Science.gov

Sample records for challenges-a psycho-social approach

  1. Low self–esteem in women with eating disorders and alcohol abuse as a psycho–social factor to be included in their psychotherapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Author have analyzed the psycho–social peculiarities of the women from Romania who are affected by eating disorders and alcohol excessive consumption, and studied the manner of the link between these disease and the psycho–sexual. 120 participants at the study (Oltenia district) were divided into 2 groups: 60 healthy women, 30 with eating disorders and 30 alcohol dependent women. In all subjects were applied the following tests: Scale for compulsive appetite (SCA) and Scale of interest for own weight, both for eating disorders, CAGE questionnaire for alcohol dependence and two scales for determining: the gender–role ambivalence (O'Neil and Caroll Scale) and the masculinity and feminity index (A. Chelcea). The results obtained in both lots of Romanian women with pathologic behavior (food and/or alcohol consumption) have indicated a low psycho–sexual identity versus control group but no correlation with masculinity/feminity index. PMID:21254749

  2. Psycho-Social Parameters in Young Female Long Distance Runners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Edmund J.; And Others

    This study was designed to determine selected psycho-social parameters associated with a group of teenage, female long distance runners. These young women, who train by running approximately 50-90 miles per week, had scores in certain physiological and anthropometric measurements which were among the most advantageous for running ever recorded in…

  3. Justifying Educational Acquaintance with the Moral Horrors of History on Psycho-Social Grounds: "Facing History and Ourselves" in Critical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    This paper challenges a pervasive curricular justification for educationally acquainting young people with stories of genocide and other moral horrors from history. According to this justification, doing so favours the development of psycho-social soft skills connected with interpersonal awareness and the establishment and maintenance of positive…

  4. Psycho-social effects of traffic noise exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öhrström, E.

    1991-12-01

    In this paper a study of psycho-social effects of exposure to high levels of road traffic noise is presented. A questionnaire was constructed to evaluate not only annoyance reactions and sleep disturbance effects of noise, but also more long-term effects on psycho-social well-being (PSW). PSW was evaluated by 26 questions concerning depression, relaxation, activity, passivity, general well-being and social orientation. The postal questionnaire was answered by 151 persons in a quiet city area and 97 persons in an area exposed to an Leq level of 72 dB(A). The results showed that a higher proportion of those who lived in the noisy area in apartments with windows facing the street more often felt depressed. Those who had windows facing the courtyard, in the noisy area, however, were not more depressed that those who lived in the quiet area. Methodological difficulties in this type of study are also discussed in the paper.

  5. [Provincial public center for crisis intervention and psycho-social rehabilitation. A path towards communitary suicidology].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This work on the systematic comprehensive approach towards the Prevention and Postvencion of Suicide started to develop back in mid 2011 in Río Gallegos, capital of Santa Cruz Province. The first step on this development was a Pilot Plan for the Training of Professionals and also field intervention. The Center for Crisis Intervention and Psycho-social Rehabilitation was founded eight months later. The case-client in crisis plus family group- undergoes quantitative and qualitative evaluation by means of a triage system, all of which allows starting intensive face-to-face and also phone follow up according to the Crisis Intervention Model. Such intervention is developed by means of the participation in the "Grupo Sostén", the Adolescents Group if the client fits into that age, and also family relationship interviews as well as Multi-family meetings open to the Community. There is also a Community Team in the Center which performs collective assessment in schools, in conjunction with the "Equidad en Redes" Educational Specialty Team, belonging to the Provincial Education Council. The approach takes place on the field, and works as a screening step for the early detection of risk. Such risk is dealt with by means of short term intervention group programs involving the whole of the educational community. When facing situations of committed suicide there are interventions in communities to the interior of the province, fundamentally through the Hospital Team which works as the cluster convener for the social intersectoral frame-work. PMID:25546541

  6. Psycho-Social Determinants of Gender Prejudice in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nnachi, N. O.; Okpube, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    This work focused on the "Psycho-social Determinants of Gender Prejudice in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)". The females were found to be underrepresented in STEM fields. The under-representation results from gender stereotype, differences in spatial skills, hierarchical and territorial segregations and…

  7. Psycho-Social Issues in Females Study of Science and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyabo, Omoniyi Mary Banke; Oke, Oloruntegbe Kunle

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between psycho-social factors with females study of science and technology course at the institutions of higher learning in Nigeria and its counseling implications. Three research questions and hypotheses were raised to guide the study. The subjects for the study comprised 240 undergraduate female students…

  8. Psycho-social Needs Impact on Hookah Smoking Initiation among Women: A Qualitative Study from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Baheiraei, Azam; Shahbazi Sighaldeh, Shirin; Ebadi, Abbas; Kelishadi, Roya; Majdzadeh, Seyed Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Iranian women, the use of hookah is the most common method of tobacco smoking. This study aimed to find the role of psycho-social needs and gaps as a possible risk factor for hookah smoking initiation in women. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted during 2012–2013 in Tehran, Iran. Thirty-six women participated in the study. They were current or former users of hookah. Data were collected through in-depth individual interviews and was analyzed through content analysis. Results: Four main categories were identified from the data. This study focused on the category: Psycho-social needs and gaps. This category has five sub-categories which explain why women begin to smoke hookah including curiosity; desire for non-feminine, forbidden, and negative activities; need for amusement and recreation; for others: To show off; attract attention; satisfy and join others and protection. Conclusions: From this study, a variety of factors which contribute to the initiation of hookah smoking among women have been identified. Keeping young girls and women away from seemingly happy gatherings of hookah smokers; Providing appropriate recreational facilities for young women and training families on how to help their children in the event of a crisis-like intention to take up smoking behavior, can be some effective ways for reducing hookah smoking initiation among women. PMID:26425334

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS ON PSYCHO-SOCIAL BELIEF IN RURAL LOWER MISSISSIPPI DELTA RESIDENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined four major psycho-social variables, health belief, social influence, health locus of control, and self efficacy in rural lower Mississippi Delta residents. Socio-demographic variables of race, education and income were used to measure differences in perception of attitudes of imp...

  10. [The role of art therapy in the rehabilitation of psycho-socially disabled people].

    PubMed

    Simon, Lajos; Kovács, Emese

    2015-01-01

    The present review focuses on the generally accepted and applied community psychiatry based models of psycho-social rehabilitation. The basics of the Strenghts model and the Recovery based model are introduced in this paper. Both models can be assisted by art therapy in various ways. The forms and the therapeutic factors of art therapy are also discussed, as well as the effects of the creating experience during the art therapy sessions. The authors introduce the good practice of the Moravcsik Foundation with highlights in two special areas that are beyond the generally applied art therapy work and representing important support in reaching the goals set during the rehabilitation process. Further, the authors describe the Budapest Art Brut Gallery and the PsychArt24 art marathon project in details. PMID:26202626

  11. A survey of the psycho-social aspects of murderers in Iran.

    PubMed

    Roohanna, R S

    1982-01-01

    The psycho-social aspects of 72 murderers (one female, 71 males) were studied. The murderers came from the Khoozestan and the Lorestan provinces of Iran. One of them had been transferred from the north of Iran (probably on exile). The murderers were mostly from lower social classes and crowded homes. The majority of them had worked as unskilled labourers or farmers. A great number of them regretted their action but a few were proud of what they had done. They believed that they had saved the chastity of their family which is very important in Islam. None of them were epileptic nor had any history of it. Four claimed to be nervous. Eight were alcoholics and three were addicted to drugs. One of them was suspected of having manic-depressive psychosis and only one had paranoid schizophrenia. The female and four of the males were psychopaths. PMID:7054061

  12. Feeling well and talking about sex: psycho-social predictors of sexual functioning after cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Changes to sexual wellbeing are acknowledged to be a long-term negative consequence of cancer and cancer treatment. These changes can have a negative effect on psychological well-being, quality of life and couple relationships. Whilst previous conclusions are based on univariate analysis, multivariate research can facilitate examination of the complex interaction between sexual function and psycho-social variables such as psychological wellbeing, quality of life, and relationship satisfaction and communication in the context of cancer, the aim of the present study. Method Six hundred and fifty seven people with cancer (535 women, 122 men) and 148 partners (87 women, 61 men), across a range of sexual and non-sexual cancers, completed a survey consisting of standardized measures of sexual functioning, depression and anxiety, quality of life, relationship satisfaction, dyadic sexual communication, and self-silencing, as well as ratings of the importance of sex to life and relationships. Results Men and women participants, reported reductions in sexual functioning after cancer across cancer type, for both people with cancer and partners. Multiple regression analysis examined psycho-social predictors of sexual functioning. Physical quality of life was a predictor for men and women with cancer, and for male partners. Dyadic sexual communication was a predictor for women with cancer, and for men and women partners. Mental quality of life and depression were also predictors for women with cancer, and the lower self-sacrifice subscale of self-silencing a predictor for men with cancer. Conclusion These results suggest that information and supportive interventions developed to alleviate sexual difficulties and facilitate sexual renegotiation should be offered to men and women with both sexual and non-sexual cancers, rather than primarily focused on individuals with sexual and reproductive cancers, as is the case currently. It is also important to include partners in supportive interventions. Interventions aimed at improving sexual functioning should include elements aimed at improving physical quality of life and sexual communication, with a focus on psychological wellbeing also being important for women with cancer. PMID:24673768

  13. [Complex psycho-social intervention program complementing conventional antitumor therapy -- promising results].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Zsuzsanna; Rigó, Adrien; Kökönyei, Gyöngyi; Szabó, Eva; Kovács, Dorottya; Sebestyén, Arpád; Balogh, Béla; Prezenszki, Zsuzsanna; Nagy, Melánia

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the research was to assess the effectiveness of a comprehensive, complex psycho-social intervention program, operating on different levels of spiritual plane, life management and behavioural health, among women with breast cancer. The general objective of the study was to help in coping, promote cognitive and emotional processing, encourage psychological and spiritual growth, improve the quality of life, and reduce the chances of remission. The research has been carried out in Budapest at the Radiology Diagnostic Department of the National Oncology Institute, involving 173 women treated for malignant breast tumour (C50) (experimental group: n=86, control group: n=87). Thirty-four women from the experimental group participated in the complex intervention program. We carried out two tests: one before the start and one after the end of the program. Research tools: Shortened Beck Depression Inventory, Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30, QLQ-BR23), Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T), the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R), the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, and the Benefit Finding Questionnaire. The women participating the experimental program showed a significant positive change in comparison to the control group: in anxiety F (1, 65)=6.021, p=0.017; in depression: F(1, 72)=4.347, p=0.041; in experience of personal control: F(1, 69)=7.346, p=0.008; in EORTC General Health/Quality of Life Subscale F(1, 78)=7.531, p=0.008; in EORTC physical functioning F(1, 78)=4.874, p=0.014; in EORTC fatigue F(1, 78)=15.060, p=0.000; in BR23 body-image F(1, 79)=8.828, p=0.004; in BR23 arm symptoms F(1, 78)=7.229, p=0.009; in benefit finding F(1, 80)=21.171, p=0.000, and in posttraumatic growth F(1, 31)=24.186, p=0.000). The program has proven effective, its widespread use in practice is recommended. PMID:23236595

  14. Implementation of a comprehensive program including psycho-social and treatment literacy activities to improve adherence to HIV care and treatment for a pediatric population in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Van Winghem, Joelle; Telfer, Barbara; Reid, Tony; Ouko, Judith; Mutunga, Angela; Jama, Zaina; Vakil, Shobha

    2008-01-01

    Background To achieve good clinical outcomes with HAART, patient adherence to treatment and care is a key factor. Since the literature on how to care for pediatric HIV patients is limited, we describe here adherence interventions implemented in our comprehensive care program in a resource-limited setting in Kenya. Methods We based our program on factors reported to influence adherence to HIV care and treatment. We describe, in detail, our program with respect to how we adapted our clinical settings, implemented psycho-social support activities for children and their caregivers and developed treatment literacy for children and teenagers living with HIV/AIDS. Results This paper focused on the details of the program, with the treatment outcomes as secondary. However, our program appeared to have been effective; for 648 children under 15 years of age who were started on HAART, the Kaplan-Meier mortality survival estimate was 95.27% (95%CI 93.16–96.74) at 12 months after the time of initiation of HAART. Conclusion Our model of pediatric HIV/AIDS care, focused on a child-centered approach with inclusion of caregivers and extended family, addressed the main factors influencing treatment adherence. It appeared to produce good results and is replicable in resource-limited settings. PMID:19025581

  15. The Treatment of Father-Daughter Incest: A Psycho-Social Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giarretto, Henry

    1976-01-01

    This article describes the Child Sexual Abuse Treatment Program (CSATP) in San Jose, California. Based on the theory and methods of Humanistic Psychology, the program provides counseling to sexually abused children and their families. (SB)

  16. Effects of a Special Olympics Unified Sports Soccer Program on Psycho-Social Attributes of Youth with and without Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozer, D.; Baran, F.; Aktop, A.; Nalbant, S.; Aglamis, E.; Hutzler, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of a Special Olympics (SO) Unified Sports (UNS) soccer program on psycho-social attributes of youth with and without intellectual disabilities (ID). Participants were 76 male youth with (n = 38) and without (n = 38) ID. Participants with ID were randomly allocated into a SO athletes group (n…

  17. Remapping the "Landscape of Choice": Patterns of Social Class Convergence in the Psycho-Social Factors Shaping the Higher Education Choice Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettley, Nigel Charles; Whitehead, Joan M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a critique of recent Bourdieusian research into the higher education (HE) choice process. Specifically, Ball et al. (2002) maintain that class-related differences in students' psycho-social dispositions in Years 12 and 13, the "landscape of choice", shape their intentions or "decisions" to participate in HE and their selection…

  18. Sleep disturbance, psycho-social and medical symptoms—A pilot survey among persons exposed to high levels of road traffic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öhrström, E.

    1989-08-01

    A pilot survey was undertaken to elucidate sleep quality, as well as psycho-social and medical symptoms and mood, among people who had lived for many years in an area with high levels of road traffic noise during night hours and inhabitants of a quiet control area: 106 personal interviews were performed and specific questionnaires on sleep and mood answered by 63 persons during three consecutive days. It was found that both sleep quality and mood (social orientation, activity, wellbeing and extroversion) were depressed in the noisy area as compared with a control area. Symptoms of tiredness, headache and nervous stomach disorders were more frequent. A significant relationship between sensitivity to noise and sleep quality was also found. From this pilot study hypotheses may be formulated about a relationship between environmental noise and different psycho-social and medical symptoms. It is suggested that similar studies on a larger scale are performed to elucidate long-term effects of noise.

  19. Why Do Some People Do “More” to Mitigate Climate Change than Others? Exploring Heterogeneity in Psycho-Social Associations

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Egea, José Manuel; García-de-Frutos, Nieves; Antolín-López, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    The urgency of climate change mitigation calls for a profound shift in personal behavior. This paper investigates psycho-social correlates of extra mitigation behavior in response to climate change, while also testing for potential (unobserved) heterogeneity in European citizens' decision-making. A person's extra mitigation behavior in response to climate change is conceptualized—and differentiated from common mitigation behavior—as some people's broader and greater levels of behavioral engagement (compared to others) across specific self-reported mitigation actions and behavioral domains. Regression analyses highlight the importance of environmental psychographics (i.e., attitudes, motivations, and knowledge about climate change) and socio-demographics (especially country-level variables) in understanding extra mitigation behavior. By looking at the data through the lens of segmentation, significant heterogeneity is uncovered in the associations of attitudes and knowledge about climate change—but not in motivational or socio-demographic links—with extra mitigation behavior in response to climate change, across two groups of environmentally active respondents. The study has implications for promoting more ambitious behavioral responses to climate change, both at the individual level and across countries. PMID:25191841

  20. Shape Recognition, the magnitude of the challenge a machine learning approach

    E-print Network

    Majumder, Aditi

    Shape Recognition, the magnitude of the challenge a machine learning approach Julian Yarkony these abilities but a huge range of animals from ad- vanced mammals such as dogs dolphins, and humans to very this introductory discussion here this survey will take a machine learning approach and discuss the aspects of shape

  1. The Role of Lifestyle and Psycho-Social Factors in Predicting Changes in Body Composition in Black South African Women

    PubMed Central

    Gradidge, Philippe Jean-Luc; Norris, Shane A.; Micklesfield, Lisa K.; Crowther, Nigel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine whether lifestyle and psycho-social factors determine changes in body composition over 10 years in a population of black African females with a high prevalence of obesity. Materials and Methods Data were collected from 430 women at baseline and 10-year follow-up. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry-derived body fat mass and fat free soft tissue mass, and simple anthropometric measures were taken at both time points. Data on physical activity (PA), diet, smoking, and alcohol intake were collected at baseline. Body size dissatisfaction and body size discrepancy were determined at baseline using the feel minus ideal (FID) index and the perceived minus actual weight status discrepancy score (PAD), respectively. Results All body composition measurements increased over 10 years (p<0.0005). Two distinct groups of overweight/obese females were identified using PAD and FID: one that was content with their body size and one that wished to be leaner. Vigorous PA at baseline was inversely associated with absolute changes in all measures of adiposity. In subjects who underestimated their body size at baseline (74.0% of the study population) changes in total and peripheral levels of body fat were less than in subjects who correctly identified their body size. In the group that underestimated body size, more women wanted to be leaner than in the group who knew their body size (60.1% vs 47.5%, p<0.05). Conclusions Underestimation of body size is common and is associated with a lower gain in total body adiposity and a prevalent desire to lose weight. PMID:26171972

  2. Between Relief and Development: Theories, Practice and Evaluation of Psycho-Social Projects in Croatia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mimica, Jadranka; Stubbs, Paul

    1996-01-01

    Two approaches to humanitarian assistance are the relief model, responding to a temporary crisis; and the development model, in which refugee emergencies are also opportunities for long-term development. In Croatia, emphasis has been on psychological over social assistance; a social development response would contribute more to real recovery. (SK)

  3. The Skills of Facilitator Nurses in Psycho-Social Group Intervention for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chujo, Masami; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to provide cancer patients with a psychosocial group intervention consisting of 3 parts, i.e., education on how to cope with stress and solve problems, group discussions, and progressive muscle relaxation, and to investigate the intervention techniques of Japanese facilitators. Methods Group interventions for breast cancer patients performed by 3 facilitators were analyzed qualitatively and inductively using a phenomenological approach. Results The skills of facilitators included 10 intervention techniques and 1 problem in interventions. Intervention techniques, which promote group dynamics and thereby help participants acquire improvements in their coping abilities and quality of life (QOL), were somewhat different between new and experienced facilitators, with the content showing immaturity and maturity in the new and experienced facilitators, respectively. Both experienced and new facilitators faced the risk of experiencing problems in interventions, which countered the purpose of the intervention of improving the participants’ coping abilities or QOL. Conclusion While intervention skills are necessary for facilitators to execute group interventions, it must be borne in mind, that even well-experienced facilitators may not always be able to accomplish skillful intervention. PMID:26306056

  4. When treatment success is not as black and white as a radiograph: the bio/psycho/social impact of chronic osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoward, Freya Jane; Bury, Sarah Lucy

    2014-01-01

    This case report is from Malawi Beit CURE international Hospital (BCIH), a center of excellence for the management of chronic osteomyelitis (COM) in children. Currently minimal evidence based data exists on the long term outcomes for treatment of bone defects following COM. Few studies evaluating outcomes are based solely on clinical parameters. This case study highlights the often-debilitating outcome after treatment and hence the need for further research to find the most effective treatment to create treatment guidelines. It particularly demonstrates the importance of the bio/psycho/social impact of long-term morbidity and disability, which must be considered alongside clinical outcomes in evaluation. PMID:25810806

  5. Correlation of etho-social and psycho-social data from "Mars-500" interplanetary simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafforin, Carole; Vinokhodova, Alla; Chekalina, Angelina; Gushin, Vadim

    2015-06-01

    Studies of social groups under isolation and confinement for the needs of space psychology were mostly limited by questionnaires completed with batteries of subjective tests, and they needed to be correlated with video recordings for objective analyses in space ethology. The aim of the present study is to identify crewmembers' behavioral profiles for better understanding group dynamics during a 520-day isolation and confinement of the international crew (n=6) participating to the "Mars-500" interplanetary simulation. We propose to correlate data from PSPA (Personal Self-Perception and Attitudes) computerized test, sociometric questionnaires and color choices test (Luscher test) used to measure anxiety levels, with data of video analysis during group discussion (GD) and breakfast time (BT). All the procedures were implemented monthly - GD, or twice a month - BT. Firstly, we used descriptive statistics for displaying quantitative subjects' behavioral profiles, supplied with a software based-solution: the Observer XT®. Secondly, we used Spearmen's nonparametric correlation analysis. The results show that for each subject, the level of non-verbal behavior ("visual interactions", "object interactions", "body interaction", "personal actions", "facial expressions", and "collateral acts") is higher than the level of verbal behavior ("interpersonal communication in Russian", and "interpersonal communication in English"). From the video analyses, dynamics profiles over months are different between the crewmembers. From the correlative analyses, we found highly negative correlations between anxiety and interpersonal communications; and between the sociometric parameter "popularity in leisure environment" and anxiety level. We also found highly significant positive correlations between the sociometric parameter "popularity in working environment" and interpersonal communications, and facial expressions; and between the sociometric parameter "popularity in leisure environment " and interpersonal communications, and facial expressions. As a whole, the findings show high importance of ethological investigations with video monitoring for assessment of group behavior in extreme environment. At the same time, correct interpretation of the video recording results requires their comparison with the results of classical socio-psychological methods. We discuss about the different approaches: objective vs. subjective; active vs. discursive; exhaustive vs. restrictive; descriptive vs. introspective.

  6. Posttraumatic stress following acute medical trauma in children: A proposed model of bio-psycho-social processes during the peri-trauma period

    PubMed Central

    Marsac, Meghan L.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Delahanty, Douglas L.; Widaman, Keith; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2015-01-01

    Millions of children worldwide experience acute medical events. Children’s responses to these events range from transient distress to significant posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSS). While many models suggest explanations for the development and maintenance of PTSS in adults, very few have focused on children. Current models of child PTSS are primarily restricted to the post-trauma period, thus neglecting the critical peri-trauma period when screening and preventive interventions may be most easily implemented. Research on PTSS in response to pediatric medical trauma typically examines predictors in isolation, often overlooking potentially important interactions. This paper proposes a new model utilizing the bio-psycho-social framework and focusing on peri-trauma processes of acute medical events. Understanding the relationships among bio-psycho-social factors during peri-trauma can inform early identification of at-risk children, preventive interventions, and clinical care. Recommendations for future research, including the need to examine PTSS in the context of multiple influences, are discussed. PMID:25217001

  7. The Effect of the Values Education Programme on 5.5-6 Year Old Children's Social Development: Social Skills, Psycho-Social Development and Social Problem Solving Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dereli-Iman, Esra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the Values Education Programme (developed for pre-school children) on the children's social skills, psycho-social development, and social problem solving skills. The sample group consisted of 66 children (33 experimental group, 33 control group) attending pre-school. The Values Education…

  8. Effects of a Special Olympics Unified Sports soccer program on psycho-social attributes of youth with and without intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Özer, D; Baran, F; Aktop, A; Nalbant, S; A?lam??, E; Hutzler, Y

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of a Special Olympics (SO) Unified Sports (UNS) soccer program on psycho-social attributes of youth with and without intellectual disabilities (ID). Participants were 76 male youth with (n=38) and without (n=38) ID. Participants with ID were randomly allocated into a SO athletes group (n=23, mean age=14.5; SD=1.2 years) and a control group (CG) (n=15, mean age=14.5; SD=.8 years). Twenty-three randomly selected youth without ID formed the partner group (mean age=14.1; SD=.9 years) and 15 youth without ID (mean age=13.8; SD=.5 years) formed the CG. Instruments included the Friendship Activity Scale (FAS) (Siperstein, 1980), the Adjective Checklist (Siperstein, 1980), and the Children Behavior Checklist (Achenbach, 1991). The soccer training program lasted eight weeks, 1.5h per session, three times per week, in addition to school physical education (PE). The CG did not participate in any sports in addition to PE. The findings showed that the UNS program was effective in decreasing the problem behaviors of youth with ID and increasing their social competence and FAS scores. In addition, the program was found to be effective in improving the attitude of youth without disabilities toward participants with disabilities. In conclusion, the present findings demonstrate the utility of a UNS program for both youth with and without disabilities. PMID:22093669

  9. Prevalence of Malocclusion and its Psycho-Social Impact among 12 To 15-Year-old School Children in Lucknow City

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sabyasachi; GV, Jagannatha; Narang, Ridhi; Biswas, Gautam; Sood, Poonam; Garg, Aarti; Narayan, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Facial aesthetics affects how people are perceived by society and how they perceive themselves. Anterior malocclusion can have an impact on the overall facial appearance. Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of malocclusion and its psycho-social impact among 12 to 15 yrs old school children in Lucknow city. Materials and Methods: The study consisted of collection of information for psychosocial assessment using a questionnaire and clinical examination of malocclusion. Data regarding psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics was collected using a Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) given by Klages et al., (2006). Results: 15.57% children belonged to the definite malocclusion category and 5.41% to the handicapped malocclusion category. The mean Dental self confidence score differed significantly among both male (p?0.001) and female children (p?0.001) across the age groups. The mean Social impact score did not differ significantly among both male (p?0.31) and female children (p?0.12) across the age groups. Conclusion: The results of the present study imply that dental aesthetics had a significant impact on the psychosocial aspects of human life irrespective of the gender. PMID:25478444

  10. Embodied and exbodied mind in clinical psychology. A proposal for a psycho-social interpretation of mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zatti, Alberto; Zarbo, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    A brief theoretical review of the current state of the art of embodiment research in clinical psychology has been expounded in order to highlight the key role that embodied conceptualization has on the understanding and explanation of several mental disorders, such as eating disorders, schizophrenia and depression. Evidence has suggested that mental disorders may be explained as disturbances of embodiment, from the disembodiment to the hyperembodiment. In order to understand how some clinical conditions are affected by cultural models, we propose and define a new framework called Exbodiment, complementary to the Embodiment approach to cognition. Mental disorder is strictly related to the subject-culture interaction that may be explained as a two way process in which embodiment and exbodiment are complementary points of view. In this perspective, embodiment may be seen as the “top-down” process, while exbodiment the “bottom-up” one. The introduction of exbodiment conceptualization highlights how subject is both receiver and interpreter of social influence. Subject is the target of a cultural pressure and, at the same time, enacts its own embodied culture in world. Exbodiment conceptualization may help clinicians to better understand and explain the role of culture in the onset and maintenance of mental disorders. PMID:25784894

  11. Understanding the Psycho-Social and Cultural Factors That Influence the Experience of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Chinese American College Students: A Systems Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Edmund Wong Din-Mond

    2012-01-01

    A review of the extant research literature reveals limited data on college students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Even less information is known in regards to minority populations living with ADHD, specifically Asian American college student. This research project was focused on Chinese American college students with ADHD.…

  12. UNDERSTANDING THE CUMULATIVE AFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND PSYCHO-SOCIAL STRESSORS THAT THREATEN THE POHLIK-LAH AND NER-ER-NER LIFEWAY: THE YUROK TRIBE’S APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    First, this project compiled potential chemical/toxin contaminants that might contribute as risk factors to humans in the project’s research area and then sought to correlate them with established negative health outcomes within the Tribal Membership. Outcomes include...

  13. Major Psycho-Social Problems and the Psychiatric Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Psychiatric Technology, Sacramento, CA.

    Presentations made at institutes and workshops conducted by the National Association of Psychiatric Technology (NAPT) are included in this publication. Drug abuse, alcoholism, crisis intervention, mental retardation, and mental health manpower were the themes for these presentations: (1) "Mental Health Trends in California" by G. Duffy, (2) "The…

  14. Psycho-social Profile of Abused Children in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chowdhury, Aparajita; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reviews the child abuse cases in India under categories based on different forms of child abuse, marital issues involved, parent child interactions, social and psychological characteristics, trends associated with the abused children, and remedial measures. Concludes with an emphasis on the need for empirical data on the extent and nature of child…

  15. Psycho-Social Problems and Causes: Indexes of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevison, Myrne B.

    1984-01-01

    Examines the rate and direction of change in Canada's social problems by developing indexes for major problem areas. These measures show a period of relative stability in the 1950s and early 60s then worrisome inflation accompanied by out-of-control financial costs. Identifies crucial life stages where help is required. (JAC)

  16. Children of Chernobyl: A psycho-social empowerment project

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The focus of this research has been to design and implement a social action project, using a Freirian Methodology for popular mental health among the victims of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear meltown disaster living in Belarus. Although Chernobyl is in the Ukraine, only 35 kilometers from Kiev, 70% of the 50 million curies of radiation from the 1986 Chernobyl meltdown fell on the Republic of Belarus. This continues to directly affect 2.4 million of the total population of 10 million people. These people, 800,000 of whom are children, still live in the radiated zones. They live with the knowledge that the food, the water, and the ground are slowly poisoning them through continued and ongoing exposure to radiation. While there has been some significant research on the medical effects of the disaster in the Ukraine, much more research needs to be done in Belarus. Very little research or treatment has responded to the emotional, mental health and psychosocial impacts of the disaster on individuals, families and communities. Following the introduction to the problem, a rationale for a new paradigm in Mental Health Treatment is presented in a chapter titled Liberation Psychology'. This chapter integrates fields of psychology, psychotherapy, social work, education, and community organization from a Freirian perspective. The Social Action Project is outlined and described in specific detail. The Social Action Project has led to medical, computer and school supplies being sent to Belarus. Workshops and training have been designed and implemented. Texts and manuals have been translated and published. Further, there is documentation of a joint conceptualization and design of this Children of Chernobyl' project with signed letters of agreement and a report of a fact finding mission to Belaraus. The Social Action Project is then evaluated with Future Planning discussed in the conclusion.

  17. Divided Countries, Divided Mind 1: Psycho-Social Issues in Adaptation Problems of North Korean Defectors

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    A review of studies on the adaptation problems of North Korean defectors in South Korean society and studies of people's adaptation to political and cultural changes in other countries suggests that similar adaptation problems may occur in the process of and after unification. Defectors have various adaptation problems and some of them have psychiatric disorders such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The reasons for this were revealed to be the difference in the culture and personality between South and North Korea, which have developed for the last 60 years without any communication with each other, in spite of their common racial and cultural heritage. Economic factors including the lack of skills and knowledge for working at industrialized and competitive society like South Korean society, also aggravate the severity of such adaptation problems. Research on defectors' adaptation problems and on the differences in the culture and mentality between North and South Korea can provide useful information on what kinds of problems may arise during the process of and after unification and what should be done to achieve mutual adaptation and harmonious and peaceful unification. PMID:20046402

  18. Investigating the Achievement Goals of University Students in Terms of Psycho-Social Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayis, Ahmet Rifat; Ceyhan, Aydogan Aykut

    2015-01-01

    It is the aim of this research to investigate the achievement goals of university students. Firstly, university students' adoption levels of achievement goals are described. Next, how their level of academic self-efficacy, irrational beliefs, perfectionism, self-determination, locus of control and gender predict each achievement goal is depicted.…

  19. Psycho-Social Factors Causing Stress: A Study of Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Geetika; Tyagi, Harish Kumar; Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The present investigation was planned to determine the influence of type of personality, gender, age, qualification and experience causing stress among teacher educators at work. Method: A sample of 100 subjects from male and female teachers teaching in teacher training colleges, Delhi, India was drawn randomly. The data was collected by…

  20. Parent, psycho-social, and household factors associated with urban children's active commuting to school

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active commuting to school (ACS), i.e. walking or cycling to school, has been proposed as a method to increase physical activity. Few studies have examined children's ACS using the framework of behavior change theory. This study used social cognitive theory as the framework. The objective of this st...

  1. Demographic and Psycho-Social Implications for Assessment and Treatment of Chronic Pain Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auvenshine, Dwight

    Several demographic and psychosocial variables affect assessment and treatment of chronic pain patients. The variables include demographic characteristics, life styles, family constellations, job conditions, financial status, support networks, and leisure activities. In recent years clinics and programs have emerged in a variety of configurations.…

  2. Parent, psycho-social, and household factors associated with children's active commuting to school

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active commuting to school (ACS), i.e. walking or cycling to school, has been associated with higher levels of physical activity. Few studies have examined children's ACS using the framework of behavior change theory. This study used social cognitive theory as the framework. To examine the relations...

  3. Study of Psycho-Social Factors Affecting Traffic Accidents Among Young Boys in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, Seyyed Mohammad Hossein; Fekr Azad, Hossein; Tahmasebi, Siyamak; Rafiei, Hassan; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Tajlili, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Unprecedented growth of fatalities due to traffic accidents in the recent years has raised great concerns and efforts of authorities in order to identify and control the causes of these accidents. Objectives: In the present study, the contribution of psychological, social, demographic, environmental and behavioral factors on traffic accidents was studied for young boys in Tehran, emphasizing the importance of psychosocial factors. Patients and Methods: The design of the present study was quantitative (correlational) in which a sample population including 253 boys from Tehran (Iran) with an age range of 18 to 24 who had been referred to insurance institutions, hospitals, correctional facilities as well as prisons, were selected using stratified cluster sampling during the year 2013.The subjects completed the following questionnaires: demographic, general health, lifestyle, Manchester Driving Behavior Questionnaire (MDBQ), young parenting, and NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI). For data analysis, descriptive statistics, correlation coefficient, and inferential statistics including simultaneous regression, stepwise regression, and structural equations modeling were used. Results: The findings indicated that in the psychosocial model of driving behavior (including lapses, mistakes, and intentional violations) and accidents, psychological factors, depression (P < 0.02), personality trait of conscientiousness (P < 0.02), failure schema due to the parenting style of mother (P = 0.001), and perception of police commands (P < 0.002), played an important role in predicting driving behavior. Among social factors, perception of police regulations (P = 0.003), had an important effect on violations and mistakes. Among environmental and behavioral factors, major factors such as driving age (P = 0.001), drug and alcohol use (P = 0.001), having driver’s license (P = 0.013), records of imprisonment or committing a crime (P = 0.012) were also able to predict occurrence of accidents. Conclusions: As the results of this study show, different factors contribute to different driving behaviors and accidents. The broad scope of these factors links accidents to other social issues and damages. PMID:26421169

  4. Health-related behaviours and psycho-social characteristics of 18 year-old Australians.

    PubMed

    Milligan, R A; Burke, V; Beilin, L J; Richards, J; Dunbar, D; Spencer, M; Balde, E; Gracey, M P

    1997-11-01

    Psychosocial variables associated with health-related behaviours for diet, physical activity, alcohol consumption and smoking were examined in 18 year-old Australian men (n = 301) and women (n = 282). These psychosocial variables included Type A behaviour and depression, perceived self-efficacy for engaging in healthy behaviours and perceived barriers to performing these behaviours. Self-efficacy for following a healthy diet and moderating alcohol intake was greater in females but males had higher self-efficacy for physical activity. Self-efficacy for smoking did not differ according to gender. Lack of willpower was perceived as a barrier to desirable dietary, smoking and physical activity behaviours. Other perceived diet-related barriers included buying suitable foods when eating out, ignorance about appropriate foods and, in young women, perceived expense. Barriers for desirable levels of physical activity included planning time, tiredness, limiting social life and lack of social support. Social occasions were the main perceived barriers preventing both alcohol moderation and quitting smoking. Lack of family support, stress and concerns about weight gain, particularly in women, were perceived barriers to smoking cessation. Type A behaviour was associated with smoking and "unsafe" drinking in both men and women, generally unhealthy dietary choices in young women but with greater physical activity in young men. Depressive affect was significantly higher in female smokers and "unsafe" drinkers and tended to have an inverse relationship with physical activity in men and women. Depressive affect was inversely related to self-efficacy in both men and women for each of the health behaviours examined. Health promotion in young adults should therefore attempt to increase self-efficacy and address perceived barriers to change, taking into account gender-related differences in attitudes and the influence of depression and Type A characteristics on health-related behaviours. PMID:9351145

  5. Psycho-Social Factors as Predictors of Success in a Work-Release Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brahen, Leonard S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the significance of social and environmental factors as predictors of the rehabilitative potential of an inmate. Work history must be used as a whole. The more recent a good history, the more successful an inmate's jail record. Work factors may aid in selecting narcotics-addicted inmates for work-release programs. (Author/BEF)

  6. Psycho-Social Influences on the Accomplishments of Mexican-American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCorquodale, Patricia

    The accomplishments of Mexican American students have been limited by the level of education completed and by concentration in particular occupations. As part of a larger research project concerning this problem, 259 eighth grade students from Tucson were compared on the basis of sex and ethnicity, with a focus on attitudes toward science. No…

  7. Meeting the Energy Challenge -A White Paper on Energy

    E-print Network

    Harman, Neal.A.

    a significant role in decreasing the UK's reliance on imported energy6 and the political and economic and the Government estimates that, on current indications, the UK will have to import 80% of its energy by 2020, MECMeeting the Energy Challenge - A White Paper on Energy: Implications for Wales An Overview of Key

  8. Vision Multi-picture Challenge A Multi-picture

    E-print Network

    Sloman, Aaron

    Vision Multi-picture Challenge A Multi-picture Challenge for Theories of Vision Aaron Sloman School.g. turning a corner in a large and unfamiliar town. The pictures that follow present a sequence of unrelated scenes. Try to view the pictures at a rate of one per second or less: i.e. keep your finger on the "next

  9. Communication in cancer care: psycho-social, interactional, and cultural issues. A general overview and the example of India

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K.; Strohschein, Fay J.; Saraf, Gayatri; Loiselle, Carmen G.

    2014-01-01

    Communication is a core aspect of psycho-oncology care. This article examines key psychosocial, cultural, and technological factors that affect this communication. Drawing from advances in clinical work and accumulating bodies of empirical evidence, the authors identify determining factors for high quality, efficient, and sensitive communication and support for those affected by cancer. Cancer care in India is highlighted as a salient example. Cultural factors affecting cancer communication in India include beliefs about health and illness, societal values, integration of spiritual care, family roles, and expectations concerning disclosure of cancer information, and rituals around death and dying. The rapidly emerging area of e-health significantly impacts cancer communication and support globally. In view of current globalization, understanding these multidimensional psychosocial, and cultural factors that shape communication are essential for providing comprehensive, appropriate, and sensitive cancer care. PMID:25452741

  10. CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR--BACKGROUND FACTORS AND PSYCHO-SOCIAL CORRELATES. EAU CLAIRE COUNTY YOUTH STUDY, 1961-1964.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    THURSTON, JOHN R.; AND OTHERS

    CLASSROOM AGGRESSION, DEFINED IN THIS STUDY AS MARKEDLY UNACCEPTABLE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR OCCURRING HABITUALLY OR FREQUENTLY IN SCHOOL, IS EXAMINED IN RELATION TO SEX, GRADE, AND URBAN-RURAL STATUS. THE WRITERS STATE THAT NEUROTIC, PSYCHOPATHIC, AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOR PATTERNS HAVE THE FOLLOWING FOUR FOCAL CAUSATIVE AREAS--(1) SCHOOL, (2) HOME AND…

  11. The meanings of menopause: identifying the bio-psycho-social predictors of the propensity for treatment at menopause

    E-print Network

    Rubinstein, Helena

    2013-11-12

    that prolonged use of artificial hormones could lead to elevated rates of some cancers and thromboembolisms (Million Women Study Collaborators, 2003; Writing Group for the Women’s Health Initiative Investigators, 2002). The virtually immediate response from... as a result of the abrupt reduction of estrogen, and women who have treatment for breast cancer may also enter a premature menopause during initial treatment for their malignancy (Goodwin, Ennis, Pritchard, Trudeau, & Hood, 1999). Pathophysiology...

  12. Psycho-social factors determining success in high-performance triathlon: compared perception in the coach-athlete pair.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Tendero, Germán; Salinero Martín, Juan José

    2012-12-01

    High-level sport can be analyzed using the complex system model, in which performance is constrained by many factors. Coaches' and athletes' perceptions of important positive and negative factors affecting performance were compared. Participants were 48 high-level international triathletes (n = 34) and their coaches (n = 14). They were personally interviewed via a questionnaire designed by four accredited experts, who selected groups of both positive and negative factors affecting performance. A list of factors was developed, in order of greater to lesser importance in the opinion of athletes and coaches, for subsequent analysis. Two ranked lists (positive and negative factors) indicated that athletes appear to rate personal environment factors (family, teammates, lack of support from relatives) higher, while the coaches tended to give more importance to technical and institutional aspects (institutional support, coach, medical support). There was complete agreement between coaches and triathletes about the top five positive factors. Negative factor agreement was somewhat lower (agreement on 3/5 factors). The most important positive factor for coaches and athletes was "dedication/engagement," while the most important factor adversely affecting performance was "injuries". PMID:23409598

  13. Piloting a psycho-social intervention for incarcerated women with trauma histories: lessons learned and future recommendations.

