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Sample records for chain reaction pcr

  1. Buoyancy-Driven Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, K D; Wheeler, E K; Benett, W; Stratton, P; Christian, A; Chen, A; Ortega, J; Weisgraber, T H; Goodson, K E

    2004-09-28

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) facilitates DNA detection by significantly increasing the concentration of specific DNA segments. A new class of PCR instruments uses a buoyancy-driven re-circulating flow to thermally cycle the DNA sample and benefits from reduced cycle times, low sample volumes, a miniaturized format, and low power consumption. This paper analyzes a specific buoyancy PCR device in a micro-channel ''race-track'' geometry to determine key parameters about PCR cycle times and other figures of merit as functions of device dimensions. The 1-D model balances the buoyancy driving force with frictional losses. A hydrostatic pressure imbalance concept is used between the left and right sides of the fluid loop to calculate the buoyancy driving force. Velocity and temperature distributions within the channels are determined from two-dimensional analysis of the channel section, with developing region effects included empirically through scaled values of the local Nusselt number. Good agreement between four independent verification steps validate the 1-D simulation approach: (1) analytical expressions for the thermal entrance length are compared against, (2) comparison with a full 3-D finite element simulation, (3) comparison with an experimental flow field characterization, and (4) calculation of the minimum PCR runtime required to get a positive PCR signal from the buoyancy-driven PCR device. The 1-D approach closely models an actual buoyancy-driven PCR device and can further be used as a rapid design tool to simulate buoyancy PCR flows and perform detailed design optimizations studies.

  2. Identifying of meat species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    SciTech Connect

    Foong, Chow Ming; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah

    2013-11-27

    Meat has been widely consumed as an important protein source in daily life of human. Furthermore, with busy and intense urban lifestyle, processed food is now one of the main protein sources of one’s diet. Consumers rely on the food labeling to decide if the meat product purchased is safe and reliable. Therefore, it is important to ensure the food labeling is done in a correct manner to avoid consumer fraud. More consumers are now concern about the food quality and safety as compared to before. This study described the meat species identification and detection method using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 8 types of meats (cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, chicken, duck, pork and horse). The objective of this study is to decide on the specificity of oligonucleotide sequences obtained from previous study. There were 5 proposed oligonucleotide primer in this study. The main important finding in this work is the specificity of oligonucleotide primers to raw meats. It if found that the oligonucleotide primers proposed were not specific to the local raw meat species. Therefore, further study is needed to obtain a species-specific oligonucletide primers for PCR, in order to be applied in food product testing.

  3. Identifying of meat species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foong, Chow Ming; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah

    2013-11-01

    Meat has been widely consumed as an important protein source in daily life of human. Furthermore, with busy and intense urban lifestyle, processed food is now one of the main protein sources of one's diet. Consumers rely on the food labeling to decide if the meat product purchased is safe and reliable. Therefore, it is important to ensure the food labeling is done in a correct manner to avoid consumer fraud. More consumers are now concern about the food quality and safety as compared to before. This study described the meat species identification and detection method using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 8 types of meats (cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, chicken, duck, pork and horse). The objective of this study is to decide on the specificity of oligonucleotide sequences obtained from previous study. There were 5 proposed oligonucleotide primer in this study. The main important finding in this work is the specificity of oligonucleotide primers to raw meats. It if found that the oligonucleotide primers proposed were not specific to the local raw meat species. Therefore, further study is needed to obtain a species-specific oligonucletide primers for PCR, in order to be applied in food product testing.

  4. Designing Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Primer Multiplexes in the Forensic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2011-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common experiment in upper-level undergraduate biochemistry, molecular biology, and forensic laboratory courses as reagents and thermocyclers have become more affordable for institutions. Typically, instructors design PCR primers to amplify the region of interest and the students prepare their samples for…

  5. MEN2A carrier detection by combined polymerase chain reaction and ligase chain reaction (PCR/LCR) techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, V.L.; Wel, Q.; Danielson, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A) is a dominantly inherited cancer syndrome that is characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma, parathyroid hyperplasia and phaeoachromocytoma. MEN2A predisposing mutations have been shown to occur in the conserved cysteine rich extracellular domain of the ret proto-oncogene. Thus far, only five separate codons, C609, C611, C618, C620, and C634, each coding for cysteine residues in exons 10 and 11 of the human ret gene, have been associated with MEN2A. Direct analyses of all five of these codon sequences was performed by a combination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and ligase chain reaction (LCR) techniques. Genomic DNA was initially amplified with PCR primers surrounding the sequences of exons 10 and 11. Using a multiplex LCR reaction, and resolving the products on a 7 M urea, 10% polyacrylamide gel, the presence of a T{yields}C base substitution was immediately identified according to size. We have used these techniques to identify the prediposing mutation in genomic DNA from the proband of a MEN2A family and subsequently demonstrated the inheritance pattern of this same base substitution mutation in the rest of the family. These PCR/LCR techniques provide a rapid MEN2A detection scheme.

  6. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. 147.30 Section... Examination Procedures § 147.30 Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test... should consist of the following sequences: ER12JA07.005 (c) Polymerase chain reaction. (1) Treat...

  7. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. 147.30 Section... Examination Procedures § 147.30 Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test... should consist of the following sequences: ER12JA07.005 (c) Polymerase chain reaction. (1) Treat...

  8. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. 147.30 Section... Examination Procedures § 147.30 Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test... should consist of the following sequences: ER12JA07.005 (c) Polymerase chain reaction. (1) Treat...

  9. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of aquatic animal pathogens in a diagnostic laboratory setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Getchell, Rodman G.; McClure, Carol A.; Weber, S.E.; Garver, Kyle A.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time, or quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is quickly supplanting other molecular methods for detecting the nucleic acids of human and other animal pathogens owing to the speed and robustness of the technology. As the aquatic animal health community moves toward implementing national diagnostic testing schemes, it will need to evaluate how qPCR technology should be employed. This review outlines the basic principles of qPCR technology, considerations for assay development, standards and controls, assay performance, diagnostic validation, implementation in the diagnostic laboratory, and quality assurance and control measures. These factors are fundamental for ensuring the validity of qPCR assay results obtained in the diagnostic laboratory setting.

  10. Accuracy of universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of bacterial meningitis among suspected patients

    PubMed Central

    Moayedi, Ali Reza; Nejatizadeh, Abdolazim; Mohammadian, Maryam; Rahmati, Mohammad Bagher; Namardizadeh, Vahideh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Central nervous system (CNS) infections are life-threatening diseases caused by viral, bacterial, parasitic and fungal microorganisms. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of bacterial meningitis among patients who were referred to Koodakan Hospital in Bandar Abbas because they were suspected of having the disease. Methods This study was conducted in 2013 on the patients who were admitted to Bandar Abbas’ Koodakan Hospital because they were suspected of having meningitis. A questionnaire, including demographic data, was completed for each patient. Universal PCR, Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, and gram staining and cultures were done for all the patients. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results Among the 100 patients studied 59 (59%) were male and 41 (41%) were female. No patient in our study had a positive smear and culture for meningitis. Among the patients with negative smears and cultures six (6%) had positive universal PCR, and 94 (94%) had negative universal PCR. Based on these results, PCR had 95% specificity and 100% negative predictive value for the prediction of meningitis. In 30 patients (30%), the biochemical analysis of CSF were in favor of meningitis. Among the 30 patients, six patients (20%) had positive universal PCR and 24 patients (80%) had negative universal PCR. Conclusion Based on our results, the universal PCR test is useful in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis in children. We recommend using it in combination with other tests, such as CSF analysis, for diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. PMID:26816587

  11. Monitoring Acidophilic Microbes with Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Frank F. Roberto

    2008-08-01

    Many techniques that are used to characterize and monitor microbial populations associated with sulfide mineral bioleaching require the cultivation of the organisms on solid or liquid media. Chemolithotrophic species, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, or thermophilic chemolithotrophs, such as Acidianus brierleyi and Sulfolobus solfataricus can grow quite slowly, requiring weeks to complete efforts to identify and quantify these microbes associated with bioleach samples. Real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assays in which DNA targets are amplified in the presence of fluorescent oligonucleotide primers, allowing the monitoring and quantification of the amplification reactions as they progress, provide a means of rapidly detecting the presence of microbial species of interest, and their relative abundance in a sample. This presentation will describe the design and use of such assays to monitor acidophilic microbes in the environment and in bioleaching operations. These assays provide results within 2-3 hours, and can detect less than 100 individual microbial cells.

  12. Amplification of Chloroplast DNA Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR): A Practical Activity for Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kenny; Barfoot, Jan; Crawford, Kathleen E.; Simpson, Craig G.; Beaumont, Paul C.; Bownes, Mary

    2006-01-01

    We describe a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol suitable for use in secondary schools and colleges. This PCR protocol can be used to investigate genetic variation between plants. The protocol makes use of primers which are complementary to sequences of nucleotides that are highly conserved across different plant genera. The regions of…

  13. Nanoscale superstructures assembled by polymerase chain reaction (PCR): programmable construction, structural diversity, and emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Hua; Ma, Wei; Xu, Liguang; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-11-19

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an essential tool in biotechnology laboratories and is becoming increasingly important in other areas of research. Extensive data obtained over the last 12 years has shown that the combination of PCR with nanoscale dispersions can resolve issues in the preparation DNA-based materials that include both inorganic and organic nanoscale components. Unlike conventional DNA hybridization and antibody-antigen complexes, PCR provides a new, effective assembly platform that both increases the yield of DNA-based nanomaterials and allows researchers to program and control assembly with predesigned parameters including those assisted and automated by computers. As a result, this method allows researchers to optimize to the combinatorial selection of the DNA strands for their nanoparticle conjugates. We have developed a PCR approach for producing various nanoscale assemblies including organic motifs such as small molecules, macromolecules, and inorganic building blocks, such as nanorods (NRs), metal, semiconductor, and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs). We start with a nanoscale primer and then modify that building block using the automated steps of PCR-based assembly including initialization, denaturation, annealing, extension, final elongation, and final hold. The intermediate steps of denaturation, annealing, and extension are cyclic, and we use computer control so that the assembled superstructures reach their predetermined complexity. The structures assembled using a small number of PCR cycles show a lower polydispersity than similar discrete structures obtained by direct hybridization between the nanoscale building blocks. Using different building blocks, we assembled the following structural motifs by PCR: (1) discrete nanostructures (NP dimers, NP multimers including trimers, pyramids, tetramers or hexamers, etc.), (2) branched NP superstructures and heterochains, (3) NP satellite-like superstructures, (4) Y-shaped nanostructures and DNA

  14. Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) outperforms real-time PCR in the detection of environmental DNA from an invasive fish species.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hideyuki; Takahara, Teruhiko; Minamoto, Toshifumi; Matsuhashi, Saeko; Uchii, Kimiko; Yamanaka, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) has been used to investigate species distributions in aquatic ecosystems. Most of these studies use real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect eDNA in water; however, PCR amplification is often inhibited by the presence of organic and inorganic matter. In droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), the sample is partitioned into thousands of nanoliter droplets, and PCR inhibition may be reduced by the detection of the end-point of PCR amplification in each droplet, independent of the amplification efficiency. In addition, real-time PCR reagents can affect PCR amplification and consequently alter detection rates. We compared the effectiveness of ddPCR and real-time PCR using two different PCR reagents for the detection of the eDNA from invasive bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus, in ponds. We found that ddPCR had higher detection rates of bluegill eDNA in pond water than real-time PCR with either of the PCR reagents, especially at low DNA concentrations. Limits of DNA detection, which were tested by spiking the bluegill DNA to DNA extracts from the ponds containing natural inhibitors, found that ddPCR had higher detection rate than real-time PCR. Our results suggest that ddPCR is more resistant to the presence of PCR inhibitors in field samples than real-time PCR. Thus, ddPCR outperforms real-time PCR methods for detecting eDNA to document species distributions in natural habitats, especially in habitats with high concentrations of PCR inhibitors. PMID:25850372

  15. A-T linker adapter polymerase chain reaction for determining flanking sequences by rescuing inverse PCR or thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR products.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Quoclinh; Zhu, Pengyu; Shi, Hui; Xu, Wentao; Hao, Junran; Luo, Yunbo; Huang, Kunlun

    2014-12-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genome walking method has been extensively used to isolate unknown flanking sequences, whereas nonspecific products are always inevitable. To resolve these problems, we developed a new strategy to isolate the unknown flanking sequences by combining A-T linker adapter PCR with inverse PCR (I-PCR) or thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR). The result showed that this method can be efficiently achieved with the flanking sequence from the Arabidopsis mutant and papain gene. Our study provides researchers with an additional method for determining genomic DNA flanking sequences to identify the target band from bulk of bands and to eliminate the cloning step for sequencing. PMID:25086366

  16. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. 147.30 Section 147.30 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT AUXILIARY...

  17. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. 147.30 Section 147.30 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT AUXILIARY...

  18. A simple procedure for optimising the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using modified Taguchi methods.

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, B D; Clarkson, J M

    1994-01-01

    Taguchi methods are used widely as the basis for development trials during industrial process design. Here, we describe their suitability for optimisation of the PCR. Unlike conventional strategies, these arrays revealed the effects and interactions of specific reaction components simultaneously using just a few reactions, negating the need for extensive experimental investigation. Reaction components which effected product yield were easily determined. In addition, this technique was applied to the qualitative investigation of RAPD-PCR profiles, where optimisation of the size and distribution of a number of products was determined. Images PMID:7937094

  19. Expression profiling by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR).

    PubMed

    Lech, Maciej; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR is a variation of the standard PCR technique that is commonly used to quantify nucleic acid. However, in this technique the amount of amplified specific sequence can be quantified at each stage of the PCR cycle. If investigated sequence is present in large number of copies in particular sample, amplification product is detected already in earlier cycles; if the sequence is rare, amplification is observed in later cycles. Quantification of amplified product is acquired using fluorescent probes or fluorescent DNA-binding dyes. Accumulation of fluorescent signal can be measured by real-time PCR instruments during each of 35-45 cycwwles of the PCR reaction, which simplify the procedure by eliminating the visualization of the amplified products using gel electrophoresis. Real-time-PCR allows quantifying the amount of product already during the PCR reaction as soon as it is detectable. Correctly performed, this method may be used for precise gene expression analysis in life science, medicine, and diagnostics and has become the standard method of choice for the quantification of mRNA. However in the past few years it became obvious that real-time PCR is complex and variability of RNA templates, assay designs, inappropriate data normalization, and data interpretation may cause diverse analytical problems. PMID:24957236

  20. Effect of reference database on frequency estimates of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based DNA profiles.

    PubMed

    Monson, K L; Budowle, B

    1998-05-01

    A variety of general, regional, ancestral and ethnic databases is available for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based loci LDLR, GYPA, HBGG, D7S8, Gc, DQA1, and D1S80. Generally, we observed greater differences in frequency estimations of DNA profiles between racial groups than between ethnic or geographic subgroups. Analysis revealed few forensically significant differences within ethnic subgroups, particularly within general United States groups, and multi-locus frequency estimates typically differ by less than a factor of ten. Using a database different from the one to which a target profile belongs tends to overestimate rarity. Implementation of the general correction of homozygote frequencies for a population substructure, advised by the 1996 National Research Council report, The Evaluation of Forensic DNA Evidence, has a minimal effect on profile frequencies. Even when it is known that both the suspect and all possible perpetrators must belong to the same isolated population, the special correction for inbreeding, which was proposed by the 1996 National Research Council report for this special case, has a relatively modest effect, typically a factor of two or less for 1% inbreeding. The effect becomes more substantial (exceeding a factor of ten) for inbreeding of 3% or more in multi-locus profiles rarer than about one in a million. PMID:9608687

  1. APPLICATION OF POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (PCR) AND PCR BASED RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM FOR DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF DERMATOPHYTES FROM DERMATOLOGICAL SPECIMENS

    PubMed Central

    Bagyalakshmi, R; Senthilvelan, B; Therese, K L; Murugusundram, S; Madhavan, H N

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To develop and optimize polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) targeting 18S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of fungi for rapid detection and identification of dermatophytes. Materials and Methods: Two PCR-RFLP methods targeting 18S rDNA and ITS regions of fungi were optimized using standard and laboratory isolates of dermatophytes and other fungi. Sixty-eight dermatological clinical specimens (nail clippings (56), material obtained from blisters (8), hair root (2), scraping from scaly plaque of foot (1) and skin scraping (1) collected by the dermatologist were subjected to both the optimized PCR-RFLP and conventional mycological (smear and culture) methods. Results: PCRs targeting 18S rDNA and the ITS region were sensitive to detect 10 picograms and 1 femtogram of T. rubrum DNA, respectively. PCR targeting 18S rDNA was specific for dermatophytes and subsequent RFLP identified them to species level. PCR-RFLP targeting the ITS region differentiated dermatophytes from other fungi with identification to species level. Among the 68 clinical specimens tested, both PCR-RFLP methods revealed the presence of dermatophytes in 27 cases (39.7%), whereas culture revealed the same only in 2 cases (7.40%), increasing the clinical sensitivity by 32.3%. Among 20 smear positive specimens, both PCR-RFLP methods detected dermatophytes in 12 (17.6%). Both the methods detected the presence of dermatophytes in 13 (19.11%) smear and culture negative specimens, increasing the clinical sensitivity by 36.1%. Conclusion: PCR-RFLP methods targeting 18S rDNA and the ITS regions of fungi were specific and highly sensitive for detection and speciation of dermatophytes. PMID:19967012

  2. NanoPCR observation: different levels of DNA replication fidelity in nanoparticle-enhanced polymerase chain reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Cenchao; Yang, Wenjuan; Ji, Qiaoli; Maki, Hisaji; Dong, Anjie; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2009-11-01

    Nanoparticle-assisted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) technology is getting more and more attention recently. It is believed that some of the DNA recombinant technologies will be upgraded by nanotechnology in the near future, among which DNA replication is one of the core manipulation techniques. So whether or not the DNA replication fidelity is compromised in nanoparticle-assisted PCR is a question. In this study, a total of 16 different metallic and non-metallic nanoparticles (NPs) were tested for their effects on DNA replication fidelity in vitro and in vivo. Sixteen types of nanomaterials were distinctly different in enhancing the PCR efficiency, and their relative capacity to retain DNA replication fidelity was largely different from each other based on rpsL gene mutation assay. Generally speaking, metallic nanoparticles induced larger error rates in DNA replication fidelity than non-metallic nanoparticles, and non-metallic nanomaterials such as carbon nanopowder or nanotubes were still safe as PCR enhancers because they did not compromise the DNA replication fidelity in the Taq DNA polymerase-based PCR system.

  3. A preliminary trial using multi-target polymerase chain reaction (multiplex PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) on the same feedstuffs to detect tissues of animal origin.

    PubMed

    Colombo, F; Marchisio, E; Trezzi, I E; Peri, V; Pinotti, L; Baldi, A; Soncini, G

    2004-08-01

    A preliminary study using multi-target polymerase chain reaction (multiplex PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was done on the same feedstuffs to detect animal tissues. The results of the two methods differ somewhat: PCR-RFLP did not detect any signal in any sample, but multiplex PCR detected a signal in one sample. These findings could be a basis for further investigations. PMID:15509020

  4. Coupled reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) as a sensitive and rapid method for isozyme genotyping.

    PubMed

    Mocharla, H; Mocharla, R; Hodes, M E

    1990-09-14

    We have developed a highly sensitive and rapid coupled reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique for detection of alpha-amylase-encoding gene transcripts and for distinguishing between the human salivary (AMY1) and pancreatic (AMY2) gene transcripts. The two genes are 93-94% homologous. However, the AMY1 gene has an additional exon known as exon S, and an extra 32 bp in exon 1. Genotyping of the different AMYs by RT-PCR was based on this unique feature of the AMY1 mRNA sequence. Detection of AMY gene (AMY1 and AMY2) transcripts in cellular RNA was achieved with a set of primers common to both human AMY1 and AMY2 genes and derived from the exon 3-4 regions. In contrast, AMY1 gene transcripts were distinguished from the pancreatic AMY2 gene transcripts by use of primers specific to the exon S-1 regions of the AMY1 gene. To distinguish AMY1 transcripts from a mixture of AMY1 and AMY2, use was made of the differences in the ethidium bromide-stained agarose gel patterns obtained after digestion of the amplified exon 3-4 fragments with TaqI. AMY gene transcripts were detectable by autoradiography in RT-PCR amplified DNA obtained from as little as 5 pg of human pancreatic or parotid total RNA. A comparison of sensitivity of Northern blotting vs. RT-PCR suggested that the RT-PCR method is about 3-6 x 10(3)-fold more sensitive than Northern blotting in detecting AMY gene transcripts in human pancreatic total RNA. PMID:1699848

  5. Absolute mRNA quantification using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A novel approach by a PCR aided transcript titration assay (PATTY).

    PubMed Central

    Becker-André, M; Hahlbrock, K

    1989-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is used as part of a new approach to the absolute quantification of mRNA. We describe a PCR aided transcript titration assay (PATTY) which is based on the co-amplification of an in vitro generated transcript differing by a single base exchange from the target mRNA. Identical portions of a total RNA sample are "spiked" with different amounts of this mutated standard RNA, converted to cDNA and amplified by PCR. Because the base exchange creates a novel restriction endonuclease site, the ratio of co-amplified DNA derived from target mRNA to amplified DNA derived from standard RNA can be determined after restriction endonuclease digestion and separation by gel electrophoresis. This method gives accurate results within 24 hours and is useful especially for the quantification of either low-abundance mRNA or more abundant mRNA present in very small amounts of total RNA. The low-abundance mRNA encoding 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) in cultured potato cells (Solanum tuberosum L.) was measured in a case study. About 100 molecules per assay could be accurately detected by the new method. Images PMID:2479917

  6. Statistical Models for the Analysis and Design of Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction (dPCR) Experiments.

    PubMed

    Dorazio, Robert M; Hunter, Margaret E

    2015-11-01

    Statistical methods for the analysis and design of experiments using digital PCR (dPCR) have received only limited attention and have been misused in many instances. To address this issue and to provide a more general approach to the analysis of dPCR data, we describe a class of statistical models for the analysis and design of experiments that require quantification of nucleic acids. These models are mathematically equivalent to generalized linear models of binomial responses that include a complementary, log-log link function and an offset that is dependent on the dPCR partition volume. These models are both versatile and easy to fit using conventional statistical software. Covariates can be used to specify different sources of variation in nucleic acid concentration, and a model's parameters can be used to quantify the effects of these covariates. For purposes of illustration, we analyzed dPCR data from different types of experiments, including serial dilution, evaluation of copy number variation, and quantification of gene expression. We also showed how these models can be used to help design dPCR experiments, as in selection of sample sizes needed to achieve desired levels of precision in estimates of nucleic acid concentration or to detect differences in concentration among treatments with prescribed levels of statistical power. PMID:26436653

  7. Polymerase chain displacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Harris, Claire L; Sanchez-Vargas, Irma J; Olson, Ken E; Alphey, Luke; Fu, Guoliang

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative PCR assays are now the standard method for viral diagnostics. These assays must be specific, as well as sensitive, to detect the potentially low starting copy number of viral genomic material. We describe a new technique, polymerase chain displacement reaction (PCDR), which uses multiple nested primers in a rapid, capped, one-tube reaction that increases the sensitivity of normal quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Sensitivity was increased by approximately 10-fold in a proof-of-principle test on dengue virus sequence. In PCDR, when extension occurs from the outer primer, it displaces the extension strand produced from the inner primer by utilizing a polymerase that has strand displacement activity. This allows a greater than 2-fold increase of amplification product for each amplification cycle and therefore increased sensitivity and speed over conventional PCR. Increased sensitivity in PCDR would be useful in nucleic acid detection for viral diagnostics. PMID:23384180

  8. Comparison of bacterial culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica in wild animals.

    PubMed

    Sting, Reinhard; Runge, Martin; Eisenberg, Tobias; Braune, Silke; Müller, Wolfgang; Otto, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Detection of the zoonotic pathogen Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica (EF tularensis) in wild animals with culture techniques as well as polymerase chain reaction were compared and discussed on the basis of the investigation of 60 animals. The samples originated from 55 European brown hares (Lepus europaeus), two red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and one each from a wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a European beaver (Castor fiber), and a lemur (Lemur catta). When comparing the growth of 28 F. tularensis isolates on the cysteine blood agar and the modified Martin-Lewis-agar used in this study, cultivation was successful for 26 isolates on both media, but for two isolates only on the cysteine blood agar. Out of 43 carcasses 19 tested positive in bacteriological culture and PCR. Two culture positive samples of tonsils originating from foxes could not be confirmed by PCR, although PCR was positive in 22 samples that missed growth of F. tularensis. Comparative studies on cultural detection of E. tularensis were performed on samples of 16 hares from lung, spleen, liver and gut and in one case with a peritoneal swab. In at least one of these localizations cultivation of the pathogen was successful. Detection rate was reduced to 94% (15 of 16 hares) considering only the results of the cultures of the lungs and spleens. For a sensitive and rapid detection of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica, the PCR is a suitable method thereby avoiding hazardous multiplying of the pathogen. However, cultivation of F. tularensis is often a prerequisite for further studies on antibiotic resistance patterns of the pathogen, molecular epidemiological and pathological analyses of tularaemia. PMID:23901583

  9. Removal of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) inhibitors associated with cloacal swab samples and tissues for improved diagnosis of avian influenza virus by RT-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) is routinely used for the rapid detection of Avian Influenza virus (AIV) in clinical samples. The usefulness of diagnostic RRT-PCR can be limited, in part, by the inhibitory substances present in some clinical specimens, which can ...

  10. Identification and quantification of masaicism for trisomies using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    SciTech Connect

    Pangalos, C.; Avramopoulos, D.; Vary, C.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a method for identifying and quantifying mosaicism for trisomy 21 and other trisomies using PCR. Our previous experience has showed that mosaicism can be visualized using short sequence repeat (SSR) polymorphic markers in the cases where the supernumerary chromosome has a meiotic origin (60% for mosaic trisomy 21). This approach has the advantage that mosaicism can be detected in small samples of any type of nucleated cells as opposed to cytogenetic studies. Our recent experiments using mixtures of DNA samples in order to imitate mosaicism, followed by densitometry on the resulting allelic bands after PCR, show that there is a good correlation between band intensity and percentage of mosaicism. Comparison of the two quantities shows a consistency in the results which permits us to estimate the percentage of mosaicism using densitometry of the bands and standard correction of the result. In conclusion, our method can be very useful for studying cases of mosaic trisomies of meiotic origin in specific tissues where karyotyping might not be possible. In addition, the PCR method is much faster that the cytogenetic analysis. By this method it should also be possible to study mosaic trisomies of mitotic origin when the percentage of mosaicism is high.

  11. Detection of fumonisin producing Fusarium verticillioides in paddy (Oryza sativa L.) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwar, P.K.; Moharram, S. Ahmed; Janardhana, G.R.

    2009-01-01

    The study reports the occurrence of fumonisin producing Fusarium verticillioides in 90 samples of stored paddy (Oryza sativa L.) collected from different geographical regions of Karnataka, India. Fumonisin producing F. verticillioides was identified based on micromorphological characteristics and PCR using two sets of primers. One set of primers was F. verticillioides species specific, which selectively amplified the intergenic space region of rDNA. The other set of primers was specific to fumonisin producing F. verticillioides. Eight paddy samples were positive for F. verticillioides. Eleven isolates obtained from these samples were capable of producing fumonisin. PMID:24031332

  12. Molecular typing of Paenibacillus larvae strains isolated from Bulgarian apiaries based on repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (Rep-PCR).

    PubMed

    Rusenova, Nikolina; Parvanov, Parvan; Stanilova, Spaska

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform molecular typing of Paenibacillus larvae (P. larvae) isolates from Bulgarian apiaries with repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) using BOX A1R, MBO REP1, and ERIC primers. A total of 96 isolates collected from brood combs with clinical symptoms of American foulbrood originating from apiaries located in different geographical regions of Bulgaria, a reference strain P. larvae NBIMCC 8478 and 30 commercial honey samples with Bulgarian origin were included in the study. Rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis revealed two genotypes ab and AB of P. larvae isolates from brood combs and honey samples. A combination of genotypes ab/AB was detected in one apiary and honey sample. The prevailing genotype ab was found in 78.1 % of brood combs isolates as well as in the reference strain whereas genotype AB was determined in 21.9 % of isolates. The examination of honey samples confirmed the preponderance of ab genotype which was demonstrated in 20 of 30 samples analyzed. In conclusion, the genetic epidemiology of P. larvae revealed two genotypes--ab and AB for Bulgarian strains. Developed protocols for molecular typing of P. larvae are reliable and may be used to trace the source of infection. PMID:23361165

  13. Molecular characterization of Trichinella genotypes by inter-simple sequence repeat polymerase chain reaction (ISSR-PCR).

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Salamanca, F; Nogal-Ruiz, J J; Benito, C; Camachot, M V; Martínez-Fernández, A R

    2006-06-01

    A bulk analysis of inter-simple sequence repeat-polymerase chain reaction (ISSR-PCR) provides a quick, reliable, and highly informative system for DNA banding patterns that permit species identification. The present study evaluates the applicability of this system to Trichinella species identification. After a single amplification carried out on a single larva with the primer 816([CA]nRY) under high stringency conditions, which provide high reproducibility, we were able to identify by consistent banding patterns 5 sibling species: Trichinella spiralis (ISS48), 2 Trichinella britovi isolates (ISS11 and ISS86), Trichinella murrelli (ISS35), Trichinella nativa (ISS71), Trichinella nelsoni (ISS29); 3 additional Trichinella genotypes: T8 (ISS149), T9 (ISS408 and ISS409), and T6 (ISS34); and the nonencapsulated species Trichinella pseudospiralis (ISS13). Moreover, 33 new Trichinella isolates from 2 zoogeographical regions were unequivocally identified. All Trichinella isolates have shown an identical pattern with those produced by the reference strain. According to these data, we have demonstrated that ISSR-PCR is a robust technique that emerges as a useful new application for the molecular identification of Trichinella isolates in epidemiological studies. PMID:16884006

  14. Molecular typing among beef isolates of Escherichia coli using consensus repetitive intergenic enterobacteria-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoolkifli, Nurliyana Wan; Mutalib, Sahilah Abd

    2013-11-01

    Genomic DNA of Escherichia coli were characterized by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-Polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and the presence of Shiga toxin gene-I (Stx1) and Shiga toxin gene-2 (Stx2). These isolates were originated from imported raw beef which are come from two countries namely Australia and India. The isolation of E. coli was conducted by using Eosin Methylene Blue Agar (EMBA). A total of 94 strains had been isolated from 30 samples of imported raw beefand 42 strains had been detected positively E. coli by doing biochemical tests. All strains had been tested and the results of biochemical tests showed that 3 strains were from Australia samples while the other 39 strains were from India samples. The biochemical tests used are Indole test, Methyl Red test, Voges-Proskauer test and Citrate test. All the 42 strains were examined for Shiga toxin (stx1 and stx2) gene detection by two pair primers which are stx2F (5'-TTCTTCGGTATCCTATTCCC-3'), stx2R (5'-ATGCATCTCTGGTCATTGTA-3'), stx1F (5'-CAGTTAATGTGGTGGCGAAG-3'), and stx1R (5'-CTGTCACAGTAACAACCGT-3'). The results showed that none of the strains are positive for Shiga toxin gene. Application of ERIC-PCR method towards E. coli had successfully shown the high diversity polymorphism in 21 different genome types of DNA with primers ERIC1R (5'- CACTTAGGGGTCCTCGAATGTA- 3') and ERIC2R (5'- AAGTAAGTGACTGGGGTGACGC- 3').

  15. Differentiating Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba moshkovskii using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in rural communities in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, a total of 426 human faecal samples were examined for the presence of Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, Entamoeba moshkovskii infection via a combination of microscopic examination and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting 16S ribosomal RNA of Entamoeba species. Methods Faecal sample were collected from 426 participants in five rural villages in Peninsular Malaysia. The faecal samples were processed by direct wet smear and formalin ethyl acetate concentration technique followed by iodine staining and examined via microscopy for the presence of Entamoeba species and other intestinal parasites. Microscopically positive samples for Entamoeba species cysts were further characterized using a Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (Nested-PCR) targeting 16S-like ribosomal RNA gene. The data entry and analysis was carried out using the SPSS software (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) program for Windows version 17 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). Results Based on single faecal examination, overall prevalence of Entamoeba infection was 17.6% (75/426). Females (19.1%) were more commonly infected compared to males (15.9%). Comparison by age groups showed that adults (23.9%) had higher infection rates than children (15.3%). The PCR results showed that 52 out of 75 microscopy positive samples successfully generated species-specific amplicons. The infection with E. histolytica (75.0%; 39/52) was the most common, followed by E. dispar (30.8%; 18/52) and E. moshkovskii (5.8%; 3/52). Of these, 33 (63.5%) were shown to contain only E. histolytica, 10 (19.2%) contained E. dispar and 3 (5.8%) contained only E. moshkovskii. Mixed infection with E. histolytica and E. dispar was found in 6 (11.5%) samples. Conclusions The present study essentially emphasized the benefit of molecular techniques in discriminating the pathogenic Entamoeba species from the non-pathogenic for accurate diagnosis and better management of amoebiasis. The presence of E

  16. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in various oral lesions by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Mravak-Stipetić, M; Gall-Troselj, K; Lukac, J; Kusić, Z; Pavelić, K; Pavelić, J

    1998-01-01

    Nested PCR was used for the detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA in specimens collected from seven different topographic sites in the oral cavity. Out of 161 patients, only 21 (13.04%) were positive. There was no correlation between H. pylori status and patient diagnosis and age. No preferential site for bacterial colonization was found in the oral cavity, nor was an association established between a bacterial presence and ulcerated versus non-ulcerated lesions. The results indicate that the oral mucosa does not appear to represent a preferred site of colonization for H. pylori. Furthermore, the evidence presented in this paper suggests that H. pylori is not pathogenic in the oral cavity, nor is it associated with common oral pathologic processes. PMID:9466726

  17. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for a bacterial thiaminase I gene and the thiaminase-producing bacterium Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, C.A.; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Zajicek, J.L.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2009-01-01

    The thiaminase I enzyme produced by the gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus isolated from the viscera of Lake Michigan alewives Alosa pseudoharengus is currently the only defined source of the thiaminase activity linked to thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in early mortality syndrome (EMS) in the larvae of Great Lakes salmonines. Diets of alewife or isolated strains of P. thiaminolyticus mixed in a semipurified diet and fed to lake trout Salvelinus namaycush have been shown to produce EMS in fry. We utilized quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) to aid in studies of the sources of P. thiaminolyticus and thiaminase I. Quantitative PCR assays were established to detect the thiaminase I gene of P. thiaminolyticus, the 16S rRNA gene from most species of bacteria, and the 16S rRNA gene specifically from P. thiaminolyticus and a few closely related taxa. The Q-PCR assays are linear over at least six orders of magnitude and can detect the thiaminase I gene of P. thiaminolyticus from as few as 1,000 P. thiaminolyticus cells/g of sample or the Paenibacillus 16S rRNA gene from as few as 100 P. thiaminolyticus cells/g of sample. The initial results from alewife viscera samples with high thiaminase activity yielded unexpectedly low densities of P. thiaminolyticus cells; Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus was detectable in 2 of 6 alewife viscera tested at densities on the order of 100 cells/g out of 100,000,000 total bacterial cells/g. The low numbers of P. thiaminolyticus detected suggest that alewives contain additional non-P. thiaminolyticus sources of thiaminase activity.

  18. Comparison of Enterococcus quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis results from midwest U.S. river samples using EPA Method 1611 and Method 1609 PCR reagents

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has provided recommended beach advisory values in its 2012 recreational water quality criteria (RWQC) for states wishing to use quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for the monitoring of Enterococcus fecal indicator bacteria...

  19. DATA COLLECTION CONSTRAINTS FOR THE USE OF LENGTH HETEROGENEITY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (LH-PCR) AS AN INDICATOR OF STREAM SANITARY AND ECOLOGICAL CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is part of a larger project for the development of bacterial indicators of stream sanitary and ecological condition. Here we report preliminary research on the use of Length Heterogeneity Polymerase Chain Reaction (LH-PCR), which discriminates among 16S rRNA genes bas...

  20. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification of rodent blood meals confirms host sharing by flea vectors of plague.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Heather A; Stapp, Paul; Cohen, Amybeth

    2010-12-01

    Elucidating feeding relationships between hosts and parasites remains a significant challenge in studies of the ecology of infectious diseases, especially those involving small or cryptic vectors. Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are a species of conservation importance in the North American Great Plains whose populations are extirpated by plague, a flea-vectored, bacterial disease. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, we determined that fleas (Oropsylla hirsuta) associated with prairie dogs feed upon northern grasshopper mice (Onychomys leucogaster), a rodent that has been implicated in the transmission and maintenance of plague in prairie-dog colonies. Our results definitively show that grasshopper mice not only share fleas with prairie dogs during plague epizootics, but also provide them with blood meals, offering a mechanism by which the pathogen, Yersinia pestis, may be transmitted between host species and maintained between epizootics. The lack of identifiable host DNA in a significant fraction of engorged Oropsylla hirsuta collected from animals (47%) and prairie-dog burrows (100%) suggests a rapid rate of digestion and feeding that may facilitate disease transmission during epizootics but also complicate efforts to detect feeding on alternative hosts. Combined with other analytical approaches, e.g., stable isotope analysis, molecular genetic techniques can provide novel insights into host-parasite feeding relationships and improve our understanding of the role of alternative hosts in the transmission and maintenance of disease. PMID:21175944

  1. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay using hydroxy naphthol blue, conventional polymerase chain reaction and real-time PCR in the diagnosis of intraocular tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Balne, P K; Basu, S; Rath, S; Barik, M R; Sharma, S

    2015-01-01

    This study is a comparative evaluation (Chi-square test) of a closed tube loop mediated isothermal amplification assay using hydroxy naphthol blue dye (HNB-LAMP), real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and conventional PCR in the diagnosis of intraocular tuberculosis. Considering clinical presentation as the gold standard in 33 patients, the sensitivity of HNB-LAMP assay (75.8%) was higher (not significant, P value 0.2) than conventional PCR (57.6%) and lower than real-time PCR (90.9%). Specificity was 100% by all three methods. No amplification was observed in negative controls (n = 20) by all three methods. The cost of the HNB-LAMP assay was Rs. 500.00 and it does not require thermocycler, therefore, it can be used as an alternative to conventional PCR in resource-poor settings. PMID:26470966

  2. Heminested reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (hnRT-PCR) as a tool for rabies virus detection in stored and decomposed samples

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Danielle B; Langoni, Helio; Almeida, Marilene F; Megid, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Background The use of methods, both sensitive and specific, for rabies diagnosis are important tools for the control and prophylaxis of the disease. Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) has been used in rabies diagnosis with good results, even in decomposed materials. Additionally, molecular techniques have been used for epidemiological studies and to gain a better knowledge of viral epidemiology. Findings The aim of this work was to evaluate the RT-PCR and hnRT-PCR for rabies virus detection in original tissues stored at -20°C for different periods considering their use for rabies virus detection in stored and decomposed samples. RT-PCR and hnRT-PCR were evaluated in 151 brain samples from different animal species, thawed and left at room temperature for 72 hours for decomposition. The RT-PCR and hnRT-PCR results were compared with previous results from Direct Fluorescent Antibody Test and Mouse Inoculation Test. From the 50 positive fresh samples, 26 (52%) were positive for RT-PCR and 45 (90%) for hnRT-PCR. From the 48 positive decomposed samples, 17 (34, 3%) were positive for RT-PCR and 36 (75%) for hnRT-PCR. No false-positives results were found in the negatives samples evaluated to the molecular techniques. Conclusion These results show that the hnRT-PCR was more sensitive than RT-PCR, and both techniques presented lower sensibility in decomposed samples. The hnRT-PCR demonstrated efficacy in rabies virus detection in stored and decomposed materials suggesting it's application for rabies virus retrospective epidemiological studies. PMID:18710536

  3. A Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Aflatoxin-producing Fungus Using an Optimized Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)

    PubMed Central

    Bintvihok, Anong; Treebonmuang, Supitchaya; Srisakwattana, Kitiya; Nuanchun, Wisut; Patthanachai, Koranis; Usawang, Sungworn

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is produced by Aspergillus flavus growing in feedstuffs. Early detection of maize contamination by aflatoxigenic fungi is advantageous since aflatoxins exert adverse health effects. In this study, we report the development of an optimized conventional PCR for AFB1 detection and a rapid, sensitive and simple screening Real-time PCR (qPCR) with SYBR Green and two pairs of primers targeting the aflR genes which involved aflatoxin biosynthesis. AFB1 contaminated maize samples were divided into three groups by the toxin concentration. Genomic DNA was extracted from those samples. The target genes for A. flavus were tested by conventional PCR and the PCR products were analyzed by electrophoresis. A conventional PCR was carried out as nested PCR to verify the gene amplicon sizes. PCR-RFLP patterns, obtained with Hinc II and Pvu II enzyme analysis showed the differences to distinguish aflatoxin-producing fungi. However, they are not quantitative and need a separation of the products on gel and their visualization under UV light. On the other hand, qPCR facilitates the monitoring of the reaction as it progresses. It does not require post-PCR handling, which reduces the risk of cross-contamination and handling errors. It results in a much faster throughout. We found that the optimal primer annealing temperature was 65°C. The optimized template and primer concentration were 1.5 μL (50 ng/μL) and 3 μL (10 μM/μL) respectively. SYBR Green qPCR of four genes demonstrated amplification curves and melting peaks for tub1, afIM, afIR, and afID genes are at 88.0°C, 87.5°C, 83.5°C, and 89.5°C respectively. Consequently, it was found that the four primers had elevated annealing temperatures, nevertheless it is desirable since it enhances the DNA binding specificity of the dye. New qPCR protocol could be employed for the determination of aflatoxin content in feedstuff samples. PMID:26977262

  4. Polymerase Chain Reaction for Educational Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Stephen J.; dePamphillis, Claude

    1994-01-01

    Suggests the incorporation of the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique into high school and college biology laboratories. Discusses the following sections: (1) current PCR applications; (2) PCR technique; (3) Manual and Machine PCR; (4) Manual PCR Preparations and Procedure; (5) Materials, Supplies, and Recipes; (6) Primer Selection; and (7)…

  5. Apparent Polyploidization after Gamma Irradiation: Pitfalls in the Use of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) for the Estimation of Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Gene Copy Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Winnie W. Y.; Lake, Vanessa; Banos, Connie; Davies, Justin; Banati, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has been widely used to quantify changes in gene copy numbers after radiation exposure. Here, we show that gamma irradiation ranging from 10 to 100 Gy of cells and cell-free DNA samples significantly affects the measured qPCR yield, due to radiation-induced fragmentation of the DNA template and, therefore, introduces errors into the estimation of gene copy numbers. The radiation-induced DNA fragmentation and, thus, measured qPCR yield varies with temperature not only in living cells, but also in isolated DNA irradiated under cell-free conditions. In summary, the variability in measured qPCR yield from irradiated samples introduces a significant error into the estimation of both mitochondrial and nuclear gene copy numbers and may give spurious evidence for polyploidization. PMID:23722662

  6. Giardia and Cryptosporidium spp. dissemination during wastewater treatment and comparative detection via immunofluorescence assay (IFA), nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP).

    PubMed

    Gallas-Lindemann, Carmen; Sotiriadou, Isaia; Plutzer, Judit; Noack, Michael J; Mahmoudi, Mohammad Reza; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2016-06-01

    Environmental water samples from the Lower Rhine area in Germany were investigated via immunofluorescence assays (IFAs), nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to detect the presence of Giardia spp. (n=185) and Cryptosporidium spp. (n=227). The samples were concentrated through filtration or flocculation, and oocysts were purified via centrifugation through a sucrose density gradient. For all samples, IFA was performed first, followed by DNA extraction for the nested PCR and LAMP assays. Giardia cysts were detected in 105 samples (56.8%) by IFA, 62 samples (33.5%) by nested PCR and 79 samples (42.7%) by LAMP. Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 69 samples (30.4%) by IFA, 95 samples (41.9%) by nested PCR and 99 samples (43.6%) by LAMP. According to these results, the three detection methods are complementary for monitoring Giardia and Cryptosporidium in environmental waters. PMID:26880717

  7. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and identification of mycotoxigenic Penicillium species using conserved genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymerase chain reaction amplification of conserved genes and sequence analysis provides a very powerful tool for the identification of toxigenic as well as non-toxigenic Penicillium species. Sequences are obtained by amplification of the gene fragment, sequencing via capillary electrophoresis of d...

  8. Antibiotic resistance and molecular typing among cockle (Anadara granosa) strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Sahilah, A M; Laila, R A S; Sallehuddin, H Mohd; Osman, H; Aminah, A; Ahmad Azuhairi, A

    2014-02-01

    Genomic DNA of Vibrio parahaemolyticus were characterized by antibiotic resistance, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) analysis. These isolates originated from 3 distantly locations of Selangor, Negeri Sembilan and Melaka (East coastal areas), Malaysia. A total of 44 (n = 44) of tentatively V. parahaemolyticus were also examined for the presence of toxR, tdh and trh gene. Of 44 isolates, 37 were positive towards toxR gene; while, none were positive to tdh and trh gene. Antibiotic resistance analysis showed the V. parahaemolyticus isolates were highly resistant to bacitracin (92%, 34/37) and penicillin (89%, 33/37) followed by resistance towards ampicillin (68%, 25/37), cefuroxime (38%, 14/37), amikacin (6%, 2/37) and ceftazidime (14%, 5/37). None of the V. parahaemolyticus isolates were resistant towards chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, streptomycin and vancomycin. Antibiogram patterns exhibited, 9 patterns and phenotypically less heterogenous when compared to PCR-based techniques using ERIC- and RAPD-PCR. The results of the ERIC- and RAPD-PCR were analyzed using GelCompare software. ERIC-PCR with primers ERIC1R and ERIC2 discriminated the V. parahaemolyticus isolates into 6 clusters and 21 single isolates at a similarity level of 80%. While, RAPD-PCR with primer Gen8 discriminated the V. parahaemolyticus isolates into 11 clusters and 10 single isolates and Gen9 into 8 clusters and 16 single isolates at the same similarity level examined. Results in the presence study demonstrated combination of phenotypically and genotypically methods show a wide heterogeneity among cockle isolates of V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:24068534

  9. A temperature control method for shortening thermal cycling time to achieve rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Minqiang; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.; Sørensen, Karen S.; Skov, Julia; Sun, Yi; Duong Bang, Dang; Pedersen, Michael E.; Hansen, Mikkel F.; Wolff, Anders

    2013-07-01

    We present a temperature control method capable of effectively shortening the thermal cycling time of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device with an external heater and a temperature sensor. The method employs optimized temperature overshooting and undershooting steps to achieve a rapid ramping between the temperature steps for DNA denaturation, annealing and extension. The temperature dynamics within the microfluidic PCR chamber was characterized and the overshooting and undershooting parameters were optimized using the temperature-dependent fluorescence signal from Rhodamine B. The method was validated with the PCR amplification of mecA gene (162 bp) from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacterium (MRSA), where the time for 30 cycles was reduced from 50 min (without over- and undershooting) to 20 min.

  10. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, Christopher R.; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D. Curtis; Holst, Gregory L.; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L.; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously—each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel. PMID:26339317

  11. Determination of gene dosage by a quantitative adaptation of the polymerase chain reaction (gd-PCR): Rapid detection of deletions and duplications of gene sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Celi, F.S.; Roth, J.; Schuldiner, A.R. Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD ); Cohen, M.M. ); Antonarakis, S.E. ); Wertheimer, E. )

    1994-05-15

    Screening methods based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, single-stranded conformational polymorphism, and heteroduplex analysis, are powerful tools for the detection of point mutations as well as small deletions and insertions, but are unable to detect heterozygous deletions or duplications of exons, genes, or chromosomes. The authors now report a PCR-based approach, designated gene dosage-PCR (gd-PCR), that allows rapid screening for heterozygous deletions and duplications of genes or exons. Gene dosage-PCR is a quantitative method in which two in vitro-synthesized DNA internal standards are coamplified with the genomic DNA sample, one corresponding to the gene of interest (test sequence) and the other to a reference (disomic) gene (reference sequence). Both internal standards are designed to be amplified with the same primer pairs and with efficiencies similar to those of their genomic DNA counterparts, yielding PCR products slightly smaller than those derived from genomic DNA. Amplification of approximately equimolar amounts of the two internal standards and genomic DNA, in the presence of [[sup 32]P]dCTP, results in four radiolabeled PCR products; after electrophoresis and quantification of the products, gene dosage is easily calculated. For validation, genomic DNA from 56 subjects, 28 with cytogenetically documented Down syndrome (trisomy 21) and 28 controls that were disomic for chromosome 21, was assayed. Using the [beta]-amyloid precursor protein gene (APP: Chromosome 21q21) as the test sequence, control subjects had an adjusted mean gene dose of 2.00 [+-] 0.29, while subjects with Down syndrome had a mean gene dose of 3.05 [+-] 0.27. There was a clear separation of all of the samples between the two groups. The authors also successfully used gd-PCR to detect allelic deletions by screening pertinent regions of the insulin receptor gene. 48 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Development of a TaqMan Probe-Based Insulated Isothermal Polymerase Chain Reaction (iiPCR) Assay for Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Race 4.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Hong; Lin, Yi-Jia; Chang, Tsai-De; Hong, Li-Ling; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Chang, Pi-Fang Linda

    2016-01-01

    This study developed a novel and inexpensive detection method based on a TaqMan probe-based insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) method for the rapid detection of Panama disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) race 4, which is currently among the most serious fungal vascular diseases worldwide. By using the portable POCKIT™ device with the novel primer set iiFoc-1/iiFoc-2, the Foc race 4 iiPCR assay (including DNA amplification and signal monitoring) could be completed within one hour. The developed Foc race 4 iiPCR assay is thus a user-friendly and efficient platform designed specifically for the detection of Foc race 4. The detection limit of this optimized Foc iiPCR system was estimated to be 1 copy of the target standard DNA as well as 1 fg of the Foc genomic DNA. This approach can serve as a rapid detection method for in planta detection of Foc race 4 in field-infected banana. It was concluded that this molecular detection procedure based on iiPCR has good potential for use as an efficient detection method. PMID:27448242

  13. Development of a TaqMan Probe-Based Insulated Isothermal Polymerase Chain Reaction (iiPCR) Assay for Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Race 4

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Jia; Chang, Tsai-De; Hong, Li-Ling; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Chang, Pi-Fang Linda

    2016-01-01

    This study developed a novel and inexpensive detection method based on a TaqMan probe-based insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) method for the rapid detection of Panama disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) race 4, which is currently among the most serious fungal vascular diseases worldwide. By using the portable POCKIT™ device with the novel primer set iiFoc-1/iiFoc-2, the Foc race 4 iiPCR assay (including DNA amplification and signal monitoring) could be completed within one hour. The developed Foc race 4 iiPCR assay is thus a user-friendly and efficient platform designed specifically for the detection of Foc race 4. The detection limit of this optimized Foc iiPCR system was estimated to be 1 copy of the target standard DNA as well as 1 fg of the Foc genomic DNA. This approach can serve as a rapid detection method for in planta detection of Foc race 4 in field-infected banana. It was concluded that this molecular detection procedure based on iiPCR has good potential for use as an efficient detection method. PMID:27448242

  14. Isolation of Coxiella burnetii by a centrifugation shell-vial assay from ticks collected in Cyprus: detection by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses.

    PubMed

    Spyridaki, Ioanna; Psaroulaki, Anna; Loukaides, Fidias; Antoniou, Maria; Hadjichristodolou, Christos; Tselentis, Yannis

    2002-01-01

    Ticks are the principal vectors and reservoirs of Coxiella burnetii. The identification of isolates is necessary for understanding the clinical diversity of Q fever in different geographic areas. This is the first report of isolation of C. burnetii from ticks by the shell-vial assay and by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of this pathogen in ticks. Of 141 ticks collected in Cyprus (Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Hyalloma spp.), 10% were found to be infected with C. burnetii. Three ticks were positive by hemolymph test, and 11 triturated ticks were positive by nested PCR. Three isolates were obtained by the centrifugation shell-vial technique. Analysis by PCR, then restriction fragment length polymorphism showed that the 3 Cyprus isolates had identical restriction profiles to reference strains Nine Mile and Q212. The methods described are useful in studying the epidemiology and ecology of C. burnetii. PMID:12135275

  15. The first identification of a blood-sucking abomasal nematode Ashworthius sidemi in cattle (Bos taurus) using simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Moskwa, Bożena; Bień, Justyna; Cybulska, Aleksandra; Kornacka, Aleksandra; Krzysiak, Michał; Cencek, Tomasz; Cabaj, Władysław

    2015-06-30

    A simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was used to identify Ashworthius sidemi, a blood-sucking gastrointestinal nematode that commonly infects bison, red and roe deer, and moose in Poland. The present study uses this technique to confirm the possibility of transmission of A. sidemi infection from wildlife to domestic animals, such as cattle and sheep, grazing on the same natural pastures. A 406 bp fragment of genomic A. sidemi DNA was actually detected in DNA isolated from larval cultures derived from feces from cattle. A. sidemi DNA has been detected in cattle which represent a new host for this parasite. This is the first evidence of A. sidemi in cattle. The results reveal that a PCR test based on DNA from L3 larvae can be used for in vivo detection of A. sidemi invasions in breeding animals. In conclusion, the transfer of A. sidemi infection from wildlife to the farm animals sharing the same pastures appears possible. PMID:25981105

  16. Examination of meat components in commercial dog and cat feed by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs) technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsien-Chi; Lee, Shu-Hwae; Chang, Tien-Jye; Wong, Min-Liang

    2004-07-01

    It has been shown that certain slow neurological diseases such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (also known as "mad cow" disease) could be transmitted through contaminated food intake by animals; therefore, the examination of meat components in commercial feeds is important for the control of the disease in public health. The combination of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs) technique was applied to examine the meat components in dog and cat commercial feeds. The partial nucleotide sequence (359 bp) of animal mitochondrial cytochrome b (cytb, CYT) gene was amplified by PCR and then digested with restriction enzyme Alu I or Mbo I. In this work, eight brands of commercial dog and cat feeds available in Taiwan were examined. All brands of dog feeds that were tested contained meat from four different animals (cattle, pig, goat and chicken). In cat feeds, the chicken meat was found in five out of eight brands. PMID:15297759

  17. A fast one-step reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification procedure providing highly specific complementary DNA from plant virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Sambade, A; Martín, S; Olmos, A; García, M L; Cambra, M; Grau, O; Guerri, J; Moreno, P

    2000-06-01

    Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) are being used increasingly for detection and typing RNA viruses. For this purpose, metal block thermal cyclers (MBTC) are considered to provide higher DNA yield, whereas air thermal cyclers (ATC) allow PCR amplification in a much shorter time. A fast ATC protocol (0 s denaturation, 0 s annealing, and 4-8 s elongation) was developed to amplify genomic segments from two RNA viruses, which allowed increasing the number of cycles without a parallel increase of non-specific DNA fragments. Under these conditions, 80-90 cycles with the ATC provided a DNA yield close to that of a standard 40-cycles MBTC protocol in about half the time. The DNA synthesised by the new procedure was highly specific and could be cloned readily. PMID:10856749

  18. Quantitation of Bt-176 maize genomic sequences by surface plasmon resonance-based biospecific interaction analysis of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Feriotto, Giordana; Gardenghi, Sara; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Gambari, Roberto

    2003-07-30

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biosensors have been described for the identification of genetically modified organisms (GMO) by biospecific interaction analysis (BIA). This paper describes the design and testing of an SPR-based BIA protocol for quantitative determinations of GMOs. Biotinylated multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) products from nontransgenic maize as well as maize powders containing 0.5 and 2% genetically modified Bt-176 sequences were immobilized on different flow cells of a sensor chip. After immobilization, different oligonucleotide probes recognizing maize zein and Bt-176 sequences were injected. The results obtained were compared with Southern blot analysis and with quantitative real-time PCR assays. It was demonstrated that sequential injections of Bt-176 and zein probes to sensor chip flow cells containing multiplex PCR products allow discrimination between PCR performed using maize genomic DNA containing 0.5% Bt-176 sequences and that performed using maize genomic DNA containing 2% Bt-176 sequences. The efficiency of SPR-based BIA in discriminating material containing different amounts of Bt-176 maize is comparable to real-time quantitative PCR and much more reliable than Southern blotting, which in the past has been used for semiquantitative purposes. Furthermore, the approach allows the BIA assay to be repeated several times on the same multiplex PCR product immobilized on the sensor chip, after washing and regeneration of the flow cell. Finally, it is emphasized that the presented strategy to quantify GMOs could be proposed for all of the SPR-based, commercially available biosensors. Some of these optical SPR-based biosensors use, instead of flow-based sensor chips, stirred microcuvettes, reducing the costs of the experimentation. PMID:14705890

  19. Use of Length Heterogeneity Polymerase Chain Reaction (LH-PCR) as Non-Invasive Approach for Dietary Analysis of Svalbard Reindeer, Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sungbae; Han, Donguk; Lee, Eun Ju; Park, Sangkyu

    2014-01-01

    To efficiently investigate the forage preference of Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus), we applied length-heterogeneity polymerase chain reaction (LH-PCR) based on length differences of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) to fecal samples from R. tarandus platyrhynchus. A length-heterogeneity (LH) database was constructed using both collected potential food sources of Svalbard reindeer and fecal samples, followed by PCR, cloning and sequencing. In total, eighteen fecal samples were collected between 2011 and 2012 from 2 geographic regions and 15 samples were successfully amplified by PCR. The LH-PCR analysis detected abundant peaks, 18.6 peaks on an average per sample, ranging from 100 to 500 bp in size and showing distinct patterns associated with both regions and years of sample collection. Principal component analysis (PCA) resulted in clustering of 15 fecal samples into 3 groups by the year of collection and region with a statistically significant difference at 99.9% level. The first 2 principal components (PCs) explained 71.1% of the total variation among the samples. Through comparison with LH database and identification by cloning and sequencing, lichens (Stereocaulon sp. and Ochrolechia sp.) and plant species (Salix polaris and Saxifraga oppositifolia) were detected as the food sources that contributed most to the Svalbard reindeer diet. Our results suggest that the use of LH-PCR analysis would be a non-invasive and efficient monitoring tool for characterizing the foraging strategy of Svalbard reindeer. Additionally, combining sequence information would increase its resolving power in identification of foraged diet components. PMID:24618847

  20. Evaluation of Real-Time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) to Determine Escherichia coli Concentrations at Two Lake Erie Beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kephart, Christopher M.; Bushon, Rebecca N.

    2009-01-01

    During the recreational seasons of 2006 and 2007, the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method was used to determine Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations in samples from two Lake Erie beaches. Results from the qPCR method were compared to those obtained by traditional culturing on modified mTEC agar. Regression analysis showed strong, statistically significant correlations between results from the two methods for both years. Correlation coefficients at Edgewater and Villa Angela Beaches were 0.626 and 0.789 for 2006 and 0.667 and 0.829 for 2007, respectively. Linear regression analyses were done to determine how well E. coli concentrations could have been predicted from qPCR results. These hypothetical predictions were compared to the current practice of determining recreational water quality from E. coli concentrations determined for samples collected on the previous day. The qPCR method resulted in a greater percentage of correct predictions of water-quality exceedances than the current method for both beaches and both years. However, because regression equations differed somewhat between both sites and both years, the study did not result in any single relation reliable enough to use for actual real-time prediction of water-quality exceedances for either beach; therefore, a posterior analysis of data was done. Additional years of data may be needed to develop such a relation. Results from this study support the continued development and testing of a qPCR method for providing rapid and accurate estimates of E. coli concentrations for monitoring recreational water quality.

  1. Market surveillance on non-halal additives incorporated in surimi based products using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-southern hybridization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravindran, S.; Sahilah, A. M.; Aminah, A.

    2014-09-01

    Halal surveillance on halal ingredients incorporated in surimi based products were studied using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-southern hybridization on chip analysis. The primers used in this technique were targeted on mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) of cytochrome b (cyt b) gene sequence which able to differentiate 7 type (beef, chicken, duck, goat, buffalo, lamb and pork) of species on a single chip. 17 (n = 17*3) different brands of surimi-based product were purchased randomly from Selangor local market in January 2013. Of 17 brands, 3 (n = 3*3) brands were positive for chicken DNA, 1 (n = 1*3) brand was positive for goat DNA, and the remainder 13 brands (n = 13*3) have no DNA species detected. The sensitivity of PCR-southern hybridization primers to detect each meat species was 0.1 ng. In the present study, it is evidence that PCR-Southern Hybridization analysis offered a reliable result due to its highly specific and sensitive properties in detecting non-halal additive such as plasma protein incorporation in surimi-based product.

  2. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  3. Identification of WA-type three-line hybrid rice with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y; Gao, B D; Chen, H Y; Mao, J J; Cao, A X; Zhu, J G; Zhu, S F

    2012-02-01

    A real-time fluorescent PCR (RTF-PCR) was developed to detect and quantify wild abortive (WA)-type three-line hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.). The mitochondrial R₂₋₆₃₀ WA gene was reported to be closely related to male sterility in plants, and developed as a molecular maker to identify the cytoplasmic male sterility system of hybrid rice. First, we got the DNA sequence of R₂₋₆₃₀ WA gene in 17 rice species with traditional PCR. Then, a pair of specific primers (P₃, P₄) and TaqMan fluorescence probe (P₃₋₁₄) were designed based on the R₂₋₆₃₀ DNA sequence. The following RTF-PCR was performed on the 17 rice species finally. The results indicate that the probes used here are specific for three-line hybrid rice F₁ and male sterile lines. We can even identify a single hybrid seed using the probes, which confirmed that the probes can be applied to the identification and quantification of the WA-type three-line hybrid rice. In addition, the RFT-PCR system can be optimized when the annealing temperature is 60 °C and the Mg²⁺ concentration is 3.5 mmol/L. PMID:22161239

  4. Colony Polymerase Chain Reaction with Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-01-01

    When screening a large number of individual Schizosaccharomyces pombe strains by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a rapid "colony PCR" approach may be used. Numerous colony PCR protocols are available, and fundamental to them all is that the colony must be fresh (grown overnight) and that as few cells as possible are used. In this protocol, we present three reliable methods for preparing S. pombe cells for colony PCR. PMID:27140919

  5. Characterization and evaluation of an arbitrary primed Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) product for the specific detection of Brucella species

    PubMed Central

    Qasem, Jafar A.; AlMomin, Sabah; Al-Mouqati, Salwa A.; Kumar, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory detection of Brucella is based largely on bacterial isolation and phenotypic characterization. These methods are lengthy and labor-intensive and have been associated with a heightened risk of laboratory-acquired infection. Antibody based indirect detection methods also suffer from limitations in proper diagnosis of the organism. To overcome these problems, nucleic acid amplification has been explored for rapid detection and confirmation of the presence of Brucella spp. PCR-based diagnostics is useful for screening large populations of livestock to identify infected individuals and confirms the presence of the pathogen. Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was performed and identified a 1.3 kb PCR fragment specifically amplifiable from DNA isolated from Brucella. A BLAST search revealed no significant homology with the reported sequences from species other than the members of Brucella. The isolated fragment seems to be a part of d-alanine–d-alanine ligase gene in Brucella sp. Translational BLAST revealed certain degree of homology of this sequence with orthologs of this gene reported from other microbial species at the deduced amino acid level. The sequence information was used to develop PCR based assays to detect Brucella sp. from various samples. The minimum detection limit of Brucella from blood and milk samples spiked with Brucella DNA was found to be 1 ng/ml and 10 ng/ml, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the PCR based detection protocol was successfully used for the detection of Brucella from various organs and spiked samples of diseased sheep. Diagnosis of Brucellosis by PCR based method reported in this study is relatively rapid, specific and simple. PMID:25737656

  6. Genotyping of Trypanosoma cruzi Sublineage in Human Samples from a North-East Argentina Area by Hybridization with DNA Probes and Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Cristina; Lorenz, Virginia; Ortiz, Silvia; Gonzalez, Verónica; Racca, Andrea; Bontempi, Iván; Manattini, Silvia; Solari, Aldo; Marcipar, Iván

    2010-01-01

    We have evaluated blood samples of chronic and congenital Trypanosoma cruzi-infected patients from the city of Reconquista located in the northeast of Argentina where no information was previously obtained about the genotype of infecting parasites. Fourteen samples of congenital and 19 chronical patients were analyzed by hybridization with DNA probes of minicircle hypervariable regions (mHVR). In congenital patients, 50% had single infections with TcIId, 7% single infections with TcIIe, 29% mixed infections with TcIId/e, and 7% had mixed infections with TcIId/b and 7% TcIId/b, respectively. In Chronical patients, 52% had single infections with TcIId, 11% single infections with TcIIe, 26% had mixed infections with TcIId/e, and 11% had non-identified genotypes. With these samples, we evaluated the minicircle lineage-specific polymerase chain reaction assay (MLS-PCR), which involves a nested PCR to HVR minicircle sequences and we found a correlation with hybridization probes of 96.4% for TcIId and 54.8% for TcIIe. PMID:20064998

  7. Use of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in molecular screening of Newcastle disease virus in poultry and free-living bird populations.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Adriano de Oliveira Torres; Rodrigues, Juliana Nogueira Martins; Seki, Meire Christina; de Moraes, Fabricio Edgar; Silva, Jaqueline Raymondi; Durigon, Edison Luis; Pinto, Aramis Augusto

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a simple molecular method of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to differentiate Newcastle disease virus strains according to their pathogenicity, in order to use it in molecular screening of Newcastle disease virus in poultry and free-living bird populations. Specific primers were developed to differentiate LaSota--LS--(vaccine strain) and Sao Joao do Meriti--SJM--strain (highly pathogenic strain). Chickens and pigeons were experimentally vaccinated/infected for an in vivo study to determine virus shedding in feces. Validation of sensitivity and specificity of the primers (SJM and LS) by experimental models used in the present study and results obtained in the molecular analysis of the primers by BLAST made it possible to generalize results. The development of primers that differentiate the level of pathogenicity of NDV stains is very important, mainly in countries where real-time RT-PCR is still not used as a routine test. These primers were able to determine the presence of the agent and to differentiate it according to its pathogenicity. PMID:22983878

  8. A simple real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay for authentication of the Chinese Panax ginseng cultivar Damaya from a local ginseng population.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, J; Li, G

    2016-01-01

    Panax ginseng is one of the most important medicinal plants in the Orient. Owing to its increasing demand in the world market, cultivated ginseng has become the main source of medicinal material. Among the Chinese ginseng cultivars, Damaya commands higher prices and is grown in significant proportions among the local ginseng population. Due to the lack of rapid and accurate authentication methods, Damaya is distributed among different cultivars in the local ginseng population in China. Here, we identified a unique, Damaya-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) site present in the second intron of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (cox2). Based on this SNP, a Damaya cultivar-specific primer was designed and an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was optimized for the effective molecular authentication of Damaya. We designed a method by combining a simple DNA isolation method with real-time allele-specific PCR using SYBR Green I fluorescent dye, and proved its efficacy in clearly discriminated Damaya cultivar from other Chinese ginseng cultivars according to the allelic discrimination analysis. Hence, this study provides a simple and rapid assay for the differentiation and conservation of Damaya from the local Chinese ginseng population. PMID:27420983

  9. Molecular Identification of Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium fortuitum by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) Polymerase Chain Reaction and ERIC PCR

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Farahani, Abbas; Jamali, Hooshang

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds Non tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are of importance now-a-days due to their increasing virulence outbreaks and emerging antibiotic resistance. Since the most common NTM in Iran is reportedly Mycobacterium fortuitum, the present study was designed with the aim of molecular identification of clinical isolates of M. foruitum to analyse their heterogeneity. Materials and Methods A total of 81 isolates of NTM isolated from various samples were collected. The clinical isolates were assigned to species M. fortuitum by using conventional and molecular methods. The DNA banding patterns of ERIC- PCR and RAPD- PCR were analysed by using Bionumeric 7.5 software. Results Out of 81 tested NTM, 36 strains of M. fortuitum were identified. 33 isolates were selected for molecular typing in this study. Based on RAPD and ERIC analysis, M. fortuitum isolates were divided into 3 and 6 clusters, respectively. Most of the isolates were distributed into types of II RAPD (20 members/ 60.6 %) and V (14 members/ 42.4% with sub cluster I & II) of ERIC. In RAPD analysis, the major fragments were 300 bp, followed by fragment 1000. In ERIC analysis, the major fragments were 280 bp followed by fragment 1200 bp. Conclusion In conclusion, though the results from this study represented higher discriminatory power of ERIC, however the combination of RAPD and ERIC analysis were able to sufficiently discriminate the genotypic diversity, infection control, and gain useful epidemiological information regarding M. fortuitum isolates. PMID:26816886

  10. Interlaboratory comparison of three microbial source tracking quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays from fecal-source and environmental samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stelzer, Erin A.; Strickler, Kriston M.; Schill, William B.

