

    2014-03-01

    A high-throughput ultrasound/photoacoustic probe for delivering high contrast and signal-to-noise ratio images was designed, constructed, and tested. The probe consists of a transvaginal ultrasound array integrated with four 1mm-core optical fibers and a sheath. The sheath encases transducer and is lined with highly reflecting aluminum for high intensity light output and uniformity while at the same time remaining below the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) recommended by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The probe design was optimized by simulating the light fluence distribution in Zemax. The performance of the probe was evaluated by experimental measurements of the fluence and real-time imaging of polyethylene-tubing filled with blood. These results suggest that our probe has great potential for in vivo imaging and characterization of ovarian cancer.

  15. Imaging of oxygenation in 3D tissue models with multi-modal phosphorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Borisov, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Cell-penetrating phosphorescence based probes allow real-time, high-resolution imaging of O2 concentration in respiring cells and 3D tissue models. We have developed a panel of such probes, small molecule and nanoparticle structures, which have different spectral characteristics, cell penetrating and tissue staining behavior. The probes are compatible with conventional live cell imaging platforms and can be used in different detection modalities, including ratiometric intensity and PLIM (Phosphorescence Lifetime IMaging) under one- or two-photon excitation. Analytical performance of these probes and utility of the O2 imaging method have been demonstrated with different types of samples: 2D cell cultures, multi-cellular spheroids from cancer cell lines and primary neurons, excised slices from mouse brain, colon and bladder tissue, and live animals. They are particularly useful for hypoxia research, ex-vivo studies of tissue physiology, cell metabolism, cancer, inflammation, and multiplexing with many conventional fluorophors and markers of cellular function.

  16. Synthesis of a Targeted Biarsenical Cy3-Cy5 Affinity Probe for Superresolution Fluorescence Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Na; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-11-01

    Photoswitchable fluorescent probes capable of the targeted labeling of tagged proteins are of significant interest due to their ability to enable in situ imaging of protein complexes within native biomolecular assemblies. Here we describe the synthesis of a fluorescent probe (AsCy3Cy5), and demonstrate the targeted labeling and super-resolution imaging of a tagged protein within a supramolecular protein complex.

  17. X-ray phase computed tomography for nanoparticulated imaging probes and therapeutics: preliminary feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Yang, Yi; Tang, Shaojie

    2011-03-01

    With the scientific progress in cancer biology, pharmacology and biomedical engineering, the nano-biotechnology based imaging probes and therapeutical agents (namely probes/agents) - a form of theranostics - are among the strategic solutions bearing the hope for the cure of cancer. The key feature distinguishing the nanoparticulated probes/agents from their conventional counterparts is their targeting capability. A large surface-to-volume ratio in nanoparticulated probes/agents enables the accommodation of multiple targeting, imaging and therapeutic components to cope with the intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity. Most nanoparticulated probes/agents are synthesized with low atomic number materials and thus their x-ray attenuation are very similar to biological tissues. However, their microscopic structures are very different, which may result in significant differences in their refractive properties. Recently, the investigation in the x-ray grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) CT has demonstrated its advantages in differentiating low-atomic materials over the conventional attenuation-based CT. We believe that a synergy of x-ray grating-based DPC CT and nanoparticulated imaging probes and therapeutic agents may play a significant role in extensive preclinical and clinical applications, or even become a modality for molecular imaging. Hence, we propose to image the refractive property of nanoparticulated imaging probes and therapeutical agents using x-ray grating-based DPC CT. In this work, we conduct a preliminary feasibility study with a focus to characterize the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and contrast-detail behavior of the x-ray grating-based DPC CT. The obtained data may be instructive to the architecture design and performance optimization of the x-ray grating-based DPC CT for imaging biomarker-targeted imaging probes and therapeutic agents, and even informative to the translation of preclinical research in theranostics into clinical applications.

  18. A colorimetric and fluorescent dual probe for palladium in aqueous medium and live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin-Wu; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Tan, Qi-Feng; Yao, Pei-Fen; Tan, Jia-Heng; Zhang, Lei

    2016-04-21

    A colorimetric and fluorescent dual probe for palladium species was rationally developed by combining the resorufin fluorophore with allyl chloroformate. The probe enables the visual detection of palladium based on its vivid color change from pale yellow to pink and its fluorescence off-on response to palladium in PBS solution. The detection limit was calculated to be as low as 2.1 nM. The live cell imaging results showed that this probe could be used as an effective fluorescent probe for detecting intracellular palladium species. All these results featured its promising application prospects in the palladium analytical field. PMID:26990285

  19. Fluoromodule-based reporter/probes designed for in vivo fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Chakraborty, Subhasish K.; Sampath, Padma; Rojas, Juan J.; Hou, Weizhou; Saurabh, Saumya; Thorne, Steve H.; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Optical imaging of whole, living animals has proven to be a powerful tool in multiple areas of preclinical research and has allowed noninvasive monitoring of immune responses, tumor and pathogen growth, and treatment responses in longitudinal studies. However, fluorescence-based studies in animals are challenging because tissue absorbs and autofluoresces strongly in the visible light spectrum. These optical properties drive development and use of fluorescent labels that absorb and emit at longer wavelengths. Here, we present a far-red absorbing fluoromodule–based reporter/probe system and show that this system can be used for imaging in living mice. The probe we developed is a fluorogenic dye called SC1 that is dark in solution but highly fluorescent when bound to its cognate reporter, Mars1. The reporter/probe complex, or fluoromodule, produced peak emission near 730 nm. Mars1 was able to bind a variety of structurally similar probes that differ in color and membrane permeability. We demonstrated that a tool kit of multiple probes can be used to label extracellular and intracellular reporter–tagged receptor pools with 2 colors. Imaging studies may benefit from this far-red excited reporter/probe system, which features tight coupling between probe fluorescence and reporter binding and offers the option of using an expandable family of fluorogenic probes with a single reporter gene. PMID:26348895

  20. A resonant scanning dipole-antenna probe for enhanced nanoscale imaging.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Lars; van 't Oever, Jorick; van Hulst, Niek F

    2013-11-13

    We present a scanning antenna probe that provides 35 nm optical hotspots with a 16-fold excitation enhancement. A resonant optical antenna, tuned to operation in the visible, is carved into the aluminum-coated scanning probe. The antenna resonances, field localization, excitation, and polarization response are probed in the near-field by scanning over single fluorescent nanobeads. At the same time, the distance-dependent coupling of the emission to the antenna mode is mapped. Good agreement with theory is obtained. The presented scanning antenna approach is useful for both nanoscale plasmonic mode imaging and (bio)imaging. PMID:24124987

  1. Chemical-contrast imaging with pulse-shaping based pump-probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Daniel C.; Bhagwat, Amar R.; Ogilvie, Jennifer P.

    2013-02-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy and pulse-shaping techniques are providing new modes of contrast for the field of multiphoton microscopy. Endogenous species such as heme proteins show rich nonlinear spectroscopic signatures of excited state absorption, stimulated emission and ground-state bleaching. Commercially available octave-spanning Ti:sapphire oscillators offer new opportunities for imaging based on pump-probe contrast. Spatial light modulators take advantage of this large bandwidth, shaping pulses of light to selectively excite molecular structures with similar spectral properties. We present two-color pump-probe imaging of heme proteins solutions and red blood cells.

  2. Swept-source common-path optical coherence tomography with a MEMS endoscopic imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Can; Wang, Donglin; Zhou, Zhengwei; Liang, Peng; Samuelson, Sean; Pozzi, Antonio; Xie, Huikai

    2014-03-01

    A MEMS-based common-path endoscopic imaging probe for 3D swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) has been developed. The common path is achieved by setting the reference plane at the rear surface of the GRIN lens inside the probe. MEMS devices have the advantages of low cost, small size and fast speed, which are suitable for miniaturizing endoscopic probes. The aperture size of the two-axis MEMS mirror employed in this endoscopic probe is 1 mm by 1 mm and the footprint of the MEMS chip is 1.55 mm by 1.7 mm. The MEMS mirror achieves large two dimensional optical scan angles up to 34° at 4.0 V. The endoscopic probe using the MEMS mirror as the scan engine is only 4.0 mm in diameter. Additionally, an optimum length of the GRIN lens is established to remove the artifacts in the SSOCT images generated from the multiple interfaces inside the endoscopic imaging probe. The MEMS based commonpath probe demonstrates real time 3D OCT images of human finger with 10.6 μm axial resolution, 17.5 μm lateral resolution and 1.0 mm depth range at a frame rate of 50 frames per second.

  3. Scanning thermal microscopy probe capable of simultaneous electrical imaging and the addition of diamond tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E.; Hao, L.; Cox, D. C.; Gallop, J. C.

    2008-03-01

    Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) is a scanning probe technique that allows the mapping of the thermal properties and/or temperature of a substrate. Developments in this scanning probe technique are of great importance to further the study of thermal transport at the micron and at the nano scale, for instance to better the understanding of heat transport in nano-electronic devices or energy transfer in biological systems. Here we describe: 1) the scanning technique developed to acquire simultaneous images of the topography, the thermal and electrical properties of the substrate using a commercially available Veeco SThM probe; 2) how the SThM probe was modified by mounting a micron-sized diamond pyramid on its tip in order to improve the probe's lateral resolution and the topography resolution tests on the performance of the modified probe.

  4. Strained cyclooctyne as a molecular platform for construction of multimodal imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yao; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Kai; Wu, Biying; Duan, Jianli; Chen, Hao; Bu, Lihong; Zhang, Ruiping; Hu, Xianming; Deng, Zixin; Xing, Lei; Hong, Xuechuan; Cheng, Zhen

    2015-05-11

    Small-molecule-based multimodal and multifunctional imaging probes play prominent roles in biomedical research and have high clinical translation ability. A novel multimodal imaging platform using base-catalyzed double addition of thiols to a strained internal alkyne such as bicyclo[6.1.0]nonyne has been established in this study, thus allowing highly selective assembly of various functional units in a protecting-group-free manner. Using this molecular platform, novel dual-modality (PET and NIRF) uPAR-targeted imaging probe: (64)Cu-CHS1 was prepared and evaluated in U87MG cells and tumor-bearing mice models. The excellent PET/NIRF imaging characteristics such as good tumor uptake (3.69%ID/g at 2 h post-injection), high tumor contrast, and specificity were achieved in the small-animal models. These attractive imaging properties make (64)Cu-CHS1 a promising probe for clinical use. PMID:25800807

  5. Local collective motion analysis for multi-probe dynamic imaging and microrheology.

    PubMed

    Khan, Manas; Mason, Thomas G

    2016-08-01

    Dynamical artifacts, such as mechanical drift, advection, and hydrodynamic flow, can adversely affect multi-probe dynamic imaging and passive particle-tracking microrheology experiments. Alternatively, active driving by molecular motors can cause interesting non-Brownian motion of probes in local regions. Existing drift-correction techniques, which require large ensembles of probes or fast temporal sampling, are inadequate for handling complex spatio-temporal drifts and non-Brownian motion of localized domains containing relatively few probes. Here, we report an analytical method based on local collective motion (LCM) analysis of as few as two probes for detecting the presence of non-Brownian motion and for accurately eliminating it to reveal the underlying Brownian motion. By calculating an ensemble-average, time-dependent, LCM mean square displacement (MSD) of two or more localized probes and comparing this MSD to constituent single-probe MSDs, we can identify temporal regimes during which either thermal or athermal motion dominates. Single-probe motion, when referenced relative to the moving frame attached to the multi-probe LCM trajectory, provides a true Brownian MSD after scaling by an appropriate correction factor that depends on the number of probes used in LCM analysis. We show that LCM analysis can be used to correct many different dynamical artifacts, including spatially varying drifts, gradient flows, cell motion, time-dependent drift, and temporally varying oscillatory advection, thereby offering a significant improvement over existing approaches. PMID:27269299

  6. Local collective motion analysis for multi-probe dynamic imaging and microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Manas; Mason, Thomas G.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamical artifacts, such as mechanical drift, advection, and hydrodynamic flow, can adversely affect multi-probe dynamic imaging and passive particle-tracking microrheology experiments. Alternatively, active driving by molecular motors can cause interesting non-Brownian motion of probes in local regions. Existing drift-correction techniques, which require large ensembles of probes or fast temporal sampling, are inadequate for handling complex spatio-temporal drifts and non-Brownian motion of localized domains containing relatively few probes. Here, we report an analytical method based on local collective motion (LCM) analysis of as few as two probes for detecting the presence of non-Brownian motion and for accurately eliminating it to reveal the underlying Brownian motion. By calculating an ensemble-average, time-dependent, LCM mean square displacement (MSD) of two or more localized probes and comparing this MSD to constituent single-probe MSDs, we can identify temporal regimes during which either thermal or athermal motion dominates. Single-probe motion, when referenced relative to the moving frame attached to the multi-probe LCM trajectory, provides a true Brownian MSD after scaling by an appropriate correction factor that depends on the number of probes used in LCM analysis. We show that LCM analysis can be used to correct many different dynamical artifacts, including spatially varying drifts, gradient flows, cell motion, time-dependent drift, and temporally varying oscillatory advection, thereby offering a significant improvement over existing approaches.

  7. Feasibility study on the development of a fiber-optic gamma imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seunghan; Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Jeon, Hyesu; Jang, Jae Seok; Kwon, Guwon; Lee, Dong Eun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Lee, Bongsoo

    2015-07-01

    In this research, we fabricated a fiber-optic gamma imaging probe that could measure the scintillation image induced by gamma-rays. For evaluating the spatial resolution of the optical and the scintillation images measured by using the proposed gamma imaging probe, first, we obtained the light intensity distributions across the sharp edge from the optical and the scintillation images by using a USAF 1951 resolution target and an X-ray beam and then analyzed each modulation transfer function (MTF) curve. Next, we measured the scintillation images with information regarding the distribution by the gamma-rays emitted from Cs-137 sources with four different radioactivities. Finally, we evaluated the intensity variation of the scintillating light from the region of interest (ROI) in the scintillation image according to the radioactivity of Cs-137.

  8. Near-infrared fluorescent probes in cancer imaging and therapy: an emerging field

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiaomin; Wang, Fuli; Qin, Weijun; Yang, Xiaojian; Yuan, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an attractive modality for early cancer detection with high sensitivity and multi-detection capability. Due to convenient modification by conjugating with moieties of interests, NIRF probes are ideal candidates for cancer targeted imaging. Additionally, the combinatory application of NIRF imaging and other imaging modalities that can delineate anatomical structures extends fluorometric determination of biomedical information. Moreover, nanoparticles loaded with NIRF dyes and anticancer agents contribute to the synergistic management of cancer, which integrates the advantage of imaging and therapeutic functions to achieve the ultimate goal of simultaneous diagnosis and treatment. Appropriate probe design with targeting moieties can retain the original properties of NIRF and pharmacokinetics. In recent years, great efforts have been made to develop new NIRF probes with better photostability and strong fluorescence emission, leading to the discovery of numerous novel NIRF probes with fine photophysical properties. Some of these probes exhibit tumoricidal activities upon light radiation, which holds great promise in photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and photoimmunotherapy. This review aims to provide a timely and concise update on emerging NIRF dyes and multifunctional agents. Their potential uses as agents for cancer specific imaging, lymph node mapping, and therapeutics are included. Recent advances of NIRF dyes in clinical use are also summarized. PMID:24648733

  9. Enhanced Fluorescence Imaging of Live Cells by Effective Cytosolic Delivery of Probes

    PubMed Central

    Massignani, Marzia; Canton, Irene; Sun, Tao; Hearnden, Vanessa; MacNeil, Sheila; Blanazs, Adam; Armes, Steven P.; Lewis, Andrew; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Background Microscopic techniques enable real-space imaging of complex biological events and processes. They have become an essential tool to confirm and complement hypotheses made by biomedical scientists and also allow the re-examination of existing models, hence influencing future investigations. Particularly imaging live cells is crucial for an improved understanding of dynamic biological processes, however hitherto live cell imaging has been limited by the necessity to introduce probes within a cell without altering its physiological and structural integrity. We demonstrate herein that this hurdle can be overcome by effective cytosolic delivery. Principal Findings We show the delivery within several types of mammalian cells using nanometre-sized biomimetic polymer vesicles (a.k.a. polymersomes) that offer both highly efficient cellular uptake and endolysomal escape capability without any effect on the cellular metabolic activity. Such biocompatible polymersomes can encapsulate various types of probes including cell membrane probes and nucleic acid probes as well as labelled nucleic acids, antibodies and quantum dots. Significance We show the delivery of sufficient quantities of probes to the cytosol, allowing sustained functional imaging of live cells over time periods of days to weeks. Finally the combination of such effective staining with three-dimensional imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy allows cell imaging in complex three-dimensional environments under both mono-culture and co-culture conditions. Thus cell migration and proliferation can be studied in models that are much closer to the in vivo situation. PMID:20454666

  10. Molecular Surface Sampling and Chemical Imaging using Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    Proximal probe thermal desorption/secondary ionization mass spectrometry was studied and applied to molecular surface sampling and chemical imaging using printed patterns on photopaper as test substrates. With the use of a circular cross section proximal probe with a tip diameter of 50 m and fixed temperature (350 C), the influence of probe-to-surface distance, lane scan spacing, and surface scan speed on signal quality and spatial resolution were studied and optimized. As a compromise between signal amplitude, signal reproducibility, and data acquisition time, a surface scan speed of 100 m/s, probe-to-paper surface distance of 5 m, and lane spacing of 10 m were used for imaging. Under those conditions the proximal probe thermal desorption/secondary ionization mass spectrometry method was able to achieve a spatial resolution of about 50 m as determined by the ability to distinguish surface patterns of known dimensions that were printed on the paper substrate. It is expected that spatial resolution and chemical image quality could be further improved by using probes of smaller cross section size and by incorporating a means to maintain a fixed optimal probe-to-surface distance real time, continuously adapting to the changing topography of the surface during a lane scan.

