Sample records for chaga mushroom inonotus

  1. Antimutagenic effects of subfractions of Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extract.

    PubMed

    Ham, Seung-Shi; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Moon, Sun-Young; Chung, Mi Ja; Cui, Cheng-Bi; Han, Eun-Kyung; Chung, Cha-Kwon; Choe, Myeon

    2009-01-01

    Inonotus obliquus is a mushroom commonly known as Chaga that is widely used in folk medicine in Siberia, North America, and North Europe. Here, we evaluated the antimutagenic and antioxidant capacities of subfractions of Inonotus obliquus extract. The ethyl acetate extract was separated by vacuum chromatography into three fractions, and the fraction bearing the highest antimutagenic activity was subsequently separated into four fractions by reversed phase (ODS-C18) column chromatography. The most antimutagenic fraction was then separated into two subfractions (subfractions 1 and 2) by normal phase silica gel column chromatography. Ames test analysis revealed that the subfractions were not mutagenic. At 50 ?g/plate, subfractions 1 and 2 strongly inhibited the mutagenesis induced in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 by the directly acting mutagen MNNG (0.4 ?g/plate) by 80.0% and 77.3%, respectively. They also inhibited 0.15 ?g/plate 4NQO-induced mutagenesis in TA98 and TA100 by 52.6-62.0%. The mutagenesis in TA98 induced by the indirectly acting mutagens Trp-P-1 (0.15 ?g/plate) and B(?)P (10 ?g/plate) was reduced by 47.0-68.2% by the subfractions, while the mutagenesis in TA100 by Trp-P-1 and B(?)P was reduced by 70.5-87.2%. Subfraction 1 was more inhibitory than subfraction 2 with regard to the mutagenic effects of 4NQO, Trp-P-1, and B(?)P. Subfractions 1 and 2 also had a strong antioxidant activity against DPPH radicals and were identified by MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR analyses as 3?-hydroxy-lanosta-8, 24-dien-21-al and inotodiol, respectively. Thus, we show that the 3beta-hydroxy-lanosta-8, 24-dien-21-al and inotodiol components of Inonotus obliquus bear antimutagenic and antioxidative activities. PMID:18992843

  2. Gamma-irradiation improves the color and antioxidant properties of Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extract.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Sung, Nak-Yun; Kwon, Sun-Kyu; Srinivasan, Periasamy; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-Il; Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Jin Kyu; Byun, Myung-Woo; Kim, Mee-Ree; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on color and antioxidative properties of Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extract (CME). CME (10 mg/mL) was gamma-irradiated at 0, 3, 5, 7, and 10 kGy, and color, antioxidant activity, and total phenolic compound levels were then determined. The lightness and yellowness were increased (P < .05), and the redness was decreased (P < .05), as irradiation dose increased. The antioxidant parameters such as the 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, superoxide, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, ferric reducing/antioxidant power, and inhibition of lipid peroxidation increased as the irradiation dose increased. Also, the total phenolic compound levels of CME were increased (P < .05) by gamma-irradiation. These results suggest that gamma-irradiation could be considered a means for improving the antioxidant properties and the color of CME. PMID:20041791

  3. Extract of Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) stimulates 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jeong In; Kim, Dong Hyun; Yun, Jong Won

    2010-11-01

    Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) has long been used as a folk medicine due to its numerous biological functions such as antibacterial, antiallergic, antiinflammatory and antioxidative activities. In the present study, it was found that the I. obliquus hot water extract (IOWE) activated adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Even in the absence of adipogenic stimuli by insulin, the IOWE strongly induced adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The major constituent of IOWE was glucose-rich polysaccharides with a molecular mass of 149? kDa. IOWE enhanced the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, increasing TG (triacylglycerol) accumulation that is critical for acquisition of the adipocyte phenotype, in a dose-dependent manner. IOWE stimulated gene expression of C/EBP? (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein ?) and PPAR? (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors ?) during adipocyte differentiation, and induced the expression of PPAR? target genes such as aP2 (adipocyte protein 2), LPL (lipoprotein lipase) and CD36 (fatty acid translocase). Immunoblot analysis revealed that IOWE increased the expression of adipogenic makers such as PPAR? and GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4). The luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that IOWE did not exhibit PPAR? ligand activity. Although these results require further investigation, the ability of natural mushroom product to increase PPAR? transcriptional activities may be expected to be therapeutic targets for dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21031614

  4. Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) induces G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis in human hepatoma HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Myung-Ja; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, Seong-Yeol; Kim, Yunha; Kim, Se-Jin; Lee, Jin Seok; Chai, Kyu Yun; Kim, Hye-Jung; Cui, Ming-Xun; So, Hong Seob; Kim, Ki-Young; Park, Raekil

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) water extract on human hepatoma cell lines, HepG2 and Hep3B cells. METHODS: The cytotoxicity of Chaga extract was screened by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Morphological observation, flow cytometry analysis, Western blot were employed to elucidate the cytotoxic mechanism of Chaga extract. RESULTS: HepG2 cells were more sensitive to Chaga extract than Hep3B cells, as demonstrated by markedly reduced cell viability. Chaga extract inhibited the cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, which was accompanied with G0/G1-phase arrest and apoptotic cell death. In addition, G0/G1 arrest in the cell cycle was closely associated with down-regulation of p53, pRb, p27, cyclins D1, D2, E, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2, Cdk4, and Cdk6 expression. CONCLUSION: Chaga mushroom may provide a new therapeutic option, as a potential anticancer agent, in the treatment of hepatoma. PMID:18203281

  5. Reversal of the TPA-induced inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication by Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extracts: effects on MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Ran; Park, Joon-Suk; Jo, Eun-Hye; Hwang, Jae-Woong; Kim, Sun-Jung; Ra, Jeong-Chan; Aruoma, Okezie I; Lee, Yong-Soon; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2006-01-01

    Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) has continued to receive attention as a folk medicine with indications for the treatment of cancers and digestive diseases. The anticarcinogenic effect of Chaga mushroom extract was investigated using a model system of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in WB-F344 normal rat liver epithelial cells. The cells were pre-incubated with Chaga mushroom extracts (5, 10, 20 microg/ml) for 24 h and this was followed by co-treatment with Chaga mushroom extracts and TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, 10 ng/ml) for 1 h. The inhibition of GJIC by TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate), promoter of cancer, was prevented with treatment of Chaga mushroom extracts. Similarly, the increased phosphorylated ERK1/2 and p38 protein kinases were markedly reduced in Chaga mushroom extracts-treated cells. There was no change in the JNK kinase protein level, suggesting that Chaga mushroom extracts could only block the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase. The Chaga mushroom extracts further prevented the inhibition of GJIC through the blocking of Cx43 phosphorylation. Indeed cell-to-cell communication through gap junctional channels is a critical factor in the life and death balance of cells because GJIC has an important function in maintaining tissue homeostasis through the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and adaptive functions of differentiated cells. Thus Chaga mushroom may act as a natural anticancer product by preventing the inhibition of GJIC through the inactivation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase. PMID:17012771

  6. [A study of the antiherpetic activity of the chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extracts in the Vero cells infected with the herpes simplex virus].

    PubMed

    Polkovnikova, M V; Nosik, N N; Garaev, T M; Kondrashina, N G; Finogenova, M P; Shibnev, V A

    2014-01-01

    The chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) contains a wide range of excellent bioactive compounds. However, limited information exists on the antiviral activity of the compounds extracted from chaga. A number of subfractions of chaga were obtained using different solvents and different procedures. The subfractions of chaga extracted with water, alcohol, alkali were tested for their toxicity for the Vero cell culture and antiviral effect in the Vero cells infected with the Herpes simplex virus (HSV), Type 1. It was shown that most of the subfractions were not toxic for the Vero cells and had protective effect on the Vero cells infected with HSV. The subfraction IV in the concentration 5 microg/ml protected the Vero cells from cytodestructive action of HSV and no viral DNA was detected in infected cells treated with chaga extracts. Best protective effect was observed when compound was added before or within one hour after the Vero cells were infected with HSV. PMID:25069286

  7. Aqueous extract from a Chaga medicinal mushroom, Inonotus obliquus (higher Basidiomycetes), prevents herpes simplex virus entry through inhibition of viral-induced membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hong-Hui; Yu, Xiong-Tao; Li, Ting; Wu, Hong-Ling; Jiao, Chun-Wei; Cai, Mian-Hua; Li, Xiang-Min; Xie, Yi-Zhen; Wang, Yi; Peng, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Chaga medicinal mushroom, Inonotus obliquus, a popular prescription in traditional medicine in Europe and Asia, was used to reduce inflammation in the nasopharynx and to facilitate breathing. The aqueous extract from I. obliquus (AEIO) exhibited marked decrease in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection (the 50% inhibitory concentration was 3.82 ?g/mL in the plaque reduction assay and 12.29 ?g/mL in the HSV-1/blue assay) as well as safety in Vero cells (the 50% cellular cytotoxicity was > 1 mg/mL, and selection index was > 80). Using a time course assay, effective stage analysis, and fusion inhibition assay, the mechanism of anti-HSV activity was found against the early stage of viral infection through inhibition of viral-induced membrane fusion. Therefore, AEIO could effectively prevent HSV-1 entry by acting on viral glycoproteins, leading to the prevention of membrane fusion, which is different from nucleoside analog antiherpetics. PMID:23510282

  8. Anticancer effects of fraction isolated from fruiting bodies of Chaga medicinal mushroom, Inonotus obliquus (Pers.:Fr.) Pilát (Aphyllophoromycetideae): in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Langner, Ewa; Kaczor, Józef; Kandefer-Szersze?, Martyna; Sanecka, Bozena; Mazurkiewicz, Witold; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    The medicinal mushroom Chaga, Inonotus obliquus (Pers.:Fr.) Pilát (Hymenochaetaceae), has been used in folk medicine in Russia, Poland, and most of the Baltic countries, as a cleansing and disinfecting measure, and as decoctions for stomach diseases, intestinal worms, liver and heart ailments, and cancer treatment. Many reports have been published concerning the health promoting functions of this mushroom, including antibacterial, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and antioxidant activities. The purpose of the present study was evaluation of in vitro anticancer activity of fraction IO4 isolated from I. obliquus. The effect on cell proliferation, motility and viability was assessed in a range of cancer and normal cells. Chaga fraction prepared from dried fruiting bodies was subjected to anticancer evaluation in human lung carcinoma (A549), colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29), and rat glioma (C6) cell cultures. Human skin fibroblasts (HSF), bovine aorta endothelial cells (BAEC), models of rat oligodendrocytes (OLN-93), hepatocytes (Fao), rat astroglia, and mouse neurons (P19) were applied to test toxicity in normal cells. The following methods were applied: tumor cell proliferation (MTT assay and BrdU assay), cytotoxicity (LDH assay), tumor cell motility (wound assay), tumor cell morphology (May-Grünwald-Giemsa staining), and death detection (ELISA). Chaga fraction elicited anticancer effects which were attributed to decreased tumor cell proliferation, motility and morphological changes induction. Of note is the fact that it produced no or low toxicity in tested normal cells. The data presented could open interesting paths for further investigations of fraction IO4 as a potential anticancer agent. PMID:22135889

  9. New antioxidant polyphenols from the medicinal mushroom Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Kyoung; Kim, Young-Sook; Jang, Yoon-Woo; Jung, Jin-Young; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2007-12-15

    The fruiting body of Inonotus obliquus, a medicinal mushroom called chaga, has been used as a traditional medicine for cancer treatment. Although this mushroom has been known to exhibit potent antioxidant activity, the mechanisms responsible for this activity remain unknown. In our investigation for free radical scavengers from the methanolic extract of this mushroom, inonoblins A (1), B (2), and C (3) were isolated along with the known compounds, phelligridins D (4), E (5), and G (6). Their structures were established by extensive spectroscopic analyses. These compounds exhibited significant scavenging activity against the ABTS radical cation and DPPH radical, and showed moderate activity against the superoxide radical anion. PMID:17980585

  10. Preparation of Chaga medicinal mushroom, Inonotus obliquus-fermented rice using solid-state fermentation and its taste quality and antioxidant property.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shin-Yi; Yeh, Chan-Chun; Liang, Chih-Hung; Mau, Jeng-Leun

    2012-01-01

    Chaga medicinal mushroom, Inonotus obliquus (Pers.:Fr.) Pilat, was inoculated into cooked embryo rice and the mycelial growth in I. obliquus-fermented embryo rice (IER) was monitored. Besides, nonvolatile taste components and antioxidant properties of fruiting bodies, mycelia, IER, and embryo rice were studied. The optimal conditions for mycelial growth were determined to be: 30°C, an inoculation rate of 1 mL/15 g, water supplementation of 60%, and no extra nitrogen source added. IER showed similar proximate composition to embryo rice but contained a substantial amount of ergothioneine (101 mg/kg dry weight). IER contained higher amounts of soluble sugars and polyols, and umami taste components, including monosodium glutamate (MSG)-like components and flavor 5'-nucleotides, than embryo rice. Besides, IER showed a second level of equivalent umami concentrations (223.73 g MSG/100 g). Fruiting bodies did not contain umami components but showed the most effective antioxidant properties. Although some of EC50 values of IER were less than those of mycelia and embryo rice, IER still showed effective antioxidant properties. Based on the results obtained, IER will be a novel functional food. PMID:23510252

  11. Anticancer activity of subfractions containing pure compounds of Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extract in human cancer cells and in Balbc/c mice bearing Sarcoma-180 cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Mi Ja; Chung, Cha-Kwon; Jeong, Yoonhwa; Ham, Seung-Shi

    2010-06-01

    The Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) has been used in folk medicine to treat cancers. However, limited information exists on the underlying anticancer effects of the major component of I. obliquusin vivo. We hypothesize that the pure compounds (3beta-hydroxy-lanosta-8,24-dien-21-al, inotodiol and lanosterol, respectively) separated from I. obliquus would inhibit tumor growth in Balbc/c mice bearing Sarcoma-180 cells (S-180) in vivo and growth of human carcinoma cells in vitro. To test this hypothesis, the growth inhibition of each subfraction isolated from I. obliquus on human carcinoma cell lines (lung carcinoma A-549 cells, stomach adenocarcinoma AGS cells, breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells, and cervical adenocarcinoma HeLa cells) was tested in vitro. Then, after S-180 implantation, the mice were fed a normal chow supplemented with 0, 0.1 or 0.2 mg of subfraction 1, 2 or 3 per mouse per day. All of the subfractions isolated from I. obliquus showed significant cytotoxic activity against the selected cancer cell lines in vitro. Subfraction 1 was more active than subfraction 2 and subfraction 3 against the A549, AGS and MCF-7 cancer cell lines in vitro. In in vivo results, subfraction 1 isolated from I. obliquus at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.2 mg/mouse per day significantly decreased tumor volume by 23.96% and 33.71%, respectively, as compared with the control. Subfractions 2 and 3 also significantly inhibited tumor growth in mice bearing S-180 as compared with the control mouse tumor. Subfraction 1 isolated from I. obliquus showed greater inhibition of tumor growth than subfractions 2 and 3, which agrees well with the in vitro results. The results suggest that I. obliquus and its compounds in these subfractions isolated from I. obliquus could be used as natural anticancer ingredients in the food and/or pharmaceutical industry. PMID:20607061

  12. Anticancer activity of subfractions containing pure compounds of Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extract in human cancer cells and in Balbc/c mice bearing Sarcoma-180 cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Mi Ja; Chung, Cha-Kwon; Jeong, Yoonhwa

    2010-01-01

    The Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) has been used in folk medicine to treat cancers. However, limited information exists on the underlying anticancer effects of the major component of I. obliquus in vivo. We hypothesize that the pure compounds (3?-hydroxy-lanosta-8,24-dien-21-al, inotodiol and lanosterol, respectively) separated from I. obliquus would inhibit tumor growth in Balbc/c mice bearing Sarcoma-180 cells (S-180) in vivo and growth of human carcinoma cells in vitro. To test this hypothesis, the growth inhibition of each subfraction isolated from I. obliquus on human carcinoma cell lines (lung carcinoma A-549 cells, stomach adenocarcinoma AGS cells, breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells, and cervical adenocarcinoma HeLa cells) was tested in vitro. Then, after S-180 implantation, the mice were fed a normal chow supplemented with 0, 0.1 or 0.2 mg of subfraction 1, 2 or 3 per mouse per day. All of the subfractions isolated from I. obliquus showed significant cytotoxic activity against the selected cancer cell lines in vitro. Subfraction 1 was more active than subfraction 2 and subfraction 3 against the A549, AGS and MCF-7 cancer cell lines in vitro. In in vivo results, subfraction 1 isolated from I. obliquus at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.2 mg/mouse per day significantly decreased tumor volume by 23.96% and 33.71%, respectively, as compared with the control. Subfractions 2 and 3 also significantly inhibited tumor growth in mice bearing S-180 as compared with the control mouse tumor. Subfraction 1 isolated from I. obliquus showed greater inhibition of tumor growth than subfractions 2 and 3, which agrees well with the in vitro results. The results suggest that I. obliquus and its compounds in these subfractions isolated from I. obliquus could be used as natural anticancer ingredients in the food and/or pharmaceutical industry. PMID:20607061

  13. Review on Chaga Medicinal Mushroom, Inonotus obliquus (Higher Basidiomycetes): Realm of Medicinal Applications and Approaches on Estimating its Resource Potential.

    PubMed

    Balandaykin, Mikhail E; Zmitrovich, Ivan V

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the realm of medicinal applications of Inonotus obliquus raw materials, sterile conks I. obliquus, based on the bibliographies of chemical studies of the fungus. The experimental part of the paper is devoted to the presentation of methods of estimating the resource potential of this fungus based on data obtained in the comfort zone of ththis species. A new form, I. obliquus f. sterilis, is formally described. PMID:25746615

  14. Inhibitory effects of a polysaccharide extract from the Chaga medicinal mushroom, Inonotus obliquus (higher Basidiomycetes), on the proliferation of human neurogliocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xianbin; Luo, Qi; Li, Chuang; Ding, Zhaoyi; Pang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Changfu

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the inhibitory roles of a polysaccharide extract from Inonotus obliquus on U251 human neurogliocytoma cells cultured in vitro. After administering the polysaccharide extract from I. obliquus to U251 cells cultivated in vitro, methyl thiazolyl tetrazoliym assay was performed to measure the inhibitory effects of the extract on tumor cell proliferation. The expression of the apoptosis-related proteins Bcl-2 and caspase-3 were determined by Western blotting. Different concentrations of I. obliquus extract (25, 50, 100, 200, and 500 µg/mL) were added to U251 cells at 24, 48, and 72 hours. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazoliym assay showed that the inhibition ratio increased with increased extract concentration and prolonged treatment duration. The I. obliquus extract sharply decreased the expression of Bcl-2 but dramatically increased the expression of caspase-3. This function was gradually enhanced with increased drug concentration and prolonged treatment duration. The I. obliquus extract can inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells. This inhibition function is closely related to the downregulation of Bcl-2 and the upregulation of caspase-3. PMID:24940902

  15. Antioxidant small phenolic ingredients in Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat (Chaga).

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuki; Sato, Yuzo; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2007-08-01

    Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat (Chaga, in Russia, kabanoanatake in Japan) is a fungus having been used as a folk medicine in Russia and said to have many health beneficial functions such as immune modulating and anti-cancer activities. In the present study, the antioxidant activity of hot water extract (decoction) of Chaga was precisely compared with those of other medicinal fungi (Agaricus blazei Mycelia, Ganoderma lucidum and Phellinus linteus) showing Chaga had the strongest antioxidant activity among fungi examined in terms of both superoxide and hydroxyl radicals scavenging activities. Further determination of the antioxidant potential of isolated fruiting body (brown part) and Sclerotium (black part) revealed the 80% MeOH extract of fruiting body had the highest potential as high as that of Chaga decoction. Finally, seven antioxidant components were isolated and purified from the 80% MeOH extract of Chaga fruiting body, and their chemical structures were determined as small phenolics as follows: 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy benzoic acid 2-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl ethyl ester (BAEE), protocatechic acid (PCA), caffeic acid (CA), 3,4-dihybenzaladehyde (DB), 2,5-dihydroxyterephtalic acid (DTA), syringic acid (SA) and 3,4-dihydroxybenzalacetone (DBL). Notably, BAEE was assigned as the new compound firstly identified from the natural source in the present study. PMID:17666849

  16. In vitro antitumor activity and structure characterization of ethanol extracts from wild and cultivated Chaga medicinal mushroom, Inonotus obliquus (Pers.:Fr.) Pilát (Aphyllophoromycetideae).

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Yin, Ting; Chen, Xian-Hui; Zhang, Gong; Curtis, Rempel B; Lu, Zhan-Hui; Jiang, Ji-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Inonotus obliquus (Pers.:Fr.) Pilát has been traditionally used as a folk remedy for treatment of cancers, cardiovascular disease and diabetes in Russia, Poland, and most of the Baltic countries, but natural reserves of this fungus have nearly been exhausted. This study was designed to investigate the artificial cultivation of I. obliquus and the antitumor activity of its tissues. The ethanol extract of cultivated sclerotium had the highest cell growth inhibitory rate (74.6%) as determined by an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. 78% of the bags produced sclerotia and only 6.17 g/bag of sclerotium was obtained. Extracts of the cultivated fruiting body showed 44.2% inhibitory activity against tumor cells. However, the yield was as high as 18.24 g/bag, and 98% of the bags produced fruiting body. The results of gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) showed that similar compounds were extracted from the wild and cultivated samples. The principal compounds observed were lanosterol, inotodiol, and ergosterol. Their percentages of the mass fraction were 86.1, 59.9, and 71.8% of the total, for the wild sclerotium, cultivated sclerotium, and cultivated fruiting body, respectively. Ergosterol was found to be much higher (27.32%) in cultivated fruiting body. We conclude that cultivated fruiting body of I. obliquus obtained by inoculation of the substrate with spawn mycelium of the fifth generation could serve as an ideal substitute for the wild I. obliquus. PMID:22135888

  17. Amelioration of scopolamine induced cognitive dysfunction and oxidative stress by Inonotus obliquus - a medicinal mushroom.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Vijayasree Vayalanellore; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan Amirthalingam; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2011-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the cognitive enhancing and anti-oxidant activities of Inonotus obliquus (Chaga) against scopolamine-induced experimental amnesia. Methanolic extract of Chaga (MEC) at 50 and 100 mg kg (-1)doses were administered orally for 7 days to amnesic mice. Learning and memory was assessed by passive avoidance task (PAT) and Morris water maze (MWM) test. Tacrine (THA, 10 mg kg (-1), orally (p.o)) used as a reference drug. To elucidate the mechanism of the cognitive enhancing activity of MEC, the activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), anti-oxidant enzymes, the levels of acetylcholine (ACh) and nitrite of mice brain homogenates were evaluated. MEC treatment for 7 days significantly improved the learning and memory as measured by PAT and MWM paradigms. Further, MEC significantly reduced the oxidative-nitritive stress, as evidenced by a decrease in malondialdehyde and nitrite levels and restored the glutathione and superoxide dismutase levels in a dose dependent manner. In addition, MEC treatment significantly decreased the AChE activity in both the salt and detergent-soluble fraction of brain homogenates. Further, treatment with MEC restored the levels of ACh as did THA. Thus, the significant cognitive enhancement observed in mice after MEC administration is closely related to higher brain anti-oxidant properties and inhibition of AChE activity. These findings stress the critical impact of Chaga, a medicinal mushroom, on the higher brain functions like learning and memory. PMID:21779570

  18. Cancer cell cytotoxicity of extracts and small phenolic compounds from Chaga [Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuki; Nishida, Hiroshi; Matsugo, Seiichi; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2009-06-01

    Previously, we studied the antioxidant potential of Chaga mushroom [Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat] extracts and isolated several small (poly)phenolic compounds as the major antioxidant components in the 80% methanol (MeOH) extract. In the present study, these isolated phenolic ingredients together with several other types of Chaga extracts were examined for cytotoxic effects against normal (IMR90) and cancer (A549, PA-1, U937, and HL-60) cell lines. Results revealed decoctions from both the fruiting body (FB) and sclerotium (ST) parts of Chaga, especially the ST part, showed considerable cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, but the cytotoxicity appeared to be stronger against normal cells than cancer cells. The 80% MeOH ST extract also showed the same trend. On the other hand, the 80% MeOH extract of FB showed significant cytotoxicity towards tumor cell lines without affecting normal cells, for example, the 50% lethal dose was 49.4 +/- 2.9 microg/mL for PA-1 cells versus 123.6 +/- 13.8 microg/mL for normal cells. The phenolic components isolated from the 80% MeOH extracts had markedly greater cancer cell toxicity than the extracts themselves. In particular, two out of seven compounds showed strong cytotoxicity towards several tumor cell lines without giving rise to significant cell toxicity toward normal cells. For example, the 50% lethal dose for 3,4-dihydroxybenzalacetone was 12.2 micromol/L in PA-1 cells but was 272.8 micromol/L in IMR90 cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis further revealed these phenolic ingredients have high potentiality for apoptosis induction in PA-1 cells. PMID:19627197

  19. Chaga mushroom-induced oxalate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yuko; Seta, Koichi; Ogawa, Yayoi; Takayama, Tatsuya; Nagata, Masao; Taguchi, Takashi; Yahata, Kensei

    2014-06-01

    Chaga mushrooms have been used in folk and botanical medicine as a remedy for cancer, gastritis, ulcers, and tuberculosis of the bones. A 72-year-old Japanese female had been diagnosed with liver cancer 1 year prior to presenting at our department. She underwent hepatectomy of the left lobe 3 months later. Chaga mushroom powder (4 - 5 teaspoons per day) had been ingested for the past 6 months for liver cancer. Renal function decreased and hemodialysis was initiated. Renal biopsy specimens showed diffuse tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Oxalate crystals were detected in the tubular lumina and urinary sediment and oxalate nephropathy was diagnosed. Chaga mushrooms contain extremely high oxalate concentrations. This is the first report of a case of oxalate nephropathy associated with ingestion of Chaga mushrooms. PMID:23149251

  20. Immunomodulatory Activity of the Water Extract from Medicinal Mushroom Inonotus obliquus

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The immunomodulatory effect of aqueous extract of Inonotus obliquus, called as Chaga, was tested on bone marrow cells from chemically immunosuppressed mice. The Chaga water extract was daily administered for 24 days to mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide (400 mg/kg body weight), immunosuppressive alkylating agent. The number of colony-forming unit (CFU)-granulocytes/macrophages (GM) and erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E), increased almost to the levels seen in non-treated control as early as 8 days after treatment. Oral administration of the extract highly increased serum levels of IL-6. Also, the level of TNF-? was elevated by the chemical treatment in control mice, whereas was maintained at the background level in the extract-treated mice, indicating that the extract might effectively suppress TNF-? related pathologic conditions. These results strongly suggest the great potential of the aqueous extract from Inonotus obliquus as immune enhancer during chemotherapy. PMID:24049493

  1. Immunomodulatory Activity of the Water Extract from Medicinal Mushroom Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Ran

    2005-09-01

    The immunomodulatory effect of aqueous extract of Inonotus obliquus, called as Chaga, was tested on bone marrow cells from chemically immunosuppressed mice. The Chaga water extract was daily administered for 24 days to mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide (400 mg/kg body weight), immunosuppressive alkylating agent. The number of colony-forming unit (CFU)-granulocytes/macrophages (GM) and erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E), increased almost to the levels seen in non-treated control as early as 8 days after treatment. Oral administration of the extract highly increased serum levels of IL-6. Also, the level of TNF-? was elevated by the chemical treatment in control mice, whereas was maintained at the background level in the extract-treated mice, indicating that the extract might effectively suppress TNF-? related pathologic conditions. These results strongly suggest the great potential of the aqueous extract from Inonotus obliquus as immune enhancer during chemotherapy. PMID:24049493

  2. Chaga mushroom extract inhibits oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes as assessed by comet assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Hyang Burm; Jeon, Eun-Jae; Jung, Hack Sung; Kang, Myung-Hee

    2004-01-01

    The Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) is claimed to have beneficial properties for human health, such as anti-bacterial, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. The antioxidant effects of the mushroom may be partly explained by protection of cell components against free radicals. We evaluated the effect of aqueous Chaga mushroom extracts for their potential for protecting against oxidative damage to DNA in human lymphocytes. Cells were pretreated with various concentrations (10, 50, 100 and 500 microg/mL) of the extract for 1 h at 37 degrees C. Cells were then treated with 100 microM of H2O2 for 5 min as an oxidative stress. Evaluation of oxidative damage was performed using single-cell gel electrophoresis for DNA fragmentation (Comet assay). Using image analysis, the degree of DNA damage was evaluated as the DNA tail moment. Cells pretreated with Chaga extract showed over 40% reduction in DNA fragmentation compared with the positive control (100 micromol H2O2 treatment). Thus, Chaga mushroom treatment affords cellular protection against endogenous DNA damage produced by H2O2. PMID:15630179

  3. Prevention of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in PC12 cells by 3,4-dihydroxybenzalacetone isolated from Chaga (Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat).

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuki; Nishida, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yutaka; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2009-10-15

    Chaga (Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat) is a mushroom traditionally used as a folk medicine for tumors and stomach ulcers in Russia. Previously, we reported the antioxidant potential of Chaga extracts and seven isolated phenolic ingredients. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of Chaga extracts and other isolated phenolic ingredients against H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress in PC12 cells. Intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to oxidative stress and subsequent damage of cellular and nuclear components. Chaga extracts and the phenolic ingredients, 3,4-dihydroxybenzalacetone (DBL) and caffeic acid (CA), effectively suppressed intracellular ROS level in H(2)O(2)-treated cells. The H(2)O(2)-induced cell death was more pronounced, effectively prevented in the cells treated with DBL than in cells treated with CA. In addition, ROS activate various signal transduction pathways including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Therefore, we examined the potentially beneficial effects of DBL on extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38-MAPK signaling activated by H(2)O(2) stimulation. DBL selectively inhibited the phosphorylation of p38-MAPK, without affecting JNK and ERK. PMID:19647072

  4. Inhibitory effect of chaga mushroom extract on compound 48/80-induced anaphylactic shock and IgE production in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Taek Joon; Lee, Sue Jung; Kim, Eun Young; Cho, Eun Hee; Kang, Tae Bong; Yu, Kwang-Won; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2013-04-01

    Chaga mushrooms (Inonotus obliquus) are hypothesised to exhibit general immune-potentiating, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor properties, but their anti-allergic activities are not fully understood. Therefore, this study investigated whether a chaga mushroom extract (C-HE) might have anti-allergic activity. This activity was assessed through the levels of the IgE Ab produced in response to an allergen (OVA). The administration of C-HE prophylactically inhibited the systemic anaphylactic shock induced by compound 48/80 in mice. The oral administration of C-HE significantly reduced the total IgE levels in mice and slightly affected the production of IgG1. Furthermore, spleen cell cultures harvested from OVA-sensitised mice that had received C-HE orally showed a significant increase in Th1-derived responses (IFN-? production). Therefore, our results suggest that the chaga mushroom extract may be used as an anti-allergic functional food. PMID:23535020

  5. Comparison of Hypoglycemic Activity of Fermented Mushroom of Inonotus obliquus Rich in Vanadium and Wild-Growing I. obliquus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yibing Zhang; Yong Zhao; Haifeng Cui; Chunyu Cao; Jianyou Guo; Sha Liu

    The effects of vanadium-enriched and wild Inonotus obliquus were tested on hyperglycemic mice. The vanadium content of the culture medium was 0.6%, reaching a concentration of 3.0 mg\\/g\\u000a in the cultured mushroom while in the wild variety is 1\\/100 of that amount. The toxicity of vanadium at the 3.0 mg\\/g level\\u000a is negligible, but its anti-diabetic effects are significantly different to those

  6. Comparison of hypoglycemic activity of fermented mushroom of Inonotus obliquus rich in vanadium and wild-growing I. obliquus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yibing; Zhao, Yong; Cui, Haifeng; Cao, Chunyu; Guo, Jianyou; Liu, Sha

    2011-12-01

    The effects of vanadium-enriched and wild Inonotus obliquus were tested on hyperglycemic mice. The vanadium content of the culture medium was 0.6%, reaching a concentration of 3.0 mg/g in the cultured mushroom while in the wild variety is 1/100 of that amount. The toxicity of vanadium at the 3.0 mg/g level is negligible, but its anti-diabetic effects are significantly different to those of the wild variety (p?

  7. Chaga mushroom extract inhibits oxidative DNA damage in lymphocytes of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Najafzadeh, Mojgan; Reynolds, P Dominic; Baumgartner, Adolf; Jerwood, David; Anderson, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is partly caused by oxidative stress from free radicals and reduced antioxidant levels. Using hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress in vitro in peripheral lymphocytes we investigated the induction of DNA damage supplemented with ethanolic extract of Chaga mushroom as a protective antioxidant. Lymphocytes were obtained from 20 IBD patients and 20 healthy volunteers. For treatment, a constant H_{2}O_{2 } dose (50 microg/ml) was used with variable doses of Chaga extract (10-500 microg/ml). DNA damage was evaluated in 50 cells per individual and dose using the Comet assay (making 1000 observations per experimental point ensuring appropriate statistical power). Chaga supplementation resulted in a 54.9% (p < 0.001) reduction of H_{2}O_{2 } induced DNA damage within the patient group and 34.9% (p < 0.001) within the control group. Lymphocytes from Crohn's disease (CD) patients had a greater basic DNA damage than Ulcerative Colitis (UC) patients (p < 0.001). Conclusively, Chaga extract reduces oxidative stress in lymphocytes from IBD patients and also healthy individuals when challenged in vitro. Thus, Chaga extract could be a possible and valuable supplement to inhibit oxidative stress in general. PMID:18997282

  8. [Protective activity of aqueous extracts from higher mushrooms against Herpes simplex virus type-2 on albino mice model].

    PubMed

    Razumov, I A; Kazachinskaia, E I; Puchkova, L I; Kosogorova, T A; Gorbunova, I A; Loktev, V B; Tepliakova, T V

    2013-01-01

    Toxicity and antiviral activity of aqueous extracts from higher mushrooms such as Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Pegler (shiitake), Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.) P. Kumm. (oyster), Inonotus obliquus (Ach. ex Pers.) Pilát (chaga), Hydnellum compactum (Pers.) P. Karst. (compact tooth) were studied. In doses of 0.8 to 4.0 mg (dry weight) per mouse administered orally or intraperitoneally the extracts showed no acute toxicity. When the dose of the chaga extract was increased to 20 mg per mouse, a half of the animals died. Intraperitoneal administration of the aqueous extracts in a dose of 0.4-2 mg per mouse prior to the contamination by a single LD50 of Herpes simplex type 2 provided 100-percent survival of the animals exposed to the Lentinula edodes or Pleurotus ostreatus extracts and 90-percent survival of the animals exposed to the Inonotus obliquus or Hydnellum compactum extracts. PMID:24738237

  9. Terpenoids with alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity from the submerged culture of Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Ying, You-Min; Zhang, Lin-Yan; Zhang, Xia; Bai, Hai-Bo; Liang, Dong-E; Ma, Lie-Feng; Shan, Wei-Guang; Zhan, Zha-Jun

    2014-12-01

    Lanostane-type triterpenoids, inotolactones A and B, a drimane-type sesquiterpenoid, inotolactone C, and five known terpenoids 6?-hydroxy-trans-dihydroconfertifolin, inotodiol, 3?,22-dihydroxyanosta-7,9(11),24-triene, 3?-hydroxycinnamolide, and 17-hydroxy-ent-atisan-19-oic acid, were isolated from the submerged culture of chaga mushroom, Inonotus obliquus. Their structures were characterized by spectroscopic methods, including MS and NMR (1D and 2D) spectroscopic techniques. Inotolactones A and B, examples of lanostane-type triterpenoids bearing ?,?-dimethyl, ?,?-unsaturated ?-lactone side chains, exhibited more potent alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities than the positive control acarbose. This finding might be related to the anti-hyperglycemic properties of the fungus and to its popular role as a diabetes treatment. In addition, a drimane-type sesquiterpenoid and an atisane-type diterpenoid were isolated from I. obliquus. PMID:25446238

  10. Separation of an aqueous extract Inonotus obliquus (Chaga). A novel look at the efficiency of its influence on proliferation of A549 human lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mazurkiewicz, Witold; Rydel, Katarzyna; Pogocki, Dariusz; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Langner, Ewa; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous extract of Inonotus obliquus was hydrolyzed in dilute hydrochloric acid. The products were extracted applying organic solvents, and separated chromatographically on a silica gel-packed column. Eluted fractions were analyzed by means of GC-MS. The presence of hydrocarbons, alcohols, phenols and various carbonyl compounds in analyzed fractions has been detected and quantified. Preliminarily experiments on the influence of certain separated samples on the proliferation of A549 human lung carcinoma cells were performed. Therefore, we hypothesize that the major antiproliferative effects are related to the presence of benzaldehyde, which is a benzyl alcohol metabolite formed in situ in the cells culture with the yield moderated by the presence of trace amounts of "high molecular mass compounds". PMID:20635536

  11. Chemical diversity of biologically active metabolites in the sclerotia of Inonotus obliquus and submerged culture strategies for up-regulating their production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weifa Zheng; Kangjie Miao; Yubing Liu; Yanxia Zhao; Meimei Zhang; Shenyuan Pan; Yucheng Dai

    2010-01-01

    Inonotus obliquus (Fr.) Pilat is a white rot fungus belonging to the family Hymenochaetaceae in the Basidiomycota. In nature, this fungus rarely\\u000a forms a fruiting body but usually an irregular shape of sclerotial conk called ‘Chaga’. Characteristically, I. obliquus produces massive melanins released to the surface of Chaga. As early as in the sixteenth century, Chaga was used as an

  12. Inonotus obliquus containing diet enhances the innate immune mechanism and disease resistance in olive flounder Paralichythys olivaceus against Uronema marinum.

    PubMed

    Harikrishnan, Ramasamy; Balasundaram, Chellam; Heo, Moon-Soo

    2012-06-01

    The present study describes the effect of diet supplementation with Chaga mushroom, Inonotus obliquus extract at 0%, 0.01%, 0.1%, and 1.0% levels on the innate humoral (lysozyme, antiprotease, and complement), cellular responses (production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and myeloperoxidase), and disease resistance in olive flounder, Paralichythys olivaceus against Uronema marinum. The lysozyme activity and complement activity significantly increased in each diet on weeks 2 and 4 against pathogen. The serum antiprotease activity and reactive nitrogen intermediates production significantly increased in fish fed with 0.1% and 1.0% diets from weeks 1-4. However, reactive oxygen species production and myeloperoxidase activity significantly increased in 1.0% and 2.0% diets on weeks 2 and 4. In fish fed with 0.1% and 1.0% diets and challenged with U. marinum the cumulative mortality was 50% and 40% while in 0% and 0.01% diets the mortality was 85% and 55%. The results clearly indicate that supplementation diet with I. obliquus at 0.1% and 1.0% level positively enhance the immune system and confer disease resistance which may be potentially used as an immunoprophylactic in finfish culture. PMID:22484608

  13. Antioxidative Properties of Crude Polysaccharides from Inonotus obliquus

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Haibo; Zhang, Amin; Zhang, Wuxia; Cui, Guoting; Wang, Shunchun; Duan, Jinyou

    2012-01-01

    The mushroom Inonotus obliquus has been widely used as a folk medicine in Russia, Poland and most of the Baltic countries. In this study, water-soluble and alkali-soluble crude polysaccharides (IOW and IOA) were isolated from I. obliquus, and the carbohydrate-rich fractions IOW-1 and IOA-1 were obtained respectively after deproteination and depigmentation. Their contents, such as neutral carbohydrate, uronic acid and protein, were measured. Their antioxidant properties against chemicals-induced reactive species (ROS) including 1,1?-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion radical, as well as their protective effects on H2O2-induced PC12 cell death were investigated. Results showed that I. obliquus polysaccharides can scavenge all ROS tested above in a dose-dependent manner. IOA and its product IOA-1 could rescue PC12 cell viability from 38.6% to 79.8% and 83.0% at a concentration of 20?g/mL. Similarly, IOW and its product IOW-1 at the same dose, can also increase cell viability to 84.9% and 88.6% respectively. The antioxidative activities of water-soluble and alkali-soluble polysaccharide constituents from I. obliquus might contribute to diverse medicinal and nutritional values of this mushroom. PMID:22942760

  14. Antitumor and immunomodulatory activity of water-soluble polysaccharide from Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Fan, Liuping; Ding, Shaodong; Ai, Lianzhong; Deng, Kequan

    2012-10-01

    The medicinal mushroom Inonotus obliquus has been used as a folk remedy for a long time in Russia and East-European countries to treat gastrointestinal cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. In our study, a water-soluble polysaccharide (ISP2a) was successfully purified from I. obliquus by DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B and Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography. In vivo ISP2a had not only shown antitumor activity, but also could significantly enhance the immune response of tumor-bearing mice. In addition, ISP2a significantly enhanced the lymphocyte proliferation and increased the production of TNF-?. Results of these studies demonstrated that ISP2a had a potential application as natural antitumor agent with immunomodulatory activity. PMID:22840014

  15. Introduction to Distribution and Ecology of Sterile Conks of Inonotus obliquus

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Hyeon; Chang, Kwang-Choon; Lee, Tae-Soo; Ka, Kang-Hyeon; Jankovsky, L.

    2008-01-01

    Inonotus obliquus is a fungus that causes white heart rot on several broad-leaved species. This fungus forms typical charcoal-black, sterile conks (chaga) or cinder conks on infected stems of the birche (Betula spp). The dark brown pulp of the sterile conk is formed by a pure mycelial mass of fungus. Chaga are a folk remedy in Russia, reflecting the circumboreal distribution of I. obliquus in boreal forest ecosystems on Betula spp. and in meridional mountain forests on beech (Fagus spp.) in Russia, Scandinavia, Central Europe, and Eastern Europe. Distribution at lower latitudes in Western and Southern Europe, Northern America, Asia, Japan, and Korea is rare. Infected trees grow for many years without several symptoms of decline. The infection can penetrate through stem injuries with exterior sterile conks developing later. In the Czech Republic, cinder conk is found on birches inhabiting peat bogs and in mountain areas with a colder and more humid climate, although it is widespread in other broad leaved species over the Czech Republic. The most common hosts are B. pendula, B. pubescens, B. carpatica, and F. sylvatica. Less frequent hosts include Acer campestre, Acer pseudoplatanus, Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, Fraxinus excelsior, Quercus cerris, Q. petraea, Q. robur, Q. delachampii, and Ulmus sp. PMID:23997626

  16. Introduction to Distribution and Ecology of Sterile Conks of Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Woong; Hur, Hyeon; Chang, Kwang-Choon; Lee, Tae-Soo; Ka, Kang-Hyeon; Jankovsky, L

    2008-12-01

    Inonotus obliquus is a fungus that causes white heart rot on several broad-leaved species. This fungus forms typical charcoal-black, sterile conks (chaga) or cinder conks on infected stems of the birche (Betula spp). The dark brown pulp of the sterile conk is formed by a pure mycelial mass of fungus. Chaga are a folk remedy in Russia, reflecting the circumboreal distribution of I. obliquus in boreal forest ecosystems on Betula spp. and in meridional mountain forests on beech (Fagus spp.) in Russia, Scandinavia, Central Europe, and Eastern Europe. Distribution at lower latitudes in Western and Southern Europe, Northern America, Asia, Japan, and Korea is rare. Infected trees grow for many years without several symptoms of decline. The infection can penetrate through stem injuries with exterior sterile conks developing later. In the Czech Republic, cinder conk is found on birches inhabiting peat bogs and in mountain areas with a colder and more humid climate, although it is widespread in other broad leaved species over the Czech Republic. The most common hosts are B. pendula, B. pubescens, B. carpatica, and F. sylvatica. Less frequent hosts include Acer campestre, Acer pseudoplatanus, Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, Fraxinus excelsior, Quercus cerris, Q. petraea, Q. robur, Q. delachampii, and Ulmus sp. PMID:23997626

  17. Chemical diversity of biologically active metabolites in the sclerotia of Inonotus obliquus and submerged culture strategies for up-regulating their production.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weifa; Miao, Kangjie; Liu, Yubing; Zhao, Yanxia; Zhang, Meimei; Pan, Shenyuan; Dai, Yucheng

    2010-07-01

    Inonotus obliquus (Fr.) Pilat is a white rot fungus belonging to the family Hymenochaetaceae in the Basidiomycota. In nature, this fungus rarely forms a fruiting body but usually an irregular shape of sclerotial conk called 'Chaga'. Characteristically, I. obliquus produces massive melanins released to the surface of Chaga. As early as in the sixteenth century, Chaga was used as an effective folk medicine in Russia and Northern Europe to treat several human malicious tumors and other diseases in the absence of any unacceptable toxic side effects. Chemical investigations show that I. obliquus produces a diverse range of secondary metabolites including phenolic compounds, melanins, and lanostane-type triterpenoids. Among these are the active components for antioxidant, antitumoral, and antiviral activities and for improving human immunity against infection of pathogenic microbes. Geographically, however, this fungus is restricted to very cold habitats and grows very slowly, suggesting that Chaga is not a reliable source of these bioactive compounds. Attempts for culturing this fungus axenically all resulted in a reduced production of bioactive metabolites. This review examines the current progress in the discovery of chemical diversity of Chaga and their biological activities and the strategies to modulate the expression of desired pathways to diversify and up-regulate the production of bioactive metabolites by the fungus grown in submerged cultures for possible drug discovery. PMID:20532760

  18. Chagas Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is common in Latin America but not in the United States. ... nose, the bite wound or a cut. The disease can also spread through contaminated food, a blood ...

  19. Mushroom Poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Food Poisoning | Mushroom Poisoning Is it possible to tell if a wild mushroom is poisonous? You can't tell for sure if a ... watch the person for any symptoms of mushroom poisoning for the next 24 hours. Written by familydoctor.org editorial staff ... Reviewed/Updated: 04/14 Created: 09/00

  20. Wild Mushrooms in Nepal: Some Potential Candidates as Antioxidant and ACE-Inhibition Sources

    PubMed Central

    Hai Bang, Tran; Suhara, Hiroto; Doi, Katsumi; Ishikawa, Hiroya; Fukami, Katsuya; Parajuli, Gopal Prasad; Katakura, Yoshinori; Yamashita, Shuntaro; Watanabe, Kazuo; Adhikari, Mahesh Kumar; Manandhar, Hira Kaji; Kondo, Ryuichiro; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-nine mushrooms collected in the mountainous areas of Nepal were analyzed for antioxidant activity by different methods, including Folin-Ciocalteu, ORAC, ABTS, and DPPH assays. Intracellular H2O2-scavenging activity was also performed on HaCaT cells. The results showed that phenolic compounds are the main antioxidant of the mushrooms. Among studied samples, Inonotus andersonii, and Phellinus gilvus exhibited very high antioxidant activity with the phenolic contents up to 310.8 and 258.7?mg GAE/g extracts, respectively. The H2O2-scavenging assay on cells also revealed the potential of these mushrooms in the prevention of oxidative stress. In term of ACE-inhibition, results showed that Phlebia tremellosa would be a novel and promising candidate for antihypertensive studies. This mushroom exhibited even higher in vitro ACE-inhibition activity than Ganoderma lingzhi, with the IC50 values of the two mushrooms being 32??g/mL and 2??g/mL, respectively. This is the first time biological activities of mushrooms collected in Nepal were reported. Information from this study should be a valuable reference for future studies on antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities of mushrooms. PMID:24672576

  1. Wild Mushrooms in Nepal: Some Potential Candidates as Antioxidant and ACE-Inhibition Sources.

    PubMed

    Hai Bang, Tran; Suhara, Hiroto; Doi, Katsumi; Ishikawa, Hiroya; Fukami, Katsuya; Parajuli, Gopal Prasad; Katakura, Yoshinori; Yamashita, Shuntaro; Watanabe, Kazuo; Adhikari, Mahesh Kumar; Manandhar, Hira Kaji; Kondo, Ryuichiro; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-nine mushrooms collected in the mountainous areas of Nepal were analyzed for antioxidant activity by different methods, including Folin-Ciocalteu, ORAC, ABTS, and DPPH assays. Intracellular H2O2-scavenging activity was also performed on HaCaT cells. The results showed that phenolic compounds are the main antioxidant of the mushrooms. Among studied samples, Inonotus andersonii, and Phellinus gilvus exhibited very high antioxidant activity with the phenolic contents up to 310.8 and 258.7?mg GAE/g extracts, respectively. The H2O2-scavenging assay on cells also revealed the potential of these mushrooms in the prevention of oxidative stress. In term of ACE-inhibition, results showed that Phlebia tremellosa would be a novel and promising candidate for antihypertensive studies. This mushroom exhibited even higher in vitro ACE-inhibition activity than Ganoderma lingzhi, with the IC50 values of the two mushrooms being 32? ? g/mL and 2? ? g/mL, respectively. This is the first time biological activities of mushrooms collected in Nepal were reported. Information from this study should be a valuable reference for future studies on antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities of mushrooms. PMID:24672576

  2. Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, H B; Kirchhoff, L V; Simon, D; Morris, S A; Weiss, L M; Wittner, M

    1992-01-01

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of morbidity in many countries in Latin America. The important modes of transmission are by the bite of the reduviid bug and blood transfusion. The organism exists in three morphological forms: trypomastigotes, amastigotes, and epimastigotes. The mechanism of transformation and differentiation is currently being explored, and signal transduction pathways of the parasites may be involved in this process. Parasite adherence to and invasion of host cells is a complex process involving complement, phospholipase, penetrin, neuraminidase, and hemolysin. Two clinical forms of the disease are recognized, acute and chronic. During the acute stage pathological damage is related to the presence of the parasite, whereas in the chronic stage few parasites are found. In recent years the roles of tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, and the interleukins in the pathogenesis of this infection have been reported. The common manifestations of chronic cardiomyopathy are arrhythmias and thromboembolic events. Autoimmune, neurogenic, and microvascular factors may be important in the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathy. The gastrointestinal tract is another important target, and "mega syndromes" are common manifestations. The diagnosis and treatment of this infection are active areas of investigation. New serological and molecular biological techniques have improved the diagnosis of chronic infection. Exacerbations of T. cruzi infection have been reported for patients receiving immuno-suppressive therapy and for those with AIDS. Images PMID:1423218

  3. Bioassay-guided isolation of DPP-4 inhibitory fractions from extracts of submerged cultured of Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yan; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Huang, Wei; Xu, Hong-Yu; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Inonotus obliquus is a medicinal mushroom used in Russian and Eastern European folk medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that the mycelium powders of I. obliquus possess significant antihyperglycemic effects in a mouse model of diabetic disease induced by alloxan. However, the active ingredients of mycelium powders responsible for the diabetes activity have not been identified. This study aims to identify the active ingredients of I. obliquus mycelium powders by a bioassay-guided fractionation approach and explore the mechanism of action of these active ingredients by using a well-established DPP-4 (an important enzyme as a new therapeutic target for diabetes) inhibitory assay model. The results showed the chloroform extract of mycelium was potential inhibitory against DPP-4. Bioactivity guided fractionation led to the identification of 19 compounds using UPLC-Q-TOF-MS. Molecular docking between the compounds and DPP-4 revealed that compounds 5, 8, 9, 14, 15 may be the active components responsible for the DPP-4 inhibitory activity. PMID:23325103

  4. Src kinase-targeted anti-inflammatory activity of davallialactone from Inonotus xeranticus in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y G; Lee, W M; Kim, J Y; Lee, J Y; Lee, I-K; Yun, B-S; Rhee, M H; Cho, J Y

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Mushrooms are popular both as food and as a source of natural compounds of biopharmaceutical interest. Some mushroom-derived compounds such as ?-glucan have been shown to be immunostimulatory; this study explores the anti-inflammatory properties of hispidin analogues derived from the mushroom, Inonotus xeranticus. We sought to identify the molecular mechanism of action of these hispidin analogues by determining their effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammatory responses in a macrophage cell line. Experimental approach: The production of inflammatory mediators was determined by Griess assay, reverse transcription-PCR and ELISA. The inhibitory effect of davalliactone on LPS-induced activation of signalling cascades was assessed by western blotting, immunoprecipitation and direct kinase assay. Key results: In activated RAW264.7 cells, davallialactone strongly downregulated LPS-mediated inflammatory responses, including NO production, prostaglandin E2 release, expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cell surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules. Davallialactone treatment did not alter cell viability or morphology. Davallialactone was found to exert its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting a signalling cascade that activates nuclear factor kappa B via PI3K, Akt and IKK, but not mitogen-activated protein kinases. Treatment with davallialactone affected the phosphorylation of these signalling proteins, but not their level of expression. These inhibitory effects were not due to the interruption of toll-like receptor 4 binding to CD14. In particular, davallialactone strongly inhibited the LPS-induced phosphorylation and kinase activity of Src, implying that Src may be a potential pharmacological target of davallialactone. Conclusions and implications: Our data suggest that davallialactone, a small molecule found in edible mushrooms, has anti-inflammatory activity. Davallialactone can be developed as a pharmaceutically valuable anti-Src kinase agent. PMID:18454171

  5. Triterpenoids from Inonotus obliquus and their antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fenqin; Mai, Qinqin; Ma, Jianghao; Xu, Mei; Wang, Xue; Cui, Tiantian; Qiu, Feng; Han, Guang

    2015-03-01

    Three new lanostane-type triterpenes, inonotusanes A-C (1-3), and a new naturally occurring one, 3?-hydroxy-25,26,27-trinorlanosta-8,22E-dien-24-oic acid (4), together with sixteen known triterpenoids (5-20), including 13 lanostane derivatives, 2 lupanes and 1 oleanane-type triterpene were isolated from the sclerotia of Inonotus obliquus. Their structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and HRMS. Compounds 6, 8, 18 and 20 exhibited strong cytotoxicity against A549 tumor cell lines, with IC50 values of 2.34, 1.63, 8.39 and 5.39?M, respectively. Seven compounds (3, 9, 10, 12, 18-20) exhibited moderate cytotoxicity against A549, HT29, Hela or L1210 tumor cell lines. PMID:25542686

  6. Recent developments in mushrooms as anti-cancer therapeutics: a review.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema; Goyal, Arun

    2012-03-01

    From time immemorial, mushrooms have been valued by humankind as a culinary wonder and folk medicine in Oriental practice. The last decade has witnessed the overwhelming interest of western research fraternity in pharmaceutical potential of mushrooms. The chief medicinal uses of mushrooms discovered so far are as anti-oxidant, anti-diabetic, hypocholesterolemic, anti-tumor, anti-cancer, immunomodulatory, anti-allergic, nephroprotective, and anti-microbial agents. The mushrooms credited with success against cancer belong to the genus Phellinus, Pleurotus, Agaricus, Ganoderma, Clitocybe, Antrodia, Trametes, Cordyceps, Xerocomus, Calvatia, Schizophyllum, Flammulina, Suillus, Inonotus, Inocybe, Funlia, Lactarius, Albatrellus, Russula, and Fomes. The anti-cancer compounds play crucial role as reactive oxygen species inducer, mitotic kinase inhibitor, anti-mitotic, angiogenesis inhibitor, topoisomerase inhibitor, leading to apoptosis, and eventually checking cancer proliferation. The present review updates the recent findings on the pharmacologically active compounds, their anti-tumor potential, and underlying mechanism of biological action in order to raise awareness for further investigations to develop cancer therapeutics from mushrooms. The mounting evidences from various research groups across the globe, regarding anti-tumor application of mushroom extracts unarguably make it a fast-track research area worth mass attention. PMID:22582152

  7. Comparative study of contents of several bioactive components in fruiting bodies and mycelia of culinary-medicinal mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chang; Lin, Shin-Yi; Ulziijargal, Enkhjargal; Chen, Shin-Yu; Chien, Rao-Chi; Tzou, Yi-Jing; Mau, Jeng-Leun

    2012-01-01

    Mushrooms have been consumed for thousands of years, and several bioactive components were found therein, including lovastatin, ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and ergothioneine. The study reported herein was to analyze these three bioactive components in 15 fruiting bodies and 9 mycelia of 19 species of mushrooms from genera Agaricus, Agrocybe, Auricularia, Boletus, Ganoderma, Hypsizygus, Inonotus, Lentinus, Morchella, Pleurotus, Tremella, Termitomyces, and Volvariella. The results show that Hypsizygus marmoreus contained the highest amount of lovastatin (628.05 mg/kg) in fruiting bodies and Morchella esculenta contained the highest amount (1438.42 mg/ kg) in mycelia. Agaricus brasiliensis contained the highest amount of GABA (1844.85 mg/kg) in fruiting bodies, and mycelia of Boletus edulis, Pleurotus citrinopileatus, and Termitomyces albuminosus contained extraordinarily higher amounts (1274.03, 1631.67, and 2560.00 mg/kg, respectively). Volvariella volvacea contained the highest amount of ergothioneine (537.27 mg/kg) in fruiting bodies and mycelia; Boletus edulis, Pleurotus ferulae, and P. salmoneostramineus contained relatively higher amount of ergothioneine too (258.03, 250.23, and 222.08 mg/kg, respectively). However, none of these components was detected in fruiting bodies of Inonotus obliquus. In conclusion, these three bioactive components were commonly found in most mushrooms, and these results might be related to their beneficial effects. PMID:23510173

  8. Chagas Disease (American trypanosomiasis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of treatment for Chagas disease remains substantial. In Colombia alone, the annual cost of medical care for ... Argentina, Belize, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, French Guyana, Guatemala, ...

