Science.gov

Sample records for chalk river nuclear labs

  1. Radiochemistry Lab Decommissioning and Dismantlement. AECL, Chalk River Labs, Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, Stephen

    2008-01-15

    Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) was originally founded in the mid 1940's to perform research in radiation and nuclear areas under the Canadian Defense Department. In the mid 50's The Canadian government embarked on several research and development programs for the development of the Candu Reactor. AECL was initially built as a temporary site and is now faced with many redundant buildings. Prior to 2004 small amounts of Decommissioning work was in progress. Many reasons for deferring decommissioning activities were used with the predominant ones being: 1. Reduction in radiation doses to workers during the final dismantlement, 2. Development of a long-term solution for the management of radioactive wastes in Canada, 3. Financial constraints presented by the number of facilities shutdown that would require decommissioning funds and the absence of an approved funding strategy. This has led to the development of a comprehensive decommissioning plan that is all inclusive of AECL's current and legacy liabilities. Canada does not have a long-term disposal site; therefore waste minimization becomes the driving factor behind decontamination for decommissioning before and during dismantlement. This decommissioning job was a great learning experience for decommissioning and the associated contractors who worked on this project. Throughout the life of the project there was a constant focus on waste minimization. This focus was constantly in conflict with regulatory compliance primarily with respect to fire regulations and protecting the facility along with adjacent facilities during the decommissioning activities. Discrepancies in historical documents forced the project to treat every space as a contaminated space until proven differently. Decommissioning and dismantlement within an operating site adds to the complexity of the tasks especially when it is being conducted in the heart of the plant. This project was very successful with no lost time accidents in over one hundred

  2. Management of Legacy Spent Nuclear Fuel Wastes at the Chalk River Laboratories: The Challenges and Innovative Solutions Implemented - 13301

    SciTech Connect

    Schruder, Kristan; Goodwin, Derek

    2013-07-01

    AECL's Fuel Packaging and Storage (FPS) Project was initiated in 2004 to retrieve, transfer, and stabilize an identified inventory of degraded research reactor fuel that had been emplaced within in-ground 'Tile Hole' structures in Chalk River Laboratories' Waste Management Area in the 1950's and 60's. Ongoing monitoring of the legacy fuel storage conditions had identified that moisture present in the storage structures had contributed to corrosion of both the fuel and the storage containers. This prompted the initiation of the FPS Project which has as its objective to design, construct, and commission equipment and systems that would allow for the ongoing safe storage of this fuel until a final long-term management, or disposition, pathway was available. The FPS Project provides systems and technologies to retrieve and transfer the fuel from the Waste Management Area to a new facility that will repackage, dry, safely store and monitor the fuel for a period of 50 years. All equipment and the new storage facility are designed and constructed to meet the requirements for Class 1 Nuclear Facilities in Canada. (authors)

  3. Fifty years of accelerator based physics at Chalk River

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, John W.

    1999-04-26

    The Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. was a major centre for Accelerator based physics for the last fifty years. As early as 1946, nuclear structure studies were started on Cockroft-Walton accelerators. A series of accelerators followed, including the world's first Tandem, and the MP Tandem, Superconducting Cyclotron (TASCC) facility that was opened in 1986. The nuclear physics program was shut down in 1996. This paper will describe some of the highlights of the accelerators and the research of the laboratory.

  4. Risk-based Prioritization of Facility Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration Projects in the National Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program at the Chalk River Laboratory - 13564

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Jerel G.; Kruzic, Michael; Castillo, Carlos; Pavey, Todd; Alexan, Tamer; Bainbridge, Ian

    2013-07-01

    Chalk River Laboratory (CRL), located in Ontario Canada, has a large number of remediation projects currently in the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), including hundreds of facility decommissioning projects and over one hundred environmental remediation projects, all to be executed over the next 70 years. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) utilized WorleyParsons to prioritize the NLLP projects at the CRL through a risk-based prioritization and ranking process, using the WorleyParsons Sequencing Unit Prioritization and Estimating Risk Model (SUPERmodel). The prioritization project made use of the SUPERmodel which has been previously used for other large-scale site prioritization and sequencing of facilities at nuclear laboratories in the United States. The process included development and vetting of risk parameter matrices as well as confirmation/validation of project risks. Detailed sensitivity studies were also conducted to understand the impacts that risk parameter weighting and scoring had on prioritization. The repeatable prioritization process yielded an objective, risk-based and technically defendable process for prioritization that gained concurrence from all stakeholders, including Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) who is responsible for the oversight of the NLLP. (authors)

  5. Isotope hydrology of the Chalk River Laboratories site, Ontario, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Zell; Neymark, Leonid; King-Sharp, K.J.; Gascoyne, Mel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of hydrochemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater (fracture water) and porewater, and physical property and water content measurements of bedrock core at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site in Ontario. Density and water contents were determined and water-loss porosity values were calculated for core samples. Average and standard deviations of density and water-loss porosity of 50 core samples from four boreholes are 2.73 ± 12 g/cc and 1.32 ± 1.24 percent. Respective median values are 2.68 and 0.83 indicating a positive skewness in the distributions. Groundwater samples from four deep boreholes were analyzed for strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and uranium (234U/238U) isotope ratios. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope analyses and selected solute concentrations determined by CRL are included for comparison. Groundwater from borehole CRG-1 in a zone between approximately +60 and −240 m elevation is relatively depleted in δ18O and δ2H perhaps reflecting a slug of water recharged during colder climatic conditions. Porewater was extracted from core samples by centrifugation and analyzed for major dissolved ions and for strontium and uranium isotopes. On average, the extracted water contains 15 times larger concentration of solutes than the groundwater. 234U/238U and correlation of 87Sr/86Sr with Rb/Sr values indicate that the porewater may be substantially older than the groundwater. Results of this study show that the Precambrian gneisses at Chalk River are similar in physical properties and hydrochemical aspects to crystalline rocks being considered for the construction of nuclear waste repositories in other regions.

  6. Widespread methanotrophic primary production in lowland chalk rivers.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Felicity; Grey, Jonathan; Trimmer, Mark

    2014-05-22

    Methane is oversaturated relative to the atmosphere in many rivers, yet its cycling and fate is poorly understood. While photosynthesis is the dominant source of autotrophic carbon to rivers, chemosynthesis and particularly methane oxidation could provide alternative sources of primary production where the riverbed is heavily shaded or at depth beneath the sediment surface. Here, we highlight geographically widespread methanotrophic carbon fixation within the gravel riverbeds of over 30 chalk rivers. In 15 of these, the potential for methane oxidation (methanotrophy) was also compared with photosynthesis. In addition, we performed detailed concurrent measurements of photosynthesis and methanotrophy in one large chalk river over a complete annual cycle, where we found methanotrophy to be active to at least 15 cm into the riverbed and to be strongly substrate limited. The seasonal trend in methanotrophic activity reflected that of the riverine methane concentrations, and thus the highest rates were measured in mid-summer. At the sediment surface, photosynthesis was limited by light for most of the year with heavy shading induced by dense beds of aquatic macrophytes. Across 15 rivers, in late summer, we conservatively calculated that net methanotrophy was equivalent to between 1% and 46% of benthic net photosynthetic production within the gravel riverbed, with a median value of 4%. Hence, riverbed chemosynthesis, coupled to the oxidation of methane, is widespread and significant in English chalk rivers. PMID:24695425

  7. Widespread methanotrophic primary production in lowland chalk rivers

    PubMed Central

    Shelley, Felicity; Grey, Jonathan; Trimmer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Methane is oversaturated relative to the atmosphere in many rivers, yet its cycling and fate is poorly understood. While photosynthesis is the dominant source of autotrophic carbon to rivers, chemosynthesis and particularly methane oxidation could provide alternative sources of primary production where the riverbed is heavily shaded or at depth beneath the sediment surface. Here, we highlight geographically widespread methanotrophic carbon fixation within the gravel riverbeds of over 30 chalk rivers. In 15 of these, the potential for methane oxidation (methanotrophy) was also compared with photosynthesis. In addition, we performed detailed concurrent measurements of photosynthesis and methanotrophy in one large chalk river over a complete annual cycle, where we found methanotrophy to be active to at least 15 cm into the riverbed and to be strongly substrate limited. The seasonal trend in methanotrophic activity reflected that of the riverine methane concentrations, and thus the highest rates were measured in mid-summer. At the sediment surface, photosynthesis was limited by light for most of the year with heavy shading induced by dense beds of aquatic macrophytes. Across 15 rivers, in late summer, we conservatively calculated that net methanotrophy was equivalent to between 1% and 46% of benthic net photosynthetic production within the gravel riverbed, with a median value of 4%. Hence, riverbed chemosynthesis, coupled to the oxidation of methane, is widespread and significant in English chalk rivers. PMID:24695425

  8. An Investigation into the Transportation of Irradiated Uranium/Aluminum Targets from a Foreign Nuclear Reactor to the Chalk River Laboratories Site in Ontario, Canada - 12249

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, Malcolm; Jackson, Austin

    2012-07-01

    This investigation required the selection of a suitable cask and development of a device to hold and transport irradiated targets from a foreign nuclear reactor to the Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario, Canada. The main challenge was to design and validate a target holder to protect the irradiated HEU-Al target pencils during transit. Each of the targets was estimated to have an initial decay heat of 118 W prior to transit. As the targets have little thermal mass the potential for high temperature damage and possibly melting was high. Thus, the primary design objective was to conceive a target holder to dissipate heat from the targets. Other design requirements included securing the targets during transportation and providing a simple means to load and unload the targets while submerged five metres under water. A unique target holder (patent pending) was designed and manufactured together with special purpose experimental apparatus including a representative cask. Aluminum dummy targets were fabricated to accept cartridge heaters, to simulate decay heat. Thermocouples were used to measure the temperature of the test targets and selected areas within the target holder and test cask. After obtaining test results, calculations were performed to compensate for differences between experimental and real life conditions. Taking compensation into consideration the maximum target temperature reached was 231 deg. C which was below the designated maximum of 250 deg. C. The design of the aluminum target holder also allowed generous clearance to insert and unload the targets. This clearance was designed to close up as the target holder is placed into the cavity of the transport cask. Springs served to retain and restrain the targets from movement during transportation as well as to facilitate conductive heat transfer. The target holder met the design requirements and as such provided data supporting the feasibility of transporting targets over a relatively long period of time

  9. Progress in radiocarbon dating with the Chalk River MP tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, H.R.; Ball, G.C.; Brown, R.M.; Davies, W.G.; Imahori, Y.; Milton, J.C.D.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of a tandem accelerator /sup 14/C dating system at Chalk River is recounted. Background problems and sources of instability are discussed and solutions are described. Details of sample chemistry and source preparation are presented.

  10. Foil changer for the Chalk River superconducting cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, C.R.; Kilborn, R.I.; Mouris, J.E.; Proulx, D.R.; Weaver, J.F.

    1985-10-01

    Capture of an injected beam in the Chalk River superconducting cyclotron requires that a carbon stripping foil be accurately placed in a dee to intercept the incoming beam. Foil radial position must be precisely adjustable and foils must be easily replaced. A foil changing apparatus has been designed, built and tested to meet these requirements. The main components are a supply magazine, a transport system, and unloading and loading mechanisms. The magazine is on top of the cyclotron. It holds 300 foils and can be isolated from machine vacuum for refilling. Each foil is mounted on a stainless steel frame. A stainless steel roller chain fitted with 33 copper sleeves (shrouds) carries foils, one per shroud, down a dee stem to the midplane. A 12-bit absolute optical shaft encoder senses foil position. To replace a foil a shroud is positioned at the top of the cyclotron, a foil is removed, and another is transferred from the magazine to the empty shroud. Three stepping motors and associated electronics provide mechanical drive and are interfaced with a CAMAC control system.

  11. Contaminated groundwater characterization at the Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Schilk, A.J.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Lepel, E.A.; Champ, D.R.; Killey, R.W.D.; Young, J.L.; Cooper, E.L.

    1993-03-01

    The licensing requirements for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (10 CFR 61) specify the performance objectives and technical requisites for federal and commercial land disposal facilities, the ultimate goal of which is to contain the buried wastes so that the general population is adequately protected from harmful exposure to any released radioactive materials. A major concern in the operation of existing and projected waste disposal sites is subterranean radionuclide transport by saturated or unsaturated flow, which could lead to the contamination of groundwater systems as well as uptake by the surrounding biosphere, thereby directly exposing the general public to such materials. Radionuclide transport in groundwater has been observed at numerous commercial and federal waste disposal sites [including several locations within the waste management area of Chalk River Laboratories (CRL)], yet the physico-chemical processes that lead to such migration are still not completely understood. In an attempt to assist in the characterization of these processes, an intensive study was initiated at CRL to identify and quantify the mobile radionuclide species originating from three separate disposal sites: (a) the Chemical Pit, which has received aqueous wastes containing various radioisotopes, acids, alkalis, complexing agents and salts since 1956, (b) the Reactor Pit, which has received low-level aqueous wastes from a reactor rod storage bay since 1956, and (c) the Waste Management Area C, a thirty-year-old series of trenches that contains contaminated solid wastes from CRL and various regional medical facilities. Water samples were drawn downgradient from each of the above sites and passed through a series of filters and ion-exchange resins to retain any particulate and dissolved or colloidal radionuclide species, which were subsequently identified and quantified via radiochemical separations and gamma spectroscopy. These groundwaters were also analyzed for anions

  12. Response of invertebrates from the hyporheic zone of chalk rivers to eutrophication and land use.

    PubMed

    Pacioglu, Octavian; Moldovan, Oana Teodora

    2016-03-01

    Whereas the response of lotic benthic macroinvertebrates to different environmental stressors is a widespread practice nowadays in assessing the water and habitat quality, the use of hyporheic zone invertebrates is still in its infancy. In this study, classification and regression trees analysis were employed in order to assess the ecological requirements and the potential as bioindicators for the hyporheic zone invertebrates inhabiting four lowland chalk rivers (south England) with contrasting eutrophication levels (based on surface nitrate concentrations) and magnitude of land use (based on percentage of fine sediments load and median interstitial space). Samples of fauna, water and sediment were sampled twice, during low (summer) and high (winter) groundwater level, at depths of 20 and 35 cm. Certain groups of invertebrates (Glossosomatidae and Psychomyiidae caddisflies, and riffle beetles) proved to be good indicators of rural catchments, moderately eutrophic and with high fine sediment load. A diverse community dominated by microcrustaceans (copepods and ostracods) were found as good indicators of highly eutrophic urban streams, with moderate-high fine sediment load. However, the use of other taxonomic groups (e.g. chironomids, oligochaetes, nematodes, water mites and the amphipod Gammarus pulex), very widespread in the hyporheic zone of all sampled rivers, is of limited use because of their high tolerance to the analysed stressors. We recommend the use of certain taxonomic groups (comprising both meiofauna and macroinvertebrates) dwelling in the chalk hyporheic zone as indicators of eutrophication and colmation and, along with routine benthic sampling protocols, for a more comprehensive water and habitat quality assessment of chalk rivers. PMID:26531711

  13. Simulations of Two-Well Tracer Tests in Stratified Aquifers at the Chalk River and the Mobile Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyakorn, Peter S.; Andersen, Peter F.; Molz, Fred J.; Güven, Oktay; Melville, Joel G.

    1986-07-01

    A simulation study of two-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests in stratified granular aquifers at two widely separated sites is presented. The first site is located near the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in Canada, and the second site is located in Mobile, Alabama. Field data and test conditions at these sites are substantially different in terms of vertical distributions of hydraulic conductivity, well spacings, flow rates, test durations, and tracer travel distances. Furthermore, the test at the Chalk River site was conducted in a recirculating mode, whereas the test at the Mobile site was conducted in a nonrecirculating mode. Simulations of these tests were performed in three dimensions using the curvilinear finite element model developed in the previous paper of this series. The simulations incorporated measured vertical variations in relative hydraulic conductivity and local dispersivity values that are small fractions (between 1/1000 and 1/100) of the spacing between the injection and the withdrawal wells. The local dispersivities are used to account for local hydrodynamic dispersion and are chosen independently so that they are not affected by the scales of the tests. Simulation results obtained from the model are presented. Interpretation of these results is made in conjunction with measured breakthrough curves at the withdrawal well and multilevel observation wells. For the Chalk River site, predicted and measured breakthrough curves at the withdrawal well are in good agreement over the earlier part of the test duration. Deviation of the field data from the model prediction occurs over the second part, where the predicted breakthrough curves show a declining trend but the field data plot does not. For the Mobile site, predicted and measured breakthrough curves at the withdrawal well show similar trends throughout the entire test duration and are in good agreement overall. Model predictions of the effect of hydraulic conductivity stratification on

  14. Overview of the 1994 chronic HT release experiment at Chalk River

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.A.; Workman, W.J.G.; Amiro, B.D.; Spencer, F.S.; Noguchi, H.; Amano, H.; Ichimasa, Y.; Ichimasa, M.

    1995-10-01

    Trace amounts of tritiated hydrogen (HT) were released continuously to the atmosphere at Chalk River Laboratories over the 12-day period 1994 July 27 to August 8. Scientists from eight institutions in four countries took extensive air, soil and vegetation samples to study the dynamics of tritiated water (HTO) and organically-bound tritium (OBT) formation, and the environmental concentrations of these compounds at steady-state. The short-term HT air concentrations varied strongly in time and space over the test area, but the variation decreased rapidly as the averaging time increased. HTO concentrations in soil, vegetation and air built up gradually over time but they fluctuated substantially with ambient meteorological conditions, particularly rainfall. OBT concentrations in plants increased throughout the period. HTO concentrations were at or near steady-state at the end of the release, but OBT levels were continuing to rise. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Development of an Integrated Waste Plan for Chalk River Laboratories - 13376

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.

    2013-07-01

    To further its Strategic Planning, the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) required an effective approach to developing a fully integrated waste plan for its Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site. Production of the first Integrated Waste Plan (IWP) for Chalk River was a substantial task involving representatives from each of the major internal stakeholders. Since then, a second revision has been produced and a third is underway. The IWP remains an Interim IWP until all gaps have been resolved and all pathways are at an acceptable level of detail. Full completion will involve a number of iterations, typically annually for up to six years. The end result of completing this process is a comprehensive document and supporting information that includes: - An Integrated Waste Plan document summarizing the entire waste management picture in one place; - Details of all the wastes required to be managed, including volume and timings by waste stream; - Detailed waste stream pathway maps for the whole life-cycle for each waste stream to be managed from pre-generation planning through to final disposition; and - Critical decision points, i.e. decisions that need to be made and timings by when they need to be made. A waste inventory has been constructed that serves as the master reference inventory of all waste that has been or is committed to be managed at CRL. In the past, only the waste that is in storage has been effectively captured, and future predictions of wastes requiring to be managed were not available in one place. The IWP has also provided a detailed baseline plan at the current level of refinement. Waste flow maps for all identified waste streams, for the full waste life cycle complete to disposition have been constructed. The maps identify areas requiring further development, and show the complexities and inter-relationships between waste streams. Knowledge of these inter-dependencies is necessary in order to perform effective options studies for enabling

  16. Simulating Heterogeneous Infiltration and Contaminant leaching Processes at Chalk River, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M. A.; Ireson, A. M.; Keim, D.

    2015-12-01

    A study is conducted at a waste management area in Chalk River, Ontario to characterize flow and contaminant transport with the aim of contributing to improved hydrogeological risk assessment in the context of waste management. Field monitoring has been performed to gain insights into the unsaturated zone characteristics, moisture dynamics, and contaminant transport rates. The objective is to provide quantitative estimates of surface fluxes (quantification of infiltration and evaporation) and investigations of unsaturated zone processes controlling water infiltration and spatial variability in head distributions and flow rates. One particular issue is to examine the effectiveness of the clayey soil cap installed to prevent infiltration of water into the waste repository and the top sand soil cover above the clayey layer to divert the infiltrated water laterally. The spatial variability in the unsaturated zone properties and associated effects on water flow and contaminant transport observed at the site, have led to a concerted effort to develop improved model of flow and transport based on stochastic concepts. Results obtained through the unsaturated zone model investigations are combined with the hydrogeological and geochemical components and develop predictive tools to assess the long term fate of the contaminants at the waste management site.

  17. Spatial analysis of Carbon-14 dynamics in a wetland ecosystem (Duke Swamp, Chalk River Laboratories, Canada).

    PubMed

    Yankovich, T L; King-Sharp, K J; Carr, J; Robertson, E; Killey, R W D; Beresford, N A; Wood, M D

    2014-11-01

    A detailed survey was conducted to quantify the spatial distribution of (14)C in Sphagnum moss and underlying soil collected in Duke Swamp. This wetland environment receives (14)C via groundwater pathways from a historic radioactive Waste Management Area (WMA) on Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL)'s Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site. Trends in (14)C specific activities were evaluated with distance from the sampling location with the maximum (14)C specific activity (DSS-35), which was situated adjacent to the WMA and close to an area of groundwater discharge. Based on a spatial evaluation of the data, an east-to-west (14)C gradient was found, due to the influence of the WMA on (14)C specific activities in the swamp. In addition, it was possible to identify two groups of sites, each showing significant exponential declines with distance from the groundwater source area. One of the groups showed relatively more elevated (14)C specific activities at a given distance from source, likely due to their proximity to the WMA, the location of the sub-surface plume originating from the WMA, the presence of marsh and swamp habitat types, which facilitated (14)C transport to the atmosphere, and possibly, (14)C air dispersion patterns along the eastern edge of the swamp. The other group, which had lower (14)C specific activities at a given distance from the groundwater source area, included locations that were more distant from the WMA and the sub-surface plume, and contained fen habitat, which is known to act as barrier to groundwater flow. The findings suggest that proximity to source, groundwater flow patterns and habitat physical characteristics can play an important role in the dynamics of (14)C being carried by discharging groundwater into terrestrial and wetland environments. PMID:25086321

  18. Connecting large-scale atmospheric circulation, river flow and groundwater levels in a chalk catchment in southern England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavers, David A.; Hannah, David M.; Bradley, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater is an important water resource and globally it represents the largest distributed store of freshwater. In southern England, groundwater is a major source for public water supply, and many aquifers have recently experienced both extreme low and high groundwater levels. In this paper, we use observations of precipitation, river discharge and groundwater levels (1964-2010) and an atmospheric reanalysis to explore the large-scale climate patterns preceding the nine highest and lowest March river discharge and groundwater levels in the chalk catchment of the River Lambourn (Berkshire Downs, southern England). Peak monthly precipitation is shown to occur from October to January, while the highest river discharge and groundwater levels are found from February to April. For high discharge/groundwater levels, composite anomaly patterns of the mean sea level pressure show a stronger than average pressure gradient across the North Atlantic Ocean, with enhanced water vapour transport across southern England. For the lowest discharge/groundwater levels, a blocking high pressure system is found across the British Isles deflecting storms and precipitation to the north. Significantly, the intra-composite variability suggests that different sequences of atmospheric states may lead to high and low discharge/groundwater events.

  19. Overview of Nuclear Physics at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Robert D.

    2013-08-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  20. The implications of using large ensembles of climate scenarios for the management of river ecology in an English chalk stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, C. F.; Lopez, A.; New, M.

    2009-04-01

    Climate change is likely to impact on freshwater ecology, the delivery of regulatory commitments to ecological status and the management of water resources. It is becoming increasingly important for European environment agencies to use and develop methods to aid planning and abstraction licensing procedures and policies in the face of climate change and with the introduction of the Water Framework Directive. Studies have been carried out in the past to investigate the implications of climate change for biodiversity. However, predicting the future is fraught with uncertainty, an area which has not been dealt with in great depth in the past. This study has been undertaken to draw on the results of new methodologies to address the uncertainties inherent in modelling future climate and assess their usability for decision-making in water resources allocations specifically in considering interactions between flow and invertebrate communities The River Itchen was chosen as the case study catchment on the strength of having a long-term coupled ecological and flow dataset and having been an area of intensive study in the past. It is a chalk stream located in the south of England and a candidate Special Area of Conservation. It has also been designated a Special Site of Scientific Interest achieved due to the number of rare species, and the richness of the macro-invertebrate community in the river catchment. An ensemble of 246 transient simulations for future climate was obtained from ClimatePrediction.net which were then used to drive a rainfall-runoff model. In order to link the modelled river flow to ecology, the Lotic Invertebrate Flow Evaluation score has been used where the invertebrate community is linked to flow largely through sensitivity to water velocity and siltation, driven by flow variability at sites with fixed channel dimensions The large ensemble of climate scenarios and thereby flow and ecological indices allows the exploration of the risk of the river of

  1. Variability of dissolved CO2 in the Pang and Lambourn Chalk rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Nutter, J.; Binley, A.; Crook, N.; Young, A.; Pates, J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a two-year field campaign to determine the spatial and temporal variability of groundwater interaction with surface waters in two Cretaceous Chalk catchments (the Pang and Lambourn) in the Upper Thames in Berkshire, UK, based on measurement of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2). Average stream water concentrations of dissolved CO2 were up to 35 times the concentration at atmospheric equilibrium. Mean groundwater concentrations of 85 and 70 times the atmospheric equilibrium were determined from borehole water sampled in the Pang and Lambourn respectively. Diurnal and seasonal variation of in-stream concentration of dissolved CO2 is not significant enough to mask the signal from groundwater inputs.

  2. National Labs and Nuclear Emergency Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budil, Kimberly

    2015-04-01

    The DOE national laboratories, and in particular the three NNSA national security laboratories, have long supported a broad suite of national nuclear security missions for the U.S. government. The capabilities, infrastructure and base of expertise developed to support the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile have been applied to such challenges as stemming nuclear proliferation, understanding the nuclear capabilities of adversaries, and assessing and countering nuclear threats including essential support to nuclear emergency response. This talk will discuss the programs that are underway at the laboratories and the essential role that science and technology plays therein. Nuclear scientists provide expertise, fundamental understanding of nuclear materials, processes and signatures, and tools and technologies to aid in the identification and mitigation of nuclear threats as well as consequence management. This talk will also discuss the importance of direct engagement with the response community, which helps to shape research priorities and to enable development of useful tools and techniques for responders working in the field. National Labs and Nuclear Emergency Response.

  3. Evaluation of a commercial system for CAMAC-based control of the Chalk River Laboratories tandem-accelerator-superconducting-cyclotron complexcomplex

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, B.F.; Caswell, D.J.; Slater, W.R. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper discusses the control system of the Tandem Accelerator Superconducting Cyclotron (TASCC) of AECL Research at its Chalk River Laboratories which is presently based on a PDP-11 computer and the IAS operating system. The estimated expense of a custom conversion of the system to a current, equivalent operating system is prohibitive. The authors have evaluated a commercial control package from VISTA Control Systems based on VAX microcomputers and the VMS operating system. Vsystem offers a modern, graphical operator interface, an extensive software toolkit for configuration of the system and a multi-feature data-logging capability, all of which far surpass the functionality of the present control system. However, the implementation of some familiar, practical features that TASCC operators find to be essential has proven to be challenging. The assessment of Vsystem, which is described in terms of presently perceived strengths and weaknesses, is, on balance, very positive.

  4. Development of Molten Corium Using An Exothermic Chemical Reaction for the Molten- Fuel Moderator-Interaction Studies at Chalk River Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Nitheanandan, T.; Sanderson, D.B.; Kyle, G.; Farmer, M.

    2004-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has partnered with Argonne National Laboratory to develop a corium thermite prototypical of Candu material and test the concept of ejecting {approx}25 kg of the molten material from a pressure tube with a driving pressure of 10 MPa. This development program has been completed and the technology transferred to AECL. Preparation for the molten-fuel moderator-interaction tests at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories is well underway. A mixture of 0.582 U/0.077 U{sub 3}O{sub 8}/0.151 Zr/0.19 CrO{sub 3} (wt%) as reactant chemicals has been demonstrated to produce a corium consisting of 0.73 UO{sub 2}/0.11 Zr/0.06 ZrO{sub 2}/0.10 Cr (wt%) at {approx}2400 deg. C. This is comparable to the target Candu specific corium of 0.9 UO{sub 2}/0.1 Zr (wt%), with limited oxidation. The peak melt temperature was confirmed from small-scale thermitic reaction tests. Several small-scale tests were completed to qualify the thermite to ensure operational safety and a quantifiable experimental outcome. The proposed molten-fuel moderator-interaction experiments at Chalk River Laboratories will consist of heating the thermite mixture inside a 1.14-m long insulated pressure tube. Once the molten material has reached the desired temperature of {approx}2400 deg. C, the pressure inside the tube will be raised to about 10 MPa, and the pressure tube will fail at a pre-machined flaw, ejecting the molten material into the surrounding tank of water. The test apparatus, instrumentation, data acquisition and control systems have been assembled, and a series of successful commissioning tests have been completed. (authors)

  5. Remote intelligent nuclear facility monitoring in LabVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Kucewicz, J.C.; Argo, P.E.; Caffrey, M.; Loveland, R.C.; McNeil, P.J.

    1996-08-01

    A prototype system implemented in LabVIEW for the intelligent monitoring of the movement of radioactive` material within a nuclear facility is presented. The system collects and analyzes radiation sensor and video data to identify suspicious movement of material within the facility. The facility system also transmits wavelet- compressed data to a remote system for concurrent monitoring. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Monitoring the Geneseo Nuclear Structure Lab with VISION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicklaw, R.; Padalino, S.; McLean, J.

    2002-10-01

    VISION (Virtual Instrument System Information) is a LabVIEW based program designed to monitor a 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator in the Geneseo Nuclear Structure Laboratory (GNSL). The purpose of the system is to monitor and notify the user of potentially critical situations in the lab. Main parameters of interest are the water coolant temperatures in the diffusion pumps, pressures within the vacuum chambers, and Van de Graaff operational parameters. LabVIEW reads these values and then displays them on monitors located throughout the laboratory. The user can set alarm limits on the relevant parameters, and when exceeded notifies the user verbally and visually. Recent additions to the VISION program include the water level sensor, calibration of the pressure readings, a web server application, and data logging. The VISION system is Internet accessible ^1, data from the main screen is displayed over the web for remote monitoring of the accelerator. Another useful monitoring tool is the data logger, which writes acquired data to a formatted text document at specified intervals. A future goal for VISION is to not only monitor, but to control aspects of the GNSL with LabVIEW. ^1 Webpage accessible at: http://s69n144.sci.geneseo.edu/vision.htm * Research funded in part by the United States Department of Energy

  7. Nuclear Medicine at Berkeley Lab: From Pioneering Beginnings to Today (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Budinger, Thomas [LBNL, Center for Functional Imaging

    2011-10-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Thomas Budinger, head of Berkeley Lab's Center for Functional Imaging, discusses Berkeley Lab's rich history pioneering the field of nuclear medicine, from radioisotopes to medical imaging.

  8. The Results From the First High-Pressure Melt Ejection Test Completed in the Molten Fuel Moderator Interaction Facility at Chalk River Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Nitheanandan, T.; Kyle, G.; O'Connor, R.; Sanderson, DB.

    2006-07-01

    A high-pressure melt ejection test using prototypical corium was conducted at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Chalk River Laboratories. This test was planned by the CANDU Owners Group to study the potential for an energetic interaction between molten fuel and water under postulated single-channel flow-blockage events. The experiments were designed to address regulator concerns surrounding this very low probability postulated accident events in CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors. The objective of the experimental program is to determine whether a highly energetic 'steam explosion' and associated high-pressure pulse, is possible when molten material is finely fragmented as it is ejected from a fuel channel into the heavy-water moderator. The finely fragmented melt particles would transfer energy to the moderator as it is dispersed, creating a modest pressure pulse in the calandria vessel. The high-pressure melt ejection test consisted of heating up a {approx} 5 kg thermite mixture of U, U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, Zr, and CrO{sub 3} inside a 1.14-m length of insulated pressure tube. When the molten material reached the desired temperature of {approx} 2400 deg C, the pressure inside the tube was raised to 11.6 MPa, failing the pressure tube at a pre-machined flaw, and releasing the molten material into the surrounding tank of 68 deg C water. The experiment investigated the dynamic pressure history, debris size, and the effects of the material interacting with tubes representing neighbouring fuel channels. The measured mean particle size was 0.686 mm and the peak dynamic pressures were between 2.54 and 4.36 MPa, indicating that an energetic interaction between the melt and the water did not occur in the test. (authors)

  9. Dealing with Historical Discrepancies: The Recovery of National Research Experiment (NRX) Reactor Fuel Rods at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) - 13324

    SciTech Connect

    Vickerd, Meggan

    2013-07-01

    Following the 1952 National Research Experiment (NRX) Reactor accident, fuel rods which had short irradiation histories were 'temporarily' buried in wooden boxes at the 'disposal grounds' during the cleanup effort. The Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), funded by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), strategically retrieves legacy waste and restores lands affected by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) early operations. Thus under this program the recovery of still buried NRX reactor fuel rods and their relocation to modern fuel storage was identified as a priority. A suspect inventory of NRX fuels was compiled from historical records and various research activities. Site characterization in 2005 verified the physical location of the fuel rods and determined the wooden boxes they were buried in had degraded such that the fuel rods were in direct contact with the soil. The fuel rods were recovered and transferred to a modern fuel storage facility in 2007. Recovered identification tags and measured radiation fields were used to identify the inventory of these fuels. During the retrieval activity, a discrepancy was discovered between the anticipated number of fuel rods and the number found during the retrieval. A total of 32 fuel rods and cans of cut end pieces were recovered from the specified site, which was greater than the anticipated 19 fuel rods and cans. This discovery delayed the completion of the project, increased the associated costs, and required more than anticipated storage space in the modern fuel storage facility. A number of lessons learned were identified following completion of this project, the most significant of which was the potential for discrepancies within the historical records. Historical discrepancies are more likely to be resolved by comprehensive historical record searches and site characterizations. It was also recommended that a complete review of the wastes generated, and the total affected lands as a result of this historic

  10. INL Director Explains How the National Labs Are Assisting With Japan's Nuclear Crisis

    ScienceCinema

    Grossenbacher, John

    2013-05-28

    Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher discusses the types of nuclear expertise and capabilities that exist within the U.S. Department of Energy's national labs to assist with the Japan nuclear crisis. He also explains how the labs will provide long-term research that will uncover lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear plants. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. INL Director Explains How the National Labs Are Assisting With Japan's Nuclear Crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Grossenbacher, John

    2011-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher discusses the types of nuclear expertise and capabilities that exist within the U.S. Department of Energy's national labs to assist with the Japan nuclear crisis. He also explains how the labs will provide long-term research that will uncover lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear plants. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  12. Evaluation of distribution and sources of sewage molecular marker (LABs) in selected rivers and estuaries of Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Magam, Sami M; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Halimoon, Normala; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Kannan, Narayanan; Masood, Najat; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Alkhadher, Sadeq; Keshavarzifard, Mehrzad; Vaezzadeh, Vahab; Sani, Muhamad S A; Latif, Mohd Talib

    2016-03-01

    This is the first extensive report on linear alkylbenzenes (LABs) as sewage molecular markers in surface sediments collected from the Perlis, Kedah, Merbok, Prai, and Perak Rivers and Estuaries in the west of Peninsular Malaysia. Sediment samples were extracted, fractionated, and analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The concentrations of total LABs ranged from 68 to 154 (Perlis River), 103 to 314 (Kedah River), 242 to 1062 (Merbok River), 1985 to 2910 (Prai River), and 217 to 329 ng g(-1) (Perak River) dry weight (dw). The highest levels of LABs were found at PI3 (Prai Estuary) due to the rapid industrialization and population growth in this region, while the lowest concentrations of LABs were found at PS1 (upstream of Perlis River). The LABs ratio of internal to external isomers (I/E) in this study ranged from 0.56 at KH1 (upstream of Kedah River) to 1.35 at MK3 (Merbok Estuary) indicating that the rivers receive raw sewage and primary treatment effluents in the study area. In general, the results of this paper highlighted the necessity of continuation of water treatment system improvement in Malaysia. PMID:26581689

  13. PAH occurrence in chalk river systems from the Jura region (France). Pertinence of suspended particulate matter and sediment as matrices for river quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chiffre, Axelle; Degiorgi, François; Morin-Crini, Nadia; Bolard, Audrey; Chanez, Etienne; Badot, Pierre-Marie

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates the variations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in surface water, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediment upstream and downstream of the discharges of two wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents. Relationships between the levels of PAHs in these different matrices were also investigated. The sum of 16 US EPA PAHs ranged from 73.5 to 728.0 ng L(-1) in surface water and from 85.4 to 313.1 ng L(-1) in effluent. In SPM and sediment, ∑16PAHs ranged from 749.6 to 2,463 μg kg(-1) and from 690.7 μg kg(-1) to 3,625.6 μg kg(-1), respectively. Investigations performed upstream and downstream of both studied WWTPs showed that WWTP discharges may contribute to the overall PAH contaminations in the Loue and the Doubs rivers. Comparison between gammarid populations upstream and downstream of WWTP discharge showed that biota was impacted by the WWTP effluents. When based only on surface water samples, the assessment of freshwater quality did not provide evidence for a marked PAH contamination in either of the rivers studied. However, using SPM and sediment samples, we found PAH contents exceeding sediment quality guidelines. We conclude that sediment and SPM are relevant matrices to assess overall PAH contamination in aquatic ecosystems. Furthermore, we found a positive linear correlation between PAH contents of SPM and sediment, showing that SPM represents an integrating matrix which is able to provide meaningful data about the overall contamination over a given time span. PMID:26139398

  14. Chalk Murals and Great Artists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweizer, Kay

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the Annual Chalk Mural project done by the members of the National Art Honor Society at the Sacramento County Day School. Discusses the tradition of the annual project and the planning and research involved. Focuses on the 7th Annual Chalk Mural featuring Wayne Thiebaud. (CMK)

  15. Structural stratigraphy of Austin Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, K.P.; Friedman, M.

    1983-03-01

    The mechanical behavior (structural stratigraphy) of the Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk is established from the study of fracture intensity along its outcrop trend from Dallas to San Antonio and westward to Langtry, Texas, and in the subsurface from the study of core and/or fracture identification logs from 39 wells. Three mechanical-stratigraphic units are recognized as: (1) an upper, fractured massive chalk corresponding to the Bid House Chalk Member, (2) a middle, ductile chalk-marl corresponding to the Dessau Chalk and Burditt Marl Members, and (3) a lower, fractured massive chalk corresponding to the Atco Chalk Member. Representative samples from these units were experimentally shortened dry, at 10, 17 34, and 70-MPa confining pressure, 24/sup 0/C (75/sup 0/F), and at 2.5 x 10/sup -4/ s/sup -1/ to determine if the relative mechanical behavior observed at the surface could be extrapolated into the subsurface at different simulated depths of burial. The experimentally determined ductilities do parallel those determined from outcrop and subsurface studies. Through multiple linear regression analyses of strength versus intrinsic rock properties and environmental parameters, it appears that first porosity and then smectite-content are most strongly correlated with strength. For low-porosity specimens (9 to 13.5%) smectite present in amounts as little as 1% by volume has the highest correlation with strength accounting for 83% of its variability. SEM photomicrographs show that the clays are smeared-out along the induced shear fracture surfaces where they are greatly reduced in grain-size. These observations suggest that the smectite acts mechanically as a soft-inclusion, localizing shear failure and correspondingly weakening the material.

  16. Less chalk more action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitriceski Andelkovic, Bojana; Jovic, Sladjana

    2016-04-01

    Less chalk more action Education should not be a mechanical system that operates according to the principles of the orders and implementation. Education should respect the basic laws of the develop and progress. Curiosity is the engine of achievement and children spontaneously and happily learn only if they get interested, if teacher wake up and stimulate their creativity and individuality. We would like to present classes that are realized as thematic teaching with several subjects involved: chemistry, geography, math, art and biology. Classes were organized for students at age from 10 to 13 years, every month during autumn and winter 2015. Better students identified themselves as teachers and presented peer education .Teachers were monitoring the process of teaching and help to develop links between younger and older students, where older students were educators to younger students. Also one student with special needs was involved in this activities and was supported by other students during the workshops The benefit from this project will be represented with evaluation marks. Evaluation table shows that group of ten students(age 10 to13 years) which are selected in October as children with lack of motivation for learning, got better marks, at the end of January , then they had it in the beginning of the semester.

  17. Sister Lab Program Prospective Partner Nuclear Profile: Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; Tyson, S

    2006-12-14

    The Malaysian Deputy Prime Minister Tun Dr Ismail Abdul Rahman suggested in the early 1970s that Malaysia should have a role in the development of nuclear science and technology for peaceful purposes. Accordingly, the Center for the Application of Nuclear Energy (CRANE) was established, with a focus on the development of a scientific and technical pool critical to a national nuclear power program. The Malaysian Cabinet next established the Tun Ismail Atomic Research Center (TIARC) under the Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment on 19 September 1972, at a site in Bangi, about 35 km south of Kuala Lampur. On 28 June 1982, the PUSPATI reactor, a 1-MW TRIGA MK-II research reactor, first reached criticality. On 10 August 1994, TIARC was officially renamed as the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). In addition to radioisotope production and neutron radiography conducted at the PUSPATI research reactor, MINT also supports numerous programs employing nuclear technology for medicine, agriculture and industry, and has been involved in both bilateral and multilateral technical cooperation to extend its capabilities. As an energy exporting country, Malaysia has felt little incentive to develop a nuclear energy program, and high level opposition within the government discouraged it further. A recent statement by Malaysia's Science, Technology and Innovation Minister supported this view, indicating that only a near-catastrophic jump in world oil prices might change the government's view. However, the rate at which Malaysia is using its natural gas and oil reserves is expected to force it to reassess the role of nuclear energy in the near future. In addition, the government does intend to construct a radioactive waste repository to dispose of naturally occurring radioactive materials (extracted during tin mining, in particular). Also, Malaysia's growing economy could encourage expansion in Malaysia's existing nuclear-applications programs

  18. 27 CFR 9.52 - Chalk Hill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chalk Hill. 9.52 Section 9... TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.52 Chalk Hill. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Chalk Hill.” (b) Approved...

  19. 27 CFR 9.52 - Chalk Hill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chalk Hill. 9.52 Section 9... TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.52 Chalk Hill. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Chalk Hill.” (b) Approved...

  20. 27 CFR 9.52 - Chalk Hill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chalk Hill. 9.52 Section 9... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.52 Chalk Hill. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Chalk Hill.” (b) Approved...

  1. 27 CFR 9.52 - Chalk Hill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chalk Hill. 9.52 Section 9... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.52 Chalk Hill. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Chalk Hill.” (b) Approved...

  2. 27 CFR 9.52 - Chalk Hill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chalk Hill. 9.52 Section 9... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.52 Chalk Hill. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Chalk Hill.” (b) Approved...

  3. Sister Lab Program Prospective Partner Nuclear Profile: Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; Tyson, S

    2006-12-14

    Indonesia has participated in cooperative technical programs with the IAEA since 1957, and has cooperated with regional partners in all of the traditional areas where nuclear science is employed: in medicine, public health (such as insect control and eradication programs), agriculture (e.g. development of improved varieties of rice), and the gas and oil industries. Recently, Indonesia has contributed significantly to the Reduced Enrichment Research and Training Reactor (RERTR) Program by conducting experiments to confirm the feasibility of Mo-99 production using high-density low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, a primary goal of the RERTR Program. Indonesia's first research reactor, the TRIGA Mark II at Bandung, began operation in 1964 at 250 kW and was subsequently upgraded in 1971 to 1 MW and further upgraded in 2000 to 2 MW. This reactor was joined by another TRIGA Mark II, the 100-kW Kartini-PPNY at Yogyakarta, in 1979, and by the 30-MW G.A. Siwabessy multipurpose reactor in Serpong, which achieved criticality in July 1983. A 10-MW radioisotope production reactor, to be called the RPI-10, also was proposed for construction at Serpong in the late 1990s, but the project apparently was not carried out. In the five decades since its nuclear research program began, Indonesia has trained a cadre of scientific and technical staff who not only operate and conduct research with the current facilities, but also represent the nucleus of a skilled labor pool to support development of a nuclear power program. Although Indonesia's previous on-again, off-again consideration of nuclear power has not gotten very far in the past, it now appears that Indonesia again is giving serious consideration to beginning a national nuclear energy program. In June 2006, Research and Technology Minister Kusmayanto Kadiman said that his ministry was currently putting the necessary procedures in place to speed up the project to acquire a nuclear power plant, indicating that, ''We will need around

  4. Sister Lab Program Prospective Partner Nuclear Profile: Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; Tyson, S

    2006-12-14

    Vietnam's nuclear program began in the 1960s with the installation at Dalat of a 250 kW TRIGA Mk-II research reactor under the U.S. Atoms for Peace Program. The reactor was shut down and its core removed only a few years later, and the nuclear research program was suspended until after the end of the civil war in the late 1970s. The Soviet Union assisted Vietnam in restoring the Dalat reactor to an operational status in 1984, trained a cadre of scientific and technical staff in its operation, and contributed to the development of nuclear science for the medical and agricultural sectors. In the agricultural area in particular, Vietnamese experts have been very successful in developing mutant strains of rice, and continue to work with the IAEA to yield strains that have a shorter growing period, increased resistance to disease, and other desirable characteristics. Rice has always been the main crop in Vietnam, but technical cooperation with the IAEA and other states has enabled the country to become one of the top rice producers in the world, exporting much of its annual crop to over two dozen countries annually. More recently, Vietnam's government has shown increasing interest in developing a civil nuclear program to supplement its fossil fuel and other energy resources. Projections from a variety of open sources, ranging from the IAEA, the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA), the Vietnamese government, energy corporations, and think tanks all predict a massive increase in energy consumption--especially electricity--within Vietnam and the region as a whole. This growth in consumption will require a corresponding increase in energy production, which in Vietnam is currently satisfied mainly by fossil fuels (coal) and renewable energy (hydropower and biomass); Vietnam has a refining capacity of about 800 barrels/day. Most of its crude oil is exported to generate export income, and is not used to generate electricity. Although Vietnam is

  5. Austin Chalk trend, upper Gulf Coast, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Holifield, R.

    1982-01-01

    The application of innovative geologic and geophysical interpretations and of carefully tailored well completion techniques has created the opportunity for profitable, low-risk drilling programs in the Austin Chalk Formation of S. Texas. This discussion focuses on selected information that should be beneficial for exploration and development activities in the Austin Chalk. The Giddings field is discussed in some detail, since this field is the center of the greatest activity in the Austin Chalk trend.

  6. A novel representation of chalk hydrology in a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mostaquimur; Rosolem, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Unconfined chalk aquifers contain a significant portion of water in the United Kingdom. In order to optimize the assessment and management practices of water resources in the region, modelling and monitoring of soil moisture in the unsaturated zone of the chalk aquifers are of utmost importance. However, efficient simulation of soil moisture in such aquifers is difficult mainly due to the fractured nature of chalk, which creates high-velocity preferential flow paths in the unsaturated zone. In this study, the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is applied on a study area encompassing the Kennet catchment in Southern England. The fluxes and states of the coupled water and energy cycles are simulated for 10 consecutive years (2001-2010). We hypothesize that explicit representation for the soil-chalk layers and the inclusion of preferential flow in the fractured chalk aquifers improves the reproduction of the hydrological processes in JULES. In order to test this hypothesis, we propose a new parametrization for preferential flow in JULES. This parametrization explicitly describes the flow of water in soil matrices and preferential flow paths using a simplified approach which can be beneficial for large-scale hydrometeorological applications. We also define the overlaying soil properties obtained from the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) in the model. Our simulation results are compared across spatial scales with measured soil moisture and river discharge, indicating the importance of accounting for the physical properties of the medium while simulating hydrological processes in the chalk aquifers.

  7. Controls on the discharge of Chalk streams of the Berkshire Downs, UK.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Richard B

    2002-01-23

    The water quality and biological functioning of major UK rivers draining permeable basins cannot be fully understood without knowledge of the spatial and temporal controls on the aquifer-river system. In this paper, hydrogeological features of Chalk streams feeding the Thames, the focus of this special issue, are described. Large-scale features, such as line sinks along the Thames and major tributaries such as the Kennet, tend to determine the regional groundwater flow patterns in the Chalk aquifer, whereas the complex characteristics of the Chalk dominate the local spatial and temporal patterns of groundwater discharge to the tributaries draining the dip slopes. These different controls are described and illustrated by particular reference to the Lambourn (a sub-catchment of the Kennet) and Pang catchments. Various issues requiring further investigation are also highlighted. PMID:11846087

  8. Pointing with Power or Creating with Chalk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudow, Sasha R.; Finck, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the attitudes of students on the use of PowerPoint and chalk/white boards in college science lecture classes. Students were asked to complete a survey regarding their experiences with PowerPoint and chalk/white boards in their science classes. Both multiple-choice and short answer questions were used. The multiple-choice…

  9. Cretaceous shelf-sea chalk deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Hattin, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The word ''chalk'' is linked etymologically to the Cretaceous, but chalky facies neither dominate that system nor are confined to it. As used commonly, the term ''chalk'' refers to a variety of marine limestone that is white to light gray very fine grained, soft and friable, porous, and composed predominantly of calcitic skeletal remains, especially those derived from coccolithophores. No simple definition suffices to embrace all Cretaceous chalks, which include sandy, marly, shelly, phospatic, glauconitic, dolomitic, pyritic and organic-rich lithotypes. Most of the world's exposed Cretaceous chalk deposits were formed at shelf depths rather than in the deep sea. Cretaceous shelf-sea chalks are developed most extensively in northern Europe, the U.S. Gulf Coastal Plain and Western Interior, and the Middle East, with lesser occurrences alo in Australia. Most Cretaceous shelf-sea chalks formed in the temperature zones, and in relatively deep water. Cretaceous chalks deposited on well-oxygenated sea floors are bioturbated and massive where deficient in terrigenous detritus, or bioturbated and rhythmically interbedded with argillaceous units where influx of terrigenous detritus varied systematically with climate changes. Accumulation of sufficient pelagic mud to form vast deposits of Cretaceous shelf-sea chalk required (1) sustained high productivity of calareous plankton, (2) extensive development of stable shelf and continental platform environments, (3) highstands of seal level, (4) deficiency of aragonitic skeletal material in chalk-forming sediments, and (5) low rates of terrigenous detrital influx. These conditions were met at different times in different places, even within the same general region.

  10. Austin Chalk boundaries bigger than Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Calhoun, J.

    1980-11-01

    The Austin Chalk is a carbonate limestone which has major outcropping near Austin, Texas. Around Austin, San Antonio, and San Marcos it finds its major expression in the so-called Balcones Escarpment, a jutting limestone promontory that divides the Texas hill country from the Black Gumbo Farmland to the east, and forms one of the longest, most noticeable geologic features in the state. The Chalk is known to run through the entire Gulf Coast Littoral - Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. A map shows the locations of the major uplifts, downwarps, fault zones, and tectonic belts in the Austin Chalk play.

  11. 76 FR 5216 - Florida Power Corporation, Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... COMMISSION Florida Power Corporation, Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant; Exemption 1.0 Background... authorizes operation of the Crystal River ] Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant (Crystal River). The license... under 10 CFR 55.11 from the schedule requirements of 10 CFR 55.59. Specifically for Crystal River,...

  12. Persistence of fecal indicator bacteria in sediment of an oligotrophic river: comparing large and lab-scale flume systems.

    PubMed

    Walters, Evelyn; Kätzl, Korbinian; Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Rutschmann, Peter; Müller, Elisabeth; Horn, Harald

    2014-09-15

    In this study, both a lab and a large-scale flume system were used to investigate the survival of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in bed sediments of an alpine oligotrophic river. To determine the influence of substratum on persistence, survival within 3-cm-deep substratum cages versus on thin, biofilm-covered ceramic tiles was tested. Moreover, the impact of bed shear stress on survival in bed sediments was explored. It was seen that in the lab-scale flume having a very low bed shear stress (0.3 N m(-2)), E. coli and enterococci survival in 3-cm-deep substratum cages was nearly the same as in a thin biofilm (200 μm). However, in the large-scale flume system characterized by a bed shear stress of 9 N m(-2), the added protection of the deeper substratum cages promoted considerably longer survival of E. coli and enterococci than the thin biofilm. Additionally, the FIB removal mechanisms in the two flume systems varied. At the lab-scale, enterococci was seen to persist twice as long as E. coli, while in the large-scale flume the two FIB were removed at the same rate. A comparison of qPCR analyses performed in both flumes suggests that bed sediment erosion and the influence of grazers/predators were responsible for FIB removal from the sediments in the large-scale flume, whereas in the lab flume FIB inactivation caused removal. These results indicate that hydraulic parameters such as bed shear stress as well as the presence of macroinvertebrates in a system are both important factors to consider when designing flumes as they can significantly impact FIB persistence in sediments of fast-flowing, alpine streams. PMID:24952271

  13. Characterization and closure of the Met Lab Carolina Bay at the Savannah River site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, K.M.; Frazier, W.L.; Haselow, L.A.; Voss, L.

    1993-07-01

    The Met Lab Carolina Bay is subject to Subtitle C of RCRA and CERCLA requirements. Located in the northwestern section of the Savannah River Site, the Met Lab Carolina Bay is a marshy, oval-shaped natural depression covering approximately six acres. The Carolina Bay received wastes from three sources: the Met Lab Basin A-007 drainage outfall, the A-Area coal-fire power plant A-008 drainage outfall and the A/M-Area vehicle maintenance parking lot stormwater runoff A-009 outfall. Two characterization efforts conducted in 1988/89 and 1991 indicate the presence of metals in the sediments and soils of the bay. The greatest concentrations of the metals and organics being in the north-central portion of the bay. The metals and organics were primarily associated with surface sediments and the organic-rich soil layer to a depth of about two feet. Conclusions from the Human Health Baseline Risk indicate the future on-unit resident exposure to sediments and soil poses an unacceptable level of risk to human health. However, the assumptions built into the calculations lead to conservative human health risk findings. A qualitative Ecological Risk Assessment was performed on the Carolina Bay. This ecological assessment, based on historical and existing sampling data, was found to be insufficient to make a definitive decision on the contaminants` effects on the ecology of the bay. The proposed action for the Carolina Bay is to conduct an ecological characterization. It appears that the ecological risks will be in the driving factor in determining the remedial action for the Met Lab Carolina Bay.

  14. New frac treatment boosts Austin Chalk productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, D.; Pierson, N.O.

    1986-09-01

    Wells drilled in the Central Texas Austin Chalk formation tend to deplete rapidly, with production rates declining to 10 bopd or less within months of completion. According to the authors, these wells can often be restored with a dendritic fracturing treatment. Production from 50 conventionally fraced chalk wells averaged only 6 bopd. After dendritic fracturing, average output increased to 61.2 bopd. Similar results were obtained from wells not previously treated.

  15. Reprocessing of nuclear fuels at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.W.

    1986-10-04

    For more than 30 years, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) has been a major supplier of nuclear materials such as plutonium-239 and tritium-3 for nuclear and thermonuclear weapons, plutonium-238 for space exploration, and isotopes of americium, curium, and californium for use in the nuclear research community. SRP is a complete nuclear park, providing most of the processes in the nuclear fuel cycle. Key processes involve fabrication and cladding of the nuclear fuel, target, and control assemblies; rework of heavy water for use as reactor moderator; reactor loading, operation, and unloading; chemical recovery of the reactor transmutation products and spent fuels; and management of the gaseous, liquid, and solid nuclear and chemical wastes; plus a host of support operations. The site's history and the key processes from fabrication of reactor fuels and targets to finishing of virgin plutonium for use in the nuclear weapons complex are reviewed. Emphasis has been given to the chemistry of the recovery and purification of weapons grade plutonium from irradiated reactor targets.

  16. Nickel adsorption on chalk and calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, D. A.; Lakshtanov, L. Z.; Carneiro, J. F.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2014-12-01

    Nickel uptake from solution by two types of chalk and calcite was investigated in batch sorption studies. The goal was to understand the difference in sorption behavior between synthetic and biogenic calcite. Experiments at atmospheric partial pressure of CO2, in solutions equilibrated with calcite and chalk and pH ranging from 7.7 to 8.8, explored the influence of initial concentration and the amount and type of sorbent on Ni uptake. Adsorption increases with increased surface area and pH. A surface complexation model describes the data well. Stability constants for the Ni surface complex are log KNi = - 1.12 on calcite and log KNi = - 0.43 and - 0.50 on the two chalk samples. The study confirms that synthetic calcite and chalk both take up nickel, but Ni binds more strongly on the biogenic calcite than on inorganically precipitated, synthetic powder, because of the presence of trace amounts of polysaccharides and clay nanoparticles on the chalk surface.

  17. Nickel adsorption on chalk and calcite.

    PubMed

    Belova, D A; Lakshtanov, L Z; Carneiro, J F; Stipp, S L S

    2014-12-01

    Nickel uptake from solution by two types of chalk and calcite was investigated in batch sorption studies. The goal was to understand the difference in sorption behavior between synthetic and biogenic calcite. Experiments at atmospheric partial pressure of CO2, in solutions equilibrated with calcite and chalk and pH ranging from 7.7 to 8.8, explored the influence of initial concentration and the amount and type of sorbent on Ni uptake. Adsorption increases with increased surface area and pH. A surface complexation model describes the data well. Stability constants for the Ni surface complex are log KNi=-1.12 on calcite and log KNi=-0.43 and -0.50 on the two chalk samples. The study confirms that synthetic calcite and chalk both take up nickel, but Ni binds more strongly on the biogenic calcite than on inorganically precipitated, synthetic powder, because of the presence of trace amounts of polysaccharides and clay nanoparticles on the chalk surface. PMID:25300061

  18. Nuclear Safety and Trends Global River Flood Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    aerts, jeroen; jongman, brenden; ward, Philip; Winsemius, hessel; Kwadijk, Jaap; Wetzelaer, bas

    2013-04-01

    The Fukushima accident raised considerable concern around the globe on the overall safety of nuclear power plants against natural hazard induced risks. Since nuclear power-plants are often located near- or in flood zones from rivers, an important question is whether Nuclear facilities will face increased risk from flooding in the future? IN 2011, the European Nuclear Safety Regulators Group (ENSREG) was invited to provide a stress test, as to whether nuclear installations can withstand the consequences of Natural hazards, inclduing flooding. This paper contributes to the findings of ENSREG by demonstrating how global flood risk may increase in the future using a global hydrological model at a 1 x 1 km2 resolution. This information is used to assess the vulnerability of existing and planned nuclear facilities as to whether they (1) are located in flood prone areas (2) are susceptible to an increase in potential flood inundation and (3) are vulnerable to other natural hazards such as earthquake and tsunami. Based on this assessment, a priority ranking can made showing the potentially most vulnerable nuclear power plants to natural hazards, and in particular flood risk.