    2012-01-01

    During summer and early fall 2010, 15 river samples and 6 fecal-source samples were collected in West Virginia. These samples were analyzed by three laboratories for three microbial source tracking (MST) markers: AllBac, a general fecal indicator; BacHum, a human-associated fecal indicator; and BoBac, a ruminant-associated fecal indicator. MST markers were analyzed by means of the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method. The aim was to assess interlaboratory precision when the three laboratories used the same MST marker and shared deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracts of the samples, but different equipment, reagents, and analyst experience levels. The term assay refers to both the markers and the procedure differences listed above. Interlaboratory precision was best for all three MST assays when using the geometric mean absolute relative percent difference (ARPD) and Friedman's statistical test as a measure of interlaboratory precision. Adjustment factors (one for each MST assay) were calculated using results from fecal-source samples analyzed by all three laboratories and applied retrospectively to sample concentrations to account for differences in qPCR results among labs using different standards and procedures. Following the application of adjustment factors to qPCR results, ARPDs were lower; however, statistically significant differences between labs were still observed for the BacHum and BoBac assays. This was a small study and two of the MST assays had 52 percent of samples with concentrations at or below the limit of accurate quantification; hence, more testing could be done to determine if the adjustment factors would work better if the majority of sample concentrations were above the quantification limit.

  11. Characterization of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) isolates from commercial poultry by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP).

    PubMed

    Oldoni, Ivomar; Rodríguez-Avila, Andrés; Riblet, Sylva; García, Maricarmen

    2008-03-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly contagious, acute respiratory disease of chickens, of worldwide distribution, that affects growth and egg production and leads to significant economic losses during periodic outbreaks of the disease. Live attenuated vaccines (chicken embryo origin [CEO] and tissue-culture origin [TCO]) have been widely used to control the disease in the United States. It is believed that most of the outbreaks in the United States are caused by vaccine-related isolates that persist in the field and spill over into naïve poultry populations. The objective of this study was to utilize the previously developed polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis to genotype recent ILT virus (ILTV) isolates from commercial poultry. Forty-six samples were collected during January 2006 to April 2007 from five poultry production regions of the United States and were characterized within PCR-RFLP groups III-VI. Sixty-three percent of the samples analyzed were categorized as closely related to the vaccine strains (groups III-V), whereas 33% were categorized as group VI viruses that differed in six and nine PCR-RFLP patterns from the CEO and TCO vaccines; a mixture of group IV and V viruses was detected in two samples (4%). In general, groups V and VI were the most prevalent viruses, found in 52% and 33% of the samples tested respectively. Both types of viruses were detected in vaccinated and nonvaccinated flocks. Although genetically different, both viruses produced severe disease in the field. PMID:18459297

  12. Determining Annealing Temperatures for Polymerase Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.; Enners, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common technique used in high school and undergraduate science teaching. Students often do not fully comprehend the underlying principles of the technique and how optimization of the protocol affects the outcome and analysis. In this molecular biology laboratory, students learn the steps of PCR with an…

  13. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  14. Multiplex Amplification Refractory Mutation System Polymerase Chain Reaction (ARMS-PCR) for diagnosis of natural infection with canine distemper virus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Canine distemper virus (CDV) is present worldwide and produces a lethal systemic infection of wild and domestic Canidae. Pre-existing antibodies acquired from vaccination or previous CDV infection might interfere the interpretation of a serologic diagnosis method. In addition, due to the high similarity of nucleic acid sequences between wild-type CDV and the new vaccine strain, current PCR derived methods cannot be applied for the definite confirmation of CD infection. Hence, it is worthy of developing a simple and rapid nucleotide-based assay for differentiation of wild-type CDV which is a cause of disease from attenuated CDVs after vaccination. High frequency variations have been found in the region spanning from the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the matrix (M) gene to the fusion (F) gene (designated M-F UTR) in a few CDV strains. To establish a differential diagnosis assay, an amplification refractory mutation analysis was established based on the highly variable region on M-F UTR and F regions. Results Sequences of frequent polymorphisms were found scattered throughout the M-F UTR region; the identity of nucleic acid between local strains and vaccine strains ranged from 82.5% to 93.8%. A track of AAA residue located 35 nucleotides downstream from F gene start codon highly conserved in three vaccine strains were replaced with TGC in the local strains; that severed as target sequences for deign of discrimination primers. The method established in the present study successfully differentiated seven Taiwanese CDV field isolates, all belonging to the Asia-1 lineage, from vaccine strains. Conclusions The method described herein would be useful for several clinical applications, such as confirmation of nature CDV infection, evaluation of vaccination status and verification of the circulating viral genotypes. PMID:20534175

  15. Effects of Holding Time, Storage, and the Preservation of Samples on Sample Integrity for the Detection of Fecal Indicator Bacteria by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR)-based assays.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project was to answer questions related to storage of samples to be analyzed by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based assays for fecal indicator bacteria. The project was divided into two parts. The first part was to determine if filters th...

  16. Ring test evaluation of the detection of influenza A virus in swine oral fluids by real-time, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and virus isolation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The probability of detecting influenza A virus (IAV) in oral fluid (OF) specimens was calculated for each of 13 real-time, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and 7 virus isolation (VI) assays. To conduct the study, OF was inoculated with H1N1 or H3N2 IAV and serially 10-fold d...

  17. Direct RNA detection without nucleic acid purification and PCR: Combining sandwich hybridization with signal amplification based on branched hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yao; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-05-15

    We have developed a convenient, robust and low-cost RNA detection system suitable for high-throughput applications. This system uses a highly specific sandwich hybridization to capture target RNA directly onto solid support, followed by on-site signal amplification via 2-dimensional, branched hybridizing chain polymerization through toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction. The assay uses SYBR Green to detect targets at concentrations as low as 1pM, without involving nucleic acid purification or any enzymatic reaction, using ordinary oligonucleotides without modification or labeling. The system was demonstrated in the detection of malaria RNA in blood and GAPDH gene expression in cell lysate. PMID:26761615

  18. Development and evaluation of a reverse transcription-insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) assay for detection of equine arteritis virus in equine semen and tissue samples using the POCKIT™ system.

    PubMed

    Carossino, Mariano; Lee, Pei-Yu A; Nam, Bora; Skillman, Ashley; Shuck, Kathleen M; Timoney, Peter J; Tsai, Yun-Long; Ma, Li-Juan; Chang, Hsiao-Fen G; Wang, Hwa-Tang T; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2016-08-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV) is the causative agent of equine viral arteritis (EVA), a respiratory and reproductive disease of horses. Most importantly, EAV induces abortion in pregnant mares and can establish persistent infection in up to 10-70% of the infected stallions, which will continue to shed the virus in their semen. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a reverse transcription insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) for the detection of EAV in semen and tissue samples. The newly developed assay had a limit of detection of 10 RNA copies and a 10-fold higher sensitivity than a previously described real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Evaluation of 125 semen samples revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 98.46% and 100.00%, respectively for the RT-qPCR assay, and 100.00% and 98.33%, respectively for the RT-iiPCR assay. Both assays had the same accuracy (99.2%, k=0.98) compared to virus isolation. Corresponding values derived from testing various tissue samples (n=122) collected from aborted fetuses, foals, and EAV carrier stallions are as follows: relative sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 88.14%, 96.83%, and 92.62% (k=0.85), respectively for the RT-qPCR assay, and 98.31%, 92.06%, and 95.08% (k=0.90), respectively for the RT-iiPCR assay. These results indicate that RT-iiPCR is a sensitive, specific, and a robust test enabling detection of EAV in semen and tissue samples with very considerable accuracy. Even though the RT-qPCR assay showed a sensitivity and specificity equal to virus isolation for semen samples, its diagnostic performance was somewhat limited for tissue samples. Thus, this new RT-iiPCR could be considered as an alternative tool in the implementation of EAV control and prevention strategies. PMID:27036504

  19. Integrated polymerase chain reaction/electrophoresis instrument

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.

    2000-01-01

    A new approach and instrument for field identification of micro-organisms and DNA fragments using a small and disposable device containing integrated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enzymatic reaction wells, attached capillary electrophoresis (CE) channels, detectors, and read-out all on/in a small hand-held package. The analysis instrument may be made inexpensively, for example, of plastic, and thus is disposable, which minimizes cross contamination and the potential for false positive identification between samples. In addition, it is designed for multiple users with individual applications. The integrated PCR/CE is manufactured by the PCR well and CE channels are "stamped" into plastic depressions where conductive coatings are made in the wells and ends of the CE microchannels to carry voltage and current to heat the PCR reaction mixtures and simultaneously draw DNA bands up the CE channels. Light is transmitted through the instrument at appropriate points and detects PCR bands and identifies DNA fragments by size (retention time) and quantifies each by the amount of light generated as each phototransistor positioned below each CE channel detects a passing band. The instrument is so compact that at least 100 PCR/CE reactions/analyses can be performed easily on one detection device.

  20. Rapid and efficient identification of the mouse leptin receptor mutation (C57BL/KsJ-db/db) by tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) analysis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Harry; Nam, Hajin; Suh, Jun-Gyo

    2016-03-01

    The C57BLKS/J-Lepr(db) mouse has a point mutation in the leptin receptor gene and is one of the most useful animal model for non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus in human. Since the homozygote of C57BLKS/J-Lepr(db) mouse is infertile, detection of point mutation in the leptin receptor gene is important for efficient maintaining strains as well as mass production of homozygotes. To develop a rapid and efficient genotyping method for C57BLKS/J-Lepr(db) mouse, the tetra-primer amplification-refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) was used. The 407 and 199 bp PCR products were amplified from normal (+/+) mice; while the 407 and 268 bp PCR products were amplified from homozygotes (db/db) mice; and the 407, 268, and 199 bp PCR products were amplified from heterozygotes (db/+) mice. This result showed that the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR analysis by us is suitable to detect point mutation of the leptin receptor gene. Taken together, our method will dramatically reduce animal use for maintenance of strains as well as production of homozygote in the C57BLKS/J-Lepr(db) strains. PMID:27051445

  1. Rapid and efficient identification of the mouse leptin receptor mutation (C57BL/KsJ-db/db) by tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Harry; Nam, Hajin

    2016-01-01

    The C57BLKS/J-Leprdb mouse has a point mutation in the leptin receptor gene and is one of the most useful animal model for non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus in human. Since the homozygote of C57BLKS/J-Leprdb mouse is infertile, detection of point mutation in the leptin receptor gene is important for efficient maintaining strains as well as mass production of homozygotes. To develop a rapid and efficient genotyping method for C57BLKS/J-Leprdb mouse, the tetra-primer amplification-refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) was used. The 407 and 199 bp PCR products were amplified from normal (+/+) mice; while the 407 and 268 bp PCR products were amplified from homozygotes (db/db) mice; and the 407, 268, and 199 bp PCR products were amplified from heterozygotes (db/+) mice. This result showed that the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR analysis by us is suitable to detect point mutation of the leptin receptor gene. Taken together, our method will dramatically reduce animal use for maintenance of strains as well as production of homozygote in the C57BLKS/J-Leprdb strains. PMID:27051445

  2. A Practical Polymerase Chain Reaction Laboratory for Introductory Biology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowlus, R. David; Grether, Susan C.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) laboratory exercise that can be performed by introductory biology students in 1 45- to 55-minute class period. Includes a general description of the polymerase chain reaction, materials needed, procedure, and details of interest to teachers. (JRH)

  3. Detection of Aspergillus flavus and A. fumigatus in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Specimens of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants and Hematological Malignancies Patients by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Nested PCR and Mycological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Zarrinfar, Hossein; Mirhendi, Hossein; Fata, Abdolmajid; Khodadadi, Hossein; Kordbacheh, Parivash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary aspergillosis (PA) is one of the most serious complications in immunocompromised patients, in particular among hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT) and patients with hematological malignancies. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the incidence of PA and utility of molecular methods in HSCT and patients with hematological malignancies, four methods including direct examination, culture, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR were performed on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens in Tehran, Iran. Patients and Methods: During 16 months, 46 BAL specimens were obtained from individuals with allogeneic HSCT (n = 18) and patients with hematological malignancies (n = 28). Direct wet mounts with 20% potassium hydroxide (KOH) and culture on mycological media were performed. The molecular detection of Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus was done by amplifying the conserved sequences of internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) ribosomal DNA by nested-PCR and the β-tubulin gene by TaqMan real-time PCR. Results: Seven (15.2%) out of 46 specimens were positive in direct examination and showed branched septate hyphae; 11 (23.9%) had positive culture including eight (72.7%) A. flavus and three (27.3%) A. fumigatus; 22 (47.8%) had positive nested-PCR and eight (17.4%) had positive real-time PCR. The incidence of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in these patients included proven IPA in 1 (2.2%), probable IPA in 10 (21.7%), possible IPA in 19 (41.3%) and not IPA in 16 cases (34.8%). Conclusions: The incidence of IPA in allogeneic HSCT and patients with hematological malignancies was relatively high and A. flavus was the most common cause of PA. As molecular methods had higher sensitivity, it may be useful as screening methods in HSCT and patients with hematological malignancies, or to determine when empirical antifungal therapy can be withheld. PMID:25763133

  4. Cykotine mRNA expression in mouse retina after laser injury by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuschereba, Steven T.; Bowman, Phillip D.; Ujimore, Veronica; Hoxie, Stephen W.; Pizarro, Jose M.; Cross, Michael E.; Lund, David J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify cytokines produced by the retina after laser injury. With the aid of a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), right eyes of mice received lesions from a continuous wave argon laser. Left eyes served as unirradiated controls. At 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hr after laser irradiation groups of 3 mice were euthanized and retinas fixed for histology or isolated for RNA. Messenger RNA (mRNA) was reverse-transcribed into complementary DNA (cDNA) and subjected to polymerase chain reaction for the following cytokines: tumor necrosis factor-(alpha) (TNF-(alpha) ), interleukin-1(alpha) /(Beta) (IL- 1(alpha) /(Beta) ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-(Beta) 1 (TGF- (Beta) 1), macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH). Histologically, lesions were confined to the photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and choroid. In laser-injured retinas, mRNA levels were elevated for IL-1(alpha) , TGF-(Beta) 1, iNOS, and G3PDH, but not TNF-(alpha) , IL-1(Beta) , or IL-6. It appears that the retina, in response to laser injury, upregulates a select number of cytokines in a time-course dependent fashion.

  5. Evaluation of a broad range real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for the diagnosis of septic synovitis in horses

    PubMed Central

    Elmas, Colette R.; Koenig, Judith B.; Bienzle, Dorothee; Cribb, Nicola C.; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Coté, Nathalie M.; Weese, J. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Septic synovitis is a potentially debilitating and life-threatening disorder in horses. We hypothesized that a universal bacterial real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assay would have improved sensitivity and decreased turn-around time for detection of bacteria in synovial fluid (SF) samples. Forty-eight SF samples were collected from 36 horses that presented to two referral institutions with suspected septic synovitis. Universal RT-PCR, bacterial culture and SF analysis were performed on all samples, and an interpretation on the sample being septic or not was derived by three board certified specialists from the history, clinical assessment and SF characteristics. RT-PCR results were compared to a composite standard comprised of positive culture and interpretation by all three specialists of samples as “septic”. For 41 of 48 samples (85%), culture and RT-PCR results were concordant. Compared to the composite standard, 83% of samples were correctly classified by RT-PCR (turn-around time of approximately 4 hours). Relative sensitivity and specificity of RT-PCR were 87% and 72% respectively, and 56% and 86% for culture. Hence, universal RT-PCR was a rapid and highly sensitive test, which may accelerate diagnosis and improve outcome for horses with septic synovitis. PMID:24101798

  6. Quantification of minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) using amplicon-fusion-site polymerase chain reaction (AFS-PCR)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The amplification of putative oncogenes is a common finding within the genome of various cancer types. Identification and further targeting of specific junction sites within the sequence of genomic amplicons (amplicon fusion sites, AFS) by PCR (AFS-PCR) is suitable for quantification of minimal residual disease (MRD). This approach has recently been developed and described for MYCN amplified neuroblastomas. To compare AFS-PCR directly to routinely used MRD diagnostic strategies, we mapped the amplified genomic regions (ampGR) of an iAMP21-amplicon in high resolution of a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Successfully, we established AFS-PCR covering junction sites between ampGR within the iAMP21-amplicon. Quantification of MRD by AFS-PCR was directly comparable to IgH/TCR based real time quantitative PCR and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis in consecutive bone marrow (BM) specimens. Our data give an additional proof of concept of AFS-PCR for quantification of MRD. The method could be taken into account for ALL patients with genomic amplifications as alternative MRD diagnostic, if no or qualitatively poor Ig/TCR-PCRs are available. PMID:23210797

  7. Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection of Systemic Plant Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter outlines the advances and application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) since its development in 1984 and its enhancements and applications to detection of viruses, viroids and phytoplasma in pome and stone fruits. PCR is probably the most rapidly and widely adopted technology eve...

  8. Use of Quantitative Fluorescent Polymerase Chain Reaction (QF PCR) in Prenatal Diagnostic of Fetal Aneuploidies in a 17 Month Period in Parallel with Karyotyping

    PubMed Central

    Konjhodzic, Rijad; Dervovic, Edina; Kurtovic-Basic, Ilvana; Stomornjak-Vukadin, Meliha; Muhic, Adis; Baljevic, Sumeja; Pirnat-Gegic, Aida; Basic, Ejub; Bilalovic, Nurija

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: QF PCR has recently entered diagnostic practice as a possible way to bypass culturing of the fetal cells, as well as to provide a rapid response following amniocentesis. Material and methods: The effective value of the QF PCR remains a much debated issue, positions ranging from that it makes classic kayotyping obsolete except in special occasions, to that it is no more than a guideline for a mandatory karyotype. Current practices of the gynecology specialists generates samples in such fashion that kariotyping of samples quickly falls behind to the point of obsoleteness, because, by the time a karyotype has been finished, a window of opportunity for termination of pregnancy has closed. Results: QF PCR provides a rapid response alternative, but it is necessary to establish its reproducibility, as well as an algorithm of its use along classic kariotyping. This study contains samples processed in a period from August 1, 2012 to December 31 2013 in both QF PCR and classic karyotype. Object of this study was compare results obtained by two methods, and establish confidence interval of the QF PCR testing. Overall, 661 amniotic fluid samples were processed and typed with QF PCR, out of which 221 were done in parallel with karyiotyping, as an confirmation of results. PMID:24825930

  9. A novel nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for differential detection of Entamoeba histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar DNA in stool samples

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Krishna; Parija, Subhash C

    2007-01-01

    Background E. histolytica, a pathogenic amoeba, is indistinguishable in its cyst and trophozoite stages from those of non-pathogenic E. moshkovskii and E. dispar by light microscopy. We have developed a nested multiplex PCR targeting a 16S-like rRNA gene for differential detection of all the three morphologically similar forms of E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar simultaneously in stool samples. Results The species specific product size for E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar was 439, 553 and 174 bp respectively, which was clearly different for all the three Entamoeba species. The nested multiplex PCR showed a sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 100% for the demonstration of E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar DNA in stool samples. The PCR was positive for E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar in a total of 190 out of 202 stool specimens (94% sensitive) that were positive for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by examination of stool by microscopy and/or culture. All the 35 negative control stool samples that were negative for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by microscopy and culture were also found negative by the nested multiplex PCR (100% specific). The result from the study shows that only 34.6% of the patient stool samples that were positive for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by examination of stool by microscopy and/or culture, were actually positive for pathogenic E. histolytica and the remaining majority of the stool samples were positive for non-pathogenic E. dispar or E. moshkovskii as demonstrated by the use of nested multiplex PCR. Conclusion The present study reports a new nested multiplex PCR strategy for species specific detection and differentiation of E. histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii DNA in stool specimens. The test is highly specific, sensitive and also rapid, providing the results within 12 hours of receiving stool specimens. PMID:17524135

  10. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes with a nonisotopic polymerase chain reaction-coupled ligase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmann, M; Barany, F; Batt, C A

    1993-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-coupled ligase chain reaction (LCR) assay for the specific detection of Listeria monocytogenes (M. Wiedmann, J. Czajka, F. Barany, and C. A. Batt, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:3443-3447, 1992) has been modified for detection of the LCR products with a nonisotopic readout. When a chemiluminescent or a colorimetric substrate for the nonisotopic detection of the LCR products was used, the PCR-coupled LCR gave a sensitivity of 10 CFU of L. monocytogenes. The detection method with the chemiluminescent substrate Lumi-Phos 530 permitted detection of the LCR products in less than 3 h, so that the whole assay can be completed within 10 h. Images PMID:8368859

  11. Polymerase chain reaction with phase change as intrinsic thermal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yi-Fan; Yonezawa, Eri; Kuo, Long-Sheng; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ping-Hei

    2013-04-01

    This research demonstrated that without any external temperature controller, the capillary convective polymerase chain reaction (ccPCR) powered by a candle can operate with the help of phase change. The candle ccPCR system productively amplified hepatitis B virus 122 base-pairs DNA fragment. The detection sensitivity can achieve at an initial DNA concentration to 5 copies per reaction. The results also show that the candle ccPCR system can operate functionally even the ambient temperature varies from 7 °C to 45 °C. These features imply that the candle ccPCR system can provide robust medical detection services.

  12. LENGTH-HETEROGENEITY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (LH-PCR) AS AN INDICATOR OF STREAM SANITARY AND ECOLOGICAL CONDITION: OPTIMAL SAMPLE SIZE AND HOLDING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of coliform plate count data to assess stream sanitary and ecological condition is limited by the need to store samples at 4oC and analyze them within a 24-hour period. We are testing LH-PCR as an alternative tool to assess the bacterial load of streams, offering a cost ...

  13. Dual phase multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Pemov, Alexander; Bavykin, Sergei

    2008-10-07

    Highly specific and sensitive methods were developed for multiplex amplification of nucleic acids on supports such as microarrays. Based on a specific primer design, methods include five types of amplification that proceed in a reaction chamber simultaneously. These relate to four types of multiplex amplification of a target DNA on a solid support, directed by forward and reverse complex primers immobilized to the support and a fifth type--pseudo-monoplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of multiple targets in solution, directed by a single pair of unbound universal primers. The addition of the universal primers in the reaction mixture increases the yield over the traditional "bridge" amplification on a solid support by approximately ten times. Methods that provide multitarget amplification and detection of as little as 0.45-4.5.times.10.sup.-12 g (equivalent to 10.sup.2-10.sup.3 genomes) of a bacterial genomic DNA are disclosed.

  14. Methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Moore, Hannah R; Meehan, Richard R; Young, Lorraine E

    2006-01-01

    Here, we describe a robust and reproducible methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR) method to detect the percentage methylation in repeat sequences of individual pre-implantation ovine embryos produced by different embryo technologies. This method allows the comparison of embryos produced by nuclear transfer with other production and embryo culture methods, accounting for the heterogeneity between embryos within a single treatment. DNA extracted from single embryos is digested with a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme to determine the percentage methylation after PCR amplification in comparison with an undigested control. The undigested control represents 100% methylation because methylation-sensitive enzymes do not cut methylated DNA, allowing the entire sample to be amplified by PCR. Image analysis quantification of the digested subsample PCR product on an ethidium bromide-stained agarose gel is proportional to the amount of methylated DNA in each embryo. By comparing quadruplicate values obtained for each embryo against a standard curve, we are able to ensure the validity of our results for each individual embryo. Compared with bisulphite sequencing methods, the method described is rapid, inexpensive, and relatively high-throughput. PMID:16761730

  15. New methods as alternative or corrective measures for the pitfalls and artifacts of reverse transcription and polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) in cloning chimeric or antisense-accompanied RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chengfu; Liu, Yongming; Yang, Min; Liao, D. Joshua

    2013-01-01

    We established new methods for cloning cDNA ends that start with reverse transcription (RT) and soon proceed with the synthesis of the second cDNA strand, avoiding manipulations of fragile RNA. Our 3′-end cloning method does not involve poly-dT primers and polymerase chain reactions (PCR), is low in efficiency but high in fidelity and can clone those RNAs without a poly-A tail. We also established a cDNA protection assay to supersede RNA protection assay. The protected cDNA can be amplified, cloned and sequenced, enhancing sensitivity and fidelity. We report that RT product using gene-specific primer (GSP) cannot be gene- or strand-specific because RNA sample contains endogenous random primers (ERP). The gene-specificity may be improved by adding a linker sequence at the 5′-end of the GSP to prime RT and using the linker as a primer in the ensuing PCR. The strand-specificity may be improved by using strand-specific DNA oligos in our protection assay. The CDK4 mRNA and TSPAN31 mRNA are transcribed from the opposite DNA strands and overlap at their 3′ ends. Using this relationship as a model, we found that the overlapped sequence might serve as a primer with its antisense as the template to create a wrong-template extension in RT or PCR. We infer that two unrelated RNAs or cDNAs overlapping at the 5′- or 3′-end might create a spurious chimera in this way, and many chimeras with a homologous sequence may be such artifacts. The ERP and overlapping antisense together set complex pitfalls, which one should be aware of. PMID:23618925

  16. The prevalence of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys and Babesia spp. in dogs in Nueva Ecija, Philippines based on multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) assay.

    PubMed

    Corales, Joyce Marielle I; Viloria, Victoria V; Venturina, Virginia M; Mingala, Claro N

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys and Babesia spp. in dogs. It describes the practice of veterinarians in detecting tick-borne diseases in Nueva Ecija, Philippines. Seventy blood samples were collected and were subjected to multiplex PCR for the detection of E. canis, Babesia spp. and A. platys. The prevalence of babesiosis is the highest in Cabanatuan City (2/10), while a 10% prevalence (1/10) was observed in Science City of Muñoz, Talavera and Sta. Rosa. E. canis were only detected in Cabanatuan City. However, no anaplasmosis was detected in any area. The prevalence of babesiosis and ehrlichiosis in Nueva Ecija is 7.14% (5/70) and 2.85% (2/70) respectively. In addition, 70% (7/10) of the Nueva Ecija veterinary practitioners encountered cases of suspected ehrlichiosis in their practice. The diagnosis of ehrlichiosis is based primarily on presented clinical signs and complete blood counts, which include a platelet count. Of the 10 respondents, half utilized test kits while 90% interpreted blood samples. Meanwhile, only 60% of the respondents used an ELISA test kit for ehrlichiosis. For some practitioners, the main reason for not utilizing a kit is the high cost. None of the respondents had previously attended cases of suspected anaplasmosis. Only one respondent diagnosed a case of babesiosis by blood smear microscopy. PMID:25706424

  17. Convective polymerase chain reaction around micro immersion heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Martin; Braun, Dieter

    2005-10-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is performed in the thermal convection created by a micro immersion heater. Instead of repetitive heating and cooling, the temperature gradient induces thermal convection which drives the reaction liquid between hot and cold parts of the chamber. The convection triggers DNA amplification as the DNA melts into two single strands in the hot region and replicates with the use of proteins into twice the amount in the cold region. The constant heater is simply dipped into the reaction solution. Compared to previous experiments, we demonstrate that convective PCR is possible in a robotically accessible open vessel. Our approach compares well with fast PCR cyclers and replicates DNA 500 000 fold within 20minutes. We reduce the necessary components for PCR to cheap, single-use components and therefore increasing the prospects of bringing PCR to point of care applications—even in third world countries.

  18. Analysis of gamma delta V region usage in normal and diseased human intestinal biopsies and peripheral blood by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Bucht, A; Söderström, K; Esin, S; Grunewald, J; Hagelberg, S; Magnusson, I; Wigzell, H; Grönberg, A; Kiessling, R

    1995-01-01

    The intestinal population of gamma delta T cell receptor (TCR)-bearing cells was characterized with regard to V delta and V gamma subtype expression. For this purpose, we utilized V gene-specific PCR of mRNA prepared from intestinal biopsies. Predominant expression of the V delta 1 subtype was demonstrated in the small intestine of patients with coeliac disease and in the inflamed colon of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD: ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) as well as in colon biopsies taken from macroscopically normal areas of colon. Although intestinal gamma delta T cells preferentially expressed V delta 1, other V delta transcripts could be detected, of which V delta 2 and V delta 5 were commonly expressed. Analysis of biopsies from mesenteric lymph nodes demonstrated a V delta repertoire similar to the mucosa. In peripheral blood on the other hand, high expression of both V delta 2 and V delta 1 was found. The predominant expression of V delta 1 transcripts in the intestinal mucosa of IBD patients correlated well with protein cell surface expression as analysed by flow cytometry using V delta 1- and V delta 2-specific antibodies. Selective expansion of gamma delta T cells could not be demonstrated within the inflamed mucosa as shown by mRNA analysis and flow cytometry. Instead, IBD patients demonstrated a decreased proportion of TCR gamma delta-carrying T cells in the inflamed mucosa compared with macroscopically normal area of colon. On the other hand, a significantly increased percentage of T cells bearing the gamma delta TCR was found in peripheral blood of patients with Crohn's disease compared with healthy individuals, indicating that local mucosal inflammation may influence the circulating gamma delta T cell population. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7813110

  19. Effects of Upconversion Nanoparticles on Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Im, Su-Gyeong; Hah, Sang Soo; Cong, Vu Thanh; Lee, Eun Jeong; Lee, Yeon-Su; Lee, Geon Kook

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are attractive materials owing to their physical and electrochemical properties, which make them extremely useful in diagnostic applications. Photon upconversion is the phenomenon where high-energy photons are emitted upon excitation of low-energy photons. Nucleic acids detection based on upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), which display a high signal-to-noise ratio and no photobleaching, has been widely applied. We evaluated whether UCNPs can improve polymerase chain reaction (PCR) specificity and affect PCR amplification. The effects of UCNPs with a diameter size of 40, 70, and 250 nm were evaluated using 3 PCR kits (AccuPower PCR PreMix, AmpliTaq Gold 360 Master Mix, and HotStarTaq Plus Master Mix) and 3 real-time PCR kits (AccuPower GreenStar qPCR PreMix, SYBR Green PCR Master Mix, and QuantiTect SYBR Green PCR Kit). Quantum dots were used for comparison with the UCNPs. In the presence of an appropriate concentration of UCNPs, PCR specificity was optimized. UCNPs of 40-nm size improved PCR specificity more effectively than did UCNPs sized 70 or 250 nm. As the size and concentrations of the UCNPs were increased, PCR amplification was more severely inhibited. At lower annealing temperatures (25°C–45°C), addition of the 40 nm UCNP (1 µg/µL) to the PCR reagent produced specific PCR products without nonspecific sequence amplification. Therefore, UCNPs of different sizes, with different DNA polymerases used in the commercial kits, showed different inhibitory effects on PCR amplification. These results demonstrate that optimization of UCNPs, added to reaction mixtures at appropriate concentrations, can improve PCR specificity. However, the mechanism underlining UCNPs effect on PCR remains unclear and will require further investigation. PMID:24039935

  20. Polymerase chain reaction: A molecular diagnostic tool in periodontology.

    PubMed

    Maheaswari, Rajendran; Kshirsagar, Jaishree Tukaram; Lavanya, Nallasivam

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses the principles of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its application as a diagnostic tool in periodontology. The relevant MEDLINE and PubMed indexed journals were searched manually and electronically by typing PCR, applications of PCR, PCR in periodontics, polymorphism studies in periodontitis, and molecular techniques in periodontology. The searches were limited to articles in English language and the articles describing PCR process and its relation to periodontology were collected and used to prepare a concise review. PCR has now become a standard diagnostic and research tool in periodontology. Various studies reveal that its sensitivity and specificity allow it as a rapid, efficient method of detecting, identifying, and quantifying organism. Different immune and inflammatory markers can be identified at the mRNA expression level, and also the determination of genetic polymorphisms, thus providing the deeper insight into the mechanisms underlying the periodontal disease. PMID:27143822

  1. Polymerase chain reaction: A molecular diagnostic tool in periodontology

    PubMed Central

    Maheaswari, Rajendran; Kshirsagar, Jaishree Tukaram; Lavanya, Nallasivam

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses the principles of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its application as a diagnostic tool in periodontology. The relevant MEDLINE and PubMed indexed journals were searched manually and electronically by typing PCR, applications of PCR, PCR in periodontics, polymorphism studies in periodontitis, and molecular techniques in periodontology. The searches were limited to articles in English language and the articles describing PCR process and its relation to periodontology were collected and used to prepare a concise review. PCR has now become a standard diagnostic and research tool in periodontology. Various studies reveal that its sensitivity and specificity allow it as a rapid, efficient method of detecting, identifying, and quantifying organism. Different immune and inflammatory markers can be identified at the mRNA expression level, and also the determination of genetic polymorphisms, thus providing the deeper insight into the mechanisms underlying the periodontal disease. PMID:27143822

  2. Polymerization as a Model Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Maurice

    1973-01-01

    Describes the features of the free radical, anionic, and cationic mechanisms of chain addition polymerization. Indicates that the nature of chain reactions can be best taught through the study of macromolecules. (CC)

  3. Nuclear chain reaction: forty years later

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    The proceedings from a 1982 symposium 40 years after the first controlled nuclear chain reaction took place in Chicago covers four sessions and public discussion. The session covered the history of the chain reaction; peaceful uses in technology, medicine, and biological science; peaceful uses in power generation; and nuclear weapons control. Among the speakers were Eugene Wigner, Glenn Seaborg, Alvin Weinberg, and others who participated in the first chain reaction experiments. The proceedings reflect differences of opinion among the scientists as well as the general public. References, slides, and tables used to illustrate the individual talks are included with the papers.

  4. Taylor dispersion in polymerase chain reaction in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinkee; Kulla, Elejdis; Chauhan, Anuj; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2008-09-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly used for a wide range of DNA applications such as disease detection, genetic fingerprinting, and paternity testing. The importance of PCR has led to an increased interest in performing PCR in a microfluidic platform with a high throughput while using very small DNA quantities. In this paper we solve convection-diffusion equations for the DNA and deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) under conditions suitable for PCR operation in a microchip. These include pressure driven flow accompanied by temporal temperature changes that lead to an amplification reaction, which is modeled as a first order reaction. The convection-diffusion-reaction equations are solved by using the method of multiple time scales to yield average equations that can be solved to obtain the long time evolution of the concentration profiles. The results obtained by solving the averaged equations agree well with full numerical solutions. The averaged equations are also solved to simulate the PCR to illustrate some interesting aspects of this operation in a microfluidic device. It is shown that insufficient nucleotide concentrations can lead to complete depletion of NTP at certain axial locations, which leads to termination of DNA amplification at these locations, resulting in formation of a plateau in DNA concentration.

  5. Supplement to Theory of Neutron Chain Reactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Weinberg, Alvin M.; Noderer, L. C.

    1952-05-26

    General discussions are given of the theory of neutron chain reactions. These include observations on exponential experiments, the general reactor with resonance fission, microscopic pile theory, and homogeneous slow neutron reactors. (B.J.H.)

  6. qPCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction) for the quantification of bacteriophages in stream water samples to investigate hydrological processes: a proof-of-concept study in the Huewelerbach experimental catchment (Luxembourg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Marta; Narayanan Balasubramanian, Mukundh; Ogorzaly, Leslie; Pfister, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Albeit recent technological developments (e.g. field deployable instruments operating at high temporal frequencies), experimental hydrology is a discipline that remains measurement limited. From this perspective, trans-disciplinary approaches may create valuable opportunities to enlarge the amount of tools available for investigating hydrological processes. Bacteriophages have been widely used in hydrology as biological tracer for investigating colloid transport and contamination of ground water systems. However, there are only a few studies focusing on the employability of bacteriophages as surface water tracers (i.e. phage transport, system functioning). Here, we present a proof-of-concept study carried out in the Huewelerbach catchment in Luxembourg in December 2015. The aim of this study was to investigate how viral particles can be used to detect hydrological connectivity between the riparian zone/river bank and the stream during rainfall events. Moreover, this study is one of the first attempts for applying the qPCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction) technique for the quantification of bacteriophages in stream water samples to investigate hydrological processes. This technique is very sensitive and has a large dynamic range - enhancing ease and speed of phage detection. We used two different male-specific coliphages (GA phage, genogroup II and SP phage, genogroup IV). Two litres of GA phage were injected directly in the stream as a slug injection and two litres of SP phage were poured next to the river bank (alluvial deposition) close to the injection point. We also added NaCl (200 g) to both phage suspensions. We collected stream water samples 100 m and 500 m downstream (i.e. catchment outlet) of the injection point for one week. Phages were concentrated through ultracentrifugation of 100 ml of water sample followed by quantification via qPCR. Conductivity in stream water was monitored for the entire duration of the experiment. Discharge was monitored

  7. Polymerase chain reaction: basic protocol plus troubleshooting and optimization strategies.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Todd C

    2012-01-01

    In the biological sciences there have been technological advances that catapult the discipline into golden ages of discovery. For example, the field of microbiology was transformed with the advent of Anton van Leeuwenhoek's microscope, which allowed scientists to visualize prokaryotes for the first time. The development of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of those innovations that changed the course of molecular science with its impact spanning countless subdisciplines in biology. The theoretical process was outlined by Keppe and coworkers in 1971; however, it was another 14 years until the complete PCR procedure was described and experimentally applied by Kary Mullis while at Cetus Corporation in 1985. Automation and refinement of this technique progressed with the introduction of a thermal stable DNA polymerase from the bacterium Thermus aquaticus, consequently the name Taq DNA polymerase. PCR is a powerful amplification technique that can generate an ample supply of a specific segment of DNA (i.e., an amplicon) from only a small amount of starting material (i.e., DNA template or target sequence). While straightforward and generally trouble-free, there are pitfalls that complicate the reaction producing spurious results. When PCR fails it can lead to many non-specific DNA products of varying sizes that appear as a ladder or smear of bands on agarose gels. Sometimes no products form at all. Another potential problem occurs when mutations are unintentionally introduced in the amplicons, resulting in a heterogeneous population of PCR products. PCR failures can become frustrating unless patience and careful troubleshooting are employed to sort out and solve the problem(s). This protocol outlines the basic principles of PCR, provides a methodology that will result in amplification of most target sequences, and presents strategies for optimizing a reaction. By following this PCR guide, students should be able to: • Set up reactions and thermal cycling

  8. Polymerase Chain Reaction: Basic Protocol Plus Troubleshooting and Optimization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Todd C.

    2012-01-01

    In the biological sciences there have been technological advances that catapult the discipline into golden ages of discovery. For example, the field of microbiology was transformed with the advent of Anton van Leeuwenhoek's microscope, which allowed scientists to visualize prokaryotes for the first time. The development of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of those innovations that changed the course of molecular science with its impact spanning countless subdisciplines in biology. The theoretical process was outlined by Keppe and coworkers in 1971; however, it was another 14 years until the complete PCR procedure was described and experimentally applied by Kary Mullis while at Cetus Corporation in 1985. Automation and refinement of this technique progressed with the introduction of a thermal stable DNA polymerase from the bacterium Thermus aquaticus, consequently the name Taq DNA polymerase. PCR is a powerful amplification technique that can generate an ample supply of a specific segment of DNA (i.e., an amplicon) from only a small amount of starting material (i.e., DNA template or target sequence). While straightforward and generally trouble-free, there are pitfalls that complicate the reaction producing spurious results. When PCR fails it can lead to many non-specific DNA products of varying sizes that appear as a ladder or smear of bands on agarose gels. Sometimes no products form at all. Another potential problem occurs when mutations are unintentionally introduced in the amplicons, resulting in a heterogeneous population of PCR products. PCR failures can become frustrating unless patience and careful troubleshooting are employed to sort out and solve the problem(s). This protocol outlines the basic principles of PCR, provides a methodology that will result in amplification of most target sequences, and presents strategies for optimizing a reaction. By following this PCR guide, students should be able to: ● Set up reactions and thermal cycling

  9. Application of polymerase chain reaction to detect rearrangement of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, S H; Siegrist, K; Akhtar, M

    1997-07-01

    As part of our routine work-up in the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disease, we used a rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to amplify the DNA fragments of the framework 3 (FR3) region of the immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) chain genes. The assay does not involve hybridization, nested priming, or sequencing of the amplified PCR product. It was performed on 66 specimens of B-cell lymphoproliferative disease, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, hairy cell leukemia and follicular lymphoma. Twenty-six specimens of negative controls, including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia in myeloid transformation and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, were also analyzed. The assay was performed with 77% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The standard IgH chain gene rearrangement by Southern blot analysis is reserved for the remaining negative cases if clinically indicated. PMID:17353588

  10. Detecting mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Uphoff, Cord C; Drexler, Hans G

    2011-01-01

    The detection of mycoplasmas in human and animal cell cultures is mandatory for every cell culture laboratory, because these bacteria are common contaminants, persist unrecognized in cell cultures for many years, and affect research results as well as the purity of cell culture products. The reliability of the mycoplasma detection depends on the sensitivity and specificity of the method and should also be convenient to be included in the basic routine of cell culture quality assessment. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection is one of the acknowledged methodologies to detect mycoplasmas in cell cultures and cell culture products. Although the PCR offers a fast and simple technique to detect mycoplasmas, the method is also susceptible to errors and can produce false positive as well as false-negative results. Thus, the establishment and the routine application of the PCR assay require optimization and the inclusion of the appropriate control reactions. The presented protocol describes sample preparation, DNA extraction, PCR run, the analysis of the PCR products, and speciation of the contaminant. It also provides detailed information on how to avoid artifacts produced by the method. Established properly, PCR is a reliable, fast, and sensitive method and should be applied regularly to monitor the contamination status of cell cultures. PMID:21516400

  11. Using Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction to Detect Single-Nucleotide Substitutions Induced by Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Chan, Amanda H; Conklin, Bruce R

    2016-01-01

    This protocol is designed to detect single-nucleotide substitutions generated by genome editing in a highly sensitive and quantitative manner. It uses a combination of allele-specific hydrolysis probes and a new digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) technology called droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). ddPCR partitions a reaction into more than 10,000 nanoliter-scale water-in-oil droplets. As a result, each droplet contains only a few copies of the genome so that ddPCR is able to detect rare genome-editing events without missing them. PMID:27250210

  12. Detection of Microsatellite Instability by Fluorescence Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Karin D.; Glaser, Cynthia L.; Thompson, Richard E.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Griffin, Constance A.; Eshleman, James R.

    2000-01-01

    We have created a clinical molecular diagnostic assay to test for microsatellite instability (MSI) at multiple loci simultaneously in paraffin-embedded surgical pathology colon resection specimens. This fluorescent multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay analyzes the five primary microsatellite loci recommended at the 1997 National Cancer Institute-sponsored conference on MSI for the identification of MSI or replication errors in colorectal cancer: Bat-25, Bat-26, D2S123, D5S346, and D17S250. Amplicon detection is accomplished by capillary electrophoresis using the ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer. Assay validation compared 18 specimens previously assessed by radioactive PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis detection to results generated by the reported assay. Germline and tumor DNA samples were amplified in separate multiplex PCR reactions, sized in separate capillary electrophoresis runs, and compared directly to identify novel length alleles in tumor tissue. A concordance of 100% between the two modalities was achieved. The multiplex assay routinely detected a subpopulation of 10% tumor alleles in the presence of 90% normal alleles. A novel statistical model was generated that corroborates the validity of using results generated by analysis of five independent microsatellites to achieve a single overall MSI diagnosis. The assay presented is superior to standard radioactive monoplex PCR, polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis, primarily due to the multiplex PCR format. PMID:11272898

  13. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  14. A Specific Qualitative Detection Method for Peanut (Arachis Hypogaea) in Foods Using Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed a qualitative detection method for peanuts in foods using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We designed a universal primer pair CP 03-5’/ CP 03-3’ to confirm the validity of the DNAs for PCR. The plant specific amplified fragments were detected from 13 kinds of plants using the universal...

  15. Single Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction To Detect Diverse Loci Associated with Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    López-Saucedo, Catalina; Cerna, Jorge F.; Villegas-Sepulveda, Nicolas; Thompson, Rocío; Velazquez, F. Raul; Torres, Javier; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2003-01-01

    We developed and tested a single multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that detects enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic, enteroinvasive, and Shiga-toxin–producing Escherichia coli. This PCR is specific, sensitive, and rapid in detecting target isolates in stool and food. Because of its simplicity, economy, and efficiency, this protocol warrants further evaluation in large, prospective studies of polymicrobial substances. PMID:12533296

  16. Polymerase chain reaction in rapid diagnosis of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ashok K; Wilson, C G; Prasad, P L; Menon, P K

    2005-07-01

    In a prospective study a total of hundred neonates who fulfilled the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology's (ACOG) criteria for probable sepsis admitted to NICU of tertiary care armed forces hospital were investigated for evidence of sepsis. The investigation protocol included sepsis screen, blood culture and 1 mL of venous blood for molecular analysis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacterial DNA component encoding 16 s RNA in all cases. 100 newborns with probable sepsis were studied to evaluate the molecular diagnosis of sepsis using PCR amplification of 16 S RNA in newborns with risk factors for sepsis or those who have clinical evidence of sepsis. We compared the results of PCR with blood culture and other markers of sepsis screen (total leucocyte count (TLC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), immature/total neutrophil count ratio (I/T ratio), peripheral blood smear, micro ESR and C reactive protein (CRP). Controls consisted of 30 normal healthy newborns with no overt evidence of sepsis. Sepsis screen was positive in 24 (24%) of cases in study group with sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 83.5% respectively. Blood culture was positive in 09(9%t) with sensitivity of 69.2% and specificity of 100%. PCR was positive in 13(13%) of cases (9% are both blood culture and sepsis screen positive and 4% are positive by sepsis screen); the sensitivity of PCR was 100% and specificity was 95.6%. Blood culture is the most reliable method for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Polymerase chain reaction is useful and superior to blood culture for early diagnosis of sepsis in neonates. PMID:16085969

  17. Simulation of between Repeat Variability in Real Time PCR Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Lievens, Antoon; Van Aelst, Stefan; Van den Bulcke, Marc; Goetghebeur, Els

    2012-01-01

    While many decisions rely on real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis few attempts have hitherto been made to quantify bounds of precision accounting for the various sources of variation involved in the measurement process. Besides influences of more obvious factors such as camera noise and pipetting variation, changing efficiencies within and between reactions affect PCR results to a degree which is not fully recognized. Here, we develop a statistical framework that models measurement error and other sources of variation as they contribute to fluorescence observations during the amplification process and to derived parameter estimates. Evaluation of reproducibility is then based on simulations capable of generating realistic variation patterns. To this end, we start from a relatively simple statistical model for the evolution of efficiency in a single PCR reaction and introduce additional error components, one at a time, to arrive at stochastic data generation capable of simulating the variation patterns witnessed in repeated reactions (technical repeats). Most of the variation in values was adequately captured by the statistical model in terms of foreseen components. To recreate the dispersion of the repeats' plateau levels while keeping the other aspects of the PCR curves within realistic bounds, additional sources of reagent consumption (side reactions) enter into the model. Once an adequate data generating model is available, simulations can serve to evaluate various aspects of PCR under the assumptions of the model and beyond. PMID:23189123

  18. Studying the effect of graphene-ZnO nanocomposites on polymerase chain reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vinay; Rajaura, Rajveer; Sharma, Preetam Kumar; Srivastava, Rishabh Ronin; Sharma, Shyam Sundar; Agrawal, Kailash

    2016-05-01

    An emerging area of research is improving the efficiency of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by using nanoparticles. With graphene nano-flakes showing promising results, in this paper we report the effect of Graphene-ZnO nanocomposites on Polymerase Chain reaction (PCR) efficiency. G-ZnO nanocomposites were efficiently synthesized via in situ chemical method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image confirms the formation of nanocomposites. ZnO nanoparticles of size range ~20-30 nm are uniformly attached on the graphene sheets. No amplification during PCR indicates inhibitory activity of G-ZnO nanocomposites which points the fingers at ZnO moiety of the G-ZnO composite for no amplification during our PCR reaction. Further work should concentrate on finding out the main inhibitory mechanism involved in inhibition of PCR using G-ZnO composites.

  19. Application of the polymerase chain reaction to detect fowl adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, P; Ojkic, D; Tuboly, T; Huber, P; Nagy, E

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of fowl adenoviruses (FAdV) was tested. The optimal reaction parameters were evaluated and defined for purified genomic DNA of type 8 fowl adenovirus (FAdV-8), and then the same conditions were applied for nucleic acid extracted from infected cells. One hundred picograms of purified viral DNA, or 250 FAdV-8-infected cells, were detected by ethidium bromide staining of the PCR products in agarose gels. The sensitivity was increased to 10 pg purified viral DNA, or 25 infected cells, when the PCR products were hybridized with a specific labeled probe. Several field isolates of FAdV and the CELO virus (FAdV serotype 1) could be amplified by the same primers and conditions, but the size of the amplicons was smaller than that for the FAdV-8 PCR product. Other avian viruses and uninfected cell cultures tested negative. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:10369570

  20. Urine Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction in Neonatal Septicemia.

    PubMed

    Das, B K; Suri, Shipra; Nath, Gopal; Prasad, Rajniti

    2015-08-01

    This cross-sectional study was done to evaluate diagnostic efficacy of urine nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using broad-range 16SrDNA PCR-based amplification, followed by restriction analysis and sequencing in neonatal septicemia. The study included 50 babies; 48% had vaginal delivery, 46% were preterm, 20% had a history of prolonged rupture of membranes and 56% were low birth weight (≤2500 g). Clinical presentations were lethargy (96%), respiratory distress (80%) and bleeding diathesis (16%). Absolute neutrophil count <1800/mm(3) was observed in 60%, and positive C-reactive protein in 46%. Thirty neonates had positive blood culture, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (22%) was the predominant organism. Nested urine PCR was positive in 38 (76%) and detected bacterial DNA in 8 neonates with negative blood cultures. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of nested PCR were 100, 60, 78.9, 100 and 84%, respectively, compared with blood culture. Nested PCR can detect most bacteria in single assay and identify unusual and unexpected causal agents. PMID:26130622

  1. Diagnosis of duck plague in waterfowl by polymerase chain reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, W.R.; Nashold, S.W.; Docherty, D.E.; Brown, S.E.; Knudson, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    A recently developed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used for diagnosis of duck plague in waterfowl tissues from past and current cases of waterfowl mortality and to identify duck plague virus in combined cloacal/oral-pharyngeal swab samples from healthy mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) after a disease outbreak. The PCR was able to detect viral DNA from all the individual or pooled tissues assayed from 10 waterfowl, including liver and spleen samples from three Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata domesticus) that did not yield virus isolates. The strong staining intensity of the PCR products from the waterfowl tissues indicated that large amounts of virus were present, even when virus was not isolated. Duck plague DNA was also detected in a cloacal swab sample from a wood duck (Aix sponsa) carcass submitted for diagnosis. The PCR assay identified duck plague DNA in 13 swab samples that produced virus isolates from carrier mallards sampled in 1981 after a duck plague die-off. The duck plague PCR clearly demonstrated the ability to quickly diagnose duck plague in suspect mortality cases and to detect virus shed by carrier waterfowl.

  2. Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi by Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Márquez, María Elizabeth; Concepción, Juan Luis; González-Marcano, Eglys; Mondolfi, Alberto Paniz

    2016-01-01

    American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) is an infectious disease caused by the hemoflagellate parasite Trypanosoma cruzi which is transmitted by reduviid bugs. T. cruzi infection occurs in a broad spectrum of reservoir animals throughout North, Central, and South America and usually evolves into an asymptomatic chronic clinical stage of the disease in which diagnosis is often challenging. This chapter describes the application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA including protocols for sample preparation, DNA extraction, and target amplification methods. PMID:26843052

  3. Methods in molecular cardiology: the polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sonnemans, D.G.P.; de Windt, L.J.; de Muinck, E.D.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    Several polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques are described in this review to give insight into the potential applications for cardiovascular research. Although PCR can be performed in several ways, all applications are based on the same general principle, the amplification of DNA or RNA by the enzyme polymerase. This amplification provides the opportunity to detect, identify and multiply a single copy of DNA or RNA, in or outside the cell. This powerful technique can be used in several directions of DNA and RNA research resulting in the ability to specifically detect the presence and activity of genes. The use of these techniques in cardiovascular research is discussed here. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:25696037

  4. Designing Polymerase Chain Reaction Primers Using Primer3Plus.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jui-Hung; Weng, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Designing oligonucleotide primers is a crucial step for successful molecular biology experiments that require the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR involves cycles of three steps: denaturation, annealing, and extension. During denaturation, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules (templates) are separated into single strands. During annealing, a pair of primers is annealed to the complementary regions of the single-stranded molecules. In the extension step, DNA polymerase extends the primers to produce DNA molecules that correspond to the region bracketed by the primers (the amplicons). All of these steps are temperature sensitive, and the common choice of temperatures is 94°C, 60°C, and 70°C, respectively. Poorly designed primers may lead to no amplification product or additional undesired amplified fragments. The goals of primer design include good primer specificity, high annealing efficiency, appropriate melting temperature, proper GC content, and the prevention of primer hairpins or primer dimers. PMID:27574202

  5. Separation-Type Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Chip for Detecting Male Infertility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Seung-Mo; Ju, Jin-Kyoung; Ahn, Yoomin; Hwang, Seung Young

    2008-06-01

    A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) biochip is presented in this paper. In this PCR chip, the glass substrate integrated with the microheater and microsensor is separable from the reaction chamber where the sample is injected, which now makes repeated reuse of the glass substrate possible. The heat transfer efficiency and target gene amplification of the proposed separable PCR chip was compared with that of the conventional united PCR chip. The results showed that the sex-determining Y chromosome (SRY) gene PCR for detecting male infertility was successfully performed in the separable chip. However, repeated multiplex PCR was successful for only two genes, SPGY1 and SRY, but not for gene SY586. Future work is needed for a multiplex PCR with more than three genes.

  6. Comparison of Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction with Parasitological Methods for Detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in Human Fecal Samples.

    PubMed

    Sharifdini, Meysam; Mirhendi, Hossein; Ashrafi, Keyhan; Hosseini, Mostafa; Mohebali, Mehdi; Khodadadi, Hossein; Kia, Eshrat Beigom

    2015-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR methods for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in fecal samples compared with parasitological methods. A total of 466 stool samples were examined by conventional parasitological methods (formalin ether concentration [FEC] and agar plate culture [APC]). DNA was extracted using an in-house method, and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 18S ribosomal genes were amplified by nested PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. Among 466 samples, 12.7% and 18.2% were found infected with S. stercoralis by FEC and APC, respectively. DNA of S. stercoralis was detected in 18.9% and 25.1% of samples by real-time PCR and nested PCR, respectively. Considering parasitological methods as the diagnostic gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of nested PCR were 100% and 91.6%, respectively, and that of real-time PCR were 84.7% and 95.8%, respectively. However, considering sequence analyzes of the selected nested PCR products, the specificity of nested PCR is increased. In general, molecular methods were superior to parasitological methods. They were more sensitive and more reliable in detection of S. stercoralis in comparison with parasitological methods. Between the two molecular methods, the sensitivity of nested PCR was higher than real-time PCR. PMID:26350449

  7. Real time reverse transcription (RRT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for detection of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus and European swine influenza A virus infections in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND. Requirement to detect pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (H1N1v) and established swine influenza A viruses (SIVs) by RealTime real time reverse transcription (RRT) PCR methods. Objectives. First, modify an existing M gene RRT PCR for sensitive generic detection of H1N1v and other European SIVs. S...

  8. Transformational leadership: a cascading chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Lorraine

    2005-03-01

    Historical influences still permeate contemporary nursing practise. These are mirrored in organizational philosophies, transactional and autocratic leadership styles and disempowered staff. Whilst there is disparity amongst the theorists' definitions of leadership, there is consensus pertaining to the attributes necessary to realize effective leadership. Transformational leadership is heralded as new criterion for nurse managers, and can be achieved through training, education and professional development in key leadership competencies. To achieve a chain reaction, charismatic transformational leaders espouse intellectual stimulation and individual consideration to empower staff and enhance patient care. Nurse managers that develop and foster transformational leadership can surmount oppressive traditions and confidently navigate a complex and rapidly changing health care environment. PMID:15720482

  9. Principles and applications of polymerase chain reaction in medical diagnostic fields: a review

    PubMed Central

    Valones, Marcela Agne Alves; Guimarães, Rafael Lima; Brandão, Lucas André Cavalcanti; de Souza, Paulo Roberto Eleutério; de Albuquerque Tavares Carvalho, Alessandra; Crovela, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in molecular methods have revolutionized the detection and characterization of microorganisms in a broad range of medical diagnostic fields, including virology, mycology, parasitology, microbiology and dentistry. Among these methods, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) has generated great benefits and allowed scientific advancements. PCR is an excellent technique for the rapid detection of pathogens, including those difficult to culture. Along with conventional PCR techniques, Real-Time PCR has emerged as a technological innovation and is playing an ever-increasing role in clinical diagnostics and research laboratories. Due to its capacity to generate both qualitative and quantitative results, Real-Time PCR is considered a fast and accurate platform. The aim of the present literature review is to explore the clinical usefulness and potential of both conventional PCR and Real-Time PCR assays in diverse medical fields, addressing its main uses and advances. PMID:24031310

  10. Review of Detection of Brucella sp. by Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei Ling; Nielsen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a review of most of the currently used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for identification of Brucella bacteria in biological samples. We focused in particular on methods using single-pair primers, multiplex primers, real-time PCRs, PCRs for marine Brucella, and PCRs for molecular biotyping. These methods are becoming very important tools for the identification of Brucella, at the species level and recently also at the biovar level. These techniques require minimum biological containment and can provide results in a very short time. In addition, genetic fingerprinting of isolates aid in epidemiological studies of the disease and its control. PCR-based methods are more useful and practical than conventional methods used to identify Brucella spp., and new methods for Brucella spp identification and typing are still being developed. However, the sensitivity, specificity, and issues of quality control and quality assurance using these methods must be fully validated on clinical samples before PCR can be used in routine laboratory testing for brucellosis. PMID:20718083

  11. The use of real-time polymerase chain reaction with high resolution melting (real-time PCR-HRM) analysis for the detection and discrimination of nematodes Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Bursaphelenchus mucronatus.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, Anna; Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata

    2016-04-01

    The real-time PCR-HRM analysis was developed for the detection and discrimination of the quarantine nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Bursaphelenchus mucronatus. A set of primers was designed to target the ITS region of rDNA. The results have demonstrated that this analysis is a valuable tool for differentiation of these both species. PMID:26880540

  12. Identification of Erwinia stewartii by a ligase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W J; Wiedmann, M; Dillard, H R; Batt, C A

    1994-01-01

    A PCR-coupled ligase chain reaction (LCR) assay was developed to distinguish the plant pathogenic bacterium Erwinia stewartii from other erwiniae. This new technique allows discrimination to the species level on the basis of a single-base-pair difference in the 16S rRNA gene which is unique to E. stewartii. Portions of the 16S rRNA genes of E. stewartii and the closely related Erwinia herbicola were sequenced. From comparison of the two 16S rRNA gene regions, two primer pairs were constructed such that only E. stewartii DNA gave a product in the LCR assay. The ligated product was separated from the radioactively labelled primers by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualized by autoradiography. Twenty-four different Erwinia species and strains were tested by PCR-coupled LCR to verify the specificity of the assay, and only E. stewartii strains gave a positive reaction. In addition, infected and healthy plant material was also assayed. E. stewartii was detected in infected plant material, even when large populations of epiphytic bacteria were present. No enrichment was necessary for detection of the pathogen in corn leaves. This assay has potential as a diagnostic technique for the detection of E. stewartii in infected plant and vector material. Images PMID:7509585

  13. Sensitive and specific polymerase chain reaction detection of Toxoplasma gondii for veterinary and medical diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, J M; Gajadhar, A A

    1993-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii. A universal- and a T. gondii-specific primer was used to amplify a region of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. This approach allows for a theoretical detection limit of 0.01 zoite of T. gondii per sample assayed. Experiments showed that this PCR method could detect 0.1 pg of T. gondii DNA, which represents about one organism. Polymerase chain reaction tests using DNAs of cat, dog, swine, cattle, human, Sarcocystis cruzi, Eimeria ahsata, E. vermiformis, and Escherichia coli indicated no cross-reaction with nucleic acids of hosts, related coccidia, or bacteria. Data on the sensitivity and specificity suggest that this PCR assay could be extremely useful for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in human and veterinary medicine, as well as for food safety surveys. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:8431804

  14. A Specific Qualitative Detection Method for Peanut (Arachis Hypogagea) in Foods Using Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A qualitative method for detection of peanuts in foods using polymerase chain reaction was developed. A universal primer pair CP 03-5 /CP 03-3 was designed to confirm the validity of the DNAs for PCR. The plant-specific amplified fragments were detected from 13 kinds of plants using the universal pr...

  15. Use of enrichment real time-Polymerase Chain Reaction to enumerate Salmonella on chicken parts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella that survive cooking and that cross-contaminate other food during meal preparation and serving represent primary routes of consumer exposure to this pathogen from chicken. Consequently, the present study was undertaken to use enrichment real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to enu...

  16. INTERNAL AMPLIFICATION CONTROL FOR USE IN QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FECAL INDICATOR BACTERIA ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) can be used as a rapid method for detecting fecal indicator bacteria. Because false negative results can be caused by PCR inhibitors that co-extract with the DNA samples, an internal amplification control (IAC) should be run with eac...

  17. How appropriate are cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction requests for suspected central nervous system infections?

    PubMed

    Mamoojee, Yaasir; Chadwick, David

    2011-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays have become the main diagnostic tests for central nervous system viral infections in recent years. Previous studies have suggested algorithms based on CSF leukocyte count and total protein levels to determine when CSF PCR assays are indicated. Based on these criteria, 1,469 CSF PCR tests requested over a two-year period were reviewed. A proportion of positive PCR results were found in children with normal CSF, unlike in adults where such occurrences were extremely rare. The results suggest that applying a strategy of screening CSF specimens using leukocyte count, glucose and protein, at least in adults, may have avoided more than half of CSF PCR requests with little detriment to patient care and considerable cost savings. Larger prospective studies are needed to determine whether algorithms using standard CSF parameters and clinical information can optimise the use of CSF PCR assays in clinical practice. PMID:22268308

  18. Detection of Escherichia coli in sewage and sludge by polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yuli; Palmer, C.J.; Sangermano, L.R. )

    1993-02-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a powerful tool in exploration of microbial activities and identities in environmental microbiology. High concentrations of humic acidlike substances in raw sewage and raw sludge have prevented the use of PCR with sewage and sludge samples. However, monitoring waste water and sludge by the PCR would lead to increased public health protection. In this study a rapid DNA extraction method and rapid purification procedure are combined with the PCR to detect Escherichia coli in sewage and sludge. The PCR is successfully used to amplify from both, a fragment of the E. coli uidAgene that codes for [beta]-D-glucuronidase. Because of their sensitivity and specificity, the PCR and nonradioactive gene probe techniques can be used to detect potentially pathogenic microorganisms in raw sewage and sludge, allowing for evaluation of the efficiency of treatments to remove pathogens.

  19. Analysis of myosin heavy chain mRNA expression by RT-PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1997-01-01

    An assay was developed for rapid and sensitive analysis of myosin heavy chain (MHC) mRNA expression in rodent skeletal muscle. Only 2 microg of total RNA were necessary for the simultaneous analysis of relative mRNA expression of six different MHC genes. We designed synthetic DNA fragments as internal standards, which contained the relevant primer sequences for the adult MHC mRNAs type I, IIa, IIx, IIb as well as the embryonic and neonatal MHC mRNAs. A known amount of the synthetic fragment was added to each polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and yielded a product of different size than the amplified MHC mRNA fragment. The ratio of amplified MHC fragment to synthetic fragment allowed us to calculate percentages of the gene expression of the different MHC genes in a given muscle sample. Comparison with the traditional Northern blot analysis demonstrated that our reverse transcriptase-PCR-based assay was reliable, fast, and quantitative over a wide range of relative MHC mRNA expression in a spectrum of adult and neonatal rat skeletal muscles. Furthermore, the high sensitivity of the assay made it very useful when only small quantities of tissue were available. Statistical analysis of the signals for each MHC isoform across the analyzed samples showed a highly significant correlation between the PCR and the Northern signals as Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.77 and 0.96 (P < 0.005). This assay has potential use in analyzing small muscle samples such as biopsies and samples from pre- and/or neonatal stages of development.