    PubMed

    Liebman, Rachel E; Burnette, Mandi L; Raimondi, Christina; Nichols-Hadeed, Corey; Merle, Patricia; Cerulli, Catherine

    2014-08-01

    Trauma and related mental health disorders are common among incarcerated women, but empirically sound mental health interventions are lacking in prisons. Implementing such interventions is fraught with legal and logistical barriers. These barriers can be particularly detrimental for trauma-specific interventions given the unique needs of trauma survivors, yet there is little documentation of these issues or how to address them. This study describes a pilot study of an 8-week, strengths-based, trauma-focused intervention for 26 incarcerated women. Women reported considerable mental health problems and trauma. The study highlights the importance of adapting stringent research methodologies for prison-based trauma interventions. For instance, women with trauma were reluctant to participate in an intervention advertised as trauma-based. Moreover, a randomized wait list control design was unfeasible because women wanted the support of their friends when discussing trauma and could not control their schedules 9 weeks in advance. Ultimately, this work may inform future efforts to implement effective trauma-based interventions behind prison walls. PMID:23804649

  14. Revisiting "Kindergarten as Academic Boot Camp": A Nationwide Study of Ability Grouping and Psycho-Social Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catsambis, Sophia; Buttaro, Anthony, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We revisit Harry L. Gracey's perspective of kindergarten as academic boot camp where, at school entry, children acquire the student role through a structured program of activities. We provide further insights into the crucial mechanisms of socialization that occur in U.S. kindergartens by examining the relationship between within-class ability…

  15. Factors That Affect Psycho-Social Development of Preschool Children in Terms of Art Activities: Family and Teacher of Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dereli, Esra; Akaroglu, E. Gulriz

    2011-01-01

    People living in a society need socialization. While maintaining social relations, they learn behaviors approved by the society. Through art education, which is applied in preschool education, planned studying habits, taking responsibilities, cooperating, helping, developing solidarity habit and building positive relations with others are taught…

  16. Dyslexia and Psycho-Social Functioning: An Exploratory Study of the Role of Self-Esteem and Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terras, Melody M.; Thompson, Lucy C.; Minnis, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with dyslexia may have lower self-esteem and exhibit more emotional and behavioural difficulties than those without reading problems. However, the nature of any relationship between self-esteem and psychopathology remains unknown. This exploratory study assessed levels of self-esteem using the "Self-Perception Profile for Children"…

  17. Turbulent dissipation challenge: a community-driven effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Tulasi N.; Salem, Chadi; Wicks, Robert T.; Karimabadi, H.; Gary, S. Peter; Matthaeus, William H.

    2015-10-01

    > Many naturally occurring and man-made plasmas are collisionless and turbulent. It is not yet well understood how the energy in fields and fluid motions is transferred into the thermal degrees of freedom of constituent particles in such systems. The debate at present primarily concerns proton heating. Multiple possible heating mechanisms have been proposed over the past few decades, including cyclotron damping, Landau damping, heating at intermittent structures and stochastic heating. Recently, a community-driven effort was proposed (Parashar & Salem, 2013, arXiv:1303.0204) to bring the community together and understand the relative contributions of these processes under given conditions. In this paper, we propose the first step of this challenge: a set of problems and diagnostics for benchmarking and comparing different types of 2.5D simulations. These comparisons will provide insights into the strengths and limitations of different types of numerical simulations and will help guide subsequent stages of the challenge.

  18. The WOMBAT Challenge: A "Hounds and Hares" Exercise for Cosmology

    E-print Network

    Eric Gawiser; Douglas Finkbeiner; Andrew Jaffe; Joanne C. Baker; Amedeo Balbi; Marc Davis; Shaul Hanany; William Holzapfel; Leonidas Moustakas; James Robinson; Evan Scannapieco; George F. Smoot; Joseph Silk

    1998-12-11

    The Wavelength-Oriented Microwave Background Analysis Team (WOMBAT) is constructing microwave skymaps which will be more realistic than previous simulations. Our foreground models represent a considerable improvement: where spatial templates are available for a given foreground, we predict the flux and spectral index of that component at each place on the sky and estimate the uncertainties in these quantities. We will produce maps containing simulated Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies combined with all major expected foreground components. The simulated maps will be provided to the cosmology community as the WOMBAT Challenge, a "hounds and hares" exercise where such maps can be analyzed to extract cosmological parameters by scientists who are unaware of their input values. This exercise will test the efficacy of current foreground subtraction, power spectrum analysis, and parameter estimation techniques and will help identify the areas most in need of progress.

  19. A Paediatrician Looks at Traditional Approaches to Emotional Development in Preschool and Primary Years. Foundation for Child and Youth Studies Selected Papers Number 46.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Susi Erika

    This discussion of the emotional development of young children is structured upon Erik Erikson's schemata of psycho-social development. Stage 1, which involves trust versus mistrust, includes references to Erikson's theory and the work of Melanie Klein, Berry Brazelton, Stella Chess and Alexander Thomas, John Bowlby, Anthony Stevens, and D. W.…

  20. Engaging Undergraduates to Solve Global Health Challenges: A New Approach Based on Bioengineering Design

    PubMed Central

    Oden, Maria; Mirabal, Yvette; Epstein, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Recent reports have highlighted the need for educational programs to prepare students for careers developing and disseminating new interventions that improve global public health. Because of its multi-disciplinary, design-centered nature, the field of Biomedical Engineering can play an important role in meeting this challenge. This article describes a new program at Rice University to give undergraduate students from all disciplines a broad background in bioengineering and global health and provides an initial assessment of program impact. Working in partnership with health care providers in developing countries, students in the Beyond Traditional Borders (BTB) initiative learn about health challenges of the poor and put this knowledge to work immediately, using the engineering design process as a framework to formulate solutions to complex global health challenges. Beginning with a freshman design project and continuing through a capstone senior design course, the BTB curriculum uses challenges provided by partners in the developing world to teach students to integrate perspectives from multiple disciplines, and to develop leadership, communication, and teamwork skills. Exceptional students implement their designs under the guidance of clinicians through summer international internships. Since 2006, 333 students have designed more than 40 technologies and educational programs; 28 have been implemented in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, southeast Asia, and the United States. More than 18,000 people have benefited from these designs. 95% of alumni who completed an international internship reported that participation in the program changed or strengthened their career plans to include a focus on global health medicine, research, and/or policy. Empowering students to use bioengineering design to address real problems is an effective way to teach the new generation of leaders needed to solve global health challenges. PMID:20387116

  1. The Case Study Challenge--A New Approach to an Old Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romm, Tsilia; Mahler, Sophia

    1991-01-01

    Instructional objectives for teaching with case studies are outlined, and techniques for using case studies are described. Combinations of objectives and methods for different situations are explored, and suggestions for practitioners on effective use of different case study types, with different populations, and at different phases of management…

  2. Being Proactive to Increasing Supply Chain Security Challenges: A Quantitative and Qualitative Approach 

    E-print Network

    Lu, Guanyi

    2013-07-24

    Supply chain security has become relevant to both practitioners and academics for years, yet the understanding of this topic is still incomplete. The literature produces relatively few explanatory and confirmatory studies, ...

  3. Engaging undergraduates to solve global health challenges: a new approach based on bioengineering design.

    PubMed

    Oden, Maria; Mirabal, Yvette; Epstein, Marc; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2010-09-01

    Recent reports have highlighted the need for educational programs to prepare students for careers developing and disseminating new interventions that improve global public health. Because of its multi-disciplinary, design-centered nature, the field of Biomedical Engineering can play an important role in meeting this challenge. This article describes a new program at Rice University to give undergraduate students from all disciplines a broad background in bioengineering and global health and provides an initial assessment of program impact. Working in partnership with health care providers in developing countries, students in the Beyond Traditional Borders (BTB) initiative learn about health challenges of the poor and put this knowledge to work immediately, using the engineering design process as a framework to formulate solutions to complex global health challenges. Beginning with a freshman design project and continuing through a capstone senior design course, the BTB curriculum uses challenges provided by partners in the developing world to teach students to integrate perspectives from multiple disciplines, and to develop leadership, communication, and teamwork skills. Exceptional students implement their designs under the guidance of clinicians through summer international internships. Since 2006, 333 students have designed more than 40 technologies and educational programs; 28 have been implemented in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, southeast Asia, and the United States. More than 18,000 people have benefited from these designs. 95% of alumni who completed an international internship reported that participation in the program changed or strengthened their career plans to include a focus on global health medicine, research, and/or policy. Empowering students to use bioengineering design to address real problems is an effective way to teach the new generation of leaders needed to solve global health challenges. PMID:20387116

  4. Why evidence-based medicine is an insufficient approach to physical and rehabilitation medicine. Antithesis.

    PubMed

    Saraceni, V

    2014-10-01

    When philosophers of science demolished the myth of objectivity in the early decades of the 20th century, they undermined the theoretical certainty that a knowledge system comes from the cumulative development of scientific observations: here we find a criticality inherent to evidence-based medicine in relation to its claim of universality and objectivity. EBM relies on quantitative statistical models to define a treatment's effectiveness, and it has an universal character: the treatment effect is measured against the global characteristics of the general population rather than the individuals. Contemporary cognitive neuroscience takes a naturalized approach to mind and behavior, opening new inroads into investigating consciousness, motor image, bodily awareness, and intention. Common to these issues is the emphasis on the importance the person, with his or her own biology and history, as a unique and unrepeatable entity. Hence, its original aim to protect patients against arbitrary treatment notwithstanding, EBM has become largely inadequate to serve physical and rehabilitation medicine (PRM) owing to the peculiarities of its historical and narrative contents. PRM, because of its unique knowledge base, can be fully considered a science anchored in the basic sciences that underlie rehabilitation procedures. Accordingly, PRM exists within a mutual relationship with physics and biology, from which the biomedical model (well represented by EBM) originates, and is interrelated with other disciplines such as philosophy or psychology, from which the bio-psycho-social model was developed in the 1980s, leading to a comprehensive approach to health and disease. Further critical points in clinical practice include: how to translate evidence into clinical decision making; the inability to generalize experimental evidence because most studies involve selected patient samples. Despite the more than 20 years of EBM, long-established therapeutic approaches lacking scientific evidence still survive in rehabilitation. We must strive for an integrative approach to EBM, which would enable PRM, by virtue of its multifaceted theoretical and methodological approaches to persons with disability, to take the lead in redefining biomedical knowledge and, by applying this understanding, put its science into clinical practice and, perhaps, more generally, into outlining a new "ideal of science". PMID:25192186

  5. 76 FR 23543 - The Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge; a Coordinated Initiative To Advance Regional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... Economic Development Administration The Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge; a Coordinated Initiative To Advance Regional Competitiveness AGENCY: Economic Development Administration (EDA), Department of... platform for integrating and coordinating the wide range of Federal economic development resources....

  6. The Brownfields Challenge: A Survey of Environmental Justice and Community Participation Initiatives

    E-print Network

    Delaware, University of

    of ten Environmental Protection Agency-designated National Brownfields Pilot Projects and suggests how, the Environmental Protection Agency's Region III Office, and the EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency ResponseThe Brownfields Challenge: A Survey of Environmental Justice and Community Participation

  7. Winter Depression: Integrating mood, circadian rhythms, and the sleep/wake and light/dark cycles into a bio-psycho-social-environmental model

    PubMed Central

    Emens, Jonathan S.; Songer, Jeannie B.; Sims, Neelam; Laurie, Amber L.; Fiala, Steven C.; Buti, Allie L.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The phase shift hypothesis (PSH) states that most patients with SAD become depressed in the winter because of a delay in circadian rhythms with respect to the sleep/wake cycle: According to the PSH, these patients should preferentially respond to the antidepressant effects of bright light exposure when it is scheduled in the morning so as to provide a corrective phase advance and restore optimum alignment between the circadian rhythms tightly coupled to the endogenous circadian pacemaker and those rhythms that are related to the sleep/wake cycle. Recent support for the PSH has come from studies in which symptom severity was shown to correlate with the degree of circadian misalignment: it appears that a subgroup of patients are phase advanced, not phase delayed; however, the phase-delayed type is predominant in SAD and perhaps in other disorders as well, such as non-seasonal unipolar depression. It is expected that during the next few years the PSH will be tested in these and other conditions, particularly since healthy subjects appear to have more severe symptoms of sub-clinical dysphoria correlating with phase-delayed circadian misalignment; critically important will be the undertaking of treatment trials to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of morning bright light or afternoon/evening low-dose melatonin in these disorders in which symptoms are more severe as the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) is delayed with respect to the sleep/wake cycle (non-restorative sleep should also be evaluated, as well as bipolar disorder). The possibility that some individuals (and disorders) will be of the phase-advanced type should be considered, taking into account that the correct timing of phase-resetting agents for them will be bright light scheduled in the evening and/or low-dose melatonin taken in the morning. While sleep researchers and clinicians are accustomed to phase-typing patients with circadian-rhythm sleep disorders according to the timing of sleep, phase typing based on the DLMO with respect to the sleep/wake cycle may lead to quite different recommendations for the optimal scheduling of phase-resetting agents, particularly for the above disorders and conditions. PMID:20160896

  8. An investigation of psycho-social factors associated with the uptake of pre-pregnancy care in Australian women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Komiti, A; Jackson, H J; Nankervis, A; Conn, J; Allan, C; Judd, F

    2013-06-01

    Pre-pregnancy care (PPC) reduces adverse pregnancy outcomes for women with pre-existing diabetes. Yet, despite the compelling case for PPC, participation rates remain poor. The reasons for poor participation are as yet unclear. The aim of this study was to further our understanding of the factors-associated PPC uptake, particularly attitudes and beliefs towards PPC using models of health behaviour: The Health Belief Model, Social Cognitive Theory, and Theory of Reasoned Action. Participants comprised 123 women with type 1 and 2 diabetes attending outpatient clinics for diabetes and pregnancy, who completed questionnaires. Logistic regression analysis indicated that after adjusting for socio-demographic factors, exposure to a greater number of cues was a significant predictor of PPC participation (odds ratio [OR]: 1.93; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.13-3.28). Other significant predictors of PPC uptake were older age (OR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.01-1.26) and not having children (OR: 3.93; 95% CI: 1.28-12.06). The findings from this study support initiatives to provide cues to PPC for women with diabetes to enhance PPC uptake. Further, some groups such as younger women as well as women with children may possibly be considered for the focus of more vigorous intervention efforts. PMID:23701456

  9. Longitudinal surveys on effects of changes in road traffic noise-annoyance, activity disturbances, and psycho-social well-being

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öhrström, Evy

    2004-02-01

    The adverse effects of long-term exposure to a high volume of road traffic were studied in socio-acoustic surveys in 1997 and in 1999 after a substantial reduction in road traffic. The results obtained in 1997 showed a similar response pattern as in previously performed studies in the area in 1986 [Öhrström, J. Sound Vib. 122, 277-290 (1989)]. In 1999, road traffic had been reduced from 25 000 to 2400 vehicles per day, and this resulted not only in a large decrease in annoyance and activity disturbances, but also in a better general well-being. The results suggest that a reduction in both noise and other pollutants from road traffic contribute to these effects. To be able to use the outdoor environment and to have the possibility to keep windows open is essential for general well-being and daily behavior, which implies that access both to quiet indoor and outdoor sections of the residency is of importance for achievement of a healthy sound environment. More knowledge of long-term health consequences of exposure to noise and simultaneous pollutants from road traffic is needed. Studies should focus more on ``softer'' health outcomes and well-being than hitherto and preferably be performed in connection with traffic abatement measures.

  10. Performance Contracting and the Counselor's Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulvino, Charles J.; Miller, Katherine Rahdert

    1973-01-01

    After describing performance contracting as exemplified of the system in operation at a Gary, Indiana elementary school, the authors give the implications of such systems for counselors. To them, this approach seems to neglect the psycho-social aspects of students' education. They therefore recommend that counselors conduct research to evaluate…

  11. Literacy and Basic Education: A Selected, Annotated Bibliography. Annotated Bibliography #3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Non-Formal Education Information Center.

    A selected annotated bibliography on literacy and basic education, including contributions from practitioners in the worldwide non-formal education network and compiled for them, has three interrelated themes: integration of literacy programs with broader development efforts; the learner-centered or "psycho-social" approach to literacy, often with…

  12. Dangerous Encounters? Boys' Peer Dynamics and Neighbourhood Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Jenny; Conolly, Anna

    2013-01-01

    This article traces links between subjectivity, peer relations and neighbourhood risk for a group of boys living in an area of London with high levels of crime, gang activity and socio-economic inequality. Drawing on data from a qualitative study of young people and neighbourhood risk, we use a psycho-social approach to analyse how gendered…

  13. Weaving Silos--A Leadership Challenge: A Cross-Functional Team Approach to Supporting Web-Based Student Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleemann, Gary L.

    2005-01-01

    The author reviews the evolution of Web services--from information sharing to transactional to relationship building--and the progression from first-generation to fourth-generation Web sites. (Contains 3 figures.)

  14. Reasons for Living and Hoping: The Spiritual and Psycho-Social Needs of Southeast Asian Refugee Children and Youth Resettled in the United States. Proceedings from the Multi-Disciplinary, Inter-Religious Conference on the Spiritual and Psycho-Social Needs of Southeast Asian Refugee Children and Youth Resettled in the United States (Washington, DC, October 16-18, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Catholic Child Bureau, Inc., New York, NY.

    This document presents proceedings of a conference convened to identify the unmet spiritual and other non-material needs of Southeast Asian refugee children and youth and to offer recommendations to strengthen present programs and policies. Participants included leaders in the refugee community, clergy of several faiths, organizational…

  15. A Transcontinental Challenge --A Test of DNA Barcode Performance for 1,541 Species of Canadian Noctuoidea

    E-print Network

    Garzón-Orduña, Ivonne

    A Transcontinental Challenge -- A Test of DNA Barcode Performance for 1,541 Species of Canadian, comprehensive, diagnostic use of DNA barcodes for the Canadian fauna of noctuoids or ``owlet'' moths 30,000 sequences. When viewed from a Canada-wide perspective, DNA barcodes unambiguously discriminate

  16. The Regional Nature of Global Challenges: A Need and Strategy for Integrated Regional Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we explore the regional nature of global environmental challenges. We take a broad approach by examining the scientific foundation that is needed to support policy and decision making and identifying some of the most important barriers to progress that are truly scale-dependent. In so doing, we hope to show that understanding global environmental changes requires understanding a number of intrinsically regional phenomena, and that successful decision making likewise requires an integrated approach that accounts for a variety of regional Earth system processes—which we define to include both human activities and environmental systems that operate or interact primarily at sub-continental scales. Understanding regional processes and phenomena, including regional decision-making processes and information needs, should thus be an integral part of the global change research agenda. To address some of the key issues and challenges, we propose an integrated regional modeling approach that accounts for the dynamic interactions among physical, ecological, biogeochemical, and human processes and provides relevant information to regional decision makers and stakeholders.

  17. William Burchell's medical challenges: a 19th-century natural philosopher in the field.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Roger Ian

    2012-04-01

    Two hundred years ago, the naturalist William John Burchell departed from Cape Town on extensive travels in South Africa 'solely for the purpose of acquiring knowledge'. An intelligent observer who was exceptionally skilled at recording his observations in words and pictures, he is remembered for numerous contributions to the country as scientist, artist and ethnographer. The medical perspective on his travels has yet to receive attention. He identified and recorded illnesses of the indigenous peoples with whom he came into contact. He also described the medical care he administered to his companions and to himself; in doing so, he revealed a profound care for his 'fellow creatures'. His vivid and sometimes poignant descriptions remind us of some of the health risks endured by early travellers in the country. One of the most riveting is his successful care of an assistant whose left hand was severely mutilated when a firearm exploded in his hands. Burchell was probably the first person to include the materia medica of the Khoi in an essentially European approach to the non-surgical management of such a serious condition. PMID:22464510

  18. Cross-terminology mapping challenges: a demonstration using medication terminological systems.

    PubMed

    Saitwal, Himali; Qing, David; Jones, Stephen; Bernstam, Elmer V; Chute, Christopher G; Johnson, Todd R

    2012-08-01

    Standardized terminological systems for biomedical information have provided considerable benefits to biomedical applications and research. However, practical use of this information often requires mapping across terminological systems-a complex and time-consuming process. This paper demonstrates the complexity and challenges of mapping across terminological systems in the context of medication information. It provides a review of medication terminological systems and their linkages, then describes a case study in which we mapped proprietary medication codes from an electronic health record to SNOMED CT and the UMLS Metathesaurus. The goal was to create a polyhierarchical classification system for querying an i2b2 clinical data warehouse. We found that three methods were required to accurately map the majority of actively prescribed medications. Only 62.5% of source medication codes could be mapped automatically. The remaining codes were mapped using a combination of semi-automated string comparison with expert selection, and a completely manual approach. Compound drugs were especially difficult to map: only 7.5% could be mapped using the automatic method. General challenges to mapping across terminological systems include (1) the availability of up-to-date information to assess the suitability of a given terminological system for a particular use case, and to assess the quality and completeness of cross-terminology links; (2) the difficulty of correctly using complex, rapidly evolving, modern terminologies; (3) the time and effort required to complete and evaluate the mapping; (4) the need to address differences in granularity between the source and target terminologies; and (5) the need to continuously update the mapping as terminological systems evolve. PMID:22750536

  19. Cross-terminology mapping challenges: A demonstration using medication terminological systems

    PubMed Central

    Saitwal, Himali; Qing, David; Jones, Stephen; Bernstam, Elmer; Chute, Christopher G.; Johnson, Todd R.

    2015-01-01

    Standardized terminological systems for biomedical information have provided considerable benefits to biomedical applications and research. However, practical use of this information often requires mapping across terminological systems—a complex and time-consuming process. This paper demonstrates the complexity and challenges of mapping across terminological systems in the context of medication information. It provides a review of medication terminological systems and their linkages, then describes a case study in which we mapped proprietary medication codes from an electronic health record to SNOMED-CT and the UMLS Metathesaurus. The goal was to create a polyhierarchical classification system for querying an i2b2 clinical data warehouse. We found that three methods were required to accurately map the majority of actively prescribed medications. Only 62.5% of source medication codes could be mapped automatically. The remaining codes were mapped using a combination of semi-automated string comparison with expert selection, and a completely manual approach. Compound drugs were especially difficult to map: only 7.5% could be mapped using the automatic method. General challenges to mapping across terminological systems include (1) the availability of up-to-date information to assess the suitability of a given terminological system for a particular use case, and to assess the quality and completeness of cross-terminology links; (2) the difficulty of correctly using complex, rapidly evolving, modern terminologies; (3) the time and effort required to complete and evaluate the mapping; (4) the need to address differences in granularity between the source and target terminologies; and (5) the need to continuously update the mapping as terminological systems evolve. PMID:22750536

  20. COTS approach to a utility VTOL UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Jay R.

    1998-11-01

    Many UAVs are in the market place but few are very profitable. After studying the lessons learned form our predecessors, a commercial off the shelf approach was chosen to meet the price performance challenge. A multi-mission capable aircraft was chosen to provide exposure to the widest possible market. Using an analysis tool developed for DARPA, the Vigilante VTOL UAV was successfully competed against both Outrider and Predator.

  1. A Punctured Programming Approach to Adaptively Secure Functional Encryption

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    in Attribute-Based Encryption [SW05] and searching on encrypted data [BCOP04]. A central challengeA Punctured Programming Approach to Adaptively Secure Functional Encryption Brent Waters University adaptively secure functional encryption (FE) for poly- sized circuits (without complexity leveraging) from

  2. Culturally Relevant Intervention Strategies for the Psycho-social Development of Children and Youth in Poverty. Workshop Report [of] the International Society for Study of Behavioural Development (India) South Asian Workshop (Chandigarh, India, November 20-23, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unnikrishnan, Namita, Comp.

    A product of the South Asian Regional Workshop of the International Society for the Study of Behavioural Development (ISSBD), this report was intended to identify problems of low-income families in South Asia and create methods to serve their needs. The report begins with an introduction to the India chapter of the ISSBD; it then provides an…

  3. Psychosoziale Belastungen und Soziale Unterstutzungssysteme: Eine empirische Rekonstruktion der Vielfaltigkeit des Hilfe- und Unterstutzungsbedarfs junger Menschen (Psycho-Social Stress and Social Support Systems: An Empirical Reconstruction of the Diversity of Young People's Need for Help and Support).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruggemann-Helmold, Katrin; Hanssen, Kirsten; Micheel, Heinz-Gunther; Schmidt, Mathias; Wagenblass, Sabine

    1996-01-01

    Argues that youth welfare in Germany needs to establish its reference points in the experiences of its targets. Analyzes the requirements for planning youth welfare in light of the diversified needs of young people based on a study of the living conditions of young adults in the new German states. (DSK)

  4. Auswirkungen von okonomischem Druck auf die psychosoziale Befindlichkeit von Jugendlichen: Zur Bedeutung von Familienbeziehungen und Schulniveau (The Effect of Economic Pressure on the Psycho-Social Well-Being of Adolescents: The Importance of Family Relations and School Track).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butz, Petra; Boehnke, Klaus

    1997-01-01

    Presents findings on the impact of economic pressure on the well-being of adolescents in Berlin. Shows that relative losses in purchasing power are related to decreased self-esteem in problematic family climates; school level, place of residence, and relative gain in purchasing power played a greater role in xenophobia and aggressive helplessness.…

  5. Health data use, stewardship, and governance: ongoing gaps and challenges: a report from AMIA's 2012 Health Policy Meeting.

    PubMed

    Hripcsak, George; Bloomrosen, Meryl; FlatelyBrennan, Patti; Chute, Christopher G; Cimino, Jim; Detmer, Don E; Edmunds, Margo; Embi, Peter J; Goldstein, Melissa M; Hammond, William Ed; Keenan, Gail M; Labkoff, Steve; Murphy, Shawn; Safran, Charlie; Speedie, Stuart; Strasberg, Howard; Temple, Freda; Wilcox, Adam B

    2014-01-01

    Large amounts of personal health data are being collected and made available through existing and emerging technological media and tools. While use of these data has significant potential to facilitate research, improve quality of care for individuals and populations, and reduce healthcare costs, many policy-related issues must be addressed before their full value can be realized. These include the need for widely agreed-on data stewardship principles and effective approaches to reduce or eliminate data silos and protect patient privacy. AMIA's 2012 Health Policy Meeting brought together healthcare academics, policy makers, and system stakeholders (including representatives of patient groups) to consider these topics and formulate recommendations. A review of a set of Proposed Principles of Health Data Use led to a set of findings and recommendations, including the assertions that the use of health data should be viewed as a public good and that achieving the broad benefits of this use will require understanding and support from patients. PMID:24169275

  6. Challenging a Paradigm: Theoretical Calculations of the Protonation State of the Cys25-His159 Catalytic Diad in Free Papain

    PubMed Central

    Shokhen, Michael; Khazanov, Netaly; Albeck, Amnon

    2009-01-01

    A central mechanistic paradigm of cysteine proteases is that the His – Cys catalytic diad forms an ion-pair NH(+)/S(?) already in the catalytically active free enzyme. Most molecular modeling studies of cysteine proteases refer to this paradigm as their starting point. Nevertheless, several recent kinetics and X-ray crystallography studies of viral and bacterial cysteine proteases depart from the ion-pair mechanism, suggesting general base catalysis. We challenge the postulate of the ion-pair formation in free papain. Applying our QM/SCRF(VS) molecular modeling approach, we analyzed all protonation states of the catalytic diad in free papain and its SMe derivative, comparing the predicted and experimental pKa data. We conclude that the His – Cys catalytic diad in free papain is fully protonated, NH(+)/SH. The experimental pKa=8.62 of His159 imidazole in free papain, obtained by NMR controlled titratin and originally interpreated as the NH(+)/S(?) ? N/S(?) equilibrium, is now assigned to the NH(+)/SH ? N/SH equilibrium. PMID:19688822

  7. Common clinical problems in children living with HIV/AIDS: systemic approach.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Rashid H; Lala, Mamatha M

    2012-11-01

    Clinical manifestations in children living with HIV/ AIDS differ from those in adults due to poorly developed immunity that allows greater dissemination throughout various organs. In developing countries, HIV-infected children have an increased frequency of malnutrition and common childhood infections such as ear infections, pneumonias, gastroenteritis and tuberculosis. The symptoms common to many treatable conditions, such as recurrent fever, diarrhea and generalized dermatitis, tend to be more persistent and severe and often do not respond as well to treatment. The use of Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART) has greatly increased the long term survival of perinatally infected children so that AIDS is becoming a manageable chronic illness. As the immunity is maintained, the incidence of infectious complications is declining while noninfectious complications of HIV are more frequently encountered. Regular clinical monitoring with immunological and virological monitoring and the introduction of genotypic and phenotypic resistance testing where resources are available have allowed for dramatically better clinical outcomes. However, these growing children are left facing the challenges of lifelong adherence with complex treatment regimens, compounded by complex psycho-social, mental and neuro-cognitive issues. These unique challenges must be recognized and understood in order to provide appropriate medical management. PMID:23015361

  8. Human Behaviour in Long-Term Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session WP1, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Psychological Support for International Space Station Mission; Psycho-social Training for Man in Space; Study of the Physiological Adaptation of the Crew During A 135-Day Space Simulation; Interpersonal Relationships in Space Simulation, The Long-Term Bed Rest in Head-Down Tilt Position; Psychological Adaptation in Groups of Varying Sizes and Environments; Deviance Among Expeditioners, Defining the Off-Nominal Act in Space and Polar Field Analogs; Getting Effective Sleep in the Space-Station Environment; Human Sleep and Circadian Rhythms are Altered During Spaceflight; and Methodological Approach to Study of Cosmonauts Errors and Its Instrumental Support.

  9. Preliminary report: Biomedical considerations for future manned space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    The behavioral, psychological, and sociological aspects of space travel, particularly with emphasis on longer duration missions, are discussed along with the biomedical aspects of space flight. These factors may strongly interact with the various psycho-social factors and as such they stand as an immensely important area of concern in and of themselves. A foundation for understanding weightlessness related medical problems through a discussion of the history of symptoms reported specific details on the major areas of concern and approaches to their investigation are presented. Also, discussion is given to the possibility of various countermeasures. Some indication of the effects of various biomedical changes in performance are also covered.

  10. Supporting Learning and Promoting Conceptual Change with Box and AVOW Diagrams. Part 1: Representational Design and Instructional Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Peter C-H.; Shipstone, David M.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an approach to the teaching of electricity that uses box and AVOW diagrams, novel representations of the properties of the electric circuit that portray current, voltage, resistance, and power. The diagrams were developed as aids in learning, understanding, and problem solving and to promote conceptual change by challenging a number of…

  11. [The alarming increase of incapacity for work].

    PubMed

    Thibaut, P

    2013-09-01

    The alarming increase of incapacity for work The increase of incapacity for work in Belgium and in Europe is not a new phenomenon but only the transposition of an experience already lived on others continents (Canada--USA). The bio-psycho-social model proves to be, on the international level, as the more efficient view for the understanding of the mechanisms production of the disability and therefore of the incapacity for work. Following this approach, the chronic pain is the result of the dynamic interaction between physiological, psychological and social factors. It mentions also an existing link between the pain and the depression itself being a determining factor in the persistence of the incapacity for work. The bio-psycho-social model can only be conceived in the interdisciplinary approach, and will for sure allow to optimize the support and the use of medicines with a painkiller and depressive aim. The socio-economic impact created represents actually a real health problem. PMID:24195251

  12. The effect of 6-week treatment with escitalopram on CCK-4 challenge: a placebo-controlled study in CCK-4-sensitive healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tõru, Innar; Maron, Eduard; Raag, Mait; Vasar, Veiko; Nutt, David J; Shlik, Jakov

    2013-07-01

    Cholecystokinin-tetrapeptide (CCK-4)-induced panic attacks are reportedly attenuated by effective treatment with antipanic antidepressants in patients with panic disorder, but in healthy volunteers such effects are not well studied. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of 6-week treatment with an SSRI escitalopram on CCK-4-induced symptoms in healthy volunteers, who previously responded with a panic attack to CCK-4 challenge. A total of 18 healthy subjects (10 males and eight females, mean age 22.5 ± 5.8) received a 6-week treatment with escitalopram (10 mg/day) and placebo followed by CCK-4 challenge (50 ?g) in a double-blind crossover design. The panic rate was 67% after treatment with escitalopram and 56% after treatment with placebo (p = 0.7). Thus, the results showed a significant reduction in CCK-4-induced panic rates without significant differences between escitalopram and placebo conditions. There were no significant effects of either treatment on any other variable of anxiety or cardiovascular indices. Secondary analysis showed no effect of gender or 5-HTTLPR polymorphism on response to CCK-4 challenge. This study demonstrated that in contrast to the findings in patients with panic disorder, in CCK-4-sensitive healthy volunteers the treatment with an antipanic SSRI did not cause a reduction of CCK-4-induced panic attacks beyond the effect of placebo. The mechanisms behind this discrepancy and the reasons of the decrease in sensitivity to CCK-4 challenge on repeated administration remain to be clarified in future studies. PMID:22939006

  13. Pathway and Network Approaches for Identification of Cancer Signature Markers from Omics Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinlian; Zuo, Yiming; Man, Yan-gao; Avital, Itzhak; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Liu, Meng; Yang, Xiaowei; Varghese, Rency S.; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Ressom, Habtom W

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of high throughput omic technologies during the past few years has made it possible to perform many complex assays in a much shorter time than the traditional approaches. The rapid accumulation and wide availability of omic data generated by these technologies offer great opportunities to unravel disease mechanisms, but also presents significant challenges to extract knowledge from such massive data and to evaluate the findings. To address these challenges, a number of pathway and network based approaches have been introduced. This review article evaluates these methods and discusses their application in cancer biomarker discovery using hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as an example. PMID:25553089

  14. Posterior shoulder approach.

    PubMed

    Norwood, L A; Matiko, J A; Terry, G C

    1985-12-01

    A posterior shoulder surgical approach combines the subperiosteal detachment of the deltoid from the scapular spine, described by McWhorter, with a lateral extension to include the lateral deltoid splitting of Codman. The glenohumeral joint is superiorly approached between the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons, or inferiorly between the infraspinatus and teres minor tendons. This approach was used in 42 shoulders with rotator cuff tears or posterior instability without complications of infection, failure of deltoid healing, or compromise of suprascapular or axillary nerves. This combined surgical approach provides excellent exposure of the superior and posterior shoulder, which is difficult to obtain by anterior or superior approaches. This approach may be used for repair of rotator cuff tears, posterior instability, and displaced posterior glenoid fractures. PMID:4064401

  15. Stuttering-Psycholinguistic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hategan, Carolina Bodea; Anca, Maria; Prihoi, Lacramioara

    2012-01-01

    This research promotes psycholinguistic paradigm, it focusing in delimitating several specific particularities in stuttering pathology. Structural approach, on language sides proves both the recurrent aspects found within specialized national and international literature and the psycholinguistic approaches dependence on the features of the…

  16. Statpipe landfall approach solves rocky shore problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S.; Gjertveit

    1986-05-12

    The irregular seabed conditions encountered during the Statpipe project included rocky subsea shore areas at the pipeline's landfall. Part 1 focused on subsea irregularities along the Norwegian Trench. Traditional pipeline landfall is on a sandy beach, into which a trench is excavated for subsequent pull-in of the pipe from the lay-barge. Excavation of a trench, although not in sand but in solid rock, was also considered for the Statpipe landfall at Kalsto. The seabed is mostly rocky for about 900 m from the coastline along the selected landfall route, with large local variations in water depths. Further out, to about 1,200 m, is a steep slope down to soft sediments at about 100-m water depth. The area is directly exposed to wind and waves from the North Sea, which significantly affects design and installation criteria. The topography as well as the exposure to the environment made this shore approach a challenge. A trench through the rocky shore approach zone would require more than 40,000 cu m of rock to be blasted and removed. This trench would at some spots be more than 12 m deep. Blasting would have to be performed to a water depth of 40-50 m. After pipeline installation, the trench would have to be completely backfilled in order to stabilize and protect the pipeline. This backfill would again require a thick protective layer of large stones in the wave-breaking zone. The trench excavation was found to be entirely feasible with some modification to existing equipment. The schedule was uncertain, however, because of the exposure of the landfall area to winds and waves.

  17. Introducing Systems Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Martin; Holwell, Sue

    Systems Approaches to Managing Change brings together five systems approaches to managing complex issues, each having a proven track record of over 25 years. The five approaches are: System Dynamics (SD) developed originally in the late 1950s by Jay Forrester Viable Systems Model (VSM) developed originally in the late 1960s by Stafford Beer Strategic Options Development and Analysis (SODA: with cognitive mapping) developed originally in the 1970s by Colin Eden Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) developed originally in the 1970s by Peter Checkland Critical Systems Heuristics (CSH) developed originally in the late 1970s by Werner Ulrich

  18. Approaches to Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Richard W., Ed.; Ruben, Brent D., Ed.

    This anthology of essays approaches human communication from the points of view of: anthropology, art biology, economics, encounter groups, semantics, general system theory, history, information theory, international behavior, journalism, linguistics, mass media, neurophysiology, nonverbal behavior, organizational behavior, philosophy, political…

  19. ECOTOXICOLOGY: PROBLEMS AND APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In today's chemical-oriented society, any student of ecology must be cognizant of the potential for environmental toxicants to alter the balances and relationships among the plants, animals and biogeochemical cycles in an ecosystem. Ecotoxicology: roblems and Approaches" provides...

  20. Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePLUS

    ... In This Topic What Are Complementary Health Approaches? Natural Products Safety of Natural Products Mind and Body Practices Safety of Mind and ... as acupuncture, spinal manipulation, and massage therapy) and natural products (such as herbs, probiotics, and fish oil). Some ...

  1. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1986-01-01

    Provides a bibliography of materials which deal with astronomy and: (1) science fiction; (2) poetry; (3) general fiction; (4) music; (5) psychology; and (6) the law. Also cites two general references on interdisciplinary approaches with astronomy topics. (JN)

  2. Worldgraph approach to amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Peng

    String theory uses the first-quantized method (quantum mechanics) to derive scattering amplitudes. External states are considered as vertex operators inserted on the worldsheet generated by an internal string and the amplitudes are calculated perturbatively by calculating vacuum expectation values (vevs) of these vertex operators on worldsheets with different topologies. This approach is different from the common approach of particle theories in which the second-quantized method (quantum field theory) is adopted to calculate amplitudes. A natural question to ask is whether there exists a first-quantization formalism for particles that gives particle amplitudes to all orders. This thesis presents the recent research in answering this question. In the first-quantized approach for particles, amplitudes are considered as the vevs of vertex operators inserted on different graphs generated by an internal particle. I refer to these graphs as worldgraphs and first-quantized approach for particles as worldgraph approach. To evaluate these vevs, vertex operators for several external states and Green functions on different worldgraphs are needed. In this thesis, various vertex operators are considered and a general method to obtain scalar Green functions on different worldgraphs is obtained. Some examples of the worldgraph approach to amplitudes in scalar theory and Yang-Mills theory are presented.

  3. Dynamic Approaches to Language Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Narayanan

    2007-01-01

    Symbolic rule-based approaches have been a preferred way to study language and cognition. Dissatisfaction with rule-based approaches in the 1980s lead to alternative approaches to study language, the most notable being the dynamic approaches to language processing. Dynamic approaches provide a significant alternative by not being rule-based and…

  4. Delayed Wound Healing in Diabetic (db/db) Mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm ChallengeA Model for the Study of Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ge; Hochwalt, Phillip C.; Usui, Marcia L.; Underwood, Robert A.; Singh, Pradeep K.; James, Garth A.; Stewart, Philip S.; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a major clinical problem that leads to considerable morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that an important factor in the failure of chronic wounds to heal was the presence of microbial biofilm resistant to antibiotics and protected from host defenses. A major difficulty in studying chronic wounds is the absence of suitable animal models. The goal of this study was to create a reproducible chronic wound model in diabetic mice by application of bacterial biofilm. Six millimeter punch biopsy wounds were created on the dorsal surface of diabetic (db/db) mice, subsequently challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) biofilms two days post-wounding, and covered with semi-occlusive dressings for two weeks. Most of the control wounds were epithelialized by 28 days post-wounding. In contrast, none of biofilm challenged wounds were closed. Histological analysis showed extensive inflammatory cell infiltration, tissue necrosis and epidermal hyperplasia adjacent to challenged wounds- all indicators of an inflammatory non-healing wound. Quantitative cultures and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the majority of bacteria were in the scab above the wound bed rather than in the wound tissue. The model was reproducible, allowed localized cutaneous wound infections without high mortality and demonstrated delayed wound healing following biofilm challenge. This model may provide an approach to study the role of microbial biofilms in chronic wounds as well as the effect of specific biofilm therapy on wound healing. PMID:20731798

  5. Delayed wound healing in diabetic (db/db) mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm challenge: a model for the study of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ge; Hochwalt, Phillip C; Usui, Marcia L; Underwood, Robert A; Singh, Pradeep K; James, Garth A; Stewart, Philip S; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E

    2010-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a major clinical problem that lead to considerable morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that an important factor in the failure of chronic wounds to heal was the presence of microbial biofilm resistant to antibiotics and protected from host defenses. A major difficulty in studying chronic wounds is the absence of suitable animal models. The goal of this study was to create a reproducible chronic wound model in diabetic mice by the application of bacterial biofilm. Six-millimeter punch biopsy wounds were created on the dorsal surface of diabetic (db/db) mice, subsequently challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) biofilms 2 days postwounding, and covered with semiocclusive dressings for 2 weeks. Most of the control wounds were epithelialized by 28 days postwounding. In contrast, none of biofilm-challenged wounds were closed. Histological analysis showed extensive inflammatory cell infiltration, tissue necrosis, and epidermal hyperplasia adjacent to challenged wounds-all indicators of an inflammatory nonhealing wound. Quantitative cultures and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the majority of bacteria were in the scab above the wound bed rather than in the wound tissue. The model was reproducible, allowed localized cutaneous wound infections without high mortality, and demonstrated delayed wound healing following a biofilm challenge. This model may provide an approach to study the role of microbial biofilms in chronic wounds as well as the effect of specific biofilm therapy on wound healing. PMID:20731798

  6. Financial Management: An Organic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Although textbooks present corporate finance using a topical approach, good financial management requires an organic approach that integrates the various assignments financial managers confront every day. Breaking the tasks into meaningful subcategories, the current article offers one approach.