  11. High speed miniature motorized endoscopic probe for 3D optical frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; Mo, Jianhua; Helderman, Frank; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2013-03-01

    We present a miniature motorized endoscopic probe for Optical Frequency Domain Imaging with an outer diameter of 1.65 mm and a rotation speed of 3,000 - 12,500 rpm. This is the smallest motorized high speed OCT probe to our knowledge. The probe has a motorized distal end which provides a significant advantage over proximally driven probes since it does not require a drive shaft to transfer the rotational torque to the distal end of the probe and functions without a fiber rotary junction. The probe has a focal Full Width at Half Maximum of 9.6 μm and a working distance of 0.47 mm. We analyzed the non-uniform rotation distortion and found a location fluctuation of only 1.87° in repeated measurements of the same object. The probe was integrated in a high-speed Optical Frequency Domain Imaging setup at 1310 nm We demonstrated its performance with imaging ex vivo pig bronchial and in vivo goat lung.

  12. Portable oral cancer detection using a miniature confocal imaging probe with a large field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youmin; Raj, Milan; McGuff, H. Stan; Bhave, Gauri; Yang, Bin; Shen, Ting; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate a MEMS micromirror enabled handheld confocal imaging probe for portable oral cancer detection, where a comparatively large field of view (FOV) was generated through the programmable Lissajous scanning pattern of the MEMS micromirror. Miniaturized handheld MEMS confocal imaging probe was developed, and further compared with the desktop confocal prototype under clinical setting. For the handheld confocal imaging system, optical design simulations using CODE VR® shows the lateral and axial resolution to be 0.98 µm and 4.2 µm, where experimental values were determined to be 3 µm and 5.8 µm, respectively, with a FOV of 280 µm×300 µm. Fast Lissajous imaging speed up to 2 fps was realized with improved Labview and Java based real-time imaging software. Properties such as 3D imaging through autofocusing and mosaic imaging for extended lateral view (6 mm × 8 mm) were examined for carcinoma real-time pathology. Neoplastic lesion tissues of giant cell fibroma and peripheral ossifying fibroma, the fibroma inside the paraffin box and ex vivo gross tissues were imaged by the bench-top and handheld imaging modalities, and further compared with commercial microscope imaging results. The MEMS scanner-based handheld confocal imaging probe shows great promise as a potential clinical tool for oral cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Genetically Anchored Fluorescent Probes for Subcellular Specific Imaging of Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiqian; Sizovs, Antons; Wang, Meng C.; Provost, Christopher R.; Huang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Imaging hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at the subcellular resolution will greatly improve the understanding of functions of this signaling molecule. Taking advantage of the protein labeling technologies, we report a general strategy for the development of organelle specific H2S probes, which enables sub-cellular H2S imaging essentially in any organelles of interest. PMID:26806071

  14. NEAR-INFRARED DYES: Probe Development and Applications in Optical Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D.; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2010-01-01

    The recent emergence of optical imaging has brought forth a unique challenge for chemists: development of new biocompatible dyes that fluoresce in the near-infrared (NIR) region for optimal use in biomedical applications. This review describes the synthesis of NIR dyes and the design of probes capable of noninvasively imaging molecular events in small animal models. PMID:21822405

  15. Wavelength-Dependent Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy: Selectively Imaging Nanoparticle Probes in Live Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wei; Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning; and Yeung, Edward S.

    2009-11-15

    Gold and silver nanoparticles display extraordinarily large apparent refractive indices near their plasmon resonance (PR) wavelengths. These nanoparticles show good contrast in a narrow spectral band but are poorly resolved at other wavelengths in differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The wavelength dependence of DIC contrast of gold/silver nanoparticles is interpreted in terms of Mie's theory and DIC working principles. We further exploit this wavelength dependence by modifying a DIC microscope to enable simultaneous imaging at two wavelengths. We demonstrate that gold/silver nanoparticles immobilized on the same glass slides through hybridization can be differentiated and imaged separately. High-contrast, video-rate images of living cells can be recorded both with and without illuminating the gold nanoparticle probes, providing definitive probe identification. Dual-wavelength DIC microscopy thus presents a new approach to the simultaneous detection of multiple probes of interest for high-speed live-cell imaging.

  16. Semiconducting Polymer Nanoparticles as Photoacoustic Molecular Imaging Probes in Living Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Kanyi; Shuhendler, Adam J.; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Mei, Jianguo; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Bao, Zhenan; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging holds great promise for the visualization of physiology and pathology at the molecular level with deep tissue penetration and fine spatial resolution. To fully utilize this potential, PA molecular imaging probes have to be developed. Herein we introduce near infrared (NIR) light absorbing semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPNs) as a new class of contrast agents for PA molecular imaging. SPNs can produce stronger signal than commonly used single-wall carbon nanotubes and gold nanorods on a per mass basis, permitting whole-body lymph node PA mapping in living mice at a low systematic injection mass. Furthermore, SPNs possess high structural flexibility, narrow PA spectral profiles, and strong resistance to photodegradation and oxidation, which enables development of the first NIR ratiometric PA probe for in vivo real-time imaging of reactive oxygen species—vital chemical mediators of many diseases. These results demonstrate SPNs an ideal nanoplatform for developing PA molecular probes. PMID:24463363

  17. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D.; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Yu, James Y. H.; Xie, Jingping; Peterson, Todd E.; Crews, Brenda C.; Marnett, Larry; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2013-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel 18F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional 18F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an 18F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The 18F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging and

  18. Probing the improbable: imaging carbon atoms in alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, E A; Yahia, Noor; Larson, David J.; Miller, Michael K; Todd, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Atom-probe tomography has proven very powerful to analyze the detailed structure and chemistry of metallic alloys and semiconductor structures while ceramic materials have remained outside its standard purview. In the current work, we demonstrate that bulk alumina can be quantitatively analyzed and microstructural features observed. The analysis of grain boundary carbon segregation - barely achievable by electron microscopy - opens the possibility of understanding the mechanistic effects of dopants on mechanical properties, fracture and wear properties of bulk oxides.

  19. Water-soluble BODIPY-based fluorescent probe for mitochondrial imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Binglin; Tang, Simon; Woodward, Adam W.; Kim, Bosung; Belfield, Kevin D.

    2016-03-01

    A new mitochondrial targeting fluorescent probe is designed, synthesized, characterized, and investigated. The probe is composed of three moieties, a BODIPY platform working as the fluorophore, two triphenylphosphonium (TPP) groups serving as mitochondrial targeting moiety, and two long highly hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains to increase its water solubility and reduce its cytotoxicity. As a mitochondria-selective fluorescent probe, the probe exhibits a series of desirable advantages compared with other reported fluorescent mitochondrial probes. It is readily soluble in aqueous media and emits very strong fluorescence. Photophysical determination experiments show that the photophysical properties of the probe are independent of solvent polarity and it has high quantum yield in various solvents examined. The probe also has good photostability and pH insensitivity over a broad pH range. Results obtained from cell viability tests indicate that the cytotoxicity of the probe is very low. Confocal fluorescence microscopy colocalization experiments reveal that this probe possesses excellent mitochondrial targeting ability and it is suitable for imaging mitochondria in living cells.

  20. Two-photon fluorescent probe derived from naphthalimide for cysteine detection and imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanbin; Liu, Yuwen; Liu, Wei; Liang, Shucai

    2015-02-25

    A maleimide coupling naphthalimide was reported as new two-photon fluorescent (TPF) probe for cysteine (Cys). The probe was weakly fluorescent itself due to the donor-excited photoinduced electron transfer (d-PET). After reaction with Cys, d-PET process was blocked and fluorescence enhancement of the probe was observed at 470 nm. The d-PET principle was rationalized by theoretical calculations with density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory. Thiol-maleimide addition between the probe and Cys was confirmed by (1)H NMR and mass spectrum measurements. TPF analysis demonstrated a 24.7-fold emission increase of the probe induced by Cys upon excitation at 760 nm. The two-photon action cross-section of probe-Cys adduct at 760 nm reached 42 GM compared to 1.7 GM for free probe. The probe showed high sensitivity and selectivity to Cys over other potential interferences; especially it had the capability to discriminate Cys from glutathione and homocysteine. Through TPF imaging, the probe was successfully applied in the detection of Cys in living cells. PMID:25240143

  1. Two-photon fluorescent probe derived from naphthalimide for cysteine detection and imaging in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanbin; Liu, Yuwen; Liu, Wei; Liang, Shucai

    2015-02-01

    A maleimide coupling naphthalimide was reported as new two-photon fluorescent (TPF) probe for cysteine (Cys). The probe was weakly fluorescent itself due to the donor-excited photoinduced electron transfer (d-PET). After reaction with Cys, d-PET process was blocked and fluorescence enhancement of the probe was observed at 470 nm. The d-PET principle was rationalized by theoretical calculations with density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory. Thiol-maleimide addition between the probe and Cys was confirmed by 1H NMR and mass spectrum measurements. TPF analysis demonstrated a 24.7-fold emission increase of the probe induced by Cys upon excitation at 760 nm. The two-photon action cross-section of probe-Cys adduct at 760 nm reached 42 GM compared to 1.7 GM for free probe. The probe showed high sensitivity and selectivity to Cys over other potential interferences; especially it had the capability to discriminate Cys from glutathione and homocysteine. Through TPF imaging, the probe was successfully applied in the detection of Cys in living cells.

  2. Detection and Imaging of Superoxide in Roots by an Electron Spin Resonance Spin-Probe Method

    PubMed Central

    Warwar, Nasim; Mor, Avishai; Fluhr, Robert; Pandian, Ramasamy P.; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Blank, Aharon

    2011-01-01

    The detection, quantification, and imaging of short-lived reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide, in live biological specimens have always been challenging and controversial. Fluorescence-based methods are nonspecific, and electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping methods require high probe concentrations and lack the capability for sufficient image resolution. In this work, a novel (to our knowledge), sensitive, small ESR imaging resonator was used together with a stable spin probe that specifically reacts with superoxide with a high reaction rate constant. This ESR spin-probe-based methodology was used to examine superoxide generated in a plant root as a result of an apical leaf injury. The results show that the spin probe rapidly permeated the plant's extracellular space. Upon injury of the plant tissue, superoxide was produced and the ESR signal decreased rapidly in the injured parts as well as in the distal part of the root. This is attributed to superoxide production and thus provides a means of quantifying the level of superoxide in the plant. The spin probe's narrow single-line ESR spectrum, together with the sensitive imaging resonator, facilitates the quantitative measurement of superoxide in small biological samples, such as the plant's root, as well as one-dimensional imaging along the length of the root. This type of methodology can be used to resolve many questions involving the production of apoplastic superoxide in plant biology. PMID:21943435

  3. Electromechanical Imaging of Biomaterials by Scanning Probe Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Brian J; Kalinin, Sergei V; Shin, Junsoo; Jesse, Stephen; Grichko, V.; Thundat, Thomas George; Baddorf, Arthur P; Gruverman, A.

    2006-01-01

    The majority of calcified and connective tissues possess complex hierarchical structure spanning the length scales from nanometers to millimeters. Understanding the biological functionality of these materials requires reliable methods for structural imaging on the nanoscale. Here, we demonstrate an approach for electromechanical imaging of the structure of biological samples on the length scales from tens of microns to nanometers using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), which utilizes the intrinsic piezoelectricity of biopolymers such as proteins and polysaccharides as the basis for high-resolution imaging. Nanostructural imaging of a variety of protein-based materials, including tooth, antler, and cartilage, is demonstrated. Visualization of protein fibrils with sub-10 nm spatial resolution in a human tooth is achieved. Given the near-ubiquitous presence of piezoelectricity in biological systems, PFM is suggested as a versatile tool for micro- and nanostructural imaging in both connective and calcified tissues.

  4. Integrated flexible handheld probe for imaging and evaluation of iridocorneal angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoj, Vengalathunadakal K.; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham; Baskaran, Mani; Aung, Tin

    2015-01-01

    An imaging probe is designed and developed by integrating a miniaturized charge-coupled diode camera and light-emitting diode light source, which enables evaluation of the iridocorneal region inside the eye. The efficiency of the prototype probe instrument is illustrated initially by using not only eye models, but also samples such as pig eye. The proposed methodology and developed scheme are expected to find potential application in iridocorneal angle documentation, glaucoma diagnosis, and follow-up management procedures.

  5. Asteroid (4179) Toutatis size determination via optical images observed by the Chang'e-2 probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Huang, J.; Zhao, W.; Wang, X.; Meng, L.; Tang, X.

    2014-07-01

    This work is a physical and statistical study of the asteroid (4179) Toutatis using the optical images obtained by a solar panel monitor of the Chang'e-2 probe on Dec. 13, 2012 [1]. In the imaging strategy, the camera is focused at infinity. This is specially designed for the probe with its solar panels monitor's principle axis pointing to the relative velocity direction of the probe and Toutatis. The imaging strategy provides a dedicated way to resolve the size by multi-frame optical images. The inherent features of the data are: (1) almost no rotation was recorded because of the 5.41-7.35 Earth-day rotation period and the small amount of elapsed imaging time, only minutes, make the object stay in the images in a fixed position and orientation; (2) the sharpness of the upper left boundary and the vagueness of lower right boundary resulting from the direction of SAP (Sun-Asteroid-Probe angle) cause a varying accuracy in locating points at different parts of Toutatis. A common view is that direct, accurate measurements of asteroid shapes, sizes, and pole positions are now possible for larger asteroids that can be spatially resolved using the Hubble Space Telescope or large ground-based telescopes equipped with adaptive optics. For a quite complex planetary/asteroid probe study, these measurements certainly need continuous validation via a variety of ways [2]. Based on engineering parameters of the probe during the fly-by, the target spatial resolving and measuring procedures are described in the paper. Results estimated are optical perceptible size on the flyby epoch under the solar phase angles during the imaging. It is found that the perceptible size measured using the optical observations and the size derived from the radar observations by Ostro et al.~in 1995 [3], are close to one another.

  6. Dual-illumination mode, wide-field probe imaging scheme for imaging irido-corneal angle region inside eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoj, V. K.; Murukeshan, V. M.; Hong, Jesmond; Baskaran, M.; Aung, Tin

    2015-07-01

    Noninvasive medical imaging techniques have generated great interest and high potential in the research and development of ocular imaging and follow up procedures. It is well known that angle closure glaucoma is one of the major ocular diseases/ conditions that causes blindness. The identification and treatment of this disease are related primarily to angle assessment techniques. In this paper, we illustrate a probe-based imaging approach to obtain the images of the angle region in eye. The proposed probe consists of a micro CCD camera and LED/NIR laser light sources and they are configured at the distal end to enable imaging of iridocorneal region inside eye. With this proposed dualmodal probe, imaging is performed in light (white visible LED ON) and dark (NIR laser light source alone) conditions and the angle region is noticeable in both cases. The imaging using NIR sources have major significance in anterior chamber imaging since it evades pupil constriction due to the bright light and thereby the artificial altering of anterior chamber angle. The proposed methodology and developed scheme are expected to find potential application in glaucoma disease detection and diagnosis.

  7. Turn-on trivalent cation selective chemodosimetric probe to image native cellular iron pools.

    PubMed

    Venkateswarulu, M; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Mukherjee, Subhrakanti; Koner, Rik Rani

    2014-04-14

    A new turn-on cell permeable chemodosimetric probe has been developed and its application in the selective detection of trivalent cations (Fe(3+)/Cr(3+)/Al(3+)) at a sub-nanomolar level has been demonstrated. The selectivity of over a broad spectrum of mono- and divalent metal ions was established using fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, the changes in the absorption spectra of in the presence of trivalent cations enabled the most bio-relevant metal ion Fe(3+) over Cr(3+)/Al(3+) to be distinguished. The probe was found to be successful in the fluorescence imaging of native cellular iron pools. The fluorescence imaging of the native iron pools of banana pith further supported the high sensitivity of towards Fe(3+) present in living systems. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a turn-on chemodosimetric probe to image native cellular Fe(3+) pools. PMID:24534800

  8. Amyloid-β Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Probes: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C.; Långström, Bengt; Zaidi, Habib; Vinters, Harry V.; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Doudet, Doris; Mishani, Eyal; Cohen, Robert M.; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F.; Alavi, Abass; Barrio, Jorge R.

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly rising prevalence and cost of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in recent decades has made the imaging of amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits the focus of intense research. Several amyloid imaging probes with purported specificity for Aβ plaques are currently at various stages of FDA approval. However, a number of factors appear to preclude these probes from clinical utilization. As the available “amyloid specific” PET imaging probes have failed to demonstrate diagnostic value and have shown limited utility for monitoring therapeutic interventions in humans, a debate on their significance has emerged. The aim of this review is to identify and discuss critically the scientific issues contributing to the extensive inconsistencies reported in the literature on their purported in vivo amyloid specificity and potential utilization in patients. PMID:23648516

  9. Ultrafast nanoscale imaging of surface charges by scanning resistive probe microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, H.; Ryu, K.; Park, H.; Park, C.; Jeon, D.; Kim, Y. K.; Jung, J.; Min, D-K.; Kim, Y.; Lee, H. N.; Park, Y.; Shin, H.; Hong, S.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoscale manipulation of surface charges and their imaging are essential for understanding local electronic behaviors of polar materials and advanced electronic devices. Electrostatic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy have been extensively used to probe and image local surface charges responsible for electrodynamics and transport phenomena. However, they rely on the weak electric force modulation of cantilever that limits both spatial and temporal resolutions. Here we present a field effect transistor embedded probe that can directly image surface charges on a length scale of 25 nm and a time scale of less than 125 {mu}s. On the basis of the calculation of net surface charges in a 25 nm diameter ferroelectric domain, we could estimate the charge density resolution to be as low as 0.08 {mu}C/cm{sup 2}, which is equivalent to 1/20 electron per nanometer square at room temperature.