  20. Prompt detection of influenza A and B viruses using the BD Veritor™ System Flu A+B, Quidel® Sofia® Influenza A+B FIA, and Alere BinaxNOW® Influenza A&B compared to real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).

    PubMed

    Dunn, Jim; Obuekwe, Joy; Baun, Traci; Rogers, Justin; Patel, Twinkle; Snow, Linda

    2014-05-01

    The performance characteristics of rapid influenza diagnostic tests vary widely. This study evaluated the BD Veritor™ System Flu A+B (Veritor; BD Diagnostics, Sparks, MD, USA), Quidel® Sofia® Influenza A+B FIA (Sofia; Quidel Corp., San Diego, CA, USA), and Alere BinaxNOW® Influenza A&B (Binax; Alere Scarborough, Inc., Scarborough, ME, USA) compared to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of influenza viruses in nasal wash specimens from 240 pediatric patients. Positive percent agreements for influenza A and B virus detection were 93.8% and 94.2%, 95.8% and 98.1%, and 79.2% and 80.8% for Veritor, Sofia, and Binax, respectively. The Veritor and Binax tests demonstrated negative percent agreements >97.9% for detection of both influenza viruses, but the negative percent agreement of the Sofia test was 91.1% for influenza A and 70.7% for influenza B virus. Overall, the Veritor and Sofia tests were nearly as sensitive as RT-PCR and considerably more sensitive than Binax for detection of influenza viruses. However, the accuracy of the Sofia test was significantly lower than either Veritor or Binax. PMID:24582581

  1. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) analyses of medicinally used Rheum species and their application for identification of Rhei Rhizoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong-Ye; Fushimi, Hirotoshi; Cai, Shao-Qing; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2004-05-01

    Previously, we have determined marker nucleotides on the chloroplast matK gene to identify Rheum palmatum, R. tanguticum and R. officinale used as Rhei Rhizoma officially. In the present study, we further developed a convenient and efficient identification method on the basis of marker nucleotides with Amplification Refractory Mutation System analysis. On the basis of the nucleotide substitutions at positions 367 and 937 among the three species on the matK gene, at each position two kinds of reverse primers with complementary 3'-terminal nucleotides were designed. Upon PCR amplification using three sets of primers and template DNA from each species, one or two fragments (202 bp or/and 770 bp) were detected. As the resultant three fragment profiles were species-specific, the procedure enabled us to classify the botanic origins of 22 drug samples of Rhei Rhizoma. PMID:15133241

  2. Evaluation of a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Scala, Alessia; Tagliabue, Claudia; Zampiero, Alberto; Bianchini, Sonia; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal swabs from 424 children were used to compare the performances of the new multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) RIDA®GENE Flu & RSV kit and monospecific RT-PCR assays in detecting respiratory syncytial and influenza viruses. The easy-to-use kit was highly sensitive and specific and is recommended for routine practice. PMID:26458277

  3. Polymerase Chain Reaction in the Diagnosis of Visceral Leishmaniasis Recurrence in the Setting of Negative Splenic Smears.

    PubMed

    Hasnain, Golam; Basher, Ariful; Nath, Proggananda; Ghosh, Prakash; Hossain, Faria; Hossain, Shakhawat; Mondal, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    This report presents two cases of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) recurrence where the microscopy of the splenic smear failed in diagnosis. However, a strong clinical suspicion compelled further evaluation by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which validated the etiology. This short report highlights the usefulness of PCR in diagnosing cases of suspected smear-negative VL recurrence. PMID:26556834

  4. Development and validation of a Myxoma virus real-time polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Albini, Sarah; Sigrist, Brigitte; Güttinger, Regula; Schelling, Claude; Hoop, Richard K; Vögtlin, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    To aid in the rapid diagnosis of myxomatosis in rabbits, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the specific detection of Myxoma virus is described. Primers and probe were designed to amplify a 147-bp fragment within the Serp2 gene. The assay was able to detect 23 copies of a synthesized oligo indicating a reliable sensitivity. In addition, the real-time PCR did not detect the Rabbit fibroma virus used in myxomatosis vaccines. The novel PCR was shown to be able to detect Myxoma virus in fresh and paraffin-embedded rabbit tissues originating from myxomatosis cases from various regions in Switzerland. PMID:22362943

  5. Primer Extension Reactions for the PCR- based α- complementation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Achuthan, Vasudevan; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    The PCR- based- α- complementation assay is an effective technique to measure the fidelity of polymerases, especially RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRP) and Reverse Transcriptases (RT). It has been successfully employed to determine the fidelity of the poliovirus polymerase 3D-pol (DeStefano, 2010) as well as the human immunodeficiency virus Reverse Transcriptase (HIV RT) (Achuthan et al., 2014). A major advantage of the assay is that since the PCR step is involved, even the low yield of products obtained after two rounds of low yield of RNA synthesis (for RDRP) or reverse transcription (for RT) can be measured using the assay. The assay also mimics the reverse transcription process, since both RNA- and DNA- directed RT synthesis steps are performed. We recently used this assay to show that the HIV RT, at physiologically relevant magnesium concentration, has accuracy in the same range as other reverse transcriptases (Achuthan et al., 2014). Here, we describe in detail how to prepare the inserts using the primer extension reactions. The prepared inserts are then processed further in the PCR- based- α- complementation assay.

  6. A method for correcting standard-based real-time PCR DNA quantitation when the standard's polymerase reaction efficiency is significantly different from that of the unknown's

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Standard-based real-time, or quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) quantitation of an unknown sample’s DNA concentration (i.e., [DNA]-unk) assumes that the concentration dependence of the standard and unknown reactions (related to reaction efficiency, E) are equivalent. In our work with ba...

  7. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction method for differentiating western and northern corn rootworm larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Roehrdanz, Richard L

    2003-06-01

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, and northern corn rootworm, D. barberi Smith and Lawrence, are sympatric species and serious pests of corn cultivation in North America. Comparison of nucleotide sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and II was used to design polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers that discriminate immature stages of the two species based on differences in amplicon size. Multiplex PCR can be used to give a positive test for each species in a single amplification reaction. This provides a method to identify field caught larvae and facilitates investigations of larval interaction and competition between the species. PMID:12852603

  8. Use of polymerase chain reaction-amplified Helicobacter pylori urease structural genes for differentiation of isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Foxall, P A; Hu, L T; Mobley, H L

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been demonstrated as an etiologic agent of human gastritis and peptic ulcer formation. However, there is no straightforward basis to distinguish different isolates. We used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify the urease structural subunit genes, ureA and ureB, which, when digested with appropriate restriction endonucleases, allow the differentiation of patterns on agarose gels. PCR amplification was possible with DNA rapidly extracted from H. pylori by alkaline lysis and phenol-chloroform. The 2.4-kb PCR products amplified from 22 clinical isolates and subjected to HaeII restriction endonuclease digestion produced 10 distinct patterns on agarose gels, with two patterns being shared between five and six strains. PCR amplification of the urease genes may enable the differentiation of closely related H. pylori strains by restriction digest analysis of PCR-amplified ureA and ureB genes. Images PMID:1313051

  9. Ribosomal RNA-based panbacterial polymerase chain reaction for rapid diagnosis of septicaemia in Intensive Care Unit patients.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mahua Das; Kaur, Harsimran; Ray, Pallab; Gautam, Vikas; Puri, G D

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of sepsis by appropriate antibiotics is of utmost importance. Therefore, we evaluated 16S rRNA panbacterial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for rapid diagnosis of sepsis in 49 adult patients in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) and compared it with an automated blood culture. 8 ml of 10 ml blood collected was inoculated into BACTEC® aerobic bottle and the remaining 2 ml was used for DNA extraction and PCR. 109 of 115 (93%) episodes of suspected sepsis showed concordant results between automated culture and PCR. Six episodes were positive by PCR only. Panbacterial PCR reduces turnaround time with rapid differentiation between systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis. PMID:27080778

  10. Chain-reaction crash on a highway in high visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    We study the chain-reaction crash (multiple-vehicle collision) in high-visibility condition on a highway. In the traffic situation, drivers control their vehicles by both gear-changing and braking. Drivers change the gears according to the headway and brake according to taillights of the forward vehicle. We investigate whether or not the first collision induces the chain-reaction crash numerically. It is shown that dynamic transitions occur from no collisions, through a single collision, to multiple collisions with decreasing the headway. Also, we find that the dynamic transition occurs from the finite chain reaction to the infinite chain reaction when the headway is less than the critical value. We compare the multiple-vehicle collisions in high-visibility with that in low-visibility. We derive the transition points and the region maps for the chain-reaction crash in high visibility.

  11. POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (PCR) TECHNOLOGY IN VISUAL BEACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2000, the US Congress passed the Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act under which the EPA has the mandate to manage all significant public beaches by 2008. As a result, EPA, USGS and NOAA are developing the Visual Beach program which consists of software eq...

  12. Leptospirosis diagnosis by immunocapture polymerase chain reaction: a new tool for early diagnosis and epidemiologic surveillance.

    PubMed

    Balassiano, Ilana Teruszkin; Vital-Brazil, Juliana Magalhães; Pereira, Martha Maria

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an immunocapture polymerase chain reaction (IC-PCR) protocol for leptospirosis. For the standardization of IC-PCR, polyclonal (AS) and monoclonal (MAb) antibodies against different serogroups and serovars of Leptospira were coupled to polystyrene plates. Human sera were artificially contaminated with leptospires and incubated on plates. The bacterial DNA was obtained and used in a multiplex PCR. Sensitivity was tested using sera contaminated with crescent concentrations of leptospires, while specificity was established using sera contaminated with different bacterial genera and sera obtained from patients positive for viral infections. IC-PCR using AS was able to recognize specific serogroups, although some cross-reactions have been observed. No cross-reactions were observed when MAbs were used; however, the sensitivity in this case was lower than that of IC-PCR using AS. IC-PCR proved to be specific to Leptospira and is a promising tool for early diagnosis of leptospirosis, providing additional information about the infecting serovar or serogroup. PMID:22770775

  13. Rapid polymerase chain reaction diagnosis of white-nose syndrome in bats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorch, J.M.; Gargas, A.; Meteyer, C.U.; Berlowski-Zier, B. M.; Green, D.E.; Shearn-Bochsler, V.; Thomas, N.J.; Blehert, D.S.

    2010-01-01

    A newly developed polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method to rapidly and specifically detect Geomyces destructans on the wings of infected bats from small quantities (1-2 mg) of tissue is described in the current study (methods for culturing and isolating G. destructans from bat skin are also described). The lower limits of detection for PCR were 5 fg of purified fungal DNA or 100 conidia per 2 mg of wing tissue. By using histology as the standard, the PCR had a diagnostic specificity of 100% and a diagnostic sensitivity of 96%, whereas the diagnostic sensitivity of culture techniques was only 54%. The accuracy and fast turnaround time of PCR provides field biologists with valuable information on infection status more rapidly than traditional methods, and the small amount of tissue required for the test would allow diagnosis of white-nose syndrome in live animals.

  14. Analysis of BRCA2 loss of heterozygosity in tumor tissue using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Rory L; Cravero, Karen; Chu, David; Erlanger, Bracha; Toro, Patricia Valda; Beaver, Julia A; Zabransky, Daniel J; Wong, Hong Yuen; Cidado, Justin; Croessmann, Sarah; Parsons, Heather A; Kim, Minsoo; Wheelan, Sarah J; Argani, Pedram; Park, Ben Ho

    2014-07-01

    Loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) analysis of archival tumor tissue can aid in determining the clinical significance of BRCA variants. Here we describe an approach for assessing LOH in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues using variant-specific probes and droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR). We evaluated LOH in 2 related breast cancer patients harboring a rare missense BRCA2 variant of unknown clinical significance (c.6966G>T; M2322I). Conventional PCR followed by Sanger sequencing suggested a change in allelic abundance in the FFPE specimens. However, we found no evidence of LOH as determined by the allelic ratio (wild type-variant) for BRCA2 in both patients' archival tumor specimens and adjacent normal control tissues using ddPCR. In summary, these experiments demonstrate the utility of ddPCR to quickly and accurately assess LOH in archival FFPE tumor tissue. PMID:24824029

  15. Magnetic hydrophilic methacrylate-based polymer microspheres designed for polymerase chain reactions applications.

    PubMed

    Spanová, Alena; Horák, Daniel; Soudková, Eva; Rittich, Bohuslav

    2004-02-01

    Magnetic hydrophilic non-porous P(HEMA-co-EDMA), P(HEMA-co-GMA) and PGMA microspheres were prepared by dispersion (co)polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) or glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) in the presence of several kinds of magnetite. It was found that some components used in the preparation of magnetic carriers interfered with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Influence of non-magnetic and magnetic microspheres, including magnetite nanoparticles and various components used in their synthesis, on the PCR course was thus investigated. DNA isolated from bacterial cells of Bifidobacterium longum was used in PCR evaluation of non-interfering magnetic microspheres. The method enabled verification of the incorporation of magnetite nanoparticles in the particular methacrylate-based polymer microspheres and evaluation of suitability of their application in PCR. Preferably, electrostatically stabilized colloidal magnetite (ferrofluid) should be used in the design of new magnetic methacrylate-based microspheres by dispersion polymerization. PMID:14698232

  16. Preparation of 13C/15N-labeled oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian; Gupta, Goutam; Bradbury, E. Morton

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled DNA oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR based method for uniform (.sup.13 C/.sup.15 N)-labeling of DNA duplexes is described. Multiple copies of a blunt-ended duplex are cloned into a plasmid, each copy containing the sequence of interest and restriction Hinc II sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. PCR using bi-directional primers and uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled dNTP precursors generates labeled DNA duplexes containing multiple copies of the sequence of interest. Twenty-four cycles of PCR, followed by restriction and purification, gave the uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled duplex sequence with a 30% yield. Such labeled duplexes find significant applications in multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  17. Single primer-mediated circular polymerase chain reaction for hairpin DNA cloning and plasmid editing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiansheng; Khan, Inamullah; Liu, Rui; Yang, Yan; Zhu, Naishuo

    2016-05-01

    We developed and validated a universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, single primer circular (SPC)-PCR, using single primer to simultaneously insert and amplify a short hairpin sequence into a vector with a high success rate. In this method, the hairpin structure is divided into two parts and fused into a vector by PCR. Then, a single primer is used to cyclize the chimera into a mature short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector. It is not biased by loop length or palindromic structures. Six hairpin DNAs with short 4-nucleotide loops were successfully cloned. Moreover, SPC-PCR was also applied to plasmid editing within 3 h with a success rate higher than 95%. PMID:26792375

  18. Rapid identification of mycobacteria to the species level by polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Telenti, A; Marchesi, F; Balz, M; Bally, F; Böttger, E C; Bodmer, T

    1993-01-01

    A method for the rapid identification of mycobacteria to the species level was developed on the basis of evaluation by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the gene encoding for the 65-kDa protein. The method involves restriction enzyme analysis of PCR products obtained with primers common to all mycobacteria. Using two restriction enzymes, BstEII and HaeIII, medically relevant and other frequent laboratory isolates were differentiated to the species or subspecies level by PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis. PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis was performed on isolates (n = 330) from solid and fluid culture media, including BACTEC, or from frozen and lyophilized stocks. The procedure does not involve hybridization steps or the use of radioactivity and can be completed within 1 working day. Images PMID:8381805

  19. G-quadruplex-generating polymerase chain reaction for visual colorimetric detection of amplicons.

    PubMed

    Bhadra, Sanchita; Codrea, Vlad; Ellington, Andrew D

    2014-01-15

    We have developed a self-reporting polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system for visual colorimetric gene detection and distinction of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Amplification is performed using target-specific primers modified with a 5'-end tail that is complementary to a G-quadruplex deoxyribozyme-forming sequence. At end-point, G-quadruplexes are forced to fold from PCR-generated duplex DNA and then are used to colorimetrically report the successful occurrence of PCR by assaying their peroxidase activity using a chromogenic substrate. Furthermore, primer design considerations for the G-quadruplex-generating PCR system have allowed us to visually distinguish SNPs associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance alleles. PMID:24135653

  20. Real-Time Reverse Transcription–Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for SARS-associated Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Shannon L.; Bowen, Michael D.; Newton, Bruce R.; Winchell, Jonas M.; Meyer, Richard F.; Tong, Suxiang; Cook, Byron T.; Holloway, Brian P.; McCaustland, Karen A.; Rota, Paul A.; Bankamp, Bettina; Lowe, Luis E.; Ksiazek, Tom G.; Bellini, William J.; Anderson, Larry J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed to rapidly detect the severe acute respiratory syndrome–associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The assay, based on multiple primer and probe sets located in different regions of the SARS-CoV genome, could discriminate SARS-CoV from other human and animal coronaviruses with a potential detection limit of <10 genomic copies per reaction. The real-time RT-PCR assay was more sensitive than a conventional RT-PCR assay or culture isolation and proved suitable to detect SARS-CoV in clinical specimens. Application of this assay will aid in diagnosing SARS-CoV infection. PMID:15030703

  1. Comparison of proteases in DNA extraction via quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Eychner, Alison M; Lebo, Roberta J; Elkins, Kelly M

    2015-06-01

    We compared four proteases in the QIAamp DNA Investigator Kit (Qiagen) to extract DNA for use in multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. The aim was to evaluate alternate proteases for improved DNA recovery as compared with proteinase K for forensic, biochemical research, genetic paternity and immigration, and molecular diagnostic purposes. The Quantifiler Kit TaqMan quantitative PCR assay was used to measure the recovery of DNA from human blood, semen, buccal cells, breastmilk, and earwax in addition to low-template samples, including diluted samples, computer keyboard swabs, chewing gum, and cigarette butts. All methods yielded amplifiable DNA from all samples. PMID:25197027

  2. [Real-time polymerase chain reaction in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Salina, T Iu; Morozova, T I

    2008-01-01

    To enhance the efficiency of diagnosis of oligo- and abacillar pulmonary tuberculosis and its differential diagnosis with other lung diseases, the authors studied the informative value of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) used in 62 patients with different clinical forms of tuberculosis and 108 differentially diagnostic patients. Real-time PCR has been ascertained to be a significantly more sensitive and highly specific tool in tuberculosis diagnosis, which considerably improves the specific recognition of the etiology of a pathogenetic process in oligo- and abacillar patients. Particularly encouraging results have been obtained when examining differentially diagnostic patients with the rounded shadows being formed in the lung. PMID:18710048

  3. Effect of vehicular size on chain-reaction crash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    We present the dynamic model of the chain-reaction crash to take account of the vehicular size. Drivers brake according to taillights of the forward vehicle. We investigate the effect of the vehicular size on the chain-reaction crash (multiple-vehicle collision) in the traffic flow controlled by taillights. In the multiple-vehicle collision, the first crash induces more collisions. We investigate how the first collision induces the chain-reaction crash numerically. We derive, analytically, the transition points and the region maps for the chain-reaction crash in the traffic flow of vehicles with finite sizes. We clarify the effect of the vehicular size on the multiple-vehicle collision.

  4. Detection of Enterococcus faecalis in Necrotic Teeth Root Canals by Culture and Polymerase Chain Reaction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cogulu, Dilsah; Uzel, Atac; Oncag, Ozant; Aksoy, Semiha C.; Eronat, Cemal

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Enterococcus faecalis in endodontic infections in both deciduous and permanent teeth by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Methods A total of 145 children aged 5–13 years old were involved in this study. The presence of E. faecalis in necrotic deciduous and permanent teeth root canals was studied using culture and polymerase chain reaction methods. Results Among 145 molar teeth, 57% (n=83) presented necrotic asymptomatic pulp tissues and were included in this study. Culture and PCR methods detected the test species in 18 and 22 of 83 teeth involved, respectively. E. faecalis was cultured from 8 (18%) of 45 necrotic deciduous teeth and from 10 (26%) of 38 necrotic permanent teeth. PCR detection identified the target species in 10 (22%) and 12 (32%) of necrotic deciduous and permanent teeth respectively. Statistically significant difference in the presence of E. faecalis in deciduous and permanent teeth was found by culture and PCR methods (P=0.03 and 0.02, respectively). The difference in the presence of E. faecalis between two different methods was not statistically significant (P>.05). Conclusions The results of the present study confirm that both culture and PCR methods are sensitive to detect E. faecalis in root canals. PMID:19212470

  5. Immunohistochemistry and Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection Human Papilloma Virus in Warts: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Sun; Lee, Ji Hyun; Choo, Ji Yoon; Byun, Hee Jin; Jun, Jin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are the most widely used methods for the detection of viruses. PCR is known to be a more sensitive and specific method than the immunohistochemical method at this time, but PCR has the disadvantages of high cost and skilled work to use widely. With the progress of technology, the immunohistochemical methods used in these days has come to be highly sensitive and actively used in the diagnostic fields. Objective To evaluate and compare the usefulness of immunohistochemistry and PCR for detection human papilloma virus (HPV) in wart lesions. Methods Nine biopsy samples of verruca vulgaris and 10 of condyloma accuminatum were examined. Immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibody to HPV L1 capsid protein and PCR were done for the samples. DNA sequencing of the PCR products and HPV genotyping were also done. Results HPV detection rate was 78.9% (88.9% in verruca vulgaris, 70.0% in condyloma accuminatum) on immunohistochemistry and 100.0% for PCR. HPV-6 genotype showed a lower positivity rate on immunohistochemistry (50.0%) as compared to that of the other HPV genotypes. Conclusion Immunohistochemistry for HPV L1 capsid protein showed comparable sensitivity for detection HPV. Considering the high cost and great effort needed for the PCR methods, we can use immunohistochemistry for HPV L1 capsid protein with the advantage of lower cost and simple methods for HPV detection. PMID:27489431

  6. Use of polymerase chain reaction in human African trypanosomiasis stage determination and follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Truc, P.; Jamonneau, V.; Cuny, G.; Frézil, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    Stage determination of human African trypanosomiasis is based on the detection of parasites and measurements of biological changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (concentration of white blood cells > 5 cells per mm3 and increased total protein levels). The patient is treated accordingly. Demonstration of the absence or presence of trypanosomes by the double centrifugation technique is still the only test available to clinicians for assessing treatment success. In this study, however, we evaluate the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a tool for assessing the disease stage of trypanosomiasis and for determining whether treatment has been successful. All 15 study patients considered to be in the advanced stage of the disease were PCR positive; however, trypanosomes were demonstrated by double centrifugation in only 11 patients. Of the five remaining patients, who were considered to be in the early stage, PCR and double centrifugation were negative. Following treatment, 13 of the 15 second-stage patients were found to be negative for the disease in at least two samples by PCR and double centrifugation. Two others were still positive by PCR immediately and one month after the treatment. Trypanosome DNA detection using PCR suggested that the two positive patients were not cured but that their possible relapse could not be identified by a search for parasites using the double centrifugation technique. Further evaluation of the PCR method is required, in particular to determine whether PCR assays could be used in studies on patients who fail to respond to melarsoprol, as observed in several foci. PMID:10534898

  7. Routine application of the polymerase chain reaction for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical samples.

    PubMed Central

    Noordhoek, G T; Kaan, J A; Mulder, S; Wilke, H; Kolk, A H

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To investigate the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the routine laboratory for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical samples. METHODS--Samples were divided and processed separately for the detection of M tuberculosis by microscopy, culture and PCR. After DNA extraction, PCR was performed with primers specific for the insertion element IS6110 and the product was analysed by agarose gel electrophoresis, Southern blotting or dot blotting and hybridisation with a digoxigenin labelled internal probe. Each sample was tested for inhibitors of Taq polymerase with the aid of an internal control. Multiple negative and positive controls were used to monitor each step of the procedure. RESULTS--The data from two laboratories, using the same operating procedures, were combined. Of 1957 specimens, 79 (4%) were culture and PCR positive, while 1839 (93.9%) were negative in both tests. Thirty specimens (1.5%) were PCR positive only and nine (0.5%) were culture positive but PCR negative. CONCLUSION--Using culture and clinical history as the gold standard, sensitivity and specificity for PCR were 92.1% and 99.8%, respectively. With elaborate precautions, PCR is a suitable and reliable method for the detection of M tuberculosis in clinical samples in a routine microbiology laboratory. Images PMID:7490312

  8. A METHOD TO REMOVE ENVIRONMENTAL INHIBITORS PRIOR TO THE DETECTION OF WATERBORNE ENTERIC VIRUSES BY REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION-POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed to remove environmental inhibitors from sample concentrates prior to detection of human enteric viruses using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Environmental inhibitors, concentrated along with viruses during water sample processi...

  9. Identification of duck plague virus by polymerase chain reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, W.R.; Brown, Sean E.; Nashold, S.W.; Knudson, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detecting duck plague virus. A 765-bp EcoRI fragment cloned from the genome of the duck plague vaccine (DP-VAC) virus was sequenced for PCR primer development. The fragment sequence was found by GenBank alignment searches to be similar to the 3a?? ends of an undefined open reading frame and the gene for DNA polymerase protein in other herpesviruses. Three of four primer sets were found to be specific for the DP-VAC virus and 100% (7/7) of field isolates but did not amplify DNA from inclusion body disease of cranes virus. The specificity of one primer set was tested with genome templates from other avian herpesviruses, including those from a golden eagle, bald eagle, great horned owl, snowy owl, peregrine falcon, prairie falcon, pigeon, psittacine, and chicken (infectious laryngotracheitis), but amplicons were not produced. Hence, this PCR test is highly specific for duck plague virus DNA. Two primer sets were able to detect 1 fg of DNA from the duck plague vaccine strain, equivalent to five genome copies. In addition, the ratio of tissue culture infectious doses to genome copies of duck plague vaccine virus from infected duck embryo cells was determined to be 1:100, making the PCR assay 20 times more sensitive than tissue culture for detecting duck plague virus. The speed, sensitivity, and specificity of this PCR provide a greatly improved diagnostic and research tool for studying the epizootiology of duck plague. /// Se desarroll?? una prueba de reacci??n en cadena por la polimerasa para detectar el virus de la peste del pato. Un fragmento EcoRI de 765 pares de bases clonado del genoma del virus vacunal de la peste del pato fue secuenciado para la obtenci??n de los iniciadores de la prueba de la reacci??n en cadena por la polimerasa. En investigaciones de alineaci??n en el banco de genes ('GenBank') se encontr?? que la secuencia del fragmento era similar a los extremos 3a?? de un marco de lectura abierto

  10. Immunomagnetic Separation Combined with Polymerase Chain Reaction for the Detection of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris in Apple Juice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhouli; Wang, Jun; Yue, Tianli; Yuan, Yahong; Cai, Rui; Niu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    A combination of immunomagnetic separation (IMS) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris (A. acidoterrestris) in apple juice. The optimum technological parameters of the IMS system were investigated. The results indicated that the immunocapture reactions could be finished in 60 min and the quantity of IMPs used for IMS was 2.5 mg/mL. Then the combined IMS-PCR procedure was assessed by detecting A. acidoterrestris in apple juice samples. The agarose gel electrophoresis results of 20 different strains showed that the IMS-PCR procedure presented high specificity to the A. acidoterrestris. The sensitivity of the IMS-PCR was 2×101 CFU/mL and the total detection time was 3 to 4 h. Of the 78 naturally contaminated apple juice samples examined, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of IMS-PCR compared with the standardized pour plate method were 90.9%, 97.0% and 96.2%, respectively. The results exhibited that the developed IMS-PCR method will be a valuable tool for detecting A. acidoterrestris and improving food quality in juice samples. PMID:24349270

  11. MAMMALIAN DNA IN PCR REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ancient DNA analysis is becoming widespread. These studies use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify minute quantities of heavily damaged template. Unusual steps are taken to achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect ancient DNA, including high- cycle PCR amplification t...

  12. A noncontact temperature measurement method in polymerase chain reaction reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochivko, D. G.; Varlamov, D. A.; Fedorov, A. A.; Kurochkin, V. E.

    2016-04-01

    A new noncontact method for measuring temperatures of liquids, which is based on the fluorescent probes, is proposed. The method is intended for measuring temperatures of reaction media in reactors of devices for polymerase chain reactions in real time and can be used for determining dynamic temperature parameters.

  13. Micromachined polymerase chain reaction system for multiple DNA amplification of upper respiratory tract infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chia-Sheng; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chang, Chih-Ching; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Huang, Fu-Chun; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2005-01-15

    This paper presents a micro polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for the DNA-based diagnosis of microorganism genes and the detection of their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The micro PCR chip comprises cheap biocompatible soda-lime glass substrates with integrated thin-film platinum resistors as heating/sensing elements, and is fabricated using micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) techniques in a reliable batch-fabrication process. The heating and temperature sensing elements are made of the same material and are located inside the reaction chamber in order to ensure a uniform temperature distribution. This study performs the detection of several genes associated with upper respiratory tract infection microorganisms, i.e. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemopilus influenze, Staphylococcu aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Neisseria meningitides, together with their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The lower thermal inertia of the proposed micro PCR chip relative to conventional bench-top PCR systems enables a more rapid detection operation with reduced sample and reagent consumption. The experimental data reveal that the high heating and cooling rates of the system (20 and 10 degrees C/s, respectively) permit successful DNA amplification within 15 min. The micro PCR chip is also capable of performing multiple DNA amplification, i.e. the simultaneous duplication of multiple genes under different conditions in separate reaction wells. Compared with the large-scale PCR system, it is greatly advantageous for fast diagnosis of multiple infectious diseases. Multiplex PCR amplification of two DNA segments in the same well is also feasible using the proposed micro device. The developed micro PCR chip provides a crucial tool for genetic analysis, molecular biology, infectious disease detection, and many other biomedical applications. PMID:15590288

  14. Cell-based polymerase chain reaction for canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    SETTHAWONGSIN, Chanokchon; TECHANGAMSUWAN, Somporn; TANGKAWATTANA, Sirikachorn; RUNGSIPIPAT, Anudep

    2016-01-01

    Canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is the only naturally contagious tumor that is transmitted during coitus or social behaviors. Based on the tumor’s location, the diagnosis of genital TVT (GTVT) is comparably easier than those in the extragenital area (ETVT) that are more easily incorrectly diagnosed. Fortunately, CTVT cells contain a specific long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE), inserted upstream of the myc gene, allowing a diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based detection assay. The objectives of this study were aimed to improve the diagnostic accuracy by applying the diagnostic LINE1-c-myc PCR assay and fine needle aspiration (FNA) collection in direct comparison with standard cytological and histopathological analyses. Seventy-four dogs, comprised of 41 and 31 dogs with tumor masses at their external genitalia and extragenital areas (e.g. skin and nasal cavity), respectively, were included in this study. The signalment of these 65 dogs and clinical history of 20 client-owned dogs were collected. Samples were taken by biopsy for both histopathological examination and FNA for cytological examination and diagnostic PCR. The PCR products from 10 apparently CTVT samples were purified and sequenced. Sixty-one CTVT cases were diagnosed by cytological and histological analyses, but 65 were positive by the PCR assay. Overall, the PCR assay improved the accuracy of diagnostic CTVT results, especially for the more difficult ETVT tumors. Moreover, this PCR-based approach can facilitate the decision as to discontinue chemotherapy by discrimination between residual tumor cell masses and fibrotic tissue. PMID:27075116

  15. Polymerase chain reaction for detection of herpesvirus simiae (B virus) in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Slomka, M J; Brown, D W; Clewley, J P; Bennett, A M; Harrington, L; Kelly, D C

    1993-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was designed which is specific to Macaca fascicularis (cynomolgus monkey) isolates of B virus. The PCR primers produced the expected 188 basepair product from the Cyno 2 strain and seven other cynomolgus monkey isolates of B virus. Oligomer hybridization with a 31-mer oligonucleotide was used to confirm the origin of this product. The PCR failed to amplify DNA of Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, varicella-zoster virus, and other alphaherpesviruses (herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, four SA 8 isolates and three rhesus isolates of B virus). PCR testing of swabs obtained from four orally-infected cynomolgus monkeys confirmed the presence of B virus DNA in samples previously shown to be positive by culture. In addition, PCR detected B virus in several swabs from infected monkeys that were culture negative. Total DNA extracts from the trigeminal and sacral ganglia of these animals were tested by nested PCR and B virus DNA was detected in the trigeminal ganglia of 3 of the 4 orally-infected cynomolgus monkeys. Nested PCR did not detect B virus DNA in total DNA extracts obtained from the brains of the four monkeys. PMID:8392323

  16. Identification of Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar cysts in stool by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Sanuki, J; Asai, T; Okuzawa, E; Kobayashi, S; Takeuchi, T

    1997-01-01

    An attempt to identify cysts of Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar in human stool was conducted by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using two sets of primers (p11 plus p12 and p13 plus p14) specific for either species of ameba. The cysts in stool specimens obtained from 12 infected individuals were concentrated, freeze-thawed, and treated with Triton X-100 before their examination by PCR. The results of PCR on the cysts were generally consistent with data obtained by PCR on ameba trophozoites hatched from the cysts, by zymodeme analysis, and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and with clinical findings. This PCR was negative for the stool containing large numbers of cysts of either E. coli, E. hartmanni, or Giardia lamblia as well as for the stool specimens obtained from uninfected individuals. The ameba cyst in stool processed using the present method was effective for the PCR analysis even after 1 month of storage at 4 degrees C. The present PCR was sensitive enough to detect ten cysts of either of the amebae. PMID:9000244

  17. Cell-based polymerase chain reaction for canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Setthawongsin, Chanokchon; Techangamsuwan, Somporn; Tangkawattana, Sirikachorn; Rungsipipat, Anudep

    2016-08-01

    Canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is the only naturally contagious tumor that is transmitted during coitus or social behaviors. Based on the tumor's location, the diagnosis of genital TVT (GTVT) is comparably easier than those in the extragenital area (ETVT) that are more easily incorrectly diagnosed. Fortunately, CTVT cells contain a specific long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE), inserted upstream of the myc gene, allowing a diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based detection assay. The objectives of this study were aimed to improve the diagnostic accuracy by applying the diagnostic LINE1-c-myc PCR assay and fine needle aspiration (FNA) collection in direct comparison with standard cytological and histopathological analyses. Seventy-four dogs, comprised of 41 and 31 dogs with tumor masses at their external genitalia and extragenital areas (e.g. skin and nasal cavity), respectively, were included in this study. The signalment of these 65 dogs and clinical history of 20 client-owned dogs were collected. Samples were taken by biopsy for both histopathological examination and FNA for cytological examination and diagnostic PCR. The PCR products from 10 apparently CTVT samples were purified and sequenced. Sixty-one CTVT cases were diagnosed by cytological and histological analyses, but 65 were positive by the PCR assay. Overall, the PCR assay improved the accuracy of diagnostic CTVT results, especially for the more difficult ETVT tumors. Moreover, this PCR-based approach can facilitate the decision as to discontinue chemotherapy by discrimination between residual tumor cell masses and fibrotic tissue. PMID:27075116

  18. Clinical application of a polymerase chain reaction assay in the diagnosis of pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi in a horse.

    PubMed

    Vivrette, S L; Sellon, D C; Gibbons, D S

    2000-11-01

    Diagnosis of pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi can be made more rapidly by use of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay than by use of conventional bacteriologic culture techniques. Use of a PCR assay aids in the differentiation between virulent and avirulent strains of R equi, and the assay may be used to identify R equi in feces and soil of breeding farms. PMID:11061388

  19. Predictive role of polymerase chain reaction in the early diagnosis of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Elsa B; Rivero, Rocío; De Rissio, Ana María; Malagrino, Nora; Esteva, Mónica I; Riarte, Adelina Rosa; Ruiz, Andrés Mariano

    2014-09-01

    The efficacy of specific chemotherapy in congenital Chagas disease before the first year of life ranges between 90 and 100%. Between this age and 15 years of age, the efficacy decreases to around 60%. Therefore, early infection detection is a priority in vertical transmission. The aim of this work was to assess whether polymerase chain reaction (PCR) plays a predictive role in the diagnosis of congenital Chagas disease as compared to conventional parasitological and serological methods. To this end, we studied a total of 468 children born to Trypanosoma cruzi seroreactive mothers came from Argentina, Bolivia and Paraguay, who lived in the city of Buenos Aires and suburban areas (Argentina), a non-endemic area of this country. These children were assessed by PCR from 2004 to 2009 with the specific primers Tcz1 and Tcz2, and 121 and 122. PCR allowed detecting 49 T. cruzi-positive children. Eight of these 49 children were excluded from the analysis: six because they did not complete follow-up and two because the first control was performed after 12 months of age. Parasitological methods allowed detecting 25 positive children, 7 of whom had been earlier diagnosed by PCR (1.53±2.00 vs. 6.71±1.46 months; p=0.0002). Serological methods allowed detecting 16 positive children, 12 of whom had been earlier diagnosed by PCR (1.46±1.48 vs. 11.77±4.40 months; p<0.0001). None of the children negative by PCR was positive by serological or parasitological methods. This study shows that PCR allows early diagnosis in congenital Chagas disease. At present, an early positive PCR is not indicative for treatment. However, a positive PCR would alert the health system to search only those infected infants diagnosed by early PCR and thus generate greater efficiency in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital T. cruzi infection. PMID:24892867

  20. Plasmid Copy Number Determination by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Anindyajati; Artarini, A Anita; Riani, Catur; Retnoningrum, Debbie S

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant therapeutic proteins are biopharmaceutical products that develop rapidly for years. Recombinant protein production in certain hosts requires vector expression harboring the gene encoding the corresponding protein. Escherichia coli is the prokaryote organism mostly used in recombinant protein production, commonly using a plasmid as the expression vector. Recombinant protein production is affected by plasmid copy number harboring the encoded gene, hence the determination of plasmid copy number also plays an important role in establishing a recombinant protein production system. On the industrial scale, a low copy number of plasmids are more suitable due to their better stability. In the previous study we constructed pCAD, a plasmid derived from the low copy number pBR322 plasmid. This study was aimed to confirm pCAD's copy number by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Plasmid copy number was determined by comparing the quantification signal from the plasmid to those from the chromosome. Copy number was then calculated by using a known copy number plasmid as a standard. Two pairs of primers, called tdk and ori, were designed for targeting a single gene tdk in the chromosome and a conserved domain in the plasmid's ori, respectively. Primer quality was analyzed in silico using PrimerSelect DNASTAR and PraTo software prior to in vitro evaluation on primer specificity and efficiency as well as optimization of qPCR conditions. Plasmid copy number determination was conducted on E. coli lysates harboring each plasmid, with the number of cells ranging from 10(2)-10(5) cells/μL. Cells were lysed by incubation at 95ºC for 10 minutes, followed by immediate freezing at -4°C. pBR322 plasmid with the copy number of ~19 copies/cell was used as the standard, while pJExpress414-sod plasmid possessing the high copy number pUC ori was also determined to test the method being used. In silico analysis based on primer-primer and primer-template interactions showed

  1. Decapitation Improves Detection of Wolbachia pipientis (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae) in Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) Mosquitoes by the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    BECKMANN, J. F.; FALLON, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is often used to detect microorganisms, pathogens, or both, including the reproductive parasite Wolbachia pipientis (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae), in mosquitoes. Natural populations of Culex pipiens L. (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes are infected with one or more strains of W. pipientis, and crosses between mosquitoes harboring different Wolbachia strains provide one of the best-known examples of cytoplasmic incompatibililty (CI). When we used PCR to monitor Wolbachia in the Buckeye strain of Culex pipiens, and in a Wolbachia-cured sister colony obtained by tetracycline treatment, we noted false negative PCR reactions with DNA samples from infected mosquitoes; these results were inconsistent with direct microscopic observation of Wolbachia-like particles in gonads dissected from mosquitoes in the same population. Assays with diluted template often improved detection of positive samples, suggesting that DNA prepared from whole mosquitoes contained an inhibitor of the PCR reaction. We reconciled discrepancies between PCR and microscopy by systematic measurement of the PCR reaction in the presence of an internal standard. Mosquito decapitation before DNA extraction restored the reliability of the PCR reaction, allowing accurate determination of Wolbachia infection status in infected and tetracycline-cured mosquito populations, consistent with microscopic examination. Using PCR primers based on the Tr1 gene, we confirmed that the Wolbachia infection in the Buckeye strain of Culex pipiens belongs to the genotype designated wPip1. Finally, to explore more widely the distribution of PCR inhibitors, we demonstrated that DNA isolated from the cricket, Acheta domesticus (L.); the beetle, Tenebrio molitor L.; the honey bee, Apis mellifera L.; and the mosquito, Anopheles punctipennis Say also contained PCR inhibitors. These results underscore the importance of measuring the presence of inhibitors in PCR templates by using a known positive

  2. Tissue extraction of DNA and RNA and analysis by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D P; Lewis, F A; Taylor, G R; Boylston, A W; Quirke, P

    1990-01-01

    Several DNA extraction techniques were quantitatively and qualitatively compared using both fresh and paraffin wax embedded tissue and their suitability investigated for providing DNA and RNA for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A one hour incubation with proteinase K was the most efficient DNA extraction procedure for fresh tissue. For paraffin wax embedded tissue a five day incubation with proteinase K was required to produce good yields of DNA. Incubation with sodium dodecyl sulphate produced very poor yields, while boiling produced 20% as much DNA as long enzyme digestion. DNA extracted by these methods was suitable for the PCR amplification of a single copy gene. Proteinase K digestion also produced considerable amounts of RNA which has previously been shown to be suitable for PCR analysis. A delay before fixation had no effect on the amount of DNA obtained while fixation in Carnoy's reagent results in a much better preservation of DNA than formalin fixation, allowing greater yields to be extracted. Images PMID:1696290

  3. Detection of DNA sequence polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism genes by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Bell, D A

    1991-01-01

    The glutathione transferase mu gene (GST1) and the debrisoquine hydroxylase gene (CYP2D6) are known to be polymorphic in the human population and have been associated with increased susceptibility to cancer. Smokers with low lymphocyte GST mu activity are at higher risk for lung cancer, while low debrisoquine hydroxylase activity has been correlated with lower risk for lung and bladder cancer. Phenotypic characterization of these polymorphisms by lymphocyte enzyme activity (GST) and urine metabolite ratios (debrisoquine) is cumbersome for population studies. Recent cloning and sequencing of the mutant alleles of these genes has allowed genotyping via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Advantages of PCR approaches are speed, technical simplicity, and minimal sample requirements. This article reviews the PCR-based methods for detection of genetic polymorphisms in human cancer susceptibility genes. PMID:1684153

  4. [Use of the nested polymerase chain reaction in the differential diagnosis of human herpes simplex virus].

    PubMed

    Glukhov, A I; Gordeev, S A; Al'tshuler, M L; Severin, S E

    2003-02-01

    Herpes is one of the most widespread human viral pathologies. The article depicts a special modification of polymerized chain reaction--(PCR)--(referred to as "nested"), which has a higher sensitivity, specificity and reliability as compared to the ordinary PCR, and which is designed to detect the herpes viruses. The method was initially tested at purified preparation of viral DNA, and later--at clinical materials obtained from patients and healthy donors. Secretions from the urogenital tract (smears), scrapes from the urogenital tracts and urinal cellular samples were examined in patients. Herpes simplex was detected in all cases. As for the healthy people, the identical examinations produced in them mainly the negative findings. Therefore, the nested PCR is a simple, sensitive and effective instrument in the diagnostics and prevention of herpes; it can be recommended for a comprehensive usage in medical practice. PMID:12688217

  5. Pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Valadan, Reza; Amjadi, Omolbanin; Tehrani, Mohsen; Rafiei, Alireza; Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2015-09-15

    Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) provides a powerful tool for precise gene expression analysis. The accuracy of the results highly depends on careful selection of a reference gene for data normalization. HPRT1 (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase 1) is a frequently used housekeeping gene for normalizing relative expression values. However, the existence of processed pseudogenes for HPRT1 might interfere with reliable results obtained in qRT-PCR due to amplification of unintended products. Here, we designed a primer pair for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in qRT-PCR. We demonstrate that this primer pair specifically amplified HPRT1 messenger RNA (mRNA) sequence while avoiding coamplification of the pseudogenes. PMID:26050630

  6. A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction for identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Smith, Susan R.; Miyamoto, Amy; Shadduck, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detection and identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1, the causative agent of avian cholera in wild waterfowl. Arbitrarily primed PCR was used to detect DNA fragments that distinguish serotype 1 from the other 15 serotypes of P. multocida (with the exception of serotype 14). Oligonucleotide primers were constructed from these sequences, and a PCR assay was optimized and evaluated. PCR reactions consistently resulted in amplification products with reference strains 1 and 14 and all other serotype 1 strains tested, with cell numbers as low as 2.3 cells/ml. No amplification products were produced with other P. multocida serotypes or any other bacterial species tested. To compare the sensitivity and further test the specificity of this PCR assay with traditional culturing and serotyping techniques, tissue samples from 84 Pekin ducks inoculated with field strains of P. multocida and 54 wild lesser snow geese collected during an avian cholera outbreak were provided by other investigators working on avian cholera. PCR was as sensitive (58/64) as routine isolation (52/64) in detecting and identifying P. multocida serotype 1 from the livers of inoculated Pekins that became sick or died from avian cholera. No product was amplified from tissues of 20 other Pekin ducks that received serotypes other than type 1 (serotype 3, 12 × 3, or 10) or 12 control birds. Of the 54 snow geese necropsied and tested for P. multocida, our PCR detected and identified the bacteria from 44 compared with 45 by direct isolation. The serotype-specific PCR we developed was much faster and less labor intensive than traditional culturing and serotyping procedures and could result in diagnosis of serotype 1 pasteurellosis within 24 hr of specimen submission.

  7. A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction for identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.R.; Miyamoto, A.; Shadduck, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detection and identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1, the causative agent of avian cholera in wild waterfowl. Arbitrarily primed PCR was used to detect DNA fragments that distinguish serotype 1 from the other 15 serotypes of P. multocida (with the exception of serotype 14). Oligonucleotide primers were constructed from these sequences, and a PCR assay was optimized and evaluated. PCR reactions consistently resulted in amplification products with reference strains 1 and 14 and all other serotype 1 strains tested, with cell numbers as low as 2.3 cells/ml. No amplification products were produced with other P. multocida serotypes or any other bacterial species tested. To compare the sensitivity and further test the specificity of this PCR assay with traditional culturing and serotyping techniques, tissue samples from 84 Pekin ducks inoculated with field strains of P. multocida and 54 wild lesser snow geese collected during an avian cholera outbreak were provided by other investigators working on avian cholera. PCR was as sensitive (58/64) as routine isolation (52/64) in detecting and identifying P. multocida serotype 1 from the livers of inoculated Pekins that became sick or died from avian cholera. No product was amplified from tissues of 20 other Pekin ducks that received serotypes other than type 1 (serotype 3, 12 ?? 3, or 10) or 12 control birds. Of the 54 snow geese necropsied and tested for P. multocida, our PCR detected and identified the bacteria from 44 compared with 45 by direct isolation. The serotype-specific PCR we developed was much faster and less labor intensive than traditional culturing and serotyping procedures and could result in diagnosis of serotype 1 pasteurellosis within 24 hr of specimen submission.

  8. Development of a polymerase chain reaction assay to detect cyprinid herpesvirus 2 in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Waltzek, Thomas B; Kurobe, Tomofumi; Goodwin, Andrew E; Hedrick, Ronald P

    2009-03-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 2 (CyHV2) has been associated with epidemic mortality among cultured populations of goldfish Carassius auratus. As the principal target tissues are hematopoietic cells in the kidney and spleen, the disease is designated herpesviral hematopoietic necrosis (HVHN). Originally described from Japan, the virus is present in at least five other countries and probably has a global distribution in goldfish. Preventing the further spread of the virus via control programs that exploit sensitive viral detection methods is critical. We developed a conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test based on unique sequences found in the putative helicase gene of CyHV2 and completed initial steps toward the validation of this test. The helicase CyHV2 PCR has an analytic sensitivity of at least 78 copies of the target sequence per reaction in serially diluted plasmid and 84 copies/microg of DNA from the kidney and spleen of goldfish experimentally infected with CyHV2. The analytic specificity of the helicase CyHV2 PCR was demonstrated by the lack of amplification of genomic DNA from cyprinid herpesvirus 1, cyprinid herpesvirus 3, and ictalurid herpesvirus 1 (IcHV1). The helicase CyHV2 PCR effectively detected DNA from CyHV2 from goldfish over a broad geographic range, including Japan, California, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. The performance of the helicase CyHV2 PCR was compared with that of the previously described real-time TaqMan PCR for CyHV2 on a set of 37 samples of DNA from goldfish after experimental or natural exposure to CyHV2. The two tests had very strong agreement (kappa coefficient = 0.907) in classifying fish as positive or negative for CyHV2. The helicase CyHV2 PCR therefore complements the real-time PCR test as a conventional diagnostic method for preventing the further spread of CyHV2. PMID:19485127

  9. Comparison of a Ligase Chain Reaction-Based Assay and Cell Culture for Detection of Pharyngeal Carriage of Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Andrew J.; Gilleran, Gerry; Eastick, Kirstine; Ross, Jonathan D. C.

    2000-01-01

    In 264 genitourinary medicine clinic attenders reporting recent fellatio, the prevalence of pharyngeal Chlamydia trachomatis determined by an expanded standard including cell culture and two in-house PCR tests was 1.5% in 194 women and zero in 70 men. The ligase chain reaction (Abbott LCx) had a specificity of 99.2% and a positive predictive value of 60%. PMID:10970416

  10. A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay differentiates between Bolbphorus damnificus and Bolbophorus type II sp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A duplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed to differentiate between Bolbophorus damnificus and Bolbophorus type II species cercariae. Both trematode species are prevalent throughout the commercial catfish industry,.as both infect the ram’s horn snail, Plano...

  11. Development and application of a hexaplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for screening global citrus tristeza virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The discovery of the diversity of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genotypes has complicated detection and diagnostic measures. To simplify the identification and differentiation of CTV genotypes, an efficient multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) technique for the screenin...

  12. Detection of Pneumocystis carinii DNA in sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage samples by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, M; Elvin, K; Löfdahl, S; Linder, E

    1993-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay was developed for the detection of Pneumocystis carinii DNA in induced sputum and bronchoscopic alveolar lavage samples. The primer pair was selected from the published sequence of the thymidylate synthase gene of P. carinii derived from infected rats. The amplified DNA fragment of 403 bp was detected by agarose gel electrophoresis and by Southern and slot blot hybridization. No positive reaction was seen with DNA from different microorganisms typically found in the respiratory tract. P. carinii DNA was demonstrated in 30 of 42 sputum samples from immunosuppressed patients, whereas 21 of 42 sputum samples were positive by indirect immunofluorescence (IFL). Among the 42 patients, 14 were receiving prophylactic chemotherapy. In that group, PCR detected P. carinii in nine sputum samples, whereas IFL detected P. carinii in only four sputum samples. A positive PCR result was also seen in 5 of 43 IFL-negative bronchoscopic alveolar lavage samples from patients with respiratory symptoms. The PCR assay detected 10 copies of the target DNA, which corresponds to 10(-18) g of the specific P. carinii sequence. The results indicate that PCR amplification in combination with DNA hybridization is specific and is a more sensitive diagnostic method than IFL for the detection of P. carinii. Images PMID:8432806

  13. Rapid and biologically safe diagnosis of African swine fever virus infection by using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Steiger, Y; Ackermann, M; Mettraux, C; Kihm, U

    1992-01-01

    In order to circumvent the need for infectious virus for the diagnosis of African swine fever (ASF), we established the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique for the detection of ASF virus (ASFV) DNA. A 740-bp fragment that originated from the conserved region of the viral genome was partially sequenced. From this sequence, four PCR primers and one oligonucleotide probe were designed and synthesized. A specific 640-bp PCR product was amplified by using oligonucleotides 1 and 5 as primers and extracts of the following samples as templates: organs and plasma obtained from ASFV-infected pigs, ASFV-infected cell cultures, and cloned DNA fragments containing the same conserved genomic region as that in the original 740-bp clone. No specific reaction products were observed in the corresponding controls. The identities of the PCR products were confirmed either by a second amplification with nested primers or by hybridization with a specific, biotinylated oligonucleotide probe. PCR proved to be a quicker and more sensitive method than virus isolation followed by the hemadsorption test when spleen and plasma samples from experimentally ASFV-infected pigs were tested. Furthermore, cloned virus DNA could be used as a positive control in the place of a live virus control. This is advantageous whenever the use of live virus is undesirable. Images PMID:1734041

  14. A disposable, continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction device: design, fabrication and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Victoria; Li, Huizhong; Sant, Himanshu; Ameel, Tim; Gale, Bruce K

    2016-08-01

    Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is used to amplify a specific segment of DNA through a thermal cycling protocol. The PCR industry is shifting its focus away from macro-scale systems and towards micro-scale devices because: micro-scale sample sizes require less blood from patients, total reaction times are on the order of minutes opposed to hours, and there are cost advantages as many microfluidic devices are manufactured from inexpensive polymers. Some of the fastest PCR devices use continuous flow, but they have all been built of silicon or glass to allow sufficient heat transfer. This article presents a disposable polycarbonate (PC) device that is capable of achieving real-time, continuous flow PCR in a completely disposable polymer device in less than 13 minutes by thermally cycling the sample through an established temperature gradient in a serpentine channel. The desired temperature gradient was determined through simulations and validated by experiments which showed that PCR was achieved. Practical demonstration included amplification of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) derived cDNA. PMID:27393216

  15. Detection of hog cholera virus and differentiation from other pestiviruses by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Wirz, B; Tratschin, J D; Müller, H K; Mitchell, D B

    1993-05-01

    Reverse transcription coupled with the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used for the detection and differentiation of pestiviruses. For this purpose, one primer pair was selected from a highly conserved region of the genome of pestiviruses. Using these primers (PEST 1-PEST 2), DNA fragments of between 72 and 74 bp could be amplified from all pestivirus isolates tested. In order to differentiate hog cholera virus (HCV) from bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and border disease virus (BDV), we selected a primer pair from a conserved region in the genome of HCV strains that differed from that sequenced in the genome of BVDV strains. By using these primers (HCV 1-HCV 2), a DNA fragment of 478 bp could be specifically amplified from HCV isolates. By these means, viral RNA was detected in extracts of lymph node, spleen, tonsil, and lung. Such extracts were used directly for RT-PCR without prior RNA isolation. We also performed multiplex PCR by using both the PEST 1-PEST 2 and HCV 1-HCV 2 primer pairs in a single reaction. This allowed the differentiation of HCV from BVDV and BDV in one step. To assess the sensitivity of the method, RT-PCR was compared with virus propagation in tissue culture and subsequent detection by immunofluorescence staining. The results show that RT-PCR is useful for the rapid detection and differentiation of pestiviruses. PMID:8388887

  16. A TaqMan-based real-time polymerase chain reaction for the detection of porcine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Ying; Li, Xiao-Kang; Cui, Bao-An; Wei, Zhan-Yong; Li, Xin-Sheng; Wang, Yan-Bin; Zhao, Li; Wang, Zhen-Ya

    2009-03-01

    A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a TaqMan probe was developed to detect porcine parvovirus (PPV). Real-time PCR was optimized to quantify PPV using a detection system (Rotor Gene 2000 detector) and a dual-labeled fluorogenic probe. The gene-specific labeled fluorogenic probe for the VP2 gene of PPV was used to detect PPV. Quantitation of PPV was accomplished by a standard curve plotting cycle threshold values (Ct) against each dilution of standard plasmids. When the specificity of the assay using specific PPV primers was evaluated by testing the PPV standard strain and other viruses, no cross-reactions were detected with non-PPV reference viruses. The detection limit of real-time PCR for PPV was 2.08log10 genome copy equivalent (gce). In this study, a real-time PCR assay was performed on 80 clinical samples and compared with a conventional PCR assay. In 48 of 80 samples, PPV DNA was detected by the conventional PCR assay. All samples positive for PPV DNA by the conventional PCR assay were also positive by the real-time PCR assay, and 12 of 32 samples that tested negative for PPV DNA by the conventional method tested positive by the real-time PCR assay. Using the real-time PCR assay, the number of samples in which PPV was detected increased by 15%. Therefore, it is considered to be a useful tool for the detection of PPV. PMID:19041671

  17. Polymerase chain reaction for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in human biological samples.

    PubMed

    Cermáková, Z; Rysková, O; Plísková, L

    2005-01-01

    Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Toxoplasma gondii from gene TGR1E with primers TGR1E-1, TGR1E-2 (standard PCR), and from B1 gene with primers TM1, TM2, TM3 (hemi-nested PCR) was detected in biological samples from 347 individuals (441 biological materials). Of the total of 441 biological materials, T. gondii DNA was detected in 5.2 %; it was positive in the following samples: blood (n = 6), blood from newborns (2), biopsies (2) and samples of progenitor cells (2) (from candidates for bone marrow transplantation). DNA of T. gondii was also revealed in 11 samples (8.3 %) of 120 cases of pregnant women during prenatal examinations. A positive result in the blood was also found in two cases of newborn babies from mothers who were infected in later pregnancy. The positive PCR examination was confirmed by serological methods (ELISA and complement fixation test). Agreement of PCR results and the detection of antibodies against toxoplasma was found in 83.3 %. Rapid PCR examination for the confirmation of acute parasitemia T. gondii is particularly important for the patients in whom the infection may cause serious consequences (e.g., for fetus in pregnant women or for patients suffering from imunosuppression). PMID:16408853

  18. Nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for the detection of group A rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Elschner, M; Prudlo, J; Hotzel, H; Otto, P; Sachse, K

    2002-03-01

    Rotaviruses are important pathogens associated with diarrhoeal diseases in almost all species of mammals. In the present study, a nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of group A rotaviruses was developed, which is based on a target region in gene segment 6. Rotavirus strains of human, bovine, porcine, canine, feline, equine, and ovine origin were examined. Furthermore several faecal specimens, in which rotavirus had already been detected using other methods than PCR, were included in the study. A nested RT-PCR product was formed with all strains and faecal samples tested. The detection limit for virus-containing cell culture supernatant was 3 x 10(-2) [50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50)] by RT-PCR and 3 x 10(-3) TCID50) by nested amplification. In order to examine the influence of the sample matrix on sensitivity, a rotavirus-negative faecal specimen was spiked with virus-containing cell culture suspension of the porcine rotavirus OSU. The detection limit of the present PCR procedure was approximately 1.6 x 10(2) TCID50 per g faeces and could be increased by one order of magnitude using nested PCR. The present method for detection and identification of group A rotaviruses represents a powerful diagnostic tool and was shown to be applicable to rotaviruses of different origin, including human sources. PMID:12002423

  19. Trends and advances in food analysis by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Salihah, Nur Thaqifah; Hossain, Mohammad Mosharraf; Lubis, Hamadah; Ahmed, Minhaz Uddin

    2016-05-01

    Analyses to ensure food safety and quality are more relevant now because of rapid changes in the quantity, diversity and mobility of food. Food-contamination must be determined to maintain health and up-hold laws, as well as for ethical and cultural concerns. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), a rapid and inexpensive quantitative method to detect the presence of targeted DNA-segments in samples, helps in determining both accidental and intentional adulterations of foods by biological contaminants. This review presents recent developments in theory, techniques, and applications of RT-PCR in food analyses, RT-PCR addresses the limitations of traditional food analyses in terms of sensitivity, range of analytes, multiplexing ability, cost, time, and point-of-care applications. A range of targets, including species of plants or animals which are used as food ingredients, food-borne bacteria or viruses, genetically modified organisms, and allergens, even in highly processed foods can be identified by RT-PCR, even at very low concentrations. Microfluidic RT-PCR eliminates the separate sample-processing step to create opportunities for point-of-care analyses. We also cover the challenges related to using RT-PCR for food analyses, such as the need to further improve sample handling. PMID:27407185

  20. Polymerase chain reaction-based discrimination of viable from non-viable Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ching Giap; Ideris, Aini; Omar, Abdul R; Yii, Chen Pei; Kleven, Stanley H

    2014-01-01

    The present study was based on the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of the 16S ribosomal nucleic acid (rRNA) of Mycoplasma for detection of viable Mycoplasma gallisepticum. To determine the stability of M. gallisepticum 16S rRNA in vitro, three inactivation methods were used and the suspensions were stored at different temperatures. The 16S rRNA of M. gallisepticum was detected up to approximately 20-25 h at 37 °C, 22-25 h at 16 °C, and 23-27 h at 4 °C. The test, therefore, could detect viable or recently dead M. gallisepticum (< 20 h). The RT-PCR method was applied during an in vivo study of drug efficacy under experimental conditions, where commercial broiler-breeder eggs were inoculated with M. gallisepticum into the yolk. Hatched chicks that had been inoculated in ovo were treated with Macrolide 1. The method was then applied in a flock of day 0 chicks with naturally acquired vertical transmission of M. gallisepticum, treated with Macrolide 2. Swabs of the respiratory tract were obtained for PCR and RT-PCR evaluations to determine the viability of M. gallisepticum. This study proved that the combination of both PCR and RT-PCR enables detection and differentiation of viable from non-viable M. gallisepticum. PMID:25686255

  1. Sensitive Detection of Thirteen Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Agents Using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Malaguti, Natália; Bahls, Larissa Danielle; Uchimura, Nelson Shozo; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by a polymicrobial proliferation of anaerobic bacteria and depletion of lactobacilli, which are components of natural vaginal microbiota. Currently, there are limited conventional methods for BV diagnosis, and these methods are time-consuming, expensive, and rarely allow for the detection of more than one agent simultaneously. Therefore, we conceived and validated a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) assay for the simultaneous screening of thirteen bacterial vaginosis-associated agents (BV-AAs) related to symptomatic BV: Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus curtisii, Mobiluncus mulieris, Bacteroides fragilis, Mycoplasma hominis, Atopobium vaginae, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Megasphaera type I, Clostridia-like bacteria vaginosis-associated bacteria (BVABs) 1, 2, and 3, Sneathia sanguinegens, and Mycoplasma genitalium. The overall validation parameters of M-PCR compared to single PCR (sPCR) were extremely high, including agreement of 99.1% and sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values of 100.0%, negative predictive value of 97.0%, accuracy of 99.3%, and agreement with Nugent results of 100.0%. The prevalence of BV-AAs was very high (72.6%), and simultaneous agents were detected in 53.0%, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the M-PCR assay. Therefore, the M-PCR assay has great potential to impact BV diagnostic methods in vaginal samples and diminish associated complications in the near future. PMID:26078959

  2. Aspergillus Polymerase Chain Reaction: Systematic Review of Evidence for Clinical Use in Comparison With Antigen Testing

    PubMed Central

    White, P. Lewis; Wingard, John R.; Bretagne, Stéphane; Löffler, Jürgen; Patterson, Thomas F.; Slavin, Monica A.; Barnes, Rosemary A.; Pappas, Peter G.; Donnelly, J. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background. Aspergillus polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was excluded from the European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) definitions of invasive fungal disease because of limited standardization and validation. The definitions are being revised. Methods. A systematic literature review was performed to identify analytical and clinical information available on inclusion of galactomannan enzyme immunoassay (GM-EIA) (2002) and β-d-glucan (2008), providing a minimal threshold when considering PCR. Categorical parameters and statistical performance were compared. Results. When incorporated, GM-EIA and β-d-glucan sensitivities and specificities for diagnosing invasive aspergillosis were 81.6% and 91.6%, and 76.9% and 89.4%, respectively. Aspergillus PCR has similar sensitivity and specificity (76.8%–88.0% and 75.0%–94.5%, respectively) and comparable utility. Methodological recommendations and commercial PCR assays assist standardization. Although all tests have limitations, currently, PCR is the only test with independent quality control. Conclusions. We propose that there is sufficient evidence that is at least equivalent to that used to include GM-EIA and β-d-glucan testing, and that PCR is now mature enough for inclusion in the EORTC/MSG definitions. PMID:26113653

  3. Assembling long heteroduplexes by asymmetric polymerase chain reaction and annealing the resulting single-stranded DNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mugui; Wei, Chuchu; Ye, Xiufen; Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Cuicui; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Xiaobo; Tu, Jumin

    2015-04-15

    We developed an effective protocol for generating high-purity heteroduplexes via annealing single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) derived from plasmid DNA by asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (A-PCR). With the addition of dimethyl sulfoxide, a one-step A-PCR procedure can generate ssDNAs stably at a range of reaction temperatures. Several annealing buffers can anneal two ssDNAs into heteroduplexes effectively. We further developed a simple strategy to create d(GATC) hemimethylated heteroduplexes by annealing fully methylated homoduplexes in the presence of excessive unmethylated ssDNAs. The constructed heteroduplexes have been well tested as substrates for mismatch repair in Escherichia coli and, thus, can be used in various biotechnology applications. PMID:25575760

  4. Aseptic meningitis caused by Leptospira spp diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Romero, Eliete Caló; Blanco, Roberta Morozetti; Yasuda, Paulo Hideki

    2010-12-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the pathogenic Leptospira spp. The clinical presentations are diverse, ranging from undifferentiated fever to fulminant disease including meningeal forms. The neurological leptospirosis forms are usually neglected. The aim of this study was to investigate leptospirosis as the cause of aseptic meningitis using different diagnostic techniques including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Thirty-nine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients presenting with meningeal abnormalities, predominance of lymphocytes and negative results by traditional microbiological tests were processed by leptospiral culture, anti-leptospiral antibody response and PCR. Leptospira spp DNA was detected in 23 (58.97%) of the CSF samples. Anti-leptospiral antibodies were found in 13 (33.33%) CSF samples. Twelve CSF samples were positive by PCR assay and negative by microscopic agglutination test (MAT) assay. Two CSF samples were positive by MAT and negative by PCR. The positive and negative agreement between both tests was 11 and 14, respectively. CSF samples from six cases of unknown diagnosis were positive by PCR assay. Eight cases showed positive results using PCR and MAT. Leptospirosis could be detected by PCR assay from the 3rd-26th day after illness onset. The sensitivity of the PCR was assessed with confirmed cases of leptospirosis (by MAT) and found to be 89.5%. All CSFs were negative by culture. PCR was found to be a powerful tool for diagnosing meningitis cases of leptospirosis. We recommend that it may be used as a supplementary diagnostic tool, especially in the early stages of the disease, when other diagnostic techniques such as serology are not sensitive. PMID:21225195

  5. Comparative genotyping of Streptococcus mutans by repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction and multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Momeni, S S; Whiddon, J; Moser, S A; Cheon, K; Ruby, J D; Childers, N K

    2013-02-01

    The genetic diversity of Streptococcus mutans has been extensively studied using a variety of genotyping methods. Repetitive extragenic palindromic-polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) is a genotyping approach used for screening large numbers of bacterial isolates. This two-part study used multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis to evaluate genotypes previously identified as unique using rep-PCR. In part one, an isolate was selected from each of the 22 S. mutans rep-PCR genotype groups representing 8000 clinical isolates. For part two, four additional isolates were selected from the six most commonly occurring genotype groups (GG) for further analysis. Real-time PCR was performed using eight housekeeping S. mutans gene loci and the amplicons were sequenced. Sequence data analysis was performed using CLC DNA Workbench and alleles were compared with the PubMLST database for Oral Streptococcus using the Nakano scheme. Concatenated sequences were evaluated with MEGA using a minimum evolution method with bootstrap. All 22 rep-PCR genotypes were unique by MLST analysis. Within rep-PCR GGs, MLST matched rep-PCR in three groups demonstrating clonality; three groups exhibited more diversity with MLST. The discovery of three clonal groups is unique to this study and suggests that S. mutans genotypes are shared between unrelated subjects. Furthermore, MLST defined 19 new alleles and 26 new sequence types that have been confirmed and registered with PubMLST. Methods for processing were streamlined and a process for using MLST with rep-PCR is suggested. In conclusion, MLST verified that rep-PCR is a reliable and cost-effective method for screening large numbers of S. mutans strains for epidemiological study. PMID:23194334

  6. Optimized nested polymerase chain reaction for antemortem detection of Mycobacteria in Amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva) and orange-winged Amazons (Amazona amazonica).