  7. Project S.T.E.P.: Seniors Tutor for Educational Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Teresa

    The general objective of this project is to enhance the educational and psycho-social development of seventh and eighth grade students who are experiencing learning or psycho-social deficits. This is accomplished through a meaningful tutorial relationship with a senior citizen aide. Together the adolescent student and tutor create educational…

  8. New approaches to robotics.

    PubMed

    Brooks, R A

    1991-09-13

    In order to build autonomous robots that can carry out useful work in unstructured environments new approaches have been developed to building intelligent systems. The relationship to traditional academic robotics and traditional artificial intelligence is examined. In the new approaches a tight coupling of sensing to action produces architectures for intelligence that are networks of simple computational elements which are quite broad, but not very deep. Recent work within this approach has demonstrated the use of representations, expectations, plans, goals, and learning, but without resorting to the traditional uses of central, abstractly manipulable or symbolic representations. Perception within these systems is often an active process, and the dynamics of the interactions with the world are extremely important. The question of how to evaluate and compare the new to traditional work still provokes vigorous discussion. PMID:17831441

  9. Important, misunderstood, and challenging: a qualitative study of nurses’ and allied health professionals’ perceptions of implementing self-management for patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Young, Hannah ML; Apps, Lindsay D; Harrison, Samantha L; Johnson-Warrington, Vicki L; Hudson, Nicky; Singh, Sally J

    2015-01-01

    Background In light of the growing burden of COPD, there is increasing focus on the role of self-management for this population. Currently, self-management varies widely. Little is known either about nurses’ and allied health professionals’ (AHPs’) understanding and provision of self-management in clinical practice. This study explores nurses’ and AHPs’ understanding and implementation of supported COPD self-management within routine clinical practice. Materials and methods Nurses and AHPs participated in face-to-face semistructured interviews to explore their understanding and provision of COPD self-management, as well as their perceptions of the challenges to providing such care. Purposive sampling was used to select participants from a range of professions working within primary, community, and secondary care settings. Three researchers independently analyzed each transcript using a thematic approach. Results A total of 14 participants were interviewed. Nurses and AHPs viewed self-management as an important aspect of COPD care, but often misunderstood what it involved, leading to variation in practice. A number of challenges to supporting self-management were identified, which related to lack of time, lack of insight regarding training needs, and assumptions regarding patients’ perceived self-management abilities. Conclusion Nurses and AHPs delivering self-management require clear guidance, training in the use of effective self-management skills, and education that challenges their preconceptions regarding patients. The design of health care services also needs to consider the practical barriers to COPD self-management support for the implementation of such interventions to be successful. PMID:26082628

  10. Technical approach document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law 95-604 (PL95-604), grants the Secretary of Energy the authority and responsibility to perform such actions as are necessary to minimize radiation health hazards and other environmental hazards caused by inactive uranium mill sites. This Technical Approach Document (TAD) describes the general technical approaches and design criteria adopted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in order to implement remedial action plans (RAPS) and final designs that comply with EPA standards. It does not address the technical approaches necessary for aquifer restoration at processing sites; a guidance document, currently in preparation, will describe aquifer restoration concerns and technical protocols. This document is a second revision to the original document issued in May 1986; the revision has been made in response to changes to the groundwater standards of 40 CFR 192, Subparts A--C, proposed by EPA as draft standards. New sections were added to define the design approaches and designs necessary to comply with the groundwater standards. These new sections are in addition to changes made throughout the document to reflect current procedures, especially in cover design, water resources protection, and alternate site selection; only minor revisions were made to some of the sections. Sections 3.0 is a new section defining the approach taken in the design of disposal cells; Section 4.0 has been revised to include design of vegetated covers; Section 8.0 discusses design approaches necessary for compliance with the groundwater standards; and Section 9.0 is a new section dealing with nonradiological hazardous constituents. 203 refs., 18 figs., 26 tabs.

  11. [A health economics approach].

    PubMed

    Esslinger, Adelheid Susanne; Heppner, Hans Jürgen

    2008-08-01

    Frailty is a complex term and has a broad influence on the elderly patients. For evaluating the monetary impact of frailty it is necessary to approach in a differentiated way. It is of great interest to discover the relevance of multidisciplinary assessment and accordant preventive actions. In this article the costs of osteoporosis and (hip) fractures are briefly presented. PMID:18677699

  12. Adopting a Pluricentric Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kerckvoorde, Colette

    2012-01-01

    This article argues for a "D-A-CH" approach, which stands for Germany (D), Austria (A), and Switzerland (CH), in language classes from the introductory level on. I begin by tracing the emergence and development of distinct Standard Swiss and Austrian German varieties. I then discuss marketing efforts for Swiss and Austrian German, and…

  13. Approaches to acceptable risk

    SciTech Connect

    Whipple, C.

    1997-04-30

    Several alternative approaches to address the question {open_quotes}How safe is safe enough?{close_quotes} are reviewed and an attempt is made to apply the reasoning behind these approaches to the issue of acceptability of radiation exposures received in space. The approaches to the issue of the acceptability of technological risk described here are primarily analytical, and are drawn from examples in the management of environmental health risks. These include risk-based approaches, in which specific quantitative risk targets determine the acceptability of an activity, and cost-benefit and decision analysis, which generally focus on the estimation and evaluation of risks, benefits and costs, in a framework that balances these factors against each other. These analytical methods tend by their quantitative nature to emphasize the magnitude of risks, costs and alternatives, and to downplay other factors, especially those that are not easily expressed in quantitative terms, that affect acceptance or rejection of risk. Such other factors include the issues of risk perceptions and how and by whom risk decisions are made.

  14. New Ideas and Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukov, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    The article examines theories of youth that have been proposed in the past few years by Russian scientists, and presents the author's original version of a theory of youth that is based on the thesaurus methodological approach. It addresses the ways in which biosocial characteristics may be reflected in new theories of youth.

  15. SYSTEMS APPROACH TO LEARNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WIENS, JACOB H.

    TO PERMIT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS FOR PURPOSES OF EDUCATIONAL PLANNING AT SAN MATEO, FIVE INSTITUTIONS WITH SYSTEMS PROGRAMS ARE EVALUATED ON THE BASIS OF TRIP NOTES. OAKLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE HAS BEEN COMPLETELY ORGANIZED AROUND THE VOLUNTARY WORK-STUDY LABORATORY APPROACH TO LEARNING. ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY, OKLAHOMA CHRISTIAN COLLEGE, HENRY FORD…

  16. Overview of Curricular Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartz, Cameo V.; Parker, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Institutions of higher education address the transition from after-college life in a variety of curricular approaches. Articulation agreements provide greater transferability of courses from one college to another, thereby easing the transition for students. Career courses, which are typically taught by career center staff, are a common offering…

  17. Orion Emergency Mask Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, George C.; Graf, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Emergency mask approach on Orion poses a challenge to the traditional Shuttle or Station approaches. Currently, in the case of a fire or toxic spill event, the crew utilizes open loop oxygen masks that provide the crew with oxygen to breath, but also dumps the exhaled oxygen into the cabin. For Orion, with a small cabin volume, the extra oxygen will exceed the flammability limit within a short period of time, unless a nitrogen purge is also provided. Another approach to a fire or toxic spill event is the use of a filtering emergency masks. These masks utilize some form of chemical beds to scrub the air clean of toxic providing the crew safe breathing air for a period without elevating the oxygen level in the cabin. Using the masks and a form of smoke-eater filter, it may be possible to clean the cabin completely or to a level for safe transition to a space suit to perform a cabin purge. Issues with filters in the past have been the reaction time, breakthroughs, and high breathing resistance. Development in a new form of chemical filters has shown promise to make the filtering approach feasible.

  18. Orion Emergency Mask Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, George C.; Graf, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Emergency mask approach on Orion poses a challenge to the traditional Shuttle or Station approaches. Currently, in the case of a fire or toxic spill event, the crew utilizes open loop oxygen masks that provide the crew with oxygen to breath, but also dumps the exhaled oxygen into the cabin. For Orion, with a small cabin volume, the extra oxygen will exceed the flammability limit within a short period of time, unless a nitrogen purge is also provided. Another approach to a fire or toxic spill event is the use of a filtering emergency masks. These masks utilize some form of chemical beds to scrub the air clean of toxic providing the crew safe breathing air for a period without elevating the oxygen level in the cabin. Using the masks and a form of smoke-eater filter, it may be possible to clean the cabin completely or to a level for safe transition to a space suit to perform a cabin purge. Issues with filters in the past have been the reaction temperature and high breathing resistance. Development in a new form of chemical filters has shown promise to make the filtering approach feasible.

  19. Islamic approach in counseling.

    PubMed

    Hanin Hamjah, Salasiah; Mat Akhir, Noor Shakirah

    2014-02-01

    A religious approach is one of the matters emphasized in counseling today. Many researchers find that there is a need to apply the religious element in counseling because religion is important in a client's life. The purpose of this research is to identify aspects of the Islamic approach applied in counseling clients by counselors at Pusat Kaunseling Majlis Agama Islam Negeri Sembilan (PKMAINS). In addition, this research also analyses the Islamic approach applied in counseling at PKMAINS with reference to al-Quran and al-Sunnah. This is a qualitative research in the form of case study at PKMAINS. The main method used in this research is interview. The research instrument used is interview protocol. The respondents in this study include 9 counselors who serve in one of the counseling centers in Malaysia. This study also uses questionnaire as an additional instrument, distributed to 36 clients who receive counseling service at the center. The findings of the study show that the Islamic approach applied in counseling at PKMAINS may be categorized into three main aspects: aqidah (faith), ibadah (worship/ultimate devotion and love for God) and akhlaq (moral conduct). Findings also show that the counseling in these aspects is in line with Islamic teachings as contained in al-Quran and al-Sunnah. PMID:23563898

  20. Integrative approach to obesity.

    PubMed

    McClafferty, Hilary H

    2007-12-01

    Integrative medicine blends conventional medicine with carefully evaluated complementary therapies and considers all elements of a patient's lifestyle (physical, mental, spiritual). Integrative medicine therapies and philosophies have characteristics similar to those of successful treatment programs for pediatric obesity. This article defines pediatric obesity and explores those similarities in more detail. It also updates the practitioner on selected integrative approaches as they relate to prevention and treatment of pediatric obesity. PMID:18061786

  1. Parsec's astrometry direct approaches .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, A. H.

    Parallaxes - and hence the fundamental establishment of stellar distances - rank among the oldest, keyest, and hardest of astronomical determinations. Arguably amongst the most essential too. The direct approach to obtain trigonometric parallaxes, using a constrained set of equations to derive positions, proper motions, and parallaxes, has been labeled as risky. Properly so, because the axis of the parallactic apparent ellipse is smaller than one arcsec even for the nearest stars, and just a fraction of its perimeter can be followed. Thus the classical approach is of linearizing the description by locking the solution to a set of precise positions of the Earth at the instants of observation, rather than to the dynamics of its orbit, and of adopting a close examination of the never many points available. In the PARSEC program the parallaxes of 143 brown dwarfs were aimed at. Five years of observation of the fields were taken with the WIFI camera at the ESO 2.2m telescope, in Chile. The goal is to provide a statistically significant number of trigonometric parallaxes to BD sub-classes from L0 to T7. Taking advantage of the large, regularly spaced, quantity of observations, here we take the risky approach to fit an ellipse in ecliptical observed coordinates and derive the parallaxes. We also combine the solutions from different centroiding methods, widely proven in prior astrometric investigations. As each of those methods assess diverse properties of the PSFs, they are taken as independent measurements, and combined into a weighted least-square general solution.

  2. Computational vaccinology: quantitative approaches.

    PubMed

    Flower, Darren R; McSparron, Helen; Blythe, Martin J; Zygouri, Christianna; Taylor, Debra; Guan, Pingping; Wan, Shouzhan; Coveney, Peter V; Walshe, Valerie; Borrow, Persephone; Doytchinova, Irini A

    2003-01-01

    The immune system is hierarchical and has many levels, exhibiting much emergent behaviour. However, at its heart are molecular recognition events that are indistinguishable from other types of biomacromolecular interaction. These can be addressed well by quantitative experimental and theoretical biophysical techniques, and particularly by methods from drug design. We review here our approach to computational immunovaccinology. In particular, we describe the JenPep database and two new techniques for T cell epitope prediction. One is based on quantitative structure-activity relationships (a 3D-QSAR method based on CoMSIA and another 2D method based on the Free-Wilson approach) and the other on atomistic molecular dynamic simulations using high performance computing. JenPep (http://www.jenner.ar.uk/ JenPep) is a relational database system supporting quantitative data on peptide binding to major histocompatibility complexes, TAP transporters, TCR-pMHC complexes, and an annotated list of B cell and T cell epitopes. Our 2D-QSAR method factors the contribution to peptide binding from individual amino acids as well as 1-2 and 1-3 residue interactions. In the 3D-QSAR approach, the influence of five physicochemical properties (volume, electrostatic potential, hydrophobicity, hydrogen-bond donor and acceptor abilities) on peptide affinity were considered. Both methods are exemplified through their application to the well-studied problem of peptide binding to the human class I MHC molecule HLA-A*0201. PMID:14712934

  3. A modal approach to modeling spatially distributed vibration energy dissipation.

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph

    2010-08-01

    The nonlinear behavior of mechanical joints is a confounding element in modeling the dynamic response of structures. Though there has been some progress in recent years in modeling individual joints, modeling the full structure with myriad frictional interfaces has remained an obstinate challenge. A strategy is suggested for structural dynamics modeling that can account for the combined effect of interface friction distributed spatially about the structure. This approach accommodates the following observations: (1) At small to modest amplitudes, the nonlinearity of jointed structures is manifest primarily in the energy dissipation - visible as vibration damping; (2) Correspondingly, measured vibration modes do not change significantly with amplitude; and (3) Significant coupling among the modes does not appear to result at modest amplitudes. The mathematical approach presented here postulates the preservation of linear modes and invests all the nonlinearity in the evolution of the modal coordinates. The constitutive form selected is one that works well in modeling spatially discrete joints. When compared against a mathematical truth model, the distributed dissipation approximation performs well.

  4. Topological approach to proton spin problem: decomposition controversy and beyond

    E-print Network

    S. C. Tiwari

    2015-09-10

    Lorentz covariant and gauge invariant definitions of quark and gluon spin and orbital angular momenta continue to pose a great theoretical challenge. A major controversy on the fundamental concepts followed Chen et al proposal: the basic idea is to split the gauge potential into pure gauge and physical components motivated by the gauge symmetry. We term it gauge symmetry paradigm (GSP) to distinguish it from the well-known inertial frame dependent transverse-longitudinal decomposition (TLP). A thorough study adhering to the traditional meaning of Lorentz covariance and gauge invariance is reported; it leads to a new result: logically consistent development of GSP does not exist and Chen et al proposal turns out to be either trivial or metamorphosed into TLP. Going beyond the controversy and the spin sum rules the necessity for a nonperurbative QCD approach to address the proton spin problem is underlined. We suggest topological approach: generalized de Rham theorems for QCD, and spin as a topological invariant for baryons are discussed. Nonabelian Stokes theorem is applied to derive color flux for the closed loop in a variant of Burkardt's U-shaped path. Similarity between Chen et al decomposition and Kondo decomposition of the gauge potential is suggestive of a topological perspective on the Chen et al proposal with interesting physics

  5. Perioperative approach to children.

    PubMed

    Zuckerberg, A L

    1994-02-01

    There has been a tremendous amount of progress in the perioperative approach to the child since Levy wrote "Psychic trauma of operations in children and a note on combat neurosis" nearly 50 years ago. Recognition of prolonged behavioral derangements following the anesthetic-surgical-hospital experience and the prominent role that the parent and physician play in modifying these have dramatically changed the contemporary pediatric perioperative care. Of paramount importance is the psychological preparation of family and child. With increasing outpatient or same-day admission surgery and free-standing surgical centers, preoperative preparation will, of necessity, increasingly become the responsibility of the pediatrician. PMID:8295800

  6. Cognitive approaches to emotions.

    PubMed

    Oatley, Keith; Johnson-Laird, P N

    2014-03-01

    Cognitive approaches offer clear links between how emotions are thought about in everyday life and how they are investigated psychologically. Cognitive researchers have focused on how emotions are caused when events or other people affect concerns and on how emotions influence processes such as reasoning, memory, and attention. Three representative cognitive theories of emotion continue to develop productively: the action-readiness theory, the core-affect theory, and the communicative theory. Some principles are common to them and divergences can be resolved by future research. Recent explanations have included how emotions structure social relationships, how they function in psychological illnesses, and how they are central to music and fiction. PMID:24389368

  7. Abortion: Approaches from Virtue

    E-print Network

    Rovie, Eric M.

    stream_size 32037 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Auslegung.v25.n02.137-150.pdf.txt stream_source_info Auslegung.v25.n02.137-150.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Abortion...: Approaches from Virtue Eric M. Rovie Washington University in St. Louis It is a platitude that the issue of abortion polarizes people into extreme positions. In this paper, I explore the oft-neglected gray area between the pro-life stance and pro...

  8. New approaches for immunosuppression

    SciTech Connect

    Eiseman, B.; Hansbrough, J.; Weil, R.

    1980-01-01

    New approaches for experimental immunosuppression have been reviewed. These include the following: (1) cyclosporin A, a metabolite from fungus that suppresses multiplying but not resting T and B lymphocytes and can be used in pulsed manner with interspersed drug-free periods; (2) total lymphoid irradiation (transplantation tolerance in rats has been achieved by pretransplant radiation); (3) thoracic duct drainage, which is being revived following its demonstrated effectiveness in the treatment of some autoimmune diseases; (4) hyperbaric oxygen (HBOX). We have found that HBOX 2 1/2 ATA for five hours daily depresses cell-mediated immunity in mice and that this can be reversed by intravenous administration of autologous macrophages.

  9. The collaboratory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, A.M.

    1997-04-01

    A {open_quotes}collaboratory{close_quotes} has been defined as a center without walls, in which researchers can perform their work without regard to geographical location. To an increasing degree, engineering design and development is also taking the form of far-flung collaborations among divisions of a plant, subcontractors, university consultants and customers. It has long been recognized that quality engineering education presents the student with an environment that duplicates as much as possible that which the graduate will encounter in industry. To that end, it is important that engineering schools begin to introduce the collaboratory approach in its preparation, and even use it in delivery of subject matter to students.

  10. Two approaches to human rights

    E-print Network

    Holland, Sean Jamison

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary philosophy of human rights is dominated by two seemingly opposed approaches. This dissertation is concerned with the choice between them. The traditional approach to human rights is characterized by the belief ...

  11. Engineering approaches to immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Melody A; Hirosue, Sachiko; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2012-08-22

    As the science of immunology grows increasingly mechanistic, motivation for developing quantitative, design-based engineering approaches has also evolved, both for therapeutic interventions and for elucidating immunological pathways in human disease. This has seeded the nascent field of "immunoengineering," which seeks to apply engineering analyses and design approaches to problems in translational immunology. For example, cell engineers are creating ways to tailor and use immune cells as living therapeutics; protein engineers are devising new methods of rapid antibody discovery; biomaterials scientists are guiding vaccine delivery and immune-cell activation with novel constructs; and systems immunologists are deciphering the evolution and maintenance of T and B cell receptor repertoires, which could help guide vaccine design. The field is multidisciplinary and collaborative, with engineers and immunologists working together to better understand and treat disease. We discuss the scientific progress in this young, yet rapidly evolving research area, which has yielded numerous start-up companies that are betting on impact in clinical and commercial translation in the near future. PMID:22914624

  12. The quality systems approach.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, D E

    1999-07-01

    Health care as an industry is going through an evolution similar to that experienced by manufacturing and other service sectors of the world economy. When competition threatens, the traditional management approach is slash-and-burn to manage costs. This approach affects people, services, and facilities. When the slash-and-burn method runs out of fuel, organizations start to merge, thinking that bigger is better. Just getting bigger only looks like change, with a new cast of fewer people and organizational structure. The root cause for existing problems has not been fixed. The only real solution, as manufacturing and services learned, is to understand and improve work processes to ensure that the right work is being done in a high-quality manner and at a competitive price. The era of quality systems is just dawning in health care. The focus must remain on quality patient outcomes at a competitive price by improving supporting systems and processes to accomplish these goals. PMID:10388908

  13. Breakfast: a multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of breakfast as an essential part of an healthy diet has been only recently promoted even if breakfast practices were known since the Middle Age. The growing scientific evidences on this topic are extremely sector-based nevertheless breakfast could be regarded from different point of views and from different expertises. This approach, that take into account history, sociology, anthropology, medicine, psychology and pedagogy, is useful to better understand the value of this meal in our culture. The aim of this paper was to analyse breakfast-related issues based on a multidisciplinary approach with input by specialists from different fields of learning. Discussion Breakfast is now recommended as part of a diet because it is associated with healthier macro- and micronutrient intakes, body mass index and lifestyle. Moreover recent studies showed that breakfast improves cognitive function, intuitive perception and academic performance. Research demonstrates the importance of providing breakfast not only to children but in adults and elderly too. Although the important role breakfast plays in maintaining the health, epidemiological data from industrialised countries reveal that many individuals either eat a nutritionally unhealthy breakfast or skip it completely. Summary The historical, bio-psychological and educational value of breakfast in our culture is extremely important and should be recognized and stressed by the scientific community. Efforts should be done to promote this practice for the individual health and well-being. PMID:23842429

  14. Modular Approach to Spintronics.

    PubMed

    Camsari, Kerem Yunus; Ganguly, Samiran; Datta, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    There has been enormous progress in the last two decades, effectively combining spintronics and magnetics into a powerful force that is shaping the field of memory devices. New materials and phenomena continue to be discovered at an impressive rate, providing an ever-increasing set of building blocks that could be exploited in designing transistor-like functional devices of the future. The objective of this paper is to provide a quantitative foundation for this building block approach, so that new discoveries can be integrated into functional device concepts, quickly analyzed and critically evaluated. Through careful benchmarking against available theory and experiment we establish a set of elemental modules representing diverse materials and phenomena. These elemental modules can be integrated seamlessly to model composite devices involving both spintronic and nanomagnetic phenomena. We envision the library of modules to evolve both by incorporating new modules and by improving existing modules as the field progresses. The primary contribution of this paper is to establish the ground rules or protocols for a modular approach that can build a lasting bridge between materials scientists and circuit designers in the field of spintronics and nanomagnetics. PMID:26066079

  15. Modular Approach to Spintronics

    PubMed Central

    Camsari, Kerem Yunus; Ganguly, Samiran; Datta, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    There has been enormous progress in the last two decades, effectively combining spintronics and magnetics into a powerful force that is shaping the field of memory devices. New materials and phenomena continue to be discovered at an impressive rate, providing an ever-increasing set of building blocks that could be exploited in designing transistor-like functional devices of the future. The objective of this paper is to provide a quantitative foundation for this building block approach, so that new discoveries can be integrated into functional device concepts, quickly analyzed and critically evaluated. Through careful benchmarking against available theory and experiment we establish a set of elemental modules representing diverse materials and phenomena. These elemental modules can be integrated seamlessly to model composite devices involving both spintronic and nanomagnetic phenomena. We envision the library of modules to evolve both by incorporating new modules and by improving existing modules as the field progresses. The primary contribution of this paper is to establish the ground rules or protocols for a modular approach that can build a lasting bridge between materials scientists and circuit designers in the field of spintronics and nanomagnetics. PMID:26066079

  16. A Narrative Approach to Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Anne

    2003-01-01

    In this paper I present a narrative approach to environmental education research. This approach evolved through a dynamic interplay between research questions, theory, experience, conversation, and reflection. I situate the approach with respect to narrative inquiry and clarify the key conceptual metaphors underpinning my study, including "story,"…

  17. THE CHALLENGE ... A PROGRAM FOR GIFTED CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARTER, C. DOUGLAS

    THE NONGRADED PRIMARY SCHOOL ALLOWS EACH CHILD TO PROGRESS AT HIS OWN RATE. LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT ARE SET UP FOR LANGUAGE ARTS, SOCIAL STUDIES, AND SCIENCE. THE BASIC LANGUAGE SKILLS ARE DIVIDED INTO EIGHT LEVELS, BY THE TIME THE CHILD HAS COMPLETED THE EIGHTH LEVEL, HE HAS DEVELOPED MOST OF HIS NECESSARY READING SKILLS. A NINTH LEVEL IS INCLUDED…

  18. Afghanistan's Opium Challenge: A Decentralized Solution

    E-print Network

    Masjidi, Shamroz Khan

    2012-05-31

    According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Afghanistan since 2003 is the largest producer of illicit opium in the world. In 2011, it produced 5,800 metric tons of opium from approximately 131,000 hectors cultivated land - an increase...

  19. Sea otter health: Challenging a pet hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lafferty, Kevin D

    2015-12-01

    A recent series of studies on tagged sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) challenges the hypothesis that sea otters are sentinels of a dirty ocean, in particular, that pet cats are the main source of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii in central California. Counter to expectations, sea otters from unpopulated stretches of coastline are less healthy and more exposed to parasites than city-associated otters. Ironically, now it seems that spillover from wildlife, not pets, dominates spatial patterns of disease transmission. PMID:26155464

  20. Food safety challenges--a Pakistan's perspective.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Biological, chemical, and physical contamination of foods is a terrifying threat for the health and economic growth in developing societies. Rampantly available literature on foodborne illnesses especially diarrhea among children exclusively depicts the intensified disease burden associated with foodborne illness in the underdeveloped economies. Prevalence of many pathogens in several foods is commonplace in Pakistan. Precise estimates for foodborne illnesses in Pakistan are hard to make because of the absence of any monitoring, surveillance, and infection control. Poor processing and storage of milk, cereal grains, and nuts are a major cause of aflatoxin contamination and mold proliferation. Numerous studies manifest a multitude of foods to be contaminated with heavy metals. Escalating population growth limits the economic potential of the individual and the state through a tendency among the traders and manufacturers to intentionally debase food commodities offered for sale to make profit at the cost of their quality and safety. Therefore, a growing trend of adulteration in foods during the recent past, particularly adulteration of milk, poses a pressing challenge for the government. This review is a concerted attempt to elucidate the prevailing food safety scenario in Pakistan. Information derived from local and related international studies will be presented to clearly depict a picture of food safety in Pakistan. It is proposed that an extensive food safety infrastructure leading to a safer supply of foods needs to be devised, designed, and implemented. PMID:24915401

  1. Accepting the Utopian Challenge: A Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carman, Breanna R.

    2013-01-01

    The scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) allows institutions to achieve the goals required for student learning and success. The purpose of this paper is to address recommendations for the implementation of SoTL that should have relevant input from students. These include, but are not limited to, better communication, evaluation, continuing…

  2. Sea otter health: Challenging a pet hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    A recent series of studies on tagged sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) challenges the hypothesis that sea otters are sentinels of a dirty ocean, in particular, that pet cats are the main source of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii in central California. Counter to expectations, sea otters from unpopulated stretches of coastline are less healthy and more exposed to parasites than city-associated otters. Ironically, now it seems that spillover from wildlife, not pets, dominates spatial patterns of disease transmission. PMID:26155464

  3. Challenging a culture of racial equivalence.

    PubMed

    Song, Miri

    2014-03-01

    We live at a time when our understandings and conceptualizations of 'racism' are often highly imprecise, broad, and used to describe a wide range of racialized phenomena. In this article, I raise some important questions about how the term racism is used and understood in contemporary British society by drawing on some recent cases of alleged racism in football and politics, many of which have been played out via new media technologies. A broader understanding of racism, through the use of the term 'racialization', has been helpful in articulating a more nuanced and complex understanding of racial incidents, especially of people's (often ambivalent) beliefs and behaviours. However, the growing emphasis upon 'racialization' has led to a conceptualization of racism which increasingly involves multiple perpetrators, victims, and practices without enough consideration of how and why particular interactions and practices constitute racism as such. The trend toward a growing culture of racial equivalence is worrying, as it denudes the idea of racism of its historical basis, severity and power. These frequent and commonplace assertions of racism in the public sphere paradoxically end up trivializing and homogenizing quite different forms of racialized interactions. I conclude that we need to retain the term 'racism', but we need to differentiate more clearly between 'racism' (as an historical and structured system of domination) from the broader notion of 'racialization'. PMID:24697716

  4. Sea otter health: challenging a pet hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    A recent series of studies on tagged sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) challenges the hypothesis that sea otters are sentinels of a dirty ocean, in particular, that pet cats are the main source of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii in central California. Counter to expectations, sea otters from unpopulated stretches of coastline are less healthy and more exposed to parasites than city-associated otters. Ironically, now it seems that spillover from wildlife, not pets, dominates spatial patterns of disease transmission.

  5. Patient Perspectives in OMERACT Provide an Anchor for Future Metric Development and Improved Approaches to Healthcare Delivery in Connective Tissue Disease Related Interstitial Lung Disease (CTD-ILD)

    PubMed Central

    Mittoo, Shikha; Frankel, Sid; LeSage, Daphne; Strand, Vibeke; Shah, Ami A.; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Danoff, Sonye; Hummers, Laura K.; Swigris, Jeffery J.; Huscher, Dörte; Christensen, Angela M.; Cenac, Sophia L.; Erbil, Jen K.; Ferguson, Sancia; Garcia-Valladares, Ignacio; Grewal, Harmanjot K.; Orbai, Ana-Maria; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Tran, Maithy; Bingham, Clifton O.; Castelino, Flavia V.; Fischer, Aryeh; Saketkoo, Lesley Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objective The impact and natural history of connective tissue disease related interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD) are poorly understood; and have not been previously described from the patient’s perspective. This investigation sought insight into CTD-ILD from the patients’ perspective to add to our knowledge of CTD-ILD, identify disease-specific areas of unmet need and gather potentially meaningful information towards development of disease-specific patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). Methods A mixed methods design incorporating patient focus groups (FGs) querying disease progression and life impact followed by questionnaires with items of importance generated by >250 ILD specialists were implemented among CTD-ILD patients with rheumatoid arthritis, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, systemic sclerosis, and other CTD subtypes. FG data were analyzed through inductive analysis with five independent analysts, including a patient research partner. Questionnaires were analyzed through Fisher’s Exact tests and hierarchal cluster analysis. Results Six multicenter FGs included 45 patients. Biophysiologic themes were cough and dyspnea, both pervasively impacting health related quality of life (HRQoL). Language indicating dyspnea was unexpected, unique and contextual. Psycho-social themes were Living with Uncertainty, Struggle over Self-Identity, and Self-Efficacy - with education and clinician communication strongly emphasised. All questionnaire items were rated ‘moderately’ to ‘extremely’ important with 10 items of highest importance identified by cluster analysis. Conclusion Patients with CTD-ILD informed our understanding of symptoms and impact on HRQoL. Cough and dyspnea are central to the CTD-ILD experience. Initial FGs have provided disease-specific content, context and language essential for reliable PROM development with questionnaires adding value in recognition of patients’ concerns. PMID:26568747

  6. Coordinated Parallel Runway Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koczo, Steve

    1996-01-01

    The current air traffic environment in airport terminal areas experiences substantial delays when weather conditions deteriorate to Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). Expected future increases in air traffic will put additional pressures on the National Airspace System (NAS) and will further compound the high costs associated with airport delays. To address this problem, NASA has embarked on a program to address Terminal Area Productivity (TAP). The goals of the TAP program are to provide increased efficiencies in air traffic during the approach, landing, and surface operations in low-visibility conditions. The ultimate goal is to achieve efficiencies of terminal area flight operations commensurate with Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) at current or improved levels of safety.

  7. Approaching the new reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Al V.

    1993-01-01

    I'm very pleased to be here and to have this opportunity to discuss with you what I view as the current challenges in space science. Today, NASA finds itself at a major crossroads. We are in the process of moving from one era in our existence into another. As we continue to launch important science missions, we are simultaneously changing the way we do business, in a very fundamental way. We are again focusing on more frequent access to space through smaller, less costly missions. We are again focusing on NASA's role as a source of technological advancement within the U.S. economy. And we are returning to the leaner, more flexible approach to managing our projects. In short, NASA has embarked on a new journey, and a challenging journey it will be.

  8. Neuroblastoma: A neurochemical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Schor, N.F. )

    1991-07-01

    Neuroblastoma is among the most common malignancies of childhood. Despite greatly improved therapy for some pediatric tumors, the prognosis for children with metastatic neuroblastoma has not changed significantly in the past 10 years. With conventional chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery, children with metastatic neuroblastoma have a 20% long-term survival rate. The authors describe here approaches to neuroblastoma that target its neuronal characteristics. On the one hand, the neurotransmitter receptors on the surface of the neuroblastoma cells and, on the other hand, specific isozymes that distinguish neuroblastoma cells from their normal counterparts are the focus of these experimental therapies. In the former case, specificity for tumor cells is effected by (1) selective protection of normal neuronal elements from toxicity, or (2) selective potentiation of toxicity for neural tumor cells. It is hoped that these strategies will be generalizable to other neural crest-derived tumors. 32 references.

  9. Therapeutic Approaches for Shankopathies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoming; Bey, Alexandra; Chang, Leeyup; Krystal, Andrew D.; Jiang, Yong-hui

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), the current treatments for these disorders are mostly focused on behavioral and educational approaches. The considerable clinical and molecular heterogeneity of ASD present a significant challenge to the development of an effective treatment targeting underlying molecular defects. Deficiency of SHANK family genes causing ASD represent an exciting opportunity for developing molecular therapies because of strong genetic evidence for SHANKs as causative genes in ASD and the availability of a panel of Shank mutant mouse models. In this article we review the literature suggesting the potential for developing therapies based on molecular characteristics and discuss several exciting themes that are emerging from studying Shank mutant mice at the molecular level and in terms of synaptic function. PMID:23536326

  10. An environmental approach

    SciTech Connect

    Geerling, C.

    1996-11-01

    The Shell Petroleum Development Company is operating in southern Nigeria in the delta of the Niger River. This delta covers an area 70,000 square kin of coastal ridge barriers, mangroves, freshwater swamp forest and lowland rain forests. Over the past decades considerable changes has occurred through coastal zone modifications, upstream urban and hydrological infrastructure, deforestation, agriculture, fisheries, industrial development, oil operation, as well as demographic changes. The problems associated with these changes are: (1) over-exploitation of renewable natural resources and breakdown of traditional management structures; (2) impact from industry such as pollution and physical changes, and (3) a perception of lack of social and economic equity. This paper describes approaches to help counteract theses problems.

  11. Psychological symptoms and medical responses in nineteenth-century India.

    PubMed

    Radhika, P; Murthy, Pratima; Sarin, Alok; Jain, Sanjeev

    2015-03-01

    The article documents medical approaches to mental illness in mid- to late-nineteenth-century India through examining the Indian Medical Gazette and other medical accounts. By the late nineteenth century, psychiatry in Europe moved from discussions around asylum-based care to a nuanced and informed debate about the nature of mental symptoms. This included ideas on phrenology and craniometry, biological and psycho-social causes, physical and drug treatments, many of which travelled to India. Simultaneously, indigenous socio-medical ideas were being debated. From the early to the mid-nineteenth century, not much distinction was made between the Western and the native 'mind', and consequently the diagnosis and investigation of mental symptoms did not differ. However, by the late nineteenth century Western medicine considered the 'Western mind' as more civilized and sophisticated than the 'native mind. PMID:25698688

  12. [Systemic therapies--a contribution to psychotherapy integration].

    PubMed

    Schiepek, Günter

    2012-06-01

    Some converging lines from neuroscience, neurobiological psychotherapy research, process-outcome-research, internet-based change monitoring and the systems and complexity sciences actually allow for an open and generic definition of systemic therapies. The "family" of systemic therapies as designed here is not restricted to the field of psychotherapy. It is a scientifically founded and engaged, bio-psycho-social multi-level approach to a common or integrative psychotherapy, not restricted to a psychotherapeutic confession or exclusively to family or couples therapy. A core element of systemic therapy is the support of self-organizing processes and the use of data-driven feedback tools. The conclusion goes to a modified concept of evidence-based practice and, vice versa, practice-based evidence, to an integration of the medical model and the common factors model into a self-organization theory of human change processes, and to a list of criteria for scientifically based practice in psychotherapy. PMID:22638946

  13. Internet Training for Nurse Aides to Prevent Resident Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Blair Irvine, A.; Bourgeois, Michelle; Billow, Molly; Seeley, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate Internet training to help Nurse Aides decrease resident aggression. Design Randomized treatment and control design; pre-post assessment. Setting The study was conducted entirely on the Internet. Participants Nurse Aides; N=62 Intervention Internet based interactive training using video modeling and mastery learning instructional design. Measurements Video situations testing and assessment of psycho-social constructs associated with behavior change; follow-up interviews with a sample of treatment participants. Results MANCOVA analysis showed positive results (p=.001) for knowledge, attitudes, self efficacy, and behavioral intention, with large effect sizes; it was well received by the users. Conclusions Interactive training is an effective approach to shaping appropriate staff reactions to aggressive resident behaviors. The training can effectively be delivered on the Internet. In this research, it was both valued and well received by study participants. PMID:17931576

  14. Approaching attometer laser vibrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rembe, Christian; Kadner, Lisa; Giesen, Moritz

    2014-05-27

    The heterodyne two-beam interferometer has been proven to be the optimal solution for laser-Doppler vibrometry regarding accuracy and signal robustness. The theoretical resolution limit for a two-beam interferometer of laser class 3R (up to 5 mW visible measurement-light) is in the regime of a few femtometer per square-root Hertz and well suited to study vibrations in microstructures. However, some new applications of RF-MEM resonators, nanostructures, and surface-nano-defect detection require resolutions beyond that limit. The resolution depends only on the noise and the sensor sensitivity to specimen displacements. The noise is already defined in nowadays systems by the quantum nature of light for a properly designed optical sensor and more light would lead to an inacceptable influence like heating of a very tiny structure. Thus, noise can only be improved by squeezed-light techniques which require a negligible loss of measurement light which is impossible for almost all technical measurement tasks. Thus, improving the sensitivity is the only possible path which could make attometer laser vibrometry possible. Decreasing the measurement wavelength would increase the sensitivity but would also increase the photon shot noise. In this paper, we discuss an approach to increase the sensitivity by assembling an additional mirror between interferometer and specimen to form an optical cavity. A detailed theoretical analysis of this setup is presented and we derive the resolution limit, discuss the main contributions to the uncertainty budget, and show a first experiment proving the sensitivity amplification of our approach.

  15. Treating comorbid anxiety and depression: Psychosocial and pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Coplan, Jeremy D; Aaronson, Cindy J; Panthangi, Venkatesh; Kim, Younsuk

    2015-12-22

    Comorbid anxiety with depression predicts poor outcomes with a higher percentage of treatment resistance than either disorder occurring alone. Overlap of anxiety and depression complicates diagnosis and renders treatment challenging. A vital step in treatment of such comorbidity is careful and comprehensive diagnostic assessment. We attempt to explain various psychosocial and pharmacological approaches for treatment of comorbid anxiety and depression. For the psychosocial component, we focus only on generalized anxiety disorder based on the following theoretical models: (1) "the avoidance model"; (2) "the intolerance of uncertainty model"; (3) "the meta-cognitive model"; (4) "the emotion dysregulation model"; and (5) "the acceptance based model". For depression, the following theoretical models are explicated: (1) "the cognitive model"; (2) "the behavioral activation model"; and (3) "the interpersonal model". Integration of these approaches is suggested. The treatment of comorbid anxiety and depression necessitates specific psychopharmacological adjustments as compared to treating either condition alone. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors are considered first-line treatment in uncomplicated depression comorbid with a spectrum of anxiety disorders. Short-acting benzodiazepines (BZDs) are an important "bridging strategy" to address an acute anxiety component. In patients with comorbid substance abuse, avoidance of BZDs is recommended and we advise using an atypical antipsychotic in lieu of BZDs. For mixed anxiety and depression comorbid with bipolar disorder, we recommend augmentation of an antidepressant with either lamotrigine or an atypical agent. Combination and augmentation therapies in the treatment of comorbid conditions vis-à-vis monotherapy may be necessary for positive outcomes. Combination therapy with tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentin and selective serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (e.g., duloxetine) are specifically useful for comorbid chronic pain syndromes. Aripiprazole, quetiapine, risperidone and other novel atypical agents may be effective as augmentations. For treatment-resistant patients, we recommend a "stacking approach" not dissimilar from treatment of hypertension In conclusion, we delineate a comprehensive approach comprising integration of various psychosocial approaches and incremental pharmacological interventions entailing bridging strategies, augmentation therapies and ultimately stacking approaches towards effectively treating comorbid anxiety and depression. PMID:26740928

  16. Treating comorbid anxiety and depression: Psychosocial and pharmacological approaches

    PubMed Central

    Coplan, Jeremy D; Aaronson, Cindy J; Panthangi, Venkatesh; Kim, Younsuk

    2015-01-01

    Comorbid anxiety with depression predicts poor outcomes with a higher percentage of treatment resistance than either disorder occurring alone. Overlap of anxiety and depression complicates diagnosis and renders treatment challenging. A vital step in treatment of such comorbidity is careful and comprehensive diagnostic assessment. We attempt to explain various psychosocial and pharmacological approaches for treatment of comorbid anxiety and depression. For the psychosocial component, we focus only on generalized anxiety disorder based on the following theoretical models: (1) “the avoidance model”; (2) “the intolerance of uncertainty model”; (3) “the meta-cognitive model”; (4) “the emotion dysregulation model”; and (5) “the acceptance based model”. For depression, the following theoretical models are explicated: (1) “the cognitive model”; (2) “the behavioral activation model”; and (3) “the interpersonal model”. Integration of these approaches is suggested. The treatment of comorbid anxiety and depression necessitates specific psychopharmacological adjustments as compared to treating either condition alone. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors are considered first-line treatment in uncomplicated depression comorbid with a spectrum of anxiety disorders. Short-acting benzodiazepines (BZDs) are an important “bridging strategy” to address an acute anxiety component. In patients with comorbid substance abuse, avoidance of BZDs is recommended and we advise using an atypical antipsychotic in lieu of BZDs. For mixed anxiety and depression comorbid with bipolar disorder, we recommend augmentation of an antidepressant with either lamotrigine or an atypical agent. Combination and augmentation therapies in the treatment of comorbid conditions vis-à-vis monotherapy may be necessary for positive outcomes. Combination therapy with tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentin and selective serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (e.g., duloxetine) are specifically useful for comorbid chronic pain syndromes. Aripiprazole, quetiapine, risperidone and other novel atypical agents may be effective as augmentations. For treatment-resistant patients, we recommend a “stacking approach” not dissimilar from treatment of hypertension In conclusion, we delineate a comprehensive approach comprising integration of various psychosocial approaches and incremental pharmacological interventions entailing bridging strategies, augmentation therapies and ultimately stacking approaches towards effectively treating comorbid anxiety and depression. PMID:26740928

  17. Cementing: A systematic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, C.W.; Landrum, W.R.

    1983-10-01

    A step-by-step approach in the form of a cementing process design chart, has been developed for use in Conoco's operating divisions worldwide. The design chart described in this paper includes cement and additive selection and associated hardware for casing and liner cementing operations. Each type of cementing operation is designed to insure the compatibility of hardware and cement slurry components. The process design chart is separated into two major categories: primary cementing; and liner cementing. These categories are separated further into design criteria for cementing each casing string in a well, conductor pipe through production string and each type of liner that is set. Conoco has realized reduced primary cementing costs, up to $35,000.00 per well in some cases, and fewer remedial cement jobs as a result of using practices included in this process design chart. These cost savings can be attributed to the proper cementing practices from many geographic regions which are consolidated into this easy to use cementing design chart. One example of how cement costs can be reduced is by limiting the amount of expensive synthetic cement additives that have been added to less critical pipe strings. These expensive cement additives have been replaced by less expensive natural cement additives that perform just as well, and have resulted in a reduction in the cost per cubic foot of cement slurry.