  19. Microdeformation and subcritical cracking in chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsaker, Anne; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2016-04-01

    Deformation processes in chalks, both in relation to changing pore fluids and stress conditions has been of great interest as chalk is an important reservoir rock for both hydrocarbons and ground water. Lately it has also gained interest as a potential reservoir rock for captured CO2. Chalks are composed of large amounts of biogenic calcite grains, the skeletal debris of marine microorganisms. Its deformation is highly time and stress dependent, and governed by a transition from distributed to localized deformation at the onset of yield, affected by mechanisms such as subcritical crack growth and pore collapse. We present a microdeformation rig which makes use of thermal expansion as a means of subjecting small samples to strictly controlled tensile stresses. High resolution imaging provides resolutions down to 0.5 micrometers, enabling study of pore scale processes during slow deformation. Examples of localized and distributed deformation are presented.

  20. Favorable prices justify Austin Chalk plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mickey, V.

    1981-03-01

    The elements of economics required to justify new natural gas processing plants seem to come together in the Austin Chalk trend of south-central Texas. The Mapco pipeline which originates in the western overthrust belt and carries natural gas liquids to Mont Belvieu, Texas, provides a market for the liquids. With 110 rigs drilling in a 4-county area of the Chalk (Burleson, Lee, Fayette, and Brazos), natural gas reserves are being proven adequate to justify the many new plants being placed in the area. Natural gas liquids prices, which historically are closely correlated with crude oil prices, are reflecting the impact of partial decontrol of those prices. Improvements in natural gas processing technology allow for more energy-efficient plants with more control over the liquids products produced. The result is a hotbed of natural gas processing activity in the Austin Chalk trend.

  1. Surface production facilities in the Austin chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Vadala, C.; Dornak, H.; McDonald, P.

    1983-01-01

    Development drilling in the Austin chalk primarily is centered in a 5-county area between Giddings and Caldwell, Texas. Latest statistics indicate that 182 producers currently are operating in the area with a projected total production of approx. 125,000 bopd and 400 MMcfd. Cumulative oil production stands at nearly 75 million bbl. Surface production facilities include pumping units, production batteries, compressor stations, processing plants, and pipeline gathering systems for both oil and gas. An overview and a discussion of these facilities, as they pertain to the Giddings field and the Austin Chalk, are presented.

  2. Austin chalk stimulation techniques and design

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, C.D.; Weber, D.; Garza, D.; Swaner, S.

    1982-01-01

    This study presents design completion techniques being used to stimulate the Austin Chalk Formation in the Giddings field and Gonzales County, Texas. As background information, a history of the Giddings field and development of the Austin Chalk is discussed. The main purpose is to consider factors affecting fracture treatment design, including fracture height, pump rates, types of fracturing fluids, proppant concentrations, and leak-off controls. This is to insure effective and successful stimulation treatment. Possible alternative design considerations for future fracture treatments also are discussed.

  3. Improved Interlock System at the Nuclear Structure Lab at Univ. of Notre Dame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lor, Xao; Lesher, Shelly; Stech, Ed

    2010-11-01

    The current interlock system at the Nuclear Structure Lab (NSL) at the University of Notre Dame requires multiple procedures to be performed in order to start up one of the three accelerators. New features and equipment will be added to the current interlock system to allow access into the experimental rooms safely. This change is necessary because the planned addition of experimental equipment will allow beams from two accelerators to enter the same target hall. In order to minimize the impact of one experiment on another, access will be determined by active monitoring of the radiation levels in the rooms instead of the possibility of accelerated beam being present. New equipment planned to be used in the laboratory are personal dosimeter badges, with a monitor reader for a pass-by data exchange and monitor screens to display live radiation levels and access levels in all of the experimental rooms. This poster will present this procedure and explain how personnel can access the NSL rooms safely while the ion beams are on.

  4. ALARA Overview System at Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Station.

    PubMed

    Kline, K B; Cope, W B

    1995-08-01

    During the Spring of 1994 the Health Physics Department at Florida Power Company used video and audio equipment to support remote health physics coverage for their Crystal River Unit 3 refueling outage (Refuel 9). The system consisted of eight cameras with audio interface linked to a control center located in a low-dose area. The system allowed health physics personnel to monitor steam generator and refueling activities with minimum exposure in high-dose areas, cutting by half the dose from the previous outage. B&W Nuclear Technologies provided complete setup, maintenance and tear-down, as well as assuming responsibilities for contaminated video and audio equipment. PMID:7622378

  5. The End of "Chalk and Talk"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Tim

    2012-01-01

    "Chalk and talk" had been the staple pedagogical approach of my Science teaching practice since entering the profession. I felt that there was a great deal of information that I must impart to my students. My tried and tested way to deliver information to my students had always been simply to stand in front of them and tell it to them... So what…

  6. Austin chalk yields oil near basaltic cone

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-03

    This paper reports on the completion of a Cretaceous Austin chalk horizontal oil well near a basaltic cone in the Uvalde volcanic field area of Dimmit County, Tex. The well is the HDP Inc. 1 autumn Unit, about 9 miles northeast to Carrizo Springs HDP, which stands for horizontal development and production, of Palo Alto, Calif., drilled the well on a farmout from American Exploration Co., Houston. It initially pumped and flowed 1,600 b/d of oil without stimulation from openhole. HDP drilled about 1,500 ft of horizontal and deviated hole in Austin chalk B-1, the producing horizon. Production in late August was about 500 b/d of oil, pending determination of proration unit size and allowable. The well, in the greater Pearsall field Austin chalk play along the Dimmit-Savala county line, is the first horizontal chalk producer in Elaine field. The field has produced mainly from Escondido sand, Olmos sand and Anacacho limestone, all in the Upper Cretaceous.

  7. Competitive sorption of organic contaminants in chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, E. R.; Borisover, M.

    2003-12-01

    In the Negev desert, Israel, a chemical industrial complex is located over fractured Eocene chalk formations where transfer of water and solutes between fracture voids and matrix pores affects migration of contaminants in the fractures due to diffusion into the chalk matrix. This study tests sorption and sorption competition between contaminants in the chalk matrix to make it possible to evaluate the potential for contaminant attenuation during transport in fractures. Single solute sorption isotherms on chalk matrix material for five common contaminants ( m-xylene, ametryn, 1,2-dichloroethane, phenanthrene, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol) were found to be nonlinear, as confirmed in plots of Kd versus initial solution concentration. Over the studied concentration ranges, m-xylene Kd varied by more than a factor of 100, ametryn Kd by a factor of 4, 1,2-dichloroethane Kd by more than a factor of 3, phenanthrene Kd by about a factor of 2, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol Kd by a factor of 10. It was earlier found that sorption is to the organic matter component of the chalk matrix and not to the mineral phases (Chemosphere 44 (2001) 1121). Nonlinear sorption isotherms indicate that there is at least some finite sorption domain. Bi-solute competition experiments with 2,4,6-tribromophenol as the competitor were designed to explore the nature of the finite sorption domain. All of the isotherms in the bi-solute experiments are more linear than in the single solute experiments, as confirmed by smaller variations in Kd as a function of initial solution concentration. For both m-xylene and ametryn, there is a small nonlinear component or domain that was apparently not susceptible to competition by 2,4,6-tribromophenol. The nonlinear sorption domain(s) is best expressed at low solution concentrations. Inert-solvent-normalized single and bi-solute sorption isotherms demonstrate that ametryn undergoes specific force interactions with the chalk sorbent. The volume percent of phenanthrene

  8. 76 FR 53972 - Florida Power Corporation, Crystal River Unit No. 3 Nuclear Generating Plant; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... rule (72 FR 49139, August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires participants to submit and serve all... COMMISSION Florida Power Corporation, Crystal River Unit No. 3 Nuclear Generating Plant; Notice of... Facility Operating License No. DPR-72 for Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear generating Plant (CR-3),...

  9. Austin Chalk stimulations require thorough planning

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, C.D.; Garza, D.; Swaner, S.; Weber, D.

    1982-08-01

    Considers the influence of fracture height, well site position, pump rates, types of fracture fluids, proppant concentrations, and leak-off controls. Careful attention to each of these factors can result in successful stimulation treatment and optimum production rates. The Austin Chalk trend stretches along the entire Gulf Coast from Mexico into Louisiana. Well position relative to faults and natural fractures in the Austin Chalk is the single most critical factor directly affecting productivity. Observations include: cross-linked fluids are necessary in most cases to achieve desired proppant concentration and distribution; there appears to be a relationship between fracture height and pump time; accurate estimates of fracture height are necessary to develop the desired propped fracture length; and leak-off in natural fractures potentially compromises well productivity.

  10. Austin chalk maintains brisk drilling pace

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    Horizontal drilling in the Cretaceous Austin chalk trend of South Texas continues to set a fast pace. The Texas Railroad Commission has issued nearly 900 permits to drill horizontal wells in the Pearsall field area alone from 1984 through February 1991. TRC issued 1,485 permits for horizontal wells statewide during that period, including 1,285 since Jan. 1, 1990. Statewide, operators have reported completion of 685 horizontal wells. That includes 472 in Pearsall field, where TRC has issued 882 permits, and 121 in Giddings field, where 305 permits have been issued. Frio County, site of Pearsall field, led Texas counties with 494 permits and 278 horizontal completions. Oil drilling and reentry work is under way in many areas, and horizontal Austin chalk gas/condensate completions have been reported in Dimmit and Burleson counties.

  11. Giddings Austin chalk enters deep lean-gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Moritis, G.

    1995-12-25

    Deep lean gas is the latest phase in the growth of the Giddings field Austin chalk play. The first phase involved drilling vertical oil and gas wells. Next came the horizontal well boom in the shallower Austin chalk area, which is still continuing. And now this third phase places horizontal laterals in the Austen chalk at about 14,000--15,000 ft to produce lean gas. The article describes the producing wells and gas gathering.

  12. Characterization of the Austin Chalk producing trend

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.Y.; Poston, S.W.; Wu, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Fracture patterns and reservoir dual characteristics are presented for a portion of the fractured Austin Chalk producing trend. The production histories of 1,235 wells from Giddings Field covering portions of Lee, Burleson, Washington, and Fayette counties were analyzed by decline curve analysis. Production of the average Austin Chalk well is usually characterized by an early rapid decline and a later slow decline. The average initial effective decline rate is about 90% per year, and lasts about six months to one year. For the later, less dramatic decline, the average is about 35% per year. Statistical results of well performance indicate no difficulty in finding oil in the Austin Chalk producing trend. However, areas of high fracture density must be encountered for a well to be profitable. A contour map of the iso-reserves was prepared for a better understanding of the fracture system and reservoir characteristics. Besides the general northeast-southwest production trend, the map shows anomalies in the fracture system and reservoir characteristics. A simple, rapid technique to estimate reservoir parameters directly from the double-decline behavior of log (rate) versus time curves is given. Values of flow capacity, storage capacity, dimensionless fracture storage parameter (..omega..), and dimensionless interporosity flow parameter (lambda) can be estimated by this technique.

  13. USED NUCLEAR MATERIALS AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE: ASSET OR WASTE?

    SciTech Connect

    Magoulas, V.

    2013-06-03

    The nuclear industry, both in the commercial and the government sectors, has generated large quantities of material that span the spectrum of usefulness, from highly valuable (“assets”) to worthless (“wastes”). In many cases, the decision parameters are clear. Transuranic waste and high level waste, for example, have no value, and is either in a final disposition path today, or – in the case of high level waste – awaiting a policy decision about final disposition. Other materials, though discardable, have intrinsic scientific or market value that may be hidden by the complexity, hazard, or cost of recovery. An informed decision process should acknowledge the asset value, or lack of value, of the complete inventory of materials, and the structure necessary to implement the range of possible options. It is important that informed decisions are made about the asset value for the variety of nuclear materials available. For example, there is a significant quantity of spent fuel available for recycle (an estimated $4 billion value in the Savannah River Site’s (SRS) L area alone); in fact, SRS has already blended down more than 300 metric tons of uranium for commercial reactor use. Over 34 metric tons of surplus plutonium is also on a path to be used as commercial fuel. There are other radiological materials that are routinely handled at the site in large quantities that should be viewed as strategically important and / or commercially viable. In some cases, these materials are irreplaceable domestically, and failure to consider their recovery could jeopardize our technological leadership or national defense. The inventories of nuclear materials at SRS that have been characterized as “waste” include isotopes of plutonium, uranium, americium, and helium. Although planning has been performed to establish the technical and regulatory bases for their discard and disposal, recovery of these materials is both economically attractive and in the national

  14. 76 FR 32237 - Florida Power Corporation, Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant; Notice of Availability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Florida Power Corporation, Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant; Notice of Availability of Draft Supplement 44 to the Generic Environmental Impact Statement for License Renewal of Nuclear Plants and Public Meetings for the License...

  15. 77 FR 1743 - Facility Operating License Amendment From Florida Power Corporation, Crystal River Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Facility Operating License Amendment From Florida Power Corporation, Crystal River Nuclear Generating Plant, Unit 3 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: License amendment; opportunity to request a hearing, petition for leave to...

  16. The Beauty of the Beasts in Chalk Pastels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her seventh-grade art students captured an image of a stuffed animal in the "whole-to-part" drawing technique using chalk pastels. Shading with chalk pastels can give a gradual change in value from dark to light. The shading and color changes the mood of the original drawing, and adds texture, too. Chalk…

  17. Horizontal drilling in the Austin Chalk: Stratigraphic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, C.O. Jr. ); Bobigian, R.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Horizontal drilling has renewed interest in the Austin chalk in south-central Texas. Large fields on opposite sides of the San Marcos arch Giddings to the northeast and Pearsall to the southwest were active with vertical drilling 10 years ago. Giddings' 4,500 Austin wells produced 209 million BO and 934 bcfg of gas through 1988; Pearsall's 1,440 wells produced 57 million BO and 35 bcfg of gas. Most vertical wells were completed, 20% were economic successes, 40% were marginal, 40% were uneconomic due to uneven areal distribution of near-vertical fractures and small faults, which provide reservoirs in otherwise tight chalk. Horizontal drilling, led by Amoco in Giddings and Oryx in Pearsall, enhances the chances of encountering the fractures by drilling perpendicular to the fracture trend. Horizontal drilling requires preselection of the stratigraphic horizon to be penetrated. One must understand the variable Austin stratigraphy to choose the zone with the most brittle character and best matrix porosity, both reduced by increased clay content. Chalk 130 ft thick on the San Marcos arch thickens to 600 to 800 ft in central Giddings field where middle marl separates lower and upper chalk Northeastward only lower chalk is preserved beneath a post-Austin submarine channel. The Austin thickens to 300-500 ft in Pearsall field where middle member ash beds separate lower and upper chalk inhibiting vertical reservoir communication. Locally, on the Pearsall arch, ash is missing, lower chalk thickens, and upper chalk thins.

  18. Compaction of North-sea chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Dániel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2014-05-01

    The Ekofisk field is the largest petroleum field in the Norwegian North Sea territory where oil is produced from chalk formations. Early stage of oil production caused considerable changes in pore fluid pressure which led to a reservoir compaction. Pore collapse mechanism caused by the dramatic increase of effective stress, which in turn was caused by the pressure reduction by hydrocarbon depletion, was early identified as a principal reason for the reservoir compaction (Sulak et al. 1991). There have been several attempts to model this compaction. They performed with variable success on predicting the Ekofisk subsidence. However, the most of these models are based on empirical relations and do not investigate in detail the phenomena involved in the compaction. In sake of predicting the Ekofisk subsidence while using only independently measurable variables we used a chalk compaction model valid on geological time-scales (Japsen et al. 2011) assuming plastic pore-collapse mechanism at a threshold effective stress level. We identified the phenomena involved in the pore collapse. By putting them in a sequential order we created a simple statistical analytical model. We also investigated the time-dependence of the phenomena involved and by assuming that one of the phenomena is rate-limiting we could make estimations of the compaction rate at smaller length-scales. By carefully investigating the nature of pressure propagation we could upscale our model to reservoir scale. We found that the predicted compaction rates are close enough to the measured rates. We believe that we could further increase accuracy by refining our model. Sulak, R. M., Thomas, L. K., Boade R. R. (1991) 3D reservoir simulation of Ekofisk compaction drive. Journal of Petroleum Technology, 43(10):1272-1278, 1991. Japsen, P., Dysthe, D. K., Hartz, E. H., Stipp, S. L. S., Yarushina, V. M., Jamtveit. (2011) A compaction front in North Sea chalk. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth (1978

  19. Drilling and well completion of Austin Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Coffman, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    This study describes U.S. Operating, Inc.'s experiences in drilling and well completion in the Austin Chalk zone of Lee County, Texas. This area's difficulties have included high pressure gas, lost circulation in low pressure zones, varying content of producing formations, varying grades and qualities of production in the same producing zones, and faulting. The potential for severe kicking is always present, and casing failures are common. Procedures for dealing with the expected kicks, lost circulation, difficult casing jobs, and variable production are described.

  20. Seismic and horizontal drilling unlock Austin Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Kuich, N. )

    1990-09-01

    Giddings is a Texas field whose economic production is totally dependent on the development of natural fracture porosity. Matrix porosities and permeabilities in the Austin Chalk limestone, the primary objective, are incapable of maintaining commercial hydrocarbon production. This paper discusses how fracture identification from seismic data has been used as a successful prospecting tool in the area for over ten years. The advent of horizontal drilling technology now allows the development of multiple seismic fracture indicators in the same wellbore. These indicators often represent unique hydrocarbon accumulations.

  1. Chalk play tops Gulf Coast horizontal scene

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-18

    This paper reports on horizontal drilling in the Cretaceous Austin chalk of Texas which dominates news of U.S. Gulf Coast horizontal action. In spite of a significant decline in horizontal drilling in Texas-the Texas Railroad Commission reported a 15 unit decline in the number of permits to drill horizontal wells during the third quarter-operators in East and South Texas continue to expand plays and develop new ones. The Cretaceous Bruda may be gaining some respect as a horizontal target in Texas. Elsewhere on the Gulf Coast, Mississippi soon will see more action on the horizontal drilling front.

  2. Stimulation techniques used in the Austin Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, J.; McDow, G. Turner, J.

    1982-01-01

    The object of this work is to discuss the most widely used stimulation techniques employed in the Austin Chalk formation in S. Texas. Although this trend has been explored for years and continues to be one of the most active in the country, there remains a difference of opinion over how to effectively stimulate this reservoir. Several schools of thought regarding types of fluids, additives, and general treating techniques are examined. The fracture geometry of various treatments as predicted by pre-treatment computer designs are compared to the parameters obtained from post-frac analysis.

  3. New understanding of the complexity of groundwater flow in Chalk catchments of the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, D.; Shand, P.; Gooddy, D.; Abesser, C.; Bloomfield, J.; Mathias, S.; Butler, A.; Williams, A.; Binley, A.; Wheater, H.

    2006-12-01

    The Chalk is the largest aquifer in the UK accounting for more than half the groundwater used and nearly a quarter of the total public water supplied in England and Wales. Although the Chalk is a double porosity and permeability medium, transmission of water in the saturated zone depends largely on flow through fractures, the location and distribution of which are controlled by lithology and geological structure. These features operate on a number of spatial scales and so provide a range of flow pathways that can markedly affect both stream flow and water quality. In addition, overlying Palaeogene or superficial deposits can act as controls on recharge and zones of increased groundwater storage. As part of a major initiative on Lowland Catchment Research in the UK two Chalk sub-catchments, in the River Thames basin, the rivers Pang and Lambourn, have been the focus of an intensive set of studies. The catchments have been characterised using a multidisciplinary approach. This has resulted in an improved understanding of the way such catchments work and the mechanisms that control groundwater flow. The low fracture porosity gives rise to a low specific yield, which means that large fluctuations in water table elevation beneath the interfluves are not uncommon. Consequently, groundwater catchments differ from the topographic catchments and their size varies seasonally. This means, for example, that groundwater might be flowing to the River Pang in winter but to the River Thames in summer. It also means that various flow features in the catchment may be active at different locations and times during the year. Four flow systems have been identified, through a detailed analysis of the data; a shallow, but rapid flow system; a slower, deeper system; a very high velocity system developed in large diameter solution enhanced fractures and a system found in the river valley sediments. The interconnections between and within these systems can be poor and sometimes vary on a

  4. 78 FR 79709 - Duke Energy Florida, Inc., Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant Post-Shutdown...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... COMMISSION Duke Energy Florida, Inc., Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant Post-Shutdown... Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS) Accession No. ML13340A009), for the Crystal River Unit 3... PSDAR on Thursday, January 16, 2014, from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m., EST, at the Crystal River Nuclear...

  5. Typical well nonexistent in Austin Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Mickey, V.

    1981-11-01

    Discoveries of localized large-capacity reservoirs capable of sustaining high-rate production distinguish the current Austin Chalk play from past booms in the S.E. Texas trend. The chalk gained its reputation for high initial potentials with quick decline rates in the area of the Pearsall field in Frio County; this is southwest of the current focus of play in Burleson, Lee, Fayette, Washington, and Gonzales Counties. In this portion of the vast producing trend a different kind of rock exists - one that is highly fractured and gives up large amounts of hydrocarbons for a sustained period. An example of high-rate sustained production is in the Birch Creek area near Lake Somerville in Burleson County. Projected reserves should average 100,000 to 125,000 bbl/well. With varying amounts of associated gas from 400 MMCF to one billion cubic feet. Initial production tests on these wells range from 200 to 500 bopd and 200 MCFD to 3 MMCFD. After several months of production, the wells indicate capacity to hold up to initial performance.

  6. Temporal variability of micro-organic contaminants in lowland chalk catchments: New insights into contaminant sources and hydrological processes.

    PubMed

    Manamsa, K; Lapworth, D J; Stuart, M E

    2016-10-15

    This paper explores the temporal variation of a broad suite of micro organic (MO) compounds within hydrologically linked compartments of a lowland Chalk catchment, the most important drinking water aquifer in the UK. It presents an assessment of results from relatively high frequency monitoring at a well-characterised site, including the type and concentrations of compounds detected and how they change under different hydrological conditions including exceptionally high groundwater levels and river flow conditions during 2014 and subsequent recovery. This study shows for the first time that within the Chalk groundwater there can be a greater diversity of the MOs compared to surface waters. Within the Chalk 26 different compounds were detected over the duration of the study compared to 17 in the surface water. Plasticisers (0.06-39μg/L) were found to dominate in the Chalk groundwater on 5 visits (38.4%) accounting for 14.5% of detections but contributing highest concentrations whilst other compounds dominated in the surface water. Trichloroethene and atrazine were among the most frequently detected compounds. The limit for the total pesticide concentration detected did not exceed EU/UK prescribed concentration values for drinking water. Emerging organic compounds such as caffeine, which currently do not have water quality limits, were also detected. The low numbers of compounds found within the hyporheic zone highlight the role of this transient interface in the attenuation and breakdown of the MOs, and provision of an important ecosystem service. PMID:26850859

  7. Austin Chalk (!) Petroleum System: Upper Cretaceous, Southeastern Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, W.C.; Katz, B.J.; Robison, V.D.

    1995-10-01

    The Austin Group (Coniacian-Santonian) is a sequence of interstratified chalk and marl deposited during a sea-level highstand as a transgressive unit. Austin Chalk deposition occurred on a southeastward-dipping carbonate ramp that exhibits distinctive onshore and offshore chalk lithofacies. Discrete intervals within offshore Austin lithofacies display good to excellent source rock potential. Organic carbon content ranges upward to 20.0 wt. % with generation potentials exceeding 45 mg HC/g of rock measured. Source potential increases basinward where offshore chalk units exhibit increases in both organic richness and net thickness. These organically rich units display an affinity for the Type II reference curve. Hydrogen index values typically exceed 300 mg HC/g TOC. Several geochemical indices suggest that the oil-window is located at relatively shallow depths (6,700 ft). Offshore chalks sourced onshore Austin reservoirs through lateral migration (along fractures and stylolites) which occurred during the middle Tertiary. Hydrocarbons may also have been sourced from the underlying Eagle Ford Shale (Turonian). Austin Shale reservoirs are characterized by low porosity/low permeability dual pore systems consisting of microporous matrix and fractures. Diagenesis (mechanical compaction, styloitization, and calcite cementation) has strongly modified Austin Chalk pore systems. Matrix porosity generally decreases with increasing depth because of progressive burial diagenesis. Austin reservoirs typically have two major sets of fractures; reservoir performance is related to fracture connectivity. Austin Chalk reservoirs are sealed by the overlying Taylor Marl (Campanian).

  8. Race horses vs work horses: Competition between the nuclear weapons labs in the 1950s

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, S.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a discussion of the missions and research programs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and details the competition between the two nuclear weapons laboratories in the 1950's. (FI)

  9. Race horses vs work horses: Competition between the nuclear weapons labs in the 1950s

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, S.

    1992-06-01

    This document provides a discussion of the missions and research programs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and details the competition between the two nuclear weapons laboratories in the 1950`s. (FI)

  10. Russian/US nuclear weapons labs share NDT technologies for emergency response

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    In December 1995 a team of NDT experts from Los Alamos National Laboratory travelled to the Russian city of Sarov, also known as Arzamas-16, to officially transfer to Russia NDT equipment--a mobile radiography system--built for use in nuclear emergency response. Previously, during the period August 29 through September 16, 1994, nine Russian nuclear weapons experts had been trained on the safe and effective use and maintenance of this NDT equipment, a mobile radiography capability, at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The training occurred mainly at Los Alamos` Technical Area 8--where NDT in support of the US nuclear weapons program has taken place since the 1940s. The Russians came from the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the Russian Federal Nuclear Centers at Arzamas-165 (VNIIEF) and Chelyabinsk-70 (VNIITF).

  11. Intrinsic and Carrier Colloid-facilitated transport of lanthanides through discrete fractures in chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, N.; Tran, E. L.; Klein-BenDavid, O.; Teutsch, N.

    2015-12-01

    Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste is the long term solution for the disposal of long lived radionuclides and spent fuel. However, some radionuclides might be released from these repositories into the subsurface as a result of leakage, which ultimately make their way into groundwater. Engineered bentonite barriers around nuclear waste repositories are generally considered sufficient to impede the transport of radionuclides from their source to the groundwater. However, colloidal-sized mobile bentonite particles ("carrier" colloids) originating from these barriers have come under investigation as a potential transport vector for radionuclides sorbed to them. As lanthanides are generally accepted to have the same chemical behaviors as their more toxic actinide counterparts, lanthanides are considered an acceptable substitute for research on radionuclide transportation. This study aims to evaluate the transport behaviors of lanthanides in colloid-facilitated transport through a fractured chalk matrix and under geochemical conditions representative the Negev desert, Israel. The migration of Ce both with and without colloidal particles was explored and compared to the migration of a conservative tracer (bromide) using a flow system constructed around a naturally fractured chalk core. Results suggest that mobility of Ce as a solute is negligible. In experiments conducted without bentonite colloids, the 1% of the Ce that was recovered migrated as "intrinsic" colloids in the form of carbonate precipitates. However, the total recovery of the Ce increased to 9% when it was injected into the core in the presence of bentonite colloids and 13% when both bentonite and precipitate colloids were injected. This indicates that lanthanides are essentially immobile in chalk as a solute but may be mobile as carbonate precipitates. Bentonite colloids, however, markedly increase the mobility of lanthanides through fractured chalk matrices.

  12. Environmental radioactivity levels in the Cumberland River at the Hartsville Nuclear Project site, 1975-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    Samples of surface water taken from the Cumberland River during the period from 1975 through 1982 exhibited radioactivity levels less than 1% of the maximum permissible concentrations published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Radioactivity concentrations reported herein are typical of natural radioactivity levels with slight indications of influences from fallout of radioactivity from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

  13. Colloid facilitated transport of lanthanides through discrete fractures in chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Emily; Klein Ben-David, Ofra; Teutsch, Nadya; Weisbrod, Noam

    2015-04-01

    Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste is the internationally agreed-upon, long term solution for the disposal of long lived radionuclides and spent fuel. Eventually, corrosion of the waste canisters may lead to leakage of their hazardous contents, and the radionuclides can ultimately make their way into groundwater and pose a threat to the biosphere. Engineered bentonite barriers placed around nuclear waste repositories are generally considered sufficient to impede the transport of radionuclides from their storage location to the groundwater. However, colloidal-sized mobile bentonite particles eroding from these barriers have come under investigation as a potential transport vector for radionuclides sorbed to them. In addition, the presence of organic matter in groundwater has been shown to additionally facilitate the uptake of radionuclides by the clay colloids. This study aims to evaluate the transport behaviors of radionuclides in colloid-facilitated transport through a fractured chalk matrix and under geochemical conditions representative of the Negev desert, Israel. Lanthanides are considered an acceptable substitute to actinides for research on radionuclide transportation due to their similar chemical behavior. In this study, the migration of Ce both with and without colloidal particles was explored and compared to the migration of a conservative tracer (bromide). Tracer solutions containing known concentrations of Ce, bentonite colloids, humic acid and bromide were prepared in a matrix solution containing salt concentrations representative of that of the average rain water found in the Negev. These solutions were then injected into a flow system constructed around a naturally fractured chalk core. Samples were analyzed for Ce and Br using ICP-MS, and colloid concentrations were determined using spectrophotographic analysis. Breakthrough curves comparing the rates of transportation of each tracer were obtained, allowing for comparison of

  14. Evaluation of Austin Chalk from cores

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    To evaluate the economic and producing capacity of the Austin Chalk it is necessary to recognize the existence of 2 types of reservoirs, the matrix and the fracture reservoir. These 2 reservoirs are vastly different in their ability to store and produce hydrocarbons. A detailed definition of each and an understanding of their interdependence and interaction is necessary for a successful evaluation. The fracture reservoir can, in its natural state, have a very high permeability and capacity to transmit liquids or gas. It can have significant storage capacity. Matrix porosity and oil saturation indicate zones of matrix hydrocarbon accumulation. The permeability present would not flow significant amounts of fluid without the presence of a fracture system, either natural or artificially induced. Fractures must have sufficient permeability to reduce pressure in the fracture approaching well-bore flowing pressure.

  15. Evidence of influence of regional and local heterogeneities within a chalk karst aquifer based on nitrates and chlorides analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Janyani, S.; Dupont, J. P.; Massei, N.; Dörfliger, N.

    2012-04-01

    In Upper Normandy, a region located in the western Paris Basin, the main source of drinking water comes from the karst aquifer. Developing under the chalk plateaus, it is a covered aquifer overlaid by superficial formations of clay-with-flints and loess. Clay-with-flints result from chalk weathering whereas loess are wind periglacial deposits. The local geologic and hydrogelogic contexts are characterized by a mature development of sinkholes. The chalk karst is causing turbidity, often linked to the fast infiltration of surface water, carrying the products of river and slope erosion and associated contaminants into the aquifer through the sinkholes. Several authors have shown the potential of turbidity as a marker of suspended elements transport and karst conduits fast transport. In this study, we conducted monthly monitoring of 11 boreholes located in the upstream watershed near boreholes (surveyed by the French Geological Survey BRGM): Graveron-Semerville in the Southern department of Upper Normandy (Eure) and Rocquemont in the Norhtern department of Upper Normandy (Seine-Maritime). The monitoring carried out included water level and electrical conductivity (reflecting total water mineralization) measurements, and major elements analysis. In any case, the water levels are similar over time (in accordance with the reference borehole). High mineralizations are observed in the Eure boreholes with significant anomalies of nitrate (70 to 130 mg/l ) and chloride (35 to 90 mg/l). For the Seine Maritime boreholes, no anomalies in nitrates and chlorides were found. To explain such differences, the agricultural activities are not sufficiently different from the study site. The explanation would then come from different reservoirs involved in water storage: loessic formations, thicker and more spreaded in the Seine Maritime department and clay with flints, of significantly higher thickness on average in the Eure department. We also discuss the influence of the drainage

  16. Horizontal well drilled into deep, hot Austin chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, D.; Johnson, M.; Godfrey, B.

    1995-04-03

    Bent-housing steerable downhole motors helped maintain course for a deep, hot, horizontal well in the Austin chalk. The Navasota Unit No. 1 was planned as a B zone, single downdip lateral, Austin chalk horizontal well with a maximum departure from vertical of 3,767 ft and a planned total depth (TD) of 17,342 ft measured depth (MD)/14,172 ft TVD. The Austin chalk was found significantly deeper in this well than planned, which resulted in an actual TD of 17,899 ft MD/14,993 ft TVD, the deepest (TVD) horizontal well in the Austin chalk to date. The well was spudded on August 6, 1994, and took 52 days to reach TD. The static bottom hole temperature was almost 350 F. The paper describes the well plan, drilling results, and the lateral section.

  17. Experimental formation of chalk from calcareous ooze. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Seyfried, W.E.; Johnson, T.C.

    1981-02-15

    Samples of calcareous ooze collected from the tropical and equatorial Atlantic Ocean were subjected to hydrothermal alteration in order to simulate the diagenesis of chalk. Changes in mineralogy and morphology of enclosed microfossils were measured. (ACR)

  18. The invertebrate ecology of the Chalk aquifer in England (UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice, L.; Robertson, A. R.; White, D.; Knight, L.; Johns, T.; Edwards, F.; Arietti, M.; Sorensen, J. P. R.; Weitowitz, D.; Marchant, B. P.; Bloomfield, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    The Chalk is an important water supply aquifer, yet ecosystems within it remain poorly understood. Boreholes (198) in seven areas of England (UK) were sampled to determine the importance of the Chalk aquifer as a habitat, and to improve understanding of how species are distributed. Stygobitic macro-invertebrates were remarkably common, and were recorded in 67 % of boreholes in unconcealed Chalk, although they were not recorded in Chalk that is concealed by low-permeability strata and thus likely to be confined. Most species were found in shallow boreholes (<21 m) and boreholes with deep (>50 m) water tables, indicating that the habitat is vertically extensive. Stygobites were present in more boreholes in southern England than northern England (77 % compared to 38 %). Only two species were found in northern England compared to six in southern England, but overall seven of the eight stygobitic macro-invertebrate species found in England were detected in the Chalk. Two species are common in southern England, but absent from northern England despite the presence of a continuous habitat prior to the Devensian glaciation. This suggests that either they did not survive glaciations in the north where glaciers were more extensive, or dispersal rates are slow and they have never colonised northern England. Subsurface ecosystems comprising aquatic macro-invertebrates and meiofauna, as well as the microbial organisms they interact with, are likely to be widespread in the Chalk aquifer. They represent an important contribution to biodiversity, and may influence biogeochemical cycles and provide other ecosystem services.

  19. Appropriate use criteria in clinical routine practice: implications in a nuclear cardiology lab.

    PubMed

    Gimelli, Alessia; Rovai, Ilaria; Liga, Riccardo; Pasanisi, Emilio Maria; Marzullo, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    The efforts for a broad application of the appropriate use criteria to reduce inappropriate nuclear stress testing have frequently been unsuccessful and the reported rates of inappropriateness have varied widely between studies. We sought to analyze the criteria of clinical appropriateness of a cohort of consecutive patients referred to our nuclear cardiology laboratory to perform stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and to assess the relationships between test appropriateness and the evaluation of ischaemia. A cohort of 251 consecutive patients, admitted to our Institute from January to March 2015, who underwent stress/rest MPI on a dedicated cardiac camera equipped with cadmium-zinc-telluride detectors, was selected. The level of clinical appropriateness of each MPI test was categorized in each patient according to the AUC criteria. According to the accepted criteria, the majority of the MPI stress-tests could be classified as clinically appropriate (218 of 251, 87 % of the tests), while only 16 (6 %) and 17 (7 %) resulted of uncertain appropriateness or clearly inappropriate, respectively. Of the 251 appropriate tests, 22 (10 %), 65 (30 %), and 131 (60 %) showed the presence of a mild (SDS < 4), moderate (4 ≥ SDS < 7), and severe (SDS ≥ 7) ischemic burden, respectively, while none of the inappropriate test showed moderate-to-severe ischaemia (P < 0.001 for comparisons). The rate of inappropriate MPI tests is considerably low in a high-volume laboratory. Appropriate and inappropriate studies identify patients at high and low probability of significant ischemia, respectively, providing insights on the effects of the level of appropriateness on stress-test results. PMID:26961179

  20. 76 FR 77023 - In the Matter of Florida Power Corporation, et al., Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... Opportunity for Hearing,'' was published in the Federal Register on August 30, 2011 (76 FR 53972). No comments... COMMISSION In the Matter of Florida Power Corporation, et al., Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant...) and nine other entities are the owners of Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant (Crystal...

  1. Influence of lithofacies and diagensis on Norwegian North Sea chalk reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Brasher, J.E.; Vagle, K.R.

    1996-05-01

    The depositional mechanism of chalk is a key influence in the chalk`s ultimate reservoir quality. Classically, the depositional mechanism is interpreted from core descriptions. Where core data are lacking, dipmeter and borehole imagery logs have proven useful in making lithofacies assessments. Criteria for recognition of three chalk categories are established. Category III chalks correspond to those chalks that have been deposited by gravity flows or slumping and tend to have the best reservoir parameters. Category I chalks are most often affiliated with pelagic deposition and tend to have the poorest reservoir parameters. Category II chalks are intermediate between I and III. Anomalously high primary porosities have been maintained in Norwegian North Sea chalks where the effects of mechanical and chemical compaction have been limited. The diagenetic pathway of a chalk reflects changes brought about by mechanical and chemical compaction. Five factors most heavily influence the diagenetic pathway: (1) burial depth, (2) chalk type, (3) overpressuring, (4) presence of hydrocarbons, and (5) original grain size. Assessments of the sedimentological model, diagenetic pathway, and resultant reservoir quality are provided in case studies of Edda, Tor, and Eldfisk fields. Because the distribution of chalk is largely independent of existing structures, most fields have a component of stratigraphic/diagenetic trapping. Each case study shows unique examples of how petrophysical and reservoir engineering data can be incorporated in assessments of chalk type and the diagenetic pathway and how they may affect reservoir parameters and productivity.

  2. Understanding heterogeneity in UK Chalk catchments and its influence on groundwater flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, D. W.; Vounaki, T.; Jackson, C. R.; Hughes, A. G.; Wheater, H. S.

    2008-12-01

    The numerical simulation of groundwater flooding is increasingly necessary as this problem is gaining recognition from government and regulators and climate change may bring more extreme events. The Natural Environment Research Council of the UK is funding the British Geological Survey, Imperial College, and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology to examine the problem of groundwater flooding in the Cretaceous Chalk of Berkshire, 50 kilometres west of London. Typically regional resource issues can be examined using traditional groundwater models that do not consider in detail the influence of flow in the unsaturated zone, but the delays in recharge transmission through this zone to the water table may be very significant in terms of flood timing and prediction. The position of ground elevation relative to water table is clearly important but not often considered in groundwater resource modelling. Groundwater level and stream (and flood) flow responses are important data that may be hard to gather from typical groundwater monitoring systems. These problems have been examined in a Chalk catchment in Berkshire where good records of the 2000-1 and 2003 flooding events have been collected, including flooded extent, rainfall, groundwater levels, river and spring flows. From this analysis, it appears that two groundwater mounds develop in the upper part of the Pang and Lambourn catchments. These mounds intersect dry valleys, which flowed for several months, the consequent flooding causing considerably disruption. Modelling of these events is providing new insight into the heterogeneity of Chalk transmissivity and storage parameters, enhanced knowledge of its dual permeability and porosity and demonstrating the importance of understanding the post-depositional hydrogeological history of the aquifer.

  3. Homing in on sweet spots in Cretaceous Austin chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.E. ); Sonnenberg, F.P.

    1993-11-29

    In discussing the nature and causes of fracturing in the Cretaceous Austin chalk of south central Texas, many geologists and operators involved in horizontal drilling of the chalk consider regional rock stress as the probable main cause of the fractures. If Austin chalk fractures are mainly the result of regional extensional stress without localizing factors, then fractured sweet spots are randomly distributed and successful exploration is more or less a matter of luck, usually dependent upon the coincidental placement of a seismic line. But if local, deep-seated structure or basement topography are the main causes of sweet spots, then a successful exploration method would be to first delineate the basement paleo structure or topography and secondly, place a seismic line to confirm the delineated features. Finding localities of maximum fracturing and production would than be based on scientific logic rather than luck. It is the purpose of this article to present the results of an examination of these alternative causes for the Austin chalk fracturing in the hope of determining the most cost effective exploration method for the fractured chalk reservoir.

  4. Gas/oil capillary pressure at chalk at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Christoffersen, K.R.; Whitson, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    Accurate capillary pressure curves are essential for studying the recovery of oil by gas injection in naturally fractured chalk reservoirs. A simple and fast method to determine high-pressure drainage capillary pressure curves has been developed. The effect of gas/oil interfacial tension (IFT) on the capillary pressure of chalk cores has been determined for a methane/n-pentane system. Measurements on a 5-md outcrop chalk core were made at pressures of 70, 105, and 130 bar, with corresponding IFT`s of 6.3, 3.2, and 1.5 mN/m. The results were both accurate and reproducible. The measured capillary pressure curves were not a linear function of IFT when compared with low-pressure centrifuge data. Measured capillary pressures were considerably lower than IFT-scaled centrifuge data. It appears that the deviation starts at an IFT of about 5 mN/m. According to the results of this study, the recovery of oil by gravity drainage in naturally fractured chalk reservoirs may be significantly underestimated if standard laboratory capillary pressure curves are scaled by IFT only. However, general conclusions cannot be made on the basis on only this series of experiments on one chalk core.

  5. 75 FR 13320 - Florida Power Corporation, et al., Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant; Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... March 27, 2009 (74 FR 13967). There will be no change to radioactive effluents that affect radiation... [Part 73, Power Reactor Security Requirements, 74 FR 13926, 13967 (March 27, 2009)]. The licensee... COMMISSION Florida Power Corporation, et al., Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant;...

  6. 75 FR 16518 - Florida Power Corporation, et al.; Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... FR 13926- 13993), effective May 26, 2009, with a full implementation date of March 31, 2010, requires... have a significant effect on the quality of the human environment (75 FR 13320, dated March 19, 2010... COMMISSION Florida Power Corporation, et al.; Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant; Exemption...

  7. 75 FR 69710 - Florida Power Corporation, et al.; Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... March 27, 2009; 74 FR 13926. There will be no change to radioactive effluents that affect radiation... impact [Part 73, Power Reactor Security Requirements, March 27, 2009; 74 FR 13926]. With its request to... COMMISSION Florida Power Corporation, et al.; Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant...

  8. 75 FR 70953 - Florida Power Corporation, et al.; Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... site security plans. The amendments to 10 CFR 73.55 published on March 27, 2009 (74 FR 13926... on the quality of the human environment (75 FR 69710 dated November 15, 2010). This exemption is... COMMISSION Florida Power Corporation, et al.; Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant; Exemption...

  9. What are the governing processes during low-flows in a chalk catchment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubega Musuuza, Jude; Coxon, Gemma; Hutton, Chris; Howden, Nicholas; Woods, Ross; Freer, Jim; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Low flows are important because they lead to the prioritisation of different consumptive water usages, imposition of restrictions and bans, raising of water tariffs and higher production costs to industry. The partitioning of precipitation into evaporation, storage and runoff depends on the local variability in meteorological variables and site-specific characteristics e.g., topography, soils and vegetation. The response of chalk catchments to meteorological forcing especially precipitation is of particular interest because of the preferential flow through the weathered formation. This makes the observed stream discharge groundwater-dominated and hence, out of phase with precipitation. One relevant question is how sensitive the low flow characteristics of such a chalk catchment is to changes in climate and land use. It is thus important to understand all the factors that control low stream discharge periods. In this study we present the results from numerical sensitivity analysis experiments performed with a detailed physically-based model on the Kennet, a sub-catchment of the River Thames, in the UK during the historical drought years of the 1970's.

  10. Cyclic sedimentation, synsedimentary volcanism, microfabrics, and fracture intensity in the Austin Chalk, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, S.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Pelagic depositional environments of the Austin Chalk (Coniacian-Santonian) were influenced by sea-level variation, planktonic productivity, and allochthonous detrital input. Subtle differences in chalk facies influence fracture intensity, therefore imposing stratigraphic variability on hydrologic properties of the Austin Chalk. Variations in fracture intensity may affect ground-water flow through the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site south of Dallas in the same way that they influence hydrocarbon production in South Texas. The lower Austin Chalk was deposited during transgression. Glauconitic sandstone is overlain by cyclic chalk containing chalk-filled channels. Meter-thick chalk/marl cycles have frequencies in the Milankovitch spectrum. Marl accumulated during episodes of decreased planktonic productivity. Maximum flooding is indicated by organic-rich marls in the upper part of the Lower Austin Chalk. Shallowing during deposition of the middle and upper Austin Chalk is indicated by increasing abundance of winnowed lag deposits and firm grounds, resulting in increased faunal diversity. Authigenic clay, a product of alteration of volcanic ash codeposited with the chalk and marl, increases ductility in the middle Austin Chalk. The stratigraphic distribution of authigenic clay corresponds to disseminated biotite, quartz, and feldspar phenocrysts in most samples of the middle Austing Chalk. Authigenic clay decreases porosity, influences porosity-permeability relationships, and provides a regionally traceable low SP log response that correlates with low fracture intensity.

  11. Horizontal spacing, depletion, and infill potential in the Austin Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Kyte, D.G.; Meehan, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    There have been more than 4500 laterals drilled in the Austin Chalk. This paper looks at estimated ultimate recoveries (EUR) on a barrels/acre basis for these Austin Chalk wells. Baffels/acre recoveries were computed by estimating ultimate per-well recoveries, drilled density and the impact of vertical production. The data were then analyzed for depletion and infill potential. Certain areas were selected for further study using an artificial neural network. The network was built and used to study the effects of parameters such as lateral length, first production date, structure of the Austin Chalk, etc. on these recoverable barrel/acre numbers. The methodology and regional results of the study are reviewed with detailed analyses shown in selected areas.

  12. Managing extremes in groundwater-dominated catchments: the Chalk of SE England (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheater, H. S.

    2009-12-01

    The Chalk aquifers of Southern and Eastern England are a dominant local and regional water resource, and rivers located on the Chalk outcrop have a characteristic behaviour and support valuable and protected aquatic ecosystems. In these catchments, typically less than 2% of rainfall is translated into stormflow response. Infiltration occurs into an unsaturated zone that varies in depth from zero at the stream to 100m at the interfluve. Seasonal groundwater recharge is translated into a seasonal river hydrograph, and the length of flowing river expands and contracts seasonally - so-called ‘bourne’ behaviour. Groundwater catchment areas also vary temporally, and stream-aquifer interactions can be complex. Extensive and long duration flooding in 2000/2001 highlighted the vulnerability of these systems to extremes of long duration rainfall (weeks and months). Source areas for runoff expand into dry valleys, springs break out in ‘new’ locations and given the normally low %runoff, highly non-linear flow response occurs. Conversely, droughts are also of major concern, particularly given scenarios of climate change for SE England. Water quality issues are also important, particularly nutrient pollution. These management concerns have focussed attention on the need for improved understanding, and for appropriate modelling tools for flood risk assessment and drought and water quality management. The paper addresses recent research into the historic behaviour of these systems under extremes, the relative roles of fracture and porous matrix flow in the unsaturated zone under extremes, and the nature of stream-aquifer interactions, including detailed experimental studies. Challenges for modelling are identified; for groundwater flooding conventional flood design approaches are inadequate, but groundwater models lack appropriate topographic constraints and the required spatial and temporal resolution; for drought, recharge estimation and diffuse pollution, better

  13. Chemical pretreatment of Savannah River Site nuclear waste for disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Walker, D.D.

    1992-12-31

    This work describes two processes, Extended Sludge Processing and In-Tank Precipitation, which have been developed and demonstrated at full-scale to pretreat the Savannah River Site High-Level Waste for permanent disposal. These processes will be carried out in waste storage tanks which have been modified for chemical processing. These processes will concentrate the radioactivity into a small volume for vitrification. The bulk of the waste will be sufficiently decontaminated such that it can be disposed of as a low-level waste. The decontaminated waste will be incorporated into a cement wasteform in the Saltstone Facility.

  14. Human Geophagia, Calabash Chalk and Undongo: Mineral Element Nutritional Implications

    PubMed Central

    Abrahams, Peter W.; Davies, Theo C.; Solomon, Abiye O.; Trow, Amanda J.; Wragg, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    The prime aim of our work is to report and comment on the bioaccessible concentrations – i.e., the soluble content of chemical elements in the gastrointestinal environment that is available for absorption – of a number of essential mineral nutrients and potentially harmful elements (PHEs) associated with the deliberate ingestion of African geophagical materials, namely Calabash chalk and Undongo. The pseudo-total concentrations of 13 mineral nutrients/PHEs were quantified following a nitric-perchloric acid digestion of nine different Calabash chalk samples, and bioaccessible contents of eight of these chemical elements were determined in simulated saliva/gastric and intestinal solutions obtained via use of the Fed ORganic Estimation human Simulation Test (FOREhST) in vitro procedure. The Calabash chalk pseudo-total content of the chemical elements is often below what may be regarded as average for soils/shales, and no concentration is excessively high. The in vitro leachate solutions had concentrations that were often lower than those of the blanks used in our experimental procedure, indicative of effective adsorption: lead, a PHE about which concern has been previously raised in connection with the consumption of Calabash chalk, was one such chemical element where this was evident. However, some concentrations in the leachate solutions are suggestive that Calabash chalk can be a source of chemical elements to humans in bioaccessible form, although generally the materials appear to be only a modest supplier: this applies even to iron, a mineral nutrient that has often been linked to the benefits of geophagia in previous academic literature. Our investigations indicate that at the reported rates of ingestion, Calabash chalk on the whole is not an important source of mineral nutrients or PHEs to humans. Similarly, although Undongo contains elevated pseudo-total concentrations of chromium and nickel, this soil is not a significant source to humans for any of the

  15. Impact-assessment report: Chalk Point Steam Electric Station aquatic-monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The Chalk Point Steam Electric Station (SES), owned and operated by the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO), is located in the estuarine portion of the Patuxent River just above the Benedict Bridge near Aquasco, Maryland. The plant's two coal-fired units use once-through cooling systems and pursuant to the Code of Maryland Regulations 10.50.01.13, which governs water-quality impact assessments for thermal discharges, PEPCO is required to: assess compliance with mixing-zone specifications that relate discharge flows and thermal-plume size to advective and diffusive properties of the receiving-water body; determine the magnitude and consequences of plant impacts on spawning and nursery areas for organisms that are representative of and important to the receiving body; and determine the magnitude and dollar value of impingement losses.

  16. Sediment transport and siltation of brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) spawning gravels in chalk streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acornley, R. M.; Sear, D. A.

    1999-02-01

    Deposition rates of fine sediment into brown trout spawning gravels were measured at monthly intervals for a period of one year in a small channel of the River Test, Hampshire. Data were also collected on stream discharge, water depth, flow velocity and suspended sediment concentrations. Deposition rates followed a seasonal pattern and were maximal during periods of high discharge in the late winter/early spring when suspended sediment concentrations were high. The material deposited in the spawning gravels included silts and fine sands (<250 m) that were transported in suspension and coarser fragments of low density tufa-like material that were transported as bed load. The ecological implications of fine sediment deposition for salmonid egg survival in chalk streams are considered.

  17. Completion techniques for horizontal wells in the Pearsall Austin Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, C.D.; Handren, P.J. )

    1992-05-01

    Oryx Energy Co. used three basic completion techniques and various combinations of them to complete 20 horizontal wells in the Pearsall Austin Chalk. The completion method selected is based on a general set of guidelines. In this paper additionally, equipment selection and various types of workover operations are reviewed.

  18. Why Chalk Breaks into Three Pieces When Dropped

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    It has been the author's experience over many years, no doubt shared by others, that a stick of chalk usually breaks into three pieces when accidentally dropped onto the floor. I rarely gave it any thought, apart from noting that the fundamental mode of vibration of a freely supported, rigid rod has two nodes at an equal distance from each…

  19. Chalk-microfluidic: flooding microsystems with reactive fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, Amélie; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Li, Lei; Hiorth, Aksel

    2014-05-01

    Experiments on core scale and field tests that have been carried out the last decade have clearly shown that water chemistry affects the final oil recovery. However, there is generally no consensus in the scientific community of why additional oil is released. Part of the reason for this is that there are very few in-situ observations of how the water chemistry affects fluid distributions on the pore scale, and/or the pore surface characteristics. In this work, as a first step, our aim is to focus on in-situ observations of single phase flow and interactions at the pore scale. In order to work at this small scale, we first investigate how to control the flow location. We propose to use the same principle as "paper-microfluidic": some areas of the chalk are chemically treated so that no fluid flows inside while other areas let the fluids flow in the chalk pores. Since chalk and paper obviously has different mechanical behavior, we need to adapt this technique. Custom-made microsystems with chalk and calcite will be presented. We will then show experiments with reacting fluids in these microsystems. These experiments are observed using wide field fluorescence microscopy and white light vertical/phase shift interferometric microscopy.

  20. Polymer mud improves chalk gas production and profits

    SciTech Connect

    Cornett, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A new polymer drilling fluid is being used successfully in the Austin Chalk area of Texas to improve wellbore stability, decrease formation damage and significantly increase production rates. This article discusses development of the fluid, laboratory test results, field performance and benefits to operators.

  1. Controls on fracture distribution in the Giddings Austin Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.T. )

    1990-09-01

    Fracture distribution in the Giddings Austin Chalk is controlled by both structure and the stratigraphy of the Austin Group. Parameters that most affect reservoir performance include fracture width, height, and spacing, as well as the number of fracture sets and their orientations. Lateral variance of these parameters is a function of structural position, while vertical change is related to stratigraphy. The Austin Chalk productive trend is thought to coincide with the hingeline of the Gulf Coast basin, where extension has been concentrated during subsidence of the basin. Fracturing is attributed to a number of mechanisms including normal faulting, bending over buried structures, gravity creep, differential compaction, and aquathermal pressuring. A change in structural style from faulting to flexure takes place from west to east across the Giddings field, accompanied by a change in fracture distribution. In the west, fractures develop only in close proximity to faults whereas in the east they are more widely distributed over broad warps. Stratigraphic controls include lithology, porosity, bed thickness, and ductility contrast between adjacent beds. The Austin Chalk consists of sparse biomicrite interbedded with marls, shales, and clay seams. In general, thin beds are more highly fractured than thick beds, and clean limestone is more highly fractured than marl or shale. Where the more ductile marls and clays exceed a critical thickness, fractures tend to terminate within individual chalk beds, resulting in barriers to vertical flow within the reservoir.

  2. Nano sized clay detected on chalk particle surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skovbjerg, L. L.; Hassenkam, T.; Makovicky, E.; Hem, C. P.; Yang, M.; Bovet, N.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2012-12-01

    Chalk is a sedimentary rock consisting mostly of micrometer sized particles of biogenic calcite (CaCO3). It forms the reservoirs for oil in the Danish part of the North Sea and important drinking water aquifers in northern Europe. The interaction between organic molecules and the particle surfaces has a strong influence on the migration of oil in the reservoirs. Adhesion of oil components to chalk particle surfaces is thought to significantly reduce production and efforts are being made to determine the mechanisms behind enhanced/improved oil recovery (EOR/IOR) during water flooding. Aquifers beneath industrial areas can be heavily polluted with organic compounds and similar adsorption mechanisms could influence the geographical extent of the contaminant plume. Chalk, as a sedimentary rock, has been studied extensively for many years but the properties of the particle surfaces, where adsorption takes place, are largely unknown. In this study, we have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show that the grain surfaces in offshore and onshore chalk are more heterogeneous than previously assumed. The particles are not simply calcite surfaces but are partially covered by clay that is only 1-4 nm thick. With chemical force mapping (CFM), we have probed the surface using a tip coated with organic molecules to represent a tiny, mono-functionalized oil droplet. The functional groups of the self assembled monolayer on the tip were either -CH3 or -COO-. From maps of adhesion, it is evident that in calcite saturated water, both the polar and the nonpolar functional groups adhere to the nano sized clay particles but not to calcite. This is fundamentally important information for the development of conceptual and chemical models to explain wettability alterations in chalk reservoirs.

  3. Dual FIB-SEM 3D Imaging and Lattice Boltzmann Modeling of Porosimetry and Multiphase Flow in Chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, A. J.; Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.; Heath, J. E.; Petrusak, R.

    2010-12-01

    Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) is an often-applied technique for determining pore throat distributions and seal analysis of fine-grained rocks. Due to closure effects, potential pore collapse, and complex pore network topologies, MIP data interpretation can be ambiguous, and often biased toward smaller pores in the distribution. We apply 3D imaging techniques and lattice-Boltzmann modeling in interpreting MIP data for samples of the Cretaceous Selma Group Chalk. In the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Selma Chalk is the apparent seal for oil and gas fields in the underlying Eutaw Fm., and, where unfractured, the Selma Chalk is one of the regional-scale seals identified by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for CO2 injection sites. Dual focused ion - scanning electron beam and laser scanning confocal microscopy methods are used for 3D imaging of nanometer-to-micron scale microcrack and pore distributions in the Selma Chalk. A combination of image analysis software is used to obtain geometric pore body and throat distributions and other topological properties, which are compared to MIP results. 3D data sets of pore-microfracture networks are used in Lattice Boltzmann simulations of drainage (wetting fluid displaced by non-wetting fluid via the Shan-Chen algorithm), which in turn are used to model MIP procedures. Results are used in interpreting MIP results, understanding microfracture-matrix interaction during multiphase flow, and seal analysis for underground CO2 storage. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences as part of an Energy Frontier Research Center. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Geology and hydrology of the Elk River, Minnesota, nuclear-reactor site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norvitch, Ralph F.; Schneider, Robert; Godfrey, Richard G.