  9. American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease).

    PubMed

    Rassi, Anis; Rassi, Anis; Marcondes de Rezende, Joffre

    2012-06-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a chronic infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite. It is transmitted to human beings mainly through the feces of infected triatomine bugs. The disease affects an estimated 8 to 10 million people in the Americas, putting them at risk of developing life-threatening cardiac and gastrointestinal complications. This article provides a brief update on the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of Chagas disease. PMID:22632639

  10. Structure determination of inonotsuoxides A and B and in vivo anti-tumor promoting activity of inotodiol from the sclerotia of Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Tomoko; Yamada, Takeshi; Taji, Sayaka; Ohishi, Hirofumi; Wada, Shun-Ichi; Tokuda, Harukuni; Sakuma, Kazuo; Tanaka, Reiko

    2007-01-01

    Two new lanostane-type triterpenoids, inonotsuoxides A (1) and B (2) along with three known lanostane-type triterpenoids, inotodiol (3), trametenolic acid (4), and lanosterol (5), were isolated from the sclerotia of Inonotus obliquus (Pers.: Fr.) (Japanese name: Kabanoanakake) (Russian name: Chaga). Their structures were determined to be 22R,25-epoxylanost-8-ene-3beta,24S-diol (1) and 22S,25-epoxylanost-8-ene-3beta,24S-diol (2) on the basis of spectral data including single crystal X-ray analysis. These compounds except for 2 were tested for their inhibitory effects on Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), as a test for potential cancer chemopreventive agents. The most abundant triterpene, inotodiol (3), was investigated for the inhibitory effect in a two-stage carcinogenesis test on mouse skin using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) as an initiator and TPA as a promoter. Compound 3 was found to exhibit the potent anti-tumor promoting activity in the in vivo carcinogenesis test. PMID:17049251

  11. Hepatoprotective effects of mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Soares, Andréia Assunço; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Bracht, Adelar; da Costa, Sandra Maria Gomes; Koehnlein, Eloá Angélica; de Souza, Cristina Giatti Marques; Peralta, Rosane Marina

    2013-01-01

    The particular characteristics of growth and development of mushrooms in nature result in the accumulation of a variety of secondary metabolites such as phenolic compounds, terpenes and steroids and essential cell wall components such as polysaccharides, b-glucans and proteins, several of them with biological activities. The present article outlines and discusses the available information about the protective effects of mushroom extracts against liver damage induced by exogenous compounds. Among mushrooms, Ganoderma lucidum is indubitably the most widely studied species. In this review, however, emphasis was given to studies using other mushrooms, especially those presenting efforts of attributing hepatoprotective activities to specific chemical components usually present in the mushroom extracts. PMID:23884116

  12. Polysaccharides from Inonotus obliquus sclerotia and cultured mycelia stimulate cytokine production of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro and their chemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangqun; Li, Juan; Hu, Yan

    2014-08-01

    Inonotus obliquus is an edible and medicinal mushroom to treat many diseases. In the present study, polysaccharides and fractions were isolated and purified by DEAE-52 and Sephadex G-200 chromatography from I. obliquus wild sclerotia, culture broth and cultured mycelia under submerged fermentation. The extracts and fractions could significantly induce the secretion of TNF-?, IFN-?, IL-1?, and IL-2 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and showed no toxicity to PBMCs. The stimulation effect of the six extracts and eight fractions on the four-cytokine production was dose-dependent. Sclerotial polysaccharides were more effective in the four-cytokine production at 150 ?g/ml while exopolysaccharides and endopolysacchrides showed a much better effect on IL-1? production at 30 ?g/ml. Purified fractions from exopolysaccharides and endopolysaccharides were more effective than the fraction from sclerotia in most cytokine production. These heteropolysaccharide-protein conjugates mainly contained glucose, galactose, and mannose. Protein content, molecular weight, monosaccharide molar ratio, and anomeric carbon configuration differed from each other and had effects on the cytokine induction activity of the polysaccharides to some extent. PMID:24867795

  13. Lipoxygenase Inhibitory Activity of Korean Indigenous Mushroom Extracts and Isolation of an Active Compound from Phellinus baumii.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Woong; Song, Ja-Gyeong; Hwang, Byung Soon; Kim, Dae-Won; Lee, Yoon-Ju; Woo, E-Eum; Kim, Ji-Yul; Lee, In-Kyoung; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2014-06-01

    We investigated a total of 335 samples of Korean native mushroom extracts as part of our lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitor screening program. Among the mushroom-methanolic extracts we investigated, 35 exhibited an inhibitory activity greater than 30% against LOX at a concentration of 100 µg/mL. Especially, Collybia maculata, Tylopilus neofelleus, Strobilomyces confusus, Phellinus gilvus, P. linteus, P. baumii, and Inonotus mikadoi exhibited relatively potent LOX inhibitory activities of 73.3%, 51.6%, 52.4%, 66.7%, 59.5%, 100.0%, and 85.2%, respectively. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of inoscavin A from the methanolic extract of P. baumii, which showed the most potent activity and was identified by spectroscopic methods. Specifically, inoscavin A exhibited potent LOX inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 6.8 µM. PMID:25071389

  14. Lipoxygenase Inhibitory Activity of Korean Indigenous Mushroom Extracts and Isolation of an Active Compound from Phellinus baumii

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Woong; Song, Ja-Gyeong; Hwang, Byung Soon; Kim, Dae-Won; Lee, Yoon-Ju; Woo, E-Eum; Kim, Ji-Yul; Lee, In-Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a total of 335 samples of Korean native mushroom extracts as part of our lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitor screening program. Among the mushroom-methanolic extracts we investigated, 35 exhibited an inhibitory activity greater than 30% against LOX at a concentration of 100 µg/mL. Especially, Collybia maculata, Tylopilus neofelleus, Strobilomyces confusus, Phellinus gilvus, P. linteus, P. baumii, and Inonotus mikadoi exhibited relatively potent LOX inhibitory activities of 73.3%, 51.6%, 52.4%, 66.7%, 59.5%, 100.0%, and 85.2%, respectively. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of inoscavin A from the methanolic extract of P. baumii, which showed the most potent activity and was identified by spectroscopic methods. Specifically, inoscavin A exhibited potent LOX inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 6.8 µM. PMID:25071389

  15. Fungal myocarditis and pericardial effusion secondary to Inonotus tropicalis (phylum Basidiomycota) in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Thibault; Pipe-Martin, Hannah; Kim, Kenneth S; Leissinger, Mary K; Bauer, Rudy W; Grasperge, Britton J; Grooters, Amy M; Sutton, Deanna A; Pariaut, Romain

    2015-06-01

    Fungal disease is a rare cause of pericardial effusion in dogs. This report describes the first case of fungal pericardial effusion and myocarditis secondary to the fungal organism Inonotus tropicalis. A 9-year-old female spayed French bulldog with a multi-year history of treatment with glucocorticoids for management of atopy was presented for exercise intolerance, ascites and weight loss. Physical examination and thoracic imaging revealed enlarged peripheral and cranial mediastinal lymph nodes, left ventricular thickening and cardiac tamponade secondary to pericardial effusion. Fine needle aspiration of the cranial mediastinal lymph node showed pyogranulomatous inflammation with short, thin and poorly septated hyphae. Culture of the aspirate yielded a fungal isolate identified as Inonotus tropicalis based on morphologic features and rRNA gene sequencing. Postmortem examination showed myocardial thickening with multifocal to coalescing, firm, white, ill-defined nodules. Histology confirmed the presence of disseminated fungal infection with extensive myocardial involvement. Inonotus tropicalis is an opportunistic poroid wood-decaying basidiomycete. Infection in this dog was likely the result of chronic immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:26003903

  16. MushroomExpert.Com

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kuo, Michael

    Developed by amateur mycologist Dr. Michael Kuo with contributions from amateur and professional mycologists, MushroomExpert.Com is an excellent resource for a wide variety of mushroom enthusiasts. The site provides a genus and species index and search engine for detailed information on, and quality up-close photos of, over 330 North American Mushrooms. Individual species pages include brief sections on Habitat, Cap, Stem, and Microscopic Features-to name a few. The site also provides information for beginners, as well as sections on Studying Mushrooms, Edibility, a Morel Data Collection Project, and more.

  17. Mushrooms-Mineral Content

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugh Ramage

    1930-01-01

    SPECTROGRAPHIC analysis of mushrooms by the method described in Nature of April 20, 1929, p. 601, has revealed a remarkable composition. A button mushroom from the Cromer district was divided into skin, white portion, gills, and stem and the parts were dried in a water oven at 100° C. The analyses prove that each part has a high potassium and

  18. Mushroom Use by College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, John P.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Surveyed 1,507 college students to investigate the extent of hallucinogenic mushroom use and compared mushroom users to nonusers. Results showed that among the respondents who reported use of hallucinogenic drugs (17 percent), over 85 percent had used hallucinogenic (psilocybin) mushrooms and over half had used mushrooms but no other…

  19. Anticancer substances of mushroom origin.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, T S; Krupodorova, T A; Barshteyn, V Y; Artamonova, A B; Shlyakhovenko, V A

    2014-06-01

    The present status of investigations about the anticancer activity which is inherent to medicinal mushrooms, as well as their biomedical potential and future prospects are discussed. Mushroom products and extracts possess promising immunomodulating and anticancer effects, so the main biologically active substances of mushrooms responsible for immunomodulation and direct cytoto-xicity toward cancer cell lines (including rarely mentioned groups of anticancer mushroom proteins), and the mechanisms of their antitumor action were analyzed. The existing to date clinical trials of mushroom substances are mentioned. Mushroom anticancer extracts, obtained by the different solvents, are outlined. Modern approaches of cancer treatment with implication of mushroom products, including DNA vaccinotherapy with mushroom immunomodulatory adjuvants, creation of prodrugs with mushroom lectins that can recognize glycoconjugates on the cancer cell surface, development of nanovectors etc. are discussed. The future prospects of mushroom anticancer substances application, including chemical modification of polysaccharides and terpenoids, gene engineering of proteins, and implementation of vaccines are reviewed. PMID:24980757

  20. The mushroom message.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, M

    1992-04-28

    A basic law of ecology is that living things are tightly dependent on one another, often in ways that are not easy to imagine. Who, for example, would have predicted that when the last dodo was killed in 1675, that death would lead to the slow extermination of the tambalocoque tree, whose fruits germinate only after passing through the dodo's digestive system? Now no natural strands of tambalocoque younger than 300 years can be found. Or who would have predicted that clear-cutting tropical rainforests would so significantly alter local weather patterns that the tropical rainforest biome itself and its vast diversity of life might not survive? Such interactions are worth noting because of the possible ramifications of a phenomenon that ecologists have just begun to document. Mushrooms worldwide appear to be in a catastrophic state of decline. Throughout Europe, in countries with terrains as diverse as Holland, Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Poland and England, wild mushrooms are becoming increasingly difficult to find. Those fungi that are found are significantly smaller than those found years ago. Preliminary data suggest that the same troubling situation is occurring throughout North American as well. The decline has been so precipitous that biologists have begun to refer to it as a mass extinction. The 2 obvious explanations for the demise of the mushrooms--habitat destruction and overpicking of edible types by an ever growing human population--have been ruled out. Sophisticated sampling schemes designed by ecologists control for the fact that there is less land available for wild mushrooms; they have been declining at a rate that far exceeds the rate at which land is being developed. The fact that the decline has affected both edible and inedible mushrooms equally indicates that humans hunting for tasty treats are not the main cause of the problem. The loss of wild mushrooms worldwide might not seem like that big a deal, but the consequences may well be grave because of the way those fungi interact with other life forms. If the mushrooms die off, ecologists fear that our forests may not be far behind. Many mushrooms live in close association with trees; the mushrooms provide the trees with water and minerals while the trees supply the mushrooms with carbohydrates. The mushrooms' underground filaments often extend much deeper into the soil than do the roots of trees, thus making available to trees resources that would otherwise be unusable. Ecologists have found that trees lacking mushrooms are significantly more susceptible to environmental stress than those growing with the fungi. Eef Arnolds, an ecologist specializing in mushrooms at the Agricultural University of the Netherlands thinks that "severe frost or drought could lead to a mass dying of trees." Although the cause of the decline has not be pinpointed, most experts believe that the mushrooms are responding to abnormal atmospheric levels of nitrogen, sulfur, and ozone. Dr. Arnolds suggests that in Holland the main culprit appears to be excessive nitrogen applied as fertilizer to agricultural fields. Once again it appears that we are seeing the unpredicted effects of our wanton pollution of our environment. If the experts are correct about the cause of the decrease in mushroom populations, the mushrooms can provide us with some very critical information and insight like the canaries that miners used to bring into mine shafts to warn of a lack of breathable air, these small indicator species are warning us about the state of our planet. We can only hope that collectively we have enough sense to begin to pay attention. PMID:12285642

  1. JAMA Patient Page: Chagas Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Chagas disease. SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS FOR MORE INFORMATION • World Health Organization www.who.int • Centers for Disease Control and ... November 14, 2007—Vol 298, No. 18 Sources: World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute ...

  2. The Pharmacological Potential of Mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This review describes pharmacologically active compounds from mushrooms. Compounds and complex substances with antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antiallergic, immunomodulating, anti-inflammatory, antiatherogenic, hypoglycemic, hepatoprotective and central activities are covered, focusing on the review of recent literature. The production of mushrooms or mushroom compounds is discussed briefly. PMID:16136207

  3. Invited Review Autoimmunity in Chagas heart disease

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    Invited Review Autoimmunity in Chagas heart disease J.S. Leon, D.M. Engman* Northwestern University the genesis of autoimmunity in Chagas heart disease: (i) What mechanism(s) are potentially responsible for Parasitology Inc. Keywords: Myocarditis; Chagas heart disease Myosin; Autoimmunity 1. Introduction After

  4. Inonotus obliquus Protects against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis and Premature Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jong Seok; Pahk, Jung Woon; Lee, Jong Seok; Shin, Won Cheol; Lee, Shin Young; Hong, Eock Kee

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the cytoprotective effects of Inonotus obliquus against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and premature senescence. Pretreatment with I. obliquus scavenged intracellular ROS and prevented lipid peroxidation in hydrogen peroxide-treated human fibroblasts. As a result, I. obliquus exerted protective effects against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and premature senescence in human fibroblasts. In addition, I. obliquus suppressed UV-induced morphologic skin changes, such as skin thickening and wrinkle formation, in hairless mice in vivo and increased collagen synthesis through inhibition of MMP-1 and MMP-9 activities in hydrogen peroxide- treated human fibroblasts. Taken together, these results demonstrate that I. obliquus can prevent the aging process by attenuating oxidative stress in a model of stress-induced premature senescence. PMID:21359681

  5. Mushroom Barley Soup Ingredients

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Mushroom Barley Soup Ingredients: 1 tablespoon oil 1 onion 2 celery stalks 2 carrots 2 cups of the onion, and peel off the brown layers. Run under water to remove any dirt. Cut the onion in half lengthwise, and place the flat side on the cutting board. Slice across the onion, from one side to the other

  6. Selenium in Edible Mushrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerzy Falandysz

    2008-01-01

    Selenium is vital to human health. This article is a compendium of virtually all the published data on total selenium concentrations, its distribution in fruitbody, bioconcentration factors, and chemical forms in wild-grown, cultivated, and selenium-enriched mushrooms worldwide. Of the 190 species reviewed (belonging to 21 families and 56 genera), most are considered edible, and a few selected data relate to

  7. Control of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Yoichi; Nakagawa, Jun

    2006-01-01

    The Southern Cone Initiative (Iniciativa de Salud del Cono Sur, INCOSUR) to control domestic transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi is a substantial achievement based on the enthusiasm of the scientific community, effective strategies, leadership, and cost-effectiveness. INCOSUR triggered the launch of other regional initiatives in Central America and in the Andean and Amazon regions, which have all made progress. The Central American Initiative targeted the elimination of an imported triatomine bug (Rhodnius prolixus) and the control of a widespread native species (Triatoma dimidiata), and faced constraints such as a small scientific community, the difficulty in controlling a native species, and a vector control programme that had fragmented under a decentralized health system. International organizations such as the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) have played an important role in bridging the gaps between fragmented organizational resources. Guatemala achieved virtual elimination of R. prolixus and ;reduction of Tri. Dimidiata and El Salvador and Honduras revitalized their national programmes. The programme also revealed new challenges. Tri. dimidiata control needs to cover a large geographic area efficiently with stratification, quality control, community mobilization, and information management. Stakeholders such as the National Chagas Program, the local health system and their communities, as well as local government must share responsibilities to continue comprehensive vector control. PMID:16735164

  8. Garbage Composting for Mushroom Production

    PubMed Central

    Block, S. S.

    1965-01-01

    Laboratory and pilot-plant composting of garbage mixtures of newspaper and vegetable waste has demonstrated that garbage can be converted to a medium that produces mushrooms (Agaricus campestris) in good yield. Sewage sludge was less satisfactory than newspaper, gumwood sawdust, or vegetable waste as a compost material for growing mushrooms. A sample of commercially produced compost was found to yield mushrooms in the same quantity as was produced in the laboratory experiments. Images Fig. 3 PMID:14264848

  9. Constituents of Lactarius (Mushrooms)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. M. Daniewski; G. Vidari

    \\u000a In the currently recognized 5-kingdom system of Whittaker, Fungi is a kingdom of its own, separated for instance from Plantae and Animalia (1). The kingdom of Fungi is vast and heterogeneous, comprising numerous microscopic species like molds, as well as the larger\\u000a fungi (mushrooms). The latter are spore-producing fruit-bodies of fungi that in their vegetative phases live as mycelia. Larger

  10. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Blood Screening FAQs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... known as Chagas Disease) Parasites Home Share Compartir Blood Screening FAQs On This Page Why are blood ... be concerned about getting Chagas disease? Why are blood banks now screening for Chagas disease? The transmission ...

  11. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Detailed FAQs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have Chagas disease. In what parts of the world is Chagas disease found? People who have Chagas disease can be found anywhere in the world. However, vectorborne transmission is confined to the Americas, ...

  12. Moisture adsorption isotherms for mushroom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Arora; J Ahmed; G. S. V Raghavan

    2004-01-01

    The moisture adsorption isotherms of Agaricus bisporus and Pleurotus florida mushrooms were determined at temperatures (30–70°C) typically found in drying and storage. The samples were equilibrated above saturated salt solutions. Equilibrium moisture content of mushroom decreased with an increase in temperature at constant water activity. The data was adjusted to 11 sorption models to ascertain the best fit. Comparisons were

  13. REVIEW PAPER Mycorrhizal mushroom diversity

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    REVIEW PAPER Mycorrhizal mushroom diversity and productivity--an indicator of forest health? Simon and productivity of wild mushrooms. Mycorrhizal fungi depend on photosynthetically fixed carbon produced raise the question of whether mycorrhizal fungi can be used as indicators for tree health. & Discussion

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Inonotus obliquus in Colitis Induced by Dextran Sodium Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Se Young; Hur, Sun Jin; An, Chi Sun; Jeon, Yun Hui; Jeoung, Young Jun; Bak, Jong Phil; Lim, Beong Ou

    2010-01-01

    A total of 28 male BALB/c mice (average weight 20.7?±?1.6?g) were divided into 4 treatment groups and fed a commercial diet (A), a commercial diet + induced colitis by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) (B), Inonotus obliquus (IO) administration (C), and IO administration + induced colitis by DSS (D). IO treatment (C, D) decreased the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)1 compared to those of the colitis induced group (B). The expressions of IL-4 and STAT6 were decreased in group D compared to the colitis induced group (B). The serum immunoglobulin (Ig)E level decreased in IO treatment groups (C, D) compared to no IO treatment groups (A and B) although there was no significant difference between the IO treatment groups. Extract from IO itself had a weak cytotoxic effect on murine macrophage cell line (RAW264.7 cells). Extract from IO inhibited lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced, TNF-?, STAT1, pSTAT1, STAT6, and pSTAT6 production in RAW264.7 cells. PMID:20300439

  15. Conservation of the mycelia of the medicinal mushroom Humphreya coffeata (Berk.) Stey. in sterile distilled water

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Monserrat; Rocha-Zavaleta, Leticia; Valdez-Cruz, Norma A.; Trujillo-Roldán, Mauricio A.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is a growing interest in obtaining and studying the biologically active compounds from higher basidiomycetes, such as Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes and Inonotus obliquus[1], but the techniques for safe long-term storage are time-consuming, susceptible to contamination, and do not prevent genetic and physiological changes during long-term maintenance [2]. A recent strategy for obtaining biologically active compounds is using mycelia submerged cultures of these mushrooms, cultured under controlled laboratory conditions [1]. However, obtaining spores of these fungi under these conditions is difficult, and in most cases the way to obtain the spores is unknown [1]. Therefore, the strategy for mycelium storage seems to be more appropriated and simple.•A modification of Castellani's method [3–7] is proposed for higher basidiomycetes, by using the mycelium of Humphreya coffeata (Berk.) Stey., whose culture filtrates demonstrated bioactivity against lymphoma cells [8].•H. coffeata (Berk.) Stey. was grown on malt extract agar with filter paper disks that were removed after 4 days, placed in tubes with sterile distilled water, and stored at 4 °C.•Filter paper disks with H. coffeata (Berk.) Stey. stored at 4 °C were confirmed to be viable for up to 18 months, with no visible morphological alterations.

  16. Changes of Ginsenoside Content by Mushroom Mycelial Fermentation in Red Ginseng Extract

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Song Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Sun; Kim, Mi-Ryung; Kim, Sun Young; Kim, Jin-Man; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2011-01-01

    To obtain microorganisms for the microbial conversion of ginsenosides in red ginseng extract (RGE), mushroom mycelia were used for the fermentation of RGE. After fermentation, total sugar contents and polyohenol contents of the RGEs fermented with various mushrooms were not a significant increase between RGE and the ferments. But uronic acid content was relatively higher in the fermented RGEs cultured with Lentus edodes (2155.6 ?g/mL), Phelllinus linteus (1690.9 ?g/mL) and Inonotus obliquus 26137 and 26147 (1549.5 and 1670.7 ?g/mL) compared to the RGE (1307.1 ?g/mL). The RGEs fermented by Ph. linteus, Cordyceps militaris, and Grifola frondosa showed particularly high levels of total ginsenosides (20018.1, 17501.6, and 16267.0 ?g/mL, respectively). The ferments with C. militaris (6974.2 ?g/mL), Ph. linteus (9109.2 ?g/mL), and G. frondosa (7023.0 ?g/mL) also showed high levels of metabolites (sum of compound K, Rh1, Rg5, Rk1, Rg3, and Rg2) compared to RGE (3615.9 ?g/mL). Among four different RGE concentrations examined, a 20 brix concentration of RGE was favorable for the fermentation of Ph. linteus. Maximum biotransformation of ginsneoside metabolites (9395.5 ?g/mL) was obtained after 5 days fermentation with Ph. linteus. Maximum mycelial growth of 2.6 mg/mL was achieved at 9 days, in which growth was not significantly different during 5 to 9 days fermentation. During fermentation of RGE by Ph. linteus in a 7 L fermenter, Rg3, Rg5, and Rk1 contents showed maximum concentrations after 5 days similar to flask fermentation. These results confirm that fermentation with Ph. linteus is very useful for preparing minor ginsenoside metabolites while being safe for foods. PMID:23717066

  17. Wild Mushrooms Might Be Your Last Meal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... intensive care and on a list for a liver transplant. Mistaking toxic mushrooms for edible ones is common ... has no antidote, attacked her liver. Without the liver transplant, she would have died. Foraging for mushrooms is ...

  18. Chagas' disease as a foodborne illness.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Karen Signori; Schmidt, Flávio Luis; Guaraldo, Ana M A; Franco, Regina M B; Dias, Viviane L; Passos, Luiz A C

    2009-02-01

    Various researchers have studied the importance of the oral transmission of Chagas' disease since the mid-20th century. Only in recent years, due to an outbreak that occurred in the Brazilian State of Santa Catarina in 2005 and to various outbreaks occurring during the last 3 years in the Brazilian Amazon basin, mainly associated with the consumption of Amazonian palm berry or açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) juice, has this transmission route aroused the attention of researchers. Nevertheless, reports published in the 1960s already indicated the possibility of Chagas' disease transmission via food in Brazil, mainly in the Amazonian region. Recently, in December 2007, an outbreak of Chagas' disease occurred in Caracas, Venezuela, related to ingestion of contaminated fruit juices. The objective of this article is to point out the importance of foodborne transmission in the etiology of Chagas' disease, on the basis of published research and Brazilian epidemiology data. PMID:19350996

  19. Travelers' Health: Trypanosomiasis, American (Chagas Disease)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov . Home Destinations Travel Notices Find a Clinic Yellow Fever Vaccinations Clinics FAQ Disease Directory Information Centers For Travelers Common Travel Health Topics Adopting a Child from Another Country Adventure ... Yellow Book Contents Chapter 3 (78) Trypanosomiasis, American (Chagas ...

  20. Chagas Disease Cardiomyopathy: Immunopathology and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chevillard, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in Latin America and affects ca. 10 million people worldwide. About 30% of Chagas disease patients develop chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC), a particularly lethal inflammatory cardiomyopathy that occurs decades after the initial infection, while most patients remain asymptomatic. Mortality rate is higher than that of noninflammatory cardiomyopathy. CCC heart lesions present a Th1 T-cell-rich myocarditis, with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and prominent fibrosis. Data suggest that the myocarditis plays a major pathogenetic role in disease progression. Major unmet goals include the thorough understanding of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic targets and identification of prognostic genetic factors. Chagas disease thus remains a neglected disease, with no vaccines or antiparasitic drugs proven efficient in chronically infected adults, when most patients are diagnosed. Both familial aggregation of CCC cases and the fact that only 30% of infected patients develop CCC suggest there might be a genetic component to disease susceptibility. Moreover, previous case-control studies have identified some genes associated to human susceptibility to CCC. In this paper, we will review the immunopathogenesis and genetics of Chagas disease, highlighting studies that shed light on the differential progression of Chagas disease patients to CCC. PMID:25210230

  1. Bird fanciers lung in mushroom workers.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J; Barrett, M

    2015-04-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis has been described in mushrooms workers caused by exposure to mushroom or fungal spores in the compost used to grow mushrooms. We describe two mushroom workers who developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to exposure to avian proteins found in poultry manure which was used in producing mushroom compost. Both workers were employed in the compost production area. Both presented with typical features of HP. Both workers had negative serological and precipitin studies to Apergillus fumigatus, Saccarhopolyspora rectivirgula and thermophilic actinomycetes but had positive responses to poultry antibodies. Neither was exposed to mushroom spores. Both workers required initial therapy with corticosteroids. Relocation with avoidance of further exposure resulted in complete cure in one worker and change in work practice with the use of personal protections equipment resulted in the second workerclinical stabilisation. These are the first reported cases of bird fanciers lung in mushroom workers. PMID:26016305

  2. Report of wood decay fungus Inonotus tropicalis (phylum Basidiomycota) from a dog with a granulomatous mediastinal mass.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Barbara J; McGrath, Elizabeth; Giuffrida, Michelle; Craft, Serena L M; Kung, Chung Yee; Smith, Matthew E

    2013-09-01

    A 75.9-kg, 3.5-year-old male Irish Wolfhound dog with a 2-3-week history of gagging and eating difficulties was referred to the University of Florida Veterinary Medical Hospital (Gainesville, Florida) for evaluation of a large cranial mediastinal mass suspected to be a thymoma or lymphosarcoma. The patient had 4 months of nearly 10 kg progressive weight loss with severe flank sensitivity and radiographically apparent lumbar vertebral changes interpreted as discospondylitis. Lab work revealed hyperglobulinemia, mild proteinuria, normal T4, negative Brucella canis titer, and negative blood and urine bacterial cultures. A thoracotomy revealed a nonresectable, destructive, space-occupying mediastinal mass resulting in euthanasia without surgical recovery. Biopsies from the mass were collected during surgery for histology. Microscopic examination revealed extensive granulomatous cellulitis and lymphadenitis characterized by central cavitated necrotic areas containing debris and degenerate neutrophils, intermediate zones of fibrovascular proliferation with marked mixed inflammation, peripheral fibrosis, frequent multinucleated macrophages, and scattered mineralization. The necrotic material contained dense mats of 2 µm wide by 8-15 µm long fungal hyphae with parallel walls, acute angle branching, frequent septae, and occasional bulb-like dilations. DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region confirmed the presence of a fungus in the Inonotus tropicalis group. Inonotus tropicalis is primarily a wood decay fungus that is found on dead wood from angiosperms in tropical and subtropical habitats. Isolates of the I. tropicalis group have been detected a few times from immunosuppressed human beings with X-linked granulomatous disease. PMID:23929678

  3. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Diagnosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Parasites - American Trypanosomiasis (also known as Chagas Disease) Parasites Home Share ... see the DPDx Web site: Chagas disease (American Trypanosomiasis) Diagnostic Procedures: Blood Specimens Print page Get email ...

  4. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Triatomine Bug FAQs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of reduviid bug that can carry the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi that causes Chagas disease. Various triatomine bugs in ... that you have been infected with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the cause of Chagas disease. The mild swelling ...

  5. Mushrooms and Health Summit Proceedings123

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Mary Jo; Dwyer, Johanna; Hasler-Lewis, Clare M.; Milner, John A.; Noakes, Manny; Rowe, Sylvia; Wach, Mark; Beelman, Robert B.; Caldwell, Joe; Cantorna, Margherita T.; Castlebury, Lisa A.; Chang, Shu-Ting; Cheskin, Lawrence J.; Clemens, Roger; Drescher, Greg; Fulgoni, Victor L.; Haytowitz, David B.; Hubbard, Van S.; Law, David; Myrdal Miller, Amy; Minor, Bart; Percival, Susan S.; Riscuta, Gabriela; Schneeman, Barbara; Thornsbury, Suzanne; Toner, Cheryl D.; Woteki, Catherine E.; Wu, Dayong

    2014-01-01

    The Mushroom Council convened the Mushrooms and Health Summit in Washington, DC, on 9–10 September 2013. The proceedings are synthesized in this article. Although mushrooms have long been regarded as health-promoting foods, research specific to their role in a healthful diet and in health promotion has advanced in the past decade. The earliest mushroom cultivation was documented in China, which remains among the top global mushroom producers, along with the United States, Italy, The Netherlands, and Poland. Although considered a vegetable in dietary advice, mushrooms are fungi, set apart by vitamin B-12 in very low quantity but in the same form found in meat, ergosterol converted with UV light to vitamin D2, and conjugated linoleic acid. Mushrooms are a rare source of ergothioneine as well as selenium, fiber, and several other vitamins and minerals. Some preclinical and clinical studies suggest impacts of mushrooms on cognition, weight management, oral health, and cancer risk. Preliminary evidence suggests that mushrooms may support healthy immune and inflammatory responses through interaction with the gut microbiota, enhancing development of adaptive immunity, and improved immune cell functionality. In addition to imparting direct nutritional and health benefits, analysis of U.S. food intake survey data reveals that mushrooms are associated with higher dietary quality. Also, early sensory research suggests that mushrooms blended with meats and lower sodium dishes are well liked and may help to reduce intakes of red meat and salt without compromising taste. As research progresses on the specific health effects of mushrooms, there is a need for effective communication efforts to leverage mushrooms to improve overall dietary quality. PMID:24812070

  6. Developmental organization of the mushroom bodies of Thermobia domestica (Zygentoma, Lepismatidae): insights into mushroom body

    E-print Network

    Farris, Sarah M.

    Developmental organization of the mushroom bodies of Thermobia domestica (Zygentoma, Lepismatidae): insights into mushroom body evolution from a basal insect Sarah M. Farris Department of Biology, West The mushroom bodies of the insect brain are sensory integration centers best studied for their role in learning

  7. Beta-glucans in edible mushrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pamela Manzi; Laura Pizzoferrato

    2000-01-01

    Edible mushrooms contain interesting functional components. In particular beta glucans, homo- and hetero-glucans with ?(1?3), ?(1?4) and ?(1?6) glucosidic linkages, are supposed to be responsible for some healthy properties of mushrooms. In this research the amount of beta glucans in different edible mushroom species has been evaluated and their distribution within the soluble and insoluble fractions of dietary fibre has

  8. Elevated cardiac enzymes due to mushroom poisoning.

    PubMed

    Avc?, Sema; Usul, Eren; Kavak, Nezih; Büyükcam, Fatih; Arslan, Engin Deniz; Genç, Selim; Özkan, Seda

    2014-01-01

    Mushroom poisoning is an important reason of plant toxicity. Wild mushrooms that gathered from pastures and forests can be dangerous for human health. The clinical outcomes and symptoms of mushroom toxicity vary from mild gastrointestinal symptoms to acute multiple organ failure. Toxic effects to kidney and liver of amatoxin are common but cardiotoxic effects are unusual. In this case, we reported the cardiotoxic effect of amatoxin with the elevated troponin-I without any additional finding in electrocardiography, echocardiography and angiography. PMID:25567466

  9. Review: surveillance of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ken; Yoshioka, Kota

    2012-01-01

    After remarkable reduction in prevalence through regional elimination of domestic vectors, the central challenge of Chagas disease control is shifting towards interruption of the disease transmission by non-eliminable vectors in Latin America. Vector surveillance with community participation was cost-effective against the eliminable vectors. But the efforts often failed against the non-eliminable vectors due to lack of surveillance coverage or sustainability. For instance, in El Salvador and Honduras, the operational vector control personnel lost access to many communities under decentralized health systems. To cover wider areas lastingly, the countries implemented the surveillance systems involving non-specialists from locally embedded resources, such as local health services, schools and community leaders. From these experiences, this paper outlines a common structure of the current community-based surveillance systems, consisting of five fundamental sequential functions. To increase scalability and sustainability, four of the five functions could be delegated to the locally available human resources, and the surveillance systems can be integrated into the general health systems. Challenges at national and regional levels are discussed for further evolution of the surveillance systems. PMID:22726647

  10. Lignocellulose degradation in mushroom composts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. R. Fermor; J. F. Smith

    1984-01-01

    The edible mushroomAgaricus bisporus is grown commercially on composted manure\\/straw mixtures. However, this proven composting procedure is wasteful of raw materials.\\u000a A nonmanure compost was developed (Smith, 1980) with two main aims:\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a (1) \\u000a \\u000a To conserve raw materials, while still producing a compost favoringAgaricus bisporus colonization and giving an economic yield of mushrooms.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a (2) \\u000a \\u000a To speed up composting, hence making more

  11. Vitamin D4 in Mushrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katherine M. Phillips; Ronald L. Horst; Nicholas J. Koszewski; Ryan R. Simon

    2012-01-01

    An unknown vitamin D compound was observed in the HPLC-UV chromatogram of edible mushrooms in the course of analyzing vitamin D2 as part of a food composition study and confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be vitamin D4 (22-dihydroergocalciferol). Vitamin D4 was quantified by HPLC with UV detection, with vitamin [3H] itamin D3 as an internal standard. White button, crimini,

  12. Nutritional Composition of Some Wild Edible Mushrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmet Colak; Özlem Faiz

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the nutritional content of some wild edible mushrooms from Turkey Trabzon-Maçka District. Methods: Eight different species of wild edible mushrooms (Craterellus cornuco- pioides (L.) P. Karst, Armillaria mellea (Vahl) P. Kumm., Sarcodon imbricatus (L.) P. Karst., Lycoperdon perlatum Pers., Lactarius volemus (Fr.) Fr., Ramaria flava (Schaeff.) Quél. Cantharellus cibarius Fr., Hydnum

  13. The cancer preventive effects of edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tongtong; Beelman, Robert B; Lambert, Joshua D

    2012-12-01

    An increasing body of scientific literature suggests that dietary components may exert cancer preventive effects. Tea, soy, cruciferous vegetables and other foods have been investigated for their cancer preventive potential. Some non-edible mushrooms like Reishi (Ganoderma lucidum) have a history use, both alone and in conjunction with standard therapies, for the treatment of various diseases including cancer in some cultures. They have shown efficacy in a number of scientific studies. By comparison, the potential cancer preventive effects of edible mushrooms have been less well-studied. With similar content of putative effective anticancer compounds such as polysaccharides, proteoglycans, steroids, etc., one might predict that edible mushrooms would also demonstrate anticancer and cancer preventive activity. In this review, available data for five commonly-consumed edible mushrooms: button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus), A. blazei, oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus), shiitake mushrooms (Lentinus edodes), and maitake (Grifola frondosa) mushrooms is discussed. The results of animal model and human intervention studies, as well as supporting in vitro mechanistic studies are critically evaluated. Weaknesses in the current data and topics for future work are highlighted. PMID:22583406

  14. The Problem of Psilocybin Mushroom Abuse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norman R. Peden; Stuart D. Pringle; James Crooks

    1982-01-01

    1 We have reviewed the clinical features and management of 44 consecutive patients presenting to hospital over a 5 week period during an outbreak of ingestion of psilocybin containing mushrooms.2 Patients presented to hospital usually because of dysphoric effects an average of 3.8 h after ingesting the mushrooms.3 Mydriasis was present in 40 patients but fewer than half showed other

  15. Nutritional value of mushrooms widely consumed in Italy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pamela Manzi; Altero Aguzzi; Laura Pizzoferrato

    2001-01-01

    With the aim of extending knowledge on chemical and nutritional characteristics of commercial mushrooms widely consumed in Italy, fresh and processed mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus, Pleurotus ostreatus and Boletus group) were analysed fresh or after cooking. Results show that botanical variety, processing and cooking are all effective determinants of mushroom proximate composition. Dried mushrooms (Boletus group) after cooking show the highest

  16. Parental, Personality, and Peer Correlates of Psychoactive Mushroom Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anglin, M. Douglas; And Others

    1986-01-01

    College undergraduates (N=53) reporting use of a hallucinogenic mushroom (Psilocybe) were matched to nonusers. Hallucinogenic mushroom use by men was most associated with peers' mushroom use, whereas mushroom use by women was most associated with parental drug use, especially fathers' marijuana use. Personality measures were secondary in…

  17. Dose due to mushroom ingestion in Spain.

    PubMed

    Baeza, A; Guillén, F J

    2004-01-01

    The dose due to ingestion of mushrooms depends on their radioactive content. However, not all the mass of the mushroom ingested is digested and assimilated completely by man. To analyse the degree of assimilation of the radioactive content of mushrooms, we have carried out culture under controlled laboratory conditions for Pleurotus eryngii mushrooms to which we added known activities of 134Cs, 85Sr and 239Pu. We then applied the Van Soest method to the fruiting bodies, which were obtained in order to determine the fraction of these radionuclides associated with the major components of the cell that are assimilable by man. Finally, on the basis of the results, we determined the dose due to 137Cs, 90Sr and (239+240)Pu for several mushroom species collected in different natural and semi-natural ecosystems in Spain. PMID:15367777

  18. Stimulatory effect of different lignocellulosic materials for phenolic compound production and antioxidant activity from Inonotus obliquus in submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linghui; Xu, Xiangqun

    2013-04-01

    White-rot fungus Inonotus obliquus grown in submerged culture produces antioxidative phenolic compounds. In this study, addition of lignocellulosic materials into the liquid culture increased the production and antioxidant activity of extra- and intra-cellular phenolic compounds (EPC and IPC, respectively). The production of EPC and IPC was significantly enhanced by wheat straw (by 151.2 and 45.3 %), sugarcane bagasse (by 106.9 and 26.1 %), and rice straw (by 67.6 and 38.9 %). Both of the EPC and IPC extracts from the three substrates showed a higher hydroxyl and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity than those from the control medium. The highly active polyphenols such as tea catechins of epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and phelligridin G in the EPC extracts increased by 113.1, 75.0, and 86.3 % in the sugarcane bagasse medium. Davallialactone and inoscavin B in the EPC extracts were generated in large amounts in the lignocellulose media but not found in the control medium. The IPC extract from the wheat straw medium had the highest production of EGCG and ECG (17.6 and 18.1 mg/l). The different enhancement among the materials was attributed to the content and degradation rate of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The different antioxidant activity of the EPC and IPC extracts was related to their phenolic compositions. PMID:23408232

  19. Dynamical tunneling in mushroom billiards

    E-print Network

    A. Bäcker; R. Ketzmerick; S. Löck; M. Robnik; G. Vidmar; R. Höhmann; U. Kuhl; H. -J. Stöckmann

    2008-05-05

    We study the fundamental question of dynamical tunneling in generic two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems by considering regular-to-chaotic tunneling rates. Experimentally, we use microwave spectra to investigate a mushroom billiard with adjustable foot height. Numerically, we obtain tunneling rates from high precision eigenvalues using the improved method of particular solutions. Analytically, a prediction is given by extending an approach using a fictitious integrable system to billiards. In contrast to previous approaches for billiards, we find agreement with experimental and numerical data without any free parameter.

  20. [Hemolysis in mushroom poisoning: facts and hypotheses].

    PubMed

    Flammer, R; Gallen, S

    1983-10-22

    Primary hemolysis induced by antigens and toxins of mushrooms must be distinguished from hemolysis secondary to shock and disseminated intravascular coagulation with disruption of erythrocytes caused by severe poisoning with many mushroom species. Primary hemolysis is well documented as immunohemolysis after repeated ingestion of involute paxillus (Paxillus involutus). Direct hemolysis is reported after eating raw mushrooms with a high content of hemolysins. Hemolysis is only speculative in monomethylhydrazine poisoning by false morels (Gyromitra esculenta). Secondary hemolysis due to shock is not uncommon. Hemolysis in connection with enzymopenia of erythrocytes has not been documented as yet. In the present study the various hemolytic syndromes are described and discussed. PMID:6359399

  1. Confirmation of Chagas' cardiomyopathy following heart transplantation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Binh An P. Phan; Michael A. Laflamme; April Stempien-Otero; Ajit P. Limaye; Frederick S. Buckner; Wayne C. Levy

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of Chagas' cardiomyopathy confirmed in a patient after heart transplantation. The patient initially presented\\u000a with symptoms of congestive heart failure and was found to have positive serology for prior Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Despite optimal medical management, the patient had deterioration of his cardiac function and he underwent heart\\u000a transplantation. Pathology examination of the explanted heart confirmed

  2. Quality of bread supplemented with mushroom mycelia.

    PubMed

    Ulziijargal, Enkhjargal; Yang, Joan-Hwa; Lin, Li-Yun; Chen, Chiao-Pei; Mau, Jeng-Leun

    2013-05-01

    Mushroom mycelia of Antrodia camphorata, Agaricus blazei, Hericium erinaceus and Phellinus linteus were used to substitute 5% of wheat flour to make bread. Bread quality, including specific volume, colour property, equivalent umami concentration (EUC), texture profile analysis, sensory evaluation and functional components, was analysed. Mycelium-supplemented bread was smaller in loaf volume and coloured, and had lower lightness and white index values. White bread contained the lowest amounts of free umami amino acids and umami 5'-nucleotides and showed the lowest EUC value. Incorporating 5% mushroom mycelia into the bread formula did not adversely affect the texture profile of the bread. However, incorporating 5% mushroom mycelia into the bread formula did lower bread's acceptability. After baking, mycelium-supplemented bread still contained substantial amounts of ?-aminobutyric acid and ergothioneine (0.23-0.86 and 0.79-2.10 mg/g dry matter, respectively). Overall, mushroom mycelium could be incorporated into bread to provide its beneficial health effects. PMID:23265457

  3. Spinach and Mushroom Enchilada Lasagna Ingredients

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    in half 1/2 teaspoon oregano 20 ounces spinach, frozen, 2 packages, thawed 2 cups reduced fat Monterey minutes. When mushrooms are soft, add oregano and spinach and heat through. 6. Pour half of the enchilada

  4. Mushrooms—Biologically Distinct and Nutritionally Unique

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Mary Jo; Miller, Amy Myrdal; Roupas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mushrooms are fungi, biologically distinct from plant- and animal-derived foods (fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, protein [meat, fish, poultry, legumes, nuts, and seeds]) that comprise the US Department of Agriculture food patterns operationalized by consumer-focused MyPlate messages. Although mushrooms provide nutrients found in these food groups, they also have a unique nutrient profile. Classified into food grouping systems by their use as a vegetable, mushrooms’ increasing use in main entrées in plant-based diets is growing, supporting consumers’ efforts to follow dietary guidance recommendations. Mushrooms’ nutrient and culinary characteristics suggest it may be time to reevaluate food groupings and health benefits in the context of 3 separate food kingdoms: plants/botany, animals/zoology, and fungi/mycology. PMID:25435595

  5. Hepatocarcinogenesis by hydrazine mycotoxins of edible mushrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bela Toth

    1979-01-01

    Two edible mushrooms are known to contain hydrazine analogs. The wild false morel Gyromitra esculenta contains up to 0.3% acetaldehyde methylformylhydrazone and N?methyl?N?formylhydrazine (MFH). The latter chemical, under certain conditions, also yields methylhydrazine. The commonly eaten, cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus contains up to 0.04% ??N?[??L(+)?glutamyl]?4?hydroxymethylphenylhydrazine and 4?hydroxymethylphenylhydrazine. MFH was administered in drinking water continuously for life to Swiss mice and

  6. Antioxidant properties of several specialty mushrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeng-Leun Mau; Hsiu-Ching Lin; Si-Fu Song

    2002-01-01

    Four specialty mushrooms are commercially available in Taiwan, including Dictyophora indusiata (basket stinkhorn), Grifola frondosa (maitake), Hericium erinaceus (lion's mane), and Tricholoma giganteum (white matsutake). Methanolic extracts were prepared from these specialty mushrooms and their antioxidant properties were studied. The antioxidant activities at 1.2 mg ml?1 were in the order of basket stinkhorn>lion's mane>maitake>white matsutake. Basket stinkhorn showed an excellent

  7. Molecular Epidemiologic Source Tracking of Orally Transmitted Chagas Disease, Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Maikell; Martínez, Clara E.; Messenger, Louisa A.; Nessi, Anaibeth; Londoño, Juan C.; Espinosa, Raul; Martínez, Cinda; Alfredo, Mijares; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael; Lewis, Michael D.; de Noya, Belkisyolé A.; Miles, Michael A.; Llewellyn, Martin S.

    2013-01-01

    Oral outbreaks of Chagas disease are increasingly reported in Latin America. The transitory presence of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites within contaminated foods, and the rapid consumption of those foods, precludes precise identification of outbreak origin. We report source attribution for 2 peri-urban oral outbreaks of Chagas disease in Venezuela via high resolution microsatellite typing. PMID:23768982

  8. Toxicological Profiles of Poisonous, Edible, and Medicinal Mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Woo-Sik; Hossain, Md. Akil

    2014-01-01

    Mushrooms are a recognized component of the human diet, with versatile medicinal properties. Some mushrooms are popular worldwide for their nutritional and therapeutic properties. However, some species are dangerous because they cause toxicity. There are many reports explaining the medicinal and/or toxic effects of these fungal species. Cases of serious human poisoning generally caused by the improper identification of toxic mushroom species are reported every year. Different substances responsible for the fatal signs and symptoms of mushroom toxicity have been identified from various poisonous mushrooms. Toxicity studies of mushroom species have demonstrated that mushroom poisoning can cause adverse effects such as liver failure, bradycardia, chest pain, seizures, gastroenteritis, intestinal fibrosis, renal failure, erythromelalgia, and rhabdomyolysis. Correct categorization and better understanding are essential for the safe and healthy consumption of mushrooms as functional foods as well as for their medicinal use. PMID:25346597

  9. Toxicological profiles of poisonous, edible, and medicinal mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Jo, Woo-Sik; Hossain, Md Akil; Park, Seung-Chun

    2014-09-01

    Mushrooms are a recognized component of the human diet, with versatile medicinal properties. Some mushrooms are popular worldwide for their nutritional and therapeutic properties. However, some species are dangerous because they cause toxicity. There are many reports explaining the medicinal and/or toxic effects of these fungal species. Cases of serious human poisoning generally caused by the improper identification of toxic mushroom species are reported every year. Different substances responsible for the fatal signs and symptoms of mushroom toxicity have been identified from various poisonous mushrooms. Toxicity studies of mushroom species have demonstrated that mushroom poisoning can cause adverse effects such as liver failure, bradycardia, chest pain, seizures, gastroenteritis, intestinal fibrosis, renal failure, erythromelalgia, and rhabdomyolysis. Correct categorization and better understanding are essential for the safe and healthy consumption of mushrooms as functional foods as well as for their medicinal use. PMID:25346597

  10. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis induced by Shiitake mushroom spores.

    PubMed

    Ampere, Alexandre; Delhaes, Laurence; Soots, Jacques; Bart, Frederic; Wallaert, Benoit

    2012-08-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is a pulmonary granulomatosis involving an immunoallergic mechanism caused by chronic inhalation of antigens, most frequently organic substances, as well as chemicals. We report the first European case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to the inhalation of Shiitake mushroom spores. A 37-year-old French Caucasian man with a one-month history of persistent dry cough, shortness of breath and loss of weight was admitted to our hospital on December 2010. Anamnesis showed he was involved in mushroom production beginning in the summer of 2010. His temperature on admission was 36.6°C and he had a normal blood pressure (135/90 mmHg). Bilateral fine crackles were audible in the base of both lungs. Pulmonary function tests showed a mild restrictive pattern with decreased DLco and a PaO(2) of 65 mmHg, Chest CT scan revealed reticulo-nodular shadows, slight ground glass opacities, liner atelectasis, and subpleural opacities in both lung fields. Bronchoscopy was normal but cytological examination of BAL revealed a predominant lymphocytosis (55%). Serum precipitins to the Shiitake mushroom spores were positive (3 precipitins arcs with high intensity) and as a result we advised the patient to cease his mushroom production activities. The diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to inhalation of Shiitake mushroom spores was established as a result of the improvement of all of his clinical symptoms, i.e., cough, weight loss, bilateral fine crackles, mild restrictive pattern of pulmonary function, and reticulo-nodular shadows on chest CT, once exposure was eliminated. Recent interest in exotic mushrooms varieties, e.g., Shiitake, in developed countries because of their possible medicinal properties might increase the potential risk of HP among mushrooms workers. Therefore, healthcare professionals have to take this new potential respiratory disease into account. PMID:22329454

  11. Medicinal mushrooms as a source of antitumor and immunomodulating polysaccharides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. Wasser

    2002-01-01

    The number of mushrooms on Earth is estimated at 140,000, yet maybe only 10% (approximately 14,000 named species) are known. Mushrooms comprise a vast and yet largely untapped source of powerful new pharmaceutical products. In particular, and most importantly for modern medicine, they represent an unlimited source of polysaccharides with antitumor and immunostimulating properties. Many, if not all, Basidiomycetes mushrooms

  12. Synaptogenesis in the Mushroom Body Calyx During Metamorphosis in the

    E-print Network

    Menzel, Randolf - Institut für Biologie

    Synaptogenesis in the Mushroom Body Calyx During Metamorphosis in the Honeybee Apis mellifera synaptogenesis and morpho- genesis within the mushroom body calyx of the honeybee Apis mellifera and to find out- phosis. We show that synaptogenesis in the mushroom body calycal neuropile starts in early metamorphosis

  13. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF2 etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  14. Chagas' Disease: Pregnancy and Congenital Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic infection that kills approximately 12,000 people a year. Mass migration of chronically infected and asymptomatic persons has caused globalization of Chagas disease and has made nonvectorial infection, including vertical and blood-borne transmission, more of a threat to human communities than vectorial infection. To control transmission, it is essential to test all pregnant women living in endemic countries and all pregnant women having migrated from, or having lived in, endemic countries. All children born to seropositive mothers should be tested not only within the first month of life but also at ~6 months and ~12 months of age. The diagnosis is made by identification of the parasite in blood before the age of 6 months and by identification of the parasite in blood and/or positive serology after 10 months of age. Follow up for a year is essential as a significant proportion of cases are initially negative and are only detected at a later stage. If the condition is diagnosed and treated early, the clinical response is excellent and the majority of cases are cured. PMID:24949443

  15. Immunoregulatory networks in human Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Dutra, W O; Menezes, C A S; Magalhães, L M D; Gollob, K J

    2014-08-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in all Latin America. Due to the increase in population migration, Chagas disease has spread worldwide and is now considered a health issue not only in endemic countries. While most chronically infected individuals remain asymptomatic, approximately 30% of the patients develop a potentially deadly cardiomyopathy. The exact mechanisms that underlie the establishment and maintenance of the cardiac pathology are not clear. However, there is consistent evidence that immunoregulatory cytokines are critical for orchestrating the immune response and thus influence disease development or control. While the asymptomatic (indeterminate) form represents a state of balance between the host and the parasite, the establishment of the cardiac form represents the loss of this balance. Analysis of data obtained from several studies has led to the hypothesis that the indeterminate form is associated with an anti-inflammatory cytokine profile, represented by high expression of IL-10, while cardiac form is associated with a high production of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha in relation to IL-10, leading to an inflammatory profile. Here, we discuss the immunoregulatory events that might influence disease outcome, as well as the mechanisms that influence the establishment of these complex immunoregulatory networks. PMID:24611805

  16. Chagas disease and globalization of the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Briceño-León, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The increasing number of autochthonous cases of Chagas disease in the Amazon since the 1970s has led to fear that the disease may become a new public health problem in the region. This transformation in the disease's epidemiological pattern in the Amazon can be explained by environmental and social changes in the last 30 years. The current article draws on the sociological theory of perverse effects to explain these changes as the unwanted result of the shift from the "inward" development model prevailing until the 1970s to the "outward" model that we know as globalization, oriented by industrial forces and international trade. The current article highlights the implementation of five new patterns in agriculture, cattle-raising, mining, lumbering, and urban occupation that have generated changes in the environment and the traditional indigenous habitat and have led to migratory flows, deforestation, sedentary living, the presence of domestic animals, and changes in the habitat that facilitate colonization of human dwellings by vectors and the domestic and work-related transmission of the disease. The expansion of Chagas disease is thus a perverse effect of the globalization process in the Amazon. PMID:17308715

  17. Effect of Light Wavelengths and Coherence on Growth, Enzymes Activity, and Melanin Accumulation of Liquid-Cultured Inonotus obliquus (Ach.:Pers.) Pilát.

    PubMed

    Poyedinok, Natalia; Mykhaylova, Oksana; Tugay, Tatyana; Tugay, Andrei; Negriyko, Anatoly; Dudka, Irina

    2015-05-01

    To investigate effects of light wavelengths and coherence on growth of liquid-cultured Inonotus obliquus mycelia, melanin accumulation and enzymes activity, culture condition as light of different wavelengths and coherence were studied. Short-term exposure of the vegetative mycelium by low-intensity coherent blue light was optimal for stimulation of growth, melanin synthesis, and increase in extracellular and intracellular activities of tyrosinase and polyphenoloxidase and extracellular catalase. Red coherent light, in the same mode, can effectively be used to stimulate the growth of mycelium and to increase intracellular and extracellular activity of polyphenoloxidase, extracellular catalase and tyrosinase, and intracellular peroxidase. Low-coherent light had less stimulating effect on the biosynthetic activity of I. ?bliquus. It should be used in the cultivation directed at the obtaining endomelanin, polyphenoloxidase, and extracellular tyrosinase. PMID:25809995

  18. Mushroom as a product and their role in mycoremediation.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Shweta; Mathur, Nupur; Bhatnagar, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Mushroom has been used for consumption as product for a long time due to their flavor and richness in protein. Mushrooms are also known as mycoremediation tool because of their use in remediation of different types of pollutants. Mycoremediation relies on the efficient enzymes, produced by mushroom, for the degradation of various types of substrate and pollutants. Besides waste degradation, mushroom produced a vendible product for consumption. However, sometimes they absorb the pollutant in their mycelium (biosorption process) and cannot be consumed due to absorbed toxicants. This article reviews the achievement and current status of mycoremediation technology based on mushroom cultivation for the remediation of waste and also emphasizes on the importance of mushroom as product. This critical review is also focused on the safety aspects of mushroom cultivation on waste. PMID:24949264

  19. Mushroom as a product and their role in mycoremediation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mushroom has been used for consumption as product for a long time due to their flavor and richness in protein. Mushrooms are also known as mycoremediation tool because of their use in remediation of different types of pollutants. Mycoremediation relies on the efficient enzymes, produced by mushroom, for the degradation of various types of substrate and pollutants. Besides waste degradation, mushroom produced a vendible product for consumption. However, sometimes they absorb the pollutant in their mycelium (biosorption process) and cannot be consumed due to absorbed toxicants. This article reviews the achievement and current status of mycoremediation technology based on mushroom cultivation for the remediation of waste and also emphasizes on the importance of mushroom as product. This critical review is also focused on the safety aspects of mushroom cultivation on waste. PMID:24949264

  20. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Prevention and Control

    MedlinePLUS

    ... housing and spraying insecticide inside housing to eliminate triatomine bugs has significantly decreased the spread of Chagas disease. ... Disease General Information Detailed FAQs Blood Screening FAQs Triatomine Bug FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment ...

  1. Cardiac chagas disease masquerading as an acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    ElMunzer, Badih J; Sallach, Susan M; McGuire, Darren K

    2004-01-01

    Although myocardial infarction is most often the manifestation of epicardial coronary artery disease, Chagas heart disease due to chronic Trypanasome Cruzi infection may present with a syndrome of chest pain and elevations in markers of cardiac myonecrosis. In the setting of an increasingly diverse global population and immigration of peoples from endemic areas of Trypanasome Cruzi, it is important to be aware of the myriad cardiac manifestations of Chagas disease. PMID:14766021

  2. Prizes and parasites: incentive models for addressing Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Crager, Sara E; Price, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in immunology have provided a foundation of knowledge to understand many of the intricacies involved in manipulating the human response to fight parasitic infections, and a great deal has been learned from malaria vaccine efforts regarding strategies for developing parasite vaccines. There has been some encouraging progress in the development of a Chagas vaccine in animal models. A prize fund for Chagas could be instrumental in ensuring that these efforts are translated into products that benefit patients. PMID:19493074

  3. The pale brittle stem mushroom, Psathyrella candolleana (higher Basidiomycetes): an indigenous medicinal mushroom new to Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Habib, Mouthana N; Holliday, John C; Tura, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The pale brittle stem mushroom, Psathyrella candolleana, a species new to Iraq, is described from the sub-arid region of Aljazira (Iraq). Both classical taxonomy and DNA analyses confirm the identification of the fungus strain (RM-0861) as P. candolleana, a species that belongs to the family Psatherellaceae known to possess medicinal properties. Being a saprophyte, this fungus is cultivatable in laboratory conditions and therefore shows potential for production and use as a medicinal mushroom in human and veterinary health. PMID:25404226

  4. Antibodies to laminin in Chagas' disease

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We have found that sera from humans with Chagas' disease and Rhesus monkeys infected with Trypanosoma cruzi contain IgM and IgG antibodies, which react with structures in a variety of connective tissues. These antibodies react with laminin but not with various other purified connective tissue components like collagen types I, III, IV, and V, fibronectin, heparan sulfate (BM-1) proteoglycan, or chondronectin. The tissue-reacting antibodies were isolated by absorption to a laminin- Sepharose column. The bound fraction contained all the tissue-reacting antibodies. These antibodies strongly stained trypomastigotes and amastigotes, but weakly stained epimastigotes. These studies show that sera from T. cruzi-infected primates contain antilaminin antibodies, which may be produced by those host in response to a laminin-like molecule present in the parasite. PMID:6801186

  5. MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT

    E-print Network

    #12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE, Pacific and Yukon Region North Vancouver, B.C. B.C. Ministry of Agriculture Fisheries and Foods Resource, Lands and Parks and Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. #12;ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page TABLE

  6. [Automutilation after consumption of hallucinogenic mushrooms].

    PubMed

    Attema-de Jonge, M E; Portier, C B; Franssen, E J F

    2007-12-29

    Two young men, 25 and 32 years old, presented with severe automutilation by knife wounds after consumption of hallucinogenic mushrooms. The first patient had also used cocaine, cannabis and alcohol, while the second patient had only used the hallucinogenic mushrooms. Both patients were treated symptomatically and survived despite their severe stab wounds. Psilocybin-containing mushrooms are used as mind-altering drugs. These drugs may sometimes induce 'bad trips', a psychotic reaction accompanied by fear, panic, and dangerous behaviour, especially when used in combination with other drugs and alcohol or by psychiatrically unstable patients. During a bad trip, patients may hurt themselves. Because the duration of the psychotic and sympathicomimetic effects of psilocybin after ingestion of mushrooms is short (up to 6 h), and since psilocin itself causes no permanent organ toxicity, the treatment of psilocybin intoxication is only symptomatic. The diagnosis ofpsilocybin intoxication is hampered by the lack of routinely available, rapid and sensitive, analytical methods for the quantification ofpsilocybin and its active metabolite psilocin. PMID:18257429

  7. Flagellate dermatitis after consumption of Shiitake mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Agnieszka B; Kreft, Burkhard; Marsch, Wolfgang Ch

    2014-06-01

    Flagellate dermatitis occurs in patients who have eaten Shiitake mushrooms. We are reporting on a 55-year-old man, who developed whiplash-striped, severely itching efflorescences on the trunk 3 days after eating Lentinula edodes. Flagellate dermatitis is also known as a cutaneous side effect of bleomycin therapy. PMID:25097492

  8. Induction of cardiac autoimmunity in Chagas heart disease: A case for molecular mimicry

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    Induction of cardiac autoimmunity in Chagas heart disease: A case for molecular mimicry EDECIO. Keywords: Chagas disease cardiomyopathy, autoimmunity, cardiomyocyte, Trypanosoma cruzi, molecular mimicry autoimmune responses in both humans and experimental animal models of disease reinforced this idea

  9. 78 FR 34037 - Certain Preserved Mushrooms From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ...Administration [A-570-851] Certain Preserved Mushrooms From the People's Republic of China...antidumping duty order on certain preserved mushrooms from the People's Republic of China...1\\ See Certain Preserved Mushrooms From the People's Republic of...