  10. Single-body lensed-fiber scanning probe actuated by magnetic force for optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Min, Eun Jung; Na, Jihoon; Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2009-06-15

    We propose a fiber-based hand-held scanning probe suitable for the sample arm of an optical imaging system including optical coherence tomography. To achieve compactness, a single-body lensed-fiber and a solenoid actuator were utilized. The focusing lens of the probe was directly formed onto the distal end of a fiber, which eliminated the need for additional optical components and optical alignment. A ferromagnetic iron bead was glued onto the middle of the fiber to enable actuation by magnetic force, which allowed easy fabrication and good practicality. The fiber piece having the built-in fiber lens was forced to oscillate in its resonant frequency. With the implemented probe, optical coherence tomography images of a human fingertip and a pearl were obtained at an imaging speed of 30 frames/s over a scanning range of 4 mm. PMID:19529740

  11. A Bridge Not Too Far: Linking Disciplines Through Molecular Imaging Probes.

    PubMed

    Valliant, John F

    2016-09-01

    The field of nuclear medicine will rely increasingly on the discovery, proper evaluation, and clinical use of molecular imaging probes and on collaborations. Collaborations will include new initiatives among experts already involved in the field and with researchers, technologists, and clinicians from different areas of science and medicine. This article serves to highlight some of the opportunities in which molecular imaging and nuclear medicine in conjunction with probe development, new imaging technologies, and multidisciplinary collaborations can have a significant impact on health care and basic science from the perspective of a person involved in probe development. The article emphasizes breast cancer, but the concepts are readily applied to other areas of medicine and medical research. PMID:27601414

  12. High Resolution Tissue Imaging Using the Single-probe Mass Spectrometry under Ambient Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Wei; Pan, Ning; Yang, Zhibo

    2015-06-01

    Ambient mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is an emerging field with great potential for the detailed spatial analysis of biological samples with minimal pretreatment. We have developed a miniaturized sampling and ionization device, the Single-probe, which uses in-situ surface micro-extraction to achieve high detection sensitivity and spatial resolution during MSI experiments. The Single-probe was coupled to a Thermo LTQ Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer and was able to create high spatial and high mass resolution MS images at 8 ± 2 and 8.5 μm on flat polycarbonate microscope slides and mouse kidney sections, respectively, which are among the highest resolutions available for ambient MSI techniques. Our proof-of-principle experiments indicate that the Single-probe MSI technique has the potential to obtain ambient MS images with very high spatial resolutions with minimal sample preparation, which opens the possibility for subcellular ambient tissue MSI to be performed in the future.

  13. Novel PET/SPECT Probes for Imaging of Tau in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    As the world's population ages, the number of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is predicted to increase rapidly. The presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), composed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, is one of the neuropathological hallmarks of AD brain. Since the presence of NFTs is well correlated with neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in AD, imaging of tau using positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is useful for presymptomatic diagnosis and monitoring of the progression of AD. Therefore, novel PET/SPECT probes for the imaging of tau have been developed. More recently, several probes were tested clinically and evaluated for their utility. This paper reviews the current state of research on the development and evaluation of PET/SPECT probes for the imaging of tau in AD brain. PMID:25879047

  14. Automatic guidance of an ultrasound probe by visual servoing based on B-mode image moments.

    PubMed

    Mebarki, Rafik; Krupa, Alexandre; Collewet, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new visual servo approach to automatically control in real-time the full motion of a 2D ultrasound (US) probe held by a medical robot in order to reach a desired image of motionless soft tissue object in B-mode ultrasound imaging. Combinations of image moments of the observed object cross-section are used as feedback information in the visual control scheme. These visual features are extracted in real-time from the US image thanks to a fast image segmentation method. Simulations performed with a static US volume containing an egg-shaped object, and ex-vivo experiments using a robotized US probe that interacts with a motionless rabbit heart immersed in water, show the validity of this new approach and its robustness to different perturbations. This method shows promise for a variety of US-guided medical interventions that require real-time servoing. PMID:18982623

  15. A targeted molecular probe for colorectal cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attramadal, T.; Bjerke, R.; Indrevoll, B.; Moestue, S.; Rogstad, A.; Bendiksen, R.; Healey, A.; Johannesen, E.

    2008-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer death. Morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs can be reduced if the disease can be detected at an early stage. Screening is a viable approach as there is a clear link to risk factors such as age. We have developed a fluorescent contrast agent for use during colonoscopy. The agent is administered intravenously and is targeted to an early stage molecular marker for colorectal cancer. The agent consists of a targeting section comprising a peptide, and a fluorescent reporter molecule. Clinical imaging of the agent is to be performed with a far red fluorescence imaging channel (635 nm excitation/660-700 nm emission) as an adjunct to white light colonoscopy. Preclinical proof of mechanism results are presented. The compound has a K d of ~3nM. Two human xenograft tumour models were used. Tumour cells were implanted and grown subcutaneously in nude mice. Imaging using a fluorescence reflectance imaging system and quantitative biodistribution studies were performed. Substances tested include the targeted agent, and a scrambled sequence of the peptide (no binding) used as a negative control. Competition studies were also performed by co-administration of 180 times excess unlabelled peptide. Positive imaging contrast was shown in the tumours, with a clear relationship to expression levels (confirmed with quantitative biodistribution data). There was a significant difference between the positive and negative control substances, and a significant reduction in contrast in the competition experiment.

  16. Aminopeptidase N/CD13 targeting fluorescent probes: synthesis and application to tumor cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhouen; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Kazuhito; Hatta, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nishimoto, Sei-ichi

    2005-11-01

    A family of fluorescein-peptide conjugates (CNP1-3) for aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) targeting fluorescent probes were designed and synthesized. Among the three conjugates, CNP1 bearing tumor-homing cyclic peptide CNGRC, could selectively label APN/CD13 over-expressing on the surface of tumor cells of HT-1080, as identified by means of fluorescent microscopic cell imaging. CNP1 was shown to be a promising fluorescent probe applicable to tumor-targeting molecular imaging. PMID:15885853

  17. Probing Nearby Planetary Systems by Debris Disk Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Many main-sequence stars possess tenuous circumstellar dust clouds believed to trace extrasolar analogs of the Sun's asteroidand Kuiper Belts. While most of these "debris disks" are known only from far-infrared photometry, a growing number of them are now spatially resolved. In this talk, I'll review what is currently known about the structure of debris disks. Using images from the Hubble, Spitzer, and Herschel Space Telescopes, I will show how modeling of these resolved systems can place strong constraints on dust particle properties in the disks. Some of the disks show disturbed structures suggestive of planetary perturbations: specific cases will be discussed where directly-imaged exoplanets are clearly affecting debris disk structure. I'll conclude with thoughts on the future of high contrast exoplanet imaging.

  18. In vivo inflammation imaging using a CB2R-targeted near infrared fluorescent probe

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaojuan; Shao, Pin; Ling, Xiaoxi; Yang, Ling; Hou, Weizhou; Thorne, Steve H; Beaino, Wissam; Anderson, Carolyn J; Ding, Ying; Bai, Mingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is considered as a critical cause of a host of disorders, such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative diseases, although the exact mechanism is yet to be explored. Imaging tools that can specifically target inflammation are therefore important to help reveal the role of inflammation in disease progression, and allows for developing new therapeutic strategies to ultimately improve patient care. The purpose of this study was to develop a new in vivo inflammation imaging approach by targeting the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R), an emerging inflammation biomarker, using a unique near infrared (NIR) fluorescent probe. Herein, we report the first in vivo CB2R-targeted NIR inflammation imaging study using a synthetic fluorescent probe developed in our laboratory, NIR760-mbc94. In vitro binding assay and fluorescence microscopy study indicate NIR760-mbc94 specifically binds towards CB2R in mouse RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Furthermore, in vivo imaging was performed using a Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation mouse model. NIR760-mbc94 successfully identified inflamed tissues and the probe uptake was blocked by a CB2R ligand, SR144528. Additionally, immunofluorescence staining in cryosectioned tissues validated the NIR760-mbc94 uptake in inflamed tissues. In conclusion, this study reports the first in vivo CB2R-targeted inflammation imaging using an NIR fluorescent probe. Specific targeting of NIR760-mbc94 has been demonstrated in macrophage cells, as well as a CFA-induced inflammation mouse model. The combined evidence indicates that NIR760-mbc94 is a promising inflammation imaging probe. Moreover, in vivo CB2R-targeted fluorescence imaging may have potential in the study of inflammation-related diseases. PMID:26069858

  19. The development and evaluation of head probes for optical imaging of the infant head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, Gilberto

    The objective of this thesis was to develop and evaluate optical imaging probes for mapping oxygenation and haemodynamic changes in the newborn infant brain. Two imaging approaches are being developed at University College London (UCL): optical topography (surface mapping of the cortex) and optical tomography (volume imaging). Both have the potential to provide information about the function of the normal brain and about a variety of neurophysiologies! abnormalities. Both techniques require an array of optical fibres/fibre bundles to be held in contact with the head, for periods of time from tens of seconds to an hour or more. The design of suitable probes must ensure the comfort and safety of the subject, and provide measurements minimally sensitive to external sources of light and patient motion. A series of prototype adaptable helmets were developed for optical tomography of the premature infant brain using the UCL 32-channel time-resolved system. They were required to attach 32 optical fibre bundles over the infant scalp, and were designed to accommodate infants with a variety of head shapes and sizes, aged between 24-weeks gestational age and term. Continual improvements to the helmet design were introduced following the evaluation of each prototype on infants in the hospital. Data were acquired to generate images revealing the concentration and oxygenation of blood in the brain, and the response of the brain to sensory stimulation. This part of the project also involved designing and testing new methods of acquiring calibration data using reference phantoms. The second focus of the project was the development of probes for use with the UCL frequency-multiplexed near-infrared topography system. This is being used to image functional activation in the infant cortex. A series of probes were developed and experiments were conducted to evaluate their sensitivity to patient motion and to compression of the probe. The probes have been used for a variety of

  20. Advances of molecular imaging probes for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Xiaobo; Liu, Zhiguo; Yu, Lun; Hu, Shuo; Chen, Lizhang; Zeng, Wenbin

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive decline in multiple cognitive domains and it becomes the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. There is an urgent need for the early diagnosis and treatment of AD to ease caregiver burden and medical costs, as well as improve patients' living activities associated with the dramatic increasing number of affected individuals. Molecular imaging with target-specific probes is contributing to identify the underlying biology in AD, which benefits to the early diagnosis of AD and the evaluation of anti-AD therapy. Molecular imaging probes, such as (11)C-PIB, (11)C-MP4A, (18)F-AV-45, and (11)F-FDG, can selectively bind to special bimolecular of AD or accurately accumulate at the location of damage areas, thus become an edge tool for a better management of the diseases in the clinical practice and new drug development. In the past decades, a large variety of probes is being developed and tested to be useful for the early and accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, patient selection for disease-modifying therapeutic trials and monitoring the effect of anti-amyloid therapy. Since imaging probes may also help to guide physicians to identify those patients that could best benefit from a given therapeutic regimen, dose, or duration of drug, this paper is to present a perspective of the available imaging probes for AD, classified on different modalities. Meanwhile, recent advances of those probes that have been selected for clinical trials and are at the different stages of the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) approval are outlined. Additionally, future directions and specific application of imaging strategies designed for both diagnosis and treatment for AD are discussed. PMID:24484277

  1. Investigation of a MMP-2 Activity-Dependent Anchoring Probe for Nuclear Imaging of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Temma, Takashi; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Yonezawa, Aki; Kondo, Naoya; Sano, Kohei; Sakamoto, Takeharu; Seiki, Motoharu; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Since matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is an important marker of tumor malignancy, we developed an original drug design strategy, MMP-2 activity dependent anchoring probes (MDAP), for use in MMP-2 activity imaging, and evaluated the usefulness of this probe in in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods We designed and synthesized MDAP1000, MDAP3000, and MDAP5000, which consist of 4 independent moieties: RI unit (111In hydrophilic chelate), MMP-2 substrate unit (short peptide), anchoring unit (alkyl chain), and anchoring inhibition unit (polyethylene glycol (PEGn; where n represents the approximate molecular weight, n = 1000, 3000, and 5000). Probe cleavage was evaluated by chromatography after MMP-2 treatment. Cellular uptake of the probes was then measured. Radioactivity accumulation in tumor xenografts was evaluated after intravenous injection of the probes, and probe cleavage was evaluated in tumor homogenates. Results MDAP1000, MDAP3000, and MDAP5000 were cleaved by MMP-2 in a concentration-dependent manner. MDAP3000 pretreated with MMP-2 showed higher accumulation in tumor cells, and was completely blocked by additional treatment with an MMP inhibitor. MDAP3000 exhibited rapid blood clearance and a high tumor accumulation after intravenous injection in a rodent model. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that MDAP3000 exhibited a considerably slow washout rate from tumors to blood. A certain fraction of cleaved MDAP3000 existed in tumor xenografts in vivo. Conclusions The results indicate the possible usefulness of our MDAP strategy for tumor imaging. PMID:25010662

  2. Design and Synthesis of Near-infrared Fluorescent Probes for Imaging of Biological Nitroxyl.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Liu, Ruochuan; Zhang, Huatang; Peltier, Raoul; Lam, Yun-Wah; Zhu, Qing; Hu, Yi; Sun, Hongyan

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxyl (HNO), the reduced and protonated form of nitric oxide (NO), has recently been identified as an interesting and important signaling molecule in biological systems. However, research on its biosynthesis and bioactivities are hampered by the lack of versatile HNO detection methods applicable to living cells. In this report, two new near-infrared (NIR) probes were designed and synthesized for HNO imaging in living cells. One of the probes was found to display high sensitivity towards HNO, with up to 67-fold of fluorescence increment after reaction with HNO. The detection limit was determined to be as low as 0.043 μM. The probe displayed high selectivity towards HNO over other biologically related species including metal ions, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species and reactive sulfur species. Furthermore, the probe was shown to be suitable for imaging of exogenous and endogenous HNO in living cells. Interestingly, the probe was found to be mainly localized in lysosomes. We envision that the new NIR probe described here will serve as a useful tool for further elucidation of the intricate roles of HNO in living cells. PMID:26584764

  3. Design and Synthesis of Near-infrared Fluorescent Probes for Imaging of Biological Nitroxyl

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yi; Liu, Ruochuan; Zhang, Huatang; Peltier, Raoul; Lam, Yun-Wah; Zhu, Qing; Hu, Yi; Sun, Hongyan

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxyl (HNO), the reduced and protonated form of nitric oxide (NO), has recently been identified as an interesting and important signaling molecule in biological systems. However, research on its biosynthesis and bioactivities are hampered by the lack of versatile HNO detection methods applicable to living cells. In this report, two new near-infrared (NIR) probes were designed and synthesized for HNO imaging in living cells. One of the probes was found to display high sensitivity towards HNO, with up to 67-fold of fluorescence increment after reaction with HNO. The detection limit was determined to be as low as 0.043 μM. The probe displayed high selectivity towards HNO over other biologically related species including metal ions, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species and reactive sulfur species. Furthermore, the probe was shown to be suitable for imaging of exogenous and endogenous HNO in living cells. Interestingly, the probe was found to be mainly localized in lysosomes. We envision that the new NIR probe described here will serve as a useful tool for further elucidation of the intricate roles of HNO in living cells. PMID:26584764

  4. Multimodal nonlinear endo-microscopy probe design for high resolution, label-free intraoperative imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Xu, Xiaoyun; McCormick, Daniel T; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Stephen T C

    2015-07-01

    We present a portable, multimodal, nonlinear endo-microscopy probe designed for intraoperative oncological imaging. Application of a four-wave mixing noise suppression scheme using dual wavelength wave plates (DWW) and a polarization-maintaining fiber improves tissue signal collection efficiency, allowing for miniaturization. The probe, with a small 14 mm transversal diameter, includes a customized miniaturized two-axis MEMS (micro-electromechanical system) raster scanning mirror and micro-optics with an illumination laser delivered by a polarization-maintaining fiber. The probe can potentially be integrated into the arms of a surgical robot, such as da Vinci robotic surgery system, due to its minimal cross sectional area. It has the ability to incorporate multiple imaging modalities including CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering), SHG (second harmonic generation), and TPEF (two-photon excited fluorescence) in order to allow the surgeon to locate tumor cells within the context of normal stromal tissue. The resolution of the endo-microscope is experimentally determined to be 0.78 µm, a high level of accuracy for such a compact probe setup. The expected resolution of the as-built multimodal, nonlinear, endo-microscopy probe is 1 µm based on the calculation tolerance allocation using Monte-Carlo simulation. The reported probe is intended for use in laparoscopic or radical prostatectomy, including detection of tumor margins and avoidance of nerve impairment during surgery. PMID:26203361

  5. Multimodal nonlinear endo-microscopy probe design for high resolution, label-free intraoperative imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu; Xu, Xiaoyun; McCormick, Daniel T.; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Stephen T.C.