    1963-01-01

    The Elk River, Minn., nuclear-reactor site is on the east bluff of the Mississippi River about 35 miles northwest of Minneapolis and St. Paul. The area is underlain by about 70 to 180 feet of glacial drift, including at the top as much as 120 feet of outwash deposits (valley train) of the glacial Mississippi River. The underlying Cambrian bedrock consists of marine sedimentary formations including artesian sandstone aquifers. A hypothetically spilled liquid at the reactor site could follow one or both of two courses, thus: (1) It could flow over the land surface and through an artificial drainage system to the river in a matter of minutes; (2) part or nearly all of it could seep downward to the water table and then move laterally to the river. The time required might range from a few weeks to a year, or perhaps more. The St. Paul and Minneapolis water-supply intakes, 21 and 25 miles downstream, respectively, are the most critical points to be considered in the event of an accidental spill. Based on streamflow and velocity data for the Mississippi River near Anoka, the time required for the maximum concentration of a contaminant to travel from the reactor site to the St. Paul intake was computed to be about 8 hours, at the median annual maximum daily discharge. For this discharge, the maximum concentration at the intake would be about 0.0026 microcurie per cubic foot for the release of 1 curie of activity into the river near the reactor site.

  5. Virtual Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Ruth

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the potential of computers in teaching laboratories to spare the lives of animals; however, it is felt that in areas of physiology education, virtual labs are not as desirable a learning experience for advanced students as live animal labs. (Author/AIM)

  6. Redox conditions in the Late Cretaceous Chalk Sea: the possible use of cerium anomalies as palaeoredox indicators in the Cenomanian and Turonian Chalk of England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeans, Christopher V.; Wray, David S.; Williams, C. Terry

    2015-09-01

    The cerium anomalies preserved in the Chalk have been investigated as possible palaeoredox indicators of the Late Cretaceous Sea and its sediment. This has been based upon over a hundred new rare earth element analyses of selected samples and grain size fractions from the Chalk. Particular attention has been given to the methodology of differentiating between the cerium anomalies preserved in the bioclastic calcite and those in carbonate-fluorapatite preserved in the acetic acid insoluble residues of chalks. Variations in the cerium anomaly of different particle size fractions of uncemented chalks suggest that fractionation of rare earth elements between the Chalk's seawater and the various organisms that contributed skeletal material to the bioclastic calcite of the Chalk may have occurred. Post-depositional processes of calcite cementation and late diagenetic sulphidisation have had no apparent effect on the cerium anomaly of the acetic acid insoluble residues. The cerium anomalies associated with the acetic acid insoluble residues from (1) an alternating sequence of chalks and marls from Ballard Cliff (Dorset, UK) typical of Milankovitch cyclicity show a marked diagenetic pattern, whereas those from (2) non-volcanic and volcanic marls display a pattern that is best explained by the variations in the availability of phosphorus and the timing of argillisation of volcanic glass during diagenesis. The general conclusion is drawn that the cerium anomalies preserved in the Chalk can provide an insight into the changing palaeoredox conditions in the Late Cretaceous Sea as well as in the pore fluids of its sediments.

  7. Seismic geomorphology of the Danish Chalks, offshore, North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Florian; van Buchem, Frans; Schmidt, Ingelise

    2014-05-01

    The Upper Cretaceous and Lowermost Paleocene chalk deposits of the North Sea Basin constitute a unique phase in the evolution of carbonate facies, through the rock-forming dominance of fine grained calcareous plankton, particularly coccolithophorids. These planktonic organisms were deposited over extensive areas and very often laid down as laterally extensive, regular dm-scale bedded packages, that locally may reach a thickness of up to 1250 m. In the Danish Graben, the depositional conditions for the chalk sedimentation changed dramatically during the middle of the Upper Cretaceous. At this time the basin topography was inverted, radically changing the position of the depocenters and the ocean floor morphology. In uplifted areas local erosion and long phases of non-deposition occurred, whereas in areas of subsidence thick packages of chalk accumulated. Along the newly created highs, mass waste deposition took place at the deca-kilometre scale. In this presentation we will document evidence for the tectonic inversion, and pay particular attention to the rich pallet of geomorphological features that characterise this tectonically active period. This study benefitted from a recently re-processed 3D seismic dataset (6000 km²), and a regional well-log and biostratigraphic dataset. In addition, the seismic interpretation applied advanced seismic interpretation software (PaleoScan™), which uses a patented model grid that links up seismic points and honours interpreted horizon constraints resulting in a seismic Relative Geological Time model. Standard seismic attributes, displayed upon horizons from a 3D RGT model of the chalk package, have shown to be very effective in the illustration and interpretation of complex chalk depositional features. Special attention has been focussed on mass waste deposits around inverted structures and salt diapirs. Several different mass waste complexes have been documented in 3D, illustrating a number of typical features such as

  8. Horizontal wells up odds for profit in Giddings Austin chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, W.T. )

    1992-02-17

    This paper reports on horizontal drilling in the Giddings field Austin chalk which has significantly improved average well recoveries and more than offset increased drilling costs. Although not the panacea originally promoted, horizontal drilling, in Giddings field, offers economic profits to the average investor. Economic analysis indicates that the typical investor is making money by earning returns in excess of market values. Field-wide development will, therefore, remain active unless oil prices or average well recoveries fall below $12/bbl or 112,000 bbl of oil equivalent (BOE), respectively. The application of technological innovation in the Giddings field may culminate in the drilling of over 2,000 horizontal Austin chalk wells, and has conceivably increased recoverable reserves by 400 million BOE.

  9. A prototype expert system for the monitoring of defected nuclear fuel elements in Canada deuterium uranium reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, B.J.; Green, R.J. ); Che, C.W.T. )

    1992-06-01

    This paper reports on a prototype expert system for fuel failure monitoring in Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) power reactors. Based on a coolant activity analysis, the system is able to provide information in an operating reactor on the number of fuel failures, the average defect size, and the amount of tramp uranium deposited on the in-core surfaces of the primary heat transport system. The fission product release model used in the system is based on results from an in-reactor experimental program at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. The expert system is validated against fuel failure data from a number of CANDU power reactors.

  10. Monitoring compaction and compressibility changes in offshore chalk reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, G.; Hardy, R. ); Eltvik, P. )

    1994-03-01

    Some of the North Sea's largest and most important oil fields are in chalk reservoirs. In these fields, it is important to measure reservoir compaction and compressibility because compaction can result in platform subsidence. Also, compaction drive is a main drive mechanism in these fields, so an accurate reserves estimate cannot be made without first measuring compressibility. Estimating compaction and reserves is difficult because compressibility changes throughout field life. Installing of accurate, permanent downhole pressure gauges on offshore chalk fields makes it possible to use a new method to monitor compressibility -- measurement of reservoir pressure changes caused by the tide. This tidal-monitoring technique is an in-situ method that can greatly increase compressibility information. It can be used to estimate compressibility and to measure compressibility variation over time. This paper concentrates on application of the tidal-monitoring technique to North Sea chalk reservoirs. However, the method is applicable for any tidal offshore area and can be applied whenever necessary to monitor in-situ rock compressibility. One such application would be if platform subsidence was expected.

  11. Why Chalk Breaks into Three Pieces When Dropped

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    It has been the author's experience over many years, no doubt shared by others, that a stick of chalk usually breaks into three pieces when accidentally dropped onto the floor. I rarely gave it any thought, apart from noting that the fundamental mode of vibration of a freely supported, rigid rod has two nodes at an equal distance from each end. For example, a baseball bat has a node in the barrel (the sweet spot) about 15 cm from the end and another node in the handle. However, chalk is not expected to break at the node points, since maximum stress arises at the antinode in the middle of the chalk where bending is a maximum. Richard Feynman described a similar problem with long sticks of spaghetti.1 He found that they always break into three or more pieces when bent slowly beyond their breaking point, rather than simply breaking in half. He was unable to figure out why, although the problem was solved many years later2 and is nicely illustrated by Vollmer and Mollmann.3

  12. Maternal Geophagy of Calabash Chalk on Foetal Cerebral Cortex Histomorphology

    PubMed Central

    EKANEM, Theresa Bassey; EKONG, Moses Bassey; ELUWA, Mokutima Amarachi; IGIRI, Anozeng Oyono; OSIM, Eme Efiom

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calabash chalk, a kaolin-base substance is a common geophagic material mostly consumed by pregnant women. This study investigated its effect on the histomorphology of the foetal cerebral cortex. Methods: Twelve gestating Wistar rats were divided equally into groups 1 and 2. On pregnancy day seven (PD7), group 2 animals were administered 200 mg/kg body weight of calabash chalk suspension, while group 1 animals served as the control and received 1 ml of distilled water, by oral gavages and for 14 days (PD7-PD20). On PD21, the dams were sacrificed, and the foetuses removed, examined for gross malformations, weighed and culled to two foetuses per mother. Their whole brains were excised, weighed and preserved using 10% buffered formalin, and routinely processed by haematoxylin and eosin, and Luxol fast blue methods. Results: The foetuses showed no morphological change, but their mean body weights was higher (p=0.0001). Histomorphological sections of the cerebral cortex showed hypertrophy and hyperplasia of cells in all the cortical layers, with less demonstrated Nissl and higher (p=0.001) cellular population compared with the control group. Conclusion: Calabash chalk cause body weight increase and histomorphological changes in the cerebral cortex of foetuses. PMID:26715904

  13. Horizontal technology helps spark Louisiana`s Austin chalk trend

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1996-04-29

    A handful of companies paced by some of the most active operators in the US are pressing the limits of horizontal technology to ramp up Cretaceous Austin chalk exploration and development (E and D) across Louisiana. Companies find applications in Louisiana for lessons learned drilling horizontal wells to produce chalk intervals in Texas in Giddings, Pearsall, and Brookeland fields. Continuing advances in horizontal well technology are helping operators deal with deeper, hotter reservoirs in more complex geological settings that typify the chalk in Louisiana. Better horizontal drilling, completion, formation evaluation, and stimulation techniques have enabled operators to produce oil and gas from formations previously thought to be uneconomical. Most of the improved capabilities stem from better horizontal tools. Horizontal drilling breakthroughs include dual powered mud motors and retrievable whipstocks, key links in the ability to drill wells with more than one horizontal lateral. Better geosteering tools have enabled operators to maintain horizontal wellbores in desired intervals by signaling bit positions downhole while drilling. This paper reviews the technology and provides a historical perspective on the various drilling programs which have been completed in this trend. It also makes predictions on future drilling successes.

  14. Fracture detection techniques in the Georgetown and Austin Chalk formations

    SciTech Connect

    Julian, P.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study relates the success of detecting and analyzing naturally fractured systems in the Austin Chalk and Georgetown Formations from log evaluations. The Austin Chalk is composed principally of calcareous unicellular algal remains called cocospheres and their disunited, gearshaped, skeletal remains called cocoliths. The Georgetown Formation is a hard, dense, and finely brittle limestone. Both formations contain matrix porosity, but are dependent on open fracture systems for economical hydrocarbon production. Hence, defining and evaluating the developed fracture systems before setting an expensive casing string is important. The Dual Induction Log and the Compensated Neutron-Formation Density Log offers an economical method of evaluating these fracture systems. Case studies in Robertson, Milam, and Burleson Counties, Texas have shown that fracture systems near the wellbore can be detected. Attempts to determine the existence of hydrocarbons in fracture systems using logs were successful in the Austin Chalk and Georgetown Formations. Full core analyses were also successful in determining the existence of these fracture systems. However, obtaining core samples on all wells as a method of determining fracture systems is not recommended due to the high cost of coring.

  15. H CANYON PROCESSING IN CORRELATION WITH FH ANALYTICAL LABS

    SciTech Connect

    Weinheimer, E.

    2012-08-06

    Management of radioactive chemical waste can be a complicated business. H Canyon and F/H Analytical Labs are two facilities present at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC that are at the forefront. In fact H Canyon is the only large-scale radiochemical processing facility in the United States and this processing is only enhanced by the aid given from F/H Analytical Labs. As H Canyon processes incoming materials, F/H Labs provide support through a variety of chemical analyses. Necessary checks of the chemical makeup, processing, and accountability of the samples taken from H Canyon process tanks are performed at the labs along with further checks on waste leaving the canyon after processing. Used nuclear material taken in by the canyon is actually not waste. Only a small portion of the radioactive material itself is actually consumed in nuclear reactors. As a result various radioactive elements such as Uranium, Plutonium and Neptunium are commonly found in waste and may be useful to recover. Specific processing is needed to allow for separation of these products from the waste. This is H Canyon's specialty. Furthermore, H Canyon has the capacity to initiate the process for weapons-grade nuclear material to be converted into nuclear fuel. This is one of the main campaigns being set up for the fall of 2012. Once usable material is separated and purified of impurities such as fission products, it can be converted to an oxide and ultimately turned into commercial fuel. The processing of weapons-grade material for commercial fuel is important in the necessary disposition of plutonium. Another processing campaign to start in the fall in H Canyon involves the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel for disposal in improved containment units. The importance of this campaign involves the proper disposal of nuclear waste in order to ensure the safety and well-being of future generations and the environment. As processing proceeds in the fall, H Canyon will have a substantial

  16. Understanding groundwater, surface water, and hyporheic zone biogeochemical processes in a Chalk catchment using fluorescence properties of dissolved and colloidal organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapworth, D. J.; Gooddy, D. C.; Allen, D.; Old, G. H.

    2009-09-01

    Understanding groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) interaction in Chalk catchments is complicated by the degree of geological heterogeneity. At this study site, in southern United Kingdom, alluvial deposits in the riparian zone can be considered as a patchwork of varying grades and types with an equally varied lateral connectivity. Some display good connection with the river system and others good connection with the groundwater system and, by definition, poorer connectivity with the surface water. By coupling tangential flow fractionation (TFF) with fluorescence analysis we were able to characterize the organic matter in the river and hyporheic zone. There is a significant proportion of particulate and colloidal fluorescent organic matter (FOM) within the river system and at depth within the gravels beneath the river channel. At depth in the hyporheic zone, the surface water inputs are dampened by mixing with deeper groundwater FOM. The shallow (0-0.5 m below river bed) hyporheic zone is highly dynamic as a result of changing surface water inputs from upstream processes. Labile C in the form of protein-like FOM appears to be attenuated preferentially compared to fulvic-like fluorescence in the hyporheic zone compared to the adjacent gravel and sand deposits. These preliminary findings have important implications for understanding nutrient and trace element mobility and attenuation within the groundwater, surface water, and hyporheic zone of permeable Chalk catchments. Fluorescence analysis of dissolved organic matter has been shown to be a useful environmental tracer that can be used in conjunction with other methods to understand GW-SW processes within a permeable Chalk catchment.

  17. Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2000-04-14

    The proposed DOE action considered in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is to implement appropriate processes for the safe and efficient management of spent nuclear fuel and targets at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken County, South Carolina, including placing these materials in forms suitable for ultimate disposition. Options to treat, package, and store this material are discussed. The material included in this EIS consists of approximately 68 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of spent nuclear fuel 20 MTHM of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at SRS, as much as 28 MTHM of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel from foreign and domestic research reactors to be shipped to SRS through 2035, and 20 MTHM of stainless-steel or zirconium-clad spent nuclear fuel and some Americium/Curium Targets stored at SRS. Alternatives considered in this EIS encompass a range of new packaging, new processing, and conventional processing technologies, as well as the No Action Alternative. A preferred alternative is identified in which DOE would prepare about 97% by volume (about 60% by mass) of the aluminum-based fuel for disposition using a melt and dilute treatment process. The remaining 3% by volume (about 40% by mass) would be managed using chemical separation. Impacts are assessed primarily in the areas of water resources, air resources, public and worker health, waste management, socioeconomic, and cumulative impacts.

  18. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Project summary report, Elk River Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Adams, J.A.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes information concerning the decommissioning of the Elk River Reactor. Decommissioning data from available documents were input into a computerized data-handling system in a manner that permits specific information to be readily retrieved. The information is in a form that assists the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in its assessment of decommissioning alternatives and ALARA methods for future decommissionings projects. Samples of computer reports are included in the report. Decommissioning of other reactors, including NRC reference decommissioning studies, will be described in similar reports.

  19. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: IMPACTS OF FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS ON SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Magoulas, V.

    2013-06-03

    The US has a non-proliferation policy to receive foreign and domestic research reactor returns of spent fuel materials of US origin. These spent fuel materials are returned to the Department of Energy (DOE) and placed in storage in the L-area spent fuel basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The foreign research reactor returns fall subject to the 123 agreements for peaceful cooperation. These “123 agreements” are named after section 123 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and govern the conditions of nuclear cooperation with foreign partners. The SRS management of these foreign obligations while planning material disposition paths can be a challenge.

  20. Environmental assessment for DOE permission for off-loading activities to support the movement of commercial low level nuclear waste across the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This environmental assessment investigates the potential environmental and safety effects which could result from the land transport of low level radioactive wastes across the Savannah River Plant. Chem-Nuclear Systems operates a low level radioactive waste burial facility adjacent to the Savannah River Plant and is seeking permission from the DOE to transport the waste across Savannah River Plant.

  1. Reading Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Lorna

    This guide is intended for use in conducting a reading lab for a broad group of workers ranging from nonreaders to persons reading at a fifth-grade level. Presented first is a course overview that includes the following: information on the course's targeted population, student selection process, and demographics; strategies for adult remediation;…

  2. Lab Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Linda

    1997-01-01

    Discusses barriers individuals face in using computers in the classroom and the importance of eliminating these barriers. The article notes that visual, mobility, and hearing impairments are the disabilities most often encountered in school labs and that numerous software and hardware tools are available to help individuals with these disabilities…

  3. Labs: 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igelsrud, Don, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article presents a variety of topics discussed in this column and at a biology teachers' workshop concerning the quality and value of lab techniques used for teaching high school biology. Topics included are Drosophila salivary glands, sea urchins, innovations, dyes and networking. (CW)

  4. Role of shale thickness on vertical connectivity of fractures: application of crack-bridging theory to the Austin Chalk, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Peggy; Cooke, Michele L.

    2001-07-01

    Contrasting material properties of alternating chalk and shale layers control vertical connectivity of fractures. Our field observations within the Austin Chalk, Texas indicate that: (1) the majority of vertical fractures occur in chalk layers and abut against contacts with shale layers, (2) thicker shale layers have greater resistance to fracture propagation than thinner shale layers. From these observations we hypothesize both the resistance of shale to fracturing and the thickness of shale layers may inhibit fracture propagation across the shale and into the next chalk layer. We model crack propagation within a three-layered system (brittle chalk:fracture resistant shale:brittle chalk). The modeled crack extends across the shale, but closing tractions applied to the crack segment within the shale layer simulate resistance of shale to fracturing. The crack-tip lies a short distance within the unfractured chalk layer simulating a coplanar flaw with potential to propagate. If the stress intensity factor at the flaw exceeds the chalk fracture toughness, the crack propagates, thereby bridging and eventually rupturing the shale layer. For any chalk thickness, there is a critical shale thickness above which fractures cross the shale layer and below which fractures arrest at shale. Finite Element Method (FEM) analysis evaluates the influence of shale ductility within the chalk: shale: chalk system. Although remote and fluid pressure driven fractures produce identical stress intensity factors in elastic chalk/shale systems, lower driving stresses are required to propagate fluid pressure driven fractures through a system ductile shale layers than fractures under remote tension.

  5. Fracture characterization of greater Ekofisk area chalks from core analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    Fracture characteristics are one of the input parameters for both waterflood design and subsidence analysis of the Ekofisk field. The fracture parameters of Maastrichtian age (Tor Formation) and Danian age (Ekofisk Formation) reservoir chalks have been determined from detailed description and analysis of 18 cores. Fracture pattern, mineralization, orientation, and intensity were all logged for the major groups of natural fractures. The fracture characteristics vary with chalf sedimentology. As a result, the fracturing in the Tor and Ekofisk Formation reservoirs shows some fundamental differences. The Tor Formation contains two fracture types. One set, stylolite-associated fractures, form an anastomosing network of nearly vertical extension fractures that extend between 5 and 20 cm from individual stylolites. These fractures occur predominantly in thin debris-flow facies chalks that are typical of the Tor Formation. Pilot waterflood results indicate that this fracture set imparts a permeability anisotropy to the Tor Formation reservoir in the pilot waterflood area. The second fracture set effects both Tor and Ekofisk Formation rocks. These tectonic fractures are conjugate, through-going, and planar, and they dip between 60/sup 0/ and 70/sup 0/. This group of fractures occurs predominantly in massive debris-flow facies chalks that are common in, but not restricted to, the Ekofisk Formation. Fracture orientation data indicate that a radial pattern of tectonic fractures may be present in this field. The field waterflood is being designed to accommodate this highly varied fracture pattern and analyses are under way to determine the possibility of fracture slip and closure during subsidence.

  6. Groundwater recharge dynamics in unsaturated fractured chalk: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, Claudia; Pastore, Nicola; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicolaetta M.

    2016-04-01

    The heterogeneity of the unsaturated zone controls its hydraulic response to rainfall and the extent to which pollutants are delayed or attenuated before reaching groundwater. It plays therefore a very important role in the recharge of aquifers and the transfer of pollutants because of the presence of temporary storage zones and preferential flows. A better knowledge of the physical processes in the unsaturated zone would allow an improved assessment of the natural recharge in a heterogeneous aquifer and of its vulnerability to surface-applied pollution. The case study regards the role of the thick unsaturated zone of the Cretaceous chalk aquifer in Picardy (North of France) that controls the hydraulic response to rainfall. In the North Paris Basin, much of the recharge must pass through a regional chalk bed that is composed of a porous matrix with embedded fractures. Different types of conceptual models have been formulated to explain infiltration and recharge processes in the unsaturated fractured rock. The present study analyses the episodic recharge in fractured Chalk aquifer using the kinematic diffusion theory to predict water table fluctuation in response to rainfall. From an analysis of the data, there is the evidence of 1) a seasonal behavior characterized by a constant increase in the water level during the winter/spring period and a recession period, 2) a series of episodic behaviors during the summer/autumn. Kinematic diffusion models are useful for predict preferential fluxes and dynamic conditions. The presented approach conceptualizes the unsaturated flow as a combination of 1) diffusive flow refers to the idealized portion of the pore space of the medium within the flow rate is driven essentially by local gradient of potential; 2) preferential flow by which water moves across macroscopic distances through conduits of macropore length.

  7. Sulfur isotope patterns of iron sulfide and barite nodules in the Upper Cretaceous Chalk of England and their regional significance in the origin of coloured chalks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeans, Christopher V.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Hu, Xu-Fang

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between the development of iron sulfide and barite nodules in the Cenomanian Chalk of England and the presence of a red hematitic pigment has been investigated using sulfur isotopes. In southern England where red and pink chalks are absent, iron sulfide nodules are widespread. Two typical large iron sulfide nodules exhibit δ34S ranging from -48.6‰ at their core to -32.6‰ at their outer margins. In eastern England, where red and pink chalks occur in three main bands, there is an antipathetic relationship between the coloured chalks and the occurrence of iron sulfide or barite nodules. Here iron sulfide, or its oxidised remnants, are restricted to two situations: (1) in association with hard grounds that developed originally in chalks that contained the hematite pigment or its postulated precursor FeOH3, or (2) in regional sulfidization zones that cut across the stratigraphy. In the Cenomanian Chalk exposed in the cliffs at Speeton, Yorkshire, pyrite and marcasite (both iron sulfide) nodules range in δ34S from -34.7‰ to +40.0‰. In the lower part of the section δ34S vary from -34.8‰ to +7.8‰, a single barite nodule has δ34S between +26.9‰ and +29.9‰. In the middle part of the section δ34S ranges from +23.8‰ to +40.0‰. In the sulfidization zones that cut across the Cenomanian Chalk of Lincolnshire the iron sulfide nodules are typically heavily weathered but these may contain patches of unoxidised pyrite. In these zones, δ34S ranges from -32.9‰ to +7.9‰. The cross-cutting zones of sulfidization in eastern England are linked to three basement faults - the Flamborough Head Fault Zone, the Caistor Fault and the postulated Wash Line of Jeans (1980) - that have affected the deposition of the Chalk. It is argued that these faults have been both the conduits by which allochthonous fluids - rich in hydrogen sulfide/sulfate, hydrocarbons and possibly charged with sulfate-reducing bacteria - have penetrated the Cenomanian Chalk as

  8. Stimulation results in the Giddings (Austin Chalk) field

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, D.N.

    1995-05-01

    So called ``water-fracs`` have obtained excellent results in the Austin Chalk formation of Giddings field. This inexpensive treatment uses high volumes of water but no proppant. The reasons the treatment is successful include imbibition, gravity drainage, skin damage removal, and repressurization of the reservoir to enhance recovery. Union Pacific Resources Co. (UPRC) has treated about 250 vertical and 150 horizontal wells with very high economic success rates. Incremental recoveries from horizontal well water fracs alone exceed 5 million bbl of oil equivalent (6 Mcf = 1 bbl).

  9. Formation evaluation in the Texas Cretaceous chalk trend

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, E. Jr.; Stedman, D.; Fertl, W.H.

    1982-06-01

    Skilled formation evaluation is essential to economic well completions in the Cretaceous carbonate trend of South and Central Texas. The Austin chalk and Buda lime wells within this trend are known for high initial production rates followed by rapid production decline probably due to completion in zones of insufficient porosity and permeability. Therefore, the proper use of geophysical wireline data to locate fractures and determine fracture quality and hydrocarbon potential prior to setting casing is an essential element in evaluating the economics of any given well. This work details current successful evaluation procedures utilized in the trend. 11 refs.

  10. A geological assessment: What`s ahead for Louisiana Austin chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, W.T.

    1997-06-02

    Both noteworthy and recent, the extension of the Austin chalk horizontal drilling play into Louisiana has been as closely watched as it has been controversial. The play has been controversial for the critics who claim the Louisiana chalk boom is simply the latest chapter in the chalk`s boom and bust history. The play is closely watched by chalk enthusiasts who have seen Louisiana horizontal wells yield as much as 80,000 bbl of oil and 250 MMcf of gas in a single month. Who is right? How will the play develop? This article presents a geological assessment of the play and offers some insights into the future of horizontal drilling in Louisiana.

  11. A unique Austin Chalk reservoir, Van field, Van Zandt County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, J.T. )

    1990-09-01

    Significant shallow oil production from the Austin Chalk was established in the Van field, Van Zandt County, in East Texas in the late 1980s. The Van field structure is a complexly faulted domal anticline created by salt intrusion. The Woodbine sands, which underlie the Austin Chalk, have been and continue to be the predominant reservoir rocks in the field. Evidence indicates that faults provided vertical conduits for migration of Woodbine oil into the Austin Chalk where it was trapped along the structural crest. The most prolific Austin Chalk production is on the upthrown side of the main field fault, as is the Woodbine. The Austin Chalk is a soft, white to light gray limestone composed mostly of coccoliths with some pelecypods. Unlike the Austin Chalk in the Giddings and Pearsall fields, the chalk at Van was not as deeply buried and therefore did not become brittle and susceptible to tensional or cryptic fracturing. The shallow burial in the Van field was also important in that it allowed the chalk to retain primary microporosity. The production comes entirely from this primary porosity. In addition to the structural position and underlying oil source from the Woodbine, the depositional environment and associated lithofacies are also keys to the reservoir quality in the Van field as demonstrated by cores from the upthrown and downthrown (less productive) sides of the main field fault. It appears that at the time of Austin Chalk deposition, the main field fault was active and caused the upthrown side to be a structural high and a more agreeable environment for benthonic organisms such as pelecypods and worms. The resulting bioturbation enhanced the reservoir's permeability enough to allow migration and entrapment of the oil. Future success in exploration for analogous Austin Chalk reservoirs will require the combination of a favorable environment of deposition, a nearby Woodbine oil source, and a faulted trap that will provide the conduit for migration.

  12. Identifying Sources of Non-fallout Nuclear Contamination in Hudson River Sediments by Plutonium and Neptunium isotope ratios.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenna, T. C.; Chillrud, S. N.

    2002-12-01

    In an effort to identify and characterize nuclear contaminants released from sources contained within the Hudson River drainage basin, Pu isotopes and 237Np have been measured in a series of sediment cores collected from various locations within the region. During the last several decades, the Hudson River has received input of radioactive contamination from several sources. The first and most significant, has been global fallout, which was a result of atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons primarily by governments of the United States and Former Soviet Union in the 1950s and 1960s. The second, is contamination resulting from reactor releases at the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant (IPNPP) located on the Hudson River about 35 miles north of New York City. This facility began operation in 1962. A third source of radioactive contamination to the region is contamination resulting from activities at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) located on the Mohawk River, which began operation in 1946. Our research entails identifying different sources of nuclear contamination by measurement of plutonium and neptunium isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The isotopic composition of a nuclear contaminant is a sensitive indicator of its origin. By comparing the isotopic composition measured in fluvial sediments to mean values reported for global fallout (i.e. 240Pu/239Pu = 0.18 ñ 0.014, 237Np/239Pu = 0.48 ñ 0.07, and 241Pu/239Pu = .00194 ñ 00028) it is possible to identify contaminants as non-fallout in origin. To date, we have analyzed selected samples from 3 sediment cores collected from the following locations: 1) the Mohawk River downstream of KAPL, 2) the Hudson River above its confluence with the Mohawk River, and 3) the lower Hudson River at a location in close proximity to IPNPP. Isotopic analysis of sediments from the Mohawk River indicates contamination that is clearly non-fallout in origin (240Pu/239Pu ranges between 0

  13. LabView Based Nuclear Physics Laboratory experiments as a remote teaching and training tool for Latin American Educational Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Sajo-Bohus, L.; Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Gonzalez, W.; Rangel, A.

    2007-10-26

    A virtual laboratory via internet to provide a highly iterative and powerful teaching tool for scientific and technical discipline is given. The experimenter takes advantage of a virtual laboratory and he can execute nuclear experiment at introductory level e.g. Gamma ray detection with Geiger-Mueller Counter at remote location using internet communication technology.

  14. Lab architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2008-04-01

    There are few more dramatic illustrations of the vicissitudes of laboratory architecturethan the contrast between Building 20 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its replacement, the Ray and Maria Stata Center. Building 20 was built hurriedly in 1943 as temporary housing for MIT's famous Rad Lab, the site of wartime radar research, and it remained a productive laboratory space for over half a century. A decade ago it was demolished to make way for the Stata Center, an architecturally striking building designed by Frank Gehry to house MIT's computer science and artificial intelligence labs (above). But in 2004 - just two years after the Stata Center officially opened - the building was criticized for being unsuitable for research and became the subject of still ongoing lawsuits alleging design and construction failures.

  15. Horizontal gas-condensate find brightens Louisiana chalk outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1994-12-19

    A ray of hope may have appeared in the Louisiana portion of the Cretaceous Austin chalk trend after several years of expensive disappointment. OXY USA Inc. plans to use dual leg horizontal wells to develop a fracture chalk reservoir named Masters Creek field in Rapides Parish. The state has approved four 1,920 acre spacing units, one of which contains OXY's A1 Monroe well. The A1 Monroe flowed 6.6 MMcfd of gas with 2,162 b/d of 48[degree] gravity condensate, not oil as previously reported, through a 26/64 in. choke with 6,196 psi flowing tubing pressure from a single southward 4,000 ft horizontal leg at 14,803 ft true vertical depth. Bottomhole pressure is 13,100 psi. OXY called A1 Monroe a significant discovery and said it has additional exploration acreage blocks along the trend. Louisiana exempts production from horizontal wells from state severance tax until all project costs are returned. The paper briefly discusses OXY's program.

  16. Fracture development and mechanical stratigraphy of Austin Chalk, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, K.; Friedman, M.; Spang, J.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanical stratigraphy of the Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk is established from study of fracture intensity along its outcrop trend from Dallas to San Antonio and westward to Langtry, Texas, and in the subsurface from study of cores and/or fracture identification logs from 30 wells. Three mechanical-stratigraphic units are recognized. Representative samples from the three mechanical-stratigraphic units were experimentally shortened, dry, at 10, 17, 34, and 70 MPa confining pressure, at 24/sup 0/C, and at a strain rate of 2.5 x 10/sup -4/ sec/sup -1/ to determine if the relative mechanical behavior observed at the surface could be extrapolated into the subsurface at different simulated burial depths. SEM photomicrographs of undeformed specimens show that smectite and other clays are distributed as large (30 ..mu..m), discrete, amorphous, concentrated masses throughout the chalk. They are comminuted along the induced fracture surfaces where their grain size is 0.5 ..mu..m or less. These observations suggest that smectite acts as a soft-inclusion, localizing shear failure and corresponding weakening the material. 9 figures, 5 tables.

  17. 78 FR 14842 - Crystal River Nuclear Generating Plant, Unit 3; Application for Renewal of License to Facility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... application in the Federal Register on March 9, 2009 (74 FR 10099). The FPC requested withdrawal of the... renewal, which was published in the Federal Register on June 3, 2011 (76 FR 32237). However, since the... COMMISSION Crystal River Nuclear Generating Plant, Unit 3; Application for Renewal of License to...

  18. Investigation of cable deterioration in the containment building of the Savannah River Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.; Jones, L.H.

    1982-08-01

    This report describes an investigation of the deterioration of polyethylene and polyvinylchloride cable materials which occurred in the containment building of the Savannah River nuclear reactor located at Aiken, South Carolina. Radiation dosimetry and temperature mapping data of the containment area indicated that the maximum dose experienced by the cable materials was only 2.5 Mrad at an average operating temperature of 43/sup 0/C. Considering this relatively moderate environment, the amount of material degradation seemed surprising. To understand these findings, an experimental program was performed on the commercial polyethylene and polyvinylchloride materials used at the plant to investigate their degradation behavior under combined ..gamma..-radiation and elevated temperature conditions. It is established that the material deterioration at the plant resulted from radiation-induced oxidation and that the degradation rate can be correlated with local levels of radiation intensity in the containment area.

  19. CONTROL TESTING OF THE UK NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY'S RADBALL TECHNOLOGY AT SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.

    2009-11-23

    The UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall (patent pending), which offers a means to locate and quantify radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. To date, the RadBall has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK. The trials have demonstrated the successful ability of the RadBall technology to be deployed and retrieved from active areas. The positive results from these initial deployment trials and the anticipated future potential of RadBall have led to the NNL partnering with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to further underpin and strengthen the technical performance of the technology. RadBall consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. It has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach places. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly less transparent, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation maps provides information on the spatial distribution and strength of the sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. This study completed at SRNL addresses key aspects of the testing of the RadBall technology. The first set of tests was performed at Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) using various gamma-ray sources and an x-ray machine with known radiological characteristics. The objective of these preliminary tests was to identify the optimal dose and collimator thickness. The second set of tests involved a highly contaminated hot cell. The objective of

  20. Novel insights into Fukushima nuclear accident from isotopic evidence of plutonium spread along coastal rivers.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Olivier; Pointurier, Fabien; Onda, Yuichi; Chartin, Caroline; Hubert, Amélie; Lepage, Hugo; Pottin, Anne-Claire; Lefèvre, Irène; Bonté, Philippe; Laceby, J Patrick; Ayrault, Sophie

    2014-08-19

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident led to important releases of radionuclides into the environment, and trace levels of plutonium (Pu) were detected in northeastern Japan. However, measurements of Pu isotopic atom and activity ratios are required to differentiate between the contributions of global nuclear test fallout and FDNPP emissions. In this study, we used a double-focusing sector field ICP-MS to measure Pu atom and activity ratios in recently deposited sediment along rivers draining the most contaminated part of the inland radioactive plume. Results showed that plutonium isotopes (i.e., (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu, and (242)Pu) were detected in all samples, although in extremely low concentrations. The (241)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios measured in sediment deposits (0.0017-0.0884) were significantly higher than the corresponding values attributed to the global fallout (0.00113 ± 0.00008 on average for the Northern Hemisphere between 31°-71° N: Kelley, J. M.; Bond, L. A.; Beasley, T. M. Global distribution of Pu isotopes and (237)Np. Sci. Total. Env. 1999, 237/238, 483-500). The results indicated the presence of Pu from FDNPP, in slight excess compared to the Pu background from global fallout that represented up to ca. 60% of Pu in the analyzed samples. These results demonstrate that this radionuclide has been transported relatively long distances (∼45 km) from FDNPP and been deposited in rivers representing a potential source of Pu to the ocean. In future, the high (241)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio of the Fukushima accident sourced-Pu should be measured to quantify the supply of continental-originating material from Fukushima Prefecture to the Pacific Ocean. PMID:25014620

  1. Assessment of groundwater usage at Chalk Point power plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    In order to quantify the usage of ground water in an operating electric power plant, a study was initiated in 1978 aimed at determining where in the energy conversion process ground water is used and to suggest, if possible, alternate means for providing this water and/or methods to reduce consumption. The Chalk Point Plant was selected for this study because of its difference in fuel source (coal and oil), and because of its high consumption of ground water (approximately 800,000 to 1,200,000 gallons per day). Located at the confluence of the Patuxent River and Swanson Creek in the southeast corner of Prince George's County, Maryland, it consists of three operating units, with a fourth unit under construction during the survey time. (unit 4 has recently become operational). With the cooperation of the Potomac Electric Power Company, the plant was selected for study and was instrumented with several flow meters. Over a two-year period, this plant has been monitored to provide the information needed to make an assessment of the rates, nature, and methods of water usage in an operating power plant.

  2. Application of thematic mapper imagery to oil exploration in Austin Chalk, central Gulf Coast basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, W.M.

    1988-02-01

    One of the newest major oil plays in the Gulf Coast basin, the Austin Chalk reportedly produces in three belts: an updip belt, where production is from fractured chalk in structurally high positions along faults above 7000 ft; a shallow downdip belt, where the chalk is uniformly saturated with oil from 7000 to 9000 ft; and a deeper downdip belt saturated with gas and condensate below 9000 ft. The updip fields usually occur on the southeastern, upthrown side of the Luling, Mexia, and Charlotte fault zones. Production is from fractures that connect the relatively sparse matrix pores with more permeable fracture systems. The fractures resulted from regional extensional stress during the opening of the Gulf Coast basin on the divergent margin of the North American plate during the Laramide orogeny. The fractures are more common in the more brittle chalk than in the overlying Navarro and underlying Eagle Ford shales, which are less brittle. The oil in the updip traps in the chalk may have been generated in place downdip, and migrated updip along the extension fractures into the updip traps during or after the Laramide orogeny. A fairway of previously unmapped updip faults and drag folds has been mapped using Thematic Mapper imagery and seismic, structural, and resistivity maps near the Nixon field, Burleson County, Texas. This fairway, prospective for oil from the Austin Chalk, contains wells reported to produce from the Austin Chalk which lie along lineaments and linear features on the Thematic Mapper imagery and faults in the seismic and structure maps.

  3. Laboratory determination of effective stress laws for deformation and permeability of chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Teufel, L W; Warpinski, N R

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory deformation and permeability measurements have been made on chalk samples from Ekofisk area fields as a function of confining stress and pore pressure to determine the effective stress laws for chalk. An understanding of the effective stress law is essential to obtain correct reservoir-property data from core analysis and is critical for reservoir management studies and reservoir compaction models. A powerful statistical technique known as the response surface method has been used to analyze our laboratory data determine the form of the effective stress law for deformation and permeability. Experiments were conducted on chalk samples that had a range of porosities from 15% to 36%, because porosity is the dominant intrinsic property that effects deformation and permeability behavior of chalk. Deformation of a 36% porosity chalk was highly nonlinear, but the effective stress law was linear, with {alpha} equal to about unity. Lower-porosity samples showed linear strain behavior and a linear effective stress law with {alpha} as low as 0.74. Analysis of the effective stress law for permeability is presented only for the lowest porosity chalk sample because changes in permeability in the higher-porosity chalk samples due to increasing confining stress or pore pressure were not were large enough, to deduce meaningful effective stress relationships. 15 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The influence of water and supercritical CO2 on the failure behavior of chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liteanu, E.; Spiers, C. J.; de Bresser, J. H. P.

    2013-06-01

    Reduction of compressive strength by injection of water into chalk is a well-known mechanism responsible for increased compaction in chalk reservoirs. This raises the question of whether such effects might be enhanced in the context of long-term storage of CO2 or of CO2 injection for enhanced oil and gas recovery (EOR/EGR) purposes. Therefore, data regarding the effect of supercritical CO2 on the mechanical behavior of chalk are needed. The effect of supercritical CO2 on the short-term failure behavior of wet chalk was accordingly investigated by means of conventional triaxial deformation experiments, performed on Maastrichtian chalk cores under dry conditions, in the presence of saturated chalk solution and using CO2-saturated solution at temperatures simulating reservoir conditions (20-80 °C) and effective confining pressures up to 7 MPa. Increasing temperature from 20 to 80 °C did not show any significant effects on the strength of the dry samples. Addition of aqueous solution to the samples led to drastic weakening of the chalk, the effect being more pronounced at high effective confining pressures (Peff > 3 MPa). Addition of 10 MPa supercritical CO2 to wet samples did not produce any significant additional effect in comparison with the wet samples. All samples showed a yield strength envelope characterized by shear failure at low effective mean stresses giving way to a compaction cap at high mean stresses. The weakening effect of aqueous solution was explained in terms of a reduction in frictional resistance of the material, due to water-enhanced grain-contact cracking, and perhaps pressure solution, with a possible contribution by disjoining pressure effects caused by water adsorption. While CO2 does not seem to reduce short-term failure strength of wet chalk, processes such as intergranular pressure solution have to be considered for assessing mechanical stability of chalk in the context of long-term CO2 storage or EOR/EGR operations.

  5. Nonproliferation impacts assessment for the management of the Savannah River Site aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    On May 13, 1996, the US established a new, 10-year policy to accept and manage foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the US. The goal of this policy is to reduce civilian commerce in weapons-usable highly enriched uranium (HEU), thereby reducing the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation. Two key disposition options under consideration for managing this fuel include conventional reprocessing and new treatment and packaging technologies. The Record of Decision specified that, while evaluating the reprocessing option, ``DOE will commission or conduct an independent study of the nonproliferation and other (e.g., cost and timing) implications of chemical separation of spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors.`` DOE`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation conducted this study consistent with the aforementioned Record of Decision. This report addresses the nonproliferation implications of the technologies under consideration for managing aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site. Because the same technology options are being considered for the foreign research reactor and the other aluminum-based spent nuclear fuels discussed in Section ES.1, this report addresses the nonproliferation implications of managing all the Savannah River Site aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel, not just the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. The combination of the environmental impact information contained in the draft EIS, public comment in response to the draft EIS, and the nonproliferation information contained in this report will enable the Department to make a sound decision regarding how to manage all aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site.

  6. Seismic architecture of the Chalk Group from onshore reflection data in eastern Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Julien; Anderskouv, Kresten; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Boussaha, Myriam; Nielsen, Lars; Stemmerik, Lars; Surlyk, Finn; Thibault, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    The Upper Cretaceous-Danian chalk is well exposed in the 14 km long coastal cliff of Stevns Klint (eastern Denmark). The cliff is a world renowned for its spectacular exposure of the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary. Based on regional geological knowledge of the field and cores, the characteristics of the Chalk Group have been well constrained. Distinct sedimentary facies have been encountered; the sedimentology, the biostratigraphy, the diagenesis and the reservoir properties have been thoroughly investigated and reported. Stimulated by the intensive geological research, the field studies have been completed with the acquisition of an extensive set of subsurface data. The data include high resolution 2D multichannel seismics onshore and offshore, a seismic refraction profile, two entirely cored boreholes including wireline logs, GPR cross-hole tomography, thermographic analysis, etc. We intend to compile and merge the geological and geophysical datasets to investigate the variation of the Chalk Group properties and their signature in the subsurface. In this communication, the seismic reflection data are being analysed. Very high resolution litho-, bio- and cyclostratigraphy can be correlated with the seismic stratigraphy. Several seismic facies are identified in the Chalk Group: the 'transparent' (white chalk), the stratified (marl-chalk alternations), the crudely stratified (flint-rich chalk) and the hummocky (bryozoan mounds). The units notably vary in thickness at a relatively small scale. The variations confirm the complex shelf organisation which was highly influenced by bottom currents. In addition to the stratigraphic observations, peculiar deformation structures can be recognised. The area has been supposedly tectonically stable since deposition as the coastal cliff lacks fault offset but the succession has been uplifted of c. 1 km. The main fracture patterns are associated with the recent unloading of the ice, opening shallow horizontal fractures

  7. Diffusive parameters of tritiated water and uranium in chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Descostes, M.; Pili, E.; Felix, O.; Frasca, B.; Radwan, J.; Juery, A.

    2012-07-15

    The Cretaceous Chalk of North-western Europe exhibits a double porosity (matrix and fracture) providing pathways for both slow and rapid flow of water. The present study aims at understanding and predicting the contaminant transfer properties through a significant section of this formation, with a particular emphasis on diffusion. This requires to study the nature of porosity and to perform diffusion experiments in representative samples using uranium and tritiated water (HTO), respectively taken as a reactive tracer and an inert one. The diffusive parameters, i.e. the accessible porosity and the effective diffusion coefficient were determined. Additional information was obtained with mercury porosimetry, gravimetric water content, textural and mineralogical characterization. The diffusion tests performed with HTO appear to be the best method to measure the total accessible porosity in any type of porous media, especially those having large pore size distributions. Our study demonstrates that classical gravimetric water content measurements are not sensitive to the reduction in pore size as opposed to HTO diffusion tests because capillary water is not extracted by conventional gravimetric method but can still be probed by diffusion experiments. We found effective diffusion coefficients D{sub e}(U(VI)) near 4 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}s{sup -1}). The slower migration of U(VI) compared to HTO indicates sorption, with R{sub d}(U(VI)) from 100 to 360 mL g{sup -1}. These values are one order of magnitude larger than other determinations of the U(VI) sorption coefficient because only the matrix porosity is concerned here. The migration of U(VI) in chalk is only limited by sorption on ancillary Fe-Pb-bearing minerals. Transport of HTO and U(VI) is independent of the porosity distribution. Uranium diffusion in the chalk matrix porosity is fast enough to allow the total invasion of the pore space within characteristic time scales of the order of 1000 years. This results in a

  8. How to drill and complete Austin chalk wells

    SciTech Connect

    Coffman, C.A.

    1982-07-01

    Problems in drilling and completing Texas wells with high-pressure gas and lower-pressure zones (where the mud system is lost into the pay zone) are described; wells that have a gas zone in the lower zone and oil zone in the upper; wells with an oil zone in upper and lower zones but with different gravity weight and color; and wells where high-pressure gas kicks are found in the upper zone and returns are lost in the lower. Topics include isolating the pay zone and cementing the liner. Whether to frac or acidize is determined by checking fractures, fluorescences, and gas shows. Goal is to reach the fault in the chalk.

  9. Austin Chalk: cross-link gel water, slick water fracs common in Giddings field

    SciTech Connect

    Mickey, V.

    1981-05-01

    Of the approx. 600 wells drilled in the Giddings field, Austin Chalk trend in the last year, most were probably completed by cross-link gel fracs or slick water fracs. Although open hole completions are not uncommon in the chalk, they are not really practical in most situations, given the 600 to 800 ft of gross pay usually encountered in the Austin Chalk trend. Most of the open hole completions occur when an operator takes a kick while drilling and decides to drop a mud pill over the zone, run casing above it, cement it in and produce the interval open hole. Chalk wells are subject to kick at any time during drilling because of natural fracturing systems throughout the trend. Mud weights are generally fairly light for faster drilling, approx. 9.4 to 9.8 lb, depending on the particular area.

  10. The Austin Chalk--Drilling and completion techniques-Marcelina Creek Field study

    SciTech Connect

    Betz, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    Exxon Company, U.S.A. has spent considerable time and effort learning how to minimize formation damage in the lost returns prone and clay sensitive Austin Chalk formation. To date, Exxon has successfully drilled 24 Austin Chalk wells in the Marcelina Creek Field in Wilson County, Texas, utilizing a variety of drilling and completion techniques in an effort to determine the optimum method of drilling and completing Austin Chalk wells. This paper describes these different techniques and reviews actual results. Although Exxon has not concluded which drilling and completion technique yields optimum Austin Chalk wells in this field, this paper attempts to develop a correlation between well productivity and the type of drilling and completion technique used.

  11. Trace fossils and paleoenvironments of lower and middle Austin Chalk (upper Cretaceous), north-central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, W.C. ); Reaser, D.F. )

    1990-09-01

    Outcrops of lower and middle Austin Chalk in the vicinity of Cedar Hill and Waxahachie, Texas (designated site of the Superconducting Super Collider), are profusely bioturbated. The lower Austin (Coniacian) disconformably overlies the Eagle Ford Shale (Turonian) and consists of about 60 m of medium- to thick-bedded indurated chalk with thin intervening marls. The middle Austin (Santonian) is composed of about 65 m of thick-bedded marl containing thin beds of argillaceous chalk. Both chalk and marl units are moderately to intensely bioturbated. However, ichnofossils are more conspicuous in chalks where multiple episodes of burrowing are recognizable. Early formed burrows (indistinct mottles) represent the initial softground Austin substrate. Later generations of well-preserved burrows record a post-compaction (dewatered) firmground substrate. No hardgrounds have been recognized. The abundance and diversity of ichnofossils in Austin strata are in marked contrast to the paucity of other megafauna, except large inoceramids. Planolites, Teichichnus, Thalassinoides, and Chondrites are the predominant ichnogenera in the lower Austin; these forms are superimposed on a background of nondiagnostic, irregularly shaped mottles. Some strata contain well-preserved J-, S-, T-, U-, Y-, and X-shaped traces having menicus fillings. These subhorizontal, endogenic, full-relief burrows are typically infilled with dark gray (pyritic) chalk. Locally, pyrite or Fe-oxide-filled vertical tubes are preserved. Many traces have been deformed by compaction. The middle Austin contains Planolites, Chondrites, Thalassinoides, Pseudobilobites, and both small- and large-diameter, sinuous, horizontal burrows. These ichnofossils are infilled with chalk or comminuted shells and are more resistant to weathering than the surrounding middle Austin marl. Intensely burrowed horizons occur in association with distinctive Fe-stained chalk beds.

  12. Fluxes of radiocaesium associated with suspended sediment in rivers impacted by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Hugh; Blake, Will; Onda, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Yamashiki, Yosuke; Matsuura, Yuki; Taylor, Alex

    2014-05-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident which followed the earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011 resulted in the release of Cs-134 and Cs-137 into the surrounding environment, where highly elevated levels are reported. There is considerable concern about the redistribution of these radioactive contaminants from the atmosphere to vegetation, soil and aquatic systems. Fluvial redistribution of radiocaesium may contaminate downstream areas that were subject to low fallout and deliver significant quantities of highly contaminated fine sediment to the coastal zone. This study reports on the magnitude of fluvial transfer of Cs-134 and Cs-137 through river networks located across the fallout region. Initially six nested river monitoring stations were established within the Abukuma River basin from June 2011. Subsequently, an additional 23 stations were established between October 2012 and January 2013, which included stations within the Abukuma basin as well as smaller coastal catchments north and south of the power plant. Combined, these 29 sites represent a globally-unique river monitoring network designed to quantify sediment-associated transfer of radiocaesium from headwaters to the Pacific Coast of Japan. The catchments range in area from 8 to 5,172 km2 and span a large range in spatially-averaged radiocaesium inventories. Flow and turbidity (converted to suspended sediment concentration) were measured at each station while bulk suspended sediment samples were collected at regular intervals using time-integrated samplers to allow measurement of Cs-134 and Cs-137 activity concentrations by gamma spectrometry. Preliminary monitoring data showed highly elevated but also highly variable fluxes of radiocaesium in rivers across the fallout region. High magnitude flows in response to typhoon events exported large quantities of radiocaesium. Rivers are an important and continuing source of radiocaesium input to the coastal environment and the Pacific Ocean in

  13. The effect of chalk on the finger-hold friction coefficient in rock climbing.

    PubMed

    Amca, Arif Mithat; Vigouroux, Laurent; Aritan, Serdar; Berton, Eric

    2012-11-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the effect of chalk on the friction coefficient between climber's fingers and two different rock types (sandstone and limestone). The secondary purpose was to investigate the effects of humidity and temperature on the friction coefficient and on the influence of chalk. Eleven experienced climbers took part in this study and 42 test sessions were performed. Participants hung from holds which were fixed on a specially designed hang board. The inclination of the hang board was progressively increased until the climber's hand slipped from the holds. The angle of the hang board was simultaneously recorded by using a gyroscopic sensor and the friction coefficient was calculated at the moment of slip. The results showed that there was a significant positive effect of chalk on the coefficient of friction (+18.7% on limestone and +21.6% on sandstone). Moreover sandstone had a higher coefficient of friction than limestone (+15.6% without chalk, +18.4% with chalk). These results confirmed climbers' belief that chalk enhances friction. However, no correlation with humidity/temperature and friction coefficient was noted which suggested that additional parameters should be considered in order to understand the effects of climate on finger friction in rock climbing. PMID:23259237

  14. 3D characterization of the fracture network in a deformed chalk reservoir analogue: The Lagerdorf case

    SciTech Connect

    Koestler, A.G.; Reksten, K.

    1994-12-31

    Quantitative descriptions of the 3D fracture networks in terms of connectivity, fracture types, fracture surface roughness and flow characteristics are necessary for reservoir evaluation, management, and enhanced oil recovery programs of fractured reservoirs. For a period of 2 years, a research project focused on an analogue to fractured chalk reservoirs excellently exposed near Laegerdorf, NW Germany. Upper Cretaceous chalk has been uplifted and deformed by an underlying salt diapir, and is now exploited for the cement industry. In the production wall of a quarry, the fracture network of the deformed chalk was characterized and mapped at different scales. The wall was scraped off as chalk exploitation proceeded, continuously revealing new sections through the faulted and fractured chalk body. A 230 m long part of the 35m high production wall was investigated during its recess of 25m. The large amount of fracture data were analyzed with respect to parameters such as fracture density distribution, orientation- and length distribution, and in terms of the representativity of data sets collected from restricted rock volumes. This 3D description and analysis of a fracture network revealed quantitative generic parameters of importance for modeling chalk reservoirs with less data and lower data quality.

  15. Reactive transport modelling of groundwater chemistry in a chalk aquifer at the watershed scale.

    PubMed

    Mangeret, A; De Windt, L; Crançon, P

    2012-09-01

    This study investigates thermodynamics and kinetics of water-rock interactions in a carbonate aquifer at the watershed scale. A reactive transport model is applied to the unconfined chalk aquifer of the Champagne Mounts (France), by considering both the chalk matrix and the interconnected fracture network. Major element concentrations and main chemical parameters calculated in groundwater and their evolution along flow lines are in fair agreement with field data. A relative homogeneity of the aquifer baseline chemistry is rapidly reached in terms of pH, alkalinity and Ca concentration since calcite equilibrium is achieved over the first metres of the vadose zone. However, incongruent chalk dissolution slowly releases Ba, Mg and Sr in groundwater. Introducing dilution effect by rainwater infiltration and a local occurrence of dolomite improves the agreement between modelling and field data. The dissolution of illite and opal-CT, controlling K and SiO(2) concentrations in the model, can be approximately tackled by classical kinetic rate laws, but not the incongruent chalk dissolution. An apparent kinetic rate has therefore been fitted on field data by inverse modelling: 1.5×10(-5) mol(chalk)L (-1) water year (-1). Sensitivity analysis indicates that the CO(2) partial pressure of the unsaturated zone is a critical parameter for modelling the baseline chemistry over the whole chalk aquifer. PMID:22797192

  16. Mechanisms for surface contamination of soils and bottom sediments in the Shagan River zone within former Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site.

    PubMed

    Aidarkhanov, A O; Lukashenko, S N; Lyakhova, O N; Subbotin, S B; Yakovenko, Yu Yu; Genova, S V; Aidarkhanova, A K

    2013-10-01

    The Shagan River is the only surface watercourse within the former Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS). Research in the valley of the Shagan River was carried out to study the possible migration of artificial radionuclides with surface waters over considerable distances, with the possibility these radionuclides may have entered the Irtysh River. The investigations revealed that radioactive contamination of soil was primarily caused by the first underground nuclear test with soil outburst conducted at the "Balapan" site in Borehole 1004. The surface nuclear tests carried out at the "Experimental Field" site and global fallout made insignificant contributions to contamination. The most polluted is the area in the immediate vicinity of the "Atomic" Lake crater. Contamination at the site is spatial. The total area of contamination is limited to 10-12 km from the crater piles. The ratio of plutonium isotopes was useful to determine the source of soil contamination. There was virtual absence of artificial radionuclide migration with surface waters, and possible cross-border transfer of radionuclides with the waters of Shagan and Irtysh rivers was not confirmed. PMID:23811126

  17. Genetic structure of Populus hybrid zone along the Irtysh River provides insight into plastid-nuclear incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yan-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Duan, Ai-Guo; Abuduhamiti, Bawerjan

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the maintenance of species integrity despite hybridization has often been explained by the co-adaption of nuclear gene complexes. However, the interaction between plastid and nuclear sub-genomes has been underestimated. Here, we analyzed the genetic structure of a Populus alba and P. tremula hybrid zone along the Irtysh River system in the Altai region, northwest China, using both nuclear microsatellites and plastid DNA sequences. We found high interspecific differentiation, although the hybrid P. × canescens was prevalent. Bayesian inference classified most hybrids into F1, followed by a few back-crosses to P. alba, and fewer F2 hybrids and back-crosses to P. tremula, indicating a few introgressions but preference toward P. alba. When plastid haplotypes in parental species were distinct, P. × canescens carried the haplotypes of both parents, but showed significant linkage between intraspecific haplotype and nuclear genotypes at several microsatellite loci. Selection, rather than migration and assortative mating, might have contributed to such plastid-nuclear disequilibria. By removing later-generated hybrids carrying interspecific combinations of haplotype and nuclear genotypes, plastid-nuclear incompatibility has greatly limited the gene exchange between P. alba and P. tremula via backcrossing with hybrids, demonstrating a significant association between plastid haplotype and the proportion of nuclear admixture. PMID:27306416

  18. Genetic structure of Populus hybrid zone along the Irtysh River provides insight into plastid-nuclear incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Duan, Ai-Guo; Abuduhamiti, Bawerjan

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the maintenance of species integrity despite hybridization has often been explained by the co-adaption of nuclear gene complexes. However, the interaction between plastid and nuclear sub-genomes has been underestimated. Here, we analyzed the genetic structure of a Populus alba and P. tremula hybrid zone along the Irtysh River system in the Altai region, northwest China, using both nuclear microsatellites and plastid DNA sequences. We found high interspecific differentiation, although the hybrid P. × canescens was prevalent. Bayesian inference classified most hybrids into F1, followed by a few back-crosses to P. alba, and fewer F2 hybrids and back-crosses to P. tremula, indicating a few introgressions but preference toward P. alba. When plastid haplotypes in parental species were distinct, P. × canescens carried the haplotypes of both parents, but showed significant linkage between intraspecific haplotype and nuclear genotypes at several microsatellite loci. Selection, rather than migration and assortative mating, might have contributed to such plastid-nuclear disequilibria. By removing later-generated hybrids carrying interspecific combinations of haplotype and nuclear genotypes, plastid-nuclear incompatibility has greatly limited the gene exchange between P. alba and P. tremula via backcrossing with hybrids, demonstrating a significant association between plastid haplotype and the proportion of nuclear admixture. PMID:27306416

  19. Knowledges and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-20

    The Knowledges and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operations: Savannah River Site (SRS) Production Reactors, provides the basis for the development of content-valid certification examinations for Senior Reactor Operators (SROs) and Central Control Room Supervisors (SUP). The position of Shift Technical Engineer (STE) has been included in the catalog for completeness. This new SRS reactor operating shift crew position is held by an individual holding a CCR Supervisor Certification who has received special engineering and technical training. Also, the STE has a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering or a related technical field. The SRS catalog contains approximately 2500 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for SROs and SUPs at heavy water moderated production reactors. Each K/A statement has been rated for its importance to the safe operation of the plant in a manner ensuring the health and safety of the public. The SRS K/A catalog is presently organized into five major sections: Plant Systems grouped by Safety Function, Plant Wide Generic K/As, Emergency Plant Evolutions, Theory and Components (to be developed).