    PubMed

    Baquião, Arianne Costa; Luna, Janaina Oliveira; Medina, Aziz Orro; Sanfilippo, Luiz Francisco; de Faria, Maria Jacinta; dos Santos, Manuel Armando Azevedo

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to optimize nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and apply them on samples from parrots. Results were negative for the presence of these Mycobacterium in the samples, and nested PCR was specific, faster, and more sensitive than other tests, thereby justifying its use in antemortem diagnosis. PMID:24712177

  7. Direct polymerase chain reaction from blood and tissue samples for rapid diagnosis of bovine leukemia virus infection

    PubMed Central

    NISHIMORI, Asami; KONNAI, Satoru; IKEBUCHI, Ryoyo; OKAGAWA, Tomohiro; NAKAHARA, Ayako; MURATA, Shiro; OHASHI, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection induces bovine leukemia in cattle and causes significant financial harm to farmers and farm management. There is no effective therapy or vaccine; thus, the diagnosis and elimination of BLV-infected cattle are the most effective method to eradicate the infection. Clinical veterinarians need a simpler and more rapid method of diagnosing infection, because both nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR are labor intensive, time-consuming, and require specialized molecular biology techniques and expensive equipment. In this study, we describe a novel PCR method for amplifying the BLV provirus from whole blood, thus eliminating the need for DNA extraction. Although the sensitivity of PCR directly from whole blood (PCR-DB) samples as measured in bovine blood containing BLV-infected cell lines was lower than that of nested PCR, the PCR-DB technique showed high specificity and reproducibility. Among 225 clinical samples, 49 samples were positive by nested PCR, and 37 samples were positive by PCR-DB. There were no false positive samples; thus, PCR-DB sensitivity and specificity were 75.51% and 100%, respectively. However, the provirus loads of the samples detected by nested PCR and not PCR-DB were quite low. Moreover, PCR-DB also stably amplified the BLV provirus from tumor tissue samples. PCR-DB method exhibited good reproducibility and excellent specificity and is suitable for screening of thousands of cattle, thus serving as a viable alternative to nested PCR and real-time PCR. PMID:26911373

  8. Direct polymerase chain reaction from blood and tissue samples for rapid diagnosis of bovine leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nishimori, Asami; Konnai, Satoru; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nakahara, Ayako; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection induces bovine leukemia in cattle and causes significant financial harm to farmers and farm management. There is no effective therapy or vaccine; thus, the diagnosis and elimination of BLV-infected cattle are the most effective method to eradicate the infection. Clinical veterinarians need a simpler and more rapid method of diagnosing infection, because both nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR are labor intensive, time-consuming, and require specialized molecular biology techniques and expensive equipment. In this study, we describe a novel PCR method for amplifying the BLV provirus from whole blood, thus eliminating the need for DNA extraction. Although the sensitivity of PCR directly from whole blood (PCR-DB) samples as measured in bovine blood containing BLV-infected cell lines was lower than that of nested PCR, the PCR-DB technique showed high specificity and reproducibility. Among 225 clinical samples, 49 samples were positive by nested PCR, and 37 samples were positive by PCR-DB. There were no false positive samples; thus, PCR-DB sensitivity and specificity were 75.51% and 100%, respectively. However, the provirus loads of the samples detected by nested PCR and not PCR-DB were quite low. Moreover, PCR-DB also stably amplified the BLV provirus from tumor tissue samples. PCR-DB method exhibited good reproducibility and excellent specificity and is suitable for screening of thousands of cattle, thus serving as a viable alternative to nested PCR and real-time PCR. PMID:26911373

  9. Rapid and inexpensive species differentiation using a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction high-resolution melt assay.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Kelly M; Perez, Anjelica C U; Sweetin, Katherine C

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a method for developing real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) high-resolution melt (HRM) assays to identify multiple species present in a mixture simultaneously using LCGreen Plus and melt temperatures. Highly specific PCR primers are designed to yield amplicons with different melt temperatures for simple routine species identification compared with differentiating melt curve kinetics traces or difference plots. This method is robust and automatable, and it leads to savings in time and reagent costs, is easily modified to probe any species of interest, eliminates the need for post-PCR gel or capillary electrophoresis in routine assays, and requires no expensive dye-labeled primers. PMID:26836486

  10. Incidence of enteroviruses in Mamala Bay, Hawaii using cell culture and direct polymerase chain reaction methodologies.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, K A; Roll, K; Fujioka, R S; Gerba, C P; Pepper, I L

    1998-06-01

    The consequence of point and nonpoint pollution sources, discharged into marine waters, on public recreational beaches in Mamala Bay, Hawaii was evaluated using virus cell culture and direct reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Twelve sites, nine marine, two freshwater (one stream and one canal), and one sewage, were assessed either quarterly or monthly for 1 year to detect the presence of human enteric viruses. Water samples were concentrated from initial volumes of 400 L to final volumes of 30 mL using Filterite electronegative cartridge filters and a modified beef extract elution procedure. Cell culture was applied using the Buffalo Green Monkey kidney cell line to analyze samples for enteroviruses. Positive samples were also evaluated by RT-PCR, using enterovirus-specific primers. Levels of RT-PCR inhibition varied with each concentrated sample. Resin column purification increased PCR detection sensitivity by at least one order of magnitude in a variety of sewage outfall and recreational marine water samples but not in the freshwater canal samples. Using cell culture, viable enteroviruses were found in 50 and 17% of all outfall and canal samples, respectively. Samples were positive at beaches 8% of the time. These data illustrate the potential public health hazard associated with recreational waters. Using direct PCR, viruses were detected at the outfall but were not found in any beach or canal samples, in part, owing to substances that inhibit PCR. Therefore, conventional cell culture is the most effective means of detecting low levels of infectious enteroviruses in environmental waters, whereas direct RT-PCR is rendered less effective by inhibitory compounds and low equivalent reaction volumes. PMID:9734309

  11. Use of polymerase chain reaction in the quantitation of mdr-1 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, L.D.; Herzog, C.E.; Rudick, J.B.; Fojo, A.T.; Bates, S.E. )

    1990-11-01

    The ability of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to quantitate expression of mRNA was examined in the present study. The model chosen was expression of the multidrug resistance gene mdr-1/Pgp in two colon carcinoma cell lines which express mdr-1/Pgp at levels comparable to those found in many clinical samples. PCR was utilized to evaluate differences in mdr-1/Pgp expression in the two cell lines after modulation by sodium butyrate. Thus, comparisons were made across a range of mdr-1/Pgp expression as well as comparisons of small differences. The PCR was found to be both sensitive and quantitative. Accurate quantitation requires demonstration of an exponential range which varies among samples. The exponential range can be determined by carrying out the PCR for a fixed number of cycles on serial dilutions of the RNA reverse transcription product, or by performing the reaction with a varying number of cycles on a fixed quantity of cDNA. By quantitation of the difference in PCR product derived from a given amount of RNA from the sodium butyrate treated and untreated cells, the difference in mRNA expression between samples can be determined. Normalization of the results can be achieved by independent amplification of a control gene, such as {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, when the latter is also evaluated in the exponential range. Simultaneous amplification of the control and target genes results in lower levels of PCR products due to competition, which varies from sample to sample. The PCR is thus a labor-intensive but sensitive method of quantitating gene expression in small samples of RNA.

  12. Problem-Solving Test: Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: polymerase chain reaction, DNA amplification, electrophoresis, breast cancer, "HER2" gene, genomic DNA, "in vitro" DNA synthesis, template, primer, Taq polymerase, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] elongation activity, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] exonuclease activity, deoxyribonucleoside…

  13. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes by using the polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bessesen, M.T.; Luo, Q.; Blaser, M.J.; Ellison, R.T. III.; Rotbart. H.A. )

    1990-09-01

    A method was developed for detection of Listeria monocytogens by polymerase chain reaction amplification followed by agarose gel electrophoresis or dot blot analysis with {sup 32}P-labeled internal probe. The technique identified 95 of 95 L. monocytogenes strains, 0 of 12 Listeria strains of other species, and 0 of 12 non-Listeria strains.

  14. Characteristics of a chain thermal explosion as a function of the kinetic properties of reaction chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azatyan, V. V.; Piloyan, A. A.; Saikova, G. R.; Smirnov, N. N.

    2016-03-01

    Study of the combustion and explosion of hydrogen‒carbon oxide‒air mixtures shows that the sharpness of a chain thermal explosion depends on the frequency of branching in a given branch of a reaction chain. It is established that varying the CO: H2 concentration allows us to observe and eliminate the degeneration of an explosion while maintaining the regimes of ignition and deflagration.

  15. [The use of polymerase chain reaction in laboratory diagnosis of dermatophytosis].

    PubMed

    Tiryaki, Yasin; Gültekin Korkmazgil, Berna; Eyigör, Mete; Aydın, Neriman

    2015-04-01

    Dermatophytes are among the common causes of fungal infections in the community. Classical diagnostic tests for dermatophytosis have some disadvantages such as failure of direct microscopy in species differentiation and culture methods being time consuming and having low sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the identification of dermatophytes directly from the clinical samples and the cultures. A total of 123 samples that comprise 63 skin and 60 nail scrapings obtained from 110 patients (69 female, 41 male; age range: 4-82 years) who were prediagnosed as dermatophytosis, were included in the study. Samples were examined with routine direct microscopy, culture and two different nested PCR (nPCR) protocols. The first was a pan-dermatophyte nPCR protocol targeting chitin synthase gene (CHS-1) of dermatophytes and the second was a nPCR protocol which targets specific ITS-1 genes of Trichophyton rubrum and T.mentagrophytes. Similar PCR methods were also applied to cultivated strains. Sequence analysis was performed for the samples that yielded positive results in pan-dermatophyte nPCR and negative results in T.rubrum/T.mentagrophytes - specific nPCR. Hyphae and/or spore structures were observed in 62 (50%) samples with direct microscopic examination and dermatophytes were isolated in 30 (24%) samples. Twenty-eight of the isolates grown in culture were identified as T.rubrum, and two as T.mentagrophytes with T.rubrum/T.mentagrophytes-specific nPCR protocol. In direct application, 67 (55%) of the clinical samples were found positive with pan-dermatophyte nPCR and 65 (53%) were positive with T.rubrum/T.mentagrophytes-specific nPCR. Samples which were negative in direct microscopic examination were also negative in culture. Nine of them were found positive with pan-dermatophyte nPCR and eight were positive with T.rubrum/T.mentagrophytes-specific nPCR. Two of the 30 samples which were positive in culture

  16. A novel mechanism for direct real-time polymerase chain reaction that does not require DNA isolation from prokaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Soejima, Takashi; Xiao, Jin-zhong; Abe, Fumiaki

    2016-01-01

    Typically, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is performed after DNA isolation. Real-time PCR (qPCR), also known as direct qPCR in mammalian cells with weak membranes, is a common technique using crude samples subjected to preliminary boiling to elute DNA. However, applying this methodology to prokaryotic cells, which have solid cell walls, in contrast to mammalian cells which immediately burst in water, can result in poor detection. We successfully achieved PCR elongation with the addition of 1.3 cfu of Cronobacter muytjensii to a newly developed direct qPCR master mix without performing any crude DNA extraction (detection limit of 1.6 × 100 cfu/ml for the test sample compared with a detection limit of 1.6 × 103 cfu/ml primarily for crude (boiling) or classical DNA isolation). We revealed that the chromosomal DNA retained in prokaryotic cells can function as a PCR template, similarly to the mechanism in in situ PCR. Elucidating this reaction mechanism may contribute to the development of an innovative master mix for direct qPCR to detect genes in a single bacterium with solid cell walls and might lead to numerous novel findings in prokaryotic genomics research. PMID:27334801

  17. A novel mechanism for direct real-time polymerase chain reaction that does not require DNA isolation from prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Takashi; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Abe, Fumiaki

    2016-01-01

    Typically, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is performed after DNA isolation. Real-time PCR (qPCR), also known as direct qPCR in mammalian cells with weak membranes, is a common technique using crude samples subjected to preliminary boiling to elute DNA. However, applying this methodology to prokaryotic cells, which have solid cell walls, in contrast to mammalian cells which immediately burst in water, can result in poor detection. We successfully achieved PCR elongation with the addition of 1.3 cfu of Cronobacter muytjensii to a newly developed direct qPCR master mix without performing any crude DNA extraction (detection limit of 1.6 × 10(0) cfu/ml for the test sample compared with a detection limit of 1.6 × 10(3) cfu/ml primarily for crude (boiling) or classical DNA isolation). We revealed that the chromosomal DNA retained in prokaryotic cells can function as a PCR template, similarly to the mechanism in in situ PCR. Elucidating this reaction mechanism may contribute to the development of an innovative master mix for direct qPCR to detect genes in a single bacterium with solid cell walls and might lead to numerous novel findings in prokaryotic genomics research. PMID:27334801

  18. STR DNA typing: increased sensitivity and efficient sample consumption using reduced PCR reaction volumes.

    PubMed

    Leclair, Benoît; Sgueglia, Joanne B; Wojtowicz, Patricia C; Juston, Ann C; Frégeau, Chantal J; Fourney, Ron M

    2003-09-01

    Improvements in detection limits/sensitivity and lower sample consumption are potential benefits of reducing PCR reaction volumes used in forensic DNA typing of crime scene samples. This premise was studied first with experimental mixtures and a nine-loci megaplex, which demonstrated stochiometric amplification and accurate detection. Next, adjudicated casework samples were subjected to amplification under 15 different template DNA to PCR reaction volume ratios. Reduction of PCR reaction volume and DNA down to 10 microL and 0.500 ng, respectively, produced identical profiles with the same signal intensity and heterozygous allele peak height ratio (HR). Reduction to 5 microL and 0.063 ng yielded HR values that were slightly affected in one to three STR loci. PCR reaction volume reduction can enhance detection and sensitivity while reducing the consumption of irreplaceable crime scene samples. PMID:14535663

  19. Series DNA Amplification Using the Continuous-Flow Polymerase Chain Reaction Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Seung-Ryong; Kang, Chi Jung; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2008-02-01

    We proposed a continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip that can be used for series DNA amplification. The continuous-flow PCR chip has several advantages such as fast thermal cycling, series of amplifications, cost-effective fabrication, portability, and fluorescence detection. The continuous-flow PCR chip is composed of two parts namely poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchannel for sample injection and indium-tin-oxide (ITO) heater/glass chip for thermal cycling. The fabricated microchannel width and depth are 250 and 200 µm, respectively. Also, the total working length of the PDMS microchannel is 1340 mm which is equivalent for 20 cycles of amplification. A 2:2:3 microchannel length ratio for three different temperature zones namely denaturation, annealing, and extension was assigned, respectively. Upon the operation of the fabricated continuous-flow PCR chip, the amplification of plasmid DNA pKS-GFP with 720 base pairs and PG-noswsi with 300 base pairs were found successfully with a total reaction time of 15 min.

  20. Detection and typing of lymphotropic herpesviruses by multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Pozo, F; Tenorio, A

    1999-04-01

    A multiplex nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed for the simultaneous detection and typing of all human lymphotropic herpesviruses described to date, including Ebstein Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), human herpesvirus 6, variants A and B (HHV6-A, HHV6-B), human herpesvirus 7 (HHV7) and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8). Oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify a highly conserved region within the DNA polymerase gene. Each reaction component and thermal cycling parameters were thoroughly standardized to achieve optimal specificity and sensitivity for the PCR assay, which was estimated at about 10-100 molecules for each virus. An internal control, consisting of 100 molecules of a cloned fragment of the porcine pseudorabies herpesvirus (PrV) genome, was included to detect false negative results. To assess suitability and clinical application of the multiplex PCR method, a total of 35 well-characterized specimens, including Kaposi's sarcoma skin lesions, serum, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva and urine samples, were tested. Results obtained suggest this technique could be applied as a sole diagnostic tool in several clinical settings in which herpesviral infection is suspected and differential diagnosis required, avoiding the need to test specimens by separate PCR methods. PMID:10328531

  1. A power-efficient thermocycler based on induction heating for DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Debjani; Venkataraman, V.; Mohan, K. Naga; Chandra, H. Sharat; Natarajan, Vasant

    2004-09-01

    We have built a thermocycler based on the principles of induction heating for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of target sequences in DNA samples of interest. The cycler has an average heating rate of ˜0.8 °C/s and a cooling rate of ˜0.5 °C/s, and typically takes ˜4 h to complete a 40-cycle PCR protocol. It is power-efficient (˜6 W per reaction tube), micro-processor controlled, and can be adapted for battery operation. Using this instrument, we have successfully amplified a 350 bp segment from a plasmid and SRY, the human sex determining gene, which occurs as a single-copy sequence in genomic DNA of human males. The PCR products from this thermocycler are comparable to those obtained by the use of commercially available machines. Its easy front-end operation, low-power design, portability and low cost makes it suitable for diagnostic field applications of PCR.

  2. Development of a set of multiplex standard polymerase chain reaction assays for the identification of infectious agents from aborted bovine clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Tramuta, Clara; Lacerenza, Daniela; Zoppi, Simona; Goria, Mariella; Dondo, Alessandro; Ferroglio, Ezio; Nebbia, Patrizia; Rosati, Sergio

    2011-07-01

    The current study describes the development of a set of 5 multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) assays for the simultaneous detection of abortive infection agents in bovine fetal tissues, including Brucella spp., Leptospira spp., and Campylobacter fetus (mPCR1); Hammondia heydorni, Neospora caninum, and Toxoplasma gondii (mPCR2); Coxiella burnetii and Chlamydophila psittaci (mPCR3); Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma bovigenitalium, and Ureaplasma diversum (mPCR4); and Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1; mPCR5). The protocol was tested on different tissue samples collected from 50 aborted bovine fetuses, and it showed that out of the 50 fetuses, 7 (14%, mPCR2) were PCR-positive for N. caninum, 4 (8%, mPCR5) were PCR-positive for BVDV, and 2 (4%, mPCR4) were PCR-positive for U. diversum. The results obtained by using each multiplex PCR were 100% concordant with those obtained by using the respective PCR assays targeting single genes on the same specimens. Moreover, all multiplex PCR assays on clinical samples were compared with reference methods, obtaining a perfect accordance in all samples and confirming the validity of the set of multiplex PCR assays. The proposed set of multiplex PCR assays is, therefore, suitable for the simultaneous detection of the main infectious agents responsible for bovine abortion. PMID:21908306

  3. Mechanisms of Propidium Monoazide Inhibition of Polymerase Chain Reaction and implications for Propidium Monoazide Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. M.; Darrach, H.; Ponce, A.; McFarland, E.; Laymon, C.; Fingland, N. K.

    2015-12-01

    PMA-qPCR is a laboratory technique that can be used to identify viable microbes by employing the use of propidium monoazide (PMA), a DNA-intercalating dye, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The current model of PMA-qPCR operates under the assumption that PMA is only capable of entering membrane-compromised cells, where it irreversibly cross-links to DNA and makes it unavailable for amplification via qPCR. However, the exact mechanism behind PMA's entry into the cell and its interaction with genetic material is not well understood. To better understand PMA's capabilities, we have examined the effect PMA has on enzyme binding and processivity using endonucleases and exonucleases. Our results suggest that the current model behind PMA-qPCR inhibition is incomplete, in that rather than precipitating the entirety of the DNA, PMA also inhibits enzyme binding and/or processivity in soluble DNA. These results have important implications for studying the viable community of microorganisms in various applications, such as environmental monitoring, planetary protection and bioburden assessment, and biohazard detection.

  4. Genotyping by multiplex polymerase chain reaction for detection of endemic hepatitis B virus transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Repp, R; Rhiel, S; Heermann, K H; Schaefer, S; Keller, C; Ndumbe, P; Lampert, F; Gerlich, W H

    1993-01-01

    A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol was developed for rapid genotyping of hepatitis B virus (HBV). During the first PCR round, a universal HBV primer pair was used to amplify the entire pre-S region of the HBV genome. Within the pre-S region, many nucleotide exchanges are observed. These are partly correlated to the serological hepatitis B surface antigen subtypes. Five additional subtype-specific primers were selected from that region which, together with two universal non-group-specific primers, generated specific combinations of two to four DNA fragments of defined sizes. By this approach, 55 hepatitis B surface antigen-positive patients from a pediatric oncology unit in Germany were analyzed. Fifty-four patients who had been infected within 2 years had an identical pattern in the multiplex PCR, suggesting a common source of infection and person-to-person transmission within the unit. One child who was infected 5 years later had a different PCR pattern and, therefore, must have been infected from a different source. Furthermore, 109 serum samples taken from pregnant Cameroonian women and 25 serum samples from their babies taken 6 months after birth were analyzed. In one case, mother-to-infant transmission of the virus was demonstrated. Apart from its role in epidemiological studies on HBV, multiplex PCR may also be a useful tool for rapid genetic analysis in other fields if there is a moderate degree of sequence variation which enables the design of specific primers. Images PMID:8501209

  5. Three sample preparation protocols for polymerase chain reaction based detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Kostrzynska, M; Sankey, M; Haack, E; Power, C; Aldom, J E; Chagla, A H; Unger, S; Palmateer, G; Lee, H; Trevors, J T; De Grandis, S A

    1999-02-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite responsible for an increasing number of outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness worldwide. In this report, we describe development of sample preparation protocols for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based detection of C. parvum in fecal material and environmental water samples. Two of these methods were found adequate for isolation of Cryptosporidium DNA from filtered water pellet suspensions. The first involved several filtration steps, immunomagnetic separation and freeze-thaw cycles. The second method involved filtration, addition of EnviroAmp lysis reagent, freeze-thaw cycles and precipitation of the DNA with isopropanol. Using nested PCR, we detected 100 oocysts/ml of filtered water pellet suspension, with either of the above sample preparation procedures. Nested PCR increased sensitivity of the assay by two to three orders of magnitude as compared to the primary PCR. The detection limit for seeded fecal samples was 10-fold higher than for filtered environmental water pellet suspension. Nested PCR results showed 62.4 and 91.1% correlation with immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for fecal samples and filtered environmental water pellet suspensions, respectively. This correlation decreased to 47.2% and 44.4%, respectively, when only IFA positive samples were analyzed. However, in fecal samples contaminated with a high number (> 10(5)/g) of C. parvum oocysts, this correlation was 100%. PMID:10076632

  6. Improvement of Temperature Uniformity for Polymerase Chain Reaction Chip with Heat Spreader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rong-Sheng; Mao, Chao-Yang; Chen, Yung-Shieng

    2007-11-01

    For polymerase chain reaction (PCR) applications, a uniform temperature field in the microreactor is crucial. In this paper, we report on the electrothermal and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations performed with the aim of optimizing the temperature distribution by heat spreaders for PCR application. Firstly, the equivalent resistivity of the microresistor heater is evaluated, and a conformable result is then verified by comparing with the experimental result using a prototype PCR chip. Secondly, the temperature distribution at 94 °C in the PCR chip is investigated. Furthermore, a heat spreader is inserted into the PCR chip to reduce the temperature difference in the DNA sample and thus improve the temperature uniformity effectively. The results demonstrated that the effective volume percentage and the energy consumption in the chamber are positively related to the thickness of the heat spreader, while the temperature difference is inversely related to the thickness of the heat spreader. Finally, the (b)-design is better than the (a)-design in terms of both the increase in effective volume percentage of the DNA sample and the decrease in energy consumption. In other words, the (b)-design is recognized as having better temperature uniformity.

  7. Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Better Method for Diagnosing Chronic Schistosoma mansoni Infections

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas Hamed; Mohamed, Rabie M.; Belal, Usama S.; Abdel-Raheem, Ehab M.; Naoi, Koji; Norose, Kazumi

    2015-01-01

    For more effective diagnosis of the acute and chronic stages of Schistosoma mansoni infection in humans, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was compared with the Kato-Katz method. A total of 150 stool samples were collected from inpatient and outpatient clinics at the Department of Tropical Medicine, Minia University Hospital, Egypt. Three groups of patients, 50 with acute intestinal schistosomiasis, 70 with chronic intestinal schistosomiasis and 30 normal healthy controls were studied. Stool samples were analyzed by PCR and the Kato-Katz method. The mean number of eggs per gram of feces was 4.6 when estimated by the Kato-Katz method in positive stool samples from acute schistosomiasis cases but only 1.7 in chronic cases. In acute intestinal schistosomiasis, 15 and 45 out of 50 cases were positive by Kato-Katz and PCR, respectively. In the chronic intestinal schistosomiasis cases, 6 and 68 out of 70 cases were positive by the Kato-Katz and PCR methods, respectively. We conclude that PCR appears to be an effective diagnostic technique for S. mansoni infection, especially where a low worm burden exists, such as in chronic cases. PMID:26865821

  8. Novel multi-targeted polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of presumed tubercular uveitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to report the use of multi-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the diagnosis of presumed tubercular uveitis. Multi-targeted PCR using three targets specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, i.e., IS6110, MPB64, and protein b, was performed on intraocular fluid samples of 25 subjects. Nine had presumed tubercular uveitis, six had intraocular inflammation secondary to a nontubercular etiology (disease controls), and ten had no evidence of intraocular inflammation (normal controls). As described previously, response to antitubercular therapy was considered as the gold standard. Results Multi-targeted PCR was positive in seven out of nine patients with presumed tubercular uveitis and negative in all normal and disease controls. The sensitivity and specificity were 77.77% and 100%, respectively. For the diagnosis of presumed tubercular uveitis, multi-targeted PCR had a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 88.88%. Conclusion Multi-targeted PCR can be a valuable tool for diagnosing presumed tubercular uveitis. PMID:23514226

  9. Systematic screening of yeast artificial-chromosome libraries by use of the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Green, E D; Olson, M V

    1990-01-01

    We have developed an approach for screening ordered arrays of yeast artificial-chromosome (YAC) clones containing human DNA that is based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This approach is designed to determine the locations of positive clones within a YAC library that is stored as individual clones in 96-well microtiter plates. The high sensitivity and specificity of the PCR allow the detection of target sequences in DNA prepared from pools of 1920 or more YAC clones. The PCR-based screening protocol is performed in two successive stages, which effectively limit the location of a positive clone to four microtiter plates (384 clones). Final localization of each positive clone is accomplished by conventional DNA.DNA hybridization using a single filter containing the YAC clones from the appropriate four microtiter plates. This PCR-based screening strategy has proven highly efficient, allowing the identification and isolation of numerous YAC clones containing specific human genes. The prospects of developing a strategy for screening YAC libraries based completely on PCR assays are discussed, as are the potential applications of this approach to the systematic analysis of the human genome. Images PMID:2405397

  10. Detection of the genes encoding botulinum neurotoxin types A to E by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, E A; Pemberton, J M; Desmarchelier, P M

    1993-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used as the basis for the development of highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tests for organisms harboring botulinum neurotoxin type A through E genes. Synthetic DNA primers were selected from nucleic acid sequence data for Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins. Individual components of the PCR for each serotype (serotypes A through E) were adjusted for optimal amplification of the target fragment. Each PCR assay was tested with organisms expressing each of the botulinum neurotoxin types (types A through G), Clostridium tetani, genetically related nontoxigenic organisms, and unrelated strains. Each assay was specific for the intended target. The PCR reliably identified multiple strains having the same neurotoxin type. The sensitivity of the test was determined with different concentrations of genomic DNA from strains producing each toxin type. As little as 10 fg of DNA (approximately three clostridial cells) was detected. C. botulinum neurotoxin types A, B, and E, which are most commonly associated with human botulism, could be amplified from crude DNA extracts, from vegetative cells, and from spore preparations. This suggests that there is great potential for the PCR in the identification and detection of botulinum neurotoxin-producing strains. Images PMID:8215372

  11. Detection of avian group D rotavirus using the polymerase chain reaction for the VP6 gene.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Delana Andreza Melo; da Silva, René Ribeiro; Kaiano, Jane Haruko Lima; Silvestre, Rodrigo Vellasco Duarte; de Souza Oliveira, Darleise; Linhares, Alexandre C; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira

    2012-11-01

    Group D rotaviruses (RVs-D) have been documented in birds and, while they may be common in these animals, few molecular studies are available for this specific group. In this study, specific primers for the gene that encodes for the RVs-D VP6 protein were designed and used in a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Thirty pools of samples were tested by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) yielding a 30% (9/30) positivity. These pools were subjected subsequently to RT-PCR, with a 53% (16/30) positivity rate. The sensitivity of the PCR assay was demonstrated up to a dilution of 5 × 10(-4)ng/μL (0.5 pg/μL) of the cloned VP6 gene. The four samples were sequenced and showed 90.8-91.1% similarity with regards to the RVs-D VP6 gene. To assess for specificity our RT-PCR was applied to nine samples known to contain enteric viral agents other than group D rotaviruses including picobirnavirus, rotavirus group A, and reovirus with negative results. Overall, the data confirm the specificity of the primers used for detecting the RVs-D by RT-PCR, suggesting that this assay can be used for diagnostic purposes. PMID:22820073

  12. Evaluation of in-house polymerase chain reaction assay sensitivity, can it be utilized in limited-resources settings?

    PubMed Central

    Dorudinia, Atosa; Shamaei, Masoud; Karimi, Shirin; Javadi, Alireza; Mohammadi Ziazi, Leila; Pourabdollah, Mihan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay has widely used for the detection of tuberculosis (TB). This study tried to compare in-house PCR with some well-known commercial PCR kits for detection of TB agent. Methods: Clinical samples obtained from 620 TB suspected patients were analyzed for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) by in-house PCR. All samples were obtained through pulmonary specimens consisted of 384 sputum, 148 bronchial aspirates and 88 pleural effusions. Results: Considering culture as a golden criterion, in which its diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of PCR assay were 87.7% and 85.6%, respectively. The findings of this study also indicate 22.1% (137/620) of the specimens were detected as MTC by PCR. Both PCR and culture confirmed presence of MTC in 57 of the samples. In comparison to culture, the diagnostic sensitivity of PCR for sputum was 87.5% (42/48), bronchial aspirates 100% (12/12), and 60% (3/5) for pleural effusions. The sensitivity of in-house PCR method is comparable with the sensitivity of Amplicor and Cobas TaqMan for MTC. Conclusion: The study illustrates the in-house PCR assay for detection of MTC has high sensitivity and specificity versus approved commercial kits. This could be reliable test in the diagnosis of MTC in resource-limited countries. PMID:25679005

  13. Zoster ... "a lmost" ... sine herpete: diagnostic utility of real time-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Vena, Gino A; Apruzzi, Doriana; Vestita, Michelangelo; Calvario, Agata; Foti, Caterina; Cassano, Nicoletta

    2010-10-01

    Zoster sine herpete is a particular form of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection characterized by segmental pain and dysesthesia, without any cutaneous lesions ever becoming perceptible. This report describes the case of a female patient, presenting with intercostal pain associated with a single papulo-vesicular lesion localized within the same area. Thanks to such a lesion, real time-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis on vesicle fluid swab was possible, thus revealing a significant number of VZV genome copies. This innovative tool has proven essential to diagnose this abortive form of herpes zoster, which would otherwise have remained unidentified. PMID:21213602

  14. Chain Copolymerization Reactions: An Algorithm to Predict the Reaction Evolution with Conversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallardo, Alberto; Aguilar, Maria Rosa; Abraham, Gustavo A.; Roman, Julio San

    2004-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to study and understand the behavior of chain copolymerization reactions. When a binary copolymerization reaction follows the terminal model, Conversion is able to predict the evolution of different parameters, such as instantaneous and cumulative copolymer molar fractions, or molar fractions of any sequence with the…

  15. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with nested polymerase chain reaction analysis in enucleated eye ball in Eales' disease.

    PubMed

    Verma, Aditya; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Dhanurekha, L; Gayathri, R; Lily Therese, K

    2016-06-01

    Nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) was performed on enucleated eyeball for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) genome in a patient with Eales' disease. PCR analysis in all previous studies has been done mainly using aqueous, vitreous and epiretinal membranes from these patients. Paraffin wax embedded tissue section of the enucleated eyeball was analyzed by histopathology and nPCR targeting MPB64 gene and IS6110 region of M. tb genome. Lymphocytic infiltration was seen in the vitreous, iris and the retinal tissue. Ziehl Neelsen stain was negative for acid fast bacilli. Caseation necrosis was not seen in any section. Agarose gel electrophoretogram showed positive results with 200 bp specific amplified product targeting MPB64 gene, whereas nPCR targeting IS6110 region was negative. Since biopsy proven M. tb is extremely difficult in ocular tissues due to extensive necrosis, the nPCR technique aided in the diagnosis. PMID:26499903

  16. Direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in respiratory specimens in a clinical laboratory by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, B A; Hicks, K E

    1993-01-01

    The emergence of epidemic multiple-drug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in conjunction with an increase in the number of reported cases of tuberculosis (TB) represents a major public health problem. In light of a recent outbreak of MDR M. tuberculosis at our center, we began the development of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the rapid diagnosis of pulmonary TB using two sets of primers, one based on the IS6110 repeated sequence of M. tuberculosis and the other based on the protein antigen b (PAB). Reaction conditions were first optimized as to the appropriate extraction protocol and the concentrations of primer pairs, nucleotides, and MgCl2. Following a preliminary evaluation of the assay with clinical specimens, extraction and amplification procedures were further modified. PAB and IS6110 primers detected between 2 and 23 and 0.023 and 0.23 CFU of M. tuberculosis, respectively, in pooled, M. tuberculosis-negative sputa by our optimized PCR assay. After routine processing for mycobacteria, 734 specimens were subsequently amplified. DNA for amplification was obtained by boiling and beating the sediments with Tween 20. For each reaction, DNA (10 microliters) was added to an amplification mixture containing 12 pmol of IS6110 primers, 20 pmol of PAB primers, 2 mM MgCl2, 200 microM nucleotides, and 2.5 U of Taq polymerase and the mixture was then amplified for 40 cycles. The sensitivity and specificity of our PCR assay were 87.2 and 97.7%, respectively. We were unable to interpret the results for seven specimens (1%). In our experience, PCR proved to be a useful rapid diagnostic test for TB in a clinical setting and a valuable epidemiological tool for determining exposure groups in the hospital setting. Our findings also underscore the need for the systematic optimization of PCR assay conditions. Images PMID:8349744

  17. Detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA in salmonid tissues by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, D.M.; Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is an important salmonid pathogen that is difficult to culture. We developed and assessed a real-time, quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for the detection and enumeration of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR is based on TaqMan technology and amplifies a 69-base pair (bp) region of the gene encoding the major soluble antigen (MSA) of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR assay consistently detected as few as 5 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue. The specificity of the qPCR was confirmed by testing the DNA extracts from a panel of microorganisms that were either common fish pathogens or reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Kidney samples from 38 juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in a naturally infected population were examined by real-time qPCR, a nested PCR, and ELISA, and prevalences of R. salmoninarum detected were 71, 66, and 71%, respectively. The qPCR should be a valuable tool for evaluating the R. salmoninarum infection status of salmonids.

  18. Detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA in salmonid tissues by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Chase, Dorothy M; Elliott, Diane G; Pascho, Ronald J

    2006-07-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is an important salmonid pathogen that is difficult to culture. We developed and assessed a real-time, quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for the detection and enumeration of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR is based on TaqMan technology and amplifies a 69-base pair (bp) region of the gene encoding the major soluble antigen (MSA) of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR assay consistently detected as few as 5 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue. The specificity of the qPCR was confirmed by testing the DNA extracts from a panel of microorganisms that were either common fish pathogens or reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Kidney samples from 38 juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in a naturally infected population were examined by real-time qPCR, a nested PCR, and ELISA, and prevalences of R. salmoninarum detected were 71, 66, and 71%, respectively. The qPCR should be a valuable tool for evaluating the R. salmoninarum infection status of salmonids. PMID:16921877

  19. Influence of Pichia pastoris cellular material on polymerase chain reaction performance as a synthetic biology standard for genome monitoring.

    PubMed

    Templar, Alexander; Woodhouse, Stefan; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Nesbeth, Darren N

    2016-08-01

    Advances in synthetic genomics are now well underway in yeasts due to the low cost of synthetic DNA. These new capabilities also bring greater need for quantitating the presence, loss and rearrangement of loci within synthetic yeast genomes. Methods for achieving this will ideally; i) be robust to industrial settings, ii) adhere to a global standard and iii) be sufficiently rapid to enable at-line monitoring during cell growth. The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) is increasingly used for industrial production of biotherapeutic proteins so we sought to answer the following questions for this particular yeast species. Is time-consuming DNA purification necessary to obtain accurate end-point polymerase chain reaction (e-pPCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) data? Can the novel linear regression of efficiency qPCR method (LRE qPCR), which has properties desirable in a synthetic biology standard, match the accuracy of conventional qPCR? Does cell cultivation scale influence PCR performance? To answer these questions we performed e-pPCR and qPCR in the presence and absence of cellular material disrupted by a mild 30s sonication procedure. The e-pPCR limit of detection (LOD) for a genomic target locus was 50pg (4.91×10(3) copies) of purified genomic DNA (gDNA) but the presence of cellular material reduced this sensitivity sixfold to 300pg gDNA (2.95×10(4) copies). LRE qPCR matched the accuracy of a conventional standard curve qPCR method. The presence of material from bioreactor cultivation of up to OD600=80 did not significantly compromise the accuracy of LRE qPCR. We conclude that a simple and rapid cell disruption step is sufficient to render P. pastoris samples of up to OD600=80 amenable to analysis using LRE qPCR which we propose as a synthetic biology standard. PMID:27211507

  20. Epidemiological investigation of Salmonella tilene by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Chandar M; Fonseca, Kevin; Longmore, Ken; Rennie, Robert; Chui, Linda; Lingley, Mike; Woodward, David

    1997-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DNA fingerprinting by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed on 11 isolates of Salmonella tilene. Five strains were from a cluster of human patients, six from sugar gliders and pygmy hedgehogs kept as family pets or from local pet retailers, and one isolate from the first North American case of S tilene described in Washington State in 1994. The PFGE restriction patterns showed all isolates to be similar. However, PCR using primers to the 16S and 23S rRNA genes of Escherichia coli demonstrated that the Washington State isolate differed from the rest of the other isolates, which were all similar based upon their DNA fingerprint. This study indicates that reliance on one technique alone may be insufficient to show nuances between strains that are, in many respects, closely related. PMID:22346526

  1. Rapid multi sample DNA amplification using rotary-linear polymerase chain reaction device (PCRDisc).

    PubMed

    Sugumar, D; Kong, L X; Ismail, Asma; Ravichandran, M; Su Yin, Lee

    2012-03-01

    Multiple sample DNA amplification was done by using a novel rotary-linear motion polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device. A simple compact disc was used to create the stationary sample chambers which are individually temperature controlled. The PCR was performed by shuttling the samples to different temperature zones by using a combined rotary-linear movement of the disc. The device was successfully used to amplify up to 12 samples in less than 30 min with a sample volume of 5 μl. A simple spring loaded heater mechanism was introduced to enable good thermal contact between the samples and the heaters. Each of the heater temperatures are controlled by using a simple proportional-integral-derivative pulse width modulation control system. The results show a good improvement in the amplification rate and duration of the samples. The reagent volume used was reduced to nearly 25% of that used in conventional method. PMID:22685508

  2. Molecular characterization of Leishamania isolates from China by inter-simple sequence repeat polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Yuetao; Wang, Junyun; Bao, Yifang; Guan, Liren; Gao, Chunhua; Shi, Feng

    2010-05-01

    Leishmania has distinct epidemiological and biological characteristics and causes a variety of clinical symptoms. To understand the genetic diversity and the phylogenetic relationships among Leishmania isolates from China, 29 Leishmania isolates from different geographic origins, vectors, and hosts were analyzed using 21 inter-simple sequence repeat polymerase chain reaction (ISSR-PCR) primers. A total of 864 polymorphic bands were obtained. According to the results of the neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree and principal component analysis, the 29 isolates studied clustered into six groups. Isolates of Leishmania donovani complex from China share the highest similarity with the reference strain of L. donovani (DD8). This study helps to elucidate the genetic relationship among Leishmania isolates from China and similarities between Chinese isolates and World Health Organization reference strains. Furthermore, ISSR-PCR could also be a quick, simple, and reliable method for Leishmania species identification. PMID:20237800

  3. Rapid multi sample DNA amplification using rotary-linear polymerase chain reaction device (PCRDisc)

    PubMed Central

    Sugumar, D.; Kong, L. X.; Ismail, Asma; Ravichandran, M.; Su Yin, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sample DNA amplification was done by using a novel rotary-linear motion polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device. A simple compact disc was used to create the stationary sample chambers which are individually temperature controlled. The PCR was performed by shuttling the samples to different temperature zones by using a combined rotary-linear movement of the disc. The device was successfully used to amplify up to 12 samples in less than 30 min with a sample volume of 5 μl. A simple spring loaded heater mechanism was introduced to enable good thermal contact between the samples and the heaters. Each of the heater temperatures are controlled by using a simple proportional–integral–derivative pulse width modulation control system. The results show a good improvement in the amplification rate and duration of the samples. The reagent volume used was reduced to nearly 25% of that used in conventional method. PMID:22685508

  4. Detection of the Pinewood Nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, Using a Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay.

    PubMed

    Cao, A X; Liu, X Z; Zhu, S F; Lu, B S

    2005-05-01

    ABSTRACT The pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, has caused significant damage to pine plantations both in East Asia and North America and is an important quarantine organism. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to detect B. xylophilus. A set of primers and probe specific for B. xylophilus was designed to target the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region. Optimal primer concentration, Mg(2+) concentration, and extension temperature were 400 nM, 3.0 mM, and 60 degrees C, respectively. The assay was highly specific and sensitive, detecting as little as 0.01 ng of B. xylophilus DNA. The real-time PCR assay also successfully detected B. xylophilus in field samples, and it should be very useful for quarantine purposes. PMID:18943323

  5. Midtrimester fetal herpes simplex-2 diagnosis by serology, culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Curtin, William M; Menegus, Marilyn A; Patru, Maria-Magdalena; Peterson, C Jeanne; Metlay, Leon A; Mooney, Robert A; Stanwood, Nancy L; Scheible, Amy L; Dorgan, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of herpes simplex virus (HSV) in utero comprises a minority of neonatal herpes infections. Prenatal diagnosis is rare. We describe a midtrimester diagnosis of fetal HSV-2 infection. Ultrasound at 20 weeks for elevated maternal serum α-fetoprotein (MSAFP) showed lagging fetal growth, echogenic bowel, echogenic myocardium, and liver with a mottled pattern of echogenicity. Amniocentesis demonstrated normal karyotype, elevated AFP and positive acetylcholinesterase. Culture isolated HSV-2 with an aberrant growth pattern. Maternal serology was positive for HSV-2. Quantitative DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed 59 million copies/ml. Fetal autopsy demonstrated widespread tissue necrosis but only sparse HSV-2 inclusions. Fetal HSV-2 infection can be suspected when an elevated MSAFP accompanies ultrasound findings suggesting perinatal infection. Maternal HSV serology, amniotic fluid culture and quantitative PCR are recommended for diagnostic certainty and counseling. PMID:23075531

  6. Polymerase Chain Reaction Diagnosis of Leishmaniasis: A Species-Specific Approach.

    PubMed

    González-Marcano, Eglys; Kato, Hirotomo; Concepción, Juan Luis; Márquez, María Elizabeth; Mondolfi, Alberto Paniz

    2016-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is an infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania which are transmitted to humans through bites of infected sand flies. The variable clinical manifestations and the evolution of the disease are determined by the infecting species. Recognition at a species level is of utmost importance since this greatly impacts therapy decision making as well as predicts outcome for the disease. This chapter describes the application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the detection of Leishmania parasites across the disease spectrum, including protocols for sample collection and transportation, genomic material extraction, and target amplification methods with special emphasis on PCR amplification of the cytochrome b gene for Leishmania spp. species identification. PMID:26843051

  7. Detection of Avian bornavirus in multiple tissues of infected psittacine birds using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Delnatte, Pauline; Mak, Matthew; Ojkic, Davor; Raghav, Raj; DeLay, Josepha; Smith, Dale A

    2014-03-01

    Avian bornavirus (ABV), the cause of proventricular dilation disease in psittacine birds, has been detected in multiple tissues of infected birds using immunohistochemical staining (IHC) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the current study, real-time RT-PCR, using primers targeting the ABV matrix gene, was used to detect ABV in 146 tissues from 7 ABV-infected psittacine birds. Eighty-six percent of the samples tested positive, with crossing point values ranging from 13.82 to 37.82 and a mean of 22.3. These results were compared to the findings of a previous study using gel-based RT-PCR and IHC on the same samples. The agreement between the 2 RT-PCR techniques was 91%; when tests disagreed it was because samples were negative using gel-based RT-PCR but positive on real-time RT-PCR. Agreement with IHC was 77%; 16 out of 74 samples were negative using IHC but positive on real-time RT-PCR. The results suggest that real-time RT-PCR is a more sensitive technique than gel-based RT-PCR and IHC to detect ABV in tissues. The tissues that were ranked most frequently as having a high amount of viral RNA were proventriculus, kidney, colon, cerebrum, and cerebellum. Skeletal muscle, on the other hand, was found to have a consistently low amount of viral RNA. PMID:24518276

  8. Development of a rapid and sensitive polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bovine herpesvirus type 1 in bovine semen.

    PubMed Central

    van Engelenburg, F A; Maes, R K; van Oirschot, J T; Rijsewijk, F A

    1993-01-01

    We developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to detect bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) in bovine semen. Since bovine semen contains components that inhibit PCR amplification, a protocol was developed to purify BHV-1 DNA from bovine semen. To identify failures of PCR amplification, we used an internal control template that was coamplified by the same PCR primers. When separated fractions of BHV-1-contaminated semen were analyzed by the PCR, we found that more than 90% of the BHV-1 DNA was present in a pooled fraction consisting of seminal fluid, nonsperm cells, and virus adsorbed to spermatozoa. By using this fraction, three to five molecules of BHV-1 DNA in 50 microliters of bovine semen could be detected. A pilot study to compare this PCR assay with the routinely used virus isolation method showed that this PCR assay is 2- to 100-fold more sensitive. In addition, the results of the PCR assay are available in 1 day, whereas the virus isolation method takes 7 days. Therefore, the PCR assay may be a good alternative to the virus isolation method. Images PMID:8308103

  9. Reaction chain modeling of denitrification reactions during a push-pull test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisson, A.; de Anna, P.; Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Labasque, T.; Aquilina, L.

    2013-05-01

    Field quantitative estimation of reaction kinetics is required to enhance our understanding of biogeochemical reactions in aquifers. We extended the analytical solution developed by Haggerty et al. (1998) to model an entire 1st order reaction chain and estimate the kinetic parameters for each reaction step of the denitrification process. We then assessed the ability of this reaction chain to model biogeochemical reactions by comparing it with experimental results from a push-pull test in a fractured crystalline aquifer (Ploemeur, French Brittany). Nitrates were used as the reactive tracer, since denitrification involves the sequential reduction of nitrates to nitrogen gas through a chain reaction (NO3- → NO2- → NO → N2O → N2) under anaerobic conditions. The kinetics of nitrate consumption and by-product formation (NO2-, N2O) during autotrophic denitrification were quantified by using a reactive tracer (NO3-) and a non-reactive tracer (Br-). The formation of reaction by-products (NO2-, N2O, N2) has not been previously considered using a reaction chain approach. Comparison of Br- and NO3- breakthrough curves showed that 10% of the injected NO3- molar mass was transformed during the 12 h experiment (2% into NO2-, 1% into N2O and the rest into N2 and NO). Similar results, but with slower kinetics, were obtained from laboratory experiments in reactors. The good agreement between the model and the field data shows that the complete denitrification process can be efficiently modeled as a sequence of first order reactions. The 1st order kinetics coefficients obtained through modeling were as follows: k1 = 0.023 h- 1, k2 = 0.59 h- 1, k3 = 16 h- 1, and k4 = 5.5 h- 1. A next step will be to assess the variability of field reactivity using the methodology developed for modeling push-pull tracer tests.

  10. Reaction chain modeling of denitrification reactions during a push-pull test.

    PubMed

    Boisson, A; de Anna, P; Bour, O; Le Borgne, T; Labasque, T; Aquilina, L

    2013-05-01

    Field quantitative estimation of reaction kinetics is required to enhance our understanding of biogeochemical reactions in aquifers. We extended the analytical solution developed by Haggerty et al. (1998) to model an entire 1st order reaction chain and estimate the kinetic parameters for each reaction step of the denitrification process. We then assessed the ability of this reaction chain to model biogeochemical reactions by comparing it with experimental results from a push-pull test in a fractured crystalline aquifer (Ploemeur, French Brittany). Nitrates were used as the reactive tracer, since denitrification involves the sequential reduction of nitrates to nitrogen gas through a chain reaction (NO3(-)→NO2(-)→NO→N2O→N2) under anaerobic conditions. The kinetics of nitrate consumption and by-product formation (NO2(-), N2O) during autotrophic denitrification were quantified by using a reactive tracer (NO3(-)) and a non-reactive tracer (Br(-)). The formation of reaction by-products (NO2(-), N2O, N2) has not been previously considered using a reaction chain approach. Comparison of Br(-) and NO3(-) breakthrough curves showed that 10% of the injected NO3(-) molar mass was transformed during the 12 h experiment (2% into NO2(-), 1% into N2O and the rest into N2 and NO). Similar results, but with slower kinetics, were obtained from laboratory experiments in reactors. The good agreement between the model and the field data shows that the complete denitrification process can be efficiently modeled as a sequence of first order reactions. The 1st order kinetics coefficients obtained through modeling were as follows: k1=0.023 h(-1), k2=0.59 h(-1), k3=16 h(-1), and k4=5.5 h(-1). A next step will be to assess the variability of field reactivity using the methodology developed for modeling push-pull tracer tests. PMID:23500936

  11. Rapid detection of sacbrood virus in honeybee using ultra-rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Mi-Sun; Thi, Kim Cuc Nguyen; Van Nguyen, Phu; Han, Sang-Hoon; Kwon, Soon-Hwan; Yoon, Byoung-Su

    2012-01-01

    A real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay was developed for the fast and highly sensitive detection of the sacbrood virus (SBV) genome and applied to honeybee samples. Using plasmid DNA containing a partial SBV genome and diluted serially, as few as 1×10(2)copies/μl (correlation co-efficiency >0.99) were detected by the qRT-PCR assay, whereas 1×10(3)copies/μl were detected by the conventional RT-PCR assay. As a rapid detection method, ultra-rapid real-time PCR (URRT-PCR) was carried out with a GenSpector TMC-1000 silicon-glass chip-based thermal cycler, which has a 6μl micro-chamber volume and a fast outstandingly heating/cooling rate. Using this method, 10(3)copies of pBX-SBV3.8 clone were detected within 17 min after 40 PCR cycles, including melting point analysis. To reduce the detection time for SBV, synthesis of the cDNA of the SBV genome from a honeybee sample was attempted for different reaction times and the cDNA was used as the template for URRT-PCR assays. The results indicated that a 5 min reaction time was sufficient to synthesize cDNA as the template for the SBV URRT-PCR assay. This study described a novel PCR-based method that is able to detect an RNA virus in environmental samples within 22 min, including reverse transcription, PCR detection and melting point analysis in real-time. PMID:22079620

  12. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  13. A Unique Primer with an Inosine Chain at the 5′-Terminus Improves the Reliability of SNP Analysis Using the PCR-Amplified Product Length Polymorphism Method

    PubMed Central

    Shojo, Hideki; Tanaka, Mayumi; Takahashi, Ryohei; Kakuda, Tsuneo; Adachi, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-amplified product length polymorphism (PCR-APLP) is one of the most convenient and reliable methods for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. This method is based on PCR, but uses allele-specific primers containing SNP sites at the 3′-terminus of each primer. To use this method at least two allele-specific primers and one “counter-primer”, which serves as a common forward or reverse primer of the allele-specific primers, are required. The allele-specific primers have SNP sites at the 3′-terminus, and another primer should have a few non-complementary flaps at the 5′-terminus to detect SNPs by determining the difference of amplicon length by PCR and subsequent electrophoresis. A major disadvantage of the addition of a non-complementary flap is the non-specific annealing of the primer with non-complementary flaps. However, a design principle for avoiding this undesired annealing has not been fully established, therefore, it is often difficult to design effective APLP primers. Here, we report allele-specific primers with an inosine chain at the 5′-terminus for PCR-APLP analysis. This unique design improves the competitiveness of allele-specific primers and the reliability of SNP analysis when using the PCR-APLP method. PMID:26381262

  14. Utility of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction in Leptospirosis Diagnosis: Association of Level of Leptospiremia and Clinical Manifestations in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Agampodi, Suneth B.; Matthias, Michael A.; Moreno, Angelo C.

    2012-01-01

    (See the Editorial Commentary by Katz, on pages 1256–8.) Background. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), despite cost and logistical challenges, has the potential to provide accurate and timely diagnosis for leptospirosis at the point-of-care in endemic areas. We studied optimal sample types for qPCR, timing of sampling, and clinical manifestations in relation to quantitative leptospiremia. Methods. A new qPCR assay using pathogenic Leptospira-specific 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene Taqman primers and an optimized temperature stepdown protocol was used to analyze patient blood samples. Serum was compared with whole blood as sample source. Quantitative leptospiremia was compared with clinical manifestations of leptospirosis and outcome. Results. The diagnostic sensitivity of qPCR of whole blood and serum was 18.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.97%–31.4%) and 51.0% (95% CI: 37.5%–64.4%) respectively. The qPCR on suspected cases confirmed infection in 58 of 381 cases (15.2%). Of these, 6 cases confirmed by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing were serologically negative using a standard but not regionally optimized microscopic agglutination test panel. The bacterial load in serum/blood ranged from 102 to 106 Leptospira/mL. Median leptospiral load for uncomplicated, renal failure, myocarditis, and multi-organ failure patients were 8616, 11007, 36100, and 15882 Leptospira/mL respectively. The qPCR window of positivity ranged from day 2 to day 15; sensitivity of qPCR was not affected by the length of the interval between the onset of symptoms and sample collection (P = .328). Conclusions. Quantitative PCR shows potential as a valid diagnostic test with a wider window of positivity than previously thought. Quantitative leptospiremia in serum/whole blood samples did not directly correlate with clinical manifestations of outcome in this patient population. PMID:22354922

  15. Specific and Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Clinical Samples by Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anamika; Kashyap, Vijendra Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis, a global health problem and highly prevalent in India, has always been a serious problem with respect to definitive diagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques are now widely used for early detection and species differentiation of mycobacteria, but mostly with their own limitations. We aim to detect and differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections by choosing appropriate target sequences, ideally present in all mycobacterial species (MTB complex) and absent in others. Methods. Amplification of three target sequences from unrelated genes, namely, hsp 65 (165 bp), dnaJ (365 bp), and insertion element IS 6110 (541 bp) by PCR was carried out in clinical samples from suspected cases of tuberculosis/ mycobacterioses and healthy controls. Results. The sensitivity of this method ranged from 73.33% to 84.61%, and the specificity was 80%. The PCR method was significantly better (P = 0.03 and P = 0.009) than both smear and culture methods. Conclusion. Our trimarker-based PCR method could specifically detect M. tuberculosis and MTB complex infection from that of major pathogenic NTM and nonpathogenic mycobacteria. This method, by well distinguishing between MTB complex and NTM, presented a fast and accurate method to detect and diagnose mycobacterial infections more efficiently and could thereby help in better patient management particularly considering the increase in mycobacterial infections due to emergence of NTM over the past decades. PMID:23093958

  16. Detection of bovine group B rotaviruses in feces by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Chinsangaram, J; Akita, G Y; Osburn, B I

    1994-07-01

    A pair of primers designed from the sequence of genome segment 9 of group B rat rotavirus (IDIR) were employed to amplify genome segment 9 of a group B bovine rotavirus in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and to sequence the derived PCR products. A new pair of primers were synthesized from the obtained sequence data and used in a PCR detection assay for group B bovine rotavirus in fecal samples. In addition, another pair of primers were designed to produce a PCR-derived internal probe. This probe was used in a chemiluminescent hybridization to confirm the specificity and to increase the sensitivity of the assay. This assay could detect 0.1 fg of target double-stranded RNA. It was specific to group B bovine rotavirus and did not detect group B rat (IDIR) and porcine rotaviruses, group A bovine (NCDV), simian (SA-11), equine (H-2), porcine (OSU), human (DS-1), deer, and avian rotaviruses, coronavirus, or other enteric organisms tested in this study. PMID:7948199

  17. Polymerase chain reaction-based analysis to detect terrestrial animal protein in fish meal.

    PubMed

    Bellagamba, Federica; Valfrè, Franco; Panseri, Sara; Moretti, Vittorio M

    2003-04-01

    The recent European bovine spongiform encephalopathy crisis has focused attention on the importance of adopting stringent control measures to avoid the risk of the diffusion of mad cow disease through meat meal-based animal feedstuffs. Potential adulteration of such feedstuffs with bone particles from terrestrial animals is determined by microscopic examination by law before the release of these feedstuffs for free circulation in the European Community. This study describes a DNA monitoring method to examine fish meal for contamination with mammalian and poultry products. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method based on the nucleotide sequence variation in the 12S ribosomal RNA gene of mitochondrial DNA was developed and evaluated. Three species-specific primer pairs were designed for the identification of ruminant, pig, and poultry DNA. The specificity of the primers used in the PCR was tested by comparison with DNA samples for several vertebrate species and confirmed. The PCR specifically detected mammalian and poultry adulteration in fish meals containing 0.125% beef, 0.125% sheep, 0.125% pig, 0.125% chicken, and 0.5% goat. A multiplex PCR assay for ruminant and pig adulteration was optimized and had a detection limit of 0.25%. PMID:12696697

  18. Detection of coliform bacteria in water by polymerase chain reaction and gene probes.

    PubMed Central

    Bej, A K; Steffan, R J; DiCesare, J; Haff, L; Atlas, R M

    1990-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and gene probe detection of regions of two genes, lacZ and lamB, were tested for their abilities to detect coliform bacteria. Amplification of a segment of the coding region of Escherichia coli lacZ by using a PCR primer annealing temperature of 50 degrees C detected E. coli and other coliform bacteria (including Shigella spp.) but not Salmonella spp. and noncoliform bacteria. Amplification of a region of E. coli lamB by using a primer annealing temperature of 50 degrees C selectively detected E. coli and Salmonella and Shigella spp. PCR amplification and radiolabeled gene probes detected as little as 1 to 10 fg of genomic E. coli DNA and as a few as 1 to 5 viable E. coli cells in 100 ml of water. PCR amplification of lacZ and lamB provides a basis for a method to detect indicators of fecal contamination of water, and amplification of lamB in particular permits detection of E. coli and enteric pathogens (Salmonella and Shigella spp.) with the necessary specificity and sensitivity for monitoring the bacteriological quality of water so as to ensure the safety of water supplies. Images PMID:2306085

  19. Diagnosis of Whooping Cough in Switzerland: Differentiating Bordetella pertussis from Bordetella holmesii by Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, Laure F.; Emonet, Stéphane; François, Patrice; Bonetti, Eve-Julie; Schrenzel, Jacques; Hug, Melanie; Altwegg, Martin; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M.

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella holmesii, an emerging pathogen, can be misidentified as Bordetella pertussis by routine polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In some reports, up to 29% of the patients diagnosed with pertussis have in fact B. holmesii infection and invasive, non-respiratory B. holmesii infections have been reported worldwide. This misdiagnosis undermines the knowledge of pertussis' epidemiology, and may lead to misconceptions on pertussis vaccine's efficacy. Recently, the number of whooping cough cases has increased significantly in several countries. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether B. holmesii was contributing to the increase in laboratory-confirmed cases of B. pertussis in Switzerland. A multiplex species-specific quantitative PCR assay was performed on 196 nasopharyngeal samples from Swiss patients with PCR-confirmed Bordetella infection (median age: 6 years-old, minimum 21 days-old, maximum 86 years-old), formerly diagnosed as Bordetella pertussis (IS481+). No B. holmesii (IS481+, IS1001−, hIS1001+) was identified. We discuss whether laboratories should implement specific PCR to recognize different Bordetella species. We conclude that in Switzerland B. holmesii seems to be circulating less than in neighboring countries and that specific diagnostic procedures are not necessary routinely. However, as the epidemiological situation may change rapidly, periodic reevaluation is suggested. PMID:24586447

  20. Diagnosis of whooping cough in Switzerland: differentiating Bordetella pertussis from Bordetella holmesii by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Laure F; Emonet, Stéphane; François, Patrice; Bonetti, Eve-Julie; Schrenzel, Jacques; Hug, Melanie; Altwegg, Martin; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella holmesii, an emerging pathogen, can be misidentified as Bordetella pertussis by routine polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In some reports, up to 29% of the patients diagnosed with pertussis have in fact B. holmesii infection and invasive, non-respiratory B. holmesii infections have been reported worldwide. This misdiagnosis undermines the knowledge of pertussis' epidemiology, and may lead to misconceptions on pertussis vaccine's efficacy. Recently, the number of whooping cough cases has increased significantly in several countries. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether B. holmesii was contributing to the increase in laboratory-confirmed cases of B. pertussis in Switzerland. A multiplex species-specific quantitative PCR assay was performed on 196 nasopharyngeal samples from Swiss patients with PCR-confirmed Bordetella infection (median age: 6 years-old, minimum 21 days-old, maximum 86 years-old), formerly diagnosed as Bordetella pertussis (IS481+). No B. holmesii (IS481+, IS1001-, hIS1001+) was identified. We discuss whether laboratories should implement specific PCR to recognize different Bordetella species. We conclude that in Switzerland B. holmesii seems to be circulating less than in neighboring countries and that specific diagnostic procedures are not necessary routinely. However, as the epidemiological situation may change rapidly, periodic reevaluation is suggested. PMID:24586447

  1. Sensitive detection of Treponema pallidum by using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Burstain, J M; Grimprel, E; Lukehart, S A; Norgard, M V; Radolf, J D

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a sensitive assay for Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (T. pallidum), the agent of veneral syphilis, based upon the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A 658-bp portion of the gene encoding the 47-kDa membrane immunogen was amplified, and the PCR products were probed by DNA-DNA hybridization with a 496-bp fragment internal to the amplitifed DNA. The assay detected approximately 0.01 pg of purified T. pallidum DNA, and positive results were obtained routinely from suspensions of treponemes calculated to contain 10 or more organism and from some suspensions calculated to contain a single organism. Specific PCR products were obtained for the closely related agent of yaws, Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue, but not with human DNA or DNAs from other spirochetes (including Borrelia burgdoferi), skin microorganisms, sexually transmitted disease pathogens, and central nervous system pathogens. T. pallidum DNA was detected in serum, cerebrospinal fluids, and amniotic fluids from syphilis patients but not in in nonsyphilitic controls. T. pallidum DNA was also amplified from paraffin-embedded tissue. The diagnosis of syphillis by using PCR may become a significant addition to the diagnostic armamentarium and a valuable technique for the investigation of syphilis pathogenesis. Images PMID:1993770

  2. Specific detection of banana residue in processed foods using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yumiko; Ishihata, Kimie; Nakano, Shigeru; Yamada, Toshihiro; Yano, Takeo; Uchida, Kouji; Nakao, Yoshiki; Urisu, Atsuo; Adachi, Reiko; Teshima, Reiko; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2010-07-28

    Specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods were developed for the detection of banana residue in processed foods. For high banana specificity, the primer set BAN-F/BAN-R was designed on the basis of the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcL) genes of chloroplasts and used to obtain amplified products specific to banana by both conventional and real-time PCR. To confirm the specificity of these methods, genomic DNA samples from 31 other species were examined; no amplification products were detected. Subsequently, eight kinds of processed foods containing banana were investigated using these methods to confirm the presence of banana DNA. Conventional PCR had a detection limit of 1 ppm (w/w) banana DNA spiked in 50 ng of salmon testis DNA, whereas SYBR Green I real-time semiquantitative PCR had a detection limit as low as 10 ppm banana DNA. Thus, both methods show high sensitivity and may be applicable as specific tools for the detection of trace amounts of banana in commercial food products. PMID:20604506

  3. Application of polymerase chain reaction for detection of Legionella pneumophila in serum samples.

    PubMed

    Alexiou-Daniel, S.; Stylianakis, A.; Papoutsi, A.; Zorbas, I.; Papa, A.; Lambropoulos, A.F.; Antoniadis, A.