    2015-01-01

    We present a portable, multimodal, nonlinear endo-microscopy probe designed for intraoperative oncological imaging. Application of a four-wave mixing noise suppression scheme using dual wavelength wave plates (DWW) and a polarization-maintaining fiber improves tissue signal collection efficiency, allowing for miniaturization. The probe, with a small 14 mm transversal diameter, includes a customized miniaturized two-axis MEMS (micro-electromechanical system) raster scanning mirror and micro-optics with an illumination laser delivered by a polarization-maintaining fiber. The probe can potentially be integrated into the arms of a surgical robot, such as da Vinci robotic surgery system, due to its minimal cross sectional area. It has the ability to incorporate multiple imaging modalities including CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering), SHG (second harmonic generation), and TPEF (two-photon excited fluorescence) in order to allow the surgeon to locate tumor cells within the context of normal stromal tissue. The resolution of the endo-microscope is experimentally determined to be 0.78 µm, a high level of accuracy for such a compact probe setup. The expected resolution of the as-built multimodal, nonlinear, endo-microscopy probe is 1 µm based on the calculation tolerance allocation using Monte-Carlo simulation. The reported probe is intended for use in laparoscopic or radical prostatectomy, including detection of tumor margins and avoidance of nerve impairment during surgery. PMID:26203361

  6. Molecular Imaging Probes for Diagnosis and Therapy Evaluation of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qingqing; Li, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major cause of cancer death in women where early detection and accurate assessment of therapy response can improve clinical outcomes. Molecular imaging, which includes PET, SPECT, MRI, and optical modalities, provides noninvasive means of detecting biological processes and molecular events in vivo. Molecular imaging has the potential to enhance our understanding of breast cancer biology and effects of drug action during both preclinical and clinical phases of drug development. This has led to the identification of many molecular imaging probes for key processes in breast cancer. Hormone receptors, growth factor receptor, and angiogenic factors, such as ER, PR, HER2, and VEGFR, have been adopted as imaging targets to detect and stage the breast cancer and to monitor the treatment efficacy. Receptor imaging probes are usually composed of targeting moiety attached to a signaling component such as a radionuclide that can be detected using dedicated instruments. Current molecular imaging probes involved in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy evaluation are reviewed, and future of molecular imaging for the preclinical and clinical is explained. PMID:23533377

  7. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: general dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-10-14

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip-sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques. PMID:27607339

  8. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: General dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-09-08

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify themore » findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. In conclusion, GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.« less

  9. Benzothiadiazole Derivatives as Fluorescence Imaging Probes: Beyond Classical Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Neto, Brenno A D; Carvalho, Pedro H P R; Correa, Jose R

    2015-06-16

    This Account describes the origins, features, importance, and trends of the use of fluorescent small-molecule 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BTD) derivatives as a new class of bioprobes applied to bioimaging analyses of several (live and fixed) cell types. BTDs have been successfully used as probes for a plethora of biological analyses for only a few years, and the impressive responses obtained by using this important class of heterocycle are fostering the development of new fluorescent BTDs and expanding the biological applications of such derivatives. The first use of a fluorescent small-molecule BTD derivative as a selective cellular probe dates back to 2010, and since then impressive advances have been described by us and others. The well-known limitations of classical scaffolds urged the development of new classes of bioprobes. Although great developments have been achieved by using classical scaffolds such as coumarins, BODIPYs, fluoresceins, rhodamines, cyanines, and phenoxazines, there is still much to be done, and BTDs aim to succeed where these dyes have shown their limitations. Important organelles and cell components such as nuclear DNA, mitochondria, lipid droplets, and others have already been successfully labeled by fluorescent small-molecule BTD derivatives. New technological systems that use BTDs as the fluorophores for bioimaging experiments have been described in recent scientific literature. The successful application of BTDs as selective bioprobes has led some groups to explore their potential for use in studying membrane pores or tumor cells under hypoxic conditions. Finally, BTDs have also been used as fluorescent tags to investigate the action mechanism of some antitumor compounds. The attractive photophysical data typically observed for π-extended BTD derivatives is fostering interest in the use of this new class of bioprobes. Large Stokes shifts, large molar extinction coefficients, high quantum yields, high stability when stored in solution or

  10. Optimization of a gamma imaging probe for axillary sentinel lymph mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, M.; Loudos, G.; Stratos, D.; Papadimitroulas, P.; Liakou, P.; Georgoulias, P.

    2012-09-01

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping is a technique for assessing whether early-stage invasive breast cancer has metastasized, thus determining prognosis and treatment options. SLN identification is achieved using the blue-dye and radioactive colloids techniques, which are sometimes combined with lymphoscintigraphy. Furthermore, intra-operative gamma acoustic probes, as well as gamma imaging probes are used during surgery. The purpose of this study is the construction of a gamma probe for sentinel lymph node imaging and its optimization in terms of sensitivity with respect to spatial resolution. The reference probe has small field of view (2.5 × 2.5 cm2) and is based on a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) coupled to a pixellated CsI(Tl) scintillator. Following experimental validation, we simulated the system using the GATE Monte Carlo toolkit (GATE v6.1) and modeled various collimator geometries, in order to evaluate their performance and propose the optimal configuration. The constraints of the proposed gamma imaging probe are i) sensitivity close to 2 cps/kBq and ii) spatial resolution equal to 6 mm at 2 cm source-to-collimator distance and ~ 10 mm at 5 cm. An integrated structure that achieves those requirements is a tungsten collimator with 2 × 2 mm2square holes, 16 mm thickness, 0.15 mm septa, where each CsI(Tl) 2 × 2 × 5 mm3 crystal pixel is placed inside the collimator.

  11. Continuously zoom imaging probe for the multi-resolution foveated laparoscope.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi; Hua, Hong

    2016-04-01

    In modern minimally invasive surgeries (MIS), standard laparoscopes suffer from the tradeoff between the spatial resolution and field of view (FOV). The inability of simultaneously acquiring high-resolution images for accurate operation and wide-angle overviews for situational awareness limits the efficiency and outcome of the MIS. A dual view multi-resolution foveated laparoscope (MRFL) which can simultaneously provide the surgeon with a high-resolution view as well as a wide-angle overview was proposed and demonstrated to have great potential for improving the MIS. Although experiment results demonstrated the high-magnification probe has an adequate magnification for viewing surgical details, the dual-view MRFL is limited to two fixed levels of magnifications. A fine adjustment of the magnification is highly desired for obtaining high resolution images with desired field coverage. In this paper, a high magnification probe with continuous zooming capability without any mechanical moving parts is demonstrated. By taking the advantages of two electrically tunable lenses, one for optical zoom and the other for image focus compensation, the optical magnification of the high-magnification probe varies from 2 × to 3 × compared with that of the wide-angle probe, while the focused object position stays the same as the wide-angle probe. The optical design and the tunable lens analysis are presented, followed by prototype demonstration. PMID:27446645

  12. Continuously zoom imaging probe for the multi-resolution foveated laparoscope

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yi; Hua, Hong

    2016-01-01

    In modern minimally invasive surgeries (MIS), standard laparoscopes suffer from the tradeoff between the spatial resolution and field of view (FOV). The inability of simultaneously acquiring high-resolution images for accurate operation and wide-angle overviews for situational awareness limits the efficiency and outcome of the MIS. A dual view multi-resolution foveated laparoscope (MRFL) which can simultaneously provide the surgeon with a high-resolution view as well as a wide-angle overview was proposed and demonstrated to have great potential for improving the MIS. Although experiment results demonstrated the high-magnification probe has an adequate magnification for viewing surgical details, the dual-view MRFL is limited to two fixed levels of magnifications. A fine adjustment of the magnification is highly desired for obtaining high resolution images with desired field coverage. In this paper, a high magnification probe with continuous zooming capability without any mechanical moving parts is demonstrated. By taking the advantages of two electrically tunable lenses, one for optical zoom and the other for image focus compensation, the optical magnification of the high-magnification probe varies from 2 × to 3 × compared with that of the wide-angle probe, while the focused object position stays the same as the wide-angle probe. The optical design and the tunable lens analysis are presented, followed by prototype demonstration. PMID:27446645

  13. Note: Seesaw actuation of atomic force microscope probes for improved imaging bandwidth and displacement range

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, H.; Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-08-15

    The authors describe a method of actuation for atomic force microscope (AFM) probes to improve imaging speed and displacement range simultaneously. Unlike conventional piezoelectric tube actuation, the proposed method involves a lever and fulcrum ''seesaw'' like actuation mechanism that uses a small, fast piezoelectric transducer. The lever arm of the seesaw mechanism increases the apparent displacement range by an adjustable gain factor, overcoming the standard tradeoff between imaging speed and displacement range. Experimental characterization of a cantilever holder implementing the method is provided together with comparative line scans obtained with contact mode imaging. An imaging bandwidth of 30 kHz in air with the current setup was demonstrated.

  14. Design, fabrication, and characterization of thermoplastic microlenses for fiber-optic probe imaging.

    PubMed

    Shinoj, V K; Murukeshan, V M; Tor, S B; Loh, N H; Lye, S W

    2014-02-20

    Microlens-ended fibers could find great usefulness in future biomedical applications, particularly in endoscopic imaging applications. In this context, this paper focuses on microlens-attached specialty optical fibers such as imaging fiber that can be used for probe imaging applications. Stand-alone self-aligned polymer microlenses have been fabricated by microcompression molding. The fabrication parameters have been optimized for different materials, such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polycarbonate (PC Lexan 123R), Zeonor 1060R (ZNR), and Topas COC. A comparison study of the focusing and spatial resolution of the fabricated lenses is performed prior to employing them for fiber-optic fluorescence imaging applications. PMID:24663305

  15. Superresolution Imaging of Amyloid Fibrils with Binding-Activated Probes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Protein misfolding into amyloid-like aggregates underlies many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, insights into the structure and function of these amyloids will provide valuable information on the pathological mechanisms involved and aid in the design of improved drugs for treating amyloid-based disorders. However, determining the structure of endogenous amyloids at high resolution has been difficult. Here we employ binding-activated localization microscopy (BALM) to acquire superresolution images of α-synuclein amyloid fibrils with unprecedented optical resolution. We propose that BALM imaging can be extended to study the structure of other amyloids, for differential diagnosis of amyloid-related diseases and for discovery of drugs that perturb amyloid structure for therapy. PMID:23594172

  16. Etchable plasmonic nanoparticle probes to image and quantify cellular internalization

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Gary B.; Friman, Tomas; Pang, Hong-Bo; Pallaoro, Alessia; de Mendoza, Tatiana Hurtado; Willmore, Anne-Mari A.; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Mann, Aman P.; She, Zhi-Gang; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Reich, Norbert O.; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in using nanoparticles as labels or to deliver drugs and other bioactive compounds to cells in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescent imaging, commonly used to study internalization and subcellular localization of nanoparticles, does not allow unequivocal distinction between cell surface-bound and internalized particles, since there is no methodology to turn particles ‘off.’ We have developed a simple technique to rapidly remove silver nanoparticles outside living cells leaving only the internalized pool for imaging or quantification. The silver nanoparticle (AgNP) etching is based on the sensitivity of Ag to a hexacyanoferrate/thiosulfate redox-based destain solution. In demonstration of the technique we present a new class of multicolored plasmonic nanoprobes comprising dye-labeled AgNPs that are exceptionally bright and photostable, carry peptides as model targeting ligands, can be etched rapidly and with minimal toxicity in mice and that show tumour uptake in vivo. PMID:24907927

  17. Cross-talk artefacts in Kelvin probe force microscopy imaging: A comprehensive study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbet, S.; Popoff, M.; Diesinger, H.; Deresmes, D.; Théron, D.; Mélin, T.

    2014-04-01

    We provide in this article a comprehensive study of the role of ac cross-talk effects in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM), and their consequences onto KPFM imaging. The dependence of KPFM signals upon internal parameters such as the cantilever excitation frequency and the projection angle of the KPFM feedback loop is reviewed, and compared with an analytical model. We show that ac cross-talks affect the measured KPFM signals as a function of the tip-substrate distance, and thus hamper the measurement of three-dimensional KPFM signals. The influence of ac cross-talks is also demonstrated onto KPFM images, in the form of topography footprints onto KPFM images, especially in the constant distance (lift) imaging mode. Our analysis is applied to unambiguously probe charging effects in tobacco mosaic viruses (TMVs) in ambient air. TMVs are demonstrated to be electrically neutral when deposited on silicon dioxide surfaces, but inhomogeneously negatively charged when deposited on a gold surface.

  18. Near-infrared fluorescent probes for imaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hongjuan; Lou, Kaiyan; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    One of the early pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) is the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques in the brain. There has been a tremendous interest in the development of Aβ plaques imaging probes for early diagnosis of AD in the past decades. Optical imaging, particularly near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, has emerged as a safe, low cost, real-time, and widely available technique, providing an attractive approach for in vivo detection of Aβ plaques among many different imaging techniques. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the state-of-the-art development of NIRF Aβ probes and their in vitro and in vivo applications with special focus on design strategies and optical, binding, and brain-kinetic properties. PMID:26579421

  19. A simple and non-contact optical imaging probe for evaluation of corneal diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xun Jie Jeesmond; Shinoj, V. K.; Murukeshan, V. M.; Baskaran, M.; Aung, T.

    2015-09-01

    Non-contact imaging techniques are preferred in ophthalmology. Corneal disease is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide, and a possible way of detection is by analyzing the shape and optical quality of the cornea. Here, a simple and cost-effective, non-contact optical probe system is proposed and illustrated. The probe possesses high spatial resolutions and is non-dependent on coupling medium, which are significant for a clinician and patient friendly investigation. These parameters are crucial, when considering an imaging system for the objective diagnosis and management of corneal diseases. The imaging of the cornea is performed on ex vivo porcine samples and subsequently on small laboratory animals, in vivo. The clinical significance of the proposed study is validated by performing imaging of the New Zealand white rabbit's cornea infected with Pseudomonas.

  20. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    DOEpatents

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  1. All-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colchester, Richard J.; Noimark, Sacha; Mosse, Charles A.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-02-01

    High frequency ultrasound probes such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters can be invaluable for guiding minimally invasive medical procedures in cardiology such as coronary stent placement and ablation. With current-generation ultrasound probes, ultrasound is generated and received electrically. The complexities involved with fabricating these electrical probes can result in high costs that limit their clinical applicability. Additionally, it can be challenging to achieve wide transmission bandwidths and adequate wideband reception sensitivity with small piezoelectric elements. Optical methods for transmitting and receiving ultrasound are emerging as alternatives to their electrical counterparts. They offer several distinguishing advantages, including the potential to generate and detect the broadband ultrasound fields (tens of MHz) required for high resolution imaging. In this study, we developed a miniature, side-looking, pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging, with fibre-optic transmission and reception. The axial resolution was better than 70 microns, and the imaging depth in tissue was greater than 1 cm. Ultrasound transmission was performed by photoacoustic excitation of a carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane composite material; ultrasound reception, with a fibre-optic Fabry-Perot cavity. Ex vivo tissue studies, which included healthy swine tissue and diseased human tissue, demonstrated the strong potential of this technique. To our knowledge, this is the first study to achieve an all-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging. The potential for performing all-optical B-mode imaging (2D and 3D) with virtual arrays of transmit/receive elements, and hybrid imaging with pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic sensing are discussed.

  2. Pre-Assembly of Near-Infrared Fluorescent Multivalent Molecular Probes for Biological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Peck, Evan M; Battles, Paul M; Rice, Douglas R; Roland, Felicia M; Norquest, Kathryn A; Smith, Bradley D

    2016-05-18

    A programmable pre-assembly method is described and shown to produce near-infrared fluorescent molecular probes with tunable multivalent binding properties. The modular assembly process threads one or two copies of a tetralactam macrocycle onto a fluorescent PEGylated squaraine scaffold containing a complementary number of docking stations. Appended to the macrocycle periphery are multiple copies of a ligand that is known to target a biomarker. The structure and high purity of each threaded complex was determined by independent spectrometric methods and also by gel electrophoresis. Especially helpful were diagnostic red-shift and energy transfer features in the absorption and fluorescence spectra. The threaded complexes were found to be effective multivalent molecular probes for fluorescence microscopy and in vivo fluorescence imaging of living subjects. Two multivalent probes were prepared and tested for targeting of bone in mice. A pre-assembled probe with 12 bone-targeting iminodiacetate ligands produced more bone accumulation than an analogous pre-assembled probe with six iminodiacetate ligands. Notably, there was no loss in probe fluorescence at the bone target site after 24 h in the living animal, indicating that the pre-assembled fluorescent probe maintained very high mechanical and chemical stability on the skeletal surface. The study shows how this versatile pre-assembly method can be used in a parallel combinatorial manner to produce libraries of near-infrared fluorescent multivalent molecular probes for different types of imaging and diagnostic applications, with incremental structural changes in the number of targeting groups, linker lengths, linker flexibility, and degree of PEGylation. PMID:27088305

  3. Broadband miniature optical ultrasound probe for high resolution vascular tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Colchester, Richard J; Zhang, Edward Z; Mosse, Charles A; Beard, Paul C; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2015-04-01

    An all-optical ultrasound probe for vascular tissue imaging was developed. Ultrasound was generated by pulsed laser illumination of a functionalized carbon nanotube composite coating on the end face of an optical fiber. Ultrasound was detected with a Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity on the end face of an adjacent optical fiber. The probe diameter was < 0.84 mm and had an ultrasound bandwidth of ~20 MHz. The probe was translated across the tissue sample to create a virtual linear array of ultrasound transmit/receive elements. At a depth of 3.5 mm, the axial resolution was 64 µm and the lateral resolution was 88 µm, as measured with a carbon fiber target. Vascular tissues from swine were imaged ex vivo and good correspondence to histology was observed. PMID:25909031

  4. Probing Ultrafast Nuclear Dynamics in Halomethanes by Time-Resolved Electron and Ion Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaee, F.; Rudenko, A.; Rolles, D.; Savelyev, E.; Bomme, C.; Boll, R.; Manschwetus, B.; Erk, B.; Trippel, S.; Wiese, J.; Kuepper, J.; Amini, K.; Lee, J.; Brouard, M.; Brausse, F.; Rouzee, A.; Olshin, P.; Mereshchenko, A.; Lahl, J.; Johnsson, P.; Simon, M.; Marchenko, T.; Holland, D.; Underwood, J.

    2016-05-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe experiments provide opportunities to investigate photochemical reaction dynamics and the resulting changes in molecular structure in detail. Here, we present a study of the UV-induced photodissociation of gas-phase halomethane molecules (CH3 I, CH2 IBr, ...) in a pump-probe arrangement using two complementary probe schemes, either using a femtosecond near-infrared laser or the FLASH free-electron laser. We measured electrons and ions produced during the interaction using a double-sided velocity map imaging spectrometer equipped with a CCD camera for electron detection and with the Pixel Imaging Mass Spectrometry (PImMS) camera for ions, which can record the arrival time for up to four ions per pixel. This project is supported by the DOE, Office of Science, BES, Division of Chemical, Geological, and Biological Sciences.