  18. Mitochondrial approaches for neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Rajnish K.; Beal, M. Flint

    2008-01-01

    A large body of evidence from post-mortem brain tissue and genetic analysis in man and biochemical and pathological studies in animal models (transgenic and toxin) of neurodegeneration suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction is a common pathological mechanism. Mitochondrial dysfunction due to oxidative stress, mitochondrial DNA deletions, pathological mutations, altered mitochondrial morphology and interaction of pathogenic proteins with mitochondria leads to neuronal demise. Therefore, therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage hold great promise in neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses the potential therapeutic efficacy of creatine, coenzyme Q10, idebenone, synthetic triterpenoids, and mitochondrial targeted antioxidants (MitoQ) and peptides (SS-31) in in vitro studies and in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have also reviewed the current status of clinical trials of creatine, coenzyme Q10, idebenone and MitoQ in neurodegenerative disorders. Further, we discuss newly identified therapeutic targets including PGC-1? and Sirtuins, which provide promise for future therapeutic developments in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19076459

  19. Halitosis: the multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Curd ML; Beikler, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Halitosis, bad breath or oral malodour are all synonyms for the same pathology. Halitosis has a large social and economic impact. For the majority of patients suffering from bad breath, it causes embarrassment and affects their social communication and life. Moreover, halitosis can be indicative of underlying diseases. Only a limited number of scientific publications were presented in this field until 1995. Ever since, a large amount of research is published, often with lack of evidence. In general, intraoral conditions, like insufficient dental hygiene, periodontitis or tongue coating are considered to be the most important cause (85%) for halitosis. Therefore, dentists and periodontologists are the first-line professionals to be confronted with this problem. They should be well aware of the origin, the detection and especially of the treatment of this pathology. In addition, ear–nose–throat-associated (10%) or gastrointestinal/endocrinological (5%) disorders may contribute to the problem. In the case of halitophobia, psychiatrical or psychological problems may be present. Bad breath needs a multidisciplinary team approach: dentists, periodontologists, specialists in family medicine, ear–nose–throat surgeons, internal medicine and psychiatry need to be updated in this field, which still is surrounded by a large taboo. Multidisciplinary bad breath clinics offer the best environment to examine and treat this pathology that affects around 25% of the whole population. This article describes the origin, detection and treatment of halitosis, regarded from the different etiological origins. PMID:22722640

  20. COMPRENDO: Focus and Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schulte-Oehlmann, Ulrike; Albanis, Triantafyllos; Allera, Axel; Bachmann, Jean; Berntsson, Pia; Beresford, Nicola; Carnevali, Daniela Candia; Ciceri, Francesca; Dagnac, Thierry; Falandysz, Jerzy; Galassi, Silvana; Hala, David; Janer, Gemma; Jeannot, Roger; Jobling, Susan; King, Isabella; Klingmüller, Dietrich; Kloas, Werner; Kusk, Kresten Ole; Levada, Ramon; Lo, Susan; Lutz, Ilka; Oehlmann, Jörg; Oredsson, Stina; Porte, Cinta; Rand-Weaver, Marian; Sakkas, Vasilis; Sugni, Michela; Tyler, Charles; van Aerle, Ronny; van Ballegoy, Christoph; Wollenberger, Leah

    2006-01-01

    Tens of thousands of man-made chemicals are in regular use and discharged into the environment. Many of them are known to interfere with the hormonal systems in humans and wildlife. Given the complexity of endocrine systems, there are many ways in which endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can affect the body’s signaling system, and this makes unraveling the mechanisms of action of these chemicals difficult. A major concern is that some of these EDCs appear to be biologically active at extremely low concentrations. There is growing evidence to indicate that the guiding principle of traditional toxicology that “the dose makes the poison” may not always be the case because some EDCs do not induce the classical dose–response relationships. The European Union project COMPRENDO (Comparative Research on Endocrine Disrupters—Phylogenetic Approach and Common Principles focussing on Androgenic/Antiandrogenic Compounds) therefore aims to develop an understanding of potential health problems posed by androgenic and antiandrogenic compounds (AACs) to wildlife and humans by focusing on the commonalities and differences in responses to AACs across the animal kingdom (from invertebrates to vertebrates). PMID:16818253

  1. Defining biocultural approaches to conservation.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Michael C; McCarter, Joe; Mead, Aroha; Berkes, Fikret; Stepp, John Richard; Peterson, Debora; Tang, Ruifei

    2015-03-01

    We contend that biocultural approaches to conservation can achieve effective and just conservation outcomes while addressing erosion of both cultural and biological diversity. Here, we propose a set of guidelines for the adoption of biocultural approaches to conservation. First, we draw lessons from work on biocultural diversity and heritage, social-ecological systems theory, integrated conservation and development, co-management, and community-based conservation to define biocultural approaches to conservation. Second, we describe eight principles that characterize such approaches. Third, we discuss reasons for adopting biocultural approaches and challenges. If used well, biocultural approaches to conservation can be a powerful tool for reducing the global loss of both biological and cultural diversity. PMID:25622889

  2. Prepotential approach to quasinormal modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Choon-Lin

    2011-06-15

    Research Highlights: > A unified approach to both exactly and quasi-exactly solvable quasinormal modes. > A simple constructive approach without knowledge of underlying symmetry of the system. > Three new models admitting quasinormal modes. - Abstract: In this paper we demonstrate how the recently reported exactly and quasi-exactly solvable models admitting quasinormal modes can be constructed and classified very simply and directly by the newly proposed prepotential approach. These new models were previously obtained within the Lie-algebraic approach. Unlike the Lie-algebraic approach, the prepotential approach does not require any knowledge of the underlying symmetry of the system. It treats both quasi-exact and exact solvabilities on the same footing, and gives the potential as well as the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues simultaneously. We also present three new models with quasinormal modes: a new exactly solvable Morse-like model, and two new quasi-exactly solvable models of the Scarf II and generalized Poeschl-Teller types.

  3. Ablative Approaches for Pulmonary Metastases.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Matthew J; Ricardi, Umberto; Ball, David; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary metastases are common in patients with cancer for which surgery is considered a standard approach in appropriately selected patients. A number of patients are not candidates for surgery due to a medical comorbidities or the extent of surgery required. For these patients, noninvasive or minimally invasive approaches to ablate pulmonary metastases are potential treatment strategies. This article summarizes the rationale and outcomes for non-surgical treatment approaches, including radiotherapy, radiofrequency and microwave ablation, for pulmonary metastases. PMID:26611507

  4. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS), myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS), Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the syndrome of neurogenic muscle weakness, ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), and Leigh's syndrome. Likewise, other diseases in which mitochondrial dysfunction plays a very important role include neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes or cancer. Generally, in mitochondrial diseases a mutation in the mitochondrial DNA leads to a loss of functionality of the OXPHOS system and thus to a depletion of ATP and overproduction of ROS, which can, in turn, induce further mtDNA mutations. The work by Yu-Ting Wu, Shi-Bei Wu, and Yau-Huei Wei (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taiwan) [4] focuses on the aforementioned mitochondrial diseases with special attention to the compensatory mechanisms that prompt mitochondria to produce more energy even under mitochondrial defect-conditions. These compensatory mechanisms include the overexpression of antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial biogenesis and overexpression of respiratory complex subunits, as well as metabolic shift to glycolysis. The pathways observed to be related to mitochondrial biogenesis as a compensatory adaptation to the energetic deficits in mitochondrial diseases are described (PGC- 1, Sirtuins, AMPK). Several pharmacological strategies to trigger these signaling cascades, according to these authors, are the use of bezafibrate to activate the PPAR-PGC-1? axis, the activation of AMPK by resveratrol and the use of Sirt1 agonists such as quercetin or resveratrol. Other strategies currently used include the addition of antioxidant supplements to the diet (dietary supplementation with antioxidants) such as L-carnitine, coenzyme Q10,MitoQ10 and other mitochondria-targeted antioxidants,N-acetylcysteine (NAC), vitamin C, vitamin E vitamin K1, vitamin B, sodium pyruvate or -lipoic acid. As aforementioned, other diseases do not have exclusively a mitochondrial origin but they might have an importan

  5. Microbial Burden Approach : New Monitoring Approach for Measuring Microbial Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Vaishampayan, Parag; Barmatz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Advantages of new approach for differentiating live cells/ spores from dead cells/spores. Four examples of Salmonella outbreaks leading to costly destruction of dairy products. List of possible collaboration activities between JPL and other industries (for future discussion). Limitations of traditional microbial monitoring approaches. Introduction to new approach for rapid measurement of viable (live) bacterial cells/spores and its areas of application. Detailed example for determining live spores using new approach (similar procedure for determining live cells). JPL has developed a patented approach for measuring amount of live and dead cells/spores. This novel "molecular" method takes less than 5 to 7 hrs. compared to the seven days required using conventional techniques. Conventional "molecular" techniques can not discriminate live cells/spores among dead cells/spores. The JPL-developed novel method eliminates false positive results obtained from conventional "molecular" techniques that lead to unnecessary delay in the processing and to unnecessary destruction of food products.

  6. Quantum Theories and Relativistic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov-Borodin, A. V.

    2010-05-04

    Deterministic and nondeterministic approaches are widely used in physics in relativistic and quantum theories. The questions of general consistency of these theories and the principal possibility of their unification are considered. There is proposed the way to unification of deterministic and nondeterministic approaches in non-contradictive system. Some consequences of this supposition are considered and discussed.

  7. Approaches to Teaching Foreign Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse, M. G., Ed.

    Works by European and American educators from the Renaissance to the twentieth century are presented. A historical re-evaluation of foreign-language teaching combined with the scientific approach of modern linguistics can provide valuable insights for current teaching and learning approaches. Selections are presented from the writings of the…

  8. Education and Hypnosis for Treatment of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (FGIDs) in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Tania

    2015-01-01

    FGIDs in children and adolescents (ROME III classification) have a significant impact on the daily functioning and quality of life. Often it is the pain that is one of the main contributors to the burden of functional dyspepsia, functional abdominal pain (syndrome), and irritable bowel syndrome. Current knowledge confirms that a number of integrated networks at cortical and subcortical sites are responsible for the experience of pain. From the work of Mayer and Tillisch (2011), mainly based on structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography, it has become clear that abdominal pain syndromes are disorders of the bi-directional mind-brain-gut interactions. In this multi-factorial bio-psycho-social model we recognize the importance of neurobiological processes in the mind-brain-gut interactions, leading to alterations in motility, sensation, and immune functions. Medical treatment often offers little or no relief. Until now pharmaceutical research has not succeeded in developing safe new drugs with an effect on the brain-gut axis. More recent published research shows the rationale for the use of medical hypnosis in FGID. In this article the author will illustrate her specific approach in a pediatric gastroenterology clinic with children and adolescents with FGIDs. Being a pediatric gastroenterologist, the author emphasizes the importance of a clear diagnosis, explains the rationale for educating the patient and his or her parents on the multi-factorial bio-psycho-social model and the concepts of chronic pain, discusses the specific settings and pitfalls for hypnosis treatment in children, and last but not least, provides some examples of hypnotic sessions used with FGIDs. PMID:26046720

  9. Substance misuse teaching in undergraduate medical education

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Over 12,000 hospital admissions in the UK result from substance misuse, therefore issues surrounding this need to be addressed early on in a doctor’s training to facilitate their interaction with this client group. Currently, undergraduate medical education includes teaching substance misuse issues, yet how this is formally integrated into the curriculum remains unclear. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 17 key members of staff responsible for the whole or part of the undergraduate medical curriculum were conducted to identify the methods used to teach substance misuse. Using a previously devised toolkit, 19 curriculum co-ordinators then mapped the actual teaching sessions that addressed substance misuse learning objectives. Results Substance misuse teaching was delivered primarily in psychiatry modules but learning objectives were also found in other areas such as primary care placements and problem-based learning. On average, 53 teaching sessions per medical school focused on bio-psycho-social models of addiction whereas only 23 sessions per medical school focused on professionalism, fitness to practice and students’ own health in relation to substance misuse. Many sessions addressed specific learning objectives relating to the clinical features of substance dependence whereas few focused on iatrogenic addiction. Conclusions Substance misuse teaching is now inter-disciplinary and the frequent focus on clinical, psychological and social effects of substance misuse emphasises the bio-psycho-social approach underlying clinical practice. Some areas however are not frequently taught in the formal curriculum and these need to be addressed in future changes to medical education. PMID:24533849

  10. Surgical Approaches to Breast Augmentation: The Transaxillary Approach.

    PubMed

    Strock, Louis L

    2015-10-01

    The transaxillary approach to breast augmentation has the advantage of allowing breast implants to be placed with no incisions on the breasts. There has been a general perception of a lack of technical control compared with the inframammary approach. This article presents the transaxillary approach from the perspective of the technical control gained with the aid of an endoscope, which allows precise creation of the tissue pocket with optimal visualization. The aspects of technique that allow optimal technical control are discussed, in addition to postoperative processes that aid in stabilizing the device position and allow consistent and predictable outcomes. PMID:26408445

  11. Systems and synthetic biology approaches to alter plant cell walls and reduce biomass recalcitrance

    PubMed Central

    Kalluri, Udaya C; Yin, Hengfu; Yang, Xiaohan; Davison, Brian H

    2014-01-01

    Fine-tuning plant cell wall properties to render plant biomass more amenable to biofuel conversion is a colossal challenge. A deep knowledge of the biosynthesis and regulation of plant cell wall and a high-precision genome engineering toolset are the two essential pillars of efforts to alter plant cell walls and reduce biomass recalcitrance. The past decade has seen a meteoric rise in use of transcriptomics and high-resolution imaging methods resulting in fresh insights into composition, structure, formation and deconstruction of plant cell walls. Subsequent gene manipulation approaches, however, commonly include ubiquitous mis-expression of a single candidate gene in a host that carries an intact copy of the native gene. The challenges posed by pleiotropic and unintended changes resulting from such an approach are moving the field towards synthetic biology approaches. Synthetic biology builds on a systems biology knowledge base and leverages high-precision tools for high-throughput assembly of multigene constructs and pathways, precision genome editing and site-specific gene stacking, silencing and/or removal. Here, we summarize the recent breakthroughs in biosynthesis and remodelling of major secondary cell wall components, assess the impediments in obtaining a systems-level understanding and explore the potential opportunities in leveraging synthetic biology approaches to reduce biomass recalcitrance. PMID:25363806

  12. The biogenic approach to cognition.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Pamela

    2006-03-01

    After half a century of cognitive revolution we remain far from agreement about what cognition is and what cognition does. It was once thought that these questions could wait until the data were in. Today there is a mountain of data, but no way of making sense of it. The time for tackling the fundamental issues has arrived. The biogenic approach to cognition is introduced not as a solution but as a means of approaching the issues. The traditional, and still predominant, methodological stance in cognitive inquiry is what I call the anthropogenic approach: assume human cognition as the paradigm and work 'down' to a more general explanatory concept. The biogenic approach, on the other hand, starts with the facts of biology as the basis for theorizing and works 'up' to the human case by asking psychological questions as if they were biological questions. Biogenic explanations of cognition are currently clustered around two main frameworks for understanding biology: self-organizing complex systems and autopoiesis. The paper describes the frameworks and infers from them ten empirical principles--the biogenic 'family traits'--that constitute constraints on biogenic theorizing. Because the anthropogenic approach to cognition is not constrained empirically to the same degree, I argue that the biogenic approach is superior for approaching a general theory of cognition as a natural phenomenon. PMID:16628463

  13. New approaches to cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Neely, Robert C; Leacche, Marzia; Byrne, Christopher R; Norman, Anthony V; Byrne, John G

    2014-12-01

    Modern treatment of cardiovascular disease requires a patient-centered approach. With several technological advances, the options for treatment must be carefully weighed and novel approaches tested for safety and efficacy. In this article, we outline some of the new approaches available to cardiothoracic surgeons for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, including off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting, transcatheter valve replacement, and hybrid and robotic technology. We discuss current evidence and controversies and highlight the challenges that we face in training surgeons in an environment of ever-evolving surgical techniques. PMID:25498978

  14. Humane Education: A Curriculum Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Robert W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a curriculum-based approach to humane education and addresses the role of humane education in the school curriculum as well as the relationship's of education to other facets of animal welfare work. (Author/DS)

  15. Science Institutes Series Ethoexperimental Approaches

    E-print Network

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    ASI Series Science Institutes Series Ethoexperimental Approaches to the Study of Behavior/oural and Social Sciences - Vol. 48 Published in cooperation with NATO Scientific AffairsDivision #12;[iI, A. C

  16. Paying for Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about all contacts you have with your insurance company, including notes on calls and copies of bills, ... be able to help you determine which insurance companies cover specific complementary health approaches. Contact information for ...

  17. The Dirac-Brueckner Approach

    E-print Network

    R. Brockmann; R. Machleidt

    1996-12-01

    In this review, we give a thorough introduction into the Dirac-Brueckner approach including the mathematical details of the formalism involved. Furthermore, we present results for nuclear matter, NN scattering in the nuclear medium, and finite nuclei.

  18. Distributed Databases: The Adaptable Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braniff, Thomas A.

    1978-01-01

    Distributed data bases in statewide and multi-institutional systems are discussed. It is suggested that traditional approaches to data processing and current data base software are inappropriate for a distributed data base system. (BH)

  19. Women's Health and Complementary Approaches

    MedlinePLUS

    ... links Read our disclaimer about external links Menu Women’s Health and Complementary Approaches Some health and wellness issues ... our disclaimer about external links Related Topics MedlinePlus Women's Health Resources NIH Office of Research on Women's Health ...

  20. A Mathematical Approach to Hybridization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, P. S. C.; Thompson, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    Presents an approach to hybridization which exploits the similarities between the algebra of wave functions and vectors. This method will account satisfactorily for the number of orbitals formed when applied to hybrids involving the s and p orbitals. (GS)

  1. [Modern treatment approaches to gambling.

    PubMed

    Egorov, A Iu

    2014-01-01

    Compulsive gambling has received widespread attention in the last decade. Gambling has become the first non-chemical addiction, which went down to the section "Addiction and related disorders" of the modern DSM-V. The review considers non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches to the treatment of gambling. Among non-drug approaches, cognitive-behavioral therapy and 12-step programs have gained the most popularity in the "Gamblers Anonymous" community. Among pharmacological approaches, three classes of drugs: antidepressants (mainly SSRIs), opiate antagonists (naltrexone and nalmefene) and mood stabilizers (valproate, lithium, topiramate) proved to be effective in treatment of gambling. No differences in the efficacy of the three classes of psychotropic drugs have been identified. Preliminary results for N-acetylcysteine and memantine cause optimism in terms of perspective. PMID:24988975

  2. Systems Science Approach to Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadirkamanathan, Visakan

    Behaviours of many complex systems of interest cannot be adequately described since the underlying science has not advanced enough to be able to tease out the mathematical relationships. There is a need therefore to use methods and tools that capture the structure in the data that is representative of the systems behaviour. The subject of system identification allows us to deduce mathematical relations that govern the dynamics of systems based on the observed data. In addition, it can also be used to understand the system from basic principles. In this brief talk, the main approaches of systems science to data are reviewed identifying their strengths and limitations. The approaches include computational intelligence methods such as neural networks, genetic algorithms and fuzzy logic, as well as system identification methods in both time and frequency domains. Examples from physical science, neuroscience and social science serve to highlight achievements of the systems science approach to data.

  3. Employee Reactions to Merit Pay: Cognitive Approach and Social Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yingchun

    2010-01-01

    The dissertation aims to tackle one of the most pressing questions facing the merit pay system researchers and practitioners: Why do merit pay raises have such a small effect on employees' satisfaction, commitment and job performance? My approach to the study of this question is to develop explanatory frameworks from two perspectives: cognitive…

  4. Quantitative approachesQuantitative approaches in behavioral neurosciencein behavioral neuroscience

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    1st ISBS Summer School1st ISBS Summer School St. Petersburg, RussiaSt. Petersburg, Russia May 9th) are separated by one "stopping" episode New approach: sensitive to stress, drugs and genetic differences genes Gonzales-Maeso et al., 2003, J Neurosci G x G Drug x G #12;High-throughput "omics": functional

  5. An information theoretic approach for generating an aircraft avoidance Markov Decision Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinert, Andrew J.

    Developing a collision avoidance system that can meet safety standards required of commercial aviation is challenging. A dynamic programming approach to collision avoidance has been developed to optimize and generate logics that are robust to the complex dynamics of the national airspace. The current approach represents the aircraft avoidance problem as Markov Decision Processes and independently optimizes a horizontal and vertical maneuver avoidance logics. This is a result of the current memory requirements for each logic, simply combining the logics will result in a significantly larger representation. The "curse of dimensionality" makes it computationally inefficient and unfeasible to optimize this larger representation. However, existing and future collision avoidance systems have mostly defined the decision process by hand. In response, a simulation-based framework was built to better understand how each potential state quantifies the aircraft avoidance problem with regards to safety and operational components. The framework leverages recent advances in signals processing and database, while enabling the highest fidelity analysis of Monte Carlo aircraft encounter simulations to date. This framework enabled the calculation of how well each state of the decision process quantifies the collision risk and the associated memory requirements. Using this analysis, a collision avoidance logic that leverages both horizontal and vertical actions was built and optimized using this simulation based approach.

  6. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R.; Wu, C. H.; Hazen, T. C.

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ?black box? in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ?black box?.

  7. Synergistic approach to patient dialysate

    PubMed Central

    Dragotoiu, A; Checheri??, AI; Ciocâlteu, A; Rizeanu, S

    2015-01-01

    The stress a patient is subjected to during dialysis treatment can be reduced by using a synergetic approach by the medical team. The integration into therapy of the positive psychical resources such as: active positive coping mechanisms, individual or family mental resilience, improvement of the image and self-esteem, better tolerance to frustration can represent an important part in the improvement of the patient’s quality of life, determination of a positive approach of the situations both for him and close friends and relatives. PMID:26361514

  8. 78 FR 16509 - Amendment to Information Collection Activity; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... example, outcomes related to attitudes, self confidence, and psycho-social development that may be... achieve self-sufficiency. The projects will evaluate up to twelve subsidized and transitional...

  9. Computers at home, new spatial needs? : a case study

    E-print Network

    Franco, Adriana

    1982-01-01

    This thesis investigates five families in Boston who have introduced computers into their homes. The analysis is interdisciplinary and each case has been considered in terms of psycho-social and architectural terms. The ...

  10. Competition and the Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clevenger, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The evidence presented here would seem to indicate that a competitively oriented classroom does not strongly promote learning or strengthen interpersonal relationships or contribute to healthy psycho-social attitudes. (Author)

  11. 76 FR 66724 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: New Proposed Collection, Neuropsychosocial Measures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... influences (including physical, chemical, biological, and psychosocial) on children's health and development..., Neuropsychosocial Measures Formative Research Methodology Studies for the National Children's Study Summary: Under... and Psycho-Social Measures Formative Research Studies for the National Children's Study (NCS). Type...

  12. [Psychology of patient management: evaluation and quality assurance of psychosocial management in pediatric oncology].

    PubMed

    Kusch, M; Labouvie, H; Jäger, R S; Bode, U

    1997-02-01

    Since the introduction of health-care reform in Germany, quality assurance of inpatient care is required. In paediatric oncology this also includes quality assurance measures of psycho-social care. Care Psychology deals with the development, testing and continual improvement of high-quality psycho-social care. Based on clinical experience, scientific knowledge and ascertained requirements a handbook and manual of service delivery of psycho-social care is formulated and tested in everyday practice. Service performance analyses are carried out, and verified improvements are re-tested in practice. This, as well as additional attempts, should lead to total quality management (TQM) of psycho-social care in paediatric oncology according to the criteria of the European Foundation of Quality Management (EFQM). PMID:9156631

  13. Family Research: An Ethnographic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Howard F.

    1991-01-01

    An ethnographic approach based on in-depth interviewing, naturalistic and participant observation, narrative description, and contextual interpretation is proposed as a tool for family health care research. The multiple meanings of family, both for research clinicians and for society, are considered. The problem of how a family orientation is incorporated into biomedical' health care is discussed. PMID:21229058

  14. Organ donation: a communitarian approach.

    PubMed

    Etzioni, Amitai

    2003-03-01

    Recently, various suggestions have been made to respond to the increasingly great shortage of organs by paying for them. Because of the undesirable side effects of such approaches (commodification, injustice, and costs), a communitarian approach should be tried first. A communitarian approach to the problem of organ shortage entails changing the moral culture so that members of society will recognize that donating one's organs, once they are no longer of use to the donor, is the moral (right) thing to do. This approach requires much greater and deeper efforts than sharing information and making public service announcements. It entails a moral dialogue, in which the public is engaged, leading to a change in what people expect from one another. Among the devices that could help change the moral culture are a public statement, endorsed by community members and leaders, that expresses the community sense that donation "is what a good person does" and a community-specific web page that lists those who have made the commitment. A change in law so that a person's wishes in the matter are recognized as final and binding are also desired. This position paper deals only with cadaver organs and not living donors. PMID:12807104

  15. Alternative Approaches to Introductory Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonello, Frank J.; And Others

    This document examines the educational output of three alternative approaches to introductory macroeconomics at the University of Notre Dame. The framework for evaluation consists of the cognitive and affective tradeoffs entailed by using a new experimental course as opposed to two more traditional courses. The experimental course is a freshman…

  16. ENGLISH WRITING, APPROACHES TO COMPOSITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Euclid English Demonstration Center, OH.

    THIS COLLECTION OF PAPERS BY STAFF MEMBERS OF THE EUCLID ENGLISH DEMONSTRATION CENTER FOCUSES ON APPROACHES TO THE TEACHING OF COMPOSITION IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. THE PAPERS ARE (1) "LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION," BY JAMES F. MCCAMPBELL, (2) "COMPOSING--EPIPHANY AND DETAIL," BY JOSEPH DYESS, (3) "THE LANGUAGE COMPOSITION ACT," BY LESTER E.…

  17. Comparative Psychology: An Epigenetic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Gary

    1987-01-01

    A comparative psychology course oriented around the themes of phylogeny and ontogeny is described. The course emphasizes the evolution and development of behavioral processes and includes a discussion of the concept of integrative levels and Schneirla's approach/withdrawal theory. The course evaluates genetic determinism and stresses the principle…

  18. Medical Spanish: A Functional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, James M.

    A functional approach to language teaching begins with knowing how students intend to use the foreign language for specific purposes and in specific situations. Instructors of medical Spanish can begin by determining the specific language functions that their students must be able to express when communicating with Hispanic patients, by means of a…

  19. Approaches to Academic Growth Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderman, Eric M.; Gimbert, Belinda; O'Connell, Ann A.; Riegel, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is much interest in assessing growth in student learning. Assessments of growth have important implications and affect many policy decisions at many levels. Aims: In the present article, we review some of the different approaches to measuring growth and examine the implications of their usage. Sample: Samples used in research on…

  20. Statistical Approaches To Texture Classification

    E-print Network

    Zisserman, Andrew

    Statistical Approaches To Texture Classification Manik Varma Jesus College Robotics Research Group Department of Engineering Science University of Oxford A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor on the statistical dis- tribution of texton primitives are developed to categorise single, uncalibrated images

  1. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, Jane

    This paper addresses the problem of an inadequate science teaching approach at a time when students need to be familiar with, and be able to understand, global problems and personal problems delving into complex, interrelated issues based on the science of a living universe. This report focuses on research about the problems in science education,…

  2. Appreciating Music: An Active Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Andrew R.; Pargas, Roy P.

    2005-01-01

    A particularly innovative use of laptops is to enhance the music appreciation experience. Group listening and discussion, in combination with a new Web-based application, lead to deeper understanding of classical music. ["Appreciating Music: An Active Approach" was written with Joshua Austin.

  3. PERTURBATION APPROACH FOR QUANTUM COMPUTATION

    SciTech Connect

    G. P. BERMAN; D. I. KAMENEV; V. I. TSIFRINOVICH

    2001-04-01

    We discuss how to simulate errors in the implementation of simple quantum logic operations in a nuclear spin quantum computer with many qubits, using radio-frequency pulses. We verify our perturbation approach using the exact solutions for relatively small (L = 10) number of qubits.

  4. A Psychoanalytic Approach to Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramvi, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on what both psychoanalysis and anthropology have in common: the emphasis on the researcher's own experience. An ethnographic fieldwork will be used to illustrate how a psychoanalytical approach unfolds the material when studying conditions for learning from experience among teachers in two Norwegian junior high schools, and…

  5. A Freudian Approach to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartner, Sandra L.

    This document offers the point of view that Bruno Bettelheim's writings, based on Sigmund Freud's approach to education, suggest the most practical applications for achieving positive results within the classroom. The overall result of a student being taught all through school by the Freudian method would be an extremely positive one. Such a…

  6. Interdisciplinary Approach to Building Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Harry

    The paper discusses the interdisciplinary approach used by the Amity High School House Construction Project to develop a construction cluster in a small high school, to give students on-the-job training, and to teach them the relevancy of academic education. The project's monthly plan of action is briefly described. Suggested activities,…

  7. Early Writing: A Developmental Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Elizabeth; And Others

    This document consists of four papers on the acquisition of writing skills by young children. The first paper provides a historical and developmental perspective on early writing. Children's development of manual dexterity is briefly overviewed and aspects of the educational approaches of Pestalozzi, Montessori, Chomsky, Rogers and Ashton-Warner…

  8. Teaching Creation: A Modular Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosworth, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The present article describes a modular approach to teaching Genesis 1-3 that values depth over breadth even in an introductory class. The module allows students to learn about the text and its original context by orienting discussion around contemporary issues of practical concern. Specifically, the creation-evolution debates provide an…

  9. Demographic Planning: An Action Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Harold L.; Smith, Joyce

    1974-01-01

    Community colleges are in a good position to obtain reliable long-term forecasts of future demand. An approach developed at Johnson County Community College in Overland Park, Kansas, has enabled the college to assist other community institutions in their parallel planning efforts. (Author/MLF)

  10. The Labelling Approach to Deviance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rains, Prudence M.; Kitsuse, John L.; Duster, Troy; Freidson, Eliot

    2003-01-01

    This reprint of one chapter from the 1975 text, "Issues in the Classification of Children" by Nicholas Hobbs and others, addresses the theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues involved in the "labeling" approach to the sociology of deviance. It examines the social process of classification, the use of classification in social agencies,…

  11. An Approach for Dynamic Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Liou, Meng-Sing; Hindman, Richard G.

    1994-01-01

    An approach is presented for the generation of two-dimensional, structured, dynamic grids. The grid motion may be due to the motion of the boundaries of the computational domain or to the adaptation of the grid to the transient, physical solution. A time-dependent grid is computed through the time integration of the grid speeds which are computed from a system of grid speed equations. The grid speed equations are derived from the time-differentiation of the grid equations so as to ensure that the dynamic grid maintains the desired qualities of the static grid. The grid equations are the Euler-Lagrange equations derived from a variational statement for the grid. The dynamic grid method is demonstrated for a model problem involving boundary motion, an inviscid flow in a converging-diverging nozzle during startup, and a viscous flow over a flat plate with an impinging shock wave. It is shown that the approach is more accurate for transient flows than an approach in which the grid speeds are computed using a finite difference with respect to time of the grid. However, the approach requires significantly more computational effort.

  12. Updating the Language Experience Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Allen, Roach

    Three recent developments discussed were representative of some of the modern trends in the language-experience approach. The first stressed the increased use of multisensory materials which have expanded the chances for success of many language-limited children. The second trend focused on the extended use of learning centers to provide them with…

  13. Chemical Calculations; An Audiotutorial Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lower, Stephen K.

    An audiotutorial approach to problem-solving in college chemistry relying upon audio tapes is available. The program is designed to increase the teacher's effectiveness by providing individualized attention to student difficulties related to problem-solving. Problem solutions are recorded on audio tapes (designed for use with Sony TC-160 cassettes…

  14. Approaches to Drug Abuse Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boren, John J., Ed.; Onken, Lisa Simon, Ed.; Carroll, Kathleen M., Ed.

    The intent of this book is to present information on various counseling approaches for drug abuse used in some of the best known and most respected treatment programs in the United States. In an effort to make the comparison of the various models less difficult and to clarify how the model is applied in practice, each chapter follows a specific…

  15. Classical approach in atomic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'ev, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    The application of a classical approach to various quantum problems - the secular perturbation approach to quantization of a hydrogen atom in external fields and a helium atom, the adiabatic switching method for calculation of a semiclassical spectrum of a hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields, a spontaneous decay of excited states of a hydrogen atom, Gutzwiller's approach to Stark problem, long-lived excited states of a helium atom discovered with the help of Poincaré section, inelastic transitions in slow and fast electron-atom and ion-atom collisions - is reviewed. Further, a classical representation in quantum theory is discussed. In this representation the quantum states are treated as an ensemble of classical states. This approach opens the way to an accurate description of the initial and final states in classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and a purely classical explanation of tunneling phenomenon. The general aspects of the structure of the semiclassical series such as renormgroup symmetry, criterion of accuracy and so on are reviewed as well.

  16. Approaching Bose-Einstein Condensation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Loris

    2011-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is discussed at the level of an advanced course of statistical thermodynamics, clarifying some formal and physical aspects that are usually not covered by the standard pedagogical literature. The non-conventional approach adopted starts by showing that the continuum limit, in certain cases, cancels out the crucial…

  17. Budgeting Approaches in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Several budgeting approaches have been initiated as alternatives to the traditional, incremental process. These include formula budgeting; zero-base budgeting; planning, programming, and budgeting systems; and responsibility center budgeting. Each is premised on assumptions about how organizations might best make resource allocation decisions.…

  18. Cleft Palate; A Multidiscipline Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Richard B., Ed.

    Nineteen articles present a multidisciplinary approach to the management of facial clefts. The following subjects are discussed: the history of cleft lip and cleft palate surgery; cogenital defects; classification; the operation of a cleft palate clinic; physical examination of newborns with cleft lip and/or palate; nursing care; anesthesia;…

  19. Indian Education: An Intergenerational Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffalohead, Priscilla; Sterner, Michele

    The Indian Education Program in the Osseo School District (Minnesota) serves approximately 200 American Indian students in grades K-12 from 27 schools and a variety of tribes. The Program's intergenerational approach reflects tribal traditions in that generations learn together and grandparents, parents, and students are involved in the…

  20. Multimethod Approaches in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Julian

    2004-01-01

    Noting the attractions of self-report questionnaires and surveys to those engaged in educational research, this article discusses some of the problems that can arise from their injudicious use. It is argued that the potentially misleading nature of findings from such approaches is particularly highlighted when mixed methodologies are employed.…

  1. Piagetian Approach to Cognitive Development

    E-print Network

    Coulson, Seana

    1 Piagetian Approach to Cognitive Development Piaget's Stages · Sensorimotor ­ (birth ­ 2 yrs: Secondary Circular Reactions (4-8 mos.) · Increasing interest in outcomes beyond child's body ­ Ball rolling of Representational Thought · Delayed Imitation The Child's Expanding World · Primary ­ Perform Action ­ Note Effect

  2. Tiedeman's Approach to Career Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harren, Vincent A.

    Basic to Tiedeman's approach to career development and decision making is the assumption that one is responsible for one's own behavior because one has the capacity for choice and lives in a world which is not deterministic. Tiedeman, a cognitive-developmental theorist, views continuity of development as internal or psychological while…

  3. Toxicological approaches to complex mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of toxicological studies in understanding the health effects of environmental exposures to mixtures. The approach taken is to review mixtures that have received the greatest emphasis from toxicology; major mixtures research programs; the toxicologist's view of mixtures and approaches to their study; and the complementary roles of toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological studies. Studies of tobacco smoke, engine exhaust, combustion products, and air pollutants comprise most of the past research on mixtures. Because of their great experimental control over subjects, exposures, and endpoints, toxicologists tend to consider a wider range of toxic interactions among mixture components and sequential exposures than is practical for human studies. The three fundamental experimental approaches used by toxicologists are integrative (studying the mixture as a whole), dissective (dissecting a mixture to determine causative constituents), and synthetic (studying interactions between agents in simple combinations). Toxicology provides information on potential hazards, mechanisms by which mixture constituents interact to cause effects, and exposure dose-effect relationships; but extrapolation from laboratory data to quantitative human health risks is problematic. Toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological approaches are complementary but are seldom coordinated. Fostering synergistic interactions among the disciplines in studying the risks from mixtures could be advantageous. PMID:7515806

  4. Multidisciplinary Approaches in Evolutionary Linguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gong, Tao; Shuai, Lan; Wu, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Studying language evolution has become resurgent in modern scientific research. In this revival field, approaches from a number of disciplines other than linguistics, including (paleo)anthropology and archaeology, animal behaviors, genetics, neuroscience, computer simulation, and psychological experimentation, have been adopted, and a wide scope…

  5. New Approach to Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Davis K.

    2004-01-01

    Examinations profoundly affect students' psychological and emotional well-being. Not surprisingly, in today's test-centered climate test anxiety has become a widespread problem. A new, multi-dimensional treatment approach to test anxiety reduction is presented with both the mental health clinician and educator in mind. Suited to high school,…

  6. Density Functional Approach Francesco Sottile

    E-print Network

    Botti, Silvana

    Density Functional Approach Francesco Sottile Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau - France European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF) 22 October 2010 #12;Density Functional Theory 1. Any observable of a quantum system can be obtained from the density of the system alone. = O[n] Hohenberg, P. and W. Kohn

  7. Minimalist Approach to Perceptual Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lenay, Charles; Stewart, John

    2012-01-01

    Work aimed at studying social cognition in an interactionist perspective often encounters substantial theoretical and methodological difficulties: identifying the significant behavioral variables; recording them without disturbing the interaction; and distinguishing between: (a) the necessary and sufficient contributions of each individual partner for a collective dynamics to emerge; (b) features which derive from this collective dynamics and escape from the control of the individual partners; and (c) the phenomena arising from this collective dynamics which are subsequently appropriated and used by the partners. We propose a minimalist experimental paradigm as a basis for this conceptual discussion: by reducing the sensory inputs to a strict minimum, we force a spatial and temporal deployment of the perceptual activities, which makes it possible to obtain a complete recording and control of the dynamics of interaction. After presenting the principles of this minimalist approach to perception, we describe a series of experiments on two major questions in social cognition: recognizing the presence of another intentional subject; and phenomena of imitation. In both cases, we propose explanatory schema which render an interactionist approach to social cognition clear and explicit. Starting from our earlier work on perceptual crossing we present a new experiment on the mechanisms of reciprocal recognition of the perceptual intentionality of the other subject: the emergent collective dynamics of the perceptual crossing can be appropriated by each subject. We then present an experimental study of opaque imitation (when the subjects cannot see what they themselves are doing). This study makes it possible to characterize what a properly interactionist approach to imitation might be. In conclusion, we draw on these results, to show how an interactionist approach can contribute to a fully social approach to social cognition. PMID:22582041

  8. Computer Algebra, Instrumentation and the Anthropological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, John

    2007-01-01

    This article considers research and scholarship on the use of computer algebra in mathematics education following the instrumentation and the anthropological approaches. It outlines what these approaches are, positions them with regard to other approaches, examines tensions between the two approaches and makes suggestions for how work in this…

  9. A SYSTEM APPROACH FOR SOLVING EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MILLER, DONALD R.

    THIS PAPER INVESTIGATES VARIOUS ASPECTS OF THE SYSTEMS APPROACH FOR SOLVING EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS--(1) THE SYSTEMS CONCEPT, (2) THE RELIABILITY OF THE ASSUMPTIONS ON WHICH THE SYSTEMS APPROACH IS BASED, (3) THE LIMITATIONS INHERENT IN THE SYSTEMS APPROACH, (4) THE HUMAN ELEMENT AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE SYSTEMS APPROACH, (5) THE WAYS THE…

  10. Fuzzy multiple linear regression: A computational approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, C. H.; Huang, X. H.; Fleming, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new computational approach for performing fuzzy regression. In contrast to Bardossy's approach, the new approach, while dealing with fuzzy variables, closely follows the conventional regression technique. In this approach, treatment of fuzzy input is more 'computational' than 'symbolic.' The following sections first outline the formulation of the new approach, then deal with the implementation and computational scheme, and this is followed by examples to illustrate the new procedure.