    1998-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To apply the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to serum samples for the rapid diagnosis of Legionnaire's disease using the L5SL9 and L5SR93 primers designed to generate a 104-base-pair (bp) fragment from the 5S RNA gene of Legionella spp. The amplified product was detected by electrophoresis and by hybridization with the L5S-1-specific probe. METHODS: Single specimens of serum obtained from 24 patients with confirmed legionellosis, at different stages of their disease, were tested by PCR. Additionally, 10 serum samples from patients with no clinical symptoms of pneumonia and 10 samples from patients suffering from pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Coxiella burnetii or Chlamydia psittaci were also tested as controls in order to determine the specificity of the method. RESULTS: Of the 24 examined serum samples, the amplified products from 12 hybridized with the L5S-1 probe (sensitivity 50%). None of the negative controls was positive after PCR. No correlation was found between the day of illness and the positivity in the test. CONCLUSIONS: The PCR technique could be applied as a diagnostic tool for the rapid diagnosis of legionellosis in serum samples after modification, mainly to improve its sensitivity. PMID:11864308

  4. Classification of mutations at the HLA-A locus by use of the polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, G.; Grist, S.; Firgaira, F.; Turner, D.; Morley, A. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors investigated whether the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) could be used to determine the mechanism of mutation in lymphocyte clones mutated at the HLA-A locus. Three polymorphisms, at Factor XIIIA, D6S109, and intron 3 of the HLA-A gene, were used to study a series of clones previously characterized by Southern blotting (SB) at multiple loci on chromosome 6. For detection of loss of heterozygosity, the results of PCR and SB were concordant in 140 of 141 clones when polymorphism in the Factor XIIIA region was studied and in 144 of 145 clones when polymorphism in the HLA-A gene was studied. For classification of the mechanism of mutation, PCR and SB gave the same result in 88 of 92 clones (96%) when a combination of the HLA-A and Factor XIIIA polymorphisms was used and in 46 of 47 clones (98%) when a combination of the HLA-A and D6S109 polymorphisms was used. The results indicate that PCR provides a simple and reliable method for categorizing mutations at the HLA-A locus as arising from mitotic recombination, deletion, or from presumptive minor changes within the gene. Rare events such as gene conversion, nondisjunction, or large deletions extending to the telomere will be misclassified. However, such events are rare for mutations at this locus. 9 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Specific detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Oyofo, B A; Thornton, S A; Burr, D H; Trust, T J; Pavlovskis, O R; Guerry, P

    1992-01-01

    Development of a routine detection assay for Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in clinical specimens was undertaken by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). An oligonucleotide primer pair from a conserved 5' region of the flaA gene of C. coli VC167 was used to amplify a 450-bp region by PCR. The primer pair specifically detected 4 strains of C. coli and 47 strains of C. jejuni; but it did not detect strains of Campylobacter fetus, Campylobacter lari, Campylobacter upsaliensis, Campylobacter cryaerophila, Campylobacter butzleri, Campylobacter hyointestinalis, Wolinella recta, Helicobacter pylori, Escherichia coli, Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., Vibrio cholerae, Citrobacter freundii, or Aeromonas spp. By using a nonradioactively labeled probe internal to the PCR product, the assay could detect as little as 0.0062 pg of purified C. coli DNA, or the equivalent of four bacteria. In stools seeded with C. coli cells, the probe could detect between 30 and 60 bacteria per PCR assay. The assay was also successfully used to detect C. coli in rectal swab specimens from experimentally infected rabbits and C. jejuni in human stool samples. Images PMID:1400961

  6. Evaluation of a rapid polymerase chain reaction based identification technique for Vibrio cholerae isolates.

    PubMed

    le Roux, W J; Masoabi, D; de Wet, C M E; Venter, S N

    2004-01-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of waterborne pathogens, such as Vibrio cholerae, in drinking-water sources is important to enable effective resource management and public health protection. Phenotypic systems currently being used for the identification of Vibrio cholerae isolates are time-consuming and the need exists for the development of suitable molecular techniques that can offer both fast and reliable identification. During this study, isolates identified as Vibrio cholerae by means of two different biochemical test systems (API 20E and VITEK 32) were analysed with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare the reliability of the various identification systems. The selected PCR technique amplified a sequence within the outer membrane protein of Vibrio cholerae, a gene specific for V. cholerae. It was found that out of 243 isolates biochemically identified as V. cholerae with either the API or VITEK system, 21 isolates did not give a positive result with the PCR detection method. Sequencing the 16S rDNA of more than half of these isolates and comparison of the sequences with Internet databases indicated that most of the isolates belonged to the genus Aeromonas. The results indicated that the rapid PCR procedure was more accurate than the API or VITEK systems currently being used for the phenotypic identification of Vibrio cholerae isolates. PMID:15318514

  7. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in salmon using the Probelia polymerase chain reaction system.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jason; King, Kerryn; Forsyth, Santina; Coventry, M John

    2003-03-01

    A validation was conducted on the performance of a commercially available polymerase chain reaction (PCR) kit (Probelia) in comparison with International Organization for Standardization (ISO) method 11290-1 (adopted as an Australian New Zealand Standard Method, AS/NZS 1766.2.16.1:1998) for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in salmon samples. The validation was conducted following the guidelines of an Australian New Zealand Standard (Guide to Determining the Equivalence of Food Microbiology Test Methods, Part 1, Qualitative Tests, AS/NZS 4659.1:1999), which adopts an approach similar to that recommended by the Association of Analytical Communities Microbiology Method Validation Program for Performance Tested and Peer Verified Methods. The validation study involved the use of five cultures of L. monocytogenes, each challenged at a single level of inoculation into five different types of salmon samples. A total of 60 salmon samples (30 unchallenged and 30 challenged) were tested using both the PCR method and the ISO method. Results from this study indicated that the Probelia PCR method is equivalent to the ISO method. In addition, the detection sensitivity of the Probelia PCR system was determined as approximately 0.5 CFU per PCR assay (equivalent to 20 CFU/ml broth culture) for a pure culture of L. monocytogenes. The Probelia PCR method offers the advantage of detecting L. monocytogenes to genetic specificity within 48 to 50 h, whereas the ISO method requires 5 days for negative results with additional days for confirmed positive results by the use of other biochemical and cultural tests. PMID:12636297

  8. Detection of trypanosomes in suspected sleeping sickness patients in Uganda using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Kyambadde, J. W.; Enyaru, J. C.; Matovu, E.; Odiit, M.; Carasco, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    Diagnosis of sleeping sickness (trypanosomiasis) is difficult because of the fluctuating levels of parasitaemia encountered in patients. In the present study we found that the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) demonstrated trypanosome infection in 20 out of 35 (57.1%) blood samples and in 21 out of 34 (61.7%) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected from an area endemic for sleeping sickness in north-west Uganda. A total of 14 blood samples and 13 CSF samples that were positive for trypanosomes by double centrifugation were also positive by PCR, demonstrating good concordance between the two methods. However, 6 (28.6%) of the 21 blood samples that were parasitologically negative were positive by PCR, while 8 (38.0%) out of 21 CSF samples that were negative by double centrifugation were positive by PCR. These 14 negative samples could therefore be from sleeping sickness cases even though a positive PCR test is not evidence for the presence of trypanosomes. Furthermore, of these 8 CSF samples, 4 had been designated as early cases, based on the absence of trypanosomes and on a count of < or = 5 white blood cells (WBC) per microliter. This suggests that some late-stage cases could potentially be missed according to the present criteria, and it is therefore important to perform clinical trials to determine whether these cases could be treated successfully with the first-stage drug alone. The remaining four CSF samples had been classified as late-stage cases, based on a count of > 6 WBC per microliter, even though trypanosomes could not be detected in these samples by either double centrifugation or PCR. A cut-off point of 5 WBC per microliter, which is used as a rule of thumb to stage sleeping sickness patients, seems to leave some late-stage cases undetected since trypanosomes were detected in four CSF samples from suspected cases with < 5 WBC per microliter. PMID:10686746

  9. Fabrication of Polymerase Chain Reaction Plastic Lab-on-a-Chip Device for Rapid Molecular Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We aim to fabricate a thermoplastic poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) Lab-on-a-Chip device to perform continuous- flow polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) for rapid molecular detection of foodborne pathogen bacteria. Methods: A miniaturized plastic device was fabricated by utilizing PMMA substrates mediated by poly(dimethylsiloxane) interfacial coating, enabling bonding under mild conditions, and thus avoiding the deformation or collapse of microchannels. Surface characterizations were carried out and bond strength was measured. The feasibility of the Lab-on-a-Chip device for performing on-chip PCR utilizing a lab-made, portable dual heater was evaluated. The results were compared with those obtained using a commercially available thermal cycler. Results: A PMMA Lab-on-a-Chip device was designed and fabricated for conducting PCR using foodborne pathogens as sample targets. A robust bond was established between the PMMA substrates, which is essential for performing miniaturized PCR on plastic. The feasibility of on-chip PCR was evaluated using Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Cronobacter condimenti, two worldwide foodborne pathogens, and the target amplicons were successfully amplified within 25 minutes. Conclusions: In this study, we present a novel design of a low-cost and high-throughput thermoplastic PMMA Lab-on-a-Chip device for conducting microscale PCR, and we enable rapid molecular diagnoses of two important foodborne pathogens in minute resolution using this device. In this regard, the introduced highly portable system design has the potential to enable PCR investigations of many diseases quickly and accurately. PMID:27230459

  10. Improvement in the Thermal Stability of Pyrophosphatase by Conjugation to Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide): Application to the Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuecheng; Liu, Feng; Li, Xin; Wang, Lei; Wang, Hongwei; Chen, Gaojian; Yuan, Lin; Brash, John L; Chen, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid amplification. However, the PCR is inhibited in its yield due to its byproduct, pyrophosphate (PPi), a byproduct of the reaction; the yield is thereby limited. The conventional method for hydrolysis of PPi by pyrophosphatase (PPase) is not well adapted for operation at elevated temperatures over long times as required during the PCR. In this work, we reported a strategy to improve the PCR yield using a conjugate of the enzyme with the thermally responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM). Pyrophosphatase (PPase) was conjugated to PNIPAM site-specifically near the active center. As compared to the free enzyme, the optimum temperature of the conjugate was shown to increase from 45 to 60 °C. For the conjugate, about 77% enzyme activity was retained after incubation at 60 °C for 3 h, representing a 6.8-fold increase as compared to the unconjugated enzyme. For the PCR using the conjugate, the yield was 1.5-fold greater than using the unconjugated enzyme. As well as improving the yield of the PCR (and possibly other biological reactions) at elevated temperature, polymer conjugation may also provide a strategy to improve the heat resistance of proteins more generally. PMID:26373436

  11. One-heater flow-through polymerase chain reaction device by heat pipes cooling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jyh Jian; Liao, Ming Huei; Li, Kun Tze; Shen, Chia Ming

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a novel microfluidic reactor capable of flow-through polymerase chain reactions (PCR). For one-heater PCR devices in previous studies, comprehensive simulations and experiments for the chip geometry and the heater arrangement were usually needed before the fabrication of the device. In order to improve the flexibility of the one-heater PCR device, two heat pipes with one fan are used to create the requisite temperature regions in our device. With the integration of one heater onto the chip, the high temperature required for the denaturation stage can be generated at the chip center. By arranging the heat pipes on the opposite sides of the chip, the low temperature needed for the annealing stage is easy to regulate. Numerical calculations and thermal measurements have shown that the temperature distribution in the five-temperature-region PCR chip would be suitable for DNA amplification. In order to ensure temperature uniformity at specific reaction regions, the Re of the sample flow is less than 1. When the microchannel width increases and then decreases gradually between the denaturation and annealing regions, the extension region located in the enlarged part of the channel can be observed numerically and experimentally. From the simulations, the residence time at the extension region with the enlarged channel is 4.25 times longer than that without an enlarged channel at a flow rate of 2 μl/min. The treated surfaces of the flow-through microchannel are characterized using the water contact angle, while the effects of the hydrophilicity of the treated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels on PCR efficiency are determined using gel electrophoresis. By increasing the hydrophilicity of the channel surface after immersing the PDMS substrates into Tween 20 (20%) or BSA (1 mg/ml) solutions, efficient amplifications of DNA segments were proved to occur in our chip device. To our knowledge, our group is the first to introduce heat pipes into

  12. Detection of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction in patients with different hematologic diseases treated by bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stuppia, L; Calabrese, G; Guanciali Franchi, P; Di Bartolomeo, P; Antonucci, A; Peila, R; Torlontano, G; Palka, G

    1993-02-01

    Thirteen male patients affected by different hematologic diseases who underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with female donors were investigated by cytogenetic analysis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a DNA sequence specific for the Y chromosome. In six of these patients, PCR showed the presence of the Y chromosome-related sequence; in only three of these did cytogenetic analysis confirm the presence of mixed chimerism. In the remaining three patients, the results of the PCR were confirmed by in situ hybridization on cell nuclei with a probe for the alpha-satellite of the Y chromosome. We compare results obtained with the two methods and discuss the meaning of the minimal residual disease detected by PCR in patients submitted to BMT. PMID:8453609

  13. Implosion chain reaction mitigation in underwater assemblies of photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Jiajie; Bishai, Mary; Diwan, Milind; Dolph, Jeffrey; Kettell, Steve; Sexton, Kenneth; Sharma, Rahul; Simos, Nikolaos; Stewart, James; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Viren, Brett; Arnold, Douglas; Tabor, Philip; Turner, Stephen; Benson, Terry; Wahl, Daniel; Wendt, Christopher; Hahn, Alan; Kaducak, Marc; Mantsch, Paul; Sundaram, S. K.

    2013-11-01

    Since the accident with a cascade failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in the Super-Kamiokande experiment in 2001, the mechanical performance of large format semi-hemispherical PMTs has become a critical issue for large water Cherenkov detectors. The subject of this study is the survival of an assembled array of PMTs under significant hydrostatic pressure and subjected to shock waves caused by the failure of a single PMT. This paper details the results of the second stage of a R&D program focused on the design and testing of different PMT assemblies to mitigate the risk of a “chain-reaction” of PMT failures. The initial results show that our PMT assembly design can effectively reduce the magnitude of the shock wave. With the testing results in this paper and the hydrodynamic simulation calculation, we can further improve the design of PMT deployment to mitigate the risk of chain reactions caused by implosion induced shock waves.

  14. Enhancing the specificity and efficiency of polymerase chain reaction using polyethyleneimine-based derivatives and hybrid nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Weiwei; Cao, Xueyan; Wen, Shihui; Guo, Rui; Shen, Mingwu; Wang, Jianhua; Shi, Xiangyang

    2012-01-01

    There is a general necessity to improve the specificity and efficiency of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and exploring the PCR-enhancing mechanism still remains a great challenge. In this paper we report the use of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI)-based derivatives and hybrid nanocomposites as a novel class of enhancers to improve the specificity and efficiency of a nonspecific PCR system. We show that the surface-charge polarity of PEI and PEI derivatives plays a major role in their effectiveness to enhance the PCR. Positively charged amine-terminated pristine PEI, partially (50%) acetylated PEI (PEI-Ac50), and completely acetylated PEI (PEI-Ac) are able to improve PCR efficiency and specificity with an optimum concentration order of PEI < PEI-Ac50 < PEI-Ac, whereas negatively charged carboxyl-terminated PEI (PEI-SAH; SAH denotes succinamic acid groups) and neutralized PEI modified with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and acetyl (Ac) groups (PEI-PEG-Ac) are unable to improve PCR specificity and efficiency even at concentrations three orders of magnitude higher than that of PEI. Our data clearly suggests that the PCR-enhancing effect is primarily based on the interaction between the PCR components and the PEI derivatives, where electrostatic interaction plays a major role in concentrating the PCR components locally on the backbones of the branched PEI. In addition, multiwalled carbon nanotubes modified with PEI and PEI-stabilized gold nanoparticles are also able to improve the PCR specificity and efficiency with an optimum PEI concentration less than that of the PEI alone, indicating that the inorganic component of the nanocomposites may help improve the interaction between PEI and the PCR components. The developed PEI-based derivatives or nanocomposites may be used as efficient additives to enhance other PCR systems for different biomedical applications. PMID:22393296

  15. Plague in a Pediatric Patient: Case Report and Use of Polymerase Chain Reaction as a Diagnostic Aid.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Wendi K; Nelson, Christina A; Fowler, Joe; Epson, Erin E; Mead, Paul S; Lawaczeck, Elisabeth W

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of bubonic plaque in a 7-year-old patient who presented with a core temperature of 107°F, seizures, vomiting, altered mental status, and septic shock. This case highlights the utility of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a diagnostic aid for rapid presumptive identification of Yersinia pestis as well as the importance of correlating PCR results with clinical data. We discuss the various manifestations of plague as they relate to infection control, postexposure prophylaxis, antimicrobial therapy, and treatment duration. PMID:26625461

  16. Multiplex-polymerase chain reaction assay for the authentication of the mackerel Scomber colias in commercial canned products.

    PubMed

    Infante, Carlos; Manchado, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    A multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system was developed for the authentication of the mackerel Scomber colias in commercial canned products. This novel method consists of an S. colias-specific fragment [159 base pairs (bp)] located in the nontranscribed spacer (NTS) sequence, and a Scomber genus-specific PCR product in the 5S rRNA gene (196-201 bp) as a positive amplification control. The system was assayed using 18 different canned products labeled as S. colias. A positive identification was made in all but one sample, revealing this methodology as a potential molecular tool for direct application in the authentication of S. colias canned products. PMID:16792069

  17. Detection of viable antibiotic-resistant/sensitive Acinetobacter baumannii in indoor air by propidium monoazide quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Tseng, C-C; Hsiao, P-K; Chang, K-C; Cheng, C-C; Yiin, L-M; Hsieh, C-J

    2015-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii represents a significant cause of nosocomial infections. Therefore, we combined real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the propidium monoazide (PMA-qPCR) to assess the feasibility of detecting viable, airborne A. baumannii. The biological collection efficiencies of three samplers for collecting airborne A. baumannii were evaluated by PMA-qPCR in a chamber study. After sampling, the effects of storage in collection fluid on A. baumannii were evaluated. The results showed that the culturable ratio of A. baumannii measured using the culture method was significantly correlated with the viable ratio measured using PMA-qPCR, but was not significantly correlated with the qPCR results. It was indicated that the AGI-30 impinger and the BioSampler were much more effective than the Nuclepore filter sampler for collecting airborne A. baumannii. The storage temperature was critical for aerosol samples, as the loss of viable A. baumannii was minimized when the PMA-bound DNA was stored at -20°C or if the collected cells were stored at 4°C and subsequently processed by PMA-qPCR within 1 month. The PMA-qPCR method was also to distinguish between colistin-sensitive and colistin-resistant A. baumannii, and no colistin-sensitive A. baumannii was detected by PMA-qPCR upon treatment of the BioSampler collection medium with 2 μg/ml colistin for 5 min. PMID:25283547

  18. Detection and Typing of Human Papilloma Viruses by Nested Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jalal Kiani, Seyed; Shatizadeh Malekshahi, Somayeh; Yousefi Ghalejoogh, Zohreh; Ghavvami, Nastaran; Shafiei Jandaghi, Nazanin Zahra; Shahsiah, Reza; Jahanzad, Isa; Yavarian, Jila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in under-developed countries. Human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 and 18 are the most prevalent types associated with carcinogenesis in the cervix. Conventional Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), type-specific and consensus primer-based PCR followed by sequencing, Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) or hybridization by specific probes are common methods for HPV detection and typing. In addition, some researchers have developed a multiplex PCR for simultaneous detection and typing of different HPVs. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection and its types in cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) using the Nested Multiplex PCR (NMPCR) assay. Patients and Methods: Sixty-six samples with histologically confirmed SCC were evaluated. Total DNA was isolated by phenol–chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. Nested multiplex PCR was performed with first-round PCR by GP-E6/E7 consensus primers for amplification of the genomic DNA of all known mucosal HPV genotypes and second-round PCR by type-specific multiplex PCR primer cocktails. Results: Human papilloma virus infection was detected in 78.8% of samples, with the highest prevalence of HPV 16 (60.6%) while concurrent infections with two types was detected in 10.6%. Conclusions: The NMPCR assay is more convenient and easy for analysis of results, which is important for fast diagnosis and patient management, in a type-specific manner. PMID:26865940

  19. A chain reaction approach to modelling gene pathways.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gary C; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, James J; Soong, Seng-Jaw; Lamartiniere, Coral; Barnes, Stephen

    2012-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Of great interest in cancer prevention is how nutrient components affect gene pathways associated with the physiological events of puberty. Nutrient-gene interactions may cause changes in breast or prostate cells and, therefore, may result in cancer risk later in life. Analysis of gene pathways can lead to insights about nutrient-gene interactions and the development of more effective prevention approaches to reduce cancer risk. To date, researchers have relied heavily upon experimental assays (such as microarray analysis, etc.) to identify genes and their associated pathways that are affected by nutrient and diets. However, the vast number of genes and combinations of gene pathways, coupled with the expense of the experimental analyses, has delayed the progress of gene-pathway research. The development of an analytical approach based on available test data could greatly benefit the evaluation of gene pathways, and thus advance the study of nutrient-gene interactions in cancer prevention. In the present study, we have proposed a chain reaction model to simulate gene pathways, in which the gene expression changes through the pathway are represented by the species undergoing a set of chemical reactions. We have also developed a numerical tool to solve for the species changes due to the chain reactions over time. Through this approach we can examine the impact of nutrient-containing diets on the gene pathway; moreover, transformation of genes over time with a nutrient treatment can be observed numerically, which is very difficult to achieve experimentally. We apply this approach to microarray analysis data from an experiment which involved the effects of three polyphenols (nutrient treatments), epigallo-catechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), genistein, and resveratrol, in a study of nutrient-gene interaction in the estrogen synthesis pathway during puberty. RESULTS: In this preliminary study, the estrogen synthesis pathway was simulated by a chain reaction model. By

  20. A chain reaction approach to modelling gene pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, James J.; Soong, Seng-jaw; Lamartiniere, Coral; Barnes, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Background Of great interest in cancer prevention is how nutrient components affect gene pathways associated with the physiological events of puberty. Nutrient-gene interactions may cause changes in breast or prostate cells and, therefore, may result in cancer risk later in life. Analysis of gene pathways can lead to insights about nutrient-gene interactions and the development of more effective prevention approaches to reduce cancer risk. To date, researchers have relied heavily upon experimental assays (such as microarray analysis, etc.) to identify genes and their associated pathways that are affected by nutrient and diets. However, the vast number of genes and combinations of gene pathways, coupled with the expense of the experimental analyses, has delayed the progress of gene-pathway research. The development of an analytical approach based on available test data could greatly benefit the evaluation of gene pathways, and thus advance the study of nutrient-gene interactions in cancer prevention. In the present study, we have proposed a chain reaction model to simulate gene pathways, in which the gene expression changes through the pathway are represented by the species undergoing a set of chemical reactions. We have also developed a numerical tool to solve for the species changes due to the chain reactions over time. Through this approach we can examine the impact of nutrient-containing diets on the gene pathway; moreover, transformation of genes over time with a nutrient treatment can be observed numerically, which is very difficult to achieve experimentally. We apply this approach to microarray analysis data from an experiment which involved the effects of three polyphenols (nutrient treatments), epigallo-catechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), genistein, and resveratrol, in a study of nutrient-gene interaction in the estrogen synthesis pathway during puberty. Results In this preliminary study, the estrogen synthesis pathway was simulated by a chain reaction model. By

  1. Homogeneous duplex polymerase chain reaction assay using switchable lanthanide fluorescence probes.

    PubMed

    Lehmusvuori, Ari; Tapio, Antti-Heikki; Mäki-Teeri, Petra; Rantakokko-Jalava, Kaisu; Wang, Qi; Takalo, Harri; Soukka, Tero

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay based on switchable lanthanide chelate complementation probes. In the complementation probe technology, two nonfluorescent oligonucleotide probes, one labeled with a lanthanide ion carrier chelate and another with a light absorbing antenna ligand, form a fluorescent complex by self-assembly of the reporter molecules when the two probes are hybridized in adjacent positions to the target DNA. Here we report the synthesis of a new terbium(III) (Tb(III)) ion carrier chelate and a new light-absorbing antenna ligand for Tb(III) and the development of a duplex Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) PCR assay. For the detection of Ct in urine samples, a specific sequence in Ct cryptic plasmid was amplified and detected using europium(III) (Eu(III)) complementation probes. An internal amplification control was amplified in each reaction and detected using Tb(III) complementation probes to verify the Ct negative results. Ct bacteria were concentrated from urine samples with a rapid and simple centrifugation-based sample preparation method. Good diagnostic accuracy (99-100%) was achieved, and also Ct positive reactions yielded a very high Eu(III) signal-to-background ratio (maximum of 244). High performance of the complementation probes is advantageous when sample may contain impurities after a simple sample preparation. PMID:23353013

  2. Copy number ratios determined by two digital polymerase chain reaction systems in genetically modified grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Urquiza, M.; Acatzi Silva, A. I.

    2014-02-01

    Three certified reference materials produced from powdered seeds to measure the copy number ratio sequences of p35S/hmgA in maize containing MON 810 event, p35S/Le1 in soybeans containing GTS 40-3-2 event and DREB1A/acc1 in wheat were produced according to the ISO Guides 34 and 35. In this paper, we report digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) protocols, performance parameters and results of copy number ratio content of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in these materials using two new dPCR systems to detect and quantify molecular deoxyribonucleic acid: the BioMark® (Fluidigm) and the OpenArray® (Life Technologies) systems. These technologies were implemented at the National Institute of Metrology in Mexico (CENAM) and in the Reference Center for GMO Detection from the Ministry of Agriculture (CNRDOGM), respectively. The main advantage of this technique against the more-used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is that it generates an absolute number of target molecules in the sample, without reference to standards or an endogenous control, which is very useful when not much information is available for new developments or there are no standard reference materials in the market as in the wheat case presented, or when it was not possible to test the purity of seeds as in the maize case presented here. Both systems reported enhanced productivity, increased reliability and reduced instrument footprint. In this paper, the performance parameters and uncertainty of measurement obtained with both systems are presented and compared.

  3. PCR thermocycler

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.

    2003-01-01

    A sleeve-type silicon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber or thermocycler having improved thermal performance. The silicon sleeve reaction chamber is improved in thermal performance by etched features therein that reduce thermal mass and increase the surface area of the sleeve for cooling. This improved thermal performance of the thermocycler enables an increase in speed and efficiency of the reaction chamber. The improvement is accomplished by providing grooves in the faces of the sleeve and a series of grooves on the interior surfaces that connect with grooves on the faces of the sleeve. The grooves can be anisotropically etched in the silicon sleeve simultaneously with formation of the chamber.

  4. PCR thermocycler

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.

    2005-05-17

    A sleeve-type silicon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber or thermocycler having improved thermal performance. The silicon sleeve reaction chamber is improved in thermal performance by etched features therein that reduce thermal mass and increase the surface area of the sleeve for cooling. This improved thermal performance of the thermocycler enables an increase in speed and efficiency of the reaction chamber. The improvement is accomplished by providing grooves in the faces of the sleeve and a series of grooves on the interior surfaces that connect with grooves on the faces of the sleeve. The grooves can be anisotropically etched in the silicon sleeve simultaneously with formation of the chamber.

  5. Tidal chain reaction and the origin of replicating biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathe, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Template-directed polymer assembly is a likely feature of prebiotic chemistry, but the product blocks further synthesis, preventing amplification and Darwinian selection. Nucleic acids are unusual because charge repulsion between opposing phosphates permits salt-dependent association and dissociation. It was postulated (Lathe, R. (2004). Fast tidal cycling and the origin of life. Icarus 168, 18-22) that tides at ocean shores provide the driving force for amplification: evaporative concentration promoted association/assembly on drying, while charge repulsion on tidal dilution drove dissociation. This permits exponential amplification by a process termed here the tidal chain reaction (TCR). The process is not strictly contingent upon tidal ebb and flow: circadian dews and rainfalls can produce identical cycling. Ionic strength-dependent association and dissociation of nucleic acids and possible prebiotic precursors are reviewed. Polymer scavenging, chain assembly by the recruitment of pre-formed fragments, is proposed as the primary mechanism of reiterative chain assembly. Parameters determining prebiotic polymer structure and amplification by TCR are discussed, with the suggestion that Darwinian selection may have operated on families of related polymers rather than on individual molecules.

  6. Multiplexed miRNA northern blots via hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Maayan; Pierce, Niles A

    2016-09-01

    Northern blots enable detection of a target RNA of interest in a biological sample using standard benchtop equipment. miRNAs are the most challenging targets as they must be detected with a single short nucleic acid probe. With existing approaches, it is cumbersome to perform multiplexed blots in which several RNAs are detected simultaneously, impeding the study of interacting regulatory elements. Here, we address this shortcoming by demonstrating multiplexed northern blotting based on the mechanism of hybridization chain reaction (HCR). With this approach, nucleic acid probes complementary to RNA targets trigger chain reactions in which fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The programmability of HCR allows multiple amplifiers to operate simultaneously and independently within a blot, enabling straightforward multiplexing. We demonstrate simultaneous detection of three endogenous miRNAs in total RNA extracted from 293T and HeLa cells. For a given target, HCR signal scales linearly with target abundance, enabling relative and absolute quantitation. Using non-radioactive HCR, sensitive and selective miRNA detection is achieved using 2'OMe-RNA probes. The HCR northern blot protocol takes ∼1.5 days independent of the number of target RNAs. PMID:27270083

  7. Multiplexed miRNA northern blots via hybridization chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzkopf, Maayan; Pierce, Niles A.

    2016-01-01

    Northern blots enable detection of a target RNA of interest in a biological sample using standard benchtop equipment. miRNAs are the most challenging targets as they must be detected with a single short nucleic acid probe. With existing approaches, it is cumbersome to perform multiplexed blots in which several RNAs are detected simultaneously, impeding the study of interacting regulatory elements. Here, we address this shortcoming by demonstrating multiplexed northern blotting based on the mechanism of hybridization chain reaction (HCR). With this approach, nucleic acid probes complementary to RNA targets trigger chain reactions in which fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The programmability of HCR allows multiple amplifiers to operate simultaneously and independently within a blot, enabling straightforward multiplexing. We demonstrate simultaneous detection of three endogenous miRNAs in total RNA extracted from 293T and HeLa cells. For a given target, HCR signal scales linearly with target abundance, enabling relative and absolute quantitation. Using non-radioactive HCR, sensitive and selective miRNA detection is achieved using 2′OMe-RNA probes. The HCR northern blot protocol takes ∼1.5 days independent of the number of target RNAs. PMID:27270083

  8. A simple procedure eliminating multiple optimization steps required in developing multiplex PCR reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Grondin, V.; Roskey, M.; Klinger, K.; Shuber, T.

    1994-09-01

    The PCR technique is one of the most powerful tools in modern molecular genetics and has achieved widespread use in the analysis of genetic diseases. Typically, a region of interest is amplified from genomic DNA or cDNA and examined by various methods of analysis for mutations or polymorphisms. In cases of small genes and transcripts, amplification of single, small regions of DNA are sufficient for analysis. However, when analyzing large genes and transcripts, multiple PCRs may be required to identify the specific mutation or polymorphism of interest. Ever since it has been shown that PCR could simultaneously amplify multiple loci in the human dystrophin gene, multiplex PCR has been established as a general technique. The properities of multiplex PCR make it a useful tool and preferable to simultaneous uniplex PCR in many instances. However, the steps for developing a multiplex PCR can be laborious, with significant difficulty in achieving equimolar amounts of several different amplicons. We have developed a simple method of primer design that has enabled us to eliminate a number of the standard optimization steps required in developing a multiplex PCR. Sequence-specific oligonucleotide pairs were synthesized for the simultaneous amplification of multiple exons within the CFTR gene. A common non-complementary 20 nucleotide sequence was attached to each primer, thus creating a mixture of primer pairs all containing a universal primer sequence. Multiplex PCR reactions were carried out containing target DNA, a mixture of several chimeric primer pairs and primers complementary to only the universal portion of the chimeric primers. Following optimization of conditions for the universal primer, limited optimization was needed for successful multiplex PCR. In contrast, significant optimization of the PCR conditions were needed when pairs of sequence specific primers were used together without the universal sequence.

  9. Development and application of reverse transcriptase nested polymerase chain reaction test for the detection of exogenous avian leukosis virus.

    PubMed

    García, Maricarmen; El-Attrache, John; Riblet, Sylva M; Lunge, Vagner R; Fonseca, André S K; Villegas, Pedro; Ikuta, Nilo

    2003-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay that utilizes nested primers to amplify a fragment of the long terminal repeat of exogenous avian leukosis virus (ALV) was developed and evaluated for detection of ALV subgroup J directly from clinical samples. Compilation of sequence data from different endogenous and exogenous ALVs allowed the selection of a conserved set of nested primers specific for the amplification of exogenous ALV subgroups A, B, C, D, and J and excluded amplification of endogenous viruses or endogenous viral sequences within the chicken genome. The nested primers were successfully used in both PCR and reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR assays to detect genetically diverse ALV-J field isolates. Detection limits of ALV-J isolate ADOL-Hc1 DNA by nested PCR and RNA by RT-nested PCR were superior to detection of group-specific antigen by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in cell culture. Detection of ALV-J in cloacal swabs by RT-nested PCR was compared with direct detection by antigen-capture (ac)-ELISA; RT-nested PCR detected fewer positive samples than ac-ELISA, suggesting that RT-nested PCR excluded detection of endogenous virus in clinical samples. Detection of ALV-J in plasma samples by RT-nested PCR was compared with virus isolation in C/E chicken embryo fibroblasts; the level of agreement between both assays as applied to plasma samples ranged from low to moderate. The main disagreement between both assays was observed for a group of plasma samples found positive by RT-nested PCR and negative by virus isolation, suggesting that RT-nested PCR detected ALV-J genome in plasma samples of transiently or intermittently infected birds. ALV-J transient and intermittent infection profiles are characterized by inconsistent virus isolation responses throughout the life of a naturally infected flock. PMID:12713157

  10. Clinical utility of panfungal polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of invasive fungal disease: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Trubiano, J A; Dennison, A M; Morrissey, C O; Chua, K Y; Halliday, C L; Chen, S C-A; Spelman, D

    2016-02-01

    The role of panfungal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for diagnosis of invasive fungal disease (IFD) is inadequately defined. We describe the use of an internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) region-directed panfungal PCR in this context at a tertiary referral transplant center. A retrospective review of patients at Alfred Health, Melbourne, Australia (2009-2014) who had clinical samples referred for panfungal PCR testing was conducted. Baseline patient characteristics, antifungal drug history, fungal culture/histopathology, and radiology results were recorded. For bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples, identification of a fungus other than a Candida spp. was defined as a potential pathogen.Of 138 panfungal PCR tests (108 patients), 41 (30%) were positive for a fungal product. Ninety-seven percent (134/138) of specimens were from immunocompromised hosts. Thirteen percent (19/138) of panfungal PCR positive results were for potential pathogens and potential pathogens were detected more frequently in tissue as compared with BAL (12/13 vs. 6/26; P = .0001). No positive panfungal PCR results were obtained from CSF specimens. If histopathology examination was negative, panfungal PCR identified a potential pathogen in only 12% (11/94) of specimens. For the 20 culture negative/histopathology positive specimens, diagnosis of IFD to causative species level by panfungal PCR occurred in 35% (6/20).Sterile site specimens, in particular tissue, were more frequently panfungal PCR positive for potential pathogens than BAL. The utility of panfungal PCR appears greatest in tissue specimens, as an adjunct to histopathology to improve diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Based on the results of this study we are now only testing tissue specimens by panfungal PCR. PMID:26527638

  11. Field application of polymerase chain reaction diagnosis and strain typing of Trypanosoma cruzi in Bolivian triatomines.

    PubMed

    Breniere, S F; Bosseno, M F; Telleria, J; Carrasco, R; Vargas, F; Yaksic, N; Noireau, F

    1995-08-01

    A new approach for direct identification and characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi stocks in biological samples was tested for field applicability on an extensive sample of feces collected from triatomine vectors from four different species found in Bolivia. The first step of the technique is polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the hypervariable region of kinetoplast DNA minicircles of T. cruzi parasites. In this report, 345 fecal samples were analyzed and the PCR results were compared with microscopic examination. For Triatoma infestans, the principal Bolivian vector, both techniques were in concordance 85.3% of the time. For the three other species, Rhodnius pictipes, Eratyrus mucronatus, and Triatoma sordida, the fecal samples were all negative by microscopic examination whereas PCR results showed several T. cruzi-infected insects in each species. The second step of the procedure is the characterization of the T. cruzi clones by means of hybridization of the PCR products with clone-specific probes generated by the PCR. We used two probes corresponding to major clones circulating in high frequency in Bolivia (as shown by previous population genetic studies using isoenzyme characterization). We obtained four primary results: 1) we confirm the importance of two major clones in Bolivia in two distinct regions; 2) we report high rates of mixed infections (multiple clones in a single vector) in Triatoma infestans, up to 22% and 35% in Cochabamba and La Paz departments, respectively; 3) the results favor the absence of interaction between different clones; and 4) we find, for the first time, evidence of the major clones circulating in three species of triatomines that are known as mainly sylvatic species.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7677221

  12. Knockout confirmation for Hurries: rapid genotype identification of Trypanosoma cruzi transfectants by polymerase chain reaction directly from liquid culture.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, Monica Visnieski; Fragoso, Stenio Perdigão; Picchi, Gisele Fernanda Assine

    2014-07-01

    Gene knockout is a widely used approach to evaluate loss-of-function phenotypes and it can be facilitated by the incorporation of a DNA cassette having a drug-selectable marker. Confirmation of the correct knockout cassette insertion is an important step in gene removal validation and has generally been performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays following a time-consuming DNA extraction step. Here, we show a rapid procedure for the identification of Trypanosoma cruzi transfectants by PCR directly from liquid culture - without prior DNA extraction. This simple approach enabled us to generate PCR amplifications from different cultures varying from 106-108 cells/mL. We also show that it is possible to combine different primer pairs in a multiplex detection reaction and even to achieve knockout confirmation with an extremely simple interpretation of a real-time PCR result. Using the "culture PCR" approach, we show for the first time that we can assess different DNA sequence combinations by PCR directly from liquid culture, saving time in several tasks for T. cruzi genotype interrogation. PMID:24936912

  13. Saliva Polymerase-Chain-Reaction Assay for Cytomegalovirus Screening in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Boppana, Suresh B.; Ross, Shannon A.; Shimamura, Masako; Palmer, April L.; Ahmed, Amina; Michaels, Marian G.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Bernstein, David I.; Tolan, Robert W.; Novak, Zdenek; Chowdhury, Nazma; Britt, William J.; Fowler, Karen B.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is an important cause of hearing loss, and most infants at risk for CMV-associated hearing loss are not identified early in life because of failure to test for the infection. The standard assay for newborn CMV screening is rapid culture performed on saliva specimens obtained at birth, but this assay cannot be automated. Two alternatives — real-time polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR)–based testing of a liquid-saliva or dried-saliva specimen obtained at birth — have been developed. METHODS In our prospective, multicenter screening study of newborns, we compared real-time PCR assays of liquid-saliva and dried-saliva specimens with rapid culture of saliva specimens obtained at birth. RESULTS A total of 177 of 34,989 infants (0.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.4 to 0.6) were positive for CMV, according to at least one of the three methods. Of 17,662 newborns screened with the use of the liquid-saliva PCR assay, 17,569 were negative for CMV, and the remaining 85 infants (0.5%; 95% CI, 0.4 to 0.6) had positive results on both culture and PCR assay. The sensitivity and specificity of the liquid-saliva PCR assay were 100% (95% CI, 95.8 to 100) and 99.9% (95% CI, 99.9 to 100), respectively, and the positive and negative predictive values were 91.4% (95% CI, 83.8 to 96.2) and 100% (95% CI, 99.9 to 100), respectively. Of 17,327 newborns screened by means of the dried-saliva PCR assay, 74 were positive for CMV, whereas 76 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.5) were found to be CMV-positive on rapid culture. Sensitivity and specificity of the dried-saliva PCR assay were 97.4% (95% CI, 90.8 to 99.7) and 99.9% (95% CI, 99.9 to 100), respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 90.2% (95% CI, 81.7 to 95.7) and 99.9% (95% CI, 99.9 to 100), respectively. CONCLUSIONS Real-time PCR assays of both liquid- and dried-saliva specimens showed high sensitivity and specificity for detecting CMV infection and should be

  14. Deconstructing the Polymerase Chain Reaction: Understanding and Correcting Bias Associated with Primer Degeneracies and Primer-Template Mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Green, Stefan J.; Venkatramanan, Raghavee; Naqib, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive to mismatches between primer and template, and mismatches can lead to inefficient amplification of targeted regions of DNA template. In PCRs in which a degenerate primer pool is employed, each primer can behave differently. Therefore, inefficiencies due to different primer melting temperatures within a degenerate primer pool, in addition to mismatches between primer binding sites and primers, can lead to a distortion of the true relative abundance of targets in the original DNA pool. A theoretical analysis indicated that a combination of primer-template and primer-amplicon interactions during PCR cycles 3–12 is potentially responsible for this distortion. To test this hypothesis, we developed a novel amplification strategy, entitled “Polymerase-exonuclease (PEX) PCR”, in which primer-template interactions and primer-amplicon interactions are separated. The PEX PCR method substantially and significantly improved the evenness of recovery of sequences from a mock community of known composition, and allowed for amplification of templates with introduced mismatches near the 3’ end of the primer annealing sites. When the PEX PCR method was applied to genomic DNA extracted from complex environmental samples, a significant shift in the observed microbial community was detected. Furthermore, the PEX PCR method provides a mechanism to identify which primers in a primer pool are annealing to target gDNA. Primer utilization patterns revealed that at high annealing temperatures in the PEX PCR method, perfect match annealing predominates, while at lower annealing temperatures, primers with up to four mismatches with templates can contribute substantially to amplification. The PEX PCR method is simple to perform, is limited to PCR mixes and a single exonuclease step which can be performed without reaction cleanup, and is recommended for reactions in which degenerate primer pools are used or when mismatches between primers

  15. Automated Microfluidic Platform for Serial Polymerase Chain Reaction and High-Resolution Melting Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weidong; Bean, Brian; Corey, Scott; Coursey, Johnathan S; Hasson, Kenton C; Inoue, Hiroshi; Isano, Taisuke; Kanderian, Sami; Lane, Ben; Liang, Hongye; Murphy, Brian; Owen, Greg; Shinoda, Nobuhiko; Zeng, Shulin; Knight, Ivor T

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an automated genetic analyzer for human sample testing based on microfluidic rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA). The integrated DNA microfluidic cartridge was used on a platform designed with a robotic pipettor system that works by sequentially picking up different test solutions from a 384-well plate, mixing them in the tips, and delivering mixed fluids to the DNA cartridge. A novel image feedback flow control system based on a Canon 5D Mark II digital camera was developed for controlling fluid movement through a complex microfluidic branching network without the use of valves. The same camera was used for measuring the high-resolution melt curve of DNA amplicons that were generated in the microfluidic chip. Owing to fast heating and cooling as well as sensitive temperature measurement in the microfluidic channels, the time frame for PCR and HRMA was dramatically reduced from hours to minutes. Preliminary testing results demonstrated that rapid serial PCR and HRMA are possible while still achieving high data quality that is suitable for human sample testing. PMID:25827436

  16. Two putative protein-tyrosine kinases identified by application of the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, A F

    1989-01-01

    The pivotal role that protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play in the growth regulation of eukaryotic cells is manifest in the frequent appearance of members of the PTK family as growth factor receptors or as the transforming agents of acutely transforming retroviruses. A feature common to all members of the PTK family is a highly conserved catalytic domain which is characteristic of the group as a whole and whose activity appears to be tightly regulated within the cell by other domains of the PTK. Degenerate oligonucleotide probes corresponding to two invariant amino acid sequence motifs within the catalytic domains of all PTK family members were synthesized and employed in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify cDNA sequences between them. An M13 PCR library was produced in this way from cDNA prepared against mRNA from the murine hemopoietic cell line FDC-P1. The PCR library was then screened by DNA sequencing for PTK-related sequences. Two sequences were identified that, on the basis of sequence comparison with known PTKs, may encode representatives of a new class of PTK. Images PMID:2466296

  17. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the seagrass pathogen Labyrinthula zosterae.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Nina; Fricke, Birgit; Schmidt, Martina C; Tams, Verena; Beining, Katrin; Schwitte, Hildegard; Boettcher, Anne A; Martin, Daniel L; Bockelmann, Anna-Christina; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Rauch, Gisep

    2011-11-01

    The protist Labyrinthula zosterae (Phylum Bigyra, sensu Tsui et al. 2009) has been identified as a causative agent of wasting disease in eelgrass (Zostera marina), of which the most intense outbreak led to the destruction of 90% of eelgrass beds in eastern North America and western Europe in the 1930s. Outbreaks still occur today, albeit at a smaller scale. Traditionally, L. zosterae has been quantified by measuring the necrotic area of Z. marina leaf tissue. This indirect method can however only lead to a very rough estimate of pathogen load. Here, we present a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) approach to directly detect and quantify L. zosterae in eelgrass tissue. Based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of rRNA genes, species-specific primers were designed. Using our qPCR, we were able to quantify accurately and specifically L. zosterae load both from culture and eelgrass leaves using material from Europe and North America. Our detection limit was less than one L. zosterae cell. Our results demonstrate the potential of this qPCR assay to provide rapid, accurate and sensitive molecular identification and quantification of L. zosterae. In view of declining seagrass populations worldwide, this method will provide a valuable tool for seagrass ecologists and conservation projects. PMID:21777400

  18. Histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and polymerase chain reaction assays in the study of cases with fatal sporadic myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Jeannette; Bhatnagar, Julu; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Nolte, Kurt B; Klein, Dennis; Gookin, Michelle S; Peñaranda, Silvia; Oberste, M Steven; Jones, Tara; Smith, Chalanda; Pallansch, Mark A; Zaki, Sherif R

    2007-09-01

    Paraffin tissue blocks from 27 cases with sporadic myocarditis were collected during a 12-year period at a single medical examiner's office. Blocks were studied by using histopathology; immunohistochemistry for viruses (adenovirus, enterovirus, influenza A and B, and human herpes types 4 and 5), bacteria (Neisseria meningitidis, Ehrlichia sp, spotted fever group Rickettsia) and parasites (Toxoplasma gondii and Trypanosoma cruzi); and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/RT-PCR for adenovirus and enterovirus. We identified enterovirus in 5 (18.5%) cases and Sarcocystis in a 36-year-old woman who had focal inflammation and myocyte necrosis. Immunohistochemical evidence of enteroviruses was found in the myocytes of 2 patients less than 6 months old who had diffuse mononuclear myocardial inflammation, interstitial pneumonitis; one also had encephalitis. In these 2 patients, the presence of enterovirus was confirmed by RT-PCR targeting the 5' nontranslated region and was serotyped as coxsackievirus B2 by sequencing the VP1 capsid region. In another 3 cases (ages 12, 47, and 54), enterovirus was detected by the 5' nontranslated region region; VP1 sequencing identified these as echoviruses 6, 13, and 7, respectively. Accurately identifying an infectious agent is the foundation for clinical and public health interventions. Despite using multiple diagnostic methods, an organism could only be detected in a small proportion of sporadic myocarditis cases. PMID:17602724

  19. Accuracy of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis diagnosis using polymerase chain reaction: systematic literature review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ciro Martins; Mazin, Suleimy Cristina; dos Santos, Elisa Raphael; Cesetti, Mariana Vicente; Bächtold, Guilherme Albergaria Brízida; Cordeiro, João Henrique de Freitas; Theodoro, Fabrício Claudino Estrela Terra; Damasco, Fabiana dos Santos; Carranza, Sebastián Andrés Vernal; Santos, Adriana de Oliveira; Roselino, Ana Maria; Sampaio, Raimunda Nonata Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (MCL) is hampered by the absence of a gold standard. An accurate diagnosis is essential because of the high toxicity of the medications for the disease. This study aimed to assess the ability of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify MCL and to compare these results with clinical research recently published by the authors. A systematic literature review based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses: the PRISMA Statement was performed using comprehensive search criteria and communication with the authors. A meta-analysis considering the estimates of the univariate and bivariate models was performed. Specificity near 100% was common among the papers. The primary reason for accuracy differences was sensitivity. The meta-analysis, which was only possible for PCR samples of lesion fragments, revealed a sensitivity of 71% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.59; 0.81] and a specificity of 93% (95% CI = 0.83; 0.98) in the bivariate model. The search for measures that could increase the sensitivity of PCR should be encouraged. The quality of the collected material and the optimisation of the amplification of genetic material should be prioritised. PMID:25946238

  20. Tuberculosis-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in adolescent diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ju-Hee; Lee, Jun Ah; Kim, Dong Ho; Cho, Joongbum

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of tuberculosis-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in a 14-year-old girl. The patient presented with weight loss, malaise, fatigue, prolonged fever, and generalized lymphadenopathy. Laboratory investigation revealed pancytopenia (white blood cells, 2,020 cells/µL; hemoglobin, 10.2 g/dL; platelets, 52,000 cells/µL), hypertriglyceridemia (229 mg/dL), and hyperferritinemia (1,420 ng/mL). Bone marrow biopsy showed a hypocellular bone marrow with a large numbers of histiocytes and marked hemophagocytosis; based on these findings, she was diagnosed with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with both the bone marrow aspiration and sputum samples revealed the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Antitubercular therapy with immune modulation therapy including dexamethasone and intravenous immunoglobulin was initiated. The results of all laboratory tests including bone marrow biopsy and PCR with both the bone marrow aspiration and sputum samples were normalized after treatment. Thus, early bone marrow biopsy and the use of techniques such as PCR can avoid delays in diagnosis and improve the survival rates of patients with tuberculosis-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. PMID:26893604

  1. Solar thermal polymerase chain reaction for smartphone-assisted molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Mancuso, Matthew; Lu, Zhengda; Akar, Gunkut; Cesarman, Ethel; Erickson, David

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based diagnostic techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are used extensively in medical diagnostics due to their high sensitivity, specificity and quantification capability. In settings with limited infrastructure and unreliable electricity, however, access to such devices is often limited due to the highly specialized and energy-intensive nature of the thermal cycling process required for nucleic acid amplification. Here we integrate solar heating with microfluidics to eliminate thermal cycling power requirements as well as create a simple device infrastructure for PCR. Tests are completed in less than 30 min, and power consumption is reduced to 80 mW, enabling a standard 5.5 Wh iPhone battery to provide 70 h of power to this system. Additionally, we demonstrate a complete sample-to-answer diagnostic strategy by analyzing human skin biopsies infected with Kaposi's Sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) through the combination of solar thermal PCR, HotSHOT DNA extraction and smartphone-based fluorescence detection. We believe that exploiting the ubiquity of solar thermal energy as demonstrated here could facilitate broad availability of nucleic acid-based diagnostics in resource-limited areas. PMID:24553130

  2. Touchdown polymerase chain reaction detection of polycystic kidney disease and laboratory findings in different cat populations.

    PubMed

    Scalon, Marcela C; da Silva, Thamiris F; Aquino, Larissa C; Carneiro, Filipe T; Lima, Maíra G da M; Lemos, Marcelle Dos S; Paludo, Giane R

    2014-06-10

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most prevalent inherited genetic disease of cats, predominantly affecting Persian and Persian-related cats. A point mutation (C→A transversion) in exon 29 of the PKD1 gene causes ADPKD, and is the specific molecular target for genetic diagnosis in cats. The current study describes a newly developed touchdown polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect this single point mutation, using 2 primers specific for the mutant allele, adapted from an existing multiplex amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS PCR). Furthermore, correlations between the clinical outcomes of tested animals and the results of the genetic test were investigated. A total of 334 cats were tested, 188 from the Veterinary Hospital of Small Animals at the University of Brasilia, and 146 from an anti-rabies vaccine campaign of the Federal District. A total prevalence of 9% was evident among the samples, with 33% of the Persian cats testing positive, and 7% of the Brazilian long- and shorthaired cats testing positive. Prevalence was not correlated with gender or hemogram. Positive animals exhibited hyperglobulinemia (P = 0.02). This research demonstrated that the mutation does not only occur in Persian and Persian-related cats, and that a touchdown PCR can be used to diagnose ADPKD. PMID:24916445

  3. Applications of constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis/high-fidelity polymerase chain reaction to human genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Li-Sucholeiki, X C; Khrapko, K; André, P C; Marcelino, L A; Karger, B L; Thilly, W G

    1999-06-01

    Constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis (CDCE) permits high-resolution separation of single-base variations occurring in an approximately 100 bp isomelting DNA sequence based on their differential melting temperatures. By coupling CDCE for highly efficient enrichment of mutants with high-fidelity polymerase chain reaction (hifi PCR), we have developed an analytical approach to detecting point mutations at frequencies equal to or greater than 10(-6) in human genomic DNA. In this article, we present several applications of this approach in human genetic studies. We have measured the point mutational spectra of a 100 bp mitochondrial DNA sequence in human tissues and cultured cells. The observations have led to the conclusion that the primary causes of mutation in human mitochondrial DNA are spontaneous in origin. In the course of studying the mitochondrial somatic mutations, we have also identified several nuclear pseudogenes homologous to the analyzed mitochondrial DNA fragment. Recently, through developments of the means to isolate the desired target sequences from bulk genomic DNA and to increase the loading capacity of CDCE, we have extended the CDCE/hifi PCR approach to study a chemically induced mutational spectrum in a single-copy nuclear sequence. Future applications of the CDCE/hifi PCR approach to human genetic analysis include studies of somatic mitochondrial mutations with respect to aging, measurement of mutational spectra of nuclear genes in healthy human tissues and population screening for disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in large pooled samples. PMID:10380762

  4. Real-time polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun-Xin; Wang, Lin-Nong; Zhou, Ru-Xia; Yu, Yang; Du, Tong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To design, optimize and validate a rapid, internally controlled real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis. METHODS Tears alone or together with corneal epithelium scrapings from 30 patients (30 eyes) suspected of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis were tested for HSV DNA by RT-PCR. The samples were collected during the first visit and then on the subsequent 7, 14, 28, 42, and 56d. The symptoms of the patients were scored before treatment to determine the correlation between HSV concentration in the corneal epithelium scrapings and clinical scores. RESULTS The positive rate (46.4%) in the corneal epithelium group before the therapy was significantly higher than that (13.3%) in the tears group (P=0.006). There were 13 positive HSV patients before the therapy, the concentration of HSV DNA in corneal epithelium scrapings group was significantly higher than that in the tears group (paired t-test, P=0.0397). Multilevel mixed-effects model analysis showed that the difference between the corneal epithelium scrapings group and the tears group was statistically significant (P=0.0049). The Spearman rank correlation analysis indicated a positive correlation between the HSV concentration in the corneal epithelium scrapings and clinical scores before the treatment (r=0.844, P<0.0001). CONCLUSION RT-PCR appears to be a powerful molecular tool for the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis. PMID:27275421

  5. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism authentication of raw meats from game birds.

    PubMed

    Rojas, María; González, Isabel; Fajardo, Violeta; Martín, Irene; Hernández, Pablo E; García, Teresa; Martín, Rosario

    2008-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis has been applied to the identification of meats from quail (Coturnix coturnix), pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa), guinea fowl (Numida meleagris), capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), Eurasian woodcock (Scolopax rusticola), woodpigeon (Columba palumbus), and song thrush (Turdus philomelos). PCR amplification was performed using a set of primers flanking a conserved region of approximately 720 base pairs (bp) from the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene. Restriction site analysis based on sequence data from this DNA fragment permitted the selection of AluI and BfaI endonucleases for species identification. The restriction profiles obtained when amplicons were digested with the chosen enzymes allowed the unequivocal identification of all game bird species analyzed. However, the use of the PCR-RFLP technique described is limited to raw meat authentication. It is not suitable for cooked products because thermal treatment strongly accelerates DNA degradation leading to difficulties in amplifying the 720 bp fragment. PMID:19202803

  6. Solar thermal polymerase chain reaction for smartphone-assisted molecular diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Mancuso, Matthew; Lu, Zhengda; Akar, Gunkut; Cesarman, Ethel; Erickson, David

    2014-02-01

    Nucleic acid-based diagnostic techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are used extensively in medical diagnostics due to their high sensitivity, specificity and quantification capability. In settings with limited infrastructure and unreliable electricity, however, access to such devices is often limited due to the highly specialized and energy-intensive nature of the thermal cycling process required for nucleic acid amplification. Here we integrate solar heating with microfluidics to eliminate thermal cycling power requirements as well as create a simple device infrastructure for PCR. Tests are completed in less than 30 min, and power consumption is reduced to 80 mW, enabling a standard 5.5 Wh iPhone battery to provide 70 h of power to this system. Additionally, we demonstrate a complete sample-to-answer diagnostic strategy by analyzing human skin biopsies infected with Kaposi's Sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) through the combination of solar thermal PCR, HotSHOT DNA extraction and smartphone-based fluorescence detection. We believe that exploiting the ubiquity of solar thermal energy as demonstrated here could facilitate broad availability of nucleic acid-based diagnostics in resource-limited areas.

  7. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of aqueous humour samples in necrotising retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, T H C; Rozenberg, F; Cassoux, N; Rao, N A; LeHoang, P; Bodaghi, B

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic value of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed on aqueous humour for the detection of viral DNA in patients with necrotising herpetic retinitis. Methods: The clinical features and laboratory results of 22 patients (29 eyes) presenting with necrotising herpetic retinitis between March 1999 and June 2001 were reviewed retrospectively. Aqueous humour was obtained after anterior chamber paracentesis and PCR was performed in all cases. Results: Viral DNA was detected in the aqueous humour of 19 patients (86.4%). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) seroconversion was evidenced in one additional patient. In the acute retinal necrosis (ARN) group (n = 19), varicella zoster virus (VZV) DNA was identified in six patients, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) DNA in two patients, herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) DNA in four patients, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) genome in four patients. In the progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) group (n = 3), VZV DNA was detected in all patients. No sample was positive for more than one virus. Conclusions: PCR analysis of aqueous humour in patients with clinical features of necrotising viral retinitis can provide specific aetiological orientation and the method appears to be safe and highly sensitive. PMID:12488268

  8. Monochrome Multiplexing in Polymerase Chain Reaction by Photobleaching of Fluorogenic Hydrolysis Probes.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Friedrich; Trotter, Martin; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2016-03-01

    Multiplexing in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a technique widely used to save cost and sample material and to increase sensitivity compared to distributing a sample to several singleplex reactions. One of the most common methods to detect the different amplification products is the use of fluorogenic probes that emit at different wavelengths (colors). To reduce the number of detection channels, several methods for monochrome multiplexing have been suggested. However, they pose restrictions to the amplifiable target length, the sequence, or the melting temperature. To circumvent these limitations, we suggest a novel approach that uses different fluorophores with the same emission maximum. Discrimination is achieved by their different fluorescence stability during photobleaching. Atto488 (emitting at the same wavelength as 6-carboxyfluorescein, FAM) and Atto467N (emitting at the same wavelength as cyanine 5, Cy5) were found to bleach significantly less than FAM and Cy5; i.e., the final fluorescence of Atto dyes was more than tripled compared to FAM and Cy5. We successfully applied this method by performing a 4-plex PCR targeting antibiotic resistance genes in S. aureus using only 2 color channels. Confidence of discrimination between the targets was >99.9% at high copy initial copy numbers of 100 000 copies. Cases where both targets were present could be discriminated with equal confidence for Cy5 channel and reduced levels of confidence (>68%) for FAM channel. Moreover, a 2-plex digital PCR reaction in 1 color channel was shown. In the future, the degree of multiplexing may be increased by adding fluorogenic probe pairs with other emission wavelengths. The method may also be applied to other probe and assay formats, such as Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes and immunoassays. PMID:26840905

  9. Dual Combined Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for the Diagnosis of Lyssavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lavenir, Rachel; Lepelletier, Anthony; Faouzi, Abdellah; Troupin, Cécile; Nourlil, Jalal; Buchy, Philippe; Bourhy, Herve

    2016-01-01

    The definitive diagnosis of lyssavirus infection (including rabies) in animals and humans is based on laboratory confirmation. The reference techniques for post-mortem rabies diagnosis are still based on direct immunofluorescence and virus isolation, but molecular techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods, are increasingly being used and now constitute the principal tools for diagnosing rabies in humans and for epidemiological analyses. However, it remains a key challenge to obtain relevant specificity and sensitivity with these techniques while ensuring that the genetic diversity of lyssaviruses does not compromise detection. We developed a dual combined real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (combo RT-qPCR) method for pan-lyssavirus detection. This method is based on two complementary technologies: a probe-based (TaqMan) RT-qPCR for detecting the RABV species (pan-RABV RT-qPCR) and a second reaction using an intercalating dye (SYBR Green) to detect other lyssavirus species (pan-lyssa RT-qPCR). The performance parameters of this combined assay were evaluated with a large panel of primary animal samples covering almost all the genetic variability encountered at the viral species level, and they extended to almost all lyssavirus species characterized to date. This method was also evaluated for the diagnosis of human rabies on 211 biological samples (positive n = 76 and negative n = 135) including saliva, skin and brain biopsies. It detected all 41 human cases of rabies tested and confirmed the sensitivity and the interest of skin biopsy (91.5%) and saliva (54%) samples for intra-vitam diagnosis of human rabies. Finally, this method was successfully implemented in two rabies reference laboratories in enzootic countries (Cambodia and Morocco). This combined RT-qPCR method constitutes a relevant, useful, validated tool for the diagnosis of rabies in both humans and animals, and represents a promising tool for lyssavirus

  10. Dual Combined Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for the Diagnosis of Lyssavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Dacheux, Laurent; Larrous, Florence; Lavenir, Rachel; Lepelletier, Anthony; Faouzi, Abdellah; Troupin, Cécile; Nourlil, Jalal; Buchy, Philippe; Bourhy, Herve

    2016-07-01

    The definitive diagnosis of lyssavirus infection (including rabies) in animals and humans is based on laboratory confirmation. The reference techniques for post-mortem rabies diagnosis are still based on direct immunofluorescence and virus isolation, but molecular techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods, are increasingly being used and now constitute the principal tools for diagnosing rabies in humans and for epidemiological analyses. However, it remains a key challenge to obtain relevant specificity and sensitivity with these techniques while ensuring that the genetic diversity of lyssaviruses does not compromise detection. We developed a dual combined real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (combo RT-qPCR) method for pan-lyssavirus detection. This method is based on two complementary technologies: a probe-based (TaqMan) RT-qPCR for detecting the RABV species (pan-RABV RT-qPCR) and a second reaction using an intercalating dye (SYBR Green) to detect other lyssavirus species (pan-lyssa RT-qPCR). The performance parameters of this combined assay were evaluated with a large panel of primary animal samples covering almost all the genetic variability encountered at the viral species level, and they extended to almost all lyssavirus species characterized to date. This method was also evaluated for the diagnosis of human rabies on 211 biological samples (positive n = 76 and negative n = 135) including saliva, skin and brain biopsies. It detected all 41 human cases of rabies tested and confirmed the sensitivity and the interest of skin biopsy (91.5%) and saliva (54%) samples for intra-vitam diagnosis of human rabies. Finally, this method was successfully implemented in two rabies reference laboratories in enzootic countries (Cambodia and Morocco). This combined RT-qPCR method constitutes a relevant, useful, validated tool for the diagnosis of rabies in both humans and animals, and represents a promising tool for lyssavirus

  11. Rapid discrimination of rabies viruses isolated from various host species in Brazil by multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Go; Tanabe, Hitomi; Shoji, Youko; Itou, Takuya; Ito, Fumio H; Sato, Tetsuo; Sakai, Takeo

    2005-08-01

    Rabies is carried mainly by mammalian carnivores and vampire bats in Latin America. However, rabies virus (RV) has been isolated in recent years from not only vampire bats in rural areas but also from several non-vampire bat species in urban areas, respectively. Therefore, rapid molecular screening is necessary for efficient epidemiology of these RVs. In this study, we investigated the usefulness of multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for determining the origins of 54 RV isolates from various host species in Brazil. And to evaluate the multiplex RT-PCR as a potential diagnostic tool, we investigated the sensitivity of this method. In addition, we compared the results with a phylogenetic tree developed from sequences of the RV glycoprotein (G protein) gene. Multiplex RT-PCR products showed five different sizes of products, whereas the phylogenic tree showed six groups. Of these six groups, four corresponded with the four sizes of the multiplex RT-PCR products. The other two groups showed correspondance with another one size of the multiplex RT-PCR products, indicating that multiplex RT-PCR results reflected the lineage of the 54 isolates. This study also showed that this method can detect trace amounts of RNA. In conclusion, this multiplex RT-PCR method allows the rapid, specific, and simultaneous detection of RVs isolated from various host species in Brazil. PMID:16036175

  12. Detection of Haemophilus influenzae in respiratory secretions from pneumonia patients by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Abdeldaim, Guma M K; Strålin, Kristoffer; Kirsebom, Leif A; Olcén, Per; Blomberg, Jonas; Herrmann, Björn

    2009-08-01

    A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the omp P6 gene was developed to detect Haemophilus influenzae. Its specificity was determined by analysis of 29 strains of 11 different Haemophilus spp. and was compared with PCR assays having other target genes: rnpB, 16S rRNA, and bexA. The method was evaluated on nasopharyngeal aspirates from 166 adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia. When 10(4) DNA copies/mL was used as cutoff limit for the method, P6 PCR had a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 96.0% compared with the culture. Of 20 culture-negative but P6 PCR-positive cases, 18 were confirmed by fucK PCR as H. influenzae. Five (5.9%) of 84 nasopharyngeal aspirates from adult controls tested PCR positive. We conclude that the P6 real-time PCR is both sensitive and specific for identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions. Quantification facilitates discrimination between disease-causing H. influenzae strains and commensal colonization. PMID:19446978

  13. Detection of Wuchereria bancrofti DNA in paired serum and urine samples using polymerase chain reaction-based systems

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes, Camila; Brandão, Eduardo; Oliveira, Paula; Rocha, Abraham; Rego, Tamisa; Medeiros, Rafael; Aguiar-Santos, Ana; Ferraz, João; Reis, Christian; Araujo, Paulo; Carvalho, Luiz; Melo, Fabio L

    2014-01-01

    The Global Program for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF) aims to eliminate this disease by the year 2020. However, the development of more specific and sensitive tests is important for the success of the GPELF. The present study aimed to standardise polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based systems for the diagnosis of filariasis in serum and urine. Twenty paired biological urine and serum samples from individuals already known to be positive for Wuchereria bancrofti were collected during the day. Conventional PCR and semi-nested PCR assays were optimised. The detection limit of the technique for purified W. bancrofti DNA extracted from adult worms was 10 fg for the internal systems (WbF/Wb2) and 0.1 fg by using semi-nested PCR. The specificity of the primers was confirmed experimentally by amplification of 1 ng of purified genomic DNA from other species of parasites. Evaluation of the paired urine and serum samples by the semi-nested PCR technique indicated only two of the 20 tested individuals were positive, whereas the simple internal PCR system (WbF/Wb2), which has highly promising performance, revealed that all the patients were positive using both samples. This study successfully demonstrated the possibility of using the PCR technique on urine for the diagnosis of W. bancrofti infection. PMID:25424447

  14. Concordant clonal delineation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by macrorestriction analysis and polymerase chain reaction genome fingerprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Struelens, M J; Bax, R; Deplano, A; Quint, W G; Van Belkum, A

    1993-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of DNA macrorestriction fragments (macrorestriction analysis) allows epidemiologic typing and delineation of genetic relatedness of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by indexing variations in the global chromosome architecture. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated genome fingerprinting can also discriminate MRSA strains by detecting locally variable DNA motifs. To assess the correlation between these methods, 48 epidemic MRSA strains collected from 20 hospitals over a 10-year period were tested in a blind comparison by (i) macrorestriction analysis with SstII or SmaI endonuclease and (ii) PCR fingerprinting with four primer sets aimed at the mecA gene, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences, and arbitrary sequences. Isolates were discriminated into 22 macrorestriction patterns and 15 PCR fingerprints. MRSA strains belonging to 12 distinct clones by macrorestriction analysis showed 11 distinct PCR genotypes distinguished by multiple band differences. In contrast, 34 of 37 MRSA strains found to be clonally related by macrorestriction analysis clustered in two highly related PCR genotypes that differed by a single DNA fragment (P < 0.0001). These data demonstrate concordant clonal delineation of epidemic MRSA by macrorestriction analysis and PCR fingerprinting and thereby indicate that the rapid PCR assay may be an efficient epidemiologic typing system. Images PMID:8370721

  15. Detection and Enumeration of Streptococcus agalactiae from Bovine Milk Samples by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Nara Ladeira; Gonçalves, Juliano Leonel; Botaro, Bruno Garcia; Silva, Luis Felipe de Prada E; dos Santos, Marcos Veiga

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) combined with DNA extraction directly from composite milk and bulk tank samples for detection and enumeration of Streptococcus agalactiae (SAG) causing subclinical mastitis. Dilutions of sterile reconstituted skim milk inoculated with SAG ATCC 13813 were used to establish a standard curve (cfu/mL) for the qPCR assay targeting SAG. The analytical sensitivity and repeatability of the qPCR assay were determined. Bulk tank (BTM; n = 38) and composite milk samples (CM; n = 26) collected from lactating cows with positive isolation of SAG were submitted to the qPCR protocol and SAG plate counting, with results from both methods compared. Amplification of DNA was not possible in two out of 64 samples, indicating that qPCR was able to detect SAG in 96 and 97% of BTM and CM samples, respectively. The inter-assay coefficient of variation was <5%, showing that the technique had adequate repeatability. The qPCR protocol can be a high-throughput and rapid diagnostic assay to accurately detect SAG from BTM and CM samples compared with conventional microbiological culture method. However, the evaluated qPCR protocol is not accurate for enumerating SAG in milk samples, probably due to quantification of DNA of non-viable cells. PMID:26134534

  16. Utility of a single nasal polymerase chain reaction assay in predicting absence of skin and environmental contamination in hospitalized patients with past methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Dubert M; Wagner, Matthew; Carson, Grace; Hanish, Christine; Thompson, Jody; Orr, Megan; Roth, Felix; Carson, Paul J

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated hospitalized patients with a history of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) for persistent colonization and need for contact precautions. Up to 3 daily cultures of nares, skin, and any present wounds were compared with a single nasal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Most patients (76.2%) were no longer colonized with MRSA. A single PCR assay was sufficient to exclude persistent colonization and environmental contamination and remove the contact precautions. PMID:26874408

  17. [The development of a test-system for the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of DNA content in criminalistic objects by the real-time polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Lapenkov, M I; Plakhina, N V; Alekseev, Ia I; Varlamov, D A

    2011-01-01

    An original test-system for the preliminary quantitative and qualitative evaluation of isolated DNA is proposed by the polymerase chain reaction in real time (PCR-RT) based on the TaqMan technology. This test-system permits to simultaneously measure the amount of DNA in the sample, identify the genetic gender, and detect PCR inhibitors. The method has been approbated in the practical work of forensic medical experts. PMID:21735715

  18. Range of phytoplasma concentrations in various plant hosts as determined by competitive polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Berges, R; Rott, M; Seemüller, E

    2000-10-01

    ABSTRACT For competitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR), an internal standard DNA template was developed that consisted of a highly conserved, internally deleted 16S rDNA fragment of an aster yellows phytoplasma. The internal standard was calibrated using a quantified culture of Acholeplasma laidlawii. Serial dilutions of the internal standard and fixed amounts of target templates from infected plants were coamplified with the same primers, and the products obtained were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedure. Analysis of the data revealed that the phytoplasma concentration in the plants examined differed by a factor of about 4 x 10(6). Phytoplasma concentrations of 2.2 x 10(8) to 1.5 x 10(9) cells per g of tissue were identified in periwinkles infected with various phytoplasmas. High to moderate concentrations were detected in Malus domestica (apple) genotypes infected with the apple proliferation phytoplasma, Alnus glutinosa (alder) genotypes infected with the alder yellows phytoplasma, and most aster yellows-infected Populus (poplar) genotypes examined. Very low phytoplasma concentrations, ranging from 370 to 34,000 cells per g of tissue, were identified in proliferation-diseased apple trees on resistant rootstocks 4551 and 4608, yellows-diseased Quercus robur (oak) trees, and Carpinus betulus (hornbeam) trees. Such low concentrations, which corresponded to about 4 to 340 cells in the reaction mixture, could only be detected and quantified by nested PCR. PMID:18944479

  19. Nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction cancer detection method

    DOEpatents

    Belinsky, Steven A.; Palmisano, William A.