  5. Broadband miniature optical ultrasound probe for high resolution vascular tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Colchester, Richard J.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Mosse, Charles A.; Beard, Paul C.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-01-01

    An all-optical ultrasound probe for vascular tissue imaging was developed. Ultrasound was generated by pulsed laser illumination of a functionalized carbon nanotube composite coating on the end face of an optical fiber. Ultrasound was detected with a Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity on the end face of an adjacent optical fiber. The probe diameter was < 0.84 mm and had an ultrasound bandwidth of ~20 MHz. The probe was translated across the tissue sample to create a virtual linear array of ultrasound transmit/receive elements. At a depth of 3.5 mm, the axial resolution was 64 µm and the lateral resolution was 88 µm, as measured with a carbon fiber target. Vascular tissues from swine were imaged ex vivo and good correspondence to histology was observed. PMID:25909031

  6. A Plasmonic Gold Nanostar Theranostic Probe for In Vivo Tumor Imaging and Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Ashton, Jeffrey R.; Moding, Everett J.; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Register, Janna K.; Fales, Andrew M.; Choi, Jaeyeon; Whitley, Melodi J.; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Qi, Yi; Ma, Yan; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Kirsch, David G.; Badea, Cristian T.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-01-01

    Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity. In this study, we developed a gold nanostar (GNS) probe for multi-modality theranostics including surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection, x-ray computed tomography (CT), two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, and photothermal therapy (PTT). We performed radiolabeling, as well as CT and optical imaging, to investigate the GNS probe's biodistribution and intratumoral uptake at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice. The results showed that 30-nm GNS have higher tumor uptake, as well as deeper penetration into tumor interstitial space compared to 60-nm GNS. In addition, we found that a higher injection dose of GNS can increase the percentage of tumor uptake. We also demonstrated the GNS probe's superior photothermal conversion efficiency with a highly concentrated heating effect due to a tip-enhanced plasmonic effect. In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS. This multifunctional GNS probe has the potential to be used for in vivo biosensing, preoperative CT imaging, intraoperative detection with optical methods (SERS and TPL), as well as image-guided photothermal therapy. PMID:26155311

  7. Curcumin analogues as selective fluorescence imaging probes for brown adipose tissue and monitoring browning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueli; Tian, Yanli; Zhang, Hongbin; Kavishwar, Amol; Lynes, Matthew; Brownell, Anna-Liisa; Sun, Hongbin; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Moore, Anna; Ran, Chongzhao

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) and browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) can be promising new approaches to counter metabolic disorder diseases in humans. Imaging probes that could consistently monitor BAT mass and browning of WAT are highly desirable. In the course of our imaging probe screening, we found that BAT could be imaged with curcumin analogues in mice. However, the poor BAT selectivity over WAT and short emissions of the lead probes promoted further lead optimization. Limited uptake mechanism studies suggested that CD36/FAT (fatty acid transporter) probably contributed to the facilitated uptake of the probes. By increasing the stereo-hindrance of the lead compound, we designed CRANAD-29 to extend the emission and increase the facilitated uptake, thus increasing its BAT selectivity. Our data demonstrated that CRANAD-29 had significantly improved selectivity for BAT over WAT, and could be used for imaging BAT mass change in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model, as well as for monitoring BAT activation under cold exposure. In addition, CRANAD-29 could be used for monitoring the browning of subcutaneous WAT (sWAT) induced by β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL-316, 243. PMID:26269357

  8. Non-invasive Imaging of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Using Cathepsin Protease Probes

    PubMed Central

    Withana, Nimali P.; Ma, Xiaowei; McGuire, Helen M.; Verdoes, Martijn; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Ofori, Leslie O.; Zhang, Ruiping; Li, Hao; Sanman, Laura E.; Wei, Ke; Yao, Shaobo; Wu, Peilin; Li, Fang; Huang, Hui; Xu, Zuojun; Wolters, Paul J.; Rosen, Glenn D.; Collard, Harold R.; Zhu, Zhaohui; Cheng, Zhen; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal, chronic, progressive disease characterized by formation of scar tissue within the lungs. Because it is a disease of unknown etiology, it is difficult to diagnose, to predict disease course and to devise treatment strategies. Recent evidence suggests that activated macrophages play key roles in the pathology of IPF. Therefore, imaging probes that specifically recognize these pools of activated immune cells could provide valuable information about how these cells contribute to the pathobiology of the disease. Here we demonstrate that cysteine cathepsin-targeted imaging probes can be used to monitor the contribution of macrophages to fibrotic disease progression in the bleomycin-induced murine model of pulmonary fibrosis. Furthermore, we show that the probes highlight regions of macrophage involvement in fibrosis in human biopsy tissues from IPF patients. Finally, we present first-in-human results demonstrating non-invasive imaging of active cathepsins in fibrotic lesions of patients with IPF. Together, our findings validate small molecule cysteine cathepsin probes for clinical PET imaging and suggest that they have the potential to be used to generate mechanistically-informative molecular information regarding cellular drivers of IPF disease severity and progression. PMID:26797565

  9. Comparison of imaging and probe measurements in a linear plasma column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, A. D.; Thakur, S. C.; Brandt, C.; Sechrest, Y.; Tynan, G. R.; Munsat, T.

    2014-10-01

    The advent of fast imaging diagnostics, which provide two-dimensional measurements on relevant plasma time scales, has proven invaluable for interpreting plasma dynamics in laboratory devices. Despite its success, imaging remains a qualitative aid for many studies, because intensity cannot often be mapped onto a single physical variable for use in a theoretical model. This study explores the relationship between visible-light and electrostatic probe measurements in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment (CSDX). CSDX is a well-characterized linear machine producing dense plasmas relevant to the tokamak edge (Te ~ 3 eV, ne ~1013 /cc). Visible light from ArI and ArII line emission is collected at high frame rates using a fast digital camera. Floating potential and ion-saturation current are measured by an array of electrostatic probe tips. We construct a detailed comparison between imaging and probe measurements of fluctuations, including temporal, spatial, and spectral properties. In addition, we combine probe and imaging techniques to identify modes in a multi-instability regime. Supported by the Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization.

  10. Curcumin analogues as selective fluorescence imaging probes for brown adipose tissue and monitoring browning

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueli; Tian, Yanli; Zhang, Hongbin; Kavishwar, Amol; Lynes, Matthew; Brownell, Anna-Liisa; Sun, Hongbin; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Moore, Anna; Ran, Chongzhao

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) and browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) can be promising new approaches to counter metabolic disorder diseases in humans. Imaging probes that could consistently monitor BAT mass and browning of WAT are highly desirable. In the course of our imaging probe screening, we found that BAT could be imaged with curcumin analogues in mice. However, the poor BAT selectivity over WAT and short emissions of the lead probes promoted further lead optimization. Limited uptake mechanism studies suggested that CD36/FAT (fatty acid transporter) probably contributed to the facilitated uptake of the probes. By increasing the stereo-hindrance of the lead compound, we designed CRANAD-29 to extend the emission and increase the facilitated uptake, thus increasing its BAT selectivity. Our data demonstrated that CRANAD-29 had significantly improved selectivity for BAT over WAT, and could be used for imaging BAT mass change in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model, as well as for monitoring BAT activation under cold exposure. In addition, CRANAD-29 could be used for monitoring the browning of subcutaneous WAT (sWAT) induced by β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL-316, 243. PMID:26269357

  11. Dinuclear ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes as single and two-photon luminescence cellular imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenchao; Zuo, Jiarui; Wang, Lili; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2014-02-28

    A new series of dinuclear ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes, which possess larger π-conjugated systems, good water solubility and pH resistance, and high photostability, were developed to act as single and two-photon luminescence cellular imaging probes. PMID:24418839

  12. Design of “smart” probes for optical imaging of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xinglu; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is a mode of programmed cell death in multicellular organisms and plays a central role in controlling embryonic development, growth and differentiation and monitoring the induction of tumor cell death through anticancer therapy. Since the most effective chemotherapeutics rely on apoptosis, imaging apoptotic processes can be an invaluable tool to monitor therapeutic intervention and discover new drugs modulating apoptosis. The most attractive target for developing specific apoptosis imaging probes is caspases, crucial mediators of apoptosis. Up to now, various optical imaging strategies for apoptosis have been developed as an easy and economical modality. However, current optical applications are limited by poor sensitivity and specificity. A subset of molecular imaging contrast agents known as “activatable” or “smart” molecular probes allow for very high signal-to-background ratios compared to conventional targeted contrast agents and open up the possibility of imaging intracellular targets. In this review, we will discuss the unique design strategies and applications of activatable probes recently developed for fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging of caspase activity. PMID:22514789

  13. Exoplanet Direct Imaging: Coronagraph Probe Mission Study EXO-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2013-01-01

    Flagship mission for spectroscopy of ExoEarths is a long-term priority for space astrophysics (Astro2010). Requires 10(exp 10) contrast at 3 lambda/D separation, ( (is) greater than 10,000 times beyond HST performance) and large telescope (is) greater than 4m aperture. Big step. Mission for spectroscopy of giant planets and imaging of disks requires 10(exp 9) contrast at 3 lambda/D (already demonstrated in lab) and (is) approximately 1.5m telescope. Should be much more affordable, good intermediate step.Various PIs have proposed many versions of the latter mission 17 times since 1999; no unified approach.

  14. Probing Endoplasmic Reticulum Dynamics using Fluorescence Imaging and Photobleaching Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey; Snapp, Erik

    2013-01-01

    This UNIT describes approaches and tools for studying the dynamics and organization of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes and proteins in living cells using commercially available widefield and confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM). It has been long appreciated that the ER plays a number of key roles in secretory protein biogenesis, calcium regulation, and lipid synthesis. However, study of these processes has been often restricted to biochemical assays that average the behaviors of millions of lysed cells or to imaging static fixed cells. Now, with new fluorescent protein reporter tools, highly sensitive commercial microscopes, and photobleaching techniques, it is possible to interrogate the behaviors of ER proteins, membranes, and stress pathways in single cells with exquisite spatial and temporal resolution. The ER presents a unique set of imaging challenges including the high mobility of ER membranes, a diverse range of dynamic ER structures, and the influence of post-translational modifications on fluorescent protein reporters. Solutions to these challenges are described and considerations for performing photobleaching assays, especially Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescence Loss in Photobleaching (FLIP) for ER proteins will be discussed. In addition, ER reporters and ER-specific pharmacologic compounds are presented with a focus on misfolded secretory protein stress and the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). PMID:24510787

  15. Ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging with orthogonal probe relaxation.

    PubMed

    Odstrcil, M; Baksh, P; Boden, S A; Card, R; Chad, J E; Frey, J G; Brocklesby, W S

    2016-04-18

    Ptychography is a scanning coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) technique that relies upon a high level of stability of the illumination during the course of an experiment. This is particularly an issue for coherent short wavelength sources, where the beam intensity is usually tightly focused on the sample in order to maximize the photon flux density on the illuminated region of the sample and thus a small change in the beam position results in a significant change in illumination of the sample. We present an improved ptychographic method that allows for limited stability of the illumination wavefront and thus significantly improve the reconstruction quality without additional prior knowledge. We have tested our reconstruction method in a proof of concept experiment, where the beam instability of a visible light source was emulated using a piezo driven mirror, and also in a short wavelength microscopy CDI setup using a high harmonic generation source in the extreme ultraviolet range. Our work shows a natural extension of the ptychography method that paves the way to use ptychographic imaging with any limited pointing stability coherent source such as free electron or soft X-ray lasers and improve reconstruction quality of long duration synchrotron experiments. PMID:27137273

  16. The Vitamin E Radical Probed by Anion Photoelectron Imaging.

    PubMed

    Anstöter, Cate S; West, Christopher W; Bull, James N; Verlet, Jan R R

    2016-07-28

    The biological antioxidant activity of vitamin E has been related to the stability of the tocopheroxyl radical. Using anion photoelectron imaging and electronic structure calculations, the four tocopheroxyl components of vitamin E have been studied in the gas phase and have yielded the adiabatic electron affinity of the α-, β/γ-, and δ-tocopheroxyl radicals. Using these values, the bond dissociation enthalpy of the O-H bond of tocopherol has been estimated and is consistent with previous studies and with the trends in biological activity. Differences in the photoelectron angular distributions have been interpreted to result from changes in the symmetry of the molecular orbitals from which the electron was detached. PMID:27367260

  17. Background-free in-vivo Imaging of Vitamin C using Time-gateable Responsive Probe

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bo; Ye, Zhiqing; Yang, Yajie; Ma, Hua; Zheng, Xianlin; Jin, Dayong; Yuan, Jingli

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive optical imaging of active biomolecules in the living organism requires both a molecular probe specifically responsive to the target and a high-contrast approach to remove the background interference from autofluorescence and light scatterings. Here, a responsive probe for ascorbic acid (vitamin C) has been developed by conjugating two nitroxide radicals with a long-lived luminescent europium complex. The nitroxide radical withholds the probe on its “off” state (barely luminescent), until the presence of vitamin C will switch on the probe by forming its hydroxylamine derivative. The probe showed a linear response to vitamin C concentration with a detection limit of 9.1 nM, two orders of magnitude lower than that achieved using electrochemical methods. Time-gated luminescence microscopy (TGLM) method has further enabled real-time, specific and background-free monitoring of cellular uptake or endogenous production of vitamin C, and mapping of vitamin C in living Daphnia magna. This work suggests a rational design of lanthanide complexes for background-free small animal imaging of biologically functional molecules. PMID:26373894

  18. Background-free in-vivo Imaging of Vitamin C using Time-gateable Responsive Probe.

    PubMed

    Song, Bo; Ye, Zhiqing; Yang, Yajie; Ma, Hua; Zheng, Xianlin; Jin, Dayong; Yuan, Jingli

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive optical imaging of active biomolecules in the living organism requires both a molecular probe specifically responsive to the target and a high-contrast approach to remove the background interference from autofluorescence and light scatterings. Here, a responsive probe for ascorbic acid (vitamin C) has been developed by conjugating two nitroxide radicals with a long-lived luminescent europium complex. The nitroxide radical withholds the probe on its "off" state (barely luminescent), until the presence of vitamin C will switch on the probe by forming its hydroxylamine derivative. The probe showed a linear response to vitamin C concentration with a detection limit of 9.1 nM, two orders of magnitude lower than that achieved using electrochemical methods. Time-gated luminescence microscopy (TGLM) method has further enabled real-time, specific and background-free monitoring of cellular uptake or endogenous production of vitamin C, and mapping of vitamin C in living Daphnia magna. This work suggests a rational design of lanthanide complexes for background-free small animal imaging of biologically functional molecules. PMID:26373894

  19. Frequency Domain Fluorescent Molecular Tomography and Molecular Probes for Small Animal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujala, Naresh Gandhi

    Fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) is a noninvasive biomedical optical imaging that enables 3-dimensional quantitative determination of fluorochromes distributed in biological tissues. There are three methods for imaging large volume tissues based on different light sources: (a) using a light source of constant intensity, through a continuous or constant wave, (b) using a light source that is intensity modulated with a radio frequency (RF), and (c) using ultrafast pulses in the femtosecond range. In this study, we have developed a frequency domain fluorescent molecular tomographic system based on the heterodyne technique, using a single source and detector pair that can be used for small animal imaging. In our system, the intensity of the laser source is modulated with a RF frequency to produce a diffuse photon density wave in the tissue. The phase of the diffuse photon density wave is measured by comparing the reference signal with the signal from the tissue using a phasemeter. The data acquisition was performed by using a Labview program. The results suggest that we can measure the phase change from the heterogeneous inside tissue. Combined with fiber optics and filter sets, the system can be used to sensitively image the targeted fluorescent molecular probes, allowing the detection of cancer at an early stage. We used the system to detect the tumor-targeting molecular probe Alexa Fluor 680 and Alexa Fluor 750 bombesin peptide conjugates in phantoms as well as mouse tissues. We also developed and evaluated fluorescent Bombesin (BBN) probes to target gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors for optical molecular imaging. GRP receptors are over-expressed in several types of human cancer cells, including breast, prostate, small cell lung, and pancreatic cancers. BBN is a 14 amino acid peptide that is an analogue to human gastrin-releasing peptide that binds specifically to GRPr receptors. BBN conjugates are significant in cancer detection and therapy. The

  20. Validating a new methodology for optical probe design and image registration in fNIRS studies

    PubMed Central

    Wijeakumar, Sobanawartiny; Spencer, John P.; Bohache, Kevin; Boas, David A.; Magnotta, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an imaging technique that relies on the principle of shining near-infrared light through tissue to detect changes in hemodynamic activation. An important methodological issue encountered is the creation of optimized probe geometry for fNIRS recordings. Here, across three experiments, we describe and validate a processing pipeline designed to create an optimized, yet scalable probe geometry based on selected regions of interest (ROIs) from the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature. In experiment 1, we created a probe geometry optimized to record changes in activation from target ROIs important for visual working memory. Positions of the sources and detectors of the probe geometry on an adult head were digitized using a motion sensor and projected onto a generic adult atlas and a segmented head obtained from the subject's MRI scan. In experiment 2, the same probe geometry was scaled down to fit a child's head and later digitized and projected onto the generic adult atlas and a segmented volume obtained from the child's MRI scan. Using visualization tools and by quantifying the amount of intersection between target ROIs and channels, we show that out of 21 ROIs, 17 and 19 ROIs intersected with fNIRS channels from the adult and child probe geometries, respectively. Further, both the adult atlas and adult subject-specific MRI approaches yielded similar results and can be used interchangeably. However, results suggest that segmented heads obtained from MRI scans be used for registering children's data. Finally, in experiment 3, we further validated our processing pipeline by creating a different probe geometry designed to record from target ROIs involved in language and motor processing. PMID:25705757

  1. Development of background-free tame fluorescent probes for intracellular live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Alamudi, Samira Husen; Satapathy, Rudrakanta; Kim, Jihyo; Su, Dongdong; Ren, Haiyan; Das, Rajkumar; Hu, Lingna; Alvarado-Martínez, Enrique; Lee, Jung Yeol; Hoppmann, Christian; Peña-Cabrera, Eduardo; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Park, Hee-Sung; Wang, Lei; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence labelling of an intracellular biomolecule in native living cells is a powerful strategy to achieve in-depth understanding of the biomolecule's roles and functions. Besides being nontoxic and specific, desirable labelling probes should be highly cell permeable without nonspecific interactions with other cellular components to warrant high signal-to-noise ratio. While it is critical, rational design for such probes is tricky. Here we report the first predictive model for cell permeable background-free probe development through optimized lipophilicity, water solubility and charged van der Waals surface area. The model was developed by utilizing high-throughput screening in combination with cheminformatics. We demonstrate its reliability by developing CO-1 and AzG-1, a cyclooctyne- and azide-containing BODIPY probe, respectively, which specifically label intracellular target organelles and engineered proteins with minimum background. The results provide an efficient strategy for development of background-free probes, referred to as 'tame' probes, and novel tools for live cell intracellular imaging. PMID:27321135

  2. Development of background-free tame fluorescent probes for intracellular live cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alamudi, Samira Husen; Satapathy, Rudrakanta; Kim, Jihyo; Su, Dongdong; Ren, Haiyan; Das, Rajkumar; Hu, Lingna; Alvarado-Martínez, Enrique; Lee, Jung Yeol; Hoppmann, Christian; Peña-Cabrera, Eduardo; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Park, Hee-Sung; Wang, Lei; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence labelling of an intracellular biomolecule in native living cells is a powerful strategy to achieve in-depth understanding of the biomolecule's roles and functions. Besides being nontoxic and specific, desirable labelling probes should be highly cell permeable without nonspecific interactions with other cellular components to warrant high signal-to-noise ratio. While it is critical, rational design for such probes is tricky. Here we report the first predictive model for cell permeable background-free probe development through optimized lipophilicity, water solubility and charged van der Waals surface area. The model was developed by utilizing high-throughput screening in combination with cheminformatics. We demonstrate its reliability by developing CO-1 and AzG-1, a cyclooctyne- and azide-containing BODIPY probe, respectively, which specifically label intracellular target organelles and engineered proteins with minimum background. The results provide an efficient strategy for development of background-free probes, referred to as ‘tame' probes, and novel tools for live cell intracellular imaging. PMID:27321135

  3. Simulating and interpreting Kelvin probe force microscopy images on dielectrics with boundary integral equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yongxing; Barnett, David M.; Pinsky, Peter M.