  10. Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) in Mexico: an update.

    PubMed

    Carabarin-Lima, Alejandro; González-Vázquez, María Cristina; Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Baylón-Pacheco, Lidia; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Reyes-López, Pedro Antonio; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2013-08-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, a flagellated organism that is transmitted mainly to humans through the infected feces of triatomine kissing bugs (vector transmission in endemic areas) or by transfusion of infected blood, donations of infected organ, or transmission from an infected mother to her child at birth. Chagas disease was first described in 1909 by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, and due to the parasite's distribution throughout North, Central and South America, the disease is commonly known as American trypanosomiasis. However, this disease is now present in non-endemic countries such as Canada, the United States of America, and several countries in Europe (principally Spain). Moreover, Chagas disease was recently designated by the World Health Organization as one of the main neglected tropical diseases. The aim of this review is to summarize the research efforts recently described in studies conducted in Mexico on Chagas disease. In this country, there are no existing vector control programs. In addition, there is no consensus on the diagnostic methods for acute and chronic Chagas disease in maternity wards and blood banks, and trypanocidal therapy is not administered to chronic patients. The actual prevalence of the disease is unknown because no official reporting of cases is performed. Therefore, the number of people infected by different routes of transmission (vector, congenital, blood transfusion, organ transplantation, or oral) is unknown. We believe that by promoting education about Chagas disease in schools starting at the basic elementary level and including reinforcement at higher education levels will ensure that the Mexican population would be aware of this health problem and that the control measures adopted will have more acceptance and success. We hope that this review sensitizes the relevant authorities and that the appropriate measures to reduce the risk of infection by T. cruzi are undertaken to provide the Mexican people a better quality of life. PMID:23643518

  11. Acute Chagas disease in El Salvador 2000-2012 - need for surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Emi; de Aguilar, Ana Vilma Guevara; de Ramírez, Marta Alicia Hernández; Chévez, José Eduardo Romero; Nakagawa, Jun; Cedillos, Rafael Antonio; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-01

    Several parasitological studies carried out in El Salvador between 2000-2012 showed a higher frequency of acute cases of Chagas disease than that in other Central American countries. There is an urgent need for improved Chagas disease surveillance and vector control programs in the provinces where acute Chagas disease occurs and throughout El Salvador as a whole. PMID:24676660

  12. Hericium erinaceus: an edible mushroom with medicinal values.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Asaduzzaman; Tania, Mousumi; Liu, Rui; Rahman, Mohammad Mijanur

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms are considered as nutritionally functional foods and source of physiologically beneficial medicines. Hericium erinaceus, also known as Lion's Mane Mushroom or Hedgehog Mushroom, is an edible fungus, which has a long history of usage in traditional Chinese medicine. This mushroom is rich in some physiologically important components, especially ?-glucan polysaccharides, which are responsible for anti-cancer, immuno-modulating, hypolipidemic, antioxidant and neuro-protective activities of this mushroom. H. erinaceus has also been reported to have anti-microbial, anti-hypertensive, anti-diabetic, wound healing properties among other therapeutic potentials. This review article has overviewed the recent advances in the research and study on H. erinaceus and discussed the potential health beneficial activities of this mushroom, with the recognition of bioactive compounds responsible for these medicinal properties. PMID:23735479

  13. Gustatory learning and processing in the Drosophila mushroom bodies.

    PubMed

    Kirkhart, Colleen; Scott, Kristin

    2015-04-15

    The Drosophila mushroom bodies are critical association areas whose role in olfactory associative learning has been well characterized. Recent behavioral studies using a taste association paradigm revealed that gustatory conditioning also requires the mushroom bodies (Masek and Scott, 2010; Keene and Masek, 2012). Here, we examine the representations of tastes and the neural sites for taste associations in the mushroom bodies. Using molecular genetic approaches to target different neuronal populations, we find that the gamma lobes of the mushroom bodies and a subset of dopaminergic input neurons are required for taste associative learning. Monitoring responses to taste compounds in the mushroom body calyx with calcium imaging reveals sparse, taste-specific and organ-specific activation in the Kenyon cell dendrites of the main calyx and the dorsal accessory calyx. Our work provides insight into gustatory representations in the mushroom bodies, revealing the essential role of gustatory inputs not only as rewards and punishments but also as adaptive cues. PMID:25878268

  14. Supplementary Online Information 1. Photographs of Octopus and Mushroom Spring. See Supplementary Figure 1.

    E-print Network

    Supplementary Online Information 1. Photographs of Octopus and Mushroom Spring. See Supplementary the effluent channel of Mushroom Spring and Octopus Spring, as shown in Supplementary Figure 3. Pyrosequencing

  15. Chagas disease in Italy: breaking an epidemiological silence.

    PubMed

    Angheben, A; Anselmi, M; Gobbi, F; Marocco, S; Monteiro, G; Buonfrate, D; Tais, S; Talamo, M; Zavarise, G; Strohmeyer, M; Bartalesi, F; Mantella, A; Di Tommaso, M; Aiello, Kh; Veneruso, G; Graziani, G; Ferrari, Mm; Spreafico, I; Bonifacio, E; Gaiera, G; Lanzafame, M; Mascarello, M; Cancrini, G; Albajar-Vinas, P; Bisoffi, Z; Bartoloni, A

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease that due to population movements is no longer limited to Latin America, threatens a wide spectrum of people(travellers, migrants, blood or organ recipients,newborns, adoptees) also in non-endemic countries where it is generally underdiagnosed. In Italy, the available epidemiological data about Chagas disease have been very limited up to now, although the country is second in Europe only to Spain in the number of residents from Latin American. Among 867 at-risk subjectsscreened between 1998 and 2010, the Centre for Tropical Diseases in Negrar (Verona) and the Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, University of Florence found 4.2% patients with positive serology for Chagas disease (83.4% of them migrants, 13.8% adoptees).No cases of Chagas disease were identified in blood donors or HIV-positive patients of Latin American origin. Among 214 Latin American pregnant women,three were infected (resulting in abortion in one case).In 2005 a case of acute Chagas disease was recorded in an Italian traveller. Based on our observations, we believe that a wider assessment of the epidemiological situation is urgently required in our country and public health measures preventing transmission and improving access to diagnosis and treatment should be implemented. PMID:21944554

  16. Neuronal Health – Can Culinary and Medicinal Mushrooms Help?

    PubMed Central

    Sabaratnam, Vikineswary; Kah-Hui, Wong; Naidu, Murali; Rosie David, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Hericium erinaceus a culinary and medicinal mushroom is a well established candidate for brain and nerve health. Ganoderma lucidum, Grifola frondosa and Sarcodon scabrosus have been reported to have neurite outgrowth and neuronal health benefits. The number of mushrooms, however, studied for neurohealth activity are few compared to the more than 2 000 species of edible and / or medicinal mushrooms identified. In the on-going search for other potent culinary and / or medicinal mushrooms, indigenous mushrooms used in traditional medicines such as Lignosus rhinocerotis and Ganoderma neo-japonicum are also being investigated. Further, the edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus can be a potential candidate, too. Can these edible and medicinal mushrooms be tapped to tackle the health concerns of the aging population which is projected to be more than 80-90 million of people age 65 and above in 2050 who may be affected by age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Scientific validation is needed if these mushrooms are to be considered and this can be achieved by understanding the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in the stimulation of neurite outgrowth. Though it is difficult to extrapolate the in vitro studies to what may happen in the human brain, studies have shown that there can be improvement in cognitive abilities of the aged if the mushroom is incorporated in their daily diets. PMID:24716157

  17. Neuronal health - can culinary and medicinal mushrooms help?

    PubMed

    Sabaratnam, Vikineswary; Kah-Hui, Wong; Naidu, Murali; Rosie David, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Hericium erinaceus a culinary and medicinal mushroom is a well established candidate for brain and nerve health. Ganoderma lucidum, Grifola frondosa and Sarcodon scabrosus have been reported to have neurite outgrowth and neuronal health benefits. The number of mushrooms, however, studied for neurohealth activity are few compared to the more than 2 000 species of edible and / or medicinal mushrooms identified. In the on-going search for other potent culinary and / or medicinal mushrooms, indigenous mushrooms used in traditional medicines such as Lignosus rhinocerotis and Ganoderma neo-japonicum are also being investigated. Further, the edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus can be a potential candidate, too. Can these edible and medicinal mushrooms be tapped to tackle the health concerns of the aging population which is projected to be more than 80-90 million of people age 65 and above in 2050 who may be affected by age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Scientific validation is needed if these mushrooms are to be considered and this can be achieved by understanding the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in the stimulation of neurite outgrowth. Though it is difficult to extrapolate the in vitro studies to what may happen in the human brain, studies have shown that there can be improvement in cognitive abilities of the aged if the mushroom is incorporated in their daily diets. PMID:24716157

  18. Medicinal mushroom science: Current perspectives, advances, evidences, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wasser, Solomon P

    2014-01-01

    The main target of the present review is to draw attention to the current perspectives, advances, evidences, challenges, and future development of medicinal mushroom science in the 21 st century. Medicinal mushrooms and fungi are thought to possess approximately 130 medicinal functions, including antitumor, immunomodulating, antioxidant, radical scavenging, cardiovascular, anti-hypercholesterolemic, antiviral, antibacterial, anti-parasitic, antifungal, detoxification, hepatoprotective, and antidiabetic effects. Many, if not all, higher Basidiomycetes mushrooms contain biologically active compounds in fruit bodies, cultured mycelium, and cultured broth. Special attention is paid to mushroom polysaccharides. The data on mushroom polysaccharides and different secondary metabolites are summarized for approximately 700 species of higher hetero- and homobasidiomycetes. Numerous bioactive polysaccharides or polysaccharide-protein complexes from the medicinal mushrooms described appear to enhance innate and cell-mediated immune responses, and exhibit antitumor activities in animals and humans. Whilst the mechanism of their antitumor actions is still not completely understood, stimulation and modulation of key host immune responses by these mushroom compounds appear central. Polysaccharides and low-molecular-weight secondary metabolites are particularly important due to their antitumor and immunostimulating properties. Several of the mushroom compounds have been subjected to Phase I, II, and III clinical trials, and are used extensively and successfully in Asia to treat various cancers and other diseases. Special attention is given to many important unsolved problems in the study of medicinal mushrooms. PMID:25179726

  19. The first report on mushroom green mould disease in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Hatvani, Lóránt; Saboli?, Petra; Kocsubé, Sándor; Kredics, László; Czifra, Dorina; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Kaliterna, Joško; Ivi?, Dario; ?ermi?, Edyta; Kosalec, Ivan

    2012-12-01

    Green mould disease, caused by Trichoderma species, is a severe problem for mushroom growers worldwide, including Croatia. Trichoderma strains were isolated from green mould-affected Agaricus bisporus (button or common mushroom) compost and Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) substrate samples collected from Croatian mushroom farms. The causal agents of green mould disease in the oyster mushroom were T. pleurotum and T. pleuroticola, similar to other countries. At the same time, the pathogen of A. bisporus was exclusively the species T. harzianum, which is different from earlier findings and indicates that the range of mushroom pathogens is widening. The temperature profiles of the isolates and their hosts overlapped, thus no range was found that would allow optimal growth of the mushrooms without mould contamination. Ferulic acid and certain phenolic compounds, such as thymol showed remarkable fungistatic effect on the Trichoderma isolates, but inhibited the host mushrooms as well. However, commercial fungicides prochloraz and carbendazim were effective agents for pest management. This is the first report on green mould disease of cultivated mushrooms in Croatia. PMID:23334043

  20. Amanita phalloides-Type Mushroom Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Kathy; Woo, Olga F.; Olson, Kent R.; Pond, Susan M.; Seward, James; Becker, Charles E.

    1982-01-01

    In the fall of 1981 the San Francisco Bay Area Regional Poison Control Center received more than 100 calls regarding wild mushroom ingestion. Ten cases, including three fatalities, had all the features of Amanita phalloides poisoning. Encephalopathy, coma and renal insufficiency occurred in all three patients who died, but did not occur in those who survived. Two of the three patients who died arrived at the hospital late in the course of their illness, and severe gastroenteritis with accompanying dehydration probably contributed to their deaths. The poison control center promoted public awareness of the mushroom hazard through newspaper and television stories and by notifying local health departments. It also has devised a simple form to improve the quality of data collection and to assist in later verification of suspected A phalloides poisoning. PMID:7179945

  1. [The Kombucha mushroom: two different opinions].

    PubMed

    Gamundi, R; Valdivia, M

    1995-01-01

    Positive and negative views of the Kombucha mushroom, a popular remedy in Asia, are expressed. The Kombucha mushroom, used for centuries, is believed to have antibiotic tendencies and to strengthen the immune and metabolic systems. Studies show that the tea, made from fermented fungus, has high levels of B vitamins. Caution should be used during fermentation because exposing the fungus to sunlight may adversely affect the process. The mold in which the fungus grows may contain aspergillus, a fungal infection which may be fatal to HIV-positive persons. The tea is being commercialized as a stimulant of the immune system but is unpopular in the U.S. due to its toxicity risks. Public awareness messages must convey the danger of overstimulating the immune system of HIV-positive patients, whose immune systems are already overstimulated. Furthermore, the process of fermentation may encourage the growth of other organisms which produce medical complications in HIV-positive patients. PMID:11363369

  2. Mushrooms as Possible Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kosani?, Marijana; Rankovi?, Branislav; Daši?, Marko

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine in-vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of the acetonic and methanolic extracts of the mushrooms Boletus aestivalis, Boletus edulis and Leccinum carpini. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by using free radical scavenging activity and reducing power. In addition, total content of phenol and flavonoid in extracts were determined as pyrocatechol equivalent, and as rutin equivalent, respectively. As a result of the study acetonic extracts from Boletus edulis was more powerful antioxidant activity with IC50 value of 4.72 ?g/mL which was similar or greater than the standard antioxidants, ascorbic acid (IC50 = 4.22 ?g/mL), BHA (IC50 = 6.42 ?g/mL) and ?-tocopherol (IC50 = 62.43 ?g/mL). Moreover, the tested extracts had effective reducing power. A significant relationship between total phenolic and flavonoid contents and their antioxidative activities was significantly observed. The antimicrobial activity of each extract was estimated by determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration by using microdilution plate method against five species of bacteria and five species of fungi. Generally, the tested mushroom extracts had relatively strong antimicrobial activity against the tested microorganisms. The minimum inhibitory concentration for both extracts related to the tested bacteria and fungi were 1.25 - 10 mg/ mL. The present study shows that tested mushroom species demonstrated a strong antioxidant and antimicrobial activity. It suggests that mushroom may be used as good sources of natural antioxidants and for pharmaceutical purposes in treating of various deseases. PMID:24250542

  3. Hepatocarcinogenesis by hydrazine mycotoxins of edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Toth, B

    1979-01-01

    Two edible mushrooms are known to contain hydrazine analogs. The wild false morel Gyromitra esculenta contains up to 0.3% acetaldehyde methylformylhydrazone and N-methyl-N-formylhydrazine (MFH). The latter chemical, under certain conditions, also yields methylhydrazine. The commonly eaten, cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus contains up to 0.04% beta-N-[gamma-L(+)-glutamyl]-4-hydroxymethylphenylhydrazine and 4-hydroxymethylphenylhydrazine. MFH was administered in drinking water continuously for life to Swiss mice and Syrian (golden) hamsters. In both species the compound induced high incidences of benign and malignant hepatocellular neoplasms. Also, methylhydrazine given orally induced a significant incidence of malignant histiocytomas in the livers of hamsters. The N'-acetyl derivative of 4-hydroxymethylphenylhydrazine administered orally to mice gave rise to lung tumors and blood vessel tumors, mainly in the liver. Furthermore, these three compounds produced tumors in various other tissues. Histopathologically, the tumors were classified as benign hepatomas, liver cell carcinomas, angiomas and angiosarcomas of blood vessels, and adenomas and adenocarcinomas of lungs. From representative samples of these neoplasms detailed transmission electron microscopic investigations were also carried out. Since these hydrazine analogs induce tumors in animals and these mushrooms are consumed on a large scale by humans in various parts of the world, their hazardous nature should be considered. PMID:572876

  4. Chagas disease: Central American initiative launched.

    PubMed

    1998-02-01

    An initiative to interrupt the transmission of Chagas disease in Central America was launched at a meeting held October 22-24, 1997, in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Sponsored by the UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), the meeting was attended by government delegates from Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. The initiative was launched within the framework of Resolution 13 of the Meeting of Ministers of Health of the Central American Countries, held in Belize in September 1997. Detailed plans of activities were prepared for each country for the period 1998-2001, for approval by the various ministries of health, while operational, epidemiological, and entomological research priorities were also agreed upon. Research projects to help improve disease control will be sponsored by TDR. The first meeting of the Technical Intergovernment Commission established to meet annually to assess progress in control activities will occur in October 1998 in Guatemala. Vector and infection rate data are briefly presented on each country represented at the meeting. PMID:12348564

  5. Behavioural biology of Chagas disease vectors.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Claudio Ricardo; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Lorenzo, Marcelo Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Many arthropod species have adopted vertebrate blood as their main food source. Blood is rich in nutrients and, except for the presence of parasites, sterile. However, this food source is not freely available, nor is obtaining it devoid of risk. It circulates inside vessels hidden underneath the skin of mobile hosts that are able to defend themselves and even predate the insects that try to feed on them. Thus, the haematophagous lifestyle is associated with major morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have accumulated throughout the evolutionary history of the various lineages of blood-sucking arthropods. These adaptations have significant consequences for the evolution of parasites as well as for the epidemiology of vector-transmitted diseases. In this review article, we analyse various aspects of the behaviour of triatomine bugs to illustrate how each behavioural trait represents a particular adaptation to their close association with their hosts, which may easily turn into predators. Our aim is to offer to the reader an up-to-date integrative perspective on the behaviour of Chagas disease vectors and to propose new research avenues to encourage both young and experienced colleagues to explore this aspect of triatomine biology. PMID:24473801

  6. VNI cures acute and chronic experimental Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Villalta, Fernando; Dobish, Mark C; Nde, Pius N; Kleshchenko, Yulia Y; Hargrove, Tatiana Y; Johnson, Candice A; Waterman, Michael R; Johnston, Jeffrey N; Lepesheva, Galina I

    2013-08-01

    Chagas disease is a deadly infection caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Afflicting approximately 8 million people in Latin America, Chagas disease is now becoming a serious global health problem proliferating beyond the traditional geographical borders, mainly because of human and vector migration. Because the disease is endemic in low-resource areas, industrial drug development has been lethargic. The chronic form remains incurable, there are no vaccines, and 2 existing drugs for the acute form are toxic and have low efficacy. Here we report the efficacy of a small molecule, VNI, including evidence of its effectiveness against chronic Chagas disease. VNI is a potent experimental inhibitor of T. cruzi sterol 14?-demethylase. Nontoxic and highly selective, VNI displays promising pharmacokinetics and administered orally to mice at 25 mg/kg for 30 days cures, with 100% cure rate and 100% survival, the acute and chronic T. cruzi infection. PMID:23372180

  7. A new era for chagas disease drug discovery?

    PubMed

    Keenan, Martine; Chaplin, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical trials investigating treatment of chronic indeterminate Chagas disease with two re-purposed azole anti-fungal drugs, posaconazole and ravuconazole, revealed their inferiority to the current standard-of-care benznidazole and highlighted the inadequacy of the existing pre-clinical testing paradigm for this disease. A very limited number of controlled clinical trials for Chagas disease have been conducted to date. The selection of these compounds for clinical evaluation relied heavily on pre-clinical data obtained from in vitro screens and animal studies. This chapter reviews the evolution of CYP51 as a target for Trypanosoma cruzi growth inhibition and also explores the impact of clinical trial data on contemporary Chagas disease drug discovery. Advances in pre-clinical profiling assays, the current compound landscape and progress towards the identification of new drug targets to re-invigorate research are reviewed. PMID:25727705

  8. The Costs of Preventing and Treating Chagas Disease in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Riquelme, Marianela; Guhl, Felipe; Turriago, Brenda; Pinto, Nestor; Rosas, Fernando; Martínez, Mónica Flórez; Fox-Rushby, Julia; Davies, Clive; Campbell-Lendrum, Diarmid

    2008-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to report the costs of Chagas disease in Colombia, in terms of vector disease control programmes and the costs of providing care to chronic Chagas disease patients with cardiomyopathy. Methods Data were collected from Colombia in 2004. A retrospective review of costs for vector control programmes carried out in rural areas included 3,084 houses surveyed for infestation with triatomine bugs and 3,305 houses sprayed with insecticide. A total of 63 patient records from 3 different hospitals were selected for a retrospective review of resource use. Consensus methodology with local experts was used to estimate care seeking behaviour and to complement observed data on utilisation. Findings The mean cost per house per entomological survey was $4.4 (in US$ of 2004), whereas the mean cost of spraying a house with insecticide was $27. The main cost driver of spraying was the price of the insecticide, which varied greatly. Treatment of a chronic Chagas disease patient costs between $46.4 and $7,981 per year in Colombia, depending on severity and the level of care used. Combining cost and utilisation estimates the expected cost of treatment per patient-year is $1,028, whereas lifetime costs averaged $11,619 per patient. Chronic Chagas disease patients have limited access to healthcare, with an estimated 22% of patients never seeking care. Conclusion Chagas disease is a preventable condition that affects mostly poor populations living in rural areas. The mean costs of surveying houses for infestation and spraying infested houses were low in comparison to other studies and in line with treatment costs. Care seeking behaviour and the type of insurance affiliation seem to play a role in the facilities and type of care that patients use, thus raising concerns about equitable access to care. Preventing Chagas disease in Colombia would be cost-effective and could contribute to prevent inequalities in health and healthcare. PMID:19015725

  9. Recent developments on umami ingredients of edible mushrooms: A review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Umami is a pleasant savory taste which has been attributed mainly to the presence of MSG-like amino acids and flavor 5’- nucleotides and widely used in food industry. Edible mushrooms have a peculiar umami taste. The umami taste makes the edible mushrooms palatable and adaptable in most food prepara...

  10. Voluntary Ingestion of Cortinarius Mushrooms Leading to Chronic Interstitial Nephritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jesus Calviño; Rafael Romero; Elena Pintos; Daniel Novoa; Dolores Güimil; Teresa Cordal; Javier Mardaras; Victor Arcocha; Xose M. Lens; Domingo Sanchez-Guisande

    1998-01-01

    ‘Magic mushrooms’ ingestion among the drug-using population has become a popular cheap way to get hallucinogenic effects which is not free of complications. One of these is acute renal failure related to Cortinarius genus intake. This one greatly resembles ‘magic mushrooms’ and confusion is possible for inexperienced collectors. We report the case of a young male ex-drug addict who developed

  11. Conversion of conifer wastes into edible and medicinal mushrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suki C. Croan

    Mushroom-producing white-rot fungi can be used to convert woodwaste into gour- met and medicinal mushrooms. White-rot fungi do not always readily colonize on coni- fer wood because of its extractives content. This study evaluated the resinous extractive content of loblolly pine ( Pinus taeda), ponderosa pine ( Pinus ponderosa ), and an un- known species of southern yellow pine before

  12. Crocipodin, a benzotropolone pigment from the mushroom Leccinum crocipodium (Boletales)

    E-print Network

    Trauner, Dirk

    Crocipodin, a benzotropolone pigment from the mushroom Leccinum crocipodium (Boletales) Lydia December 2010 Keywords: Crocipodin Mushroom pigment Benzotropolone Heck reaction Bolete a b s t r a c t Crocipodin, an unusual benzotropolone pigment, has been isolated from the fruit bodies of the mush- room

  13. NUTRIENT CONTENT AND NUTRIENT RETENTION OF SELECTED MUSHROOMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2003 Americans consumed 2.6 pounds per capita of mushrooms. While the white button mushroom remains a frequent component of many recipes, other varieties such as shiitake, enoki, maitake, oyster, portabella, and shiitake are also growing in popularity. To improve and expand the data in the US...

  14. Pharmacological Study of Oyster Mushroom ( Pleurotus Ostreatus ) Extract on Isolated Guinea Pig Trachea Smooth Muscle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. N. Schachter; E. Zuskin; S. Goswami; V. Castranova; U. Arumugam; M. Whitmer; P. Siegel; A. Chiarelli; J. Fainberg

    2005-01-01

    Mushroom farm workers suffer from respiratory symptoms during the farming of mushrooms. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) extract (OME) on isolated guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle in vitro. Isolated guinea pig tracheal tissue from 27 nonsensitized guinea pigs were studied. The OME was obtained from indoor mushroom growing fields and

  15. Antioxidant capacity and mineral contents of edible wild Australian mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X; Suwandi, J; Fuller, J; Doronila, A; Ng, K

    2012-08-01

    Five selected edible wild Australian mushrooms, Morchella elata, Suillus luteus, Pleurotus eryngii, Cyttaria gunnii, and Flammulina velutipes, were evaluated for their antioxidant capacity and mineral contents. The antioxidant capacities of the methanolic extracts of the dried caps of the mushrooms were determined using a number of different chemical reactions in evaluating multi-mechanistic antioxidant activities. These included the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, ferric ion reducing antioxidant power, and ferrous ion chelating activity. Mineral contents of the dried caps of the mushrooms were also determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. The results indicated that these edible wild mushrooms have a high antioxidant capacity and all, except C. gunnii, have a high level of several essential micro-nutrients such as copper, magnesium, and zinc. It can be concluded that these edible wild mushrooms are good sources of nutritional antioxidants and a number of mineral elements. PMID:22522306

  16. Semiflexible polymer brushes and the brush-mushroom crossover.

    PubMed

    Egorov, Sergei A; Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Milchev, Andrey; Binder, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    Semiflexible polymers end-grafted to a repulsive planar substrate under good solvent conditions are studied by scaling arguments, computer simulations, and self-consistent field theory. Varying the chain length N, persistence length lp, and grafting density ?g, the chain linear dimensions and distribution functions of all monomers and of the free chain ends are studied. Particular attention is paid to the limit of very small ?g, where the grafted chains behave as "mushrooms" no longer interacting with each other. Unlike a flexible mushroom, which has a self-similar structure from the size (a) of an effective monomer up to the mushroom height (h/a ? N(v), ? ? 3/5), a semiflexible mushroom (like a free semiflexible chain) exhibits three different scaling regimes, h/a ? N for contour length L = Na < lp, a Gaussian regime, h/a ? (Llp)(1/2)/a for lp ? L ? R* ? (lp(2)/a), and a regime controlled by excluded volume, h/a ? (lp/a)(1/5)N(?). The semiflexible brush is predicted to scale as h/a ? (lpa?g)(1/3)N in the excluded volume regime, and h/a ? (lpa(3)?(2))(1/4)N in the Gaussian regime. Since in the volume taken by a semiflexible mushroom excluded-volume interactions are much weaker in comparison to a flexible mushroom, there occurs an additional regime where semiflexible mushrooms overlap without significant chain stretching. Moreover, since the size of a semiflexible mushroom is much larger than the size of a flexible mushroom with the same N, the crossover from mushroom to brush behavior is predicted to take place at much smaller densities than for fully flexible chains. The numerical results, however, confirm the scaling predictions only qualitatively; for chain lengths that are relevant for experiments, often intermediate effective exponents are observed due to extended crossovers. PMID:25687784

  17. Epicuticular lipids induce aggregation in Chagas disease vectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alicia N Lorenzo Figueiras; Juan R Girotti; Sergio J Mijailovsky; M Patricia Juárez

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The triatomine bugs are vectors of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Aggregation behavior plays an important role in their survival by facilitating the location of refuges and cohesion of aggregates, helping to keep them safely assembled into shelters during daylight time, when they are vulnerable to predators. There are evidences that aggregation is

  18. Vector blood meals and Chagas disease transmission potential, United States.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Lori; Dorn, Patricia L; Hobson, Julia; de la Rua, Nicholas M; Lucero, David E; Klotz, John H; Schmidt, Justin O; Klotz, Stephen A

    2012-04-01

    A high proportion of triatomine insects, vectors for Trypanosoma cruzi trypanosomes, collected in Arizona and California and examined using a novel assay had fed on humans. Other triatomine insects were positive for T. cruzi parasite infection, which indicates that the potential exists for vector transmission of Chagas disease in the United States. PMID:22469536

  19. Experimental Vaccines against Chagas Disease: A Journey through History

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Monteón-Padilla, Víctor; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C.; Rios-Castro, Martha; Martínez-Cruz, Mariana; Carabarin-Lima, Alejandro; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, which is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is primarily a vector disease endemic in 21 Latin American countries, including Mexico. Although many vector control programs have been implemented, T. cruzi has not been eradicated. The development of an anti-T. cruzi vaccine for prophylactic and therapeutic purposes may significantly contribute to the transmission control of Chagas disease. Immune protection against experimental infection with T. cruzi has been studied since the second decade of the last century, and many types of immunogens have been used subsequently, such as killed or attenuated parasites and new DNA vaccines. This primary prevention strategy appears feasible, effective, safe, and inexpensive, although problems remain. The objective of this review is to summarize the research efforts about the development of vaccines against Chagas disease worldwide. A thorough literature review was conducted by searching PubMed with the terms “Chagas disease” and “American trypanosomiasis” together with “vaccines” or “immunization”. In addition, reports and journals not cited in PubMed were identified. Publications in English, Spanish, and Portuguese were reviewed.

  20. Pathogenesis of Chagas' Disease: Parasite Persistence and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Hecht, Mariana M.; Guimaro, Maria C.; Sousa, Alessandro O.; Nitz, Nadjar

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Acute Trypanosoma cruzi infections can be asymptomatic, but chronically infected individuals can die of Chagas' disease. The transfer of the parasite mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircle to the genome of chagasic patients can explain the pathogenesis of the disease; in cases of Chagas' disease with evident cardiomyopathy, the kDNA minicircles integrate mainly into retrotransposons at several chromosomes, but the minicircles are also detected in coding regions of genes that regulate cell growth, differentiation, and immune responses. An accurate evaluation of the role played by the genotype alterations in the autoimmune rejection of self-tissues in Chagas' disease is achieved with the cross-kingdom chicken model system, which is refractory to T. cruzi infections. The inoculation of T. cruzi into embryonated eggs prior to incubation generates parasite-free chicks, which retain the kDNA minicircle sequence mainly in the macrochromosome coding genes. Crossbreeding transfers the kDNA mutations to the chicken progeny. The kDNA-mutated chickens develop severe cardiomyopathy in adult life and die of heart failure. The phenotyping of the lesions revealed that cytotoxic CD45, CD8+ ??, and CD8?+ T lymphocytes carry out the rejection of the chicken heart. These results suggest that the inflammatory cardiomyopathy of Chagas' disease is a genetically driven autoimmune disease. PMID:21734249

  1. Chagas disease: control, elimination and eradication. Is it possible?

    PubMed

    Coura, José Rodrigues

    2013-12-01

    From an epidemiological point of view, Chagas disease and its reservoirs and vectors can present the following characteristics: (i) enzooty, maintained by wild animals and vectors, with broad occurrence from southern United States of America (USA) to southern Argentina and Chile (42ºN 49ºS), (ii) anthropozoonosis, when man invades the wild ecotope and becomes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi from wild animals or vectors or when the vectors and wild animals, especially marsupials, invade the human domicile and infect man, (iii) zoonosis-amphixenosis and exchanged infection between animals and humans by domestic vectors in endemic areas and (iv) zooanthroponosis, infection that is transmitted from man to animals, by means of domestic vectors, which is the rarest situation in areas endemic for Chagas disease. The characteristics of Chagas disease as an enzooty of wild animals and as an anthropozoonosis are seen most frequently in the Brazilian Amazon and in the Pan-Amazon region as a whole, where there are 33 species of six genera of wild animals: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Edentata (Xenarthra), Carnivora and Primata and 27 species of triatomines, most of which infected with T. cruzi . These conditions place the resident populations of this area or its visitors - tourists, hunters, fishermen and especially the people whose livelihood involves plant extraction - at risk of being affected by Chagas disease. On the other hand, there has been an exponential increase in the acute cases of Chagas disease in that region through oral transmission of T. cruzi , causing outbreaks of the disease. In four seroepidemiological surveys that were carried out in areas of the microregion of the Negro River, state of Amazonas, in 1991, 1993, 1997 and 2010, we found large numbers of people who were serologically positive for T. cruzi infection. The majority of them and/or their relatives worked in piassava extraction and had come into contact with and were stung by wild triatomines in that area. Finally, a characteristic that is greatly in evidence currently is the migration of people with Chagas disease from endemic areas of Latin America to non-endemic countries. This has created a new dilemma for these countries: the risk of transmission through blood transfusion and the onus of controlling donors and treating migrants with the disease. As an enzooty of wild animals and vectors, and as an anthropozoonosis, Chagas disease cannot be eradicated, but it must be controlled by transmission elimination to man. PMID:24402148

  2. Wild Mushroom Poisoning in North India: Case Series with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Nipun; Bhalla, Ashish; Kumar, Susheel; Dhiman, Radha K.; Chawla, Yogesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Mushroom is an important constituent of diet in many ethnic tribes in India. Ethnic Indian tribes are known to consume nearly 283 species of wild mushrooms out of 2000 species recorded world over. Although they are experts in distinguishing the poisonous from edible mushrooms, yet occasional cases of toxicity are reported due to accidental consumption of poisonous mushrooms. We report amanita like toxicity in a family after consumption of wild mushrooms resulting in fatal outcome. PMID:25755582

  3. Justice where justice is due: A posthumous Nobel Prize to Carlos Chagas (1879–1934), the discoverer of American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas' disease)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reinaldo B. Bestetti; Cláudia A. Martins; Augusto Cardinalli-Neto

    2009-01-01

    Working in the Brazilian backland, Chagas described a new disease. He discovered the etiologic agent, the vector, the reservoir, the acute stage, the several clinical aspects of the chronic stage (particularly the heart disease), role of autoimmunity in its pathogenesis, and anticipated the social impact of the disease. Chagas was nominated to Nobel Prize twice: in 1913, and in 1921.

  4. Acylhomoserine lactone production by bacteria associated with cultivated mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Prashanth, Shanmugam N; Bianco, Giuliana; Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Iacobellis, Nicola S

    2011-11-01

    The main bacterial pathogens of cultivated mushroom as well as mushroom-associated bacteria, which were isolated from Agaricus bisporus, Pleurotus ostreatus and Pleurotus eryngii mushroom niches, were evaluated for the production of N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) by using four bioreporters. Furthermore, identification of AHLs by LC-ESI-FTICR MS was performed on culture filtrates of selected pathogens and mushroom-associated bacteria strains, which resulted in inducing at least one of the four bioreporters. Strains of Burkolderia gladioli pv. agariciola, Pseudomonas agarici and Pseudomonas gingeri, but not those of Pseudomonas tolaasii and Pseudomonas reactans, produced an array of AHLs depending on the strain. This is the first report of AHL production by mushroom bacterial pathogens. Forty-four of 236 bacterial isolates obtained from different niches of cultivated mushrooms, in part identified by the Biolog identification system, were demonstrated to produce AHLs. Among them, seven mushroom-associated bacterial species were for the first time demonstrated to produce the above signal molecules. In the culture filtrates of a certain number of isolates/strains the AHL-hydrolyzed forms were also present. The minimal signal inducing concentration (MSIC) of selected pure AHLs was also determined for the four bioreporters used in this study. PMID:21942309

  5. Radiocaesium and natural gamma emitters in mushrooms collected in Spain.

    PubMed

    Baeza, Antonio; Hernández, Santiago; Guillén, Fco Javier; Moreno, Gabriel; Manjón, José Luis; Pascual, Rosario

    2004-01-01

    Mushrooms can accumulate heavy metals in general, including radionuclides found in the nature. However, little attention has been paid to the radioactive content of mushrooms collected in Spain and the dose for the population due to their ingestion. To address this, we analysed the contents of 137Cs, 40K, 226Ra and 7Be present in different species of mushrooms, according to their genus and nutritional mechanism. We observed that mycorrhizal mushrooms accumulate 137Cs more than saprophytes, and vice versa for 7Be. 40K and 226Ra are accumulated to the same degree by the two groups of mushrooms. We estimated the dose due to ingestion of mushrooms in Spain to be 2 microSv/year, and the contribution of 40K and 226Ra to be generally greater than that of 137Cs. The contribution of 137Cs to the dose was calculated by taking into account the results of an experiment carried out under the controlled laboratory conditions, which showed that approximately 98% of 134Cs was associated with the readily digestible fraction of the mushrooms. PMID:14654275

  6. Harm potential of magic mushroom use: a review.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Opperhuizen, Antoon; van den Brink, Wim

    2011-04-01

    In 2007, the Minister of Health of the Netherlands requested the CAM (Coordination point Assessment and Monitoring new drugs) to assess the overall risk of magic mushrooms. The present paper is an updated redraft of the review, written to support the assessment by CAM experts. It summarizes the literature on physical or psychological dependence, acute and chronic toxicity, risk for public health and criminal aspects related to the consumption of magic mushrooms. In the Netherlands, the prevalence of magic mushroom use was declining since 2000 (last year prevalence of 6.3% in 2000 to 2.9% in 2005), and further declined after possession and use became illegal in December 2008. The CAM concluded that the physical and psychological dependence potential of magic mushrooms was low, that acute toxicity was moderate, chronic toxicity low and public health and criminal aspects negligible. The combined use of mushrooms and alcohol and the quality of the setting in which magic mushrooms are used deserve, however, attention. In conclusion, the use of magic mushrooms is relatively safe as only few and relatively mild adverse effects have been reported. The low prevalent but unpredictable provocation of panic attacks and flash-backs remain, however, a point of concern. PMID:21256914

  7. Wild growing mushrooms for the Edible City? Cadmium and lead content in edible mushrooms harvested within the urban agglomeration of Berlin, Germany.

    PubMed

    Schlecht, Martin Thomas; Säumel, Ina

    2015-09-01

    Health effects by consuming urban garden products are discussed controversially due to high urban pollution loads. We sampled wild edible mushrooms of different habitats and commercial mushroom cultivars exposed to high traffic areas within Berlin, Germany. We determined the content of cadmium and lead in the fruiting bodies and analysed how the local setting shaped the concentration patterns. EU standards for cultivated mushrooms were exceeded by 86% of the wild mushroom samples for lead and by 54% for cadmium but not by mushroom cultures. We revealed significant differences in trace metal content depending on species, trophic status, habitat and local traffic burden. Higher overall traffic burden increased trace metal content in the biomass of wild mushrooms, whereas cultivated mushrooms exposed to inner city high traffic areas had significantly lower trace metal contents. Based on these we discuss the consequences for the consumption of mushrooms originating from urban areas. PMID:26016949

  8. Clinical importance of toxin concentration in Amanita verna mushroom.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ismail; Kaya, Ertugrul; Sinirlioglu, Zeynep Aydin; Bayram, Recep; Surmen, Mustafa Gani; Colakoglu, Serdar

    2014-09-01

    Poisoning from Amanita group of mushrooms comprises approximately 3% of all poisonings in our country and their being responsible for nearly the entire fatal mushroom poisonings makes them important. These mushrooms contain primarily two types of toxins, amatoxins and phallotoxins. Phallotoxins have a more limited toxicity potential and they primarily consist of phalloidin (PHN) and phallacidin (PCN). Amatoxins, on the other hand, are very toxic and they primarily consist of alpha-amanitin (AA), beta-amanitin (BA) and gamma-amanitin (GA). Toxin levels can vary among various species, even among varieties of the same species, of Amanita mushroom family. Revealing the differences between the toxin compositions of the Amanita species that grow in our region may contribute to the clinics of poisonings. Our study aims at showing in detail the toxin levels in various parts of Amanita verna mushroom. A. verna mushrooms needed for toxin analysis were collected from Kozak Plateau near Ayvalik county of Bal?kesir, Turkey in April 2013. The mushrooms were divided into their parts as pileus, gills, stripe and volva. Following the procedures required before the analysis, the AA, BA, GA, PHN and PCN levels were measured using the RP-HPLC method. While the lowest level of amatoxin was in the volva of the mushroom, the highest was measured in the gills. This was followed by pileus and stripe where the levels were close to each other. Similarly, the highest level of phallotoxin was measured in the gills. Gamma toxin and phalloidin were at lower amounts than the other toxins. A. verna is frequently confused with edible mushrooms with white caps due to its macroscopic similarity. If just one of them is eaten by mistake by an adult person with no mushroom experience, it can easily poison them. The amount of amatoxin is more as compared to Amanita phalloides and A. phalloides var. alba. Particularly, the AA and BA levels are approximately three times higher, whereas GA levels are lower. Similarly, the level of PCN is approximately four times higher as compared to A. phalloides and A. phalloides var. alba; by contrast, the level of PNH is about a half of theirs. In summary, it can be said that A. verna is a more toxic mushroom than A. phalloides and has a higher rate of mortality. With our study, the amatoxin and phallotoxin concentrations and distribution in A. verna mushrooms were shown in detail for the first time and it would be useful to carry out more similar studies with other members of Amanita family growing in various parts of the world. PMID:24911374

  9. Special Publication No. 2, A Bibliography On Chagas' Disease (1909-1969) 

    E-print Network

    Olivier, Margaret C.; Olivier, Louis J.; Segal, Dorothy B.

    1972-01-01

    . Region of Baixo Jaguaribe.) Rev. Brasil. Malariol., 17(2-3):149-158, Apr.-Sept. Alencar, Joaquim de; et al. 1962.-Estudos sobre a epidemiologia da doen?a de Chagas no Cear?. I. Dados preliminares. (Epide- miology of Chagas' disease in Ceara. I... epidemiologia da doen?a de Chagas no Ceara. II?Novos dados. (Epidemiology of Chagas* disease in Cear?. II. New Data.) Rev. Brasil. Malariol., 15(4): 551-565, Oct.-Dec. Alencar, Joaquim E. de; Fontenele, Zilmar Ferreira; Cunha Raimundo Vieira; and Sherlock...

  10. 75 FR 60076 - Certain Preserved Mushrooms from the People's Republic of China; Extension of Time Limit for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ...A-570-851) Certain Preserved Mushrooms from the People's Republic...order on certain preserved mushrooms from the People's Republic...2010. See Certain Preserved Mushrooms From the People's Republic...documents that Shandong Fengyu Edible Fungus Co., Ltd.,...

  11. 76 FR 4287 - Certain Preserved Mushrooms From the People's Republic of China; Extension of Time Limit for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ...order on certain preserved mushrooms from the People's Republic...2010. See Certain Preserved Mushrooms From the People's Republic...NSRs. See Certain Preserved Mushrooms From the People's Republic...reviews cover Shandong Fengyu Edible Fungus Co., Ltd. and...

  12. Understanding cultural significance, the edible mushrooms case

    PubMed Central

    Garibay-Orijel, Roberto; Caballero, Javier; Estrada-Torres, Arturo; Cifuentes, Joaquín

    2007-01-01

    Background Cultural significance is a keystone in quantitative ethnobiology, which offers the possibility to make inferences about traditional nomenclature systems, use, appropriation and valuing of natural resources. In the present work, using as model the traditional mycological knowledge of Zapotecs from Oaxaca, Mexico, we analyze the cultural significance of wild edible resources. Methods In 2003 we applied 95 questionnaires to a random sample of informants. With this data we integrated the Edible Mushroom Cultural Significance Index. This index included eight variables: frequency of mention, perceived abundance, use frequency, taste, multifunctional food use, knowledge transmission, health and economy. Data were analyzed in an inductive perspective using ordination and grouping techniques to reveal the behavior of species in a cultural multivariate dimension. Results In each variable the species had different conducts. Cantharellus cibarius s.l. was the species with most frequency of mention. Pleurotus sp. had the highest perceived abundance. C. cibarius s.l. was the most frequently consumed species. Gomphus clavatus was the most palatable species and also ranked highest in the multifunctional food index. Cortinarius secc.Malacii sp. had the highest traditional importance. Only Tricholoma magnivelare was identified as a health enhancer. It also had the most economic importance. According to the compound index, C. cibarius s.l., the Amanita caesarea complex, Ramaria spp. and Neolentinus lepideus were the mushrooms with highest cultural significance. Multivariate analysis showed that interviewees identify three main groups of mushrooms: species with high traditional values, frequent consumption and known by the majority; species that are less known, infrequently consumed and without salient characteristics; and species with low traditional values, with high economic value and health enhancers. Conclusion The compound index divided the cultural significance into several cultural domains and showed the causes that underlie this phenomenon. This approach can be used in cross-cultural studies because it brings a list with the relative position of species among a cultural significance gradient. This list is suitable for comparisons and also it is flexible because cultural variables can be included or removed to adjust it to the nature of the different cultures or resources under study. PMID:17217539

  13. Mushroom Lectins: Specificity, Structure and Bioactivity Relevant to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W.; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell–cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity. PMID:25856678

  14. The Edibility and Cultivation of the Oyster Mushroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenneman, James; Guttman, Mark C.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an enjoyable and fascinating experience that involves the cultivation of oyster mushrooms. By allowing students to participate in this process, the students are able to better understand the biology and utility of fungi. (ZWH)

  15. Biomedical effects of mushrooms with emphasis on pure compounds.

    PubMed

    Paterson, R Russell M; Lima, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms show great promise for disease treatments. They have been employed in the Orient and Occident for thousands of years, although the practice has persisted in the East. They remain highly valuable. Authentic human trials and pure compounds are emphasized in this review of the most current literature. Polysaccharides from the fungi appear effective in cancer treatments and low-molecular-weight compounds also attract much interest. However, reports of toxicity must be taken seriously. Prescriptions for mushrooms and preparations need to be given by qualified medical practitioners. The reason why these preparations are not more widely used in the West is related to problems of (A) intellectual property rights, (B) mass production, and (C) obtaining pure compounds that retain activity. Mushroom compounds require testing against infectious diseases such as those caused by bacteria, because the current antibiotics are failing from resistances. Overall, the future is assured for medicinal mushrooms. PMID:25355390

  16. Current situation and perspectives regarding human Chagas disease in midwestern of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Christiane Santos; dos Santos, José Eloy; Medeiros, Fernanda Alvarenga Cardoso; Furtado, Eliana; Dias, João Carlos Pinto

    2014-01-01

    Recognising the importance of Chagas disease in Brazil, Bambuí set up epidemiological surveillance for Chagas disease in 1974 and was the first municipality to do so. To ascertain the current epidemiology of Chagas disease in this municipality, 1.782 blood samples from the general population were analysed; 7.7% of samples were found to be seropositive for Chagas disease. A strong positive correlation between increasing age and Chagas disease was evident in both genders, with the highest prevalence in individuals aged over 60 years. Clinically, the cardiodigestive form of Chagas disease was the most common in these samples. These data confirm the interruption of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission, in parallel with a still important residual morbidity of Chagas disease in the county, thus supporting political decisions that will prioritise epidemiological surveillance and medical treatment of Chagas disease in the coming years. PMID:24831551

  17. Transmission of chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) by food.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Karen Signori; Schmidt, Flávio Luis; Barbosa, Rodrigo L; Guaraldo, Ana M A; Franco, Regina M B; Dias, Viviane L; Passos, Luiz A C

    2010-01-01

    In April 2009, the centenary of the discovery of the American trypanosomiasis, or Chagas disease, was celebrated. A hundred years after the discovery, little has been invested in diagnostics and treatment because the disease affects mainly poor people in developing countries. However, some changes in the epidemiology of the disease are of great importance today. Chagas disease transmitted through food is a public health concern in all areas where there is a reservoir of Trypanosoma cruzi in wild animals (e.g., mammals and marsupials) and/or where infected triatomine bugs are in contact with human food source items (especially fruits and vegetables). Recently, several outbreaks of illness related to the ingestion of food contaminated with T. cruzi have been recorded in Brazil, Colombia, and Venezuela. PMID:20610174

  18. Microbial community structure changes during oyster mushroom substrate preparation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Balázs Vajna; Adrienn Nagy; Enik? Sajben; László Manczinger; Nóra Szijártó; Zsófia Kádár; Diána Bordás; Károly Márialigeti

    2010-01-01

    Although oyster mushroom (Pleurotus spp.) is a valuable food, cultivated worldwide on an industrial scale, still very little is known about the microbial dynamics\\u000a during oyster mushroom substrate preparation. Therefore, the characterization of the microbial dynamics by chemical and biological\\u000a tools was the objective of this study. During substrate preparation, enzymatic digestibility of the substrate improved by\\u000a 77%, whereas the

  19. CHARITY: Chagas cardiomyopathy bisoprolol intervention study: a randomized double-blind placebo force-titration controlled study with Bisoprolol in patients with chronic heart failure secondary to Chagas cardiomyopathy [NCT00323973

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franklin R Quiros; Carlos A Morillo; Juan P Casas; Luz A Cubillos; Federico A Silva

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chagas' disease is the major cause of disability secondary to tropical diseases in young adults from Latin America, and around 20 million people are currently infected by T. cruzi. Heart failure due to Chagas cardiomyopathy is the main clinical presenation in Colombia. Heart failure due to Chagas' disease may respond to digoxin, diuretics and vasodilator therapy. Beta-adrenoreceptor antagonism seems

  20. Economic evaluation of Chagas disease screening in Spain.

    PubMed

    Imaz-Iglesia, Iñaki; Miguel, Lucía García-San; Ayala-Morillas, L Eduardo; García-Pérez, Lidia; González-Enríquez, Jesús; Blasco-Hernández, Teresa; Martín-Águeda, María Belén; Sarría-Santamera, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Although Spain is the European country with the highest Chagas disease burden, the country does not have a national control program of the disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of several strategies for Chagas disease screening among Latin American residents living in Spain. The following screening strategies were evaluated: (1) non-screening; (2) screening of the Latin American pregnant women and their newborns; (3) screening also the relatives of the positive pregnant women; (4) screening also the relatives of the negative pregnant women. A cost-utility analysis was carried out to compare the four strategies from two perspectives, the societal and the Spanish National Health System (SNHS). A decision tree representing the clinical evolution of Chagas disease throughout patient's life was built. The strategies were compared through the incremental cost-utility ratio, using euros as cost measurement and quality-adjusted life years as utility measurement. A sensitivity analysis was performed to test the model parameters and their influence on the results. We found the "Non-screening" as the most expensive and less effective of the evaluated strategies, from both the societal and the SNHS perspectives. Among the screening evaluated strategies the most efficient was, from both perspectives, to extent the antenatal screening of the Latin American pregnant women and their newborns up to the relatives of the positive women. Several parameters influenced significantly on the sensitivity analyses, particularly the chronic treatment efficacy or the prevalence of Chagas disease. In conclusion, for the general Latin American immigrants living in Spain the most efficient would be to screen the Latin American mothers, their newborns and the close relatives of the mothers with a positive serology. However for higher prevalence immigrant population the most efficient intervention would be to extend the program to the close relatives of the negative mothers. PMID:25917718

  1. Challenges and perspectives of Chagas disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD), also known as American trypanosomiasis, is caused by the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and affects an estimated 8 to 10 million people worldwide. In Latin America, 25 million people live in risk areas, while in 2008 alone, 10,000 CD-related deaths were reported. This review aimed to evaluate the challenges of CD control, future perspectives, and actions performed worldwide to control expansion of the disease and its impact on public health in Latin America. PMID:24354455

  2. Community Participation in Chagas Disease Vector Surveillance: Systematic Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fernando Abad-Franch; M. Celeste Vega; Miriam S. Rolón; Walter S. Santos; Antonieta Rojas de Arias

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundVector control has substantially reduced Chagas disease (ChD) incidence. However, transmission by household-reinfesting triatomines persists, suggesting that entomological surveillance should play a crucial role in the long-term interruption of transmission. Yet, infestation foci become smaller and harder to detect as vector control proceeds, and highly sensitive surveillance methods are needed. Community participation (CP) and vector-detection devices (VDDs) are both thought

  3. Biologically Inspired Mushroom-Shaped Adhesive Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heepe, Lars; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-07-01

    Adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon with great importance in technology, in our everyday life, and in nature. In this article, we review physical interactions that resist the separation of two solids in contact. By using examples of biological attachment systems, we summarize and categorize various principles that contribute to the so-called gecko effect. Emphasis is placed on the contact geometry and in particular on the mushroom-shaped geometry, which is observed in long-term biological adhesive systems. Furthermore, we report on artificial model systems with this bio-inspired geometry and demonstrate that surface microstructures with this geometry are promising candidates for technical applications, in which repeatable, reversible, and residue-free adhesion under different environmental conditions—such as air, fluid, and vacuum—is required. Various applications in robotic systems and in industrial pick-and-place processes are discussed.