  11. Malaysia implements the integrated approach.

    PubMed

    1977-01-01

    Malaysia has implemented an integrated approach in providing family planning services to eligible couples. In 1964 the government of Malaysia adopted a national family planning program, and implementation began in the urban areas and extended into the rural areas. Other agencies are involved in providing family planning services and information including the Federation of Family Planning Associations, the Ministry of Health, the National Family Planning Board, and the Federal Land Development Authority. The number of women practicing contraception has increased from 20,726 in 1967 to 533,646 by 1976. and other methods, 3.9%, respectively. There has been an increase in the percentage of acceptors between ages 15-29 from 56% in 1968 to 71.3% in 1975. The 2nd Malaysian national plan will use a multidisciplinary approach to the problem. PMID:12260250

  12. Technology approaches to currency security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, John C.; Dubbel, Daniel C.; Benson, Richard C.

    1998-04-01

    The continued development of reprographic technology and computer graphics (notably color laser copiers, scanners and color laser printers) has increased the tools available to both professional and casual counterfeiters. The result is an increase in the counterfeit risk to the U.S. dollar and other currencies. To counter these threats improved methods of currency authentication are needed both for use by the general public and by national currency authorities. The growing number of cash transfer machines has increased the importance of machine readable security features. This paper describes some technology based approaches to currency security based on special materials. It also proposes a metaphor for currency authentication which attempts to provide a framework for unifying approaches based on secure features and those based on codes.

  13. Laparoscopic approach to retrorectal cyst

    PubMed Central

    Gunkova, Petra; Martinek, Lubomir; Dostalik, Jan; Gunka, Igor; Vavra, Petr; Mazur, Miloslav

    2008-01-01

    Retrorectal cysts are rare benign lesions in the presacral space which are frequently diagnosed in middle-aged females. We report here our experience with two symptomatic female patients who were diagnosed as having a retrorectal cyst and managed using a laparoscopic approach. The two patients were misdiagnosed as having an ovarian cystic lesion after abdominal ultrasonography. Computer tomography (CT) scan was mandatory to establish the diagnosis. The trocar port site was the same in both patients. An additional left oophorectomy was done for a coexisting ovarian cystic lesion in one patient in the same setting. There was no postoperative morbidity or mortality and the two patients were discharged on the 5th and 6th post operative days, respectively. Our cases show that laparoscopic management of retrorectal cysts is a safe approach. It reduces surgical trauma and offers an excellent tool for perfect visualization of the deep structures in the presacral space. PMID:19030218

  14. BIOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO APHASIA TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Small, Steven L.; Llano, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Herein, we review the basic mechanisms neural regeneration and repair and attempt to correlate the findings from animal models of stroke recovery to clinical trials for aphasia. Several randomized, controlled clinical trials that have involved manipulation of different neurotransmitter systems, including noradrenergic, dopaminergic, cholinergic and glutamatergic systems, have shown signals of efficacy. Biological approaches such as anti-Nogo and cell-replacement therapy have shown efficacy in preclinical models, but have yet to reach proof of concept in the clinic. Finally, noninvasive cortical stimulation techniques have been used in a few small trials, and have shown promising results. It appears that the efficacy of all of these platforms can be potentiated through coupling with speech-language therapy. Given this array of potential mechanisms that exist to augment and/or stimulate neural reorganization after stroke, we are optimistic that approaches to aphasia therapy will transition from compensatory models to models where brain reorganization is the goal. PMID:19818231

  15. Snow metamorphism: a fractal approach

    E-print Network

    Carbone, Anna; Frigo, Barbara; Turk, Christian; 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.036103

    2010-01-01

    Snow is a porous disordered medium consisting of air and three water phases: ice, vapour and liquid. The ice phase consists of an assemblage of grains, ice matrix, initially arranged over a random load bearing skeleton. The quantitative relationship between density and morphological characteristics of different snow microstructures is still an open issue. In this work, a three-dimensional fractal description of density corresponding to different snow microstructure is put forward. First, snow density is simulated in terms of a generalized Menger sponge model. Then, a fully three-dimensional compact stochastic fractal model is adopted. The latter approach yields a quantitative map of the randomness of the snow texture, which is described as a three-dimensional fractional Brownian field with the Hurst exponent H varying as continuous parameter. The Hurst exponent is found to be strongly dependent on snow morphology and density. The approach might be applied to all those cases where the morphological evolution o...

  16. Spacetime Approach to Phase Transitions

    E-print Network

    Wolfhard Janke; Adriaan M. J. Schakel

    2007-05-08

    In these notes, the application of Feynman's sum-over-paths approach to thermal phase transitions is discussed. The paradigm of such a spacetime approach to critical phenomena is provided by the high-temperature expansion of spin models. This expansion, known as the hopping expansion in the context of lattice field theory, yields a geometric description of the phase transition in these models, with the thermal critical exponents being determined by the fractal structure of the high-temperature graphs. The graphs percolate at the thermal critical point and can be studied using purely geometrical observables known from percolation theory. Besides the phase transition in spin models and in the closely related $\\phi^4$ theory, other transitions discussed from this perspective include Bose-Einstein condensation, and the transitions in the Higgs model and the pure U(1) gauge theory.

  17. Jellyfish Stings: A Practical Approach.

    PubMed

    Lakkis, Najla A; Maalouf, Grace J; Mahmassani, Dina M

    2015-09-01

    Jellyfish have a worldwide distribution. Their stings can cause different reactions, ranging from cutaneous, localized, and self-limited to serious systemic or fatal ones, depending on the envenoming species. Several first aid treatments are used to manage such stings but few have evidence behind their use. This review of the literature describes and discusses the different related first aid and treatment recommendations, ending with a summarized practical approach. Further randomized controlled trials in this field are needed. PMID:25935311

  18. Diagrammatic approach to quantum search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a simple diagrammatic approach for estimating how a randomly walking quantum particle searches on a graph in continuous time, which involves sketching small weighted graphs with self-loops and considering degenerate perturbation theory's effects on them. Using this method, we give the first example of degenerate perturbation theory solving search on a graph whose evolution occurs in a subspace whose dimension grows with.

  19. Standard approach to plant modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Mecredy, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Organizational and management approaches to the design, installation, and turnover of nuclear plant modifications have changed dramatically in the last 10 to 15 yr. In response to these changes, organizational and individual responsibilities have been defined and management systems have been established at Rochester Gas and Electric (RG and E) Corporation to ensure that high-quality plant modifications are installed in a timely manner that satisfies user needs at minimal cost.

  20. Goiter: An Approach to Management

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The incidence of goiter (any swelling of the thyroid, either diffuse or localized) varies from five to ten percent in the adult population. Carcinoma of the thyroid is rare, occurring in approximately 2.5 per 100,000 population. The prognosis is generally good. Clinically patients usually present in one of four ways: goiter alone, goiter with pain, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. An approach to the management of this problem is presented, keeping these facts in mind. PMID:21301521

  1. Recommended approach to sofware development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, F. E.; Page, J.; Eslinger, S.; Church, V.; Merwarth, P.

    1983-01-01

    A set of guideline for an organized, disciplined approach to software development, based on data collected and studied for 46 flight dynamics software development projects. Methods and practices for each phase of a software development life cycle that starts with requirements analysis and ends with acceptance testing are described; maintenance and operation is not addressed. For each defined life cycle phase, guidelines for the development process and its management, and the products produced and their reviews are presented.

  2. Approach to patients with eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Lanny J

    2011-01-01

    Eosinophilia is commonly seen in medical practice and can underlie a variety of medical conditions. Eosinophilia, defined as peripheral blood eosinophil counts greater than 500 per microliter, may vary from mild-severe. Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome has been identified as an unusual cause of moderate to severe eosinophilia. Progress in treatment of this condition has accompanied greater understanding about the basic biology of eosinophils. This review will highlight the approach to patients with eosinophilia, along with associated conditions and syndromes. PMID:22073495

  3. Approaches to the Aggregation Problem 

    E-print Network

    Hannan, Michael T

    2015-08-12

    /plain; charset=UTF-8 APPROACHES TO THE AGGREGATION PROBLEM by Michael T. Hannan Stanford University 1972Technical Report No. 46 ABSTRACT This paper attempts to further development of a general "theory of aggregation" which will integrate the results... in levels of data aggregation. While the theoretical and methodological issues have implications for each other» it is unlikely that we can develop a single abstract calculus for analysing both types of issues.^ There do exist, however, abstract formu...

  4. Different approaches of spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacoume, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several approaches to the problem of the calculation of spectral power density of a random function from an estimate of the autocorrelation function were studied. A comparative study was presented of these different methods. The principles on which they are based and the hypothesis implied were pointed out. Some indications on the optimization of the length of the estimated correlation function was given. An example of application of the different methods discussed in this paper was included.

  5. PARSEC's Astrometry - The Risky Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, A. H.

    2015-10-01

    Parallaxes - and hence the fundamental establishment of stellar distances - rank among the oldest, most direct, and hardest of astronomical determinations. Arguably amongst the most essential too. The direct approach to obtain trigonometric parallaxes, using a constrained set of equations to derive positions, proper motions, and parallaxes, has been labelled as risky. Properly so, because the axis of the parallactic apparent ellipse is smaller than one arcsec even for the nearest stars, and just a fraction of its perimeter can be followed. Thus the classical approach is of linearizing the description by locking the solution to a set of precise positions of the Earth at the instants of observation, rather than to the dynamics of its orbit, and of adopting a close examination of the few observations available. In the PARSEC program the parallaxes of 143 brown dwarfs were planned. Five years of observation of the fields were taken with the WFI camera at the ESO 2.2m telescope in Chile. The goal is to provide a statistically significant number of trigonometric parallaxes for BD sub-classes from L0 to T7. Taking advantage of the large, regularly spaced, quantity of observations, here we take the risky approach to fit an ellipse to the observed ecliptic coordinates and derive the parallaxes. We also combine the solutions from different centroiding methods, widely proven in prior astrometric investigations. As each of those methods assess diverse properties of the PSFs, they are taken as independent measurements, and combined into a weighted least-squares general solution. The results obtained compare well with the literature and with the classical approach.

  6. Diagrammatic Approach to Quantum Search

    E-print Network

    Thomas G. Wong

    2015-02-09

    We introduce a simple diagrammatic approach for estimating how a randomly walking quantum particle searches on a graph in continuous-time, which involves sketching small weighted graphs with self-loops and considering degenerate perturbation theory's effects on them. Using this method, we give the first example of degenerate perturbation theory solving search on a graph whose evolution occurs in a subspace whose dimension grows with $N$.

  7. Alternative systematic approaches to training

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    This handbook is approved for use by all DOE Components and contractors. The handbook was prepared primarily for DOE nuclear facilities, but the information can be effectively used by any other type of facility. DOE nuclear, DOE non-nuclear, commercial nuclear reactor, fuel fabrication, chemical processing, or other types of facilities may also apply the principles of this approach and find it useful and applicable to local needs. The handbook provides DOE and contractor operating organizations with concepts and guidance regarding the use of alternative techniques to implement a systematic approach to training (SAT). The techniques described in this handbook are endorsed by DOE and use of the guidance in this handbook is appropriate for establishment of technical training programs at DOE nuclear facilities. The use of guidance on selection and implementation of appropriate training approaches after consideration of job complexity, the consequences of error based on risk/hazard potential, and available training media should result in effective and efficient training programs. The information presented in this handbook can be used to grade the level of effort and formality used in developing training programs.

  8. An abstract approach to music.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, H. G.; Tipei, S.

    1999-04-19

    In this article we have outlined a formal framework for an abstract approach to music and music composition. The model is formulated in terms of objects that have attributes, obey relationships, and are subject to certain well-defined operations. The motivation for this approach uses traditional terms and concepts of music theory, but the approach itself is formal and uses the language of mathematics. The universal object is an audio wave; partials, sounds, and compositions are special objects, which are placed in a hierarchical order based on time scales. The objects have both static and dynamic attributes. When we realize a composition, we assign values to each of its attributes: a (scalar) value to a static attribute, an envelope and a size to a dynamic attribute. A composition is then a trajectory in the space of aural events, and the complex audio wave is its formal representation. Sounds are fibers in the space of aural events, from which the composer weaves the trajectory of a composition. Each sound object in turn is made up of partials, which are the elementary building blocks of any music composition. The partials evolve on the fastest time scale in the hierarchy of partials, sounds, and compositions. The ideas outlined in this article are being implemented in a digital instrument for additive sound synthesis and in software for music composition. A demonstration of some preliminary results has been submitted by the authors for presentation at the conference.

  9. Proteomic approaches to bacterial differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Norbeck, Angela D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Elias, Dwayne A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-12-01

    While genomic approaches have been applied for the detection and identification of individual bacteria within microbial communities, analogous proteomics approaches have been effectively precluded due to their inherent complexity. An in silico assessment of peptides that could potentially be present in the proteomes of artificial simple and complex communities was performed to evaluate the effect of proteome complexity on species detection. A mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach was employed to experimentally detect and validate the predicted tryptic peptides initially identified as distinctive within the simple community. An assessment of peptide distinctiveness and the potential for mapping to a particular bacterium within a community was made throughout each step of the study. A second in silico assessment of peptide distinctiveness for a complex community of 25 microorganisms was conducted to investigate the levels of instrumental performance that would be required to experimentally detect these peptides, as well as how performance varied with complexity (e.g., the number of different microorganisms). The experimental data for a simple community showed that it is feasible to predict, observe, and to quantify distinctive peptides from one organism in the presence of at least a 100-fold greater abundance of another, thus yielding putative markers for identifying a bacterium of interest. This work represents a first step towards quantitative proteomic characterization of complex microbial communities and the possible development of community wide markers of perturbations to such communities.

  10. Statistical Approach to Protein Quantification*

    PubMed Central

    Gerster, Sarah; Kwon, Taejoon; Ludwig, Christina; Matondo, Mariette; Vogel, Christine; Marcotte, Edward M.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Bühlmann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A major goal in proteomics is the comprehensive and accurate description of a proteome. This task includes not only the identification of proteins in a sample, but also the accurate quantification of their abundance. Although mass spectrometry typically provides information on peptide identity and abundance in a sample, it does not directly measure the concentration of the corresponding proteins. Specifically, most mass-spectrometry-based approaches (e.g. shotgun proteomics or selected reaction monitoring) allow one to quantify peptides using chromatographic peak intensities or spectral counting information. Ultimately, based on these measurements, one wants to infer the concentrations of the corresponding proteins. Inferring properties of the proteins based on experimental peptide evidence is often a complex problem because of the ambiguity of peptide assignments and different chemical properties of the peptides that affect the observed concentrations. We present SCAMPI, a novel generic and statistically sound framework for computing protein abundance scores based on quantified peptides. In contrast to most previous approaches, our model explicitly includes information from shared peptides to improve protein quantitation, especially in eukaryotes with many homologous sequences. The model accounts for uncertainty in the input data, leading to statistical prediction intervals for the protein scores. Furthermore, peptides with extreme abundances can be reassessed and classified as either regular data points or actual outliers. We used the proposed model with several datasets and compared its performance to that of other, previously used approaches for protein quantification in bottom-up mass spectrometry. PMID:24255132

  11. Neuromodulation: Selected approaches and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Parpura, Vladimir; Silva, Gabriel A.; Tass, Peter A.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Koehne, Jessica; Lee, Kendall H.; Andrews, Russell J.

    2012-01-01

    The brain operates through complex interactions in the flow of information and signal processing within neural networks. The “wiring” of such networks, being neuronal or glial, can physically and/or functionally go rogue in various pathological states. Neuromodulation, as a multidisciplinary venture, attempts to correct such faulty nets. In this review, selected approaches and challenges in neuromoduation are discussed. The use of water-dispersible carbon nanotubes have proven effective in modulation of neurite outgrowth in culture as well as in aiding regeneration after spinal cord injury in vivo. Studying neural circuits using computational biology and analytical engineering approaches brings to light geometrical mapping of dynamics within neural networks, much needed information for stimulation interventions in medical practice. Indeed, sophisticated desynchronization approaches used for brain stimulation have been successful in coaxing “misfiring” neuronal circuits to resume productive firing patterns in various human disorders. Devices have been developed for the real time measurement of various neurotransmitters as well as electrical activity in the human brain during electrical deep brain stimulation. Such devices can establish the dynamics of electrochemical changes in the brain during stimulation. With increasing application of nanomaterials in devices for electrical and chemical recording and stimulating in the brain, the era of cellular, and even intracellular, precision neuromodulation will soon be upon us. PMID:23190025

  12. On Approach: Jupiter and Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of On Approach: Jupiter and Io

    This sequence of images was taken on Jan. 8, 2007, with the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), while the spacecraft was about 81 million kilometers (about 50 million miles) from Jupiter. Jupiter's volcanic moon Io is to the right; the planet's Great Red Spot is also visible. The image was one of 11 taken during the Jan. 8 approach sequence, which signaled the opening of the New Horizons Jupiter encounter.

    Even in these early approach images, Jupiter shows different face than what previous visiting spacecraft -- such as Voyager 1, Galileo and Cassini -- have seen. Regions around the equator and in the southern tropical latitudes seem remarkably calm, even in the typically turbulent 'wake' behind the Great Red Spot.

    The New Horizons science team will scrutinize these major meteorological features -- including the unexpectedly calm regions -- to understand the diverse variety of dynamical processes on the solar system's largest planet. These include the newly formed Little Red Spot, the Great Red Spot and a variety of zonal features.

  13. Approach to managing elevated creatinine.

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Richard

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a systematic approach to finding the underlying cause of an elevated creatinine level. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: This diagnostic approach is based on a synthesis of information from reference works on nephrology, articles found through a MEDLINE search, and the author's personal experience. MAIN MESSAGE: Elevated creatinine levels suggest the differential diagnosis of renal failure (RF). History and a complete physical examination are important, keeping in mind that RF is often asymptomatic in the early stages. After repeating the creatinine test to verify results, baseline tests should be ordered to identify the cause of the RF. Comparing results of serial tests is essential for determining whether RF is acute or chronic, stable or progressive. An ultrasound scan is particularly useful for eliminating an obstructive cause; the size of the kidney can indicate whether disease is acute or chronic. Complementary blood tests and imaging studies might be useful. CONCLUSION: Diagnosing and managing RF can appear complex, but a systematic approach will help you find the cause and treat the condition. PMID:15171676

  14. Pragmatic approaches to genetic screening.

    PubMed

    Mallia, Pierre; ten Have, Henk

    2005-01-01

    Pragmatic approaches to genetic testing are discussed and appraised. Whilst there are various schools of pragmatism, the Deweyan approach seems to be the most appreciated in bioethics as it allows a historical approach indebted to Hegel. This in turn allows the pragmatist to specify and balance principles in various contexts. There are problems with where to draw a line between what is referred to here as the micro- and macro-level of doing bioethics, unless one is simply to be classified as a principlist. Whilst most discussions on genetics occur at a macro level, most specifying must be done also at a micro level - the clinical encounter. Whilst pragmatism encourages us to understand better social and scientific factors and puts into perspective statements like 'playing God', doubts are raised about the 'consensus' process and how one can put aside fundamental values such as the moral status of the embryo on which there is general disagreement. If those doing pragmatism do not endorse these values, there seems to be little ground for process and compromise with those who do. It seems therefore that pragmatism cannot ignore values, even those which are not endorsed by everyone. PMID:15906941

  15. Approaches for modeling magnetic nanoparticle dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Daniel B; Weaver, John B

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful biological probes as well as therapeutic agents. There have been several approaches used to model nanoparticle magnetization dynamics for both Brownian as well as Néel rotation. The magnetizations are often of interest and can be compared with experimental results. Here we summarize these approaches including the Stoner-Wohlfarth approach, and stochastic approaches including thermal fluctuations. Non-equilibrium related temperature effects can be described by a distribution function approach (Fokker-Planck equation) or a stochastic differential equation (Langevin equation). Approximate models in several regimes can be derived from these general approaches to simplify implementation. PMID:25271360

  16. Adaptive approach to negative scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuijn, Chris

    1997-02-01

    The demand for accurate color reproduction has never been as high as today. Not only in the high-end electronic prepress market, but also in the desktop publishing and home office markets, the availability of both input and output devices is increasing rapidly. Most of the input devices today capture positive originals: scanners capture either reflective or transmissive originals; digital cameras are capable of capturing real life scenes as well. In some market segments (such as, e.g., the newspaper environment), there also is a definite interest in scanning negative originals. Especially with the new emerging APS standard for film (where manual manipulation of the film strips is no longer necessary), the demand for negative scanning will also increase in the home office market. Scanning negatives, however, is a very delicate process. Not only the input device should be characterized properly, but also the negative film itself is a parameter which needs to be studied carefully. On negative film, the information is stored inverted and due to the color dye layers within the negative film, there also is a density shift between the red, green and blue planes. The main problem, however, is caused by the fact that, due to the variations in the development process, the characteristics of a strip of developed negative film can differ considerably from other strips of the same film type. In this paper, we first give a brief survey of our approach to scanning negatives presented in the past. Then, we show how the unpredictable properties of negative films can cause this approach to fail and discuss some substantial improvements. In this respect, we show how the adaptive approach taken in the conventional photofinishing environment can be used electronically. In a following section, we describe how the inverted positive image data can be transformed into a well-known, calibrated color space. In the last section, we briefly discuss the minimal requirements for an ideal negative scanner.

  17. Surgical management of carotid body tumors: a 15-year single institution experience employing an interdisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Jennifer L; Atkins, Marvin D; Bohannon, William T; Buckley, Clifford J; Lairmore, Terry C

    2016-01-01

    Cervical paragangliomas are rare neoplasms that arise from extraadrenal paraganglia in close association with the cranial nerves and extracranial arterial system of the head and neck, and therefore surgical extirpation can be challenging. A retrospective study was conducted of all patients undergoing surgical excision of a cervical paraganglioma between 2000 and 2015. The demographic characteristics, clinical features, surgical approach, and outcomes were reviewed. A total of 20 cervical paragangliomas were excised in 17 patients. There were 14 female and 3 male patients with a mean age of 56.6 ± 17.0 at the time of operation. Twelve patients had unilateral tumors and 5 patients had bilateral tumors. Familial involvement was confirmed by history or direct genetic analysis in 8 (47%) of the 17 patients. There were no malignant paragangliomas, and only 3 patients had tumors that were determined to be functional. Tumor size ranged from 1.3 to 6.0 cm. Two patients required combined arterial resection as part of complete excision of the tumor. There were no permanent operative cranial nerve injuries, no recurrences, minimal morbidity, and no mortality. In conclusion, optimal management of cervical paragangliomas should include a thorough preoperative evaluation, accurate definition of the surgical anatomy, and exclusion of synchronous paragangliomas. A combined therapeutic approach by a multidisciplinary team including surgeons and interventional radiologists provides safe and effective management of cervical paragangliomas with very low morbidity and excellent outcomes. PMID:26722157

  18. Surgical management of carotid body tumors: a 15-year single institution experience employing an interdisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Jennifer L.; Atkins, Marvin D.; Bohannon, William T.; Buckley, Clifford J.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical paragangliomas are rare neoplasms that arise from extraadrenal paraganglia in close association with the cranial nerves and extracranial arterial system of the head and neck, and therefore surgical extirpation can be challenging. A retrospective study was conducted of all patients undergoing surgical excision of a cervical paraganglioma between 2000 and 2015. The demographic characteristics, clinical features, surgical approach, and outcomes were reviewed. A total of 20 cervical paragangliomas were excised in 17 patients. There were 14 female and 3 male patients with a mean age of 56.6 ± 17.0 at the time of operation. Twelve patients had unilateral tumors and 5 patients had bilateral tumors. Familial involvement was confirmed by history or direct genetic analysis in 8 (47%) of the 17 patients. There were no malignant paragangliomas, and only 3 patients had tumors that were determined to be functional. Tumor size ranged from 1.3 to 6.0 cm. Two patients required combined arterial resection as part of complete excision of the tumor. There were no permanent operative cranial nerve injuries, no recurrences, minimal morbidity, and no mortality. In conclusion, optimal management of cervical paragangliomas should include a thorough preoperative evaluation, accurate definition of the surgical anatomy, and exclusion of synchronous paragangliomas. A combined therapeutic approach by a multidisciplinary team including surgeons and interventional radiologists provides safe and effective management of cervical paragangliomas with very low morbidity and excellent outcomes. PMID:26722157

  19. A Computational Approach for Model Update of an LS-DYNA Energy Absorbing Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2008-01-01

    NASA and its contractors are working on structural concepts for absorbing impact energy of aerospace vehicles. Recently, concepts in the form of multi-cell honeycomb-like structures designed to crush under load have been investigated for both space and aeronautics applications. Efforts to understand these concepts are progressing from tests of individual cells to tests of systems with hundreds of cells. Because of fabrication irregularities, geometry irregularities, and material properties uncertainties, the problem of reconciling analytical models, in particular LS-DYNA models, with experimental data is a challenge. A first look at the correlation results between single cell load/deflection data with LS-DYNA predictions showed problems which prompted additional work in this area. This paper describes a computational approach that uses analysis of variance, deterministic sampling techniques, response surface modeling, and genetic optimization to reconcile test with analysis results. Analysis of variance provides a screening technique for selection of critical parameters used when reconciling test with analysis. In this study, complete ignorance of the parameter distribution is assumed and, therefore, the value of any parameter within the range that is computed using the optimization procedure is considered to be equally likely. Mean values from tests are matched against LS-DYNA solutions by minimizing the square error using a genetic optimization. The paper presents the computational methodology along with results obtained using this approach.

  20. An integrated approach for thermal stabilization of a mesophilic adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sojin; Jung, Du-kyo; Phillips, George N; Bae, Euiyoung

    2014-09-01

    Thermally stable proteins are desirable for research and industrial purposes, but redesigning proteins for higher thermal stability can be challenging. A number of different techniques have been used to improve the thermal stability of proteins, but the extents of stability enhancement were sometimes unpredictable and not significant. Here, we systematically tested the effects of multiple stabilization techniques including a bioinformatic method and structure-guided mutagenesis on a single protein, thereby providing an integrated approach to protein thermal stabilization. Using a mesophilic adenylate kinase (AK) as a model, we identified stabilizing mutations based on various stabilization techniques, and generated a series of AK variants by introducing mutations both individually and collectively. The redesigned proteins displayed a range of increased thermal stabilities, the most stable of which was comparable to a naturally evolved thermophilic homologue with more than a 25° increase in its thermal denaturation midpoint. We also solved crystal structures of three representative variants including the most stable variant, to confirm the structural basis for their increased stabilities. These results provide a unique opportunity for systematically analyzing the effectiveness and additivity of various stabilization mechanisms, and they represent a useful approach for improving protein stability by integrating the reduction of local structural entropy and the optimization of global noncovalent interactions such as hydrophobic contact and ion pairs. PMID:24615904

  1. Setup reduction approaches for machining

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1997-04-01

    Rapid setup is a common improvement approach in press working operations such as blanking and shearing. It has paid major dividends in the sheet metal industry. It also has been a major improvement thrust for high-production machining operations. However, the literature does not well cover all the setup operations and constraints for job shop work. This review provides some insight into the issues involved. It highlights the floor problems and provides insights for further improvement. The report is designed to provide a quick understanding of the issues.

  2. 'Lean' approach gives greater efficiency.

    PubMed

    Call, Roger

    2014-02-01

    Adapting the 'Lean' methodologies used for many years by many manufacturers on the production line - such as in the automotive industry - and deploying them in healthcare 'spaces' can, Roger Call, an architect at Herman Miller Healthcare in the US, argues, 'easily remedy many of the inefficiencies' found within a healthcare facility. In an article that first appeared in the September 2013 issue of The Australian Hospital Engineer, he explains how 'Lean' approaches such as the 'Toyota production system', and 'Six Sigma', can be harnessed to good effect in the healthcare sphere. PMID:24620487

  3. Approach to Mars Field Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlberger, William; Rice, James W.; Parker, Timothy; Lipps, Jere H.; Hoffman, Paul; Burchfiel, Clark; Brasier, Martin

    1998-01-01

    The goals of field study on Mars are nothing less than to understand the processes and history of the planet at whatever level of detail is necessary. A manned mission gives us an unprecedented opportunity to use the immense power of the human mind to comprehend Mars in extraordinary detail. To take advantage of this opportunity, it is important to examine how we should approach the field study of Mars. In this effort, we are guided by over 200 years of field exploration experience on Earth as well as six manned missions exploring the Moon.

  4. Unified Approach to Dense Matter

    E-print Network

    Byung-Yoon Park; Hee-Jung Lee; Vicente Vento; Joon-Il Kim; Dong-Pil Min; Mannque Rho

    2004-08-02

    We apply the Skyrme model to dense hadronic matter, which provides a unified approach to high density, valid in the large Nc limit. In our picture, dense hadronic matter is described by the classical soliton configuration with minimum energy for the given baryon number density. By incorporating the meson fluctuations on such ground state we obtain an effective Lagrangian for meson dynamics in a dense medium. Our starting point has been the Skyrme model defined in terms of pions, thereafter we have extended and improved the model by incorporating other degrees of freedom such as dilaton, kaons and vector mesons.

  5. Novel Approaches for Glycodrug Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Hirosato

    This chapter will give you an overview of recent approaches for drug development, focusing on the function and roles of carbohydrates. Section 2 will outline the biochemical functions of polysaccharide (neutral polysaccharide, chitin and chitosan, glycosaminoglycan, and synthetic polysaccharides) and glycopolymers and the perspectives of their medicinal/medical use. Section 3 will outline recent biopharmaceutical research and development, utilizing the functions of carbohydrates. Section 4 will outline drug discovery and development of new medicines targeting carbohydrates. In addition, recent advances in carbohydrate synthesis technology, needed for development of new medicines, will also be described.

  6. HEDR modeling approach: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    This report is a revision of the previous Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project modeling approach report. This revised report describes the methods used in performing scoping studies and estimating final radiation doses to real and representative individuals who lived in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. The scoping studies and dose estimates pertain to various environmental pathways during various periods of time. The original report discussed the concepts under consideration in 1991. The methods for estimating dose have been refined as understanding of existing data, the scope of pathways, and the magnitudes of dose estimates were evaluated through scoping studies.

  7. Femoral approach to lead extraction.

    PubMed

    Mulpuru, Siva K; Hayes, David L; Osborn, Michael J; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2015-03-01

    Laser and radiofrequency energy-assisted lead extraction has greatly facilitated this complex procedure. Although success rates are high, in some instances alternate methods of extraction are required. In this review, we discuss techniques for femoral extraction of implanted leads and retained fragments. The major tools available, including commonly used snares and delivery tools, are discussed. We briefly describe combined internal jugular and femoral venous extraction approaches, as well as complimentary utilization of more than one technique via the femoral vein. Animated and procedural sequences are included to help the reader visualize the key components of these techniques. PMID:25311643

  8. An approach to space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, G. H.; Nadler, J. H.; Hochberg, T.; Barnouin, O.; Gu, Y. B.

    1990-01-01

    Fusion offers the potential for a very high specific power, providing a large specific impulse that can be traded-off with thrust for mission optimization. Thus fusion is a leading candidate for missions beyond the moon. A new approach is discussed for space fusion power, namely Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC). This method offers a high power density in a relatively small, simple device. It appears capable of burning aneutronic fuels which are most desirable for space applications and is well suited for direct conversion. An experimental device to test the concept is described.

  9. Nonpharmacologic approach to sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Mansel, J Keith; Carey, Elise C

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in patients with cancer, occurring throughout the disease trajectory and sometimes well after treatment has concluded. Insomnia often does not occur in isolation; it may be associated with pain, fatigue, depression, and medication usage. Screening for sleep disturbances is an essential part of caring for oncologic patients. The criterion standard for nonpharmacologic treatment of insomnia in these patients is cognitive-behavioral therapy, a multimodal approach using sleep hygiene and education, stimulus control, sleep restriction, and relaxation. Exercise and complementary and integrative medicine have been studied with varying results, and no firm recommendation can be made about their efficacy. PMID:25299144

  10. Pharmacological approaches in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    McCarville, Justin L; Caminero, Alberto; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-12-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten, characterized by immune responses toward gluten constituents and the autoantigen transglutaminase 2. The only current treatment available for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet, however there are a plethora of therapies in development for the treatment of celiac disease (e.g. vaccine), management of symptoms while consuming gluten (e.g. Necator americanus) or adjuvant therapies in conjunction with the gluten-free diet (e.g. larazotide acetate). Current approaches in development target barrier function, immune responses, detoxifying gluten or sequestering gluten. Developing therapies include those targeting environmental factors, such as the microbiota or proteases. PMID:26414923

  11. Nanoparticle Approaches against Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weiwei; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide success of antibiotics, the treatment of bacterial infection still faces significant challenges, particularly the emergence of antibiotic resistance. As a result, nanoparticle drug delivery platforms including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and various inorganic nanoparticles have been increasingly exploited to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of existing antibiotics. This review focuses on areas where nanoparticle approaches hold significant potential to advance the treatment of bacterial infection. These areas include targeted antibiotic delivery, environmentally responsive antibiotic delivery, combinatorial antibiotic delivery, nanoparticle-enabled antibacterial vaccination, and nanoparticle-based bacterial detection. In each area we highlight the innovative antimicrobial nanoparticle platforms and review their progress made against bacterial infections. PMID:25044325

  12. Hybrid Retrieval Approaches to Geospatial Music Recommendation

    E-print Network

    Widmer, Gerhard

    Hybrid Retrieval Approaches to Geospatial Music Recommendation Markus Schedl Department Austrian Research Institute for Artificial Intelligence, Vienna, Austria dominik.schnitzer@ofai.at ABSTRACT for retrieval purposes and (ii) novel geospatial music recommendation approaches using location information

  13. AN EVOLUTIONARY APPROACH FOR BUSINESS PROCESS REDESIGN

    E-print Network

    van der Aalst, Wil

    : Business Process Redesign, Process Modelling, Business Process Management, Workflows, Best PracticesAN EVOLUTIONARY APPROACH FOR BUSINESS PROCESS REDESIGN Towards an Intelligent System Mariska Netjes present an evolutionary approach towards business process redesign and explain its first three steps: 1

  14. An Approach to Evaluating Equipment Efficiency Policies 

    E-print Network

    Newsom, D. E.; Evans, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    . INITIAL APPLICATION OF THE APPROACH The initial approach to the study of the four teen other types of industrial equipment was de veloped as a series of equipment characterizations. The purpose of these preliminary characterizations was to lay...

  15. IP routing lookup: hardware and software approach 

    E-print Network

    Chakaravarthy, Ravikumar V.

    2005-08-29

    The work presented in this thesis is motivated by the dual goal of developing a scalable and efficient approach for IP lookup using both hardware and software approach. The work involved designing algorithms and techniques to increase the capacity...

  16. An Effective Approach to Teaching Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birss, Viola I.; Truax, D. Rodney

    1990-01-01

    An approach which may be useful for teaching electrochemistry in freshman college chemistry courses is presented. Discussed are the potential problems with teaching this subject and solutions provided by this approach. (CW)

  17. Boom Rendezvous Alternative Docking Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    Space rendezvous and docking has always been attempted with primarily one philosophic methodology. The slow matching of one vehicle's orbit by a second vehicle and then a final closing sequence that ends in matching the orbits with perfect precision and with near zero relative velocities. The task is time consuming, propellant intensive, risk inherent (plume impingement, collisions, fuel depletion, etc.) and requires substantial hardware mass. The historical background and rationale as to why this approach is used is discussed in terms of the path-not-taken and in light of an alternate methodology. Rendezvous and docking by boom extension is suggested to have inherent advantages that today s technology can readily exploit. Extension from the primary spacecraft, beyond its inherent large inertia, allows low inertia connections to be made rapidly and safely. Plume contamination issues are eliminated as well as the extra propellant mass and risk required for the final thruster (docking) operations. Space vehicle connection hardware can be significantly lightened. Also, docking sensors and controls require less fidelity; allowing them to be more robust and less sensitive. It is the potential safety advantage and mission risk reduction that makes this approach attractive, besides the prospect of nominal time and mass savings.

  18. New approaches to embryo selection.

    PubMed

    Montag, Markus; Toth, Bettina; Strowitzki, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Embryo selection has been an important topic since the introduction of assisted reproduction, with embryo morphology being the most obvious criterion. Although morphology serves as indicator for overall IVF laboratory quality, its statistical assessment limits the possibility to identify the most implantation-competent embryos. In order to reach a direct picture of the developing embryo, invasive procedures such as preimplantation genetic screening or transcriptome and proteome analysis of biopsied embryonic tissue were initially prioritized and are still under investigation. More recently, focus has shifted towards noninvasive techniques that maintain the integrity of the embryo. Metabolomic profiling of culture medium from growing embryos attracted much research. Although successful in a pilot study, that approach failed in a randomized controlled trial. Other metabolomics studies are on their way but not yet available for routine clinical use. The most promising strategy at present is the combined evaluation of morphology and developmental kinetics using time-lapse imaging. This has brought new insights into certain characteristics that enable deselection of embryos at an early stage of development and to identify others with high potential for successful implantation. However, there is still considerable room for improvement. Further strategies will most likely involve the combination of several different approaches. PMID:23933036

  19. Soliton approach to magnetic holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgärtel, Klaus

    ``Magnetic holes'' (MHs), depressions in the magnetic field magnitude associated with enhancements in density and kinetic pressure, have been observed in the solar wind, the magnetosheaths of terrestrial planets and in the environments of comets, suggesting that this phenomenon may be a common occurrence in space plasmas. MHs are usually believed to result from the mirror instability which can develop in high-beta plasmas with a temperature anisotropy, T?/T?>1. Motivated by the fact that solar wind MHs are often observed in a mirror mode stable environment [Winterhalter et al., 1994], this paper proposes a mechanism for the maintenance of MHs in an equilibrium plasma. We suggest an explanation in terms of magnetically rarefactive (``dark'') MHD solitons with anticorrelation of magnetic field and density, which propagate with small velocities at large angles to the ambient magnetic field. This intrinsically nonlinear approach is based on a magnetohydrodynamic plasma description including Hall inertia effects and utilizes the well-developed soliton theory of the Derivative Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation (DNLS) which appears as a partly adequate approximation to the parent Hall-MHD system. The approach introduces an alternative mechanism into the discussion over the physical nature of MHs that is not related to an instability and provides an explanation for various aspects of the observations including amplitude, thickness, and spatial structure of MHs.

  20. Modeling Approaches in Planetary Seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee; Knapmeyer, Martin; Panning, Mark; Schmerr, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Of the many geophysical means that can be used to probe a planet's interior, seismology remains the most direct. Given that the seismic data gathered on the Moon over 40 years ago revolutionized our understanding of the Moon and are still being used today to produce new insight into the state of the lunar interior, it is no wonder that many future missions, both real and conceptual, plan to take seismometers to other planets. To best facilitate the return of high-quality data from these instruments, as well as to further our understanding of the dynamic processes that modify a planet's interior, various modeling approaches are used to quantify parameters such as the amount and distribution of seismicity, tidal deformation, and seismic structure on and of the terrestrial planets. In addition, recent advances in wavefield modeling have permitted a renewed look at seismic energy transmission and the effects of attenuation and scattering, as well as the presence and effect of a core, on recorded seismograms. In this chapter, we will review these approaches.

  1. Fast approach for toner saving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Ilia V.; Kurilin, Ilya V.; Rychagov, Michael N.; Lee, Hokeun; Kim, Sangho; Choi, Donchul

    2011-01-01

    Reducing toner consumption is an important task in modern printing devices and has a significant positive ecological impact. Existing toner saving approaches have two main drawbacks: appearance of hardcopy in toner saving mode is worse in comparison with normal mode; processing of whole rendered page bitmap requires significant computational costs. We propose to add small holes of various shapes and sizes to random places inside a character bitmap stored in font cache. Such random perforation scheme is based on processing pipeline in RIP of standard printer languages Postscript and PCL. Processing of text characters only, and moreover, processing of each character for given font and size alone, is an extremely fast procedure. The approach does not deteriorate halftoned bitmap and business graphics and provide toner saving for typical office documents up to 15-20%. Rate of toner saving is adjustable. Alteration of resulted characters' appearance is almost indistinguishable in comparison with solid black text due to random placement of small holes inside the character regions. The suggested method automatically skips small fonts to preserve its quality. Readability of text processed by proposed method is fine. OCR programs process that scanned hardcopy successfully too.

  2. Snow metamorphism: A fractal approach.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Anna; Chiaia, Bernardino M; Frigo, Barbara; Türk, Christian

    2010-09-01

    Snow is a porous disordered medium consisting of air and three water phases: ice, vapor, and liquid. The ice phase consists of an assemblage of grains, ice matrix, initially arranged over a random load bearing skeleton. The quantitative relationship between density and morphological characteristics of different snow microstructures is still an open issue. In this work, a three-dimensional fractal description of density corresponding to different snow microstructure is put forward. First, snow density is simulated in terms of a generalized Menger sponge model. Then, a fully three-dimensional compact stochastic fractal model is adopted. The latter approach yields a quantitative map of the randomness of the snow texture, which is described as a three-dimensional fractional Brownian field with the Hurst exponent H varying as continuous parameters. The Hurst exponent is found to be strongly dependent on snow morphology and density. The approach might be applied to all those cases where the morphological evolution of snow cover or ice sheets should be conveniently described at a quantitative level. PMID:21230135

  3. Neural Approaches to Machine Consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksander, Igor; Eng., F. R.

    2008-10-01

    `Machine Consciousness', which some years ago might have been suppressed as an inappropriate pursuit, has come out of the closet and is now a legitimate area of research concern. This paper briefly surveys the last few years of worldwide research in this area which divides into rule-based and neural approaches and then reviews the work of the author's laboratory during the last ten years. The paper develops a fresh perspective on this work: it is argued that neural approaches, in this case, digital neural systems, can address phenomenological consciousness. Important clarifications of phenomenology and virtuality which enter this modelling are explained in the early parts of the paper. In neural models, phenomenology is a form of depictive inner representation that has five specific axiomatic features: a sense of self-presence in an external world; a sense of imagination of past experience and fiction; a sense of attention; a capacity for planning; a sense of emotion-based volition that influences planning. It is shown that these five features have separate but integrated support in dynamic neural systems.