  20. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-28

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk.

  1. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-01

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk

  2. Analysis on radiocesium concentration in rivers that have catchment areas affected by the fallout from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Keisuke; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Sakaguchi, Aya; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Onda, Yuichi

    2014-05-01

    Due to Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, radioactive materials including Cs-134 and Cs-137 were widely distributed in surrounded area. The radiocesiums have been transported in river networks. This study showed the monitoring results of radiocesium concentration in river waters and suspended sediments in Abukuma river basin and smaller coastal river catchments. The monitoring started at 6 sites from June 2011. Subsequently, additional 24 monitoring sites were installed between October 2012 and January 2013. Flow and turbidity (for calculation of suspended sediment concentration) were measured at each site, while suspended sediments and river water were collected every one or half month to measure Cs-134 and Cs-137 activity concentrations by gamma spectrometry. Activity concentrations of Cs-134 and Cs- 137 on suspended sediments were generally decreasing at all sites. The decreasing rate changed lower at about one year later from the accident. Activity concentration in river waters also showed the same tendency although there are only few data within 1 year from the accident. Activity concentrations measured at the same day are proportional to the mean catchment inventory. Therefore, the activity concentration can be normalized by the mean catchment inventory. The normalized activity can be fitted to following double exponential function: [At] = 1.551 exp (-5.265t) + 0.069 exp (-0.266 t), where t [year] is the time from the accident. There is no time evolution of Kd between suspended sediments and river water. Instead, Kd was varied spatially. Although the reason of the spatial variation is not clear for now, geology of the catchment (i.e. mineral composition of suspended particles) seems to relate to the variation.

  3. Underwater lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The University of Southern California's Catalina Marine Science Center (CMSC) has announced plans to build an underwater marine research laboratory near Santa Catalina Island off the California coast. The project, which will take 2 years to build, will be sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The laboratory will be similar in concept to the U.S. Navy Sea Lab III, which was canceled some time ago.The project's purpose is to give divers access to a laboratory without having to surface. The project leader, Andrew Pilmanis, of the University of Southern California, stated recently (Industrial Research and Development, July 1983): “By the nature of the work, scientists require a lot of bottom time, and to do it by scuba isn't practical…. The only way to do that is with saturation diving. Once the diver is saturated with inert gas, whether the individual stays a few days or for months, only one decompression is required.” Divers will typically stay in the laboratory for 7-10 days. The laboratory will initially be placed at a depth of 20 m, later to be refloated and located at depths to 37 m.

  4. Determining Sources and Transport of Nuclear Contamination in Hudson River Sediments with Plutonium, Neptunium, and Cesium isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenna, T. C.; Chillrud, S. N.; Chaky, D. A.; Simpson, H. J.; McHugh, C. M.; Shuster, E. L.; Bopp, R. F.

    2004-12-01

    Different sources of radioactive contamination contain characteristic and identifiable isotopic signatures, which can be used to study sediment transport. We focus on Pu-239, Pu-240, Np-237 and Cs-137, which are strongly bound to fine grained sediments. The Hudson River drainage basin has received contamination from at least three separate sources: 1) global fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, which contributed Pu, Np and Cs; 2) contamination resulting from reactor releases at the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant (IPNPP) located on the Hudson River Estuary ˜70km north of New York Harbor, where records document releases of Cs-137; 3) contamination resulting from activities at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) located on the Mohawk River, where incomplete records document releases of Cs-137 but no mention is made of Pu or Np. Here we report measurements of Pu isotopes, Np-237 and Cs-137 for a series of sediment cores collected from various locations within the drainage basin: 1) Mohawk River downstream of KAPL, 2) Hudson River upstream of its confluence with the Mohawk River, and 3) lower Hudson River at a location in close proximity to IPNPP. In addition, we present data from selected samples from two other lower Hudson River locations: One site located ˜30km downstream of IPNPP and another ˜30km upstream of IPNPP. By comparing the isotopic ratios Pu-240/Pu-239, Np-237/Pu-239, and Cs-137/Pu-239, measured in fluvial sediments to mean global fallout values, it is possible to identify and resolve different sources of non-fallout contamination. To date, isotopic data for sediments indicate non-fallout sources of Pu-239, Pu-240, and Cs-137; Np-237, however, appears to originate from global fallout only. Mohawk River sediments downstream of KAPL exhibit enrichments in Pu-239, Pu-240, and Cs-137 that are 7 to 20 times higher than levels expected from global fallout as indicated from Np-237. The elevated levels, non-fallout isotopic signatures

  5. Origin distribution and alteration of organic matter and generation and migration of hydrocarbons in Austin Chalk, Upper Cretaceous, Southeastern Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, G. J., Jr.

    1981-08-01

    The Austin Chalk is an impure onshore chalk that was deposited on a ramp marginal to the Gulf of Mexico during the Late Cretaceous. Basinal chalks are organic rich, commonly containing 0.5-5.0% amorphous, sapropelic kerogen derived from marine organic matter with only trace amounts of terrestial kerogen. Less organic matter was deposited and perserved in oxygenated shallow water, and fresh-water diagenesis oxidized the organic matter on outcrop. In each sample, the kerogen is concentrated in microstylolites, with organic fluids segregated in micropores in the chalk.

  6. Current oil and gas production from North American Upper Cretaceous chalks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholle, Peter A.

    1977-01-01

    Production of oil and natural gas from North American chalks has increased significantly during the past five years, spurred by the prolific production from North Sea chalks, as well as by higher prices and improved production technology. Chalk reservoirs have been discovered in the Gulf Coast in the Austin Group, Saratoga and Annona Chalks, Ozan Formation, Selma Group, Monroe gas rock (an informal unit of Navarro age), and other Upper Cretaceous units. In the Western Interior, production has been obtained from the Cretaceous Niobrara and Greenhorn Formations. Significant, though subcommercial, discoveries of natural gas and gas condensate also have been made in the Upper Cretaceous Wyandot Formation on the Scotian Shelf of eastern Canada. All North American chalk units share a similar depositional and diagenetic history. The chalks consist primarily of whole and fragmented coccoliths with subordinate planktonic and benthonic Foraminifera, inoceramid prisms, oysters, and other skeletal grains. Most have between 10 and 35 percent HCl-insoluble residue, predominantly clay. Deposition was principally below wave base in tens to hundreds of meters of water. The diagenetic history of a chalk is critical in determining its reservoir potential. All chalk has a stable composition (low-Mg calcite) and very high primary porosity. With subsequent burial, mechanical and chemical (solution-transfer) compaction can reduce or completely eliminate pore space. The degree of loss of primary porosity in chalk sections is normally a direct function of the maximum depth to which it has been buried. Pore-water chemistry, pore-fluid pressures, and tectonic stresses also influence rates of cementation. Oil or gas reservoirs of North American chalk fall into three main groups: 1. Areas with thin overburden and significant primary porosity retention (for example, Niobrara Formation of Kansas and eastern Colorado). 2. Areas with thicker overburden but considerable fracturing. Here primary

  7. Advanced Physics Lab at TCU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, C. A.

    2009-04-01

    The one semester, one credit hour Modern Physics Lab is viewed as a transition between the structured Physics 1 and 2 labs and junior/senior research. The labs focus on a variety of experiments built around a multichannel analyzer, various alpha, beta and gamma ray detectors and weak radioactive sources. Experiments include radiation safety and detection with a Geiger counter and NaI detector, gamma ray spectroscopy with a germanium detector, beta spectrum, alpha energy loss, gamma ray absorption, Compton effect, nuclear and positron annihilation lifetime, speed of gamma rays. Other experiments include using the analog oscilloscope, x-ray diffraction of diamond and using an SEM/EDX. Error analysis is emphasized throughout. The semester ends with an individual project, often an extension of one of the earlier experiments, and students present their results as a paper and an APS style presentation to the department.

  8. Effects of the restoration mortar on chalk stone buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, R. M.; Teodorescu, S.; Ştirbescu, R. M.; Dulamă, I. D.; Şuică-Bunghez, I. R.; Bucurică, I. A.; Fierăscu, R. C.; Fierscu, I.; Ion, M. L.

    2016-06-01

    The monument buildings as components of cultural heritage are exposed to degradation of surfaces and chemical and mechanical degradation, often associated to soiling and irreversible deterioration of the building. In many conservative and restorative works, a cement-based mortar was used without knowing all the adverse effects of this material on the building. This paper deals with the study of the effects of natural cement used in restorative works in the particular case of the Basarabi-Murfatlar Churches Ensemble. Cement-based materials exposed to sulfate present in the chalk stone - gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O), can induce signs of deterioration, due to ettringite ([Ca3Al (OH)612H2O]2(SO4)32H2O) or thaumasite (Ca3[Si(OH)612H2O](CO3)SO4) formation. These phases contribute to strain within the material, inducing expansion, strength loss, spalling and severe degradation. Several combined techniques (XRD, EDXRF, ICP-AES, SEM, EDS, sulphates content, FT-IR and Raman analysis were carried out to put into evidence the effects of them on the building walls.

  9. Pressure build-up characteristics in Austin Chalk wells

    SciTech Connect

    Claycomb, E.

    1983-02-28

    Pressure build-up data collected from wells in the Giddings Austin Chalk field have been analyzed through use of techniques currently available to the petroleum industry. The slope of ..delta..T vs. ..delta..P, along with a Horner graph and knowledge of well history, should indicate which method of analysis is applicable. The operator should know what kind of stimulation, if any; was performed on the well and the degree of success. A Horner graph, along with a graph of ..delta..T vs. ..delta..P should be plotted as a matter of course. Information gained from proper analysis of build-up data may be used both in well diagnosis and in prediction of well performance. In well diagnosis, a pressure buildup-falloff test is one of the few means of analyzing a problem well. Properly analyzed build-up data will give estimates of average reservoir pressure, in situ permeability, and fracture length. These data will aid in fracture optimization, reserve prediction, and performance prediction.

  10. Absolute paleobathymetry of Upper Cretaceous chalks based on ostracodes - Evidence from the Demopolis Chalk (Campanian and Maastrichtian) of the northern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, T.M. )

    1991-05-01

    The presence of abundant and diverse sighted ostracodes in chalk and marl of the Demopolis Chalk (Campanian and Maastrichtian) in Alabama and Mississippi strongly suggests that the Late Cretaceous sea floor was within the photic zone. The maximum depth of deposition is calculated from an equation based on eye morphology and efficiency and estimates of the vertical light attenuation. In this equation, K, the vertical light attenuation coefficient, is the most critical variable because it is the divisor for the rest of the equation. Rates of accumulation of coccoliths during the Cretaceous are estimated and are on the same order as those in modern areas of high phytoplankton production, suggesting similar pigment and coccolith concentrations in the water column. Values of K are known for a wide range of water masses and pigment concentrations, including areas of high phytoplankton production; thus light attenuation through the Cretaceous seas can be estimated reliably. Waters in which attenuation is due only to biogenic matter-conditions that result in deposition of relatively pure chalk-have values of K ranging between 0.2 and 0.3. Waters rich in phytoplankton and mud-conditions that result in deposition of marl-have K values as great as 0.5. Substituting these values for K results in depth range of 65 to 90 m for deposition of chalk and depth of 35 m for deposition of marl. These depth values suggest that deposition of many Cretaceous chalks and marls around the world were deposited under relatively shallow conditions.

  11. Monitoring and assessment of radionuclide discharges from Temelín Nuclear Power Plant into the Vltava River (Czech Republic).

    PubMed

    Hanslík, Eduard; Ivanovová, Diana; Juranová, Eva; Simonek, Pavel; Jedináková-Krízová, Vĕra

    2009-02-01

    The paper summarizes impacts of the Temelín Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) on the Vltava and Labe River basins. The study is based on the results of long-term monitoring carried out before the plant operation (1989-2000), and subsequently during the plant operation (2001-2005). In the first period, the main objective was to determine background radionuclide levels remaining in the environment after global fallout and due to the Chernobyl accident. A decrease in the concentrations of (90)Sr, (134)Cs and (137)Cs, which was observed before the plant operation, continued also during the subsequent period. Apart from tritium, the results of the observation did not indicate any impacts of the plant on the concentrations of activation and fission products in the hydrosphere. The annual average tritium concentrations in the Vltava River were in agreement with predicted values. The maximum annual average tritium concentration (13.5 Bq L(-1)) was observed in 2004 downstream from the wastewater discharge in the Vltava River at Solenice. Estimated radiation doses for adults due to intakes of river water as drinking water contaminated by tritium are below 0.1 microSv y(-1). PMID:19070946

  12. Improving UK Chalk hydrometeorology across spatial scales using a small hydrometeorological network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolem, Rafael; Iwema, Joost; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Desilets, Darin; Koltermann da Silva, Juliana

    2016-04-01

    Chalk in the UK acts as a primary aquifer providing up to 80% of the public water supply locally. Chalk outcrops are located over most of southern and eastern England. Despite its importance, the characterization of Chalk in hydrometeorological models is still very limited. There is a need for a comprehensive and coherent integration of observations and modeling efforts across spatial scales for better understanding Chalk hydrometeorology. Here we introduce the "A MUlti-scale Soil moisture-Evapotranspiration Dynamics" (AMUSED) project. AMUSED goal is to better identify the key dominant processes controlling changes in soil moisture and surface fluxes (e.g., evapotranspiration) across spatial scales by combining ground-based observations with hydrometeorological models and satellite remote sensing products. The AMUSED observational platform consists of three sites located in Upper Chalk region of the Lambourn Catchment located in southern England covering approximately 2 square-km characterized by distinct combinations of soil and vegetation types. The network includes standard meteorological measurements, an eddy covariance system for turbulent fluxes and cosmic-ray neutron sensors for integrated soil moisture estimates at intermediate scales. Here we present our initial results from our three sites.

  13. Reactive transport modelling of groundwater chemistry in a chalk aquifer at the watershed scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeret, A.; De Windt, L.; Crançon, P.

    2012-09-01

    This study investigates thermodynamics and kinetics of water-rock interactions in a carbonate aquifer at the watershed scale. A reactive transport model is applied to the unconfined chalk aquifer of the Champagne Mounts (France), by considering both the chalk matrix and the interconnected fracture network. Major element concentrations and main chemical parameters calculated in groundwater and their evolution along flow lines are in fair agreement with field data. A relative homogeneity of the aquifer baseline chemistry is rapidly reached in terms of pH, alkalinity and Ca concentration since calcite equilibrium is achieved over the first metres of the vadose zone. However, incongruent chalk dissolution slowly releases Ba, Mg and Sr in groundwater. Introducing dilution effect by rainwater infiltration and a local occurrence of dolomite improves the agreement between modelling and field data. The dissolution of illite and opal-CT, controlling K and SiO2 concentrations in the model, can be approximately tackled by classical kinetic rate laws, but not the incongruent chalk dissolution. An apparent kinetic rate has therefore been fitted on field data by inverse modelling: 1.5 × 10- 5 molchalk L - 1water year - 1. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the CO2 partial pressure of the unsaturated zone is a critical parameter for modelling the baseline chemistry over the whole chalk aquifer.

  14. Mineralization of 2,4-D, mecoprop, isoproturon and terbuthylazine in a chalk aquifer.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, G B; Sørensen, S R; Aamand, J

    2001-06-01

    The potential to mineralize 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), mecoprop, isoproturon and terbuthylazine was studied in soil and aquifer chalk sampled at an agricultural field near Aalborg, Denmark. Laboratory microcosms were incubated for 258 days under aerobic conditions at 10 degrees C with soil and chalk from 0.15-4.45 m below the surface. The [ring-U-14C]-labeled herbicides were added to obtain a concentration of 6 micrograms kg-1 and mineralization was measured as evolved [14C]carbon dioxide. The herbicides were readily mineralized in soil from the plough layer, except for terbuthylazine, which was mineralized only to a limited extent. In the chalk, lag periods of at least 40 days were observed, and a maximum of 51%, 33% and 6% of the added 2,4-D, mecoprop and isoproturon, respectively, were recovered as [14C]carbon dioxide. Large variations in both rate and extent of mineralization were observed within replicates in chalk. No mineralization of terbuthylazine in chalk was observed. As a measure of the general metabolic activity towards aromatic compounds, [ring-U-14C]-benzoic acid was included. It was readily mineralized at all depths. PMID:11407030

  15. Application of thematic mapper imagery to oil exploration in Austin Chalk, Central Gulf Coast basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, W.M.

    1988-01-01

    One of the newest major oil plays in the Gulf Coast basin, the Austin Chalk reportedly produces in three belts: an updip belt, where production is from fractured chalk in structurally high positions along faults above 7,000 ft; a shallow downdip belt, where the chalk is uniformly saturated with oil from 7,000 to 9,000 ft; and a deeper downdip belt saturated with gas and condensate below 9,000 ft. The updip fields usually occur on the southeastern, upthrown side of the Luling, Mexia, and Charlotte fault zones. Production is from fractures that connect the relatively sparse matrix pores with more permeable fracture systems. The fractures resulted from regional extensional stress during the opening of the Gulf Coast basin on the divergent margin of the North American plate during the Laramide orogeny. The fractures are more common in the more brittle chalk than in the overlying Navarro and underlying Eagle Ford shales, which are less brittle. The oil in the updip traps in the chalk may have been generated in place downdip, and migrated updip along the extension fractures into the updip traps during or after the Laramide orogeny.

  16. Decay-Series Disequilibria in a Chalk Aquifer : Characterisation of Water-Rock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, A.; Bourdon, B.; Pili, E.

    2003-12-01

    We have studied uranium-series disequilibria in a chalk aquifer and the unsaturated zone above it in order to characterise the time scales of radionuclide migration from the water recharge zone of the aquifer to the nearby river. Our field area is located in Champagne (France). The aquifer is characterized by a double porosity : matrix and fracture, providing both a fast and a slow pathways for water flow. We have collected both carbonate rocks and groundwater samples from boreholes and spring and river water from the same area. Rock/water interaction inside the aquifer induces dissolution and reprecipitation of carbonates, together with a mobilization of uranium, and (-recoil effect results in preferential mobilization of daughter nuclides. We have measured uranium and thorium isotopes for carbonates samples from the aquifer by TIMS and multi-collection ICP-MS. The fractionation of uranium and thorium isotopes is distinctive in the various parts of the aquifer. Rock samples from the saturated zone show a depletion in 234U with a (234U/238U) ratio ranging from 0.945 to 0.993 (ñ 0.005). This indicates that uranium 234U has been released by rock/water interaction over the last million year. Nevertheless, rock samples from the water table oscillation zone display a (234U/238U) activity ratio greater than 1 and range from 1.002 to 1.052 (ñ 0.005), suggesting uranium reprecipitation possibly by a redox front. (230Th/238U) ratios range from 1.25 to 1.59 (ñ 0.03) in both the saturated and vadose zone, whilst (230Th/232Th) ratios vary from 1.89 to 5.68 (ñ 0.05) with the highest values for the water table oscillation zone. The 238U-230Th system suggests the existence of a iron oxihydroxide and/or silicate phases which influence the redeposition and/or adsorption of elements inside the zone of water oscillation. Modelling is in progress in order to determine leaching rate of the radionuclides in the substratum together with the adsorption/desorption rate constants on

  17. Dynamic depositional and early diagenetic processes in a deep-water shelf setting, upper cretaceous Austin Chalk, North Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, S.D.; Nance, H.S.

    1994-12-31

    The Austin Chalk of north Texas was deposited on a deep-water shelf north of the Sea Marcos Platform during a worldwide Coniacian and Santonian sea-level highstand. Transgressive (lowermost lower Austin Chalk), highstand (uppermost lower Austin Chalk), and regressive (middle and upper Austin Chalk) phases of cyclic chalk and marl sedimentation are recognized in excavations and tunnels created in Ellis County for the Superconducting Super Collider provide new evidence of sediment transport during Austin Chalk deposition. During transgression, bottom currents syndepositionally reworked nannoplankton oozes, incising channels as much as 120 ft across and 8 ft deep. Weakly burrowed channel fills having preservation of fine lamination document rapid infilling. Channel fills are composed of pyritized and carbonized wood and Inoceramus lag deposits, pellets, echinoderm fragments, and globigerinid grainstones, and coccolith ooze. During maximum highstand, bottom reworking was suppressed. Detrital content of highstand marls is low (>20 percent); organic content is high (1.4 to 3.5 percent). Coccolith preservation is excellent because of minimal diagenetic alteration. Regression is marked by resumed channel cutting and storm-bed winnowing in the middle and upper Austin Chalk. Suppressed resistivity log response and recessive weathering characteristics of the middle Austin Chalk are not primarily related to depositional environment but rather to increased input of volcanic ash during the accumulation of this interval. Early stabilization of ash produced clay-coated microfabrics in sediments that are otherwise similar to the transgressive deposits.

  18. Chalk, What Chalk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Loren L.

    2004-01-01

    When it comes to technological wizardry in the classroom, interactive whiteboards stand on the cutting edge of the future. Students seem innately able to manipulate any type of computerized equipment, and, more important, they are highly motivated to engage in "techno-discovery." It is the duty of every educator to facilitate further discovery and…

  19. The surface reactivity of chalk (biogenic calcite) with hydrophilic and hydrophobic functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okhrimenko, D. V.; Dalby, K. N.; Skovbjerg, L. L.; Bovet, N.; Christensen, J. H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2014-03-01

    The surface properties of calcium carbonate minerals play an important role in a number of industrial and biological processes. Properties such as wettability and adsorption control liquid-solid interface behaviour and thus have a strong influence on processes such as biomineralisation, remediation of aquifers and oil recovery. We investigated how two model molecules of different polarity, namely water and ethanol, interact with reservoir and outcrop chalk samples and we compared their behaviour with that of pure, inorganically precipitated calcite. Thermodynamic quantities, such as the work of wetting, surface energy and isosteric adsorption enthalpy, were determined from vapour adsorption isotherms. The chalks were studied fresh and after extraction of organic residues that were originally present in these samples. The work of wetting correlates with the amount of organic matter present in the chalk samples but we observed a fundamental difference between the adsorption properties of chalk and pure, inorganically precipitated calcite toward the less polar, ethanol molecule. Further analysis of the chemical composition of the organic matter extracted from the chalk samples was made by gas chromatography (GC-MS). Monitoring surface composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after extraction of the organic material, and with atomic force microscopy (AFM), showed that nanometer sized clay crystals observed on the chalk particle surfaces could be an important part of the reason for the differences. Removal of the extractable portion of the hydrocarbons liberates adsorption sites that have different wetting properties than the rest of the chalk and these have an energy distribution that is similar to clays. Thus, the results exemplify the complexity of biogenic calcite adsorption behaviour and demonstrate that chalk wetting in drinking water aquifers as well as oil reservoirs is controlled partly by the nanoparticles of clay that have grown on the

  20. Authigenic kaolinite and associated pyrite in chalk of the Cretaceous Niobrara Formation, Eastern Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollastro, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Cores from the Smoky Hill Chalk Member of the Cretaceous Niobrara Formation have several zones containing authigenic kaolinite as spherical, moldic, polycrystalline aggregates that occur within single or multichambered foraminiferal tests and are commonly associated with framboidal pyrite. Such kaolinite is inferred to result from volcanic ash deposited during chalk sedimentation. Shortly after burial, a colloidal aluminous gel or solution formed from the unstable ash and moved into organic-rich foraminiferal tests, where sulfate-reducing bacteria created a favorable microenvironment for the simultaneous crystallization of kaolinite and pyrite. -Author

  1. Deciphering Your Lab Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... what a lab report may look like. (Note: Pathology reports, such as for a biopsy , will look ... lab report. For some examples of what a pathology report may look like, see The Doctor’s Doctor: ...

  2. Preliminary estimate of possible flood elevations in the Columbia River at Trojan Nuclear Power Plant due to failure of debris dam blocking Spirit Lake, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kresch, D.L.; Laenen, Antonius

    1984-01-01

    Failure of the debris dam, blocking the outflow of Spirit Lake near Mount St. Helens, could result in a mudflow down the Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers into the Columbia River. Flood elevations at the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant on the Columbia River, 5 mi upstream from the Cowlitz River, were simulated with a hydraulic routing model. The simulations are made for four Columbia River discharges in each of two scenarios, one in which Columbia River floods coincide with a mudflow and the other in which Columbia River floods follow a mudflow sediment deposit upstream from the Cowlitz River. In the first scenario, Manning 's roughness coefficients for clear water and for mudflow in the Columbia River are used; in the second scenario only clear water coefficients are used. The grade elevation at the power plant is 45 ft above sea level. The simulated elevations exceed 44 ft if the mudflow coincides with a Columbia River discharge that has a recurrence interval greater than 10 years (610,000 cu ft/sec); the mudflow is assumed to extend downstream from the Cowlitz River to the mouth of the Columbia River, and Manning 's roughness coefficients for a mudflow are used. The simulated elevation is 32 ft if the mudflow coincides with a 100-yr flood (820,000 cu ft/sec) and clear-water Manning 's coefficients are used throughout the entire reach of the Columbia River. The elevations exceed 45 ft if a flow exceeding the 2-yr peak discharge in the Columbia River (410,000 cu ft/sec) follows the deposit of 0.5 billion cu yd of mudflow sediment upstream of the Cowlitz River before there has been any appreciable scour or dredging of the deposit. In this simulation it is assumed that: (1) the top of the sediment deposited in the Columbia River is at an elevation of 30 ft at the mouth of the Cowlitz River, (2) the surface elevation of the sediment deposit decreases in an upstream direction at a rate of 2.5 ft/mi, and (3) clear water Manning 's coefficients apply to the entire modeled reach of

  3. Virtual Reality Lab Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Hrishikesh; Palmer, Timothy A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality Lab Assistant (VRLA) demonstration model is aligned for engineering and material science experiments to be performed by undergraduate and graduate students in the course as a pre-lab simulation experience. This will help students to get a preview of how to use the lab equipment and run experiments without using the lab hardware/software equipment. The quality of the time available for laboratory experiments can be significantly improved through the use of virtual reality technology.

  4. Future projection of radiocesium flux to the ocean from the largest river impacted by Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhiraga Pratama, Mochamad; Yoneda, Minoru; Shimada, Yoko; Matsui, Yasuto; Yamashiki, Yosuke

    2015-02-01

    Following the initial fall out from Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), a significant amount of radiocesium has been discharged from Abukuma River into the Pacific Ocean. This study attempted to numerically simulate the flux of radiocesium into Abukuma River by developing the multiple compartment model which incorporate the transport process of the radionuclide from the ground surface of the catchment area into the river, a process called wash off. The results from the model show that the sub-basins with a high percentage of forest area release the radionuclides at lower rate compared to the other sub-basins. In addition the results show that the model could predict the seasonal pattern of the observed data. Despite the overestimation observed between the modeled data and the observed data, the values of R2 obtained from 137Cs and 134Cs of 0.98 and 0.97 respectively demonstrate the accuracy of the model. Prediction of the discharge from the basin area for 100 years after the accident shows that, the flux of radiocesium into the Pacific Ocean is still relatively high with an order of magnitude of 109 bq.month-1 while the total accumulation of the discharge is 111 TBq for 137Cs and 44 TBq for 134Cs.

  5. Future projection of radiocesium flux to the ocean from the largest river impacted by Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Adhiraga Pratama, Mochamad; Yoneda, Minoru; Shimada, Yoko; Matsui, Yasuto; Yamashiki, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    Following the initial fall out from Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), a significant amount of radiocesium has been discharged from Abukuma River into the Pacific Ocean. This study attempted to numerically simulate the flux of radiocesium into Abukuma River by developing the multiple compartment model which incorporate the transport process of the radionuclide from the ground surface of the catchment area into the river, a process called wash off. The results from the model show that the sub-basins with a high percentage of forest area release the radionuclides at lower rate compared to the other sub-basins. In addition the results show that the model could predict the seasonal pattern of the observed data. Despite the overestimation observed between the modeled data and the observed data, the values of R(2) obtained from (137)Cs and (134)Cs of 0.98 and 0.97 respectively demonstrate the accuracy of the model. Prediction of the discharge from the basin area for 100 years after the accident shows that, the flux of radiocesium into the Pacific Ocean is still relatively high with an order of magnitude of 10(9) bq.month(-1) while the total accumulation of the discharge is 111 TBq for (137)Cs and 44 TBq for (134)Cs. PMID:25673214

  6. Future projection of radiocesium flux to the ocean from the largest river impacted by Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Adhiraga Pratama, Mochamad; Yoneda, Minoru; Shimada, Yoko; Matsui, Yasuto; Yamashiki, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    Following the initial fall out from Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), a significant amount of radiocesium has been discharged from Abukuma River into the Pacific Ocean. This study attempted to numerically simulate the flux of radiocesium into Abukuma River by developing the multiple compartment model which incorporate the transport process of the radionuclide from the ground surface of the catchment area into the river, a process called wash off. The results from the model show that the sub-basins with a high percentage of forest area release the radionuclides at lower rate compared to the other sub-basins. In addition the results show that the model could predict the seasonal pattern of the observed data. Despite the overestimation observed between the modeled data and the observed data, the values of R2 obtained from 137Cs and 134Cs of 0.98 and 0.97 respectively demonstrate the accuracy of the model. Prediction of the discharge from the basin area for 100 years after the accident shows that, the flux of radiocesium into the Pacific Ocean is still relatively high with an order of magnitude of 109 bq.month−1 while the total accumulation of the discharge is 111 TBq for 137Cs and 44 TBq for 134Cs. PMID:25673214

  7. TRANSFER OF EXCESS NUCLEAR MATERIAL FROM LOS ALAMOS TO SAVANNAH RIVER SITE FOR LONG-TERM DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    C. W. HOTH; L. A. FOSTER; T. F YARBRO

    2001-06-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is preparing excess nuclear material for shipment to Savannah River Site (SRS) for final disposition. Prior to shipment the nuclear material will be stabilized and packaged to meet strict criteria. The criterion that must be met include: (1) the DOE stabilization, packaging and storage requirements for plutonium bearing materials, DOE-STD-3013, (2) shipping container packaging requirements, (3) SRS packaging and storage criteria, and (4) DOE Material Disposition criteria for either immobilization or MOX reactor fuel. Another issue in preparing for this transfer is the DOE certification of shipping containers and the availability of shipping containers. This transfer of the nuclear material is fully supported by the EM, DP and NN Sections of the DOE, as well as, by LANL and SRS, yet a strong collaboration is needed to meet all established requirements relating to stabilization, packaging, shipment, storage and final disposition. This paper will present the overall objectives, the issues and the planned strategy to accomplish this nuclear material transfer.

  8. Effective-stress-law behavior of Austin chalk rocks for deformation and fracture conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Teufel, L.W.

    1994-08-01

    Austin chalk core has been tested to determine the effective law for deformation of the matrix material and the stress-sensitive conductivity of the natural fractures. For deformation behavior, two samples provided data on the variations of the poroelastic parameter, {alpha}, for Austin chalk, giving values around 0.4. The effective-stress-law behavior of a Saratoga limestone sample was also measured for the purpose of obtaining a comparison with a somewhat more porous carbonate rock. {alpha} for this rock was found to be near 0.9. The low {alpha} for the Austin chalk suggests that stresses in the reservoir, or around the wellbore, will not change much with changes in pore pressure, as the contribution of the fluid pressure is small. Three natural fractures from the Austin chalk were tested, but two of the fractures were very tight and probably do not contribute much to production. The third sample was highly conductive and showed some stress sensitivity with a factor of three reduction in conductivity over a net stress increase of 3000 psi. Natural fractures also showed a propensity for permanent damage when net stressed exceeded about 3000 psi. This damage was irreversible and significantly affected conductivity. {alpha} was difficult to determine and most tests were inconclusive, although the results from one sample suggested that {alpha} was near unity.

  9. Maastrichtian ammonites chiefly from the Prairie Bluff Chalk in Alabama and Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobban, W.A.; Kennedy, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Prairie Bluff Chalk of Alabama and Mississippi yields a diverse ammonite fauna of Maastrichtian age. Twenty-eight species, of which three are new, are recorded. The bulk of the fauna can be referred to a Discoscaphites conradi assemblage zone, but some elements in the fauna are significantly older. -Authors

  10. Reservoir fracture mapping using microearthquakes: Austin chalk, Giddings field, TX and 76 field, Clinton Co., KY

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, W.S.; Rutledge, J.T.; Fairbanks, T.D.

    1996-12-31

    Patterns of microearthquakes detected downhole defined fracture orientation and extent in the Austin chalk, Giddings field, TX and the 76 field, Clinton Co., KY. We collected over 480 and 770 microearthquakes during hydraulic stimulation at two sites in the Austin chalk, and over 3200 during primary production in Clinton Co. Data were of high enough quality that 20%, 31% and 53% of the events could be located, respectively. Reflected waves constrained microearthquakes to the stimulated depths at the base of the Austin chalk. In plan view, microearthquakes defined elongate fracture zones extending from the stimulation wells parallel to the regional fracture trend. However, widths of the stimulated zones differed by a factor of live between the two Austin chalk sites, indicating a large difference in the population of ancillary fractures. Post-stimulation production was much higher from the wider zone. At Clinton Co., microearthquakes defined low-angle, reverse-fault fracture zones above and below a producing zone. Associations with depleted production intervals indicated the mapped fractures had been previously drained. Drilling showed that the fractures currently contain brine. The seismic behavior was consistent with poroelastic models that predicted slight increases in compressive stress above and below the drained volume.

  11. Reservoir fracture mapping using microearthquakes: Austin chalk, Giddings field, TX and 76 field, Clinton Co., KY

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, W.S.; Rutledge, J.T.; Gardner, T.L.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Miller, M.E.; Schuessler, B.K.

    1996-11-01

    Patterns of microearthquakes detected downhole defined fracture orientation and extent in the Austin chalk, Giddings field, TX and the 76 field, Clinton Co., KY. We collected over 480 and 770 microearthquakes during hydraulic stimulation at two sites in the Austin chalk, and over 3200 during primary production in Clinton Co. Data were of high enough quality that 20%, 31% and 53% of the events could be located, respectively. Reflected waves constrained microearthquakes to the stimulated depths at the base of the Austin chalk. In plan view, microearthquakes defined elongate fracture zones extending from the stimulation wells parallel to the regional fracture trend. However, widths of the stimulated zones differed by a factor of five between the two Austin chalk sites, indicating a large difference in the population of ancillary fractures. Post-stimulation production was much higher from the wider zone. At Clinton Co., microearthquakes defined low-angle, reverse-fault fracture zones above and below a producing zone. Associations with depleted production intervals indicated the mapped fractures had been previously drained. Drilling showed that the fractures currently contain brine. The seismic behavior was consistent with poroelastic models that predicted slight increases in compressive stress above and below the drained volume.

  12. 24. ARAIII Reactor building ARA608 interior. Camera facing south. Chalk ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. ARA-III Reactor building ARA-608 interior. Camera facing south. Chalk marks on wall indicate presence or absence of spot contamination. Ineel photo no. 3-2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Drilling and production aspects of horizontal wells in the Austin Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikholeslami, B.A.; Scholhman, B.W.; Seidel, F.A.; Button, D.M. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper discusses testing of horizontal technology for use in the highly fractured Giddings oil field. Three short-and seven medium-radius wells were drilled successfully in the Austin Chalk formation. The paper discusses well plans, bottomhole assemblies, trajectory control, telemetry, mud systems, hydraulics, hole cleaning, casing design, cementing, problems encountered, formation evaluation, completions, and reservoir response.

  14. Assessment of fracture-induced anisotropy in the Austin Chalk Formation (Upper Cretaceous), central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.A. )

    1990-05-01

    This study relates geophysical and geological data to the detection of fractures and their influence on the movement of fluid in the Atco Member of the Austin Chalk in central Texas. In areas of production, the Austin Chalk has very low matrix permeabilities, with hydrocarbons confined to zones of near-vertical, stress-aligned fractures. Horizontal drilling has been estimated to increase per well reserves in the Austin Chalk from 75,000 bbl and 82 mmcf to 500,000 bbl and 500 mmcf. The objective of deviated wells in the Austin Chalk is to intersect at right angles as many of the hydrocarbon-prone fracture zones as possible. Therefore, the detection and description of these fracture zones prior to drilling is critical. Fractures have been proven to influence the velocities of shear waves. To assess shear wave velocities in different directions, several shear wave refraction and three-component vertical seismic profiles have been acquired. These data provided a measure of the fracture-induced shear wave anisotropy and an indication of the dominant fracture trend. Other data, including azimuthal resistivity surveys, cores, and aerial photographs, provided additional control for evaluating the fractures. The final phase of the study compares the geophysical and geological interpretations to the result of shallow groundwater pumping tests. The pumping tests have been conducted in vertical boreholes and were designed to evaluate the influence of the fracturing on fluid movement.

  15. Ichnology and paleosubstrates of Austin Chalk (Cretaceous) outcrops: Southern Dallas and Ellis Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, W.C. ); Reaser, D.F. )

    1991-03-01

    Ichnofossils are abundant in outcrops of the Austin Chalk near Waxahachie, Texas (designated site of the Super-Conducting Super Collider). The abundance and diversity of ichnofossils in Austin strata contrast with the paucity of other macrofossils, except large inoceramids. The lower Austin Chalk (Coniacian) disconformably overlies the Eagle Ford Shale (Turonian). Planolites, Thalassinoides, and Chondrites are conspicuous in the lower Austin. Some lower Austin strata contain well-preserved burrows having menicus fillings. However, most lower Austin ichnofossils are poorly preserved and have compacted. The middle Austin Marl and upper Austin Chalk (Santonain) contain Planolites, Chondrites, Thalassinoides, and Pseudobilobites. Several thin, intensely burrowed, Fe-stained, horizons within the middle Austin represent omission surfaces having postomission Thalassinoides. The upper Austin disconformably underlies the Taylor Marl (Campanian). The Austin-Taylor contact is a Rhizocorallium-infested omission surface overlain by a condensed bed of phosphatic and pyritic bioclasts. Upper Austin occurrences of Rhizocorallium and Pseudobilobites are unique for North American Cretaceous chalks. Based on cross-cutting relationships and differences in morphology, diameter, and burrow-filling sediments, numerous ichnospecies of Thalassinoides are discernable throughout the Austin. Variations in preservation quality exhibited by successive generations of ichnofossils record progressive changes in substrate consistency. Earliest formed burrows have diffuse outlines representing an initial thixotropic (softground) Austin substrate. Subsequent generations of burrows have more distinct outlines recording a gradual increase in substrate firmness. Paleo-firmgrounds are common in Austin outcrops; evidence of hardgrounds is lacking. The Thalassinoides-dominated Austin ichnoassemblage represents an inner shelf paleoenvironment.

  16. The surface reactivity of chalk (biogenic calcite) with hydrophilic and hydrophobic functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okhrimenko, D. V.; Dalby, K. N.; Skovbjerg, L. L.; Bovet, N.; Christensen, J. H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2014-03-01

    The surface properties of calcium carbonate minerals play an important role in a number of industrial and biological processes. Properties such as wettability and adsorption control liquid-solid interface behaviour and thus have a strong influence on processes such as biomineralisation, remediation of aquifers and oil recovery. We investigated how two model molecules of different polarity, namely water and ethanol, interact with reservoir and outcrop chalk samples and we compared their behaviour with that of pure, inorganically precipitated calcite. Thermodynamic quantities, such as the work of wetting, surface energy and isosteric adsorption enthalpy, were determined from vapour adsorption isotherms. The chalks were studied fresh and after extraction of organic residues that were originally present in these samples. The work of wetting correlates with the amount of organic matter present in the chalk samples but we observed a fundamental difference between the adsorption properties of chalk and pure, inorganically precipitated calcite toward the less polar, ethanol molecule. Further analysis of the chemical composition of the organic matter extracted from the chalk samples was made by gas chromatography (GC-MS). Monitoring surface composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after extraction of the organic material, and with atomic force microscopy (AFM), showed that nanometer sized clay crystals observed on the chalk particle surfaces could be an important part of the reason for the differences. Removal of the extractable portion of the hydrocarbons liberates adsorption sites that have different wetting properties than the rest of the chalk and these have an energy distribution that is similar to clays. Thus, the results exemplify the complexity of biogenic calcite adsorption behaviour and demonstrate that chalk wetting in drinking water aquifers as well as oil reservoirs is controlled partly by the nanoparticles of clay that have grown on the

  17. Full-waveform Inversion of Crosshole GPR Data Collected in Strongly Heterogeneous Chalk: Challenges and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Looms, Majken C.; Nielsen, Lars; Klotzsche, Anja; van der Kruk, Jan; Moreau, Julien; Stemmerik, Lars; Holliger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Chalk is an important reservoir rock for hydrocarbons and for groundwater resources for many major cities. Therefore, this rock type has been extensively investigated using both geological and geophysical methods. Many applications of crosshole GPR tomography rely on the ray approximation and corresponding inversions of first break traveltimes and/or maximum first-cycle amplitudes. Due to the inherent limitations associated with such approaches, the resulting models tend to be overly smooth and cannot adequately capture the small-scale heterogeneities. In contrast, the full-waveform inversion uses all the information contained in the data and is able to provide significantly improved images. Here, we apply full-waveform inversion to crosshole GPR data to image strong heterogeneity of the chalk related to changes in lithology and porosity. We have collected a crosshole tomography dataset in an old chalk quarry in Eastern Denmark. Based on core data (including plug samples and televiewer logging data) collected in our four ~15-m-deep boreholes and results from previous related studies, it is apparent that the studied chalk is strongly heterogeneous. The upper ~7 m consist of variable coarse-grained chalk layers with numerous flint nodules. The lower half of the studied section appears to be finer-grained and contains less flint. However, still significant porosity variations are also detected in the lower half. In general, the water-saturated (watertable depth ~2 m) chalk is characterized by high porosities, and thus low velocities and high attenuation, while the flint is essentially non-porous and has correspondingly high velocities and low attenuation. Together these characteristics form a strongly heterogeneous medium, which is challenging for the full-waveform inversion to recover. Here, we address the importance of (i) adequate starting models, both in terms of the dielectric permittivity and the electrical conductivity, (ii) the estimation of the source wavelet

  18. Late Maastrichtian chalk mounds, Stevns Klint, Denmark — Combined physical and biogenic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Damholt, Tove; Surlyk, Finn

    2007-08-01

    Upper Maastrichtian chalk exposed at the Sigerslev quarry, Stevns Klint, Denmark is characterized by wavy and mound-like bedding geometries outlined by bands of black flint nodules. Four morphological elements are recognized, although bedding geometries are highly variable: southward migrating mounds, eastward migrating mounds, chalk waves and evenly bedded chalk. The mounds are interpreted as having been formed by currents carrying fine-grained suspended sediment which was primarily deposited on the up-current mound flanks. Bryozoans were prolific on the up-current flanks and mound summits, which stabilized the mounds, increased bed roughness and the overall accumulation rate. However, accumulation thicknesses do not correlate consistently with bryozoan density. The bryozoans were therefore important for the formation of the mounds, but the distribution of bryozoans did not solely determine depositional thickness across a mound and thus mound growth pattern. Relatively long wavelength wavy-bedded chalk show gentle convex-up geometries and would probably be described as sediment waves if recognized in seismic sections. The chalk waves were deposited under weaker current velocities than those active during mound formation. The exposed succession is topped by more evenly bedded chalk which was deposited by quiet pelagic fall-out of fine-grained material. The whole succession was deposited on the upper part of the northern flank of a large WNW-ESE trending 3 km wide depositional ridge with an amplitude of 35-40 m formed by contour-parallel WNW-ward flowing bottom currents. The mounds may have been deposited by regional bottom currents, or by spill-over currents from the valley south of the large ridge. The succession was deposited during varying bottom current intensities and the depositional architecture indicates a complex and dynamic environment. The depositional style seems to be controlled by the interplay and relative importance of two end-member processes

  19. Occurrence of oil in the Austin Chalk at Van field, Van Zandt County, Texas: A unique geologic setting

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, J.T.; Carrington, D.B. )

    1990-09-01

    The Austin Chalk is buried to a depth of only 2,100-2,500 ft and has retained primary microporosity unlike the typical deep fractured chalk reservoirs. The Van structure is a complexly faulted domal anticline created by salt intrusion and is approximately 2,000 ft higher than surrounding structures in the area. A major northwest-dipping fault acts as the primary trapping mechanism. The field has produced 0.5 billion BO from thick Woodbine sands since its discovery in 1929. Occurrence of oil in the Austin Chalk has been known since the field discovery, but prior completions were low rate oil producers. Recent development of a large fracture stimulation technique has resulted in increased production rates of up to 300 BOPD. The Austin Chalk reservoir limits were determined by isopaching feet of minimum productive resistivity having porosity above a cutoff value. The resistivity/porosity isopach showed a direct correlation between Austin Chalk productivity and the Austin Chalk structure and faulting pattern. Structural evidence along with oil typing indicate that the oil in the Austin Chalk has migrated upward along fault planes and through fault juxtaposition from the Woodbine sands 200 ft below the Austin Chalk. Thin-section and scanning electron microscopy work performed on conventional cores showed that the Van Austin Chalk formation is a very fine grained limestone composed primarily of coccoliths. Various amounts of detrital illite clay are present in the coccolith matrix. All effective porosity is micro-intergranular and ranges from 15 to 35%. Based on the core analyses, the main porosity reducing agent and therefore control on reservoir quality is the amount of detrital clay present filling the micropores. Permeability is very low with values ranging from 0.01 to 1.5 md. There is no evidence of significant natural fractures in the core. Artificial fractures are therefore required to create the permeability needed to sustain commercial production rates.

  20. Laboratory measurements of the electrokinetic and electrochemical potential in chalk, with application to monitoring of saline intrusion in the UK chalk aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAllister, D.; Jackson, M.; Butler, A. P.; Vinogradov, J.

    2012-12-01

    Saline intrusion is a global phenomenon affecting the availability of freshwater in coastal aquifers. The aim of this work is to investigate whether measurements of spontaneous potential (SP) can be used to monitor the intrusion of seawater into coastal aquifers, with specific application to the chalk aquifer near Brighton on the south coast of the UK. SP arises to maintain electrical neutrality when a separation of charge occurs due to gradients in pressure (electrokinetic or streaming potential), concentration (electrochemical potential) and temperature (thermoelectric potential). Concentration gradients are a characteristic feature of saline intrusion and may give rise to a measureable electrochemical potential (EC). In addition the electrokinetic potential (EK) will arise during abstraction and up-coning of the saline front. The intruding saline front could therefore be detected and monitored continuously, with SP measurements in boreholes and at the surface providing dense monitoring in space and time. To determine the likely magnitude of EK and EC signals during saline intrusion into the chalk aquifer, we measured EK and EC potentials in samples of Seaford chalk saturated with (i) natural, potable groundwater from the aquifer and (ii) seawater sampled from the English Channel. The EK coupling coefficient, which relates the gradient in voltage to the gradient in water pressure when the total current is zero, was found to be -60 mV/MPa in samples saturated with groundwater. In seawater saturated samples it was found to be only -1 mV/MPa. This result agrees with earlier work suggesting the EK potential is suppressed in high salinity environments due to a compressed electrical double layer. The EK coupling coefficient was negative in both cases, suggesting that the surface charge of Seaford chalk is negative when in contact with groundwater and seawater. The electrochemical experiments involved establishing a concentration gradient across the chalk samples

  1. Sequential vein growth with fault displacement: An example from the Austin Chalk Formation, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Joon; Wiltschko, David V.; Grossman, Ethan L.; Morse, John W.; Lamb, William M.

    1997-10-01

    To determine the opening and precipitation history and characteristics of vein-forming fluids, analyses of oxygen and carbon isotopes and trace elements were carried out on multilayered crack-seal calcite veins in the Austin Chalk Formation near San Antonio, Texas. The veins developed within the normal fault zones possessing unique chemical and textural characteristics which indicate sequential vein development. They are composed of alternating millimeter- to submillimeter-thick calcite veinlets and host lithons, occasionally crosscut by coarse, equant-grained secondary calcite veins. Regular changes in δ18O (e.g., -2.6 to -5.6‰, Pee Dee belemnite (PDB)) of the calcite veinlets along the length of veins suggest that the individual calcite veinlets were sequentially developed. A systematic δ18O decrease in the vein opening direction primarily resulted from a continuous increase in temperature of the ascending fluids delivered to the Austin Chalk. Relatively constant δ13C (approximately +1.4±0.4‰, PDB) for the multilayered veins and most secondary veins indicates that the composition of fluids from which the calcite veins precipitated was initially buffered by the bulk chalk. There is no spatial variation in trace element composition of the calcite veinlets along the length of veins. Low Sr concentrations in both calcite veinlets and secondary veins relative to those of the host chalk reflect a low partition coefficient of Sr in calcite during vein formation. Normal faults in the Cretaceous Austin Chalk were conduits to upwardly mobile vein-forming fluids.

  2. [Dynamics of tritium content in flood-lands reservoirs of the Pripyat river and cooling pond of the Chernobyl nuclear plant].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, D I

    1999-01-01

    Tritium content in water from natural and artificial reservoirs within 30-km exclusion zone of the Chernobyl NPP has been determined. The increase of Tritium activity in the involved water reserwous has been registered in May 1994 and April 1995. As supposed the source of the increase, nuclear power plants, equipped with WWER reactors and located in catchment area of Pripyat river. PMID:10689425

  3. Computer Lab Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the layout and elements of an effective school computer lab. Includes configuration, storage spaces, cabling and electrical requirements, lighting, furniture, and computer hardware and peripherals. (PKP)

  4. Modeling Various Teaching Methods in a Faculty of Education in Science Education: Chalk and Talk, Virtual Labs or Hovercrafts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laronde, Gerald; MacLeod, Katarin

    2012-01-01

    This research was conducted with 291 Junior/Intermediate (J/I) pre-service teachers in a ubiquitous laptop Bachelor of Education program at Nipissing University. The authors modeled a lesson using three different teaching styles using flight as the content medium, a specific expectation found in the Ontario Ministry of Education grade six Science…

  5. Three-dimensional analytic model of the magnetic field for the Chalk River Superconducting Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, W.G.; Lee-Whiting, G.E.; Douglas, S.R.; Pusch, G.D.

    1994-07-01

    A three-dimensional analytic model of the magnetic field for the TASCC cyclotron that satisfies Maxwell`s equations exactly has been constructed for use with the new differential-algebra orbit-dynamics code. The model includes: (1) the superconducting coils; (2) the saturated iron poles; (3) the partially saturated yoke; (4) the saturated-iron trim rods. Lines of dipole density along the edges of the hills account for the non-uniformities and edge effects and along with three yoke constants constitute the only free parameters.

  6. Geological environment of karst within chalk using airborne time domain electromagnetic data cross-interpreted with boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reninger, P.-A.; Martelet, G.; Lasseur, E.; Beccaletto, L.; Deparis, J.; Perrin, J.; Chen, Y.

    2014-07-01

    The ability of airborne Time Domain ElectroMagnetic (TDEM) to image plurikilometric chalk heterogeneities and its implications for the development of a karstic system is addressed in this study. A heliborne TDEM survey was conducted around Courtenay (France) over the Paris Basin Upper Cretaceous chalk. This aquifer is known as a highly weathered and karstified horizon both strongly modify chalk petrophysical properties. Numerous boreholes and one recently reprocessed seismic line were used in order to strengthen TDEM interpretations. We performed cross statistics between boreholes and the resistivity model. This allowed defining empirical resistivity ranges corresponding to the main geological formations within the area. We were therefore able to map large scale heterogeneities in the chalk over the study area. First, the TDEM method highlighted probable weathering corridors in the chalk, related to the tectonic activity, consistent with faults previously interpreted in the seismics at deeper levels. Second, it was possible to image a large scale undulating geometry in the chalk with a SW-NE orientation, this direction is consistent throughout the Paris Basin, and well defined on the cliffs of Normandy (Channel coast, north of France). This geometry has revealed two separate chalk deposits C1 and C2 in Courtenay area: C1 is more resistive than C2. The resistivity model has then been compared to piezometric measurements acquired as part of previous hydrological studies. The karstic drainage appears to be developed within C1 chalk deposit and most of the piezometric domes seem to be associated to intermediate resistivity zones in C1, interpreted as weathered. According to the results obtained from this study, we were able to suggest a geological framework for the development of Courtenay karstic system.

  7. PRIME Lab Radiocarbon Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, D. J.; Mueller, K. A.; Ma, X.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1996-03-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is one of three NSF national facilities for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), and is the only one capable of determining six cosmogenic radionuclides: 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, and 129I. This abstract describes the current status of the radiocarbon analysis program at PRIME Lab.

  8. Making Real Virtual Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Harry E.; Keller, Edward E.

    2005-01-01

    Francis Bacon began defining scientific methodology in the early 17th century, and secondary school science classes began to implement science labs in the mid-19th century. By the early 20th century, leading educators were suggesting that science labs be used to develop scientific thinking habits in young students, and at the beginning of the 21st…

  9. Operating a Math Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Elementary Curriculum Development.

    The rationale behind the use of mathematics laboratories is stated, then directions for organizing and implementing a math lab are given. Topics such as housekeeping, keeping an inventory, noise level, record keeping and assignments, giving grades, correlating textbooks with a math lab, and finding meaningful laboratory problems are each discussed…

  10. Physics Labs with Flavor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes my attempts to look deeper into the so-called "shoot for your grade" labs, started in the '90s, when I began applying my teaching experience in Russia to introductory physics labs at the College of Charleston and other higher education institutions in South Carolina. The term "shoot for your grade" became popular among…

  11. NOT Another Lab Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ende, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Ask students to name the aspects of science class they enjoy most, and working on labs will undoubtedly be mentioned. What often won't be included, however, is writing lab reports. For many students, the process of exploration and data collection is paramount, while the explanation and analysis of findings often takes a backseat. After all, if…

  12. LabSkills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Nick

    2010-01-01

    This article describes LabSkills, a revolutionary teaching tool to improve practical science in schools. LabSkills offers the chance to help improve the exposure that the average Key Stage 5 (age 16-19) student has to practical work. This is a huge area for development being highlighted by universities who are seeing a worryingly growing trend in…

  13. A Museum Learning Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandiver, Kathleen M.; Bijur, Jon Markowitz; Epstein, Ari W.; Rosenthal, Beryl; Stidsen, Don

    2008-01-01

    The "Learning Lab: The Cell" exhibit was developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Museum and the MIT Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS). Specially designed for middle and high school students, the Learning Lab provides museum visitors of all ages with fascinating insights into how our living cells work. The…

  14. Isotopic signature of selected lanthanides for nuclear activities profiling using cloud point extraction and ICP-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, Charles; Lebed, Pablo J; Larivière, Dominic

    2016-05-01

    The presence of fission products, which include numerous isotopes of lanthanides, can impact the isotopic ratios of these elements in the environment. A cloud point extraction (CPE) method was used as a preconcentration/separation strategy prior to measurement of isotopic ratios of three lanthanides (Nd, Sm, and Eu) by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). To minimise polyatomic interference, the combination of interferents removal by CPE, reaction/collision cell conditions in He and NH3 mode and tandem quadrupole configuration was investigated and provided optimal results for the determination of isotopic ratio in environmental samples. Isotopic ratios were initially measured in San Joaquin soil (NIST-2709a), an area with little contamination of nuclear origin. Finally, samples collected from three sites with known nuclear activities (Fangataufa Lagoon in French Polynesia, Chernobyl and the Ottawa River near Chalk River Laboratory) were analysed and all exhibited altered isotopic ratios for (143/145)Nd, (147/149)Sm, and (151/153)Eu. These results demonstrate the potential of CPE and ICP-MS/MS for the detection of altered isotopic ratio in environmental samples collected in area subjected to nuclear anthropogenic contamination. The detection of variations in these isotopic ratios of fission products represents the first application of CPE in nuclear forensic investigations of environmental samples. PMID:26895346

  15. No weapons in the weapons lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebino, Rick

    2010-03-01

    I spent 12 years working at a top-secret nuclear-weapons lab that had its own dedicated force of heavily armed security guards. Of course, security-related incidents were rare, so the guards' main challenge was simply staying awake.

  16. Jefferson Lab Science: Past and Future

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  17. Jefferson Lab Science: Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, R. D.

    2015-09-01

    The continuous electron beam accelerator facility and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  18. Jefferson Lab Science: Present and Future

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McKeown, Robert D.