    2007-05-08

    A molecular marker-based method for monitoring and detecting cancer in humans. Aberrant methylation of gene promoters is a marker for cancer risk in humans. A two-stage, or "nested" polymerase chain reaction method is disclosed for detecting methylated DNA sequences at sufficiently high levels of sensitivity to permit cancer screening in biological fluid samples, such as sputum, obtained non-invasively. The method is for detecting the aberrant methylation of the p16 gene, O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene, Death-associated protein kinase gene, RAS-associated family 1 gene, or other gene promoters. The method offers a potentially powerful approach to population-based screening for the detection of lung and other cancers.

  20. Simultaneous quantification of alternatively spliced transcripts in a single droplet digital PCR reaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Tao, Lian; Zheng, Yun-Ling

    2014-06-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is an essential component required for telomerase activity and telomere maintenance. Several alternatively spliced forms of hTERT mRNA have been reported in human primary and tumor cells. Currently, however, there is no sensitive and accurate method for the simultaneous quantification of multiple alternatively spliced RNA transcripts, such as in the case of hTERT. Here we show droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) provides sensitive, simultaneous digital quantification in a single reaction of two alternatively spliced single deletion hTERT transcripts (α-/β+ and α+/β-) as well as the opportunity to manually quantify non-deletion (α+/β+) and double deletion (α-/β-) transcripts. Our ddPCR method enables direct comparison among four alternatively spliced mRNAs without the need for internal standards or multiple primer pairs specific for each variant as real-time PCR (qPCR) requires, thus eliminating potential variation due to differences in PCR amplification efficiency. PMID:24924392

  1. Single Quantum Dot Analysis Enables Multiplexed Point Mutation Detection by Gap Ligase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yunke; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Gene point mutations present important biomarkers for genetic diseases. However, existing point mutation detection methods suffer from low sensitivity, specificity, and tedious assay processes. In this report, we propose an assay technology which combines the outstanding specificity of gap ligase chain reaction (Gap-LCR), the high sensitivity of single molecule coincidence detection and superior optical properties of quantum dots (QDs) for multiplexed detection of point mutations in genomic DNA. Mutant-specific ligation products are generated by Gap-LCR and subsequently captured by QDs to form DNA-QD nanocomplexes that are detected by single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) through multi-color fluorescence burst coincidence analysis, allowing for multiplexed mutation detection in a separation-free format. The proposed assay is capable of detecting zeptomoles of KRAS codon 12 mutation variants with near 100% specificity. Its high sensitivity allows direct detection of KRAS mutation in crude genomic DNA without PCR pre-amplification. PMID:23239594

  2. Analysis of infectious laryngotracheitis virus isolates from Ontario and New Brunswick by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, H S; Key, D W; Nagy, E

    1998-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify DNA of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) isolates obtained from field specimens. The examined 47 samples included 37 isolates representing 35 cases of infectious laryngotracheitis from Ontario and 10 isolates originating from 10 field cases in New Brunswick. The viruses were grown in either embryonated chicken eggs or cell culture, the DNA extracted and amplified using primers designed from the sequence information of a 1.1 kb BamHI fragment of the Ontario 1598 ILTV strain. Thirty-four of the Ontario isolates and all of the New Brunswick isolates were amplified successfully. This suggests that the selected primers would be useful for the majority of the isolates encountered in outbreaks of ILTV. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:9442943

  3. Analysis of cytomegalovirus (CMV) viremia using the pp65 antigenemia assay, the amplicor CMV test, and a semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction test after allogeneic marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ksouri, H; Eljed, H; Greco, A; Lakhal, A; Torjman, L; Abdelkefi, A; Ben Othmen, T; Ladeb, S; Slim, A; Zouari, B; Abdeladhim, A; Ben Hassen, A

    2007-03-01

    A pp65 antigenemia assay for polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) (CINAkit Rapid Antigenemia), and a qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for plasma 'PCR-P qual' (Amplicor cytomegalovirus [CMV] test) were performed for 126 samples (blood and plasma) obtained from 18 bone marrow transplant patients, over a 9-month surveillance period. Among those samples, 92 were assayed with a semi-quantitative PCR test for PMNLs 'PCR-L quant.' The number of samples with a positive CMV test for antigenemia and PCR-P qual assays was 20.63% and 12.7%, respectively, whereas the PCR-L quant assay was positive in 48 of the 92 samples assayed (52.17%). The rates of concordance of the results of PCR-P qual and antigenemia, PCR-P qual and PCR-L quant, antigenemia and PCR-L quant were 92%, 65.2% and 66.8%, respectively. The analysis of the results for the 92 specimens tested by all 3 methods showed a rate of concordance of 63% among all methods. Good agreement (kappa=0.72) was found only between pp65 Ag and PCR-P qual assays. Clinical disease correlates with an antigenemia high viral load. Three patients had CMV disease despite preemptive therapy, and all of them had graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). PMNLs-based assays are more efficient in monitoring CMV reactivation, but for high-risk patients with GVHD, more sensitive assays (real-time PCR) must be done. PMID:17313466

  4. Simultaneous detection of seven sexually transmitted agents in human immunodeficiency virus-infected Brazilian women by multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Souza, Raquel P; de Abreu, André L P; Ferreira, Érika C; Rocha-Brischiliari, Sheila C; de B Carvalho, Maria D; Pelloso, Sandra M; Bonini, Marcelo G; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia E L

    2013-12-01

    We determined the prevalence of seven clinically important pathogens that cause sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, herpes simplex virus 1 [HSV-1], HSV-2, and Treponema pallidum), by using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) in samples from Brazilian woman infected with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and uninfected Brazilian women (controls). The M-PCR assay identified all STIs tested for and surprisingly, occurred association between the control and STIs. This association was probably caused by excellent HIV infection control and regular monitoring in these women established by public health strategies in Brazil to combat HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Studies using this M-PCR in different populations may help to better elucidate the roles of STIs in several conditions. PMID:24080632

  5. Development of a multiplex polymerase chain reaction to detect five common Gram-negative bacteria of aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Tsai, M-A; Ho, P-Y; Wang, P-C; E, Y-J; Liaw, L-L; Chen, S-C

    2012-07-01

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR) technique was developed as a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool for identifying five major Gram-negative bacilli -Vibrio vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Chryseobacterium meningosepticum and Edwardsiella tarda- that cause major diseases in cultured aquatic animals in Taiwan. The expected amplicons for V. vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticus, A. hydrophila, C. meningosepticum and E. tarda were 410, 368, 685, 180 and 230bp, respectively. The assay was shown to be specific for the target pathogens. The sensitivities of detection were estimated to be 20.5fg∼200pg of genomic DNA or 10(2) ∼10(4) colony-forming units (cfu) of bacterial isolates when adopted as PCR templates. The m-PCR was capable of simultaneously amplifying target fragments from bacterial genome DNA mixed with the DNA extracted from viscera and tissues taken from fish without affecting the performance of the method. PMID:22571515

  6. A pentaplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of four species of soil-transmitted helminths.

    PubMed

    Basuni, Madihah; Muhi, Jamail; Othman, Nurulhasanah; Verweij, Jaco J; Ahmad, Maimunah; Miswan, Noorizan; Rahumatullah, Anizah; Aziz, Farhanah Abdul; Zainudin, Nurul Shazalina; Noordin, Rahmah

    2011-02-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth infections remain a major public health burden in low- and middle-income countries. The traditional diagnosis by microscopic examination of fecal samples is insensitive and time-consuming. In this study, a pentaplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was evaluated for the simultaneous detection of Ancylostoma, Necator americanus, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis. The results were compared with those obtained by conventional parasitological diagnostic methods. Real-time PCR was positive in 48 of 77 samples (62.3%) and microscopic examination was positive in six samples (7.8%) only (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the real-time PCR assay described in this study provides a specific and sensitive diagnostic tool for the detection of these four helminth species in epidemiological studies and monitoring of treatment programs. PMID:21292911

  7. Detection of Lassa virus RNA in specimens from patients with Lassa fever by using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Lunkenheimer, K; Hufert, F T; Schmitz, H

    1990-01-01

    Suitable oligonucleotide primers and probes were synthesized to amplify Lassa virus (Josiah strain)-specific nucleoprotein and glycoprotein gene fragments by using reverse transcription combined with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Our primers did not amplify the related lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. By using PCR, about 50 50% tissue culture infective doses could be detected in the supernatant of infected cells. Furthermore, in all five serum specimens and four of five urine specimens of patients with acute Lassa fever, viral RNA could be demonstrated. Negative results were obtained with all serum and urine specimens of healthy subjects. Our data suggest that PCR may be applied as an alternative to virus isolation in the rapid diagnosis of Lassa fever. Images PMID:2279999

  8. Effect of surface charge of PDDA-protected gold nanoparticles on the specificity and efficiency of DNA polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Longfei; He, Yujian

    2013-01-21

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has become an indispensable technique in molecular biology, however, it suffers from low efficiency and specificity problems. Developing suitable additives to effectively avoid nonspecific PCR reactions and explore the mechanism for PCR enhancing is a significant challenge. In this paper, we report three different modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with different surface charge polarities and poly (diallyl dimethylammonium) chloride (PDDA) for use as novel PCR enhancers to improve the efficiency and specificity. These AuNPs included the positively charged PDDA protected AuNPs (PDDA-AuNPs), the neutral PDDA-AuNPs modified with excess chloride ion (PDDA.C-AuNPs), and the negatively charged sodium citrate (Na(3)Ct) protected AuNPs (Na(3)Ct-AuNPs). Our data clearly suggests that the positively charged PDDA-AuNPs with an optimum concentration as low as 1.54 pM could significantly enhance the specificity and efficiency of PCR, however, the optimum concentration of the negatively charged Na(3)Ct-AuNPs (2.02 nM) was more than 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of positively charged PDDA-AuNPs. The PCR specificity and efficiency are also improved by the neutral PDDA.C-AuNPs with an optimum concentration, much more than that of the PDDA-AuNPs. This suggests that there should be an electrostatic interaction between the positively charged PDDA-AuNPs and the negatively charged PCR components, and the surface charge polarities of PDDA-AuNPs may play an important role in improving the PCR specificity and efficiency. PMID:23170311

  9. Real-Time PCR (qPCR) Primer Design Using Free Online Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Brenda; Basu, Chhandak

    2011-01-01

    Real-time PCR (quantitative PCR or qPCR) has become the preferred method for validating results obtained from assays which measure gene expression profiles. The process uses reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), coupled with fluorescent chemistry, to measure variations in transcriptome levels between samples. The four most…

  10. Rapid Polymerase Chain Reaction-based Screening Assay for Bacterial Biothreat Agents

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Samuel; Rothman, Richard E.; Hardick, Justin; Kuroki, Marcos; Hardick, Andrew; Doshi, Vishal; Ramachandran, Padmini; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To design and evaluate a rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay for detecting Eubacteria and performing early screening for selected Class A biothreat bacterial pathogens. Methods The authors designed a two-step PCR-based algorithm consisting of an initial broad-based universal detection step, followed by specific pathogen identification targeted for identification of the Class A bacterial biothreat agents. A region in the bacterial 16S rRNA gene containing a highly variable sequence flanked by clusters of conserved sequences was chosen as the target for the PCR assay design. A previously described highly conserved region located within the 16S rRNA amplicon was selected as the universal probe (UniProbe, Integrated DNA Technology, Coralville, IA). Pathogen-specific TaqMan probes were designed for Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis. Performance of the assay was assessed using genomic DNA extracted from the aforementioned biothreat-related organisms (inactivated or surrogate) and other common bacteria. Results The UniProbe detected the presence of all tested Eubacteria (31 / 31) with high analytical sensitivity. The biothreat-specific probes accurately identified organisms down to the closely related species and genus level, but were unable to discriminate between very close surrogates, such as Yersinia philomiragia and Bacillus cereus. Conclusions A simple, two-step PCR-based assay proved capable of both universal bacterial detection and identification of select Class A bacterial biothreat and biothreat-related pathogens. Although this assay requires confirmatory testing for definitive species identification, the method has great potential for use in ED-based settings for rapid diagnosis in cases of suspected Category A bacterial biothreat agents. PMID:18370996

  11. National Malaria Prevalence in Cambodia: Microscopy Versus Polymerase Chain Reaction Estimates.

    PubMed

    Lek, Dysoley; Popovici, Jean; Ariey, Frederic; Vinjamuri, Seshu Babu; Meek, Sylvia; Bruce, Jan; Taylor, Walter R J; Socheat, Duong; Menard, Didier; Rogers, William O

    2016-09-01

    Accurate information regarding malaria prevalence at national level is required to design and assess malaria control/elimination efforts. Although many comparisons of microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods have been conducted, there is little published literature covering such comparisons in southeast Asia especially at the national level. Both microscopic examination and PCR detection were performed on blood films and dried blood spots samples collected from 8,067 individuals enrolled in a nationwide, stratified, multistage, cluster sampling malaria prevalence survey conducted in Cambodia in 2007. The overall malaria prevalence and prevalence rates of Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, and Plasmodium malariae infections estimated by microscopy (N = 8,067) were 2.74% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.39-3.12%), 1.81% (95% CI: 1.53-2.13%), 1.14% (95% CI: 0.92-1.40%), and 0.01% (95% CI: 0.003-0.07%), respectively. The overall malaria prevalence based on PCR detection (N = 7,718) was almost 2.5-fold higher (6.31%, 95% CI: 5.76-6.89%, P < 0.00001). This difference was significantly more pronounced for P. falciparum (4.40%, 95% CI: 3.95-4.90%, P < 0.00001) compared with P. vivax (1.89%, 95% CI: 1.60-2.22%, P < 0.001) and P. malariae infections (0.22%, 95% CI: 0.13-0.35%, P < 0.0001). The significant proportion of microscopy-negative but PCR-positive individuals (289/7,491, 3.85%) suggest microscopic examination frequently underestimated malaria infections and that active case detection based on microscopy may miss a significant reservoir of infection, especially in low-transmission settings. PMID:27402511

  12. Controlling Hybridization Chain Reactions with pH.

    PubMed

    Idili, Andrea; Porchetta, Alessandro; Amodio, Alessia; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Ricci, Francesco

    2015-08-12

    By taking inspiration from nature, where self-organization of biomolecular species into complex systems is finely controlled through different stimuli, we propose here a rational approach by which the assembly and disassembly of DNA-based concatemers can be controlled through pH changes. To do so we used the hybridization chain reaction (HCR), a process that, upon the addition of an initiator strand, allows to create DNA-based concatemers in a controlled fashion. We re-engineered the functional units of HCR through the addition of pH-dependent clamp-like triplex-forming domains that can either inhibit or activate the polymerization reaction at different pHs. This allows to finely regulate the HCR-induced assembly and disassembly of DNA concatemers at either basic or acidic pHs in a reversible way. The strategies we present here appear particularly promising as novel tools to achieve better spatiotemporal control of self-assembly processes of DNA-based nanostructures. PMID:26177980

  13. Comparison of automated BAX polymerase chain reaction and standard culture methods for detection of Listeria monocyogenes in blue crab meat (Callinectus sapidus) and blue crab processing plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared the BAX Polymerase Chain Reaction method (BAX PCR) with the Standard Culture Method (SCM) for detection of L. monocytogenes in blue crab meat and crab processing plants. The aim of this study was to address this data gap. Raw crabs, finished products and environmental sponge samp...

  14. Detection of Newcastle disease virus RNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue and comparison with immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The usefulness of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues was examined and compared to the immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) assays for detection of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Spleen and lung tissues...

  15. Rapid Differentiation and Identification of Potential Severe Strains of Citrus tristeza Virus by Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multiplex Taqman®-based real-time reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to detect all strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and to identify potentially severe strains of the virus. A CTV TaqMan probe (CTV-CY5) based on the coat protein (CP) gene sequences...

  16. A Capsid Gene-Based Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for the Detection of Marine Vesiviruses in the Caliciviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rtRT-PCR) assay was developed for the identification of marine vesiviruses. The primers were designed to target a 176-nucleotide fragment within a highly conserved region of the San Miguel sea lion viruses (SMSVs) capsid gene. The assay de...

  17. Bubble-free on-chip continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction: concept and application.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenming; Kang, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2011-06-01

    Bubble formation inside a microscale channel is a significant problem in general microfluidic experiments. The problem becomes especially crucial when performing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a chip which is subject to repetitive temperature changes. In this paper, we propose a bubble-free sample injection scheme applicable for continuous-flow PCR inside a glass/PDMS hybrid microfluidic chip, and attempt to provide a theoretical basis concerning bubble formation and elimination. Highly viscous paraffin oil plugs are employed in both the anterior and posterior ends of a sample plug, completely encapsulating the sample and eliminating possible nucleation sites for bubbles. In this way, internal channel pressure is increased, and vaporization of the sample is prevented, suppressing bubble formation. Use of an oil plug in the posterior end of the sample plug aids in maintaining a stable flow of a sample at a constant rate inside a heated microchannel throughout the entire reaction, as compared to using an air plug. By adopting the proposed sample injection scheme, we demonstrate various practical applications. On-chip continuous-flow PCR is performed employing genomic DNA extracted from a clinical single hair root sample, and its D1S80 locus is successfully amplified. Also, chip reusability is assessed using a plasmid vector. A single chip is used up to 10 times repeatedly without being destroyed, maintaining almost equal intensities of the resulting amplicons after each run, ensuring the reliability and reproducibility of the proposed sample injection scheme. In addition, the use of a commercially-available and highly cost-effective hot plate as a potential candidate for the heating source is investigated. PMID:21461443

  18. Evaluation of four DNA extraction methods for the detection of Tritrichomonas foetus in feline stool specimens by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Stephen H; Birkenheuer, Adam J; Levy, Michael G; Marr, Henry; Gookin, Jody L

    2008-09-01

    Feces are increasingly valued as practical samples for molecular diagnosis of infectious disease. However, extraction of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) quality DNA from fecal samples can be challenging because of coextraction of PCR inhibitors. Because the type and quantity of PCR inhibitors is influenced by diet, endogenous flora, and concurrent disease, it is unlikely that extraction method performance with human feces can be directly extrapolated to that of domestic cats. In the present study, 4 commercially available DNA extraction methods were examined for their influence on the sensitivity of PCR for the detection of Tritrichomonas foetus in feline stool. DNA was extracted from serially diluted feline-origin T. foetus trophozoites in the absence or presence of feline feces. The ZR Fecal DNA kit was identified as affording the greatest analytical sensitivity and reproducibility and was able to detect >or=10 T. foetus organisms per 100 mg feces in 100% of PCR reactions. Further, the identified extraction method could be completed in the shortest time of all kits tested. PMID:18776100

  19. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction as a Tool for Evaluation of Magnetic Poly(Glycidyl methacrylate)-Based Microspheres in Molecular Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Trachtová, Stepánka; Spanová, Alena; Horák, Daniel; Kozáková, Hana; Rittich, Bohuslav

    2016-01-01

    DNA amplification by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used for the evaluation of efficiency of polymer coating of magnetic hydrophilic poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) (P(HEMA-co-GMA)) and poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) microspheres with/without carboxyl groups. The inhibition effect of magnetic microspheres on real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) course was evaluated by regression analysis after the addition of different concentrations of tested microspheres to PCR mixtures. Microspheres mostly did not interfere in RT-PCR till the concentration 50 µg/25 µl PCR mixture. No relationship between Fe content (and microsphere diameter) and inhibition effect was found. Microspheres containing carboxyl groups extinguished the fluorescence at lower concentrations (10-20 µg/25 µl PCR mixture) without inhibition of DNA amplification as PCR products were detected using agarose gel electrophoresis. Negative effect of maghemite on PCR course was partially reduced by coating of magnetic core by silica or polymers. Two inhibition mechanisms of DNA amplification were discussed in this work. PMID:26708828

  20. Factors affecting detection of PVY in dormant tubers by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and nucleic acid spot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Singh, R P

    1996-06-01

    A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol was developed using two 20-mer primers located in nuclear inclusion genes NIa and NIb of potato virus Y (PVY). A 1017 bp PCR-product was detected in dormant potato tubers, infected with PVY(O), but not in tubers from healthy plants. The PCR product was specific to PVY, as determined by Southern blot detection by hybridization with a PVY(O)-specific probe. As little as 1 pg of purified PVY(O)-RNA can be detected after RT-PCR amplification. The presence of phenolics or polysaccharides in tuber nucleic acids inhibited PVY(O) amplification, which was eliminated by diluting nucleic acid preparations prior to cDNA synthesis, modifying the nucleic acid extraction procedure by isopropanol precipitation and using phosphate-buffered saline-Tween in the cDNA mix. Potato cultivars differed in PVY(O) concentration in tubers as much as 128-fold. Tuber parts used for nucleic acid extractions were important in potato cultivars with low virus titres and did not result in reduced detection of PVY(O) by both nucleic acid spot hybridization and RT-PCR, but RT-PCR band intensity was lower at longer storage periods. The primer pair developed in this study exhibited broad specificities with field isolates from Peru, Scotland and North America. PMID:8795005

  1. Quantitative fucK gene polymerase chain reaction on sputum and nasopharyngeal secretions to detect Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Abdeldaim, Guma M K; Strålin, Kristoffer; Olcén, Per; Blomberg, Jonas; Mölling, Paula; Herrmann, Björn

    2013-06-01

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the fucK gene was developed for specific detection of Haemophilus influenzae. The method was tested on sputum and nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) from 78 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). With a reference standard of sputum culture and/or serology against the patient's own nasopharyngeal isolate, H. influenzae etiology was detected in 20 patients. Compared with the reference standard, fucK PCR (using the detection limit 10(5) DNA copies/mL) on sputum and NPA showed a sensitivity of 95.0% (19/20) in both cases, and specificities of 87.9% (51/58) and 89.5% (52/58), respectively. In a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, sputum fucK PCR was found to be significantly superior to sputum P6 PCR for detection of H. influenzae CAP. NPA fucK PCR was positive in 3 of 54 adult controls without respiratory symptoms. In conclusion, quantitative fucK real-time PCR provides a sensitive and specific identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions. PMID:23541117

  2. Validation of a polymerase chain reaction assay for monitoring the therapeutic efficacy of diminazene aceturate in trypanosome-infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Bengaly, Z; Kasbari, M; Desquesnes, M; Sidibé, I

    2001-03-20

    The diagnostic performance of a polymerase chain reaction assay (PCR) for monitoring the effectiveness of aceturate diminazene treatment was compared with those of an antibody-detection ELISA test and the buffy-coat technique using sheep experimentally infected with either savannah-type or forest-type Trypanosoma congolense or T. vivax. Within the period of infection, the PCR using specific savannah-type T. congolense primers showed a significant higher diagnostic sensitivity (p<0.05) than the buffy-coat technique. Both techniques gave closed results for detecting forest-type T. congolense or T. vivax infections. Following trypanocidal treatment, the PCR showed that specific product disappeared definitively 1 or 2 days later in animals in which a decrease of the antibody level and a significant improvement of the red packed cell volume were observed. The occurrence of relapse infection was detected by the PCR in one animal infected by T. vivax on day 19 post-treatment and confirmed by the persistence and increasing antibody level whereas the buffy-coat technique detected parasites 42 days later. Then, the PCR signals remained positive on several occasions while parasitaemia was detected only two times.The application of PCR combined with the antibody detection appeared to provide a useful tool as compared to the buffy-coat technique for monitoring the effectiveness of trypanocidal treatment. PMID:11230917

  3. RAPID DNA SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF REVERTANTS OF THE HISD3052 ALLELE OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM TA98 USING THE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION AND DIRECT SEQUENCING: APPLICATION TO 1-NITROPYRENE-INDUCED REVERTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to speed the processing of revertants of Salmonella typhimurium TA98 for DNA sequence analysis. riefly, a crude DNA extract from a single colony was prepared and used in an asymmetric PCR to amplify a 228-bp fragment containing the...

  4. Typing of Plasmodium falciparum DNA from 2 years old Giemsa-stained dried blood spots using nested polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D; Dhiman, S; Rabha, B; Goswami, D; Yadav, K; Deka, M; Veer, V; Baruah, I

    2016-01-01

    A panel of 129 Giemsa-stained thick blood spots (TBS) confirmed for Plasmodium falciparum infection having different levels of parasite density were collected from a malaria endemic area. DNA was extracted and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was performed to amplify P. falciparum DNA. Nested PCR assay successfully amplified P. falciparum DNA at a very low parasitaemia of ~10 parasites/μl of blood. Current PCR assay is very simple and can be used retrospectively to monitor the invasion and prevalence of different Plasmodium species in endemic areas. PMID:27080775

  5. Detection of hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid in the serum by amplification with polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, N; Yokosuka, O; Omata, M; Hosoda, K; Ohto, M

    1990-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA was detected in the sera of patients with non-A, non-B chronic liver disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RNA was extracted from the serum, reverse transcribed to cDNA, and amplified by PCR. With this method, 30 patients with non-A, non-B chronic liver disease and 10 healthy subjects were tested. HCV RNA was detected in 13 of 16 (81%) anti-HCV-positive patients and also in 7 of 14 (50%) anti-HCV-negative patients, but in none of 10 anti-HCV-negative healthy subjects. Specificity of this method was confirmed by direct sequencing of amplified cDNA segment. The nucleotide sequences (37 nucleotides) obtained from 15 patients showed only 68-78% homology compared with the prototype HCV nucleotide sequence. In addition, of 15 nucleotide sequences, there were 12 different types. But the translated amino acid sequences (12 amino acids) showed 83-100% homology compared with the prototype HCV amino acid sequence. These data suggest the majority of anti-HCV-positive patients are carriers of HCV. But to detect all the viremic patients, the anti-HCV antibody testing may be insufficient. Direct detection of HCV RNA may be useful in the study of virus replication and its association with various liver diseases. Images PMID:2173727

  6. A real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for detection and quantification of Vesiculovirus.

    PubMed

    Tolardo, Aline Lavado; Souza, William Marciel de; Romeiro, Marilia Farignoli; Vieira, Luiz Carlos; Luna, Luciano Kleber de Souza; Henriques, Dyana Alves; Araujo, Jansen de; Siqueira, Carlos Eduardo Hassegawa; Colombo, Tatiana Elias; Aquino, Victor Hugo; Fonseca, Benedito Antonio Lopes da; Bronzoni, Roberta Vieira de Morais; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda; Durigon, Edison Luiz; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2016-06-01

    Vesiculoviruses (VSV) are zoonotic viruses that cause vesicular stomatitis disease in cattle, horses and pigs, as well as sporadic human cases of acute febrile illness. Therefore, diagnosis of VSV infections by reliable laboratory techniques is important to allow a proper case management and implementation of strategies for the containment of virus spread. We show here a sensitive and reproducible real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection and quantification of VSV. The assay was evaluated with arthropods and serum samples obtained from horses, cattle and patients with acute febrile disease. The real-time RT-PCR amplified the Piry, Carajas, Alagoas and Indiana Vesiculovirus at a melting temperature 81.02 ± 0.8ºC, and the sensitivity of assay was estimated in 10 RNA copies/mL to the Piry Vesiculovirus. The viral genome has been detected in samples of horses and cattle, but not detected in human sera or arthropods. Thus, this assay allows a preliminary differential diagnosis of VSV infections. PMID:27276185

  7. Rapid enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes in artificially contaminated cabbage using real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Hough, Angela J; Harbison, Sally-Ann; Savill, Marion G; Melton, Laurence D; Fletcher, Graham

    2002-08-01

    A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection method specific for Listeria monocytogenes was developed, and studies involving pure culture showed that the response of the assay was linear over 7 log10 (log) cycles. The method was then applied to the detection of L. monocytogenes artificially inoculated onto cabbage, a vegetable chosen because it is a major component of coleslaw, which has been associated with an outbreak of listeriosis. After being allowed to attach to the food, cells were washed from the cabbage leaf surface and recovered by centrifugation. The DNA was purified by an organic solvent extraction technique and analyzed by real-time PCR. In this matrix, the method again produced a linear response over 7 log cycles from 1.4 x 10(2) to 1.4 x 10(9) CFU of L. monocytogenes in 25 g of cabbage, and analysis of the reproducibility of the system showed that log differences in L. monocytogenes numbers added to cabbage could be reliably distinguished. The system allowed quantitative results to be obtained within 8 h and was relatively inexpensive, showing good potential for routine analytical use. PMID:12182489

  8. Genome fingerprinting by simple sequence repeat (SSR)-anchored polymerase chain reaction amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Zietkiewicz, E.; Labuda, D. ); Rafalski, A. )

    1994-03-15

    Simple sequence repeats (SSR), or microsatellites, are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes. Here the authors demonstrate the utility of microsatellite-directed DNA fingerprinting by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the interrepeat region. No sequencing is required to design the oligonucleotide primers. They tested primers anchored at 3[prime] or 5[prime] termini of the (A)[sub n] repeats, extended into the flanking sequence by 2 to 4 nucleotide residues [3[prime]-anchored primers: (CA)[sub 8]RG, (CA)[sub 8]RY, and (CA)[sub 7]RTCY; and 5[prime]-anchored primers: BDB(CA)[sub 7]C, DBDA(CA)[sub 7], VHVG(TG)[sub 7] and HVH(TG)[sub 7]T]. Radioactively labeled amplification products were analyzed by electrophoresis, revealing information on multiple genomic loci in a single gel lane. Complex, species-specific patterns were obtained from a variety of eukaryotic taxa. Intraspecies polymorphisms were also observed and shown to segregate as Mendelian markers. Inter-SSR PCR provides a novel fingerprinting approach applicable for taxonomic and phylogenetic comparisons and as a mapping tool in a wide range of organisms. This application of (CA)[sub n] repeats may be extended to different microsatellites and other common dispersed elements. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Mutagenicity Assessment of Organophosphates using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Preety; Chaudhry, Asha

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In this study we have evaluated the mutagenicity of organophosphate pesticides acephate, chlorpyrifos, and profenofos using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay with the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus taken as an experimental model. Materials and Methods: Second instar larvae were treated with LC20 of each pesticide for 24 h and mutations induced in the sequence of mitochondrial COII gene (690bp) were studied from restriction patterns generated with AluI, PacI, and PsiI restriction endonucleases. Results: Variations in the number and size of digested fragments were recorded from treated individuals compared with controls showing that the restriction enzymes created a cut at different locations. In addition, sequences of COII gene from control and treated individuals were also used to confirm the RFLP patterns. From the sequence alignment data, it was found that mutations caused the destruction and generation of restriction sites in the gene sequence of treated individuals. Conclusion: This study indicates that all the three pesticides had potential to induce mutations in the normal sequence of COII gene and also advocates the use of PCR-RFLP assay as an efficient, rapid, and sensitive technique to detect mutagenicity of pesticides. PMID:24403735

  10. High sensitivity detection of active botulinum neurotoxin by glyco-quantitative polymerase chain-reaction.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seok Joon; Jeong, Eun Ji; Yoo, Yung Choon; Cai, Chao; Yang, Gi-Hyeok; Lee, Jae Chul; Dordick, Jonathan S; Linhardt, Robert J; Lee, Kyung Bok

    2014-03-01

    The sensitive detection of highly toxic botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) from Clostridium botulinum is of critical importance because it causes human illnesses if foodborne or introduced in wounds and as an iatrogenic substance. Moreover, it has been recently considered a possible biological warfare agent. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in BoNT detection technologies, including mouse lethality assays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and endopeptidase assays and by mass spectrometry. Critical assay requirements, including rapid assay, active toxin detection, sensitive and accurate detection, still remain challenging. Here, we present a novel method to detect active BoNTs using a Glyco-quantitative polymerase chain-reaction (qPCR) approach. Sialyllactose, which interacts with the binding-domain of BoNTs, is incorporated into a sialyllactose-DNA conjugate as a binding-probe for active BoNT and recovered through BoNT-immunoprecipitation. Glyco-qPCR analysis of the bound sialyllactose-DNA is then used to detect low attomolar concentrations of BoNT and attomolar to femtomolar concentrations of BoNT in honey, the most common foodborne source of infant botulism. PMID:24506443

  11. Combination of immunosensor detection with viability testing and confirmation using the polymerase chain reaction and culture.

    PubMed

    Johnson-White, Brandy; Lin, Baochuan; Ligler, Frances S

    2007-01-01

    Rapid and accurate differential determination of viable versus nonviable microbes is critical for formulation of an appropriate response after pathogen detection. Sensors for rapid bacterial identification can be used for applications ranging from environmental monitoring and homeland defense to food process monitoring, but few provide viability information. This study combines the rapid screening capability of the array biosensor using an immunoassay format with methods for determination of viability. Additionally, cells captured by the immobilized antibodies can be cultured following fluorescence imaging to further confirm viability and for cell population expansion for further characterization, e.g., strain identification or antibiotic susceptibility testing. Finally, we demonstrate analysis of captured bacteria using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR results for waveguide-captured cells were 3 orders of magnitude more sensitive than the fluorescence immunoassay and can also provide additional genetic information on the captured microbes. These approaches can be used to rapidly detect and distinguish viable versus nonviable and pathogenic versus nonpathogenic captured organisms, provide culture materials for further analysis on a shorter time scale, and assess the efficacy of decontamination or sterilization procedures. PMID:17194131

  12. Effect of single mismatches at 3′–end of primers on polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Simsek, M; Adnan, H

    2000-01-01

    Objective and Method To investigate the effect of three different mismatches (G/T, G/A or G/G) at the 3′–end of a primer to amplify a 268 bp (base pair) region of the human β–globin gene using different annealing temperatures (45 to 65°C). Results The primer with the G/T mismatch was as efficient as the normal primer (G/C match) in the amplification of a 268 bp product at all temperatures tested. However, the primers having G/A or G/G mismatches at the 3′-end did not produce any specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment at all the annealing temperatures used, except a barely detectable 268 bp product for the G/G mismatch at 45 and 50°C. Conclusion We conclude that our PCR system was refractory to amplification when one of the primers contained a G/A or G/G mismatch at the 3′–end with template DNA. PMID:24019700

  13. A real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for detection and quantification of Vesiculovirus

    PubMed Central

    Tolardo, Aline Lavado; de Souza, William Marciel; Romeiro, Marilia Farignoli; Vieira, Luiz Carlos; Luna, Luciano Kleber de Souza; Henriques, Dyana Alves; de Araujo, Jansen; Siqueira, Carlos Eduardo Hassegawa; Colombo, Tatiana Elias; Aquino, Victor Hugo; da Fonseca, Benedito Antonio Lopes; Bronzoni, Roberta Vieira de Morais; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda; Durigon, Edison Luiz; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Vesiculoviruses (VSV) are zoonotic viruses that cause vesicular stomatitis disease in cattle, horses and pigs, as well as sporadic human cases of acute febrile illness. Therefore, diagnosis of VSV infections by reliable laboratory techniques is important to allow a proper case management and implementation of strategies for the containment of virus spread. We show here a sensitive and reproducible real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection and quantification of VSV. The assay was evaluated with arthropods and serum samples obtained from horses, cattle and patients with acute febrile disease. The real-time RT-PCR amplified the Piry, Carajas, Alagoas and Indiana Vesiculovirus at a melting temperature 81.02 ± 0.8ºC, and the sensitivity of assay was estimated in 10 RNA copies/mL to the Piry Vesiculovirus. The viral genome has been detected in samples of horses and cattle, but not detected in human sera or arthropods. Thus, this assay allows a preliminary differential diagnosis of VSV infections. PMID:27276185

  14. Detection of bovine leukemia virus in cattle by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Murtaugh, M P; Lin, G F; Haggard, D L; Weber, A F; Meiske, J C

    1991-06-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is widely distributed in U.S. cattle herds. It infects B lymphocytes and causes neoplastic disease in 5-10% of infected animals. Direct economic losses are incurred as a result of death, reduced milk production and condemnation at slaughter. Thus the identification of cattle infected with BLV is of significant concern to the U.S. cattle industry. For this reason, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was used to examine seropositive and seronegative cattle for the presence of BLV DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Using an amplification protocol able to detect 1 viral genome in 100,000 cells, BLV was not detected in 7 seronegative cattle in an infected herd. BLV sequences were detected in 13 of 18 seropositive animals with various levels of infection as determined by in vitro lymphocyte culture and electron microscopy. An active infection was demonstrated in one animal, based on the presence of viral RNA. These findings indicate that PCR is a sensitive method for the detection of BLV in cattle and provides new information regarding the dynamics of the infection. PMID:1658030

  15. A Consensus on Fungal Polymerase Chain Reaction Diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    White, P. Lewis; Barton, Richard; Guiver, Malcolm; Linton, Christopher J.; Wilson, Steve; Smith, Melvyn; Gomez, Beatriz L.; Carr, Michael J.; Kimmitt, Patrick T.; Seaton, Shila; Rajakumar, Kumar; Holyoake, Tessa; Kibbler, Chris C.; Johnson, Elizabeth; Hobson, Richard P.; Jones, Brian; Barnes, Rosemary A.

    2006-01-01

    The limitations of classical diagnostic methods for invasive fungal infections (IFIs) have led to the development of molecular techniques to aid in the detection of IFIs. Despite good published performance, interlaboratory reproduction of these assays is variable, and no consensus has been reached for an optimal method. This publication describes the first multicenter study of polymerase chain reaction methods, for the detection of Aspergillus and Candida species, currently used in the UK and Ireland by distribution and analysis of multiple specimen control panels. All three Candida methods were comparable, achieving a satisfactory level of detection (10 cfu), and the method of preference was dependent on the requirements of the particular laboratory. The results for the five Aspergillus assays were more variable, but two methods (2Asp and 4Asp) were superior (101 conidia). Formally, the overall performances of the two Aspergillus assays were comparable (κ statistic = 0.77). However, on the Roche LightCycler, there was a clear sample-type effect that greatly reduced the detection limit of the 4Asp method when testing whole blood samples. Therefore, the preferred Aspergillus method relied on the amplification platform available to the user. This study represents the initial process to achieve a consensus method for the diagnosis of IFIs. PMID:16825512

  16. Development of a polymerase chain reaction applicable to rapid and sensitive detection of Clonorchis sinensis eggs in human stool samples.

    PubMed

    Cho, Pyo Yun; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Choi, Kyung Mi; Kim, Jin Su; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Won-Ja; Lim, Sung-Bin; Cha, Seok Ho; Park, Yun-Kyu; Pak, Jhang Ho; Lee, Hyeong-Woo; Hong, Sung-Jong; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2013-07-01

    Microscopic examination of eggs of parasitic helminths in stool samples has been the most widely used classical diagnostic method for infections, but tiny and low numbers of eggs in stool samples often hamper diagnosis of helminthic infections with classical microscopic examination. Moreover, it is also difficult to differentiate parasite eggs by the classical method, if they have similar morphological characteristics. In this study, we developed a rapid and sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based molecular diagnostic method for detection of Clonorchis sinensis eggs in stool samples. Nine primers were designed based on the long-terminal repeat (LTR) of C. sinensis retrotransposon1 (CsRn1) gene, and seven PCR primer sets were paired. Polymerase chain reaction with each primer pair produced specific amplicons for C. sinensis, but not for other trematodes including Metagonimus yokogawai and Paragonimus westermani. Particularly, three primer sets were able to detect 10 C. sinensis eggs and were applicable to amplify specific amplicons from DNA samples purified from stool of C. sinensis-infected patients. This PCR method could be useful for diagnosis of C. sinensis infections in human stool samples with a high level of specificity and sensitivity. PMID:23916334

  17. The effect of chain initiation reaction on the stability of gaseous detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, K.; Hashemi, S. A.

    Most of the works on the stability analysis of detonations have used a one-step, irreversible reaction with an Arrhenius form of the reaction rate (e.g. [1]). Short and Quirk [2] carried out direct numerical simulation of detonation by making use of a three-step chain-branching reaction model. Using the chain-branching crossover temperature as a bifurcation parameter, they studied the effect of chain branching reaction on the stability of detonation. By varying this parameter, the mechanisms of regular and irregular modes of instability and finally failure mode were obtained. Short et al. [3] studied the unsteady structure of detonation for above cases. A two-step reaction model was used by Mazaheri et al. [4] to study the stability of detonations. In this model, the first step was a non-heat release induction step and the second step was an exothermic reaction. Using this model, the effects of induction and reaction length on the stability of detonation were studied. In this work, a more realistic four-step reaction model is used for numerical simulation of unstable detonation. This four-step model contains chain initiation; chain branching, chain propagation and chain termination. Using this four-step model, the effect of initiation reaction (which, has not been previously studied)is investigated by varying the rate of initiation reaction through changing the activation energy of this reaction (Eai).

  18. Comparative evaluation of staining techniques and polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of intestinal microsporidiosis in immunocompromised patients

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Ujjala; Khanduja, Sonali; Agarwal, Vikas; Dhole, Tapan N; Ghoshal, Uday C

    2015-01-01

    Context: Microsporidia, which causes chronic diarrhoea in immunocompromised hosts, are often missed. The commonest diagnostic techniques include modified trichrome (MT) stain; however, it requires expertise and does not identify the species, which is important therapeutically. Other diagnostic techniques include Calcoflour white staining and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Data on comparative utility of different diagnostic techniques are scanty. Aim: Comparison of Calcoflour white, MT staining and PCR for the diagnosis of intestinal microsporidiosis. Subjects and Methods: Fecal samples of consecutive immunocompromised patients were evaluated for Microsporidia using Calcoflour white, MT stain and PCR. Species were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism using HindIII and HinfI. Presence of Microsporidia by two or more techniques was considered true positive. Absence of Microsporidia by all three techniques was taken as true negative. Results: Of 730 patients, Microsporidia was detected in 28 (3.8%), 250 (34.2%) and 30 (4.1%) patients by MT, Calcoflour white stains and PCR, respectively. Enterocytozoon bieneusi was identified in all 30 (4.1%) patients. 30 (4.1%) and 479 (65.6%) patients were true positive and true negative, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of Calcoflour white, MT stains and PCR were 100%, 93.8%, 96.8% and 68.5%, 100% and 99.8%, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy of MT stain and PCR was superior to Calcoflour white (99.6% vs. 69.8%; P < 0.05). Conclusions: Though Calcoflour white stain is a highly sensitive, but it is nonspecific technique. MT stain and PCR with high sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy are useful diagnostic techniques. Furthermore, PCR is useful for species identification, which has therapeutic implications. PMID:26629452

  19. Detection of Copy Number Imbalance in Canine Urothelial Carcinoma With Droplet Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, H; Shapiro, S G; Breen, M

    2016-07-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) is the most common neoplasm of the canine urinary tract. Clinical presentation of UC is shared with several other, more common urinary tract disorders, and this often delays diagnosis of the UC. Definitive diagnosis of UC requires histopathologic examination of a biopsy specimen, but the cost and invasiveness for these diagnostic tests often result in most diagnoses being made on the basis of clinical findings, diagnostic imaging, and cytologic examination of urine sediment. Regardless of the diagnostic process used, most UCs currently are not diagnosed until they are at an advanced clinical stage and so are associated with poor prognosis. Improved methods for earlier and less invasive detection are needed. In a previous study, the authors demonstrated the presence of highly recurrent DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) in canine UC and hypothesized that detection of these CNAs in tumor cells can be used as a molecular diagnostic for UC. In this study, a multiplexed droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) assay was detected to detect and quantify CNAs of specific regions of canine chromosomes 8, 13, 19, and 36. The assay was effective at differentiating 31 neoplastic and 25 nonneoplastic bladder tissues based on copy number, with 100% sensitivity and specificity in tissue samples. CNAs were also detected by ddPCR in 67% (12 of 18) of urine DNA specimens derived from UC patients. The findings show that ddPCR is a useful molecular technique to detect CNAs and may be used as a noninvasive molecular diagnostic test for canine UC. PMID:26574558

  20. Detection of MYCN Amplification in Serum DNA Using Conventional Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Youngeun; Lee, Ji Won; Park, Soo Jin; Yi, Eun Sang; Choi, Young Bae; Yoo, Keon Hee; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2016-09-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor of childhood and is characterized by a wide range of clinical behaviors. Amplification of MYCN is a well-known poor prognostic factor in NB patients. As the MYCN amplification status is usually tested using tumor specimens, lengthy and invasive procedures are unavoidable. To evaluate the possibility of detecting MYCN amplification without invasive procedure, we performed conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to identify MYCN amplification using the preserved serum DNA. PCR of serum DNA was done in 105 NB patients whose MYCN status had been confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. MYCN amplification was evaluated as the ratio of signal intensities between MYCN and NAGK (M/N ratio). When regarding the tissue FISH results as a reference, 10 patients had MYCN-amplified (MNA) NB, and 95 had non-MNA NB. The M/N ratio of the MNA group (median 2.56, range 1.01-3.58) was significantly higher than that of the non-MNA group (median 0.97, range 0.67-5.18) (P < 0.001). In the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the area under the curve was 0.957 (95% confidence interval 0.898-1.000; P < 0.001), and it showed 90.9% sensitivity and 97.9% specificity with the selected cut-off value set as 1.6. The detection of MYCN amplification using conventional PCR analysis of serum samples seems to be a simple and promising method to evaluate the MYCN status of NB patients. Further study with a larger set of patients is needed to confirm the accuracy of this result. PMID:27510381

  1. Use of polymerase chain reaction for early identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in positive cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Cormican, M. G.; Barry, T.; Gannon, F.; Flynn, J.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To develop a readily applicable polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based technique which would permit the identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates from Bactec phials at an earlier stage than currently available methods. METHODS: Mycobacterial cells cultured in Bactec 12B medium were harvested by centrifugation. The cells were lysed by heating in distilled water. Oligonucleotide primers based on the sequence of the gene coding for the immunogenic protein MPB64 were then used to amplify a 240 base pair fragment of DNA directly from the crude cell lysate. The PCR product was visualised under ultraviolet light following electrophoresis of an aliquot in an agarose gel containing ethidium bromide. The sensitivity of the PCR was adjusted so that about 600 cfu of M tuberculosis gave a positive result. The lowest growth index at which this method of identification might be applied to Bactec phials was determined and a number of routine cultures giving a positive growth index examined. RESULTS: M tuberculosis was positively identified at the lowest growth index, as determined by the Bactec system. Of 45 routine cultures examined, with growth indexes ranging from 6 to 999, the 15 confirmed by conventional means to contain M tuberculosis were correctly identified from 1 ml of culture medium. CONCLUSIONS: The method described can be used to identify M tuberculosis isolates cultured in the Bactec system at the earliest detectable rise in growth index. It may therefore allow cultured mycobacteria to be identified at an earlier stage than conventional methods or the commercially available DNA probes adapted for use with the Bactec system. Images PMID:1517460

  2. Simultaneous detection of pyrethroid, organophosphate, and cyclodiene target site resistance in Haematobia irritans (Diptera: Muscidae) by multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Luísa N; Guerrero, Felix D; Foil, Lane D

    2014-09-01

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans (L., 1758) (Diptera: Muscidae), is an important pest that causes significant economic losses to the livestock industry, but insecticide resistance in horn fly populations has made horn fly control increasingly difficult to achieve. In this study, we developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to simultaneously detect target site resistance to pyrethroids (kdr mutation), organophosphates (G262A acetylcholinesterase mutation), and cyclodienes (Rdl mutation) and used the new procedure to follow the progression of these three mutations after exposure to different insecticide pressure. We assayed flies collected at the Macon Ridge research station, Winnsboro, LA, from 2008 to 2012. The multiplex PCR showed robust results in all our assays. The kdr mutation remained at high frequencies during all years, even after 4 yr with no use of pyrethroids. The G262A acetylcholinesterase mutation fluctuated from 7.5 to 23.8% during the studied years, while the Rdl mutation was rare in 2008, 2009, and June 2010, and then significantly increased after the first use of endosulfan. The possibility of screening for all the known target site resistance mutations in a single PCR reaction makes the multiplex PCR a useful and affordable tool that can be used to help diagnose insecticide resistance. PMID:25276924

  3. Capillary-based fully integrated and automated system for nanoliter polymerase chain reaction analysis directly from cheek cells.

    PubMed

    He, Y; Zhang, Y H; Yeung, E S

    2001-07-27

    A miniaturized, integrated and automated system based on capillary fluidics has been developed for nanoliter DNA analysis directly from cheek cells. All steps for DNA analysis, including injecting aqueous reagents and DNA samples, mixing the solutions together, thermal cell lysis, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), transfer and injection of PCR product, separation, sizing and detection of those products are performed in a capillary-based integrated system. A small amount of cheek cells collected by a plastic toothpick is directly dissolved in the PCR cocktail in a plastic vial or mixed on-line with a small volume of PCR cocktail (125 nl) in the capillary. After thermal cell lysis and PCR in a microthermal cycler, the DNA fragments are mixed with DNA size standards and transferred to a micro-cross for injection and separation by capillary gel electrophoresis. Programmable syringe pumps, switching valves, multiposition and freeze-thaw valves are used for microfluidic control in the entire system. This work establishes the feasibility of performing all the steps of DNA analysis from real samples in a capillary-based nanoliter integrated system. PMID:11521874

  4. Confirmation of Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes by polymerase chain reaction in placentas of women with reactive serology for Lyme antibodies.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, R; Bracero, L A; Aguero-Rosenfeld, M; Beneck, D; Coleman, J; Schwartz, I

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine whether Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes were present in placentas of asymptomatic women with reactive Lyme serology using a silver stain, and to confirm the identity of the spirochetes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sixty placentas of asymptomatic women with ELISA-positive or-equivocal serology for Lyme antibodies during pregnancy were examined for spirochetes using a silver stain. The results of the ELISA serology were confirmed by Western blot analysis. PCR amplification for B. burgdorferi was performed on placentas identified to have spirochetes and on a group of placentas negative for spirochetes. Spirochetes were identified by silver staining in 3 (5%) of the 60 placentas. PCR confirmed B. burgdorferi nucleotide sequences in 2 of the placentas. The 5 women had equivocal Lyme ELISA and negative syphilis serology. The results of the Western blot analysis were negative in 2 cases and indeterminate in 1 case. Six controls were negative for spirochetes by silver staining and PCR. A normal perinatal outcome was observed in all cases. Spirochetes identified in placental tissue of pregnancies with reactive Lyme serology were confirmed by PCR to be B. burgdorferi. There was no relationship between the presence of placental spirochetes and the results of Lyme serology or the pregnancy outcome. PMID:8793493

  5. Comparative field analyses of rapid analyte measurement platform and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays for West Nile virus surveillance.

    PubMed

    Williges, Eric; Farajollahi, Ary; Nelder, Mark P; Gaugler, Randy

    2009-12-01

    Rapid detection of West Nile virus (WNV) in mosquito pools is essential for predicting epizootics and epidemics. We compare the efficiency and sensitivity of the Rapid Analyte Measurement Platform (RAMP) to reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from 2005 to 2008 from field mosquito populations in Mercer County, NJ. Overall, 316 pools tested negative and 115 pools tested positive for WNV. Eighty-nine pools tested positive using RAMP and all were confirmed by RT-PCR; 26 pools were WNV-negative using RAMP but positive using RT-PCR. False-positives from RAMP were not detected in our four-year study, indicating that RAMP is a reliable tool when used to augment existing RT-PCR-based WNV surveillance programs. Local mosquito control programs using RAMP will benefit from its ease of use, quick results, and lack of false positives but should understand the sensitivity of this test when compared to RT-PCR. Used with standard methods, RAMP will enhance existing mosquito control and WNV surveillance by providing rapid results and improved mosquito management decisions. PMID:20836836

  6. Rapid detection of Newcastle disease virus replication in embryonated chicken eggs using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, V P; Raj, Gopal Dhinakar; Raja, A; Kumanan, K; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2011-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus, is an economically important disease of poultry globally. Rapid methods to detect and differentiate the virus are important to curtail the spread of this virus. Nucleic acid based detection methods are routinely employed for diagnosis that suffer from the disadvantage of failure to discriminate viable virus and non-infectious genome. However, virus isolation remains the gold standard for diagnosis of field outbreaks. The sensitivity of virus isolation was combined with nucleic acid based detection methods so that the time taken for confirmatory diagnosis could be considerably reduced while increasing sensitivity. Quantitative real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and conventional RT-PCR techniques were compared for the detection of NDV genome replication in 9-11-day-old embryonated chicken eggs (ECE) using the nucleoprotein (NP) gene of the virus as a target. The results suggest that at least two to fourfold increase in cycle threshold (C(t)) values over the baseline C(t) value of samples lacking infectious virus, would indicate live NDV replication. The limit of detection of NDV replication using qRT-PCR was 1×10(4.0) mean embryo infective doses (EID(50)). The earliest time point when live virus replication was detectable by qRT-PCR or RT-PCR was 30h post-inoculation in ECE. PMID:20951166

  7. Detection of Avibacterium paragallinarum by Polymerase chain reaction from outbreaks of Infectious coryza of poultry in Andhra Pradesh

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, T. M. Nabeel; Sreedevi, B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was carried out for the detection of Avibacterium paragallinarum from outbreaks of infectious coryza of poultry Materials and Methods: The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was standardized for the diagnosis of infectious coryza by using infectious coryza Killed vaccine, ventri biologicals, Pune as source of DNA of A. paragallinarum. Five outbreaks of infectious coryza from Andhra Pradesh were investigated in the present study. A total of 56 infra orbital sinus swabs and 22 nasal swabs were tested by PCR. Results: PCR analysis showed 56 positives (71.7%) for infectious coryza out of total 78 samples tested. Of 56 infra orbital sinus swabs tested, 47 were positive (83.9%) and 9 nasal swabs (40.9%) out of 22 tested had given positive results for infectious coryza. Samples collected from birds at acute stage of disease and samples collected before treatment with antibiotics were given better results on PCR. Conclusion: For preventing the economic losses associated with the disease, an early, accurate and rapid diagnosis is essential. PCR is a rapid and highly sensitive diagnostic technique which can substitute conventional cultural examination. PMID:27047005

  8. Nasal Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Potential Use in Guiding Antibiotic Therapy for Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer A; Wright, Michael E; Sheperd, Lyndsay A; Musher, Daniel M; Dang, Bich N

    2015-01-01

    Context: The role at admission of nasal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in guiding antibiotic therapy for lower respiratory tract infection is unknown. Objective: To determine whether nasal MRSA PCR at admission can predict the absence of MRSA in lower respiratory tract secretions. Design: We performed a retrospective study of adult patients admitted to a large urban hospital. Patients had a nasal MRSA PCR test and a lower respiratory tract culture obtained within 48 hours of admission and the culture yielded S aureus. Main outcome measures: Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. Results: Our results showed high sensitivity (93.3%) and negative predictive value (95.2%) of nasal PCR for MRSA in the lower respiratory tract. Conclusion: With its high sensitivity and negative predictive value, a nasal MRSA PCR test performed within 48 hours of hospital admission could help guide the discontinuation of MRSA-directed empiric antibiotic therapy in patients who are unlikely to be infected with this organism. A prospective study is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:25432002

  9. Comparison between Culture and a Multiplex Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay Detecting Ureaplasma urealyticum and U. parvum

    PubMed Central

    Frølund, Maria; Björnelius, Eva; Lidbrink, Peter; Ahrens, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Skov

    2014-01-01

    A novel multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for simultaneous detection of U. urealyticum and U. parvum was developed and compared with quantitative culture in Shepard's 10 C medium for ureaplasmas in urethral swabs from 129 men and 66 women, and cervical swabs from 61 women. Using culture as the gold standard, the sensitivity of the qPCR was 96% and 95% for female urethral and cervical swabs, respectively. In male urethral swabs the sensitivity was 89%. The corresponding specificities were 100%, 87% and 99%. The qPCR showed a linear increasing DNA copy number with increasing colour-changing units. Although slightly less sensitive than culture, this multiplex qPCR assay detecting U. urealyticum and U. parvum constitutes a simple and fast alternative to the traditional methods for identification of ureaplasmas and allows simultaneous species differentiation and quantitation in clinical samples. Furthermore, specimens overgrown by other bacteria using the culture method can be evaluated in the qPCR. PMID:25047036

  10. Effects of primer-template mismatches on the polymerase chain reaction: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 model studies.

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, S; Kellogg, D E; McKinney, N; Spasic, D; Goda, L; Levenson, C; Sninsky, J J

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the effects of various primer-template mismatches on DNA amplification of an HIV-1 gag region by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Single internal mismatches had no significant effect on PCR product yield while those at the 3'-terminal base had varied effects. A:G, G:A, and C:C mismatches reduced overall PCR product yield about 100-fold, A:A mismatches about 20-fold. All other 3'-terminal mismatches were efficiently amplified, although the G:G mismatches appeared to be more sensitive to sequence context and dNTP concentrations than other mismatches. It should be noted that mismatches of T with either G, C, or T had a minimal effect on PCR product yield. Double mismatches within the last four bases of a primer-template duplex where one of the mismatches is at the 3' terminal nucleotide, in general, reduced PCR product yield dramatically. The presence of a mismatched T at the 3'-terminus, however, allowed significant amplification even when coupled with an adjacent mismatch. Furthermore, even two mismatched Ts at the 3'-terminus allowed efficient amplification. Images PMID:2179874

  11. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis DNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Eosinophilic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Xayavong, Maniphet; da Silva, Ana Cristina Aramburu; Park, Sarah Y; Whelen, A Christian; Calimlim, Precilia S; Sciulli, Rebecca H; Honda, Stacey A A; Higa, Karen; Kitsutani, Paul; Chea, Nora; Heng, Seng; Johnson, Stuart; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Fox, LeAnne M; da Silva, Alexandre J

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the most common infectious cause of eosinophilic meningitis. Timely diagnosis of these infections is difficult, partly because reliable laboratory diagnostic methods are unavailable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of A. cantonensis DNA in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens. A total of 49 CSF specimens from 33 patients with eosinophilic meningitis were included: A. cantonensis DNA was detected in 32 CSF specimens, from 22 patients. Four patients had intermittently positive and negative real-time PCR results on subsequent samples, indicating that the level of A. cantonensis DNA present in CSF may fluctuate during the course of the illness. Immunodiagnosis and/or supplemental PCR testing supported the real-time PCR findings for 30 patients. On the basis of these observations, this real-time PCR assay can be useful to detect A. cantonensis in the CSF from patients with eosinophilic meningitis. PMID:26526920

  12. High-throughput, low-cost, and event-specific polymerase chain reaction detection of herbicide tolerance in genetically modified soybean A2704-12.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Li, H; Li, J; Wang, X F; Wei, P C; Li, L; Yang, J B

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an event-specific qualitative and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for detection of herbicide-tolerance genetically modified (GM) soybean A2704-12. The event-specific PCR primers were designed, based on the 5'-flanking integration sequence in the soybean genome, to amplify the 239-bp target fragment. Employing the same event-specific primers, qualitative PCR and real-time quantitative PCR detection methods were successfully developed. The results showed that the A2704-12 event could be specifically distinguished from other GM soybean events. In the qualitative PCR assay, the limit of detection was 0.05%, and in the real-time quantitative PCR assay, the limit of detection was less than 0.01%. Moreover, our genomic DNA (gDNA) extraction protocol is high-throughput, safe, and low-cost. The event-specific PCR assay system is cost-efficient by using SYBR Green I in real-time PCR, and by using the same primers in both the qualitative and quantitative PCR assays. We therefore developed a high-throughput, low-cost, and event-specific qualitative and quantitative PCR detection method for GM soybean A2704-12. The method would be useful for market supervision and management of GM soybean A2704-12 due to its high specificity and sensitivity. PMID:24615034

  13. Interlaboratory validation data on real-time polymerase chain reaction detection for unauthorized genetically modified papaya line PRSV-YK.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takumi; Noguchi, Akio; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Kazuto; Futo, Satoshi; Sakata, Kozue; Fukuda, Nozomi; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi; Tanaka, Hidenori; Akashi, Ryo; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko

    2016-06-01

    This article is referred to research article entitled "Whole genome sequence analysis of unidentified genetically modified papaya for development of a specific detection method" (Nakamura et al., 2016) [1]. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection method for unauthorized genetically modified (GM) papaya (Carica papaya L.) line PRSV-YK (PRSV-YK detection method) was developed using whole genome sequence data (DDBJ Sequenced Read Archive under accession No. PRJDB3976). Interlaboratory validation datasets for PRSV-YK detection method were provided. Data indicating homogeneity of samples prepared for interlaboratory validation were included. Specificity and sensitivity test data for PRSV-YK detection method were also provided. PMID:27408919

  14. Molecular diagnosis of strongyloidiasis in tropical areas: a comparison of conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction with parasitological methods

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Fabiana Martins; Malta, Fernanda de Mello; Marques, Priscilla Duarte; Sitta, Renata Barnabé; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Gryschek, Ronaldo César Borges; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of conventional polymerase chain reaction (cPCR) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) in the diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis from stool samples in tropical areas. Stool samples were collected from individuals and were determined to be positive for Strongyloides stercoralis (group I), negative for S. stercoralis (group II) and positive for other enteroparasite species (group III). DNA specific to S. stercoralis was found in 76.7% of group I samples by cPCR and in 90% of group I samples by qPCR. The results show that molecular methods can be used as alternative tools for detecting S. stercoralis in human stool samples in tropical areas. PMID:25946255

  15. A sensitive, specific and reproducible real-time polymerase chain reaction method for detection of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum infection in field-collected anophelines.