  4. Terpenoids and sterols from some Japanese mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Yaoita, Yasunori; Kikuchi, Masao; Machida, Koichi

    2014-03-01

    Over the past twenty years, our research group has been studying the chemical constituents of mushrooms. From nineteen species, namely, Amanita virgineoides Bas (Amanitaceae), Daedaleopsis tricolor (Bull.: Fr.) Bond. et Sing. (Polyporaceae), Grifolafrondosa (Fr.) S. F. Gray (Polyporaceae), Hericium erinaceum (Bull.: Fr.) Pers. (Hericiaceae), Hypsizigus marmoreus (Peck) Bigelow (Tricholomataceae), Lactarius piperatus (Scop.: Fr.) S. F. Gray (Russulaceae), Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Sing. (Pleurotaceae), Lyophyllyum connatum (Schum.: Fr.) Sing. (Tricholomataceae), Naematoloma sublateritium (Fr.) Karst. (Strophariaceae), Ompharia lapidescens Schroeter (Polyporaceae), Panellus serotinus (Pers.: Fr.) Kuhn. (Tricholomataceae), Pholiota nameko (T. Ito) S. Ito et Imai in Imai (Strophariaceae), Pleurotus eringii (DC.: Fr.) Quel. (Pleurotaceae), Polyporus umbellatus Fries (Polyporaceae), Russula delica Fr. (Russulaceae), Russula sanguinea (Bull.) Fr. (Russulaceae), Sarcodon aspratus (Berk.) S. Ito (Thelephoraceae), Tricholoma matsutake (S. Ito et Imai) Sing. (Tricholomataceae), and Tricholomaportentosum (Fr.) Quel. (Tricholomataceae), we isolated eight new sesquiterpenoids, six new meroterpenoids, three new triterpenoids, and twenty eight new sterols. In this review, structural features of these new compounds are discussed. PMID:24689228

  5. Cellular and physiological effects of Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi).

    PubMed

    Sliva, Daniel

    2004-10-01

    In Asia, a variety of dietary products have been used for centuries as popular remedies to prevent or treat different diseases. A large number of herbs and extracts from medicinal mushrooms are used for the treatment of diseases. Mushrooms such as Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi), Lentinus edodes (Shiitake), Grifola frondosa (Maitake), Hericium erinaceum (Yamabushitake), and Inonotus obliquus (Chaga) have been collected and consumed in China, Korea, and Japan for centuries. Until recently, these mushrooms were largely unknown in the West and were considered 'fungi' without any nutritional value. However, most mushrooms are rich in vitamins, fiber, and amino acids and low in fat, cholesterol, and calories. These mushrooms contain a large variety of biologically active polysaccharides with immunostimulatory properties, which contribute to their anticancer effects. Furthermore, other bioactive substances, including triterpenes, proteins, lipids, cerebrosides, and phenols, have been identified and characterized in medicinal mushrooms. This review summarizes the biological effects of Ganoderma lucidum upon specific signaling molecules and pathways, which are responsible for its therapeutic effects. PMID:15544548

  6. Heart transplantation for Chagas cardiomyopathy in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kransdorf, E P; Czer, L S C; Luthringer, D J; Patel, J K; Montgomery, S P; Velleca, A; Mirocha, J; Zakowski, P C; Zabner, R; Gaultier, C R; Qvarnstrom, Y; Benedict, T; Steurer, F; Bosserman, E; Paddock, C D; Rafiei, M; Kobashigawa, J A

    2013-12-01

    Since an initial case in 2006, we noted multiple patients undergoing heart transplantation (HTx) for Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC) at our transplant program. The clinical characteristics, laboratory results and outcomes of patients with CC undergoing HTx in the United States have not been reported previously. In 2010, we implemented a systematic screening and management program for patients undergoing HTx for CC. Before HTx, all patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy who were born in a Chagas disease endemic country were screened for Trypanosoma cruzi (TC) infection with serology. After HTx, monitoring for TC reactivation was performed using clinical visits, echocardiography, endomyocardial biopsy and serial whole blood polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. Between June 2006 and January 2012, 11 patients underwent HTx for CC. One patient was empirically treated due to the presence of TC amastigotes in explanted cardiac tissue. Two patients experienced allograft dysfunction due to TC reactivation and three patients experienced subclinical reactivation (positive PCR results), which were treated. Chagas disease is a common cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in patients from endemic countries undergoing HTx at a transplant program in the United States. Reactivation is common after transplantation and can cause adverse outcomes. PMID:24165397

  7. Opportunity Cost for Early Treatment of Chagas Disease in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Janine M.; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Sanchez-González, Gilberto; Peña-Nieves, Adriana; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Background Given current neglect for Chagas disease in public health programs in Mexico, future healthcare and economic development policies will need a more robust model to analyze costs and impacts of timely clinical attention of infected populations. Methodology/Principal Findings A Markov decision model was constructed to simulate the natural history of a Chagas disease cohort in Mexico and to project the associated short and long-term clinical outcomes and corresponding costs. The lifetime cost for a timely diagnosed and treated Chagas disease patient is US$ 10,160, while the cost for an undiagnosed individual is US$ 11,877. The cost of a diagnosed and treated case increases 24-fold from early acute to indeterminate stage. The major cost component for lifetime cost was working days lost, between 44% and 75%, depending on the program scenario for timely diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions/Significance In the long term, it is cheaper to diagnose and treat chagasic patients early, instead of doing nothing. This finding by itself argues for the need to shift current policy, in order to prioritize and attend this neglected disease for the benefit of social and economic development, which implies including treatment drugs in the national formularies. Present results are even more relevant, if one considers that timely diagnosis and treatment can arrest clinical progression and enhance a chronic patient's quality of life. PMID:24743112

  8. Pathogenesis of Chagas disease: time to move on

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Tyler, Kevin M.; Brant, Fatima; Esper, Lisia; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. The contributions of parasite and immune system for disease pathogenesis remain unresolved and controversial. The possibility that Chagas disease was an autoimmune progression triggered by T. cruzi infection led some to question the benefit of treating chronically T. cruzi-infected persons with drugs. Furthermore, it provided the rationale for not investing in research aimed at a vaccine which might carry a risk of inducing autoimmunity or exacerbating inflammation. This viewpoint was adopted by cash-strapped health systems in the developing economies where the disease is endemic and has been repeatedly challenged by researchers and clinicians in recent years and there is now a considerable body of evidence and broad consensus that parasite persistence is requisite for pathogenesis and that antiparasitic immunity can be protective against T. cruzi pathogenesis without eliciting autoimmune pathology. Thus, treatment of chronically infected patients is likely to yield positive outcomes and efforts to understand immunity and vaccine development should be recognized as a priority area of research for Chagas disease. PMID:22201990

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas' Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Caryn; Kjos, Sonia; Yabsley, Michael J.; Montgomery, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and causes potentially life-threatening disease of the heart and gastrointestinal tract. The southern half of the United States contains enzootic cycles of T. cruzi, involving 11 recognized triatomine vector species. The greatest vector diversity and density occur in the western United States, where woodrats are the most common reservoir; other rodents, raccoons, skunks, and coyotes are also infected with T. cruzi. In the eastern United States, the prevalence of T. cruzi is highest in raccoons, opossums, armadillos, and skunks. A total of 7 autochthonous vector-borne human infections have been reported in Texas, California, Tennessee, and Louisiana; many others are thought to go unrecognized. Nevertheless, most T. cruzi-infected individuals in the United States are immigrants from areas of endemicity in Latin America. Seven transfusion-associated and 6 organ donor-derived T. cruzi infections have been documented in the United States and Canada. As improved control of vector- and blood-borne T. cruzi transmission decreases the burden in countries where the disease is historically endemic and imported Chagas' disease is increasingly recognized outside Latin America, the United States can play an important role in addressing the altered epidemiology of Chagas' disease in the 21st century. PMID:21976603

  10. Can mushrooms help save the world? Interview by Bonnie J. Horrigan.

    PubMed

    Stamets, Paul

    2006-03-01

    Paul Stamets, founder and director of Fungi Perfecti, LLC., and director of the Fungi Perfecti Research Laboratories (www.fungi.com), has been a mycologist and mushroom enthusiast for more than 30 years. A pioneer in the cultivation of edible and medicinal mushrooms, he is credited with the discovery of four new mushroom species. Stamets is the author of five books on mushroom cultivation, use, and identification, including MycoMedicinals: An Informational Treatise on Mushrooms; Psilocybin Mushrooms of the World; Growing Gourmet and Medicinal Mushrooms; Mushroom Cultivator; Psilocybe Mushrooms & Their Allies; and his most recent one Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World. Stamets holds a vision of a deeply interconnected world environment and firmly believes that a greater knowledge of fungi can solve many of the world's pollution problems as well as some of the world's health problems. He has a strong interest in saving the old growth forests of the Pacific Northwest where many ancient species of mushrooms can be found. A dedicated explorer with a passion to preserve, protect, and clone as many ancestral strains of mushrooms as possible, he was the 1998 recipient of the Collective Heritage Institute's Bioneers Award and the 1999 recipient of the Founder of a New Northwest Award from the Pacific Rim Association of Resource Conservation and Development Councils. EXPLORE interviewed Stamets at his home and mushroom farms near Seattle, Washington, in the summer of 2005. PMID:16781630

  11. Perioperative management of a patient with Chagas disease having mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Robert S; Leckie, Steven; Mahmood, Feroze

    2009-06-01

    A patient with advanced Chagas disease presented with symptoms attributable to dilated cardiomyopathy and mitral regurgitation. Although esophageal involvement is part of the constellation of findings in Chagas, transesophageal echocardiography was safely used to guide the mitral valve surgery. PMID:19502028

  12. Effect of isosorbide dinitrate on gastroesophageal reflux in healthy volunteers and patients with Chagas' disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. M. Matsuda; R. B. Oliveira; R. O. Dantas; N. Iazigi

    1995-01-01

    The effect of isosorbide dinitrate (ISD) on gastroesophageal reflux and gastric emptying during the 24-min period following a liquid meal was studied in healthy volunteers, Chagas' disease patients with normal esophageal motility (CD-1 group), and Chagas' disease patients with esophageal dysmotility (CD-2 group) with dynamic scintigraphy. At random, on two separate days, the subjects received 5 mg isosorbide dinitrate or

  13. Small fiber neuropathy in the chronic phase of Chagas disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nolano, Maria; Provitera, V; Manganelli, F; Pagano, A; Perretti, A; Santoro, L

    2013-06-01

    We describe the occurrence of small fiber neuropathy in a patient affected by Chagas disease in the indeterminate phase. After the exclusion of all the possible etiologies of small fiber neuropathy, the disorder was considered related to Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Although a peripheral involvement has been described in Chagas disease, this is the first report of a selective involvement of small fibers. PMID:23475268

  14. EVALUATION OF THE WESTERN BLOT IN THE CONFIRMATORY SEROLOGIC DIAGNOSIS OF CHAGAS' DISEASE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    EDNA MARIA VISSOCI REICHE; HELIO OKAMURA; ELAINE CRISTINA TAGATA; JOSEVITOR JANKEVICIUS

    1998-01-01

    The Western blot method, using antigens from epimastigote forms of the Trypanosoma cruzi Y strain, was evaluated for the confirmatory diagnosis of Chagas' disease. Serum samples were obtained from 136 chagasic patients (Group I), 23 patients with inconclusive serologic results for Chagas' disease (Group II), 53 patients with other diseases (Group III), and 50 healthy individuals (Group IV). The Western

  15. Identification of phenotypic markers of B cells from patients with Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Fares, R C G; Correa-Oliveira, R; de Araújo, F F; Keesen, T S L; Chaves, A T; Fiuza, J A; Ferreira, K S; Rocha, M O C; Gomes, J A S

    2013-07-01

    Chagas disease was discovered more than a hundred years ago, but its pathogenesis is still not completely understood. Autoimmunity is one of the mechanisms shown to contribute to its pathogenesis, which may indicate an important participation of B lymphocytes. Patients with Chagas disease have shown increased percentage of B cells producing IL-10. However, there are no reports of the phenotypic markers of B cells producing IL-10 in patients with Chagas disease. For the first time in the literature, we evaluated the phenotypic profile of distinct markers of B cells from peripheral blood of noninfected individuals and patients with Chagas disease. Our results showed that patients with Chagas disease had a higher expression of CD21 and CD24 on the surface of CD19+ B cells, while CD43 and CD23 were expressed equally in all groups. Moreover, the expression of MHC-II (HLA-DR), CD80, CD86, caspase-3, granzyme B and intracellular IL-10 and TGF-? by CD19+ B cells was higher in patients with Chagas disease. The results of IL-10 production within CD19+ CD5+ CD1d+ B cells showed a higher percentage of this cytokine in patients with Chagas disease. Thus, our data bring a new knowledge about distinct markers of B cells in immune responses of Chagas disease. PMID:23607422

  16. Partial unilateral lesions of the mushroom bodies affect olfactory learning in honeybees Apis mellifera L.

    E-print Network

    Menzel, Randolf - Institut für Biologie

    Partial unilateral lesions of the mushroom bodies affect olfactory learning in honeybees Apis Toulouse cedex 04, France Keywords: brain lesion, cognition, honeybee, hydroxyurea, mushroom bodies been associated with olfactory learning and memory. Here we used hydroxyurea (HU) to treat honeybee

  17. Acute Chagas Disease: New Global Challenges for an Old Neglected Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Daniela V.; Gollob, Kenneth J.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and although over 100 years have passed since the discovery of Chagas disease, it still presents an increasing problem for global public health. A plethora of information concerning the chronic phase of human Chagas disease, particularly the severe cardiac form, is available in the literature. However, information concerning events during the acute phase of the disease is scarce. In this review, we will discuss (1) the current status of acute Chagas disease cases globally, (2) the immunological findings related to the acute phase and their possible influence in disease outcome, and (3) reactivation of Chagas disease in immunocompromised individuals, a key point for transplantation and HIV infection management. PMID:25077613

  18. Towards a Paradigm Shift in the Treatment of Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón de Noya, B.; Araujo-Jorge, T.; Grijalva, M. J.; Guhl, F.; López, M. C.; Ramsey, J. M.; Ribeiro, I.; Schijman, A. G.; Sosa-Estani, S.; Torrico, F.; Gascon, J.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for Chagas disease with currently available medications is recommended universally only for acute cases (all ages) and for children up to 14 years old. The World Health Organization, however, also recommends specific antiparasite treatment for all chronic-phase Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals, even though in current medical practice this remains controversial, and most physicians only prescribe palliative treatment for adult Chagas patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. The present opinion, prepared by members of the NHEPACHA network (Nuevas Herramientas para el Diagnóstico y la Evaluación del Paciente con Enfermedad de Chagas/New Tools for the Diagnosis and Evaluation of Chagas Disease Patients), reviews the paradigm shift based on clinical and immunological evidence and argues in favor of antiparasitic treatment for all chronic patients. We review the tools needed to monitor therapeutic efficacy and the potential criteria for evaluation of treatment efficacy beyond parasitological cure. Etiological treatment should now be mandatory for all adult chronic Chagas disease patients. PMID:24247135

  19. Physicochemical and Nutritional Characteristics of Organic Acid-Treated Button Mushrooms ( Agaricus bisporous )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richu Singla; Abhijit Ganguli; Moushumi Ghosh

    An effort was made to evaluate the effectiveness of organic acids to improve the quality and shelf life of button mushroom\\u000a (Agaricus bisporous). Shelf life of malic acid-treated mushrooms was improved to a significant level (p?mushrooms remained unaltered. Antioxidant levels of treated mushrooms

  20. Current findings, future trends, and unsolved problems in studies of medicinal mushrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Solomon P. Wasser

    2011-01-01

    The target of the present review is to draw attention to many critically important unsolved problems in the future development\\u000a of medicinal mushroom science in the twenty-first century. Special attention is paid to mushroom polysaccharides. Many, if\\u000a not all, higher Basidiomycetes mushrooms contain biologically active polysaccharides in fruit bodies, cultured mycelium, and\\u000a cultured broth. The data on mushroom polysaccharides are

  1. ?????????????????? ????????????????????????????????????????????????????? Species Diversity of Edible Mushrooms and Plants at Sakaerat Biosphere Reserve

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sujitra Kosol; Tantima Kumlung; Tanapak Inyod; Pongmanee Thongbai; Taksin Archavacom

    The study of species diversity and distribution of edible mushrooms and plants was carried out at Sakaerat Biosphere Reserve, Nakhon Ratchasima, by participatory action research during September 2004 to August 2005. Thirty species from 8 families of edible mushrooms were found in the deciduous dipterocarp forest, dry evergreen forest, and reforest plantation. The dominant species of mushrooms were Russula spp.(Fam.

  2. 75 FR 22369 - Certain Preserved Mushrooms From Chile, India, Indonesia, and the People's Republic of China...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ...Certain Preserved Mushrooms from Chile, India, Indonesia and the...duty orders on mushrooms from Chile, India, Indonesia, and the...See Preserved Mushrooms from Chile, China, India, and Indonesia...including but not limited to water, brine, butter or butter...

  3. 75 FR 31426 - Certain Preserved Mushrooms from Indonesia: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ...A-560-802) Certain Preserved Mushrooms from Indonesia: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping...order on certain preserved mushrooms from Indonesia for the period of review (POR), February...order on certain preserved mushrooms from Indonesia with respect to these companies....

  4. Mushroom chemical defense: Food aversion learning induced by hallucinogenic toxin, muscimol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott Camazine

    1983-01-01

    Wild animals eat fungi, yet mushroom poisonings in nature are unknown. The opossumDidelphis virginiana readily consumed the toxic mushroomAmanita muscaria, became ill, and then developed an aversion to the fungus. Both the illness and the aversion were due, in part at least, to the toxin muscimol. This appears to be the first demonstration of a mushroom chemical defense against fungivores

  5. Non-volatile taste components of several cultivated mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Gu, Zhen; Yang, Yan; Zhou, Shuai; Liu, Yanfang; Zhang, Jingsong

    2014-01-15

    Five species of dried mushrooms are commercially available in China, namely Agrocybe cylindracea, Pleurotus cystidiosus, Agaricus blazei, Pleurotus eryngii, and Coprinus comatus, and their nonvolatile taste components were studied. Trehalose (12.23-301.63mg/g) and mannitol (12.37-152.11mg/g) were considered as the major mushroom sugar/polyol in the five test species. The total free amino acid levels ranged from 4.09 to 22.73mg/g. MSG-like components contents ranged from 0.97 to 4.99mg/g. 5'-Nucleotide levels ranged from 1.68mg/g in P. eryngii to 3.79mg/g in C. comatus. Fumaric acid (96.11mg/g) in P. cystidiosus were significantly higher compared with the other mushrooms, and citric acid (113.13mg/g), as the highest of any organic acid among the five mushrooms, were found in A. blazei. Equivalent umami concentrations values in these five test mushrooms ranged from 11.19 to 88.37g/100g dry weight. A. blazei, C.comatus and A. cylindracea possessed highly strong umami taste. PMID:24054262

  6. Nucleotide Sequencing and Identification of Some Wild Mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sudip Kumar; Mandal, Aninda; Datta, Animesh K.; Gupta, Sudha; Paul, Rita; Saha, Aditi; Sengupta, Sonali; Dubey, Priyanka Kumari

    2013-01-01

    The rDNA-ITS (Ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacers) fragment of the genomic DNA of 8 wild edible mushrooms (collected from Eastern Chota Nagpur Plateau of West Bengal, India) was amplified using ITS1 (Internal Transcribed Spacers 1) and ITS2 primers and subjected to nucleotide sequence determination for identification of mushrooms as mentioned. The sequences were aligned using ClustalW software program. The aligned sequences revealed identity (homology percentage from GenBank data base) of Amanita hemibapha [CN (Chota Nagpur) 1, % identity 99 (JX844716.1)], Amanita sp. [CN 2, % identity 98 (JX844763.1)], Astraeus hygrometricus [CN 3, % identity 87 (FJ536664.1)], Termitomyces sp. [CN 4, % identity 90 (JF746992.1)], Termitomyces sp. [CN 5, % identity 99 (GU001667.1)], T. microcarpus [CN 6, % identity 82 (EF421077.1)], Termitomyces sp. [CN 7, % identity 76 (JF746993.1)], and Volvariella volvacea [CN 8, % identity 100 (JN086680.1)]. Although out of 8 mushrooms 4 could be identified up to species level, the nucleotide sequences of the rest may be relevant to further characterization. A phylogenetic tree is constructed using Neighbor-Joining method showing interrelationship between/among the mushrooms. The determined nucleotide sequences of the mushrooms may provide additional information enriching GenBank database aiding to molecular taxonomy and facilitating its domestication and characterization for human benefits. PMID:24489501

  7. Mushroom bodies regulate habit formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Brembs, Björn

    2009-08-25

    To make good decisions, we evaluate past choices to guide later decisions. In most situations, we have the opportunity to simultaneously learn about both the consequences of our choice (i.e., operantly) and the stimuli associated with correct or incorrect choices (i.e., classically). Interestingly, in many species, including humans, these learning processes occasionally lead to irrational decisions. An extreme case is the habitual drug user consistently administering the drug despite the negative consequences, but we all have experience with our own, less severe habits. The standard animal model employs a combination of operant and classical learning components to bring about habit formation in rodents. After extended training, these animals will press a lever even if the outcome associated with lever-pressing is no longer desired. In this study, experiments with wild-type and transgenic flies revealed that a prominent insect neuropil, the mushroom bodies (MBs), regulates habit formation in flies by inhibiting the operant learning system when a predictive stimulus is present. This inhibition enables generalization of the classical memory and prevents premature habit formation. Extended training in wild-type flies produced a phenocopy of MB-impaired flies, such that generalization was abolished and goal-directed actions were transformed into habitual responses. PMID:19576773

  8. [Emergent drugs (III): hallucinogenic plants and mushrooms].

    PubMed

    Burillo-Putze, G; López Briz, E; Climent Díaz, B; Munné Mas, P; Nogue Xarau, S; Pinillos, M A; Hoffman, R S

    2013-01-01

    An increase in the consumption of vegetable substances with a hallucinogenic effect has been observed. Some of these substances are associated with ancestral religious ceremonies, while many of them are legal or are partially regulated. Salvia divinorum is a powerful kappa receptor agonist, with dissociative and hallucinogenic properties, which start quickly and have a short duration. Kratom (Mytragyna speciosa) has mitragynine as its principal alkaloid, with stimulating effects at low doses (coke-like effect), and sedative effects (opiate-like effect) at high doses. Several deaths from its consumption have been detected. The consumption of hallucinogenic mushrooms appears in cyclic form, although there has been increase in their online offer. They are consumed in search of their hallucinogenic effects, above all those belonging to the family of psilocybes, which contain tryptamines with a hallucinogenic effect similar to LSD. Peyote (Lophophora psilocybes), a cactus rich in mescaline (trimetoxifeniletilamina), produces hallucinations of the five senses, and forms part of the religious culture of the North American Indians. Daturas, which are ubiquitous, produce anticholinergic symptoms and effects on the central nervous system (delirium, hallucinations, etc.), due to their high atropine and scopolamine content. Other substances used for their hallucinogenic effects include the drink known as ayahuasca, and seeds for preparing infusions like Ololiuqui, Morning Glory (Ipomoea violacea), Hawaian Baby Woodrose (Argyreia nervosa), Syrian Rue (Peganum harmala) and Iboga Rootbark (Tabernanthe iboga). PMID:24406363

  9. Aerodynamics of puffball mushroom spore dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador, Guillermo; Barberie, Alex; Hu, David

    2012-11-01

    Puffball mushrooms Lycoperdon are spherical fungi that release a cloud of spores in response to raindrop impacts. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we elucidate the aerodynamics of this unique impact-based spore-dispersal. We characterize live puffball ejections by high speed video, the geometry and elasticity of their shells by cantilever experiments, and the packing fraction and size of their spores by scanning electron microscope. We build a dynamically similar puffball mimic composed of a tied-off latex balloon filled with baby powder and topped with a 1-cm slit. A jet of powder is elicited by steady lateral compression of the mimic between two plates. The jet height is a bell-shaped function of force applied, with a peak of 18 cm at loads of 45 N. We rationalize the increase in jet height with force using Darcy's Law: the applied force generates an overpressure maintained by the air-tight elastic membrane. Pressure is relieved as the air travels through the spore interstitial spaces, entrains spores, and exits through the puffball orifice. This mechanism demonstrates how powder-filled elastic shells can generate high-speed jets using energy harvested from rain.

  10. Paleogene Radiation of a Plant Pathogenic Mushroom

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Martin P. A.; Bloomer, Paulette; Wingfield, Michael J.; Wingfield, Brenda D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The global movement and speciation of fungal plant pathogens is important, especially because of the economic losses they cause and the ease with which they are able to spread across large areas. Understanding the biogeography and origin of these plant pathogens can provide insights regarding their dispersal and current day distribution. We tested the hypothesis of a Gondwanan origin of the plant pathogenic mushroom genus Armillaria and the currently accepted premise that vicariance accounts for the extant distribution of the species. Methods The phylogeny of a selection of Armillaria species was reconstructed based on Maximum Parsimony (MP), Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Bayesian Inference (BI). A timeline was then placed on the divergence of lineages using a Bayesian relaxed molecular clock approach. Results Phylogenetic analyses of sequenced data for three combined nuclear regions provided strong support for three major geographically defined clades: Holarctic, South American-Australasian and African. Molecular dating placed the initial radiation of the genus at 54 million years ago within the Early Paleogene, postdating the tectonic break-up of Gondwana. Conclusions The distribution of extant Armillaria species is the result of ancient long-distance dispersal rather than vicariance due to continental drift. As these finding are contrary to most prior vicariance hypotheses for fungi, our results highlight the important role of long-distance dispersal in the radiation of fungal pathogens from the Southern Hemisphere. PMID:22216099

  11. Tropical diseases encountered in Canada: 1. Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Schipper, H.; McClarty, B. M.; McRuer, K. E.; Nash, R. A.; Penney, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    Chagas' disease, or South American trypanosomiasis, is an endemic South American disease now being seen in Canada in both acute and chronic forms. It is characterized by an initial parasitemia that elicits a brisk immune response. Evidence is mounting that the debilitating chronic form, which is characterized by cardiac and visceral organ failure, results from antigenic cross-reactivity between the parasite and the human host, which generates an aberrant, destructive, cell-mediated immune response. Diagnosis, treatment and potential areas for investigation are discussed. PMID:6767543

  12. When a misperception favors a tragedy: Carlos Chagas and the Nobel Prize of 1921.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Couto, Lucélio B; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto

    2013-11-20

    Carlos Chagas, the discoverer of Chagas' disease was nominated to the Nobel Prize in 1921, but none did win the prize in that year. As a leader of a young scientist team, he discovered all aspects of the new disease from 1909 to 1920. It is still obscure why he did not win the Nobel Prize in 1921. Chagas was discarded by Gunnar Hedrèn on April 16, 1921. Hedrèn should have made a written report about the details of his evaluation to the Nobel Committee. However, such a document has not been found in the Nobel Committee Archives. No evidence of detractions made by Brazilian scientists on Chagas was found. Since Chagas nomination was consistent with the Nobel Committee requirements, as seen in the presentation letter by until now unknown Cypriano de Freitas, it become clear that Chagas did not win the Nobel Prize exclusively because the Nobel Committee did not perceive the importance of his discovery. Thus, it would be fair a posthumous Nobel Prize of 1921 to Carlos Chagas. A diploma of the Nobel Prize, as precedent with Dogmack in 1947, would recognize the merit of the scientist who made the most complete medical discovery of all times. PMID:24063910

  13. Two Cases of Mushroom Poisoning by Podostroma Cornu-Damae

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin Young; Seok, Soon Ja; Song, Je Eun; Choi, Jung Ho; Choi, Jun Yong; Kim, Chang Oh; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung

    2013-01-01

    Podostroma cornu-damae is a rare fungus that houses a fatal toxin in its fruit body. In this case report, two patients collected and boiled the wild fungus in water, which they drank for one month. One patient died, presenting with desquamation of the palms and soles, pancytopenia, severe sepsis and multiple organ failure. The other patient recovered after one month of conservative care after admission. We found a piece of Podostroma cornu-damae in the remaining clusters of mushrooms. Mushroom poisoning by Podostroma cornu-damae has never been previously reported in Korea. PMID:23225831

  14. Probing Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (higher Basidiomycetes): a bitter mushroom with amazing health benefits.

    PubMed

    Batra, Priya; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Khajuria, Robinka

    2013-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (Lingzhi or Reishi) is known as a bitter mushroom with remarkable health benefits. The active constituents found in mushrooms include polysaccharides, dietary fibers, oligosaccharides, triterpenoids, peptides and proteins, alcohols and phenols, mineral elements (such as zinc, copper, iodine, selenium, and iron), vitamins, and amino acids. The bioactive components found in the G. lucidum mushroom have numerous health properties to treat diseased conditions such as hepatopathy, chronic hepatitis, nephritis, hypertension, hyperlipemia, arthritis, neurasthenia, insomnia, bronchitis, asthma, gastric ulcers, atherosclerosis, leukopenia, diabetes, anorexia, and cancer. In spite of the voluminous literature available, G. lucidum is used mostly as an immune enhancer and a health supplement, not therapeutically. This review discusses the therapeutic potential of G. luidum to attract the scientific community to consider its therapeutic application where it can be worth pursuing. PMID:23557365

  15. Selenium uptake by edible oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus sp.) from selenium-hyperaccumulated wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Poonam; Prakash, Ranjana; Prakash, N Tejo

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to produce selenium (Se)-fortifying edible mushrooms, five species of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sp.), were cultivated on Se-rich wheat straw collected from a seleniferous belt of Punjab, India. Total selenium was analyzed in the selenium hyperaccumulated wheat straw and the fruiting bodies. Significantly high levels (p<0.0001) of Se uptake were observed in fruiting bodies of all mushrooms grown on Se-rich wheat straw. To the best of our knowledge, accumulation and quantification of selenium in mushrooms has hitherto not been reported with substrates naturally enriched with selenium. The results demonstrate the potential of selenium-rich agricultural residues as substrates for production of Se-enriched mushrooms and the ability of different species of oyster mushrooms to absorb and fortify selenium. The study envisages potential use of selenium-rich agricultural residues towards cultivation of Se-enriched mushrooms for application in selenium supplementation or neutraceutical preparations. PMID:23535542

  16. High interleukin 17 expression is correlated with better cardiac function in human Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Luisa M D; Villani, Fernanda N A; Nunes, Maria do Carmo P; Gollob, Kenneth J; Rocha, Manoel O C; Dutra, Walderez O

    2013-02-15

    This study was designed to investigate whether the expression of interleukin 17 (IL-17) is associated with the indeterminate or cardiac clinical forms of Chagas disease and whether IL-17 expression can be correlated with patients' cardiac function. Our results demonstrated that cardiac Chagas patients have a lower intensity of expression of IL-17 by total lymphocytes and lower frequency of circulating T helper 17 cells. Correlative analysis showed that high IL-17 expression was associated with better cardiac function, as determined by left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular diastolic diameter values. Therefore, IL-17 expression can be a protective factor to prevent myocardial damage in human Chagas disease. PMID:23204182

  17. A Multi-species Bait for Chagas Disease Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Theo; Vitta, Ana C. R.; Lorenzo-Figueiras, Alicia N.; Barezani, Carla P.; Zani, Carlos L.; Lazzari, Claudio R.; Diotaiuti, Liléia; Jeffares, Lynne; Bohman, Björn; Lorenzo, Marcelo G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Triatomine bugs are the insect vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. These insects are known to aggregate inside shelters during daylight hours and it has been demonstrated that within shelters, the aggregation is induced by volatiles emitted from bug feces. These signals promote inter-species aggregation among most species studied, but the chemical composition is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present work, feces from larvae of the three species were obtained and volatile compounds were identified by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS). We identified five compounds, all present in feces of all of the three species: Triatoma infestans, Panstrongylus megistus and Triatoma brasiliensis. These substances were tested for attractivity and ability to recruit insects into shelters. Behaviorally active doses of the five substances were obtained for all three triatomine species. The bugs were significantly attracted to shelters baited with blends of 160 ng or 1.6 µg of each substance. Conclusions/Significance Common compounds were found in the feces of vectors of Chagas disease that actively recruited insects into shelters, which suggests that this blend of compounds could be used for the development of baits for early detection of reinfestation with triatomine bugs. PMID:24587457

  18. Strategies for the preparation and concentration of mushroom aromatic products.

    PubMed

    Villares, Ana; Guillamon, Eva; Mateo-Vivaracho, Laura; D'Arrigo, Matilde; Garcia-Lafuente, Ana

    2012-08-01

    Fungal aroma comprises at least seven chemical groups of volatile organic compounds, which are plain hydrocarbons, heterocycles, alcohols, phenols, acids and derivatives, carbonyls (aldehydes and ketones), and sulfur containing molecules. This aromatic blend provides the excellent sensory properties to produce and several strategies have been employed to create aromatic products having the aroma and taste of mushrooms and truffles. Nowadays, there are several procedures to obtain aroma concentrates. Among them, the simulation of mushroom aroma by the combination of the main substances responsible for the flavour could be an efficient strategy. Nevertheless, natural procedures are gaining more importance since the concentrate is not a synthetic product and the processes commonly involve the use of mushroom waste. In this field, the maceration with precursor molecules, such as linoleic acid, or different types of enzymes is commonly used in food industry. This article provides a wide view of the most common strategies to produce fungal aroma taking into account the main advantages and disadvantages they present. The article presents some promising patents on strategies for the preparation and concentration of mushroom aromatic products. PMID:22594661

  19. PMB113 California Mushrooms F2007 Course control number 70968

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    proper collection procedures for macrofungi We will not stress higher-level classification, as many of the families are currently in a state of flux. The same could also be said for the genera, but we feel VI: Modern Genera. David Largent and Timothy Baroni, Mad River Press. How to identify Mushrooms

  20. The Use of Mushroom Glucans and Proteoglycans in Cancer Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Parris M. Kidd

    Immunoceuticals can be considered as substances having immunotherapeutic efficacy when taken orally. More than 50 mushroom species have yielded potential immunoceuticals that exhibit anticancer activity in vitro or in animal models and of these, six have been investigated in human cancers. All are non-toxic and very well tolerated. Lentinan and schizophyllan have little oral activity. Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC)

  1. High explosive corner turning performance and the LANL Mushroom test

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.G.; Seitz, W.L.; Forest, C.A.; Harry, H.H.

    1997-09-01

    The Mushroom test is designed to characterize the corner turning performance of a new generation of less insensitive booster explosives. The test is described in detail, and three corner turning figures-of-merit are examined using pure TATB (both Livermore`s Ultrafine and a Los Alamos research blend) and PBX9504 as examples.

  2. Antimetastatic and Immunomodulating Effect of Water Extracts From Various Mushrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sung-Soo Ronald Han; Chong-Kwan Cho; Yeon-Weol Lee; Hwa-Seung Yoo

    2009-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate inhibitory effects against lung metastasis and promotion of splenocytes by water extracts from various mushrooms including Armillaria mellea, Grifola frondosa, Garnoderma frondosa, Codyceps militaris, Hericium erinaceus, Coriolus versicolor, Agaricus Blazei with Lycium Chinense Miller (known as M8). Analysis of carbohydrate using HPTLC showed that ?-glucan and pachyman were some of the major components of

  3. Effects of Thinning Young Forests on Chanterelle Mushroom

    E-print Network

    harvesters $3.6 million for the crop; the chanterelles were then marketed locally, na- tionally, and internationally. Pacific North- west chanterelles continue to contribute to a global trade in wild edible and monitoring of edible forest mushrooms, and Alexander et al. (2002) describe com- parisons of the value

  4. A Map of Olfactory Representation in the Drosophila Mushroom Body

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hui-Hao Lin; Jason Sih-Yu Lai; An-Lun Chin; Yung-Chang Chen; Ann-Shyn Chiang

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural coding for olfactory sensory stimuli has been mappednear completion in theDrosophila first-order center, but little is known in the higher brain centers. Here, we report that the antenna lobe (AL) spatial map is transformed further in the calyx of the mushroom body (MB), an essential olfactory associated learning center, by stereotypic connections with projec- tion neurons (PNs). We

  5. Original article Cultivation of shiitake mushroom, Lentinula edodes,

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Cultivation of shiitake mushroom, Lentinula edodes, in several lignocellulosic Lentinula edodes (IE-40 and IE-105) was evaluated on bar- ley straw, corn cob, corn stover, rice bran-98 % in sugarcane leaves and 36-37 % in bracts of pineapple crown. (© Inra/Elsevier, Paris.) Lentinula edodes

  6. Modeling horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the gut of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius prolixus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott Matthews; Vadrevu SreeHari Rao; Ravi V Durvasula

    2011-01-01

    Background  Paratransgenesis is an approach to reducing arthropod vector competence using genetically modified symbionts. When applied\\u000a to control of Chagas disease, the symbiont bacterium Rhodococcus rhodnii, resident in the gut lumen of the triatomine vector Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), is transformed to export cecropin A, an insect immune peptide. Cecropin A is active against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas

  7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC CHAGAS HEART DISEASE TEN YEARS AFTER TREATMENT WITH ANTI-TRYPANOSOMA CRUZINITRODERIVATIVES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LIANA LAURIA-PIRES; MARIA S. BRAGA; ANA C. VEXENAT; NADJAR NITZ; AUGUSTO SIMOES-BARBOSA; DOUGLAS L. TINOCO; ANTONIO R. L. TEIXEIRA

    2000-01-01

    A randomized ten-year follow-up study involving 91 Chagas patients and 41 uninfected controls was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of nitroderivative therapy. Anti- Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies were con- sistently lower one year after treatment than 10 years thereafter ( P 0.001). The blood of all treated and 93.7% of untreated Chagas patients yielded polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product from probes

  8. Safety assessment of the post-harvest treatment of button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) using ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Simon, R R; Borzelleca, J F; DeLuca, H F; Weaver, C M

    2013-06-01

    Wild mushrooms are an excellent source of vitamin D. The presence of vitamin D in mushrooms is attributed to sunlight exposure, which catalyzes the conversion of fungal ergosterol to vitamin D2 via a series of photochemical/thermal reactions. Mushroom growers now incorporate UV light treatments during processing to produce mushrooms with levels of vitamin D that compare to those in wild mushrooms. Presented herein is a comprehensive review of information relevant to the safety of introducing vitamin D mushrooms, produced using UV light technologies, to the food supply. Historical reference to the use of UV light for production of vitamin D is discussed, and studies evaluating the nutritional value and safety of vitamin D mushrooms are reviewed. Traditional safety evaluation practices for food additives are not applicable to whole foods; therefore, the application of substantial equivalence and history-of-safe-use is presented. It was demonstrated that vitamin D in mushrooms, produced using UV light technologies, are equivalent to vitamin D in mushrooms exposed to sunlight, and that UV light has a long-history of safe use for production of vitamin D in food. Vitamin D mushrooms produced using UV light technologies were therefore considered safe and suitable for introduction to the marketplace. PMID:23485617

  9. Chagas disease. What is known and what should be improved: a systemic review.

    PubMed

    Coura, José Rodrigues; Borges-Pereira, José

    2012-06-01

    This study consists of a broad review on what is known and what should be improved regarding knowledge of Chagas disease, not only through analysis on the main studies published on the topics discussed, but to a large extent based on experience of this subject, acquired over the past 50 years (1961-2011). Among the subjects covered, we highlight the pathogenesis and evolution of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, drugs in use and new strategies for treating Chagas disease; the serological tests for the diagnosis and the controls of cure the infection; the regional variations in prevalence, morbidity and response to treatment of the disease; the importance of metacyclogenesis of T. cruzi in different species of triatomines and its capacity to transmit Chagas infection; the risks of adaptation of wild triatomines to human dwellings; the morbidity and need for a surveillance and control program for Chagas disease in the Amazon region and the need to prioritize initiatives for controlling Chagas disease in Latin America and Mexico and in non-endemic countries, which is today a major international dilemma. Finally, we raise the need for to create a new initiative for controlling Chagas disease in the Gran Chaco, which involves parts of Argentina, Bolivia and Paraguay. PMID:22760123

  10. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Associated with Mushroom Worker’s Lung: An Update on the Clinical Significance of the Importation of Exotic Mushroom Varieties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John E. Moore; Rory P. Convery; B. Cherie Millar; Juluri R. Rao; J. Stuart Elborn

    2005-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis remains an important industrial disease in mushroom workers. It has a significant morbidity, and early diagnosis and removal from exposure to the antigen are critically important in its management. Recently, several new allergens have been described, particularly those from mushroom species originating in the Far East, which are of clinical significance to workers occupationally exposed to such allergens

  11. Flavor-enhancing properties of mushrooms in meat-based dishes in which sodium has been reduced and meat has been partially substituted with mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Myrdal Miller, A; Mills, K; Wong, T; Drescher, G; Lee, S M; Sirimuangmoon, C; Schaefer, S; Langstaff, S; Minor, B; Guinard, J-X

    2014-09-01

    The effects of beef substitution with crimini or white mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) on the flavor profiles of carne asada and beef taco blends were measured with a descriptive analysis panel. Sensory mitigation of sodium reduction through the incorporation of mushrooms was also investigated in the taco blends. The substitution of beef with mushrooms in the carne asada did not alter the overall flavor strength of the dish, but the incorporation of 50% or 80% ground mushroom in the beef taco blend did enhance its overall flavor as well as mushroom, veggie, onion, garlic and earthy flavors, and umami and sweet tastes. Overall flavor intensity of the 25% reduced-salt version of the 80% mushroom taco blend matched that of the full-salt versions of the 100% and 50% beef formulations, thus indicating that the substitution of 80% of the meat with mushrooms did mitigate the 25% sodium reduction in terms of the overall flavor impact of the dish, even if it did not quite compensate for the reduction in salty taste. This proof-of-concept study for the Healthy Flavors Research Initiative indicates that because of their flavor-enhancing umami principles, mushrooms can be used as a healthy substitute for meat and a mitigating agent for sodium reduction in meat-based dishes without loss of overall flavor. PMID:25124478

  12. Agrochemicals against malaria, sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis and Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Witschel, Matthias; Rottmann, Matthias; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto

    2012-01-01

    In tropical regions, protozoan parasites can cause severe diseases with malaria, leishmaniasis, sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease standing in the forefront. Many of the drugs currently being used to treat these diseases have been developed more than 50 years ago and can cause severe adverse effects. Above all, resistance to existing drugs is widespread and has become a serious problem threatening the success of control measures. In order to identify new antiprotozoal agents, more than 600 commercial agrochemicals have been tested on the pathogens causing the above mentioned diseases. For all of the pathogens, compounds were identified with similar or even higher activities than the currently used drugs in applied in vitro assays. Furthermore, in vivo activity was observed for the fungicide/oomyceticide azoxystrobin, and the insecticide hydramethylnon in the Plasmodium berghei mouse model, and for the oomyceticide zoxamide in the Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense STIB900 mouse model, respectively. PMID:23145187

  13. Immunopathologic and morphologic studies of skeletal muscle in Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Laguens, R. P.; Cossio, P. M.; Diez, C.; Segal, A.; Vasquez, C.; Kreutzer, E.; Khoury, E.; Arana, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Skeletal muscle biopsies from 21 individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi were studied my means of immunofluorescence, ultrastructural immunochemical, light and electron microscopic, and histochemical procedures. In 12 cases, definite morphologic alterations were found. These alterations were coincident with the presence of circulating antibodies against the plasma membrane of striated muscle fibers and endothelial cells (EVI antibodies). In almost all cases the lesions also presented autologous immunoglobulins bound to the plasma membrane of muscle fibers and endothelial cells. Interstitial inflammatory exudate was not observed in the diseased muscle. On the basis of these observations, it is suggested that the EVI antibody is related to some of the pathogenetic mechanism of skeletal muscle damage in Chagas' disease. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:125546

  14. Agrochemicals against Malaria, Sleeping Sickness, Leishmaniasis and Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Witschel, Matthias; Rottmann, Matthias; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto

    2012-01-01

    In tropical regions, protozoan parasites can cause severe diseases with malaria, leishmaniasis, sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease standing in the forefront. Many of the drugs currently being used to treat these diseases have been developed more than 50 years ago and can cause severe adverse effects. Above all, resistance to existing drugs is widespread and has become a serious problem threatening the success of control measures. In order to identify new antiprotozoal agents, more than 600 commercial agrochemicals have been tested on the pathogens causing the above mentioned diseases. For all of the pathogens, compounds were identified with similar or even higher activities than the currently used drugs in applied in vitro assays. Furthermore, in vivo activity was observed for the fungicide/oomyceticide azoxystrobin, and the insecticide hydramethylnon in the Plasmodium berghei mouse model, and for the oomyceticide zoxamide in the Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense STIB900 mouse model, respectively. PMID:23145187

  15. Learned host preference in a Chagas disease vector, Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Vinauger, Clément; Pereira, Marcos H; Lazzari, Claudio R

    2012-04-01

    It has been largely assumed that the individual experience of disease vector insects may affect host choice and, as a consequence, have an important influence on parasite transmission. In particular, it is speculated that vector insects should be able to learn and remember the most and/or less defensive hosts, shifting their preference accordingly. Nevertheless, despite the invested efforts in testing the capacity to learn and remember information of blood-sucking insects, only little conclusive information has been obtained hitherto. Recently, the ability of Rhodnius prolixus to associate a behaviourally neutral odour to the perspective of either obtaining a blood-meal or being punished has been demonstrated, the same odour becoming attractant or repellent for the bugs, respectively, according to the individual previous experience. The present work represents a step forward in the study of the cognitive abilities of Chagas disease vectors and their influence on host choice. We tested whether or not bugs bias their choice for a host based on the association of its odour with a negative experience. Our results show that whereas naïve bugs presented no preference when confronted to the odour of two different hosts, bugs previously exposed to the contingency of the odour of one host and a mechanical perturbation mimicking defensive behaviour, biased their preference towards the other host. This constitutes the first evidence of olfactory conditioning to host odours in triatomine bugs, vectors of Chagas disease and one of the few available up to date on haematophagous insects. The epidemiological significance of this finding is discussed. PMID:22138145

  16. [Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of different parts of wild growing edible mushrooms].

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Liu, Jian-hong; Song, Ding-shan; Dong, Qin; Ou, Jia-ming; Yang, Ai-ming

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, vibrational spectra of different parts of fruiting bodies of wild growing mushrooms were recorded with Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. It was different for the spectra of cap skin, gill, cap meat and stem of the same mushroom. The great differences were found between cap skin and other parts of the same mushrooms of Russula virescens and Russula rubra, whereas the spectra of mushroom Termitomyces albuminosus show greated differences between gill and other parts. These indicate variety in the chemical composition of different parts of the same fruiting body. The results suggest that the mushrooms could be identified at the species level by comparison of the vibrational spectra of different parts of fruiting bodies of mushrooms. PMID:16241053

  17. DNA-based geographic typing of the gourmet mushroom Tricholoma matsutake traded in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianping XuMatt; Matt Cadorin; Yun-Jiang Liang; Zhu L. Yang

    2010-01-01

    Tricholoma matsutake is among the most valuable mushrooms in the world, and natural populations of this species from different geographic regions\\u000a are priced very differently. To examine the geographic origins of ‘matsutake’ mushrooms traded in China, we analyzed the mushrooms\\u000a from two major production and trading regions in China, the Southwest and the Northeast, using a recently published retroelement-based\\u000a DNA

  18. Inhibiting Effect of Bioactive Metabolites Produced by Mushroom Cultivation on Bacterial Quorum Sensing-Regulated Behaviors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hu Zhu; Shou-xian Wang; Shuai-shuai Zhang; Chun-xu Cao

    2011-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to search for novel quorum sensing (QS) inhibitors from mushroom and to analyze their inhibitory activity, with a view to their possible use in controlling detrimental infections. Methods: The bioactive metabolites produced by mushroom cultivation were tested for their abilities to inhibit QS-regulated behavior. All mushroom strains were cultivated in potato-dextrose medium by large-scale submerged fermentation.

  19. Indian Medicinal Mushrooms as a Source of Antioxidant and Antitumor Agents

    PubMed Central

    A. Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil; K. Janardhanan, Kainoor

    2007-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms occurring in South India namely Ganoderma lucidum, Phellinus rimosus, Pleurotus florida and Pleurotus pulmonaris possessed profound antioxidant and antitumor activities. This indicated that these mushrooms would be valuable sources of antioxidant and antitumor compounds. Investigations also revealed that they had significant antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities. Thus, Indian medicinal mushrooms are potential sources of antioxidant and anticancer compounds. However, intensive and extensive investigations are needed to exploit their valuable therapeutic use. PMID:18398492

  20. Stimulation of Yield in the Cultivated Mushroom by Vegetable Oils1

    PubMed Central

    Schisler, Lee C.

    1967-01-01

    Supplementation of mushroom compost at spawning and at casing with various refined and crude seed oils resulted in 1 to 1.5 lb/ft2 increases in mushroom yield. Supplementation at casing with ground seeds or protein-oil combinations caused 2 to 2.5 lb/ft2 increases in mushroom yield. Further evidence is presented for a relationship between lipid metabolism and the initiation of fruiting in the cultivated mushroom, Agaricus bisporus (Lange) Sing. Preliminary results suggest the possible involvement of sterols in the fruiting stimulation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:16349718

  1. Studies Concerning the Accumulation of Minerals and Heavy Metals in Fruiting Bodies of Wild Mushrooms

    SciTech Connect

    Stihi, Claudia; Radulescu, Cristiana [Valahia University of Targoviste, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Sciences Department, Unirii street, 130082, Targoviste (Romania); Gheboianu, Anca; Bancuta, Iulian [Valahia University of Targoviste, Multidisciplinary Research Institute for Sciences and Technologies, Unirii street, 130082, Targoviste (Romania); Popescu, Ion V. [Valahia University of Targoviste, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Sciences Department, Unirii street, 130082, Targoviste (Romania); Valahia University of Targoviste, Multidisciplinary Research Institute for Sciences and Technologies, Unirii street, 130082, Targoviste (Romania); Academy of Romanian Scientist, Bucharest (Romania); Busuioc, Gabriela [Valahia University of Targoviste, Faculty of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnologies, Environmental Engineering Department, Unirii street, 130082, Targoviste (Romania)

    2011-10-03

    The minerals and heavy metals play an important role in the metabolic processes, during the growth and development of mushrooms, when they are available in appreciable concentration. In this work the concentrations of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd and Pb were analyzed using the Flame Atomic Absorption spectrometry (FAAS) together with Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) in 3 wild mushrooms species and their growing substrate, collected from various forestry fields in Dambovita County, Romania. The analyzed mushrooms were: Amanita phalloides, Amanita rubescens and Armillariella mellea. The accumulation coefficients were calculated to assess the mobility of minerals and heavy metals from substrate to mushrooms [1].

  2. Amphiphilic Pickering Emulsifiers Based on Mushroom-Type Janus Particles.

    PubMed

    Passas-Lagos, E; Schüth, F

    2015-07-21

    Iron-based mushroom-type Janus particles consisting of a poly(sytrene-co-divinylbenzene) and a silica moiety both with controllable morphologies were successfully synthesized on the gram scale and investigated as surfactants for Pickering emulsions. Two oil-water model systems, namely toluene-water and vegetable oil-water, were stabilized, giving mainly water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions. By varying several parameters, including Janus particle morphologies and the oil-water ratio, fine-tuning of the emulsion systems was possible; it was even possible to invert the continuous phase to an oil-in-water (o/w) system. Furthermore, the emulsions were stable against coalescence and sedimentation and could be easily separated by centrifugation or a strong magnet. The synthesized mushroom-type Janus particles are suitable for creating Pickering emulsions and can be used as building blocks for creating nanostructures with tailored properties for specific applications. PMID:26152905

  3. Soma siddhas and alchemical enlightenment: psychedelic mushrooms in Buddhist tradition.

    PubMed

    Hajicek-Dobberstein, S

    1995-10-01

    In the legendary biographies of some Buddhist adepts from the 2nd- and 9th-centuries there are some clues which can be interpreted to reveal that the adepts were consuming psychedelic Amanita muscaria, 'fly agaric', mushrooms to achieve enlightenment. This secret ingredient in the alchemical elixir they used to attain 'realization' was, of course, unnamed, in keeping with their vows to maintain the secrecy of their practices. Its identity was concealed behind a set of symbols, some of which appeared in the Soma symbol system of the Rg Veda, some other symbols possibly passed down from a time of earlier shamanic use of the mushroom in the forests of Northern Eurasia, and some symbols that may be unique to these Buddhist legends. The congruity of these sets of symbols from Northern and Southern Asian traditions will be shown to be reflected in the Germanic tradition in some characteristics of the Oldest God, Odin. PMID:8583800

  4. Evaluation of Lignocellulosic Wastes for Production of Edible Mushrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Rani; N. Kalyani; K. Prathiba

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of lignocellulosic wastes such as paddy straw, sorghum stalk, and banana pseudostem was investigated during\\u000a solid-state fermentation by edible mushrooms Pleurotus eous and Lentinus connotus. Biological efficiency of 55–65% was observed in paddy straw followed by sorghum stalk (45%) and banana pseudostem (33%)\\u000a for both fungal species. The activity of extracellular enzymes, namely cellulase, polyphenol oxidase, and laccase,

  5. Stability of agaritine - a natural toxicant of Agaricus mushrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Hajšlová; L. Hájková; V. Schulzová; H. Frandsen; J. Gry; H. C. Andersson

    2002-01-01

    Agaritine (N-(?-(+)-glutamyl)-4-hydroxymethylphenylhydrazine) is a phenylhydrazine derivative found in the cultivated Agaricus mushroom which is claimed to give rise to carcinogenic products when metabolized. The stability of a synthetic sample of agaritine was tested in water and methanol. In tap water kept in open vials, agaritine was totally degraded within 48h. Since agaritine degradation was less pronounced in closed than in

  6. Non-volatile taste components of several speciality mushrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeng-Leun Mau; Hsiu-Ching Lin; Jung-Tsun Ma; Si-Fu Song

    2001-01-01

    Four speciality mushrooms are commercially available in Taiwan, including Dictyophora indusiata (basket stinkhorn), Grifola frondosa (maitake), Hericium erinaceus (lion's mane), and Tricholoma giganteum (white matsutake). Protein contents ranged from 14.6 to 22.3%. Carbohydrate contents were high in basket stinkhorn and white matsutake (67.0 and 70.1%) and low in maitake and lion's mane (58.8 and 57.2%, respectively). Contents of total soluble

  7. Oscillating mushrooms: adiabatic theory for a non-ergodic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfreich, V.; Rom-Kedar, V.; Turaev, D.

    2014-10-01

    Can elliptic islands contribute to sustained energy growth as parameters of a Hamiltonian system slowly vary with time? In this paper we show that a mushroom billiard with a periodically oscillating boundary accelerates the particle inside it exponentially fast. We provide an estimate for the rate of acceleration. Our numerical experiments corroborate the theory. We suggest that a similar mechanism applies to general systems with mixed phase space.

  8. Composition variability of spent mushroom compost in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Jordan, S N; Mullen, G J; Murphy, M C

    2008-01-01

    Spent mushroom compost (SMC) has proven to be an attractive material for improving soil structure in tilled soils and increasing dry matter production in grassland soils, owing to its high organic matter content and availability of essential plant nutrients. Because of this, it is important to identify the variability in composition of SMC in order to evaluate its merit as a fertilizer/soil conditioner. For this reason, a study was carried out involving the analysis of SMC samples obtained from five mushroom growers using compost from each of the 13 mushroom composting yards currently operating in both Northern Ireland (5 yd) and the Republic of Ireland (8 yd). The selected parameters measured include dry matter, organic matter, total N, P and K, C/N ratio; plant-available P and K, pH, EC, total Ca, Mg, Na, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb; and cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin constituents. Yield of mushroom data were also collected from the selected growers. There were significant differences (P<0.05) within two compost production yards for some parameters, therefore, for the most part, the uniformity of SMC within each yard is relatively consistent. However, significant differences (P<0.05) were evident when comparing SMC obtained from growers supplied with compost from Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland independently, particularly among total and available phosphorus and potassium values. The results obtained show that, while SMC has fertilizer merit, its variability of composition must be taken into account when assessing this value. The variability of composition is also of particular interest in the context of recent emphasis on plant nutrient management in agriculture. PMID:17306529

  9. Microwave-assisted air dehydration of apple and mushroom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomas Funebo; Thomas Ohlsson

    1998-01-01

    Microwave-assisted hot-air dehydration of apple and mushroom was performed with low-power microwave energy. The purpose of the investigation was to compare hot-air drying and microwave-assisted hot-air drying. The air velocity, the microwave output power and the air temperature were the variables in the experiments. The microwave energy was supplied by either microwave applicators with transverse magnetic (TM) modes as dominant

  10. Evaluation of lignocellulosic wastes for production of edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Rani, P; Kalyani, N; Prathiba, K

    2008-12-01

    The degradation of lignocellulosic wastes such as paddy straw, sorghum stalk, and banana pseudostem was investigated during solid-state fermentation by edible mushrooms Pleurotus eous and Lentinus connotus. Biological efficiency of 55-65% was observed in paddy straw followed by sorghum stalk (45%) and banana pseudostem (33%) for both fungal species. The activity of extracellular enzymes, namely cellulase, polyphenol oxidase, and laccase, together with the content of cellulose, lignin, and phenols, was studied in spent substrates on seventh, 17th, and 27th days of spawning, and these values were used as indicators of the extent of lignocellulosic degradation by mushroom. Both the mushroom species proved to be efficient degraders of lignocellulosic biomass of paddy straw and sorghum stalk, and the extent of cellulose degradation was 63-72% of dry weight (d.w.), and lignin degradation was 23-30% of the d.w. In banana pseudostem, the extent of the degradation was observed to be only 15-22% of the d.w. for both lignin and cellulose. Preferential removal of cellulose during initial growth period and delayed degradation of lignin were observed in all three substrates. This is associated with decrease in activity of cellulase and polyphenol oxidase and increase in laccase activity with spawn aging in spent substrates. Thus, bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass by P. eous and L. connotus offers a promising way to convert low-quality biomass into an improved human food. PMID:18327544

  11. Mushroom harvesting ants in the tropical rain forest.

    PubMed

    Witte, Volker; Maschwitz, Ulrich

    2008-11-01

    Ants belong to the most important groups of arthropods, inhabiting and commonly dominating most terrestrial habitats, especially tropical rainforests. Their highly collective behavior enables exploitation of various resources and is viewed as a key factor for their evolutionary success. Accordingly, a great variety of life strategies evolved in this group of arthropods, including seed harvesters, gardeners, and planters, fungus growers, nomadic hunters, life stock keepers, and slave makers. This study reports the discovery of a new lifestyle in ants. In a Southeast Asian rainforest habitat, Euprenolepis procera is specialized in harvesting a broad spectrum of naturally growing mushrooms, a nutritionally challenging and spatiotemporally unpredictable food source. While unfavorable to the vast majority of animals, E. procera has developed exceptional adaptations such as a shift to a fully nomadic lifestyle and special food processing capabilities, which allow it to rely entirely on mushrooms. As a consequence, E. procera is the most efficient and predominant consumer of epigeic mushrooms in the studied habitat and this has broad implications for the tropical rainforest ecosystem. PMID:18633583

  12. Anti-inflammatory activity of mycelial extracts from medicinal mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yan; Zhu, Shuiling; Lu, Zhenming; Xu, Hongyu; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms have been essential components of traditional Chinese herbal medicines for thousands of years, and they protect against diverse health-related conditions. The components responsible for their anti-inflammatory activity have yet to be fully studied. This study investigates the anti-inflammatory activity of n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of mycelia in submerged culture from 5 commercially available medicinal mushrooms, namely Cephalosporium sinensis, Cordyceps mortierella, Hericium erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, and Armillaria mellea. MTT colorimetric assay was applied to measure the cytotoxic effects of different extracts. Their anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated via inhibition against production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) in murine macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Of the 20 extracts, n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts from C. sinensis, C. mortierella, and G. lucidum; chloroform extracts from H. erinaceus and A. mellea; and ethyl acetate extracts from A. mellea at nontoxic concentrations (<300 ?g/mL) dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced NO production. Among them, the chloroform extract from G. lucidum was the most effective inhibitor, with the lowest half maximal inhibitory concentration (64.09 ± 6.29 ?g/mL) of the LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate that extracts from medicinal mushrooms exhibited anti-inflammatory activity that might be attributable to the inhibition of NO generation and can therefore be considered a useful therapeutic and preventive approach to various inflammation-related diseases. PMID:25271860

  13. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of wild growing mushrooms and toadstools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moha?ek-Grošev, Vlasta; Božac, Romano; Puppels, Gerwin J.

    2001-12-01

    Recently, there has been increase of general interest in fungi because of the possible medical applications of their polysaccharide constituents called glucans, some of which are reported to have immunomodulatory properties. Since an extraction method can change the chemical composition of a substance, especially a delicate one such as fungal thallus, it is necessary and useful to know more about the studied matter in advance in order to choose the chemical procedure properly. We demonstrated the usefulness of vibrational spectroscopy in identifying different glucan types in various parts of intact fruiting bodies of Asco- and Basidiomycetes. Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used for obtaining vibrational spectra of spores and fruiting bodies of more than 70 species belonging to 37 different genera of wild growing mushrooms. The list of the bands in 750-950 cm -1 interval, assigned to ?- and ?-glucans, is provided for all species studied. Vibrational spectra in the interval 1000-1200 cm -1 could serve as an indicator of mushroom genus, although particular species cannot be identified spectroscopically. Great similarities in spectra of spores of the same genus, but different species, e.g. Tricholoma album and Trichloma sulphureum, were observed. On the other hand, spectra of cap, stalk and spores of the same mushroom show great differences, indicating variety in the chemical composition of different parts of the same fruiting body.

  14. Triatominae Biochemistry Goes to School: Evaluation of a Novel Tool for Teaching Basic Biochemical Concepts of Chagas Disease Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunha, Leonardo Rodrigues; de Oliveria Cudischevitch, Cecília; Carneiro, Alan Brito; Macedo, Gustavo Bartholomeu; Lannes, Denise; da Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate a new approach to teaching the basic biochemistry mechanisms that regulate the biology of Triatominae, major vectors of "Trypanosoma cruzi," the causative agent of Chagas disease. We have designed and used a comic book, "Carlos Chagas: 100 years after a hero's discovery" containing scientific information…

  15. A decision support system for the management of accidental mushroom and plant poisoning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mirca Zotti; Sandro Zappatore; Anna M Caviglia; Monica Tosa

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the discussion focuses on a decision support system to be used as a tool in the treatment of poisoning cases attributable to mushrooms, plants and animals. In this first release, attention is focused on the risks related to fungi. Problems involved with mushroom poisoning and identification are analyzed to highlight which elements or characters must be taken

  16. Identification of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers in the Laccase Gene of Shiitake Mushrooms (Lentinula edodes)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Ka, Kang-Hyeon; Kang, Ji Hyoun; Kim, Sangil; Lee, Jung Won; Jeon, Bong-Kyun; Yun, Jung-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    We identified single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in the laccase gene to establish a line-diagnostic system for shiitake mushrooms. A total of 89 fungal isolates representing four lines, including Korean registered, Korean wild type, Chinese, and Japanese lines, were analyzed. The results suggest that SNP markers in the laccase gene can be useful for line typing in shiitake mushrooms. PMID:25892919

  17. On the run: free-living mushroom corals avoiding interaction with sponges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, B. W.; de Voogd, N. J.

    2012-06-01

    Individuals of the free-living mushroom coral Heliofungia fralinae moved away when placed in contact with fragments of the toxic haplosclerid sponge Callyspongia (Euplacella) biru. This reaction was not evoked by three other sponge species. The experiment demonstrated that mobility of mushroom corals helps them to flee from organisms that secrete secondary metabolites in competition for space.

  18. In vitro effects of plant and mushroom extracts on immunological function of chicken lymphocytes and macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study was conducted to examine the effects of milk thistle (Silybum marianum), turmeric (Curcuma longa), reishi mushroom (Ganoderma lucidum), and shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes) on innate immunity and tumor cell viability. In vitro culture of chicken spleen lymphocytes with extracts ...

  19. Integrative Properties of the Pe1 Neuron, a Unique Mushroom Body Output Neuron

    E-print Network

    Menzel, Randolf - Institut für Biologie

    Integrative Properties of the Pe1 Neuron, a Unique Mushroom Body Output Neuron Ju¨rgen Rybak1 extrinsic neuron, the Pe1 neuron, connects the peduncle of the mushroom body (MB) with two areas. Each side of the bee brain contains only one Pe1 neuron. Using a combination of intracellular recording

  20. Evolution of gilled mushrooms and puffballs inferred from ribosomal DNA sequences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DAVID S. HIBBETT; E LIZABETH M. PINE; EWALD LANGER; G ITTA LANGER; MICHAEL J. DONOGHUE

    1997-01-01

    Homobasidiomycete fungi display many complex fruiting body morphologies, including mushrooms and puffballs, but their anatomical simplicity has confounded efforts to understand the evolution of these forms. We per- formed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of homobasi- diomycetes, using sequences from nuclear and mitochondrial ribosomal DNA, with an emphasis on understanding evolu- tionary relationships of gilled mushrooms and puffballs. Parsimony-based optimization of

  1. Biology, Life Table and Host Specificity of the Mushroom Pest, Brennandania Lambi (Acari: Pygmephoroidea)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jian-Rong Gao; Ping Zou

    2001-01-01

    Biology and life table parameters of Brennandania lambi (Krczal) were studied at different temperatures while feeding on white mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) mycelium cultured on mushroom compost. The duration of egg and larva development, preoviposition and oviposition period, female longevity, and the time to 50% mortality declined as temperature increased from 16 to 28°C. The threshold temperature of development (female) was

  2. Poisoning by Amanita phalloides ("deathcap") mushrooms in the Australian Capital Territory.

    PubMed

    Trim, G M; Lepp, H; Hall, M J; McKeown, R V; McCaughan, G W; Duggin, G G; Le Couteur, D G

    1999-09-01

    Amanita phalloides ("deathcap") mushrooms are widespread in south-eastern Australia. Seven patients presented to hospital in the Australian Capital Territory with poisoning by this mushroom between 1988 and 1998. Three developed hepatoxicity and one died. Because A. phalloides is becoming more widespread, increased community and medical awareness is needed to reduce the frequency and morbidity of poisoning. PMID:10495756

  3. 76 FR 56732 - Certain Preserved Mushrooms From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ...However, those comments were deemed to have new information and were returned to Blue...mushrooms covered under this order are the species Agaricus bisporus and Agaricus bitorquis...order are the following: (1) All other species of mushroom, including straw...