    2015-02-12

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. Furthermore, this facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  19. NMR response of non-reservoir fluids in sandstone and chalk.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaag, C H; Stallmach, F; Skjetne, T; Veliyulin, E

    2001-01-01

    Transverse (T2) NMR relaxation time at 2 MHz proton resonance frequency was measured on core plug samples from two different lithologies, sandstone and chalk, before and after exposure to selected drilling fluids. The results show that NMR signal response was significantly altered after displacing 50% of the original pore fluids, crude oil and water, by drilling fluid filtrate. Relaxation spectra of the rock samples invaded by water-based filtrate shift to significantly shorter T2-values. This shift yields an underestimation of the free-fluid volumes when selecting cut-off values of 33 ms and 100 ms for sandstone and chalk, respectively. In opposite, rock samples affected by oil-based filtrate respond with a signal indicating significantly larger free-fluid volumes than present before exposure. NMR-permeability calculated based on the Timur-Coates Free Fluid model altered in some cases by one order of magnitude. PMID:11445352

  20. Results of blue crab studies at Chalk Point. Final report 1978-1979

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, P.A.; Polgar, T.T.; Miller, R.E.; Holland, A.F.

    1980-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of two years of blue crab tagging studies conducted in the Patuxent estuary near the Chalk Point power plant. This report is organized in the following manner: An introduction and objectives section defines the objectives of the blue crab study, discusses the modes of interaction between blue crabs and power plant operations, and discusses the life history characteristics of blue crabs. A study methods section provides detailed information on tagging and capture operations and on analysis methods. A results section presents the major findings of the study. A discussion and conclusions section interprets and discusses major findings and defines the impacts of power plant operations at Chalk Point on blue crab populations in the Patuxent estuary. A list of references is included.

  1. Evaluation of auxiliary tempering pump effectiveness at Chalk Point Steam Electric Station

    SciTech Connect

    Wendling, L.C.; Holland, A.F.

    1989-08-01

    The effectiveness of auxiliary tempering pump operation at Chalk Point Steam Electric Station (SES) at reducing plant-induced mortality of aquatic biota was evaluated. Several Representative Important Species (RIS) and dominant benthic and zooplankton species were used in the evaluation as indicators of overall system-wide responses. Expected mortality with and without auxiliary pump operation was estimated using thermal tolerance data available from the scientific literature for blue crabs, white perch, striped bass, spot, Macoma balthica and Acartia tonsa. The evaluation led to the conclusion that the operation of auxiliary tempering pumps at Chalk Point SES increases plant-induced mortality of spot, white perch, striped bass, and zooplankton. Operation of the tempering pumps may reduce blue crab mortality slightly under certain circumstances, and Macoma balthica mortality is probably largely unaffected by their operation.

  2. Early Cretaceous chalks from the North Sea giving evidence for global change.

    PubMed

    Mutterlose, Jörg; Bottini, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    Among calcareous nannofossils, important primary producers in Jurassic and Cretaceous oceans, nannoconids were carbonate rock-forming organisms. During the late Barremian and early Aptian (~126 to 122 million years ago), nannoconids went through a crisis culminating during the Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a. Here we present nannofossil and geochemical data from a section of early Barremian-early Aptian age from the North Sea, recording the earliest chalks ever known in the Boreal Realm. These middle-late Barremian chalks were generated by blooming of endemic nannoconids under relative warm and arid conditions. A subsequent decrease of nannoconids in the latest Barremian coincides with increased nutrient and clay input. This nannoconid decline, also detected at low latitudes, was associated with the Ontong Java Plateau emplacement. We conclude that nannoconids were rock forming also at high latitudes, under clear and oligotrophic waters. Their decline was related to increased continental runoff under reinforced greenhouse conditions. PMID:23575690

  3. Signal analysis of cyclicity in Maastrichtian pelagic chalks from the Danish North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stage, Morten

    1999-11-01

    Low field bulk magnetic susceptibility has been determined on Maastrichtian chalk samples from a drill core from the Dan Field in the Danish North Sea. Fast Fourier Transformations (FFT) have been used to detect possible cycles in the magnetic susceptibility data. Power spectra from the complete section and from sub-sections of the magnetic susceptibility reveal two cyclicities of ca. 0.4 cycles/m and ca. 1.7 cycles/m, which are present on a 90% confidence level. Signal analysis of natural gamma-ray wire-line log data supports these findings. Sedimentation rate estimates place the cycles in the Milankovitch frequency band. Artificial time series are used to study the applicability of the FFT to identifying cyclicity in chalks. Expected geological distortions (e.g., hiati and sedimentation rate variations) are introduced into the time series to investigate the response of the frequency spectra. Different methods of handling missing data intervals are also examined.

  4. Channels in resedimented chalks, Cretaceous Gulf Coastal province of Texas and Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, B.E.

    1984-09-01

    Extensive roadcuts on U.S. Highway 90 in the vicinity of Langtry in west Texas display superb exposures of well-bedded chalky limestones comprising the lowest 27 m (89 ft) of the Austin Chalk equivalent. The limestone occurs as highly persistent beds averaging about 40 cm (15 in.) thick and separated by shale partings averaging 2-3 cm (about 1 in.). Limestone-shale contacts are very sharp. Nannoplankton indicate a Turonian to Santonian age and an outer shelf source; sedimentary features suggest redeposition by moderately low-density turbidity currents in a midfan setting characterized by distinctive distributary channels with channel-mouth bars and levees. The informal term Langtry formation is applied to these strata, which flank shallower water platform facies to the east, north, and west (Austin Chalk and San Vicente Member of the Boquillas Formation), and pass into basinal limestones of the San Felipe Formation in the La Mula basin to the south.

  5. Drilling and production aspects of horizontal wells in the Austin Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikholeslami, B.A.; Schlottman, B.W.; Siedel, F.A.; Button, D.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Since 1984, Amoco has pursued horizontal completions within the Burleson, Lee, and Fayette county areas of the Austin Chalk trend in central Texas. To date, two different drilling methods have been based to drill ten horizontal wells, which have been successfully completed and are presently producing. With use of both the short- and medium-radius drilling methods, significant cost reductions were realized and well performance was defined and optimized during the program. The program's overall success was directly attributable to the cooperative efforts of a team of drillers, reservoir engineers, and geologists. The drilling methods used by Amoco and the results of horizontal drilling in the Austin Chalk give production data that compare horizontal well performance against offset vertical well performance, which in this program resulted in horizontal/vertical well production ratios of 2.5 to 7. In addition, a significant relationship between length of horizontal well bore and production ratios was observed.

  6. Chernobyl nuclear accident hydrologic analysis and emergency evaluation of radionuclide distributions in the Dnieper River, Ukraine, during the 1993 summer flood

    SciTech Connect

    Voitsekhovitch, O.V.; Zheleznyak, M.J.; Onishi, Y.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes joint activities of Program 7.1.F, ``Radionuclide Transport in Water and Soil Systems,`` of the USA/Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) Joint Coordinating Committee of Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety to study the hydrogeochemical behavior of radionuclides released to the Pripyat and Dnieper rivers from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine. These joint activities included rapid evaluation of radionuclide distributions in the Pripyat and Dnieper river system and field data evaluation and modeling for the 1993 summer flood to assist the Ukrainian government in their emergency response during the flood. In July-August 1993, heavy rainfall over the Pripyat River Catchment in Belarus and Ukraine caused severe flooding, significantly raising {sup 90}Sr concentrations in the river. Near the Chernobyl area, the maximum {sup 90}Sr concentration in the Pripyat River reached 20--25 PCi/L in early August; near the Pripyat River mouth, the concentration rose to 35 pCi/L. The peak {sup 90}Sr concentration in the Kiev Reservoir (a major source of drinking water for Kiev) was 12 pCi/L. Based on these measured radionuclide levels, additional modeling results and the assumption of water purification in a water treatment station, {sup 90}Sr concentrations in Kiev`s drinking water were estimated to be less than 8 pCi/L. Unlike {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs concentrations in the Pripyat River during the flood did not rise significantly to the pre-flood levels. Estimated {sup 137}Cs concentrations for the Kiev drinking water were two orders of magnitude lower than the drinking water standard of 500 pCi/L for {sup 137}Cs.

  7. Waveform analysis of crosshole GPR data collected in heterogeneous chalk deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Nielsen, Lars; Looms, Majken C.; Moreau, Julien; Stemmerik, Lars; Klotzsche, Anja; van der Kruk, Jan; Holliger, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Chalks are important reservoirs for groundwater production onshore Denmark and for hydrocarbons in the North Sea Basin. Therefore this rock type is studied extensively with geological and geophysical methods. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) tomography is used to characterize fine-scale reservoir properties, e.g. subtle changes in porosity. We have conducted a range of high-resolution GPR crosshole experiments in Boesdal quarry in Eastern Denmark. The objective is to investigate the impact of fine-scale heterogeneity on reservoir properties in chalk. The studied chalk interval is c.15 m thick. It can be divided into two main units based on the traveltime analysis and interpretation of the cored material from the boreholes. The lower unit consists mainly of porous calcareous mudstone with occasional occurrences of flint nodules. The upper succession is c. 8 m thick and is fairly heterogeneous with multiple beds of wackestones and packstones with abundant flint nodules or bands. The heterogeneity of the upper layer is expressed by more complex waveforms than the lower unit. Pronounced attenuation of the transmitted wave fields is observed in the highly porous lower unit. Full-waveform inversion methods are highly dependent on the quality of the starting models (usually obtained from ray-based tomography), as well as on the assumptions made regarding the source signal. Adequate estimation of starting models and source waveform is, however, a challenging task for the strongly heterogeneous chalk material. We highlight the critical aspects regarding these tasks for the two contrasting layers. Furthermore we demonstrate how different starting models and assumptions regarding the source signal estimation affect the waveform inversion results.

  8. Seismic characterization of fracture orientation in the Austin Chalk using azimuthal P-wave AVO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shuhail, Abdullatif Adulrahman

    The Austin Chalk is a naturally fractured reservoir. Horizontal drilling, to intersect more fractures, is the most efficient method to develop this reservoir. Information about the predominant fracture orientation in the subsurface is essential before horizontal drilling. This information may be provided by cores, well logs, outcrop, or seismic data. In this study, I apply the azimuthal P-wave AVO method suggested by Ruger and Tsvankin (1997) on 2-D P-wave seismic data in Gonzales County, Texas, in order to determine the fracture azimuth in the Austin Chalk. The data also include oil production from horizontal wells and various types of well logs from vertical wells in the study area. The raw seismic data was imaged through a processing sequence that preserved the relative changes of amplitudes with offset. The stacked sections of some seismic lines showed that the top of the Austin Chalk reflector is laterally inconsistent. This is interpreted as an indication of fractured zones in the subsurface. This interpretation was strengthened by well logs that indicated fracturing in nearby wells. The AVO gradient of every CDP in a seismic line was determined. The median AVO gradient of all the CDPs in a seismic line was chosen to represent the whole line. The median AVO gradients of the lines and their corresponding line azimuths were used repeatedly to solve the azimuthal AVO equation, of Ruger and Tsvankin (1997), for the fracture azimuth using a combination of three different lines every time. The resultant fracture-azimuth solutions clustered about two, nearly perpendicular, azimuths: N58E and S31E. To resolve the inherently ambiguous solutions, the results from the production and well log data were used. Since the production and well log data indicated the presence of NE-trending fractures, I chose the N58E direction as the fracture azimuth. This result agreed with the results of other studies in surrounding areas, using different methods, about the fracture azimuth

  9. Development and maintenance of a telescoping debris flow fan in response to human-induced fan surface channelization, Chalk Creek Valley Natural Debris Flow Laboratory, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasklewicz, T.; Scheinert, C.

    2016-01-01

    Channel change has been a constant theme throughout William L. Graf's research career. Graf's work has examined channel changes in the context of natural environmental fluctuations, but more often has focused on quantifying channel change in the context of anthropogenic modifications. Here, we consider how channelization of a debris flows along a bajada has perpetuated and sustained the development of 'telescoping' alluvial fan. Two-dimensional debris-flow modeling shows the importance of the deeply entrenched channelized flow in the development of a telescoping alluvial fan. GIS analyses of repeat (five different debris flows), high-resolution (5 cm) digital elevation models (DEMs) generated from repeat terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data elucidate sediment and topographic dynamics of the new telescoping portion of the alluvial fan (the embryonic fan). Flow constriction from channelization helps to perpetuate debris-flow runout and to maintain the embryonic fan and telescoping nature of the alluvial fan complex. Embryonic fan development, in response to five debris flows, proceeds with a major portion of the flows depositing on the southern portion of the embryonic fan. The third through the fifth debris flows also begin to shift some deposition to the northern portion of the embryonic. The transfer of sediment from a higher portion of the embryonic fan to a lower portion continues currently on the embryonic fan. While channelized flow has been shown to be critical to the maintenance of the telescoping fan, the flow constriction has led to higher than background levels of sediment deposition in Chalk Creek, a tributary of the Arkansas River. A majority of the sediment from each debris flow is incorporated into Chalk Creek as opposed to being stored on the embryonic fan.

  10. Horizontal exploitation of the Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk of south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, R.; Hand, L.; Dickerson, D.; Bird, S. )

    1990-05-01

    Horizontal drilling in the fractured Austin Chalk of south Texas has proven to be a viable technology for exploiting reserve opportunities in mature trends as well as in frontier areas. To date, the results of an interdisciplinary approach to the regional analysis of structure and stress regimes combined with studies of the depositional characteristics of the Austin Chalk and Eagleford Shale have been a success. Productive characteristics of the Austin Chalk indicate the influence of regional fractures on the preferential flow direction and partitioning in the Pearsall field area of the trend. Well bore orientation and inclination are designed such that multiple fracture swarms at several stratigraphic horizons are intersected with a single horizontal well bore. As a result of the greater frequency of fracture contacts with the well bore, there is a significant increase in the ultimate recovery of hydrocarbons in place. Conventional vertical drilling techniques are frequently ineffective at encountering these laterally partitioned fracture sets, resulting in lower volumes of recoverable hydrocarbons. Additionally, horizontal well bores may increase ultimate recovery of hydrocarbons by lowering the pressure gradient to the well bore and maximizing the reservoir energy.

  11. Chemostratigraphy of Upper Cretaceous chalk sequences in Norwegian-Danish basin and North Sea Central Trough

    SciTech Connect

    Joergensen, N.O.

    1987-05-01

    Geochemical studies of subsurface sections and outcrops in the Upper Cretaceous chalk sequences from the Norwegian-Danish basin and the North Sea Central Trough have resulted in a detailed chemostratigraphy for these strata. The most applicable chemostratigraphic markers are based on the distribution of strontium, magnesium, manganese, the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio, and the variations in the carbonate contents. It is demonstrated that the chemostratigraphic approach is valid at two levels: (1) a superior chemostratigraphy in which deep-sea cores from the Atlantic Ocean and sections from western Europe are correlated on the basis of significant geochemical anomalies and long-term variations most likely induced by oceanic geochemical cycles and sea level fluctuations; (2) a subordinate but detailed intrabasinal chemostratigraphic correlation which primarily reflects the physicochemical conditions in the depositional environment. The Upper Cretaceous chemostratigraphy established in the Danish area allows a detailed correlation between relatively continuous chalk sequences in the Norwegian-Danish basin and the rather condensed and hiati-influenced sections in the oil fields of the North Sea. The results emphasize the applicability of chemostratigraphy in the subsurface exploration for hydrocarbon reservoirs in chalk.

  12. Late Cretaceous (late Campanian-Maastrichtian) sea-surface temperature record of the Boreal Chalk Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Nicolas; Harlou, Rikke; Schovsbo, Niels H.; Stemmerik, Lars; Surlyk, Finn

    2016-02-01

    The last 8 Myr of the Cretaceous greenhouse interval were characterized by a progressive global cooling with superimposed cool/warm fluctuations. The mechanisms responsible for these climatic fluctuations remain a source of debate that can only be resolved through multi-disciplinary studies and better time constraints. For the first time, we present a record of very high-resolution (ca. 4.5 kyr) sea-surface temperature (SST) changes from the Boreal epicontinental Chalk Sea (Stevns-1 core, Denmark), tied to an astronomical timescale of the late Campanian-Maastrichtian (74 to 66 Ma). Well-preserved bulk stable isotope trends and calcareous nannofossil palaeoecological patterns from the fully cored Stevns-1 borehole show marked changes in SSTs. These variations correlate with deep-water records of climate change from the tropical South Atlantic and Pacific oceans but differ greatly from the climate variations of the North Atlantic. We demonstrate that the onset and end of the early Maastrichtian cooling and of the large negative Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary carbon isotope excursion are coincident in the Chalk Sea. The direct link between SSTs and δ13C variations in the Chalk Sea reassesses long-term glacio-eustasy as the potential driver of carbon isotope and climatic variations in the Maastrichtian.

  13. Late Cretaceous (Late Campanian-Maastrichtian) sea surface temperature record of the Boreal Chalk Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, N.; Harlou, R.; Schovsbo, N. H.; Stemmerik, L.; Surlyk, F.

    2015-11-01

    The last 8 Myr of the Cretaceous greenhouse interval were characterized by a progressive global cooling with superimposed cool/warm fluctuations. The mechanisms responsible for these climatic fluctuations remain a source of debate that can only be resolved through multi-disciplinary studies and better time constraints. For the first time, we present a record of very high-resolution (ca. 4.5 kyr) sea-surface temperature (SST) changes from the Boreal epicontinental Chalk Sea (Stevns-1 core, Denmark), tied to an astronomical time scale of the late Campanian-Maastrichtian (74 to 66 Myr). Well-preserved bulk stable isotope trends and calcareous nannofossil palaeoecological patterns from the fully cored Stevns-1 borehole show marked changes in SSTs. These variations correlate with deep-water records of climate change from the tropical South Atlantic and Pacific oceans but differ greatly from the climate variations of the North Atlantic. We demonstrate that the onset and end of the early Maastrichtian cooling and of the large negative Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary carbon isotope excursion are coincident in the Chalk Sea. The direct link between SSTs and δ13C variations in the Chalk Sea reassesses long-term glacio-eustasy as the potential driver of carbon isotope and climatic variations in the Maastrichtian.

  14. Fracture-network 3D characterization in a deformed chalk reservoir analogue -- the Laegerdorf case

    SciTech Connect

    Koestler, A.G.; Reksten, K.

    1995-09-01

    Quantitative descriptions of 3D fracture networks in terms of fracture characteristics and connectivity are necessary for reservoir evaluation, management, and EOR programs of fractured reservoirs. The author`s research has focused on an analogue to North Sea fractured chalk reservoirs that is excellently exposed near Laegerdorf, northwest Germany. An underlying salt diapir uplifted and deformed Upper Cretaceous chalk; the cement industry now exploits it. The fracture network in the production wall of the quarry was characterized and mapped at different scales, and 12 profiles of the 230-m wide and 35-m high production wall were investigated as the wall receded 25 m. In addition, three wells were drilled into the chalk volume. The wells were cored and the wellbores were imaged with both the resistivity formation micro scanner (FMS) and the sonic circumferential borehole image logger (CBIL). The large amount of fracture data was analyzed with respect to parameters, such as fracture density distribution, orientation, and length distribution, and in terms of the representativity and predictability of data sets collected from restricted rock volumes.

  15. Overview of the Government of Canada Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program - 13551

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, D.; McCauley, D.; Miller, J.; Brooks, S.

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear legacy liabilities have resulted from more than 60 years of nuclear research and development carried out on behalf of Canada. The liabilities are located at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario and Whiteshell Laboratories in Manitoba, as well as three shutdown prototype reactors in Ontario and Quebec that are being maintained in a safe storage state. Estimated at about $7.4 billion (current day dollars), these liabilities consist of disused nuclear facilities and associated infrastructure, a wide variety of buried and stored waste, and contaminated lands. In 2006, the Government of Canada adopted a long-term strategy to deal with the nuclear legacy liabilities and initiated a five-year, $520 million start-up phase, thereby creating the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP). The Government of Canada renewed the NLLP in 2011 with a $439-million three-year second phase that ends March 31, 2014. The projects and activities carried out under the Program focus on infrastructure decommissioning, environmental restoration, improving the management of legacy radioactive waste, and advancing the long-term strategy. The NLLP is being implemented through a Memorandum of Understanding between Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and AECL whereby NRCan is responsible for policy direction and oversight, including control of funding, and AECL is responsible for implementing the program of work and holding and administering all licences, facilities and lands. (authors)

  16. Jefferson Lab: Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2016-04-01

    The continuous electron beam accelerator facility and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for nuclear physics research whose upgrade is presently underway, with completion expected in 2017. The upgraded facility will accelerate electron beams to 11 GeV for experiments in the existing Halls A, B and C. In addition, a 12 GeV beam can be provided to a new experimental hall, Hall D, to generate a 9 GeV tagged photon beam. This upgrade will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in hadronic, nuclear, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  17. Jefferson Lab: Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2016-08-01

    The continuous electron beam accelerator facility and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for nuclear physics research whose upgrade is presently underway, with completion expected in 2017. The upgraded facility will accelerate electron beams to 11 GeV for experiments in the existing Halls A, B and C. In addition, a 12 GeV beam can be provided to a new experimental hall, Hall D, to generate a 9 GeV tagged photon beam. This upgrade will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in hadronic, nuclear, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  18. A particle assembly/constrained expansion (PACE) model for the formation and structure of porous metal oxide deposits on nuclear fuel rods in pressurized light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Donald W.; Lu, Shijing; O'Brien, Christopher J.; Bucholz, Eric W.; Rak, Zsolt

    2015-02-01

    A new model is proposed for the structure and properties of porous metal oxide scales (aka Chalk River Unidentified Deposits (CRUD)) observed on the nuclear fuel rod cladding in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The model is based on the thermodynamically-driven expansion of agglomerated octahedral nickel ferrite particles in response to pH and temperature changes in the CRUD. The model predicts that porous nickel ferrite with internal {1 1 1} surfaces is a thermodynamically stable structure under PWR conditions even when the free energy of formation of bulk nickel ferrite is positive. This explains the pervasive presence of nickel ferrite in CRUD, observed CRUD microstructures, why CRUD maintains its porosity, and variations in porosity within the CRUD observed experimentally. This model is a stark departure from decades of conventional wisdom and detailed theoretical analysis of CRUD chemistry, and defines new research directions for model validation, and for understanding and ultimately controlling CRUD formation.

  19. Diagenesis of the Machar Field (British North Sea) chalk: Evidence for decoupling of diagenesis in fractures and the host rock

    SciTech Connect

    Maliva, R.G.; Dickson, J.A.D.; Smalley, P.C.; Oxtoby, N.H.

    1995-01-02

    The Chalk Group (Cretaceous/Tertiary) in the Machar Field (British North Sea) contains both fracture-filling and microcrystalline calcite cements. Modeling of fluid-rock interaction using data on light stable isotopes obtained by whole rock analyses and laser ablation analyses of calcite cements reveal that the fracture and matrix diagenetic systems were largely decoupled. The calcium and carbonate of the fracture-filling calcite cements were derived largely from the adjacent chalk matrix. The fracture diagenetic system had a high water-rock ratio, which maintained a relatively stable water {delta}{sup 18}O ratio during calcite dissolution and precipitation. The chalk matrix, on the contrary, had a low molar water-rock ratio during recrystallization, which resulted in increases in the pore-water {delta}{sup 18}O value during recrystallization at elevated temperatures. This evolution of the pore-water {delta}{sup 18}O value is manifested by highly variable cement {delta}{sup 18}O values. The present-day formation waters of the Machar Field have {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios significantly higher than the whole rock and fracture-filling cement calcite values, evidence that the chemical composition of the formation waters is not representative of that of the pore waters during chalk recrystallization. Little diagenesis is therefore now occurring in the Machar Field. The diagenetic systems of the chalk matrix and fractures both had a high degree of openness with respect to carbon, because of the introduction of organically derived bicarbonate rather than advection of water through the chalk. The bulk of calcite cementation in fractures and the recrystallization and cementation of the chalk matrix occurred at temperatures in the 80--100 C range, at or just below the present-day reservoir temperature of 97 C.

  20. Savannah River Site nuclear materials stabilization and storage Year 2000 ``at risk`` systems white paper

    SciTech Connect

    Mooneyhan, J.L.

    1998-05-14

    The primary mission of Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage (NMSS) is the stabilization of plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) bearing legacy nuclear materials. The F-Canyon Distributed Control System (DCS) and the F-Area Outside Facilities (OF-F) Chemical Handling programmable Logic Controller (PLC) are independent process control systems used to control a portion of the nuclear material stabilization process. One NMSS roll-up system contains two F-Canyon control systems that are scheduled to attain Year 2000 compliance by 9/30/99, 6 months beyond the desired 3/31/99 date. These 1970s vintage systems, which are integral to the operation and safety of high-level radioactive material processing systems, require both hardware and software modifications. Based upon previous experience with upgrading similar systems, prudent engineering dictates a schedule with sufficient time to procure equipment, conduct rigorous off-line testing including pilot operation of all new hardware, and obtain high quality, accurate documentation. Schedule acceleration, which negatively impacts any of the critical phases in the modification process risks hardware and/or software failures/errors, could significantly extend outages, with cost penalties estimated at $3 million per week. The proposed schedule directed at full Year 2000 compliance by 9/30/99 provides for implementation based upon best engineering and operations judgment, minimal cost and facility disruption, 3 months of normal systems operation /prior to 1/1/2000, and a contingency plan, which provides that the facility is maintained in a safe configuration at all times, ensuring no adverse impacts on facility personnel, property, or the general public.

  1. Virtual labs: a substitute for traditional labs?

    PubMed

    Scheckler, Rebecca K

    2003-01-01

    Current technologies give us the ability to enhance and replace developmental biology classes with computer-based resources, often called virtual labs. In the process of using these resources, teachers may be tempted to neglect the simpler technologies and lab bench activities, which can be labor intensive. In this paper, I take a critical look at the role of computer-based materials for the teaching of developmental biology in order to aid teachers in assessing their value. I conclude that while digital tools have value, they should not replace all of the traditional laboratory activities. Clearly, both computer-enhanced activities and traditional labs must be included in laboratory exercises. Reliance on only one or the other is inappropriate. In order to determine when it is appropriate to use a particular educational tool, the goals of the course and the needs of biology students for an education that gives them a realistic and engaged view of biology must be understood. In this paper, I dispel some of the myths of computer tools and give specific guidelines for assessing their usage, taking into account the special needs of a developmental biology class and the difficulties of observing all the developmental stages of subject organisms in the timescale of class meetings. PMID:12705675

  2. GeneLab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Thompson, Terri G.

    2015-01-01

    NASA GeneLab is expected to capture and distribute omics data and experimental and process conditions most relevant to research community in their statistical and theoretical analysis of NASAs omics data.

  3. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-05-22

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  4. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-13

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  5. LABS Foundational Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    They are the inventors of our generation dedicated to exceptional science, advancing the technologies of tomorrow. CO-LABS honors the outstanding achievements of researchers and their impact on the world.

  6. Advanced Lab Consortium ``Conspiracy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Jonathan F.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced Laboratory instruction is a time-honored and essential element of an undergraduate physics education. But, from my vantage point, it has been neglected by the two major professional societies, APS and AAPT. At some schools, it has been replaced by ``research experiences,'' but I contend that very few of these experiences in the research lab, particularly in the junior year, deliver what they promise. It is time to focus the attention of APS, AAPT, and the NSF on the advanced lab. We need to create an Advanced Lab Consortium (ALC) of faculty and staff to share experiments, suppliers, materials, pedagogy, ideas, in short to build a professional network for those committed to advanced lab instruction. The AAPT is currently in serious discussions on this topic and my company stands ready with both financial and personnel resources to support the effort. This talk is a plea for co-conspirators.

  7. Dose reconstruction for an occupational cohort at the Savannah River nuclear facility: evaluation of a hybrid method.

    PubMed

    Hamra, Ghassan; Nylander-French, Leena A; Richardson, David

    2008-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is the only nuclear facility in the United States that produces tritium, a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. The purpose of the study was to derive annual tritium dose estimates for SRS employees through the development of a job-exposure matrix. The proposed method is unique in that along with qualitative information on job, area and time of employment, it utilises recorded annual whole-body dose measures, when available, in order to estimate doses from tritium intakes of the monitored workers. Using information from 75 253 dose measures for the period 1954-1978, the average proportion of the whole-body dose that was due to tritium intake was calculated; these proportions were allowed to vary by job, area and time period. This information was used to assign tritium dose levels for 43 590 employment-years. The collective estimated tritium dose was 4319 mSv compared with the total known tritium dose of 17 382 mSv. The correlation (R2) of estimated tritium dose with known tritium dose was 0.68. PMID:18550516

  8. Caoxite-hydroxyapatite composition as consolidating material for the chalk stone from Basarabi-Murfatlar churches ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Turcanu-Caruţiu, Daniela; Fierăscu, Radu-Claudiu; Fierăscu, Irina; Bunghez, Ioana-Raluca; Ion, Mihaela-Lucia; Teodorescu, Sofia; Vasilievici, Gabriel; Rădiţoiu, Valentin

    2015-12-01

    The development of new composition for surface conservation of some architectural monuments represents now an important research topic. The Basarabi-Murfatlar Ensemble, recognized as the first religious monument from mediaeval Dobrogea (Romania) (from 9th to 11th century), is one of the most impressive archaeological sites of Europe. This ensemble is built from amorphous calcium carbonate, very sensitive to humidity, frost, salts, etc. The aim of this paper is to test on chalk stone samples a new consolidant - hydroxyapatite (HAp) mixed with calcium oxalate trihydrate (caoxite) (COT). Some specific techniques for evaluation its impact on chalk stone surface are used, as follows: petrographical and physical-chemical techniques: SEM, OM, ICP-AES, TGA, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, chromatic parameters changes, the accelerated weathering tests: heating, freeze-thaw, and their effects on porosity and capillary water uptake by the chalk surface. All these have been evaluated before and after treatment with COT-HAp, putting into evidence the effect of the new composition on the chalk stone surface. HAp induces COT stabilization, and their joint composition can bind weathered stone blocks providing a substantial reinforcement of chalk surface.

  9. The greening of the national labs

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, E.

    1993-04-02

    The big three weapons laboratories - Los Alamos, Livermore, and Sandia - could face dramatic changes in the way they do business if a proposal made by Representative George Brown (D-CA) is enacted. Brown, chairman of the House Science Committee, introduced a bill last week that would consolidate nuclear weapons R D from several labs (without saying at which sites or how). Brown also wants to shift the focus of the labs work more toward civilian projects, and the bill would involve the White House more directly in managing their research agenda. The Brown bill (HR 1432), which has won the backing of Representatives Marilyn Lloyd (D-TN), Tim Valentine (D-NC), Rick Boucher (D-VA), and Ron Wyden (R-OR), asks the secretary of energy to make a comprehensive study of current lab activities and submit a plan to redirect one or more of these labs to civilian missions by 31 March 1994. Brown and other members of Congress had considered turning one of the nuclear weapons centers into a green lab, that is, dedicating it to R D on environmental technology. That idea seems to have been set aside in favor of a more general formula that would be administered by a new Federal Laboratory Mission Evaluation and Coordination Committee, reporting to the president's science adviser. This watchdog panel, according to the bill, would seek to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of all the federal laboratories and ensure that between 10% and 20% of their budgets are devoted to collaborative efforts with industry and state and local governments. Administratively, the bill would also create some new positions at the Dept. of Energy (DOE), including an undersecretary for science and technology who would manage the labs.

  10. Discussing spent nuclear fuel in high school classrooms: addressing public fears through early education

    SciTech Connect

    Winkel, S.; Sullivan, J.; Jones, S.; Sullivan, K.; Hyland, B.; Pencer, J.; Colton, A.

    2013-07-01

    The Inreach program combines the Deep River Science Academy (DRSA) 'learning through research' approach with state of the art communication technology to bring scientific research to high school classrooms. The Inreach program follows the DRSA teaching model where a university student tutor works on a research project with scientific staff at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories. Participating high school classes are located across Canada. The high school students learn about the ongoing research activities via weekly web conferences. In order to engage the students and encourage participation in the conferences, themed exercises linked to the research project are provided to the students. The DRSA's Inreach program uses a cost-effective internet technology to reach a wide audience, in an interactive setting, without anyone leaving their desks or offices. An example Inreach research project is presented here: an investigation of the potential of the Canadian supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) concept to burn transuranic elements (Np, Pu, Am, Cm) to reduce the impact of used nuclear fuel. During this project a university student worked with AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) researchers on technical aspects of the project, and high school students followed their progress and learned about the composition, hazards, and disposition options for used nuclear fuel. Previous projects included the effects of tritium on cellular viability and neutron diffraction measurement of residual stresses in automobile engines.

  11. Qualification of Programmable Electronic System (PES) equipment based on international nuclear I and C standards

    SciTech Connect

    De Grosbois, J.; Hepburn, G. A.; Olmstead, R.; Goble, W.; Kumar, V.

    2006-07-01

    Nuclear power plants (NPPs) are increasingly faced with the challenge of qualifying procured equipment, sub-components, and systems that contain digital programmed electronics for use in safety-related applications. Referred to as a 'programmable electronic system' (PES), such equipment typically contains both complex logic that is vulnerable to systematic design faults, and low voltage electronics hardware that is subject to random faults. Procured PES products or components are often only commercial grade, yet can offer reliable cost effective alternatives to custom-designed or nuclear qualified equipment, provided they can be shown to meet the quality assurance, functional safety, environmental, and reliability requirements of a particular application. The process of confirming this is referred to as application-specific product qualification (ASPQ) and can be challenging and costly. This paper provides an overview of an approach that has been developed at Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) and successfully applied to PES equipment intended for use in domestic Candu R 6 nuclear power plants and special purpose reactors at Chalk River Laboratories. The approach has evolved over the past decade and has recently been adapted to be consistent with, and take advantage of new standards that are applicable to nuclear safety-related I and C systems. Also discussed are how recognized third-party safety-certifications of PES equipment to International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards, and the assessment methods employed, may be used to reduce ASPQ effort. (authors)

  12. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix C, Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Mangement Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in two related decision making processes concerning: (1) the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which will focus on the next 10 years; and (2) programmatic decisions on future spent nuclear fuel management which will emphasize the next 40 years. DOE is analyzing the environmental consequences of these spent nuclear fuel management actions in this two-volume Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Volume 1 supports broad programmatic decisions that will have applicability across the DOE complex and describes in detail the purpose and need for this DOE action. Volume 2 is specific to actions at the INEL. This document, which limits its discussion to the Savannah River Site (SRS) spent nuclear fuel management program, supports Volume 1 of the EIS. Following the introduction, Chapter 2 contains background information related to the SRS and the framework of environmental regulations pertinent to spent nuclear fuel management. Chapter 3 identifies spent nuclear fuel management alternatives that DOE could implement at the SRS, and summarizes their potential environmental consequences. Chapter 4 describes the existing environmental resources of the SRS that spent nuclear fuel activities could affect. Chapter 5 analyzes in detail the environmental consequences of each spent nuclear fuel management alternative and describes cumulative impacts. The chapter also contains information on unavoidable adverse impacts, commitment of resources, short-term use of the environment and mitigation measures.

  13. Jefferson Lab, a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, B.M.

    1996-10-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab; formerly known as CEBAF), operates a 4 GeV, 200 {micro}A continuous wave (CW) electron accelerator that re-circulates the beam five times through two superconducting 400 MeV linacs. Electrons can be extracted from any of the five recirculation passes and beam can be simultaneously delivered to the three experimental halls. As the commissioning stage nears completion, the accelerator is becoming a fully operational machine. Experiments in Hall C have been underway since November 1995 with beam powers of over 300 kW at various energies. Hall A has received beam for spectrometer commissioning, while Hall B is expected to receive its first beam in the fall of 1996. Accelerator availability of greater than 70% during physics runs and excellent beam quality have contributed to making Jefferson Lab a world class laboratory for accelerator-based electromagnetic nuclear physics. With the high performance of the superconducting RF cavities, machine upgrades to 6 GeV, and eventually 8 to 10 GeV are now in the planning stages. Operational and commissioning details concerning all aspects of the machine will be discussed.

  14. The Impact of Surface Charge on the Mechanical Behavior of High-Porosity Chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megawati, M.; Hiorth, A.; Madland, M. V.

    2013-09-01

    We present rock mechanical test results and analytical calculations which demonstrate that a negative surface charge, resulting from sulfate adsorption from the pore water, impacts the rock mechanical behavior of high-porosity chalk. Na2SO4 brine flooded into chalk cores at 130 °C results in significantly reduced bulk modulus and yield point compared with that of NaCl brine at the same conditions. The experimental results have been interpreted using a surface complexation model combined with the Gouy-Chapman theory to describe the double layer. The calculated sulfate adsorption agrees well with the measured data. A sulfate adsorption of about 0.3 μmol/m2 and 0.7-1 μmol/m2 was measured at 50 and 130 °C, respectively. Relative to a total sites of 5 sites/nm2 these values correspond to an occupation of 4 % and 8-13 % which sufficiently explains the negative charging of the calcite surfaces. The interaction between charged surfaces specifically in the weak overlaps of electrical double layer gives rise to the total disjoining pressure in granular contacts. The net repulsive forces act as normal forces in the grains vicinity, counteracting the cohesive forces and enhance pore collapse failure during isotropic loading, which we argue to account for the reduced yield and bulk modulus of chalk cores. The effect of disjoining pressure is also assessed at different sulfate concentrations in aqueous solution, temperatures, as well as ionic strength of solution; all together remarkably reproduce similar trends as observed in the mechanical properties.

  15. Successional changes and diversity of soil macrofaunal communities on chalk grasslands in Upper-Normandy (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutoit, Thierry; Decaens, Thibaud; Alard, Didier

    A study of soil macrofaunal communities was made along a secondary plant succession following sheep grazing abandonment in some chalk grasslands of Upper-Normandy (France). 78 taxonomic units were identified. Taxonomic richness was highest in the recently abandoned grassland. Each plot was characterised by its own specific taxonomic groups. The environmental factors which explained the major contrasts between soil macrofaunal communities were the extent of tree colonisation and litter characteristics (C:N, biomass). Successional changes induced major changes in functional groups of soil macrofauna i. e. endogeic species dominated under herbaceous vegetation while epigeic species were more important in woody plots.

  16. Spatial heterogeneity of high-resolution Chalk groundwater geochemistry - Underground quarry at Saint Martin-le-Noeud, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barhoum, S.; Valdès, D.; Guérin, R.; Marlin, C.; Vitale, Q.; Benmamar, J.; Gombert, P.

    2014-11-01

    Chalk groundwater is an important aquifer resource in France because it accounts for a production of 12 million m3 y-1 with a large proportion reserved for drinking water. Processes occurring in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and the overlying superficial formations have a high impact on Chalk groundwater geochemistry and require better understanding. The study site is a former underground Chalk quarry located near Beauvais (France) that extends over 1200 m in length, at a depth ranging from 20 to 30 m. The water table intersects the cavity creating 15 underground “lake” that give access to the Chalk groundwater. Lakes geochemistry has been studied: water samples were collected in July 2013 and major ion concentrations were analyzed. UZ and clay-with-flints thickness above each lake were estimated qualitatively using an electromagnetic sensor (EM31) and Underground GPS. The results unexpectedly showed that groundwater quality varied widely in spatial terms for both allochthonous and autochthonous ions (e.g., HCO3- ranged from 2.03 to 4.43 meq L-1, NO3- ranged from 0.21 to 1.33 meq L-1). Principal component analysis indicated the impact of agricultural land use on water quality, with the intake of NO3- as well as SO42-, Cl- and Ca2+. Chalk groundwater geochemistry is compared with the nature and structure of the UZ. We highlight correlations (1) between thick clay-with-flints layers and the ions Mg2+ and K+, and (2) between UZ thickness and Na+. In conclusion, this paper identifies various ion sources (agriculture, clay-with-flints and Chalk) and demonstrates different processes in the UZ: dissolution, ionic exchange and solute storage.

  17. Z Machine at Sandia Labs

    SciTech Connect

    2007-10-17

    Sandia Labs' Z machine is the largest laboratory source of x-rays in the world. For the few nanoseconds of a Z Machine test, its electrical output equals the output of 50x the electrical generating stations of all the power plants on earth. The Z Machine complex encompasses an area roughly the size of a major college basketball arena. Originally created to validate nuclear weapons models, the Z Machine is also considered a "dark horse" in the race for viable fusion energy production. After the famous "arcs and sparks" photo of Z (a photo no longer possible after its refurbishment), this is a fast-motion video of workers completing Z's recent refurbishment.

  18. Nonproliferation through international lab-to-lab technology cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlop, W H

    1998-09-10

    At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) one of the fastest growing programs as a result of the end of the Cold War is the Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and International Security Directorate (NAI). Since the early 1990's NAI types of programs have grown from a small percentage of LLNL's budget to constitute one of its major programs. NAI's work includes developing instruments to detect chemicals and radiation, analyzing complex national defense problems, anticipating threats to the US, and providing personnel to support national and international efforts in crisis management and arms control. These functions support the US government in dealing with weapons-of-mass-destruction challenges- proliferation, terrorism, and nuclear-state instability. To combat the rapidly emerging chem-bio-terrorism threats, NAI is drawing on LLNL's advanced technologies in bioscience, microfabrication, and computations to help the Department of Energy (DOE )provide major support to the US government. Half of NAI's effort is directed toward preventing proliferation before it starts, which is the mission of the Proliferation Prevention and Arms Control Program (PPAC). Until recently, our emphasis was on arms control. Now, arms control continues to be an important component while international cooperation and fissile material control are our dominant activities for the Department of Energy. Many of the post-Cold-War changes are highly visible, such as the elimination of nuclear testing by the United States, Russia, China and other major powers; agreements and continuing negotiations to dramatically reduce numbers of nuclear weapons; and increasing international focus on nonproliferation and counterterrorism. Other changes are less highly publicized but are no less significant. One such area is the increasing interactions between DOE Laboratory scientists and their counterparts in the nuclear weapons institutes of the former Soviet Union. Although the large majority of these

  19. LCOGT Imaging Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufts, Joseph R.; Lobdill, Rich; Haldeman, Benjamin J.; Haynes, Rachel; Hawkins, Eric; Burleson, Ben; Jahng, David

    2008-07-01

    The Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) is an ambitious project to build and operate, within 5 years, a worldwide robotic network of 50 0.4, 1, and 2 m telescopes sharing identical instrumentation and optimized for precision photometry of time-varying sources. The telescopes, instrumentation, and software are all developed in house with two 2 m telescopes already installed. The LCOGT Imaging Lab is responsible for assembly and characterization of the network's cameras and instrumentation. In addition to a fully equipped CNC machine shop, two electronics labs, and a future optics lab, the Imaging Lab is designed from the ground up to be a superb environment for bare detectors, precision filters, and assembled instruments. At the heart of the lab is an ISO class 5 cleanroom with full ionization. Surrounding this, the class 7 main lab houses equipment for detector characterization including QE and CTE, and equipment for measuring transmission and reflection of optics. Although the first science cameras installed, two TEC cooled e2v 42-40 deep depletion based units and two CryoTiger cooled Fairchild Imaging CCD486-BI based units, are from outside manufacturers, their 18 position filter wheels and the remainder of the network's science cameras, controllers, and instrumentation will be built in house. Currently being designed, the first generation LCOGT cameras for the network's 1 m telescopes use existing CCD486-BI devices and an in-house controller. Additionally, the controller uses digital signal processing to optimize readout noise vs. speed, and all instrumentation uses embedded microprocessors for communication over ethernet.

  20. Guide to Savannah River Laboratory Analytical Services Group

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The mission of the Analytical Services Group (ASG) is to provide analytical support for Savannah River Laboratory Research and Development Programs using onsite and offsite analytical labs as resources. A second mission is to provide Savannah River Site (SRS) operations with analytical support for nonroutine material characterization or special chemical analyses. The ASG provides backup support for the SRS process control labs as necessary.

  1. The flow mechanism in the Chalk based on radio-isotope analyses of groundwater in the London Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downing, R.A.; Pearson, F.J.; Smith, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    14C analyses of groundwaters from the Chalk of the London Basin are re-interpreted and the age of the groundwater is revised. Radio-isotope analyses are used to examine the flow mechanism in the aquifer. The evidence supports the view that a network of micro-fissures and larger intergranular pores in the matrix provides a significant part of the water pumped from Chalk wells and the major fissures distribute the water to the wells. Most of the matrix is fine-grained and contains a very old water. This diffuses into the micro-fissures and larger pores and is carried to the wells by the major fissures. ?? 1979.

  2. SenseLab

    PubMed Central

    Crasto, Chiquito J.; Marenco, Luis N.; Liu, Nian; Morse, Thomas M.; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Lai, Peter C.; Bahl, Gautam; Masiar, Peter; Lam, Hugo Y.K.; Lim, Ernest; Chen, Huajin; Nadkarni, Prakash; Migliore, Michele; Miller, Perry L.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the latest developments in neuroscience information dissemination through the SenseLab suite of databases: NeuronDB, CellPropDB, ORDB, OdorDB, OdorMapDB, ModelDB and BrainPharm. These databases include information related to: (i) neuronal membrane properties and neuronal models, and (ii) genetics, genomics, proteomics and imaging studies of the olfactory system. We describe here: the new features for each database, the evolution of SenseLab’s unifying database architecture and instances of SenseLab database interoperation with other neuroscience online resources. PMID:17510162

  3. The NOAO Data Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.; Olsen, K.; Stobie, E. B.; Mighell, K. J.; Norris, P.

    2015-09-01

    We describe the NOAO Data Lab to help community users take advantage of current large surveys and prepare them even larger surveys in the era of LSST. The Data Lab will allow users to efficiently utilize catalogs of billions of objects, combine traditional telescope image and spectral data with external archives, share custom results with collaborators, publish data products to other users, and experiment with analysis toolkits. Specific science cases will be used to develop a prototype framework and tools, allowing us to work directly with scientists from survey teams to ensure development remains focused on scientifically productive tasks.

  4. Mechanical and chemical processes affecting the chalk during burial, insights from combined reflection seismics, well data and field work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Julien; Boussaha, Myriam; Nielsen, Lars; Thibault, Nicolas; Stemmerik, Lars

    2014-05-01

    The chalk must undergo several phases of grain reorganisation and chemical reactions during its diagenetic evolution from a carbonaceous ooze to a sedimentary rock. Some of these transformations could be observed on structures from the kilometre- to the micrometre-scale with seismic reflection and cores analyses, respectively. However, few sites allow to combine all the different scale of observation for chalk diagenesis. Onshore and offshore high resolution seismics, two fully cored >350 m wells with wireline logging tools and very high quality exposures from a coastal cliff and a quarry form such an exceptional dataset in the Stevns peninsula area, eastern Danish Basin (Denmark). The studied chalk interval in the area is of Maastrichtian to Danian age. The chalk has been divided in 4 lithofacies, chalk-marl alternations, white chalk, white chalk with flint layers and bryozoan chalk. Advanced stratigraphic works have been performed with astronomical calibration based on stable isotope stratigraphy, wireline logs as well as several palaeontological proxies and detailed sedimentological analysis. Since a couple of decades, a specific kind of fractures has been described in the Chalk of Denmark, the so-called hairline fractures. They have recently been interpreted as compaction bands associated with the pore collapse of the chalk. We have observed these fractures on the field and on the cores in specific intervals. At depth, these fractures are in genetic relation with the formation of some stylolithes. The pressure-solution allows the formation of carbonate seams in the hairline fractures. At larger scale, on the field are observed faults which are sealed with flint precipitations. They slightly offset (<1 m) strata underlined by flint bands. On the onshore and offshore seismic reflection profiles, numerous strata-bound faults form noisy intervals as well as amplitude anomalies. Their normal offsets are less than 25 m. Their branching patterns, and their restriction

  5. Resolution dependence of petrophysical parameters derived from X-ray tomography of chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Müter, D.; Sørensen, H. O.; Jha, D.; Harti, R.; Dalby, K. N.; Stipp, S. L. S.; Suhonen, H.; Feidenhans'l, R.; Engstrøm, F.

    2014-07-28

    X-ray computed tomography data from chalk drill cuttings were taken over a series of voxel dimensions, ranging from 320 to 25 nm. From these data sets, standard petrophysical parameters (porosity, surface area, and permeability) were derived and we examined the effect of the voxel dimension (i.e., image resolution) on these properties. We found that for the higher voxel dimensions, they are severely over or underestimated, whereas for 50 and 25 nm voxel dimension, the resulting values (5%–30% porosity, 0.2–2 m{sup 2}/g specific surface area, and 0.06–0.34 mD permeability) are within the expected range for this type of rock. We compared our results to macroscopic measurements and in the case of surface area, also to measurements using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method and found that independent of the degree of compaction, the results from tomography amount to about 30% of the BET method. Finally, we concluded that at 25 nm voxel dimension, the essential features of the nanoscopic pore network in chalk are captured but better resolution is still needed to derive surface area.

  6. Chalk-calcite-microfluidic experiments: construction and flooding of microsystems with reactive fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, Amélie; Thuy Luu, Thi; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Hiorth, Aksel

    2015-04-01

    Direct in situ observation of the pore structure changes that occur when chalk is flooded with brines could resolve many of the open questions that remain about the interactions between mineralogical alterations and oil-liberating mechanisms. Experiments on core scale and field tests that have been carried out the last decade have clearly shown that water chemistry affects the final oil recovery. However, there is generally no consensus in the scientific community of why additional oil is released. In this work, our aim is to focus on in-situ observations of single phase flow and interactions at the pore scale. To do so, we create several types of custom-made microsystems with chalk and calcite crystals. We then do experiments with reacting fluids in these microsystems. During these experiments, we realize in-situ observations (geometrical characteristics, reaction rate) using microsopy techniques (white light vertical/phase shift interferometric microscopy, and classical microscopy), and show how they vary as function as the water chemistry. In simple systems made of calcite, we obtain reactive rates that are coherent with the litterature and with numerical simulations based on Lattice-Boltzmann methods.

  7. Hydrological role of karst in the Chalk aquifer of Upper Normandy, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Janyani, Sanae; Dupont, Jean-Paul; Massei, Nicolas; Slimani, Smail; Dörfliger, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    The role of karst on large-scale groundwater flow is defined for the Chalk aquifer of Upper Normandy (western Paris Basin), France. In the regional context, chalk plateaus occupy the greater part of watersheds and are the main sites of groundwater recharge. Previous studies focused on karstic output systems in the valleys and less on water-level variations in the recharge zones upstream. This study assesses the relevant hydrogeological processes using time-series data (boreholes and springs) recorded along a down-gradient hydrologeological cross-section in two selected watersheds. These hydrological data are interpreted in the framework of previous descriptions of the morphological organization of the study area's karst network. The results highlight the hydrological role of (1) the input karst (vertical conduits) which drains recharging water, (2) the output karst (sub-horizontal conduits widely developed in the vicinity of valleys in the surface watersheds) which drains the output flows, and (3) the connections between these two (input and output) networks, which control the upstream water levels and allow quick transfer to springs, particularly after strong rainfall events. A conceptual model of the hydrological functioning of this covered karst aquifer is established, which should serve for the structuring and parameterization of a numerical model.

  8. Nanoscale Pore Imaging and Pore Scale Fluid Flow Modeling in Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, Liviu; Silin, Dmitriy

    2004-08-19

    For many rocks of high economic interest such as chalk, diatomite, tight gas sands or coal, nanometer scale resolution is needed to resolve the 3D-pore structure, which controls the flow and trapping of fluids in the rocks. Such resolutions cannot be achieved with existing tomographic technologies. A new 3D imaging method, based on serial sectioning and using the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technology has been developed. FIB allows for the milling of layers as thin as 10 nanometers by using accelerated Ga+ ions to sputter atoms from the sample surface. After each milling step, as a new surface is exposed, a 2D image of this surface is generated. Next, the 2D images are stacked to reconstruct the 3D pore or grain structure. Resolutions as high as 10 nm are achievable using such a technique. A new robust method of pore-scale fluid flow modeling has been developed and applied to sandstone and chalk samples. The method uses direct morphological analysis of the pore space to characterize the petrophysical properties of diverse formations. Not only petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability, relative permeability and capillary pressures) can be computed but also flow processes, such as those encountered in various IOR approaches, can be simulated. Petrophysical properties computed with the new method using the new FIB data will be presented. Present study is a part of the development of an Electronic Core Laboratory at LBNL/UCB.

  9. Hydrological responses of the chalk aquifer to the regional climatic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Janyani, Sanae; Massei, Nicolas; Dupont, Jean-Paul; Fournier, Matthieu; Dörfliger, Nathalie

    2012-09-01

    SummaryPiezometric variability was investigated using monthly time series from 40 piezometers in different areas across the Upper Normandy region, over the 1968-2009 period. The piezometers were classified according to their hydrological behaviour. This paper aimed at characterising the dominant modes explaining piezometric variability and at investigating the causes of this variability. Significant components in the piezometric signals were identified: the annual cycle and an interannual mode (4-12 years) with different variances for each observation borehole group. The influence of the morphostructural organisation of the Upper Normandy chalk plateau on the modalities of the water level variability in the chalk aquifer was defined. The relative contributions and standard deviations of each component found in the signal time series of the groundwater level was estimated. The highest values were recorded in the Northern study area, and clay-with-flints and aquifer thicknesses influence the transfer on an annual scale, while the loess thickness influences the transfer on a multi-year scale.

  10. The stability of surficial fine sediment deposits in lowland chalk streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Robert C.; Wotton, Roger; Droppo, Ian; Davies, Grieg; Wharton, Geraldene

    2010-05-01

    Lowland chalk streams in the UK are experiencing increased deposition of fine sediment due to changes in land-use practices, channel modifications, and groundwater abstraction. The fine sediment is linked to benthic habitat degradation, the obstruction of surface-groundwater flow, and the storage of contaminants, such as pesticides and heavy metals. While research has been conducted on the provenance, transport, deposition, and storage of fine sediment in chalk streams, none has expressly investigated erosion. Therefore a key step is missing in our understanding of sediment dynamics in these systems. A yearlong field survey was conducted in two reaches in the Frome-Piddle Catchment (Dorset, England) to quantify the stability of surficial fine sediment deposits. Sediment stability is dependent on both hydrodynamic conditions and sediment erodibility, so water flow velocities and in situ erodibility measurements were recorded. These measurements were paired with sediment cores for analysis of the physical, chemical and biological properties of the sediment. The results indicate that hydrodynamic conditions vary spatially and temporally as a result of the distinctive annual hydrograph and seasonal macrophyte growth. Sediment erodibility exhibits seasonal variations, with low thresholds for erosion in winter and high thresholds in spring and late summer. Consequently, the stability of fine sediment deposits varies substantially over space and time, which has important implications for sediment transport models.

  11. A model for the effect of pH on the growth of chalk yeasts.

    PubMed

    Dantigny, Philippe; Burgain, Anaïs; Deniel, Franck; Bensoussan, Maurice

    2014-09-01

    Hyphopichia burtonii, Pichia anomala, and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera were isolated from spoiled packaged sliced bread. These chalk yeasts were characterized by a wide range of pH for which growth was almost optimum. Thus, the curve growth vs pH exhibited plateau and sharp profiles close to the minimum and the maximum pH. This study described a chalk yeast model (CYM) for the effect of pH derived from a new germination model for fungi (Dantigny, P., Nanguy, S., P.-M., Judet-Correia, D., and Bensoussan, M. 2011, International Journal of Food Microbiology, 146, 176-181). The CYM is asymmetric, versatile, based on parameters with biological significance, and compatible with the gamma concept. The CYM was compared to the cardinal pH model (CPM) which is widely used to describe the effect of pH on microbial growth. The CYM exhibited RMSE values two fold less than those obtained with the CPM for H. burtonii, and S. fibuligera for which plateaus were clearly observed. For P. anomala, the plateau was less obvious, but the RMSE value obtained with the CYM was similar to that found with the CPM. The CYM could extend its use to represent the effect of pH on mold growth. PMID:24995847

  12. Induced microearthquake patterns and oil-producing fracture systems in the Austin chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, W. S.; Fairbanks, T. D.; Rutledge, J. T.; Anderson, D. W.

    1998-04-01

    Microearthquakes collected during hydraulic stimulation allowed us to study fracture zones in Austin chalk oil reservoirs at two sites in the Giddings field, Texas. We deployed three-component, downhole geophone tools in production wells at depths of 2100 m and greater, one near Cook's Point, and two on the Matcek lease near Caldwell. At Cook's Point, we collected 482 microseismic events during a 4000 m 3 (25,000 bbl) hydraulic stimulation in an offset well. We collected 770 events during a similar operation on the Matcek lease. Many seismograms contained reflected phases that constrained location depths to the production zone at the base of the Austin chalk. By restricting all microearthquake locations to production depths, we located 20% of the Cook's Point events and over 60% of the Matcek events. At both sites we observed only the fracture wing closest to the observation stations. Locations formed elongated patterns extending up to 1 km from the stimulation well and trending N60°E, parallel to the known, regional fracture trend. The Cook's Point seismic zone measured over 100 m in width, while long stretches of the Matcek seismic zone narrowed to 30 m or less. We believe that the width of the seismic zone reflected the density of conductive fractures and thus, the volume of the reservoir accessed by the stimulation. Indeed, production rates in the first year following stimulation were much higher at Cook's Point, where we observed the wider of the two seismic zones.

  13. Pressure solution and microfracturing in primary oil migration, Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Chanchani, J.; Berg, R.R.; Lee, C.I.

    1996-09-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk is a well known source rock and fractured reservoir in the Gulf Coast. Production is mainly from tectonic fractures, and the mechanism by which oil migrated from the matrix into the fractures is poorly understood. Microfracturing due to oil generation offers a possible explanation for the mechanism of the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. Petrographic study shows that the major components of the primary migration system are the solution seams and the associated microfractures. Pressure solution is manifest as centimeter to millimeter-scale solution seams and smaller microseams. The solution seams are composites formed by the superposition of the smaller microseams. A significant amount of organic matter was concentrated in the seams along with other insoluble residue. Swarms of horizontal microfractures, many of them filled with calcite and other residue, are associated with the seams. Vertical, tectonic fractures that constitute the reservoir porosity, intersect the solution seams. Pressure solution concentrated organic matter within the solution seams and oil was generated there. It is postulated that the accompanying increase in fluid volume raised the pore pressures and fractured the rock. The newly created microfractures were avenues for migration of fluids from the seams, perhaps by microfracture propagation.