    2008-02-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is designed for measuring the tip-sample contact potential differences by probing the sample surface, measuring the electrostatic interaction, and adjusting a feedback circuit. However, for the case of a dielectric (insulating) sample, the contact potential difference may be ill defined, and the KPFM probe may be sensing electrostatic interactions with a certain distribution of sample trapped charges or dipoles, leading to difficulty in interpreting the images. We have proposed a general framework based on boundary integral equations for simulating the KPFM image based on the knowledge about the sample charge distributions (forward problem) and a deconvolution algorithm solving for the trapped charges on the surface from an image (inverse problem). The forward problem is a classical potential problem, which can be efficiently solved using the boundary element method. Nevertheless, the inverse problem is ill posed due to data incompleteness. For some special cases, we have developed deconvolution algorithms based on the forward problem solution. As an example, this algorithm is applied to process the KPFM image of a gadolinia-doped ceria thin film to solve for its surface charge density, which is a more relevant quantity for samples of this kind than the contact potential difference (normally only defined for conductive samples) values contained in the raw image.

  4. In vivo pump-probe optical coherence tomography imaging in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Shelton, Ryan L; Kim, Wihan; Pearson, Jeremy; Applegate, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Currently, optical coherence tomography (OCT), is not capable of obtaining molecular information often crucial for identification of disease. To enable molecular imaging with OCT, we have further developed a technique that harnesses transient changes in light absorption in the sample to garner molecular information. A Fourier-domain Pump-Probe OCT (PPOCT) system utilizing a 532 nm pump and 830 nm probe has been developed for imaging hemoglobin. Methylene blue, a biological dye with well-know photophysics, was used to characterize the system before investigating the origin of the hemoglobin PPOCT signal. The first in vivo PPOCT images were recorded of the vasculature in Xenopus laevis. The technique was shown to work equally well in flowing and nonflowing vessels. Furthermore, PPOCT was compared with other OCT extensions which require flow, such as Doppler OCT and phase-variance OCT. PPOCT was shown to better delineate tortuous vessels, where nodes often restrict Doppler and phase-variance reconstruction. PMID:24282110

  5. Functional probe for annulus fibrosus-targeted intervertebral disc degeneration imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Yeong; Mcclincy, Michael; Vo, Nam V.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Kang, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is closely associated with low back pain. Typically nonsurgical treatment of IDD is the most effective when detected early. As such, establishing reliable imaging methods for the early diagnosis of disc degeneration is critical. The cellular and tissue localization of a facile functional fluorescent probe, HYK52, that labels disc annulus fibrosus is reported. HYK52 was synthesized with high yield and purity via a two-step chemical reaction. Rabbit disc cell studies and ex vivo tissue staining images indicated intracellular localization and intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue binding of HYK52 with negligible cytotoxicity. Moreover, HYK52 is purposefully designed with a functional terminal carboxyl group to allow for coupling with various signaling molecules for multimodal imaging applications. These results suggest that this IVD-targeted probe may have great potential in early diagnosis of IDD. PMID:23839314

  6. Near-field fluorescence imaging with 32 nm resolution based on microfabricated cantilevered probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Rolf; Freyland, J. Moritz; Gersen, Henkjan; Heinzelmann, Harry; Schürmann, Gregor; Noell, Wilfried; Staufer, Urs; de Rooij, Nico F.

    2000-12-01

    High-resolution near-field optical imaging with microfabricated probes is demonstrated. The probes are made from solid quartz tips fabricated at the end of silicon cantilevers and covered with a 60-nm-thick aluminum film. Transmission electron micrographs indicate a continuous aluminum layer at the tip apex. A specially designed instrument combines the advantages of near-field optical and beam-deflection force microscopy. Near-field optical data of latex bead projection patterns in transmission and of single fluorophores have been obtained in constant-height imaging mode. An artifact-free optical resolution of 31.7±3.6 nm has been deduced from full width at half maximum values of single molecule images.

  7. Multi-Functionalized Carbon Nano-onions as Imaging Probes for Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Frasconi, Marco; Marotta, Roberto; Markey, Lyn; Flavin, Kevin; Spampinato, Valentina; Ceccone, Giacomo; Echegoyen, Luis; Scanlan, Eoin M; Giordani, Silvia

    2015-12-21

    Carbon-based nanomaterials have attracted much interest during the last decade for biomedical applications. Multimodal imaging probes based on carbon nano-onions (CNOs) have emerged as a platform for bioimaging because of their cell-penetration properties and minimal systemic toxicity. Here, we describe the covalent functionalization of CNOs with fluorescein and folic acid moieties for both imaging and targeting cancer cells. The modified CNOs display high brightness and photostability in aqueous solutions and their selective and rapid uptake in two different cancer cell lines without significant cytotoxicity was demonstrated. The localization of the functionalized CNOs in late-endosomes cell compartments was revealed by a correlative approach with confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Understanding the biological response of functionalized CNOs with the capability to target cancer cells and localize the nanoparticles in the cellular environment, will pave the way for the development of a new generation of imaging probes for future biomedical studies. PMID:26577582

  8. Functional probe for annulus fibrosus-targeted intervertebral disc degeneration imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Yeong; Mcclincy, Michael; Vo, Nam V; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Kang, James D; Bai, Mingfeng

    2013-10-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is closely associated with low back pain. Typically nonsurgical treatment of IDD is the most effective when detected early. As such, establishing reliable imaging methods for the early diagnosis of disc degeneration is critical. The cellular and tissue localization of a facile functional fluorescent probe, HYK52, that labels disc annulus fibrosus is reported. HYK52 was synthesized with high yield and purity via a two-step chemical reaction. Rabbit disc cell studies and ex vivo tissue staining images indicated intracellular localization and intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue binding of HYK52 with negligible cytotoxicity. Moreover, HYK52 is purposefully designed with a functional terminal carboxyl group to allow for coupling with various signaling molecules for multimodal imaging applications. These results suggest that this IVD-targeted probe may have great potential in early diagnosis of IDD. PMID:23839314

  9. Nanoscale thermal imaging using a scanning spin probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laraoui, Abdelghani; Aycock-Rizzo, Halley; Gao, Yang; Riedo, Elisa; Meriles, Carlos

    We use a 30-nm diamond-nanocrystal-hosted nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center attached to the apex of a silicon tip as a local temperature sensor. First, we apply an electrical current to heat up the tip to a predefined operating temperature and rely on the NV to monitor the small thermal changes the tip experiences as it is brought into contact with surfaces of varying thermal conductivity. With the aid of a combined AFM/confocal setup, we image engineered microstructures with nanoscale resolution, and attain excellent agreement between the thermal conductivity and topographic maps. Given the small mass of the NV-hosting diamond nanoparticle, our technique shows a fast time response of order hundred microseconds, limited by the heat dissipation time of the tip. In a second approach, we heat nanostructured gold deposited on glass substrate by injecting a direct current. By monitoring the frequency shift of NV spin transitions upon scanning the AFM tip we reconstruct nanometer-resolved temperature maps. Our technique promises multiple applications ranging from the investigation of phonon dynamics in nanostructures to the characterization of heterogeneous phase transitions in various solid-state systems.

  10. In vivo imaging of brain metabolism activity using a phosphorescent oxygen-sensitive probe

    PubMed Central

    Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Borisov, Sergei; Pumbo, Elena; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2013-01-01

    Several approaches have been adopted for real-time imaging of neural activity in vivo. We tested a new cell-penetrating phosphorescent oxygen-sensitive probe, NanO2-IR, to monitor temporal and spatial dynamics of oxygen metabolism in the neocortex following peripheral sensory stimulation. Probe solution was applied to the surface of anesthetized mouse brain; optical imaging was performed using a MiCAM-02 system. Trains of whisker stimuli were delivered and associated changes in phosphorescent signal were recorded in the contralateral somatosensory (“barrel”) cortex. Sensory stimulation led to changes in oxygenation of activated areas of the barrel cortex. The oxygen imaging results were compared to those produced by the voltage-sensitive dye RH-1691. While the signals emitted by the two probes differed in shape and amplitude, they both faithfully indicated specific whisker evoked cortical activity. Thus, NanO2-IR probe can be used as a tool in visualization and realtime analysis of sensory- evoked neural activity in vivo. PMID:23624034

  11. A wireless handheld probe with spectrally constrained evolution strategies for diffuse optical imaging of tissue

    PubMed Central

    Flexman, M. L.; Kim, H. K.; Stoll, R.; Khalil, M. A.; Fong, C. J.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2012-01-01

    We present a low-cost, portable, wireless diffuse optical imaging device. The handheld device is fast, portable, and can be applied to a wide range of both static and dynamic imaging applications including breast cancer, functional brain imaging, and peripheral artery disease. The continuous-wave probe has four near-infrared wavelengths and uses digital detection techniques to perform measurements at 2.3 Hz. Using a multispectral evolution algorithm for chromophore reconstruction, we can measure absolute oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration as well as scattering in tissue. Performance of the device is demonstrated using a series of liquid phantoms comprised of Intralipid®, ink, and dye. PMID:22462907

  12. A ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probe for fluoride ion imaging in living cells and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Zeng, Lingyu; Wang, Yanying; Liu, Zhihong; Ye, Xiaoxue; Li, Chunya

    2016-09-21

    Using 6-hydroxyl-quinoline-2-benzothiazole (HQB) as a two-photon fluorophore and tert-butyldiphenylsilyl as a recognition domain for F(-), a ratiometric two-photon fluorescent fluoride probe, QF, was synthesized and fully characterized. QF displays both one- and two-photon ratiometric responses towards fluoride ions in aqueous solution. QF was enabled to detect exogenous fluoride ions in living cells by a ratiometric method. Two-photon microscopic imaging of fluoride ions in living HeLa cells and zebrafish has also been achieved. QF has been demonstrated to be an excellent fluorescent probe with high selectivity, low cytotoxicity and good photostability. PMID:27353376

  13. In vivo imaging and biochemical characterization of protease function using fluorescent activity-based probes

    PubMed Central

    Edgington, Laura E.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Activity-based probes (ABPs) are reactive small molecules that covalently bind to active enzymes. When tagged with a fluorophore, ABPs serve as powerful tools to investigate enzymatic activity across a wide variety of applications. In this article, we will provide detailed protocols for using fluorescent ABPs to biochemically characterize the activity of proteases in vitro. Furthermore, we will describe how these probes can be applied to image protease activity in live animals and tissues along with subsequent analysis by histology, flow cytometry, and SDS-PAGE. PMID:23788323

  14. Imaging pigment chemistry in melanocytic conjunctival lesions with pump-probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Vajzovic, Lejla; Robles, Francisco E.; Cummings, Thomas J.; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi; Warren, Warren S.

    2013-03-01

    We extend nonlinear pump-probe microscopy, recently demonstrated to image the microscopic distribution of eumelanin and pheomelanin in unstained skin biopsy sections, to the case of melanocytic conjunctival lesions. The microscopic distribution of pigmentation chemistry serves as a functional indicator of melanocyte activity. In these conjunctival specimens (benign nevi, primary acquired melanoses, and conjunctival melanoma), we have observed pump-probe spectroscopic signatures of eumelanin, pheomelanin, hemoglobin, and surgical ink, in addition to important structural features that differentiate benign from malignant lesions. We will also discuss prospects for an in vivo `optical biopsy' to provide additional information before having to perform invasive procedures.

  15. Histotripsy Lesion Formation using an Ultrasound Imaging Probe Enabled by a Low-Frequency Pump Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Hall, Timothy L.; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    When applying histotripsy pulses shorter than 2 cycles, the formation of a dense bubble cloud only relies on the applied peak negative pressure (p-) exceeding the “intrinsic threshold” of the medium (absolute value of 26 – 30 MPa in most soft tissue). A previous study conducted by our research group showed that a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse (3 MHz) can be enabled by a sub-threshold low-frequency pump pulse (500 kHz) where the sum exceeds the intrinsic threshold, thus generating lesion-producing dense bubble clouds (“dual-beam histotripsy”). This paper investigates the feasibility of using an imaging transducer to provide the high-frequency probe pulse in the dual-beam histotripsy approach. More specifically, an ATL L7–4 imaging transducer, pulsed by a Verasonics V-1 Data Acquisition System, was used to generate the high-frequency probe pulses. The low-frequency pump pulses were generated by a 20-element 345 kHz array transducer, driven by a custom high voltage pulser. These dual-beam histotripsy pulses were applied to red-blood-cell (RBC) tissue-mimicking phantoms at a pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz, and optical imaging was used to visualize bubble clouds and lesions generated in the RBC phantoms. The results showed that dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were generated when the p- of the sub-threshold pump and probe pulses combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The average size of the smallest reproducible lesions using the imaging probe pulse enabled by the sub-threshold pump pulse was 0.7 × 1.7 mm while that using the supra-threshold pump pulse alone was 1.4 × 3.7 mm. When the imaging transducer was steered laterally, bubble clouds and lesions were steered correspondingly until the combined p- no longer exceeded the intrinsic threshold. These results were also validated with ex vivo porcine liver experiments. Using an imaging transducer for dual-beam histotripsy can have two advantages, 1) lesion

  16. Histotripsy Lesion Formation Using an Ultrasound Imaging Probe Enabled by a Low-Frequency Pump Transducer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2015-08-01

    When histotripsy pulses shorter than 2 cycles are applied, the formation of a dense bubble cloud relies only on the applied peak negative pressure (p-) exceeding the "intrinsic threshold" of the medium (absolute value of 26-30 MPa in most soft tissues). It has been found that a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse (3 MHz) can be enabled by a sub-threshold low-frequency pump pulse (500 kHz) where the sum exceeds the intrinsic threshold, thus generating lesion-producing dense bubble clouds ("dual-beam histotripsy"). Here, the feasibility of using an imaging transducer to provide the high-frequency probe pulse in the dual-beam histotripsy approach is investigated. More specifically, an ATL L7-4 imaging transducer (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA, USA), pulsed by a V-1 Data Acquisition System (Verasonics, Redmond, WA, USA), was used to generate the high-frequency probe pulses. The low-frequency pump pulses were generated by a 20-element 345-kHz array transducer, driven by a custom high-voltage pulser. These dual-beam histotripsy pulses were applied to red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantoms at a pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz, and optical imaging was used to visualize bubble clouds and lesions generated in the red blood cell phantoms. The results indicated that dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were generated when the p- of the sub-threshold pump and probe pulses combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The average size of the smallest reproducible lesions using the imaging probe pulse enabled by the sub-threshold pump pulse was 0.7 × 1.7 mm, whereas that using the supra-threshold pump pulse alone was 1.4 × 3.7 mm. When the imaging transducer was steered laterally, bubble clouds and lesions were steered correspondingly until the combined p- no longer exceeded the intrinsic threshold. These results were also validated with ex vivo porcine liver experiments. Using an imaging transducer for dual-beam histotripsy can have two

  17. Development of laser optoacoustic and ultrasonic imaging system for breast cancer utilizing handheld array probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermilov, Sergey A.; Fronheiser, Matthew P.; Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Conjusteau, André; Mehta, Ketan; Otto, Pamela; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2009-02-01

    We describe two laser optoacoustic imaging systems for breast cancer detection based on arrays of acoustic detectors operated manually in a way similar to standard ultrasonic breast imaging. The systems have the advantages of standard light illumination (regardless of the interrogated part of the breast), the ability to visualize any part of the breast, and convenience in operation. The first system could work in both ultrasonic and optoacoustic mode, and was developed based on a linear ultrasonic breast imaging probe with two parallel rectangular optical bundles. We used it in a pilot clinical study to provide for the first time demonstration that the boundaries of the tumors visualized on the optoacoustic and ultrasonic images matched. Such correlation of coregistered images proves that the objects on both images represented indeed the same tumor. In the optoacoustic mode we were also able to visualize blood vessels located in the neighborhood of the tumor. The second system was proposed as a circular array of acoustic transducers with an axisymmetric laser beam in the center. It was capable of 3D optoacoustic imaging with minimized optoacoustic artifacts caused by the distribution of the absorbed optical energy within the breast tissue. The distribution of optical energy absorbed in the bulk tissue of the breast was removed from the image by implementing the principal component analysis on the measured signals. The computer models for optoacoustic imaging using these two handheld probes were developed. The models included three steps: (1) Monte Carlo simulations of the light distribution within the breast tissue, (2) generation of optoacoustic signals by convolving N-shaped pressure signals from spherical voxels with the shape of individual transducers, and (3) back-projecting processed optoacoustic signals onto spherical surfaces for image reconstruction. Using the developed models we demonstrated the importance of the included spatial impulse response of the

  18. Novel Strategy for Preparing Dual-Modality Optical/PET Imaging Probes via Photo-Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingyi; Ding, Jiule; Xing, Wei; Gai, Yongkang; Sheng, Jing; Zeng, Dexing

    2016-05-18

    Preparation of small molecule based dual-modality probes remains a challenging task due to the complicated synthetic procedure. In this study, a novel concise and generic strategy for preparing dual-modality optical/PET imaging probes via photo-click chemistry was developed, in which the diazole photo-click linker functioned not only as a bridge between the targeting-ligand and the PET imaging moiety, but also as the fluorophore for optical imaging. A dual-modality AE105 peptidic probe was successfully generated via this strategy and subsequently applied in the fluorescent staining of U87MG cells and the (68)Ga based PET imaging of mice bearing U87MG xenograft. In addition, dual-modality monoclonal antibody cetuximab has also been generated via this strategy and labeled with (64)Cu for PET imaging studies, broadening the application of this strategy to include the preparation of macromolecule based imaging probes. PMID:27098544

  19. Multi-scale Imaging of Cellular and Sub-cellular Structures using Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Rice, A. F.