  4. Comparative study of ATR and transflection IR spectroscopic techniques for the analysis of hallucinogenic mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Koçak, A; De Cotiis, L M; Hoffman, D B

    2010-02-25

    This paper compares the use of ATR and transflection spectroscopic techniques for the qualitative analysis of psilocin extracted from hallucinogenic mushrooms and control spiked mushrooms. Both techniques gave comparable results and agreed with prior GC/MS analysis of the actual case samples. PMID:19969433

  5. Detection of Psilocybin Mushroom Analogs in Chocolate: Incorporating Current Events into the Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brandon Huskins; Christopher R. Dockery

    2009-01-01

    In this experiment, tryptamine is used as a psilocin analog and is dispersed onto a Fisher brand cellulose laboratory sponge to simulate dehydrated mushrooms. The resulting “mushroom” material is ground, molded into chocolate, and presented to student groups for real-world and applied analyses. Students isolate the tryptamine from the chocolate using their knowledge of drug chemistry, solubility, pH, extractions, etc.

  6. Protective Effect of Ganoderma (a Mushroom with Medicinal Properties) Against Various Liver Injuries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yihuai Gao; He Gao; Eli Chan; Wenbo Tang; Xiaotian Li; Jun Liang; Shufeng Zhou

    2005-01-01

    Medicinal plants represent one approach in the management of liver injuries due to various factors such as infection, toxification, and immune damage in Oriental society. One of these plants, Ganoderma (Ling Zhi, Reishi mushroom; Aphyllophoromycetideae), has been widely used for the treatment of hepatopathy of various etiologies. This article highlights the hepatoprotective activity of Ganoderma mushroom, with an emphasis on

  7. Characterization, Molecular Cloning, and Differential Expression Analysis of Laccase Genes from the Edible Mushroom Lentinula edodes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. ZHAO; H. S. KWAN

    1999-01-01

    The effect of different substrates and various developmental stages (mycelium growth, primordium appear- ance, and fruiting-body formation) on laccase production in the edible mushroom Lentinula edodes was studied. The cap of the mature mushroom showed the highest laccase activity, and laccase activity was not stimulated by some well-known laccase inducers or sawdust. For our molecular studies, two genomic DNA sequences,

  8. Identification of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers in the Laccase Gene of Shiitake Mushrooms (Lentinula edodes).

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Ka, Kang-Hyeon; Kang, Ji Hyoun; Kim, Sangil; Lee, Jung Won; Jeon, Bong-Kyun; Yun, Jung-Kuk; Park, Sang Rul; Lee, Hyuk Je

    2015-03-01

    We identified single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in the laccase gene to establish a line-diagnostic system for shiitake mushrooms. A total of 89 fungal isolates representing four lines, including Korean registered, Korean wild type, Chinese, and Japanese lines, were analyzed. The results suggest that SNP markers in the laccase gene can be useful for line typing in shiitake mushrooms. PMID:25892919

  9. eople have harvested mushrooms from the wild for thousands of years for food and

    E-print Network

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    mushroom growers. The Chinese first culti- vated shiitake (Lentinula edodes) mushrooms around 1100 AD,000 tons) 1,215 (%) 55.8 (X 1,000 tons) 1,846 (%) 37.6 (%) 51.9 Lentinula edodes (shiitake) 320 14.7 826 16

  10. Genomic Changes of Chagas Disease Vector, South America

    PubMed Central

    Dujardin, Jean Pierre; Nicolini, Paula; Caraccio, María Noel; Rose, Virginia; Tellez, Tatiana; Bermúdez, Hernán; Bargues, María Dolores; Mas-Coma, Santiago; O’Connor, José Enrique; Pérez, Ruben

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed the main karyologic changes that have occurred during the dispersion of Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease. We identified two allopatric groups, named Andean and non-Andean. The Andean specimens present C-heterochromatic blocks in most of their 22 chromosomes, whereas non-Andean specimens have only 4–7 autosomes with C-banding. These heterochromatin differences are the likely cause of a striking DNA content variation (approximately 30%) between Andean and non-Andean insects. Our study, together with previous historical and genetic data, suggests that T. infestans was originally a sylvatic species, with large quantities of DNA and heterochromatin, inhabiting the Andean region of Bolivia. However, the spread of domestic T. infestans throughout the non-Andean regions only involved insects with an important reduction of heterochromatin and DNA amounts. We propose that heterochromatin and DNA variation mainly reflected adaptive genomic changes that contribute to the ability of T. infestans to survive, reproduce, and disperse in different environments. PMID:15109410

  11. Viability study of a multiplex diagnostic platform for Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Foti, Leonardo; Fonseca, Bruna de Paula Fonseca e; Nascimento, Lilian Dias; Marques, Christiane de Fatima Silva; da Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Duarte, Cesar Augusto Barros; Probst, Christian M; Goldenberg, Samuel; Pinto, Antônio Gomes; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2009-07-01

    A new multiplex assay platform was evaluated to detect Trypanosoma cruzi infection using the recombinant antigens CRA, FRA, CRAFRA fusion and parasite lysate. The antigens presented different sensitivity and specificity in a singleplex test when compared to a serial dilution of two pools comprising 10 positive serum samples and one pool of 10 negative samples. The recombinant protein CRA presented lower sensitivity (55%) in contrast to the 100% specificity and sensitivity of FRA, CRAFRA and T. cruzi lysate. These antigens also showed good results in a duplex test and the duplex test with CRAFRA/T. cruzi lysate showed better performance with 100% specificity and sensitivity, as well as a lower cut-off value in comparison to the other duplex test, FRA/T. cruzi lysate. Hence, when the antigens were used in duplex format, both tests showed decreased cut-off values and no interference between different bead sets, resulting in increasing sensitivity and specificity. The results of these multiplex tests show that they could be an alternative to singleplex detection for Chagas disease, and also indicate the necessity of using multiplex diagnostic tools to increase the sensitivity and specificity for diagnostic tests. Emerging data from the T. cruzi genome and from its ORFeome project will also allow the identification of new antigens for this disease detection application. PMID:19753468

  12. Lack of Segregation between Two Species of Chagas Disease Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Theo; Lorenzo, Marcelo Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Triatoma infestans and Panstrongylus megistus are relevant Chagas disease vectors. An apparent segregation among these triatomine species inside human households was suggested to rely on mutual repellence between them. However, P. megistus and T. infestans show aggregation responses to chemical signals emitted by the other species. These findings do not rule out the possibility that stimuli other than chemical signals could mediate repellence when these species exploit shelters simultaneously. In the present study, we investigated how P. megistus and T. infestans exploit shelters in controlled laboratory conditions and how insect density and environmental illumination modulate this behavior. We evaluated whether these species aggregate inside shelters or mutually repel each other. Panstrongylus megistus and T. infestans show specific patterns of shelter exploitation, which are differentially affected by insect density and environment illumination. In particular, P. megistus is more sensitive to insect density than T. infestans, whereas T. infestans shows higher sensitivity to illumination than P. megistus. Nevertheless, these species exploit shelters randomly without any apparent repellence. PMID:22764300

  13. Urbanization, land tenure security and vector-borne Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael Z; Barbu, Corentin M; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Escalante-Mejia, Patricia; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Niemierko, Malwina; Mabud, Tarub S; Behrman, Jere R; Naquira-Velarde, Cesar

    2014-08-22

    Modern cities represent one of the fastest growing ecosystems on the planet. Urbanization occurs in stages; each stage characterized by a distinct habitat that may be more or less susceptible to the establishment of disease vector populations and the transmission of vector-borne pathogens. We performed longitudinal entomological and epidemiological surveys in households along a 1900 × 125 m transect of Arequipa, Peru, a major city of nearly one million inhabitants, in which the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, by the insect vector Triatoma infestans, is an ongoing problem. The transect spans a cline of urban development from established communities to land invasions. We find that the vector is tracking the development of the city, and the parasite, in turn, is tracking the dispersal of the vector. New urbanizations are free of vector infestation for decades. T. cruzi transmission is very recent and concentrated in more established communities. The increase in land tenure security during the course of urbanization, if not accompanied by reasonable and enforceable zoning codes, initiates an influx of construction materials, people and animals that creates fertile conditions for epidemics of some vector-borne diseases. PMID:24990681

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi connatal transmission in dogs with Chagas disease: experimental case report.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha A; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Reyes, Pedro A; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2011-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi connatal transmission was studied in male and female mongrel dogs. Both dogs were experimentally infected, after which on the 20(th) day, lymphoadenomegaly and fever were found. Four months postinfection, they mated. At this time, Chagas disease was confirmed by two different diagnostic tests. The electrocardiogram and echocardiogram taken at the eight postinoculation month showed data consistent with ischemia, local conduction abnormalities and hypertrophy, as well as a diminished ejection fraction and left ventricular dilation, respectively. Four puppies were born and after weaning had weakness, progressive weight loss, and chronic diarrhea. Necropsy of all four showed digestive alterations and cardiac dilation. Serology in the offspring was positive for Chagas disease. The histopathological study demonstrated a cardiac chronic inflammatory process, although no parasites were found. Clinical data and serological determinations are consistent with death from advanced Chagas disease. PMID:21973028

  15. Karyotype and spermatogenesis in Triatoma lenti (Hemiptera: Triatominae), a potential Chagas vector.

    PubMed

    Alevi, K C C; Mendonça, P P; Succi, M; Pereira, N P; Rosa, J A; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2012-01-01

    All species of Triatominae are susceptible to infection by Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae) and consequently, potential insect vectors of Chagas disease. Currently, there are 140 known species of triatomine bugs, which can be grouped into specific species complexes. The species Triatoma lenti (Hemiptera: Triatominae) is found only in Brazil and is considered a potential vector of Chagas disease. We karyotyped male T. lenti and examined its spermatogenesis in detail. The karyotype was found to be 2n = 20A + XY, demonstrating that this organism has the modal chromosome set found in triatomines. This new information concerning males of this species contributed to biological data that will be useful for understanding this potentially important Chagas disease vector. PMID:23315807

  16. Evaluation of the western blot in the confirmatory serologic diagnosis of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Reiche, E M; Cavazzana, M; Okamura, H; Tagata, E C; Jankevicius, S I; Jankevicius, J V

    1998-11-01

    The Western blot method, using antigens from epimastigote forms of the Trypanosoma cruzi Y strain, was evaluated for the confirmatory diagnosis of Chagas' disease. Serum samples were obtained from 136 chagasic patients (Group I), 23 patients with inconclusive serologic results for Chagas' disease (Group II), 53 patients with other diseases (Group III), and 50 healthy individuals (Group IV). The Western blot results for Group I gave a confirmatory diagnosis of Chagas' diseases in 118 (86.80%), an indeterminate pattern of reactivity in 16 (11.76%), and a negative pattern in only two (1.47%). Of the samples from Groups II, III and IV, none had a positive result in the Western blot; 60.86%, 52.83%, and 16.0%, respectively, showed indeterminate results; and 39.13%, 47,16% and 84,0%, respectively, showed negative results. The Western blot method showed a sensitivity of 86.60%, a specificity of 100.0%, a positive predictive value of 100.0%, and a negative predictive value of 73.50%, and the concordance coefficient kappa was high (0.7789). The results suggest that the previous serologic results for Chagas' disease could be confirmed by Western blot for the detection of specific antibodies to T. cruzi antigenic fractions, which may reduce the medical, legal, and social consequences of an inconclusive serologic result for Chagas' disease and also underscore the need for additional studies for continued efforts in the development of an ideal standard confirmatory test for Chagas' disease. PMID:9840592

  17. Enhancement of ?-Glucan Content in the Cultivation of Cauliflower Mushroom (Sparassis latifolia) by Elicitation.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun; Ka, Kang-Hyeon; Ryu, Sung-Ryul

    2014-03-01

    The effectiveness of three kinds of enzymes (chitinase, ?-glucuronidase, and lysing enzyme complex), employed as elicitors to enhance the ?-glucan content in the sawdust-based cultivation of cauliflower mushroom (Sparassis latifolia), was examined. The elicitors were applied to the cauliflower mushroom after primordium formation, by spraying the enzyme solutions at three different levels on the sawdust-based medium. Mycelial growth was fully accomplished by the treatments, but the metabolic process during the growth of fruiting bodies was affected. The application of a lysing enzyme resulted in an increase in the ?-glucan concentration by up to 31% compared to that of the control. However, the treatment resulted in a decrease in mushroom yield, which necessitated the need to evaluate its economic efficiency. Although we still need to develop a more efficient way for using elicitors to enhance functional metabolites in mushroom cultivation, the results indicate that the elicitation technique can be applied in the cultivation of medicinal/edible mushrooms. PMID:24808733

  18. Enhancement of ?-Glucan Content in the Cultivation of Cauliflower Mushroom (Sparassis latifolia) by Elicitation

    PubMed Central

    Ka, Kang-Hyeon; Ryu, Sung-Ryul

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of three kinds of enzymes (chitinase, ?-glucuronidase, and lysing enzyme complex), employed as elicitors to enhance the ?-glucan content in the sawdust-based cultivation of cauliflower mushroom (Sparassis latifolia), was examined. The elicitors were applied to the cauliflower mushroom after primordium formation, by spraying the enzyme solutions at three different levels on the sawdust-based medium. Mycelial growth was fully accomplished by the treatments, but the metabolic process during the growth of fruiting bodies was affected. The application of a lysing enzyme resulted in an increase in the ?-glucan concentration by up to 31% compared to that of the control. However, the treatment resulted in a decrease in mushroom yield, which necessitated the need to evaluate its economic efficiency. Although we still need to develop a more efficient way for using elicitors to enhance functional metabolites in mushroom cultivation, the results indicate that the elicitation technique can be applied in the cultivation of medicinal/edible mushrooms. PMID:24808733

  19. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-based method for rapid mushroom species identification.

    PubMed

    Vaagt, Franziska; Haase, Ilka; Fischer, Markus

    2013-02-27

    Toxic mushroom species, such as the death cap ( Amanita phalloides ), are responsible for most mushroom poisonings. In the present work, novel loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays were used for the differentiation of even closely related edible and toxic mushroom species. The applicability of these methods was tested by cross-reaction studies and analysis of spiked mushroom samples (raw and fried material). Contaminations at the level of 2% (w/w) could be detected in different mushroom blends. Three detection methods were used: agarose gel analysis, fluorimetric real-time detection, and visual detection by lateral flow dipsticks (LFD). The LAMP assay combined with LFD detection allows the identification of A. phalloides in about 2 h (including DNA extraction) at a very low level of technical equipment (micropestle, water bath, and mobile centrifuge), which makes this technique perfectly suited for on-site applications. PMID:23350919

  20. The microbial population in the air of cultivation facility of oyster mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Se Chul; Ahn, Yu Na; Khan, Sajid Mohamad; Chung, Il Min; Won, Hyang Yoen; Jhune, Chang Sung; Park, Yool Jin

    2012-12-01

    The microbial population in the air of mushroom cultivation facility was studied to understand the population structure and size depending on the cultivation methods and regions. The air contents of ten farmers' oyster mushroom cultivation facilities in Kyunggi province were sampled. The results indicated that there was no difference in population size depending on the regions of mushroom cultivation. In addition, the population size of bacteria in the growth room was bigger than that of the cooling room and outside of the mushroom house, but the fungal population was similar in size between cultivation stages. With regard to population structure, Pseudomonas and Penicillium species were most frequently isolated from the air of oyster mushroom cultivation facility. PMID:23274995

  1. Drug discovery for Chagas disease should consider Trypanosoma cruzi strain diversity

    PubMed Central

    Zingales, Bianca; Miles, Michael A; Moraes, Carolina B; Luquetti, Alejandro; Guhl, Felipe; Schijman, Alejandro G; Ribeiro, Isabela

    2014-01-01

    This opinion piece presents an approach to standardisation of an important aspect of Chagas disease drug discovery and development: selecting Trypanosoma cruzi strains for in vitro screening. We discuss the rationale for strain selection representing T. cruzi diversity and provide recommendations on the preferred parasite stage for drug discovery, T. cruzi discrete typing units to include in the panel of strains and the number of strains/clones for primary screens and lead compounds. We also consider experimental approaches for in vitro drug assays. The Figure illustrates the current Chagas disease drug-discovery and development landscape. PMID:25317712

  2. Anti-triatomine saliva immunoassays for the evaluation of impregnated netting trials against Chagas disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Juarez, Jenny Ancca; Richards, Jean; Rath, Bruno; Machaca, Victor Quispe; Castro, Yagahira E; Málaga, Edith S; Levy, Katelyn; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn; Verastegui, Manuela; Levy, Michael Z

    2011-05-01

    Insecticide-impregnated nets can kill triatomine bugs, but it remains unclear whether they can protect against Chagas disease transmission. In a field trial in Quequeña, Peru, sentinel guinea pigs placed in intervention enclosures covered by deltamethrin-treated nets showed significantly lower antibody responses to saliva of Triatoma infestans compared with animals placed in pre-existing control enclosures. Our results strongly suggest that insecticide-treated nets prevent triatomine bites and can thereby protect against infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Anti-salivary immunoassays are powerful new tools to evaluate intervention strategies against Chagas disease. PMID:21426907

  3. Characterization of the key odorants in pan-fried white mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus L.) by means of molecular sensory science: comparison with the raw mushroom tissue.

    PubMed

    Grosshauser, Sonja; Schieberle, Peter

    2013-04-24

    Application of aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) on the volatile fraction isolated from pan-fried white mushrooms ( Agaricus bisporus L.) revealed 40 odor-active compounds in the flavor dilution (FD) factor range of 8-8192, among which the caramel-like smelling 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one showed the highest FD factor of 8192, followed by 2-propionyl-1-pyrroline (popcorn-like) and 3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethylfuran-2(5H)-one (seasoning-like). A total of 36 compounds are reported for the first time in processed mushrooms, and 25 odorants showing the highest FD factors were then quantitated by stable isotope dilution assays and their odor activity values (OAVs) were calculated as ratio of their concentrations to their odor thresholds. Among them, 3-methylbutanal (malty), 3-(methylthio)propanal (cooked potato), and 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline (popcorn-like) showed the highest OAVs (>100) in the pan-fried mushrooms, followed by 1-octen-3-one, 2-propionyl-1-pyrroline, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one, phenylacetaldehyde, 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine, and 3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethylfuran-2(5H)-one with OAVs >10. An aqueous aroma recombinate containing 13 odorants (OAV > 1) in their actual concentrations in the fried mushrooms showed a good similarity to the original aroma profile. The quantitation of the key odorants in raw mushrooms, identified with high FD factors during the AEDA, revealed that numerous odorants were quantitatively changed by the frying process, but in particular the concentrations of 2-phenylacetaldehyde and 3-methylbutanal were higher by factors of ?40 and 6, respectively, compared to the amounts in the processed mushrooms. The data suggested an enzymatic formation of both Strecker aldehydes by the cut mushroom tissue. In total, 26 odorants were newly identified in raw mushrooms. PMID:23581517

  4. Synaptic organization in the adult Drosophila mushroom body calyx.

    PubMed

    Leiss, Florian; Groh, Claudia; Butcher, Nancy J; Meinertzhagen, Ian A; Tavosanis, Gaia

    2009-12-20

    Insect mushroom bodies are critical for olfactory associative learning. We have carried out an extensive quantitative description of the synaptic organization of the calyx of adult Drosophila melanogaster, the main olfactory input region of the mushroom body. By using high-resolution confocal microscopy, electron microscopy-based three-dimensional reconstructions, and genetic labeling of the neuronal populations contributing to the calyx, we resolved the precise connections between large cholinergic boutons of antennal lobe projection neurons and the dendrites of Kenyon cells, the mushroom body intrinsic neurons. Throughout the calyx, these elements constitute synaptic complexes called microglomeruli. By single-cell labeling, we show that each Kenyon cell's claw-like dendritic specialization is highly enriched in filamentous actin, suggesting that this might be a site of plastic reorganization. In fact, Lim kinase (LimK) overexpression in the Kenyon cells modifies the shape of the microglomeruli. Confocal and electron microscopy indicate that each Kenyon cell claw enwraps a single bouton of a projection neuron. Each bouton is contacted by a number of such claw-like specializations as well as profiles of gamma-aminobutyric acid-positive neurons. The dendrites of distinct populations of Kenyon cells involved in different types of memory are partially segregated within the calyx and contribute to different subsets of microglomeruli. Our analysis suggests, though, that projection neuron boutons can contact more than one type of Kenyon cell. These findings represent an important basis for the functional analysis of the olfactory pathway, including the formation of associative olfactory memories. PMID:19844895

  5. Genetic diversity of Kenyan native oyster mushroom (Pleurotus).

    PubMed

    Otieno, Ojwang D; Onyango, Calvin; Onguso, Justus Mungare; Matasyoh, Lexa G; Wanjala, Bramwel W; Wamalwa, Mark; Harvey, Jagger J W

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genus Pleurotus, also commonly known as oyster mushroom, are well known for their socioeconomic and biotechnological potentials. Despite being one of the most important edible fungi, the scarce information about the genetic diversity of the species in natural populations has limited their sustainable utilization. A total of 71 isolates of Pleurotus species were collected from three natural populations: 25 isolates were obtained from Kakamega forest, 34 isolates from Arabuko Sokoke forest and 12 isolates from Mount Kenya forest. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was applied to thirteen isolates of locally grown Pleurotus species obtained from laboratory samples using five primer pair combinations. AFLP markers and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of the ribosomal DNA were used to estimate the genetic diversity and evaluate phylogenetic relationships, respectively, among and within populations. The five primer pair combinations generated 293 polymorphic loci across the 84 isolates. The mean genetic diversity among the populations was 0.25 with the population from Arabuko Sokoke having higher (0.27) diversity estimates compared to Mount Kenya population (0.24). Diversity between the isolates from the natural population (0.25) and commercial cultivars (0.24) did not differ significantly. However, diversity was greater within (89%; P > 0.001) populations than among populations. Homology search analysis against the GenBank database using 16 rDNA ITS sequences randomly selected from the two clades of AFLP dendrogram revealed three mushroom species: P. djamor, P. floridanus and P. sapidus; the three mushrooms form part of the diversity of Pleurotus species in Kenya. The broad diversity within the Kenyan Pleurotus species suggests the possibility of obtaining native strains suitable for commercial cultivation. PMID:25344263

  6. Current Technologies and Related Issues for Mushroom Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sinil; Ha, Byeong-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Mushroom transformation requires a series of experimental steps, including generation of host strains with a desirable selective marker, design of vector DNA, removal of host cell wall, introduction of foreign DNA across the cell membrane, and integration into host genomic DNA or maintenance of an autonomous vector DNA inside the host cell. This review introduces limitations and obstacles related to transformation technologies along with possible solutions. Current methods for cell wall removal and cell membrane permeabilization are summarized together with details of two popular technologies, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation and restriction enzyme-mediated integration. PMID:25892908

  7. Fatal fulminant hepatitis associated with Ganoderma lucidum (Lingzhi) mushroom powder.

    PubMed

    Wanmuang, Harirak; Leopairut, Juvady; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri; Wananukul, Winai; Bunyaratvej, Sukhum

    2007-01-01

    Hepatotoxic effect related to Ganoderma lucidum (Lingzhi) mushroom powder was first described in a patient from Hong Kong in 2004. In 2005, the authors experienced a case of fatal fulminant hepatitis associated with such a preparation. Both patients had taken other therapeutic agents and traditionally boiled Lingzhi without any toxic effect. After switching to taking Lingzhi in powder form for 1-2 months, the hepatotoxic episode occurred in both patients. The toxic role of Lingzhi powder needs close monitoring in the future, especially in combination with other drugs. PMID:17621752

  8. Current technologies and related issues for mushroom transformation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sinil; Ha, Byeong-Suk; Ro, Hyeon-Su

    2015-03-01

    Mushroom transformation requires a series of experimental steps, including generation of host strains with a desirable selective marker, design of vector DNA, removal of host cell wall, introduction of foreign DNA across the cell membrane, and integration into host genomic DNA or maintenance of an autonomous vector DNA inside the host cell. This review introduces limitations and obstacles related to transformation technologies along with possible solutions. Current methods for cell wall removal and cell membrane permeabilization are summarized together with details of two popular technologies, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation and restriction enzyme-mediated integration. PMID:25892908

  9. Marginally Unstable Periodic Orbits in Semiclassical Mushroom Billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasen, Jonathan; Cao, Hui; Wiersig, Jan; Motter, Adilson E.

    2009-10-01

    Optical mushroom-shaped billiards offer a unique opportunity to isolate and study semiclassical modes concentrated on nondispersive, marginally unstable periodic orbits. Here we show that the openness of the cavity to external electromagnetic fields leads to unanticipated consequences for the far-field radiation pattern, including directional emission. This is mediated by interactions of marginally unstable periodic orbits with chaotic modes. We also show that the semiclassical modes are robust against perturbations to the shape of the cavity, despite the lack of structural stability of the corresponding classical orbits.

  10. Buried treasure: Unlocking the secrets of medicinal mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Walton, Emma L

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of the Biomedical Journal, we investigate the potential of plants and fungi as a source of beneficial molecules for human health. We explore the weird and wonderful world of the mushroom and examine how Western medicine still has a lot to learn from Eastern practices dating back thousands of years. We also discuss a study further supporting claims that flaxseed, the plant kingdom's richest source of omega-3 fatty acids, can have lipid-lowering and fat-busting properties in the right physiological context. Finally, this issue also includes several validation studies of medical procedures or devices that define optimal conditions for their use in Asian populations. PMID:25510923

  11. Modulation of immune response in experimental Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Basso, Beatriz

    2013-02-20

    Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), the etiological agent of Chagas disease, affects nearly 18 million people in Latin America and 90 million are at risk of infection. The parasite presents two stages of medical importance in the host, the amastigote, intracellular replicating form, and the extracellular trypomastigote, the infective form. Thus infection by T. cruzi induces a complex immune response that involves effectors and regulatory mechanisms. That is why control of the infection requires a strong humoral and cellular immune response; hence, the outcome of host-parasite interaction in the early stages of infection is extremely important. A critical event during this period of the infection is innate immune response, in which the macrophage's role is vital. Thus, after being phagocytized, the parasite is able to develop intracellularly; however, during later periods, these cells induce its elimination by means of toxic metabolites. In turn, as the infection progresses, adaptive immune response mechanisms are triggered through the TH1 and TH2 responses. Finally, T. cruzi, like other protozoa such as Leishmania and Toxoplasma, have numerous evasive mechanisms to the immune response that make it possible to spread around the host. In our Laboratory we have developed a vaccination model in mice with Trypanosoma rangeli, nonpathogenic to humans, which modulates the immune response to infection by T. cruzi, thus protecting them. Vaccinated animals showed an important innate response (modulation of NO and other metabolites, cytokines, activation of macrophages), a strong adaptive cellular response and significant increase in specific antibodies. The modulation caused early elimination of the parasites, low parasitaemia, the absence of histological lesions and high survival rates. Even though progress has been made in the knowledge of some of these mechanisms, new studies must be conducted which could target further prophylactic and therapeutic trials against T. cruzi infection. PMID:24520540

  12. Barriers to Treatment Access for Chagas Disease in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Jennifer M.; Snively, Callae S.; Ramsey, Janine M.; Salgado, Marco Ocampo; Bärnighausen, Till; Reich, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Background According to World Health Organization (WHO) prevalence estimates, 1.1 million people in Mexico are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease (CD). However, limited information is available about access to antitrypanosomal treatment. This study assesses the extent of access in Mexico, analyzes the barriers to access, and suggests strategies to overcome them. Methods and Findings Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 key informants and policymakers at the national level in Mexico. Data on CD cases, relevant policy documents and interview data were analyzed using the Flagship Framework for Pharmaceutical Policy Reform policy interventions: regulation, financing, payment, organization, and persuasion. Data showed that 3,013 cases were registered nationally from 2007–2011, representing 0.41% of total expected cases based on Mexico's national prevalence estimate. In four of five years, new registered cases were below national targets by 11–36%. Of 1,329 cases registered nationally in 2010–2011, 834 received treatment, 120 were pending treatment as of January 2012, and the treatment status of 375 was unknown. The analysis revealed that the national program mainly coordinated donation of nifurtimox and that important obstacles to access include the exclusion of antitrypanosomal medicines from the national formulary (regulation), historical exclusion of CD from the social insurance package (organization), absence of national clinical guidelines (organization), and limited provider awareness (persuasion). Conclusions Efforts to treat CD in Mexico indicate an increased commitment to addressing this disease. Access to treatment could be advanced by improving the importation process for antitrypanosomal medicines and adding them to the national formulary, increasing education for healthcare providers, and strengthening clinical guidelines. These recommendations have important implications for other countries in the region with similar problems in access to treatment for CD. PMID:24147169

  13. Environmental Changes Can Produce Shifts in Chagas Disease Infection Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cordovez, Juan M; Sanabria, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    An epidemiological network contains all the organisms involved (types) in the transmission of a parasite. The nodes of the network represent reservoirs, hosts, and vectors, while the links between the nodes represent the strength and direction of parasite movement. Networks that contain humans are of special interest because they are of concern to public health authorities. Under these circumstances, it is possible, in principle, to identify cycles (closed paths in the network) that include humans and select the ones that carry the maximum probability of human infection. The basic reproduction number R0 in such a network gives the average number of new infections of any type after the introduction of one individual infected by any type. To obtain R0 for complex networks, one can use the next-generation matrix (NGM) approach. Every entry in NGM will average the contribution of each link that connects two types. To tease the contribution of every cycle apart, we define the virulence as the geometric mean of the NGM entries corresponding to the links therein. This approach allows for the quantification of specific cycles of interest while it also makes the computation of the sensitivity and elasticity of the parameters easier. In this work, we compute the virulence for the transmission dynamics of Chagas disease for a typical rural area in Colombia incorporating the effect of environmental changes on the vector population size. We concluded that the highest contribution to human infection comes from humans themselves, which is a surprising and interesting result. In addition, sensitivity analysis revealed that increasing vector population size increases the risk of human infection. PMID:25574142

  14. Serious mushroom poisonings in California requiring hospital admission, 1990 through 1994.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, J; Von Behren, J; Kreutzer, R

    1996-01-01

    Hunting and consuming wild mushrooms is an increasingly popular avocation, as well as a means of subsistence for certain groups in the United States. Consuming wild mushrooms is relatively safe for persons with the necessary expert knowledge. Each year, however, tragic deaths or illnesses occur when unsuspecting persons ingest toxic mushrooms. We conjectured that there may be vulnerable subgroups that should be targeted for public service announcements and education about mushrooms. Therefore, we reviewed California's hospital discharge database from 1990 through 1994 to ascertain demographic characteristics and outcomes of "serious" mushroom exposures requiring a hospital admission. Children younger than 5 years have a higher rate of hospital admission for "serious" poisonings. Therefore, parents should be reminded of the need for supervising children in areas with wild mushrooms. We did not find evidence that poisoning rates differed significantly between ethnic or racial groups, but this finding may be limited by a failure of these groups to seek care after becoming ill. We discuss briefly the symptoms and treatment of cases of possibly lethal ingestion of amatoxin-containing species of mushrooms. PMID:8993198

  15. Evaluation of Waste Mushroom Medium as a Fermentable Substrate and Bioethanol Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Ai; Sasaki, Chizuru; Asada, Chikako; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    Waste Shiitake (Lentinula edodes) mushroom medium, a lignocellulosic aglicultural residue, was evaluated as a fermentable substrate. 87% of the fermentable sugars remained in the waste mushroom medium. The sugar yield of the waste mushroom medium (46.3%) was higher than that of raw mushroom medium (20.3%) after 48 h of enzymatic saccharification by Meicelase because L. edodes changed wood structure. These results indicated that the waste mushroom medium is a suitable substrate for fermentation. Next, the efficient ethanol production using steam explosion pretreatment was studied. After 30 h of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using Meicelase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae AM12, 20.0 g/L ethanol was produced from 100 g/L water-insoluble residue of the waste mushroom medium treated at a steam pressure of 20 atm and a steaming time of 5 min. This corresponded to an ethanol yield of 77.0% of the theoretical, i.e. 14.7 g of ethanol obtained from 100 g of waste mushroom medium.

  16. Macro and trace mineral constituents and radionuclides in mushrooms: health benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, Jerzy; Borovi?ka, Jan

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews and updates data on macro and trace elements and radionuclides in edible wild-grown and cultivated mushrooms. A huge biodiversity of mushrooms and spread of certain species over different continents makes the study on their multi-element constituents highly challenging. A few edible mushrooms are widely cultivated and efforts are on to employ them (largely Agaricus spp., Pleurotus spp., and Lentinula edodes) in the production of selenium-enriched food (mushrooms) or nutraceuticals (by using mycelia) and less on species used by traditional medicine, e.g., Ganoderma lucidum. There are also attempts to enrich mushrooms with other elements than Se and a good example is enrichment with lithium. Since minerals of nutritional value are common constituents of mushrooms collected from natural habitats, the problem is however their co-occurrence with some hazardous elements including Cd, Pb, Hg, Ag, As, and radionuclides. Discussed is also the problem of erroneous data on mineral compounds determined in mushrooms. PMID:23179616

  17. Detection limit of Clostridium botulinum spores in dried mushroom samples sourced from China.

    PubMed

    Malakar, Pradeep K; Plowman, June; Aldus, Clare F; Xing, Zengtao; Zhao, Yong; Peck, Michael W

    2013-08-16

    A survey of dried mushrooms (Lentinula edodes (Shiitake) and Auricularia auricula (Wood Ear)) sourced from China was carried out to determine the natural contamination of these mushrooms with spores of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum and non-proteolytic C. botulinum. The mushrooms were collected from supermarkets and retailers in 21 cities in China during October 2008. Spore loads of C. botulinum in mushrooms have a degree of uncertainty and variability and this study contributes valuable data for determining prevalence of spores of C. botulinum in mushrooms. An optimized detection protocol that combined selective enrichment culture with multiplex PCR was used to test for spores of proteolytic and non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Detection limits were calculated, using a maximum likelihood protocol, from mushroom samples inoculated with defined numbers of spores of proteolytic C. botulinum or non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Based on the maximum likelihood detection limit, it is estimated that dried mushroom A. auricula contained <550spores/kg of proteolytic C. botulinum, and <350spores/kg of non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Dried L. edodes contained <1500spores/kg of proteolytic C. botulinum and it was not possible to determine reliable detection limits for spores of non-proteolytic C. botulinum using the current detection protocol. PMID:23838282

  18. Toxic Side Effects of Drugs Used to Treat Chagas’ Disease (American Trypanosomiasis)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José A Castro; María Montalto deMecca; Laura C Bartel

    2006-01-01

    Chagas’ disease (American trypanosomiasis) is an endemic parasitic disease in some areas of Latin America. About 16-18 million persons are infected with the aetiological agent of the disease, Trypanosoma cruzi, and more than 100 million are living at risk of infection. There are different modes of infection: 1) via blood sucking vector insects infected with T. cruzi, accounting for 80-90%

  19. Integrated control of Chagas disease for its elimination as public health problem - A Review.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Segura, Elsa Leonor

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis is, together with geohelminths, the neglected disease that causes more loss of years of healthy life due to disability in Latin America. Chagas disease, as determined by the factors and determinants, shows that different contexts require different actions, preventing new cases or reducing the burden of disease. Control strategies must combine two general courses of action including prevention of transmission to prevent the occurrence of new cases (these measures are cost effective), as well as opportune diagnosis and treatment of infected individuals in order to prevent the clinical evolution of the disease and to allow them to recuperate their health. All actions should be implemented as fully as possible and with an integrated way, to maximise the impact. Chagas disease cannot be eradicated due because of the demonstrated existence of infected wild triatomines in permanent contact with domestic cycles and it contributes to the occurrence of at least few new cases. However, it is possible to interrupt the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in a large territory and to eliminate Chagas disease as a public health problem with a dramatic reduction of burden of the disease. PMID:25993503

  20. Exposure to Citral, Cinnamon and Ruda Disrupts the Life Cycle of a Vector of Chagas Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles I. Abramson; Elis Aldana; Enrique Sulbaran

    The main vector of Chagas disease in Venezuela was exposed to the odors of citral, cinnamon and ruda. Cinnamon was found to stop the life cycle of Rhodnius prolixus relative to untreated animals. Citral and ruda also influenced the life cycle but not to the extent of animals exposed to cinnamon. We suggest that future research be directed toward using

  1. Myosin Autoimmunity Is Not Essential for Cardiac Inflammation in Acute Chagas' Disease1

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    Myosin Autoimmunity Is Not Essential for Cardiac Inflammation in Acute Chagas' Disease1 Juan S is an autoimmune disease induced by T. cruzi (6). In other words, T. cruzi infection induces autoimmune responses to acute myocarditis that is accompanied by autoimmunity to cardiac myosin in susceptible strains of mice

  2. Update on oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Venezuela: epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic approaches

    PubMed Central

    de Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Colmenares, Cecilia; Ruiz-Guevara, Raiza; Mauriello, Luciano; Muñoz-Calderón, Arturo; Noya, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Orally transmitted Chagas disease has become a matter of concern due to outbreaks reported in four Latin American countries. Although several mechanisms for orally transmitted Chagas disease transmission have been proposed, food and beverages contaminated with whole infected triatomines or their faeces, which contain metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, seems to be the primary vehicle. In 2007, the first recognised outbreak of orally transmitted Chagas disease occurred in Venezuela and largest recorded outbreak at that time. Since then, 10 outbreaks (four in Caracas) with 249 cases (73.5% children) and 4% mortality have occurred. The absence of contact with the vector and of traditional cutaneous and Romana’s signs, together with a florid spectrum of clinical manifestations during the acute phase, confuse the diagnosis of orally transmitted Chagas disease with other infectious diseases. The simultaneous detection of IgG and IgM by ELISA and the search for parasites in all individuals at risk have been valuable diagnostic tools for detecting acute cases. Follow-up studies regarding the microepidemics primarily affecting children has resulted in 70% infection persistence six years after anti-parasitic treatment. Panstrongylus geniculatus has been the incriminating vector in most cases. As a food-borne disease, this entity requires epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that differ from those approaches used for traditional direct or cutaneous vector transmission. PMID:25946155

  3. Chagas disease alters the relationship between heart rate variability and daily physical activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lidiane Sousa; Manoel Otávio da Costa Rocha; Raquel Rodrigues Britto; Federico Lombardi; Antonio L. Ribeiro

    2009-01-01

    Regular exercise training is considered to be capable of beneficially modifying the autonomic balance in healthy subjects. We studied the association between vagal HRV indexes and the level of physical activity in Chagas disease patients and control subjects. Although in controls habitual physical activity was closely associated with vagal HRV indexes, no relationship was found between IPAQ scores and HRV

  4. Oral transmission of Chagas disease by consumption of açaí palm fruit, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Aglaêr A; Garcia, Marcio H; Tatto, Erica; Obara, Marcos T; Costa, Elenild; Sobel, Jeremy; Araujo, Wildo N

    2009-04-01

    In 2006, a total of 178 cases of acute Chagas disease were reported from the Amazonian state of Pará, Brazil. Eleven occurred in Barcarena and were confirmed by visualization of parasites on blood smears. Using cohort and case-control studies, we implicated oral transmission by consumption of açaí palm fruit. PMID:19331764

  5. La variabilit clonale de Trypanosoma cruzi, agent de la maladie de Chagas, a-

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    La variabilité clonale de Trypanosoma cruzi, agent de la maladie de Chagas, a- t-elle un impact sur de personnes infectées par Trypanosoma cruzi, agent de la trypanosomiase sud-américaine. T cruzi est-3711 Tibayrenc M, Ward P, Moya A, Ayala FJ (1986) Natural populations of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Cha- gas

  6. Programa de Controle da Doença de Chagas no Estado de São Paulo: sorologia de

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Esther de Carvalho; Rubens Antonio da Silva; Vera Lúcia; Cortiço Corrêa Rodrigues

    The Chagas Disease Control Program in São Paulo State, Brazil, now in the entomo- logical surveillance phase, includes a serological examination of individuals residing in domi- ciliary units infested with vector triatomines infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. From 1990 to 1999, this action included area in which triatomine searches were conducted either as a routine procedure, according to their levels of

  7. Integrated control of Chagas disease for its elimination as public health problem - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Segura, Elsa Leonor

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis is, together with geohelminths, the neglected disease that causes more loss of years of healthy life due to disability in Latin America. Chagas disease, as determined by the factors and determinants, shows that different contexts require different actions, preventing new cases or reducing the burden of disease. Control strategies must combine two general courses of action including prevention of transmission to prevent the occurrence of new cases (these measures are cost effective), as well as opportune diagnosis and treatment of infected individuals in order to prevent the clinical evolution of the disease and to allow them to recuperate their health. All actions should be implemented as fully as possible and with an integrated way, to maximise the impact. Chagas disease cannot be eradicated due because of the demonstrated existence of infected wild triatomines in permanent contact with domestic cycles and it contributes to the occurrence of at least few new cases. However, it is possible to interrupt the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in a large territory and to eliminate Chagas disease as a public health problem with a dramatic reduction of burden of the disease. PMID:25993503

  8. Interleukin-10 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha serum levels in chronic Chagas disease patients.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, R H T; Azevedo, E de A N; Diniz, G T N; Cavalcanti, M da G A de M; de Oliveira, W; de Morais, C N L; Gomes, Y de M

    2015-07-01

    In Chagas disease, chronically infected individuals may be asymptomatic or may present cardiac or digestive complications, and it is well known that the human immune response is related to different clinical manifestations. Different patterns of cytokine levels have been previously described in different clinical forms of this disease, but contradictory results are reported. Our aim was to evaluate the serum levels of interleukin-10 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha in patients with asymptomatic and cardiac Chagas disease. The serum interleukin-10 levels in patients with cardiomyopathy were higher than those in asymptomatic patients, mainly in those without heart enlargement. Although no significant difference was observed in serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels among the patients, we found that cardiac patients also present high levels of this cytokine, largely those with heart dilatation. Therefore, these cytokines play an important role in chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy. Follow-up investigations of these and other cytokines in patients with chronic Chagas disease need to be conducted to improve the understanding of the immunopathology of this disease. PMID:25728555

  9. Genetic Variability of Trypanosoma cruzi:Implications for the Pathogenesis of Chagas Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Macedo; S. D. J. Pena

    1998-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, has a variable clinical course, ranging from symptomless infection to severe chronic disease with cardiovascular or gastrointestinal involvement or even overwhelming acute episodes. The factors influencing this clinical variability have not been elucidated, but genetic variation of both the host and parasite is likely to be important. Here, Andréa M. Macedo and

  10. Isozymic heterogeneity of Trypanosoma cruzi in the first autochthonous patients with Chagas' disease in Amazonian Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael A. Miles; Adelson Souza; Marinete Povoa; Jeffrey J. Shaw; Ralph Lainson; Peter J. Toye

    1978-01-01

    CHAGAS' disease, in which the aetiological agent is Trypanosoma cruzi, is a principal cause of morbidity and mortality on the South American continent; at least 10 million people are said to be infected1. There is no vaccine or acceptable chemotherapy2, and insecticide control of domiciliated triatomine vectors (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) remains problematical. Human survivors of the acute phase of infection commonly

  11. Immnunological Control of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection and Pathogenesis of Chagas’ Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zigman Brener; Ricardo T. Gazzinelli

    1997-01-01

    The major goal of studies on immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi is the understanding of immunological mechanisms involved in resistance to this protozoan as well as the pathogenesis of Chagas’ disease. Different studies have defined CD8+ T lymphocytes, IFN-? and macrophages as important elements controlling parasite replication during the acute phase of infection. In contrast, during the chronic stage of the

  12. Certifying achievement in the control of Chagas disease native vectors: what is a viable scenario?

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ken; Yoshioka, Kota

    2014-09-01

    As an evaluation scheme, we propose certifying for "control", as alternative to "interruption", of Chagas disease transmission by native vectors, to project a more achievable and measurable goal and sharing good practices through an "open online platform" rather than "formal certification" to make the key knowledge more accumulable and accessible. PMID:25317713

  13. Certifying achievement in the control of Chagas disease native vectors: what is a viable scenario?

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Ken; Yoshioka, Kota

    2014-01-01

    As an evaluation scheme, we propose certifying for “control”, as alternative to “interruption”, of Chagas disease transmission by native vectors, to project a more achievable and measurable goal and sharing good practices through an “open online platform” rather than “formal certification” to make the key knowledge more accumulable and accessible. PMID:25317713

  14. Integrate Study of a Bolivian Population Infected by Trypanosoma cruzi, the Agent of Chagas Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simone Frédérique Brenière; Marie France Bosseno; François Noireau; Nina Yacsik; Pascale Liegeard; Christine Aznar; Mireille Hontebeyrie

    2002-01-01

    A cross section of a human population (501 individuals) selected at random, and living in a Bolivian community, highly endemic for Chagas disease, was investigated combining together clinical, parasitological and molecular approaches. Conventional serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) indicated an active transmission of the infection, a high seroprevalence (43.3%) ranging from around 12% in < 5 years to 94.7%

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi strain TcI is associated with chronic Chagas disease in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease in the Amazon region is considered an emerging anthropozoonosis with a predominance of the discrete typing units (DTUs) TcI and TcIV. These DTUs are responsible for cases of acute disease associated with oral transmission. Chronic disease cases have been detected through serological surveys. However, the mode of transmission could not be determined, or any association of chronic disease with a specific T. cruzi DTU’s. The aim of this study was to characterize Trypanosoma cruzi in patients with chronic Chagas disease in the State of Amazonas, Brazil. Methods Blood culture and xenodiagnosis were performed in 36 patients with positive serology for Chagas disease who participated in a serological survey performed in urban and rural areas of Manaus, Amazonas. DNA samples were extracted from the feces of triatomines used for xenodiagnosis, and the nontranscribed spacer of the mini-exon gene and the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase subunit II (COII) were amplified by PCR and sequenced. Results Blood culture and xenodiagnosis were negative in 100% of samples; however, molecular techniques revealed that in 13 out of 36 (36%) fecal samples from xenodiagnosis, T. cruzi was characterized as the DTU TcI, and different haplotypes were identified within the same DTU. Conclusion The DTU TcI, which is mainly associated with acute cases of Chagas disease in the Amazon region, is also responsible for chronic infection in patients from a region in the State of Amazonas. PMID:24916362

  16. Process and dynamics of traditional selling wild edible mushrooms in tropical Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ruán-Soto, Felipe; Garibay-Orijel, Roberto; Cifuentes, Joaquín

    2006-01-01

    Background More than twelve temperate-inhabitant Mexican ethnic groups are considered to be mycophilic and to have extensive traditional mycological knowledge. In contrast, inhabitants of tropical lands have been studied only superficially and their mycological knowledge is less well known. In this paper, we report the results of an ethnomycological research in markets of a wide area of the Mexican tropics. Our aims were to describe the dynamics related to the traditional selling process of wild mushrooms and to determine the tendencies of informants toward mushrooms (mycophily vs. mycophoby). Methods We visited 25 markets of 12 different settlements in the states of Oaxaca, Tabasco and Veracruz and collected information by participant observation as well as by 291 non-structured and semi-structured interviews. Results Mushroom selling was observed in four towns in Oaxaca and in two in Tabasco. Women represented 81.82% of sellers, while indigenous people (Chinantecos, Chontales, Ch'oles and Zoques) comprised 68.18%. Mushroom commercialization took place in secondary mobile markets and only in peasant stands. Mushroom collectors gather the resource in places with secondary vegetation, farmed areas and cattle fields. Because of land tenure restrictions mushroom sellers did not normally collect mushrooms themselves. In Oaxaca, we observed economic dynamics not based on capitalism, such as exchange, reciprocity and barter. Conclusion The sale of some wild edible mushrooms, the large amounts of commercialization of Schizophyllum commune, the complicated intermediary process, as well as the insertion of mushrooms into different informal economic practices are all evidence of an existent mycophily in a sector of the population of this region of the Mexican tropics. Among our informants, urban mestizo people were mycophobic, rural mestizo people were non-mycophilic and indigenous people were true mycophilic. PMID:16393345

  17. Isolation and Identification of Mushroom Pathogens from Agrocybe aegerita

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jang-Nam; Sharma, Praveen K.; Lee, Wang-Hyu

    2010-01-01

    Agrocybe aegerita is an important mushroom cultivated in Korea, with good feel and a peculiar fragrance. A. aegerita can be cultivated throughout the year using culture bottles but is more susceptible to contamination than other mushrooms. Twenty-two pathogens were isolated from the fruiting bodies and compost of A. aegerita, and seven isolates were isolated from Pleurotus ostreatus to compare with the A. aegerita isolates, collected from Gimje, Iksan, Gunsan of Chonbuk, and Chilgok of Gyeongbuk Province in 2009. These isolates were identified based on morphological and molecular characteristics. Of the 29 isolates, 26 were identified as Trichoderma spp. and the remaining three were Aspergillus spp., Mucor spp., and Penicillium spp. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that the 26 isolates of Trichoderma were divided into four taxa, namely T. harzianum, T. pleuroticola, T. longibrachiatum, and T. atroviride. Among the Trichoderma spp., 16 isolates (55.2%) were identified as T. harzianum, six as T. pleuroticola (20.7%), two as T. longibrachiatum, and the remaining two were T. atroviride. PMID:23956671

  18. Breeding of new strains of mushroom by basidiospore chemical mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jia; Kang, Hyeon-Woo; Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Chang-Yun; Ro, Hyeon-Su

    2011-12-01

    Chemical mutagenesis of basidiospores of Hypsizygus marmoreus generated new mushroom strains. The basidospores were treated with methanesulfonate methylester, an alkylating agent, to yield 400 mutant monokaryotic mycelia. Twenty fast-growing mycelia were selected and mated each other by hyphal fusion. Fifty out of the 190 matings were successful (mating rate of 26.3%), judged by the formation of clamp connections. The mutant dikaryons were cultivated to investigate their morphological and cultivation characteristics. Mutant strains No. 3 and No. 5 showed 10% and 6% increase in fruiting body production, respectively. Eight mutant strains showed delayed and reduced primordia formation, resulting in the reduced production yield with prolonged cultivation period. The number of the fruiting bodies of mutant No. 31, which displayed reduced primordial formation, was only 15, compared to the parental number of 65. Another interesting phenotype was a fruiting body with a flattened stipe and pileus. Dikaryons generated by mating with the mutant spore No. 14 produced flat fruiting bodies. Further molecular biological studies will provide details of the mechanism. This work shows that the chemical mutagenesis approach is highly utilizable in the development of mushroom strains as well as in the generation of resources for molecular genetic studies. PMID:22783115

  19. Breeding of New Strains of Mushroom by Basidiospore Chemical Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jia; Kang, Hyeon-Woo; Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Chang-Yun

    2011-01-01

    Chemical mutagenesis of basidiospores of Hypsizygus marmoreus generated new mushroom strains. The basidospores were treated with methanesulfonate methylester, an alkylating agent, to yield 400 mutant monokaryotic mycelia. Twenty fast-growing mycelia were selected and mated each other by hyphal fusion. Fifty out of the 190 matings were successful (mating rate of 26.3%), judged by the formation of clamp connections. The mutant dikaryons were cultivated to investigate their morphological and cultivation characteristics. Mutant strains No. 3 and No. 5 showed 10% and 6% increase in fruiting body production, respectively. Eight mutant strains showed delayed and reduced primordia formation, resulting in the reduced production yield with prolonged cultivation period. The number of the fruiting bodies of mutant No. 31, which displayed reduced primordial formation, was only 15, compared to the parental number of 65. Another interesting phenotype was a fruiting body with a flattened stipe and pileus. Dikaryons generated by mating with the mutant spore No. 14 produced flat fruiting bodies. Further molecular biological studies will provide details of the mechanism. This work shows that the chemical mutagenesis approach is highly utilizable in the development of mushroom strains as well as in the generation of resources for molecular genetic studies. PMID:22783115

  20. Foraging behaviour in Drosophila larvae: mushroom body ablation.

    PubMed

    Osborne, K A; de Belle, J S; Sokolowski, M B

    2001-02-01

    Drosophila larvae and adults exhibit a naturally occurring genetically based behavioural polymorphism in locomotor activity while foraging. Larvae of the rover morph exhibit longer foraging trails than sitters and forage between food patches, while sitters have shorter foraging trails and forage within patches. This behaviour is influenced by levels of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PGK) encoded by the foraging (for) gene. Rover larvae have higher expression levels and higher PGK activities than do sitters. Here we discuss the importance of the for gene for studies of the mechanistic and evolutionary significance of individual differences in behaviour. We also show how structure-function analysis can be used to investigate a role for mushroom bodies in larval behaviour both in the presence and in the absence of food. Hydroxyurea fed to newly hatched larvae prevents the development of all post-embryonically derived mushroom body (MB) neuropil. This method was used to ablate MBs in rover and sitter genetic variants of foraging to test whether these structures mediate expression of the foraging behavioural polymorphism. We found that locomotor activity levels during foraging of both the rover and sitter larval morphs were not significantly influenced by MB ablation. Alternative hypotheses that may explain how variation in foraging behaviour is generated are discussed. PMID:11238255

  1. From respiratory sensitization to food allergy: Anaphylactic reaction after ingestion of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus)

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Marta F.; González-Delgado, Purificación; Postigo, Idoia; Fernández, Javier; Soriano, Victor; Cueva, Begoña; Martínez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old mold-allergic patient who developed episodes of generalized urticaria and systemic anaphylactic shock immediately after ingesting button mushrooms. A manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and a NADP-dependent mannitol dehydrogenase (MtDH) from Agaricus bisporus mushroom were identified as patient-specific IgE-binding proteins. Cross-reactivity between A. bisporus MnSOD and mold aeroallergens was confirmed. We conclude that prior sensitization to mold aeroallergens might explain severe food reactions to cross-reacting homologs mushroom proteins.

  2. Folk taxonomy and use of mushrooms in communities around Ngorongoro and Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Maasai and Kurya form two main communities around the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania which are mainly pastoralists. Changing climate to excessive drought, have recently forced them to start practicing subsistence farming which is severely affected by wild animals. This study explored status of the folk taxonomy and uses of mushrooms in the two communities as a pave way for possibilities of introducing mushroom cultivation, an alternative crop which is hardly affected by wild animals. Methods Folk taxonomy and use mushrooms by the Kurya and Maasai communities were investigated. Information was collected by face to face interviews with 150 individuals in 6 selected villages. Using descriptive statistics by Statistic Package for the Social Science (SPSS) version 17.0, the demographic characteristics of informants were evaluated and cross relationships with the recorded data were analysed. Results Kurya are mycophilic with 94% of the informants recognizing utilization of the wild mushroom either as foodstuff or as tonics while the Maasai are mycophobic with 99% being unaware of the edibility of mushroom although 28% recognized mushrooms as tonic. For both communities, the knowledge of mushroom utilization and folk taxonomy increased with age of the informants, while it decreases with formal education level of the informants which imply that the basis of knowledge is mainly traditional. Comparing the two communities, the Maasai use mushrooms only for medicinal purposes and never sought them for food while the Kurya were well knowledgeable on the edibility and folk classification especially the Termitomyces species. Characters used in folkal taxonomy included color and size of the basidiomata, shape and size of the pseudorrhiza, habitats and edibility information. A new use of ascospores whereby they anaesthaesia bees during honey harvesting was discovered, and mushroom cultivation was widely welcomed (94.7%) as an alternative crop which is rarely affected by wild animals. Conclusion In order to salvage a noted tremendous decrease of knowledge in mushroom utilization and folk taxonomy from vanishing, there is a need to document it throughout, and incorporate it in lower levels of our education system. Mushroom cultivation may possibly be the best alternative crop for the two communities thus should be advocated for improving livelihood and reduce human wildlife conflicts. The new recorded use of ascospores to anaesthaesia the bees during honey harvesting should be exploited and scaled up for sustainable integrated bee keeping and mushroom farming. PMID:22999253

  3. EPR investigation of some desiccated Ascomycota and Basidiomycota gamma-irradiated mushrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercu, V.; Negut, C. D.; Duliu, O. G.

    2010-12-01

    The suitability of the EPR spectroscopy for detection of ?-irradiation in five species of dried mushroom, currently used in gastronomy: yellow morel— Morchella esculenta, (L.) Pers. (Phylum Ascomycota), button mushroom— Agaricus bisporus (J.E.Lange), Agaricus haemorrhoidarius Fr., golden chantarelle— Cantharellus cibarius Fr., as well as oyster mushroom— Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) (Phylum Basidiomycota) is presented and discussed. Although after irradiation at doses up to 11 kGy, all specimens presented well defined EPR spectra, only A. bisporus EPR signal was enough stable to make detection possible after 18 months.