  14. A Big Bang Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheider, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The February 2005 issue of The Science Teacher (TST) reminded everyone that by learning how scientists study stars, students gain an understanding of how science measures things that can not be set up in lab, either because they are too big, too far away, or happened in a very distant past. The authors of "How Far are the Stars?" show how the…

  15. Inside Linden Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Tom

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author provides an overview of Second Life[trademark], or simply SL, which was developed at Linden Lab, a San Francisco-based corporation. SL is an online society within a threee-dimensional virtual world entirely built and owned by its residents, where they can explore, build, socialize and participate in their own economy.…

  16. Serial Dilution Simulation Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keler, Cynthia; Balutis, Tabitha; Bergen, Kim; Laudenslager, Bryanna; Rubino, Deanna

    2010-01-01

    Serial dilution is often a difficult concept for students to understand. In this short dry lab exercise, students perform serial dilutions using seed beads. This exercise helps students gain skill at performing dilutions without using reagents, bacterial cultures, or viral cultures, while being able to visualize the process.

  17. Lab with Dad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havers, Brenda; Delmotte, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Family science nights are fantastic, but planning one can be overwhelming, especially when one considers the already overloaded schedule of a classroom teacher. To overcome this challenge, the authors--colleagues with a mutual love of science--developed a much simpler annual event called "Lab With Dad." The purpose was for one target age group of…

  18. Elemental Chem Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco Mariscal, Antonio Joaquin

    2008-01-01

    This educative material uses the symbols of 45 elements to spell the names of 32 types of laboratory equipment usually found in chemical labs. This teaching material has been divided into three puzzles according to the type of the laboratory equipment: (i) glassware as reaction vessels or containers; (ii) glassware for measuring, addition or…

  19. The Crime Lab Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Crime Lab Project, which takes an economical, hands-on, interdisciplinary approach to studying the career of forensics in the middle or high school classroom. Includes step-by-step student requirements for the investigative procedure, a sample evidence request form, and an assessment rubric. (KHR)

  20. Writing Better Lab Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Rhiannon; Guarienti, Kristy; Brydon, Barbara; Robb, Jeanine; Royston, Ann; Painter, Heidi; Sutherland, Alex; Passmore, Cynthia; Smith, Martin H.

    2010-01-01

    As science teachers at a suburban California high school, the authors were concerned about the lab report conclusions written by their upper-level chemistry, biology, and ecology students--which were consistently of poor quality. Their work lacked inferences derived from data and support for their concluding statements. Working as part of a…

  1. The stability of chalk during flooding of carbonated sea water at reservoir in-situ conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nermoen, Anders; Korsnes, Reidar I.; Madland, Merete V.

    2014-05-01

    Injection of CO2 into carbonate oil reservoirs has been proposed as a possible utilization of the captured CO2 due to its capability to enhance the oil recovery. For offshore reservoirs such as Ekofisk and Valhall it has been discussed to alternate the CO2 and sea water injection (WAG) to reduce costs and keep the beneficial effects of both sea water (SSW) and gas injection. Water and CO2 mix to form carbonic acids that enhance the solubility of carbonates, thus a serious concern has been raised upon the potential de-stabilization of the reservoirs during CO2 injection. In this study we focus on how carbonated sea water alters the mechanical integrity of carbonate rocks both to evaluate safety of carbon storage sites and in the planning of production strategies in producing oil fields since enhanced compaction may have both detrimental and beneficial effects. Here we will present results from long term experiments (approx. half year each) performed on Kansas outcrop chalk (38-41% porosity), which serves as model material to understand the physical and chemical interplaying processes taking place in chalk reservoirs. All tests are performed at uni-axial strain conditions, meaning that the confining radial stresses are automatically adjusted to ensure zero radial strain. The tests are performed at in-situ conditions and run through a series of stages that mimic the reservoir history at both Ekofisk and Valhall fields. We observe the strain response caused by the injected brine. The experimental stages are: (a) axial stress build-up by pore pressure depletion to stresses above yield with NaCl-brine which is inert to the chalk; (b) uni-axial creep at constant axial stresses with NaCl-brine; (c) sea water injection; and (d) injection of carbonated water (SSW+CO2) at various mixture concentrations. Two test series were performed in which the pore pressure was increased (re-pressurized) before stage (c) to explore the stress dependency of the fluid induced strain

  2. Labs That Are a Blast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laura

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that use a simple homemade apparatus called "the cannon" to demonstrate Newton's Third Law. Reviews the chemistry concepts behind the ignition of the cannon and presents the Momentum Lab and the Projectile Motion Lab. (JRH)

  3. A Perspective on Coupled Multiscale Simulation and Validation in Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    M. P. Short; D. Gaston; C. R. Stanek; S. Yip

    2014-01-01

    The field of nuclear materials encompasses numerous opportunities to address and ultimately solve longstanding industrial problems by improving the fundamental understanding of materials through the integration of experiments with multiscale modeling and high-performance simulation. A particularly noteworthy example is an ongoing study of axial power distortions in a nuclear reactor induced by corrosion deposits, known as CRUD (Chalk River unidentified deposits). We describe how progress is being made toward achieving scientific advances and technological solutions on two fronts. Specifically, the study of thermal conductivity of CRUD phases has augmented missing data as well as revealed new mechanisms. Additionally, the development of a multiscale simulation framework shows potential for the validation of a new capability to predict the power distribution of a reactor, in effect direct evidence of technological impact. The material- and system-level challenges identified in the study of CRUD are similar to other well-known vexing problems in nuclear materials, such as irradiation accelerated corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and void swelling; they all involve connecting materials science fundamentals at the atomistic- and mesoscales to technology challenges at the macroscale.

  4. A multidisciplinary approach to reservoir subdivision of the Maastrichtian chalk in the Dan field, Danish North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Kristensen, L.; Dons, T.; Schioler, P.

    1995-11-01

    Correlation of wireline log data from the North Sea chalk reservoirs is frequently hampered by rather subtle log patterns in the chalk section due to the apparent monotonous nature of the chalk sediments, which may lead to ambiguous correlations. This study deals with a correlation technique based on an integration of biostratigraphic data, seismic interpretation, and wireline log correlation; this technique aims at producing a consistent reservoir subdivision that honors both the well data and the seismic data. This multidisciplinary approach has been used to subdivide and correlate the Maastrichtian chalk in the Dan field. The biostratigraphic subdivision is based on a new detailed dinoflagellate study of core samples from eight wells. Integrating the biostratigraphic results with three-dimensional seismic data allows recognition of four stratigraphic units within the Maastrichtian, bounded by assumed chronostratigraphic horizons. This subdivision is further refined by adding a seismic horizon and four horizons from wireline log correlations, establishing a total of nine reservoir units. The approximate chronostratigraphic nature of these units provides an improved interpretation of the depositional and structural patterns in this area. The three upper reservoir units pinch out and disappear in a northeasterly direction across the field. We interpret this stratal pattern as reflecting a relative sea level fall or regional basinal subsidence during the latest Maastrichtian, possibly combined with local synsedimentary uplift due to salt tectonics. Isochore maps indicate that the underlying six non-wedging units are unaffected by salt tectonics.

  5. Dual FIB-SEM 3D imaging and lattice boltzmann modeling of porosimetry and multiphase flow in chalk.

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, Alex; Petrusak, Robin; Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Yoon, Hongkyu

    2010-12-01

    Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) is an often-applied technique for determining pore throat distributions and seal analysis of fine-grained rocks. Due to closure effects, potential pore collapse, and complex pore network topologies, MIP data interpretation can be ambiguous, and often biased toward smaller pores in the distribution. We apply 3D imaging techniques and lattice-Boltzmann modeling in interpreting MIP data for samples of the Cretaceous Selma Group Chalk. In the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Selma Chalk is the apparent seal for oil and gas fields in the underlying Eutaw Fm., and, where unfractured, the Selma Chalk is one of the regional-scale seals identified by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for CO2 injection sites. Dual focused ion - scanning electron beam and laser scanning confocal microscopy methods are used for 3D imaging of nanometer-to-micron scale microcrack and pore distributions in the Selma Chalk. A combination of image analysis software is used to obtain geometric pore body and throat distributions and other topological properties, which are compared to MIP results. 3D data sets of pore-microfracture networks are used in Lattice Boltzmann simulations of drainage (wetting fluid displaced by non-wetting fluid via the Shan-Chen algorithm), which in turn are used to model MIP procedures. Results are used in interpreting MIP results, understanding microfracture-matrix interaction during multiphase flow, and seal analysis for underground CO2 storage.

  6. Mineral, chemical and textural relationships in rhythmic-bedded, hydrocarbon-productive chalk of the Niobrara Formation, Denver Basin, Colorado ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollastro, R.M.; Martinez, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The types of hydrocarbons produced from these chalks are determined by the level of thermal maturity associated with present-day burial or paleoburial conditions. Detailed analyses of deeply-buried chalk from core of the Smoky Hill Chalk Member of the Niobrara Formation in the Champlin Petroleum 2 Boxelder Farms well combined with core data from other Niobrara wells have helped identify many depositional and diagenetic relationships. Porosity of the chalk is proportional to maximum burial depth and inversely proportional to the amount of non-carbonate material (acid- insoluble residue content) in the chalk. Total organic carbon content in the chalk is proportional to the amount of acid-insoluble residue and relative abundance of pyrite in the acid-insoluble fraction. Quartz is inversely proportional to the amount of insoluble material, and the amount of clay tends to increase as insolubles increase, suggesting that detritus in these chalks is greatly influenced by reworked, altered, volcanic products rather than siliceous clastics.-from Authors

  7. Remote monitoring of the Gravelly Run thermal plume at Hopewell and the thermal plume at the Surry Nuclear Power Plant on the James River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talay, T. A.; Sykes, K. W.; Kuo, C. Y.

    1979-01-01

    On May 17, 1977, a remote sensing experiment was conducted on the James River, Virginia, whereby thermal spectrometer and near-infrared photography data of thermal discharges at Hopewell and the Surry nuclear power plant were obtained by an aircraft for one tidal cycle. These data were used in subsequent investigations into the near field discharge trajectories. For the Gravelly Run thermal plume at Hopewell, several empirical expressions for the plume centerline were evaluated by comparisons of the computed trajectories and those observed in the remote sensing images.

  8. Hydrotechnical facilities within the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exclusion zone: impacts on hydrologic regime and plant growth patterns of floodplain water bodies of the Pripyat River.

    PubMed

    Gudkov, D I; Zub, L N; Savitsky, A L

    2003-01-01

    As result of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident the territory of the left-bank flood-lands of the Pripyat River have undergone intensive radionuclide contamination. With the purpose of preventing the washing away of radioactive substances, a complex of flood protection dams was constructed. This construction changed the hydrological regime of these territories and caused overgrowth by higher aquatic plants. Absence of a flowing mode of reservoirs, the stagnant phenomena during spring and seasonal high waters on the embank site have caused amplification of eutrophication processes, swamping and, connected with it, increase of water-marsh floristic complex in the structure of the vegetative cover. PMID:14653638

  9. Full waveform seismic modelling of Chalk Group rocks from the Danish North Sea - implications for velocity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazeri, Mahboubeh; Moreau, Julien; Uldall, Anette; Nielsen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    This study aims at understanding seismic wave propagation in the fine-layered Chalk Group, which constitutes the main reservoir for oil and gas production in the Danish North Sea. The starting point of our analysis is the Nana-1XP exploration well, which shows strong seismic contrasts inside the Chalk Group. For the purposes of seismic waveform modelling, we here assume a one-dimensional model with homogeneous and isotropic layers designed to capture the main fluctuations in petrophysical properties observed in the well logs. The model is representative of the stratigraphic sequences of the area and it illustrates highly contrasting properties of the Chalk Group. Finite-difference (FD) full wave technique, both acoustic and elastic equations are applied to the model. Velocity analysis of seismic data is a crucial step for stacking, multiple suppression, migration, and depth conversion of the seismic record. Semblance analysis of the synthetic seismic records shows strong amplitude peaks outside the expected range for the time interval representing the Chalk Group, especially at the base. The various synthetic results illustrate the occurrence and the impact of different types of waves including multiples, converted waves and refracted waves. The interference of these different wave types with the primary reflections can explain the strong anomalous amplitudes in the semblance plot. In particular, the effect of strongly contrasting thin beds plays an important role in the generation of the high anomalous amplitude values. If these anomalous amplitudes are used to pick the velocities, it would impede proper stacking of the data and may result in sub-optimal migration and depth conversion. Consequently this may lead to erroneous or sub-optimal seismic images of the Chalk Group and the underlying layers. Our results highlight the importance of detailed velocity analysis and proper picking of velocity functions in the Chalk Group intervals. We show that application of

  10. Evaluation of calabash chalk effect on femur bone morphometry and mineralization in young wistar rats: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Ekong, Moses B; Ekanem, Theresa B; Sunday, Abraham O; Aquaisua, Aquaisua N; Akpanabiatu, Monday I

    2012-01-01

    Background: Calabash chalk, a popularly consumed geophagic material in Nigeria has been reported to contain lead, arsenic, alpha lindane, endrin, and endosulfan 11 among other pollutants. Aim: The continuous exposure of young children to this chalk necessitated this study on the bone morphometry and mineralization in young Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Fourteen young (weanling) Wistar rats of both sexes weighing 54-72 g were assigned into two groups of seven animals each. Group I served as control, while group II was the test group (TG). 40 mg/ml of C. chalk was administered as suspension to the test animals in group II. Animals in the control group were orally treated with 1ml of distilled water. Administration of the C. chalk in the animals lasted for 28 days, and the animals were sacrificed on day 29, using chloroform anaesthesia. The femur bones were dissected out, cleaned of flesh and sun-dried. The lengths and weights of the femur bones were measured using graphite furnace atomic mass spectrophotometer. Results: Results showed 1.6% decrease in body weight change in the TG, insignificant decreases in the weights and lengths of both the right and left femur bones, and significant decreased (P < 0.0126) organ-somatic index, and femur bones concentrations (mg/l) of zinc, phosphate, carbonate, calcium, sodium, and potassium (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In conclusion, this study showed that C. chalk may alter growth rate, and cause de-mineralization in the femur bone, hence, it may be detrimental to bone growth. PMID:23776822

  11. Conference on the topic: {open_quotes}Exploration and production of petroleum and gas from chalk reservoirs worldwide{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.G.

    1995-07-01

    More than 170 delegates from 14 countries in Europe, North America, Africa, and Asia took part in a conference on the topic: Exploration and Production of Petroleum and Gas from Chalk Reservoirs Worldwide. The conference was held in Copenhagen, Denmark in September,1994, and was a joint meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG), and the European Association of Petroleum Geoscientists and Engineers (EAPG). In addition to the opening remarks, 25 oral and nine poster reports were presented. The topics included chalk deposits as reservoir rocks, the occurrence of chalk deposits worldwide, the North Sea oil and gas fields, and other related topics.

  12. Recurrent recovery of Pseudomonas oryzihabitans strains in a karstified chalk aquifer.

    PubMed

    Dussart-Baptista, L; Bodilis, J; Barray, S; Frébourg, N; Fournier, M; Dupont, J-P; Jouenne, T

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas oryzihabitans is an uncommon pathogen that may cause catheter-associated infections, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Although it has been isolated from environment, the source of human infection is not well documented. In the present study, 14 isolates of P. oryzihabitans were recovered over a 28-month period from a karstified chalk aquifer, allowing to advance that distributed natural water could be a source of contamination. Microbiological analyses showed that the bacterium was mainly associated with suspended particulate matters. To investigate the clonality of P. oryzihabitans environmental isolates, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, antibiogram and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) typings were performed. Results demonstrated (i) the presence of at least three clones within the aquifer and (ii) that the presence of the bacterium in groundwater is not only the result of a biofilm bloom but also of an exogenous contamination. PMID:17097713

  13. Tracking selenium behaviour in chalk aquifer (northern France): Sr and 34S-sulphates isotopes constraints.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, Lise; Benabderraziq, Hind; Elkhattabi, Jamal; Parmentier, Marc; Gourcy, Laurence; Négrel, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Groundwaters in parts of the Paris Basin (France) are facing increasing selenium (Se) contents that can exceed the drinking water limit of 10 μg/L according to the European Framework Directive in the field of water policy (2000/60/EC). To better understand the groundwater origins and the selenium dynamics, the water chemistry of the Chalk aquifer supplying drinkable water to Lille city was studied. This area is submitted to quantitative and qualitative pressure from industrial, urban and agriculture origins. An integrated study was settled to determine the water sources and dynamics of elements, with a focus on Se. After a large chemical characterisation of the groundwater chemistry in the four field wells, a monthly monitoring was held in four wells and in the Deûle channel. Chemical analysis of major and trace elements, stable isotopes (δ18O, δ2H), strontium isotopes, and δ34S and δ18O of sulphates were realised. The chemical composition of solids sampled at various depths at vicinity of the four wells was also analysed. The specific geochemical signature of groundwater as revealed by Sr isotopes, in addition to element concentrations ratios like Mg/Sr and Se/Sr, highlighted mixture of three main groundwaters bodies: (1) the upstream groundwaters in the recharge area with the most radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr isotopic signature; (2) the confined groundwaters with high Sr concentrations due to water-rock interactions and the lowest 87Sr/86Sr isotopic signature close to the one of the chalk in Paris and London basins; (3) the Se-rich formations of Tertiary and Quaternary. The contents of Se, mainly present as SeV I (and locally as SeIV ), displayed spatial and temporal disparities that can be explained by geological and hydrogeological conditions. Se-rich clayed sediments originating from the dismantling of Se-rich tertiary formations (i.e. Ypresian) overlay the chalk formation and can be found in saturated conditions depending of the water table level. Oxidation of

  14. Campanian ammonites from the Upper Cretaceous Gober Chalk of Lamar County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobban, W.A.; Kennedy, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Roxton Limestone Member at the top of the Gober Chalk in northeast Texas yields a rich fauna, dominated by Baculites haresi Reeside, 1927, and Inoceramus balticus Boehm, 1909, with sparse occurrences of pachydiscus cf. P. paulsoni (Young, 1963), Anapachydiscus sp.juv., Placenticeras placenta (DeKay, 1828), Hoplitoplacenticeras aff. H. plasticum (Paulcke, 1907), Menabites (Delawarella) delawarensis (Morton, 1830), M.(D.) danei (Young, 1963), M.(D.) aff. M.(D.) vanuxemi (Morton, 1830), Submortoniceras vandalinaense Young, 1963, Submortoniceras sp., Eubostrychoceras sp., and Scaphites hippocrepis (DeKay, 1828) III. The presence of S. hippocrepis III suggests a late early Campanian age assignment for the fauna. The assemblage includes species known from the Western Interior, Gulf Coast, Atlantic seaboard, and western Europe. -Authors

  15. Water temperatures within spawning beds in two chalk streams and implications for salmonid egg development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acornley, R. M.

    1999-02-01

    Water temperatures within brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) spawning gravels were measured in two Hampshire chalk streams from October 1995 to April 1996 inclusive. During the winter, mean intra-gravel water temperatures were higher than those in the stream, and increased with depth in the gravel bed. The amplitude of diel fluctuations in water temperature decreased with depth in the gravel bed, although diel fluctuations were still evident at a depth of 30 cm. Differences in intra-gravel temperature gradients between the two study sites were attributed to differences in the amplitude of stream water temperature fluctuations and there was no evidence that either of the study sites were located in zones of upwelling groundwater. Published equations are used to predict, from temperature, the timing of important stages in the development of brown trout embryos (eyeing, hatching and emergence) for eggs spawned in the autumn and winter and buried at different depths in the gravel bed.

  16. Fault and joint measurements in Austin Chalk, Superconducting Super Collider Site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, H.S.; Laubach, S.E.; Dutton, A.R.

    1994-12-31

    Structure maps of 9.4 mi of nearly continuous tunnel excavations and more than 10 mi of other exposures and excavations in Austin Chalk at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site in Ellis County, Texas, record normal-fault and joint populations in the subsurface within the northern segment of the Balcones Fault Zone with unmatched resolution for such a long traverse. Small faults (<10 ft throw) occur in clusters or swarms that have as many as 24 faults. Fault swarms are as much as 2,000 ft wide, and spacing between swarms ranges from 800 to 2,000 ft, averaging about 1,000 ft. Predominantly northeast-trending joints are in swarms spaced 500 to more than 21,000 ft apart.

  17. Expected returns on investment in the Giddings, Austin Chalk (gas) field

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, R.P.; Peters, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    An economic evaluation has been performed to determine the expected returns on investment for a drilling program in the Giddings, Austin Chalk gas field. Using projected production schedules of selected well types from the encountered reserve distribution, computer based cashflow analyses were performed under 6 hypothesized future scenarios of varying hydrocarbon pricing, demand, taxation, and inflation. For the 6 future scenarios studied, the Giddings gas field drilling program was found to produce a positive, after tax net present value, using 15% as a discount factor. Furthermore, the returns on investment were higher for an independent than for a major producer. The results suggest a drilling program initiated in the near future will prove to be an attractive economic venture. 15 references.

  18. Expected returns on investment in the Giddings, Austin Chalk (Gas) Field. [Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, R.P.; Peters, E.J.; VanRensburg, W.C.J.

    1982-09-01

    An economic evaluation has been performed to determine the expected returns on investment for a drilling program in the Giddings, Austin Chalk Gas Field. Using projected production schedules of selected well types from the encountered reserve distribution, computer based cashflow analyses were performed under six hypothesized future scenarios of varying hydrocarbon pricing, demand, taxation, and inflation. For the six future scenarios studied, the Giddings Gas Field drilling program was found to produce a positive, after tax net present value, using 15% as a discount factor. Furthermore, the returns on investment were higher for an independent than for a major producer. Results suggest a drilling program initiated in the near future will prove to be an attractive economic venture.

  19. Multi isotopic tools to understand selenium origins in groundwaters of the Chalk aquifer in Northern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, Lise; Gourcy, Laurence; Benabderraziq, Hind; Elkhattabi, Jamal; Laurent, Alexandra; Négrel, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Four field wells exploiting the Chalk aquifer supply Lille city in water. The little catchment area is submitted to quantitative and qualitative pressure from industrial, urban and agriculture origins. Selenium (Se) concentrations are often higher than EU standards (0.12 µmol.L-1) for potable drinking water and can reach 0.4 μmol.L-1 leading to exploitation restrictions. An integrated study was settled to determine the water sources and dynamics of elements, with a focus on Se, with the goal of managing both water quality and quantity. After a large chemical characterisation of the system, a monthly sampling campaign was held in 2012 in four wells and in the close Deûle channel. In situ physical and chemical parameters, chemical analysis of major and trace elements with a special focus on redox-sensitive elements including SeIV, SeVI, FeII, stable water isotopes (δ18O, δ2H) and δ34S and δ18O of sulphates measures were undertaken. The chemical composition of solids sampled at various depths at vicinity of the four wells was analysed. Se concentrations in groundwaters and in the solid phase vary significantly. In the northern part of the Ansereuilles north of the Deûle channel, where the highest Se concentrations in solids was found in a 13 m alluvial clay deposit above the chalk, a first main type of waters can be defined with the variable and locally highest Se concentrations (0.19 to 0.4 µmol.L-1), relatively high and stable sulphate concentrations (2.5 µmol/L), no nitrates, dissolved Fe and Mn, negative δ34S (around -20 ‰) and δ18O typical of evaporated waters. A second main type of waters can be described at Houplin, south of the Deûle channel, where the geological profile show less than 1 mg/kg of Se, with intermediate Se concentrations (0.1 to 0.2 µmol/L), variable nitrate concentrations (0.4 to 1.2 mmol/L), not quantified dissolved Fe and Mn, sulphate concentrations close to 1.5 mmol/L, variable negative δ34S (-8 to -24 ‰) and δ18O in the

  20. In Situ Production of Chlorine-36 in the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer, Idaho: Implications for Describing Ground-Water Contamination Near a Nuclear Facility

    SciTech Connect

    L. D. Cecil; L. L. Knobel; J. R. Green; S. K. Frape

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the calculated contribution to ground water of natural, in situ produced 36Cl in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer and to compare these concentrations in ground water with measured concentrations near a nuclear facility in southeastern Idaho. The scope focused on isotopic and chemical analyses and associated 36Cl in situ production calculations on 25 whole-rock samples from 6 major water-bearing rock types present in the eastern Snake River Plain. The rock types investigated were basalt, rhyolite, limestone, dolomite, shale, and quartzite. Determining the contribution of in situ production to 36Cl inventories in ground water facilitated the identification of the source for this radionuclide in environmental samples. On the basis of calculations reported here, in situ production of 36Cl was determined to be insignificant compared to concentrations measured in ground water near buried and injected nuclear waste at the INEEL. Maximum estimated 36Cl concentrations in ground water from in situ production are on the same order of magnitude as natural concentrations in meteoric water.

  1. Diagenesis of silica-rich mound-bedded chalk, the Coniacian Arnager Limestone, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, H. B.; Stemmerik, L.; Surlyk, F.

    2010-01-01

    The Coniacian Arnager Limestone Formation is exposed on the Danish island of Bornholm in the Baltic Sea. It is composed of mound-bedded siliceous chalk, and X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy indicate a content of 30-70% insoluble minerals, including authigenic opal-CT, quartz, clinoptilolite, feldspars, calcite, dolomite, and barite. Opal-CT and clinoptilolite are the most common and constitute 16-53% and 2-9%, respectively. The content of insoluble minerals varies laterally both within the mounds and in planar beds, and the opal-CT content varies by up to 10% vertically. The mounds consist of two microfacies, spiculitic wackestone and bioturbated spiculitic wackestone, containing 10-22% and 7-12% moulds after spicules, respectively. Subsequent to deposition and shallow burial, dissolution of siliceous sponge spicules increased the silica activity of the pore water and initiated precipitation of opal-CT. The opal-CT formed at temperatures around 17 °C, the precipitation lowered the silica activity and the Si/Al ratio of the pore water, resulting in precipitation of clinoptilolite, feldspar and smectite. Calcite formed synchronously with the latest clinoptilolite. Minor amounts of quartz precipitated in pore water with low silica activity during maximum burial, probably to depths of 200-250 m. The dissolution of sponge spicules and decomposition of the sponge tissue also resulted in the release of Ba 2+, Sr 2+, Mg 2+, Ca 2+ and CO 32-, facilitating precipitation of barite and dolomite. Precipitation of especially opal-CT reduced the porosity to an average of 40% and cemented the limestone. The study highlights the diagenetic pathways of bio-siliceous chalk and the effects on preservation of porosity and permeability.

  2. Austin Chalk fracture mapping using frequency data derived from seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmuddin, Ilyas Juzer

    Frequency amplitude spectra derived from P-wave seismic data can be used to derive a fracture indicator. This fracture indicator can be used to delineate fracture zones in subsurface layers. Mapping fractures that have no vertical offset is difficult on seismic sections. Fracturing changes the rock properties and therefore the attributes of the seismic data reflecting off the fractured interface and data passing through the fractured layers. Fractures have a scattering effect on seismic energy reflected from the fractured layer. Fractures attenuate amplitudes of higher frequencies in seismic data preferentially than lower frequencies. The amplitude spectrum of the frequencies in the seismic data shifts towards lower frequencies when a spectrum from a time window above the fractured layer is compared with one below the fractured layer. This shift in amplitudes of frequency spectra can be derived from seismic data and used to indicate fracturing. A method is developed to calculate a parameter t* to measure this change in the frequency spectra for small time windows (100ms) above and below the fractured layer. The Austin Chalk in South Central Texas is a fractured layer, and it produces hydrocarbons from fracture zones with the layer (Sweet Spots). 2D and 3D P-wave seismic data are used from Burleson and Austin Counties in Texas to derive the t* parameter. Case studies are presented for 2D data from Burleson County and 3D data from Austin County. The t* parameter mapped on the 3D data shows a predominant fracture trend parallel to strike. The fracture zones have a good correlation with the faults interpreted on the top of Austin Chalk reflector. Production data in Burleson County (Giddings Field) is a proxy for fracturing. Values of t* mapped on the 2D data have a good correlation with the cumulative production map presented in this study.

  3. Anomalous magnetization in the Austin Chalk: implications for magnetic studies in rocks and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Ellwood, B.B.; Balsam, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Same day sampling and magnetic measurement of a one meter thick bed in a new road cut of the Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk (northeastern Texas) has yielded a zone of anomalous magnetic behavior. Initial measurement of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) indicated unusually high anisotropies and low bulk susceptibilities characteristic of a magnetocrystalline anisotropy which might be expected for the mineral siderite. Natural remanent magnetization (NRM) moments for these samples were low and directions were typical for samples which had acquired a normal geomagnetic field overprint at the site. Remeasurement of the NRM 3 days later yielded an increase in moment to >1 x 10/sup -3/ A/m for some samples and a direction parallel to the laboratory field. Isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) of these samples indicates saturation at low induction values (<100 mT). AMS remeasurement over a period of weeks revealed a steady decrease in the anisotropy magnitudes and a change in direction. All of these results are consistent with the initial presence of siderite in the Austin Chalk samples. After sampling, exposure to the air, and subsequent oxidation in the laboratory, the siderite appears to have altered to ..gamma..Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (maghemite), increasing the magnetic moment and changing NRM and AMS directions in these samples. It is predicted that changes will reflect the continued conversion from the less stable ..gamma..Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ to ..cap alpha..Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (hematite). Evaluation of this possibility is currently in progress.

  4. Seawater chemistry, coccolithophore population growth, and the origin of Cretaceous chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Steven M.; Ries, Justin B.; Hardie, Lawrence A.

    2005-07-01

    The magnesium/calcium ratio (Mg/Ca) and calcium (Ca) concentration of seawater have oscillated throughout geologic time; our experiments indicate that these variables have strongly influenced biomineralization and chalk production by coccolithophores. The high Mg/Ca ratio of modern seawater favors precipitation of high-Mg calcite and/or aragonite. In contrast, the low Mg/Ca ratio of imputed Cretaceous seawater favored precipitation of low-Mg calcite. We have discovered that some coccolithophore species today secrete skeletal elements of high-Mg calcite, rather than low-Mg calcite, as conventionally believed. These species incorporated less Mg when the ambient Mg/Ca ratio was lowered, secreting low-Mg calcite in imputed Cretaceous seawater. Calcification stimulates cocco lithophore population growth by contributing CO2 to photosynthesis. Three extant coc co lithophore species multiplied much faster as the composition of ambient seawater was shifted toward that estimated for Cretaceous seas. Two of these species secreted high-Mg calcite in ambient seawater having Mg/Ca > 1, and incorporation of Mg in a calcite crystal inhibits growth. Calcification of the third species, which secreted low-Mg calcite at all ambient Mg/Ca ratios, is hindered by the high Mg/Ca ratio and low absolute concentration of Ca of modern seawater. We conclude that the ionic composition of Cretaceous seawater enabled cocco lithophores to produce massive chalk deposits, and conversely, that the ionic composition of modern seawater inhibits population growth for most extant coccolitho phore species, which occupy nutrient-poor waters and fail to respond to fertilization by nitrate, phosphate, or iron.

  5. Increase of Coastal Cliff Rockfall Trigerred By Rainfall On The Chalk Coast of NW France During The Year 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duperret, A.; Genter, A.; Daigneault, M.; Mortimore, R. N.

    Coastal chalk cliffs exposed on each part of the English Channel suffer numerous collapses, with mean volumes varying between 10 000 and 100 000 cubic meters. Between October 1998 and October 2001, a minimum of 52 collapses have been ob- served along 120 km of the French chalk coastline located in Upper-Normandy and Picardy. The chalk coastline has evidenced 4 collapses in 1999 and 6 collapses in 2000 (winter and spring), whereas 28 collapses with volume greater than 1000 m3 was recorded in 2001 (winter, spring and summer). The increase of large-scale collapses during 2001 is interpreted as an excess of rainfalls recorded previously. Most of these collapses extend all over the vertical cliff height and are mainly controlled by ground- water infiltration. The modality of water circulation through the chalk rock depends on the chalk lithology and the hydrogeological properties of pre-existing fractures. In the framework of the European scientific project named ROCC (Risk of Cliff Col- lapse), the chalk lithology and the pre-existing fracture pattern have been investigated in order to determine the response of the rock mass to subaerial and marine solicita- tions, including rainfall conditions. Such data have been reported in a GIS system in order to determine the degree of cliff sensibility to collapses. Some rainfall-triggered collapses will be presented to illustrate the diversity of the rock mass response to rain- fall excess, in terms of rock mass characteristics and time delay: (1) a collapse was witnessed at Puys, the 17th May 2000, after two periods of intense rainfall inducing floods, during the two previous months. The occurrence of impervious marl seams levels within the chalk and its low fracture content may have generated water over- pressure and consequently stress concentration on the marl seams, which conduct to the rupture. The delay between rainfall and the rupture may be explained by the low velocity of groundwater through a poorly fractured porous

  6. Integrating geophysical and hydrochemical borehole-log measurements to characterize the Chalk aquifer, Berkshire, United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schürch, Marc; Buckley, David

    2002-09-01

    Geophysical and hydrochemical borehole-logging techniques were integrated to characterize hydraulic and hydrogeochemical properties of the Chalk aquifer at boreholes in Berkshire, UK. The down-hole measurements were made to locate fissures in the chalk, their spatial extent between boreholes, and to determine the groundwater chemical quality of the water-bearing layers. The geophysical borehole logging methods used were caliper, focused resistivity, induction resistivity, gamma ray, fluid temperature, fluid electrical conductivity, impeller and heat-pulse flowmeter, together with borehole wall optical-imaging. A multiparameter data transmitter was used to measure groundwater temperature, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, and redox potential of the borehole fluid down-hole. High permeability developed at the Chalk Rock by groundwater circulation provides the major flow horizon at the Banterwick Barn study site and represents a conduit system that serves as an effective local hydraulic connection between the boreholes. The Chalk Rock includes several lithified solution-ridden layers, hardgrounds, which imply a gap in sedimentation possibly representing an unconformity. Lower groundwater temperature, high dissolved-oxygen content, and flowmeter evidence of preferential groundwater flow in the Chalk Rock indicated rapid groundwater circulation along this horizon. By repeating the logging at different times of the year under changing hydraulic conditions, other water-inflow horizons within the Chalk aquifer were recognized. Résumé. Des techniques géophysiques et hydrochimiques de diagraphies en forage ont été mises en oeuvre pour caractériser les propriétés hydrauliques et hydrogéochimiques de l'aquifère de la craie dans des forages du Berkshire (Grande-Bretagne). Les mesures en descente ont été faites pour localiser les fissures dans la craie et leur développement spatial entre forages, et pour déterminer la qualité de l'eau souterraine des

  7. Size distribution studies of 137Cs in river water in the Abukuma Riverine system following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Aya; Tanaka, Kazuya; Iwatani, Hokuto; Chiga, Haruka; Fan, Qiaohui; Onda, Yuichi; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of (137)Cs in size fractionated samples in river water from the Abukuma River system, (the Kuchibuto and Abukuma Rivers, five sampling events for three sites) was studied from June 2011--approximately some three months after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident until December 2012. The total concentration of (137)Cs (mBq/L) in river water was generally high at the upper stream site in the Yamakiya District within the evacuation/off-limits zone. The (137)Cs concentration was about 1Bq/L for the first sampling campaign (June 2011) at all sites, but then decreased substantially to about one-tenth of that by the time of a second sampling campaign (November or December 2011). The (137)Cs in the <0.45 μm fraction was present exclusively as a dissolved species rather than as a species adsorbed on suspended solids or complexed with organic materials. The contribution of the dissolved fraction ranged from 1.2 to 48.9% (averaged 20%) of the total concentration of (137)Cs throughout the observation period. The maximum contribution of (137)Cs was found in the silt size fraction (3-63 μm), which can be explained by the relatively large Kd values and the suspended solids (SS) concentration of this size fraction. Although the concentration (Bq/g) of (137)Cs in each size fraction did not show any significant trends and/or variations for any of the sampling campaign, Kd values for each site increased with time. Furthermore, it was found that the Kd values decreased with distance from the headstream in the off-limits zone. Thus, the data acquired in this study give an overview of the radiological situation for Fukushima including temporal and spatial variation of radiocaesium in a natural riverine system, within a few years after the accident. PMID:24929977

  8. e-Learning - Physics Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohottala, Hashini

    2014-03-01

    The general student population enrolled in any college level class is highly diverse. An increasing number of ``nontraditional'' students return to college and most of these students follow distance learning degree programs while engaging in their other commitments, work and family. However, those students tend to avoid taking science courses with labs, mostly because of the incapability of remotely completing the lab components in such courses. In order to address this issue, we have come across a method where introductory level physics labs can be taught remotely. In this process a lab kit with the critical lab components that can be easily accessible are conveniently packed into a box and distributed among students at the beginning of the semester. Once the students are given the apparatus they perform the experiments at home and gather data All communications with reference to the lab was done through an interactive user-friendly webpage - Wikispaces (WikiS). Students who create pages on WikiS can submit their lab write-ups, embed videos of the experiments they perform, post pictures and direct questions to the lab instructor. The students who are enrolled in the same lab can interact with each other through WikiS to discuss labs and even get assistance.

  9. Introducing ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Henneken, E.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Thompson, D. M.; Bohlen, E.; Murray, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    ADS Labs is a platform that ADS is introducing in order to test and receive feedback from the community on new technologies and prototype services. Currently, ADS Labs features a new interface for abstract searches, faceted filtering of results, visualization of co-authorship networks, article-level recommendations, and a full-text search service. The streamlined abstract search interface provides a simple, one-box search with options for ranking results based on a paper relevancy, freshness, number of citations, and downloads. In addition, it provides advanced rankings based on collaborative filtering techniques. The faceted filtering interface allows users to narrow search results based on a particular property or set of properties ("facets"), allowing users to manage large lists and explore the relationship between them. For any set or sub-set of records, the co-authorship network can be visualized in an interactive way, offering a view of the distribution of contributors and their inter-relationships. This provides an immediate way to detect groups and collaborations involved in a particular research field. For a majority of papers in Astronomy, our new interface will provide a list of related articles of potential interest. The recommendations are based on a number of factors, including text similarity, citations, and co-readership information. The new full-text search interface allows users to find all instances of particular words or phrases in the body of the articles in our full-text archive. This includes all of the scanned literature in ADS as well as a select portion of the current astronomical literature, including ApJ, ApJS, AJ, MNRAS, PASP, A&A, and soon additional content from Springer journals. Fulltext search results include a list of the matching papers as well as a list of "snippets" of text highlighting the context in which the search terms were found. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  10. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of the analytical procedure of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL can determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of soil analysis on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL will attempt to determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Origin, distribution and alteration of organic matter and generation and migration of hydrocarbons in Austin Chalk, Upper Cretaceous, southeastern Texas. Final report, September 1, 1980-August 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Grabowski, G.J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The kerogen and bitumen from samples of the Austin Chalk from the subsurface of southeastern Texas were analyzed to determine the origin of the organic matter and the alteration of the kerogen to form petroleum. The effects of mineral composition on the rate of alteration and on the composition of hydrocarbons generated was examined. The source-rock potential and the processes of migration and reservoiring in the chalk are considered.

  13. Inexpensive DAQ based physics labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Clark, Shane

    2015-11-01

    Quality Data Acquisition (DAQ) based physics labs can be designed using microcontrollers and very low cost sensors with minimal lab equipment. A prototype device with several sensors and documentation for a number of DAQ-based labs is showcased. The device connects to a computer through Bluetooth and uses a simple interface to control the DAQ and display real time graphs, storing the data in .txt and .xls formats. A full device including a larger number of sensors combined with software interface and detailed documentation would provide a high quality physics lab education for minimal cost, for instance in high schools lacking lab equipment or students taking online classes. An entire semester’s lab course could be conducted using a single device with a manufacturing cost of under $20.

  14. Results of 2001 Groundwater Sampling in Support of Conditional No Longer Contained-In Determination for the Snake River Plain Aquifer in the Vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Meachum, T.R.

    2002-04-26

    This report summarizes the results of sampling five groundwater monitoring wells in the vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in 2001. Information on general sampling practices, quality assurance practices, parameter concentrations, representativeness of sampling results, and cumulative cancer risk are presented. The information is provided to support a conditional No Longer Contained-In Determination for the Snake River Plain Aquifer in the vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center.

  15. Lab at Home: Hardware Kits for a Digital Design Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, J. P.; Haim, F.

    2009-01-01

    An innovative laboratory methodology for an introductory digital design course is presented. Instead of having traditional lab experiences, where students have to come to school classrooms, a "lab at home" concept is proposed. Students perform real experiments in their own homes, using hardware kits specially developed for this purpose. They…

  16. Palaeoclimatic changes during the Upper Cretaceous of eastern Denmark: a study based on the Stevns-2 chalk core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussaha, M.; Stemmerik, L.; Thibault, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Stevns-2 core located in eastern Denmark penetrated close to 350 m of upper Campanian-Maastrichtian sediments of the upper Chalk Group (Stemmerik et al., 2006). The calcareous nannofossil biozonation spans the time interval from the UC16aBP from the upper Campanian to the NNT1 in the lowermost Danian. Carbon and Oxygen isotopes trends records climatic events occurring in the upper Cretaceous: (1) the Late Campanian warm climatic optimum, (2) the early Maastrichtian cooling event, (3) the mid-Maastrichtian warming event, and (4) the late Maastrichtian cooling event, also observed in the nearby Stevns-1 core (Thibault et al., 2011) . These climatic variations match closely those observed in the nearby Stevns-1 core and in the Atlantic, Pacific and Tethyan realms (Thibault & GARDIN, 2006; Thibault et al., 2011). Changes occurring in the number of observed Inoceramids prisms per meter of core section, in the abundance of calcareous nannofossils and in the visible trace fossils abundances seem to be linked to climatic changes as expressed in the δ18O of the bulk sediment. In addition to the sedimentological data show that the distribution of facies through time from: (1) cyclic marl alternating with mudstone-wackestone chalk and conglomerates, to (2) bioturbated white mudstone and wackestone chalk, then to (3) flint alternating with mudstone and wackestone chalk, ending with (5) bryozoans wackestone and packstone, and the sedimentation rate changes varying from 1.4 cm/kyr to 13.4 cm/kyr. Here we show how changes in the sedimentology of the chalk and abundances of different fossil group are influenced by global and regional mechanisms. Isotopic results mainly reflect global paleoclimatic changes, whereas the sedimentological record is mostly influenced by (1) local variations in paleoproductivity, (2) deep-water paleocurrents influencing the chalk deposition and the shape of the sea-floor, (3) and (4) the geodynamic activity and paleotopography of the Late

  17. Fertility of holstein dairy heifers after synchronization of ovulation and timed AI or AI after removed tail chalk.

    PubMed

    Rivera, H; Lopez, H; Fricke, P M

    2004-07-01

    Nonlactating Holstein dairy heifers (n=352) 13 mo of age were managed using a 42-d artificial insemination (AI) breeding period in which they received AI after removed tail chalk evaluated once daily. At AI breeding period onset (d 0), heifers were randomly assigned to receive synchronization of ovulation (100 microg of GnRH, d 0; 25 mg of PGF2alpha, d 6; 100 microg of GnRH, d 8) and timed AI (TAI; d 8) and AI after removed tail chalk for the entire AI breeding period (GPG; n=175), or AI after removed tail chalk for the entire AI breeding period (TC; n=177). As expected, 17.7% (31/175) of GPG heifers received AI after removed tail chalk before scheduled TAI. Pregnancy rate per artificial insemination (PR/AI) at approximately 30 d after first AI tended to be greater for TC (46.5%) than for GPG (38.3%) heifers. No treatment x inseminator interaction was detected; however, overall PR/AI was low for heifers in both treatments due to variation among the 3 inseminators (24.8, 30.0, and 58.0%). Pregnancy loss from approximately 30 to approximately 75 d after first AI was 10% and did not differ between treatments. Based on survival analysis, days to first AI was greater for TC than for GPG heifers, whereas days to pregnancy across the 42-d AI breeding period did not differ between treatments. Overall, 81.2% of GPG heifers receiving TAI synchronized luteal regression and ovulated within 48 h after the second GnRH injection. We conclude that this synchronization protocol can yield acceptable fertility in dairy heifers if AI to estrus is conducted between treatment with GnRH and PGF2alpha and AI efficiency is optimized. PMID:15328217

  18. Style of faults and associated fractures in Austin Chalk: northern extension of balcones fault zone, central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Reaser, D.F.; Collins, E.W.

    1988-09-01

    Distributions, geometries, and densities of faults and associated fractures in the Cretaceous Austin Chalk were studied in outcrop within the northernmost extension of the Balcones fault zone in Ellis and northern Hill Counties, Texas. Description of the fracture systems may be applicable to hydrocarbon exploration and production from this unit and to locating the proposed Dallas-Fort Worth Area Superconducting Super Collider site in Ellis County.

  19. Paleoceanographic changes during the Albian-Cenomanian in the Tethys and North Atlantic and the onset of the Cretaceous chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgioni, Martino; Weissert, Helmut; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Hochuli, Peter A.; Keller, Christina E.; Coccioni, Rodolfo; Petrizzo, Maria Rose; Lukeneder, Alexander; Garcia, Therese I.

    2015-03-01

    During the mid-Cretaceous the Earth was characterized by peculiar climatic and oceanographic features, such as very high temperatures, smooth thermal meridional gradient, long-term rising sea level, and formation of oceanic gateways and seaways. At that time widespread deposition of micritic pelagic limestones, generally called chalk, occurred in deep pelagic settings as well as in epeiric seas, both at tropical and at high latitudes. The origin of such extensive chalk deposition in the mid-Cretaceous is a complex and still controversial issue, which involves the interaction of several different factors. In this work we address this topic from the paleoceanographic perspective, by investigating the contribution of major oceanic circulation changes. We characterize several stratigraphic sections from the Tethys and North Atlantic with litho-, bio-, and carbon isotope stratigraphy. Our data show a change between two different oceanic circulation modes happening in the Late Albian. The first is an unstable mode, with oceanographic conditions fluctuating frequently in response to rapid environmental and climatic changes, such as those driven by orbital forcing. The second mode is more stable, with better connection between the different oceanic basins, a more stable thermocline, more persistent current flow, better defined upwelling and downwelling areas, and a more balanced oceanic carbon reservoir. We propose that under the mid-Cretaceous paleogeographic and paleoclimatic conditions this change in oceanic circulation mode favored the beginning of chalk sedimentation in deep-water settings.

  20. Mass-transport deposits and reservoir quality of Upper Cretaceous Chalk within the German Central Graben, North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfai, Jashar; Lutz, Rüdiger; Franke, Dieter; Gaedicke, Christoph; Kley, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    The architecture of intra-chalk deposits in the `Entenschnabel' area of the German North Sea is studied based on 3D seismic data. Adapted from seismic reflection characteristics, four types of mass-transport deposits (MTDs) are distinguished, i.e. slumps, slides, channels and frontal splay deposits. The development of these systems can be linked to inversion tectonics and halotectonic movements of Zechstein salt. Tectonic uplift is interpreted to have caused repeated tilting of the sea floor. This triggered large-scale slump deposition during Turonian-Santonian times. Slump deposits are characterised by chaotic reflection patterns interpreted to result from significant stratal distortion. The south-eastern study area is characterised by a large-scale frontal splay complex. This comprises a network of shallow channel systems arranged in a distributive pattern. Several slide complexes are observed near the Top Chalk in Maastrichtian and Danian sediments. These slides are commonly associated with large incisions into the sediments below. Best reservoir properties with high producible porosities are found in the reworked chalk strata, e.g. Danish North Sea, therefore MTDs detected in the study area are regarded as potential hydrocarbon reservoirs and considered as exploration targets.

  1. Geologic models and evaluation of undiscovered conventional and continuous oil and gas resources: Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Krystal

    2012-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk forms a low-permeability, onshore Gulf of Mexico reservoir that produces oil and gas from major fractures oriented parallel to the underlying Lower Cretaceous shelf edge. Horizontal drilling links these fracture systems to create an interconnected network that drains the reservoir. Field and well locations along the production trend are controlled by fracture networks. Highly fractured chalk is present along both regional and local fault zones. Fractures are also genetically linked to movement of the underlying Jurassic Louann Salt with tensile fractures forming downdip of salt-related structures creating the most effective reservoirs. Undiscovered accumulations should also be associated with structure-controlled fracture systems because much of the Austin that overlies the Lower Cretaceous shelf edge remains unexplored. The Upper Cretaceous Eagle Ford Shale is the primary source rock for Austin Chalk hydrocarbons. This transgressive marine shale varies in thickness and lithology across the study area and contains both oil- and gas-prone kerogen. The Eagle Ford began generating oil and gas in the early Miocene, and vertical migration through fractures was sufficient to charge the Austin reservoirs.

  2. Physics Labs with Flavor II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper was inspired by the numerous requests from "TPT" readers to expand the number of examples of "recurrent study" lab exercises described in my previous paper "Physics Labs with Flavor." I recommend that readers examine it first in order to better understand this one as my attempt here is to be brief. In that paper, one can find details…

  3. Business Lab Curriculum. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dill, Cheri; Weitman, Karlene

    Curriculum materials are provided for courses to be taught in business labs, including typing I, advanced and production typing, office procedures (clerical and secretarial), recordkeeping, accounting I and II, consumer math, and business law. Introductory materials include suggestions for setting up labs and a listing of required and suggested…

  4. TQM in a Computer Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Dewey A.; Phillips, Julie A.

    At the Purdue University School of Technology (PST) at Columbus, Indiana, the Total Quality Management (TQM) philosophy was used in the computer laboratories to better meet student needs. A customer satisfaction survey was conducted to gather data on lab facilities, lab assistants, and hardware/software; other sections of the survey included…

  5. An Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson lab

    SciTech Connect

    A.W. Thomas

    2009-10-01

    Long term plans for the investigation of the quark and gluon structure of matter have for some time focussed on the possibility of an electron-ion collider, with the nuclear physics communities associated with JLab and BNL being particularly active. We briefly outline the current thinking on this subject at Jefferson lab.

  6. FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE, AN IMPROVED SORBENT FOR PRETREATMENT OF HIGH LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-01-12

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove Cs-137, Sr-90, and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal onsite as low level waste. Separation processes planned at SRS include caustic side solvent extraction, for Cs-137 removal, and sorption of Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides onto monosodium titanate (MST). The predominant alpha-emitting radionuclides in the highly alkaline waste solutions include plutonium isotopes Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-240. This paper describes recent results from the development of an improved titanate material that exhibits increased removal kinetics and effective capacity for Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the baseline MST material.

  7. Size-dependent distribution of radiocesium in riverbed sediments and its relevance to the migration of radiocesium in river systems after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuya; Iwatani, Hokuto; Sakaguchi, Aya; Fan, Qiaohui; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the particle size distribution of radiocesium in riverbed sediments after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Riverbed sediments were collected in the Abukuma River system in Fukushima and Miyagi Prefectures. The collected sediments were separated into 11 fractions, ranging from granular size (>2000 μm) to clay size (<2 μm) fractions. Cesium-137 concentrations were higher in the smaller particle size fractions, possibly reflecting specific surface areas and the mineralogy, in particular the clay mineral content. A gap in (137)Cs concentration was observed between the silt size and sand size fractions of riverbed sediments at downstream sites, whereas riverbed sediments at an upstream site did not show such a concentration gap. It is likely that selective transport of small particles in suspended state from upstream areas resulted in an accumulation of radiocesium in downstream areas. PMID:24874435

  8. Characterization of Acid Mine Drainage Sources Using Stable and Radiogenic Isotopes, Chalk Creek, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordalis, D.; Michel, R.; Williams, M.; Wireman, M.

    2003-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) affects many streams throughout the western United States. Understanding flow dynamics and sources within a fractured rock setting is necessary in outlining a potential remediation strategy for AMD. Radiogenic and stable isotopes of water were used in the Mary Murphy Mine, Chalk Creek, Colorado, in order to characterize flowpaths and sourcewaters. By delineating the sources of the mine water, groundwater, and event water, we may be able to target remediation techniques for individual contamination sources. Moreover, results from this research provide insights into groundwater flow systems in mountain environments of the Colorado Rockies. Tritium, a cosmogenic isotope of hydrogen, has a half-life 12.43y and is useful for studying hydrologic processes at the decadal time scale and can be used as an effective tracer when traditional chemical tracers are non-conservative. Hydrometric information showed that discharge from the mine adit exhibited a hydrograph characteristic of snowmelt runoff. However, mixing models using stable water isotopes (D and 18O) found less than 7% of the mine's peak discharge was from snowmelt, suggesting a regional groundwater dominated system. Mine interior samples fell into two characteristic groupings: either from the extreme north side of the drift which contained most of the zinc contamination, and all other locations. The waters from the north drift, MVN-3 and MVN-4, had lower 18O values, -17.62 per mil and -17.17 per mil, respectively, than did any of the other locations, suggesting a seasonal snowmelt input. However, the tritium values associated with MVN-3 and MVN-4 suggest at least some mixing, with values of 13.4 TU and 12.5 TU, respectively. Surface water samples from Chalk Creek show average tritium values of 11.1 TU, and 18O values of -14.87 per mil. Groundwater samples were captured using monitoring wells, and plotted according to the depth of screening. Alluvial wells carried a seasonal signal similar

  9. Methamphetamine Lab Incidents, 2004-2014

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liderazgo de la DEA Resource Center » Statistics & Facts » Methamphetamine Lab Incidents Methamphetamine Lab Incidents, 2004-2014 NOTE: These maps include all meth incidents, including labs, "dumpsites" or "chemical and glassware" ...

  10. Contribution of piezometric measurement to knowledge and management of low water levels: examples on the chalk aquifer in the Champagne Ardennes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stollsteiner, P.; Bessiere, H.; Nicolas, J.; Allier, D.; Berthet, O.

    2015-04-01

    This article is based on a BRGM study on piezometric indicators, threshold values of discharge and groundwater levels for the assessment of potentially-exploitable water resources of chalky watersheds. A method for estimating low water levels based on groundwater levels is presented from three examples representing chalk aquifers with different cycles: annual, combined and interannual. The first is located in Picardy and the two others in the Champagne-Ardennes region. Piezometers with annual cycles, used in these examples, are supposed to be representative of the aquifer hydro-dynamics. Except for multi-annual systems, the analysis between discharge measurements at a hydrometric station and groundwater levels measured at a piezometer representative of the main aquifer, leads to relatively precise and satisfactory relationships within a chalky context. These relationships may be useful for monitoring, validation, extension or reconstruction of the low water flow data. On the one hand, they allow definition of the piezometric levels corresponding to the different alert thresholds of river discharges. On the other hand, they clarify the proportions of low surface water flow from runoff or drainage of the aquifer. Finally, these correlations give an assessment of the minimum flow for the coming weeks. However, these correlations cannot be used to optimize the value of the exploitable water resource because it seems to be difficult to integrate the value of the effective rainfall that could occur during the draining period. Moreover, in the case of multi-annual systems, the solution is to attempt a comprehensive system modelling and, if it is satisfactory, using the simulated values to get rid of parasites or running the model for forecasting purposes.

  11. Temporal variability of local abundance, sex ratio and activity in the Sardinian chalk hill blue butterfly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casula, P.; Nichols, J.D.

    2003-01-01

    When capturing and marking of individuals is possible, the application of newly developed capture-recapture models can remove several sources of bias in the estimation of population parameters such as local abundance and sex ratio. For example, observation of distorted sex ratios in counts or captures can reflect either different abundances of the sexes or different sex-specific capture probabilities, and capture-recapture models can help distinguish between these two possibilities. Robust design models and a model selection procedure based on information-theoretic methods were applied to study the local population structure of the endemic Sardinian chalk hill blue butterfly, Polyommatus coridon gennargenti. Seasonal variations of abundance, plus daily and weather-related variations of active populations of males and females were investigated. Evidence was found of protandry and male pioneering of the breeding space. Temporary emigration probability, which describes the proportion of the population not exposed to capture (e.g. absent from the study area) during the sampling process, was estimated, differed between sexes, and was related to temperature, a factor known to influence animal activity. The correlation between temporary emigration and average daily temperature suggested interpreting temporary emigration as inactivity of animals. Robust design models were used successfully to provide a detailed description of the population structure and activity in this butterfly and are recommended for studies of local abundance and animal activity in the field.

  12. Incrusting and boring bryozoans from the Dessau Chalk Formation (Cretaceous), Little Walnut Creek, Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, P.A. )

    1990-09-01

    Four sections were measured along a 1/4 mi length of Little Walnut Creek. The first section was 165 ft north of the US. 290 bridge while the fourth was 1/4 mi upstream. Structurally, the stream follows the fault in this section. Small faults can be found perpendicular to the primary fault and apparently account not only for minor variation in local dip (8{degrees}SE, parallel to 5{degrees}NW) but also for the placement of at least one tributary. Megainvertebrate exoskeletons were found to have been inhabited by incrusting bryozoans, boring bryozoans, and sponges. These fossils were found on both interior and exterior surfaces of Exogyra laeviuscula E tigrina, and interior surfaces of Inoceramus. A low-energy environment allowed exposure of megainvertebrate exoskeletons after death but also prevented fracturing. Low siltation rates also extended exoskeleton availability after organismic death. The nonboring bryozoans are cheilostomes and at least one species, Pyripora, has been described from the Kansas Cretaceous as well as European Cretaceous sites. The boring bryozoans are primarily represented by Terebripora sp. In conclusion, this section of Dessau Chalk Formation, Upper Austin Group, was mostly a low-energy environment, shallow, limy mud platform. This substrate was probably not stable enough for bryozoan colonization as unattached colonies have not been found in sediments. Therefore, bryozoan substrates were limited to living and dead Exogyra sp. and dead Inoceramus sp. exoskeletons.

  13. Paleomagnetism of late Cretaceous and Eocene limestones and chalks from Haiti - tectonic interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Fossen, Mickey C.; Channell, James E. T.

    1988-06-01

    We have conducted a paleomagnetic study of limestones and chalks from Haiti which suggests that the island of Hispaniola is a composite of at least two tectonically independent blocks. Sampling sites are distributed among three widely separated localities, namely: Les Cayes (nine sites; 18.3°N. Latitude; 73.6°W. Longitude) and Beloc (five sites; 18.4°N. Latitude; 72.6°W. Longitude) which are located on the southern peninsula of Haiti, and a northern locality, Ennery (six sites; 19.5°N. Latitude; 72.5°W. Longitude). Stable magnetization components of dual polarity and moderately high blocking temperature were revealed through progressive thermal demagnetization of samples from all of the Beloc and Ennery sites, while seven of the nine Les Cayes sites possessed unstable magnetizations. Mean paleolatitudes calculated from Beloc and Ennery data show 8° of latitudinal separation that is of at least Eocene age. Pole positions (Beloc: 43.2°N. Latitude; 185.8°E. Longitude, α95=25.1° and Ennery: 66.1°N. Latitude; 31.3°E. Longitude, α95=19.7°) show both colatitudinal and angular discordance with the North American apparent polar wander path. Based on these disparities, we demonstrate that the implied tectonic displacements tend to support some aspects of previously published Caribbean plate tectonic models.