  4. Earthquake Archaeology: a logical approach?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, I. S.; Buck, V. A.

    2001-12-01

    Ancient earthquakes can leave their mark in the mythical and literary accounts of ancient peoples, the stratigraphy of their site histories, and the structural integrity of their constructions. Within this broad cross-disciplinary tramping ground, earthquake geologists have tended to focus on those aspects of the cultural record that are most familiar to them; the physical effects of seismic deformation on ancient constructions. One of the core difficulties with this 'earthquake archaeology' approach is that recent attempts to isolate structural criteria that are diagnostic or strongly suggestive of a seismic origin are undermined by the recognition that signs of ancient seismicity are generally indistinguishable from non-seismic mechanisms (poor construction, adverse geotechnical conditions). We illustrate the difficulties and inconsistencies in current proposed 'earthquake diagnostic' schemes by reference to two case studies of archaeoseismic damage in central Greece. The first concerns fallen columns at various Classical temple localities in mainland Greece (Nemea, Sounio, Olympia, Bassai) which, on the basis of observed structural criteria, are earthquake-induced but which are alternatively explained by archaeologists as the action of human disturbance. The second re-examines the almost type example of the Kyparissi site in the Atalanti region as a Classical stoa offset across a seismic surface fault, arguing instead for its deformation by ground instability. Finally, in highlighting the inherent ambiguity of archaeoseismic data, we consider the value of a logic-tree approach for quantifying and quantifying our uncertainities for seismic-hazard analysis.

  5. Ecological Approaches to Studying Zoonoses.

    PubMed

    Loh, Elizabeth H; Murray, Kris A; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Hosseini, Parviez R; Rostal, Melinda K; Karesh, William B; Daszak, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Concern over emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) and a better understanding of their causes has resulted in increasing recognition of the linkages among human, animal, and ecosystem health. It is now well recognized that human activities can promote the emergence of infectious diseases through the large-scale modification of natural environments and inadvertent vectoring (e.g., international trade and travel). These perturbations can alter the ecological and evolutionary relationships among humans, wildlife, and the pathogens that move between them, resulting in disease emergence. In recent years, the rise in zoonotic EIDs has not only increased our awareness of the need for cross-sectoral collaborations, but has also highlighted the disconnect between current ecological theory and biological reality. As the One Health movement continues to gain steam, further integration of ecological approaches into the One Health framework will be required. We discuss the importance of ecological methods and theory to the study of zoonotic diseases by (i) discussing key ecological concepts and approaches, (ii) reviewing methods of studying wildlife diseases and their potential applications for zoonoses, and (iii) identifying future directions in the One Health movement. PMID:26184965

  6. Economic Approaches to Understanding Scientific Norms

    E-print Network

    Strevens, Michael

    Economic Approaches to Understanding Scientific Norms Michael Strevens To appear in Episteme A A theme of much work taking an "economic approach" to the study of sci- ence is the interaction between of formal methods, proponents of the economic approach offer what are in substantive terms profoundly

  7. Constrained Ratio Approach to Allocating Instructional Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, William B.

    1975-01-01

    Principal budgetary approaches underlying the allocation of instructional resources to an institution of higher education to maintain its continuing programs are briefly considered from several standpoints, and an alternative approach is developed. The constrained ratio approach is conducive to innovation but maintains resource control. (LBH)

  8. World-line approach to Sign Problems

    E-print Network

    Aarts, Gert

    World-line approach to Sign Problems Shailesh Chandrasekharan Duke University #12;Outline XY model + chemical potential world-line approach solving the silver blaze problem! Two component bosons + Abelian world-line approach solving the silver blaze problem! more flavors + solving sign problems

  9. An Attributional Approach to Counselor Attractiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackman, Hollis W.; Claiborn, Charles D.

    1982-01-01

    Examined two components of counselor attractiveness--perceived similarity and liking--in a comparison of two theoretical approaches to attractiveness and influence in counseling--the referent power hypothesis and an attributional approach. Results generally support the attributional approach over the reference power hypothesis. (Author)

  10. A Web-Service Approach for

    E-print Network

    A Web-Service Approach for Distributed Access to Methods, Data and Models Rajarshi Guha Geoffrey Fox Kevin E. Gilbert Marlon Pierce David Wild Overview Pub3D Model Exchange A Web-Service Approach National Meeting 6th March, 2008 #12;A Web-Service Approach for Distributed Access to Methods, Data

  11. APPROACHES TO VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-print Network

    Bateman, Ian J.

    APPROACHES TO VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE CHANGE by W. Neil Adger CSERGE Working Paper GEC 96-05 #12;APPROACHES TO VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE CHANGE by W. Neil Adger Centre for Social and Economic Research and Physical Approaches to Vulnerability to Climate Change in Vietnam' is also gratefully acknowledged. ISSN

  12. A Nonviolent Approach to Social Justice Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hongyu

    2013-01-01

    This article advocates a nonviolent approach to social justice education. First, social justice education literature is reviewed, and two contrasting and influential approaches--critical theory and poststructural theory--are the focus of critical analysis. A nonviolent approach is proposed as an alternative. Second, the notion of social justice is…

  13. Larvae, Ladies and Learning: The Project Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitham, Laurel; Killoran, Isabel

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Project Approach and how it was used in a Grade 1 exploration of Painted Lady butterflies in Ontario, Canada. Outlines the students' experience with the project and examines the compatibility of the Project Approach with the Ontario Science and Technology Curriculum document. Maintains that the Project Approach supports and…

  14. LED instrument approach instruction display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, B. D.; Kelly, W. L., IV; Crouch, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A display employing light emitting diodes (LED's) was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of such displays for presenting landing and navigation information to reduce the workload of general aviation pilots during IFR flight. The display consists of a paper tape reader, digital memory, control electronics, digital latches, and LED alphanumeric displays. A presentable digital countdown clock-timer is included as part of the system to provide a convenient means of monitoring time intervals for precise flight navigation. The system is a limited capability prototype assembled to test pilot reaction to such a device under simulated IFR operation. Pilot opinion indicates that the display is helpful in reducing the IFR pilots workload when used with a runway approach plate. However, the development of a compact, low power second generation display was recommended which could present several instructions simultaneously and provide information update capability. A microprocessor-based display could fulfill these requirements.

  15. Rheological approaches to food systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Peter; Pollard, Michael; Erni, Philipp; Marti, Irene; Padar, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    Foods, consumer products and cosmetics belong to a wide range of colloidal and non-colloidal materials. Often, they are composite materials comprising several classes of fluid and solid constituents, including biopolymer gels, particulate suspensions, emulsions and foams. Length scales relevant for such materials may be anywhere between those associated with the molecular conformation of the ingredients up to long-scale dimensions of processing flows. The corresponding time scales may be in the sub-millisecond regime during aggregation of the ingredients or up to years during the shelf life of the final product. Rheological research of food material focuses on both the interaction between its ingredients, which might exhibit a complex rheological response function themselves and the influence of processing on the food structure and its properties. This brief overview summarizes suitable food rheology approaches and is grouped by the degree of abstraction of length scales and interactions. To cite this article: P. Fischer et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  16. An Experimental Approach to Starshades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuele, Rocco; Varshneya, R.; Glassman, T.; Johnson, A. M. F.; Shipley, A.

    2010-01-01

    A starshade is an external occulter that flies tens of thousands of kilometers in front of a space telescope, along the line-of-sight to a star. A starshade blocks starlight before it enters the telescope, mitigating diffraction, and making Earth-like planets observable. The starshade testbed at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) is capable of testing the performance of sub-scale starshades in mission-similar configurations. Thus far at NGAS, starshades have suppressed a simulated star to the 10-7 contrast level or better across a broad white light bandpass. The goal of the testbed has been deep starlight suppression, but it is also important to understand starshade sensitivity to shape deformations. The purpose of this poster is to summarize our approach and initial results of assessing the impact of starshade shape flaws on performance using the testbed. We are working toward a convergence of experimental results and theoretical predictions.

  17. Cognitive effort: A neuroeconomic approach.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Andrew; Braver, Todd S

    2015-06-01

    Cognitive effort has been implicated in numerous theories regarding normal and aberrant behavior and the physiological response to engagement with demanding tasks. Yet, despite broad interest, no unifying, operational definition of cognitive effort itself has been proposed. Here, we argue that the most intuitive and epistemologically valuable treatment is in terms of effort-based decision-making, and advocate a neuroeconomics-focused research strategy. We first outline psychological and neuroscientific theories of cognitive effort. Then we describe the benefits of a neuroeconomic research strategy, highlighting how it affords greater inferential traction than do traditional markers of cognitive effort, including self-reports and physiologic markers of autonomic arousal. Finally, we sketch a future series of studies that can leverage the full potential of the neuroeconomic approach toward understanding the cognitive and neural mechanisms that give rise to phenomenal, subjective cognitive effort. PMID:25673005

  18. Component Modeling Approach Software Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2010-08-23

    The Component Modeling Approach Software Tool (CMAST) establishes a set of performance libraries of approved components (frames, glass, and spacer) which can be accessed for configuring fenestration products for a project, and btaining a U-factor, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC), and Visible Transmittance (VT) rating for those products, which can then be reflected in a CMA Label Certificate for code compliance. CMAST is web-based as well as client-based. The completed CMA program and software tool will be useful in several ways for a vast array of stakeholders in the industry: Generating performance ratings for bidding projects Ascertaining credible and accurate performance data Obtaining third party certification of overall product performance for code compliance

  19. Dietary Approaches to Prevent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bazzano, Lydia A.; Green, Torrance; Harrison, Teresa N.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure arises from a combination of environmental and genetic factors and the interactions of these factors. A substantial body of evidence from animal studies, epidemiologic studies, meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials has demonstrated that certain dietary patterns and individual dietary elements play a prominent role in the development of hypertension. Changes in diet can lower blood pressure, prevent the development of hypertension, and reduce the risk of hypertension-related complications. Dietary strategies for the prevention of hypertension include reducing sodium intake, limiting alcohol consumption, increasing potassium intake, and adopting an overall dietary pattern such as the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet or a Mediterranean diet. In order to reduce the burden of blood pressure-related complications, efforts that focus on environmental and individual behavioral changes that encourage and promote healthier food choices are warranted. PMID:24091874

  20. Optical Approach to Gravitational Redshift

    E-print Network

    Y. G. Yi

    2012-04-12

    An optical approach begins by interpreting the gravitational redshift resulting to a change in the relative velocity of light due to the medium of propagation in the gravitational field. The discussion continues by pointing out an agreement in structure between the equation for rays in geometrical optics and the geodesic equation of general relativity. From their comparison we learn that the path of rays should be given by the relation $ds^2=n^2(r)dr^2+r^2d\\theta^2$, not by $ds^2=dr^2+r^2d\\theta^2$, in a medium with spherical symmetry of refractive index $n(r)$. The development of an optical analogy suggests introducing $n^2(r)$ in place of $g_{rr}$ as an optical version of the Schwarzschild metric. In form and content, $n^2(r)$ is different from $g_{rr}$. The optical point of view replaces the general-relativity explanations in terms of time and gravitation.

  1. Geometrical approach to fluid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvshinov, B. N.; Schep, T. J.

    1997-03-01

    Differential geometry based upon the Cartan calculus of differential forms is applied to investigate invariant properties of equations that describe the motion of continuous media. The main feature of this approach is that physical quantities are treated as geometrical objects. The geometrical notion of invariance is introduced in terms of Lie derivatives and a general procedure for the construction of local and integral fluid invariants is presented. The solutions of the equations for invariant fields can be written in terms of Lagrange variables. A generalization of the Hamiltonian formalism for finite-dimensional systems to continuous media is proposed. Analogously to finite-dimensional systems, Hamiltonian fluids are introduced as systems that annihilate an exact two-form. It is shown that Euler and ideal, charged fluids satisfy this local definition of a Hamiltonian structure. A new class of scalar invariants of Hamiltonian fluids is constructed that generalizes the invariants that are related with gauge transformations and with symmetries (Noether).

  2. Nanomedicine Approaches for Corneal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Shyam S.; Lim, Rayne R.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Mohan, Rajiv R.

    2015-01-01

    Corneal diseases are the third leading cause of blindness globally. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), steroids, antibiotics and tissue transplantation are currently used to treat corneal pathological conditions. However, barrier properties of the ocular surface necessitate high concentration of the drugs applied in the eye repeatedly. This often results in poor efficacy and several side-effects. Nanoparticle-based molecular medicine seeks to overcome these limitations by enhancing the permeability and pharmacological properties of the drugs. The promise of nanomedicine approaches for treating corneal defects and restoring vision without side effects in preclinical animal studies has been demonstrated. Numerous polymeric, metallic and hybrid nanoparticles capable of transporting genes into desired corneal cells to intercept pathologic pathways and processes leading to blindness have been identified. This review provides an overview of corneal diseases, nanovector properties and their applications in drug-delivery and corneal disease management. PMID:25941990

  3. Quantum chaos: An entropy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sl/omczy?ski, Wojciech; ?yczkowski, Karol

    1994-11-01

    A new definition of the entropy of a given dynamical system and of an instrument describing the measurement process is proposed within the operational approach to quantum mechanics. It generalizes other definitions of entropy, in both the classical and quantum cases. The Kolmogorov-Sinai (KS) entropy is obtained for a classical system and the sharp measurement instrument. For a quantum system and a coherent states instrument, a new quantity, coherent states entropy, is defined. It may be used to measure chaos in quantum mechanics. The following correspondence principle is proved: the upper limit of the coherent states entropy of a quantum map as ??0 is less than or equal to the KS-entropy of the corresponding classical map. ``Chaos umpire sits, And by decision more imbroils the fray By which he reigns: next him high arbiter Chance governs all.'' John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book II

  4. Numerical approach to frictional fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Jon Alm; Toussaint, Renaud; Mâløy, Knut Jørgen; Flekkøy, Eirik; Sandnes, Bjørnar

    2015-09-01

    Experiments on confined two-phase flow systems, involving air and a dense suspension, have revealed a diverse set of flow morphologies. As the air displaces the suspension, the beads that make up the suspension can accumulate along the interface. The dynamics can generate "frictional fingers" of air coated by densely packed grains. We present here a simplified model for the dynamics together with a new numerical strategy for simulating the frictional finger behavior. The model is based on the yield stress criterion of the interface. The discretization scheme allows for simulating a larger range of structures than previous approaches. We further make theoretical predictions for the characteristic width associated with the frictional fingers, based on the yield stress criterion, and compare these to experimental results. The agreement between theory and experiments validates our model and allows us to estimate the unknown parameter in the yield stress criterion, which we use in the simulations.

  5. Postoperative singultus: an osteopathic approach.

    PubMed

    Petree, Kristie; Bruner, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Singultus, or hiccups, is a common medical condition. Despite exponential leaps in medicine, the pathophysiologic cause remains poorly defined. Persistent singultus has been associated with conditions such as pulmonary embolism and myocardial infarction. Singultus is also a well-known postoperative complication. The criterion standard of care for patients with singultus involves ruling out lethal pathologic causes, attempting physical stimulation with Valsava maneuvers or drinking water, and, if no relief has been achieved, administering drugs to ease the symptoms. The authors report a case of a man whose postoperative singultus was successfully managed with osteopathic manipulative treatment. This approach addresses many of the possible underlying neuromechanical causes of the aberrant reflex with minimal potential for adverse effects. Physicians should consider osteopathic manipulative treatment in the care of patients with singultus. PMID:25722363

  6. Episodic Memory: A Comparative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Ordas, Gema; Call, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Historically, episodic memory has been described as autonoetic, personally relevant, complex, context-rich, and allowing mental time travel. In contrast, semantic memory, which is theorized to be free of context and personal relevance, is noetic and consists of general knowledge of facts about the world. The field of comparative psychology has adopted this distinction in order to study episodic memory in non-human animals. Our aim in this article is not only to reflect on the concept of episodic memory and the experimental approaches used in comparative psychology to study this phenomenon, but also to provide a critical analysis of these paradigms. We conclude the article by providing new avenues for future research. PMID:23781179

  7. Hybrid Approach to Reinforcement Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulebtateche, Brahim; Fezari, Mourad; Boughazi, Mohamed

    2008-06-01

    Reinforcement Learning (RL) is a general framework in which an autonomous agent tries to learn an optimal policy of actions from direct interaction with the surrounding environment (RL). However, one difficulty for the application of RL control is its slow convergence, especially in environments with continuous state space. In this paper, a modified structure of RL is proposed to speed up reinforcement learning control. In this approach, supervision technique is combined with the standard Q-learning, a model-free algorithm of reinforcement learning. The a priori information is provided to the RL by an optimal LQ-controller, used to indicate preferred actions at intermittent times. It is shown that the convergence speed of the supervised RL agent is greatly improved compared to the conventional Q-Learning algorithm. Simulation work and results on the cart-pole balancing problem are given to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  8. Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka Approach

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-10-14

    EMTA is a stand-alone computer program that has been developed for the computation of elastic properties and thermal expansion coefficients (thermoelastic properties) of discontinuous fiber composites. EMTA stands for the Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach. It implements the standard and modified Mori-Tanaka models that use the Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method. EMTA carries out the Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka homogenization procedure accounting for the constituents (fiber and matrix) properties such as the elastic properties and thermal expansion coefficients (CTEs) of the fibersmore »and of the matrix. It also accounts for the constituents features such as fiber length and orientation distributions, fiber curvature, and imperfect fiber/matrix interfaces. The outputs of an EMTA execution are the elastic properties (engineering constants) and CTEs of the as-formed composite in the defined material coordinate system. These results can readily be used in engineering applications and designs that require these properties.« less

  9. Approaches to chemical synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Chiarabelli, Cristiano; Stano, Pasquale; Anella, Fabrizio; Carrara, Paolo; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2012-07-16

    Synthetic biology is first represented in terms of two complementary aspects, the bio-engineering one, based on the genetic manipulation of extant microbial forms in order to obtain forms of life which do not exist in nature; and the chemical synthetic biology, an approach mostly based on chemical manipulation for the laboratory synthesis of biological structures that do not exist in nature. The paper is mostly devoted to shortly review chemical synthetic biology projects currently carried out in our laboratory. In particular, we describe: the minimal cell project, then the "Never Born Proteins" and lastly the Never Born RNAs. We describe and critically analyze the main results, emphasizing the possible relevance of chemical synthetic biology for the progress in basic science and biotechnology. PMID:22265689

  10. An alternative approach to electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Førland, Katrine Seip; Førland, Tormod

    1995-01-01

    The concepts used conventionally in electrochemistry, single-ion chemical potential and electrostatic potential difference, are not obtainable from measurements in an inhomogeneous system. The use of nonoperational and mutually dependent forces in flux equations has impeded our understanding of electrochemical processes, and has led to wrong conclusions. The equation for entropy production is derived using only operationally defined quantities, chemical potentials of neutral components and the electric potential measured with reversible electrodes. The electric potential enters calculations as external electric work in the first law of thermodynamics. From entropy production, flux equations are obtained where the forces are operationally defined, measurable quantities. Three different problems from electrochemistry are discussed, the liquid junction potential, the Donnan potential, and energy coversion in mitochondria. The conventional method of calculations and the operational method are compared. The operational method permits more detailed calculations of emf, and an understanding of the process from a different approach.

  11. Diffraction operators in paraxial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasso, William; Navas, Marianela; Añez, Liz; Urdaneta, Romer; Díaz, Leonardo; Torres, César O.

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays, research in the field of science education points to the creation of alternative ways of teaching contents encouraging the development of more elaborate reasoning, where a high degree of abstraction and generalization of scientific knowledge prevails. On that subject, this research shows a didactic alternative proposal for the construction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffraction concepts applying the Fourier transform technique in the study of electromagnetic waves propagation in free space. Curvature transparency and Fourier sphere operators in paraxial approximation are used in order to make the usual laborious mathematical approach easier. The main result shows that the composition of optic metaxial operators results in the discovery of a simpler way out of the standard electromagnetic wave propagation in free space between a transmitter and a receptor separated from a given distance. This allows to state that the didactic proposal shown encourages the construction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffraction concepts in a more effective and easier way than the traditional teaching.

  12. Henipavirus pathogenesis and antiviral approaches.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Horvat, Branka

    2015-03-01

    Hendra virus and Nipah virus are closely related, recently emerged zoonotic paramyxoviruses, belonging to the Henipavirus genus. Both viruses induce generalized vasculitis affecting particularly the respiratory tract and CNS. The exceptionally broad species tropism of Henipavirus, the high case fatality rate and person-to-person transmission associated with Nipah virus outbreaks emphasize the necessity of effective antiviral strategies for these intriguing threatening pathogens. Current therapeutic approaches, validated in animal models, target early steps in viral infection; they include the use of neutralizing virus-specific antibodies and blocking membrane fusion with peptides that bind the viral fusion protein. A better understanding of Henipavirus pathogenesis is critical for the further advancement of antiviral treatment, and we summarize here the recent progress in the field. PMID:25634624

  13. Approach to the Hypophosphatemic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Imel, Erik A.

    2012-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia is commonly missed due to nonspecific signs and symptoms, but it causes considerable morbidity and in some cases contributes to mortality. Three primary mechanisms of hypophosphatemia exist: increased renal excretion, decreased intestinal absorption, and shifts from the extracellular to intracellular compartments. Renal hypophosphatemia can be further divided into fibroblast growth factor 23-mediated or non-fibroblast growth factor 23-mediated causes. Proper diagnosis requires a thorough medication history, family history, physical examination, and assessment of renal tubular phosphate handling to identify the cause. During the past decade, our understanding of phosphate metabolism has grown greatly through the study of rare disorders of phosphate homeostasis. Treatment of hypophosphatemia depends on the underlying disorder and requires close biochemical monitoring. This article illustrates an approach to the hypophosphatemic patient and discusses normal phosphate metabolism. PMID:22392950

  14. A New Approach for FCSRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, Francçois; Berger, Thierry; Lauradoux, Cédric; Minier, Marine; Pousse, Benjamin

    The Feedback with Carry Shift Registers (FCSRs) have been proposed as an alternative to Linear Feedback Shift Registers (LFSRs) for the design of stream ciphers. FCSRs have good statistical properties and they provide a built-in non-linearity. However, two attacks have shown that the current representations of FCSRs can introduce weaknesses in the cipher. We propose a new “ring” representation of FCSRs based upon matrix definition which generalizes the Galois and Fibonacci representations. Our approach preserves the statistical properties and circumvents the weaknesses of the Fibonacci and Galois representations. Moreover, the ring representation leads to automata with a quicker diffusion characteristic and better implementation results. As an application, we describe a new version of F-FCSR stream ciphers.

  15. Component Modeling Approach Software Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-08-23

    The Component Modeling Approach Software Tool (CMAST) establishes a set of performance libraries of approved components (frames, glass, and spacer) which can be accessed for configuring fenestration products for a project, and btaining a U-factor, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC), and Visible Transmittance (VT) rating for those products, which can then be reflected in a CMA Label Certificate for code compliance. CMAST is web-based as well as client-based. The completed CMA program and software toolmore »will be useful in several ways for a vast array of stakeholders in the industry: Generating performance ratings for bidding projects Ascertaining credible and accurate performance data Obtaining third party certification of overall product performance for code compliance« less

  16. Alzheimer's disease: an evolutionary approach.

    PubMed

    Bufill, Enric; Blesa, Rafael; Augustí, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex disease associated with advanced age whose causes are still not fully known. Approaching the disease from an evolutionary standpoint may help in understanding the root cause of human vulnerability to the disease. AD is very common in humans and extremely uncommon in other mammals, which suggests that the genetic changes underlying the alterations in cerebral structure or function that have taken place over the course of the evolution of the genus Homo have left specific neurons in the human brain particularly vulnerable to factors which trigger the disease. Most of the genes whose mutation leads to AD are involved in synaptic plasticity. Evidence has also been found relating AD to neuronal oxidative stress. Neurons in certain association areas of the human brain retain juvenile characteristics into adulthood, such as the increased expression of genes related to synaptic activity and plasticity, incomplete myelination and elevated aerobic metabolism, which can cause an increase in oxidative stress in these neurons. Oxidative stress can cause myelin breakdown and epigenetic changes in the promoter region of genes related to synaptic plasticity, reducing their expression. These changes may in some cases induce hyperphosphorylation of tau and ?-amyloid deposits, which are characteristic of AD. The adaptation of humans to the cognitive niche probably required an increase in synaptic plasticity and activity and neuronal metabolism in neurons in areas related to certain cognitive functions such as autobiographical memory, social interaction and planning. The cost of these changes may have been the brain's increased vulnerability to factors which can trigger AD. This vulnerability may have resulted from the evolutionary legacies that have occurred over the course of the evolution of the human brain, making AD a possible example of antagonistic pleiotropy. The evolutionary approach allows apparently unrelated data from different disciplines to be combined in a manner that may lead to an improved understanding of complex diseases such as Alzheimer's. PMID:23579031

  17. Lateral orbital approach: Gateway to intraorbital lesions.

    PubMed

    Surej Kumar, L K; Vinod, Moni K; Menon, P Varun

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches to the intraorbital space have been described in the literature. Selection of a proper approach to intraorbital lesions depends on various factors including the location of the tumor, the size of the lesion, and the probable pathology anticipated. The approach should provide a good exposure of intraorbital anatomical structures, allow their functional preservation, and provide good cosmetic results. Intraconal lesions of the orbit usually necessitate transcranial approaches although some intraconal and laterally situated lesions could be removed effectively via lateral orbitotomy. Lateral orbitotomy is a well-known approach for lesions of the lateral orbital cone. In this case report, the lateral orbital approach has been used for exposure of intraorbital lesion, as it is minimally invasive compared to the transcranial approach. PMID:25937740

  18. 33 CFR 167.502 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. 167.502 Section...Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.502 In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. (a) A...

  19. 33 CFR 167.502 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. 167.502 Section...Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.502 In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. (a) A...

  20. Two approaches to physics tutoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomaniuck, Tania

    One in two first-year students at science or biomedical faculties fail in basic subjects such as mathematics, chemistry or physics. Course-specific tutoring is one of the available means for improving their performance. In the present research, two tutoring models are developed. Both incorporate independent learning, but from different perspectives and priorities. A pragmatic tutoring approach. The first part of the thesis describes the search process for an optimal course-specific tutoring strategy for a standard first-year physics course in life sciences curricula. After a number of empirical research rounds, a pragmatic compromise emerged as the most suitable form of tutoring. The approach is characterised by: (1) priority to questions from students; (2) a high degree of interactivity with the tutor and among students; (3) due consideration to the number of questions to be dealt with and the depth in which they should be discussed. Most students participating in the tutoring sessions expressed their satisfaction and performed sufficiently well in their exams. However, there was still a problem: the students' insight into the course material was restricted to first-order processing of the syllabus. While this would be satisfactory in non-scientific study programmes, it is deemed insufficient in programmes where deeper insight is required in order that students be able to deal adequately with new conceptual questions or problems. In-depth tutoring. In science programmes, the core objective is for students to acquire in-depth knowledge. Therefore, science educators are designing and studying teaching methods that are geared not only to the acquisition of in-depth knowledge as such, but also to the motivation of students to take a more in-depth approach to learning. Some of the crucial notions in their research are: the extent to which the course content ties in with students' prior knowledge, problem-setting strategies and concept-context linking. 'In-depth tutoring' integrates these crucial notions into a didactical structure that deviates from the classical course structure proposed in reference works. Chapters and learning activities begin with key questions in an area of application that ties in with the interests of the students. In the case of biology students, they are invited to answer biomechanical questions on the basis of their ready knowledge of dynamics, to compare their answers with those from their fellow-students, and to evaluate. However, the questions are formulated in such a way that the students will encounter a problem: lack of knowledge, contradictions, ... This problem creates a need for new information and thus provides a motivation for the knowledge expansion foreseen in the curriculum. Through carefully designed assignments, the students acquire the knowledge and skills they need in order to be able to reach consensus on a scientifically substantiated answer to the initial question.

  1. An intelligent approach to nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-11-01

    Control counts for little without a guiding principle. Whether manipulating atoms with a scanning probe or controlling carrier concentration in thin film deposition, intelligent intervention is required to steer the process from aimless precision towards a finely optimized design. In this issue G M Sacha and P Varona describe how artificial intelligence approaches can help towards modelling and simulating nanosystems, increasing our grasp of the nuances of these systems and how to optimize them for specific applications [1]. More than a labour-saving technique their review also suggests how genetic algorithms and artificial neural networks can supersede existing capabilities to tackle some of the challenges in moving a range of nanotechnologies forward. Research has made giant strides in determining not just what system parameters enhance performance but how. Nanoparticle synthesis is a typical example, where the field has shifted from simple synthesis and observation to unearthing insights as to dominating factors that can be identified and enlisted to control the morphological and chemical properties of synthesized products. One example is the neat study on reaction media viscosity for silver nanocrystal synthesis, where Park, Im and Park in Korea demonstrated a level of size control that had previously proved hard to achieve [2]. Silver nanoparticles have many potential applications including catalysis [3], sensing [4] and surface enhanced Raman scattering [5]. In their study, Park and colleagues obtain size-controlled 30 nm silver nanocrystals in a viscosity controlled medium of 1,5-pentanediol and demonstrate their use as sacrificial cores for the fabrication of a low-refractive filler. Another nanomaterial that has barely seen an ebb in research activity over the past two decades is ZnO, with a legion of reports detailing how to produce ZnO in different nanoscale forms from rods [6], belts [7] and flowers [8] to highly ordered arrays of vertically aligned nanowires. In particular, the arrays of high aspect ratio nanowires have piqued recent interest for potential piezoelectric 'nanogenerator' applications. Yet just because you can does not mean you should, and as always any alleviation of the structural requirements for exploiting these systems is helpful. Interest in the piezoelectric properties motivated a theoretical and finite element analysis of the behaviour of aligned ZnO nanowires under compression by Romano and researchers in the US and Italy [9]. Their study concludes that the nanowire length does not significantly affect the output piezopotential, which as they suggest 'is an important result for wet-chemistry fabrication of low-cost, CMOS- or MEMS-compatible nanogenerators'. Evidently exploiting nanostructures requires an intelligent approach so that we can harness the eccentricities of their behaviour most effectively for empowering new technologies. However, as G M Sacha and P Varona point out in this issue, that intelligence need not be human [1]. They describe a number of situations—from modelling scanning probe tools and interpreting their data to extracting solutions from DNA computers—where genetic algorithms and artificial neural networks can take the place of an expert, and for some applications achieve what broaches the impossible with the methods otherwise available. Over the past few decades computers have infiltrated everyday life at an astonishing rate and it is widely recognized that now without them, the Western world would fall apart. Yet what machine learning and fuzzy logic may offer could trivialize even our existing machine reliance. Real implementation of artificial intelligence is so far scarce in technology. However it has been on the radar in science fiction for so long it almost sounds retro, and its popularity in dystopian futuristic novels has tinged the term with a melodrama that may seem inappropriate for science. In fact as the review in this issue illustrates, artificial intelligence and machine learning approaches already offer a potent suite of tools to nanotechnolo

  2. Computational Approaches to Vestibular Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Biocomputation Center at NASA Ames Research Center is dedicated to a union between computational, experimental and theoretical approaches to the study of neuroscience and of life sciences in general. The current emphasis is on computer reconstruction and visualization of vestibular macular architecture in three-dimensions (3-D), and on mathematical modeling and computer simulation of neural activity in the functioning system. Our methods are being used to interpret the influence of spaceflight on mammalian vestibular maculas in a model system, that of the adult Sprague-Dawley rat. More than twenty 3-D reconstructions of type I and type II hair cells and their afferents have been completed by digitization of contours traced from serial sections photographed in a transmission electron microscope. This labor-intensive method has now been replace d by a semiautomated method developed in the Biocomputation Center in which conventional photography is eliminated. All viewing, storage and manipulation of original data is done using Silicon Graphics workstations. Recent improvements to the software include a new mesh generation method for connecting contours. This method will permit the investigator to describe any surface, regardless of complexity, including highly branched structures such as are routinely found in neurons. This same mesh can be used for 3-D, finite volume simulation of synapse activation and voltage spread on neuronal surfaces visualized via the reconstruction process. These simulations help the investigator interpret the relationship between neuroarchitecture and physiology, and are of assistance in determining which experiments will best test theoretical interpretations. Data are also used to develop abstract, 3-D models that dynamically display neuronal activity ongoing in the system. Finally, the same data can be used to visualize the neural tissue in a virtual environment. Our exhibit will depict capabilities of our computational approaches and some of our findings from their application. For example, our research has demonstrated that maculas of adult mammals retain the property of synaptic plasticity. Ribbon synapses increase numerically and undergo changes in type and distribution (p<0.0001) in type II hair cells after exposure to microgravity for as few as nine days. The finding of macular synaptic plasticity is pertinent to the clinic, and may help explain some. balance disorders in humans. The software used in our investigations will be demonstrated for those interested in applying it in their own research.

  3. Negotiating geophysical hazards in Nepal: An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oven, Katie; Petley, Dave; Rosser, Nick; Dunn, Chris; Rigg, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    It is widely accepted that the impact of natural hazards reflects not only the nature of geophysical processes but also the social conditions that prevail. The need for collaborative research to address these complex interactions between the natural and human systems is well recognised, however moving from theory to practice presents a number of significant challenges. How researchers frame problems; develop their research questions; select the methodologies to explore these questions; and privilege certain knowledges over others, can be seen to vary between physical and social science. Drawing on a case study examining the vulnerability of rural communities to landslides in the Upper Bhote Koshi Valley, Central Nepal, this paper explores how these barriers can be overcome and the benefits of undertaking interdisciplinary research within the natural hazards field. This research investigates the different framings of landslide risk and vulnerability from different stakeholder and disciplinary perspectives. Specifically, we ask: 1. Who is vulnerable to landslide hazard? 2. Why do people occupy landslide prone areas? 3. How do ‘at risk' rural communities perceive and respond to landslide hazard and risk? The findings, based on a series of participatory methodologies, challenge a number of assumptions made regarding landslide vulnerability in mountain communities. Within the Upper Bhote Koshi Valley clear transitions in settlement patterns, rural livelihoods and thus the occupation of landslide prone areas have been seen over time. For the majority of households, their decision to occupy these areas is driven by the economic and social benefits associated with the Arniko Highway which runs through the valley, linking Nepal with Tibet. Landslide vulnerability therefore emerges not just from societal marginalisation but also from situations of relative prosperity. The findings suggest that occupants of landslide prone areas have a good understanding of landslide hazard and its associated risks in this highly dynamic environment. However, these risks are contextualised in relation to other, often more pressing, social concerns. We therefore argue for a more deliberative and reflexive approach to landslide risk management which avoids singular framings of what the problem and hence the solution might be. We suggest that this can only be achieved through interdisciplinary collaboration and the privileging of different knowledge types. Key words: Nepal; landslide; vulnerability; risk perception; interdisciplinary research

  4. AAOL wavefront data reduction approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abado, Shaddy; Gordeyev, Stanislav; Jumper, Eric

    2012-06-01

    This paper addresses a method for extracting the convection speed and direction of aberrations present in wavefronts due to aero-optical turbulence over the pupil of a turret on the side of an airborne platform. The method is applied to data from the Airborne Aero-Optics Laboratory (AAOL). Such convection information is useful in designing feed-forward adaptive-optic approaches. The method makes use of a four-beam Malley probe technique derived by constructing a two-dimensional local convective velocity-distribution over the beam's aperture. This technique is based on extending the analysis of the Notre-Dame-developed Malley probe. Two wavefront datasets (Azimuth 157° and Elevation 40° Azimuth 42° and Elevation 43°) from the AAOL are analyzed using the derived method, the first where the laser propagates through fully-separated flow and the second where the laser propagates through an attached-flow region. Finally, the two-dimensional Proper Orthogonal Decomposition is applied to one in-flight measured dataset to determine the spatial requirements of deformable mirrors in an adaptive-optics system. The paper concludes with a discussion that points out the usefulness of the two-dimensional velocity-distributions in characterizing the various flow structures which convect over the aperture.

  5. Immunological approaches to fertility regulation.

    PubMed

    Stevens, V C

    1978-01-01

    Strong evidence that specific immunogenic components of the reproductive system exist that are not represented in other body systems has led to efforts to develop an acceptable vaccine for fertility regulation. The aim is to create a vaccine administered infrequently by trained technicians outside the clinical environment. For safety and practical reasons, an approach using active immunization with a vaccine is preferred to passive immunization with antibodies. In current research with sperm antigens, a lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme (LDH-X), an enzyme normally present on the sperm surface, reduced fertility in mice and rabbits. However, significant embryo mortality occurred. Other sperm antigens have been tested and rejected. Most of the research on ovum antigens is directed toward the zona pellucida, and work is in progress to isolate experimental quantities of specific zona pellucida antigens. Antibodies to human zona are reported to react with pig zona and vice versa, providing a model system. Antibodies to whole-placenta homogenates reportedly disrupt pregnancy in several laboratory animal species, and 2 placenta-specific proteins are potential antigens since antibodies to them do not react with any other tissue so far tested. Of 3 protein hormones isolated from placental tissue, 2 are potential antigens. The possible hazards of antifertility vaccines can be divided into 2 categories: problems related to immunization and problems caused by antibodies produced. PMID:307451

  6. The Wonder Approach to learning

    PubMed Central

    L’Ecuyer, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Wonder, innate in the child, is an inner desire to learn that awaits reality in order to be awakened. Wonder is at the origin of reality-based consciousness, thus of learning. The scope of wonder, which occurs at a metaphysical level, is greater than that of curiosity. Unfortunate misinterpretations of neuroscience have led to false brain-based ideas in the field of education, all of these based on the scientifically wrong assumption that children’s learning depends on an enriched environment. These beliefs have re-enforced the Behaviorist Approach to education and to parenting and have contributed to deadening our children’s sense of wonder. We suggest wonder as the center of all motivation and action in the child. Wonder is what makes life genuinely personal. Beauty is what triggers wonder. Wonder attunes to beauty through sensitivity and is unfolded by secure attachment. When wonder, beauty, sensitivity and secure attachment are present, learning is meaningful. On the contrary, when there is no volitional dimension involved (no wonder), no end or meaning (no beauty) and no trusting predisposition (secure attachment), the rigid and limiting mechanical process of so-called learning through mere repetition become a deadening and alienating routine. This could be described as training, not as learning, because it does not contemplate the human being as a whole. PMID:25339882

  7. Quantitative approaches to computational vaccinology.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2002-06-01

    This article reviews the newly released JenPep database and two new powerful techniques for T-cell epitope prediction: (i) the additive method; and (ii) a 3D-Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (3D-QSAR) method, based on Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA). The JenPep database is a family of relational databases supporting the growing need of immunoinformaticians for quantitative data on peptide binding to major histocompatibility complexes and to the Transporters associated with Antigen Processing (TAP). It also contains an annotated list of T-cell epitopes. The database is available free via the Internet (http://www.jenner.ac.uk/JenPep). The additive prediction method is based on the assumption that the binding affinity of a peptide depends on the contributions from each amino acid as well as on the interactions between the adjacent and every second side-chain. In the 3D-QSAR approach, the influence of five physicochemical properties (steric bulk, electrostatic potential, local hydrophobicity, hydrogen-bond donor and hydrogen-bond acceptor abilities) on the affinity of peptides binding to MHC molecules were considered. Both methods were exemplified through their application to the well-studied problem of peptides binding to the human class I MHC molecule HLA-A*0201. PMID:12067414

  8. Hyperprolactinemia: pathophysiology and therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Capozzi, Anna; Scambia, Giovanni; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Lello, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a hormone, mainly secreted by lactotroph cells of the anterior pituitary gland. Recent studies have shown it may also be produced by many extrapituitary cells. Its well-recognized PRL plays an important role in lactation during pregnancy, but it is involved in other biological functions such as angiogenesis, immunoregulation and osmoregulation. Hyperprolactinemia is a typical condition producing reproductive dysfunction in both sexes, resulting in hypogonadism, infertility and galactorrhea. It may be also asymptomatic. Lactotroph adenomas (prolactinoma) is one of the most common cause of PRL excess, representing approximately 40% of all pituitary tumors. Several other conditions should be excluded before a clear diagnosis of hyperprolactinemia is made. Hyperprolactinemia may be secondary to pharmacological or pathological interruption of hypothalamic-pituitary dopaminergic pathways or idiopathic. Stress, renal failure or hypothyroidism are other frequent conditions to exclude in patients with hyperprolactinemia. We will review biochemical characteristics and physiological functions of that hormone. Clinical and pharmacological approach to hyperprolactinemia will also be discussed. PMID:26291795

  9. Quantitative risk approaches for formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Howlett, C T; Mathias, R; Friess, S

    1989-01-01

    Formaldehyde presents unique data that highlight significant issues in the extrapolation of animal studies to human risk assessments. Formaldehyde causes rare nasal cancer in rats at 15 ppm, but not at lower levels of 2 ppm and 0.5 ppm in the range of human exposures. Mice and hamster studies even at high levels have results similar to low dose rats. Higginson et al. reviewed the human epidemiology studies and concluded that no excess cancer risk was observed; and if a risk exists, it is very low. Formaldehyde is a natural metabolite--the human body turns over 51 g/day. Cells, therefore, have detoxification and other defence mechanisms to formaldehyde. Recent CIIT biomechanism results elucidate these factors. These data raise two issues: First, the appropriateness of linear quantitative risk methodology given the non-linear nature of the biological data. Either a non-linear (threshold) statistical model or NOEL approach are appropriate risk assessment techniques for formaldehyde. Second, the rare nasal cancer observed in rats also occurs in control animals. A comparison of relative risk between background and low formaldehyde exposures has been calculated for both groups. Non-linear (MLE) 5 stage multistage models estimate 0 per million risk from both background and 1 ppm of formaldehyde exposure. Linear or upperbound (95%) estimates are 7,200/million from background and 5,000/million from 1 ppm formaldehyde. These estimates have a significant impact on formaldehyde regulatory programs for warning labels and "safe" exposure levels. PMID:2700168

  10. Astronomy 2020: A Pragmatic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, M. J.

    2009-09-01

    In the cinema history of astronomy, we are currently at the stage of the Lumiere brothers with contemporary surveys providing short monochromatic time sequences of the sky. By the end of the next decade, however, panchromatic blockbusters will be commonplace and science will be predominantly driven by the objects that change in successive ``frames''. Web-scale computing resources will be required just to process the torrents of data events but the key to understanding them will be contextualisation --- linking together disparate (sets of) events and relating them to archival and supplementary data in a machine-comprehensible way. Much of the data mining and analysis of such data portfolios will be performed by proxy scientists --- intelligent agent avatars that represent an individual's particular research interests in high-dimension parameter spaces. Although this view might sound like science fiction, in this paper, I will review the technologies that will make it achievable. In particular, I will cover new approaches to web services that will be required to support these massive event streams, social networking techniques that will facilitate science and semantic technologies that will underpin everything.