    2005-03-01

    Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy is a new scanning probe capability under development within our group to reliably return to and directly interact with a specific nanobiological feature of interest. In previous work, we have successfully recognized and classified tubular versus globular biological objects from experimental atomic force microscope images using a method based on normalized central moments [ref. 1]. In this paper we extend this work to include recognition schemes appropriate for cellular and sub-cellular structures. Globular cells containing tubular actin filaments are under investigation. Thus there are differences in external/internal shapes and scales. Continuous Wavelet Transform with a differential Gaussian mother wavelet is employed for multi- scale analysis. [ref. 1] Q. Chen, V. Ayres and L. Udpa, ``Biological Investigation Using Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy,'' Proceedings 3rd IEEE Conference on Nanotechnology, vol. 2, p 863-865 (2003).

  20. Biocompatible Flavone-Based Fluorogenic Probes for Quick Wash-Free Mitochondrial Imaging in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria, vital organelles existing in almost all eukaryotic cells, play a crucial role in energy metabolism and apoptosis of aerobic organisms. In this work, we report two new flavone-based fluorescent probes, MC-Mito1 and MC-Mito2, for monitoring mitochondria in living cells. These two probes exhibit remarkably low toxicity, good cell permeability, and high specificity; these probes complement the existing library of mitochondrial imaging agents. The new dyes give nearly no background fluorescence, and their application does not require tedious postwashing after cell staining. The appreciable tolerance of MC-Mito2 encourages a broader range of biological applications for understanding the cell degeneration and apoptosis mechanism. PMID:25382851

  1. Design of a rectal probe for diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging for chemotherapy and radiotherapy monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giessen, Martijn; Santoro, Ylenia; Mirzaei Zarandi, Soroush; Pigazzi, Alessio; Cerussi, Albert E.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2014-03-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging (DOSI) has shown great potential for the early detection of non-responding tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer, already one day after therapy starts. Patients with rectal cancer receive similar chemotherapy treatment. The rectum geometry and tissue properties of healthy and tumor tissue in the rectum and the requirement of surface contact impose constraints on the probe design. In this work we present the design of a DOSI probe with the aim of early chemotherapy/radiotherapy effectiveness detection in rectal tumors. We show using Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements that the colon tissue can be characterized reliably using a source-detector separation in the order of 10 mm. We present a design and rapid prototype of a probe for DOSI measurements that can be mounted on a standard laparoscope and that fits through a standard rectoscope. Using predominantly clinically approved components we aim at fast clinical translation.

  2. Alzheimer’s disease imaging with a novel Tau targeted near infrared ratiometric probe

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Yeong; Sengupta, Urmi; Shao, Pin; Guerrero-Muñoz, Marcos J; Kayed, Rakez; Bai, Mingfeng

    2013-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) have long been recognized as one of the pathological hallmarks in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recent studies, however, showed that soluble aggregated Tau species, especially hyperphosphorylated Tau oligomers, which are formed at early stage of AD prior to the formation of NFT, disrupted neural system integration. Unfortunately, little is known about Tau aggregates, and few Tau targeted imaging probe has been reported. Successful development of new imaging methods that can visualize early stages of Tau aggregation specifically will obviously be important for AD imaging, as well as understanding Tau-associated neuropathology of AD. Here, we report the first NIR ratiometric probe, CyDPA2, that targets Tau aggregates. The specificity of CyPDA2 to aggregated Tau was evaluated with in vitro hyperphosphorylated Tau proteins (pTau), as well as ex vivo Tau samples from AD human brain samples and the tauopathy transgenic mouse model, P301L. The characteristic enhancements of absorption ratio and fluorescence intensity in CyDPA2 were observed in a pTau concentration-dependent manner. In addition, fluorescence microscopy and gel staining studies demonstrated CyDPA2-labeled Tau aggregates. These data indicate that CyDPA2 is a promising imaging probe for studying Tau pathology and diagnosing AD at an early stage. PMID:23526074

  3. Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as photoacoustic molecular imaging probes in living mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Kanyi; Shuhendler, Adam J.; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Mei, Jianguo; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Bao, Zhenan; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging holds great promise for the visualization of physiology and pathology at the molecular level with deep tissue penetration and fine spatial resolution. To fully utilize this potential, photoacoustic molecular imaging probes have to be developed. Here, we introduce near-infrared light absorbing semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as a new class of contrast agents for photoacoustic molecular imaging. These nanoparticles can produce a stronger signal than the commonly used single-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanorods on a per mass basis, permitting whole-body lymph-node photoacoustic mapping in living mice at a low systemic injection mass. Furthermore, the semiconducting polymer nanoparticles possess high structural flexibility, narrow photoacoustic spectral profiles and strong resistance to photodegradation and oxidation, enabling the development of the first near-infrared ratiometric photoacoustic probe for in vivo real-time imaging of reactive oxygen species--vital chemical mediators of many diseases. These results demonstrate semiconducting polymer nanoparticles to be an ideal nanoplatform for developing photoacoustic molecular probes.

  4. Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as photoacoustic molecular imaging probes in living mice.

    PubMed

    Pu, Kanyi; Shuhendler, Adam J; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mei, Jianguo; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Bao, Zhenan; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging holds great promise for the visualization of physiology and pathology at the molecular level with deep tissue penetration and fine spatial resolution. To fully utilize this potential, photoacoustic molecular imaging probes have to be developed. Here, we introduce near-infrared light absorbing semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as a new class of contrast agents for photoacoustic molecular imaging. These nanoparticles can produce a stronger signal than the commonly used single-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanorods on a per mass basis, permitting whole-body lymph-node photoacoustic mapping in living mice at a low systemic injection mass. Furthermore, the semiconducting polymer nanoparticles possess high structural flexibility, narrow photoacoustic spectral profiles and strong resistance to photodegradation and oxidation, enabling the development of the first near-infrared ratiometric photoacoustic probe for in vivo real-time imaging of reactive oxygen species--vital chemical mediators of many diseases. These results demonstrate semiconducting polymer nanoparticles to be an ideal nanoplatform for developing photoacoustic molecular probes. PMID:24463363

  5. Nanoparticles for Cardiovascular Imaging and Therapeutic Delivery, Part 2: Radiolabeled Probes

    PubMed Central

    Stendahl, John C.; Sinusas, Albert J.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticulate imaging agents and therapeutics have proven to be valuable tools in preclinical cardiovascular disease research. Because of their distinct properties and significant functional versatility, nanoparticulate imaging agents afford certain capabilities that are typically not provided by traditional small molecule agents. This review is the second in a two-part series covering nanoparticulate imaging agents and theranostics. It highlights current examples of radiolabeled nanoparticulate probes in preclinical cardiovascular research and demonstrates their utility in applications such as blood pool imaging and molecular imaging of ischemia, angiogenesis, atherosclerosis, and inflammation. These agents provide valuable insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease and illustrate both the limitations and the significant potential of nanoparticles in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Further technologic development to improve performance, address safety concerns, and fulfil regulatory obligations is required for clinical translation of these emergent technologies. PMID:26294304

  6. Interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging with a clinical linear array ultrasound probe for guiding nerve blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; West, Simeon J.; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate identification of tissue structures such as nerves and blood vessels is critically important for interventional procedures such as nerve blocks. Ultrasound imaging is widely used as a guidance modality to visualize anatomical structures in real-time. However, identification of nerves and small blood vessels can be very challenging, and accidental intra-neural or intra-vascular injections can result in significant complications. Multi-spectral photoacoustic imaging can provide high sensitivity and specificity for discriminating hemoglobin- and lipid-rich tissues. However, conventional surface-illumination-based photoacoustic systems suffer from limited sensitivity at large depths. In this study, for the first time, an interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging (IMPA) system was used to image nerves in a swine model in vivo. Pulsed excitation light with wavelengths in the ranges of 750 - 900 nm and 1150 - 1300 nm was delivered inside the body through an optical fiber positioned within the cannula of an injection needle. Ultrasound waves were received at the tissue surface using a clinical linear array imaging probe. Co-registered B-mode ultrasound images were acquired using the same imaging probe. Nerve identification was performed using a combination of B-mode ultrasound imaging and electrical stimulation. Using a linear model, spectral-unmixing of the photoacoustic data was performed to provide image contrast for oxygenated and de-oxygenated hemoglobin, water and lipids. Good correspondence between a known nerve location and a lipid-rich region in the photoacoustic images was observed. The results indicate that IMPA is a promising modality for guiding nerve blocks and other interventional procedures. Challenges involved with clinical translation are discussed.

  7. Multimodal imaging probe for targeting cancer cells using uMUC-1 aptamer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Won Jun; Lee, Jonghwan; Lee, Yong Seung; Cho, Sujeong; Ali, Bahy A; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Heo, Hyejung; Kim, Soonhag

    2015-12-01

    For adequate cancer therapy, newer imaging modalities with more specific ligands for unique targets are crucial. Underglycosylated mucin-1 (uMUC-1) antigen is an early marker of tumor development and is widely overexpressed on most tumors. A combination of nanotechnology with optical, radionuclide, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has great potential to improve cancer diagnosis and therapy. In this study, a multimodal nanoparticle imaging system was developed that can be used for optical, MR and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles surrounded by fluorescent rhodamine (designated MF) within a silica shell matrix were conjugated with an aptamer targeting uMUC-1 (designated MF-uMUC-1) and further labeled by (68)Ga (designated MFR-uMUC-1) with the help of a p-SCN-bn-NOTA chelating agent, resulting in single multimodal nanoparticles. The resultant nanoparticles are spherical and monodispersed, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. The MFR-uMUC-1 nanoparticle showed specific and dose-dependent fluorescent, radioisotope and MR signals targeting BT-20 cells expressing uMUC-1. In vivo targeting and multimodal imaging in tumor-bearing nude mice also showed great specificity for targeting cancers with MFR-uMUC-1. The MFR-uMUC-1 probe could be used as a single multimodal probe to visualize cancer cells by means of optical, radionuclide and MR imaging. PMID:26387066

  8. Silica micro/nanospheres for theranostics: from bimodal MRI and fluorescent imaging probes to cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Shanka

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nano-theranostics offer remarkable potential for future biomedical technology with simultaneous applications for diagnosis and therapy of disease sites. Through smart and careful chemical modifications of the nanoparticle surface, these can be converted to multifunctional tiny objects which in turn can be used as vehicle for delivering multimodal imaging agents and therapeutic material to specific target sites in vivo. In this sense, bimodal imaging probes that simultaneously enable magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence imaging have gained tremendous attention because disease sites can be characterized quick and precisely through synergistic multimodal imaging. But such hybrid nanocomposite materials have limitations such as low chemical stability (magnetic component) and harsh cytotoxic effects (fluorescent component) and, hence, require a biocompatible protecting agent. Silica micro/nanospheres have shown promise as protecting agent due to the high stability and low toxicity. This review will cover a full description of MRI-active and fluorescent multifunctional silica micro/nanospheres including the design of the probe, different characterization methods and their application in imaging and treatment in cancer. PMID:25821696

  9. Pixelation effect removal from fiber bundle probe based optical coherence tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jae-Ho; Lee, Junghoon; Kang, Jin U.

    2010-01-01

    A method of eliminating pixelization effect from en face optical coherence tomography (OCT) image when a fiber bundle is used as an OCT imaging probe is presented. We have demonstrated that applying a histogram equalization process before performing a weighted-averaged Gaussian smoothing filter to the original lower gray level intensity based image not only removes the structural artifact of the bundle but also enhances the image quality with minimum blurring of object’s image features. The measured contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for an image of the US Air Force test target was 14.7dB (4.9dB), after (before) image processing. In addition, by performing the spatial frequency analysis based on two-dimensional discrete Fourier transform (2-D DFT), we were able to observe that the periodic intensity peaks induced by the regularly arrayed structure of the fiber bundle can be efficiently suppressed by 41.0dB for the first nearby side lobe as well as to obtain the precise physical spacing information of the fiber grid. The proposed combined method can also be used as a straight forward image processing tool for any imaging system utilizing fiber bundle as a high-resolution imager. PMID:20389766

  10. Fluorescence imaging of siRNA delivery by peptide nucleic acid-based probe.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takaya; Sato, Yusuke; Iwai, Kenta; Kuge, Shusuke; Teramae, Norio; Nishizawa, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    We report on the use of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-based fluorescent probe for the analysis of siRNA delivery to living cells. The probe, Py-AA-TO, possesses thiazole orange (TO) and pyrene moieties in the C- and N-termini of PNA, and can function as a light-up probe capable of selective binding to 3'-overhanging nucleotides of target siRNAs. The affinity-labeling of the siRNAs with Py-AA-TO facilitates fluorescence imaging of cellular uptake of polymer-based carriers encapsulating the siRNAs (polyplexes) through endocytosis and subsequent sequestration into lysosome. In addition, flow cytometric measurements reveal that the monitoring of Py-AA-TO fluorescence inside the cells is successfully applicable to the analysis of the polyplex disassembly. These promising functions of Py-AA-TO are presented and discussed as a basis for the design of molecular probes for fluorescent imaging and quantitative analysis of the siRNA delivery process. PMID:25864675

  11. Immobilization of human papillomavirus DNA probe for surface plasmon resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Xinyuan; Ji, Yanhong; Ma, Suihua; Liu, Le; Liu, Zhiyi; Li, Yao; He, Yonghong; Guo, Jihua

    2009-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a kind of double-stranded DNA virus whose subspecies have diversity. Near 40 kinds of subspecies can invade reproductive organ and cause some high risk disease, such as cervical carcinoma. In order to detect the type of the subspecies of the HPV DNA, we used the parallel scan spectral surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging technique, which is a novel type of two- dimensional bio-sensing method based on surface plasmon resonance and is proposed in our previous work, to study the immobilization of the HPV DNA probes on the gold film. In the experiment, four kinds of the subspecies of the HPV DNA (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV58) probes are fixed on one gold film, and incubate in the constant temperature condition to get a HPV DNA probe microarray. We use the parallel scan spectral SPR imaging system to detect the reflective indices of the HPV DNA subspecies probes. The benefits of this new approach are high sensitive, label-free, strong specificity and high through-put.

  12. VCAM-1-targeting gold nanoshell probe for photoacoustic imaging of atherosclerotic plaque in mice.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Leonie; Berti, Romain; Ng, Vanessa W K; Matteau-Pelletier, Carl; Lam, Tina; Saboural, Pierre; Kakkar, Ashok K; Lesage, Frédéric; Rhéaume, Eric; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    The development of molecular probes and novel imaging modalities, allowing better resolution and specificity, is associated with an increased potential for molecular imaging of atherosclerotic plaques especially in basic and pre-clinical research applications. In that context, a photoacoustic molecular probe based on gold nanoshells targeting VCAM-1 in mice (immunonanoshells) was designed. The molecular probe was validated in vitro and in vivo, showing no noticeable acute toxic effects. We performed the conjugation of gold nanoshells displaying near-infrared absorption properties with VCAM-1 antibody molecules and PEG to increase their biocompatibility. The resulting immunonanoshells obtained under different conditions of conjugation were then assessed for specificity and sensitivity. Photoacoustic tomography was performed to determine the ability to distinguish gold nanoshells from blood both in phantoms and in vivo. Ex vivo optical projection tomography of hearts and aortas from atherosclerotic and control mice confirmed the selective accumulation of the immunonanoshells in atherosclerotic-prone regions in mice, thus validating the utility of the probe in vivo in small animals for pre-clinical research. These immunonanoshells represent an adequate mean to target atherosclerotic plaques in small animals, leading to new tools to follow the effect of therapies on the progression or regression of the disease. PMID:23109390

  13. Two photon fluorescence imaging of lipid membrane domains and potentials using advanced fluorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilin, Vasyl; Darwich, Zeinab; Richert, Ludovic; Didier, Pascal; Klymchenko, Andrey; Mély, Yves

    2013-02-01

    Biomembranes are ordered and dynamic nanoscale structures critical for cell functions. The biological functions of the membranes strongly depend on their physicochemical properties, such as electrostatics, phase state, viscosity, polarity and hydration. These properties are essential for the membrane structure and the proper folding and function of membrane proteins. To monitor these properties, fluorescence techniques and notably, two-photon microscopy appear highly suited due to their exquisite sensitivity and their capability to operate in complex biological systems, such as living cells and tissues. In this context, we have developed multiparametric environment-sensitive fluorescent probes tailored for precise location in the membrane bilayer. We notably developed probes of the 3-hydroxychromone family, characterized by an excited state intramolecular proton transfer reaction, which generates two tautomeric emissive species with well-separated emission bands. As a consequence, the response of these probes to changes in their environment could be monitored through changes in the ratios of the two bands, as well as through changes in the fluorescence lifetimes. Using two-photon ratiometric imaging and FLIM, these probes were used to monitor the surface membrane potential, and were applied to detect apoptotic cells and image membrane domains.

  14. Ultrasonic imaging of hidden defects using dry-coupled ultrasonic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komsky, Igor N.