  4. Severity of chronic Chagas disease is associated with cytokine/antioxidant imbalance in chronically infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Guégan, Jean-François; Barnabé, Christian; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Salgado-Rosas, Hilda; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Briones, Bernardo; Romero-Díaz, Mónica; Ramos-Jiménez, Judith; Sánchez-Guillén, María del Carmen

    2003-03-01

    Understanding the pathogenic mechanisms in chronic Chagas disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America, is essential for the design of rational therapeutic strategies. In this paper we show that the development of Chagas disease is a consequence of a long-term and complex relationship between parasite persistence and maladapted homeostatic mechanisms in the host which leads to pathologic changes. We performed a retrospective study on 50 patients with chronic Chagas disease and 50 healthy control individuals. The specific immune response was detected by ELISA and IHA tests using autochthonous antigens, inflammatory process with the cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and nitric oxide (NO), and antioxidant protection with glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. We developed generalised linear modelling procedures to assess simultaneously which explanatory variables and/or their interactions better explained disease severity in patients. Our results show the existence of a strong relationship between anti-Trypanosoma cruzi levels and chronic Chagas disease (P<0.0001). Taken together, the statistical data indicate both cumulative and complementary effects, where the increase in TNF-alpha (P=0.004) and NO (P=0.005) levels correlated with a reduction in glutathione peroxidase (P=0.0001) and SOD (P=0.01) levels drives the disease pathology in chronically infected patients. Our findings may have important implications for understanding host susceptibility to develop severe chronic infectious disease. In addition we show putative targets for the design of new therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression, considering both specific treatment against the aetiological agent and modulation of the different immunopathological reactions in chronically infected individuals with chronic Chagas disease. PMID:12670514

  5. The Effects of Temperature and Nutritional Conditions on Mycelium Growth of Two Oyster Mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus and Pleurotus cystidiosus)

    PubMed Central

    Hoa, Ha Thi

    2015-01-01

    The influences of temperature and nutritional conditions on the mycelium growth of oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (PO) and Pleurotus cystidiosus (PC) were investigated in laboratory experiment during the summer season of 2014. The results of the experiment indicated that potato dextrose agar (PDA) and yam dextrose agar (YDA) were the most suitable media for the mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PO while four media (PDA, YDA, sweet potato dextrose agar, and malt extract agar medium) were not significantly different in supporting mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PC. The optimal temperature for mycelium growth of both oyster mushroom species was obtained at 28?. Mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PO was improved by carbon sources such as glucose, molasses, and at 1~5% sucrose concentration, mycelium colony diameter of mushroom PO was achieved the highest value. Whereas glucose, dextrose, and sucrose as carbon sources gave the good mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PC, and at 1~3% sucrose concentration, mycelium colony diameter of PC was achieved the maximum value. Ammonium chloride concentrations at 0.03~0.09% and 0.03~0.05% also gave the greatest values in mycelium colony diameter of mushroom PO and PC. Brown rice was found to be the most favourable for mycelium growth of two oyster mushroom species. In addition, sugarcane residue, acasia sawdust and corn cob were selected as favourable lignocellulosic substrate sources for mycelium growth of both oyster mushrooms. PMID:25892910

  6. Efficient Recovery of Lignocellulolytic Enzymes of Spent Mushroom Compost from Oyster Mushrooms, Pleurotus spp., and Potential Use in Dye Decolorization.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seon-Hwa; Lee, Yun-Hae; Kang, Hee-Wan

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted in order to perform efficient extraction of lignocellulolytic enzymes amylase (EC 3.2.1.1), cellulase (EC 3.2.1.4), laccase (EC 1.10.3.2), and xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) from spent mushroom compost (SMC) of Pleurotus ostreatus, P. eryngii, and P. cornucopiae. Optimal enzyme recovery was achieved when SMCs were extracted with 50 mM sodium citrate (pH 4.5) buffer at 4? for 2 hr. Amylase, cellulase, and xylanase activities showed high values in extracts from P. ostreatus SMC, with 2.97 U/g, 1.67 U/g, and 91.56 U/g, respectively, whereas laccase activity and filter paper degradation ability were highest in extracts from P. eryngii SMC, with values of 9.01 U/g and 0.21 U/g, respectively. Enzymatic activities varied according to the SMCs released from different mushroom farms. The synthetic dyes remazol brilliant blue R and Congo red were decolorized completely by the SMC extract of P. eryngii within 120 min, and the decolorization ability of the extract was comparable to that of 0.3 U of commercial laccase. In addition, laccase activity of the SMC extract from P. eryngii was compared to that of commercial enzymes or its industrial application in decolorization. PMID:24493942

  7. Efficient Recovery of Lignocellulolytic Enzymes of Spent Mushroom Compost from Oyster Mushrooms, Pleurotus spp., and Potential Use in Dye Decolorization

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seon-Hwa; Lee, Yun-Hae

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to perform efficient extraction of lignocellulolytic enzymes amylase (EC 3.2.1.1), cellulase (EC 3.2.1.4), laccase (EC 1.10.3.2), and xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) from spent mushroom compost (SMC) of Pleurotus ostreatus, P. eryngii, and P. cornucopiae. Optimal enzyme recovery was achieved when SMCs were extracted with 50 mM sodium citrate (pH 4.5) buffer at 4? for 2 hr. Amylase, cellulase, and xylanase activities showed high values in extracts from P. ostreatus SMC, with 2.97 U/g, 1.67 U/g, and 91.56 U/g, respectively, whereas laccase activity and filter paper degradation ability were highest in extracts from P. eryngii SMC, with values of 9.01 U/g and 0.21 U/g, respectively. Enzymatic activities varied according to the SMCs released from different mushroom farms. The synthetic dyes remazol brilliant blue R and Congo red were decolorized completely by the SMC extract of P. eryngii within 120 min, and the decolorization ability of the extract was comparable to that of 0.3 U of commercial laccase. In addition, laccase activity of the SMC extract from P. eryngii was compared to that of commercial enzymes or its industrial application in decolorization. PMID:24493942

  8. Ecological Connectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi Reservoirs and Triatoma pallidipennis Hosts in an Anthropogenic Landscape with Endemic Chagas Disease

    E-print Network

    Ramsey, Janine M.; Gutié rrez-Cabrera, Ana E.; Salgado-Ramí rez, Liliana; Peterson, A. Townsend; Sá nchez-Cordero, Ví ctor; Ibarra-Cerdeñ a, Carlos N.

    2012-09-26

    Traditional methods for Chagas disease prevention are targeted at domestic vector reduction, as well as control of transfusion and maternal-fetal transmission. Population connectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected vectors ...

  9. Drosophila Mushroom Bodies Are Dispensable for Visual, Tactile, and Motor Learning

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Reinhard; Wittig, Tobias; Liu, Li; Wustmann, Gerold; Eyding, Dirk; Heisenberg, Martin

    1998-01-01

    A total of 18 associative learning/memory tests have been applied to Drosophila melanogaster flies lacking mushroom bodies. Only in paradigms involving chemosensory cues as conditioned stimuli have flies been found to be compromised by a block in the mushroom body pathway. Among the learning tasks not requiring these structures are a case of motor learning (yaw torque/heat), a test of the fly’s spatial orientation in total darkness, conditioned courtship suppression by mated females, and nine different examples of visual learning. The latter used the reinforcers of heat, visual oscillations, mechanical shaking, or sucrose, and as conditioned stimuli, color, intensity contrast, as well as stationary and moving visual patterns. No forms of consolidated memory have been tested in mushroom body-less flies. With respect to short-term memory the mushroom bodies of Drosophila are specially required for chemosensory learning tasks, but not for associative learning and memory in general. PMID:10454381

  10. Mushroom ?-Glucan May Immunomodulate the Tumor-Associated Macrophages in the Lewis Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-Jhen; Wu, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Sherwin; Liu, Chi-Feng; Chen, Shiu-Nan

    2015-01-01

    The present study showed that oral mushroom beta-glucan treatment significantly increased IFN-? mRNA expression but significantly reduced COX-2 mRNA expression within the lung. For LLC tumor model, oral Ganoderma lucidum or Antrodia camphorata polysaccharides treatments significantly reduced TGF-? production in serum. In addition, IL-12 and IFN-? mRNA expression were significantly increased, but IL-6, IL-10, COX-2, and TGF-? mRNA expression were substantially following oral mushroom polysaccharides treatments. The study highlights the efficacious effect of mushroom polysaccharides for ameliorating the immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. Increased M1 phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages and attenuated M2 phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages could be achieved by ingesting mushroom polysaccharides. PMID:26167490

  11. Mushroom ?-Glucan May Immunomodulate the Tumor-Associated Macrophages in the Lewis Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wan-Jhen; Wu, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Sherwin; Liu, Chi-Feng; Chen, Shiu-Nan

    2015-01-01

    The present study showed that oral mushroom beta-glucan treatment significantly increased IFN-? mRNA expression but significantly reduced COX-2 mRNA expression within the lung. For LLC tumor model, oral Ganoderma lucidum or Antrodia camphorata polysaccharides treatments significantly reduced TGF-? production in serum. In addition, IL-12 and IFN-? mRNA expression were significantly increased, but IL-6, IL-10, COX-2, and TGF-? mRNA expression were substantially following oral mushroom polysaccharides treatments. The study highlights the efficacious effect of mushroom polysaccharides for ameliorating the immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. Increased M1 phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages and attenuated M2 phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages could be achieved by ingesting mushroom polysaccharides.

  12. 78 FR 15683 - Certain Preserved Mushrooms From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ...mushrooms covered under this order are the species Agaricus bisporus and Agaricus bitorquis...Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty New Shipper Reviews 74 FR 14772 (April 1...China: Final Results of Antidumping Duty New Shipper Reviews 74 FR 28882 (June...

  13. Effect of different packaging films on postharvest quality and selected enzyme activities of Hypsizygus marmoreus mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zengtao; Wang, Yaosong; Feng, Zhiyong; Tan, Qi

    2008-12-24

    Freshly harvested Hypsizygus marmoreus mushrooms were packaged using different packaging films, and physiological changes associated with postharvest deterioration, together with the activities of selected enzymes thought to play a role in senescence, were monitored during subsequent storage for 16-24 days at 4 degrees C and 65-70% relative humidity. A biaxially oriented polypropylene film (BOPP) maintained the postharvest appearance of the mushrooms most effectively by significantly reducing the incidence of unsightly aerial hyphae on the pileal surface and restricting mushroom softening. These samples also exhibited smaller initial decreases in soluble protein, smaller increases in reducing sugar content, and lower levels of malondialdehyde accumulation during early storage. Smallest increases in proteinase activity were recorded in samples wrapped with BOPP and polyoletin packaging, and superoxide dismutase and polyphenol oxidase levels were significantly higher and lower, respectively, in the former. Choice of packaging can significantly affect postharvest quality loss in H. marmoreus and improve mushroom shelf life. PMID:19090711

  14. Mushrooms: A Potential Natural Source of Anti-Inflammatory Compounds for Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Elsayed A.; El Enshasy, Hesham; Wadaan, Mohammad A. M.; Aziz, Ramlan

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, macrofungi have been used as food and medicine in different parts of the world. This is mainly attributed to their nutritional value as a potential source of carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, and minerals. In addition, they also include many bioactive metabolites which make mushrooms and truffles common components in folk medicine, especially in Africa, the Middle East, China, and Japan. The reported medicinal effects of mushrooms include anti-inflammatory effects, with anti-inflammatory compounds of mushrooms comprising a highly diversified group in terms of their chemical structure. They include polysaccharides, terpenoids, phenolic compounds, and many other low molecular weight molecules. The aims of this review are to report the different types of bioactive metabolites and their relevant producers, as well as the different mechanisms of action of mushroom compounds as potent anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25505823

  15. Mass spectrometric determination of acromelic acid A from a new poisonous mushroom: Clitocybe amoenolens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Bessard; P. Saviuc; Y. Chane-Yene; S. Monnet; G. Bessard

    2004-01-01

    As Clitocybe acromelalga, the mushroom Clitocybe amoenolens is responsible for erythermalgia. Acromelic acids isolated from C. acromelalga have been suspected to be to some extend the active principles. The objective was to develop a specific and sensitive liquid chromatographic–mass spectrometric method that would allow acromelic acid A identification and quantification in mushrooms. The method involved a single-step methanol–water extraction followed

  16. Cultivation of oyster mushrooms on wheat straw and bagasse substrate amendedwith distillery effluent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deepak Pant; U. Gangi Reddy; Alok Adholeya

    2006-01-01

    Summary  Molasses-based distilleries produce large quantities of dark coloured effluent, which is a major cause of environmental pollution.\\u000a An experiment was conducted to investigate the efficacy of distillery effluent amendment for edible mushroom production. Three\\u000a species of oyster mushroom, namely Pleurotus florida Eger (EM 1303), Pleurotus pulmonarius (Fries) Quelet (EM 1302) and Pleurotus sajor-caju (Fries) Singer (EM 1304) were grown on

  17. The cultural significance of wild mushrooms in San Mateo Huexoyucan, Tlaxcala, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We performed an ethnomycological study in a community in Tlaxcala, Central Mexico to identify the most important species of wild mushrooms growing in an oak forest, their significance criteria, and to validate the Cultural Significance Index (CSI). Methods Thirty-three mestizo individuals were randomly selected in San Mateo Huexoyucan and were asked seven questions based on criteria established by the CSI. Among the 49 mushroom species collected in the oak forest and open areas, 20 species were mentioned most often and were analyzed in more detail. Ordination and grouping techniques were used to determine the relationship between the cultural significance of the mushroom species, according to a perceived abundance index, frequency of use index, taste score appreciation index, multifunctional food index, knowledge transmission index, and health index. Results The mushrooms with highest CSI values were Agaricus campestris, Ramaria spp., Amanita aff. basii, Russula spp., Ustilago maydis, and Boletus variipes. These species were characterized by their good taste and were considered very nutritional. The species with the lowest cultural significance included Russula mexicana, Lycoperdon perlatum, and Strobylomyces strobilaceus. The ordination and grouping analyses identified four groups of mushrooms by their significance to the people of Huexoyucan. The most important variables that explained the grouping were the taste score appreciation index, health index, the knowledge transmission index, and the frequency of use index. Conclusions A. aff. basii and A. campestris were the most significant wild mushrooms to the people of San Mateo. The diversity of the Russula species and the variety of Amanita and Ramaria species used by these people was outstanding. Environments outside the forest also produced useful resources. The CSI used in Oaxaca was useful for determining the cultural significance of mushrooms in SMH, Tlaxcala. This list of mushrooms can be used in conservation proposals for the Quercus forests in the area. PMID:24597704

  18. The use of hallucinogenic mushrooms for diagnostic purposes among some highland Chinantecs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arthur J. Rubel; Jean Gettelfinger-Krejci

    1976-01-01

    This article describes the ingestion of hallucinogenic mushrooms—Psilocybe Hoogshagenii Heim—as a means to diagnose illness among contemporary Chinantec-speaking Indians of the Sierra de Ixtlán, Oaxaca, México.\\u000a It is possible that several varieties of hallucinogenic mushrooms are used amongst these highland Chinantecs, the specific\\u000a variety utilized depending upon “seasonal availability and the precise purpose for which the narcotic is to be

  19. Mushroom worker's lung: Serologic reactions to thermophilic actinomycetes present in the air of compost tunnels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. G. G. Van den Bogart; G. Van den Ende; P. C. C. Van Loon; L. J. L. D. Van Griensven

    1993-01-01

    Vast numbers of spores of the thermophilic actinomycetesExcellospora flexuosa,Thermomonospora alba,T. curvata andT. fusca were collected from the air in fermentation tunnels during the spawning of mushroom compost, i.e. over 109 CFU m-3 of air. Five different genera of fungi, namely,Aspergillus,Aureobasidium,Cladosporium,Penicillium andScytalidium, were found at only 103 CFU m-3 of air.Agaricus bisporus, used for spawning, was absent. Sera of 10 mushroom

  20. Biotechnology of morel mushrooms: successful fruiting body formation and development in a soilless system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Segula Masaphy

    2010-01-01

    Morchella spp. ascocarps (morels) are some of the world’s most sought-after mushrooms. Successful cultivation of morels is still a\\u000a rare and difficult task despite over 100 years of effort. Here we provide the first report of successful Morchella\\u000a rufobrunnea fruiting body initiation and development in laboratory-scale experiments. Mushroom initials appeared 2 to 4 weeks after first\\u000a watering of pre-grown sclerotia incubated at

  1. Screening of edible mushrooms for release of ferulic acid from wheat bran by fermentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chun-yan Xie; Zhen-xin Gu; Xuejiao You; Gaixia Liu; Yuxia Tan; Hong Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Studies were carried out to identify edible mushrooms that are able to release ferulic acid from wheat bran. In the five samples tested in the present studies, cultured mycelia of four mushroom species were found to release ferulic acid, with Hericium erinaceus producing the highest ferulic acid yield at 4d of culture, reach 95.51mg\\/l in wheat bran broth. Enzymes detection

  2. Structural and phase transitions of one and two polymer mushrooms in poor solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Delian; Wang, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    Using the recently proposed fast lattice Monte Carlo (FLMC) simulations and the corresponding lattice self-consistent field (LSCF) calculations based on the same model system, where multiple occupancy of lattice sites is allowed [Q. Wang, Soft Matter 5, 4564 (2009); Q. Wang, Soft Matter 5, 6206 (2010)], we studied the coil-globule transition (CGT) of one-mushroom systems and the fused-separated transition (FST) of two-mushroom systems, where a polymer mushroom is formed by a group of n homopolymer chains each of N segments end-grafted at the same point onto a flat substrate and immersed in a poor solvent. With our soft potential that allows complete particle overlapping, LSCF theory neglecting the system fluctuations/correlations becomes exact in the limit of n ? ?, and FLMC results approach LSCF predictions with increasing n. Using LSCF calculations, we systematically constructed the phase diagrams of one- and two-mushroom systems. A second-order symmetric-asymmetric transition (SAT) was found in the globule state of one-mushroom systems, where the rotational symmetry around the substrate normal passing through the grafting point is broken in each individual configuration but preserved by the degeneracy of different orientations of these asymmetric configurations. Three different states were also found in two-mushroom systems: separated coils, separated globules, and fused globule. We further studied the coupling between FST in two-mushroom systems and CGT and SAT of each mushroom. Finally, direct comparisons between our simulation and theoretical results, without any parameter-fitting, unambiguously and quantitatively revealed the fluctuation/correlation effects on these phase transitions.

  3. Optimization of Microwave-Vacuum Drying of Button Mushrooms Using Response-Surface Methodology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Giri; Suresh Prasad

    2007-01-01

    Button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporous) were dried in a microwave-vacuum dryer up to a final moisture content of around 6% (d.b.). The effect of microwave power level (115 to 285 W), system pressure (6.5 to 23.5 kPa), and slice thickness (6 to 14 mm) on drying efficiency and some quality attributes (color, texture, rehydration ratio, and sensory attributes) of dehydrated mushrooms were analyzed by

  4. Antimutagenic effect of Lentinula edodes (BERK.) Pegler mushroom and possible variation among lineages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M Sugui; P. L Alves de Lima; R. D Delmanto; A. F da Eira; D. M. F Salvadori; L. R Ribeiro

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the efficiency of four different lineages (95\\/01, L1, 96\\/22 and JABK) of Lentinula edodes (BERK.) Pegler mushroom (shiitake) for inhibiting the N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) clastogenicity in vivo. Male Swiss mice (10 animals\\/group) were treated during 15 consecutive days with dried mushroom added to basal diet under three different concentrations (1, 5 and 10%). At day

  5. Classification of Sequences Expressed during the Primordial and Basidiome Stages of the Cultivated Mushroom Agaricus bisporus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D Ospina-Giraldo; P. D Collopy; C. P Romaine; D. J Royse

    2000-01-01

    Ospina-Giraldo, M. D., Collopy, P. D., Romaine, C. P., and Royse, D. J. 2000. Classification of sequences expressed during the primordial and basidiome stages of the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus. Two complementary DNA (cDNA) libraries were constructed from tissues isolated from primordia and basidiomes of Agaricus bisporus to characterize genes involved in mushroom development. Using single-pass sequencing of 869 cDNA

  6. Modelling the insect Mushroom Bodies: Application to sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Arena, Paolo; Calí, Marco; Patané, Luca; Portera, Agnese; Strauss, Roland

    2015-07-01

    Learning and reproducing temporal sequences is a fundamental ability used by living beings to adapt behaviour repertoire to environmental constraints. This paper is focused on the description of a model based on spiking neurons, able to learn and autonomously generate a sequence of events. The neural architecture is inspired by the insect Mushroom Bodies (MBs) that are a crucial centre for multimodal sensory integration and behaviour modulation. The sequence learning capability coexists, within the insect brain computational model, with all the other features already addressed like attention, expectation, learning classification and others. This is a clear example that a unique neural structure is able to cope concurrently with a plethora of behaviours. Simulation results and robotic experiments are reported and discussed. PMID:25864122

  7. Random Convergence of Olfactory Inputs in the Drosophila Mushroom Body

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Sophie J.C.; Ruta, Vanessa; Abbott, L. F.; Axel, Richard

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The mushroom body (MB) in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an associative brain centre that translates odour representations into learned behavioural responses1. Kenyon cells (KCs), the intrinsic neurons of the MB, integrate input from olfactory glomeruli to encode odours as sparse distributed patterns of neural activity2,3. We have developed anatomic tracing techniques to identify the glomerular origin of the inputs that converge onto 200 individual KCs. Here we show that each KC integrates input from a different and apparently random combination of glomeruli. The glomerular inputs to individual KCs exhibit no discernible organization with respect to their odour tuning, anatomic features, or developmental origins. Moreover, different classes of KCs do not appear to preferentially integrate inputs from specific combinations of glomeruli. This organization of glomerular connections to the MB could allow the fly to contextualize novel sensory experiences, a feature consistent with the role of this brain centre in mediating learned olfactory associations and behaviours. PMID:23615618

  8. Three new fatty acid esters from the mushroom Boletus pseudocalopus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Choi, Sang Un; Lee, Kang Ro

    2012-06-01

    A bioassay-guided fractionation and chemical investigation of a MeOH extract of the Korean wild mushroom Boletus pseudocalopus resulted in the identification of three new fatty acid esters, named calopusins A-C (1-3), along with two known fatty acid methyl esters (4-5). These new compounds are structurally unique fatty acid esters with a 2,3-butanediol moiety. Their structures were elucidated through 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopic data and GC-MS analysis as well as a modified Mosher's method. The new compounds 1-3 showed significant inhibitory activity against the proliferation of the tested cancer cell lines with IC(50) values in the range 2.77-12.51 ?M. PMID:22271425

  9. Differences in Cu content in selected mushroom species growing in the same unpolluted areas in Poland.

    PubMed

    Mleczek, Miros?aw; Siwulski, Marek; Miko?ajczak, Patrycja; G?secka, Monika; Rissmann, Iwona; Goli?ski, Piotr; Sobieralski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate copper (Cu) accumulation efficiency in whole-fruiting bodies of 18 edible and non-edible wild growing mushrooms collected from 27 places in the Wielkopolska Voivodeship. Mushrooms were collected each time from the same places to estimate the diversity in Cu accumulation between tested mushroom species within 3 consecutive years of study (2011-2013). The study results revealed various accumulation of Cu in the whole-tested mushroom fruiting bodies. The highest mean accumulation of Cu was observed in Macrolepiota procera (119.4 ± 20.0 mg kg(-1) dm), while the lowest was in Suillus luteus and Russula fellea fruiting bodies (16.1 ± 3.0 and 18.8 ± 4.6 mg kg(-1) dm, respectively). Significant differences in Cu accumulation between mushroom species collected in 2011 and in the two following years (2012 and 2013) were observed. The results indicated that sporadic consumption of these mushrooms was not related to excessive intake of Cu for the human body (no toxic influence on health). PMID:26079340

  10. Study of heavy metal concentrations in wild edible mushrooms in Yunnan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Borui; Huang, Qing; Cai, Huajie; Guo, Xiang; Wang, Tingting; Gui, Mingying

    2015-12-01

    Contamination with heavy metals in several species of edible mushrooms from the Yunnan Province in China was determined. Samples were collected from 16 locations in the Yunnan Province, and the contamination levels of Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the concentrations of essential elements (Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn) in the mushrooms were at typical levels. The concentrations of potentially toxic metals (As, Pb and Cd) were higher than the national standard values of China (1.0mg/kg for As, 0.2mg/kg for Cd, and 2.0mg/kg for Pb) in most cases. Bio-concentration factors suggested that it was easier for As and Cd to be accumulated in mushrooms than Pb, and a Health Risk Index assessment also suggested that As and Cd are greater risks to health than Pb. In conclusion, heavy metal pollution in wild edible mushrooms is a serious problem in the Yunnan Province. Among the toxic metals, As and Cd in the edible mushrooms in the area are the main sources of risk, as they may cause severe health problems. The local government needs to take measures in the form of concrete policies to protect the wild edible mushroom resources in the Yunnan Province. PMID:26041195

  11. Consumption of vitamin D2 enhanced mushrooms is associated with improved bone health.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shin-Yu; Yu, Hui-Tzu; Kao, Ju-Po; Yang, Chung-Chun; Chiang, Shen-Shih; Mishchuk, Darya O; Mau, Jeng-Leun; Slupsky, Carolyn M

    2015-07-01

    Mushrooms are the best nonanimal food source of vitamin D2. Pulsed irradiation can enhance vitamin D2 in mushrooms quickly. We investigated the effect of supplementing high vitamin D2Pleurotus ferulae mushrooms in a mouse model of osteoporosis. Thirty-two female C57BL/6JNarl mice were divided into four groups including sham, ovariectomized (OVX), OVX+nonpulsed mushroom (NPM) and OVX+pulsed mushroom (PM). After 23weeks of treatment, serum samples were analyzed for osteoblast and osteoclast indicators, as well as metabolites using NMR spectroscopy. To examine bone density, femurs were analyzed using micro-computed tomography. The NPM and PM treatment mice showed increased bone density in comparison with OVX mice. In addition, the PM mice showed higher osteoblast and lower osteoclast indicators in comparison with OVX mice. Serum metabolomics analysis indicated several metabolites that were different in PM mice, some of which could be correlated with bone health. Taken together, these results suggest that pulsed irradiated mushrooms are able to increase bone density in osteoporotic mice possibly through enhanced bone metabolism. Further studies in humans are needed to show their efficacy in preventing osteoporosis. PMID:25792284

  12. Relationship between uptake of mercury vapor by mushrooms and its catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, M.; Kenmotsu, K.; Hirota, N.; Naito, M.

    1981-12-01

    The uptake of mercury vapor by mushrooms (Shiitake) artifically grown on an oak tree and the uptake in vitro by catalase extracts prepared from mushroom Hay Bacillus and spinach are reported. Mushrooms were exposed to 1.4 mg/Hg/cu m for 11 days. Measurement of total mercury was as previously described (Ogata et al. 1978, 1979). Levels in mushrooms ranged from 0.4 +/- 0.1 ..mu..g/g at 0.5 days to 4.6 +/- 0.2 ..mu..g/g at 10.5 days and steady-state thereafter. In in vitro studies Hy uptake by mushroom catalase extract was estimated by the perborate method. Uptake was found to parallel catalase activity and was inhibited by potassium cyanide, sodium azide, and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. Similar results were obtained with Hay Bacillus and spinach catalase extracts. Results suggest that the level of mercury in the mushroom can be used as an indicator of mercury pollution in the environment. It is also suggested that catalase has an important role in uptake of mercury vapor in the plant. 2 tables (JMT)

  13. Extension of mushroom shelf-life by ultrasound treatment combined with high pressure argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagnika, Camel; Zhang, Min; Nsor-Atindana, John; Tounkara, Fatoumata

    2014-03-01

    Effects of ultrasound, high pressure argon, and treatments comprising their combinations on physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of white mushrooms were studied during 9 days of storage at 4°C. High pressure argon treatments were relatively effective in retaining firmness and were found to maintain the cell integrity. White mushrooms firmness after 9 days of storage was increased from 2.79 N for untreated mushrooms up to 3.01, 3.24, 3.58 N for ultrasound, treatments comprising ultrasound and high pressure argon, high pressure argon, respectively. Similarly, the loss of water, ascorbic acid and total soluble solid in fresh mushroom was also greatly reduced by the high pressure argon treatment. The ultrasound treatment followed by treatments comprising ultrasound and high pressure argon and high pressure argon, respectively exhibited a pronounced effect on retarding browning and in delaying mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria, yeasts and moulds growth in white mushroom, compared to the control during 9 days of cold storage. Treatments comprising ultrasound and high pressure argon treatment delayed pseudomonas growth, implying that it could extend shelf life of white mushrooms to 9 days at 4°C.

  14. A distinctive ribonuclease from fresh fruiting bodies of the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Wang, H X; Ng, T B; Chiu, S W

    2004-02-01

    A ribonuclease with an N-terminal sequence distinct from other mushroom ribonucleases was isolated from fresh fruiting bodies of the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum. The ribonuclease was adsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and Q-Sepharose, and unadsorbed on CM-Sepharose. It possessed a molecular mass of 42 kDa as judged by gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75 and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Its molecular mass was similar to that of straw mushroom ribonuclease but much higher compared with those of other mushroom ribonucleases. The ribonuclease was unique among mushroom ribonucleases in that it exhibited the highest potency toward poly(U), followed by poly(A). Its activity toward poly(G) and poly(C) was about one-half of that toward poly(A) and one-quarter of that toward poly(U). A pH of 4.0 and a temperature of 60 degrees C were required for optimal activity of the enzyme. The optimum pH was low compared with those reported for other mushroom ribonucleases. PMID:14733937

  15. Paenalcaligenes suwonensis sp. nov., isolated from spent mushroom compost.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Young; Lim, Jun-Muk; Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Weon, Hang-Yeon; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Kim, Soo-Jin

    2014-03-01

    A bacterial strain, ABC02-12(T), was isolated from spent mushroom compost, a waste product of button mushroom cultivation. Cells of the strain were Gram-stain-negative, catalase- and oxidase-positive, non-spore-forming, aerobic flagellated rods. Optimum growth occurred at 28 °C and pH 7.0. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain ABC02-12(T) shared the highest sequence similarities with Paenalcaligenes hominis CCUG 53761A(T) (96.0?%), Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis G(T) (95.7?%), Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. faecalis IAM 12369(T) (95.4?%) and Pusillimonas noertemannii BN9(T) (95.3?%). According to the phylogenetic tree, strain ABC02-12(T) formed a robust cluster with Paenalcaligenes hominis CCUG 53761A(T) and Paenalcaligenes hermetiae KBL009(T). The quinone system was ubiquinone Q-8 with minor amounts of Q-7. The major fatty acids (>5?% of total fatty acids) were C16?:?0, C16?:?1?6c and/or C16?:?1?7c (summed feature 3), C18?:?1?7c and/or C18?:?1?6c (summed feature 8), C17?:?0 cyclo, and iso-C16?:?1 I, C14?:?0 3-OH and/or an unknown fatty acid (summed feature 2). The polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and an unknown aminolipid. Putrescine was the principal polyamine, with small amounts of 2-hydroxyputrescine and cadaverine. On the basis of the evidence presented in this study, strain ABC02-12(T) is a representative of a novel species within the genus Paenalcaligenes, for which the name Paenalcaligenes suwonensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ABC02-12(T) (?=?KACC 16537(T)?=?NBRC 108927(T)). PMID:24271214

  16. Mushroom Ganoderma lucidum Prevents Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sliva, Daniel; Loganathan, Jagadish; Jiang, Jiahua; Jedinak, Andrej; Lamb, John G.; Terry, Colin; Baldridge, Lee Ann; Adamec, Jiri; Sandusky, George E.; Dudhgaonkar, Shailesh

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that mushroom intake is inversely correlated with gastric, gastrointestinal and breast cancers. We have recently demonstrated anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity of triterpene extract isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (GLT). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether GLT prevents colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice. Methods/Principal Findings Colon carcinogenesis was induced by the food-borne carcinogen (2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazol[4,5-b]pyridine [PhIP]) and inflammation (dextran sodium sulfate [DSS]) in mice. Mice were treated with 0, 100, 300 and 500 mg GLT/kg of body weight 3 times per week for 4 months. Cell proliferation, expression of cyclin D1 and COX-2 and macrophage infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The effect of GLT on XRE/AhR, PXR and rPXR was evaluated by the reporter gene assays. Expression of metabolizing enzymes CYP1A2, CYP3A1 and CYP3A4 in colon tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. GLT treatment significantly suppressed focal hyperplasia, aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation and tumor formation in mice exposed to PhIP/DSS. The anti-proliferative effects of GLT were further confirmed by the decreased staining with Ki-67 in colon tissues. PhIP/DSS-induced colon inflammation was demonstrated by the significant shortening of the large intestine and macrophage infiltrations, whereas GLT treatment prevented the shortening of colon lengths, and reduced infiltration of macrophages in colon tissue. GLT treatment also significantly down-regulated PhIP/DSS-dependent expression of cyclin D1, COX-2, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in colon tissue. Conclusions Our data suggest that GLT could be considered as an alternative dietary approach for the prevention of colitis-associated cancer. PMID:23118901

  17. Rayleigh-Taylor instability and mushroom-pattern formation in a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Kazuki; Suzuki, Naoya; Saito, Hiroki [Department of Applied Physics and Chemistry, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Akamatsu, Daisuke [National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8563 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface in an immiscible two-component Bose-Einstein condensate is investigated using the mean field and Bogoliubov theories. Rayleigh-Taylor fingers are found to grow from the interface and mushroom patterns are formed. Quantized vortex rings and vortex lines are then generated around the mushrooms. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability and mushroom-pattern formation can be observed in a trapped system.

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle during experimental Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Báez, Alejandra L; Reynoso, María N; Lo Presti, María S; Bazán, Paola C; Strauss, Mariana; Miler, Noemí; Pons, Patricia; Rivarola, Héctor W; Paglini-Oliva, Patricia

    2015-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi invasion and replication in cardiomyocytes and other tissues induce cellular injuries and cytotoxic reactions, with the production of inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide, both sources of reactive oxygen species. The myocyte response to oxidative stress involves the progression of cellular changes primarily targeting mitochondria. Similar alterations could be taking place in mitochondria from the skeletal muscle; if that is the case, a simple skeletal muscle biopsy would give information about the cardiac energetic production that could be used as a predictor of the chagasic cardiopathy evolution. Therefore, in the present paper we studied skeletal muscle mitochondrial structure and the enzymatic activity of citrate synthase and respiratory chain complexes I to IV (CI-CIV), in Albino Swiss mice infected with T. cruzi, Tulahuen strain and SGO Z12 and Lucky isolates, along the infection. Changes in the mitochondrial structure were detected in 100% of the mitochondria analyzed from the infected groups: they all presented at least 1 significant abnormality such as increase in their matrix or disorganization of their cristae, which are probably related to the enzymatic dysfunction. When we studied the Krebs cycle functionality through the measurement of the specific citrate synthase activity, we found it to be significantly diminished during the acute phase of the infection in Tulahuen and SGO Z12 infected groups with respect to the control one; citrate synthase activity from the Lucky group was significantly increased (p<0.05). The activity of this enzyme was reduced in all the infected groups during the chronic asymptomatic phase (p<0.001) and return to normal values (Tulahuen and SGO Z12) or increased its activity (Lucky) by day 365 post-infection (p.i.). When the mitochondrial respiratory chain was analyzed from the acute to the chronic phase of the infection through the measurement of the activity of complexes I to IV, the activity of CI remained similar to control in Tulahuen and Lucky groups, but was significantly augmented in the SGO Z12 one in the acute and chronic phases (p<0.05). CII increased its activity in Tulahuen and Lucky groups by day 75 p.i. and in SGO Z12 by day 365 p.i. (p<0.05). CIII showed a similar behavior in the 3 infected groups, remaining similar to control values in the first two stages of the infection and significantly increasing later on (p<0.0001). CIV showed an increase in its activity in Lucky throughout all stages of infection (p<0.0001) and an increase in Tulahuen by day 365days p.i. (p<0.0001); SGO Z12 on the other hand, showed a decreased CIV activity at the same time. The structural changes in skeletal muscle mitochondria and their altered enzyme activity began in the acute phase of infection, probably modifying the ability of mitochondria to generate energy; these changes were not compensated in the rest of the phases of the infection. Chagas is a systemic disease, which produces not only heart damage but also permanent skeletal muscle alterations. PMID:25835781

  19. Circadian entrainment by light and host in the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Verónica Sandra; Amelotti, Ivana; Gorla, David Eladio; Catalá, Silvia Susana; Ralph, Martin Roland

    2014-03-01

    Triatoma infestans (Reduviidae: Triatominae, "kissing bug") is the main insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, a chronic trypanosomiasis infecting 10 million people world-wide. This hematophagous bug feeds on diurnal and nocturnal species during each host's quiescent time. As the hosts are also its major predators, kissing bugs are subjected to dual selective pressures from a single source. Therefore, synchronization of feeding with the host's behavior is critical to the insects' survival. We show that nonphotic signals linked to the host eclipse the role of light and dark as the primary circadian zeitgeber for these bugs, although light still strongly inhibits locomotor behavior directly. In nature, this combination provides the insect with great flexibility in organizing physiology and behavior: anticipating a quiescent host or avoiding its potential predation while remaining directly responsive to immediate environmental conditions. Manipulation of nonphotic entrainment could be a useful chronobiotic tool in the control of Chagas disease. PMID:24156522

  20. High-throughput drug repositioning for the discovery of new treatments for Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Bellera, Carolina L; Sbaraglini, Maria L; Balcazar, Dario E; Fraccaroli, Laura; Vanrell, M Cristina; Casassa, A Florencia; Labriola, Carlos A; Romano, Patricia S; Carrillo, Carolina; Talevi, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Despite affecting around 8 million people worldwide and representing an economic burden above $7 billion/ year, currently approved medications to treat Chagas disease are still limited to two drugs, nifurtimox and benznidazole, which were developed more than 40 years ago and present important efficacy and safety limitations. Drug repositioning (i.e. finding second or further therapeutic indications for known drugs) has raised considerable interest within the international drug development community. There are many explanations to the current interest on drug repositioning including the possibility to partially circumvent clinical trials and the consequent saving in time and resources. It has been suggested as a particular attractive approach for the development of novel therapeutics for neglected diseases, which are usually driven by public or non-profit organizations. Here we review current computer-guided approaches to drug repositioning and reports on drug repositioning stories oriented to Chagas disease, with a focus on computer-guided drug repositioning campaigns. PMID:25769967

  1. Interferon-? and other inflammatory mediators in cardiomyocyte signaling during Chagas disease cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ludmila Rodrigues Pinto; Frade, Amanda Farage; Baron, Monique Andrade; Navarro, Isabela Cunha; Kalil, Jorge; Chevillard, Christophe; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC), the main consequence of Trypanosoma cruzi (T.cruzi) infection, is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in up to 30% of infected individuals. The heart inflammation in CCC patients is characterized by a Th1 T cell-rich myocarditis with increased production of interferon (IFN)-?, produced by the CCC myocardial infiltrate and detected at high levels in the periphery. IFN-? has a central role in the cardiomyocyte signaling during both acute and chronic phases of T.cruzi infection. In this review, we have chosen to focus in its pleiotropic mode of action during CCC, which may ultimately be the strongest driver towards pathological remodeling and heart failure. We describe here the antiparasitic protective and pathogenic dual role of IFN-? in Chagas disease. PMID:25228957

  2. Prevalence of trypanosome infections in dogs from Chagas disease endemic regions in Panama, Central America.

    PubMed

    Pineda, V; Saldaña, A; Monfante, I; Santamaría, A; Gottdenker, N L; Yabsley, M J; Rapoport, G; Calzada, J E

    2011-06-10

    The prevalence of canine trypanosomosis was investigated in two Chagas disease endemic rural communities located in the central region of Panama. Serologic tests for Trypanosoma cruzi infection revealed a prevalence of 11.1%. Hemocultures coupled with PCR analysis demonstrated a Trypanosoma rangeli infection rate of 5.1%. An overall trypanosome infection index of 16.2% (16/99) was detected in this canine population. One dog had a mixed infection of T. cruzi and T. rangeli. Six of the trypanosome-infected dogs belong to people who were diagnosed of Chagas disease. We conclude that dogs from this rural area of Panama are frequently infected with trypanosomes transmitted by the sylvatic vector, Rhodnius pallescens, and suggest that dogs are important in the peridomestic transmission cycle of trypanosomes as reservoirs and hosts. The epidemiological implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21273002

  3. Diversity-oriented synthesis yields a new drug lead for treatment of chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Dandapani, Sivaraman; Germain, Andrew R; Jewett, Ivan; le Quement, Sebastian; Marie, Jean-Charles; Muncipinto, Giovanni; Duvall, Jeremy R; Carmody, Leigh C; Perez, Jose R; Engel, Juan C; Gut, Jiri; Kellar, Danielle; Siqueira-Neto, Jair Lage; McKerrow, James H; Kaiser, Marcel; Rodriguez, Ana; Palmer, Michelle A; Foley, Michael; Schreiber, Stuart L; Munoz, Benito

    2014-02-13

    A phenotypic high-throughput screen using ?100,000 compounds prepared using Diversity-Oriented Synthesis yielded stereoisomeric compounds with nanomolar growth-inhibition activity against the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. After evaluating stereochemical dependence on solubility, plasma protein binding and microsomal stability, the SSS analogue (5) was chosen for structure-activity relationship studies. The p-phenoxy benzyl group appended to the secondary amine could be replaced with halobenzyl groups without loss in potency. The exocyclic primary alcohol is not needed for activity but the isonicotinamide substructure is required for activity. Most importantly, these compounds are trypanocidal and hence are attractive as drug leads for both acute and chronic stages of Chagas disease. Analogue (5) was nominated as the molecular libraries probe ML341 and is available through the Molecular Libraries Probe Production Centers Network. PMID:24900788

  4. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis Yields a New Drug Lead for Treatment of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput screen using ?100,000 compounds prepared using Diversity-Oriented Synthesis yielded stereoisomeric compounds with nanomolar growth-inhibition activity against the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. After evaluating stereochemical dependence on solubility, plasma protein binding and microsomal stability, the SSS analogue (5) was chosen for structure–activity relationship studies. The p-phenoxy benzyl group appended to the secondary amine could be replaced with halobenzyl groups without loss in potency. The exocyclic primary alcohol is not needed for activity but the isonicotinamide substructure is required for activity. Most importantly, these compounds are trypanocidal and hence are attractive as drug leads for both acute and chronic stages of Chagas disease. Analogue (5) was nominated as the molecular libraries probe ML341 and is available through the Molecular Libraries Probe Production Centers Network. PMID:24900788

  5. Murine susceptibility to Chagas' disease maps to chromosomes 5 and 17

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S E B Graefe; B S Meyer; B Müller-Myhsok; F Rüschendorf; C Drosten; T Laue; C Steeg; P Nürnberg; B Fleischer; SEB Graefe

    2003-01-01

    Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and commonly modelled in inbred mice. Susceptibility of mouse strains to experimental infection varies considerably. We quantified parasite tissue burdens in resistant and susceptible strains by real time PCR and applied a backcross strategy to map the genomic loci linked to susceptibility in inbred mice. Resistant B6D2F1 mice were backcrossed

  6. Chronic Chagas' Disease Cardiomyopathy Patients Display an Increased IFN-? Response to Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lúcia C. J Abel; Luiz V Rizzo; Bárbara Ianni; Fabiana Albuquerque; Fernando Bacal; Dirceu Carrara; Edimar A Bocchi; Henrique C Teixeira; Charles Mady; Jorge Kalil; Edecio Cunha-Neto

    2001-01-01

    One-third of all Trypanosoma cruzi -infected patients eventually develop chronic Chagas' disease cardiomyopathy (CCC), a particularly lethal inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy, where parasites are scarce and heart-infiltrating mononuclear cells seem to be the effectors of tissue damage. Since T. cruzi is a major inducer of interleukin-12 production, the role of inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of CCC was investigated. We assayed

  7. Increased Myeloperoxidase Activity and Protein Nitration Are Indicators of Inflammation in Patients with Chagas' Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monisha Dhiman; Jose Guillermo Estrada-Franco; Jasmine M. Pando; Francisco J. Ramirez-Aguilar; Heidi Spratt; Sara Vazquez-Corzo; Gladys Perez-Molina; Rosa Gallegos-Sandoval; Roberto Moreno; Nisha Jain Garg

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether inflammatory responses contribute to oxidative\\/nitrosative stress in patients with Chagas' disease. We used three tests (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immuno-flow cy- tometry, and STAT-PAK immunochromatography) to screen human serum samples (n 1,481) originating from Chiapas, Mexico, for Trypanosoma cruzi-specific antibodies. We identified 121 subjects who were sero- positive for T. cruzi-specific antibodies, a finding indicative

  8. Lower Richness of Small Wild Mammal Species and Chagas Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; Lima, Valdirene dos Santos; Monteiro, Kerla Joeline Lima; Otaviano, Joel Carlos Rodrigues; Ferreira da Silva, Luiz Felipe Coutinho; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    A new epidemiological scenario involving the oral transmission of Chagas disease, mainly in the Amazon basin, requires innovative control measures. Geospatial analyses of the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycle in the wild mammals have been scarce. We applied interpolation and map algebra methods to evaluate mammalian fauna variables related to small wild mammals and the T. cruzi infection pattern in dogs to identify hotspot areas of transmission. We also evaluated the use of dogs as sentinels of epidemiological risk of Chagas disease. Dogs (n?=?649) were examined by two parasitological and three distinct serological assays. kDNA amplification was performed in patent infections, although the infection was mainly sub-patent in dogs. The distribution of T. cruzi infection in dogs was not homogeneous, ranging from 11–89% in different localities. The interpolation method and map algebra were employed to test the associations between the lower richness in mammal species and the risk of exposure of dogs to T. cruzi infection. Geospatial analysis indicated that the reduction of the mammal fauna (richness and abundance) was associated with higher parasitemia in small wild mammals and higher exposure of dogs to infection. A Generalized Linear Model (GLM) demonstrated that species richness and positive hemocultures in wild mammals were associated with T. cruzi infection in dogs. Domestic canine infection rates differed significantly between areas with and without Chagas disease outbreaks (Chi-squared test). Geospatial analysis by interpolation and map algebra methods proved to be a powerful tool in the evaluation of areas of T. cruzi transmission. Dog infection was shown to not only be an efficient indicator of reduction of wild mammalian fauna richness but to also act as a signal for the presence of small wild mammals with high parasitemia. The lower richness of small mammal species is discussed as a risk factor for the re-emergence of Chagas disease. PMID:22616021

  9. A Scientometric Evaluation of the Chagas Disease Implementation Research Programme of the PAHO and TDR

    PubMed Central

    Carbajal-de-la-Fuente, Ana Laura; Yadón, Zaida E.

    2013-01-01

    The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) is an independent global programme of scientific collaboration cosponsored by the United Nations Children's Fund, the United Nations Development Program, the World Bank, and the World Health Organization. TDR's strategy is based on stewardship for research on infectious diseases of poverty, empowerment of endemic countries, research on neglected priority needs, and the promotion of scientific collaboration influencing global efforts to combat major tropical diseases. In 2001, in view of the achievements obtained in the reduction of transmission of Chagas disease through the Southern Cone Initiative and the improvement in Chagas disease control activities in some countries of the Andean and the Central American Initiatives, TDR transferred the Chagas Disease Implementation Research Programme (CIRP) to the Communicable Diseases Unit of the Pan American Health Organization (CD/PAHO). This paper presents a scientometric evaluation of the 73 projects from 18 Latin American and European countries that were granted by CIRP/PAHO/TDR between 1997 and 2007. We analyzed all final reports of the funded projects and scientific publications, technical reports, and human resource training activities derived from them. Results about the number of projects funded, countries and institutions involved, gender analysis, number of published papers in indexed scientific journals, main topics funded, patents inscribed, and triatomine species studied are presented and discussed. The results indicate that CIRP/PAHO/TDR initiative has contributed significantly, over the 1997–2007 period, to Chagas disease knowledge as well as to the individual and institutional-building capacity. PMID:24244761

  10. Benznidazole/Itraconazole Combination Treatment Enhances Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity in Experimental Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Assíria Fontes Martins, Tassiane; de Figueiredo Diniz, Lívia; Mazzeti, Ana Lia; da Silva do Nascimento, Álvaro Fernando; Caldas, Sérgio; Caldas, Ivo Santana; de Andrade, Isabel Mayer; Ribeiro, Isabela; Bahia, Maria Terezinha

    2015-01-01

    The nitroheterocyclic drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole are first-line drugs available to treat Chagas disease; however, they have limitations, including long treatment courses and toxicity. Strategies to overcome these limitations include the identification of new drugs with specific target profiles, re-dosing regimens for the current drugs, drug repositioning and combination therapy. In this work, we evaluated combination therapy as an approach for optimization of the current therapeutic regimen for Chagas disease. The curative action of benznidazole/itraconazole combinations was explored in an established infection of the mice model with the T. cruzi Y strain. The activities of the benznidazole/itraconazole combinations were compared with the results from those receiving the same dosage of each individual drug. The administration of benznidazole/itraconazole in combination eliminated parasites from the blood more efficiently than each drug alone. Here, there was a significant reduction of the number of treatment days (number of doses) necessary to induce parasitemia suppression with the benznidazole/itraconazole combination, as compared to each compound administered alone. These results clearly indicate the enhanced effects of these drugs in combination, particularly at the dose of 75 mg/kg, as the effects observed with the drug combinations were four times more effective than those of each drug used alone. Moreover, benznidazole/itraconazole treatment was shown to prevent or decrease the typical lesions associated with chronic experimental Chagas disease, as illustrated by similar levels of inflammatory cells and fibrosis in the cardiac muscle tissue of healthy and treated mice. These results emphasize the importance of exploring the potential of combination treatments with currently available compounds to specifically treat Chagas disease. PMID:26076455

  11. Parasite induced genetically driven autoimmune Chagas heart disease in the chicken model.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Antonio R L; Nitz, Nadjar; Bernal, Francisco M; Hecht, Mariana M

    2012-01-01

    The Trypanosoma cruzi acute infections acquired in infancy and childhood seem asymptomatic, but approximately one third of the chronically infected cases show Chagas disease up to three decades or later. Autoimmunity and parasite persistence are competing theories to explain the pathogenesis of Chagas disease. To separate roles played by parasite persistence and autoimmunity in Chagas disease we inoculate the T. cruzi in the air chamber of fertilized eggs. The mature chicken immune system is a tight biological barrier against T. cruzi and the infection is eradicated upon development of its immune system by the end of the first week of growth. The chicks are parasite-free at hatching, but they retain integrated parasite mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircle within their genome that are transferred to their progeny. Documentation of the kDNA minicircle integration in the chicken genome was obtained by a targeted prime TAIL-PCR, Southern hybridizations, cloning, and sequencing. The kDNA minicircle integrations rupture open reading frames for transcription and immune system factors, phosphatase (GTPase), adenylate cyclase and phosphorylases (PKC, NF-Kappa B activator, PI-3K) associated with cell physiology, growth, and differentiation, and other gene functions. Severe myocarditis due to rejection of target heart fibers by effectors cytotoxic lymphocytes is seen in the kDNA mutated chickens, showing an inflammatory cardiomyopathy similar to that seen in human Chagas disease. Notably, heart failure and skeletal muscle weakness are present in adult chickens with kDNA rupture of the dystrophin gene in chromosome 1. Similar genotipic alterations are associated with tissue destruction carried out by effectors CD45+, CD8??+, CD8? lymphocytes. Thus this protozoan infection can induce genetically driven autoimmune disease. PMID:22951533

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi in the Chicken Model: Chagas-Like Heart Disease in the Absence of Parasitism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio R. L. Teixeira; Clever Gomes; Nadjar Nitz; Alessandro O. Sousa; Rozeneide M. Alves; Maria C. Guimaro; Ciro Cordeiro; Francisco M. Bernal; Ana C. Rosa; Jiri Hejnar; Eduardo Leonardecz; Mariana M. Hecht

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundThe administration of anti-trypanosome nitroderivatives curtails Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Chagas disease patients, but does not prevent destructive lesions in the heart. This observation suggests that an effective treatment for the disease requires understanding its pathogenesis.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsTo understand the origin of clinical manifestations of the heart disease we used a chicken model system in which infection can be initiated in

  13. Special Publication No. 2, A Bibliography On Chagas' Disease (1909-1969)

    E-print Network

    Olivier, Margaret C.; Olivier, Louis J.; Segal, Dorothy B.

    1972-01-01

    de; Costa, Reynaldo de Britto; and Oliveira, J. Alberto Mello de 1964,- Desnerva?ao do plexos intramurais do tracto digestivo, em Rattus norvegicus albinus chag?sicos cronicos. (Denervation of intramural plexus of the digestive tract in R.... (Quantitative study of neurones in the myenteric and submucosal plexus of the Wistar rat.) Hospital, 66(1):119-124 (137-142), July. Alcantara, Francisco Gomes de; and Oliveira, J. Alberto Mello de 1964,- Fase cronica da molestia de Chagas em rato Wistar...

  14. The Involvement of Laminin in Anti-Myocardial Cell Autoimmune Response in Murine Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Savino, Wilson

    2000-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic chagasic cardiomyophathy associated with Chagas disease is still controversial, although evidence indicates a T cell-dependent autoimmune process. Using a mouse model for chronic Chagas disease, we previously evidenced that hearts grafted within the ears of Trypanosoma cruzi infected syngeneic recipients were rejected through a CD4+ T cell-dependent mechanism. Moreover, we showed that such a process was dependent on laminin-mediated interactions, since it could be abrogated by anti-laminin or anti-laminin receptor antibodies. In this review the same passive cell transfer model is considered for discussion: the participation of the laminin alteration in the composition of the inflammatory infiltrate formed in response to the antimyocardial autoreactive CD4+ T cells, as well as the presence of laminin-binding cytokines. Finally we suggest the existence of a relationship between the inflammatory infiltrate, the laminin contents and deposition of pro-inflammatory laminin-binding cytokines, which may act in concert during the generation of Chagas disease- related cardiomyophathy. PMID:11097219

  15. Working conditions of Chagas' disease patients in a large Brazilian city.

    PubMed

    Guariento, M E; Camilo, M V; Camargo, A M

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the working conditions of Chagas' disease patients in the city of Campinas, São Paulo, focusing on two-hundred-fifty patients with steady employment and treated at the University Hospital (HC-FCM/Unicamp): 98% were working-age and 77.6% were men. The origin of the patients reflected the migratory process occurring among this population. Most of the patients had limited professional skills, while 63.6% had not finished primary school and 21.6% were illiterate. However, 63.6% were regularly employed under duly processed work contracts. Their jobs were mainly in general services (21.6%) and heavy industry (21.2%). Some 55% of the patients reported a monthly income less than or equal to U$100.00, and 40.4% reported having been fired at least once during the last ten years, in 8.9% of the cases because of a diagnosis of Chagas' disease. Of the patients undergoing pre-hiring physical examinations (57.2%), 9.1% were refused, 92.3% of whom due to positive serology for T. cruzi. Finally, 78.4% reported not belonging to a labor union. The study demonstrated the precarious working conditions and discrimination experienced by workers with Chagas' disease. PMID:10409790

  16. The main sceneries of Chagas disease transmission. The vectors, blood and oral transmissions - A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Coura, José Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    This review deals with transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi by the most important domestic vectors, blood transfusion and oral intake. Among the vectors, Triatoma infestans, Panstrongylus megistus, Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma brasiliensis, Triatoma pseudomaculata, Triatoma sordida, Triatoma maculata, Panstrongylus geniculatus, Rhodnius ecuadoriensis and Rhodnius pallescens can be highlighted. Transmission of Chagas infection, which has been brought under control in some countries in South and Central America, remains a great challenge, particularly considering that many endemic countries do not have control over blood donors. Even more concerning is the case of non-endemic countries that receive thousands of migrants from endemic areas that carry Chagas disease, such as the United States of America, in North America, Spain, in Europe, Japan, in Asia, and Australia, in Oceania. In the Brazilian Amazon Region, since Shaw et al. (1969) described the first acute cases of the disease caused by oral transmission, hundreds of acute cases of the disease due to oral transmission have been described in that region, which is today considered to be endemic for oral transmission. Several other outbreaks of acute Chagas disease by oral transmission have been described in different states of Brazil and in other South American countries. PMID:25466622

  17. Positive deviance study to inform a Chagas disease control program in southern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Sanchez, Claudia; Baus, Esteban G; Guerrero, Darwin; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, which is mainly transmitted by the faeces of triatomine insects that find favourable environments in poorly constructed houses. Previous studies have documented persistent triatomine infestation in houses in the province of Loja in southern Ecuador despite repeated insecticide and educational interventions. We aim to develop a sustainable strategy for the interruption of Chagas disease transmission by promoting living environments that are designed to prevent colonisation of rural houses by triatomines. This study used positive deviance to inform the design of an anti-triatomine prototype house by identifying knowledge, attitudes and practices used by families that have remained triatomine-free (2010-2012). Positive deviants reported practices that included maintenance of structural elements of the house, fumigation of dwellings and animal shelters, sweeping with "insect repellent" plants and relocation of domestic animals away from the house, among others. Participants favoured construction materials that do not drastically differ from those currently used (adobe walls and tile roofs). They also expressed their belief in a clear connection between a clean house and health. The family's economic dynamics affect space use and must be considered in the prototype's design. Overall, the results indicate a positive climate for the introduction of housing improvements as a protective measure against Chagas disease in this region. PMID:25807468

  18. Access to Care for Chagas Disease in the United States: A Health Systems Analysis.

    PubMed

    Manne-Goehler, Jennifer; Reich, Michael R; Wirtz, Veronika J

    2015-07-01

    There are 300,000 estimated cases of Chagas disease in the United States but limited data on access to care. This study analyzed trends in access to care for Chagas disease in the United States and assessed the national and state barriers to access. Data on cases in blood donors and drug releases were obtained from the AABB (formerly American Association of Blood Banks) and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), respectively. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 30 key informants at the national level and in five states where treatment had been released. Interview responses were analyzed according to the health systems dimensions of regulation, financing, payment, organization, and persuasion. Data indicate that 1,908 cases were identified in the blood donation system from 2007 to 2013 and that CDC released 422 courses of benznidazole or nifurtimox during this period. The barriers to access at the national level include limited diagnostic and institutionalized referral and care processes, lack of financing for patient-care activities, and limited awareness and training among providers. This study demonstrates that access to treatment of Chagas disease in the United States is limited. The lack of licensing is only one of several barriers to access, highlighting the need for a health systems perspective when scaling up access to these essential medicines. PMID:25986581

  19. Chagas disease in the 21st Century: a public health success or an emerging threat?

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major public health burden in Latin America and a potentially serious emerging threat to a number of countries throughout the world. Although public health programs have significantly reduced the prevalence of Chagas disease in Latin America in recent decades, the number of infections in the United States and non-endemic countries in Europe and the Western Pacific Region continues to rise. Moreover, there is still no vaccine or highly effective cure available for the approximately 10 million people currently infected with T. cruzi, a third of which will develop potentially fatal cardiomyopathy and/or severe digestive tract disorders. As Chagas disease becomes an increasingly globalized public health issue in the twenty-first century, continued attentiveness from governmental and health organizations as well as improved diagnostic tools, expanded surveillance and increased research funding will be required to maintain existing public health successes and stymie the spread of the disease to new areas and populations. PMID:24626257

  20. Growing Mushrooms for Fun and Profit. Gazula, A.*, C. Saft, C. Olson, M. Smith, S. McCoy, and S. White.

    E-print Network

    Jawitz, James W.

    is conducive to growing mushrooms on renewable resources such as cereal straws and cotton seed hulls, shiitake and oyster mushroom production, handling and processing, and marketing. Agents also developed

  1. Recycling of Vineyard and Winery Wastes as Nutritive Composts for Edible Mushroom Cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Marian; Teodorescu, Alexandru

    2011-01-01

    Every year, in Romania huge amounts of wine and vine wastes cause serious environmental damages in vineyards as well as nearby winery factories, for instance, by their burning on the soil surface or their incorporation inside soil matrix. The optimal and efficient way to solve these problems is to recycle these biomass wastes as main ingredients in nutritive composts preparation that could be used for edible mushrooms cultivation. In this respect, the main aim of this work was to establish the best biotechnology of winery and vine wastes recycling by using them as appropriate growth substrata for edible and medicinal mushrooms. According to this purpose, two mushroom species of Basidiomycetes, namely Lentinula edodes as well as Pleurotus ostreatus were used as pure mushroom cultures in experiments. The experiments of inoculum preparation were set up under the following conditions: constant temperature, 23° C; agitation speed, 90-120 rev min-1 pH level, 5.0-6.0. All mycelia mushroom cultures were incubated for 120-168 h. In the next stage of experiments, the culture composts for mushroom growing were prepared from the lignocellulose wastes as vine cuttings and marc of grapes in order to be used as substrata in mycelia development and fruit body formation. The tested culture variants were monitored continuously to keep constant the temperature during the incubation as well as air humidity, air pressure and a balanced ratio of the molecular oxygen and carbon dioxide. In every mushroom culture cycle all the physical and chemical parameters that could influence the mycelia growing as well as fruit body formation of L. edodes and P. ostreatus were compared to the same fungal cultures that were grown on poplar logs used as control samples.

  2. The immunology of experimental Chagas' disease. IV. Production of lesions in rabbits similar to those of chronic Chagas' disease in man.