  14. Long-term reactive transport modelling of Berea and chalk core flood experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, A. V.; Godoy, J.; Tonietto, G.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon sequestration in geological structures establishes a long-term chemical system between the dissolved gas, fluids and rocks from the injection site. Thus, the time scale used to assess the progress of chemical reactions is normally between tens and hundreds of years. Geochemical modeling is used in a variety of fields, including environmental protection and remediation, the petroleum industry, and economic geology and it is one of the best alternatives to evaluate the reactions with geochemical data possible injection sites. In this work we used data presented in a recent article (SPE165500) in different scenarios injection with three scales 50, 100, 250 and 1000 years. The experimental data used were from core flood experiment Berea and chalk in a condition similar to those found in the reservoirs of the North Sea. (340 bar and 130 C). The approach used to the lack of appropriate kinetic parameter in reservoir conditions, was the use of experimental data collected in two different conditions (340 bar and 130 C) and (2 Bar at room temperature) after the rocky core. The numerical simulations carried out using the same conditions with two different geochemical softwares PHREEQC and TOUGHREACTS. The results provide a detailed understanding of the system resulting rock-fluid-CO2 in the medium and long term. However, the accuracy of the models is strongly dependent on the mineral primary and secondary cores found in rocks.

  15. Estimating organic maturity from well logs, Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk, Texas Gulf coast

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, G.A.; Berg, R.R. )

    1990-09-01

    The Austin Chalk is both a source rock for oil and a fractured reservoir, and the evaluation of its organic maturity from well logs could be an aid to exploration and production. Geochemical measurements have shown three zones of organic maturity for source materials: (1) an immature zone to depths of 6,000 ft, (2) a peak-generation and accumulation zone from 6,000 to 6,500 ft, and (3) a mature, expulsion and migration zone below 6,500 ft. The response of common well logs identifies these zones. True resistivity (R{sub t}) is low in the immature zone, increases to a maximum in the peak-generation zone, and decreases to intermediate values in the expulsion zone. Density and neutron porosities are different in the immature zone but are nearly equal in the peak generation and expulsion zones. Correlations with conventional core analyses indicate that R{sub t} values between 9 and 40 ohm-m in the expulsion zone reflect a moveable oil saturation of 10 to 20% in the rock matrix. The moveable saturation provides oil from the matrix to fractures and is essential for sustained oil production. Therefore, the evaluation of moveable oil from well logs could be important in exploration.

  16. Reactivity impact of {sup 16}O thermal elastic-scattering nuclear data for some numerical and critical benchmark systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kozier, K. S.; Roubtsov, D.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Kopecky, S.

    2012-07-01

    The thermal neutron-elastic-scattering cross-section data for {sup 16}O used in various modern evaluated-nuclear-data libraries were reviewed and found to be generally too high compared with the best available experimental measurements. Some of the proposed revisions to the ENDF/B-VII.0 {sup 16}O data library and recent results from the TENDL system increase this discrepancy further. The reactivity impact of revising the {sup 16}O data downward to be consistent with the best measurements was tested using the JENDL-3.3 {sup 16}O cross-section values and was found to be very small in MCNP5 simulations of the UO{sub 2} and reactor-recycle MOX-fuel cases of the ANS Doppler-defect numerical benchmark. However, large reactivity differences of up to about 14 mk (1400 pcm) were observed using {sup 16}O data files from several evaluated-nuclear-data libraries in MCNP5 simulations of the Los Alamos National Laboratory HEU heavy-water solution thermal critical experiments, which were performed in the 1950's. The latter result suggests that new measurements using HEU in a heavy-water-moderated critical facility, such as the ZED-2 zero-power reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories, might help to resolve the discrepancy between the {sup 16}O thermal elastic-scattering cross-section values and thereby reduce or better define its uncertainty, although additional assessment work would be needed to confirm this. (authors)

  17. An aerial radiological survey of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding area, Forked River, New Jersey. Date of survey: September 18--25, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, H.A.; McCall, K.A.

    1994-05-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant in Forked River, New Jersey, during the period September 18 through September 24, 1992. The survey was conducted at an altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) over a 26-square-mile (67-square-kilometer) area centered on the power station. The purpose of the survey was to document the terrestrial gamma radiation environment of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power plant and surrounding area. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a contour map. Outside the plant boundary, exposure rates were found to vary between 4 and 10 microroentgens per hour and were attributed to naturally-occurring uranium, thorium, and radioactive potassium gamma emitters. The aerial data were compared to ground-based benchmark exposure rate measurements and radionuclide assays of soil samples obtained within the survey boundary. The ground-based measurements were found to be in good agreement with those inferred from the aerial measuring system. A previous survey of the power plant was conducted in August 1969 during its initial startup phase. Exposure rates and radioactive isotopes revealed in both surveys were consistent and within normal terrestrial background levels.

  18. Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-09-07

    Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  19. What's your lab's strategy?

    PubMed

    Francis, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Important strategic choices cascade throughout a laboratory. Senior management should create a document that answers each of the five key questions explained on page 60. Once this has been detailed in writing, it remains important to disseminate the basics to all employees so they are singing the same tune. A useful way to accomplish this is through a coherent strategy statement that specifies three components: 1) objectives; 2) scope; and 3) advantages. Commercial and hospital outreach labs should be in business to win. It all starts with a definition of what winning looks like. To "participate" in your market contributes to mediocrity-and it's self-defeating. With no clear strategic direction of where-to-play and how-to-win choices that associate with the aspiration, a mission or vision statement can be frustrating rather than inspiring for employees. Articulate it plainly and concisely for everybody. With a care-fully prepared and designed strategy, you will be on your way to winning in the zero-sum game! PMID:27548928

  20. SIMULATIONS OF TWO-WELL TRACER TESTS IN STRATIFIED AQUIFERS AT THE CHALK RIVER AND THE MOBILE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simulation of two-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests in stratified granular aquifers is presented for two widely separated sites substantially different in terms of vertical distributions of hydraulic conductivity, well spacings, flow rates, test durations and tracer travel...

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of a Thermophilic Cyanobacterium from the Family Oscillatoriales (Strain MTP1) from the Chalk River, Colorado

    PubMed Central

    Grogger, Melanie; Mraz, Megan; Veverka, Donald

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome (57.7% GC, 7,647,882 bp) of the novel thermophilic cyanobacterium MTP1 was determined by metagenomics of an enrichment culture. The genome shows that it is in the family Oscillatoriales and encodes multiple heavy metal resistances as well as the capacity to make exopolysaccharides. PMID:26893415

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of a Thermophilic Cyanobacterium from the Family Oscillatoriales (Strain MTP1) from the Chalk River, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Hallenbeck, Patrick C; Grogger, Melanie; Mraz, Megan; Veverka, Donald

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome (57.7% GC, 7,647,882 bp) of the novel thermophilic cyanobacterium MTP1 was determined by metagenomics of an enrichment culture. The genome shows that it is in the family Oscillatoriales and encodes multiple heavy metal resistances as well as the capacity to make exopolysaccharides. PMID:26893415

  3. Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Chad R.; Sorgenfrei, Matthew C.; Nehrenz, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed (G-NAT) lab at NASA Ames Research Center provides a flexible, easily accessible platform for developing hardware and software for advanced small spacecraft. A collaboration between the Mission Design Division and the Intelligent Systems Division, the objective of the lab is to provide testing data and general test protocols for advanced sensors, actuators, and processors for CubeSat-class spacecraft. By developing test schemes for advanced components outside of the standard mission lifecycle, the lab is able to help reduce the risk carried by advanced nanosatellite or CubeSat missions. Such missions are often allocated very little time for testing, and too often the test facilities must be custom-built for the needs of the mission at hand. The G-NAT lab helps to eliminate these problems by providing an existing suite of testbeds that combines easily accessible, commercial-offthe- shelf (COTS) processors with a collection of existing sensors and actuators.

  4. State of the Lab 2012

    SciTech Connect

    King, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King delivers the annual State of the Lab address on Thursday, May 17, 2012, the 65th Anniversary of the founding of The Ames Laboratory. This video contains highlights from the address.

  5. State of the Lab 2012

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2013-03-01

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King delivers the annual State of the Lab address on Thursday, May 17, 2012, the 65th Anniversary of the founding of The Ames Laboratory. This video contains highlights from the address.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF INDIVIDUAL CHEMICAL REACTIONS CONSUMING ACID DURING NUCLEAR WASTE PROCESSING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 136B

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Newell, J.; Stone, M.

    2009-09-02

    Conversion of legacy radioactive high-level waste at the Savannah River Site into a stable glass waste form involves a chemical pretreatment process to prepare the waste for vitrification. Waste slurry is treated with nitric and formic acids to achieve certain goals. The total quantity of acid added to a batch of waste slurry is constrained by the catalytic activity of trace noble metal fission products in the waste that can convert formic acid into hydrogen gas at many hundreds of times the radiolytic hydrogen generation rate. A large block of experimental process simulations were performed to characterize the chemical reactions that consume acid prior to hydrogen generation. The analysis led to a new equation for predicting the quantity of acid required to process a given volume of waste slurry.

  7. GridLAB-D/SG

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-08-30

    GridLAB-D is a new power system simulation tool that provides valuable information to users who design and operate electric power transmission and distribution systems, and to utilities that wish to take advantage of the latest smart grid technology. This special release of GridLAB-D was developed to study the proposed Smart Grid technology that is used by Battelle Memorial Institute in the AEP gridSMART demonstration project in Northeast Columbus, Ohio.

  8. Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehler, Ted

    2006-12-01

    Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds Coastline Community College has under development several virtual lab simulations and activities that range from biology, to language labs, to virtual discussion environments. Imagine a virtual world that students enter online, by logging onto their computer from home or anywhere they have web access. Upon entering this world they select a personalized identity represented by a digitized character (avatar) that can freely move about, interact with the environment, and communicate with other characters. In these virtual worlds, buildings, gathering places, conference rooms, labs, science rooms, and a variety of other “real world” elements are evident. When characters move about and encounter other people (players) they may freely communicate. They can examine things, manipulate objects, read signs, watch video clips, hear sounds, and jump to other locations. Goals of critical thinking, social interaction, peer collaboration, group support, and enhanced learning can be achieved in surprising new ways with this innovative approach to peer-to-peer communication in a virtual discussion world. In this presentation, short demos will be given of several online learning environments including a virtual biology lab, a marine science module, a Spanish lab, and a virtual discussion world. Coastline College has been a leader in the development of distance learning and media-based education for nearly 30 years and currently offers courses through PDA, Internet, DVD, CD-ROM, TV, and Videoconferencing technologies. Its distance learning program serves over 20,000 students every year. sponsor Jerry Meisner

  9. Nitrate concentrations in river waters of the upper Thames and its tributaries.

    PubMed

    Neal, Colin; Jarvie, Helen P; Neal, Margaret; Hill, Linda; Wickham, Heather

    2006-07-15

    The spatial and temporal patterns of in-stream nitrate concentrations for the upper Thames and selected tributaries are described in relation to point and diffuse sources for these rural catchments. The rivers associated with catchments dominated by permeable (Cretaceous Chalk) bedrock show a smaller range in nitrate concentrations than those associated with clay and mixed sedimentary bedrock of lower permeability. The differences reflect the contrasting nature of water storage within the catchments and the influence of point and diffuse sources of nitrate. Nitrate concentrations often increase in a gradual way as a function of flow for the rivers draining the permeable catchments, although there is usually a minor dip in nitrate concentrations at low to intermediate flow due to (1) within-river uptake of nitrate during the spring and the summer when biological activity is particularly high and (2) a seasonal fall in the water table and a change in preferential flow-pathway in the Chalk. There is also a decrease in the average nitrate concentration downstream for the Kennet where average concentrations decrease from around 35 to 25 mg NO(3) l(-1). For the lower permeability catchments, when point source inputs are not of major significance, nitrate concentrations in the rivers increase strongly with increasing flow and level off and in some cases then decline at higher flows. When point source inputs are important, the initial increase in nitrate concentrations do not always occur and there can even be an initial dilution, since the dilution of point sources of nitrate will be lowest under low-flow conditions. For the only two tributaries of the Thames which we have monitored for over 5 years (the Pang and the Kennet), nitrate concentrations have increased over time. For the main stem of the Thames, which was also monitored for over 5 years, there is no clear increase over time. As the Pang and the Kennet river water is mainly supplied from the Chalk, the

  10. Characterising the vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity within the Chalk aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, A.; Bloomfield, J.; Griffiths, K.; Butler, A.

    2006-10-01

    SummaryVarious field methods have been used to examine and quantify the vertical variations in aquifer properties within the Chalk aquifer at a LOCAR site in Berkshire, UK. The site contains three 100 m open boreholes and three sets of two nested piezometers within an area of about 100 m 2. There is also an 86 m deep abstraction borehole about 40 m from the site. The techniques that have been used at the site include: geophysical logging, borehole imaging, packer testing, dilution testing and pumping tests. The packer test results show that the permeability of the aquifer varies by three orders of magnitude over the 70 m of tested material with a strongly non-linear decrease with depth below ground level. Comparison with the borehole images show that some of the highly permeable zones appear to be associated with obvious fractures. However, large fractures can be seen in zones which have much lower permeability while some highly permeable zones appear to be associated with poorly developed fractures. Single borehole dilution tests have shown that there are differences in flow velocity depth profiles over a few tens of meters across the site. These are inferred to be because the different boreholes, although of similar drilled depth and very close proximity, intersect slightly different parts of the fracture network and hence the groundwater flow system. In particular, a flowing feature at the base of one borehole is not intersected by the second, which is drilled from a slightly higher elevation. A dilution test carried out whilst the aquifer was being pumped shows that different fractures become active when the aquifer is stressed. This has implications for the interpretation of flow logs performed under pumping.

  11. Fractional flow in fractured chalk; a flow and tracer test revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odling, N. E.; West, L. J.; Hartmann, S.; Kilpatrick, A.

    2013-04-01

    A multi-borehole pumping and tracer test in fractured chalk is revisited and reinterpreted in the light of fractional flow. Pumping test data analyzed using a fractional flow model gives sub-spherical flow dimensions of 2.2-2.4 which are interpreted as due to the partially penetrating nature of the pumped borehole. The fractional flow model offers greater versatility than classical methods for interpreting pumping tests in fractured aquifers but its use has been hampered because the hydraulic parameters derived are hard to interpret. A method is developed to convert apparent transmissivity and storativity (L4-n/T and S2-n) to conventional transmissivity and storativity (L2/T and dimensionless) for the case where flow dimension, 2 < n < 3. These parameters may then be used in further applications, facilitating application of the fractional flow model. In the case illustrated, improved fits to drawdown data are obtained and the resultant transmissivities and storativities are found to be lower by 30% and an order of magnitude respectively, than estimates from classical methods. The revised hydraulic parameters are used in a reinterpretation of a tracer test using an analytical dual porosity model of solute transport incorporating matrix diffusion and modified for fractional flow. Model results show smaller fracture apertures, spacings and dispersivities than those when 2D flow is assumed. The pumping and tracer test results and modeling presented illustrate the importance of recognizing the potential fractional nature of flow generated by partially penetrating boreholes in fractured aquifers in estimating aquifer properties and interpreting tracer breakthrough curves.

  12. Geostatistical analysis of fault and joint measurements in Austin Chalk, Superconducting Super Collider Site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, R.E.; Nance, H.S.; Laubach, S.E.

    1995-06-01

    Faults and joints are conduits for ground-water flow and targets for horizontal drilling in the petroleum industry. Spacing and size distribution are rarely predicted accurately by current structural models or documented adequately by conventional borehole or outcrop samples. Tunnel excavations present opportunities to measure fracture attributes in continuous subsurface exposures. These fracture measurements ran be used to improve structural models, guide interpretation of conventional borehole and outcrop data, and geostatistically quantify spatial and spacing characteristics for comparison to outcrop data or for generating distributions of fracture for numerical flow and transport modeling. Structure maps of over 9 mi of nearly continuous tunnel excavations in Austin Chalk at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site in Ellis County, Texas, provide a unique database of fault and joint populations for geostatistical analysis. Observationally, small faults (<10 ft. throw) occur in clusters or swarms that have as many as 24 faults, fault swarms are as much as 2,000 ft. wide and appear to be on average 1,000 ft. apart, and joints are in swarms spaced 500 to more than 2l,000 ft. apart. Semi-variograms show varying degrees of spatial correlation. These variograms have structured sills that correlate directly to highs and lows in fracture frequency observed in the tunnel. Semi-variograms generated with respect to fracture spacing and number also have structured sills, but tend to not show any near-field correlation. The distribution of fault spacing can be described with a negative exponential, which suggests a random distribution. However, there is clearly some structure and clustering in the spacing data as shown by running average and variograms, which implies that a number of different methods should be utilized to characterize fracture spacing.

  13. Compaction of North-sea chalk by pore-failure and pressure solution in a producing reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Daniel; Dysthe, Dag; Jamtveit, Bjorn

    2016-02-01

    The Ekofisk field, Norwegian North sea,is an example of compacting chalk reservoir with considerable subsequent seafloor subsidence due to petroleum production. Previously, a number of models were created to predict the compaction using different phenomenological approaches. Here we present a different approach, we use a new creep model based on microscopic mechanisms with no fitting parameters to predict strain rate at core scale and at reservoir scale. The model is able to reproduce creep experiments and the magnitude of the observed subsidence making it the first microstructural model which can explain the Ekofisk compaction.

  14. Comment on: Lawrence, J.A., Mortimore, R.N., Stone, K.J., Busby, J.P., 2013. Sea saltwater weakening of chalk and the impact on cliff instability. Geomorphology 191, 14-22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornbusch, Uwe

    2015-02-01

    This comment relates to the conclusion of the recently published paper that "This work challenges the established view by identifying the role of salt from seawater in the degradation of porous rocks in coastal environments as a third and potentially the most important mechanism leading to chalk cliff collapse." (Lawrence et al., 2013: 15). The 'established view' relates to "Traditionally, the two main factors leading to cliff collapse have been considered to be (i) waves attacking and eroding the base of the cliff […] and (ii) water weakening as the chalk becomes saturated […]." (Lawrence et al., 2013: 14). The particular aspect of the paper of making surface weakening the primary process has been picked up more widely following publication under the headlines 'Salt causes chalk cliffs to collapse' in Jarlett (2013), 'Salt makes chalk cliffs collapse' in NERC (2013) and in the web resource 'How does salt make chalk cliffs collapse?' from Leeds University (2013).

  15. Nuclear waste form risk assessment for US defense waste at Savannah River Plant. Annual report fiscal year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, H.; Jackson, D.D.; Revelli, M.A.

    1981-07-01

    Waste form dissolution studies and preliminary performance analyses were carried out to contribute a part of the data needed for the selection of a waste form for the disposal of Savannah River Plant defense waste in a deep geologic repository. The first portion of this work provides descriptions of the chemical interactions between the waste form and the geologic environment. We reviewed critically the dissolution/leaching data for borosilicate glass and SYNROC. Both chemical kinetic and thermodynamic models were developed to describe the dissolution process of these candidate waste forms so as to establish a fundamental basis for interpretation of experimental data and to provide directions for future experiments. The complementary second portion of this work is an assessment of the impacts of alternate waste forms upon the consequences of disposal in various proposed geological media. Employing systems analysis methodology, we began to evaluate the performance of a generic waste form for the case of a high risk scenario for a bedded salt repository. Results of sensitivity analysis, uncertainty analyses, and sensitivity to uncertainty analysis are presented.

  16. Evaluation of impingement losses of white perch at the Indian Point Nuclear Station and other Hudson River power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Van Winkle, W.; Barnthouse, L.W.; Kirk, B.L.; Vaughan, D.S.

    1980-06-01

    This report evaluates two independent lines of evidence concerning impingement losses of white perch at the power plants on the Hudson River. Based on regression analyses of impingement rate as an index of year-class strength versus year over the period 1972 through 1977, it is concluded that there is little evidence of a statistically significant downward trend. However, an analysis of minimum detectable differences in impingement rates indicates that a long time series of year-class strength would be required to detect even substantial reductions (e.g., 50%). Second, based on our estimates of percent reduction in year-class strength due to impingement (> 20% for the 1974 year class and >15% for the 1975 year class), it is concluded that the level of impingement impact is not acceptable a priori from the point of view of managing the white perch population. Our methodologies and results are compared with those of the utilities, and the bases for the substantial differences in estimate of impingement are discussed. Appendices are included on survival of impinged white perch, impingement rate as an index of population abundance, and ability to detect decreases in population abundance. 57 refs., 29 tabs.

  17. Tracer Sampling In The Arctic From The Nuclear Submarine USS L. Mendel Rivers During SCICEX 2000: Evidence Of Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadko, D. C.; Aagaard, K.

    2006-12-01

    Observations suggest that the central Arctic Ocean is surprisingly energetic and variable, given the weak mean flow and the very strong halocline, which isolates the surface from the deeper ocean. One source of variability is numerous, generally anticyclonic eddies, many of which are centered in the halocline and likely generated within the boundary current. These and other eddies may be an important means of transporting properties in regions of weak mean flow, since they are found far from their origin, show anomalous water properties, and have a life time of years, mixing only slowly with ambient waters. Tracers additional to temperature and salinity will likely prove useful in identifying eddy sources and ages. Here we report radium isotope, temperature, and salinity data obtained from the USS L. Mendel Rivers - PACSUBICEX 3-00 SCICEX Accommodation cruise in October, 2000. The radium activity ratios are linked to shelf sources, and provide estimates of time elapsed since the waters left the shelf. The generally decreasing 228Ra/226Ra ratio in the halocline observed across the Canada Basin from Barrow to the North Pole is consistent with distance from Pacific shelf sources. Additionally, isolated anomalously high 228Ra/226Ra ratios within both the Canada and Eurasian basins suggest water parcels that have been rapidly (relative to the 5.77 year 228Ra half-life) transported from the shelves into the interior. The density field indicates that eddies are the means of this efficient transport of shelf properties into the central Arctic Ocean.

  18. Environmental parameters of the Tennessee River in Alabama. 2: Physical, chemical, and biological parameters. [biological and chemical effects of thermal pollution from nuclear power plants on water quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosing, L. M.

    1976-01-01

    Physical, chemical and biological water quality data from five sites in the Tennessee River, two in Guntersville Reservoir and three in Wheeler Reservoir were correlated with climatological data for three annual cycles. Two of the annual cycles are for the years prior to the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant operations and one is for the first 14 months of Plant operations. A comparison of the results of the annual cycles indicates that two distinct physical conditions in the reservoirs occur, one during the warm months when the reservoirs are at capacity and one during the colder winter months when the reservoirs have been drawn-down for water storage during the rainy months and for weed control. The wide variations of physical and chemical parameters to which the biological organisms are subjected on an annual basis control the biological organisms and their population levels. A comparison of the parameters of the site below the Power plant indicates that the heated effluent from the plant operating with two of the three reactors has not had any effect on the organisms at this site. Recommendations given include the development of prediction mathematical models (statistical analysis) for the physical and chemical parameters under specific climatological conditions which affect biological organisms. Tabulated data of chemical analysis of water and organism populations studied is given.

  19. 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Electron Paramagnetic Spectroscopic Comparison of Hydrophobic Acid, Transphilic Acid, and Reverse Osmosis May 2012 Isolates of Organic Matter from the Suwannee River

    PubMed Central

    Nwosu, Ugwumsinachi G.; Cook, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is found in most natural waters at concentrations low enough to make DOM isolation methodologies critical to full analytical characterization and preservation. During the last few decades, two major protocols have been developed for the extraction of DOM isolates from natural waters. These methods utilize XAD resins and reverse osmosis (RO). In this work, the hydrophobic acid (May 2012 HPOA) and transphilic acid (May 2012 TPIA) isolates from XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins, respectively, were compared with the RO (May 2012 RO) natural organic matter isolate of the Suwannee River water using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies. 13C NMR analysis showed that the May 2012 RO isolate could be viewed as a hybrid of the more hydrophobic May 2012 HPOA isolate and more hydrophilic May 2012 TPIA isolate. The May 2012 HPOA isolate is shown to be higher in alkyl and aromatic moieties, while the May 2012 TPIA isolate is higher in O-alkyl moieties. EPR analysis revealed that the May 2012 TPIA and, in particular, May 2012 HPOA isolates had higher radical concentrations than the May 2012 RO isolate. It is postulated that some of the radical concentrations came from the use of base during the isolation procedures, especially in the XAD method. PMID:25565761

  20. Distribution and degradation of diesel oil in the unsaturated zone following an oil spill on a chalk aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, R. P.; Lerner, D. N.; Lloyd, J. W.

    1994-07-01

    In 1976, there occurred a substantial loss of diesel oil from a storage facility at Royston in eastern England. The site is on the outcrop of the important Chalk aquifer, which is protected by an unsaturated zone 24-30 m thick. In 1986, a cored borehole was drilled through the site of the spillage to investigate the fate of the contaminants. The core samples were analysed by physical and chemical methods to determine the physical structure of the rock, and the characteristics and distribution of the oil. The chemically analysed samples included pore water extracts, scrapings from fracture surfaces, and non-fracture (matrix) samples. The results indicate that oil accumulated within a few millimetres of major fissure surfaces, and entry into the rock matrix was limited by the small size of pores and the presence of water. Oil may also have migrated along microscopic channels away from the major fissures. There was no evidence of downward migration of oil since the initial phase of movement. The adoption of certain assumptions regarding degradation, evaporation and dissolution processes allows the estimation of oil depletion caused by these processes. Physical weathering and degradation were found to have been extensive, but highly variable. Both processes occurred on the major fissure surfaces but, in the matrix, degradation appears to have been restricted. The conclusions have implications for the investigation and remediation of fissured Chalk aquifers contaminated by oil.

  1. Law enforcement tools available at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.

    2000-03-29

    A number of nuclear technologies developed and applied at the Savannah River Site in support of nuclear weapons material production and environmental remediation can be applied to problems in law enforcement. Techniques and equipment for high-sensitivity analyses of samples are available to identify and quantify trace elements and establish origins and histories of forensic evidence removed from crime scenes. While some of theses capabilities are available at local crime laboratories, state-of-the-art equipment and breakthroughs in analytical techniques are continually being developed at DOE laboratories. Extensive experience with the handling of radioactive samples at the DOE labs minimizes the chances of cross-contamination of evidence received from law enforcement. In addition to high-sensitivity analyses, many of the field techniques developed for use in a nuclear facility can assist law enforcement personnel in detecting illicit materials and operations, in retrieving of pertinent evidence and in surveying crime scenes. Some of these tools include chemical sniffers, hand-held detectors, thermal imaging, etc. In addition, mobile laboratories can be deployed to a crime scene to provide field screening of potential evidence. A variety of portable sensors can be deployed on vehicle, aerial, surface or submersible platforms to assist in the location of pertinent evidence or illicit operations. Several specific nuclear technologies available to law enforcement and their potential uses are discussed.

  2. A dynamically polarized hydrogen and deuterium target at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, J.R.; Keith, C.; Mitchell, J.; Seely, M.

    1998-07-01

    Polarized electron beams have been successfully used at Jefferson Lab for over a year. The authors now report the successful achievement of polarized targets for nuclear and particle physics experiments using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)technique. The technique involves initial irradiation of frozen ammonia crystals (NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3}) using the electron beam from the new Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility at Jefferson Lab, and transferring the crystals to a special target holder for use in Experimental Halls. By subjecting the still ionized and frozen ammonia crystals to a strong magnetic field and suitably tuned RF, the high electron polarization is transmitted to the nucleus thus achieving target polarization. Details of the irradiation facility, the target holder, irradiation times, ionized crystal shelf life, and achieved polarization are discussed.

  3. A dynamically polarized hydrogen and deuterium target at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, J. R.; Keith, C.; Mitchell, J.; Seely, M.; Bueltmann, S.; Crabb, D. G.; Harris, C.

    1999-06-10

    Polarized electron beams have been successfully used at Jefferson Lab for over a year. We now report the successful achievement of polarized targets for nuclear and particle physics experiments using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique. The technique involves initial irradiation of frozen ammonia crystals (NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3}), using the electron beam from the new Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility at Jefferson Lab, and transferring the crystals to a special target holder for use in Experimental Halls. By subjecting the still ionized and frozen ammonia crystals to a strong magnetic field and suitably tuned RF, the high electron polarization is transmitted to the nucleus thus achieving target polarization. Details of the irradiation facility, the target holder, irradiation times, ionized crystal shelf life, and achieved polarization are discussed.

  4. Monitoring debris flow induced channel morphodynamics with terrestrial laser scanning, Chalk Cliffs, CO (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasklewicz, T. A.; Staley, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Debris flows are important geomorphic agents in alpine drainages. They have been linked with channel initiation in headwater streams, connectivity of organic material and sediment through drainage basins, and as hazards to human development in and adjacent to steep watersheds. Debris flows also significantly alter channel morphometry at a variety of spatial scales. Of particular interest are topographic changes associated with multiple surge fronts within a debris flow as well as between several debris flows. An unnamed tributary stream to Chalk Creek, CO has over the last decade experienced one to four debris flow events annually. Four field sampling campaigns were conducted in the summer and fall of 2009. A Leica ScanStation 2, in conjunction with a robust local control network, were used to capture channel morphodynamics along five stream reaches prior to the debris flow season and after three debris flows. Point cloud data from the scanner permit the generation of two centimeter planimetric resolution digital terrain models (DTM). DTM-of-difference analyses and measures of slope, roughness, sediment transport volumes and channel dimensions were employed to detect spatial and temporal morphometric changes. The first debris flow occurred on unsaturated bed material and resulted in aggradation along 3 of the 5 reaches. One reach, a bedrock step, remained relatively unchanged, while the final reach saw significant erosion along boulder steps in the channel and an associated mass failure adjacent to the stream bank through this section. The second debris flow resulted in net aggradation along all of the reaches. The third and largest debris flow took place on saturated bed materials. The flow produced net erosion along all reaches. Significant channel changes were associated with the headward erosion of debris flow snouts and bank failures associated with undercutting of angle-of-repose slopes during debris flow erosion. Analysis of the potential relationships

  5. Comparative estimates of transpiration of ash and beech forest at a chalk site in southern Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John; Rosier, Paul T. W.

    1994-11-01

    (1) During the dry summer of 1989 stomatal conductance ( gs), boundary-layer conductance ( ga), leaf water and osmotic potentials ( ψ1, ψπ) and leaf area index ( L∗) measurements were made in mature ash and beech stands growing on shallow soil over chalk near Winchester, Hampshire, UK. In addition measurements of gs and L∗ were made in the understorey layer in the ash stand, comprised mainly of dog's mercury, hazel and bramble. Automatic weather stations located (i) above the beech stand and (ii) at the understorey level (within the ash stand) provided hourly averages of weather variables. Changes in soil moisture deficit in both stands were determined from regular measurements made with a neutron probe. (2) Maximum values of gs (up to 0.3 mol m -2 s -1) were found at the top of the ash and beech canopies at the start of the day, while at the canopy base gs was about half of these values. At all canopy levels the value of gs was more closely associated with specific humidity deficit (at the time of measurement) than with any other weather variable, and there was no relationship between gs and soil mositure deficit or leaf water status, described by ψ1 and ψπ on the day of measurement. (3) Values of gs of the understorey plants were only half those of the tree species and changed less during the day. However, seasonal changes in gs of dog's mercury did seem to be associated with increased soil moisture deficit. (4) Estimates of L∗ in the ash and beech stands were made from leaf litter collections and partitioned into canopy layers using ratios determined by destructive sampling. L∗ of the beech stand was 5.3 and for the ash stand 2.7. L∗ of the understorey varied seasonally and rose to a peak of 3 in June falling gradually for the remainder of the summer period. (5) Hourly values of gs and ga in each stand for each canopy layer were scaled up to the canopy by using L∗ of the individual canopy layers (including the understorey level in the ash stand

  6. Laboratory and field measurements of the self-potential (SP) in chalk, with application to monitoring of saline intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAllister, D.; Jackson, M.; Butler, A. P.; Vinogradov, J.

    2013-12-01

    Saline intrusion is a global phenomenon, affecting the availability of freshwater in coastal aquifers. The aim of this work is to investigate whether measurements of self-potential (SP) can be used to monitor the intrusion of seawater into coastal aquifers, with specific application to the UK chalk aquifer in the vicinity of Brighton on the south coast of the UK. The SP arises to maintain electrical neutrality when a separation of charge occurs due to gradients in pressure (electrokinetic (EK) or streaming potential) and concentration (electrochemical (EC) potential). Concentration gradients are a characteristic feature of saline intrusion and may give rise to a measureable EC potential. In addition, an EK potential will arise during abstraction. Laboratory and field SP measurements are used to investigate the magnitude of the EK and EC potentials in the UK chalk aquifer during saline intrusion. Laboratory measurements yield an EK coupling coefficient, relating the gradient in voltage to the gradient in pressure when the total current is zero, of -60 mV/MPa in samples saturated with groundwater, and -1 mV/MPa in samples saturated with seawater. This result agrees with earlier work suggesting the EK potential is suppressed at high salinity due to a compressed electrical double layer. The EC coupling is dominated by diffusion potentials arising from the concentration gradient across the saline front. Field experiments suggest that the EK component of the SP in the chalk is very small under ambient conditions, even in freshwater zones, because gradients in hydraulic head are small owing to the high conductivity of the pervasive fracture networks. However, a pumping test conducted in the chalk aquifer at a field site in Berkshire induced a measureable EK response with a coupling coefficient of magnitude consistent with the freshwater EK coupling coefficient obtained in the laboratory. SP monitoring at an observation borehole near Brighton reveals semi-diurnal SP

  7. Projectile and Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Electromagnetic Dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Adamczyk, Anne; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Differential cross sections for electromagnetic dissociation in nuclear collisions are calculated for the first time. In order to be useful for three - dimensional transport codes, these cross sections have been calculated in both the projectile and lab frames. The formulas for these cross sections are such that they can be immediately used in space radiation transport codes. Only a limited amount of data exists, but the comparison between theory and experiment is good.

  8. A Rare-Ion Beam Facility at iThemba LABS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bark, R. A.

    2015-11-01

    iThemba LABS, chiefly based around a k=200 Separated Sector Cyclotron (SSC), is a multidisciplinary facility engaged in basic nuclear physics research, materials research, radionuclide production and hadron therapy. A proposal to acquire a new cyclotron to produce rare-ion beams for nuclear and materials research is outlined.

  9. Chalk Is Cheap: Nurturing Teachers in a Famine Culture Professional Starvation Is Gnawing Away At Teacher Motivation. Here Are Some Ways For Principals To Provide Needed Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Laurel

    2005-01-01

    Scarcity has been such a constant in education for so long that self-sufficient teachers routinely purchase classroom supplies at their own expense. Sometimes desperate measures are needed to obtain even the most basic equipment. I heard of a teacher whose chalkboard was so slick from years of use that it had become chalk-proof. Her first graders…

  10. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk and Tokio and Eutaw Formations, Gulf Coast, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Krystal; Dubiel, R.F.; Pearson, O.N.; Pitman, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 957 million barrels of undiscovered oil, 3.6 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas, and 363 million barrels of undiscovered natural gas liquids in the Austin Chalk and Tokio and Eutaw Formations in onshore lands and State waters of the Gulf Coast.

  11. Fraud strikes top genome lab

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, E.

    1996-11-08

    Francis Collins, head of NIH`s Human Genome Project has informed colleagues that a junior researcher in his lab facke data in five papers co-authored by Collins. This article describes the whole scenario, how it was discovered, and what the reprocussions are.

  12. Safety Equipment in the Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Willard A.S.

    1964-01-01

    Findings of two recent surveys on safety equipment in laboratory facilities are presented. The first survey was a pilot study of emergency shower and eye wash equipment. This study was followed by a more comprehensive random survey of safety equipment in 2,820 labs. Among other findings, the surveys indicate that many plants are underequipped, or…

  13. Biodiversity Lab: Using Local Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillie, Lynn L.

    1997-01-01

    Examining living organisms in one's own backyard is a key first step toward appreciating the scope and importance of biological diversity throughout the world. The goals of this lab are to involve students in exploring the biodiversity around them, appreciating its scope, and asking questions of new organisms that they may never have noticed…

  14. The Mobile Math Lab Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Elaine

    1991-01-01

    Describes a mobile computer lab set up in a converted bus that is used by fourth graders as part of the math curriculum. The program, which emphasizes problem solving and spatial visualization, also addresses gender differences and in-service teacher training. The physical arrangements, including provisions for computer security, are described.…

  15. Evaluating E-Labs' Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plaisent, Michel; Maguiraga, Lassana; Bernard, Prosper; Larhrib, Samir

    2004-01-01

    This communication discusses preliminary results on an experimentation of e-Learning with MIS students, mainly in order to cope with the logistics of lab organization. A learning management software was installed which changed completely the learning process, from content to logistics. Students have expressed their satisfaction with the e-Learning…

  16. A Lab for All Reasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin-Jones, Linda L.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a demonstration science laboratory at the University of Florida. Discussed is laboratory design, including instructional space, lab stations, sink areas, safety areas, and a storage and distribution area. The impact of this type of design is cited. Diagrams and photographs are included. (CW)

  17. State of the Lab Address

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2013-03-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  18. State of the Lab Address

    SciTech Connect

    King, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  19. A Simple, Successful Capacitor Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, William

    2011-01-01

    Capacitors are a fundamental component of modern electronics. They appear in myriad devices and in an enormous range of sizes. Although our students are taught the function and analysis of capacitors, few have the opportunity to use them in our labs.

  20. Where Lab Tests Are Performed

    MedlinePlus

    ... labs also vary in complexity, the volume of tests performed, the technology utilized, and the number and type of professionals who conduct the testing . There are important differences among the various testing settings. This information will be useful in ... Proudly sponsored by ... Learn ...

  1. Flexible HVAC System for Lab or Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedan, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses an effort to design a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system flexible enough to accommodate an easy conversion of classrooms to laboratories and dry labs to wet labs. The design's energy efficiency and operations and maintenance are examined. (GR)

  2. Identification of unknown microcontaminants in Dutch river water by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van Leerdam, J A; Vervoort, J; Stroomberg, G; de Voogt, P

    2014-11-01

    In the past decade during automated surface water monitoring in the river Meuse at border station Eijsden in The Netherlands, a set of unknown compounds were repeatedly detected by online liquid chromatography-diode-array detection in a relatively high signal intensity. Because of the unknown nature of the compounds, the consequently unknown fate of this mixture in water treatment processes, the location being close to the water inlet of a drinking water supply company and their possible adverse public health effects, it was deemed necessary to elucidate the identity of the compounds. No data are available for the occurrence of these unknowns at downstream locations. After concentration and fractionation of a sample by preparative Liquid Chromatography, identification experiments were performed using Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HR-MS) combined with High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (HR-NMR). Accurate mass determination of the unknown parent compound and its fragments obtained in MS/MS provided relevant information on the elemental composition of the unknown compounds. With the use of NMR techniques and the information about the elemental composition, the identity of the compounds in the different sample fractions was determined. Beside some regularly detected compounds in surface water, like caffeine and bisphenol-S, five dihydroxydiphenylmethane isomers were identified. The major unknown compound was identified as 4,4'-dihydroxy-3,5,3',5'-tetra(hydroxymethyl)diphenylmethane. This compound was confirmed by analysis of the pure reference compound. This is one of the first studies that employs the combination of high resolution MS with NMR for identification of truly unknown compounds in surface waters at the μg/L level. Five of the seven identified compounds are unexpected and not contained in the CAS database, while they can be presumed to be products generated during the production of resins. PMID:25296128

  3. The Development of MSFC Usability Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yiwei; Richardson, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This conference poster reviews the development of the usability lab at Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of the lab was to integrate a fully functioning usability laboratory to provide a resource for future human factor assessments. and to implement preliminary usability testing on a MSFC website to validate the functionality of the lab.

  4. Experiences with Lab-Centric Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titterton, Nathaniel; Lewis, Colleen M.; Clancy, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Lab-centric instruction emphasizes supervised, hands-on activities by substituting lab for lecture time. It combines a multitude of pedagogical techniques into the format of an extended, structured closed lab. We discuss the range of benefits for students, including increased staff interaction, frequent and varied self-assessments, integrated…

  5. High frequency seismic monitoring of debris flows at Chalk Cliffs (CO), USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coviello, Velio; Kean, Jason; Smith, Joel; Coe, Jeffrey; Arattano, Massimo; McCoy, Scott

    2015-04-01

    A growing number of studies adopt passive seismic monitoring techniques to investigate slope instabilities and landslide processes. These techniques are attractive and convenient because large areas can be monitored from a safe distance. This is particularly true when the phenomena under investigation are rapid and infrequent mass movements like debris flows. Different types of devices are used to monitor debris flow processes, but among them ground vibration detectors (GVDs) present several, specific advantages that encourage their use. These advantages include: (i) the possibility to be installed outside the channel bed, (ii) the high adaptability to different and harsh field conditions, and (iii) the capability to detect the debris flow front arrival tens of seconds earlier than contact and stage sensors. Ground vibration data can provide relevant information on the dynamics of debris flows such as timing and velocity of the main surges. However, the processing of the raw seismic signal is usually needed, both to obtain a more effective representation of waveforms and to decrease the amount of data that need to be recorded and analyzed. With this objective, the methods of Amplitude and Impulses are commonly adopted to transform the raw signal to a 1-Hz signal that allows for a more useful representation of the phenomenon. In that way, peaks and other features become more visible and comparable with data obtained from other monitoring devices. In this work, we present the first debris flows seismic recordings gathered in the Chalk Cliffs instrumented basin, central Colorado, USA. In May 2014, two 4.5-Hz, three-axial geophones were installed in the upper part of the catchment. Seismic data are sampled at 333 Hz and then recorded by a standalone recording unit. One geophone is directly installed on bedrock, the other one mounted on a 1-m boulder partially buried in colluvium. This latter sensor integrates a heavily instrumented cross-section consisting of a 225 cm2

  6. Big projects could threaten weapons labs` research base

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, A.

    1996-05-24

    Every few seconds, a mushroom cloud explodes on Paul Cunningham`s Computer screen. The unsettling image is a screen saver in the office of the chief of nuclear materials and stockpile management at Los Alamos National Laboratory - and a wry reminder of the radical changes underway at the three US weapons labs. Now that the US has renounced underground nuclear testing, simulations are becoming the weapons designers chief tool for ensuring that the nuclear arsenal is reliable. The new approach to testing, stockpile stewardship, has triggered a fierce debate within the defense community. At issue is how to keep a balance between financing such new and costly stewardship projects as the $1.1 billion National Ignition Facility, which will simulate the conditions of nuclear detonation, and maintaining a critical mass of experienced weapons designers. This artical describes the debate and funding and political problems which go with it.

  7. Porosity and permeability development in compacting chalks during flooding of nonequilibrium brines: Insights from long-term experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nermoen, Anders; Korsnes, Reidar I.; Hiorth, Aksel; Madland, Merete V.

    2015-05-01

    We report the complete chemical alteration of a Liège outcrop chalk core resulting from a 1072 flow-through experiment performed during mechanical compaction at 130°C. Chemical rock-fluid interactions alter the volumetric strain, porosity, and permeability in a nontrivial way. The porosity reduced only from 41.32% to 40.14%, even though the plug compacted more than 25%. We present a novel analysis of the experimental data, which demonstrates that the geochemical alteration does not conserve the volume of the solids, and therefore, the strain is partitioned additively into a pore volume and solid volume component. At stresses beyond yield, the observed deformation can be explained by grain reorganization reducing the pore space between grains and solid volume changes from the rock-fluid interactions. The mechanical and chemical effects are discussed in relation to the observed permeability development.

  8. Case history of an opposed-bore, dual horizontal well in the Austin Chalk formation of south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, M.F.; Rogers, C.T.; Stacey, E.S.; Stephens, R.N.

    1993-03-01

    Petro-Hunt Corp. used a unique horizontal-well design to optimize development of an irregularly shaped lease in the Austin chalk formation in Texas. Two medium-radius horizontal bores were drilled in opposite directions from one vertical hole to maximize horizontal displacement in the lease. Underbalanced drilling techniques were used to prevent formation damage. The well design resulted in a significant cost savings per horizontal foot compared with 24 offset wells that the operator drilled. This paper reviews well planning and drilling and emphasizes techniques used to intersect thin horizontal targets and to initiate the second horizontal bore. Production results and drilling economics are discussed briefly, and ideas on future dual-horizontal-well applications are presented.

  9. LabNet Project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, G.

    1985-06-24

    LabNet value-added service is a high-speed packet-switched network that ties computers together. From the point-of-view of a single computer, or of a local network of computers within a building or a group of buildings, the LabNet high-speed network is a long-haul network (like Tymnet or ARPANET) for getting to other buildings. This service is provided through channels of the backbone that are shared by everyone at the Laboratory. The focus of the high-speed network is the efficient transfer of data between computers as opposed to the interconnection of people's terminals to these computers. The latter function is best served by the local networks, or by a separate network.

  10. Mycorrhizal symbiosis effects on growth of chalk false-brome (Brachypodium pinnatum) are dependent on the environmental light regime.

    PubMed

    Füzy, Anna; Bothe, Hermann; Molnár, Edit; Biró, Borbála

    2014-03-01

    AMF (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi) colonization of the grass chalk false-brome (Brachypodium pinnatum (L.) P. B.) was studied in selected habitats under spatially different light regimes: (a) shade condition under oak trees, (b) half shade in a shrubby area and (c) full-sun conditions on unshaded grassland. This study assessed the variations in AMF colonization of the grass dependent on the light supply in field habitats. Soil, root and shoot samples were collected four times during the vegetation period (in June, July, September and October). Root colonization, root and shoot biomass as well as soil water content were determined. The highest rate of AMF colonization was detected in June under half-sun and full-sun conditions, where about 50% of the roots were colonized. The average amount of arbuscules was less than 20% in the roots at the three sites, with the highest number of arbuscules in June, under half-sun and full-sun conditions, however, not under the trees. Overall, best mycorrhizal colonization occurred during summer, and its rate decreased in autumn. This tendency inversely correlated with the amount of precipitation, and thus with the water content of soils. The high colonization rate of the examined root samples, and also its seasonal fluctuation, might reflect the importance of the symbiosis where inorganic nutrients and water are the growth-limiting factors. The marginal AMF colonization of chalk false-brome under shade conditions indicates that plants do not use AMF under all stress conditions. When low light limits photosynthesis and thus growth of the plants, they dispense with the colonization of AMF in order to save the expenditure of organic carbon. PMID:24484951

  11. An extensive study of the concentrations of particulate/dissolved radiocaesium derived from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in various river systems and their relationship with catchment inventory.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Kazuya; Onda, Yuichi; Sakaguchi, Aya; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Matsuura, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    An extensive investigation of particulate radiocaesium in suspended solids and dissolved radiocaesium in river water was undertaken at 30 sites in Fukushima and Miyagi Prefectures in December 2012, and their relationships with catchment inventory and the solid/liquid distribution coefficient (Kd) were evaluated. Rivers located in the coastal region on the north side of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant exhibited relatively higher particulate radiocaesium concentrations. Significant correlations were found between concentrations of particulate/dissolved radiocaesium and average catchment inventories, indicating that the concentrations of particulate/dissolved radiocaesium could be approximated from the catchment inventory. Particulate radiocaesium concentration was significantly correlated with dissolved radiocaesium concentration (with the exception of concentrations measured in estuaries), and the geometric mean Kd was calculated as 3.6 × 10(5) with a 95% confidence interval of 2.6-5.1 × 10(5). PMID:25242014

  12. New Features in ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Murray, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) has been working hard on updating its services and interfaces to better support our community's research needs. ADS Labs is a new interface built on the old tried-and-true ADS Abstract Databases, so all of ADS's content is available through it. In this presentation we highlight the new features that have been developed in ADS Labs over the last year: new recommendations, metrics, a citation tool and enhanced fulltext search. ADS Labs has long been providing article-level recommendations based on keyword similarity, co-readership and co-citation analysis of its corpus. We have now introduced personal recommendations, which provide a list of articles to be considered based on a individual user's readership history. A new metrics interface provides a summary of the basic impact indicators for a list of records. These include the total and normalized number of papers, citations, reads, and downloads. Also included are some of the popular indices such as the h, g and i10 index. The citation helper tool allows one to submit a set of records and obtain a list of top 10 papers which cite and/or are cited by papers in the original list (but which are not in it). The process closely resembles the network approach of establishing "friends of friends" via an analysis of the citation network. The full-text search service now covers more than 2.5 million documents, including all the major astronomy journals, as well as physics journals published by Springer, Elsevier, the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and all of the arXiv eprints. The full-text search interface interface allows users and librarians to dig deep and find words or phrases in the body of the indexed articles. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  13. Amazon River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Mouth of the Amazon River     View Larger Image ... over 6450 kilometers eastward across Brazil, the Amazon River originates in the Peruvian Andes as tiny mountain streams that eventually ...

  14. Nile River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  Nile River Fluctuations Near Khartoum, Sudan     ... history, the rising and falling waters of the mighty Nile River have directly impacted the lives of the people who live along its banks. ... the area around Sudan's capital city of Khartoum capture the river's dynamic nature. Acquired by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer ...

  15. Mississippi River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Mississippi River Flooding during Spring 2001     ... South TIFF: 1024 x 724 The Mississippi River, from its source at Lake Itasca Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico is ... 2348 miles long. Over the course of it's history, the mighty river has flooded many times. The largest flood recorded in the lower valley ...

  16. Niger River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  Niger River after the Rainy Season     View larger image The third largest river in Africa, the Niger, forms an inland delta in central Mali. This ... is situated near the top of the image, where the Niger River changes direction to flow more directly eastward. Six hundred years ago, ...

  17. FOREWORD: Jefferson Lab: A Long Decade of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Hugh

    2011-04-01

    Jefferson Lab Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 and started operating in about 1996. 2011 is an appropriate time to try to take a look at the results that have appeared, what has been learned, and what has been exciting for our scientific community. Rather than attempt to construct a coherent view with a single author or at least a small number, we have, instead, invited small groups of people who have been intimately involved in the work itself to make contributions. These people are accelerator experts, experimentalists and theorists, staff and users. We have, in the main, sought reviews of the actual sub-fields. The primary exception is the first paper, which sets the scene as it was, in one person's view, at the beginning of Jefferson Lab. In reviewing the material as it appeared, I was impressed by the breadth of the material. Major advances are documented from form factors to structure functions, from spectroscopy to physics beyond the standard model of nuclear and particle physics. Recognition of the part played by spin, the helicities of the beams, the polarizations of the targets, and the polarizations of final state particles, is inescapable. Access to the weak interaction amplitudes through measurements of the parity violating asymmetries has led to quantification of the strange content of the nucleon and the neutron radius of lead, and to measurements of the electroweak mixing angle. Lattice QCD calculations flourished and are setting the platform for understanding of the spectroscopy of baryons and mesons. But the star of the game was the accelerator. Its performance enabled the physics and also the use of the technology to generate a powerful free electron laser. These important pieces of Jefferson Lab physics are given their place. As the third Director of Jefferson Lab, and on behalf of the other physicists and others presently associated with the lab, I would like to express my admiration and gratitude for the efforts of the directors, chief

  18. Modeling of ground-water flow in subsurface Austin Chalk and Taylor marl in Ellis County, Texas, near the superconducting super collider site

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, R.E. . Bureau of Economic Geology)

    1993-02-01

    Numerical models are useful tools for developing an understanding of ground-water flow in sparsely characterized low-permeability aquifers. Finite-difference, cross-sectional models of Cretaceous chalk and marl formations near the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) were constructed using MODFLOW to evaluate ground-water circulation paths and travel times. Weathered and fractured zones with enhanced permeability were included to assess the effect these features had on flow paths and times. Pump tests, slug tests, packer tests, core tests, and estimates were used to define hydraulic properties for model input. The model was calibrated with water-level data from monitor wells and from wire-line piezometers near a test shaft excavated by the SSC project. A ratio of vertical-to-horizontal permeability of 0.0085 was estimated through model calibration. A chalk-to-marl permeability ratio of 18 was needed to reproduce artesian head in a well completed in chalk beneath marl. Hydraulic head distributions and ground-water flow paths reflected local, intermediate, and regional flow systems with recharge beneath upland surface-water divides and discharge in valleys. Most of the flow (99%) occurred in the weathered zone, with average residence times of 5 to 10 years. Residence time in unweathered chalk bedrock was substantially longer, at an average of 1.7 Ma. As expected, the model demonstrated that deep and rapid ground-water circulation might occur in fracture zones. Particle paths calculated using MODPATH showed that ground-water travel times from recharge areas to the SSC subsurface facilities might be 20 to 60 years where flow is through fracture zones.

  19. Updated version of an interim connection space LabPQR for spectral color reproduction: LabLab.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qian; Wan, Xiaoxia; Li, Junfeng; Liang, Jingxing

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new interim connection space (ICS) called LabLab, which is an updated version of LabPQR, to overcome the drawback that the last three dimensions of LabPQR have no definite colorimetric meanings. We extended and improved the method by which the first three dimensions of LabPQR are deduced to obtain an ICS consisting of two sets of CIELAB values under different illuminants, and the reconstructed spectra from LabLab were obtained by minimizing colorimetric errors by means of the computational formula of the CIE-XYZ tristimulus values combined with least-squares best fit. The improvement obtained from the proposed method was tested to compress and reconstruct the reflectance spectra of the 1950 Natural Color System color chips and more than 50,000 ISO SOCS color patches as well as six multispectral images acquired by multispectral image acquisition systems using 1600 glossy Munsell color chips as training samples. The performance was evaluated by the mean values of color differences between the original and reconstructed spectra under the CIE 1931 standard colorimetric observer and the CIE standard illuminants D50, D55, D65, D75, F2, F7, F11, and A as well as five multichip white LED light sources. The mean and maximum values of the root mean square errors between the original and reconstructed spectra were also calculated. The experimental results show that the proposed three LabLab interim connection spaces significantly outperform principal component analysis, LabPQR, XYZLMS, Fairman-Brill, and LabRGB in colorimetric reconstruction accuracy at the cost of slight reduction of spectral reconstruction accuracy and illuminant independence of color differences of the suggested LabLab interim connection spaces outperform other interim connection spaces. In addition, the presented LabLab interim connection spaces could be quite compatible with the extensively used colorimetric management system since each dimension has definite colorimetric

  20. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama. Final report, March 1996--September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Carroll, R.E.; Groshong, R.H.; Jin, G.

    1998-12-01

    This project was designed to analyze the structure of Mesozoic and Tertiary strata in Gilbertown Field and adjacent areas to suggest ways in which oil recovery can be improved. The Eutaw Formation comprises 7 major flow units and is dominated by low-resistivity, low-contrast play that is difficult to characterize quantitatively. Selma chalk produces strictly from fault-related fractures that were mineralized as warm fluid migrated from deep sources. Resistivity, dipmeter, and fracture identification logs corroborate that deformation is concentrated in the hanging-wall drag zones. New area balancing techniques were developed to characterize growth strata and confirm that strain is concentrated in hanging-wall drag zones. Curvature analysis indicates that the faults contain numerous fault bends that influence fracture distribution. Eutaw oil is produced strictly from footwall uplifts, whereas Selma oil is produced from fault-related fractures. Clay smear and mineralization may be significant trapping mechanisms in the Eutaw Formation. The critical seal for Selma reservoirs, by contrast, is where Tertiary clay in the hanging wall is juxtaposed with poorly fractured Selma chalk in the footwall. Gilbertown Field can be revitalized by infill drilling and recompletion of existing wells. Directional drilling may be a viable technique for recovering untapped oil from Selma chalk. Revitalization is now underway, and the first new production wells since 1985 are being drilled in the western part of the field.

  1. Sedimentology and carbon-isotope stratigraphy of the Late Cretaceous Chalk Group in the Höllviken-1 core (SW Sweden)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bøttger, Dorthe; Thibault, Nicolas; Anderskouv, Kresten

    2016-04-01

    The Höllviken-1 borehole is situated on the Skåne peninsula (SW Sweden) which was part of the Danish Basin in the Late Cretaceous. 1415 meters have been cored among which ca. 1100 meters cover the complete Upper Cretaceous to lower Danian Chalk Group. Besides the publication of a synthetic log and detailed foraminifer biozonation, supplemented by a number of rare macrofossil findings and description of a number of foraminifer holotypes (Brötzen, 1944), very few studies of the core have actually been performed, since the mid 1940s. A new project has thus been undertaken aiming at improving the stratigraphy of the Chalk Group in the Höllviken-1 core. The data presented here comprise the description of the interval 837-489 m covering a large part of the Campanian and the lower Maastrichtian. Two intervals with the presence of sand are noted in the Campanian and two intervals showing possibly progradational sequences of arenaceous marls to sand are present in the Maastrichtian. The purpose of this new study is to revise the foraminifer biostratigraphy of Brötzen and complement it with high-resolution carbon-isotope stratigraphy in order to establish a new age-model for the core and better constrain the timing of siliciclastic input into the Danish Basin. In addition, high-resolution sedimentological data will be used as a preliminary test for cyclostratigraphy of the chalk-marl intervals.

  2. NCL Objective #5 - Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL)

    Cancer.gov

    Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL) Objective #5: Engage and Facilitate Academic and Industrial-based Knowledge Sharing of Nanomaterial Performance Data and Behavior Resulting from Pre-Clinical Testing.

  3. MatLab Script and Functional Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab Script and Functional Programming: MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. The MatLab seminar covers the functional and script programming aspect of MatLab language. Specific expectations are: a) Recognize MatLab commands, script and function. b) Create, and run a MatLab function. c) Read, recognize, and describe MatLab syntax. d) Recognize decisions, loops and matrix operators. e) Evaluate scope among multiple files, and multiple functions within a file. f) Declare, define and use scalar variables, vectors and matrices.

  4. Aerosciences at Sandia National Labs.

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Jeffrey L.