    2006-03-01

    Safety criteria of aircraft industry require careful inspection of aircraft components for structural integrity since airworthiness of aging aircraft can be significantly affected by combination of corrosion and fatigue damage. Surface defects can be efficiently detected by visual or other surface inspection techniques. Detection of hidden defects, on the other hand, is still a challenging task. Therefore, it is essential to develop non-destructive methods that can inspect different layers of the aircraft structures for internal defects before they become a safety concern. Ultrasonic probes with the dry-coupled substrates are highly efficient for all modalities of ultrasonic techniques including pulse-echo, pitch-catch, or through-transmission modes. The probes can be deployed in conjunction with portable ultrasonic instruments for B- and C-scanning. The dry-coupled probes have already been tested on a number of aircraft for rapid inspections of the aircraft structures from the outside without any disassembly. However, adequate inspection for small pitting corrosion and incipient fatigue cracks in metallic structures or delaminations in composite panels may require superior sensitivity and resolution of the applied ultrasonic technique. Several novel configurations of the dry-coupled probes with increased sensitivity and resolution will be presented. Ultrasonic imaging with single- or double-element dry-coupled probes will be demonstrated on the specimens with heavy pitting corrosion, machined planar and volumetric defects, and embedded internal flaws.

  15. Highly sensitive cell imaging "Off-On" fluorescent probe for mitochondria and ATP.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Priyanka; Razi, Syed S; Ali, Rashid; Srivastav, Saurabh; Patnaik, Satyakam; Srikrishna, Saripella; Misra, Arvind

    2015-07-15

    A smart Off-On molecular scaffold/fluorescent probe 1 has been designed and synthesized. The probe has shown considerable photostability, cell permeability, organelle specificity and selectivity for ATP. The multicolor live cell imaging experiments in HeLa cells showed high selectivity of probe 1 for mitochondria with fluorescence "turn-on" response. As a proof of concept and promising prospects for application in biological sciences probe 1 has been utilized to detect ATP sensitively in a partial aqueous medium and intracellularly in HeLa cells. The favorable interaction between triphosphate unit of ATP and piperazine N atoms of probe 1 is attributed to synergistic effects of H-bonding and electrostatic interactions that encouraged the CH-π and π→π stacking between anthracene and purine rings. Consequently, the observed enhanced "turn-on" emission and a naked-eye sensitive blue-green color in the medium is attributable to arrest in photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process. PMID:25727034

  16. Imaging individual proteins and nanodomains on intact cell membranes with a probe-based optical antenna.

    PubMed

    van Zanten, Thomas S; Lopez-Bosque, Maria J; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2010-01-01

    Optical antennas that confine and enhance electromagnetic fields in a nanometric region hold great potential for nanobioimaging and biosensing. Probe-based monopole optical antennas are fabricated to enhance fields localized to <30 nm near the antenna apex in aqueous conditions. These probes are used under appropriate excitation antenna conditions to image individual antibodies with an unprecedented resolution of 26 +/- 4 nm and virtually no surrounding background. On intact cell membranes in physiological conditions, the obtained resolution is 30 +/- 6 nm. Importantly, the method allows individual proteins to be distinguished from nanodomains and the degree of clustering to be quantified by directly measuring physical size and intensity of individual fluorescent spots. Improved antenna geometries should lead to true live cell imaging below 10-nm resolution with position accuracy in the subnanometric range. PMID:19943247

  17. A Nature-Inspired Betalainic Probe for Live-Cell Imaging of Plasmodium-Infected Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Letícia Christina Pires; Tonelli, Renata Rosito; Bagnaresi, Piero; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto; Bastos, Erick Leite

    2013-01-01

    A model betalainic dye was semisynthesized from betanin, the magenta pigment of the red beet, and was effective for live-cell imaging of Plasmodium-infected red blood cells. This water-soluble fluorescent probe is photostable, excitable in the visible region and cell membrane-permeable, and its photophysical properties are not notably pH-sensitive. Fluorescence imaging microscopy of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of malaria in humans, showed that only the parasite was stained. Z-stacking analysis suggested that the probe accumulates proximal to the nucleus of the parasite. Indicaxanthin, one of the natural fluorescent betalains found in the petals of certain flowers, did not stain the parasite or the red blood cell. PMID:23342028

  18. A Simple BODIPY-Based Viscosity Probe for Imaging of Cellular Viscosity in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Gao, Nengyue; Xu, Qing-Hua; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we developed a simple boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based probe, BTV, for cellular mitochondria viscosity imaging by coupling a simple BODIPY rotor with a mitochondria-targeting unit. The BTV exhibited a significant fluorescence intensity enhancement of more than 100-fold as the solvent viscosity increased. Also, the probe showed a direct linear relationship between the fluorescence lifetime and the media viscosity, which makes it possible to trace the change of the medium viscosity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that BTV could achieve practical applicability in the monitoring of mitochondrial viscosity changes in live cells through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). PMID:27589762

  19. A nature-inspired betalainic probe for live-cell imaging of Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Letícia Christina Pires; Tonelli, Renata Rosito; Bagnaresi, Piero; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto; Bastos, Erick Leite

    2013-01-01

    A model betalainic dye was semisynthesized from betanin, the magenta pigment of the red beet, and was effective for live-cell imaging of Plasmodium-infected red blood cells. This water-soluble fluorescent probe is photostable, excitable in the visible region and cell membrane-permeable, and its photophysical properties are not notably pH-sensitive. Fluorescence imaging microscopy of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of malaria in humans, showed that only the parasite was stained. Z-stacking analysis suggested that the probe accumulates proximal to the nucleus of the parasite. Indicaxanthin, one of the natural fluorescent betalains found in the petals of certain flowers, did not stain the parasite or the red blood cell. PMID:23342028

  20. Low cost FPGA based data acquisition system for a gamma imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fysikopoulos, E.; Georgiou, M.; Loudos, G.; Matsopoulos, G.

    2013-11-01

    We present the development of a low cost field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) based data acquisition system for a gamma imaging probe proposed for sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping. Radioguided surgery using a gamma probe is an established practice and has been widely introduced in SLN biopsies. For such applications, imaging systems require compact readout electronics and flexibility. Embedded systems implemented in the FPGA technology offer new possibilities in data acquisition for nuclear medicine imagers. FPGAs are inexpensive compared to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), usually used for the readout electronics of dedicated gamma cameras and their size is rather small. In this study, cost effective analog to digital converters (ADCs) were used and signal processing algorithms were implemented in the FPGA to extract the energy and position information. The analog front-end electronics were carefully designed taking into account the low sampling rate of the ADCs. The reference gamma probe has a small field of view (2.5 cm × 2.5 cm) and is based on the R8900U-00-C12 position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) coupled to a pixellated CsI(Na) scintillator with 1 mm × 1 mm × 5 mm crystal element size. Measurements were carried out using a general purpose collimator and 99mTc sources emitted at 140 keV. Performance parameters for the imaging gamma probe were compared with those obtained when data were acquired using the standard NIM (Nuclear Instrumentation Modules) electronics and found to be in very good agreement, which demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed implementation.

  1. Live-Cell Bioorthogonal Chemical Imaging: Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy of Vibrational Probes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lu; Hu, Fanghao; Chen, Zhixing; Shen, Yihui; Zhang, Luyuan; Min, Wei

    2016-08-16

    Innovations in light microscopy have tremendously revolutionized the way researchers study biological systems with subcellular resolution. In particular, fluorescence microscopy with the expanding choices of fluorescent probes has provided a comprehensive toolkit to tag and visualize various molecules of interest with exquisite specificity and high sensitivity. Although fluorescence microscopy is currently the method of choice for cellular imaging, it faces fundamental limitations for studying the vast number of small biomolecules. This is because common fluorescent labels, which are relatively bulky, could introduce considerable perturbation to or even completely alter the native functions of vital small biomolecules. Hence, despite their immense functional importance, these small biomolecules remain largely undetectable by fluorescence microscopy. To address this challenge, a bioorthogonal chemical imaging platform has recently been introduced. By coupling stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, an emerging nonlinear Raman microscopy technique, with tiny and Raman-active vibrational probes (e.g., alkynes and stable isotopes), bioorthogonal chemical imaging exhibits superb sensitivity, specificity, and biocompatibility for imaging small biomolecules in live systems. In this Account, we review recent technical achievements for visualizing a broad spectrum of small biomolecules, including ribonucleosides and deoxyribonucleosides, amino acids, fatty acids, choline, glucose, cholesterol, and small-molecule drugs in live biological systems ranging from individual cells to animal tissues and model organisms. Importantly, this platform is compatible with live-cell biology, thus allowing real-time imaging of small-molecule dynamics. Moreover, we discuss further chemical and spectroscopic strategies for multicolor bioorthogonal chemical imaging, a valuable technique in the era of "omics". As a unique tool for biological discovery, this platform has been applied to

  2. Sunscope: a video-guided intubation system through a detachable imaging probe.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jia-Rong; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Lin, Chih-Peng; Sun, Wei-Zen

    2008-06-01

    We have designed a novel apparatus, the Sunscope, which integrates a semiconductor image sensor into a compact video-guided intubation system. This device consists of three separate modules: viewer, console and visual tube. The 4-inch LCD viewer panel displays the real-time video image with optimal view angle. The console is designed with respect to ergonomics allowing comfortable manipulation and internally accommodating the power supply, image processing components and connector platform for both viewer and probe. The distal end of the detachable probe is packaged with a high resolution lens, CMOS sensor, and four LEDs. The proximal end is a 6-pin connector which can be readily removed and attached on demand. The probe is detachable and disposable with length and diameter adaptable to the size of the endotracheal tube. In our preliminary test, the video-guided apparatus helped inexperienced performers to identify the vocal cords correctly and improve the success rate of intubation on the simulation model. With further improvements on the miniature design, all captured images could be transmitted to remote devices through standard wireless transmission and could thus be stored in a specific database station. The wireless technique enables image sharing on multiple devices while a powerful database can provide valuable resources for training, data mining and serial case studies. We demonstrate that the CMOS image sensor combined with advanced reduced instruction set computer machine can serve as a visual aid for tracheal intubation. The disposable station will become a revolutionary technology both in clinical practice and medical education. PMID:18593652

  3. Imaging of biological samples by a collection-mode photon scanning tunneling microscope with an apertured probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naya, Masayuki; Mononobe, Shuji; Uma Maheswari, R.; Saiki, Tosiharu; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    1996-02-01

    We report on high resolution imaging by a collection-mode photon scanning tunneling microscope (c-mode PSTM). In our PSTM system, we have used a novel probe with a nanometric protrusion formed from a metal coated sharpened fiber. By using this probe, flagellar filaments of salmonella of diameter 25 nm could be imaged to have a full width at half maximum of 50 nm. Obtained images strongly depended on the separation of the sample to the probe, the diameter of the aperture, and polarization of the irradiated light. Comments on the origins of these dependencies are given.

  4. Metal-based optical probes for live cell imaging of nitroxyl (HNO).

    PubMed

    Rivera-Fuentes, Pablo; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-11-17

    Nitroxyl (HNO) is a biological signaling agent that displays distinctive reactivity compared to nitric oxide (NO). As a consequence, these two reactive nitrogen species trigger different physiological responses. Selective detection of HNO over NO has been a challenge for chemists, and several fluorogenic molecular probes have been recently developed with that goal in mind. Common constructs take advantage of the HNO-induced reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I). The sensing mechanism of such probes relies on the ability of the unpaired electron in a d orbital of the Cu(II) center to quench the fluorescence of a photoemissive ligand by either an electron or energy transfer mechanism. Experimental and theoretical mechanistic studies suggest that proton-coupled electron transfer mediates this process, and careful tuning of the copper coordination environment has led to sensors with optimized selectivity and kinetics. The current optical probes cover the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. This palette of sensors comprises structurally and functionally diverse fluorophores such as coumarin (blue/green emission), boron dipyrromethane (BODIPY, green emission), benzoresorufin (red emission), and dihydroxanthenes (near-infrared emission). Many of these sensors have been successfully applied to detect HNO production in live cells. For example, copper-based optical probes have been used to detect HNO production in live mammalian cells that have been treated with H2S and various nitrosating agents. These studies have established a link between HSNO, the smallest S-nitrosothiol, and HNO. In addition, a near-infrared HNO sensor has been used to perform multicolor/multianalyte microscopy, revealing that exogenously applied HNO elevates the concentration of intracellular mobile zinc. This mobilization of zinc ions is presumably a consequence of nitrosation of cysteine residues in zinc-chelating proteins such as metallothionein. Future challenges for the optical imaging of

  5. Bioengineered Probes for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The development of molecular imaging probes has changed the nature of neurobiological research. Some of the most notable successes have involved the use of biological engineering techniques for the creation of fluorescent protein derivatives for optical imaging, but recent work has also led to a number of bioengineered probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the preeminent technique for noninvasive investigation of brain structure and function. Molecular MRI agents are beginning to be applied for experiments in the nervous system, where they have the potential to bridge from molecular to systems or organismic levels of analysis. Compared with canonical synthetic small molecule agents, biomolecular or semibiosynthetic MRI contrast agents offer special advantages due to their amenability to molecular engineering approaches, their properties in some cases as catalysts, and their specificity in targeting and ligand binding. Here, we discuss an expanding list of instances where biological engineering techniques have aided in the design of MRI contrast agents and reporter systems, examining both advantages and limitations of these types of probes for studies in the central nervous system. PMID:22896803

  6. Feasibility studies of an EMCCD-based beta imaging probe for radioguided thyroid surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakova, Irina; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy; Entine, Gerald; Stack, Brendan C.; Miller, Brian

    2006-08-01

    We are developing a probe for image-guided surgery of cancer to be used in conjunction with traditional beta emitting radiopharmaceuticals such as I 131 and F 18-FDG. This device is based on a combination of two novel technologies, a microcolumnar film scintillator, CsI(Tl) and low-noise high sensitivity Electron-Multiplying CCD (EMCCD). The former allows high spatial resolution nuclear imaging and the latter facilitates detection of signal with significantly higher SNR than conventional CCDs by the virtue of internal signal gain built into its readout register. CsI(Tl) is bonded to the EMCCD via a flexible coherent fiberopic cable for easy handling. Due to its high sensitivity the probe is capable of functioning in real time providing high spatial resolution nuclear images for precise detection, delineation and excision of tumors. The evaluation of the probe using standard clinical phantoms as well as the operational data obtained on swine models and in clinical surgery will be presented.

  7. Dual tracer imaging of SPECT and PET probes in living mice using a sequential protocol

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Sarah E; Diener, Justin M; Sasser, Todd A; Correcher, Carlos; González, Antonio J; Avermaete, Tony Van; Leevy, W Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, multimodal imaging strategies have motivated the fusion of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) or Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) scans with an X-ray computed tomography (CT) image to provide anatomical information, as well as a framework with which molecular and functional images may be co-registered. Recently, pre-clinical nuclear imaging technology has evolved to capture multiple SPECT or multiple PET tracers to further enhance the information content gathered within an imaging experiment. However, the use of SPECT and PET probes together, in the same animal, has remained a challenge. Here we describe a straightforward method using an integrated trimodal imaging system and a sequential dosing/acquisition protocol to achieve dual tracer imaging with 99mTc and 18F isotopes, along with anatomical CT, on an individual specimen. Dosing and imaging is completed so that minimal animal manipulations are required, full trimodal fusion is conserved, and tracer crosstalk including down-scatter of the PET tracer in SPECT mode is avoided. This technique will enhance the ability of preclinical researchers to detect multiple disease targets and perform functional, molecular, and anatomical imaging on individual specimens to increase the information content gathered within longitudinal in vivo studies. PMID:23145357

  8. Dual Frequency Band Annular Probe for Volumetric Pulse-echo Optoacoustic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkhoran, Mohammad Azizian; Varray, François; Vray, Didier

    Optoacoustic (OA) pulse echo (PE) imaging is a hybridized modality that is capable of providing physiological information on the basis of anatomical structure. In this work, we propose a dual frequency band annular probe for backward mode volumetric PE/OA imaging. The performance of this design is evaluated based on the spatio-temporal impulse response, three dimensional steerability of the transducer and point spread function. Optimum settings for number of elements in each ring and maximum steering are suggested. The transducer design and synthetic array beamforming simulation are presented. The resolution performance and reconstruction capabilities are shown with the in-silico measurements.

  9. Principal Component Analysis of Spectroscopic Imaging Data in Scanning Probe Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2009-01-01

    The approach for data analysis in band excitation family of scanning probe microscopies based on principal component analysis (PCA) is explored. PCA utilizes the similarity between spectra within the image to select the relevant response components. For small signal variations within the image, the PCA components coincide with the results of deconvolution using simple harmonic oscillator model. For strong signal variations, the PCA allows effective approach to rapidly process, de-noise and compress the data. The extension of PCA for correlation function analysis is demonstrated. The prospects of PCA as a universal tool for data analysis and representation in multidimensional SPMs are discussed.

  10. Molecular probes for two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation imaging of biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porres, Laurent; Mongin, Olivier; Bhatthula, Bharath K. G.; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille H.; Ventelon, Lionel; Moreaux, Laurent; Pons, T.; Mertz, Jerome

    2002-11-01

    Novel microscopies based on nonlinear optical (NLO) phenomena are attracting increasing interest in the biology community owing to their potentialities in the area of real-time, non-damaging imaging of biological systems. In particular, second-harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) are NLO phenomena that scale with excitation intensity squared, and thus give rise to an intrinsic 3-dimensional resolution when used in microscopic imaging. In this perspective, we have implemented a molecular engineering approach toward NLO-probes specifically designed for SHG and/or TPEF imaging of cellular membranes. We have designed nanoscale rod-like fluorophores showing very large TPEF cross-sections in the visible red, outperforming standard fluorophores such as fluorescein by up to two orders of magnitude. Bolaamphiphilic derivatives combining high TPEF cross-sections and affinity for cellular membranes were prepared. Their incorporation into model or cell membranes can be monitored by TPEF microscopy. Amphiphilic push-pull chromophores showing both high TPA and SHG cross-sections in the near-IR region were designed as NLO-probes for imaging of biological membranes by simultaneous SHG and TPEF microscopy. These NLO-phores offer intriguing potentialities for imaging of fundamental biological processes such as adhesion, fusion or for reporting of membrane electrical potentials.