  11. Racemates or enantiomers: regulatory approaches.

    PubMed

    Birkett, D J

    1989-06-01

    1. Racemic drugs contain enantiomers which can differ substantially in pharmacological and dispositional properties. The development of chemical methods to separate and analyse drug enantiomers has led to a growing understanding of their biological properties and a regulatory dilemma as to whether only enantiomerically pure drugs should be marketed. 2. Advantages of enantiomerically pure drugs include more selective pharmacological profiles leading to better therapeutic indices, less complex pharmacokinetics and interactions, and simpler interpretation of plasma concentration response relationships. 3. As racemic drugs that are currently marketed and reaching marketing were developed when knowledge of drug enantiomers was less sophisticated, a flexible regulatory approach is required. At present, it is probably reasonable to require substantial information on the properties of enantiomers of racemic drugs but the balance is on the side of regulatory agencies needing to justify, provided adequate information is submitted, requirements for enantiomerically pure drugs. 4. This balance will gradually change to a situation where enantiomerically pure drugs will be the standard, and a strong case will need to be put by sponsors wishing to market racemic drugs. PMID:2670355

  12. [Current Approaches in Cancer Immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Otáhal, P; Trn?ný, M

    2015-01-01

    Methods of cancer immunotherapy have finally entered clinical medicine after years of preclinical research. Currently, there are several methods, which have proven to be very effective even in cases of incurable cancer. Antitumor monoclonal antibodies are among major therapeutic anti-cancer drugs and have been successfully used for many ears. Novel group of antibodies are immunomodulatory antibodies which can break tumor?-specific immune tolerance and induce regression of tumors by nonspecific activation of immune system. Bispecific antibodies represent a novel class of anticancer agents which can induce expansion of T cells in vivo, blinatumomab is an example of such agents and is currently available for the treatment of acute B?-cell leukemia. Cellular immunotherapy is also very effective, especially the use of Chimeric receptor modified T-cells for the therapy of B-?cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Although it is a very complicated and expensive method, it is highly effective approach which can induce remission even in previously hopeless conditions. The goal of this article is to explain the basic principles of cancer immunotherapy and summarize the newest findings in this field. PMID:26489509

  13. MOND using a probabilistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Usha

    2009-05-01

    MOND has been proposed as a viable alternative to the dark matter hypothesis. In the original MOND formulation [1], a modification of Newtonian Dynamics was brought about by postulating new equations of particle motion at extremely low accelerations, as a possible explanation for the flat rotation curves of spiral galaxies. In this paper, we attempt a different approach to modify the usual force laws by trying to link gravity with the probabilistic aspects of quantum mechanics [2]. In order to achieve this, one starts by replacing the classical notion of a continuous distance between two elementary particles with a statistical probability function, ?. The gravitational force between two elementary particles then can be interpreted in terms of the probability of interaction between them. We attempt to show that such a modified gravitational force would fall off a lot slower than the usual inverse square law predicts, leading to revised MOND equations. In the limit that the statistical aggregate of the probabilities becomes equal to the usual inverse square law force, we recover Newtonian/Einstein gravity.[3pt] [1] Milgrom, M. 1983, ApJ, 270, 365 [2] Goradia, S. 2002, .org/pdf/physics/0210040

  14. Protein Solubilization: A Novel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David H.; Wilson, W. William; DeLucas, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Formulation development presents significant challenges with respect to protein therapeutics. One component of these challenges is to attain high protein solubility (> 50 mg/ml for immunoglobulins) with minimal aggregation. Protein-protein interactions contribute to aggregation and the integral sum of these interactions can be quantified by a thermodynamic parameter known as the osmotic second virial coefficient (B-value). The method presented here utilizes high-throughput measurement of B-values to identify the influence of additives on protein-protein interactions. The experiment design uses three tiers of screens to arrive at final solution conditions that improve protein solubility. The first screen identifies individual additives that reduce protein interactions. A second set of B-values are then measured for different combinations of these additives via an incomplete factorial screen. Results from the incomplete factorial screen are used to train an artificial neural network (ANN). The “trained” ANN enables predictions of B-values for more than 4,000 formulations that include additive combinations not previously experimentally measured. Validation steps are incorporated throughout the screening process to ensure that 1) the protein’s thermal and aggregation stability characteristics are not reduced and 2) the artificial neural network predictive model is accurate. The ability of this approach to reduce aggregation and increase solubility is demonstrated using an IgG protein supplied by Minerva Biotechnologies, Inc. PMID:25270058

  15. A Unified Approach to Modeling Multidisciplinary Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.; Bhatia, Kumar G.

    2000-01-01

    There are a number of existing methods to transfer information among various disciplines. For a multidisciplinary application with n disciplines, the traditional methods may be required to model (n(exp 2) - n) interactions. This paper presents a unified three-dimensional approach that reduces the number of interactions from (n(exp 2) - n) to 2n by using a computer-aided design model. The proposed modeling approach unifies the interactions among various disciplines. The approach is independent of specific discipline implementation, and a number of existing methods can be reformulated in the context of the proposed unified approach. This paper provides an overview of the proposed unified approach and reformulations for two existing methods. The unified approach is specially tailored for application environments where the geometry is created and managed through a computer-aided design system. Results are presented for a blended-wing body and a high-speed civil transport.

  16. Two Approaches to Calibration in Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Campanelli, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Inferring mathematical relationships with quantified uncertainty from measurement data is common to computational science and metrology. Sufficient knowledge of measurement process noise enables Bayesian inference. Otherwise, an alternative approach is required, here termed compartmentalized inference, because collection of uncertain data and model inference occur independently. Bayesian parameterized model inference is compared to a Bayesian-compatible compartmentalized approach for ISO-GUM compliant calibration problems in renewable energy metrology. In either approach, model evidence can help reduce model discrepancy.

  17. Multidomain approach for calculating compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, L.; Chazzi, W.; Veuillot, J. P.; Viviand, H.

    1982-01-01

    A multidomain approach for calculating compressible flows by using unsteady or pseudo-unsteady methods is presented. This approach is based on a general technique of connecting together two domains in which hyperbolic systems (that may differ) are solved with the aid of compatibility relations associated with these systems. Some examples of this approach's application to calculating transonic flows in ideal fluids are shown, particularly the adjustment of shock waves. The approach is then applied to treating a shock/boundary layer interaction problem in a transonic channel.

  18. Generic attack approaches for industrial control systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, David P.

    2006-01-01

    This report suggests a generic set of attack approaches that are expected to be used against Industrial Control Systems that have been built according to a specific reference model for control systems. The posed attack approaches are ordered by the most desirable, based upon the goal of an attacker. Each attack approach is then graded by the category of adversary that would be capable of utilizing that attack approach. The goal of this report is to identify necessary levels of security required to prevent certain types of attacks against Industrial Control Systems.

  19. Concurrency-based approaches to parallel programming

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, L.V.; Chrisochoides, N.; Kohl, J.

    1995-07-17

    The inevitable transition to parallel programming can be facilitated by appropriate tools, including languages and libraries. After describing the needs of applications developers, this paper presents three specific approaches aimed at development of efficient and reusable parallel software for irregular and dynamic-structured problems. A salient feature of all three approaches in their exploitation of concurrency within a processor. Benefits of individual approaches such as these can be leveraged by an interoperability environment which permits modules written using different approaches to co-exist in single applications.

  20. Concurrency-based approaches to parallel programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kale, L.V.; Chrisochoides, N.; Kohl, J.; Yelick, K.

    1995-01-01

    The inevitable transition to parallel programming can be facilitated by appropriate tools, including languages and libraries. After describing the needs of applications developers, this paper presents three specific approaches aimed at development of efficient and reusable parallel software for irregular and dynamic-structured problems. A salient feature of all three approaches in their exploitation of concurrency within a processor. Benefits of individual approaches such as these can be leveraged by an interoperability environment which permits modules written using different approaches to co-exist in single applications.

  1. Phobos Sample Return: Next Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, Lev; Martynov, Maxim; Zakharov, Alexander; Korablev, Oleg; Ivanov, Alexey; Karabadzak, George

    The Martian moons still remain a mystery after numerous studies by Mars orbiting spacecraft. Their study cover three major topics related to (1) Solar system in general (formation and evolution, origin of planetary satellites, origin and evolution of life); (2) small bodies (captured asteroid, or remnants of Mars formation, or reaccreted Mars ejecta); (3) Mars (formation and evolution of Mars; Mars ejecta at the satellites). As reviewed by Galimov [2010] most of the above questions require the sample return from the Martian moon, while some (e.g. the characterization of the organic matter) could be also answered by in situ experiments. There is the possibility to obtain the sample of Mars material by sampling Phobos: following to Chappaz et al. [2012] a 200-g sample could contain 10-7 g of Mars surface material launched during the past 1 mln years, or 5*10-5 g of Mars material launched during the past 10 mln years, or 5*1010 individual particles from Mars, quantities suitable for accurate laboratory analyses. The studies of Phobos have been of high priority in the Russian program on planetary research for many years. Phobos-88 mission consisted of two spacecraft (Phobos-1, Phobos-2) and aimed the approach to Phobos at 50 m and remote studies, and also the release of small landers (long-living stations DAS). This mission implemented the program incompletely. It was returned information about the Martian environment and atmosphere. The next profect Phobos Sample Return (Phobos-Grunt) initially planned in early 2000 has been delayed several times owing to budget difficulties; the spacecraft failed to leave NEO in 2011. The recovery of the science goals of this mission and the delivery of the samples of Phobos to Earth remain of highest priority for Russian scientific community. The next Phobos SR mission named Boomerang was postponed following the ExoMars cooperation, but is considered the next in the line of planetary exploration, suitable for launch around 2022. A possible scenario of the Boomerang mission includes the approach to Deimos prior to the landing of Phobos. The needed excess ?V w.r.t. simple scenario (elliptical orbit à near-Phobos orbit) amounts to 0.67 km s-1 (1.6 vs 0.93 km s-1). The Boomerang mission basically repeats the Phobos-SR (2011) architecture, where the transfer-orbiting spacecraft lands on the Phobos surface and a small return vehicle launches the return capsule to Earth. We consider the Boomerang mission as an important step in Mars exploration and a direct precursor of Mars Sample Return. The following elements of the Boomerang mission might be directly employed, or serve as the prototypes for the Mars Sample return in future: Return vehicle, Earth descent module, Transfer-orbital spacecraft. We urge the development of this project for its high science value and recognize its elements as potential national contribution to an international Mars Sample Return project. Galimov E.M., Phobos sample return mission: scientific substantiation, Solar System Res., v.44, No.1, pp5-14, 2010. Chappaz L., H.J. Melosh, M. Vaguero, and K.C. Howell, Material transfer from the surface of Mars to Phobos and Deimos, 43rd Lunar and planetary Science Conference, paper 1422, 2012.

  2. Physics in an Interdisciplinary Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirela, Bulgariu

    2010-01-01

    Organizing information in a rigid system does not fit the necessity of shaping a general culture with the pupils de declared objective of any educational system. The contribution of each school subject is expressed not by what is specific to it, but by what it shares with other school subjects, what is generalized and transferable. It is on the basis of this general culture that we can achieve profound specializations with efficient and lasting results for the spiritual and material life of the individual and of the society which supports and integrates hem. A first situation which must be solved theoretically is to specify the objective and to define interdisciplinary. According to the dictionary of pedagogy, interdisciplinary is "a report of interpretation (cooperation- coordination) among the school subjects, among the structures of the educational content corresponding to the modern organization of the type of institute of education." Interdisciplinary does not mean only dealing with a phenomenon simultaneously from the points of view of several, but also a integrated and integral approach of this each science bringing its own conceptual system, way of thinking and specific methods of research and representation. In order to achieve a good interdisciplinary some exigencies have to be observed: •the teacher should have a thorough general cultural •the teacher should know the methodology of his particular discipline well but also the methodology of the other subjects in the curriculum area •the pupils should be aware of the existence of interdisciplinary of the school subjects •the achieving of some programs with themes of an interdisciplinary character.

  3. Minimally Invasive Approach to Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ninh T.; Weigel, Tracey; Ferson, Peter; Keenan, Robert; Schauer, Philip

    1998-01-01

    Background: Recent advances in laparoscopic and thoracoscopic surgery have made it possible to perform esophagectomy using minimally invasive techniques. The aim of this report was to present our preliminary experience with minimally invasive esophagectomy. Methods: We reviewed our experience on eight patients who underwent minimally invasive esophagectomy using either laparoscopic and/or thoracoscopic techniques from June 1996 to May 1997. Indications for esophagectomy included stage I carcinoma (5), palliative resection (1), Barrett's with high grade dysplasia (1) and end stage achalasia (1). Results: The average age was 68 years (54-82). The surgical approach to esophagectomy included laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with cervical anastomosis (n=4), thoracoscopic and laparoscopic esophagectomy with cervical anastomosis (n=1), and laparoscopic mobilization with right mini-thoracotomy and intra-thoracic anastomosis (n=3). Conversion to mini-laparotomy was required in two patients (25%) to complete esophageal dissection and facilitate gastric pull-up. The mean operative time was 460 minutes. The mean intensive care stay was 1.9 days (range of 0-7 days) with a mean hospital stay of 13-8 days. Minor complications included atrial fibrillation (n=1), pleural effusion (n=2) and persistent air leak (n=1). Major complications included cervical anastomotic leak (n=1), and delayed gastric emptying requiring pyloroplasty (n=1). There was no perioperative mortality. Conclusions: This preliminary experience suggests that minimally invasive esophagectomy is safe and feasible in centers with experience in advanced minimally invasive surgical procedures. Further studies are necessary to determine advantages over open esophagectomy. PMID:9876747

  4. Approaches to the Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, Cary Mcilwaine, Jr.

    This thesis analyzes several theoretical approaches to the one band Hubbard model in hopes of extracting selected physical quantities in limits most closely corresponding to real materials. Along the way, three rather remarkable theorems of a much broader scope are proven. It is hoped that these may be of general interest in a variety of related physical and mathematical disciplines. In chapter one, the well-known mean field theory developed by Affleck and Marston is studied in the presence of a magnetic field. Through a rather straightforward numerical procedure, phase diagrams in t/delta ^ace are generated as a function of field. The results of this study are then extended to a magnetic susceptibility calculation and to the analysis of the phase diagram of fan alternate mean field theory, the "generalized flux phases" proposed by Anderson. Several interesting properties and symmetries of the solutions are then briefly discussed. In chapter two, the Gutzwiller projector is analyzed both analytically and numerically, with the results being used to calculate the momentum density function for a trial wavefunction also proposed by Anderson. Two of the above mentioned theorems are developed in this chapter, the one prescribing the expansion of a general restricted sum in terms of its related unrestricted sums, and the other presenting the exact diagonilization of a component of the projector which is equivalent through a U(1) gauge transformation to the total spin operator. In chapter three, we discuss the exact solutions to the one dimensional Hubbard model first derived by Lieb and Wu. From their large U limiting behavior, we extract the phonon scattering matrix elements and first order single particle energies for some finite systems. The third potentially general theorem, which related charge determinants with an arbitrary number of "gaps" between their rows to a comparatively simple function of the corresponding van der Monde determinants, is proven here.

  5. Schwinger's Approach to Einstein's Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kim

    2012-05-01

    Albert Einstein was one of Julian Schwinger's heroes, and Schwinger was greatly honored when he received the first Einstein Prize (together with Kurt Godel) for his work on quantum electrodynamics. Schwinger contributed greatly to the development of a quantum version of gravitational theory, and his work led directly to the important work of (his students) Arnowitt, Deser, and DeWitt on the subject. Later in the 1960's and 1970's Schwinger developed a new formulation of quantum field theory, which he dubbed Source Theory, in an attempt to get closer contact to phenomena. In this formulation, he revisited gravity, and in books and papers showed how Einstein's theory of General Relativity emerged naturally from one physical assumption: that the carrier of the gravitational force is a massless, helicity-2 particle, the graviton. (There has been a minor dispute whether gravitational theory can be considered as the massless limit of a massive spin-2 theory; Schwinger believed that was the case, while Van Dam and Veltman concluded the opposite.) In the process, he showed how all of the tests of General Relativity could be explained simply, without using the full machinery of the theory and without the extraneous concept of curved space, including such effects as geodetic precession and the Lense-Thirring effect. (These effects have now been verified by the Gravity Probe B experiment.) This did not mean that he did not accept Einstein's equations, and in his book and full article on the subject, he showed how those emerge essentially uniquely from the assumption of the graviton. So to speak of Schwinger versus Einstein is misleading, although it is true that Schwinger saw no necessity to talk of curved spacetime. In this talk I will lay out Schwinger's approach, and the connection to Einstein's theory.

  6. Integrated Approach to Malaria Control

    PubMed Central

    Shiff, Clive

    2002-01-01

    Malaria draws global attention in a cyclic manner, with interest and associated financing waxing and waning according to political and humanitarian concerns. Currently we are on an upswing, which should be carefully developed. Malaria parasites have been eliminated from Europe and North America through the use of residual insecticides and manipulation of environmental and ecological characteristics; however, in many tropical and some temperate areas the incidence of disease is increasing dramatically. Much of this increase results from a breakdown of effective control methods developed and implemented in the 1960s, but it has also occurred because of a lack of trained scientists and control specialists who live and work in the areas of endemic infection. Add to this the widespread resistance to the most effective antimalarial drug, chloroquine, developing resistance to other first-line drugs such as sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, and resistance of certain vector species of mosquito to some of the previously effective insecticides and we have a crisis situation. Vaccine research has proceeded for over 30 years, but as yet there is no effective product, although research continues in many promising areas. A global strategy for malaria control has been accepted, but there are critics who suggest that the single strategy cannot confront the wide range of conditions in which malaria exists and that reliance on chemotherapy without proper control of drug usage and diagnosis will select for drug resistant parasites, thus exacerbating the problem. An integrated approach to control using vector control strategies based on the biology of the mosquito, the epidemiology of the parasite, and human behavior patterns is needed to prevent continued upsurge in malaria in the endemic areas. PMID:11932233

  7. Unified approach for incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tyne-Hsien

    1993-01-01

    An unified approach for solving both compressible and incompressible flows was investigated in this study. The difference in CFD code development between incompressible and compressible flows is due to the mathematical characteristics. However, if one can modify the continuity equation for incompressible flows by introducing pseudocompressibility, the governing equations for incompressible flows would have the same mathematical characters as compressible flows. The application of a compressible flow code to solve incompressible flows becomes feasible. Among numerical algorithms developed for compressible flows, the Centered Total Variation Diminishing (CTVD) schemes possess better mathematical properties to damp out the spurious oscillations while providing high-order accuracy for high speed flows. It leads us to believe that CTVD schemes can equally well solve incompressible flows. In this study, the governing equations for incompressible flows include the continuity equation and momentum equations. The continuity equation is modified by adding a time-derivative of the pressure term containing the artificial compressibility. The modified continuity equation together with the unsteady momentum equations forms a hyperbolic-parabolic type of time-dependent system of equations. The continuity equation is modified by adding a time-derivative of the pressure term containing the artificial compressibility. The modified continuity equation together with the unsteady momentum equations forms a hyperbolic-parabolic type of time-dependent system of equations. Thus, the CTVD schemes can be implemented. In addition, the boundary conditions including physical and numerical boundary conditions must be properly specified to obtain accurate solution. The CFD code for this research is currently in progress. Flow past a circular cylinder will be used for numerical experiments to determine the accuracy and efficiency of the code before applying this code to more specific applications.

  8. Unified approach for incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tyne-Hsien

    1995-01-01

    A unified approach for solving incompressible flows has been investigated in this study. The numerical CTVD (Centered Total Variation Diminishing) scheme used in this study was successfully developed by Sanders and Li for compressible flows, especially for the high speed. The CTVD scheme possesses better mathematical properties to damp out the spurious oscillations while providing high-order accuracy for high speed flows. It leads us to believe that the CTVD scheme can equally well apply to solve incompressible flows. Because of the mathematical difference between the governing equations for incompressible and compressible flows, the scheme can not directly apply to the incompressible flows. However, if one can modify the continuity equation for incompressible flows by introducing pseudo-compressibility, the governing equations for incompressible flows would have the same mathematical characters as compressible flows. The application of the algorithm to incompressible flows thus becomes feasible. In this study, the governing equations for incompressible flows comprise continuity equation and momentum equations. The continuity equation is modified by adding a time-derivative of the pressure term containing the artificial compressibility. The modified continuity equation together with the unsteady momentum equations forms a hyperbolic-parabolic type of time-dependent system of equations. Thus, the CTVD schemes can be implemented. In addition, the physical and numerical boundary conditions are properly implemented by the characteristic boundary conditions. Accordingly, a CFD code has been developed for this research and is currently under testing. Flow past a circular cylinder was chosen for numerical experiments to determine the accuracy and efficiency of the code. The code has shown some promising results.

  9. Approach to autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Patrick F.; Thomas, Roger E.; Lee, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-V), and to develop an approach to managing ASD using the CanMEDS– Family Medicine (CanMEDS-FM) framework. Sources of information The DSM-V from the American Psychiatric Association, published in May 2013, provides new diagnostic criteria for ASD. The College of Family Physicians of Canada’s CanMEDS-FM framework provides a blueprint that can guide the complex management of ASD. We used data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to determine the prevalence of ASD, and we used the comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis completed by the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for their guidelines on ASD to assess the evidence for more than 100 interventions. Main message The prevalence of ASD was 1 in 88 in 2008 in the United States according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The ASD classification in the fourth edition of the DSM included autism, Asperger syndrome, pervasive developmental disorder, and childhood disintegrative disorder. The new DSM-V revision incorporates all these disorders into one ASD umbrella term with different severity levels. The management of ASD is complex and requires a multidisciplinary team effort and continuity of care. The CanMEDS-FM roles provide a framework for management. Conclusion Family physicians are the key leaders of the multidisciplinary care team for ASD, and the CanMEDS-FM framework provides a comprehensive guide to help manage a child with ASD and to help the child’s family. PMID:25971758

  10. CSM: Profamilia's approach in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Samuel, S

    1982-03-01

    Colombia's PROFAMILIA has successfully operated a contraceptive social marketing (CSM) program since 1973. Beginning with 1 salesperson distributing primarily to Cajas de Subsideio, the CSM program is now distributed through 70-80% of the 6000 registered pharmacies in the country, as well as pharmacy counters of several supermakets in urban areas. During 1981, PROFAMILIA's 5 salespersons accountd for commerical sales of oral contraceptives (OCs) to 225,000 couples and sales of barrier methods to another 75,000. Program sales of contraceptives and other products generated approximately US $1.7 million in revenue for the same year. PROFAMILIA's marketing approach is unique in its product and promotinal characteristics. Supplies are obtained directly from local and foreign manufacturers and are resold without any repackaging. While it is generally believed that CSM programs expand the market for contraceptives, data analysis and analysis of PROFAMILIA's distribution system suggests that the PROFAMILIA CSM program has simply absorbed some of the previously existing commerical market. Total commerical market sales of oral contraceptives (OCs) have grown at an annual rate of 3-4% since 1975. During the same period, direct sales of Schering, Wyeth, and other competitors have declined. PROFAMILIA's community-based program operates mainly among urban and semi-rural lower income populations. It sells products through established retail outlets rather than through institutional or non-retail outlets. PROFAMILIA's community-based program in all respects but its use of a staff of 112 salaried "instructoras" is as much a marketing program as PROFAMILIA's sales through pharmacies. Taken together, the 2 program expanded the commerical makert by about 1/2 since 1975. The contraceptive social marketing or pharmacy sales program appears to excel at generation of revenue and delivery of products to higher income clients. The community-based program excels at delivery of information and sales to lower income clients. PROFAMILIA CSM and community-based program sales are in a period of relative stagnation. Sales projections show only modest increases between 1981-85, despite the fact that a significant number of potential consumers remain unserved. Ultimately, PROFAMILIA may be faced with the need to reduce their number markedly as sales revenue is eroded by inflation while costs rise. A shift in duties back to motivation rather than distribution, combined with increased media promotion seems the clearest short-term response to the problem of unserved consumers. PMID:12264180

  11. Threat displays for final approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Chad Warren

    During periods of good visibility, airports can conduct Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches (CSPA) and simultaneously operate parallel runways separated by more than 750 feet. When visibility degrades to Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) and pilots must fly exclusively by the instruments, the runway separation required to operate parallel runways increases to 3400 feet or more. For many airports around the country and the world this means the second runway must be closed and the airport operates at half capacity. To alleviate the delays caused by this capacity reduction many airports worldwide are planning to expand and build new runways. The projected cost of the ten largest airport projects in the United States is $8-16 Billion. Perhaps a less expensive solution can be found with innovative technology rather than real estate? This research presents the first ever design, implementation, and characterization of a synthetic vision display and the supporting flight system to attempt to achieve this solution. The display uses 3D graphics and an air to air datalink called Automatic Dependent Surveillance--Broadcast to present the pilot with the information necessary to aviate, navigate and monitor traffic. This thesis also documents the first series of flight experiments to test the applicability of synthetic vision displays to both runway incursion avoidance and CSPA. Finally, utilizing the results from the flight testing in a Monte Carlo analysis, the effect of deploying this display on minimum safe runway separation is calculated. It has been found that the minimum safe runway separation for IMC operation can safely be reduced to 1900 feet. If, in addition, significant changes are made in Air Traffic Control procedures for longitudinal aircraft spacing, the analysis shows that the display system presented herein will allow for runway separation of 1400 feet with no new restrictions on aircraft size or crosswind. Furthermore, with certain restrictions on aircraft size and crosswind the runway spacing can be reduced to 750 feet. These results have tremendous implications for pilots, controllers and the public. They will also have large impacts on the financial and environmental costs of airport expansion projects.

  12. Biotechnology Approaches to Life Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Andrew; McKay, David; Schweitzer, Mary

    2001-01-01

    The direct detection of organic biomarkers for living or fossil microbes on Mars by an in situ instrument is a worthy goal for future lander missions. Several new and innovative biotechnology approaches are being explored. Firstly we have proposed an instrument based on immunological reactions to specific antibodies to cause activation of fluorescent stains. Antibodies are raised or acquired to a variety of general and specific substances that might be in Mars soil. These antibodies are then combined with various fluorescent stains and applied to micron sized numbered spots on a small (2-3 cm) test plate where they become firmly attached after freeze drying. Using technology that has been developed for gene mining in DNA technology up to 10,000 tests per square inch can now be applied to a test plate. On Mars or the planet/moon of interest, a sample of soil from a trench or drill core is extracted with water and/or an organic solvent and ultrasonication and then applied to the test plate. Any substance, which has an antibody on the test plate, will react with its antibody and activate its fluorescent stain. At the moment a small UV light source will illuminate the test plate, which is observed with a small CCD camera, although other detection systems will be applied. The numbered spots that fluoresce indicate the presence of the tested-for substance, and the intensity indicates relative amounts. Furthermore with up to a thousand test plates available false positives and several variations of antibody can also be screened for. The entire instrument can be quite small and light, on the order of 10 cm in each dimension. A possible choice for light source may be small UV lasers at several wavelengths. Some of the wells or spots can contain simply standard fluorescent stains used to detect live cells, dead cells, DNA, etc. The stains in these spots may be directly activated, with no antibodies being necessary. The proposed system will look for three classes of biomarkers: those from extant life, such as DNA, those from extinct life such as hopanes, and those from organic compounds not necessarily associated with life such as PAHs, rocket exhaust contamination and other a/pre-biotic chemicals. Both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies can be used. Monoclonal antibodies react with a very specific compound, but polyclonal antibodies may react to any of a whole family of compounds. Furthermore the technique of phage display to raise antibodies against classically non-antigenic molecules is also being considered. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Evaluation and Opportunities in Overtraining Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roose, Jolanda; de Vries, Wouter R.; Schmikli, Sandor L.; Backx, Frank J. G.; van Doornen, Lorenz J. P.

    2009-01-01

    Overtraining (OT) as a sports phenomenon can be caused by stressors on various levels (physical, emotional, psychological, and social) and evokes responses on these levels. This study evaluated research and new opportunities in the field of OT by introducing an integrated multidisciplinary approach, based on the single and multistressors approach.…

  14. Operational approach to complementarity and duality relations

    SciTech Connect

    Luis, Alfredo

    2004-12-01

    We present a fully operational and consistent approach to complementarity. In contrast to previous approaches, in this proposal the duality relations emerge exclusively from the outcomes of simultaneous measurements performed on every run of the experiment and under the same experimental conditions. This can be done without assuming any definite relationship between the measurement performed and the complementary observables being studied.

  15. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  16. Making Sense of Approaches to Moral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Matthew; Osguthorpe, Richard

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a metatheoretical analysis of "approaches" to moral education and how we make sense of them. Such approaches are commonly analyzed with simple, binary category schemes, for example, being categorized as either 'indirect' or 'direct' in nature. This kind of minimal framework clearly oversimplifies the complex nature of any…

  17. Basic Employability Skills: A Triangular Design Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Stuart; Heimler, Ronald; Morote, Elsa-Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to examine the basic employability skills needed for job performance, the reception of these skills in college, and the need for additional training in these skills after graduation. Design/methodology/approach: The research was based on a triangular design approach, in which the attitudes of three distinct groups--recent…

  18. Approaches to psychiatric nosology: A viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajit; Sarkar, Siddharth; Grover, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric nosology is required for communication among clinicians and researchers, understanding etiology, testing treatment efficacy, knowing the prevalence of the problems and disorders, healthcare planning, organizing the services, and reimbursement purposes. Many approaches have been used for psychiatric nosology, including categorical, dimensional, hybrid, and etiological. The categorical approach considers illness as being either present or absent, and similarity with prototypical description of a disorder is taken as a marker for the disorder. The dimensional approach regards that symptoms of disorder exist on a continuum from normal to severely ill. The hybrid approach combines categorical and dimensional approaches, with categorical diagnosis for broad diagnostic group and dimensional indicator for severity. The etiological approach tends to find “reason” for the set of symptoms, which could be biological, psychological, or social. In this article, certain critical issues about the different nosological approaches are discussed. Hybrid approach currently seems to be the most preferred for widespread usage. In conclusion, psychiatric nosology needs to evolve through epistemic iteration leading to successive changes and devising a more refined and useful system with time. PMID:25316945

  19. A Gentle Approach for Young Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suskind, Diana; Kozma, Marta

    The Gentle Approach is a method for lifting infants younger than 6 months that promotes security and reassurance during adult-imposed changes in position. Developed at the Emmi Pilker National Methodological Institute for Residential Nurseries in Budapest, Hungary, the approach provides continual support and less opportunity for unprotected…

  20. Competence: Conceptual Approach and Practice in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Deist, Francoise

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to analyse the conceptual approaches to competence and practice in competence management in France. Design/methodology/approach: Extensive literature review, discussion with academic experts in the French competence network of AGRH and interviews concerning developments following the 2003 national agreement…

  1. The RESPECT Approach to Tailored Telephone Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouse, Corey H.; Basch, Charles E.; Wolf, Randi L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the RESPECT approach to tailored telephone education (TTE) is described. This approach was shown to be highly effective through a randomized intervention trial for increasing the rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Methods: At the conclusion of the trial, the investigators identified the main principles that…

  2. Conceptual approach for Integrated Project Delivery (IPD)

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    -led approach. CM-at Risk, or GMP: Construction Manager is a consultant to the owner during design phases in highly collaborative relationships throughout the complete facility life cycle to achieve effectiveConceptual approach for Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) & Building Information Modeling (BIM

  3. A Linear Algebraic Approach to Teaching Interpolation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tassa, Tamir

    2007-01-01

    A novel approach for teaching interpolation in the introductory course in numerical analysis is presented. The interpolation problem is viewed as a problem in linear algebra, whence the various forms of interpolating polynomial are seen as different choices of a basis to the subspace of polynomials of the corresponding degree. This approach

  4. Personality, Approaches to Learning and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanberg, Anne Berit; Martinsen, Oyvind Lund

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between the five-factor model of personality, approaches to learning and academic achievement. Based on the previous research, we expected approaches to have a mediating effect between personality and academic achievement. Six hundred and eighty-seven business students participated in a survey; 56%…

  5. A Knowledgebased Approach to Merging Information

    E-print Network

    Hunter, Anthony

    A Knowledgebased Approach to Merging Information Anthony Hunter and Rupert Summerton Department There is an increasing need for technology for merging semi-structured information (such as struc- tured reports) from heterogeneous sources. For this, we advocate a knowledgebased approach when the information to be merged

  6. A Professional Approach to PR Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nager, Norman R.

    After reviewing some of the problems involved in a traditional approach to teaching, this paper introduces a teaching system based on a patterned approach to the public relations writing process. The system format which is presented involves an analysis of persuasive communication components, programmed questioning of traditional premises, and…

  7. ADAPTIVE AND STATISTICAL APPROACHES IN CONCEPTUAL MODELING

    E-print Network

    Lagus, Krista

    ADAPTIVE AND STATISTICAL APPROACHES IN CONCEPTUAL MODELING Timo Honkela, Kevin I. Hynn¨a, Krista University of Technology Department of Computer Science and Engineering Laboratory of Computer and Information Science Report A75 #12;#12;Contents Preface 1 1 Adaptive and Statistical Approaches to Conceptual

  8. ADAPTIVE AND STATISTICAL APPROACHES IN CONCEPTUAL MODELING

    E-print Network

    Lagus, Krista

    ADAPTIVE AND STATISTICAL APPROACHES IN CONCEPTUAL MODELING Timo Honkela, Kevin I. HynnË?a, Krista University of Technology Department of Computer Science and Engineering Laboratory of Computer and Information Science Report A75 #12; #12; Contents Preface 1 1 Adaptive and Statistical Approaches

  9. Methodological Approaches to Online Scoring of Essays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Gregory K. W. K.; O'Neil, Harold F., Jr.

    This report examines the feasibility of scoring essays using computer-based techniques. Essays have been incorporated into many of the standardized testing programs. Issues of validity and reliability must be addressed to deploy automated approaches to scoring fully. Two approaches that have been used to classify documents, surface- and word-based…

  10. The Cognitive Behavioral Approach to Weight Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girdano, Dorothy Dusek

    The cognitive behavioral approach to weight maintenance assumes that obese people should be concerned with weight control rather than weight loss, and it embraces both the behavioral approach and a maintenance program which examines risks, value priorities, and the basic principles of weight loss/weight gain. The University of Maryland offers a…

  11. Google's Hybrid Approach to Research Alfred Spector

    E-print Network

    Cortes, Corinna

    success or useful negative result. Because of the time-frame and effort involved, Google's approachGoogle's Hybrid Approach to Research Alfred Spector Google Inc. azs@google.com Peter Norvig Google Inc. pnorvig@google.com Slav Petrov Google Inc. slav@google.com 1 Introduction In this paper, we

  12. An Agile Course-Delivery Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capellan, Mirkeya

    2009-01-01

    In the world of software development, agile methodologies have gained popularity thanks to their lightweight methodologies and flexible approach. Many advocates believe that agile methodologies can provide significant benefits if applied in the educational environment as a teaching method. The need for an approach that engages and motivates…

  13. An Algorithmic Approach to Gene Regulatory Sequence

    E-print Network

    Rouchka, Eric

    An Algorithmic Approach to Gene Regulatory Sequence Analysis Eric C. Rouchka1 TR-ULBL-2008-01 March Approach to Gene Regulatory Sequence Analysis Eric C. Rouchka1,* 1 Department of Computer Engineering important regulatory signals. A method for detect- ing common regulatory motifs using a modified Bernoulli

  14. Sequencing crop genomes: approaches and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant genome sequencing methodology parrallels the sequencing of the human genome. The first projects were slow and very expensive. BAC by BAC approaches were utilized first and whole-genome shotgun sequencing rapidly replaced that approach. So called 'next generation' technologies such as short rea...

  15. Deuteron form factors in a phenomenological approach

    E-print Network

    Cuiying Liang; Yubing Dong

    2015-02-18

    The electromagnetic form factors of the deuteron, particularly the quadrupole form factor, are studied with a help of a phenomenological Lagrangian approach where the vertex of the deuteron-proton-neutron with $D$-state contribution is explicitly taken into account. The result shows the importance of this contribution to the quadrupole form factor in the approach.

  16. Teaching Science through a Systems Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llewellyn, Douglas; Johnson, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Based on the recommendation of the AAAS and the NRC, middle level science is the rightful introduction for a systems approach, including the study of its parts, subsystems, interconnections, and interrelationships. Dr. Seuss's "The Lorax" provides an excellent opportunity to combine ecological consequences within a systems approach (Sweeney 2001).…

  17. UNIFORMLY APPROACHABLE MAPS KRZYSZTOFC IESIELSKI DIKRAN DIKRANJAN

    E-print Network

    Ciesielski, Krzysztof Chris

    approachable (brie f M )­approximation fore ve compact # ande ve M # . The function f uniformly approachable (brie fly, WUA) f ({x }, )­approximation fore ve ryx # ande ve M # . supported by NATOC ollaborative ) C Y ) # Y (1) (Se e Compare Se Inde e d,e ve function f is since g f a )­ approximation of fore ve M

  18. Three Approaches to Educational Resource Allocation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, W. G.

    The three main approaches to educational planning are social demand, manpower forecasting, and cost benefit. The social demand approach, useful only for reference purposes, attempts to forecast and assess consumer demand for education. Manpower forecasting tries to insure an output of the educational system to meet future economic demands, but…

  19. An Outward-Looking Approach in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clausen, Sten Krog

    This report is based on the work of the international colloquy organized by the Council of Europe (Luxembourg, 1981). The aim of the colloquy was to explore how to foster an outward-looking approach in schools, and how to bring about a new approach to teaching man/environment relationships and ways in which people affect and are affected by their…

  20. Approaches to the Analysis of Literary Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventola, Eija, Ed.

    Articles included in this compilation represent functional approaches to literary analysis. Most of these papers were presented at the Sixteenth International Systemics Congress held in Helsinki, Finland, in 1989. The aim of the congress was to establish dialogue between various functional approaches to the theoretical study of language, to…

  1. Thematic Approaches to Teaching Rhetorical Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, David; Sharp, Harry, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Argues that a thematic approach to teaching criticism--based on frequent, integrated writing tasks--accommodates the constraints found in the typical undergraduate course on rhetorical criticism. Illustrates this approach with reference to two themes: Ronald Reagan's discourse and the rhetoric of war and peace. (MM)

  2. SPATIAL APPROACH TO PLANNING THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BELLOMY, CLEON C.; CAUDILL, WILLIAM W.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS REPORT DEFINES THE SPATIAL APPROACH TO PLANNING THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT AND SUGGESTS A MORE NATURAL APPROACH TO A LESS RESTRICTED ARCHITECTURE. ONE OF THE TWO BASIC ARCHITECTURAL ELEMENTS IN THE SPATIAL CONCEPT IS THE HORIZONTAL SCREEN WHICH KEEPS THE SUN AND RAIN OFF, LETS IN LIGHT, KEEPS OUT SUN HEAT, RETAINS ROOM HEAT, AND…

  3. The Continued Development of the Structural Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Waldo E.

    1967-01-01

    A brief discussion of traditional Latin textbooks is followed by a survey of the first attempts at new materials (emphasizing integration of audiovisual aids and texts) at the William Penn Charter School and at the University of Michigan. The body of the article considers the structural approach, using "Latin: A Structural Approach" (1957) and…

  4. A Demonstration of Approach and Avoidance Conflicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, W. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Choosing between 2 unpleasant alternatives (Would you rather be less intelligent or less attractive?) is more difficult than choosing between two desirable options (Would you rather be more intelligent or more attractive?). Here I describe a classroom demonstration of avoidance-avoidance conflicts. Students make a series of approach-approach and…

  5. Mixed Methods Approaches in Family Science Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plano Clark, Vicki L.; Huddleston-Casas, Catherine A.; Churchill, Susan L.; Green, Denise O'Neil; Garrett, Amanda L.