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, A. R.; Teixeira, M. L.; Santos-Buch, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    Eight rabbits that received a single inoculation of trypomastigotes of a virulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi first developed a transient acute illness associated with parasitemia; later, 4 of these rabbits died with chronic myocarditis and/or with megacolon in the absence of demonstrable parasitemia or encysted parasites in tissues. Two of these rabbits with chronic myocarditis died unexpectedly. Three of the inoculated rabbits that survived the infection were sacrificed 18 months later and showed similar but less severe microscopic lesions. The remaining rabbit is alive and well at the time of writing (26 months) with negative blood cultures but high hemagglutinating antibody titers to T. cruzi antigens. The natural course of T. cruzi infection in rabbits and the lesions observed postmortem are similar to those recorded for humans with chronic Chagas' disease. Multiple injections of particulate subcellular antigens of T. cruzi in rabbits resulted in microscopic lesions similar to those observed in rabbits that survived protozoan infection. Sera of rabbits inoculated with T. cruzi have antibodies to striated and smooth muscle structures. However, evidence provided in this and in other experiments strongly suggest that the lesions of chronic Chagas' disease are produced by delayed hypersensitivity to T. cruzi antigens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figures 3-4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:808136

  3. [Frontiers in Bioscience 8, e315-322, May 1,2003] THE SIGNIFICANCE OF AUTOIMMUNITY IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF CHAGAS HEART DISEASE

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    -specific immunity 4. Chagas heart disease is caused by autoimmunity 5. Potential mechanisms of T. cruzi-induced autoimmunity 6. Conclusions 7. Acknowledgements 8. References 1. ABSTRACT Chagas heart disease develops the role autoimmunity plays in disease pathogenesis is not known, it is clear that autoimmune responses

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi Recombinant Complement Regulatory Protein: a Novel Antigen for Use in an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Diagnosis of Chagas' Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendell S. F. Meira; Lucia M. C. Galvao; Eliane D. Gontijo; George L. L. Machado-Coelho; Karen A. Norris; Egler Chiari; Escola de Farmacia

    2002-01-01

    Currently, diagnosis of Chagas' disease is based on serological methods, but due to the high occurrence of inconclusive results, more reliable methods are needed. The use of recombinant antigens for serodiagnosis of Chagas' disease is recommended in order to increase the sensitivity and specificity of the serological tests. The Trypanosoma cruzi complement regulatory protein (CRP) is a surface glycoprotein present

  5. [The assessment process within science and the nomination of Carlos Chagas for the Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine].

    PubMed

    Pittella, José Eymard Homem

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest achievements in the history of medicine was the description of Chagas disease by the physician and scientist Carlos Chagas. A hundred years after the discovery of the disease, speculation still remains regarding the two official nominations of Carlos Chagas for the Nobel Prize, the biggest worldwide scientific award, in 1913 and in 1921. It has been accepted that the reason why the prize was not awarded to this brilliant scientist may have been the strong opposition that he faced in Brazil, from some physicians and researchers of that time. They went as far as questioning the existence of Chagas disease, thereby possibly influencing the decision of the Nobel Committee not to award the prize to him. Analysis of the database of the Nobel prize archives, with the revelation of the names of nominators, nominees and prizewinners spanning the years 1901-1951, brought information not only about what was considered to be a scientific achievement at that time, but also about who the important scientists were and what the relationships between them were. The non-recognition of Carlos Chagas' discoveries by the Nobel Committee appears to be more correctly explained by these factors than by the negative impact of the local opposition. PMID:19287939

  6. ACCUMULATION OF RADIOCESIUM BY MUSHROOMS IN THE ENVIRONMENT: A LITERATURE REVIEW AND IMAGE GALLERY

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M; Mary Ramsey, M

    2006-11-05

    During the last 50 years, a large amount of information on radionuclide accumulators or 'sentinel-type' organisms in the environment has been published. Much of this work focused on the risks of food-chain transfer of radionuclides to higher organisms such as reindeer and man. However, until the 1980's and 1990's, there has been little published data on the radiocesium ({sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs) accumulation by mushrooms. This presentation will consist of a review of the published data for {sup 134,137}Cs accumulation by mushrooms in nature. The review will consider the time of sampling, sample location characteristics, the radiocesium source term and other aspects that promote {sup 134,137}Cs uptake by mushrooms. This review will focus on published data for mushrooms that demonstrate a large propensity for use in the environmental biomonitoring of radiocesium contamination. It will also provide photographs and descriptions of habitats for many of these mushrooms to facilitate their collection for biomonitoring.

  7. Integration of ?-glucan fibre rich fractions from barley and mushrooms to form healthy extruded snacks.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Margaret A; Derbyshire, Emma; Tiwari, Brijesh K; Brennan, Charles S

    2013-03-01

    ?-glucan is a commonly researched plant cell wall component that when incorporated into food products has been associated with cholesterol and glycaemic response reductions. This study focusses on ?-glucan rich fractions from barley and mushroom used in the production of extruded ready to eat snacks. Inclusion of barley ?-glucan rich fractions and mushroom ?-glucan fractions at 10 % levels increased the total dietary fibre content of extrudates compared to the control (P?mushroom fraction (P?mushroom ?-glucan rich fractions manipulated the starch digestibility profile and hence rate of glucose release during digestion compared to the control sample. This in turn resulted in a significant (P?mushroom ?-glucan rich fractions. We conclude that the inclusion of these fractions could be utilised by the food industry to manipulate the glycaemic response of extruded snack products. PMID:23232921

  8. Chemical and toxicological investigations of a previously unknown poisonous European mushroom Tricholoma terreum.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xia; Feng, Tao; Shang, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Yun-Li; Wang, Fang; Li, Zheng-Hui; Dong, Ze-Jun; Luo, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Ji-Kai

    2014-06-01

    The established tradition of consuming and marketing wild mushrooms has focused attention on mycotoxicity, which has become a global issue. In the present study, we describe the toxins found in a previously unknown poisonous European mushroom Tricholoma terreum. Fifteen new triterpenoids terreolides?A-F (1-6) and saponaceolides?H-P (8-16) were isolated from the fruiting bodies of the toxic mushroom T. terreum. Terreolides?A-C (1-3) possessed a unique 5/6/7 trioxaspiroketal system, whereas terreolides D-F (4-6) possessed an unprecedented carbon skeleton. Two abundant compounds in the mushroom, saponaceolide?B (7) and saponaceolide?M (13), displayed acute toxicity, with LD50 values of 88.3 and 63.7?mg?kg(-1) when administered orally in mice. Both compounds were found to increase serum creatine kinase levels in mice, indicating that T. terreum may be the cause of mushroom poisoning ultimately leading to rhabdomyolysis. PMID:24753190

  9. Retrotransposon Microsatellite Amplified Polymorphism Strain Fingerprinting Markers Applicable to Various Mushroom Species

    PubMed Central

    Le, Quy Vang; Won, Hyo-Kyung; Lee, Tae-Soo; Lee, Chang-Yun; Lee, Hyun-Sook

    2008-01-01

    The retrotransposon marY1 is a gypsy family retroelement, which is detected ubiquitously within the fungal taxonomic groups in which mushrooms are included. To utilize marY1 as a molecular marker for the DNA fingerprinting of mushrooms, oligonucleotides marY1-LTR-L and marY1-LTR-R were designed on the basis of highly conserved regions from the multiple sequence alignment of 30 marY1 sequences retrieved from a nucleotide sequence database. In accordance with Retrotransposon Microsatellite Amplified Polymorphism (REMAP) fingerprinting methodology, the two oligonucleotides were utilized together with the short sequence repeat primers UBC807 and UBC818 for polymerase chain reaction using templates from different mushroom genomic DNAs. Among the tested oligonucleotides, the marY1-LTR-L and UBC807 primer set yielded the greatest amount of abundance and variation in terms of DNA band numbers and patterns. This method was successfully applied to 10 mushroom species, and the primer set successfully discriminated between different commercial mushroom cultivars of the same strains of 14 Pleurotus ostreatus and 16 P. eryngii. REMAP reproducibility was superior to other popular DNA fingerprinting methodologies including the random amplified polymorphic DNA method. PMID:23997618

  10. Biasing effects on the characteristics and the optimization of mushroom waveguide photodetectors (WGPDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Batawy, Yasser M.; Youssef, Sarah

    2014-07-01

    Waveguide photodetectors (WGPDs) are considered a leading candidate to overcome the bandwidth-quantum efficiency trade-off as the flow of the photon and carrier fluxes are perpendicular to each other enabling high date rate applications. Mushroom-WGPD was proposed to overcome the trade-off between the capacitance of the photodetector and the contact resistance. In this paper, an extended calibrated circuit model for mushroom-WGPD, including the effect of the biasing of the photodetector, is presented so resulting in the feasibility of a complete circuit simulation of the entire photoreceiver circuit. The effects of the biasing over the performance of Mushroom-WGPDs have been explored for different loads and different dimensions of the device. Based on the studies of different parameters for design and materials, optimization has been performed for the mushroom-WGPD. With this optimization, the optimal values of the thickness of the absorption layer to produce the highest bandwidth of the photodetector are obtained for different biasing values. These optimizations are performed for different areas of the photodetector and also for different load resistors, and they result in a significant improvement in the performance of the mushroom-WGPDs.

  11. Acute Hepatorenal Failure in a Patient Following Consumption of Mushrooms: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Farzad; Ebrahimi Bakhtavar, Hanieh; Ghavidel, Atefeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: One of the highly toxic mushrooms that are common in the northwest region of Iran is Amanita phalloides, which might result in renal or liver failure. Case Presentation: This is a case report of a patient referred a few days after consumption of wild mushrooms to emergency department having gastrointestinal complaint whose experiments indicated liver and renal failure. The supportive treatment was given to the patient prescribing N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and Livergol (silymarin) along with hemodialysis. A few days after admission to the hospital, the patient died due to severe clinical symptoms. Conclusions: The patient was poisoned by A. phalloides complaining gastrointestinal symptoms including nausea; vomiting and watery diarrhea about six hours after consumption and then, amatoxin in the mushroom caused damage to hepatocytes and renal cells and finally led to hepatorenal failure. Deaths caused by this type of mushroom are extremely high and necessary trainings should be provided to the people by the health system not to consume wild mushrooms, especially in spring and summer. PMID:26019894

  12. Enhancing stability of essential oils by microencapsulation for preservation of button mushroom during postharvest

    PubMed Central

    Alikhani-Koupaei, Majid; Mazlumzadeh, Meisam; Sharifani, Mohamadmehdi; Adibian, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Fresh button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus L.) are sensitive to browning, water loss, and microbial attack. The short shelf-life of mushrooms is an impediment to the distribution and marketing of the fresh product. Essential oils outstand as an alternative to chemical preservatives and their use in foods meets the demands of consumers for natural products. To resolve controlled release of oil and increase in antioxidant and antimicrobial activities, the oil was incorporated into microcapsules. Effects of microcapsulated thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) and rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) on quality of fresh button mushroom were compared. Physicochemical qualities were evaluated during 15 days of storage at 4 ± 0.5°C. All treatments prevented product weight loss and decrease in polyphenoloxidase and peroxidase activities during storage. Color and firmness, microbiological analysis, and total phenolic content caused the least change. With use of microencapsulated oils, mushrooms were within acceptable limits during 10 days of storage. Microencapsulated rosemary oil produced the highest beneficial effects and has potential to improve quality of button mushrooms and extend shelf-life. PMID:25473510

  13. Nutritional composition of two wild mushrooms consumed by the tribals of the Western Ghats of India

    PubMed Central

    Sudheep, Naga M.; Sridhar, Kandikere R.

    2014-01-01

    This study provides the nutritional qualities of two wild mushrooms (Agaricus abruptibulbus and Termitomyces globulus) commonly consumed by the tribals of Kaiga forests of the Western Ghats of India. Both mushrooms composed of high quantity of crude protein, crude fibre, calorific value and low quantity of crude lipid. Potassium and selenium contents were high, while sodium, calcium and phosphorus contents were low. Except for three essential amino acids (EAAs: leucine, tyrosine and lysine), the rest of the amino acids in both mushrooms were comparable to soybean and wheat. Based on the EAA standards of FAO-WHO, these mushrooms composed of high quantity of threonine, isoleucine and histidine. The EAA score of isoleucine in cooked A. abruptibulbus and threonine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, histidine and sulphur amino acids in cooked T. globulus were substantially high. Oleic acid constitutes a major unsaturated fatty acid in these mushrooms, which was significantly increased in cooked A. abruptibulbus. Cooking also increased the ratio of TUFA/TSFA in A. abruptibulbus, while it was opposite in T. globulus. Cooking significantly increased the linoleic acid in A. abruptibulbus and eicosadienoic acid in T. globulus. PMID:24999438

  14. Selenium bioaccessibility and speciation in biofortified Pleurotus mushrooms grown on selenium-rich agricultural residues.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Poonam; Aureli, Federica; D'Amato, Marilena; Prakash, Ranjana; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Nagaraja, Tejo Prakash; Cubadda, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Cultivation of saprophytic fungi on selenium-rich substrates can be an effective means to produce selenium-fortified food. Pleurotus florida, an edible species of oyster mushrooms, was grown on wheat straw from the seleniferous belt of Punjab (India) and its potential to mobilize and accumulate selenium from the growth substrate was studied. Selenium concentration in biofortified mushrooms was 800 times higher compared with control samples grown on wheat straw from non selenium-rich areas (141 vs 0.17 ?g Se g(-1) dry weight). Seventy-five percent of the selenium was extracted after in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion and investigation of the selenium molecular fractions by size exclusion HPLC-ICP-MS revealed that proteins and any other high molecular weight selenium-containing molecule were hydrolyzed to peptides and low molecular weight selenocompounds. Analysis of the gastrointestinal hydrolysates by anion exchange HPLC-ICP-MS showed that the bioaccessible selenium was mainly present as selenomethionine, a good bioavailable source of selenium, which accounted for 73% of the sum of the detected species. This study demonstrates the feasibility of producing selenium-biofortified edible mushrooms using selenium-rich agricultural by-products as growth substrates. The proposed approach can be used to evaluate whether selenium-contaminated plant waste materials harvested from high-selenium areas may be used to produce selenium-biofortified edible mushrooms based on the concentration, bioaccessibility and speciation of selenium in the mushrooms. PMID:23578637

  15. Metal\\/metalloid contamination and isotopic composition of lead in edible mushrooms and forest soils originating from a smelting area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Komárek; Vladislav Chrastný; Jana Štíchová

    2007-01-01

    High metal contents in edible mushrooms growing in severely contaminated industrial areas pose an important toxicological risk. In the presented study, trace element (Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, Ag, As, Se) contents were determined in caps and stipes of three different edible mushroom species (Boletus edulis Bull. Fr., Xerocomus badius Fr. Gilb., Xerocomus chrysenteron Bull. Quél.). Additionally, information about the chemical

  16. Therapeutic potential of culinary-medicinal mushrooms for the management of neurodegenerative diseases: diversity, metabolite, and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Naidu, Murali; Wong, Kah-Hui; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2014-03-24

    Abstract Mushrooms have long been used not only as food but also for the treatment of various ailments. Although at its infancy, accumulated evidence suggested that culinary-medicinal mushrooms may play an important role in the prevention of many age-associated neurological dysfunctions, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Therefore, efforts have been devoted to a search for more mushroom species that may improve memory and cognition functions. Such mushrooms include Hericium erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, Sarcodon spp., Antrodia camphorata, Pleurotus giganteus, Lignosus rhinocerotis, Grifola frondosa, and many more. Here, we review over 20 different brain-improving culinary-medicinal mushrooms and at least 80 different bioactive secondary metabolites isolated from them. The mushrooms (either extracts from basidiocarps/mycelia or isolated compounds) reduced beta amyloid-induced neurotoxicity and had anti-acetylcholinesterase, neurite outgrowth stimulation, nerve growth factor (NGF) synthesis, neuroprotective, antioxidant, and anti-(neuro)inflammatory effects. The in vitro and in vivo studies on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the bioactive effects of mushrooms are also discussed. Mushrooms can be considered as useful therapeutic agents in the management and/or treatment of neurodegeneration diseases. However, this review focuses on in vitro evidence and clinical trials with humans are needed. PMID:24654802

  17. Compton scattering by internal shields based on melanin-containing mushrooms provides protection of gastrointestinal tract from ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Revskaya, Ekaterina; Chu, Peter; Howell, Robertha C; Schweitzer, Andrew D; Bryan, Ruth A; Harris, Matthew; Gerfen, Gary; Jiang, Zewei; Jandl, Thomas; Kim, Kami; Ting, Li-Min; Sellers, Rani S; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-11-01

    There is a need for radioprotectors that protect normal tissues from ionizing radiation in patients receiving high doses of radiation and during nuclear emergencies. We investigated the possibility of creating an efficient oral radioprotector based on the natural pigment melanin that would act as an internal shield and protect the tissues via Compton scattering followed by free radical scavenging. CD-1 mice were fed melanin-containing black edible mushrooms Auricularia auricila-judae before 9 Gy total body irradiation. The location of the mushrooms in the body before irradiation was determined by in vivo fluorescent imaging. Black mushrooms protected 80% of mice from the lethal dose, while control mice or those given melanin-devoid mushrooms died from gastrointestinal syndrome. The crypts of mice given black mushrooms showed less apoptosis and more cell division than those in control mice, and their white blood cell and platelet counts were restored at 45 days to preradiation levels. The role of melanin in radioprotection was proven by the fact that mice given white mushrooms supplemented with melanin survived at the same rate as mice given black mushrooms. The ability of melanin-containing mushrooms to provide remarkable protection against radiation suggests that they could be developed into oral radioprotectors. PMID:23113595

  18. INHIBITION OF GROWTH AND INDUCTION OF APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN CANCER CELL LINES BY AN ETHYL ACETATE FRACTION FROM SHIITAKE MUSHROOMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiitake mushrooms have been reported to have cancer preventing properties, and polysaccharides isolated from shiitake mushrooms are being used in some parts of the world as an adjuvant in cancer chemtherapy. However, little research has been conducted verifying the antitumor activities of "mycoche...

  19. Immobilization of mushroom polyphenol oxidase on poly(allyl glycidyl ether-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) macroporous beaded copolymers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bhalchandra K. Vaidya; Abhijeet J. Karale; Hitesh K. Suthar; Ganesh Ingavle; Tara Sankar Pathak; S. Ponrathnam; Sanjay Nene

    2007-01-01

    Functional, macroporous, beaded copolymers containing epoxy groups were synthesized for immobilization of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) from edible mushroom (Agaricus bisporus). The effect of incorporation of two different sets of monomers such as glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and allyl glycidyl ether (AGE) and the effect of cross-linking agent ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDM) with varying cross-link densities on binding and expression of mushroom

  20. The smell and odorous components of dried shiitake mushroom, Lentinula edodes II: sensory evaluation by ordinary people

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masakazu Hiraide; Ichiro Yokoyama; Yoshifumi Miyazaki

    2005-01-01

    This study is part of an effort to improve the quality of dried shiitake mushrooms [Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Pegler], in accordance with consumer preference, and deals with a preference survey using questionnaires combined with sensory evaluation. The smell was evaluated using powdered dried shiitake mushrooms. Age, original preference (OP), sex, sensory intensity (SI), hedonic preference (HP), and sample amount were

  1. Compton Scattering by Internal Shields Based on Melanin-Containing Mushrooms Provides Protection of Gastrointestinal Tract from Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Revskaya, Ekaterina; Chu, Peter; Howell, Robertha C.; Schweitzer, Andrew D.; Bryan, Ruth A.; Harris, Matthew; Gerfen, Gary; Jiang, Zewei; Jandl, Thomas; Kim, Kami; Ting, Li-Min; Sellers, Rani S.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract There is a need for radioprotectors that protect normal tissues from ionizing radiation in patients receiving high doses of radiation and during nuclear emergencies. We investigated the possibility of creating an efficient oral radioprotector based on the natural pigment melanin that would act as an internal shield and protect the tissues via Compton scattering followed by free radical scavenging. CD-1 mice were fed melanin-containing black edible mushrooms Auricularia auricila-judae before 9?Gy total body irradiation. The location of the mushrooms in the body before irradiation was determined by in vivo fluorescent imaging. Black mushrooms protected 80% of mice from the lethal dose, while control mice or those given melanin-devoid mushrooms died from gastrointestinal syndrome. The crypts of mice given black mushrooms showed less apoptosis and more cell division than those in control mice, and their white blood cell and platelet counts were restored at 45 days to preradiation levels. The role of melanin in radioprotection was proven by the fact that mice given white mushrooms supplemented with melanin survived at the same rate as mice given black mushrooms. The ability of melanin-containing mushrooms to provide remarkable protection against radiation suggests that they could be developed into oral radioprotectors. PMID:23113595

  2. [Evaluation of knowledge and practices related to Chagas disease and its vectors among adults and children in an endemic region in Minas Gerais State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Villela, Marcos Marreiro; Pimenta, Denise Nacif; Lamounier, Paulo Acácio; Dias, João Carlos Pinto

    2009-08-01

    Despite the success of the Chagas Disease Control Program (PCCD) in Brazil, some endemic areas have experienced difficulty in maintaining the program's activities, especially after the health system's decentralization, since the sustainability of control measures for Chagas disease and vectors is known to depend on information and community participation. This study aimed to analyze knowledge and practices related to vectors and Chagas disease in Bambuí, Minas Gerais State, Brasil. The population's knowledge was tested with a questionnaire, accompanied by six illustrations of triatomine bugs for identification. Both adults and primary and secondary schoolchildren in rural areas of the county participated in the research. The Bambuí population showed good overall knowledge on triatomines and Chagas disease in both groups (adults and children), although the concepts were limited to preventing the insect vector from invading houses. The results emphasize the importance of educational campaigns in the context of the program as a fundamental component of community participation in Chagas disease vector control. PMID:19649411

  3. Warming-induced shift in European mushroom fruiting phenology.

    PubMed

    Kauserud, Håvard; Heegaard, Einar; Büntgen, Ulf; Halvorsen, Rune; Egli, Simon; Senn-Irlet, Beatrice; Krisai-Greilhuber, Irmgard; Dämon, Wolfgang; Sparks, Tim; Nordén, Jenni; Høiland, Klaus; Kirk, Paul; Semenov, Mikhail; Boddy, Lynne; Stenseth, Nils C

    2012-09-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems, fungi are the major agents of decomposition processes and nutrient cycling and of plant nutrient uptake. Hence, they have a vital impact on ecosystem processes and the terrestrial carbon cycle. Changes in productivity and phenology of fungal fruit bodies can give clues to changes in fungal activity, but understanding these changes in relation to a changing climate is a pending challenge among ecologists. Here we report on phenological changes in fungal fruiting in Europe over the past four decades. Analyses of 746,297 dated and geo-referenced mushroom records of 486 autumnal fruiting species from Austria, Norway, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom revealed a widening of the annual fruiting season in all countries during the period 1970-2007. The mean annual day of fruiting has become later in all countries. However, the interspecific variation in phenological responses was high. Most species moved toward a later ending of their annual fruiting period, a trend that was particularly strong in the United Kingdom, which may reflect regional variation in climate change and its effects. Fruiting of both saprotrophic and mycorrhizal fungi now continues later in the year, but mycorrhizal fungi generally have a more compressed season than saprotrophs. This difference is probably due to the fruiting of mycorrhizal fungi partly depending on cues from the host plant. Extension of the European fungal fruiting season parallels an extended vegetation season in Europe. Changes in fruiting phenology imply changes in mycelia activity, with implications for ecosystem function. PMID:22908273

  4. The use of mushroom glucans and proteoglycans in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kidd, P M

    2000-02-01

    Immunoceuticals can be considered as substances having immunotherapeutic efficacy when taken orally. More than 50 mushroom species have yielded potential immunoceuticals that exhibit anticancer activity in vitro or in animal models and of these, six have been investigated in human cancers. All are non-toxic and very well tolerated. Lentinan and schizophyllan have little oral activity. Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC) is poorly defined but has shown early clinical promise. Maitake D-Fraction has limited proof of clinical efficacy to date, but controlled research is underway. Two proteoglycans from Coriolus versicolor - PSK (Polysaccharide-K) and PSP (Polysaccharide-Peptide - have demonstrated the most promise. In Japanese trials since 1970, PSK significantly extended survival at five years or beyond in cancers of the stomach, colon-rectum, esophagus, nasopharynx, and lung (non-small cell types), and in a HLA B40-positive breast cancer subset. PSP was subjected to Phase II and Phase III trials in China. In double-blind trials, PSP significantly extended five-year survival in esophageal cancer. PSP significantly improved quality of life, provided substantial pain relief, and enhanced immune status in 70-97 percent of patients with cancers of the stomach, esophagus, lung, ovary, and cervix. PSK and PSP boosted immune cell production, ameliorated chemotherapy symptoms, and enhanced tumor infiltration by dendritic and cytotoxic T-cells. Their extremely high tolerability, proven benefits to survival and quality of life, and compatibility with chemotherapy and radiation therapy makes them well suited for cancer management regimens. PMID:10696116

  5. Antimetastatic and immunomodulating effect of water extracts from various mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung-Soo Ronald; Cho, Chong-Kwan; Lee, Yeon-Weol; Yoo, Hwa-Seung

    2009-09-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate inhibitory effects against lung metastasis and promotion of splenocytes by water extracts from various mushrooms including Armillaria mellea, Grifola frondosa, Garnoderma frondosa, Codyceps militaris, Hericium erinaceus, Coriolus versicolor, Agaricus Blazei with Lycium Chinense Miller (known as M8). Analysis of carbohydrate using HPTLC showed that beta-glucan and pachyman were some of the major components of M8. Oral administration of M8 resulted in a dose-dependent tendency to inhibit lung metastasis after intravenous injection of colon26-L5 cells. Treatment with M8 resulted in a significant increase of T cell and B cell mitogenic stimuli. The population of CD3, CD19, CD4, and CD8 positive cells increased in a dose dependent manner of M8 administration. However, no significant results were obtained from the population of Mac-1 and NK1.1 positive cells. Oral administration of M8 resulted in the increased production of IFN-gamma and IL-4 by splenocytes stimulated with Con A compared with untreated controls. These results show that M8 has antitumor activities which may be useful as an antimetastatic agent. PMID:20633495

  6. Reversible and competitive inhibitory kinetics of amoxicillin on mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Xin; Zhang, Jian; Chai, Wei-Ming; Feng, Hui-Ling; Xiang, Zhi-Hao; Shen, Dong-Yan; Chen, Qing-Xi

    2013-11-01

    In the present work, we investigated the inhibitory effects of amoxicillin, a bacteriolytic ?-lactam antibiotic drug, on the rate of monophenol hydroxylation and o-diphenol oxidation catalyzed by mushroom tyrosinase. The results showed that amoxicillin could inhibit both monophenolase and diphenolase activities. For monophenolase activity, the inhibition on reaction rate was dose-dependent, while the influence on lag period was not obvious. For diphenolase activity, amoxicillin was found to be a reversible inhibitor, with an IC50 value of 9.0 ± 1.8 mM. Kinetics analysis showed that amoxicillin was a mixed type inhibitor of the enzyme with KI and KIS values of 8.30 mM and 44.79 mM, respectively. Further, the molecular mechanism underlying the inhibition of tyrosinse by amoxicillin was investigated by means of fluorescence quenching and molecular docking techniques. The results showed that amoxicillin could form static interaction with the catalytic pocket of the enzyme through the interaction of amoxicillin with the dicopper irons and amino acid residues in the enzyme active center. Our results contributed to the usage of amoxicillin as a potential tyrosinase inhibitor in the field of medicinal industry and could also provide guidance in the design of novel tyrosinase inhibitors. PMID:24099941

  7. Screening of inhibitors for mushroom tyrosinase using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sushama; Sistla, Srinivas; Jadhav, Jyoti

    2014-11-26

    Tyrosinase inhibitors have been used as whitening or antihyperpigment agents because of their ability to suppress dermal-melanin production. In the present study, screening and kinetic evaluation of various small molecules were performed on mushroom tyrosinase (MT) using surface plasmon resonance. The binding constant KD (M) values obtained for tannic acid, phloroglucinol, saffron, catechol, and pyrogallol are 1.213 × 10(-4), 7.136 × 10(-5), 3.111 × 10(-5), 1.557 × 10(-5), and 7.981 × 10(-6) M, respectively. Pyrogallol has been found to display high affinity for MT, whereas catechol, saffron, and phloroglucinol have been found to bind with low affinity. MT shows considerable changes in the secondary structure in the presence of inhibitors. The study reveals the Biacore/SPR sensor's ability in the rapid identification and characterization of inhibitors for MT. The methodology described here can be used to rapidly screen and optimize various lead compounds for other enzymes and elucidate structure function inter-relationships between various enzymes. PMID:25402844

  8. Effects of thymol on mushroom tyrosinase-catalyzed melanin formation.

    PubMed

    Satooka, Hiroki; Kubo, Isao

    2011-08-24

    The novel inhibitory mechanism of thymol (2-isopropyl-5-methylphenol) on dopachrome formation by mushroom tyrosinase (EC 1.14.18.1) was identified. The UV-vis spectrum and oxygen consumption assays showed dopachrome formation using L-tyrosine as a substrate was suppressed by thymol. This inhibitory activity was reversed by the addition of a well-known radical scavenger, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA). Further investigations using N-acetyl-L-tyrosine as a substrate with HPLC analysis suggested that thymol inhibits chemical redox reactions between dopaquinone and leukodopachrome instead of enzymatic reaction. This redox inhibitory activity of thymol was examined by using a model redox reaction with L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) and p-benzoquinone. Thymol successfully inhibited oxidation of L-DOPA to dopaquinone, coupled with reduction of p-benzoquinone. Hence, the suppression of dopachrome formation by thymol is due to the inhibition of conversion of leukodopachrome to dopachrome. The antioxidant property of thymol is a key characteristic for the inhibitory mechanism of melanin synthesis. PMID:21793504

  9. Mushroom beta glucan: potential candidate for post irradiation protection.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Thulasi G; Uma Devi, P

    2013-03-18

    The in vivo radioprotective effect of a beta-glucan (BG) isolated from the mushroom Ganoderma lucidum, against radiation (RT) induced damage was investigated taking mouse survival, hematology, liver GSH (Reduced glutathione), liver Malondialdehyde (MDA) and bone marrow chromosomal aberrations as end points. Young adult swiss albino mice were whole body exposed to gamma radiation. For mouse survival study, BG was administered orally (250?g/kg body wt or 500?g/kg body wt) 15min before or 5min after 8Gy exposure. For other parameters BG was given orally 5min after 4Gy exposure. The radioprotective effect of BG was compared with that of clinically used radioprotective drug amifostine (WR-2721), at 300mg/kg body wt administered intraperitoneally, 30min before irradiation. BG (500?g/kg body wt) produced (66%) mouse survival at 30 days given post irradiation, and 83% survived at 30 days with 300mg/kg body wt of amifostine administered before RT while RT alone produced 100% mortality. BG is not toxic at the radioprotective dose. Significant reduction in number of aberrant cells and different types of aberration was observed in both BG and amifostine administered groups compared to radiation alone treated group. BG seems to have potential for use in protection against unplanned radiation exposures. PMID:23277319

  10. Lanostanoids with acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity from the mushroom Haddowia longipes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang-Shuang; Ma, Qing-Yun; Huang, Sheng-Zhuo; Dai, Hao-Fu; Guo, Zhi-Kai; Yu, Zhi-Fang; Zhao, You-Xing

    2015-02-01

    Nine lanostanoids, together with nine known ones, were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of the fruiting bodies of the mushroom Haddowia longipes. Their structures were elucidated as 11-oxo-ganoderiol D, lanosta-8-en-7,11-dioxo-3?-acetyloxy-24,25,26-trihydroxy, lanosta-8-en-7-oxo-3?-acetyloxy-11?,24,25,26-tetrahydroxy, lanosta-7,9(11)-dien-3?-acetyloxy-24,25,26-trihydroxy, lanosta-7,9(11)-dien-3?-acetyloxy-24,26-dihydroxy-25-methoxy, 11-oxo-lucidadiol, 11?-hydroxy-lucidadiol, lucidone H and lanosta-7,9(11),24E-trien-3?-acetyloxy-26,27-dihydroxy by analysing their 1D/2D NMR and MS spectra. In addition, bioassays of inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) of all compounds showed that thirteen compounds possessed inhibitory activity against AChE with the percentage inhibition ranging from 10.3% to 42.1% when tested at 100 ?M. PMID:25577284

  11. A novel alkaline protease from wild edible mushroom Termitomyces albuminosus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Suyue; Wang, Hexiang; Zhang, Guoqing

    2011-01-01

    A protease with a molecular mass of 30 kDa and the N-terminal sequence of GLQTNAPWGLARSS, was isolated from fresh fruiting bodies of the wild edible mushroom Termitomyces albuminosus. The purification protocol included ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, SP-Sepharose and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex 75. The protein was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and Q-Sepharose, but adsorbed on SP-Sepharose. The optimal pH and temperature of the purified enzyme were 10.6 and 60 °C, respectively. The enzyme was stable in the presence of 2 % (v/v) Tween 80 and 4 M urea. More than 80 % of the enzyme activity was retained in 2 % (v/v) Triton X 100, 54 % in 10 mM EDTA and 31 % in 2 % (w/v) SDS. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), but not inhibited by dithiothreitol (DTT), pepstatin or lima bean trypsin inhibitor suggesting that it was a serine protease but not a trypsin-like one. The protease was inhibited by Hg(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(3+) ions. The K(m) and V(max) values of the purified enzyme for casein were 8.26 mg ? ml(-1) and 0.668 mg ? ml(-1) ? min(-1), respectively. PMID:21706070

  12. Thermus composti sp. nov., isolated from oyster mushroom compost.

    PubMed

    Vajna, Balázs; Kanizsai, Szilvia; Kéki, Zsuzsa; Márialigeti, Károly; Schumann, Peter; Tóth, Erika M

    2012-07-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacterium (strain K-39(T)) was isolated from the thermophilic phase of the composting process for oyster mushroom substrate preparation. The strain grew at 40-80 °C (optimum, 65-75 °C), at pH 5-9 (optimum, pH 7), in media containing up to 1.5% (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain K-39(T) formed a distinct lineage within the genus Thermus. Its closest cultivated relative was Thermus islandicus PRI 3838(T) (96.8% similarity). The DNA G+C content of strain K-39(T) was 71.3 mol%. The new strain could be differentiated from the related taxa by not being able to hydrolyse starch. The predominant fatty acids of strain K-39(T) were iso-C(17:0) and anteiso-C(17:0). Strain K-39(T) contained a lower amount of the fatty acid iso-C(15:0) as compared to related species of the genus Thermus. The predominant respiratory quinone of the new isolate was menaquinone MK-8. On the basis of a taxonomic study using a polyphasic approach, strain K-39(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Thermus, for which the name Thermus composti sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is K-39(T) (=DSM 21686(T)=NCAIM B 02340(T)). PMID:21856987

  13. Purification and Characterization of Melanogenic Enzyme Tyrosinase from Button Mushroom

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ayesha S.; Ali, Sharique A.

    2014-01-01

    Melanogenesis is a biosynthetic pathway for the formation of the pigment melanin in human skin. A key enzyme, tyrosinase, catalyzes the first and only rate-limiting steps in melanogenesis. Since the discovery of its melanogenic properties, tyrosinase has been in prime focus and microbial sources of the enzyme are sought. Agaricus bisporus widely known as the common edible mushroom, it's taking place in high amounts of proteins, enzyme, carbohydrates, fibers, and low fat contents are frequently cited in the literature in relation to their nutritional value. In the present study tyrosinase from Agaricus bisporus was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation, dialysis followed by gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-100, and ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Cellulose; the enzyme was purified, 16.36-fold to give 26.6% yield on total activity in the crude extract and final specific activity of 52.19?U/mg. The SDS-PAGE electrophoresis showed a migrating protein band molecular weight of 95?kDa. The purified tyrosinase was optimized and the results revealed that the optimum values are pH 7.0 and temperature 35°C. The highest activity was reported towards its natural substrate, L-DOPA, with an apparent Km value of 0.933?mM. This indicated that tyrosinase purified from Agaricus bisporus is a potential source for medical applications. PMID:25197562

  14. Physicochemical responses and microbial characteristics of shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes) to gum arabic coating enriched with natamycin during storage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tianjia; Feng, Lifang; Zheng, Xiaolin; Li, Jianrong

    2013-06-01

    Physicochemical responses and microbial characteristics of shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes) to gum arabic (GA) coating incorporating natamycin (NA) during storage were investigated. Mushroom weight loss, firmness, total soluble solids, total sugar, reducing sugar, ascorbic acid, and microbial and sensory quality were measured. Mushroom coated with gum arabic+natamycin (GANA) maintained tissue firmness and showed reduction in microbial counts from yeasts and moulds compared with the control. In addition, GANA coating also delayed changes in the soluble solids concentration, total sugar and ascorbic acid. Sensory evaluation proved the efficacy of GANA coating by maintaining the overall quality of shiitake mushroom during the storage period. The efficiency was better than that of GA or NA treatment alone. Our study suggests that GANA has the potential to improve the quality of shiitake mushroom and extend its shelf-life up to 16d. PMID:23411335

  15. [Emergence of Chagas' disease in Europe: description of the first cases observed in Latin American immigrants in mainland France].

    PubMed

    Develoux, M; Lescure, F X; Jaureguiberry, S; Jeannel, D; Elghouzzi, M H; Gay, F; Paris, L; Le Loup, G; Danis, M; Pialoux, G

    2010-02-01

    This article describes the first cases of imported Chagas' disease detected in Paris, France. A total of 18 cases were recorded in two teaching hospitals between 2004 and 2007. There were 12 women and six men with a mean age of 38 years. All patients were Latin American immigrants who had recently arrived in France from Bolivia (Cochabamba and Santa-Cruz departments) 17 cases and from Salvador in 1. Eleven patients presented an asymptomatic indeterminate form of the chronic disease. Seven presented chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy including two with severe symptoms requiring placement of a pacemaker. Obtaining serological tests to confirm the diagnosis was difficult. All except one patient who was older than 50 years were treated with benznidazole. Based on these findings, the main priorities for management imported Chagas' disease in France are improvement of serological diagnosis and prevention of vertical transmission. PMID:20337113

  16. Dietary intakes of mushrooms and green tea combine to reduce the risk of breast cancer in Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Huang, Jian; Xie, Xing; Holman, C D'Arcy J

    2009-03-15

    To investigate effects of dietary mushrooms and joint effects of mushrooms and green tea on breast cancer, a case-control study was conducted in southeast China in 2004-2005. The incident cases were 1,009 female patients aged 20-87 years with histologically confirmed breast cancer. The 1,009 age-matched controls were healthy women randomly recruited from outpatient breast clinics. Information on frequency and quantity of dietary intake of mushrooms and tea consumption, usual diet, and lifestyle were collected by face-to-face interview using a validated and reliable questionnaire. Compared with nonconsumers, the Odds ratios (Ors) were 0.36 (95% CI = 0.25-0.51) and 0.53 (0.38-0.73) for daily intake of >or=10 g fresh mushrooms and >or=4 g dried mushrooms, based on multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for established and potential confounders. There were dose-response relationships with significant tests for trend (p < 0.001). The inverse association was found in both pre- and postmenopausal women. Compared with those who consumed neither mushrooms nor green tea, the ORs were 0.11 (0.06-0.20) and 0.18 (0.11-0.29) for daily high intake of fresh and dried mushrooms combined with consuming beverages made from >or=1.05 g dried green tea leaves per day. The corresponding linear trends were statistically significant for joint effect (p < 0.001). We conclude that higher dietary intake of mushrooms decreased breast cancer risk in pre- and postmenopausal Chinese women and an additional decreased risk of breast cancer from joint effect of mushrooms and green tea was observed. More research is warranted to examine the effects of dietary mushrooms and mechanism of joint effects of phytochemicals on breast cancer. PMID:19048616

  17. Drosophila Eph receptor guides specific axon branches of mushroom body neurons

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Monica; Nighorn, Alan; Thomas, John B.

    2007-01-01

    The conserved Eph receptors and their Ephrin ligands regulate a number of developmental processes, including axon guidance. In contrast to the large vertebrate Eph/Ephrin family, Drosophila has a single Eph receptor and a single Ephrin ligand, both of which are expressed within the developing nervous system. Here, we show that Eph and Ephrin can act as a functional receptor-ligand pair in vivo. Surprisingly, and in contrast to previous results using RNA-interference techniques, embryos completely lacking Eph function show no obvious axon guidance defects. However, Eph/Ephrin signaling is required for proper development of the mushroom body. In wild type, mushroom body neurons bifurcate and extend distinct branches to different target areas. In Eph mutants, these neurons bifurcate normally, but in many cases the dorsal branch fails to project to its appropriate target area. Thus, Eph/Ephrin signaling acts to guide a subset of mushroom body branches to their correct synaptic targets. PMID:16613832

  18. Experimental evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory potential of Oyster mushroom Pleurotus florida

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Rai, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Background: Edible mushrooms have been used as flavorful foods and as health nutritional supplements for several centuries. A number of bioactive molecules have been identified in numerous mushroom species Objective: To evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory potential of Oyster Mushroom Pleurotus florida using various experimental models in Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Acute toxicity studies were performed whereby dose of 250 mg/ kg and 500 mg/kg was selected for present study, Analgesic activity was determined using hot plate method, tail flick method, acetic acid induced writhing and formalin induced pain in rats, while carrageenan was used to induce inflammation and anti-inflammatory studies were performed. Results: HEE showed significant (P < 0.01) analgesic and anti-inflammatory response against all experimental models. Conclusion: These studies conclude that Pleurotus florida possesses analgesic and anti- inflammatory potential which might be due to presence of myochemicals like flavonoids, phenolics and polysaccharides. PMID:23543896

  19. Effects of contact cap dimension on dry adhesion of bioinspired mushroom-shaped surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Li, Xiangming; Tian, Hongmiao; Hu, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Dry adhesion observed in small creatures, such as spiders, insects, and geckos, has many great advantages such as repeatability and strong adhesiveness. In order to mimic these unique performances, fibrillar surface with a mushroom shaped end has drawn lots of attentions because of its advantage in efficiently enhancing adhesion compared with other sphere or simple flat ends. Here, in order to study the effects of contact cap dimension on adhesion strength, patterned surfaces of mushroom-shaped micropillars with differing cap diameters are fabricated based on the conventional photolithography and molding. The normal adhesion strength of these dry adhesives with varying cap diameters is measured with home-built equipment. The strength increases with the rise of cap diameter, and interestingly it becomes strongest when the mushroom caps join together.

  20. Accelerated evolution of a false-truffle from a mushroom ancestor.

    PubMed

    Bruns, T D; Fogel, R; White, T J; Palmer, J D

    1989-05-11

    THE false-truffles (Hymenogastrales) are a group of basidomycetous fungi that produce underground truffle-like basidiocarps. They are generally believed to be independently derived from several mushroom lineages, but extensive morphological divergence often obscures recognition of these phylogenetic connections. Comparisons of mitochondrial DNA now demonstrate a surprisingly close relationship between species of false-truffles in the genus Rhizopogon (Hymenogastraceae) and the mushroom genus Suillus (Boletaceae). The striking morphological differences separating all Suillus species from Rhizopogon imply an acceleration in the rate of morphological change relative to molecular change during the evolution of these false-truffles from their mushroom ancestors. This acceleration can best be explained by rapid morphological divergence resulting from selective pressures which may have acted on a small number of developmental genes. PMID:2716834

  1. Biocontrol Activity of Bacillus subtilis Isolated from Agaricus bisporus Mushroom Compost Against Pathogenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Can; Sheng, Jiping; Chen, Lin; Zheng, Yanyan; Lee, David Yue Wei; Yang, Yang; Xu, Mingshuang; Shen, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Bacillus subtilis strain B154, isolated from Agaricus bisporus mushroom compost infected by red bread mold, exhibited antagonistic activities against Neurospora sitophila. Antifungal activity against phytopathogenic fungi was also observed. The maximum antifungal activity was reached during the stationary phase. This antifungal activity was stable over a wide pH and temperature range and was not affected by proteases. Assay of antifungal activity in vitro indicated that a purified antifungal substance could strongly inhibit mycelia growth and spore germination of N. sitophila. In addition, treatment with strain B154 in A. bisporus mushroom compost infected with N. sitophila significantly increased the yield of bisporus mushrooms. Ultraviolet scan spectroscopy, tricine sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, matrix-associated laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analyses revealed a molecular weight consistent with 1498.7633 Da. The antifungal compound might belong to a new type of lipopeptide fengycin. PMID:26050784

  2. Between prohibitions: patterns and meanings of magic mushroom use in the UK.

    PubMed

    Riley, Sarah C E; Blackman, Graham

    2008-01-01

    A survey of magic mushroom use was completed by 174 participants in 2004, a year when the sale of hallucinogenic mushrooms was not illegal in the UK. The data were collected in Edinburgh and Bristol (UK). Participants were a self-selecting convenience sample. Participants tended to be in their 20s, White-British, in education or employed; 64% were male. Participants reported a pattern of infrequent but intense consumption (47% used between 4-12 times/year, average consumption in one setting was 12 g, a high dose). Use was explained in terms of laughing, hallucinations, altering perspective (41-74%), and feelings of being closer to nature (49%). Negative experiences reported included paranoia (35%) and anxiety (32%). Mushroom use was located within a wider recreational drug and alcohol culture. Four focus groups aided the interpretation of the data. Future research is recommended into negative experiences. Implications for policy and harm minimisation literature are discussed. PMID:18189205

  3. Determination of Chemical Antioxidants and Phenolic Compounds in the Brazilian Mushroom Agaricus sylvaticus.

    PubMed

    Costa Orsine, J V; Novaes, Mr Cg; Ramirez Asquieri, E; Cañete, R

    2014-03-01

    Agaricus sylvaticus mushroom has been widely studied because of its high nutritional value and medicinal properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant potential of both alcoholic and aqueous extracts of Agaricus sylvaticusand quantify their total polyphenol content. The antioxidant activity was performed by the 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging capacity and total polyphenol content was assessed by colorimetric method. Observation also noted the great antioxidant potential of aqueous, alcoholic and ethereal extracts (14.6%, 75.6% and 14.6%, respectively) of the Agaricus sylvaticus mushroom, highlighting the alcoholic extract, which demonstrates the extraordinary benefits of this mushroom in the diet, since antioxidants prevent premature ageing and various types of cancer. PMID:25303248

  4. An In Vitro Evaluation of Antioxidant and Colonic Microbial Profile Levels following Mushroom Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Vamanu, Emanuel; Avram, Ionela; Nita, Sultana

    2013-01-01

    The biological activity of mushroom consumption is achieved by the antioxidant effect of constituent biomolecules released during digestion. In the following study, the consumption of mushroom fungi was determined to increase the number of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains within the colon. The main phenolic antioxidant compounds identified were both gentisic and homogentisic acids. Moreover, the flavonoid catechin as well as a significant amount of ?- and ?-tocopherols was determined. The amount of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains from different sections of the human colon was significantly correlated with levels of antioxidative biomolecules. The experimental data clearly demonstrate a significant impact of mushroom consumption on the fermentative function of microorganisms in the human colon, resulting in the homeostasis of normal physiological colonic functions. PMID:24027755

  5. Free radical scavenging and antimicrobial properties of extracts of wild mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Oyetayo, V.O.

    2009-01-01

    Antioxidant and antimicrobial potentials of extracts obtained from four wild mushrooms, Termitomyces clypeatus (TCE), Termitomyces robustus (TRE), Lentinus subnudus (LSE) and Lenzites species (LZE) collected in Nigeria were investigated. LSE and LZE displayed good scavenging activity against 2, 2-Diphenyl-1-Picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferrous ion radicals at concentration of 2 mg/mL. However, TRE and TCE exhibited better superoxide anion scavenging effect at 2 mg/mL. All extracts (TCE, TRE, LSE and LZE) had comparable scavenging effect on hydroxyl radicals as butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT) used as control. Moreover, extracts from the wild mushrooms were able to inhibit the growth of all indicator organisms at concentrations between 12.5 mg/mL to 100 mg/mL. LSE and LZE, however, showed better antimicrobial effect on the indicator organisms. The results suggest that extracts obtained from the four wild mushrooms may serve as sources of new bioactive compounds with effective antioxidant and antimicrobial activity. PMID:24031376

  6. The applications of polysaccharides from various mushroom wastes as prebiotics in different systems.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wei-Ting; Sheih, I-Chuan; Fang, Tony J

    2013-07-01

    The bases or stipes of mushrooms are normally discarded as low-economic value animal feed and compost. There are no known reports on deriving polysaccharides from these mushroom wastes for use as prebiotics. This study showed that the relatively low concentration (0.1% to 0.5%) of polysaccharides from Lentinula edodes stipe, Pleurotus eryngii base, and Flammulina velutipes base can enhance the survival rate of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum during cold storage. The polysaccharides had synergistic effects with the peptides and amino acids from a yogurt culture to maintain probiotics above 10(7) CFU/mL during cold storage, and they also had significant protective effects on these probiotics in simulated gastric and bile juice conditions to achieve beneficial effects in the host. These results showed that mushroom wastes, which are cheaper than other sources, could be an important, new, alternative source of prebiotics. PMID:23701736

  7. Performance and meat quality of broiler chickens that are fed diets supplemented with Agaricus brasiliensis mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, João Borges; Dos Santos, Eder Clementino; Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Bertechini, Antônio Gilberto; da Silva Ávila, Carla Luiza; Dias, Francesca Silva

    2014-12-01

    This trial was performed to study the use of the mushroom Agaricus brasiliensis as an alternative additive to antimicrobial growth promoters in broiler chicken diets and to assess the quality of the broiler chicken breast meat of birds that are fed diets containing this fungus. Thus, 595 1-day-old chicks were reared in reused poultry litter without anticoccidial and antimicrobial additives. The results showed that a concentration of 1.6 g mushrooms/kg diet was ideal for these birds because it provided better bird performance. When the birds' immune system organs were analyzed, it was found that the addition of both mushrooms influenced the immune system organs of these broiler chickens. Adding A. brasiliensis to broiler chicken diets did not compromise breast meat quality. PMID:25169695

  8. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors and Their HLA Ligands are Related with the Immunopathology of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ayo, Christiane Maria; Reis, Pâmela Guimarães; Dalalio, Márcia Machado de Oliveira; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Oliveira, Camila de Freitas; de Araújo, Silvana Marques; de Oliveira Marques, Divina Seila; Sell, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes and their human leucocyte antigen (HLA) ligands in the susceptibility of chronic Chagas disease. This case-control study enrolled 131 serologically-diagnosed Chagas disease patients (59 men and 72 women, mean age of 60.4 ± 9.8 years) treated at the University Hospital of Londrina and the Chagas Disease Laboratory of the State University of Maringa. A control group was formed of 165 healthy individuals - spouses of patients or blood donors from the Regional Blood Bank in Maringa (84 men and 81 women, with a mean age of 59.0 ± 11.4 years). Genotyping of HLA and KIR was performed by PCR-SSOP. KIR2DS2-C1 in the absence of KIR2DL2 (KIR2DS2+/2DL2-/C1+) was more frequent in Chagas patients (P = 0.020; Pc = 0.040; OR = 2.14) and, in particular, those who manifested chronic chagasic cardiopathy—CCC (P = 0.0002; Pc = 0.0004; OR = 6.64; 95% CI = 2.30–18.60) when compared to the control group, and when CCC group was compared to the patients without heart involvement (P = 0.010; Pc = 0.020; OR = 3.97). The combination pair KIR2DS2+/2DL2-/KIR2DL3+/C1+ was also positively associated with chronic chagasic cardiopathy. KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 were related to immunopathogenesis in Chagas disease. The combination of KIR2DS2 activating receptor with C1 ligand, in the absence of KIR2DL2, may be related to a risk factor in the chronic Chagas disease and chronic chagasic cardiopathy. PMID:25978047

  9. Effect of dose rate of gamma irradiation on biochemical quality and browning of mushrooms Agaricus bisporus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, M.; D'Aprano, G.; Lacroix, M.

    2002-03-01

    In order to enhance the shelf-life of edible mature mushrooms Agaricus bisporus, 2 kGy ionising treatments were applied at two different dose rates: 4.5 kGy/h ( I-) and 32 kGy/h ( I+). Both I+ and I- showed 2 and 4 days shelf-life enhancement compared to the control ( C). Before day 9, no significant difference ( p>0.05) in L* value was detected in irradiated mushrooms. However, after day 9, the highest observed L* value (whiteness) was obtained for the mushrooms irradiated in I-. Analyses of phenolic compounds revealed that mushrooms in I- contained more phenols than I+ and C, the latter containing the lower level of phenols. The polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities of irradiated mushrooms, analysed via catechol oxidase and dopa oxidase substrates, resulted in being significantly lowered ( p?0.05) compared to C, with a further decrease in I+. Analyses of the enzymes indicated that PPO activity was lower in I+, contrasting with its lower phenol concentration. Ionising treatments also increased significantly ( p?0.05) the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity. The observation of mushrooms cellular membranes, by electronic microscopy, revealed a better preserved integrity in I- than in I+. It is thus assumed that the browning effect observed in I+ was caused by both the decompartimentation of vacuolar phenol and by the entry of molecular oxygen into the cell cytoplasm. The synergetic effect of the residual active PPO and the molecular oxygen, in contact with the phenols, allowed an increased oxidation rate and, therefore, a more pronounced browning in I+ than in I-.

  10. Adhesion tilt-tolerance in bio-inspired mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heepe, Lars; Carbone, Giuseppe; Pierro, Elena; Kovalev, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-01-01

    We studied experimentally and theoretically the effect of different tilt angles on the adhesion of mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructures. The marginal measured influence of tilting on pull-off forces is quantitatively well confirmed by numerical and theoretical calculations and was shown to be a direct consequence of an optimized stress distribution. In addition, the presence of a joint-like narrowing under the contact elements, as found in some biological attachment systems, was shown to further contribute to the tilt-tolerance. The results obtained allow us to explain the advantage of the widely observed mushroom-shaped contact geometry in nature for long-term and permanent adhesion.

  11. Severe rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure and posterior encephalopathy after 'magic mushroom' abuse.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Markus; Ditting, Tilmann; Watz, Henrik; Roesler, Alexander; Weidauer, Stefan; Jacobi, Volkmar; Gueller, Saskia; Betz, Christoph; Fichtlscherer, Stephan; Stein, Juergen

    2005-12-01

    We report the case of a 25-year-old, hepatitis C-infected man, who presented with severe rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure, and later developed posterior encephalopathy with cortical blindness after the ingestion of magic mushrooms. Conventional respiratory and cardiovascular support including mechanical ventilation, continuous veno-venous hemodialysis and corticosteroids led to improvement and the patient recovered completely over the following months. Magic mushrooms are becoming increasingly fashionable among drug users, as they are believed to be more harmless than other hallucinogenic designer drugs. So far, little is known about their possible severe side effects. PMID:16276262

  12. Relationship between Fibrosis and Ventricular Arrhythmias in Chagas Heart Disease Without Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tassi, Eduardo Marinho; Continentino, Marcelo Abramoff; do Nascimento, Emília Matos; Pereira, Basílio de Bragança; Pedrosa, Roberto Coury

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with Chagas disease and segmental wall motion abnormality (SWMA) have worse prognosis independent of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is currently the best method to detect SWMA and to assess fibrosis. Objective To quantify fibrosis by using late gadolinium enhancement CMR in patients with Chagas disease and preserved or minimally impaired ventricular function (> 45%), and to detect patterns of dependence between fibrosis, SWMA and LVEF in the presence of ventricular arrhythmia. Methods Electrocardiogram, treadmill exercise test, Holter and CMR were carried out in 61 patients, who were divided into three groups as follows: (1) normal electrocardiogram and CMR without SWMA; (2) abnormal electrocardiogram and CMR without SWMA; (3) CMR with SWMA independently of electrocardiogram. Results The number of patients with ventricular arrhythmia in relation to the total of patients, the percentage of fibrosis, and the LVEF were, respectively: Group 1, 4/26, 0.74% and 74.34%; Group 2, 4/16, 3.96% and 68.5%; and Group 3, 11/19, 14.07% and 55.59%. Ventricular arrhythmia was found in 31.1% of the patients. Those with and without ventricular arrhythmia had mean LVEF of 59.87% and 70.18%, respectively, and fibrosis percentage of 11.03% and 3.01%, respectively. Of the variables SWMA, groups, age, LVEF and fibrosis, only the latter was significant for the presence of ventricular arrhythmia, with a cutoff point of 11.78% for fibrosis mass (p < 0.001). Conclusion Even in patients with Chagas disease and preserved or minimally impaired ventricular function, electrical instability can be present. Regarding the presence of ventricular arrhythmia, fibrosis is the most important variable, its amount being proportional to the complexity of the groups. PMID:24918912

  13. Utilizing Chemical Genomics to Identify Cytochrome b as a Novel Drug Target for Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Shilpi; Roach, Steven L.; Barnes, S. Whitney; Hoepfner, Dominic; Walker, John R.; Chatterjee, Arnab K.; Neitz, R. Jeffrey; Arkin, Michelle R.; McNamara, Case W.; Ballard, Jaime; Lai, Yin; Fu, Yue; Molteni, Valentina; Yeh, Vince; McKerrow, James H.; Glynne, Richard J.; Supek, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased phenotypic screens enable identification of small molecules that inhibit pathogen growth by unanticipated mechanisms. These small molecules can be used as starting points for drug discovery programs that target such mechanisms. A major challenge of the approach is the identification of the cellular targets. Here we report GNF7686, a small molecule inhibitor of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, and identification of cytochrome b as its target. Following discovery of GNF7686 in a parasite growth inhibition high throughput screen, we were able to evolve a GNF7686-resistant culture of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Clones from this culture bore a mutation coding for a substitution of leucine by phenylalanine at amino acid position 197 in cytochrome b. Cytochrome b is a component of complex III (cytochrome bc1) in the mitochondrial electron transport chain and catalyzes the transfer of electrons from ubiquinol to cytochrome c by a mechanism that utilizes two distinct catalytic sites, QN and QP. The L197F mutation is located in the QN site and confers resistance to GNF7686 in both parasite cell growth and biochemical cytochrome b assays. Additionally, the mutant cytochrome b confers resistance to antimycin A, another QN site inhibitor, but not to strobilurin or myxothiazol, which target the QP site. GNF7686 represents a promising starting point for Chagas disease drug discovery as it potently inhibits growth of intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes with a half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 0.15 µM, and is highly specific for T. cruzi cytochrome b. No effect on the mammalian respiratory chain or mammalian cell proliferation was observed with up to 25 µM of GNF7686. Our approach, which combines T. cruzi chemical genetics with biochemical target validation, can be broadly applied to the discovery of additional novel drug targets and drug leads for Chagas disease. PMID:26186534

  14. A clinical adverse drug reaction prediction model for patients with chagas disease treated with benznidazole.

    PubMed

    Sperandio da Silva, Gilberto Marcelo; Mediano, Mauro Felippe Felix; Alvarenga Americano do Brasil, Pedro Emmanuel; da Costa Chambela, Mayara; da Silva, Joyce Almeida; de Sousa, Andrea Silvestre; Xavier, Sergio Salles; Rodrigues da Costa, Andrea; Magalhães Saraiva, Roberto; Hasslocher-Moreno, Alejandro Marcel

    2014-11-01

    Benznidazole (BZN) is the main trypanocidal drug used to treat Chagas disease, and the evidence supporting the benefits of BZN use during the chronic phase of the disease will favor its use in millions of individuals. However, more than 30% of patients treated with BZN may suffer adverse drug reactions (ADRs), and the development of tools to identify those patients at risk is highly desirable. In the present study, we aimed to identify predictive factors for ADRs in Chagas disease patients treated with BZN. Among 195 patients included in the study, 48.7% experienced ADRs and 31.3% had ADRs that caused BZN treatment discontinuation. Overall ADRs and ADRs that caused BZN treatment discontinuation were more common among women and in those who graduated from elementary school. Overall ADRs were also less frequent among black individuals. Based on logistic regression analysis, female sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5 to 5.4), graduation from elementary school (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.8), and white (OR, 5.0; 95% CI, 1.0 to 24.1) and mulatto (OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 28.7) races were considered to predict overall ADRs, and female sex (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.2 to 4.3) was considered to predict ADRs that caused BZN treatment discontinuation. Graduation from elementary school also presented a tendency to predict ADRs that caused BZN treatment discontinuation (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 0.9 to 3.6). The logistic regression (LR) models to predict ADRs to BZN described in this study may become important tools to minimize ADRs and improve patients' compliance and thus assist physicians treating patients with Chagas disease with BZN. PMID:25114135

  15. Cultivation-Independent Methods Reveal Differences among Bacterial Gut Microbiota in Triatomine Vectors of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    da Mota, Fabio Faria; Marinho, Lourena Pinheiro; Moreira, Carlos José de Carvalho; Lima, Marli Maria; Mello, Cícero Brasileiro; Garcia, Eloi Souza; Carels, Nicolas; Azambuja, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a trypanosomiasis whose agent is the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to humans by hematophagous bugs known as triatomines. Even though insecticide treatments allow effective control of these bugs in most Latin American countries where Chagas disease is endemic, the disease still affects a large proportion of the population of South America. The features of the disease in humans have been extensively studied, and the genome of the parasite has been sequenced, but no effective drug is yet available to treat Chagas disease. The digestive tract of the insect vectors in which T. cruzi develops has been much less well investigated than blood from its human hosts and constitutes a dynamic environment with very different conditions. Thus, we investigated the composition of the predominant bacterial species of the microbiota in insect vectors from Rhodnius, Triatoma, Panstrongylus and Dipetalogaster genera. Methodology/Principal Findings Microbiota of triatomine guts were investigated using cultivation-independent methods, i.e., phylogenetic analysis of 16s rDNA using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and cloned-based sequencing. The Chao index showed that the diversity of bacterial species in triatomine guts is low, comprising fewer than 20 predominant species, and that these species vary between insect species. The analyses showed that Serratia predominates in Rhodnius, Arsenophonus predominates in Triatoma and Panstrongylus, while Candidatus Rohrkolberia predominates in Dipetalogaster. Conclusions/Significance The microbiota of triatomine guts represents one of the factors that may interfere with T. cruzi transmission and virulence in humans. The knowledge of its composition according to insect species is important for designing measures of biological control for T. cruzi. We found that the predominant species of the bacterial microbiota in triatomines form a group of low complexity whose structure differs according to the vector genus. PMID:22563511

  16. Emerging and under-recognized Chagas cardiomyopathy in non-endemic countries

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Joana; Providência, Rui; Ramos, Evelise; Valente, Cristina; Seixas, Jorge; Meruje, Manuela; Leitão-Marques, António; Vieira, António

    2012-01-01

    Due to recent population emigration movements, an epidemic of Chagas disease is currently menacing most developed countries. The authors report the case of a 53-year-old Brazilian woman living in Europe for the last 10 years who developed heart failure symptoms, having a previous symptomatic sinus node disease with a pacemaker implant at age of 40 years. The diagnosis was based on serology and myocardial biopsy and the patient was treated with nifurtimox. The authors emphasize the need of a high level of suspicion in patients with suggestive epidemiology and the need of populational screening of specific high risk groups. New treatment options are also discussed. PMID:22905296

  17. A model for Chagas disease involving transmission by vectors and blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Hernández, J X

    1994-08-01

    Models on the population dynamics of Chagas disease are discussed. The effects of vector and blood transfusion transmission are considered and epidemiological data is provided to support model assumptions. Also, the role of density-dependence on the population dynamics of the vector population is explored as well as the existence of non-reproductive insect stages involved in the transmission process. When density dependent effects are neglected, there is a non-oscillatory approach to the endemic equilibrium (local asymptotic stability). When density-dependence effects and vector stage-structure are introduced, limit cycle solutions may be obtained. Results are compared to available field data. PMID:8079195

  18. Training Systems Modelers through the Development of a Multi-scale Chagas Disease Risk Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, J.; Stevens-Goodnight, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Bustamante, D.; Fytilis, N.; Goff, P.; Monroy, C.; Morrissey, L. A.; Orantes, L.; Stevens, L.; Dorn, P.; Lucero, D.; Rios, J.; Rizzo, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of our NSF-sponsored Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences grant is to create a multidisciplinary approach to develop spatially explicit models of vector-borne disease risk using Chagas disease as our model. Chagas disease is a parasitic disease endemic to Latin America that afflicts an estimated 10 million people. The causative agent (Trypanosoma cruzi) is most commonly transmitted to humans by blood feeding triatomine insect vectors. Our objectives are: (1) advance knowledge on the multiple interacting factors affecting the transmission of Chagas disease, and (2) provide next generation genomic and spatial analysis tools applicable to the study of other vector-borne diseases worldwide. This funding is a collaborative effort between the RSENR (UVM), the School of Engineering (UVM), the Department of Biology (UVM), the Department of Biological Sciences (Loyola (New Orleans)) and the Laboratory of Applied Entomology and Parasitology (Universidad de San Carlos). Throughout this five-year study, multi-educational groups (i.e., high school, undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral) will be trained in systems modeling. This systems approach challenges students to incorporate environmental, social, and economic as well as technical aspects and enables modelers to simulate and visualize topics that would either be too expensive, complex or difficult to study directly (Yasar and Landau 2003). We launch this research by developing a set of multi-scale, epidemiological models of Chagas disease risk using STELLA® software v.9.1.3 (isee systems, inc., Lebanon, NH). We use this particular system dynamics software as a starting point because of its simple graphical user interface (e.g., behavior-over-time graphs, stock/flow diagrams, and causal loops). To date, high school and undergraduate students have created a set of multi-scale (i.e., homestead, village, and regional) disease models. Modeling the system at multiple spatial scales forces recognition that the system's structure generates its behavior; and STELLA®'s graphical interface allows researchers at multiple educational levels to observe patterns and trends as the system changes over time. Graduate students and postdoctoral researchers will utilize these initial models to more efficiently communicate and transfer knowledge across disciplines prior to generating more novel and complex disease risk models. The hope is that these models will improve causal viewpoints, understanding of the system patterns, and how to best mitigate disease risk across multiple spatial scales. Yasar O, Landau RH (2003) Elements of computational science and engineering education. Siam Review 45(4): 787-805.