    PubMed

    Bickersmith, Sara A; Lainhart, William; Moreno, Marta; Chu, Virginia M; Vinetz, Joseph M; Conn, Jan E

    2015-06-01

    We describe a simple method for detection of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum infection in anophelines using a triplex TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay (18S rRNA). We tested the assay on Anopheles darlingi and Anopheles stephensi colony mosquitoes fed with Plasmodium-infected blood meals and in duplicate on field collected An. darlingi. We compared the real-time PCR results of colony-infected and field collected An. darlingi, separately, to a conventional PCR method. We determined that a cytochrome b-PCR method was only 3.33% as sensitive and 93.38% as specific as our real-time PCR assay with field-collected samples. We demonstrate that this assay is sensitive, specific and reproducible. PMID:26061150

  16. Diagnosis of. alpha. sub 1 -antitrypsin deficiency by enzymatic amplification of human genomic DNA and direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, C.R.; Graham, A.; Powell, S.; Gammack, A.; Riley, J.; Markham, A.F. ); Kalsheker, N. )

    1988-09-12

    The authors have compared sequencing of cloned polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products and the direct sequencing of PCR products in the examination of individuals from six families affected with {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency. In families where paternity was in question they confirmed consanguinity by DNA fingerprinting using a panel of locus-specific minisatellite probes. They demonstrate that direct sequencing of PCR amplification products is the method of choice for the absolutely specific diagnosis of AAT deficiency and can distinguish normals, heterozygotes and homozygotes in a single, rapid and facile assay. Furthermore, they demonstrate the reproducibility of the PCR and a rapid DNA isolation procedure. They have also shown that two loci can be simultaneously amplified and that the PCR product from each locus can be independently examined by direct DNA sequencing.

  17. A polymerase chain reaction assay for ascosporic inoculum of Sclerotinia species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A PCR assay was developed which amplified a 170-bp fragment of the intergenic spacer region of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, the cause of white mould. Sensitivity was 10 S. sclerotiorum ascospores per DNA extraction (0.2 ascospores per PCR reaction). The presence of soil did not affect sensitivity a...

  18. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Error rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu, Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition. PMID:25197572

  19. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Errormore » rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu , Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition.« less

  20. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Error rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu, Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition. PMID:25197572

  1. Two-step polymerase chain reactions and restriction endonuclease analyses detect and differentiate ompA DNA of Chlamydia spp.

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenboeck, B; Kousoulas, K G; Storz, J

    1992-01-01

    Specific and sensitive amplification of major outer membrane protein (MOMP) gene (ompA) DNA sequences of Chlamydia species with various MOMP genotypes was achieved by a two-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Degenerate, inosine-containing oligonucleotide primers homologous to the 5' and 3' ends of the translated regions of all chlamydial MOMP genes were used in a PCR to amplify a DNA fragment of approximately 1,120 bp. A portion of this DNA fragment was amplified in a second genus-specific reaction that yielded a DNA fragment of approximately 930 bp. A pair of degenerate oligonucleotide primers homologous to internal sequences of the primary DNA fragment was used in this PCR. This method detected three cognate chlamydial genomes in a background of 1 microgram of unrelated DNA. MOMP genes of 13 representative chlamydial MOMP genotypes of the species C. trachomatis, C. pneumoniae, and C. psittaci were amplified. In a secondary PCR, group-specific detection was achieved by the simultaneous use of one genus-specific primer and three primers derived from different fingerprint regions of three major groups of chlamydiae. This multiplex PCR differentiated the groups by the length of the amplified DNA fragments and detected the simultaneous presence of DNA sequences of the Chlamydia spp. with different MOMP genotypes. Further differentiation as ompA restriction fragment length polymorphism types among all chlamydial strains with the various MOMP genotypes analyzed here was achieved by restriction endonuclease analysis of the secondary PCR products. DNA sequences corresponding to the ompA restriction fragment length polymorphism type B577 of C. psittaci were detected in two of seven milk samples from cases of bovine mastitis. Images PMID:1349899

  2. Development of an on-site rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction system and the characterization of suitable DNA polymerases for TaqMan probe technology.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Shunsuke; Naruishi, Nahoko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Nagai, Hidenori

    2016-08-01

    On-site quantitative analyses of microorganisms (including viruses) by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system are significantly influencing medical and biological research. We have developed a remarkably rapid and portable real-time PCR system that is based on microfluidic approaches. Real-time PCR using TaqMan probes consists of a complex reaction. Therefore, in a rapid real-time PCR, the optimum DNA polymerase must be estimated by using actual real-time PCR conditions. In this study, we compared the performance of three DNA polymerases in actual PCR conditions using our rapid real-time PCR system. Although KAPA2G Fast HS DNA Polymerase has the highest enzymatic activity among them, SpeedSTAR HS DNA Polymerase exhibited better performance to rapidly increase the fluorescence signal in an actual real-time PCR using TaqMan probes. Furthermore, we achieved rapid detection of Escherichia coli in 7 min by using SpeedSTAR HS DNA Polymerase with the same sensitivity as that of a conventional thermal cycler. PMID:27271319

  3. Evaluation of gold nanoparticles as the additive in real-time polymerase chain reaction with SYBR Green I dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchao; Mi, Lijuan; Cao, Xueyan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Fan, Chunhai; Hu, Jun

    2008-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been proven to be able to improve the specificity or increase the efficiency of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) when a suitable amount of AuNPs was used. However, there is still a lack of systematic evaluation of AuNPs in real-time PCR. In this study, DNA degradation and the fluorescence quenching effect of AuNPs were first tested in real-time PCR. Then two different kinds of Taq DNA polymerase, native and recombinant Taq polymerase, were employed to evaluate the AuNPs' effect on the threshold cycle (CT) values, standard curves and melting curves in real-time PCR. Different ratios of the amount of native Taq DNA polymerase to the amount of AuNPs were also tested. It was found that AuNPs could be applied in real-time PCR with correlation coefficient R2>0.989. The combination of 2.09 nM AuNPs with 3.75 U of native Taq DNA polymerase could make the amplification curves shift to the left and enhance the efficiency of the real-time PCR (0.628 39 without AuNPs compared with 0.717 89 with 2.09 nM AuNPs), thus enabling faster detection in comparison with those of control samples. However, no improvement ability of AuNPs was found in real-time PCR based on recombinant rTaq DNA polymerase. Besides, the results suggest that a complex interaction exists between AuNPs and native Taq DNA polymerase.

  4. Avian haemosporidian parasites (Haemosporida): A comparative analysis of different polymerase chain reaction assays in detection of mixed infections.

    PubMed

    Bernotienė, Rasa; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Iezhova, Tatjana; Murauskaitė, Dovilė; Valkiūnas, Gediminas

    2016-04-01

    Mixed infections of different species and genetic lineages of haemosporidian parasites (Haemosporida) predominate in wildlife, and such infections are particularly virulent. However, currently used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based detection methods often do not read mixed infections. Sensitivity of different PCR assays in detection of mixed infections has been insufficiently tested, but this knowledge is essential in studies addressing parasite diversity in wildlife. Here, we applied five different PCR assays, which are broadly used in wildlife avian haemosporidian research, and compared their sensitivity in detection of experimentally designed mixed infections of Haemoproteus and Plasmodium parasites. Three of these PCR assays use primer sets that amplify fragments of cytochrome b gene (cyt b), one of cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, and one target apicoplast genome. We collected blood from wild-caught birds and, using microscopic and PCR-based methods applied in parallel, identified single infections of ten haemosporidian species with similar parasitemia. Then, we prepared 15 experimental mixes of different haemosporidian parasites, which often are present simultaneously in wild birds. Similar concentration of total DNA was used in each parasite lineage during preparation of mixes. Positive amplifications were sequenced, and the presence of mixed infections was reported by visualising double-base calling in sequence electropherograms. This study shows that the use of each single PCR assay markedly underestimates biodiversity of haemosporidian parasites. The application of at least 3 PCR assays in parallel detected the majority, but still not all lineages present in mixed infections. We determined preferences of different primers in detection of parasites belonging to different genera of haemosporidians during mixed infections. PMID:26821298

  5. Clinical validation of a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for rapid detection of Acinetobacter baumannii colonization.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Lobo, P; González-Galán, V; García-Quintanilla, M; Valencia, R; Cazalla, A; Martín, C; Alonso, I; Pérez-Romero, P; Cisneros, J M; Aznar, J; McConnell, M J

    2016-09-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approaches have not been assessed in terms of their ability to detect patients colonized by Acinetobacter baumannii during active surveillance. This prospective, double-blind study demonstrated that a real-time PCR assay had high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (91.2%) compared with conventional culture for detecting A. baumannii in 397 active surveillance samples, and provided results within 3h. Receiver-operator curve analyses demonstrated that the technique has diagnostic accuracy of 97.7% (95% confidence interval 96.0-99.3%). This method could facilitate the rapid implementation of infection control measures for preventing the transmission of A. baumannii. PMID:27206968

  6. Analysis of ancient DNA from coprolites: a perspective with random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction approach.

    PubMed

    Iñiguez, Alena M; Araújo, Adauto; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando; Vicente, Ana Carolina P

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine approaches that would improve the quality of ancient DNA (aDNA) present in coprolites to enhance the possibility of success in retrieving specific sequence targets. We worked with coprolites from South American archaeological sites in Brazil and Chile dating up to 7,000 years ago. Using established protocols for aDNA extraction we obtained samples showing high degradation as usually happens with this kind of material. The reconstructive polymerization pretreatment was essential to overcome the DNA degradation and the serial dilutions helped with to prevent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors. Moreover, the random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR has been shown to be a reliable technique for further experiments to recover specific aDNA sequences. PMID:12687765

  7. Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction-based System for Simultaneous Detection of Multiple Lily-infecting Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ji Yeon; Ryu, Ki Hyun; Choi, Sun Hee

    2013-01-01

    A detection system based on a multiplex reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to simultaneously identify multiple viruses in the lily plant. The most common viruses infecting lily plants are the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), lily mottle virus (LMoV), lily symptomless virus (LSV). Leaf samples were collected at lily-cultivation facilities located in the Kangwon province of Korea and used to evaluate the detection system. Simplex and multiplex RT-PCR were performed using virus-specific primers to detect single-or mixed viral infections in lily plants. Our results demonstrate the selective detection of 3 different viruses (CMV, LMoV and LSV) by using specific primers as well as the potential of simultaneously detecting 2 or 3 different viruses in lily plants with mixed infections. Three sets of primers for each target virus, and one set of internal control primers were used to evaluate the detection system for efficiency, reliability, and reproducibility. PMID:25288961

  8. Real-time polymerase chain reaction of immunoglobulin rearrangements for quantitative evaluation of minimal residual disease in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Compagno, Mara; Mantoan, Barbara; Astolfi, Monica; Boccadoro, Mario; Ladetto, Marco

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation of minimal residual disease (MRD) is critical in the evaluation of treatments aimed at maximal cytoreduction in multiple myeloma (MM). Qualitative evaluation of MRD now has a 10-yr-long history, but it remains a relatively sophisticated procedure. More recently, real-time quantitative approaches have also been developed. These approaches allow a very effective monitoring of disease but introduce additional complexity and costs to the procedure. This chapter describes how we currently perform real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in MM. Compared to the first description of the assay in June 2000, significant improvements have been made. Although real-time PCR is the main focus of the chapter, most of the information suitable for a proper setup of a qualitative approach is also provided. PMID:15968100

  9. Detection of Leptospira spp. in wildlife reservoir hosts in Ontario through comparison of immunohistochemical and polymerase chain reaction genotyping methods.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Karen E; Harte, Michael J; Ojkic, Davor; Delay, Josepha; Campbell, Douglas

    2014-03-01

    A total of 460 kidney samples from wildlife (beavers, coyotes, deer, foxes, opossums, otters, raccoons, skunks) were obtained from road-kill and hunter/trapper donations in Ontario between January 2010 and November 2012. The objectives of the study were to detect Leptospira spp. by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), to map presence of leptospires in wildlife relative to livestock and human populations, and to characterize positive samples by sequencing and comparison to leptospires known to affect domestic animals and humans. The proportion of samples that tested positive ranged from 0% to 42%, with the highest rates in skunks and raccoons. Leptospira spp. were present in kidneys of wildlife across Ontario, particularly in areas of high human density, and areas in which livestock populations are abundant. The PCR was too weak in most samples to permit genotyping and examination of the relationship between the leptospires found in this study and those affecting domestic animals and humans. PMID:24587507

  10. Improvement of polymerase chain reaction-based Bt11 maize detection method by reduction of non-specific amplification.

    PubMed

    Mano, Junichi; Yanaka, Yuka; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi

    2010-01-01

    The Bt11 maize-specific qualitative detection method based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the JAS analytical test handbook has been widely used for administrative monitoring of GM crops and quality control of commercially distributed grains. In the present investigation, some apparently false-positive detections were observed in assays using the Bt11 maize-specific method, and these erroneous results were proved to have been caused by non-specific DNA amplification. We improved the detection method to reduce non-specific amplification by decreasing the concentration of magnesium ions in the PCR mixture. The subsequent evaluation of analytical performance demonstrated no marked difference between the currently used and the improved methods, except for the reduced non-specific amplification. We conclude that the currently used standard method should be replaced with the improved method for the reliable detection of Bt11 maize. PMID:20208407

  11. Exploring the limits of ultrafast polymerase chain reaction using liquid for thermal heat exchange: A proof of principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltezos, George; Johnston, Matthew; Taganov, Konstantin; Srichantaratsamee, Chutatip; Gorman, John; Baltimore, David; Chantratita, Wasun; Scherer, Axel

    2010-12-01

    Thermal ramp rate is a major limiting factor in using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for routine diagnostics. We explored the limits of speed by using liquid for thermal exchange rather than metal as in traditional devices, and by testing different polymerases. In a clinical setting, our system equaled or surpassed state-of-the-art devices for accuracy in amplifying DNA/RNA of avian influenza, cytomegalovirus, and human immunodeficiency virus. Using Thermococcus kodakaraensis polymerase and optimizing both electrical and chemical systems, we obtained an accurate, 35 cycle amplification of an 85-base pair fragment of E. coli O157:H7 Shiga toxin gene in as little as 94.1 s, a significant improvement over a typical 1 h PCR amplification.

  12. Effect of perception irregularity on chain-reaction crash in low visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    We present the dynamic model of the chain-reaction crash to take into account the irregularity of the perception-reaction time. When a driver brakes according to taillights of the forward vehicle, the perception-reaction time varies from driver to driver. We study the effect of the perception irregularity on the chain-reaction crash (multiple-vehicle collision) in low-visibility condition. The first crash may induce more collisions. We investigate how the first collision induces the chain-reaction crash numerically. We derive, analytically, the transition points and the region maps for the chain-reaction crash in traffic flow of vehicles with irregular perception times. We clarify the effect of the perception irregularity on the multiple-vehicle collision.

  13. Statistical models for the analysis and design of digital polymerase chain (dPCR) experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorazio, Robert; Hunter, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Statistical methods for the analysis and design of experiments using digital PCR (dPCR) have received only limited attention and have been misused in many instances. To address this issue and to provide a more general approach to the analysis of dPCR data, we describe a class of statistical models for the analysis and design of experiments that require quantification of nucleic acids. These models are mathematically equivalent to generalized linear models of binomial responses that include a complementary, log–log link function and an offset that is dependent on the dPCR partition volume. These models are both versatile and easy to fit using conventional statistical software. Covariates can be used to specify different sources of variation in nucleic acid concentration, and a model’s parameters can be used to quantify the effects of these covariates. For purposes of illustration, we analyzed dPCR data from different types of experiments, including serial dilution, evaluation of copy number variation, and quantification of gene expression. We also showed how these models can be used to help design dPCR experiments, as in selection of sample sizes needed to achieve desired levels of precision in estimates of nucleic acid concentration or to detect differences in concentration among treatments with prescribed levels of statistical power.

  14. [Development of a real-time polymerase chain reaction method for the identification of Candida species].

    PubMed

    Ağca, Harun; Dalyan Cilo, Burcu; Özmerdiven, Gülşah Ece; Sağlam, Sezcan; Ener, Beyza

    2015-01-01

    Candida species are one of the major causes of nosocomial infections and are the fourth most common agent involved in bloodstream infections. The impact of non-albicans Candida species is increasing, however C.albicans is still the most common species. Since the antifungal susceptibility pattern among Candida spp. may be different, rapid diagnosis and identification of non-albicans Candida spp. are important for the determination of antifungal agents that will be used for treatment. The aim of the study was to describe a real-time polymerase chain reaction (Rt-PCR) assay that rapidly detects, identifies and quantitates Candida species from blood culture samples. A total of 50 consecutive positive blood culture bottles (BACTEC, Beckton Dickinson, USA) identified at our laboratory between June-November 2013, were included in the study. Reference strains of Candida spp. (C.albicans ATCC 10231, C.glabrata ATCC 90030, C.tropicalis ATCC 1021, C.krusei ATCC 6258, C.parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and C. dubliniensis CD36) grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar were used for quality control. BACTEC bottles that were positive for Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were also studied to search the cross-reactivity. A commercial kit (Zymo Research, USA) was used for DNA extraction. Real-time PCR was performed on LightCycler 480 (Roche, Germany) with primers and probes specific for 18S rRNA of Candida species. Twenty microlitres of the reaction mix contained 2 μl of extracted DNA, 2 μl of LightCycler Fast Start DNA Master Probe (Roche Diagnostics, Germany), 2 μl of MgCl(2) (5 mmol), 2 μl of 10x PCR buffer (Roche Diagnostics, Germany), 0.5 μl of each primer (0.01 nmol/μl) and 1 μl of each probe (0.1 μmol/μl) (TibMolBiol, Germany). Amplification was performed using the following conditions; 95°C for 10 mins and 50 cycles of denaturation at 95°C for 10 secs, annealing at 62°C for 10 secs and polymerisation at 72°C for 20 secs. A melting curve was

  15. Use of Repetitive Element Palindromic-PCR (rep-PCR) for the Epidemiologic Discrimination of Food-Borne Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of defined primers for polymerase chain reactions (PCR) amplicifcations of interspersed repetitive DNA elements present at distinct locations in prokaryotic genomes is referred to as Repetitive Element Palindromic Sequences Based-Polymerase Chain Reactions, rep-PCR. The initial discovery of...

  16. A Fast-and-Robust Profiler for Improving Polymerase Chain Reaction Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Besseris, George J.

    2014-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an in vitro technology in molecular genetics that progressively amplifies minimal copies of short DNA sequences in a fast and inexpensive manner. However, PCR performance is sensitive to suboptimal processing conditions. Compromised PCR conditions lead to artifacts and bias that downgrade the discriminatory power and reproducibility of the results. Promising attempts to resolve the PCR performance optimization issue have been guided by quality improvement tactics adopted in the past for industrial trials. Thus, orthogonal arrays (OAs) have been employed to program quick-and-easy structured experiments. Profiling of influences facilitates the quantification of effects that may counteract the detectability of amplified DNA fragments. Nevertheless, the attractive feature of reducing greatly the amount of work and expenditures by planning trials with saturated-unreplicated OA schemes is known to be relinquished in the subsequent analysis phase. This is because of an inherent incompatibility of ordinary multi-factorial comparison techniques to convert small yet dense datasets. Treating unreplicated-saturated data with either the analysis of variance (ANOVA) or regression models destroys the information extraction process. Both of those mentioned approaches are rendered blind to error since the examined effects absorb all available degrees of freedom. Therefore, in lack of approximating an experimental uncertainty, any outcome interpretation is rendered subjective. We propose a profiling method that permits the non-linear maximization of amplicon resolution by eliminating the necessity for direct error estimation. Our approach is distribution-free, calibration-free, simulation-free and sparsity-free with well-known power properties. It is also user-friendly by promoting rudimentary analytics. Testing our method on published amplicon count data, we found that the preponderant effect is the concentration of MgCl2 (p<0.05) followed by the

  17. Development of a duplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bovine herpesvirus 1 and bovine viral diarrhea virus in bovine follicular fluid.

    PubMed

    Marley, Mylissa S D; Givens, M Daniel; Galik, Patricia K; Riddell, Kay P; Stringfellow, David A

    2008-07-15

    The objective of this study was to develop a duplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for simultaneous detection of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type I and type II. Follicular fluid was collected from a BoHV-1 acutely infected heifer, a BVDV I persistently infected heifer, and from 10 ovaries recovered from an abattoir. Both the BoHV-1 and BVDV contaminated follicular fluid were diluted 1:5 to 1:10(7) using the pooled, abattoir-origin follicular fluid. Each dilution sample was analyzed using the duplex qPCR, virus isolation, reverse transcription-nested PCR (RT-nPCR), and BoHV-1 qPCR. The duplex qPCR was able to simultaneously detect BoHV-1 and BVDV I in the fluid diluted to 1:100 and 1:1000, respectively. These results corresponded with the reverse transcription-nested PCR and BoHV-1 qPCR. Therefore, the duplex qPCR might be used for quality assurance testing to identify these two viruses in cells, fluids and tissues collected from donor animals and used in reproductive technologies. PMID:18452983

  18. Comparative study of sensitivity, linearity, and resistance to inhibition of digital and nondigital polymerase chain reaction and loop mediated isothermal amplification assays for quantification of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Gavin; Garson, Jeremy A; Grant, Paul; Nastouli, Eleni; Foy, Carole A; Huggett, Jim F

    2014-05-01

    Performing nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAATs) in digital format using limiting dilution provides potential advantages that have recently been demonstrated with digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR). Key benefits that have been claimed are the ability to quantify nucleic acids without the need of an external calibrator and a greater resistance to inhibitors than real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). In this study, we evaluated the performance of four NAATs, qPCR, dPCR, real-time quantitative loop mediated isothermal amplification (qLAMP), and digital LAMP (dLAMP), for the detection and quantification of human cytomegalovirus (hCMV). We used various DNA templates and inhibitors to compare the performance of these methods using a conventional real-time thermocycler platform (Bio-Rad CFX96) and a chip based digital platform (Fluidigm Biomark 12.765 Digital Array). dPCR performed well and demonstrated greater resistance to inhibitors than the other methods although this resistance did not apply equally to all inhibitors tested. dLAMP was found to be less sensitive than dPCR, but its quantitative performance was better than qLAMP, the latter being unable to quantify below 1000 copies. dLAMP was also more resistant to inhibitors than qLAMP. Unlike qPCR, both digital methods were able to quantify viral genomes without requiring a calibrator; however, neither can currently compete with the large reaction volumes, and thus the greater absolute sensitivity, of qPCR. With the introduction of digital instrumentation that will enable larger reaction volumes, digital amplification methods such as those evaluated in this study could potentially offer a robust alternative to qPCR for nucleic acid quantification. PMID:24684191

  19. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis with allele-specific oligonucleotide primers for individual IgH VDJ regions to evaluate tumor burden in myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Sata, Hiroshi; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Maeda, Ikuhiro; Habuchi, Yoko; Nakatani, Eiji; Fukushima, Kentaro; Fujita, Jiro; Ezoe, Sachiko; Tadokoro, Seiji; Maeda, Tetsuo; Mizuki, Masao; Kosugi, Satoru; Nakagawa, Masashi; Ueda, Shuji; Iida, Masato; Tokumine, Yukihiro; Azenishi, Yasuhiko; Mitsui, Hideki; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with patient-specific, allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) primers for individual immunoglobulin H VDJ region (ASO-PCR) amplification was performed using several sources of clinical material, including mRNA from peripheral blood cells (PBMNCs), whole bone marrow cells (BMMNCs), and the CD20+ CD38- B-cell population in bone marrow, as well as cell-free DNA from the sera of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). We designed the ASO primers and produced sufficient PCR fragments to evaluate tumor burden in 20 of 30 bone marrow samples at diagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction amplification efficiency depended on primer sequences because the production of ASO-PCR fragments did not correlate with serum M-protein levels. However, the ASO-PCR levels in BMMNCs showed statistically significant correlations with those in PBMNCs and CD20+ CD38- B-cells. The good association between the BMMNC and PBMNC data indicated that PBMNCs could be a suitable source for monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD). In the case of cell-free DNA, ASO-PCR levels showed a unique pattern and remained high even after treatment. Because the sequence information for each ASO-PCR product was identical to the original, the cell-free DNA might also be useful for evaluating MRD. Moreover, the ASO-PCR products were clearly detected in 17 of 22 mRNA samples from CD20+ CD38- populations, suggesting that MM clones might exist in relatively earlier stages of B cells than in plasma cells. Thus, ASO-PCR analysis using various clinical materials is useful for detecting MRD in MM patients as well as for clarifying MM pathogenesis. PMID:25591497

  20. QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held a workshop in January 2003 on the detection of viruses in water using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Speakers were asked to address a series of specific questions, including whether a single standard method coul...

  1. Event specific qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction detection of genetically modified MON863 maize based on the 5'-transgene integration sequence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Litao; Xu, Songci; Pan, Aihu; Yin, Changsong; Zhang, Kewei; Wang, Zhenying; Zhou, Zhigang; Zhang, Dabing

    2005-11-30

    Because of the genetically modified organisms (GMOs) labeling policies issued in many countries and areas, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods were developed for the execution of GMO labeling policies, such as screening, gene specific, construct specific, and event specific PCR detection methods, which have become a mainstay of GMOs detection. The event specific PCR detection method is the primary trend in GMOs detection because of its high specificity based on the flanking sequence of the exogenous integrant. This genetically modified maize, MON863, contains a Cry3Bb1 coding sequence that produces a protein with enhanced insecticidal activity against the coleopteran pest, corn rootworm. In this study, the 5'-integration junction sequence between the host plant DNA and the integrated gene construct of the genetically modified maize MON863 was revealed by means of thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR, and the specific PCR primers and TaqMan probe were designed based upon the revealed 5'-integration junction sequence; the conventional qualitative PCR and quantitative TaqMan real-time PCR detection methods employing these primers and probes were successfully developed. In conventional qualitative PCR assay, the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.1% for MON863 in 100 ng of maize genomic DNA for one reaction. In the quantitative TaqMan real-time PCR assay, the LOD and the limit of quantification were eight and 80 haploid genome copies, respectively. In addition, three mixed maize samples with known MON863 contents were detected using the established real-time PCR systems, and the ideal results indicated that the established event specific real-time PCR detection systems were reliable, sensitive, and accurate. PMID:16302741

  2. Detection of Merkel cell polyomavirus in the human tissues from 41 Japanese autopsy cases using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Michiko; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Takeshi; Higaki-Mori, Hiromi; Yashima, Shoji; Kato, Masako; Murakami, Ichiro; Horie, Yasushi; Kitamura, Yukisato; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been shown that approximately 80% of Merkel cell carcinomas harbor a novel polyomavirus named Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). MCPyV has been detected in human tissue samples. However, detailed distribution of MCPyV in non-neoplastic Japanese human tissues remains unclear. To address this, we used single or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for 41 autopsy cases. PCR revealed MCPyV-DNA in non-neoplastic samples: total, 29/41 (71%); adult, 29/39 (74%); fetus or infant, 0/2; men, 24/28 (86%); women, 5/13 (38%); total human tissues, 66/572 (12%); skin, 8/15 (53%); adrenal gland, 9/33 (27%), and other 16 organs (4-25%). This study first reported the presence of MCPyV-DNA in non-neoplastic tissues of thyroid gland, adrenal gland, spleen, bone marrow, stomach, gallbladder, pancreas, heart, and aorta. PCR revealed that viral load ranged from 0.00026 to 0.22 in all MCPyV-positive tissues compared with Merkel cell carcinoma samples. These detailed PCR data showed higher prevalence of MCPyV infection in Japanese men than women (p = 0.004) and broad distribution of MCPyV with low viral load in more non-neoplastic human tissues than in the previous reports. These data provide valuable insights for further studies of MCPyV infection and MCPyV-related diseases. PMID:22986833

  3. Validation and Identification of Invasive Salmonella Serotypes in Sub-Saharan Africa by Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Al-Emran, Hassan M; Krumkamp, Ralf; Dekker, Denise Myriam; Eibach, Daniel; Aaby, Peter; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Ali, Mohammad; Rubach, Mathew P; Bjerregaard-Andersen, Morten; Crump, John A; Cruz Espinoza, Ligia Maria; Løfberg, Sandra Valborg; Gassama Sow, Amy; Hertz, Julian T; Im, Justin; Jaeger, Anna; Kabore, Leon Parfait; Konings, Frank; Meyer, Christian G; Niang, Aissatou; Pak, Gi Deok; Panzner, Ursula; Park, Se Eun; Rabezanahary, Henintsoa; Rakotozandrindrainy, Raphaël; Raminosoa, Tiana Mirana; Razafindrabe, Tsiriniaina Jean Luco; Sampo, Emmanuel; Schütt-Gerowitt, Heidi; Sarpong, Nimako; Soura, Abdramane Bassiahi; Tall, Adama; von Kalckreuth, Vera; Wierzba, Thomas F; May, Jürgen; Marks, Florian

    2016-03-15

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) cause the majority of bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa; however, serotyping is rarely performed. We validated a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with the White-Kauffmann-Le Minor (WKLM) scheme of serotyping using 110 Salmonella isolates from blood cultures of febrile children in Ghana and applied the method in other Typhoid Fever Surveillance in Africa Program study sites. In Ghana, 47 (43%) S. Typhi, 36 (33%) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, 14 (13%) Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin, and 13 (12%) Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis were identified by both multiplex PCR and the WKLM scheme separately. Using the validated multiplex PCR assay, we identified 42 (66%) S. Typhi, 14 (22%) S. Typhimurium, 2 (3%) S. Dublin, 2 (3%) S. Enteritidis, and 4 (6%) other Salmonella species from the febrile patients in Burkina Faso, Guinea-Bissau, Madagascar, Senegal, and Tanzania. Application of this multiplex PCR assay in sub-Saharan Africa could advance the knowledge of serotype distribution of Salmonella. PMID:26933026

  4. A novel picoliter droplet array for parallel real-time polymerase chain reaction based on double-inkjet printing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingnan; Zhou, Xiaoguang; Yu, Yude

    2014-09-21

    We developed and characterized a novel picoliter droplet-in-oil array generated by a double-inkjet printing method on a uniform hydrophobic silicon chip specifically designed for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis. Double-inkjet printing was proposed to efficiently address the evaporation issues of picoliter droplets during array generation on a planar substrate without the assistance of a humidifier or glycerol. The method utilizes piezoelectric inkjet printing equipment to precisely eject a reagent droplet into an oil droplet, which had first been dispensed on a hydrophobic and oleophobic substrate. No evaporation, random movement, or cross-contamination was observed during array fabrication and thermal cycling. We demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of this novel double-inkjet method for real-time PCR analysis. This method can readily produce multivolume droplet-in-oil arrays with volume variations ranging from picoliters to nanoliters. This feature would be useful for simultaneous multivolume PCR experiments aimed at wide and tunable dynamic ranges. These double-inkjet-based picoliter droplet arrays may have potential for multiplexed applications that require isolated containers for single-cell cultures, single molecular enzymatic assays, or digital PCR and provide an alternative option for generating droplet arrays on planar substrates without chemical patterning. PMID:25070461

  5. Assessment of Clinical Diagnosis, Microscopy, Rapid Diagnostic Tests, and Polymerase Chain Reaction in the Diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ojurongbe, Olusola; Adegbosin, Olunike Olayeni; Taiwo, Sunday Samuel; Alli, Oyebode Armstrong Terry; Olowe, Olugbenga Adekunle; Ojurongbe, Taiwo Adetola; Bolaji, Oloyede Samuel; Adeyeba, Oluwaseyi Adegboyega

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the performance of clinical diagnosis and three laboratory diagnostic methods (thick film microscopy (TFM), rapid diagnostic test (RDT), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum in Nigeria. Using clinical criteria, 217 children were recruited into the study out of which 106 (48.8%) were positive by TFM, 84 (38.7%) by RDT, and 125 (57.6%) by PCR. Using a composite reference method generated from the three diagnostic methods, 71 (32.7%) patients were found to be truly infected and 90 (41.5%) truly uninfected, while 56 (25.8%) were misidentified as infected or noninfected. When each of the 3 diagnostic methods was compared with the composite reference, PCR had sensitivity of 97.3%, specificity of 62.5%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 56.8%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 97.8%; microscopy had sensitivity of 77.2%, specificity of 72%, PPV of 66.9%, and NPV of 81.1%, while RDT had sensitivity of 62.3%, specificity of 87.4%, PPV of 67.7%, and NPV of 84.5%. PCR test performed best among the three methods followed by TFM and RDT in that order. The result of this study shows that clinical diagnosis cannot be relied upon for accurate diagnosis of P. falciparum in endemic areas. PMID:24371538

  6. Development of a polymerase chain reaction-based assay for the detection of Alternaria fungal contamination in food products.

    PubMed

    Zur, G; Hallerman, E M; Sharf, R; Kashi, Y

    1999-10-01

    Alternaria sp. are important fungal contaminants of vegetable, fruit, and grain products, including Alternaria alternata, a contaminant of tomato products. To date, the Howard method, based on microscopic observation of fungal filaments, has been the standard examination for inspection of tomato products. We report development of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method for detection of Alternaria DNA. PCR primers were designed to anneal to the internal transcribed regions ITS1 and ITS2 of the 5.8S rRNA gene of Alternaria but not to other microbial or tomato DNA. We demonstrate use of the PCR assay to detect Alternaria DNA in experimentally infested and commercially obtained tomato sauce and tomato powder. Use of the PCR method offers a rapid and sensitive assay for the presence of Alternaria DNA in tomato products. The apparent breakdown of DNA in tomato sauce may limit the utility of the assay to freshly prepared products. The assay for tomato powder is not affected by storage time. PMID:10528725

  7. Electrochemical Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain Reaction-Free Detection and Quantification of Oncogenes in Messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ai Cheng; Dai, Ziyu; Chen, Baowei; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Aiguo; Zhang, Lurong; Lim, Tit-Meng; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-12-01

    We describe a novel electrochemical branched-DNA (bDNA) assay for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-free detection and quantification of p185 BCR-ABL leukemia fusion transcript in the population of messenger RNA (mRNA) extracted from cell lines. The bDNA amplifier carrying high loading of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) tracers was used to amplify targets signal. The targets were captured on microplate well surfaces through cooperative sandwich hybridization prior to the labeling of bDNA. The activity of captured ALP was monitored by square-wave voltammetric (SWV) analysis of the electroactive enzymatic product in the presence of 1-napthyl-phosphate. The specificity and sensitivity of assay enabled direct detection of target transcript in as little as 4.6 ng mRNA without PCR amplification. In combination with the use of a well-quantified standard, the electrochemical bDNA assay was capable of direct use for a PCR-free quantitative analysis of target transcript in total mRNA population. The approach thus provides a simple, sensitive, accurate and quantitative tool alternate to the RQ-PCR for early disease diagnosis.

  8. An Internal Reference Control Duplex Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Detecting Bacterial Contamination in Blood Products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Ju; Tian, Jing-Jing; Wei, Shuang-Shi; Duan, Sheng-Bao; Wang, Hong-Mei; Chen, Ye-Zhou; Ding, Shao-Hua; Zhang, Chun; Meng, Qing-Lin; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) enables effective and sensitive screening for infectious risk in the field of blood safety. However, when using RT-PCR to detect bacterial contamination, several intractable points must be considered, one of which is the lack of appropriate quality control. In this study, we developed a simplified RT-PCR assay in which the same primer set and two distinct probes were used to detect both, an internal reference control and the target in a reaction. The copy number of the internal reference control represents the positive detection limit of the assay; therefore, when the threshold-cycle value of the target is less than or equal to that of the internal reference control, the result obtained for the target can be considered to be a true positive. When human gDNA was spiked with Escherichia coli gDNA and the detection limit for the internal reference control was set to five copies, the measured detection limit for E. coli gDNA was two copies. The internal reference control duplex RT-PCR assay showed high efficiency (0.91-1.02), high linearity (R2 > 0.99), and good reproducibility in intra- and inter-assay comparisons. Lastly, when human platelet-rich plasma samples were spiked with E. coli or other bacterial species, all species were detected efficiently, and the results of a two-sample pooled t test showed that the limit of detection for E. coli was 1 cfu/mL. Here, we present a synthetic internal reference control molecule and a new statistical method for improving the reliability of RT-PCR assays when screening for bacterial contamination in blood products. PMID:26230627

  9. Optimization of quantitative polymerase chain reactions for detection and quantification of eight periodontal bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to optimize quantitative (real-time) polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays for 8 major periodontal pathogens, i.e. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micros, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tanerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, and of the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. Results Eighteen different primer pairs were analyzed in silico regarding specificity (using BLAST analysis) and the presence of secondary structures at primer binding sites (using mFOLD). The most specific and efficiently binding primer pairs, according to these analyses, were selected for qPCR-analysis to determine amplification efficiency, limit of quantification and intra-run reproducibility. For the selected primer pairs, one for each species, the specificity was confirmed by assessing amplification of DNA extracts from isolates of closely related species. For these primer pairs, the intercycler portability was evaluated on 3 different thermal cyclers (the Applied Biosystems 7300, the Bio-Rad iQ5 and the Roche Light Cycler 480). For all assays on the different cyclers, a good correlation of the standard series was obtained (i.e. r2 ≥ 0.98), but quantification limits varied among cyclers. The overall best quantification limit was obtained by using a 2 μl sample in a final volume of 10 μl on the Light Cycler 480. Conclusions In conclusion, the proposed assays allow to quantify the bacterial loads of S. mutans, 6 periodontal pathogenic species and the genus Fusobacterium.This can be of use in assessing periodontal risk, determination of the optimal periodontal therapy and evaluation of this treatment. PMID:23199017

  10. Integrated continuous flow polymerase chain reaction and micro-capillary electrophoresis system with bioaffinity preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel K; Witek, Magorzata A; Battle, Katrina N; Immethun, Vicki E; Hupert, Mateusz L; Soper, Steven A

    2011-11-01

    An integrated and modular DNA analysis system is reported that consists of two modules: (i) A continuous flow polymerase chain reaction (CFPCR) module fabricated in a high T(g) (150°C) polycarbonate substrate in which selected gene fragments were amplified using biotin and fluorescently labeled primers accomplished by continuously shuttling small packets of PCR reagents and template through isothermal zones as opposed to heating and cooling large thermal masses typically performed in batch-type thermal reactors. (ii) μCE (micro-capillary electrophoresis) module fabricated in poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), which utilized a bioaffinity selection and purification bed (2.9  μL) to preconcentrate and purify the PCR products generated from the CFPCR module prior to electrophoretic sorting. Biotin-labeled CFPCR products were hydrostatically pumped through the streptavidin-modified bed, where they were extracted onto the surface of micropillars. The affinity bed was also fabricated in PMMA and was populated with an array of microposts (50  μm width; 100  μm height) yielding a total surface area of ∼117  mm(2). This solid-phase extraction (SPE) process demonstrated high selectivity for biotinylated amplicons and utilized the strong streptavidin/biotin interaction (K(d) = 10(-15)  M) to generate high recoveries. The SPE selected CFPCR products were thermally denatured and single-stranded DNA released for injection into a 7-cm-long μCE channel for size-based separations and fluorescence detection. The utility of the system was demonstrated using Alu DNA typing for gender and ethnicity determinations as a model. Compared with the traditional cross-T injection procedure typically used for μCE, the affinity pre-concentration and injection procedure generated signal enhancements of 17- to 40-fold, critical for CFPCR thermal cyclers due to Taylor dispersion associated with their operation. PMID:22038569

  11. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detection of transcribed sequences on human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J.F.; Zhu, Y. )

    1994-03-15

    Seventy-four pairs of oligonucleotides derived from sequence-tagged sites (STSs) on the long arm of human chromosome 21, specifically from bands 21q22.1 to 21q22.3, were used in reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) to detect the presence of expressed sequences in a fetal brain. These STSs included 69 that had not been related to transcribed sequences and 5 that had detected two known genes and three previously isolated cDNA clones. Of the 69 STSs analyzed in RT-PCR, 25 allowed amplification of specific cDNA fragments. The sizes of amplified cDNA fragments match those amplified from either human genomic DNA or somatic hybrid cells containing human chromosome 21. Of the 11 cDNA analyzed in Northern blot hybridizations, 6 hybridized to specific RNA species. The rapid screening for cDNA using previously mapped STSs has provided insight into the distribution of expressed sequences in this region of chromosome 21. Northern blot analysis of the amplified cDNA fragments has revealed interesting candidate genes in two disease loci. The marker D21S267 was previously mapped in the Down syndrome region of chromosome 21, and the marker D21S113 is closely linked to progressive myoclonus epilepsy. The cDNA fragments amplified using the primer sequences derived from D21S267 and D21S113 hybridized to 7- and 6.5-kb transcripts, respectively, which seems to express predominantly in brain. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical specimens by polymerase chain reaction and Gen-Probe Amplified Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Direct Test.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, C; Hirano, K; Wada, M; Kazumi, Y; Takahashi, M; Fukasawa, Y; Yoshimura, T; Miyagi, C; Goto, S

    1993-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using oligonucleotides based on the repetitive sequence (IS986) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a primer and the Gen-Probe Amplified Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Direct Test (MTD), which combines an M. tuberculosis rRNA amplification method with the hybridization protection assay format, were evaluated for detection of M. tuberculosis in clinical samples. The detection limits of these two assay systems based on nucleic acid amplification for cultured M. tuberculosis were less than 10 cells per reaction. A total of 135 sputum specimens were examined by the two assay systems. The PCR and the MTD systems for detection of M. tuberculosis gave overall positivity rates of 84.2% (32 of 38) and 91.9% (34 of 37), respectively, as compared with 71.9% (23 of 32) by smear and 96.9% (31 of 32) by culture in the liquid medium MB-Check. Procedures for sample preparation used in the two methods were different. Although the sensitivities of the PCR and MTD appeared to be similar to that of culture with the MB-Check system, the two methods based on nucleic acid amplification should be very useful for rapid detection of M. tuberculosis infections without the long time required for culture of M. tuberculosis. Images PMID:8308121

  13. Virtual PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Clague, D S; Vandersall, J A; Hon, G; Williams, P L

    2006-02-23

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) stands among the keystone technologies for analysis of biological sequence data. PCR is used to amplify DNA, to generate many copies from as little as a single template. This is essential, for example, in processing forensic DNA samples, pathogen detection in clinical or biothreat surveillance applications, and medical genotyping for diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is used in virtually every laboratory doing molecular, cellular, genetic, ecologic, forensic, or medical research. Despite its ubiquity, we lack the precise predictive capability that would enable detailed optimization of PCR reaction dynamics. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop Virtual PCR (VPCR) software, a computational method to model the kinetic, thermodynamic, and biological processes of PCR reactions. Given a successful completion, these tools will allow us to predict both the sequences and concentrations of all species that are amplified during PCR. The ability to answer the following questions will allow us both to optimize the PCR process and interpret the PCR results: What products are amplified when sequence mixtures are present, containing multiple, closely related targets and multiplexed primers, which may hybridize with sequence mismatches? What are the effects of time, temperature, and DNA concentrations on the concentrations of products? A better understanding of these issues will improve the design and interpretation of PCR reactions. The status of the VPCR project after 1.5 years of funding is consistent with the goals of the overall project which was scoped for 3 years of funding. At half way through the projected timeline of the project we have an early beta version of the VPCR code. We have begun investigating means to improve the robustness of the code, performed preliminary experiments to test the code and begun drafting manuscripts for publication. Although an experimental protocol for testing the code was developed, the preliminary

  14. Multiplex quantification of 12 European Union authorized genetically modified maize lines with droplet digital polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Dobnik, David; Spilsberg, Bjørn; Bogožalec Košir, Alexandra; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Žel, Jana

    2015-08-18

    Presence of genetically modified organisms (GMO) in food and feed products is regulated in many countries. The European Union (EU) has implemented a threshold for labeling of products containing more than 0.9% of authorized GMOs per ingredient. As the number of GMOs has increased over time, standard-curve based simplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses are no longer sufficiently cost-effective, despite widespread use of initial PCR based screenings. Newly developed GMO detection methods, also multiplex methods, are mostly focused on screening and detection but not quantification. On the basis of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technology, multiplex assays for quantification of all 12 EU authorized GM maize lines (per April first 2015) were developed. Because of high sequence similarity of some of the 12 GM targets, two separate multiplex assays were needed. In both assays (4-plex and 10-plex), the transgenes were labeled with one fluorescence reporter and the endogene with another (GMO concentration = transgene/endogene ratio). It was shown that both multiplex assays produce specific results and that performance parameters such as limit of quantification, repeatability, and trueness comply with international recommendations for GMO quantification methods. Moreover, for samples containing GMOs, the throughput and cost-effectiveness is significantly improved compared to qPCR. Thus, it was concluded that the multiplex ddPCR assays could be applied for routine quantification of 12 EU authorized GM maize lines. In case of new authorizations, the events can easily be added to the existing multiplex assays. The presented principle of quantitative multiplexing can be applied to any other domain. PMID:26169291

  15. Quantitative Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction for Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli: A Tool for Investigation of Asymptomatic Versus Symptomatic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Francesca; Mercado, Erik; Ruiz, Joaquim; Ecker, Lucie; Lopez, Giovanni; Mispireta, Monica; Gil, Ana I.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Cleary, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains are pediatric pathogens commonly isolated from both healthy and sick children with diarrhea in areas of endemicity. The aim of this study was to compare the bacterial load of EPEC isolated from stool samples from children with and without diarrhea to determine whether bacterial load might be a useful tool for further study of this phenomenon. Methods. EPEC was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of colonies isolated on MacConkey plates from 53 diarrheal and 90 healthy children aged <2 years. DNA was isolated from stool samples by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide extraction. To standardize quantification by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), the correlation between fluorescence threshold cycle and copy number of the intimin gene of EPEC E2348/69 was determined. Results. The detection limit of qRT-PCR was 5 bacteria/mg stool. The geometric mean load in diarrhea was 299 bacteria/mg (95% confidence interval [CI], 77–1164 bacteria/mg), compared with 29 bacteria/mg (95% CI, 10–87 bacteria/mg) in control subjects (P = .016). Bacterial load was significantly higher in children with diarrhea than in control subjects among children <12 months of age (178 vs 5 bacteria/mg; P = .006) and among children with EPEC as the sole pathogen (463 vs 24 bacteria/mg; P = .006). Conclusions. EPEC load measured by qRT-PCR is higher in diarrheal than in healthy children. qRT-PCR may be useful to study the relationship between disease and colonization in settings of endemicity. PMID:22028433

  16. Concordance study: methods of quantifying corn and soybean genomic DNA intended for real-time polymerase chain reaction applications.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, G Ronald; Helber, Jennifer T; Freese, Larry D

    2012-08-29

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is a technology commonly used for the detection and quantification of genetically engineered (GE) traits in grains and oilseeds. The method involves measuring copy numbers of taxon-specific, endogenous control genes exposed to the same manipulations as trait-specific target genes. Accurate DNA quantification is essential for successful and predictable results with qPCR. A systematic study of seven different DNA quantification methods, incorporating different chemistries and different instrumentation, were evaluated on corn and soy DNA that was extracted using two distinct extraction methods. A time course study showed that corn and soy DNA was stable under typical laboratory storage conditions. CornCTAB and cornQiagen DNA extracts produced statistically similar quantification values when measured by picogreen PG(TD700), PG(Lum20/20), Hoescht(TD700), and Hoescht(Lum20/20) methods, suggesting that these methods can be used interchangeably to quantify DNA in corn samples prior to initiation of qPCR. Soy(Qiagen) provided greater stochastic measurement variability when quantification methods were compared, whereas soyCTAB had statistically significant differences when a PG method was compared to a Hoescht method of DNA quantification. Finally, agarose gel electrophoresis data revealed more pronounced degradation for Qiagen-extracted DNA compared with CTAB extracts in both corn and soy. Consequently, Ct values generated by qPCR suggested that absolute copy numbers of PCR amplifiable targets were not concordant between Qiagen and CTAB DNA extracts. Understanding measurement uncertainty from component steps used in qPCR can contribute toward harmonizing methods for the detection of GE traits in grains and oilseeds. PMID:22866775

  17. Optimization of nested polymerase chain reaction assays for identification of Aeromonas salmonicida, Yersinia ruckeri and Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, P.W.; Winton, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were developed using first-round primers complementary to highly conserved regions within the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene (universal eubacterial primers) and second-round primers specific for sequences within the 16S rRNA genes of Aeromonas salmonicida, Yersinia ruckeri, andFlavobacterium psychrophilum. Following optimization of the MgCl2 concentration and primer annealing temperature, PCR employing the universal eubacterial primers was used to amplify a 1,500-base-pair (bp) product visible in agarose gels stained with ethidium bromide. The calculated detection limit of this single-round assay was less than 1.4 × 104 colony-forming units (CFU) per reaction for all bacterial species tested. Single-round PCR using primer sets specific for A. salmonicida, Y. ruckeri, and F. psychrophilumamplified bands of 271, 575, and 1,100 bp, respectively, with detection limits of less than 1.4 × 104, 1.4 × 105, and 1.4 × 105 CFU per reaction. Using the universal eubacterial primers in the first round and the species-specific primer sets in the second round of nested PCR assays improved the detection ability by approximately four orders of magnitude to fewer than 14 CFU per sample for each of the three bacterial species. Such nested assays could be adapted to a wide variety of bacterial fish pathogens for which 16S sequences are available.

  18. Comparison of polymerase chain reaction methods and plating for analysis of enriched cultures of Listeria monocytogenes when using the ISO11290-1 method.

    PubMed

    Dalmasso, Marion; Bolocan, Andrei Sorin; Hernandez, Marta; Kapetanakou, Anastasia E; Kuchta, Tomáš; Manios, Stavros G; Melero, Beatriz; Minarovičová, Jana; Muhterem, Meryem; Nicolau, Anca Ioana; Rovira, Jordi; Skandamis, Panagiotis N; Stessl, Beatrix; Wagner, Martin; Jordan, Kieran; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    2014-03-01

    Analysis for Listeria monocytogenes by ISO11290-1 is time-consuming, entailing two enrichment steps and subsequent plating on agar plates, taking five days without isolate confirmation. The aim of this study was to determine if a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay could be used for analysis of the first and second enrichment broths, saving four or two days, respectively. In a comprehensive approach involving six European laboratories, PCR and traditional plating of both enrichment broths from the ISO11290-1 method were compared for the detection of L. monocytogenes in 872 food, raw material and processing environment samples from 13 different dairy and meat food chains. After the first and second enrichments, total DNA was extracted from the enriched cultures and analysed for the presence of L. monocytogenes DNA by PCR. DNA extraction by chaotropic solid-phase extraction (spin column-based silica) combined with real-time PCR (RTi-PCR) was required as it was shown that crude DNA extraction applying sonication lysis and boiling followed by traditional gel-based PCR resulted in fewer positive results than plating. The RTi-PCR results were compared to plating, as defined by the ISO11290-1 method. For first and second enrichments, 90% of the samples gave the same results by RTi-PCR and plating, whatever the RTi-PCR method used. For the samples that gave different results, plating was significantly more accurate for detection of positive samples than RTi-PCR from the first enrichment, but RTi-PCR detected a greater number of positive samples than plating from the second enrichment, regardless of the RTi-PCR method used. RTi-PCR was more accurate for non-food contact surface and food contact surface samples than for food and raw material samples especially from the first enrichment, probably because of sample matrix interference. Even though RTi-PCR analysis of the first enrichment showed less positive results than plating, in outbreak scenarios where a rapid result is

  19. Detection of Neospora caninum DNA by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Payne, S; Ellis, J

    1996-04-01

    Neospora caninum is a cyst-forming coccidian parasite which is now recognised as a major cause of abortion and neonatal mortality in cattle and other livestock. This study describes the primary DNA structure of the transcribed spacer region of the rDNA of N. caninum. Of importance is that the sequence data generated have been used to develop a species-specific PCR test for N. caninum DNA, which will prove valuable in epidemiology studies on neosporosis. PMID:8773521

  20. Detection of Helicobacter pylori glmM gene in bovine milk using Nested polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Eyman Y.; El-Eragi, A. M. S.; Musa, Abuobeida M.; El-Magboul, Salma B.; A/Rahman, Magdi B.; Abdo, Abdelmounem E.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to detect the glmM gene of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in cow’s milk from different dairy farms in Khartoum State using Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: A total of 50 milk samples were collected from different dairy farms in Khartoum State (13 from Khartoum, 24 Khartoum North, and 13 from Omdurman Provinces). Results: The generated results showed that 11/50 (22%) were harboring the investigated H. pylori glmM gene in Khartoum State (1/13 [7.7%] Khartoum, 9/24 [37.5%] Khartoum North, and 1/13 [7.7%] Omdurman provinces, respectively). Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this was the first report on the detection of H. pylori glmM gene in cattle milk in Khartoum State. Nonetheless, the high percentages of H. pylori DNA detection in milk opened new avenues toward exploring the risk of human infection with H. pylori through the consumption of raw milk. PMID:27047175

  1. Polymerase chain reaction as a tool for developing stress protein probes

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, B.J.; Mattley, Y.D. . Dept. of Biology); Snell, T.W. . Div. of Biology)

    1994-08-01

    Because of the high degree of evolutionary conservation of stress proteins, potential exists for the development of nucleic acid probes from particular species that could be used to monitor stress-related changes in mRNA abundance. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a powerful tool that can be applied to the generation of these probes, provided that primer sequences can be identified that specifically amplify sequences of interest from a wide variety of organisms. The authors identified such sequences from multiple alignments of published chaperonin and stress-70 sequences, and tested their ability to amplify appropriately sized fragments from genomic DNA from a variety of vertebrates and invertebrates. Although no primer pair could be used successfully with all species, the authors were able to derive specific products from most species by testing different pairs. One primer pair for chaperonin proved particularly useful. Products were obtained from all tested species, and with a single exception (human), these primers appeared to amplify a single copy sequence. The authors determined the nucleotide sequence of the product obtained from the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis and determined by phylogenetic analysis of the inferred protein product that the product obtained is most likely derived from a rotifer DNA template. Finally, the authors show that this product can be used to detect changes in abundance of homologous mRNA in heat-stressed rotifers.

  2. A Continuous-Flow Polymerase Chain Reaction Microchip With Regional Velocity Control

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shifeng; Fozdar, David Y.; Ali, Mehnaaz F.; Li, Hao; Shao, Dongbing; Vykoukal, Daynene M.; Vykoukal, Jody; Floriano, Pierre N.; Olsen, Michael; McDevitt, John T.; Gascoyne, Peter R.C.; Chen, Shaochen

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction (PCR) microchip with a serpentine microchannel of varying width for “regional velocity control.” Varying the channel width by incorporating expanding and contracting conduits made it possible to control DNA sample velocities for the optimization of the exposure times of the sample to each temperature phase while minimizing the transitional periods during temperature transitions. A finite element analysis (FEA) and semi-analytical heat transfer model was used to determine the distances between the three heating assemblies that are responsible for creating the denaturation (96 °C), hybridization (60 °C), and extension (72 °C) temperature zones within the microchip. Predictions from the thermal FEA and semi-analytical model were compared with temperature measurements obtained from an infrared (IR) camera. Flow-field FEAs were also performed to predict the velocity distributions in the regions of the expanding and contracting conduits to study the effects of the microchannel geometry on flow recirculation and bubble nucleation. The flow fields were empirically studied using micro particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) to validate the flow-field FEA’s and to determine experimental velocities in each of the regions of different width. Successful amplification of a 90 base pair (bp) bacillus anthracis DNA fragment was achieved. PMID:19829760

  3. Detection of canine herpesvirus 1 in a wide range of tissues using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Burr, P D; Campbell, M E; Nicolson, L; Onions, D E

    1996-12-01

    Canine herpesvirus 1 (CHV-1), a member of the alphaherpesvirus sub-family, is known to cause fatal infections in litters of puppies and may also be involved in infertility, abortion, and stillbirths in adult dogs. The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of CHV-1 DNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in twelve key sites that have been associated with latency for the other herpesviruses. A 605 base pair portion of the viral glycoprotein B (gB) gene was amplified using degenerate primers, cloned, and sequenced. Conventional 20 mer primers were designed using this sequence information to amplify a 120 bp fragment of gB situated between the original degenerate primers. The specificity of amplification was confirmed by Southern Blot hybridisation using an internal oligonucleotide probe. DNA was extracted from tissue samples taken from twelve dogs at post mortem and from twenty-four blood samples. Nine out of twelve dogs showed evidence of infection with CHV-1; the tissues most commonly affected were lumbo-sacral ganglia (5/12 dogs), tonsil (5/12), parotid salivary gland (4/9), and liver (4/9). No positive results were detected within the twenty-four blood samples. These results indicate that exposure to CHV-1 may be much more common than previously suggested. PMID:9008334

  4. Detection of strawberry vein banding virus by polymerase chain reaction and dot blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mráz, I; Petrzik, K; Fránová-Honetslegrová, J; Síp, M

    1997-08-01

    Strawberry vein banding virus (SVBV) is one of seventeen members of the family Caulimoviridae. Natural infection with the virus is known in Fragaria species only. Infections caused by SVBV are often symptomless (1), but their significance increases in mixed infections with strawberry crinkle or strawberry latent C viruses (2,3). This virus has been originally found on strawberries in USA and firstly described by Frazier (4), but it is probably world-wide distributed by planting or breeding materials. SVBV has been observed on cultivated strawberries in North America, Australia, Brazil, Japan (5) and recently in Europe (6,7). The concentration of SVBV in infected plants is usually very low. Its detection by ELISA is impossible because of lack of specific antibodies. Evidence of the caulimovirus nature of SVBV has been confirmed by its circular dsDNA genome, shape and size of viral particles (8), presence of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies typical for caulimoviruses, and distant serological relationship with cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV, 9). In this paper we present detection of SVBV by combination of two detection methods--polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and dot blot hybridization with a non-radioactive probe. PMID:9391655

  5. Genotypic characterization by polymerase chain reaction of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Ote, Isabelle; Taminiau, Bernard; Duprez, Jean-Noël; Dizier, Isabelle; Mainil, Jacques G

    2011-12-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is recognized worldwide as a pathogen causing many serious diseases in humans and animals, and is the most common aetiological agent of clinical and subclinical bovine mastitis. The importance of evaluating the combination of S. aureus virulence factors has been emphasized both in human and veterinary medicine, and knowledge about the genetic variability within different S. aureus populations would help in the design of efficient treatments. The aim of the present study was to determine the genetic profiles of S. aureus strains isolated from milk of cows suffering from clinical and subclinical mastitis in Belgium. The presence of about forty virulence-associated genes was investigated by specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. A high number of genotypic subtypes were observed, demonstrating further the large variation in the presence of virulence genes in S. aureus isolates and the considerable diversity of strains populations that are able to cause mastitis in cows. In accordance with other studies, we showed that some genes are associated with mastitis-causing S. aureus isolates, whereas others are absent or rarely present. We also further highlighted the presence of conserved gene combinations, namely the enterotoxigenic egc-cluster and the bovine pathogenicity island SaPIbov. Importantly, the presence of isolates carrying genes coding for toxins involved in important human infections makes the milk of cows with mastitis a potential reservoir for these toxins, and therefore a potential danger in human health, which strengthens the importance to consider raw milk consumption and its processing very carefully. PMID:21708435

  6. Detection of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, N.; Lin, Y. P.; Krishnan, C.

    1996-01-01

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to detect the presence of the ail, yst, and virF genes of Yersinia enterocolitica simultaneously, quickly and accurately. The amplified fragment sizes were 356 base-pairs (bp) for the ail gene, 134 bp for the yst gene, and 231 bp for the virF gene. The specificity of the amplified products was confirmed by hybridization with digoxigenin-labelled oligonucleotide probes. Amplification was successful whether the template was derived from a single colony of bacteria, aliquots of boiled bacterial suspensions, from DNA extracted from pure or mixed cultures or from stool specimens. Amplification of the virF gene was also achieved from strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis carrying the 70 kb plasmid but not with preparations from other related Yersinia species or from other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. The detection limit we established was 5-10 colony forming units per millilitre (cfu/ml) and 1.0 pg of DNA. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8760951

  7. Development of a polymerase chain reaction diagnostic assay for Ceratomyxa shasta, a myxosporean parasite of salmonid fish.

    PubMed

    Palenzuela, O; Trobridge, G; Bartholomew, J L

    1999-04-15

    A diagnostic procedure based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the myxosporean parasite Ceratomyxa shasta. Three sets of oligonucleotide primers were designed to specifically amplify C. shasta ribosomal RNA genes and several parameters of the assay were tested and optimised. A simple protocol for the processing of fish tissue samples was also developed. In a single round, 20 microliters volume reaction the optimised procedure allows the detection of 50 fg of purified C. shasta genomic DNA, or 0.01 spore from a seeded fish intestine sample. This protocol is considerably faster, cheaper and more reliable than any previous diagnostic procedure for a myxosporean parasite, and can be an invaluable tool for the monitoring of early and/or subclinical C. shasta infections in wild and cultured salmon populations. PMID:10349552

  8. Comparison of a TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction assay with a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for detection of Gallid herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed

    Ou, Shan-Chia; Giambrone, Joseph J; Macklin, Kenneth S

    2012-01-01

    A TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay were developed to detect Gallid herpesvirus 1 (GaHV-1, formerly Infectious laryngotracheitis virus). The standard curve of real-time PCR was established, and the sensitivity reached 10 copies/μl. In the current study, the conversion between viral titer and GaHV-1 genomic copy number was constructed. Six primers for LAMP assay amplified target gene at 65°C within 45 min, and the detection limit was 60 copies/μl. The 6 primers were highly specific, sensitive, and reproducible for detection of GaHV-1. Although the sensitivity of LAMP was lower than that of real-time PCR, LAMP was faster, less expensive, and did not require a thermocycler. The LAMP assay would be a viable alternative assay in diagnostic laboratories that do not employ real-time PCR technology. PMID:22362944

  9. A polymerase chain reaction method for the amplification of full-length envelope genes of HIV-1 from DNA samples containing single molecules of HIV-1 provirus.

    PubMed

    McClure, P; Curran, R; Boneham, S; Ball, J K

    2000-07-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of full-length envelope genes from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) directly from uncultured clinical samples is difficult. This paper describes a comparative assessment of the performance of three thermostable polymerases in an HIV-1 full-length envelope gene PCR. The PCR method utilising Expand HiFi polymerase was successful when using DNA samples extracted from a variety of sources including blood, semen and various tissues. This method generated high and specific yields of product from samples containing as little as one copy of HIV-1 proviral DNA. The resulting PCR products were suitable for a variety of downstream analytical methods including DNA sequence analysis. PMID:10921844

  10. Use of sodC versus ctrA for real-time polymerase chain reaction-based detection of Neisseria meningitidis in sterile body fluids

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Fábio Takenori; Fukasawa, Lucila Okuyama; Gonçalves, Maria Gisele; Salgado, Maristela Marques; de Lemos, Ana Paula Silva; Harrison, Lee H; de Oliveira, Priscilla Lima; da Silva, Carla Naufal; Sacchi, Claudio Tavares

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the use of a newly described sodC-based real-time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for detecting Neisseria meningitidis in normally sterile sites, such as cerebrospinal fluid and serum. The sodC-based RT-PCR assay has an advantage over ctrA for detecting nongroupable N. meningitidis isolates, which are commonly present in asymptomatic pharyngeal carriage. However, in our study, sodC-based RT-PCR was 7.5% less sensitive than ctrA. Given the public health impact of possible false-negative results due to the use of the sodC target gene alone, sodC-based RT-PCR for the diagnosis of meningococcal meningitis should be used with caution. PMID:23579808

  11. Discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species by ligase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmann, M; Czajka, J; Barany, F; Batt, C A

    1992-01-01

    A ligase chain reaction assay based on a single-base-pair difference in the V9 region of the 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) was developed to distinguish between Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species. For this purpose, two pairs of primers were designed, with one primer of each pair being radioactively labeled. The ligated product was separated from the primers by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then detected by autoradiography. To achieve a higher sensitivity, the 16S rDNA was initially amplified by polymerase chain reaction prior to the ligase chain reaction. The ligase chain reaction was tested on 19 different Listeria species and strains and proved to be a highly specific diagnostic method for the detection of L. monocytogenes. Images PMID:1482171

  12. Development of TaqMan real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for the detection and quantitation of porcine kobuvirus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangdong; Wang, Yufei; Chen, Jianfei; Zhang, Xin; Shi, Hongyan; Shi, Da; Gao, Jing; Feng, Li

    2016-08-01

    Porcine kobuvirus (PKV) is a newly emerging virus that has been detected in diarrheic pigs. Presently, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RT-loop-mediated amplification are the only methods that can be used to detect PKV. To develop a TaqMan real-time RT-PCR for the rapid detection and quantitation of PKV nucleic acid in fecal samples, a pair of primers and a probe were designed to amplify the conserved 3D region of the PKV genome. After optimization, the TaqMan real-time RT-PCR was highly specific and ∼1000 times more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR, and the detection limit was as low as 30 DNA copies. Among the 148 intestinal samples from piglets with diarrhea, 136 and 118 were positive based on the TaqMan and conventional RT-PCR methods, respectively, indicating that the TaqMan RT-PCR was more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR, and the total concordance of the two methods was approximately 87.84%. Thus, the TaqMan real-time RT-PCR should be a useful tool for the early detection and quantitation of PKV. PMID:26912233

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of an IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and comparison with 2 polymerase chain reactions for early diagnosis of human leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Vanasco, N B; Jacob, P; Landolt, N; Chiani, Y; Schmeling, M F; Cudos, C; Tarabla, H; Lottersberger, J

    2016-04-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) may play a key role for early detection and treatment of human leptospirosis in developing countries. The aims of this study were to develop and validate an IgM ELISA under field conditions and to compare the diagnostic accuracy among IgG, IgM ELISAs, conventional PCR (cPCR), and real-time PCR (rtPCR) for early detection of human leptospirosis. Overall accuracy of IgM ELISA was sensitivity of 87.9%, specificity of 97.0%, and area under the curve of 0.940. When the 4 methods were compared, IgM ELISA showed the greatest diagnostic accuracy (J=0.6) followed by rtPCR (J=0.4), cPCR (J=0.2) and IgG ELISA (J=0.1). Our results support the use of IgM ELISA and rtPCR for early diagnosis of the disease. Moreover, due to their high specificity, they could be also useful to replace or supplement microscopic agglutination test as a confirmatory test, allowing more confirmations. PMID:26867967

  14. Development and validation of a novel hydrolysis probe real-time polymerase chain reaction for agamid adenovirus 1 in the central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Fredholm, Daniel V; Coleman, James K; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2015-03-01

    Agamid adenovirus 1 (AgAdv-1) is a significant cause of disease in bearded dragons (Pogona sp.). Clinical manifestations of AgAdv-1 infection are variable and often nonspecific; the manifestations range from lethargy, weight loss, and inappetence, to severe enteritis, hepatitis, and sudden death. Currently, diagnosis of AgAdv-1 infection is achieved through a single published method: standard nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) and sequencing. Standard nPCR with sequencing provides reliable sensitivity, specificity, and validation of PCR products. However, this process is comparatively expensive, laborious, and slow. Probe hybridization, as used in a TaqMan assay, represents the best option for validating PCR products aside from the time-consuming process of sequencing. This study developed a real-time PCR (qPCR) assay using a TaqMan probe-based assay, targeting a highly conserved region of the AgAdv-1 genome. Standard curves were generated, detection results were compared with the gold standard conventional PCR and sequencing assay, and limits of detection were determined. Additionally, the qPCR assay was run on samples known to be positive for AgAdv-1 and samples known to be positive for other adenoviruses. Based on the results of these evaluations, this assay allows for a less expensive, rapid, quantitative detection of AgAdv-1 in bearded dragons. PMID:25776549

  15. Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis of the Mouse Cyp2j Subfamily: Tissue Distribution and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Graves, Joan P; Gruzdev, Artiom; Bradbury, J Alyce; DeGraff, Laura M; Li, Huiling; House, John S; Hoopes, Samantha L; Edin, Matthew L; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2015-08-01

    Members of the cytochrome P450 CYP2J subfamily are expressed in multiple tissues in mice and humans. These enzymes are active in the metabolism of fatty acids to generate bioactive compounds. Herein we report new methods and results for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis for the seven genes (Cyp2j5, Cyp2j6, Cyp2j8, Cyp2j9, Cyp2j11, Cyp2j12, and Cyp2j13) of the mouse Cyp2j subfamily. SYBR Green primer sets were developed and compared with commercially available TaqMan primer/probe assays for specificity toward mouse Cyp2j cDNA, and analysis of tissue distribution and regulation of Cyp2j genes. Each TaqMan primer/probe set and SYBR Green primer set were shown to be specific for their intended mouse Cyp2j cDNA. Tissue distribution of the mouse Cyp2j isoforms confirmed similar patterns of expression between the two qPCR methods. Cyp2j5 and Cyp2j13 were highly expressed in male kidneys, and Cyp2j11 was highly expressed in both male and female kidneys. Cyp2j6 was expressed in multiple tissues, with the highest expression in the small intestine and duodenum. Cyp2j8 was detected in various tissues, with highest expression found in the skin. Cyp2j9 was highly expressed in the brain, liver, and lung. Cyp2j12 was predominately expressed in the brain. We also determined the Cyp2j isoform expression in Cyp2j5 knockout mice to determine whether there was compensatory regulation of other Cyp2j isoforms, and we assessed Cyp2j isoform regulation during various inflammatory models, including influenza A, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, house dust mite allergen, and corn pollen. Both qPCR methods detected similar suppression of Cyp2j6 and Cyp2j9 during inflammation in the lung. PMID:25994032

  16. Real-Time PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, A.; Boulle, N.; Lutfalla, G. S.

    Over the past few years there has been a considerable development of DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and real-time PCR has now superseded conventional PCR techniques in many areas, e.g., the quantification of nucleic acids and genotyping. This new approach is based on the detection and quantification of a fluorescent signal proportional to the amount of amplicons generated by PCR. Real-time detection is achieved by coupling a thermocycler with a fluorimeter. This chapter discusses the general principles of quantitative real-time PCR, the different steps involved in implementing the technique, and some examples of applications in medicine. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provides a way of obtaining a large number of copies of a double-stranded DNA fragment of known sequence. This DNA amplification technique, developed in 1985 by K. Mullis (Cetus Corporation), saw a spectacular development over the space of a few years, revolutionising the methods used up to then in molecular biology. Indeed, PCR has many applications, such as the detection of small amounts of DNA, cloning, and quantitative analysis (assaying), each of which will be discussed further below.