    2010-10-01

    A brief overview of Sandia National Laboratories will be presented highlighting the mission of Engineering Science Center. The Engineering Science Center provides a wide range of capabilities to support the lab's missions. As part of the Engineering Science Center the Aeroscience department provides research, development and application expertise in both experimental and computation compressible fluid mechanics. The role of Aeroscience at Sandia National Labs will be discussed with a focus on current research and development activities within the Aeroscience Department. These activities will be presented within the framework of a current program to highlight the synergy between computational and experimental work. The research effort includes computational and experimental activities covering fluid and structural dynamics disciplines. The presentation will touch on: probable excitation sources that yield the level of random vibration observed during flight; the methods that have been developed to model the random pressure fields in the turbulent boundary layer using a combination of CFD codes and a model of turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations; experimental measurement of boundary layer fluctuations; the methods of translating the random pressure fields to time-domain spatially correlated pressure fields.

  5. LabWrite: Transforming Lab Reports from Busy Work to Meaningful Learning Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferzli, Miriam; Carter, Michael; Wiebe, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Lab reports are the dreaded assignments of the laboratory course. Students dislike them, because they can be tedious and time-consuming. Instructors dislike them, because they significantly increase the grading load. For this reason, lab reports are often omitted or replaced by alternatives such as responses to lab questions, fill-in-the-blank lab…

  6. Real-time 4D ERT monitoring of river water intrusion into a former nuclear disposal site using a transient warping-mesh water table boundary (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T.; Hammond, G. E.; Versteeg, R. J.; Zachara, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Hanford 300 Area, located adjacent to the Columbia River in south-central Washington, USA, is the site of former research and uranium fuel rod fabrication facilities. Waste disposal practices at site included discharging between 33 and 59 metric tons of uranium over a 40 year period into shallow infiltration galleries, resulting in persistent uranium contamination within the vadose and saturated zones. Uranium transport from the vadose zone to the saturated zone is intimately linked with water table fluctuations and river water intrusion driven by upstream dam operations. As river stage increases, the water table rises into the vadose zone and mobilizes contaminated pore water. At the same time, river water moves inland into the aquifer, and river water chemistry facilitates further mobilization by enabling uranium desorption from contaminated sediments. As river stage decreases, flow moves toward the river, ultimately discharging contaminated water at the river bed. River water specific conductance at the 300 Area varies around 0.018 S/m whereas groundwater specific conductance varies around 0.043 S/m. This contrast provides the opportunity to monitor groundwater/river water interaction by imaging changes in bulk conductivity within the saturated zone using time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography. Previous efforts have demonstrated this capability, but have also shown that disconnecting regularization constraints at the water table is critical for obtaining meaningful time-lapse images. Because the water table moves with time, the regularization constraints must also be transient to accommodate the water table boundary. This was previously accomplished with 2D time-lapse ERT imaging by using a finely discretized computational mesh within the water table interval, enabling a relatively smooth water table to be defined without modifying the mesh. However, in 3D this approach requires a computational mesh with an untenable number of elements. In order to

  7. Jefferson Lab Accelerator Operations Training and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Epps

    2008-01-23

    The mission of the Jefferson Lab Operations Group is to provide safe and efficient delivery of high quality electron beam for Jefferson Laboratory's nuclear and accelerator physics programs. The Operations staff must be able to setup, transport, maintain, and troubleshoot beam to all three experimental halls in a safe, efficient, and expeditious manner. Due to the nature of shift work, high employee turnover is always as issue. This creates a unique situation where highly trained staff members must quickly be produced and maintained in order to meet the needs of the Laboratory. Some methods used to address this problem will be presented here.

  8. Recent Advances of Polarized 3He Target at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Qiang

    2011-10-01

    Polarized {sup 3}He target has been widely used in nuclear and particle experiments to study the neutron structure in the spin degree of freedom, as most of the {sup 3}He spin is carried by the unpaired neutron. Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping (SEOP) process is used in Jefferson Lab Hall A to polarize its {sup 3}He target. Through developments in recent years, both the performance and corresponding polarimetry of such a target were greatly improved. Several experiments recently carried out in Hall A benefited remarkably from this target for the record highest figure of merit.

  9. Copper cycling in the Patuxent River estuary and condenser micro-fouling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, A.; Chamberlain, C.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the methods and results of a study of copper cycling in the Patuxent River estuary. The study focused on detailed sampling of the water column over a number of seasons to determine: (1) the amount of excess copper in the estuary which may be attributable to corrosion of condenser tubes at the Chalk Point Power Plant; (2) the geographic distribution of excess copper in the estuary, (3) the forms of excess copper, and (4) the fate of added copper. Extensive sampling was performed including sampling above and below the pycnocline, sampling in cross channel transects and resampling stations at different tidal stages to establish short term variability. Estimates for the amount of excess copper in the Patuxent are derived and the potential impact of that excess is assessed. This report also presents the results of studies of micro-fouling processes in power plant condensers employing once-through cooling. The studies entailed: (1) the isolation and characterization of 38 bacterial isolates from effluents and condenser tubes of the Crane Power Plant which is located on Saltpeter Creek, approximately ten miles northeast of Baltimore, Maryland and the Chalk Point Power Plant on the Patuxent River, (2) laboratory experiments on colonization rates using pure cultures at high nutrient levels, and (3) growth studies on the joint influence of copper and nutrient levels.

  10. Infiltration processes in karstic chalk investigated through a spatial analysis of the geochemical properties of the groundwater: The effect of the superficial layer of clay-with-flints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, Danièle; Dupont, Jean-Paul; Laignel, Benoît; Slimani, Smaïl; Delbart, Célestine

    2014-11-01

    In the Paris Basin in Upper Normandy (France), the chalk plateaus are covered with thick deposits of loess and clay-with-flints, from a few meters to approximately 40 m thick locally. A perched groundwater is sometimes observed in the superficial layers in which evapotranspiration processes seem to occur. This study's objective was to understand the effects of the thick clay-with-flints layers on the infiltration processes. To achieve this, we adopted a spatial approach comparing the maps of the geochemical properties of the Chalk groundwater and the maps of the thickness of clay-with-flints. The French national groundwater database, ADES (Accès aux Données des Eaux, BRGM), provided the mean geochemical properties in the Chalk aquifer of Upper Normandy. This database was used to prepare maps of the environmental tracers: Ca2+, HCO3-, Mg2+, Cl-, Na+, NO3-, and SO42. The data are spatially well organized. Using principal component analysis (PCA), these maps were compared with the maps of the thickness of clay-with-flints. A focus on the coastal basins (northern Upper Normandy) shows a very strong spatial correlation between the maps of clay-with-flints thickness and all of the maps of the major ions. The thickness of clay-with-flints is negatively correlated with the autochthonous ions (HCO3- and Ca2+) and is positively correlated with the allochthonous ions (Cl-, Na+, SO42-, and NO3-). These results highlight that the thickness of clay-with-flints controls recharge. Two types of infiltration processes are proposed: (1) Thicker clay-with-flints allows storage in the perched groundwater, which allows evapotranspiration, resulting in high concentrations of allochthonous ions and a decrease in the dissolution potential of water and low concentrations of autochthonous ions. The infiltration of the perched groundwater is thus delayed and concentrated. (2) Thinner clay-with-flints causes the infiltration to be more diffuse, with low evapotranspiration and thus low

  11. Observations of debris flows at Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA: Part 1, in-situ measurements of flow dynamics, tracer particle movement and video imagery from the summer of 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, Scott W.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Kean, Jason W.; Tucker, Greg E.; Staley, Dennis M.; Wasklewicz, Thad A.

    2011-01-01

    Debris flows initiated by surface-water runoff during short duration, moderate- to high-intensity rainfall are common in steep, rocky, and sparsely vegetated terrain. Yet large uncertainties remain about the potential for a flow to grow through entrainment of loose debris, which make formulation of accurate mechanical models of debris-flow routing difficult. Using a combination of in situ measurements of debris flow dynamics, video imagery, tracer rocks implanted with passive integrated transponders (PIT) and pre- and post-flow 2-cm resolution digital terrain models (terrain data presented in a companion paper by STALEY et alii, 2011), we investigated the entrainment and transport response of debris flows at Chalk Cliffs, CO, USA. Four monitored events during the summer of 2009 all initiated from surface-water runoff, generally less than an hour after the first measurable rain. Despite reach-scale morphology that remained relatively constant, the four flow events displayed a range of responses, from long-runout flows that entrained significant amounts of channel sediment and dammed the main-stem river, to smaller, short-runout flows that were primarily depositional in the upper basin. Tracer-rock travel-distance distributions for these events were bimodal; particles either remained immobile or they travelled the entire length of the catchment. The long-runout, large-entrainment flow differed from the other smaller flows by the following controlling factors: peak 10-minute rain intensity; duration of significant flow in the channel; and to a lesser extent, peak surge depth and velocity. Our growing database of natural debris-flow events can be used to develop linkages between observed debris-flow transport and entrainment responses and the controlling rainstorm characteristics and flow properties.

  12. Wetlands, Microbes, and the Carbon Cycle: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    ScienceCinema

    Tringe, Susannah

    2013-05-29

    Susannah Tringe, who leads the Metagenome Program at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a collaboration in which Berkeley Lab plays a leading role, takes us behind the scenes to show how DNA from unknown wild microbes is extracted and analyzed to see what role they play in the carbon cycle. Tringe collects samples of microbial communities living in the wetland muck of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, organisms that can determine how these wetlands store or release carbon.

  13. Wetlands, Microbes, and the Carbon Cycle: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah

    2012-01-01

    Susannah Tringe, who leads the Metagenome Program at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a collaboration in which Berkeley Lab plays a leading role, takes us behind the scenes to show how DNA from unknown wild microbes is extracted and analyzed to see what role they play in the carbon cycle. Tringe collects samples of microbial communities living in the wetland muck of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, organisms that can determine how these wetlands store or release carbon.

  14. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    ScienceCinema

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2014-06-03

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  15. Jefferson Lab's Trim Card II

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; Sarin Philip; C. Higgins; Edward Martin; William Merz

    2005-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) uses Trim Card I power supplies to drive approximately 1900 correction magnets. These trim cards have had a long and illustrious service record. However, some of the employed technology is now obsolete, making it difficult to maintain the system and retain adequate spares. The Trim Card II is being developed to act as a transparent replacement for its aging predecessor. A modular approach has been taken in its development to facilitate the substitution of sections for future improvements and maintenance. The resulting design has been divided into a motherboard and 7 daughter cards which has also allowed for parallel development. The Trim Card II utilizes modern technologies such as a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a microprocessor to embed trim card controls and diagnostics. These reprogrammable devices also provide the versatility to incorporate future requirements.

  16. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2013-03-01

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  17. Labs drive the arms race

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, H.E.

    1984-11-01

    The conviction of laboratory managers that high technology can provide safety and national security in a dangerous world and that technological solutions are paramount over political solutions has been a major driving force in perpetuating the nuclear arms race. The credo in the laboratories appears to be that there are never enough designs of nuclear weapons for deterrence so that there is always a need to develop such new ideas as the nuclear-pumped X-ray laser as a defense against energy missiles. The author outlines several alternative steps, including the ratification and reaffirmation of arms control treaties, negotiations, and a halt to the Star Wars program. A central point is to stop nuclear weapons testing. 7 references.

  18. The DVCS program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolai, Silvia

    2014-06-01

    Recent promising results, obtained at Jefferson Lab, on cross sections and asymmetries for DVCS and their link to the Generalized Parton Distributions are the focus of this paper. The extensive experimental program to measure DVCS with the 12-GeV-upgraded CEBAF in three experimental Halls (A, B, C) of Jefferson Lab, will also be presented.

  19. Science Action Labs Part 1: Sciencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevick, Ed; Adams, Linda, Ed.

    This book contains innovative hands-on science laboratory activities that teach basic scientific method skills and are designed to be used directly with 4th- through 9th-grade students. The background materials and instructions included in each activity are written for students to work together in teams. Lab titles are: observation lab,…

  20. Innovation - A view from the Lab

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA Ag Lab in Peoria helps bridge the gap between agricultural producers and commercial manufacturers. In 2015, the Ag Lab, officially known as the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research (NCAUR), is celebrating 75 years of research in Peoria. T...

  1. Uses of Labs and Learning Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Blink, Clare

    2009-01-01

    How can an IT department transform traditional computer labs given the resource limits of a university setting? Before engaging a redesign team, conduct some groundwork and initial research to help guide design and resource decisions. When the author and her colleagues considered modifying the lab spaces at Cornell, they initially engaged in…

  2. Traditional Labs + New Questions = Improved Student Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezba, Richard J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents three typical lab activities involving the breathing rate of fish, the behavior of electromagnets, and tests for water hardness to demonstrate how labs can be modified to teach process skills. Discusses how basic concepts about experimentation are developed and ways of generating and improving science experiments. Includes a laboratory…

  3. California State University, Northridge: Hybrid Lab Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    California State University, Northridge's Hybrid Lab course model targets high failure rate, multisection, gateway courses in which prerequisite knowledge is a key to success. The Hybrid Lab course model components incorporate interventions and practices that have proven successful at CSUN and other campuses in supporting students, particularly…

  4. Practical Physics Labs: A Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Peter

    This resource manual focuses on physics labs that relate to the world around us and utilize simple equipment and situations. Forty-five laboratories are included that relate to thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, dynamics, optics, wave transmission, centripetal force, and atomic physics. Each lab has three sections. The first section…

  5. Berkeley Lab 2nd Grader Outreach

    ScienceCinema

    Scoggins, Jackie; Louie, Virginia

    2013-05-29

    The Berkeley Lab IT Department sponsored a community outreach program aimed at teaching young children about computers and networks. Second graders from LeConte Elementary School joined Lab IT Staff for a day of in-depth exercises and fun.

  6. LANGUAGE LABS--AN UPDATED REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1963

    REPORTS FROM SEVERAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS ON THE USE OF AND PLANNING OF LANGUAGE LABORATORIES ARE PRESENTED. LABORATORIES SHOULD BE ARRANGED FOR FLEXIBLE USE. THE AVERAGE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT CAN USE A LAB PROFITABLY FOR 20 TO 25 MINUTES. THERE ARE THREE DIFFERENT TYPES OF LANGUAGE LABORATORIES THAT ARE DESCRIBED. THE SATELLITE LAB IS DIVIDED BY A…

  7. Berkeley Lab 2nd Grader Outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Scoggins, Jackie; Louie, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    The Berkeley Lab IT Department sponsored a community outreach program aimed at teaching young children about computers and networks. Second graders from LeConte Elementary School joined Lab IT Staff for a day of in-depth exercises and fun.

  8. A Virtual Lab in Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Barbara A.; Sommer, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A hands-on lab for a lower division research methods course used an online format with Web page, Web forms, an e-mail listproc, and chat room. The virtual section received a higher rating for overall value than did the in-person labs. Students liked its convenience and flexibility. There were no significant differences in examination performance…

  9. Supercharging Lessons with a Virtual Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Jefferson; Vincent, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The authors describes their experiences incorporating the virtual lab into a simple circuit lesson during an energy unit in a sixth-grade class. The lesson included a hands-on group experiment using wire, batteries, and light bulbs to make a circuit and an online simulation, using a virtual lab. Class discussions, student inquiries, and the study…

  10. Latest results from FROST at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Barry G.

    2014-06-01

    The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of a polarized photon beam incident on a polarized target in meson photoproduction experiments. At Jefferson Lab, a program of such measurements has made use of the Jefferson Lab FROzen Spin Target (FROST). An overview of preliminary results are presented.

  11. Extracurricular Science Labs for STEM Talent Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausamann, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, a growing lack of engineers, natural scientists, information technology experts, and mathematicians has been noted, especially in Europe. Corresponding to the need to attract young people to science and technology, numerous extracurricular science labs ("out-of-school labs") have been established, especially in Germany. One of…

  12. Hydrogel Beads: The New Slime Lab?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockway, Debra; Libera, Matthew; Welner, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    Creating slime fascinates students. Unfortunately, though intrigue is at its peak, the educational aspect of this activity is often minimal. This article describes a chemistry lab that closely relates to the slime lab and allows high school students to explore the concepts of chemical bonding, properties, and replacement reactions. It involves the…

  13. Portable AI Lab for Teaching Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosner, Michael; Baj, Fabio.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the Portable AI Lab, a computing environment containing artificial intelligence (AI) tools, examples, and documentation for use with university AI courses. Two modules of the lab are highlighted: the automated theorem proving module and the natural language processing module, which includes augmented transition networks. (23 references)…

  14. Learning Resource Lab: Academic Coaching for Freshmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, Gregory N.

    1996-01-01

    To assist incoming freshmen, a Colorado Springs high school initiated learning resource labs staffed with academic coaches. Combining study hall, homeroom, and advisory group, the labs offer adult tutors, workshops on conflict resolution and study skills, career and technology exploration opportunities, a learning styles inventory, free reading…

  15. How spatial variations of chalk groundwater geochemistry are related to superficial formations and infiltration processes of unsaturated zone (quarry of Saint Martin le Noeud, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barhoum, Sarah; Valdès-Lao, Danièle; Guérin, Roger; Gombert, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Chalk is complex because of its dual porosity and because of superficial layers more or less thick and more or less permeable. Furthermore there is few knowledge in understanding of groundwater infiltration and dissolution processes in the chalk unsaturated zone (UZ). The role of superficial formations has to be studied especially. The experimental site is an ancient underground quarry of chalk which extends over 1200 m long and 150 m wide (30 m depth) in Saint Martin le Noeud, south of Beauvais, France. This quarry is particularly interesting to study infiltration and dissolution processes indeed this site allows to access to the interface between the unsaturated zone and the saturated zone. Water percolates from the top of the quarry more or less depending on the season. Water table outcrops in the cave and makes about 20 underground lakes. Above the quarry chalk is covered clay-with-flints (CWF) and loess, in surface there are cultivated crops fields. On the first year of the study, physicochemical parameters: temperature, depth, pH, conductivity were recorded in seven lakes with high frequency (every hour). During the same period we sampled the 20 lakes water every month to measure major ions. During this sampling period, percolation was not sufficient to collect percolated water. Results of underground GPS, electric resistivity tomography and observations of three borehole showed that thickness unsaturated zone and that the thicknesses of the superficial formations vary a lot spatially. Three interesting points (separated by less than 1 km) are presented: the above the Pedro lake (25 m of UZ, a few cm of CWF), above the Stalactites lake (30 m of UZ, more than 2.40 m of CWF); above the Blue lake (35 m depth, 60 cm of CWF). First results of chemistry showed that the temporal variation is very low during the first year but there spatial variation is very important at quarry scale. The geochemistry of the lakes are very different: HCO3- varies from 100 to 250mg

  16. Water quality along a river continuum subject to point and diffuse sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Colin; Jarvie, Helen P.; Love, Alison; Neal, Margaret; Wickham, Heather; Harman, Sarah

    2008-02-01

    SummaryThe water quality along the River Kennet, in the Thames basin of southern England, was examined in terms of the influence of point- and diffuse-nutrient inputs. The river is supplied mainly from a Cretaceous Chalk aquifer and hence the waters are of a calcium bicarbonate type. The nitrate largely comes from agricultural sources, with concentrations decreasing downstream due to plant uptake and probable denitrification. In contrast, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) is largely associated with sewage inputs and concentrations increase downstream in line with effluents from major towns such as Newbury and Reading. Adjacent to the river in the lower half of the catchment is the Kennet and Avon Canal and the two are in places hydrologically connected. The canal inputs may influence calcium carbonate (calcite) precipitation and increase suspended sediment and particulate phosphorus concentrations in the river. Monitoring upstream and downstream of Marlborough sewage treatment works (STW) showed that SRP concentrations in the effluent were highly variable due to variable efficiency of P stripping and still sufficiently concentrated to dominate downstream river SRP with potential impacts on stream ecology. Biological recovery in this river following P stripping at STWs is complex and controlling those spikes in SRP that are above a threshold of 100 μg l -1 may be a critical requirement. More stringent effluent targets than are currently recommended may be needed (less than 800 μg RP l -1) to achieve good ecological status in this river depending on SRP concentrations upstream.

  17. Identification of a New Hesperornithiform from the Cretaceous Niobrara Chalk and Implications for Ecologic Diversity among Early Diving Birds

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Alyssa; Chiappe, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    The Smoky Hill Member of the Niobrara Chalk in Kansas (USA) has yielded the remains of numerous members of the Hesperornithiformes, toothed diving birds from the late Early to Late Cretaceous. This study presents a new taxon of hesperornithiform from the Smoky Hill Member, Fumicollis hoffmani, the holotype of which is among the more complete hesperornithiform skeletons. Fumicollis has a unique combination of primitive (e.g. proximal and distal ends of femur not expanded, elongate pre-acetabular ilium, small and pyramidal patella) and derived (e.g. dorsal ridge on metatarsal IV, plantarly-projected curve in the distal shaft of phalanx III:1) hesperornithiform characters, suggesting it was more specialized than small hesperornithiforms like Baptornis advenus but not as highly derived as the larger Hesperornis regalis. The identification of Fumicollis highlights once again the significant diversity of hesperornithiforms that existed in the Late Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway. This diversity points to the existence of a complex ecosystem, perhaps with a high degree of niche partitioning, as indicated by the varying degrees of diving specializations among these birds. PMID:26580402

  18. Diagnosing hydrological limitations of a Land Surface Model: application of JULES to a deep-groundwater chalk basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Vine, N.; Butler, A.; McIntyre, N.; Jackson, C.

    2015-08-01

    Land Surface Models (LSMs) are prospective starting points to develop a global hyper-resolution model of the terrestrial water, energy and biogeochemical cycles. However, there are some fundamental limitations of LSMs related to how meaningfully hydrological fluxes and stores are represented. A diagnostic approach to model evaluation is taken here that exploits hydrological expert knowledge to detect LSM inadequacies through consideration of the major behavioural functions of a hydrological system: overall water balance, vertical water redistribution in the unsaturated zone, temporal water redistribution and spatial water redistribution over the catchment's groundwater and surface water systems. Three types of information are utilised to improve the model's hydrology: (a) observations, (b) information about expected response from regionalised data, and (c) information from an independent physics-based model. The study considers the JULES (Joint UK Land Environmental Simulator) LSM applied to a deep-groundwater chalk catchment in the UK. The diagnosed hydrological limitations and the proposed ways to address them are indicative of the challenges faced while transitioning to a global high resolution model of the water cycle.

  19. Projecting impacts of climate change on hydrological conditions and biotic responses in a chalk valley riparian wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, A. R.; Thompson, J. R.; Acreman, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Projected changes in climate are likely to substantially impact wetland hydrological conditions that will in turn have implications for wetland ecology. Assessing ecohydrological impacts of climate change requires models that can accurately simulate water levels at the fine-scale resolution to which species and communities respond. Hydrological conditions within the Lambourn Observatory at Boxford, Berkshire, UK were simulated using the physically based, distributed model MIKE SHE, calibrated to contemporary surface and groundwater levels. The site is a 10 ha lowland riparian wetland where complex geological conditions and channel management exert strong influences on the hydrological regime. Projected changes in precipitation, potential evapotranspiration, channel discharge and groundwater level were derived from the UK Climate Projections 2009 ensemble of climate models for the 2080s under different scenarios. Hydrological impacts of climate change differ through the wetland over short distances depending on the degree of groundwater/surface-water interaction. Discrete areas of groundwater upwelling are associated with an exaggerated response of water levels to climate change compared to non-upwelling areas. These are coincident with regions where a weathered chalk layer, which otherwise separates two main aquifers, is absent. Simulated water levels were linked to requirements of the MG8 plant community and Desmoulin's whorl snail (Vertigo moulinsiana) for which the site is designated. Impacts on each are shown to differ spatially and in line with hydrological impacts. Differences in water level requirements for this vegetation community and single species highlight the need for separate management strategies in distinct areas of the wetland.

  20. Diagnosing hydrological limitations of a land surface model: application of JULES to a deep-groundwater chalk basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Vine, N.; Butler, A.; McIntyre, N.; Jackson, C.

    2016-01-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are prospective starting points to develop a global hyper-resolution model of the terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. However, there are some fundamental limitations of LSMs related to how meaningfully hydrological fluxes and stores are represented. A diagnostic approach to model evaluation and improvement is taken here that exploits hydrological expert knowledge to detect LSM inadequacies through consideration of the major behavioural functions of a hydrological system: overall water balance, vertical water redistribution in the unsaturated zone, temporal water redistribution, and spatial water redistribution over the catchment's groundwater and surface-water systems. Three types of information are utilized to improve the model's hydrology: (a) observations, (b) information about expected response from regionalized data, and (c) information from an independent physics-based model. The study considers the JULES (Joint UK Land Environmental Simulator) LSM applied to a deep-groundwater chalk catchment in the UK. The diagnosed hydrological limitations and the proposed ways to address them are indicative of the challenges faced while transitioning to a global high resolution model of the water cycle.

  1. A Comparative Study on Real Lab and Simulation Lab in Communication Engineering from Students' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balakrishnan, B.; Woods, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, rapid development in computer technology has engendered simulation-based laboratory (lab) in addition to the traditional hands-on (physical) lab. Many higher education institutions adopt simulation lab, replacing some existing physical lab experiments. The creation of new systems for conducting engineering lab activities has raised…

  2. Development and Implementation of a Comprehensive Program to Deal with Canada's Nuclear Legacy Liabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Peter; Metcalfe, Douglas; Blanchette, Marcia; Dolinar, George; Halpenny, Steven; Purdy, Chris; Smith, David; Kupferschmidt, William

    2008-01-15

    The Government of Canada nuclear legacy liabilities have resulted from 60 years of nuclear research and development (R and D) carried out on behalf of Canada by the National Research Council (1944 to 1952) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL, 1952 to present). These liabilities are largely located at AECL research sites, and consist of shutdown research buildings (including several prototype and research reactors), a wide variety of buried and stored wastes, and contaminated lands. The shutdown buildings and contaminated lands need to be safely decommissioned to meet federal regulatory requirements, and long-term solutions need to be developed and implemented for management of the wastes. More than half of the liabilities are the result of Cold War activities during the 1940's, 50's and early 60's. The remaining liabilities stem from R and D for medical isotopes and nuclear reactor technology, as well as national science programs. About 70 percent of the liabilities are located at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) in Ontario, and a further 20 percent are located at AECL's shutdown Whiteshell Laboratories in Manitoba. The remaining 10 percent relate largely to three shutdown prototype reactors in Ontario and Quebec, which were key to the developmental stage of Canada's CANDU reactor technology. The inventory of legacy waste includes spent fuel, high-level, intermediate-level and low-level solid and liquid radioactive waste, and wastes (largely contaminated soils) from site clean-up work across Canada. Most of the wastes are in raw, unconditioned form, and limited characterization information is available for the wastes generated in past decades. In many cases unique and potentially costly solutions will be required to recover, handle and process the wastes. In conclusion: the Government of Canada has initiated a program to deal with nuclear legacy liabilities dating back to the Cold War and the birth of nuclear technologies and medicine in Canada. The 5

  3. Phosphorus dynamics and productivity in a sewage-impacted lowland chalk stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer-Felgate, Elizabeth J.; Jarvie, Helen P.; Williams, Richard J.; Mortimer, Robert J. G.; Loewenthal, Matthew; Neal, Colin

    2008-03-01

    SummaryHourly in situ phosphorus, conductivity, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, pH, and chlorophyll measurements were collected from January 2004 to November 2006 for the River Kennet, 2 km downstream of a sewage effluent inlet. Excess carbon dioxide pressure (EpCO 2) was calculated from continuous pH and spot alkalinity measurements. EpCO 2 and dissolved oxygen were used to estimate rates of photosynthesis and respiration. These parameters were examined alongside flow, water temperature and solar radiation to explore controls on phosphorus dynamics and in-stream productivity. Diurnal, event and seasonal patterns were observed in phosphorus concentrations. The diurnal and seasonal variations appeared to be related to the upstream sewage treatment works. The event patterns coincided with periods of high flow, and were attributed to diffuse sources. Chlorophyll behaved independently of phosphorus concentration and returned to baseline levels before photosynthesis rate. This indicated that, during the period of study, in-stream productivity was primarily controlled by aquatic plants other than phytoplankton.

  4. Quantification of aquifer properties with surface nuclear magnetic resonance in the Platte River valley, central Nebraska, using a novel inversion method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irons, Trevor P.; Hobza, Christopher M.; Steele, Gregory V.; Abraham, Jared D.; Cannia, James C.; Woodward, Duane D.

    2012-01-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance, a noninvasive geophysical method, measures a signal directly related to the amount of water in the subsurface. This allows for low-cost quantitative estimates of hydraulic parameters. In practice, however, additional factors influence the signal, complicating interpretation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Central Platte Natural Resources District, evaluated whether hydraulic parameters derived from surface nuclear magnetic resonance data could provide valuable input into groundwater models used for evaluating water-management practices. Two calibration sites in Dawson County, Nebraska, were chosen based on previous detailed hydrogeologic and geophysical investigations. At both sites, surface nuclear magnetic resonance data were collected, and derived parameters were compared with results from four constant-discharge aquifer tests previously conducted at those same sites. Additionally, borehole electromagnetic-induction flowmeter data were analyzed as a less-expensive surrogate for traditional aquifer tests. Building on recent work, a novel surface nuclear magnetic resonance modeling and inversion method was developed that incorporates electrical conductivity and effects due to magnetic-field inhomogeneities, both of which can have a substantial impact on the data. After comparing surface nuclear magnetic resonance inversions at the two calibration sites, the nuclear magnetic-resonance-derived parameters were compared with previously performed aquifer tests in the Central Platte Natural Resources District. This comparison served as a blind test for the developed method. The nuclear magnetic-resonance-derived aquifer parameters were in agreement with results of aquifer tests where the environmental noise allowed data collection and the aquifer test zones overlapped with the surface nuclear magnetic resonance testing. In some cases, the previously performed aquifer tests were not designed fully to characterize

  5. Amazon River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... the Rio Solimoes and the Rio Negro converge to form the Amazon River. This image from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) ... date:  Jul 23, 2000 Images:  Amazon River location:  South America thumbnail:  ...

  6. Mississippi River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... View Larger Image The mighty Mississippi River, from its source at Lake Itasca, Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico, is ... heavy rainfall on areas traversed by the upper Mississippi River. Each image in this pair covers an identical 195-kilometer x ...

  7. Sandia National Lab`s precision laser tracking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, D.

    1995-04-01

    Sandia Labs` mobile tracking systems have only one moving part. The double gimballed 18 inch diameter beryllium mirror is capable of constant tracking velocities up to 5 rads/sec in both axes, and accelerations to 150 rads/sec/sec in both axes. Orthogonality is <10 microradians. The mirror directs the 488 and 514 nm wavelength CW laser beams to adhesive-backed reflective material applied to the test unit. The mirror catches the return beam and visual image, directing the visual image to three camera bays, and the return beam to an image dissector behind an 80 inch gathering telescope. The image dissector or image position sensor is a photomultiplier with amplifying drift tube and electron aperture and its associated electronics. During the test, the image dissector scan senses the change in position of the reflective material and produces signals to operate the azimuth and elevation torque motors in the gimbal assembly. With the help of 1 1/8 inch diameter azimuth and elevation galvonometer steering mirrors in the optical path, the laser beam is kept on the target at extremely high velocities. To maintain a constant return signal strength, the outgoing beam is run through a microprocessor controlled beam focusing telescope.

  8. Labs21 Environmental Performance Criteria: Toward 'LEED (trademark) for Labs'

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Lintner, William; Wirdzek, Phil

    2002-10-14

    Laboratory facilities present a unique challenge for energy efficient and sustainable design, with their inherent complexity of systems, health and safety requirements, long-term flexibility and adaptability needs, energy use intensity, and environmental impacts. The typical laboratory is about three to five times as energy intensive as a typical office building and costs about three times as much per unit area. In order to help laboratory stakeholders assess the environmental performance of their laboratories, the Labs21 program, sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy, is developing the Environmental Performance Criteria (EPC), a point-based rating system that builds on the LEED(TM) rating system. Currently, LEED(TM) is the primary tool used to rate the sustainability of commercial buildings. However, it lacks some attributes essential to encouraging the application of sustainable design principles to laboratory buildings. Accordingly, the EPC has additions and modifications to the prerequisites and credits in each of the six sections of LEED(TM). It is being developed in a consensus-based approach by a diverse group of architects, engineers, consulting experts, health & safety personnel and facilities personnel. This report describes the EPC version 2.0, highlighting the underlying technical issues, and describes implications for the development of a LEED version for Laboratories.

  9. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.R.

    1998-08-01

    The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of waste, restoration of the environment, and the development of industry in and around the site.

  10. A Solid Polarized Target for CLAS12 at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhart, Mathieu; CLAS Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    To be able to study the spin-dependence of the nucleon structure with electron scattering experiments, targets providing spin-polarized nuclei are needed. We report on the development of a new solid polarized target for the CLAS12 detector, presently being installed in Jefferson Lab's Hall B. The technique of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) requires very low temperatures around 1 Kelvin and a high magnetic field of around 5 Tesla. The very large natural polarization of free electrons inside the target material under these conditions is transferred to the nuclei via microwave radiation (electron Larmor frequency). The polarization of the protons and deuterons is measured with the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique.

  11. Metallography at the Met Lab -- The first fifty years

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Met Lab at the University of Chicago was established to build the world`s first nuclear reactor. The object was to see if a pile (CP-1) could be built to create a sustained chain reaction, i.e., controlled nuclear fission. New materials of the very best quality were needed and people of many skills worked together to achieve the goal as quickly as possible. This is the story of a select group of people who were scientific and engineering pioneers in this new field. Research continued at new sites on more advanced reactors and cooling systems. Many problems were encountered in the fabrication of reactor components, and metallography was a crucial method of analyzing the reactions and quality of consolidation. 1996 will be the 50th anniversary of the beginning of the National Laboratories, so it is appropriate to commemorate and recall some pioneering achievements.

  12. Experiences with lab-centric instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titterton, Nathaniel; Lewis, Colleen M.; Clancy, Michael J.

    2010-06-01

    Lab-centric instruction emphasizes supervised, hands-on activities by substituting lab for lecture time. It combines a multitude of pedagogical techniques into the format of an extended, structured closed lab. We discuss the range of benefits for students, including increased staff interaction, frequent and varied self-assessments, integrated collaborative activities, and a systematic sequence of activities that gradually increases in difficulty. Instructors also benefit from a deeper window into student progress and understanding. We follow with discussion of our experiences in courses at U.C. Berkeley, and using data from some of these investigate the effects of lab-centric instruction on student learning, procrastination, and course pacing. We observe that the lab-centric format helped students on exams but hurt them on extended programming assignments, counter to our hypothesis. Additionally, we see no difference in self-ratings of procrastination and limited differences in ratings of course pace. We do find evidence that the students who choose to attend lab-centric courses are different in several important ways from students who choose to attend the same course in a non-lab-centric format.

  13. Integrating Robotic Observatories into Astronomy Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    The University of St. Thomas (UST) and a consortium of five local schools is using the UST Robotic Observatory, housing a 17' telescope, to develop labs and image processing tools that allow easy integration of observational labs into existing introductory astronomy curriculum. Our lab design removes the burden of equipment ownership by sharing access to a common resource and removes the burden of data processing by automating processing tasks that are not relevant to the learning objectives.Each laboratory exercise takes place over two lab periods. During period one, students design and submit observation requests via the lab website. Between periods, the telescope automatically acquires the data and our image processing pipeline produces data ready for student analysis. During period two, the students retrieve their data from the website and perform the analysis. The first lab, 'Weighing Jupiter,' was successfully implemented at UST and several of our partner schools. We are currently developing a second lab to measure the age of and distance to a globular cluster.

  14. Teachers' Perspectives on Online Virtual Labs vs. Hands-On Labs in High School Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Teresa M.

    This study of online science teachers' opinions addressed the use of virtual labs in online courses. A growing number of schools use virtual labs that must meet mandated laboratory standards to ensure they provide learning experiences comparable to hands-on labs, which are an integral part of science curricula. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teachers' perceptions of the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs. The theoretical foundation was constructivism, as labs provide student-centered activities for problem solving, inquiry, and exploration of phenomena. The research questions focused on experienced teachers' perceptions of the quality of virtual vs. hands-on labs. Data were collected through survey questions derived from the lab objectives of The Next Generation Science Standards . Eighteen teachers rated the degree of importance of each objective and also rated how they felt virtual labs met these objectives; these ratings were reported using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were few and served to illustrate the numerical results. Many teachers stated that virtual labs are valuable supplements but could not completely replace hands-on experiences. Studies on the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs are limited despite widespread use. Comprehensive studies will ensure that online students have equal access to quality labs. School districts need to define lab requirements, and colleges need to specify the lab experience they require. This study has potential to inspire positive social change by assisting science educators, including those in the local school district, in evaluating and selecting courseware designed to promote higher order thinking skills, real-world problem solving, and development of strong inquiry skills, thereby improving science instruction for all high school students.

  15. Recommended new criteria for the selection of nuclear waste repository sites in Columbia River basalt and US Gulf Coast domed salt

    SciTech Connect

    Steinborn, T.L.; Wagoner, J.L.; Qualheim, B.; Fitts, C.R.; Stetkar, R.E.; Turnbull, R.W.

    1980-06-16

    Screening criteria and specifications are recommended to aid in the evaluation of sites proposed for nuclear waste disposal in basalt and domed salt. The recommended new criteria proposed in this report are intended to supplement existing repository-related criteria for nuclear waste disposal. The existing criteria are contained in 10 CFR 60 sections which define siting criteria of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and ONWI 33(2) which defines siting criteria of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) for the Department of Energy. The specifications are conditions or parameter values that the authors recommend be applied in site acceptance evaluations. The siting concerns covered in this report include repository depth, host rock extent, seismic setting, structural and tectonic conditions, groundwater and rock geochemistry, volcanism, surface and subsurface hydrology, and socioeconomic issues, such as natural resources, land use, and population distribution.

  16. Characteristics and assessment of biogenic phosphorus in sediments from the multi-polluted Haihe River, China, using phosphorus fractionation and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. Q.; Zhang, H.; Tang, W. Z.; Shan, B. Q.

    2013-10-01

    We studied the phosphorus (P) pollution, as described by concentrations, distribution and transformation potential, of sediments of the water scarce and heavily polluted Fuyang River, a tributary of the Haihe River, using P fractionation and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR).The sediments of the Fuyang River accumulate significant amounts of inorganic phosphorus (Pi) and organic phosphorus (Po) from industrial and domestic wastewater and agricultural non-point pollution. In terms of their contribution to total phosphorus, the rank order of the P fractions was as follows: H2SO4-P > NaOH-Pi > Res-P > NaOH-Po > KCl-P and their average relative proportions were 69.7:47.5:15.9:2.9:1.0 (the proportion was based on the average proportion of the KCl-P). Seven P compounds were detected by the 31P-NMR analysis. Orthophosphate (Ortho-P: 45.2-92.4%) and orthophosphate monoesters (mono-P: 6.6-45.7%) were the dominant forms. Smaller amounts of pyrophosphates (pyro-P: 0.1-6.6%), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA-P: 0.3-3.9%), phosphonates (phon-P: 0-3.3%), phospholipids (lipids-P: 0-2.7%) and polyphosphate (poly-P: 0-0.04%) were observed in the sediments. Results of P fractionation and 31P-NMR analysis showed that 35% of Pi was labile P, including KCl-P and NaOH-Pi (Fe-P and Al-P). Biogenic-P accounted for 24% of P in the sediments. Analysis of the relationships between P species and water quality indicated that the Po compounds would mineralize to form ortho-P and would be potentially bioavailable for recycling to surface water, supporting further growth of phytoplankton and leading to algal blooms.

  17. Teaching Chemistry Lab Safety through Comics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Raddo, Pasquale

    2006-04-01

    As a means for raising students' interest in aspects pertaining to chemistry lab safety, this article presents a novel approach to teaching this important subject. Comic book lab scenes that involve fictional characters familiar to many students are presented and discussed as to the safety concerns represented in those images. These are discussed in a safety prelab session. For the sake of comparison, students are then shown images taken from current chemistry journals of safety-conscious contemporary chemists at work in their labs. Finally the need to adhere to copyright regulations for the use of the images is discussed so as to increase students' awareness of academic honesty and copyright issues.

  18. Lawrence Berkeley Lab Indexing Toolbox

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-09-08

    The Lawrence Berkeley Lab Indexing Toolbox is intended to be used in the context of X-ray crystallography experiments involving biological macromolecules. Macromolecules such as proteins form 3-dimensional periodic arrays (crystal) which in turn lead to lattice-like diffraction patterns when the crystal sample is irradiated with collimated X-rays from a synchrotron or other X-ray source. Once the diffraction pattern is captured on an imaging device the next step is to deduce the periodic nature of themore » crystal sample, along with its internal symmetry. this analysis, known as "indexing" is a well-studied problem. However, there are no other implementations designed to operate in an automated setting, in which the human experimentalist is not prosent to manually verify the results of indexing. In particular LABELIT uses three novel algorithms to facilitate automation: a more robust way to verify the position of the incident X-ray beam on the image, a better way to verify that the deduced lattice is consistent with the observed crystal lattice, and new method to deduce the internal symmetry from measurements of the lattice. Moreover, the algorithms are implemented in a Python framework that permits indexing to fail (in rare cases) without crashing the program, thus allowing the software to be incorporated in robotic systems where unattended operation is expected. It will be especially useful for high throughput operations at snychrotron beamlines.« less

  19. Strangeness Production at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Raue, Brian

    2003-11-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has an extensive program of studying the electromagnetic production of strange particles. One of the main components of this program has been the study of both photo- and electropro- duction of K+ + â º0 and K+ + Å 0 final states. Experiments are being, or have been conducted in all three of Jefferson Lab s experimental halls measuring a wide range of observables at kinematics from threshold up to W H 3.0 GeV and Q2 from 0.4 up to 5 (GeV/c)2. The largest effort in this endeavor is taking place in Hall B using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). Data have been taken at about ten different polarized electron beam energies and are currently being analyzed. Preliminary results [1] for one beam energy exist wherein the unpolarized cross section has been separated into three components: AT + eLAL, ATT , and ALT . The data indicate a t-channel dominance for the â º0 production and a strong s-channel dominance for Å 0 produc

  20. Jefferson Lab's Distributed Data Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; Thomas Powers

    2006-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) occasionally experiences fast intermittent beam instabilities that are difficult to isolate and result in downtime. The Distributed Data Acquisition (Dist DAQ) system is being developed to detect and quickly locate such instabilities. It will consist of multiple Ethernet based data acquisition chassis distributed throughout the seven-eights of a mile CEBAF site. Each chassis will monitor various control system signals that are only available locally and/or monitored by systems with small bandwidths that cannot identify fast transients. The chassis will collect data at rates up to 40 Msps in circular buffers that can be frozen and unrolled after an event trigger. These triggers will be derived from signals such as periodic timers or accelerator faults and be distributed via a custom fiber optic event trigger network. This triggering scheme will allow all the data acquisition chassis to be triggered simultaneously and provide a snapshot of relevant CEBAF control signals. The data will then be automatically analyzed for frequency content and transients to determine if and where instabilities exist.

  1. Labs not in a lab: A case study of instructor and student perceptions of an online biology lab class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doiron, Jessica Boyce

    Distance learning is not a new phenomenon but with the advancement in technology, the different ways of delivering an education have increased. Today, many universities and colleges offer their students the option of taking courses online instead of sitting in a classroom on campus. In general students like online classes because they allow for flexibility, the comfort of sitting at home, and the potential to save money. Even though there are advantages to taking online classes, many students and instructors still debate the effectiveness and quality of education in a distant learning environment. Many universities and colleges are receiving pressure from students to offer more and more classes online. Research argues for both the advantages and disadvantages of online classes and stresses the importance of colleges and universities weighing both sides before deciding to adopt an online class. Certain classes may not be suitable for online instruction and not all instructors are suitable to teach online classes. The literature also reveals that there is a need for more research on online biology lab classes. With the lack of information on online biology labs needed by science educators who face the increasing demand for online biology labs, this case study hopes to provide insight into the use of online biology lab classes and the how students and an instructor at a community college in Virginia perceive their online biology lab experience as well as the effectiveness of the online labs.

  2. Origin of nickel in water solution of the chalk aquifer in the north of France and influence of geochemical factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Daniel; El Khattabi, Jamal; Lefevre, Emilie; Serhal, Hani; Bastin-Lacherez, Sabine; Shahrour, Isam

    2008-01-01

    In the north of France, high registers of nickel are sometimes recorded within the chalk aquifer. In a confined context, the presence of pyrite in the covering clays or in the marcasite nodules encrusted in the clay may constitute a natural source of trace metals. With an objective of sanitary control, the limits of chemical contents regulating the quality of water destined for human consumption have been lowered by the European Framework Directive in the field of water policy (2000/60/EC). As a result, nickel limits have been reduced from 50 to 20 μg/l. The analyses, carried out on three water catchment fields in our area of study, were centred on variable parameters (Eh, O2(d), pH, Conductivity, T°), major elements (SO4, NO3) and metals (Fe, Ni, Mn, Co). The acquired data enabled us to identify from one hand, the conditions which are presented within the site, special thanks to the evolution of nitrate and iron contents and on the other hand, the natural origin (geological) of nickel for two of the three sites studied based essentially on the evaluation of the Nickel/Cobalt ratio. Thus, on the first site, the evolution of nickel content and nitrate content showed the influence of the phenomenon of denitrification on the re-mobilisation of the nickel. Whereas on the second site, a high variation of total iron content and oxygen dissolved in solution highlighted a particular phenomenon of oxidation of the pyrite through molecular oxygen. Finally, the correlation with the sulphates clearly showed behaviour of the nickel, once released, that was entirely dependent on the phenomenon of adsorption on the iron and manganese hydroxides.

  3. PowerPoint or chalk and talk: Perceptions of medical students versus dental students in a medical college in India

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Vikas; Upadhyaya, Prerna; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Moghe, Vijay

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess students’ perceptions of the impact of PowerPoint (PPT) presentations in lectures in comparison to the traditional chalk and talk method and lectures using transparencies and overhead projector (TOHP). The study analyzes the preferences for teaching aids of medical students versus dental students. Methods Second year medical and dental undergraduates were asked to fill in a nine-item questionnaire about their perceptions of the three lecture delivery methods. Following analysis of the questionnaire the students were interviewed further. The results were analyzed separately for medical and dental students to see if there was any difference in their perceptions. Results The majority of the medical students (65.33%) preferred PPT presentations, while 15.16% of students preferred the lectures using chalkboard, and 19.51% preferred TOHP for teaching (P < 0.001). Of the dental students: 41.84% preferred chalkboard, 31.21% preferred TOHP, and 25.85% students preferred PPT presentations in the lectures (P < 0.05). Some important comments of the students were also recorded on interview which could be valuable for the medical teachers. Conclusion: The medical students clearly preferred the use of PPT presentations while the dental students did not. The study does not bring out evidence based superiority of any lecture delivery method. It appears that in the hands of a trained teacher any teaching aid would be appropriate and effective. This highlights the need for formal training in teaching technologies to develop good presentation skills and thus motivate the students. PMID:23745057

  4. NMR permeability estimators in `chalk' carbonate rocks obtained under different relaxation times and MICP size scalings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Edmilson Helton; Figueiredo, Irineu; Moss, Adam Keith; Pritchard, Timothy Neil; Glassborow, Brent Anthony; Domingues, Ana Beatriz Guedes; Azeredo, Rodrigo Bagueira de Vasconcellos

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the selection of different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times for permeability estimation is investigated for a set of fully brine-saturated rocks acquired from Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in the North Sea and Middle East. Estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the Pythagorean means are compared with estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the concept of a cumulative saturation cut-off. Select portions of the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation-time distributions are systematically evaluated by applying various cut-offs, analogous to the Winland-Pittman approach for mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves. Finally, different approaches to matching the NMR and MICP distributions using different mean-based scaling factors are validated based on the performance of the related size-scaled estimators. The good results that were obtained demonstrate possible alternatives to the commonly adopted logarithmic mean estimator and reinforce the importance of NMR-MICP integration to improving carbonate permeability estimates.

  5. NMR permeability estimators in "chalk" carbonate rocks obtained under different relaxation times and MICP size scalings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Edmilson Helton; Figueiredo, Irineu; Moss, Adam Keith; Pritchard, Timothy Neil; Glassborow, Brent Anthony; Domingues, Ana Beatriz Guedes; Azeredo, Rodrigo Bagueira de Vasconcellos

    2016-04-01

    The effect of the selection of different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times for permeability estimation is investigated for a set of fully brine-saturated rocks acquired from Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in the North Sea and Middle East. Estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the Pythagorean means are compared with estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the concept of a cumulative saturation cutoff. Select portions of the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation-time distributions are systematically evaluated by applying various cutoffs, analogous to the Winland-Pittman approach for mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves. Finally, different approaches to matching the NMR and MICP distributions using different mean-based scaling factors are validated based on the performance of the related size-scaled estimators. The good results that were obtained demonstrate possible alternatives to the commonly adopted logarithmic mean estimator and reinforce the importance of NMR-MICP integration to improving carbonate permeability estimates.

  6. DOE Lab-to-Lab MPC&A workshop for cooperative tasks with Russian institutes: Focus on critical assemblies and item facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, A.M. Jr.; Fishbone, L.G.; Kato, W.Y.; Lazareth, O.W.; Suda, S.C.; Garcia, D.; Haga, R.

    1995-12-01

    Seventeen Russian scientists and engineers representing five different institutes participated in a Workshop on material control and accounting as part of the US-Russian Lab-to-Lab Cooperative Program in Nuclear Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A). In addition to presentations and discussions, the Workshop included an exercise at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and demonstrations at the Zero Power Physics Reactor (critical-assembly facility) of Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). The Workshop particularly emphasized procedures for physical inventory-taking at critical assemblies and item facilities, with associated supporting techniques and methods. By learning these topics and applying the methods and experience at their own institutes, the Russian scientists and engineers will be able to determine and verify nuclear material inventories based on sound procedures, including measurements. This will constitute a significant enhancement to MPC&A at the Russian institutes.

  7. NCL Objective #3 - Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL)

    Cancer.gov

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL) Objective #3: Identify and Characterize Critical Parameters Related to Nanomaterials' Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion, and Acute Toxicity (ADME/Tox) Profile in Animal Models.

  8. System of Labs Direct Fabrication Technology

    SciTech Connect

    DIMOS,DUANE B.; OLIVER,MICHAEL S.; SCHLIENGER,M. ERIC

    1999-11-01

    The System of Labs Direct Fabrication Technology program was intended to foster cooperation and development in a cooperative effort between Sandia National Labs, Idaho National Energy and Environment Lab and Oak Ridge National Lab. The goal of this program was to bring together LENS (Laser Engineered Net Shaping) from Sandia, INEEL's spray forming process and the alloy development expertise of ORNL. This program investigated the feasibility of combining the LENS and spray forming processes to exploit the best features of both approaches. Further, since both processes were thought to result in a rapidly solidified structure, the alloy design expertise of ORNL offered the opportunity for alloy design or processing options which could more fully utilize the unique capabilities of the processes.

  9. Building a lab-in/on-fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Libo

    2015-07-01

    Recently the "lab-on-fiber" technology has been rapidly developed and demonstrated in several interdisciplinary application fields. It expressed as multifunctional photonic devices and components arising from the integration onto optical fibers of different materials at micro and nano-scale with suitable physical, chemical and biological properties. In this paper, a briefly introduction about the concept of "lab-in/on-fiber" has been given. Then, we concentrate to discuss in-fiber waveguides integration technology which provides an infrastructure for "lab-in/on-fiber". Finally, we give several examples to show each unique experimental lab-in/on-fiber in different application fields and to demonstrate how it is possible to exploit the micro laboratories platforms.

  10. NCL Objective #4 - Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL)

    Cancer.gov

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL) Objective #4: Examine the Biological and Functional Characteristics of MultiComponent/Combinatorial Aspects of Nanoscaled Therapeutic, Molecular and Clinical Diagnostics, and Detection Platforms.

  11. Microspectroscopy At Beamline 73 MAX-lab

    SciTech Connect

    Engdahl, Anders

    2010-02-03

    Presentation of some projects at the infrared microspectroscopy experimental station at beamline 73 MAX-lab. Among the subjects are found identification of organic residues in fossil material and examination of the chemistry in an old oak wood wreck.

  12. Jefferson Lab physics overview: Recent results

    SciTech Connect

    Meziani, Zein-Eddine

    2007-09-01

    I review highlights of the Jefferson Lab nucleon structure program. I shall emphasize recent results from experiments exploring the spin structure of the nucleon and from dedicated experiments aimed at accessing the generalized parton distributions (GPDs).

  13. Thanatology for Everyone: Developmental Labs and Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Walter E.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    In an effort to "treat" the growing death concerns of many medical staffs, an experiential death and dying lab was created. Its evolution to meet changing needs is discussed, as well as future potential for work in this area. (Author)

  14. Infrared Spectroscopy in the General Chemistry Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Margaret A.

    2001-01-01

    Acquisition of infrared spectrometers for use in general chemistry lab was made possible through the NSF-sponsored Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement (ILI) program. Three laboratory exercises suitable for first-year students are described in which students learn to interpret infrared spectra for simple structural identification. A polymer identification lab is the first of these with minimal sample preparation. It uses familiar household polymer samples and teaches students how to use infrared spectral data to determine what bond types are present in the polymers. In a second lab, students learn to prepare potassium bromide pellets of fluorene derivatives and identify them by their functional group differences. The final exercise combines IR with several other lab techniques to identify an organic acid from a field of fourteen possibilities.

  15. Administrator Helps Students Discover Lab Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden visited the Langdon Elementary School in Washington to support National Lab Day. Bolden, a veteran of four space shuttle flights, spoke with the fifth graders abou...

  16. Large scale hot water migration systems around salt diapirs in the Danish Central Trough and their impact on diagenesis of chalk reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensenius, Jørgen; Munksgaard, Niels C.

    1989-01-01

    Fracture filling calcite from the piercement fields of East Rosa, Skjold, Rolf, North Arne, Nils and Vagn (directly underlain by salt diapirs) and the dome field Dan (overlying a deep seated salt structure) have been studied by fluorescence and cathodoluminiscence microscopy, fluid inclusion microthermometry and carbon and oxygen isotopes. The carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of the reservoir matrix chalk have also been measured. The temperature estimates obtained from fluid inclusion data suggest that the fracture filling calcite of the piercement fields precipitated during hot water flushing of the reservoirs. The flushing system only existed around the salt diapirs and was probably related to expulsion of overpressured fluid from the surrounding sediments. The thermal anomaly and the faults associated with the diapirs probably were important factors in focusing the ascending water. By combining fluid inclusion thermometry with O isotope data for the fracture filling calcites ranges of O isotopic values of the flushing water are deduced: in Skjold, Rolf, North Arne, Nils and Vagn: δ18O = - 1 to + 7%. SMOW, values typical of sedimentary porewater of sea water origin; in East Rosa: δ18O = - 4 and + 4%. SMOW, which combined with data on fluid inclusion salinities suggest that the flushing waters were responsible for substantial salt dissolution. Lower δ18O values with shallower depth of burial suggest that the porosity of chalk in the shallower fields was more severely reduced by calcite cementation during the flushing event than in the deeper fields. In the case of North Arne, Nils, Vagn and Dan, δ 13C values of the fracture filling calcites are similar to those of normal chalk (0.5 to 3.5%.). However, calcites from Rolf, Skjold and East Rosa are depleted by - 1.8, - 6.2 and - 16.7%., respectively. Only in East Rosa is the matrix chalk itself depleted in 13C (range: - 2.0 to + 0.7%.). The low δ 13C values are interpreted as the result of biodegration

  17. Jefferson Lab Plotting Toolkit for accelerator controls

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J; Keesee, M; Larrieu, C; Lei, G

    1999-03-01

    Experimental physics generates numerous data sets that scientists analyze using plots, graphs, etc. The Jefferson Lab Plotting Toolkit, JPT, a graphical user interface toolkit, was developed at Jefferson Lab to do data plotting. JPT provides data structures for sets of data, analyzes the range of the data, calculates the reasonable maximum, minimum, and scale of axes, sets line styles and marker styles, plots curves and fills areas.

  18. PLC Support Software at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    P. Chevtsov; S. Higgins; S. Schaffner; D. Seidman

    2002-10-01

    Several Automation Direct (DirectNet) Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) have been integrated into the accelerator control system at Jefferson Lab. The integration is based on new software that consists of three main parts: a PLC driver with a state machine control block, a device support module, and a common serial driver. The components of new software and experience gained with the use of this software for beam dump systems at Jefferson Lab are presented.

  19. Artists-in-Labs: Processes of Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jill

    This book verifies the need for the arts and the sciences to work together in order to develop more creative and conceptual approaches to innovation and presentation. By blending ethnographical case studies, scientific viewpoints and critical essays, the focus of this research inquiry is the lab context. For scientists, the lab context is one of the most important educational experiences. For contemporary artists, laboratories are inspiring spaces to investigate, share know-how transfer and search for new collaboration potentials.

  20. The Cardiac Electrophysiology Web Lab.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jonathan; Scharm, Martin; Mirams, Gary R

    2016-01-19

    Computational modeling of cardiac cellular electrophysiology has a long history, and many models are now available for different species, cell types, and experimental preparations. This success brings with it a challenge: how do we assess and compare the underlying hypotheses and emergent behaviors so that we can choose a model as a suitable basis for a new study or to characterize how a particular model behaves in different scenarios? We have created an online resource for the characterization and comparison of electrophysiological cell models in a wide range of experimental scenarios. The details of the mathematical model (quantitative assumptions and hypotheses formulated as ordinary differential equations) are separated from the experimental protocol being simulated. Each model and protocol is then encoded in computer-readable formats. A simulation tool runs virtual experiments on models encoded in CellML, and a website (https://chaste.cs.ox.ac.uk/WebLab) provides a friendly interface, allowing users to store and compare results. The system currently contains a sample of 36 models and 23 protocols, including current-voltage curve generation, action potential properties under steady pacing at different rates, restitution properties, block of particular channels, and hypo-/hyperkalemia. This resource is publicly available, open source, and free, and we invite the community to use it and become involved in future developments. Investigators interested in comparing competing hypotheses using models can make a more informed decision, and those developing new models can upload them for easy evaluation under the existing protocols, and even add their own protocols. PMID:26789753