  19. Triatominae species of Suriname (Heteroptera: Reduviidae) and their role as vectors of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Hiwat, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Nine species of Triatominae, representing three tribes and five genera, are currently known in Suriname. An annotated list of the species based on the collections of the Bureau of Public Health (Suriname), the National Zoological Collection Suriname and the National History Museum Leiden (the Netherlands) is provided. Additionally, the results of several years of opportunistic collection in two domestic environments are presented. The most common species are Rhodnius pictipes Stål, 1972, Rhodnius robustus Larrouse, 1972 and Panstrongylus geniculatus (Latreille, 1811). The significance of the species as vectors of Chagas disease in Suriname is discussed. PMID:25004146

  20. Severe digestive pathology associated with chronic Chagas' disease in Ecuador: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Guevara, A G; Eras, J W; Recalde, M; Vinueza, L; Cooper, P J; Ouaissi, A; Guderian, R H

    1997-01-01

    DNA extracted from peripheral blood of two Ecuadorian patients showing severe digestive pathology was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction using a Trypanosoma cruzi specific oligonucleotide primers derived from the primary sequence of a cDNA encoding for a 24 kDa excretory/secretory protein. The positive PCR results together with the clinical findings confirmed that both patients had a digestive pathology due to Chagas' disease. This pathology could be more frequent than previously described in the chagasic endemic regions of Andean countries. PMID:9322425

  1. A fibrinolytic enzyme from the medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Sapkota, Kumar; Park, Se-Eun; Choi, Bong-Suk; Kim, Seung; Nguyen, Thi Hiep; Kim, Chun-Sung; Choi, Han-Seok; Kim, Myung-Kon; Chun, Hong-Sung; Park, Yeal; Kim, Sung-Jun

    2006-12-01

    In this study we purified a fibrinolytic enzyme from Cordyceps militaris using a combination of ion-exchange chromatography on a DEAE Sephadex A-50 column, gel filtration chromatography on a Sephadex G-75 column, and FPLC on a HiLoad 16/60 Superdex 75 column. This purification protocol resulted in a 191.8-fold purification of the enzyme and a final yield of 12.9 %. The molecular mass of the purified enzyme was estimated to be 52 kDa by SDS-PAGE, fibrin-zymography, and gel filtration chromatography. The first 19 amino acid residues of the N-terminal sequence were ALTTQSNV THGLATISLRQ, which is similar to the subtilisin-like serine protease PR1J from Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliase. This enzyme is a neutral protease with an optimal reaction pH and temperature of 7.4 and 37 degrees , respectively. Results for the fibrinolysis pattern showed that the enzyme rapidly hydrolyzed the fibrin alpha-chain followed by the gamma-gamma chains. It also hydrolyzed the beta-chain, but more slowly. The Aalpha, Bbeta, and gamma chains of fibrinogen were also cleaved very rapidly. We found that enzyme activity was inhibited by Cu2+ and Co2+, but enhanced by the additions of Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions. Furthermore, fibrinolytic enzyme activity was potently inhibited by PMSF and APMSF. This enzyme exhibited a high specificity for the chymotrypsin substrate S-2586 indicating it 's a chymotrypsin-like serine protease. The data we present suggest that the fibrinolytic enzyme derived from the edible and medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris has fibrin binding activity, which allows for the local activation of the fibrin degradation pathway. PMID:17205040

  2. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    Some individuals with Chagas disease develop right precordial lead ST segment elevation in response to an ajmaline challenge test, and the prevalence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) is also high in Chagas disease. Because these same electrocardiographic abnormalities occur in the Brugada syndrome, which involves genetically defective cardiac sodium channels, acquired damage to cardiac sodium channels may also occur in Chagas disease. We studied several conventional and advanced resting 12-lead/derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in 34 patients with Chagas -related heart disease (mean age 39 14 years) and in 34 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All ECG recordings were of 5-10 min duration, obtained in the supine position using high fidelity hardware/software (CardioSoft, Houston, TX). Even after excluding those Chagas patients who had resting BBBs, tachycardia and/or pathologic arrhythmia (n=8), significant differences remained in multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters between the Chagas and control groups (n=26/group), especially in their respective QT interval variability indices, maximal spatial QRS-T angles and low frequency HRV powers (p=0.0006, p=0.0015 and p=0.0314 respectively). In relation to the issue of potential damage to cardiac sodium channels, the Chagas patients had: 1) greater than or equal to twice the incidence of resting ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 (n=10/26 vs. n=5/26) and of both leftward (n=5/26 versus n=0/26) and rightward (n=7/26 versus n=3/26) QRS axis deviation than controls; 2) significantly increased filtered (40-250 Hz) QRS interval durations (92.1 8.5 versus 85.3 plus or minus 9.0 ms, p=0.022) versus controls; and 3) significantly decreased QT and especially JT interval durations versus controls (QT interval: 387.5 plus or minus 26.4 versus 408.9 plus or minus 34.6 ms, p=0.013; JT interval: 290.5 plus or minus 26.3 versus 314.8 plus or minus 31.3 ms; p=0.0029). Heart rates and Bazett-corrected QTc/JTc intervals were not significantly different between groups. Patients with Chagas heart disease have increased cardiac repolarization abnormalities, especially by advanced ECG. Moreover, as a group, they have decreased uncorrected JT and QT interval durations and increased filtered QRS interval durations (versus age/gender-matched controls), all suggesting a potential loss of cardiac sodium channel function that might be mediated, in part, by cardiac autonomic damage. Overall findings support Brugada et al's recent hypothesis that the pathway leading to sudden death may often be similar in Chagas' disease and Brugada syndrome i.e., damage to the sodium channel (infectious/immunologic/autonomic in Chagas' genetic in Brugada) with consequent loss of sodium currents may facilitate a phase II-reentry based arrhythmic substrate for ventricular fibrillation in both conditions. In general, JT interval-related results have been underreported in the Chagas literature.

  3. Chemical composition and nutritional value of the most widely appreciated cultivated mushrooms: an inter-species comparative study.

    PubMed

    Reis, Filipa S; Barros, Lillian; Martins, Anabela; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2012-02-01

    Herein, it was reported and compared the chemical composition and nutritional value of the most consumed species as fresh cultivated mushrooms: Agaricus bisporus (white and brown mushrooms), Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom), Pleurotus eryngii (King oyster mushroom), Lentinula edodes (Shiitake) and Flammulina velutipes (Golden needle mushroom). Shiitake revealed the highest levels of macronutrients, unless proteins, as also the highest sugars, tocopherols and PUFA levels, and the lowest SFA content. White and brown mushrooms showed similar macronutrients composition, as also similar values of total sugars, MUFA, PUFA and total tocopherols. Oyster and king oyster mushrooms gave the highest MUFA contents with similar contents in PUFA, MUFA and SFA in both samples. They also revealed similar moisture, ash, carbohydrates and energy values. This study contributes to the elaboration of nutritional databases of the most consumed fungi species worldwide, allowing comparison between them. Moreover it was reported that cultivated and the wild samples of the same species have different chemical composition, including sugars, fatty acids and tocopherols profiles. PMID:22056333

  4. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori effects of medicinal mushroom extracts, with special emphasis on the Lion's Mane mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (higher Basidiomycetes).

    PubMed

    Shang, Xiaodong; Tan, Qi; Liu, Ruina; Yu, Kangying; Li, Pingzuo; Zhao, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Although the medicinal mushroom Hericium erinaceus is used extensively in traditional Chinese medicine to treat chronic superficial gastritis, the underlining pharmaceutical mechanism is yet to be fully understood. In this study, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of extracts prepared from the fruiting bodies of 14 mushroom species (H. erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, Cordyceps militaris, Pleurotus eryngii, P. ostreatus, Agrocybe aegerita, Lentinus edodes, Agaricus brasiliensis, A. bisporus, Coprinus comatus, Grifola frondosa, Phellinus igniarius, Flammulina velutipes, and Hypsizygus marmoreus) were determined against Helicobacter pylori using laboratory strains of ATCC 43504 and SS1 as well as 9 clinical isolates via an in vitro microplate agar diffusion assay. Ethanol extracts (EEs) of 12 mushrooms inhibited the growth of H. pylori in vitro, with MIC values <3 mg/mL. EEs of H. erinaceus and G. lucidum also inhibited Staphylococcus aureus (MIC 7360;10 mg/mL) but had no effect on the growth of two Escherichia coli test strains (MIC >10 mg/mL). MIC values of ethyl acetate fractions (EAFs) of H. erinaceus against 9 clinical isolates of H. pylori ranged between 62.5 and 250 µg/mL. The bacteriostatic activity of EAFs was found to be concentration-dependant, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values for H. pylori ATCC 43504 were 73.0 and 200 µg/mL, respectively. The direct inhibitory effect of EEs and EAFs of H. erinaceus against H. pylori could be another pharmaceutical mechanism of medicinal mushrooms-besides the immunomodulating effect of polysaccharides, suggested previously-in the treatment of H. pylori-associated gastrointestinal disorders. Further research to identify the active component(s) is currently undertaking in our laboratory. PMID:23557368

  5. Notes on a New Productive Strain of King Oyster Mushroom, Pleurotus eryngii (Higher Basidiomycetes), a Prized Italian Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom.

    PubMed

    Venturella, Giuseppe; Palazzolo, Eristanna; Saiano, Filippo; Gargano, Maria Letizia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the authors provide data on a culinary-medicinal, host-specific variety of P. eryngii species-complex that is known in Italy as "cardoncello". A species description, the techniques of isolation of a new strain (C-142-c), and the preparation of the substratum are illustrated. Data on the productivity of substratum inoculated with C-142-c strain and the nutritional value of cultivated "cardoncello" mushrooms are also provided. PMID:25746625

  6. Cultivation of the oyster mushroom ( Pleurotus ostreatus ) on wood substrates in Hawaii

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracy E. Tisdale; Susan C. Miyasaka; Don E. Hemmes

    2006-01-01

    Summary  Five non-native, aggressively growing trees, Falcataria moluccana (Miquel) Barneby & Grimes, Casuarina equisetifolia L. ex J. R. & G. Forst, Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maid, Psidium cattleianum Sabine, and Trema orientalis (L.) Blume, were evaluated for suitability as substrate for outdoor cultivation of the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) Kumm., in Hawaii. An existing shade house was modified for

  7. Studies on the vegetative growth requirements of Psathyrella atroumbonata, pegler, an edible mushroom in Nigeria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. M. Ayodele

    2008-01-01

    Growth requirements of Psathyrella atroumbonata Pegler, a Nigeria edible mushroom were studied. Glucose was the best carbon source. This was followed by maltose, starch and manitol in that order. The least growth was observed in lactose and cellulose. Yeast extract which is organic nitrogen proved to be the best nitrogen source. P. atroumbonata utilizes organic nitrogen better than inorganic nitrogen.

  8. A novel laccase from fresh fruiting bodies of the wild medicinal mushroom Tricholoma matsutake.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijing; Zhu, Mengjuan; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Hexiang; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge about biological activities of constituents from medicinal mushrooms belonging to the genus Tricholoma is limited. A 59-kDa laccase has now been purified from fresh fruiting bodies of the mushroom Tricholoma matsutake. The purification protocol entailed ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose, affinity chromatography on ConA-Sepharose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. Of the various affinity and ion exchange chromatographic media employed, the laccase bound only on Con A-Sepharose. The activity of the laccase did not undergo major changes over the temperature range 20-80°C. However, all activity vanished following exposure to 100°C for 10 minutes. The enzyme activity varied only slightly over the pH range 3-5, with the optimal pH of 5, but exhibited a precipitous decline when the pH was increased to 6, and was undetectable at pH 8 and 9. The laccase showed activity in the decolorization of azo dyes without a mediator. Its N-terminal sequence demonstrated only slight resemblance to those of other mushroom laccases. The newly described laccase is distinctive from the previously isolated Tricholoma mushroom laccases in a number of aspects. PMID:25781157

  9. Detection of Calcium Transients in Drosophila Mushroom Body Neurons with Camgaroo Reporters

    E-print Network

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Detection of Calcium Transients in Drosophila Mushroom Body Neurons with Camgaroo Reporters Dinghui as transgenically encoded calcium sensors in behaving animals. We expressed two versions of camgaroo in Drosophila- izationofbrainsexpressingthereportersproducesarobustincreaseinfluorescencethatisblockedbyremovingextracellularcalciumor by antagonists of voltage-dependent calcium channels. The fluorescence increase

  10. SpongeBob, the mushroom, discovered in Borneo David Perlman, Chronicle Science Writer

    E-print Network

    Silver, Whendee

    SpongeBob, the mushroom, discovered in Borneo David Perlman, Chronicle Science Writer Monday, June squarepantsii, because the newly discovered species can only be found in the rain forest of Borneo - so far, and Lewis & Clark College were rooting around for their own specialized fungal targets in Borneo's Sarawak

  11. Effect of temperature and humidity on the transpiration rate of the whole mushrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. V. Mahajan; F. A. R. Oliveira; I. Macedo

    2008-01-01

    Water loss or transpiration is an important physiological process that affects the main quality characteristics of fresh mushrooms, such as saleable weight, appearance and texture. A loss in weight of only 5% may cause fresh produce to lose freshness and appear wilted and it is an important parameter to be considered while designing packaging. A setup was developed to monitor

  12. Determination of metal content in wild edible mushroom species from regions of Greece

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paraskevi K. Ouzouni; Panayotis G. Veltsistas; Evangelos K. Paleologos; Kyriakos A. Riganakos

    2007-01-01

    Eight different species of wild edible mushrooms (Cantharellus cibarius, Hydnum repandum, Lactarius salmonicolor, Xerocomus chrysenteron, Agaricus cupreobrunneus, Amanita franchetii, Hygrophorus eburneus and Hygrophorus chrysodon) representing seven different families (Cantharellaceae, Hydnaceae, Boletaceae, Russulaceae, Agaricaceae, Amanitaceae, Hygrophoraceae) growing in Epirus (Ioannina) and West Macedonia (Grevena, Kastoria), regions of Greece were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) for their metal (Mg, Cr, Mn,

  13. MONDAY Sample Halls Menu MAIN MEAL BEEF, MUSHROOM AND ALE PIE

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Jim

    MONDAY Sample Halls Menu MAIN MEAL BEEF, MUSHROOM AND ALE PIE MAIN MEAL VEGETABLE GOULASH WITH CHEESY SCONES (V) MAIN MEAL STUFFED SOLE WITH SPINACH, TOMATO AND CHIVE CREAM JACKET POTATO CHOICE BROCCOLI HOME MADE SOUP OR ASSORTED HOT AND COLD DESSERTS TUESDAY Sample Halls Menu MAIN MEAL

  14. American Journal of Botany 84(8): 981991. 1997. FOSSIL MUSHROOMS FROM MIOCENE AND CRETACEOUS

    E-print Network

    Hibbett, David S.

    981 American Journal of Botany 84(8): 981­991. 1997. FOSSIL MUSHROOMS FROM MIOCENE AND CRETACEOUS Cretaceous and Miocene ambers. Archaeomarasmius leggetti gen. et sp. nov., from mid-Cretaceous amber of New is represented by a single complete fruiting body from Miocene amber of the Dominican Republic, is similar

  15. Pelletised fuel production from coal tailings and spent mushroom compost — Part I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Changkook Ryu; Karen Finney; Vida N Sharifi; Jim Swithenbank

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the technology of manufacturing pellet blends for energy production from two discarded materials in industry. Coal tailings material is the fine discard produced as a result of coal cleaning. Although it still has a significantly high calorific value, over a million tonnes of coal tailings are deposited in lagoons every year in the UK alone. Spent mushroom

  16. Tissue Printing to Visualize Polyphenol Oxidase and Peroxidase in Vegetables, Fruits, and Mushrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melberg, Amanda R.; Flurkey, William H.; Inlow, Jennifer K.

    2009-01-01

    A simple tissue-printing procedure to determine the tissue location of the endogenous enzymes polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase in a variety of vegetables, fruits, and mushrooms is described. In tissue printing, cell contents from the surface of a cut section of the tissue are transferred to an adsorptive surface, commonly a nitrocellulose…

  17. Paleogene Radiation of a Plant Pathogenic Mushroom Martin P. A. Coetzee1

    E-print Network

    Paleogene Radiation of a Plant Pathogenic Mushroom Martin P. A. Coetzee1 *, Paulette Bloomer2 of the economic losses they cause and the ease with which they are able to spread across large areas their dispersal and current day distribution. We tested the hypothesis of a Gondwanan origin of the plant

  18. Evaluation of yield of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus pulmonarius) grown on cotton waste and cassava peel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grillo Joseph Adebayo; Banjo Nusirat Omolara; Abikoye Elizabeth Toyin

    2009-01-01

    This work evaluated the yield of Pleurotus pulmonarius on different mixtures of cotton waste and cassava peel. P. pulmonarius demonstrated significantly higher colonization rate on cotton waste substrate (100 g cotton waste) 3 weeks after inoculation of spawn than any other substrate mixtures. Cotton waste had the shortest time for full mycelial ramification (3 weeks) and mushroom primodial appearance (3

  19. Adsorption of pesticides by sewage sludge, grape marc, spent mushroom substrate and by amended soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Sonia Rodríguez-Cruz; Eliseo Herrero-Hernández; José M. Ordax; Jesús M. Marín-Benito; Khalid Draoui; María J. Sánchez-Martín

    2011-01-01

    A comparative adsorption study of linuron, diazinon and myclobutanil, representing three classes of pesticides, by sewage sludge (SS), grape marc (GM) and spent mushroom substrate (SMS) and soils amended with these residues was carried out. The study assayed the effect of the nature of the residue, soil characteristics, pesticide properties and residue-soil incubation time on adsorption. Soil-residues were incubated outdoors

  20. Adsorption of pesticides by sewage sludge, grape marc, spent mushroom substrate and by amended soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Sonia Rodríguez-Cruz; Eliseo Herrero-Hernández; José M. Ordax; Jesús M. Marín-Benito; Khalid Draoui; María J. Sánchez-Martín

    2012-01-01

    A comparative adsorption study of linuron, diazinon and myclobutanil, representing three classes of pesticides, by sewage sludge (SS), grape marc (GM) and spent mushroom substrate (SMS) and soils amended with these residues was carried out. The study assayed the effect of the nature of the residue, soil characteristics, pesticide properties and residue-soil incubation time on adsorption. Soil-residues were incubated outdoors

  1. Processing of antennal information in extrinsic mushroom body neurons of the bee brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. Homberg

    1984-01-01

    In the bee brain neural activity of interneurons of the inner antenno-cerebral tract (inputs to the mushroom body) and extrinsic neurons of theß-lobe (output cells) was recorded intracellularly. The cells were stained with Lucifer Yellow. The response characteristics of the neurons to light, various antennal stimuli and mechanical stimuli to thorax and abdomen were studied.

  2. COMPARISON OF TWO METHODS FOR THE QUANTITATION OF BETA-GLUCANS FROM SHIITAKE MUSHROOMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal polysaccharides and glucans, including lentinan from shiitakes, have been identified as promoting human health, and consequently, the sale of mushroom-based health products has increased significantly in recent years. Reliable methods for the quantitation of lentinan must be available if shi...

  3. Effects of Spatial Dispersion on Reflection From Mushroom-Type Artificial Impedance Surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olli Luukkonen; Mário G. Silveirinha; Alexander B. Yakovlev; Constantin R. Simovski; Igor S. Nefedov; Sergei A. Tretyakov

    2009-01-01

    Several recent works have emphasized the role of spatial dispersion in wire media, and demonstrated that arrays of parallel metallic wires may behave very differently from a uniaxial local material with negative permittivity. Here, we investigate using local and non-local homogenization methods the effect of spatial dispersion on reflection from the mushroom structure introduced by Sievenpiper. The objective of the

  4. Characterization of a heterogalactan: Some nutritional values of the edible mushroom Flammulina velutipes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fhernanda R. Smiderle; Elaine R. Carbonero; Guilherme L. Sassaki; Philip A. J. Gorin; Marcello Iacomini

    2008-01-01

    Production and consume of mushrooms have grown in the world, and beside these, the nutritional properties and biological active components of fungi have received more attention by researchers. Considering these, a mannofucogalactan was isolated from Flammulina velutipes, and characterized using 13C and 1H (obs.), 13C HMQC nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and methylation analysis. The monosaccharide composition of this polymer was

  5. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Learning-Related Plasticity in PE1 and Other Mushroom

    E-print Network

    Menzel, Randolf - Institut für Biologie

    Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Learning-Related Plasticity in PE1 and Other Mushroom Body, the pedunculus-extrinsic neuron number 1 (PE1), was identified on the basis of its firing pattern, and other neurons were grouped together as non-PE1 neurons. PE1 reduces its response to CS and does not change its

  6. 77 FR 55808 - Certain Preserved Mushrooms From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ...pickled'' mushrooms containing less than 0.5 percent acetic acid are within the scope of the antidumping duty order...which are prepared or preserved by means of vinegar or acetic acid, but may contain oil or other additives. The...

  7. Ethnomycology: A global survey of mushrooms and man through the ages

    E-print Network

    Horton, Tom

    mushroom · All are cultivated on compost or logs #12;8 Common Name US $ / kg American matsutake 33 Morels ­ European truffles · Tuber gibbosum and Picoa carthusiana ­ Oregon truffles · Morchella spp. ­ Morels pounds harvested in OR, WA, ID ­ 1.3 million pounds were morels ­ $41.1 million in value · 1994-1998 per

  8. Evaluation of Selected Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms for Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Activities.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Noorlidah; Ismail, Siti Marjiana; Aminudin, Norhaniza; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza; Lau, Beng Fye

    2012-01-01

    Considering the importance of diet in prevention of oxidative stress-related diseases including hypertension, this study was undertaken to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activities of selected culinary-medicinal mushrooms extracted by boiling in water for 30?min. Antioxidant capacity was measured using the following assays: DPPH free radical scavenging activity, ?-carotene bleaching, inhibition of lipid peroxidation, reducing power ability, and cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC). Antioxidant potential of each mushroom species was calculated based on the average percentages relative to quercetin and summarized as Antioxidant Index (AI). Ganoderma lucidum (30.1%), Schizophyllum commune (27.6%), and Hericium erinaceus (17.7%) showed relatively high AI. Total phenolics in these mushrooms varied between 6.19 to 63.51?mg GAE/g extract. In the ACE inhibitory assay, G. lucidum was shown to be the most potent species (IC(50) = 50??g/mL). Based on our findings, culinary-medicinal mushrooms can be considered as potential source of dietary antioxidant and ACE inhibitory agents. PMID:21716693

  9. Host feeding, damage and control of the mushroom pest, Brennandania lambi (Acari: Pygmephoroidea) in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jufang Wu; Zhi-Qiang Zhang

    1993-01-01

    The pygmephoroid mite, Brennandania lambi (Krczal), is the most serious mite pest of mushroom production in Shanghai. China. This mite could not develop and reproduce on the mycelia of Lentinus edodes, Flammulina velutipes, Pleurotus ostreatus or Pleutotus sajor-caju, but 12–20% of the females survived 15 to 31 days on these hosts, whereas all mites died after 8 days in absence

  10. Adsorption of Cadmium from Aqueous Solutions by Edible Mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus and Lentinus edodes)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    THYAGARAJAN MATHIALAGAN; THIRUVENKATACHARI VIRARAGHAVAN; DENIS ROY CULLIMORE

    Fungal organisms can remove heavy metals from aqueous solutions. Macro fungi such as Agaricus bisporus and Lentinus edodes (shiitake), commonly called mushrooms, are edible and are grown commercially. Laboratory batch studies were conducted at room temperature (21 ± 1°C) to determine the potential of these fungal biomasses for adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solutions con- taining 1 mg\\/L cadmium. Results

  11. Adaptation of Microglomerular Complexes in the Honeybee Mushroom Body Lip to Manipulations of

    E-print Network

    Menzel, Randolf - Institut für Biologie

    Adaptation of Microglomerular Complexes in the Honeybee Mushroom Body Lip to Manipulations honeybees proceed through a sequence of tasks, passing from hive and guard duties to foraging activities connections within the MB lips during honeybee maturation. Moreover, manipulations of behavioral and sensory

  12. 78 FR 12034 - Certain Preserved Mushrooms From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    On November 6, 2012, the Department of Commerce (the Department) published the preliminary results of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain preserved mushrooms from India. The period of review is February 1, 2011, through January 31, 2012. We invited interested parties to comment on the preliminary results, but we received no comments. We made no changes for the final......

  13. Inhibitory effects of medicinal mushrooms on ?-amylase and ?-glucosidase - enzymes related to hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Su, Chun-Han; Lai, Min-Nan; Ng, Lean-Teik

    2013-04-25

    In Asia, medicinal mushrooms have been popularly used as folk medicine and functional foods. In this study, our aim was to examine the inhibitory effects of six medicinal mushrooms on key enzymes (?-amylase and ?-glucosidase) related to hyperglycemia; chemical profiles of bioactive extracts were also examined. The results showed that the n-hexane extract of Coriolus versicolor had the strongest anti-?-amylase activity, while the n-hexane extract of Grifola frondosa showed the most potent anti-?-glucosidase activity. Compared with acarbose, the anti-?-amylase activity of all mushroom extracts was weaker, however a stronger anti-?-glucosidase activity was noted. GC-MS analysis showed that the magnitude of potency of inhibiting ?-glucosidase activity varied with the levels of oleic acid and linoleic acid present in the extracts. These findings were consistent with the IC50 values of these free fatty acids on inhibiting ?-glucosidase activity. Taken together, this study suggests that oleic acid and linoleic acid could have contributed to the potent anti-?-glucosidase activity of selected medicinal mushrooms. PMID:23396484

  14. Novel medicinal mushroom blend suppresses growth and invasiveness of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiahua; Sliva, Daniel

    2010-12-01

    Mushrooms are an integral part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), and have been used for millennia to prevent or treat a variety of diseases. Currently mushrooms or their extracts are used globally in the form of dietary supplements. In the present study we have evaluated the anticancer effects of the dietary supplement, MycoPhyto® Complex (MC), a novel medicinal mushroom blend which consists of a blend of mushroom mycelia from the species Agaricus blazei, Cordyceps sinensis, Coriolus versicolor, Ganoderma lucidum, Grifola frondosa and Polyporus umbellatus, and ?-1,3-glucan isolated from the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we show that MC demonstrates cytostatic effects through the inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase of highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. DNA-microarray analysis revealed that MC inhibits expression of cell cycle regulatory genes (ANAPC2, ANAPC2, BIRC5, Cyclin B1, Cyclin H, CDC20, CDK2, CKS1B, Cullin 1, E2F1, KPNA2, PKMYT1 and TFDP1). Moreover, MC also suppresses the metastatic behavior of MDA-MB-231 by the inhibition of cell adhesion, cell migration and cell invasion. The potency of MC to inhibit invasiveness of breast cancer cells is linked to the suppression of secretion of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) from MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, the MC dietary supplement could have potential therapeutic value in the treatment of invasive human breast cancer. PMID:21042722

  15. Lanostane-Type Triterpenes from the Mushroom Astraeus pteridis with Antituberculosis Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the EtOH extract of the Truffle-mimiking mushroom Astraeus pteridis led to the isolation and identification of three new (3-5) and two known (1, 2) lanostane triterpenes, and phenylalanine betaine (6). The structures of the isolates were elucidated based on 1D and 2D...

  16. Forensic analysis of hallucinogenic mushrooms and khat (Catha edulis Forsk) using cation-exchange liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Laussmann, Tim; Meier-Giebing, Sigrid

    2010-02-25

    Hallucinogenic mushrooms (e.g. Psilocybe and Panaeolus species) as well as leaves and young shoots of the khat tree (Catha edulis Forsk) are illicit drugs in many countries. The exact concentration of the hallucinogenic alkaloids psilocin and psilocybin in mushrooms and the sympathomimetic alkaloids cathinone and cathine in khat is usually essential for jurisdiction. Facing an increasing number of mushroom and khat seizures by German customs authorities, a convenient comprehensive quantitative HPLC method based on cation-exchange liquid chromatography for these rather "exotic" drugs has been developed which avoids time-consuming multi-step sample preparation or chemical derivatization procedures. Using this method a number of different hallucinogenic fungi species and products that are mainly distributed via the internet have been analysed (dried and fresh Psilocybe cubensis Singer as well as P. cubensis collected from "grow boxes", Panaeolus cyanescens Berkeley and Broome and so-called "philosopher stones" (sclerotia of Psilocybe species)). Highest total amounts of psilocin have been detected in dried P. cyanescens reaching up to 3.00+/-0.24 mg per 100 mg. The distribution of khat alkaloids in different parts of the khat shoots has been studied. High concentrations of cathinone have not only been detected in leaves but also in green parts and barks of stalks. Additionally, the sample treatment for fresh mushroom and khat samples has been optimised. Highest amounts of alkaloids were found when fresh material was freeze-dried. PMID:20047807

  17. Evolution of the Toxins Muscarine and Psilocybin in a Family of Mushroom-Forming Fungi

    E-print Network

    Matheny, P. Brandon

    Evolution of the Toxins Muscarine and Psilocybin in a Family of Mushroom-Forming Fungi Pawel, and psilocybin, a hallucinogen, have never been performed. The known taxonomic distribution of muscarine within. Here, we present a review of muscarine and psilocybin assays performed on species of Inocybaceae during

  18. Comparison of Rapid DNA Extraction Methods Applied to PCR Identification of Medicinal Mushroom Ganoderma spp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xuanwei Zhou; Qizhang Li; Jingya Zhao; Kexuan Tang; Juan Lin; Yizhou Yin

    2007-01-01

    Four different DNA extraction methods were used to extract genomic DNA of the medicinal mushroom Lingzhi from its developing stage materials, such as mycelium, dry fruiting body, or sliced and spore powder or sporoderm?broken spore powder. The DNA samples were analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis, UV spectrophotometer, and PCR amplification. According to the average yields and purity of DNA, high

  19. Enhanced antiproliferative effects of aqueous extracts of some medicinal mushrooms on colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Arora, Shagun; Goyal, Shristhi; Balani, Jay; Tandon, Simran

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of the world. Certain edible mushroom species are rich in antioxidants, which perform a vital role in preventing this risk in manifesting itself. Initial screening was followed by qualitative phytochemical analysis; estimation of total phenolic content, DPPH radical scavenging activity, and the ferric-reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) of the ethanolic and the aqueous extracts of 3 edible medicinal mushroom species, namely, Auricularia polytricha, Macrolepiota procera, and Pleurotus ostreatus. Furthermore, based on promising results from studies of antioxidant activities, these extracts were carried forward to study cytotoxic, antiproliferative, and antiapoptotic effects on breast (MCF-7), colon (COLO-205), and kidney (ACHN) cancer cell lines. Among all the extracts, the aqueous extract of P. ostreatus and the ethanolic extract of M. procera showed the highest cytotoxic effect on all 3 cancer cell lines, especially COLO-205. The scientific data obtained so far show that the aqueous extracts of all 3 species of mushrooms have a remarkable irreversible antiproliferative effect on COLO-205 compared with other cancer cell lines. This decrease in cell viability, morphological changes, and apoptotic hallmarks observed upon treatment with the extracts validated the anticancerous property of these mushroom species. PMID:23662617

  20. Folate composition of ten types of mushrooms determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White button, crimini, shiitake, maitake, enoki, oyster, chanterelle, morel, portabella, and uv-treated portabella mushrooms were sampled from U.S. retail outlets and major producers. Folate (5-methyltetrahydrofolate [5MTHF], 10-formyl folate [10FF], 5-formyltetrahydrofolate [5FTHF]) was analyzed u...

  1. Starch concentrations in log-grown shiitake mushrooms (Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Pegler)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Pegler) mushrooms have a reputation as a healthy food, in part from the abundance of different polysaccharides that may have functional food activities. Polysaccharide content of shiitake and shiitake-derived products are being utilized as a promotional tool to hea...

  2. Differential expression of systemic cytokine profiles in Chagas' disease is associated with endemicity of Trypanosoma cruzi infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margarita Samudio; Sonia Montenegro-James; Margarita de Cabral; Jorge Martinez; Antonieta Rojas de Arias; Olga Woroniecky; Mark A James

    1998-01-01

    Chagas' disease is a serious public health problem in Paraguay, however the immunoepidemiology of the disease has not been well documented. A preliminary cross-sectional survey was carried out in two villages of the Paraguayan Chaco region and in five villages of the Oriental region to assess the endemicity of Trypanosoma cruzi infections. Thereafter, a subset of individuals (ages ranging from

  3. Monocytes from Patients with Indeterminate and Cardiac Forms of Chagas' Disease Display Distinct Phenotypic and Functional Characteristics Associated with Morbidity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paulo E. A. Souza; Manoel O. C. Rocha; Etel Rocha-Vieira; Cristiane A. S. Menezes; Andrea C. L. Chaves; Kenneth J. Gollob; Walderez O. Dutra

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that monocyte-derived macrophages display critical activities in immunity to parasites. The ability of these cells to process and present antigens, produce cytokines, and provide costimulatory signals demonstrates their pivotal role in initiating immune responses. Although potential modulatory function has been attributed to monocytes from patients with Chagas' disease, a systematic phenotypic and functional analysis of these

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi: Genetic Structure of Populations and Relevance of Genetic Variability to the Pathogenesis of Chagas Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andréa M Macedo; Carlos R Machado; Riva P Oliveira; Sérgio DJ Pena

    2004-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, has a variable clinical course, ranging from symptomless infection to severe chronic disease with cardiovascular or gastrointestinal involvement or, occasion- ally, overwhelming acute episodes. The factors influencing this clinical variability have not been elucidated, but it is likely that the genetic variability of both the host and the parasite are of importance.

  5. Opportunities for Improved Chagas Disease Vector Control Based on Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Communities in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rosecrans, Kathryn; Cruz-Martin, Gabriela; King, Ashley; Dumonteil, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a vector-borne parasitic disease of major public health importance. Current prevention efforts are based on triatomine vector control to reduce transmission to humans. Success of vector control interventions depends on their acceptability and value to affected communities. We aimed to identify opportunities for and barriers to improved vector control strategies in the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico. Methodology/principal findings We employed a sequence of qualitative and quantitative research methods to investigate knowledge, attitudes and practices surrounding Chagas disease, triatomines and vector control in three rural communities. Our combined data show that community members are well aware of triatomines and are knowledgeable about their habits. However, most have a limited understanding of the transmission dynamics and clinical manifestations of Chagas disease. While triatomine control is not a priority for community members, they frequently use domestic insecticide products including insecticide spray, mosquito coils and plug-in repellents. Families spend about $32 US per year on these products. Alternative methods such as yard cleaning and window screens are perceived as desirable and potentially more effective. Screens are nonetheless described as unaffordable, in spite of a cost comparable to the average annual spending on insecticide products. Conclusion/Significance Further education campaigns and possibly financing schemes may lead families to redirect their current vector control spending from insecticide products to window screens. Also, synergism with mosquito control efforts should be further explored to motivate community involvement and ensure sustainability of Chagas disease vector control. PMID:24676038

  6. Etanercept Induces Low QRS Voltage and Autonomic Dysfunction in Mice with Experimental Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Angulo, Héctor; García, Oscar; Castillo, Endher; Cardenas, Edward; Marques, Juan; Mijares, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a tropical parasitic disease caused by the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Chagasic cardiomyopathy is characterized by disorders of autonomic regulation and action potential conduction in the acute and chronic phases of infection. Although tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) has been linked to cardiomyopathy in experimental models and in patients with Chagas disease, other reports suggest that TNF-? may exert anti-parasitic actions during the acute phase of infection. Objectives This study aimed to determine the effects of a soluble TNF-? blocker, etanercept, on electrocardiographic parameters in the acute phase of experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Methods Electrocardiograms were obtained from untreated infected mice and infected mice who were treated with etanercept 7 days after infection. ECG wave and heart rate variability parameters were determined using Chart for Windows. Results Etanercept treatment resulted in a low QRS voltage and decreased heart rate variability compared with no treatment. However, the treated mice exhibited a delay in the fall of the survival curve during the acute phase. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that although etanercept treatment promotes survival in mice infected with a virulent T. cruzi strain, TNF-? blockade generates a low voltage complex and autonomic dysfunction during the acute phase of infection. These findings indicate that mortality during the acute phase can be attributed to a systemic inflammatory response rather than cardiac dysfunction. PMID:23877744

  7. Anti-?1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Labovsky, V; Smulski, C R; Gómez, K; Levy, G; Levin, M J

    2007-01-01

    Chronic Chagas heart disease (cChHD), a chronic manifestation of the Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is characterized by high antibody levels against the C-terminal region of the ribosomal P proteins (i.e. peptide R13, EEEDDDMGFGLFD) which bears similarity with the second extracellular loop of ?1-adrenergic receptor (?1-AR, peptide H26R HWWRAESDEARRCYNDPKCCDFVTNR). Because it has not been demonstrated clearly that IgGs from cChHD patients bind to native human ?1-AR, the aim of this study was to investigate further the physical interaction between cChHD IgGs and the human ?1-AR. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrated the binding of these antibodies to the receptor expressed on stably transfected cells, together with a ?1-AR agonist-like effect. In addition, immunoadsorption of the serum samples from cChHD patients with a commercially available matrix, containing peptides representing the first and the second extracellular loop of the ?1-AR, completely abolished reactivity against the H26R peptide and the physiological response to the receptor. The follow-up of this specificity after in vitro immunoadsorption procedures suggests that this treatment might be used to diminish significantly the serum levels of anti-?1-AR antibodies in patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:17419712

  8. Parasite Prolyl Oligopeptidases and the Challenge of Designing Chemotherapeuticals for Chagas Disease, Leishmaniasis and African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, I.M.D; Motta, F.N; Grellier, P; Santana, J.M

    2013-01-01

    The trypanosomatids Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and human African trypanosomiasis, respectively. It is estimated that over 10 million people worldwide suffer from these neglected diseases, posing enormous social and economic problems in endemic areas. There are no vaccines to prevent these infections and chemotherapies are not adequate. This picture indicates that new chemotherapeutic agents must be developed to treat these illnesses. For this purpose, understanding the biology of the pathogenic trypanosomatid-host cell interface is fundamental for molecular and functional characterization of virulence factors that may be used as targets for the development of inhibitors to be used for effective chemotherapy. In this context, it is well known that proteases have crucial functions for both metabolism and infectivity of pathogens and are thus potential drug targets. In this regard, prolyl oligopeptidase and oligopeptidase B, both members of the S9 serine protease family, have been shown to play important roles in the interactions of pathogenic protozoa with their mammalian hosts and may thus be considered targets for drug design. This review aims to discuss structural and functional properties of these intriguing enzymes and their potential as targets for the development of drugs against Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis. PMID:23514419

  9. [Epidemiology of Chagas disease in Andrés Eloy Blanco, Lara, Venezuela: triatomine infestation and human seroprevalence].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Bonfante, Claudina; Amaro, Aned; García, María; Mejías Wohlert, Ligia Elena; Guillen, Pamela; Antonio García, Rafael; Alvarez, Naysan; Díaz, Marialejandra; Cárdenas, Elsys; Castillo, Silvia; Bonfante-Garrido, Rafael; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael

    2007-05-01

    A seroepidemiological survey and vector captures were performed in four rural communities in Andrés Eloy Blanco, Lara State, Venezuela. Systematic random sampling was based on family clusters, with samples drawn from 869 individuals to determine anti-Trypanosoma cruzi and anti-Leishmania sp. antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. Positive individuals were defined as > or = 1:32 for anti-T. cruzi antibody and non-reactive to Leishmania sp. antigen, revealing an antibody frequency of 6.9% (n = 60), of whom 46.66% were females and 53.33% males and 60% were over 39 years of age. Some 5 (8.33%) seropositive individuals were under 10 years of age and 10 (16.66%) under 20 years. Rhodnius prolixus and Panstrongylus geniculatus were the triatomines captured, with infestation rates of 1.9% and 10.54%, colonization index of 0% and 18.18% in infested houses, and a T. cruzi infection index of 20% and 5.07%, respectively. The results suggest active Chagas disease transmission in Andrés Eloy Blanco in the last two decades and that P. geniculatus is replacing R. prolixus as the Chagas disease vector. PMID:17486235

  10. Current and developing therapeutic agents in the treatment of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Apt, Werner

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease must be treated in all its stages: acute, indeterminate, chronic, and initial and middle determinant chronic, due to the fact that DNA of the parasite can be demonstrated by PCR in chronic cases, where optical microscopy does not detect parasites. Nifurtimox (NF) and benznidazole (BNZ) are the drugs accepted to treat humans based upon ethical considerations and efficiency. However, both the drugs produce secondary effects in 30% of the cases, and the treatment must be given for at least 30–60 days. Other useful drugs are itraconazole and posaconazole. The latter may be the drug to treat Chagas disease in the future when all the investigations related to it are finished. At present, there is no criterion of cure for chronic cases since in the majority, the serology remains positive, although it may decrease. In acute cases, 70% cure with NF and 75% with BNZ is achieved. In congenital cases, 100% cure is obtained if the treatment is performed during the first year of life. In chronic acquired cases, 20% cure and 50% improvement of the electrocardiographic changes are obtained with itraconazole. PMID:20957215

  11. Protective actions of melatonin against heart damage during chronic Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo Rodrigues; Kuehn, Christian Collins; dos Santos, Carla Domingues; Miranda, Mariza Abreu; da Costa, Cassia Mariana Bronzon; Mendonça, Vagner José; do Prado Júnior, José Clóvis

    2013-12-01

    Chronic cardiomyopathy is the most important clinical form of Chagas disease, and it is characterised by myocarditis that is associated with fibrosis and organ dysfunction. Alternative treatment options are important tools to modulate host immune responses. The main goal of this work was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory actions of melatonin during the chronic phase of Chagas disease. TNF-?, IL-10 and nitrite concentrations were evaluated as predictive factors of immune modulation. Creatine phosphokinase-MB (CK-MB), cardiac inflammatory foci and heart weight were assessed to evaluate the efficacy of the melatonin treatment. Male Wistar rats were infected with 1×10(5) blood trypomastigotes of the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi and kept untreated for 60 days to mimic chronic infection. After this period, the rats were orally treated with melatonin 50mg/kg/day, and the experiments were performed 90, 120, and 180 days post-infection. Melatonin treatment significantly increased the concentration of IL-10 and reduced the concentrations of NO and TNF-? produced by cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, it led to decreased heart weight, serum CK-MB levels and inflammatory foci when compared to the untreated and infected control groups. We conclude that melatonin therapy is effective at protecting animals against the harmful cardiac inflammatory response that is characteristic of chronic T. cruzi infection. PMID:24055715

  12. Role of TNF in sickness behavior and allodynia during the acute phase of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Angulo, H; Thomas, L E; Castillo, E; Cárdenas, E; Mogollón, F; Mijares, A

    2013-08-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is associated with inflammation, discomfort and pain during the acute phase. The influence of TNF-? (tumor necrosis factor) in this disease outcome is controversial. In this way, the aim of this work was to determine the role of the TNF-? blocker etanercept in the pain, discomfort, and survival during the Chagas' acute phase of mice experimentally infected with a wild virulent strain of T. cruzi. The infection with this wild strain was responsible for a severe visceral inflammation and said parasite showed a tropism in peritoneal fluid cells. Etanercept was able to restore spontaneous vertical and horizontal activities during the second week after infection and to abolish mechanical allodynia during the first week after infection. Finally, etanercept delayed the mortality without any effect on the parasitemia rates. This is the first report that correlates sickness behavior and allodynia with TNF-? and suggests that this cytokine may play an important role in the physiopathology of the acute phase. PMID:23684908

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi infection enhances polyreactive antibody response in an acute case of human Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Grauert, M R; Houdayer, M; Hontebeyrie-Joskowciz, M

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of antibody response in an acute case of human Chagas' disease was investigated. Hypergammaglubulinaemia appeared at day 17 of infection, and persisted after 66 days of infection, at which time parasitaemia became undetectable. Titration of immunoglobulins showed that the three principal isotypes were involved in the response, emphasizing polyclonal B cell activation. Total IgA was detected before total IgM, and the latter before total IgG. High titres of autoantibodies were found among IgM and IgG subclasses. IgA was also the first isotype to be detected among specific anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. However, the maximal parasite antibody response was attained after 30 days of infection for all isotypes. With regard to possible cross-reactivity between molecules of host and parasite, adsorption experiments on T. cruzi-specific immunosorbent were designed. Specific antibodies, present in the eluates, also recognized natural antigens, especially laminin. In order to characterize the alpha-galactose epitope of laminin, adsorption experiments on sheep erythrocytes were performed, and revealed the possible presence of another epitope on the glycoprotein. Our results indicate that in the case of Chagas' disease investigated here, polyclonal activation occurred; moreover, they suggest that molecular mimicry may play a role by increasing autoantibodies, probably via a parasite-driven mechanism. PMID:7686828

  14. Sperm morphological features associated with chronic Chagas disease in the semen of experimentally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Pedro-Martínez, Elvia; Hernández-Pichardo, José Ernesto; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Graullera-Rivera, Verónica; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2014-10-01

    The presence of trypanosomatids in the reproductive systems of different mammals (causing genital lesions in the acute stage of the disease) may predispose the animals to low semen quality. However, there are no studies examining the alterations in the sperm morphological features in the chronic stage of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Knowledge of these aspects is important to understand the other ways of transmission of the Chagas disease. Progressive motility, mass motility, concentration, and sperm morphology of 84 ejaculates of dogs that were chronically infected with T. cruzi were evaluated. Most of the findings were consistent with the reference values and with those obtained from healthy control dogs. The scrotal circumference was not correlated with spermatozoa concentration in the infected animals. In conclusion, the T. cruzi Ninoa (MHOM/MX/1994/Ninoa) strain does not cause significant alterations in the semen quality of dogs experiencing chronic Chagas disease (at concentrations of 5 × 10(4) to 1 × 10(6) parasites per animal). PMID:25114010

  15. A logistic delay differential equation model for Chagas disease with interrupted spraying schedules.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, Anna Maria; Shillor, Meir; Kingsland, Lindsey; Thatcher, Andrea; Toeniskoetter, Matthew; Wood, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    This work studies a mathematical model for the dynamics of Chagas disease, a parasitic disease that affects humans and domestic mammals throughout rural areas in Central and South America. It presents a modified version of the model found in Spagnuolo et al. [A model for Chagas disease with controlled spraying, J. Biol. Dyn. 5 (2011), pp. 299-317] with a delayed logistic growth term, which captures an overshoot, beyond the vector carrying capacity, in the total vector population when the blood meal supply is large. It studies the steady states of the system in the case of constant coefficients without spraying, and the analysis shows that for given-averaged parameters, the endemic equilibrium is stable and attracting. The numerical simulations of the model dynamics with time-dependent coefficients are shown when interruptions in the annual insecticide spraying cycles are taken into account. Simulations show that when there are spraying schedule interruptions, spraying may become ineffective when the blood meal supply is large. PMID:22873596

  16. Geographic Distribution of Chagas Disease Vectors in Brazil Based on Ecological Niche Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Galvão, Cléber; Costa, Jane; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2012-01-01

    Although Brazil was declared free from Chagas disease transmission by the domestic vector Triatoma infestans, human acute cases are still being registered based on transmission by native triatomine species. For a better understanding of transmission risk, the geographic distribution of Brazilian triatomines was analyzed. Sixteen out of 62 Brazilian species that both occur in >20 municipalities and present synanthropic tendencies were modeled based on their ecological niches. Panstrongylus geniculatus and P. megistus showed broad ecological ranges, but most of the species sort out by the biome in which they are distributed: Rhodnius pictipes and R. robustus in the Amazon; R. neglectus, Triatoma sordida, and T. costalimai in the Cerrado; R. nasutus, P. lutzi, T. brasiliensis, T. pseudomaculata, T. melanocephala, and T. petrocchiae in the Caatinga; T. rubrovaria in the southern pampas; T. tibiamaculata and T. vitticeps in the Atlantic Forest. Although most occurrences were recorded in open areas (Cerrado and Caatinga), our results show that all environmental conditions in the country are favorable to one or more of the species analyzed, such that almost nowhere is Chagas transmission risk negligible. PMID:22523500

  17. Geographic distribution of chagas disease vectors in Brazil based on ecological niche modeling.

    PubMed

    Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Galvão, Cléber; Costa, Jane; Peterson, A Townsend

    2012-01-01

    Although Brazil was declared free from Chagas disease transmission by the domestic vector Triatoma infestans, human acute cases are still being registered based on transmission by native triatomine species. For a better understanding of transmission risk, the geographic distribution of Brazilian triatomines was analyzed. Sixteen out of 62 Brazilian species that both occur in >20 municipalities and present synanthropic tendencies were modeled based on their ecological niches. Panstrongylus geniculatus and P. megistus showed broad ecological ranges, but most of the species sort out by the biome in which they are distributed: Rhodnius pictipes and R. robustus in the Amazon; R. neglectus, Triatoma sordida, and T. costalimai in the Cerrado; R. nasutus, P. lutzi, T. brasiliensis, T. pseudomaculata, T. melanocephala, and T. petrocchiae in the Caatinga; T. rubrovaria in the southern pampas; T. tibiamaculata and T. vitticeps in the Atlantic Forest. Although most occurrences were recorded in open areas (Cerrado and Caatinga), our results show that all environmental conditions in the country are favorable to one or more of the species analyzed, such that almost nowhere is Chagas transmission risk negligible. PMID:22523500

  18. Ecology, evolution and control of Chagas disease: a century of neglected modelling and a promising future.

    PubMed

    Nouvellet, Pierre; Cucunubá, Zulma M; Gourbière, Sébastien

    2015-03-01

    More than 100 years after its formal description, Chagas disease remains a major public health concern in Latin America with a yearly burden of 430,000 Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs). The aetiological agent, a protozoan named Trypanosoma cruzi, is mainly transmitted to mammalian hosts by triatomine vectors. Multiple species of mammals and triatomines can harbour and transmit the parasite, and the feeding range of triatomine species typically includes many noncompetent hosts. Furthermore, the transmission of the pathogen can occur via several routes including the typical vector's faeces, but also oral, congenital and blood transfusion routes. These ecological and epidemiological complexities of the disease have hindered many control initiatives. In such a context, mathematical models provide invaluable tools to explore and understand the dynamics of T. cruzi transmission, and to design, optimize and monitor the efficacy of control interventions. We intend here to provide the first review of the mathematical models of Chagas disease, focussing on how they have contributed to our understanding of (1) the population dynamics and control of triatomine vectors, and (2) the epidemiology of T. cruzi infections. We also aim at suggesting promising lines of modelling that could further improve our understanding of the ecology, evolution, and control of the disease. PMID:25765195

  19. An entomoepidemiological investigation of Chagas disease in the state of Ceará, Northeast Region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Carolina Fausto de Souza; Souza-Santos, Reinaldo; Teixeira, Natalia Faria Daflon; Georg, Ingebourg; Gomes, Taís Ferreira; Boia, Marcio Neves; dos Reis, Neilane Bertoni; Maia, Alexander de Oliveira; Lima, Marli Maria

    2014-04-01

    The seroprevalence of Chagas disease in humans and the presence of triatomines were investigated in a rural locality in the State of Ceará, Brazil, an historically endemic region. Approximately 80% of the surveyed residents agreed to undergo serological tests. Intradomestic and peridomestic environments were searched for triatomines in both the dry and rainy seasons. The prevalence rate of Chagas disease was 1.2% and the majority of individuals confirmed with the disease over 50 years of age. A total of 761 specimens of triatomines were captured, most of which were from colonies composed of nymphs and adult bugs, and the majority of specimens were obtained in the dry season. Triatoma brasiliensis was the predominant species. Analysis using light microscopy revealed that 28.6% of the insects were Trypanosoma cruzi positive. Results suggest that peridomestic man-made structures, such as animal shelters, improper storage of timber and uninhabited dwellings contribute to the high rate of triatomine infestation in the area. PMID:24896053

  20. A decade of targets and patented drugs for chemotherapy of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Duschak, Vilma G

    2011-09-01

    Chagas disease, a parasitic infection typically spread by triatomine bugs, affects millions of people throughout Latin America. Current chemotherapy based on the nitroaromatic compounds, benzonidazole and nifurtimox provides unsatisfactory results and suffers from considerable side effects. Therefore, there is still an urgent need for new drugs to treat this neglected disease. During the last decade, the advances and understanding in the biology and biochemistry of Trypanosoma cruzi have allowed the identification of multiple new targets for Chagas' disease chemotherapy. Among the most promising targets for antiparasitic drugs are: cruzipain, the main cysteine protease of T. cruzi, essential for parasite survival and proliferation in mammalian host; ergosterol biosynthesis pathway; trypanothione synthesis and thiol-dependant redox metabolism. Specific enzymes of the glycolytic, pentose phosphate, polyisoprenoid (farnesylpyrophosphate synthase) and other particular biosynthetic pathways as well as enzymes from purine salvage (hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase, dihydrofolate reductase) have also been intensively studied in T. cruzi. In particular, trypanocidal agents that target the validated biochemical pathways of the parasite including cysteine proteinase inhibitors and inhibitors capable to block ergosterol biosynthesis are currently in the pipeline. Among the latter, posaconazole and ravuconazole, are planned to enter in clinical trials for trypanocidal chemotherapy in the near future. This review will summarize advances on antichagasic agents directed to specific parasite targets such as metabolic pathways or specific enzymes. Related patents filed and issued from 2000 to 2010 claiming inhibitors for specific parasite targets will be also discussed. Among them, the most represented were those related with cysteine proteinase inhibitors. PMID:21824073