  17. Approach to molecular characterization of different strains of Fasciola hepatica using random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Scarcella, S; Miranda-Miranda, E; Solana, M V; Solana, H

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to genetically characterize Fasciola hepatica strains from diverse ecogeographical regions (America and Europe), susceptible and resistant to Triclabendazole, using the random amplified polymorphic DNA fragments (RAPDs-PCR) technique to elucidate genetic variability between the different isolates. Ten different oligonucleotide primers of 10 bases with GC content varying from 50-70% were used. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out in 25 μl of total volume. Duplicate PCR reactions on each individual template DNA were performed to test the reproducibility of the individual DNA bands. The size of the RAPD-PCR fragments was determined by the reciprocal plot between the delay factors (Rf) versus the logarithm of molecular weight ladder. The phenogram obtained showed three main clusters, the major of which contained European Strains (Cullompton and Sligo) showing a genetic distance of 27.2 between them. The American strains (Cedive and Cajamarca) on the other hand formed each their distinctive group but clearly maintaining a closer genetic relationship among them than that to their European counterparts, with which showed a distance of 33.8 and 37.8, respectively. This polymorphism would give this species enhanced adaptability against the host, as well as the environment. The existence of genetically different populations of F. hepatica could allow, against any selection pressure, natural or artificial (for use fasciolicides products and/or control measures), one or more populations of F. hepatica to be able to survive and create resistance or adaptability to such selective pressure. PMID:25595655

  18. Efficacy of filter types for detecting Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in environmental water samples by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Oyofo, B A; Rollins, D M

    1993-01-01

    A previously developed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a target region in the flaA Campylobacter flagellin gene was evaluated and adapted for use with environmental water samples. The ability to detect Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli in seeded water samples was tested with various filters after concentration and freeze-thaw lysis of the bacterial cells. A nonradioactive probe for the amplified flagellin gene fragment detected as little as 1 to 10 fg of genomic DNA and as few as 10 to 100 viable C. jejuni cells per 100 ml of water filtered onto Fluoropore (Millipore Corp.) filters. No amplification was obtained with cellulose acetate filters, most likely because of binding of the DNA to the filter. Concentration and lysis of target cells on Fluoropore and Durapore (Millipore Corp.) filters allowed PCR to be performed in the same reaction tube without removing the filters. This methodology was then adapted for use with environmental water samples. The water supply to a broiler chicken production farm was suspected as the source of C. jejuni known to be endemic in grow-out flocks at the farm, despite the inability to culture the organisms by standard methods. The filtration-PCR method detected Campylobacter DNA in more than half of the farm water samples examined. Amplified campylobacter DNA was not detected in small volumes of regional surface water samples collected on a single occasion in February. The filtration-PCR amplification method provided a basis for detection of C. jejuni and C. coli in environmental waters with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity. Images PMID:8285708

  19. Comparison of the polymerase chain reaction and culture for the detection of feline Chlamydia psittaci in untreated and doxycycline-treated experimentally infected cats.

    PubMed

    Sykes, J E; Studdert, V P; Browning, G F

    1999-01-01

    The diagnostic sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was compared with that of culture on conjunctival swabs over the course of infection in 4 doxycycline-treated and 4 untreated cats that were experimentally infected with feline Chlamydia psittaci. Treated cats were given 25 mg (5 mg/kg) of doxycycline orally twice daily for 3 weeks from day 6 after challenge. Clinical signs improved within 3 days of institution of treatment. Culture remained positive for 1 day and PCR remained positive for up to 5 days after treatment was commenced. No recurrence of clinical signs occurred and the organism could not be detected by either PCR or culture for 2 weeks after cessation of therapy. In the 4 untreated cats, conjunctival swabs were taken daily to day 14 and every 2nd weekday to day 64 after challenge. PCR was significantly more sensitive than culture in untreated cats overall (PCR 85.7%, culture 72.9%, P approximately 0) and for cats with clinical signs (PCR 89.2%, culture 79.2%, P = .008). PCR and culture had equivalent sensitivity (100%) for cats showing clinical signs in the 1st month of infection, whereas PCR was considerably more sensitive than culture for cats showing clinical signs in the 2nd month (PCR 72.9%, culture 47.9%, P = .028). Organisms were not detected by PCR in blood or any tissue collected from treated or untreated cats at postmortem. Thus, effective treatment of chlamydiosis in cats is possible with much shorter treatment regimens than currently recommended, and PCR is the more sensitive diagnostic method in chronically infected cats. PMID:10357101

  20. Prevalence of the prothrombin G20210A mutation in the Irish populations: use of a novel polymerase chain reaction approach.

    PubMed

    Keenan, C; Livingstone, W J; White, B; Mynett-Johnson, L; Cusack, S; Lawler, M; Smith, O P

    2000-10-01

    The prothrombin G20210A polymorphism is associated with a threefold-increased risk of venous thrombosis. There is considerable variation in the reported prevalence of this polymorphism within normal populations, ranging from 0 to 6.5%. The prevalence within the Irish population has not been determined. A restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based assay is commonly used for the detection of the prothrombin 20210A allele. This assay does not include a control restriction digest fragment and, consequently, failure of the enzyme activity or lack of addition of enzyme to the sample cannot be distinguished from wild-type prothrombin. We developed a RFLP-based assay, which incorporates an invariant digest site, resulting in the generation of a control digest fragment. Furthermore, we developed a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for the amplification and digestion of poor-quality or low-concentration DNA. In the Irish population studied, five of 385 (1.29%) were heterozygous and one patient was homozygous for the prothrombin 20210A polymorphism. This is the first reported data on an Irish or Celtic population and suggests that the allele frequency is similar to Anglo-Saxon populations. The nested PCR method successfully amplified and digested 100/100 (100%) of the archived samples; none of these samples could be analyzed by the standard single-round PCR method. In conclusion, nested PCR should be considered in the analysis of archived samples. Single-round PCR is appropriate for recently collected samples; however, an invariant control digest site should be incorporated in RFLP-based assays to validate the integrity of the digestion enzyme and limit the risk of false-negative results. PMID:11085288

  1. Polymerase chain reaction detection of Kingella kingae in children with culture-negative septic arthritis in eastern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Slinger, Robert; Moldovan, Ioana; Bowes, Jennifer; Chan, Francis

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The bacterium Kingella kingae may be an under-recognized cause of septic arthritis in Canadian children because it is difficult to grow in culture and best detected using molecular methods. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether K kingae is present in culture-negative joint fluid specimens from children in eastern Ontario using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection methods. METHODS: K kingae PCR testing was performed using residual bacterial culture-negative joint fluid collected from 2010 to 2013 at a children’s hospital in Ottawa, Ontario. The clinical features of children with infections caused by K kingae were compared with those of children with infections caused by the ‘typical’ septic arthritis bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. RESULTS: A total of 50 joint fluid specimens were submitted over the study period. Ten were culture-positive, eight for S aureus and two for S pyogenes. Residual joint fluid was available for 27 of the 40 culture-negative specimens and K kingae was detected using PCR in seven (25.93%) of these samples. Children with K kingae were significantly younger (median age 1.7 versus 11.3 years; P=0.01) and had lower C-reactive protein levels (median 23.8 mg/L versus 117.6. mg/L; P=0.01) than those infected with other bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: K kingae was frequently detected using PCR in culture-negative joint fluid specimens from children in eastern Ontario. K kingae PCR testing of culture-negative joint samples in children appears to be warranted. PMID:27095882

  2. The parallel reaction monitoring method contributes to a highly sensitive polyubiquitin chain quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Tanaka, Keiji Saeki, Yasushi

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •The parallel reaction monitoring method was applied to ubiquitin quantification. •The ubiquitin PRM method is highly sensitive even in biological samples. •Using the method, we revealed that Ufd4 assembles the K29-linked ubiquitin chain. -- Abstract: Ubiquitylation is an essential posttranslational protein modification that is implicated in a diverse array of cellular functions. Although cells contain eight structurally distinct types of polyubiquitin chains, detailed function of several chain types including K29-linked chains has remained largely unclear. Current mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantification methods are highly inefficient for low abundant atypical chains, such as K29- and M1-linked chains, in complex mixtures that typically contain highly abundant proteins. In this study, we applied parallel reaction monitoring (PRM), a quantitative, high-resolution MS method, to quantify ubiquitin chains. The ubiquitin PRM method allows us to quantify 100 attomole amounts of all possible ubiquitin chains in cell extracts. Furthermore, we quantified ubiquitylation levels of ubiquitin-proline-β-galactosidase (Ub-P-βgal), a historically known model substrate of the ubiquitin fusion degradation (UFD) pathway. In wild-type cells, Ub-P-βgal is modified with ubiquitin chains consisting of 21% K29- and 78% K48-linked chains. In contrast, K29-linked chains are not detected in UFD4 knockout cells, suggesting that Ufd4 assembles the K29-linked ubiquitin chain(s) on Ub-P-βgal in vivo. Thus, the ubiquitin PRM is a novel, useful, quantitative method for analyzing the highly complicated ubiquitin system.

  3. Vaginal micropapillary lesions are not related to human papillomavirus infection: in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction detection techniques.

    PubMed

    Garzetti, G G; Ciavattini, A; Goteri, G; Menzo, S; De Nictolis, M; Clementi, M; Brugia, M; Romanini, C

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the human papillomavirus DNA presence in vaginal papillary lesions, with particular regard to micropapillomatosis to better define their clinical significance. Prospective study: the study population was composed of 62 women who were recruited consecutively from the Colposcopy Centre of the Ancona University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, on the grounds of vaginal papillomatosis or/and typical acuminata warts. Biopsies for routine histology, and for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA detection by means of in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were taken from the papillary lesions and from 24 healthy women, who were selected as controls. Macroscopically, vaginal micropapillomatosis was ascertained in 51 cases (82.3%), while in 11 cases (17.7%) the colposcopic diagnosis was condyloma acuminatum. During in situ hybridization, HPV DNA positivity was observed in 8 (9.4%) out of 85 samples of squamous papillae and in 11 (64.7%) out of 17 samples of condylomata; in control specimens, HPV DNA was detected in 2 (8.3%) out of 24 bioptic samples. The correspondence between in situ hybridization and PCR was 96.1%, with 17.4% more diagnosis obtained by PCR. Vaginal micropapillomatosis may be regarded as a variation in the normal anatomy of the lower genital tract without any significant relationship with HPV infection, and as a lesion easily distinguishable from condylomata acuminata by clinical examination alone. PMID:7959342

  4. Investigation on natural diets of larval marine animals using peptide nucleic acid-directed polymerase chain reaction clamping.

    PubMed

    Chow, Seinen; Suzuki, Sayaka; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Lavery, Shane; Jeffs, Andrew; Takeyama, Haruko

    2011-04-01

    The stomach contents of the larvae of marine animals are usually very small in quantity and amorphous, especially in invertebrates, making morphological methods of identification very difficult. Nucleotide sequence analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a likely approach, but the large quantity of larval (host) DNA present may mask subtle signals from the prey genome. We have adopted peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-directed PCR clamping to selectively inhibit amplification of host DNA for this purpose. The Japanese spiny lobster (Panulirus japonicus) and eel (Anguilla japonica) were used as model host and prey organisms, respectively. A lobster-specific PNA oligomer (20 bases) was designed to anneal to the sequence at the junction of the 18 S rDNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the lobster. PCR using eukaryote universal primers for amplifying the ITS1 region used in conjunction with the lobster-specific PNA on a mixed DNA template of lobster and eel demonstrated successful inhibition of lobster ITS1 amplification while allowing efficient amplification of eel ITS1. This method was then applied to wild-caught lobster larvae of P. japonicus and P. longipes bispinosus collected around Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan. ITS1 sequences of a wide variety of animals (Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Crustacea, Teleostei, Mollusca, and Chaetognatha) were detected. PMID:20535520

  5. Molecular Epidemiology of Leptospirosis in Northern Iran by Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction/Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and Sequencing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Sedigheh; Sepahian, Neda; Afsharpad, Mandana; Esfandiari, Behzad; Ziapour, Peyman; Djadid, Navid D.

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of Leptospira species in Mazandaran Province of Iran by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methods and sequencing analysis. Blood samples (n = 119) were collected from humans suspected of having leptospirosis from different parts of the province in 2007. By using an indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT), we determined that 35 (29.4%) of 119 suspected cases had leptospiral antibody titers ≥ 1:80, which confirmed the diagnosis of leptospirosis. Nested PCR assay also determined that 60 (50.4%) of 119 samples showed Leptospira infection. Furthermore, 44 (73.3%) of 60 confirmed leptospirosis amplified products were subjected to sequencing analysis. Sequence alignment identified L. interrogans, L. kirschneri, and L. wolffii species. All positive cases diagnosed by IFAT or PCR were in patients who reported contact with animals, high-risk occupational activities, and exposure to contaminated water. Therefore, it is important to increase attention about this disease among physicians and to strengthen laboratory capacity for its diagnosis in infected patients in Iran. PMID:20439973

  6. Coccidial infections in commercial broilers: epidemiological aspects and comparison of Eimeria species identification by morphometric and polymerase chain reaction techniques.

    PubMed

    Haug, Anita; Gjevre, Anne-Gerd; Thebo, Per; Mattsson, Jens G; Kaldhusdal, Magne

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study was to add to existing knowledge of the epidemiology and the aetiology of coccidial infections in commercial broiler flocks. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and morphometric identification of the Eimeria species were compared as means of differentiation in the field samples of faeces and litter. For morphometry, the Eimeria species were categorized into three groups based on lengths of the oocysts. Two random samples of commercial broilers were studied, one during 2000/01 and the other during 2003/04. The prophylactic regime (in-feed narasin), husbandry and methods applied were broadly the same for both subpopulations. Coccidial infection prevalence increased from approximately 45% to approximately 75% during this period, but infection levels (oocysts per gram of faeces) did not significantly change. There were substantial geographical differences in both prevalence and infection levels. A change in Eimeria species profile occurred during the study period. Five Eimeria species were identified at slaughter, by PCR targeting the ITS-1 region of the genome; Eimeria acervulina (100%), Eimeria tenella (77%), Eimeria maxima (25%), Eimeria praecox (10%) and Eimeria necatrix (2%). PCR and morphometric tentative identification were in complete agreement in only 49% of the cases. PMID:18393094

  7. A polymerase chain reaction-based method for constructing a linear vector with site-specific DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Toshiya; Ohta, Tohru; Abiko, Yoshihiro; Okayama, Miki; Mizoguchi, Itaru; Takuma, Taishin

    2011-09-15

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that leads to a wide variety of biological functions, including transcription, growth and development, and diseases associated with altered gene expression such as cancers. However, tools to insert site-specific methylation into DNA for analyzing epigenetic functions are limited. Here we describe a novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach to provide site-specific DNA methylation at any site, including CpG or CpNpG islands. This method is simple and versatile, and it consists of four steps to construct the DNA methylation vector: (I) design and synthesis of methylated primers, (II) PCR amplification, (III) isolation of single-stranded DNA, and (IV) annealing and ligation of isolated single-stranded DNAs. First we produced and validated a linear green fluorescence protein (GFP) vector by this method. Next we applied this method to introduce methyl groups into the promoter of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene and found that site-specific DNA methylation at the CRE element significantly altered COX-2 gene expression. These results demonstrate that this PCR-based approach is useful for the analysis of biological functions that depend on DNA methylation. PMID:21669180

  8. Error propagation in relative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction quantification models: the balance between accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Nordgård, Oddmund; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Farmen, Ragne Kristin; Heikkilä, Reino

    2006-09-15

    Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has gained wide popularity as a sensitive and reliable technique for mRNA quantification. The development of new mathematical models for such quantifications has generally paid little attention to the aspect of error propagation. In this study we evaluate, both theoretically and experimentally, several recent models for relative real-time RT-PCR quantification of mRNA with respect to random error accumulation. We present error propagation expressions for the most common quantification models and discuss the influence of the various components on the total random error. Normalization against a calibrator sample to improve comparability between different runs is shown to increase the overall random error in our system. On the other hand, normalization against multiple reference genes, introduced to improve accuracy, does not increase error propagation compared to normalization against a single reference gene. Finally, we present evidence that sample-specific amplification efficiencies determined from individual amplification curves primarily increase the random error of real-time RT-PCR quantifications and should be avoided. Our data emphasize that the gain of accuracy associated with new quantification models should be validated against the corresponding loss of precision. PMID:16899212

  9. A multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction panel for detecting neurologic pathogens in dogs with meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae-Ik; Chang, Dong-Woo; Na, Ki-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Meningoencephalitis (ME) is a common inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system in dogs. Clinically, ME has both infectious and non-infectious causes. In the present study, a multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (mqPCR) panel was optimized for the detection of eight canine neurologic pathogens (Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus spp., Neospora caninum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Bartonella spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Ehrlichia canis, and canine distemper virus [CDV]). The mqPCR panel was subsequently applied to 53 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected from dogs with ME. The analytic sensitivity (i.e., limit of detection, expressed as molecules per 1 mL of recombinant vector) was 3.8 for CDV, 3.7 for Ehrlichia canis, 3.7 for Bartonella spp., 3.8 for Borrelia burgdorferi, 3.7 for Blastomyces dermatitidis, 3.7 for Cryptococcus spp., 38 for Neospora caninum, and 3.7 for Toxoplasma gondii. Among the tested CSF samples, seven (15%) were positive for the following pathogens in decreasing order of frequency: Cryptococcus spp. (3/7), Blastomyces dermatitidis (2/7), and Borrelia burgdorferi (2/7). In summary, use of an mqPCR panel with high analytic sensitivity as an initial screen for infectious agents in dogs with ME could facilitate the selection of early treatment strategies and improve outcomes. PMID:26040611

  10. Development of a SYBR Green quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for rapid detection and quantification of infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Kirkpatrick, Naomi C; Coppo, Mauricio; Lee, Sang-Won; Devlin, Joanne M; Markham, Philip F; Browning, Glenn F; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2011-06-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis is an acute viral respiratory disease of chickens with a worldwide distribution. Sensitive detection of the causative herpesvirus is particularly important because it can persist in the host at a very low copy number and be transmitted to other birds. Quantification of viral genome copy number is also useful for clinical investigations and experimental studies. In the study presented here, a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed using SYBR Green chemistry and the viral gene UL15a to detect and quantify infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) in ILTV-inoculated chicken embryos or naturally infected birds. The specificity of the assay was confirmed using a panel of viral and bacterial pathogens of poultry. The sensitivity of the assay was compared with two conventional PCR assays, virus titration and an antigen-detecting enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The qPCR developed in this study was highly sensitive and specific, and has potential for quantification of ILTV in tissues from naturally and experimentally infected birds and embryos. PMID:21711182

  11. Antimicrobial efficacy of different root canal sealers by using real-time polymerase chain reaction: An ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Seelan, R Gnana; Kumar, A Arvind; Emil Sam, R Jonathan; Maheswari, S Uma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Root canal sealers help to minimize leakage, provides antimicrobial activity to reduce the possibility of residual bacteria, and to resolve periapical lesion. Aim: To compare five different root canal sealers against Enterococcus faecalis in an infected root canal model by using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Settings and Design: Sixty human mandibular premolars were sectioned to standardize a uniform length of 14 mm. Fifty microliters of the inoculum containing E. faecalis were transferred into each microcentrifuge tube (n = 60). The samples were divided into six groups Tubli-Seal, Apexit Plus, Fillapex, AH Plus, RoekoSeal, and Positive control, respectively. Materials and Methods: Five groups after the incubation with the microorganism E. faecalis were coated with different root canal sealers and obturated using F3 ProTaper Gutta-percha point. The dentinal shavings were collected and analyzed for RT-PCR. Statistical Analysis: The mean difference between six groups was calculated using analysis of variance and post-hoc test. Results: The highest antibacterial activity was achieved with Tubli-Seal (1938.13 DNA in pictogram [pg]) and least by RoekoSeal (3034.54 DNA in pg). Conclusion: The maximum antimicrobial activity was achieved AH Plus and Tubli-Seal. RT-PCR can be used as a valuable and accurate tool for testing antimicrobial activity. PMID:26752843

  12. Computational intelligence-based polymerase chain reaction primer selection based on a novel teaching-learning-based optimisation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Huei

    2014-12-01

    Specific primers play an important role in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments, and therefore it is essential to find specific primers of outstanding quality. Unfortunately, many PCR constraints must be simultaneously inspected which makes specific primer selection difficult and time-consuming. This paper introduces a novel computational intelligence-based method, Teaching-Learning-Based Optimisation, to select the specific and feasible primers. The specified PCR product lengths of 150-300 bp and 500-800 bp with three melting temperature formulae of Wallace's formula, Bolton and McCarthy's formula and SantaLucia's formula were performed. The authors calculate optimal frequency to estimate the quality of primer selection based on a total of 500 runs for 50 random nucleotide sequences of 'Homo species' retrieved from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. The method was then fairly compared with the genetic algorithm (GA) and memetic algorithm (MA) for primer selection in the literature. The results show that the method easily found suitable primers corresponding with the setting primer constraints and had preferable performance than the GA and the MA. Furthermore, the method was also compared with the common method Primer3 according to their method type, primers presentation, parameters setting, speed and memory usage. In conclusion, it is an interesting primer selection method and a valuable tool for automatic high-throughput analysis. In the future, the usage of the primers in the wet lab needs to be validated carefully to increase the reliability of the method. PMID:25429503

  13. A multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction panel for detecting neurologic pathogens in dogs with meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jae-Ik; Chang, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Meningoencephalitis (ME) is a common inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system in dogs. Clinically, ME has both infectious and non-infectious causes. In the present study, a multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (mqPCR) panel was optimized for the detection of eight canine neurologic pathogens (Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus spp., Neospora caninum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Bartonella spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Ehrlichia canis, and canine distemper virus [CDV]). The mqPCR panel was subsequently applied to 53 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected from dogs with ME. The analytic sensitivity (i.e., limit of detection, expressed as molecules per 1 µL of recombinant vector) was 3.8 for CDV, 3.7 for Ehrlichia canis, 3.7 for Bartonella spp., 3.8 for Borrelia burgdorferi, 3.7 for Blastomyces dermatitidis, 3.7 for Cryptococcus spp., 38 for Neospora caninum, and 3.7 for Toxoplasma gondii. Among the tested CSF samples, seven (15%) were positive for the following pathogens in decreasing order of frequency: Cryptococcus spp. (3/7), Blastomyces dermatitidis (2/7), and Borrelia burgdorferi (2/7). In summary, use of an mqPCR panel with high analytic sensitivity as an initial screen for infectious agents in dogs with ME could facilitate the selection of early treatment strategies and improve outcomes. PMID:26040611

  14. Importance of housekeeping gene selection for accurate reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in a wound healing model.

    PubMed

    Turabelidze, Anna; Guo, Shujuan; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2010-01-01

    Studies in the field of wound healing have utilized a variety of different housekeeping genes for reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis. However, nearly all of these studies assume that the selected normalization gene is stably expressed throughout the course of the repair process. The purpose of our current investigation was to identify the most stable housekeeping genes for studying gene expression in mouse wound healing using RT-qPCR. To identify which housekeeping genes are optimal for studying gene expression in wound healing, we examined all articles published in Wound Repair and Regeneration that cited RT-qPCR during the period of January/February 2008 until July/August 2009. We determined that ACTβ, GAPDH, 18S, and β2M were the most frequently used housekeeping genes in human, mouse, and pig studies. We also investigated nine commonly used housekeeping genes that are not generally used in wound healing models: GUS, TBP, RPLP2, ATP5B, SDHA, UBC, CANX, CYC1, and YWHAZ. We observed that wounded and unwounded tissues have contrasting housekeeping gene expression stability. The results demonstrate that commonly used housekeeping genes must be validated as accurate normalizing genes for each individual experimental condition. PMID:20731795

  15. Real-time fluorogenic reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for the specific detection of Bagaza virus.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Dolores; Rocha, Ana; Tena-Tomás, Cristina; Vigo, Marta; Agüero, Montserrat; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Angel

    2012-09-01

    In September 2010, an outbreak of disease in 2 wild bird species (red-legged partridge, Alectoris rufa; ring-necked pheasant, Phasianus colchicus) occurred in southern Spain. Bagaza virus (BAGV) was identified as the etiological agent of the outbreak. BAGV had only been reported before in Western Africa (Central African Republic, Senegal) and in India. The first occurrence of BAGV in Spain stimulated a demand for rapid, reliable, and efficacious diagnostic methods to facilitate the surveillance of this disease in the field. This report describes a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method based on a commercial 5'-Taq nuclease-3' minor groove binder DNA probe and primers targeting the Bagaza NS5 gene. The method allowed the detection of BAGV with a high sensitivity, whereas other closely related flaviviruses (Usutu virus, West Nile virus, and Japanese encephalitis virus) were not detected. The assay was evaluated using field samples of red-legged partridges dead during the outbreak (n = 11), as well as samples collected from partridges during surveillance programs (n = 81). The results were compared to those obtained with a pan-flaviviral hemi-nested RT-PCR followed by nucleotide sequencing, which was employed originally to identify the virus involved in the outbreak. The results obtained with both techniques were 100% matching, indicating that the newly developed real-time RT-PCR is a valid technique for BAGV genome detection, useful in both diagnosis and surveillance studies. PMID:22807508

  16. Automation and integration of polymerase chain reaction with capillary electrophoresis for high throughput genotyping and disease diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, N.

    1999-02-12

    Genotyping is to detect specific loci in the human genome. These loci provide important information for forensic testing, construction of genetic linkage maps, gene related disease diagnosis and pharmacogenetic research. Genotyping is becoming more and more popular after these loci can be easily amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Capillary electrophoresis has its unique advantages for DNA analysis due to its fast heat dissipation and ease of automation. Four projects are described in which genotyping is performed by capillary electrophoresis emphasizing different aspects. First, the author demonstrates a principle to determine the genotype based on capillary electrophoresis system. VNTR polymorphism in the human D1S80 locus was studied. Second, the separation of four short tandem repeat (STR) loci vWF, THO1, TPOX and CSF1PO (CTTv) by using poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was studied in achieving high resolution and preventing rehybridization of the DNA fragments. Separation under denaturing, non-denaturing conditions and at elevated temperature was discussed. Third, a 250 {micro}m i.d., 365 {micro}m o.d. fused silica capillary was used as the microreactor for PCR. Fourth, direct PCR from blood was studied to simplify the sample preparation for genotyping to minimum.

  17. Application of the polymerase chain reaction to the diagnosis of human toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J D; Butcher, P D; Savva, D; Holliman, R E

    1993-03-01

    Toxoplasmosis may cause significant damage to the developing fetus and is a life-threatening opportunistic infection in immunocompromised persons. Serological investigation is unreliable, while isolation of the parasite is time consuming and may lack sensitivity. We have developed a system for detecting Toxoplasma gondii based on the amplification of the P30 gene using sequential rounds of PCR and nested primers. The clinical value of this technique was assessed by the investigation of a range of tissues taken from pregnant women, fetuses, neonates, AIDS patients and organ graft recipients. The PCR assay produced more positive reactions than isolation of the parasite by means of cell culture or animal inoculation. Extended autoradiography was found to be more sensitive than stained agarose gels for detecting the PCR product. Systematic contamination of PCR reactions was avoided but it was not possible to exclude sporadic contamination in certain cases. Detection of specific DNA is of clinical value in the investigation of the pregnant woman in order to assess the risk of transplacental passage of infection and in the fetus and neonate to identify congenital toxoplasmosis. Even so, PCR findings must be interpreted with caution because of the risk of a sample being contaminated. PCR may be the investigation of choice when brain biopsy is performed on a patient with AIDS and when toxoplasmosis associated with bone marrow transplantation is suspected. PMID:8473761

  18. Hybridization probes for conventional DNA fingerprinting used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction to distinguish strains of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, W; Mitchell, T G; Freedman, E Z; Vilgalys, R

    1993-01-01

    In conventional DNA fingerprinting, hypervariable and repetitive sequences (minisatellite or microsatellite DNA) are detected with hybridization probes. As demonstrated here, these probes can be used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to generate individual fingerprints. Several conventional DNA fingerprinting probes were used to prime the PCR, yielding distinctive, hypervariable multifragment profiles for different strains of Cryptococcus neoformans. PCR fingerprinting with the oligonucleotide primers (GTG)5, (GACA)4, and the phage M13 core sequence (GAGGGTGGXGGXTCT), but not with (CA)8 or (CT)8, generated DNA polymorphisms with all 42 strains of C. neoformans investigated. PCR fingerprints produced by priming with (GTG)5, (GACA)4, or the M13 core sequence differentiated the two varieties of C. neoformans, C. neoformans var. neoformans (serotypes A and D) and C. neoformans var. gattii (serotypes B and C). Furthermore, strains of serotypes A, D, and B or C could be distinguished from each other by specific PCR fingerprint patterns. These primers, which also successfully amplified hypervariable DNA segments from other species, provide a convenient method of identification at the species or individual level. Amplification of polymorphic DNA patterns by PCR with these primers offers several advantages over classical DNA fingerprinting techniques, appears to be more reliable than other PCR-based methods for detecting polymorphic DNA, such as analysis of random-amplified polymorphic DNA, and should be applicable to many other organisms. Images PMID:8408543

  19. Polymerase chain reaction detection of Leishmania DNA in skin biopsy samples in Sri Lanka where the causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis is Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Shalindra; Wickremasinghe, Renu; Hulangamuwa, Sanjeeva; Sirimanna, Ganga; Opathella, Nandimithra; Maingon, Rhaiza D C; Chandrasekharan, Vishvanath

    2015-12-01

    Leishmania donovani is the known causative agent of both cutaneous (CL) and visceral leishmaniasis in Sri Lanka. CL is considered to be under-reported partly due to relatively poor sensitivity and specificity of microscopic diagnosis. We compared robustness of three previously described polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods to detect Leishmania DNA in 38 punch biopsy samples from patients presented with suspected lesions in 2010. Both, Leishmania genus-specific JW11/JW12 KDNA and LITSR/L5.8S internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 PCR assays detected 92% (35/38) of the samples whereas a KDNA assay specific forL. donovani (LdF/LdR) detected only 71% (27/38) of samples. All positive samples showed a L. donovani banding pattern upon HaeIII ITS1 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. PCR assay specificity was evaluated in samples containing Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, and human DNA, and there was no cross-amplification in JW11/JW12 and LITSR/L5.8S PCR assays. The LdF/LdR PCR assay did not amplify M. leprae or human DNA although 500 bp and 700 bp bands were observed in M. tuberculosis samples. In conclusion, it was successfully shown in this study that it is possible to diagnose Sri Lankan CL with high accuracy, to genus and species identification, using Leishmania DNA PCR assays. PMID:26676321

  20. Molecular characterization of Leptospira sp. strains isolated from human subjects in São Paulo, Brazil using a polymerase chain reaction-based assay: a public health tool.

    PubMed

    Romero, Eliete C; Yasuda, Paulo H

    2006-06-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay which amplifies repetitive DNA elements present within bacterial genomes was used to characterize and differentiate Leptospira sp. Thirty-five strains from a reference culture collection and 18 clinical isolates which had been previously analyzed by cross agglutinin absorption test (CAAT) were evaluated by this technique. PCR results from analysis of the reference culture collection showed no bands corresponding to serogroups Australis, Autumnalis, Bataviae, Celledoni, Cynopteri, Djasiman, Panama, Pomona, Pyrogenes, and Tarassovi. However, the PCR method was able to clearly discriminate the serogroups Andamana, Ballum, Canicola, Grippotyphosa, Hebdomadis, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Javanica, Sejroe, Semaranga, and Shermani. Clinical isolates previously characterized by CAAT as serovar Copenhageni, serovar Castellonis, and as serovar Canicola were in agreement with PCR results. The clinical isolate previously characterized as serovar Pomona was not differentiated by PCR. Forty additional clinical isolates from patients with leptospirosis obtained in São Paulo, Brazil were also evaluated by this PCR method. Thirty-nine of these were determined to belong to serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae (97.5%) and one to serogroup Sejroe (2.5%). These results demonstrate that the PCR method described in this study has utility for rapid typing of Leptospira sp. at the serogroup level and can be used in epidemiological survey. PMID:16951806

  1. Detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA by polymerase chain reaction in the blood of individuals, eight years after completion of anti-leprosy therapy.

    PubMed

    Santos, A R; Balassiano, V; Oliveira, M L; Pereira, M A; Santos, P B; Degrave, W M; Suffys, P N

    2001-11-01

    Thirty eight patients with indeterminate leprosy (HI), at least 4 to 6 years after discharge from multibacillary (MB) or paucibacillary (PB) schemes of anti leprosy multidrug therapy (MDT), were submitted to traditional diagnostic procedures for leprosy and to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of different clinical samples for detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA. No significant difference was observed for any of the parameters analyzed between PB or MB schemes of treatment and no indications were found for more efficient outcome of HI using the MB scheme. Remarkably, 18 (54.5%) of the individuals were PCR positive in at least one of the samples: positivity of PCR was highest in blood samples and four individuals were PCR positive in blood and some other sample. Upon comparison of PCR results with clinical and histopathological parameters, no correlation was found between PCR-positivity and eventual relapse. This is the first report on detection of M. leprae DNA in PB patients, more than half a decade after completion of MDT, suggesting that live bacilli are present and circulating much longer than expected, although reinfection of the individuals can not be excluded. Overall, we feel that because of the high sensitivity of the assay, extreme care should be taken about association of PCR results, efficacy of treatment and disease status. PMID:11784934

  2. Polymerase chain reaction detection of Leishmania DNA in skin biopsy samples in Sri Lanka where the causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis is Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Ranasinghe, Shalindra; Wickremasinghe, Renu; Hulangamuwa, Sanjeeva; Sirimanna, Ganga; Opathella, Nandimithra; Maingon, Rhaiza DC; Chandrasekharan, Vishvanath

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania donovani is the known causative agent of both cutaneous (CL) and visceral leishmaniasis in Sri Lanka. CL is considered to be under-reported partly due to relatively poor sensitivity and specificity of microscopic diagnosis. We compared robustness of three previously described polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods to detectLeishmania DNA in 38 punch biopsy samples from patients presented with suspected lesions in 2010. Both, Leishmaniagenus-specific JW11/JW12 KDNA and LITSR/L5.8S internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 PCR assays detected 92% (35/38) of the samples whereas a KDNA assay specific forL. donovani (LdF/LdR) detected only 71% (27/38) of samples. All positive samples showed a L. donovani banding pattern upon HaeIII ITS1 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. PCR assay specificity was evaluated in samples containing Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, and human DNA, and there was no cross-amplification in JW11/JW12 and LITSR/L5.8S PCR assays. The LdF/LdR PCR assay did not amplify M. leprae or human DNA although 500 bp and 700 bp bands were observed in M. tuberculosis samples. In conclusion, it was successfully shown in this study that it is possible to diagnose Sri Lankan CL with high accuracy, to genus and species identification, using Leishmania DNA PCR assays. PMID:26676321

  3. Segmented continuous-flow multiplex polymerase chain reaction microfluidics for high-throughput and rapid foodborne pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Shu, Bowen; Zhang, Chunsun; Xing, Da

    2014-05-15

    High-throughput and rapid identification of multiple foodborne bacterial pathogens is vital in global public health and food industry. To fulfill this need, we propose a segmented continuous-flow multiplex polymerase chain reaction (SCF-MPCR) on a spiral-channel microfluidic device. The device consists of a disposable polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) capillary microchannel coiled on three isothermal blocks. Within the channel, n segmented flow regimes are sequentially generated, and m-plex PCR is individually performed in each regime when each mixture is driven to pass three temperature zones, thus providing a rapid analysis throughput of m×n. To characterize the performance of the microfluidic device, continuous-flow multiplex PCR in a single segmented flow has been evaluated by investigating the effect of key reaction parameters, including annealing temperatures, flow rates, polymerase concentration and amount of input DNA. With the optimized parameters, the genomic DNAs from Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus could be amplified simultaneously in 19min, and the limit of detection was low, down to 10(2) copiesμL(-1). As proof of principle, the spiral-channel SCF-MPCR was applied to sequentially amplify four different bacterial pathogens from banana, milk, and sausage, displaying a throughput of 4×3 with no detectable cross-contamination. PMID:24793853

  4. Development of 1480 nm Photothermal High-Speed Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction System for Rapid Nucleotide Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terazono, Hideyuki; Hattori, Akihiro; Takei, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Kazuo; Yasuda, Kenji

    2008-06-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a key technology used in genome-based biological analysis; however, requests have been made to shorten the operation time for emergency tests such as medical diagnostics, and countermeasures against bioterrorism. We have developed a novel rapid real-time PCR system using the direct absorption of an IR laser beam by water droplets as the heating device. The advantage of this system is that only the target water droplet was heated photothermally without transmitting any heat to the surroundings, which is important for the production of fast thermal cycle intervals. The system consists of a fluorescent microscope, an oil chamber with a set of water droplets lined up at the bottom, a 1480 nm IR laser unit, which is absorbed by water and can be focused on the droplets on the stage of the microscope, and an image intensifier to quantify the PCR reaction within a water droplet by measuring the change of fluorescent intensity. Using the system, we examined the PCR procedure under the following conditions: initial heating to 95 °C, maintaining this temperature for 10 s, and the suggested here and in similar places throughout 50 cycles of 1 s at 95 °C for denaturation and 3 s at 60 °C for annealing/extension. The temperature increase and decrease between the two temperatures 95 and 60 °C, were within 1 and 0.8 s respectively, i.e., 32 K/s, which is 1.5 times faster than the conventional heat conduction-based system. Rapid PCR amplification was observed successfully by the rise change in the sigmoidal curvature of fluorescent intensity, and the procedure was accomplished within 3.5 min, including the initial heating and complete 50 PCR cycles. The results indicate that the direct absorption-based heating of water droplets photothermally could give us a faster temperature chnage than the conventional heat-conduction-based systems such as Peltier heating/cooling.

  5. Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Novel Technique for Rapid, Sensitive and Quantitative Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Li, Machao; Luo, Lijuan; Liu, Dongxin; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Hu, Shoukui; Jin, Dong; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    The article reported a novel methodology for real-time PCR analysis of nucleic acids, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time polymerase chain reaction (ET-PCR). Just like PCR, ET-PCR only required one pair of primers. A short sequence, which was recognized by restriction enzyme BstUI, was attached to the 5′ end of the forward (F) or reverse (R) PCR primer, and the new F or R primer was named EF or ER. EF/ER was labeled at the 5′ end with a reporter dye and in the middle with a quenching dye. BstUI cleaves the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5′ end recognition sequences and their complementary sequences) during the extension phase, which separates the reporter molecule from the quenching dye, leading to a gain of fluorescence signal. This process is repeated in each amplification cycle and unaffected the exponential synthesis of the PCR amplification. ET-PCR allowed real-time analysis of single or multiple targets in a single vessel, and provided the reproducible quantitation of nucleic acids. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of ET-PCR were successfully evaluated, detecting down to 250 fg of genomic DNA per tube of target pathogen DNA examined, and the positive results were generated in a relatively short period. Moreover, the practical application of ET-PCR for simultaneous detection of multiple target pathogens was also demonstrated in artificially contaminated blood samples. In conclusion, due to the technique’s simplicity of design, reproducible data and low contamination risk, ET-PCR assay is an appealing alternative to conventional approaches currently used for real-time nucleic acid analysis. PMID:27468284

  6. Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Novel Technique for Rapid, Sensitive and Quantitative Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Li, Machao; Luo, Lijuan; Liu, Dongxin; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Hu, Shoukui; Jin, Dong; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    The article reported a novel methodology for real-time PCR analysis of nucleic acids, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time polymerase chain reaction (ET-PCR). Just like PCR, ET-PCR only required one pair of primers. A short sequence, which was recognized by restriction enzyme BstUI, was attached to the 5' end of the forward (F) or reverse (R) PCR primer, and the new F or R primer was named EF or ER. EF/ER was labeled at the 5' end with a reporter dye and in the middle with a quenching dye. BstUI cleaves the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5' end recognition sequences and their complementary sequences) during the extension phase, which separates the reporter molecule from the quenching dye, leading to a gain of fluorescence signal. This process is repeated in each amplification cycle and unaffected the exponential synthesis of the PCR amplification. ET-PCR allowed real-time analysis of single or multiple targets in a single vessel, and provided the reproducible quantitation of nucleic acids. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of ET-PCR were successfully evaluated, detecting down to 250 fg of genomic DNA per tube of target pathogen DNA examined, and the positive results were generated in a relatively short period. Moreover, the practical application of ET-PCR for simultaneous detection of multiple target pathogens was also demonstrated in artificially contaminated blood samples. In conclusion, due to the technique's simplicity of design, reproducible data and low contamination risk, ET-PCR assay is an appealing alternative to conventional approaches currently used for real-time nucleic acid analysis. PMID:27468284

  7. Polymerase chain reaction-free detection of hepatitis B virus DNA using a nanostructured impedance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Cheng; Lai, Zi-Lun; Wang, Gou-Jen; Wu, Chun-Ying

    2016-03-15

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-free technique for the effective detection of genomic length hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA is described in this study. The honeycomb-like barrier layer of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) film having a uniform nanohemisphere array was used as the substrate of the sensing electrode. A 30-nm gold film was sputtered onto the AAO barrier layer surface as the electrode, followed by electrochemical deposition of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on the hemisphere surface. A specially designed single-strand 96-mer gene fragment of the target genomic DNA of HBV based on the genome sequences of HBV was immobilized on the nanostructured electrode as the capture probe. Target HBV DNA obtained from clinical samples was hybridized to the sensing probes. Detection results illustrate two dynamic linear ranges, 10(2)-10(3) and 10(3)-10(5.1) copies/mL, having R(2) values of 0.801 and 0.996 could be obtained, respectively. The detection limit of the proposed sending scheme was measured to be 111 copies/mL. The total of 45 target samples, including 20 samples with HBV concentration being lower than 10(2) copies/mL and 25 samples with HBV concentration being in the range of 10(3)-10(5.1) copies/mL, were used for real test. The concentration of these 45 HBV DNA samples was measured by the COBAS Ampliprep system. Comparing the measured results of the COBAS Ampliprep and our system, it was illustrated that the HBV DNA concentrations measured by the proposed method in this study had a high linear correlation with the COBAS Ampliprep, having R(2) values of 0.983. The proposed sensing scheme is highly feasible for future clinical applications. PMID:26479905

  8. Genetic relationships among Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) populations from Argentina using random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction markers.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, G B; Blanco, A; Gardenal, C N

    2001-05-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) polymorphism was analyzed in five Aedes aegypti (L.) populations from Argentina and one from Puerto Rico to estimate levels of intraspecific polymorphism and genetic relatedness. Allele frequencies were estimated assuming that RAPD products segregate as dominants and that genotype frequencies at those loci are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Mean expected heterozygosity (He) was 0.350; F(ST) values were significant at all loci except one, supporting the usefulness of the fragments used here to discriminate among populations. Rogers' genetic similarity between samples ranged from 0.806 to 0.621. The population from Puerto Rico was the most different from the Argentina populations. Considering that Ae. aegypti eggs, larvae, and pupae can be transported easily, relationships among the Argentinian populations may reflect the routes and intensity of commercial transit. PMID:11372960

  9. A new measurement approach of ionizing radiation in irradiated trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by Randomly Polymorphic DNA-Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Şakalar, Ergün; Mol, Sühendan

    2016-05-01

    Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were irradiated at doses of 0.250, 0.500, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 kGy in gamma cell. DNAs were extracted from the irradiated samples before and after storage. 1ERP primers were designed, and RAPD-PCR (Randomly Polymorphic DNA-Polymerase Chain Reaction) was applied to make randomly amplifications on the DNA of the irradiated samples. Agarose gel profiles of irradiated fish were obtained to determine change of band profiles. In addition, DNA fragmentation occurring in each dose was determined by comet assay for the verification of methodology developed in this study. The molecular methodology was developed to estimate ionizing radiation (IR) level in irradiated fish. This methodology allows the analysis of the trout irradiated up to the dose limit of around 0.5 kGy and stored for a period of three months. PMID:27407216

  10. DCHAIN: A user-friendly computer program for radioactive decay and reaction chain calculations

    SciTech Connect

    East, L.V.

    1994-05-01

    A computer program for calculating the time-dependent daughter populations in radioactive decay and nuclear reaction chains is described. Chain members can have non-zero initial populations and be produced from the preceding chain member as the result of radioactive decay, a nuclear reaction, or both. As presently implemented, chains can contain up to 15 members. Program input can be supplied interactively or read from ASCII data files. Time units for half-lives, etc. can be specified during data entry. Input values are verified and can be modified if necessary, before used in calculations. Output results can be saved in ASCII files in a format suitable for including in reports or other documents. The calculational method, described in some detail, utilizes a generalized form of the Bateman equations. The program is written in the C language in conformance with current ANSI standards and can be used on multiple hardware platforms.

  11. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay. PMID:26879193

  12. Detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA from Archaeological Skeletal Remains in Japan Using Whole Genome Amplification and Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Koichi; Takigawa, Wataru; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Ishido, Yuko; Kawashima, Akira; Wu, Huhehasi; Akama, Takeshi; Sue, Mariko; Yoshihara, Aya; Mori, Shuichi; Ishii, Norihisa

    2010-01-01

    Background Identification of pathogen DNA from archaeological human remains is a powerful tool in demonstrating that the infectious disease existed in the past. However, it is very difficult to detect trace amounts of DNA remnants attached to the human skeleton, especially from those buried in a humid atmosphere with a relatively high environmental temperature such as in Asia. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we demonstrate Mycobacterium leprae DNA from archaeological skeletal remains in Japan by polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. In addition, we have established a highly sensitive method of detecting DNA using a combination of whole genome amplification and polymerase chain reaction, or WGA-PCR, which provides superior sensitivity and specificity in detecting DNA from trace amounts of skeletal materials. Conclusion/Significance We have detected M. leprae DNA in archaeological skeletal remains for the first time in the Far East. Its SNP genotype corresponded to type 1; the first detected case worldwide of ancient M. leprae DNA. We also developed a highly sensitive method to detect ancient DNA by utilizing whole genome amplification. PMID:20865042

  13. [Detection of the eggs of Echinococcus multilocularis Leuckart, 1863, in the feces of the fox (Vulpes vulpes Linnaeus, 1758) by the polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Bretagne, S; Guillou, J P; Morand, M; Houin, R

    1992-12-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was applied to the identification of eggs of Echinococcus multilocularis in faeces from foxes. The test was positive in three of six faeces samples from foxes which were harbouring adult worms, and in one of four samples from foxes in which no adult E. multilocularis was found in the intestines. These initial results show that it is possible to use PCR to identify E. multilocularis eggs in faeces. PCR can be used to complement examination of intestinal contents, showing that the distribution of eggs in faeces is uneven. The sensitivity of the test was estimated to be 50 eggs in 5 g of faeces. Further work is needed to confirm these initial results before the test can be used more widely. PMID:1305852

  14. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus by a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Dong, X Y; Li, W H; Zhu, J L; Liu, W J; Zhao, M Q; Luo, Y W; Chen, J D

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of canine distemper (CD) which is a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. In the present study, a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of CDV. Four primers were designed to detect and discriminate the two viruses by generating 638- and 781-bp cDNA products, respectively. Furthermore, the duplex RT-PCR method was used to detect 67 field samples suspected of CD from Guangdong province in China. Results showed that, 33 samples were to be wild-type-like. The duplex RT-PCR method exhibited high specificity and sensitivity which could be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type and vaccine CDV, indicating its use for clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. PMID:27175171

  15. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus by a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Dong, X. Y.; Li, W. H.; Zhu, J. L.; Liu, W. J.; Zhao, M. Q.; Luo, Y. W.; Chen, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of canine distemper (CD) which is a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. In the present study, a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of CDV. Four primers were designed to detect and discriminate the two viruses by generating 638- and 781-bp cDNA products, respectively. Furthermore, the duplex RT-PCR method was used to detect 67 field samples suspected of CD from Guangdong province in China. Results showed that, 33 samples were to be wild-type-like. The duplex RT-PCR method exhibited high specificity and sensitivity which could be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type and vaccine CDV, indicating its use for clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. PMID:27175171

  16. Method of carbon chain extension using novel aldol reaction

    DOEpatents

    Silks, Louis A; Gordon, John C; Wu, Ruilan; Hangson, Susan Kloek

    2013-08-13

    Method of producing C.sub.8-C.sub.15 hydrocarbons comprising providing a ketone starting material; providing an aldol starting material comprising hydroxymethylfurfural; mixing the ketone starting material and the aldol starting material in a reaction in the presence of a proline-containing catalyst selected from the group consisting of Zn(Pro).sub.2, Yb(Pro).sub.2, and combinations thereof, or a catalyst having one of the structures (I), (II) or (III), and in the presence of a solvent, wherein the solvent comprises water and is substantially free of organic solvents, where (I), (II) and (III) respectively are: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1 is a C.sub.1-C.sub.6 alkyl moiety, X=(OH) and n=2. ##STR00002## In (III), X may be CH.sub.2, sulfur or selenium, M may be Zn, Mg, or a lanthanide, and R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently may be a methyl, ethyl, phenyl moiety.

  17. Method of carbon chain extension using novel aldol reaction

    DOEpatents

    Silks, Louis A; Gordon, John C; Wu, Ruilan; Hanson, Susan Kloek

    2013-07-30

    Method of producing C.sub.8-C.sub.15 hydrocarbons. comprising providing a ketone starting material; providing an aldol starting material comprising chloromethylfurfural; mixing the ketone starting material and the aldol starting material in a reaction in the presence of a proline-containing catalyst selected from the group consisting of Zn(Pro).sub.2, Yb(Pro).sub.3, and combinations thereof, or a catalyst having one of the structures (I), (II) or (III), and in the presence of a solvent, wherein the solvent comprises water and is substantially free of organic solvents, where (I), (II) and (III) respectively are: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1 is a C.sub.1-C.sub.6 alkyl moiety, X=(OH) and n=2. ##STR00002## In (III), X may be CH.sub.2, sulfur or selenium, M may be Zn, Mg, or a lanthanide, and R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently may be a methyl, ethyl, phenyl moiety.

  18. Prenatal detection of trisomy 21 and 18 from amniotic fluid by quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, T; Findlay, I; Papp, C; Tóth-Pál, E; Marton, T; Nagy, B; Quirke, P; Papp, Z

    1998-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of fetal trisomies is usually performed by cytogenetic analysis on amniotic fluid. This requires lengthy laboratory procedures and high costs, and is unsuitable for large scale screening of pregnant women. An alternative method, which is both rapid and inexpensive and suitable for diagnosing trisomies even from single fetal cells, is the fluorescent polymerase chain reaction using polymorphic small tandem repeats (STRs). In this paper we present the preliminary results of a larger study comparing parallel prenatal diagnoses of trisomies 21 and 18 using cytogenetics with quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction using STR markers. The results obtained by the two techniques were concordant in all cases. This is the first study reporting significant numbers of prenatal diagnoses using the quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction. We believe that further studies on greater numbers of samples will determine the absolute reliability of this technique. These results also provide a model for diagnosis of trisomy from single fetal cells isolated from maternal blood. PMID:9507392

  19. Pseudogenes as Weaknesses of ACTB (Actb) and GAPDH (Gapdh) Used as Reference Genes in Reverse Transcription and Polymerase Chain Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuan; Li, Yan; Luo, Dianzhong; Liao, D. Joshua

    2012-01-01

    The genes encoding β-actin (ACTB in human or Actb in mouse) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH in human or Gapdh in mouse) are the two most commonly used references for sample normalization in determination of the mRNA level of interested genes by reverse transcription (RT) and ensuing polymerase chain reactions (PCR). In this study, bioinformatic analyses revealed that the ACTB, Actb, GAPDH and Gapdh had 64, 69, 67 and 197 pseudogenes (PGs), respectively, in the corresponding genome. Most of these PGs are intronless and similar in size to the authentic mRNA. Alignment of several PGs of these genes with the corresponding mRNA reveals that they are highly homologous. In contrast, the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-1 gene (HPRT1 in human or Hprt in mouse) only had 3 or 1 PG, respectively, and the mRNA has unique regions for primer design. PCR with cDNA or genomic DNA (gDNA) as templates revealed that our HPRT1, Hprt and GAPDH primers were specific, whereas our ACTB and Actb primers were not specific enough both vertically (within the cDNA) and horizontally (compared cDNA with gDNA). No primers could be designed for the Gapdh that would not mis-prime PGs. Since most of the genome is transcribed, we suggest to peers to forgo ACTB (Actb) and GAPDH (Dapdh) as references in RT-PCR and, if there is no surrogate, to use our primers with extra caution. We also propose a standard operation procedure in which design of primers for RT-PCR starts from avoiding mis-priming PGs and all primers need be tested for specificity with both cDNA and gDNA. PMID:22927912

  20. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical samples by using polymerase chain reaction and a nonradioactive detection system.

    PubMed Central

    Kolk, A H; Schuitema, A R; Kuijper, S; van Leeuwen, J; Hermans, P W; van Embden, J D; Hartskeerl, R A

    1992-01-01

    A test based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in clinical samples. In this test, a 245-bp sequence of the insertion element IS986 was amplified and detected by agarose gel electrophoresis in the presence of ethidium bromide and by Southern blot and dot blot hybridization by using a 188-bp digoxigenin-labeled probe. We tested clinical specimens from 227 patients suspected of having tuberculosis. These included 102 cerebrospinal fluid, 48 sputum, 18 pleural fluid, 5 bronchoalveolar lavage, 18 blood, 7 pus, 8 bone marrow, and 6 urine samples and 15 tissue biopsy specimens. We also tested sputum samples from 75 patients with diseases other than tuberculosis. Sputum samples were first decontaminated, and all samples were treated with proteinase K-detergent solution to extract the DNA. Part of each sample was spiked with M. tuberculosis to provide a semiquantitative assay and to control for the loss of mycobacteria or interference with the PCR which may cause false-negative results. One femtogram of M. tuberculosis DNA could be detected. PCR was positive for all 32 culture-positive (for M. tuberculosis) and Ziehl-Neelsen staining (ZN)-positive samples, 10 of 12 culture-positive and ZN-negative samples, and all 4 culture-negative and ZN-positive samples. PCR detected M. tuberculosis complex bacteria in 35 of 178 culture- and ZN-negative samples. Clinical data supported the diagnosis of tuberculosis in the majority of the 35 patients from whom those samples were obtained. Images PMID:1400955

  1. Amplification and analysis of specific DNA and RNA sequences of bovine leukemia virus from infected cows by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, M P; Ehrlich, G D; Ferrer, J F; Sninsky, J J; Zandomeni, R; Dock, N L; Poiesz, B

    1992-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the etiologic agent of leukemia in cattle and is believed to cause decreases in milk productivity, fertility, and life span in infected cows. BLV is a type C retrovirus in the Oncovirinae subfamily. It is most closely related to human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) and type II (HTLV-II). Since the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provides rapid and efficient amplification of DNA sequences, primers were designed to amplify regions of the polymerase (pol) and pX genes specific for BLV targets. These sets of primers consistently amplified as few as 10 copies of BLV DNA contained in a plasmid in the background of 1 microgram of either human or bovine chromosomal DNA. In addition, no amplification products were detected from cell lines infected with HTLV-I, HTLV-II, or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 or 2 by the BLV PCR systems. Samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 18 cows, previously determined to be serologically positive or negative, were correctly identified in a blind study as containing proviral DNA by use of the BLV primers and probes. Cloning and sequencing of amplified products revealed finite sequence variations among a previously cloned BLV isolate, the wild-type virus, and the published genome. Reverse transcriptase-directed PCR with the primers for both BLV pol and BLV pX was performed on plasma from a BLV-infected cow and detected in vivo BLV RNA expression. In summary, we have developed a specific and sensitive assay using PCR for the detection and identification of BLV infections; this assay can now be applied to clinical and basic research questions in veterinary medicine. Images PMID:1370847

  2. Testing for Genetically Modified Foods Using PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ann; Sajan, Samin

    2005-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a Nobel Prize-winning technique that amplifies a specific segment of DNA and is commonly used to test for the presence of genetic modifications. Students use PCR to test corn meal and corn-muffin mixes for the presence of a promoter commonly used in genetically modified foods, the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S…

  3. Evaluation of different embryonating bird eggs and cell cultures for isolation efficiency of avian influenza A virus and avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 from real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction--positive

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two hundred samples collected from Anseriformes, Charadriiformes, Gruiformes, and Galliformes were assayed using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) for presence of avian influenza virus and avian paramyxovirus-1. Virus isolation using embryonating chicken eggs, embr...

  4. A rapid method for the detection of foodborne pathogens by extraction of a trace amount of DNA from raw milk based on label-free amino-modified silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles and polymerase chain reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method based on amino-modified silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (ASMNPs) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to rapidly and sensitively detect foodborne pathogens in raw milk. After optimizing parameters such as pH, temperature, and time, a trace amount of genomic DNA of pathogen...

  5. Characterization of full-length and polymerase chain reaction-derived partial-length Gottfried and OSU gene 4 probes for serotypic differentiation of porcine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Rosen, B I; Parwani, A V; Gorziglia, M; Larralde, G; Saif, L J

    1992-10-01

    To determine the VP4 (P type) specificity of porcine rotaviruses, full- and partial-length gene 4 probes were produced from cloned Gottfried and OSU porcine rotavirus genomic segment 4 cDNAs. The gene 4 segments from the prototype Gottfried (VP7 serotype 4) and OSU (VP7 serotype 5) porcine rotavirus strains were selected for study because of their distinct P types and the occurrence of rotaviruses with similar serotypes among swine. Partial-length gene 4 cDNAs were produced and amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and encompassed portions of the variable region (nucleotides 211 to 612) of VP8 encoded by genomic segment 4. The hybridization stringency conditions necessary for optimal probe specificity and sensitivity were determined by dot or Northern (RNA) blot hybridizations against a diverse group of human and animal rotaviruses of heterologous group A serotypes and against representative group B and C porcine rotaviruses. The PCR-derived gene 4 probes were more specific than the full-length gene 4 probes but demonstrated equivalent sensitivity. The Gottfried PCR-derived probe hybridized with Gottfried, SB2, SB3, and SB5 G serotype 4 porcine rotaviruses. The OSU PCR-derived probe hybridized with OSU, EE, A580, and SB-1A porcine rotaviruses and equine H1 rotavirus. Results of the hybridization reactions of the PCR-derived gene 4 probes with selected porcine rotavirus strains agreed with previous serological or genetic analyses, indicating their suitability as diagnostic reagents. PMID:1328281

  6. Disposable on-chip microfluidic system for buccal cell lysis, DNA purification, and polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Cho, Woong; Maeng, Joon-Ho; Ahn, Yoomin; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports the development of a disposable, integrated biochip for DNA sample preparation and PCR. The hybrid biochip (25 × 45 mm) is composed of a disposable PDMS layer with a microchannel chamber and reusable glass substrate integrated with a microheater and thermal microsensor. Lysis, purification, and PCR can be performed sequentially on this microfluidic device. Cell lysis is achieved by heat and purification is performed by mechanical filtration. Passive check valves are integrated to enable sample preparation and PCR in a fixed sequence. Reactor temperature is needed to lysis and PCR reaction is controlled within ±1°C by PID controller of LabVIEW software. Buccal epithelial cell lysis, DNA purification, and SY158 gene PCR amplification were successfully performed on this novel chip. Our experiments confirm that the entire process, except the off-chip gel electrophoresis, requires only approximately 1 h for completion. This disposable microfluidic chip for sample preparation and PCR can be easily united with other technologies to realize a fully integrated DNA chip. PMID:23784986

  7. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). 147.31 Section... Examination Procedures § 147.31 Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction... lp gene. (c) MGLP ReTi. Primers and probe should be utilized in a 25 µl reaction containing 12.5...

  8. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). 147.31 Section... Examination Procedures § 147.31 Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction... lp gene. (c) MGLP ReTi. Primers and probe should be utilized in a 25 µl reaction containing 12.5...

  9. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). 147.31 Section... Examination Procedures § 147.31 Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction... lp gene. (c) MGLP ReTi. Primers and probe should be utilized in a 25 µl reaction containing 12.5...

  10. Analysis of liver connexin expression using reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michaël; Willebrords, Joost; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although connexin production is mainly regulated at the protein level, altered connexin gene expression has been identified as the underlying mechanism of several pathologies. When studying the latter, appropriate methods to quantify connexin mRNA levels are required. The present chapter describes a well-established reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction procedure optimized for analysis of hepatic connexins. The method includes RNA extraction and subsequent quantification, generation of complementary DNA, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and data analysis. PMID:27207283

  11. Analysis of Liver Connexin Expression Using Reverse Transcription Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; Willebrords, Joost; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Although connexin production is mainly regulated at the protein level, altered connexin gene expression has been identified as the underlying mechanism of several pathologies. When studying the latter, appropriate methods to quantify connexin RNA levels are required. The present chapter describes a well-established reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction procedure optimized for analysis of hepatic connexins. The method includes RNA extraction and subsequent quantification, generation of complementary DNA, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and data analysis. PMID:27207283

  12. Polymerase Chain Reaction/Rapid Methods Are Gaining a Foothold in Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Ragheb, Suzan Mohammed; Jimenez, Luis

    Detection of microbial contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials and finished products is a critical factor to guarantee their safety, stability, and potency. Rapid microbiological methods-such as polymerase chain reaction-have been widely applied to clinical and food quality control analysis. However, polymerase chain reaction applications to pharmaceutical quality control have been rather slow and sporadic. Successful implementation of these methods in pharmaceutical companies in developing countries requires important considerations to provide sensitive and robust assays that will comply with good manufacturing practices. PMID:25188346

  13. Application of real-time polymerase chain reaction in the clinical genetic practice

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Bálint

    2013-01-01

    The development of polymerase chain reaction revolutionized the molecular genetics and diagnostics. Technical improvements helped to make more specific and sensitive target determinations. Introduction of real-time polymerase chain reaction makes possible several applications in clinical genetics like detection of gene mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms, deletions, measurement of gene expressions, micro ribonucleic acids, free nucleic acids and microbial genomes. Here I discuss a few examples for specific applications in prenatal clinical genetic practice. These are the detection of microbial genomes, deletions, trisomies, mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms and free nucleic acids.

  14. Double Gene Targeting Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Assay Discriminates Beef, Buffalo, and Pork Substitution in Frankfurter Products.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M A Motalib; Ali, Md Eaqub; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee; Asing; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Mohd Desa, Mohd Nasir; Zaidul, I S M

    2016-08-17

    Beef, buffalo, and pork adulteration in the food chain is an emerging and sensitive issue. Current molecular techniques to authenticate these species depend on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays involving long and single targets which break down under natural decomposition and/or processing treatments. This novel multiplex polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay targeted two different gene sites for each of the bovine, buffalo, and porcine materials. This authentication ensured better security, first through a complementation approach because it is highly unlikely that both sites will be missing under compromised states, and second through molecular fingerprints. Mitochondrial cytochrome b and ND5 genes were targeted, and all targets (73, 90, 106, 120, 138, and 146 bp) were stable under extreme boiling and autoclaving treatments. Target specificity and authenticity were ensured through cross-amplification reaction and restriction digestion of PCR products with AluI, EciI, FatI, and CviKI-1 enzymes. A survey of Malaysian frankfurter products revealed rampant substitution of beef with buffalo but purity in porcine materials. PMID:27501408