    2008-01-01

    The complex phenomena of interest to family scientists require the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Researchers across the social sciences are now turning to mixed methods designs that combine these two approaches. Mixed methods research has great promise for addressing family science topics, but only if researchers understand the…

  6. Transconjunctival approach in lower eyelid blepharoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Korchia, D; Braccini, F; Paris, J; Thomassin, JM

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To specify interest and indications of the transconjunctival approach in lower-eyelid plastic surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-three cases of inferior blepharoplasty performed through a transconjunctival approach are reported. The authors describe the surgical technique, its indications and results. RESULTS: The transconjunctival approach provides excellent access to the inferior fatty chambers and is cutaneous scar free. It has a lower complication rate than the classic transcutaneous approach, and no case of cyclid retraction has been reported. CONCLUSION: In our ‘cosmetic society’, the inferior blepharoplasty through a transconjunctival approach has taken a significant place in the armamentarium of the esthetic surgeon. Juvenile palpebral lipoptosis without skin excess constitutes the best indication for this technique. It is also indicated in secondary blepharoplasty and in patients presenting with a cicatricial risk or with orbital septum distention. PMID:24115863

  7. Approach guidance for outer planet pioneer missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    Onboard optical approach guidance measurements for spin-stabilized Pioneer-type spacecraft are discussed. Approach guidance measurement accuracy requirements are outlined. The application concept and operation principle of the V-slit star tracker are discussed within the context of approach guidance measurements and measurables. It is shown that the accuracy of onboard optical approach guidance measurements is inherently coupled to the stability characteristics of the spacecraft spin axis. Geometrical and physical measurement parameters are presented for Pioneer entry probe missions to Uranus via Jupiter or Saturn flyby. The impact of these parameters on both sensor instrumentation and measurement system design is discussed. The need for sensing extended objects is shown. The feasibility of implementing an onboard approach guidance measurement system for Pioneer-type spacecraft is indicated. Two Pioneer 10 onboard measurement experiments performed in May-June 1974 are described.

  8. The Norwegian approach to integrated quality development.

    PubMed

    Ovretveit, J

    2001-01-01

    The UK NHS quality proposals require all NHS organisations to develop an "integrated approach " to quality. In other countries, health care organisations are also working to ensure that the many different quality methods and systems used in health organisations do not duplicate or conflict with each other. The question this paper addresses is "what would an integrated approach to quality look like and how might managers and clinicians develop such an approach in their organisation?" The findings from the Norwegian total quality management experiment in six hospitals were that TQM could not be applied in its pure form in public health care services to ensure integration. The paper draws on this research to describe these hospitals' approach to integrate the different projects and systems which were stimulated by their initial quality programmes. The paper describes the "integrated quality development" approach which characterised these programmes. PMID:11547821

  9. Natural resource assessment: an approach to science based planning in national parks.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Carolyn G; Vanderhorst, James P; Young, John A

    2009-06-01

    We conducted a natural resource assessment at two national parks, New River Gorge National River and Shenandoah National Park, to help meet the goals of the Natural Resource Challenge--a program to help strengthen natural resource management at national parks. We met this challenge by synthesizing and interpreting natural resource information for planning purposes and we identified information gaps and natural significance of resources. We identified a variety of natural resources at both parks as being globally and/or nationally significant, including large expanses of unfragmented, mixed-mesophytic forests that qualify for wilderness protection, rare plant communities, diverse assemblages of neotropical migratory birds and salamanders, and outstanding aquatic recreational resources. In addition, these parks function, in part, as ecological reserves for plants in and wildlife. With these significant natural resources in mind, we also developed a suite of natural resource management recommendations in light of increasing threats from within and outside park boundaries. We hope that our approach can provide a blueprint for natural resource conservation at publically owned lands. PMID:19365671

  10. Natural Resource Assessment: An Approach to Science Based Planning in National Parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, Carolyn G.; Vanderhorst, James P.; Young, John A.

    2009-06-01

    We conducted a natural resource assessment at two national parks, New River Gorge National River and Shenandoah National Park, to help meet the goals of the Natural Resource Challenge—a program to help strengthen natural resource management at national parks. We met this challenge by synthesizing and interpreting natural resource information for planning purposes and we identified information gaps and natural significance of resources. We identified a variety of natural resources at both parks as being globally and/or nationally significant, including large expanses of unfragmented, mixed-mesophytic forests that qualify for wilderness protection, rare plant communities, diverse assemblages of neotropical migratory birds and salamanders, and outstanding aquatic recreational resources. In addition, these parks function, in part, as ecological reserves for plants in and wildlife. With these significant natural resources in mind, we also developed a suite of natural resource management recommendations in light of increasing threats from within and outside park boundaries. We hope that our approach can provide a blueprint for natural resource conservation at publically owned lands.

  11. Approach to design neural cryptography: A generalized architecture and a heuristic rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Nankun; Liao, Xiaofeng; Huang, Tingwen

    2013-06-01

    Neural cryptography, a type of public key exchange protocol, is widely considered as an effective method for sharing a common secret key between two neural networks on public channels. How to design neural cryptography remains a great challenge. In this paper, in order to provide an approach to solve this challenge, a generalized network architecture and a significant heuristic rule are designed. The proposed generic framework is named as tree state classification machine (TSCM), which extends and unifies the existing structures, i.e., tree parity machine (TPM) and tree committee machine (TCM). Furthermore, we carefully study and find that the heuristic rule can improve the security of TSCM-based neural cryptography. Therefore, TSCM and the heuristic rule can guide us to designing a great deal of effective neural cryptography candidates, in which it is possible to achieve the more secure instances. Significantly, in the light of TSCM and the heuristic rule, we further expound that our designed neural cryptography outperforms TPM (the most secure model at present) on security. Finally, a series of numerical simulation experiments are provided to verify validity and applicability of our results.

  12. Is the Standard Monte Carlo Power Iteration Approach the Wrong Approach? Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Thomas E.

    2012-07-11

    The recent work 'Is the Standard Monte Carlo Power Iteration Approach the Wrong Approach?' speculated that the second eigenfunction could be built using essentially the same 'building brick' approach that obtained the first eigenfunction in LA-UR-12-21928. This note shows that the speculation was at least partially correct, but not complete.

  13. Understanding the Danish Forest School Approach: Early Years Education in Practice. Understanding the... Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams-Siegfredsen, Jane

    2011-01-01

    "Understanding the Danish Forest School Approach" is a much needed source of information for those wishing to extend and consolidate their understanding of the Forest School Approach in Denmark and how it is used in the teaching and learning of young children. It will enable the reader to analyse the essential elements of this Approach to early…

  14. Understanding the Montessori Approach: Early Years Education in Practice. Understanding the... Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    "Understanding the Montessori Approach" is a much needed source of information for those wishing to extend and consolidate their understanding of the Montessori Approach and how it is used in the teaching and learning of young children. It will enable the reader to analyse the essential elements of this Approach to early childhood and and its…

  15. Understanding the Reggio Approach: Early Years Education in Practice. Second Edition. Understanding the... Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Linda; Brunton, Pat

    2009-01-01

    "Understanding the Reggio Approach" is a much needed source of information for those wishing to extend and consolidate their understanding of the Reggio Approach. Analysing the essential elements of the Reggio Approach to early childhood and its relationship to quality early years practice, this new edition is fully updated with the latest…

  16. 12 CFR 324.43 - Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA) and the gross-up approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...this part may apply the gross-up approach set forth...to determine the risk weight of its securitization...provided that it applies the gross-up approach to all of...securitization exposure under the gross-up approach, an FDIC-supervised...institution must apply the risk weight required under...

  17. 12 CFR 217.43 - Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA) and the gross-up approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...this part may apply the gross-up approach set forth...to determine the risk weight of its securitization...provided that it applies the gross-up approach to all of...securitization exposure under the gross-up approach, a Board-regulated...institution must apply the risk weight required under...

  18. 12 CFR 3.43 - Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA) and the gross-up approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...this part may apply the gross-up approach set forth...to determine the risk weight of its securitization...provided that it applies the gross-up approach to all of...securitization exposure under the gross-up approach, a national...association must apply the risk weight required under...

  19. STS-66 Edwards Landing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis approaches runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the STS-66 mission dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining

  20. Overstress and flowstress approaches to dynamic viscoplasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2015-09-01

    Viscoplasticity is mostly modelled by the flowstress approach, where the flowstress (Y) is a function of pressure, temperature, plastic strain and strain rate Y(P,T, ?p, ??). For dynamic Viscoplasticity the flowstress approach is used in hydrocodes together with the radial return algorithm, to determine deviatoric stress components in each computational cell and for each time step. The flowstress approach assumes that during plastic loading, the flowstress in stress space follows the current stress point (current Y). Unloading of a computational cell is therefore always elastic. The overstress approach to dynamic viscoplasticity was used in various versions in the 1950s and early 1960s, before the advent of hydrocodes. By the overstress approach a state point may move out of the quasistatic flow surface upon loading, and hence the term overstress. When this happens, the state point tends to fall back (or relax) onto the quasistatic flow surface through plastic flow, and the rate of this relaxation is an increasing function of the amount of overstress. In the paper we first outline in detail how these two approaches to dynamic viscoplasticity work, and then show an example for which the overstress approach has an advantage over the flowstress approach. The example has to do with elastic precursor decay in planar impact, and with the phenomenon of anomalous thermal strengthening, revealed recently in planar impact tests. The overstress approach has an advantage whenever plastic flow during unloading is of importance.

  1. Evaluating Modelling Approaches for Medical Image Annotations

    E-print Network

    Opitz, Jasmin; Sattler, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    Information system designers face many challenges w.r.t. selecting appropriate semantic technologies and deciding on a modelling approach for their system. However, there is no clear methodology yet to evaluate "semantically enriched" information systems. In this paper we present a case study on different modelling approaches for annotating medical images and introduce a conceptual framework that can be used to analyse the fitness of information systems and help designers to spot the strengths and weaknesses of various modelling approaches as well as managing trade-offs between modelling effort and their potential benefits.

  2. Multiobjective optimization approach: thermal food processing.

    PubMed

    Abakarov, A; Sushkov, Y; Almonacid, S; Simpson, R

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to utilize a multiobjective optimization technique for the thermal sterilization of packaged foods. The multiobjective optimization approach used in this study is based on the optimization of well-known aggregating functions by an adaptive random search algorithm. The applicability of the proposed approach was illustrated by solving widely used multiobjective test problems taken from the literature. The numerical results obtained for the multiobjective test problems and for the thermal processing problem show that the proposed approach can be effectively used for solving multiobjective optimization problems arising in the food engineering field. PMID:20492109

  3. Evaluation of Resource Acquisition Approaches : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, Maura L.; Mortimer, Tom; Palermini, Debbi; Nelson, Kari

    1991-09-12

    Over the last few years, Bonneville has been addressing this need and has developed numerous ways of acquiring resources. Four of these Approaches, the Competitive Acquisition, Billing Credits, and Targeted Acquisition Programs, and the Cowlitz Falls Hydroelectric Project, were the subject of this evaluation project. Each Approach is currently in different stages of a process, and Bonneville felt it was an appropriate time that an evaluation be conducted. The purpose of this evaluation is to analyze the various Approaches` processes, to learn what`s working and what`s not, and to offer recommendations as to how Bonneville might improve their resources acquisition efforts. The evaluation was conducted with no preconceived biases.

  4. Endoscopic Approaches to the Craniovertebral Junction.

    PubMed

    Kshettry, Varun R; Thorp, Brian D; Shriver, Michael F; Zanation, Adam M; Woodard, Troy D; Sindwani, Raj; Recinos, Pablo F

    2016-02-01

    The endoscopic endonasal approach provides a direct surgical trajectory to anteriorly located lesions at the craniovertebral junction. The inferior limit of surgical exposure is predicted by the nasopalatine line, and the lateral limit is demarcated by the lower cranial nerves. Endoscopic endonasal odontoidectomy allows preservation of the soft palate, and patients can restart an oral diet on the first postoperative day. Treating the condition at the craniovertebral junction using this approach requires careful preoperative planning and endoscopic endonasal surgical experience with a 2-surgeon 4-handed approach combining expertise in otolaryngology and neurosurgery. PMID:26614839

  5. Approaching Moons from Resonance via Invariant Manifolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Rodney L.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the approach phase from the final resonance of the endgame scenario in a tour design is examined within the context of invariant manifolds. Previous analyses have typically solved this problem either by using numerical techniques or by computing a catalog of suitable trajectories. The invariant manifolds of a selected set of libration orbits and unstable resonant orbits are computed here to serve as guides for desirable approach trajectories. The analysis focuses on designing an approach phase that may be tied into the final resonance in the endgame sequence while also targeting desired conditions at the moon.

  6. Design of Quiet Rotorcraft Approach Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Burley, Casey L.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    A optimization procedure for identifying quiet rotorcraft approach trajectories is proposed and demonstrated. The procedure employs a multi-objective genetic algorithm in order to reduce noise and create approach paths that will be acceptable to pilots and passengers. The concept is demonstrated by application to two different helicopters. The optimized paths are compared with one another and to a standard 6-deg approach path. The two demonstration cases validate the optimization procedure but highlight the need for improved noise prediction techniques and for additional rotorcraft acoustic data sets.

  7. Cavity approach to the random solid state.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoming; Goldbart, Paul M; Mézard, Marc; Weigt, Martin

    2005-09-30

    The cavity approach is used to address the physical properties of random solids in equilibrium. Particular attention is paid to the fraction of localized particles and the distribution of localization lengths characterizing their thermal motion. This approach is of relevance to a wide class of random solids, including rubbery media (formed via the vulcanization of polymer fluids) and chemical gels (formed by the random covalent bonding of fluids of atoms or small molecules). The cavity approach confirms results that have been obtained previously via replica mean-field theory, doing so in a way that sheds new light on their physical origin. PMID:16241698

  8. Social psychiatry and sociology of mental health: a view on their past and future relevance.

    PubMed

    Krupinski, J

    1992-03-01

    The origins of social psychiatry can be traced to the age of enlightenment and to the effects of the industrial revolution. Social psychiatry deals with social factors associated with psychiatric morbidity, social effects of mental illness, psycho-social disorders and social approaches to psychiatric care. Since the end of World War II up to the early seventies it has been claimed that social psychiatry should concentrate on the fight against war, poverty, racial discrimination, urban decay and all other social ills affecting people's mental health, and that the psychiatrist should be responsible for the mental health of the society. In contrast, sociology of mental health questioned the expertise of the psychiatrist and the very existence of mental illness, claiming that it covers deviant behaviour rejected by the society. The paper refutes this approach indicating that not the existence but the perception and presentation of psychiatric illness are socially determined. Acknowledging the contribution of sociology and social sciences to psychiatry, it is suggested that the heroic period of social psychiatry and the iconoclastic approach of sociology of mental health are over. However, social psychiatry, enriched by the use of epidemiological methods, has still much to offer to the daily practice of psychiatry. PMID:1580890

  9. Reliability-oriented multi-objective optimal decision-making approach for uncertainty-based watershed load reduction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Feifei; Liu, Yong; Su, Han; Zou, Rui; Guo, Huaicheng

    2015-05-15

    Water quality management and load reduction are subject to inherent uncertainties in watershed systems and competing decision objectives. Therefore, optimal decision-making modeling in watershed load reduction is suffering due to the following challenges: (a) it is difficult to obtain absolutely "optimal" solutions, and (b) decision schemes may be vulnerable to failure. The probability that solutions are feasible under uncertainties is defined as reliability. A reliability-oriented multi-objective (ROMO) decision-making approach was proposed in this study for optimal decision making with stochastic parameters and multiple decision reliability objectives. Lake Dianchi, one of the three most eutrophic lakes in China, was examined as a case study for optimal watershed nutrient load reduction to restore lake water quality. This study aimed to maximize reliability levels from considerations of cost and load reductions. The Pareto solutions of the ROMO optimization model were generated with the multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, demonstrating schemes representing different biases towards reliability. The Pareto fronts of six maximum allowable emission (MAE) scenarios were obtained, which indicated that decisions may be unreliable under unpractical load reduction requirements. A decision scheme identification process was conducted using the back propagation neural network (BPNN) method to provide a shortcut for identifying schemes at specific reliability levels for decision makers. The model results indicated that the ROMO approach can offer decision makers great insights into reliability tradeoffs and can thus help them to avoid ineffective decisions. PMID:25688523

  10. Knowledge-lean approaches to metonymy 

    E-print Network

    Peirsman, Yves

    2005-01-01

    Current approaches to metonymy recognition are mainly supervised, relying heavily on the manual annotation of training and test data. This forms a considerable hindrance to their application on a wider scale. This ...

  11. SOHO Sees Venus' Approach - Duration: 5 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video taken by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) shows the Sun's corona and Venus' approach for the transit. This was taken with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) in ...

  12. A Genetic Algorithm Approach for Technology Characterization 

    E-print Network

    Galvan, Edgar

    2012-10-19

    It is important for engineers to understand the capabilities and limitations of the technologies they consider for use in their systems. Several researchers have investigated approaches for modeling the capabilities of a ...

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF PERSONAL OZONE SAMPLERS: THREE APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigators funded under the HEI ozone sampler program, Drs. Hackney, Yanagisawa, and Koutrakis, and their collaborators used different approaches to develop personal ozone samples that would be sensitive, accurate, and amenable to use in epidemiological studies.

  14. A COMPUTATIONAL APPROACH TO LINGUISTIC COORDINATION

    E-print Network

    Lee, Lillian

    of Philosophy by Cristian Danescu-Niculescu-Mizil August 2012 #12;c 2012 Cristian Danescu-Niculescu-Mizil ALL RIGHTS RESERVED #12;A COMPUTATIONAL APPROACH TO LINGUISTIC COORDINATION Cristian Danescu-Niculescu

  15. An Approach to the Patient With Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Carette, Simon

    1987-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (fibrositis) is one of the most common rheumatologic conditions. This paper reviews the clinical presentation and pathophysiology of the syndrome and presents a global approach to the management of the disease. PMID:21263860

  16. LAGRANGIAN-EULERIAN APPROACH TO MODELING CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Lagrangian-Eulerian modeling approach predicts potential contaminant distributions resulting from the disposal of sewage sludge at the Deepwater Municipal Disposal Site off the northeast United States continental shelf. The Lagrangian aspect involves Monte-Carlo simulations of ...

  17. A new approach to parallel SAT solvers

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Max (Max M.)

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel approach to solving SAT problems in parallel by partitioning the entire set of problem clauses into smaller pieces that can be solved by individual threads. We examine the complications that arise with ...

  18. A Manager's Approach to Energy Cost Management 

    E-print Network

    Spencer, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A major responsibility of management is the control and containment of operating costs. Energy costs are a major portion of the industrial budget. GM has developed a 3 phase approach to energy conservation. Phase I -Administrative Controls...

  19. Evaluation of synthesized voice approach callouts /SYNCALL/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    The two basic approaches to the generation of 'synthesized' speech include a utilization of analog recorded human speech and a construction of speech entirely from algorithms applied to constants describing speech sounds. Given the availability of synthesized speech displays for man-machine systems, research is needed to study suggested applications for speech and design principles for speech displays. The present investigation is concerned with a study for which new performance measures were developed. A number of air carrier approach and landing accidents during low or impaired visibility have been associated with the absence of approach callouts. The study had the purpose to compare a pilot-not-flying (PNF) approach callout system to a system composed of PNF callouts augmented by an automatic synthesized voice callout system (SYNCALL). Pilots were found to favor the use of a SYNCALL system containing certain modifications.

  20. Human Health Research Program: Systems biological approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research using systems analytic approaches to integrate biological and toxicological data across scales of biological organization (e.g. molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, full body, population), with the goal of identifying toxicity pathways, biomarkers, and bioindicators for a...

  1. Natural language semantics: a naturalistic approach 

    E-print Network

    Underwood, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Within linguistics, the dominant truth-conditional approach to semantics belongs to the Tarskian, model-theoretic tradition. Theories in this tradition offer an abstract, mathematical description of the truth conditions ...

  2. The Team Approach to Pain Relief

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues The Team Approach to Pain Relief Past Issues / Fall 2007 ... Roberts is seen here with some of the team members, (left to right) Dr. Berger, Jacques Bolle, ...

  3. A New, Principled Approach to Anomaly Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Ferragut, Erik M; Laska, Jason A; Bridges, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Intrusion detection is often described as having two main approaches: signature-based and anomaly-based. We argue that only unsupervised methods are suitable for detecting anomalies. However, there has been a tendency in the literature to conflate the notion of an anomaly with the notion of a malicious event. As a result, the methods used to discover anomalies have typically been ad hoc, making it nearly impossible to systematically compare between models or regulate the number of alerts. We propose a new, principled approach to anomaly detection that addresses the main shortcomings of ad hoc approaches. We provide both theoretical and cyber-specific examples to demonstrate the benefits of our more principled approach.

  4. Personalizing the Approach to Childhood Asthma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About the AAAAI Personalizing the approach to childhood asthma Published Online: March 24, 2104 Clinicians treating asthmatic ... recognized the wide-ranging heterogeneity in response to asthma medications, particularly to inhaled corticosteroids. Often, despite large ...

  5. Integrated Approach to Revamping Heat Exchangers Networks 

    E-print Network

    Glass, K. E.; Dhole, V.; Wang, Y.

    2002-01-01

    A heat exchanger network constitutes the core of the plant energy systems interlinking the core process operation and the utility systems. This paper will illustrate an integrated approach for the revamp of a heat exchanger network by bringing...

  6. Extended frontobasal approach to the skull base.

    PubMed

    Banerji, D; Behari, S; Tyagi, I; Pandey, T; Jain, V K; Chhabra, D K

    2001-09-01

    The extended frontobasal approach provides an adequate midline exposure from the anterior cranial fossa to the sphenoclival region. Between November 1991 and August 1999, 13 patients with extensive anterior and anterolateral skull base tumours extending to supra and parasellar regions, cavernous sinus and sphenoclival regions were operated upon using this approach alone (7 patients) or in combination with subtemporal -infratemporal (4 patients) or transfacial (2 patients) approaches. Gross total excision was performed in 8 patients while in 4 patients with malignant tumours and in a patient with extensive skull base fungal granuloma, only partial excision was possible. Basal repair was performed using pedicled pericranium, temporalis muscle or fascia lata. The complications included increase in the cranial nerve paresis, endophthalmitis, facial oedema, CSF leak, frontal haematoma and internal carotid artery injury. This study reviews the operative technique, the indications and the complications of extended frontobasal approach. PMID:11593242

  7. Developing an Intuitive Approach to Moles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakeley, Dawn M.; de Grys, Hans

    2000-01-01

    Explains the concept of mole and presents a teaching approach in which students can experiment with atoms and develop an understanding of mass ratios. Presents 10 examples of chemistry problems involving moles and unit conversations. (YDS)

  8. Multidelity approaches for design under uncertainty

    E-print Network

    Ng, Leo Wai-Tsun

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainties are present in many engineering applications and it is important to account for their effects during engineering design to achieve robust and reliable systems. One approach is to represent uncertainties as ...

  9. Integrated Experimental And Computational Approach To Molecular

    E-print Network

    Integrated Experimental And Computational Approach To Molecular Based Characterization Of Aerosol the radiative energy balance directly through interaction with solar radiation and indirectly through cloud using NWChem26, a high performance computational chemistry package developed at EMSL. Following our

  10. Algorithmic approaches to distributed adaptive transmit beamforming

    E-print Network

    Beigl, Michael

    . INTRODUCTION By phase coherent superimpositioning of RF transmit signal components from wireless sensor nodesAlgorithmic approaches to distributed adaptive transmit beamforming Stephan Sigg and Michael Beigl- provements on distributed adaptive transmit beamforming in wireless sensor networks. These algorithms reduce

  11. Bioenergy Sustainability Mathematical Approaches to protocol development

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    Bioenergy Sustainability Assessment Mathematical Approaches to protocol development Image: http, Knoxville, TN Center for Bioenergy Sustainability, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN #12;Overview ·How is sustainability measured within the context of bioenergy? ·What are the challenges in bioenergy

  12. Tiny Asteroid Approaches Earth - Duration: 3 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Oct. 15, 2010, NASA astronomer Rob Suggs captured this view of the tiny asteroid 2010 TG19 as it made its way among the stars of the constellation Pegasus. It will continue to approach during th...

  13. Nanotechnology based approaches in cancer therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumer Biswas, Amit; Reazul Islam, Md; Sadek Choudhury, Zahid; Mostafa, Asif; Fahim Kadir, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    The current decades are marked not by the development of new molecules for the cure of various diseases but rather the development of new delivery methods for optimum treatment outcome. Nanomedicine is perhaps playing the biggest role in this concern. Nanomedicine offers numerous advantages over conventional drug delivery approaches and is particularly the hot topic in anticancer research. Nanoparticles (NPs) have many unique criteria that enable them to be incorporated in anticancer therapy. This topical review aims to look at the properties and various forms of NPs and their use in anticancer treatment, recent development of the process of identifying new delivery approaches as well as progress in clinical trials with these newer approaches. Although the outcome of cancer therapy can be increased using nanomedicine there are still many disadvantages of using this approach. We aim to discuss all these issues in this review.

  14. A Bayesian approach to feed reconstruction

    E-print Network

    Conjeevaram Krishnakumar, Naveen Kartik

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we developed a Bayesian approach to estimate the detailed composition of an unknown feedstock in a chemical plant by combining information from a few bulk measurements of the feedstock in the plant along ...

  15. Multiscale Approach to Protein Engineering in Bioluminescence

    E-print Network

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Multiscale Approach to Protein Engineering in Bioluminescence Probe Design Yi Mao Department: different resolutions atomistic model (QM/MM) network model (simplified potential) #12;Bioluminescence conversion of chemical energy into light #12;Bioluminescence Reporter Gene Imaging Insert the reporter gene

  16. A measured approach towards "good SAT representations"

    E-print Network

    Kullmann, Oliver

    A measured approach towards "good SAT representations" Oliver Kullmann Computer Science Department to some leaf of length at most k resp. after removal of the literals of C from the derivation, for every

  17. A new automated approach to cloud population

    E-print Network

    Tam, Hoki

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents vCloud Populator, a new approach to automating the cloud population process on VMware vCloud Director. Cloud population is the process during which a cloud instance is populated with entities to reflect ...

  18. A SYSTEMS BIOLOGY APPROACH TO DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Recent advances in developmental biology have yielded detailed models of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) involved in cell specification and other processes in embryonic differentiation. Such networks form the bedrock on which a systems biology approach to developme...

  19. Red Shifts with Obliquely Approaching Light Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, C. E.; Moore-Head, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Refutes the Doppler effect as the explanation of large red shifts in the spectra of distant galaxies and explains the relativistic effects in which the light sources approach the observer obliquely. Provides several diagrams and graphs. (YP)

  20. A "Bioethics" Approach to Teaching Health Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capron, Alexander Morgan

    1988-01-01

    The reasons for offering a course in bioethics to law students and some approaches to take in addressing controversial issues are examined. The use of hypothetical vs. real cases, emphasis on clinical problems, and overall course objectives are discussed. (MSE)

  1. Proactive Botnet Countermeasures An Offensive Approach

    E-print Network

    Clausen, Michael

    Proactive Botnet Countermeasures ­ An Offensive Approach Felix LEDER, Tillmann WERNER, and Peter MARTINI Institute of Computer Science IV, University of Bonn, Germany Abstract. Botnets, consisting the botnet threat and demonstrate techniques based on a formalized view of botnet infrastructures. However

  2. The Limits to Adaptation; A Systems Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Limits to Adaptation: A Systems Approach. The ability to adapt to climate change is delineated by capacity thresholds, after which climate damages begin to overwhelm the adaptation response. Such thresholds depend upon physical properties (natural processes and engineering...

  3. Quantum Cryptography Approaching the Classical Limit

    E-print Network

    Weedbrook, Christian

    We consider the security of continuous-variable quantum cryptography as we approach the classical limit, i.e., when the unknown preparation noise at the sender’s station becomes significantly noisy or thermal (even by as ...

  4. I. INTRODUCTION Kalman Filterinlg Approach to

    E-print Network

    Chang, Chein-I

    I. INTRODUCTION Kalman Filterinlg Approach to MuItispectral/t-Iyperspectral Image Classification unmixirig Kalman filtering (LUKF), is presented which incorporates the concept of linear unmixing into Kalman filtering so as to achieve signature abundance estimation, subpixel detection

  5. Triton photodisintegration in three-dimensional approach

    E-print Network

    M. A. Shalchi; S. Bayegan

    2012-02-19

    Two- and three- particles photodisintegration of the triton is investigated in a three-dimensional (3D) Faddeev approach. For this purpose the Jacobi momentum vectors for three particles system and spin-isospin quantum numbers of the individual nucleons are considered. Based on this picture the three-nucleon Faddeev integral equations with the two-nucleon interaction are formulated without employing the partial wave decomposition. The single nucleon current as well as $\\pi-$ and $\\rho-$ like exchange currents are used in an appropriate form to be employed in 3D approach. The exchange currents are derived from AV18 NN force. The two-body t-matrix, Deuteron and Triton wave functions are calculated in the 3D approach by using AV18 potential. Benchmarks are presented to compare the total cross section for the two- and three- particles photodisintegration in the range of $E_{\\gamma}<30 MeV$. The 3D Faddeev approach shows promising results.

  6. Triton photodisintegration in three-dimensional approach

    E-print Network

    Shalchi, M A; 10.1140/epja/i2012-12006-9

    2012-01-01

    Two- and three- particles photodisintegration of the triton is investigated in a three-dimensional (3D) Faddeev approach. For this purpose the Jacobi momentum vectors for three particles system and spin-isospin quantum numbers of the individual nucleons are considered. Based on this picture the three-nucleon Faddeev integral equations with the two-nucleon interaction are formulated without employing the partial wave decomposition. The single nucleon current as well as $\\pi-$ and $\\rho-$ like exchange currents are used in an appropriate form to be employed in 3D approach. The exchange currents are derived from AV18 NN force. The two-body t-matrix, Deuteron and Triton wave functions are calculated in the 3D approach by using AV18 potential. Benchmarks are presented to compare the total cross section for the two- and three- particles photodisintegration in the range of $E_{\\gamma}<30 MeV$. The 3D Faddeev approach shows promising results.

  7. A Domain Decomposition Approach for Uncertainty Analysis

    E-print Network

    Liao, Qifeng

    This paper proposes a decomposition approach for uncertainty analysis of systems governed by partial differential equations (PDEs). The system is split into local components using domain decomposition. Our domain-decomposed ...

  8. Meson wave function from holographic approaches

    E-print Network

    Alfredo Vega; Ivan Schmidt; Tanja Branz; Thomas Gutsche; Valery E. Lyubovitskij

    2010-02-08

    We discuss the light-front wave function for the valence quark state of mesons using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We consider two kinds of wave functions obtained in different holographic Soft-Wall approaches

  9. The Mechanism Design Approach to Student Assignment

    E-print Network

    Pathak, Parag

    The mechanism design approach to student assignment involves the theoretical, empirical, and experimental study of systems used to allocate students into schools around the world. Recent practical experience designing ...

  10. International ESCO business opportunities and challenges: a Japanese case study

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, E.; Murakoshi, C.

    1997-10-01

    Recently, US energy service companies (ESCOs) have begun to actively explore markets outside the US. Despite the needs of many countries for ESCO involvement, ESCOs face many challenges (i.e., marketing, financial, institutional, political and cultural barriers). Consequently, most of these firms pursue international project opportunities very selectively due to the costs and risks associated with project development. Despite these barriers, some ESCOs view international work as a strategic expansion of their business, assuming that there will be adequate business in the future to repay them for their initial investment. In this paper, the authors present the findings from a recently completed study on the proposed development of an ESCO industry in Japan. The study was based on four sources of information: (1) a review of the published and unpublished literature on ESCOs; (2) interviews with 26 ESCOs in the US, the US Department of Energy, and the National Association of Energy Service Companies (NAESCO); (3) ESCO presentations at the October 1996 NAESCO meeting; and (4) informal discussions with ESCO experts in the US. They believe that the lessons learned in this study can be transferred or applied to other countries interested in developing an ESCO industry. While energy prices have remained relatively stable over the last several years in Japan and energy capacity is not perceived as a near-term problem, other ``market drivers`` necessary for the emergence of a successful and vibrant ESCO industry exist in Japan. Despite the presence of these market drivers, significant barriers to the successful development of an ESCO industry exist in Japan.

  11. Community College Costs and Challenges: A TICAS Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Community colleges are vital to our country's future, enrolling 42% of the nation's undergraduates and awarding the majority of all associate degrees and undergraduate certificates. Yet, despite their key role, they are the only sector that is increasingly asked to do more with fewer resources. This article discusses the important role that…

  12. School Life and Community Economic Challenge: A Newfoundland Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Ken

    2007-01-01

    This study explored changes in student attitudes toward school life following the 1992 Newfoundland groundfishery closure. Using data extracted from a provincial quality of school life (QSL) survey, means associated with students from a sample of fishing communities were compared with provincial means. Although community students had poorer…

  13. Creating Safe Schools: Roles and Challenges, a Federal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modzeleski, William

    1996-01-01

    Presents an overview of the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act, a key federal program that provides funding directly to states and local educational agencies to facilitate drug and violence prevention programs. The Gun-Free Schools Act is also examined, and the major challenges communities face in correcting school safety problems are…

  14. The Paper Airplane Challenge: A Market Economy Simulation. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Kimberly

    This lesson plan features a classroom simulation that helps students understand the characteristics of a market economic system. The lesson plan states a purpose; cites student objectives; suggests a time duration; lists materials needed; and details a step-by-step teaching procedure. The "Paper Airplane Challenge" handout is attached. (BT)

  15. Rachel's Challenge: A Moral Compass for Character Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingshead, Barbara; Crump, Christi; Eddy, Rochelle; Rowe, Dina

    2009-01-01

    Though American life in 1923 was significantly different than the present day, authors John Dewey and Diana Brannon share similar concerns about character. Historically, educators as far back as the 1800s have felt an obligation to the community to transcend the primary purpose for schooling by including character education in their curricula.…

  16. Guidelines for overcoming hospital managerial challenges: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The need to respond to accreditation institutes’ and patients’ requirements and to align health care results with increased medical knowledge is focusing greater attention on quality in health care. Different tools and techniques have been adopted to measure and manage quality, but clinical errors are still too numerous, suggesting that traditional quality improvement systems are unable to deal appropriately with hospital challenges. The purpose of this paper is to grasp the current tools, practices, and guidelines adopted in health care to improve quality and patient safety and create a base for future research on this young subject. Methods A systematic literature review was carried out. A search of academic databases, including papers that focus not only on lean management, but also on clinical errors and risk reduction, yielded 47 papers. The general characteristics of the selected papers were analyzed, and a content analysis was conducted. Results A variety of managerial techniques, tools, and practices are being adopted in health care, and traditional methodologies have to be integrated with the latest ones in order to reduce errors and ensure high quality and patient safety. As it has been demonstrated, these tools are useful not only for achieving efficiency objectives, but also for providing higher quality and patient safety. Critical indications and guidelines for successful implementation of new health managerial methodologies are provided and synthesized in an operative scheme useful for extending and deepening knowledge of these issues with further studies. Conclusion This research contributes to introducing a new theme in health care literature regarding the development of successful projects with both clinical risk management and health lean management objectives, and should address solutions for improving health care even in the current context of decreasing resources. PMID:24307833

  17. Systems Engineering Challenges A Perspective from the B-2 Bomber

    E-print Network

    Shelters · DEC · SFIIU · OGADS · Windshields · Aft Deck · FMCP Weapons · JASSM · JSOW · EGBU-28 · SBRA/Mk-82 JDAM Mission Management · Center Instrument Display · In-Flight Replanner B-2 Modernization

  18. The Leadership Challenge: A National Study of Women Superintendents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesson, Linda Hampton; Grady, Marilyn L.

    Recently, serious questions have been raised about the efficacy of the traditional leadership model, which relies on rigid hierarchical structure, competition, and control. This paper presents findings of a study that investigated the leadership practices of rural and urban female superintendents in the United States. The study was two-fold: (1) a…

  19. The Bradley Challenge: A Sea Change for Australian Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Thomas; Gill, Judith

    2011-01-01

    This paper begins with a focus on the problematic nature of one key term in the Bradley Report. "Socioeconomic status," or SES as commonly used, lacks clear definition leading to ongoing debates about its measurement. A working consensus on SES and its measurement is necessary for the report's recommendations to proceed effectively. Next we…

  20. Telepathology Impacts and Implementation Challenges: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Julien; Paré, Guy

    2015-12-01

    Context .- Telepathology is a particular form of telemedicine that fundamentally alters the way pathology services are delivered. Prior reviews in this area have mostly focused on 2 themes, namely technical feasibility issues and diagnosis accuracy. Objectives .- To synthesize the literature on telepathology implementation challenges and broader organizational and societal impacts and to propose a research agenda to guide future efforts in this domain. Data Sources .- Two complementary databases were systematically searched: MEDLINE (PubMed) and ABI/INFORM (ProQuest). Peer-reviewed articles and conference proceedings were considered. The final sample consisted of 159 papers published between 1992 and 2013. Conclusions .- This review highlights the diversity of telepathology networks and the importance of considering these distinctions when interpreting research findings. Various network structures are associated with different benefits. Although the dominant rationale in single-site projects is financial, larger centralized and decentralized telepathology networks are targeting a more diverse set of benefits, including extending access to pathology to a whole region, achieving substantial economies of scale in workforce and equipment, and improving quality by standardizing care. Importantly, our synthesis reveals that the nature and scale of encountered implementation challenges also varies depending on the network structure. In smaller telepathology networks, organizational concerns are less prominent, and implementers are more focused on usability issues. As the network scope widens, organizational and legal issues gain prominence. PMID:26619028

  1. The New Challenge: A Relevant Program for the Disadvantaged Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goertz, Mary Jean; Phemister, Linda

    Programs for disadvantaged gifted students require teachers with a number of positive characteristics and a relevant curriculum. The New Challenge Program created by the University of Texas Pan-American College of Education is a Saturday morning enrichment program for disadvantaged gifted children. Students select from classes such as Basic and…

  2. Textual Challenges: A Brief Guide to Choosing Shakespearean Editions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Christine; Malcolmson, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    How should educators go about selecting appropriate editions of Shakespeare's plays for use in political science courses? Shakespeare is turning up on many politics syllabi, but, at times, the editions chosen seem to reflect primarily a concern for price or publisher reputation over pedagogical and scholarly considerations. This article offers an…

  3. Genuine Progress, Greater Challenges: A Decade of Teacher Effectiveness Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotherham, Andrew J.; Mitchel, Ashley LiBetti

    2014-01-01

    For years, the debate about American education was like a bad marriage. The arguments were about everything but the core issue--instructional quality. The other issues--education finance, school choice, standards--all matter, but are secondary to the importance of effective instruction. In the labor-intensive education field, effective instruction…

  4. Challenger: A Multiagent System for Distributed Resource Allocation

    E-print Network

    morning and see a large number of apparently unused and idle work­ stations. Perhaps a few are doing bad it takes seconds to bring up a new window. He or she could log onto other machines and run jobs on t

  5. “Internal root resorption: An endodontic challenge”: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Mittal, Shifali; Sharma, Jyotika

    2014-01-01

    Management of internal root resorption is a challenge to the endodontists. It may occur in cases with chronic pulpal inflammation, following caries or due to trauma in the form of an accidental blow. Most cases of internal root resorption are seen in anterior teeth, due to their susceptibility to trauma. However, it may be seen in posterior teeth, most likely because of carious involvement of the pulp. Early diagnosis, removal of the cause, proper treatment of the resorbed root is mandatory for successful treatment outcome. This paper is an attempt to summarize the knowledge on internal root resorption and present various cases, which were successfully managed with different treatment modalities. PMID:25506152

  6. Governors and New Economic Challenges. A Background Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Governors' Association, Washington, DC.

    Since World War II, the American economy has consistently grown. However, this economic growth has been less impressive in the past 10 years, and some significant problems have developed. These include slowed economic growth, high inflation, and high unemployment. Among the major interrelated causes of these problems have been international…

  7. BRST-BV approach to conformal fields

    E-print Network

    Metsaev, R R

    2015-01-01

    Using BRST-BV approach, we consider totally symmetric arbitrary spin conformal fields propagating in flat space. For such fields, we obtain ordinary-derivative BRST-BV Lagrangian which is invariant under gauge transformations. In our approach, the ordinary-derivative Lagrangian and gauge transformations are constructed in terms of traceless gauge fields and traceless gauge transformation parameters. Also we obtain the realization of conformal algebra symmetries on space of fields and antifields entering the BRST-BV formulation of conformal fields.

  8. A Regional Approach to Community Development

    E-print Network

    Knox, Jerry

    1987-04-01

    Management--A Stakeholder Approach. Pitman Publishing Inc. Hurst, David K. 1984 "Of Boxes, Bubbles, and Effective Management." Harvard Business Review, (May..June):78-88. Janowitz, Morris 1953 The Community Press. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Lesly...-American Review of Sociology Department of Sociology University of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66045 Abels, Paul and Michael J. Murphy 1981. Administration in the Human Services: A Normative Systems Approach. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. Bagby, Wesley M 1981...

  9. Specifying digital forensics: A forensics policy approach

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Carol Louise; Popovsky, Barbara; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2007-09-01

    In this paper we present an approach to digital forensics specification based on forensic policy definition. Our methodology borrows from computer security policy specification, which has accumulated a significant body of research over the past 30 years. We first define the process of specifying forensics properties through a forensics policy and then present an example application of the process. This approach lends itself to formal policy specification and verification, which would allow for more clarity and less ambiguity in the specification process

  10. An osteopathic approach to performing arts medicine.

    PubMed

    Shoup, David

    2006-11-01

    An osteopathic approach to the performing artist is a complete approach. It involves spending adequate time with the performing artist to obtain a complete history and evaluation. It requires attention to the performer's lifestyle, practice habits, exercise routine, nutrition, stress level, and coexisting medical problems. Because an injury to a performing artist can be physically, emotionally, and financially devastating, these patients deserve a comprehensive treatment plan to allow for the best opportunity for recovery. PMID:17097485

  11. Alternative approaches for mitral valve repair

    PubMed Central

    Goldstone, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Unique situations arise in which alternative exposures for mitral valve surgery offer distinct advantages over traditional approaches. Each exposure facilitates both mitral valve repair and replacement, although the standard repair procedures must be modified to accommodate these non-traditional exposures. Here, we detail the technical considerations required to perform transventricular and transaortic mitral valve repair as well as discuss the advantages for employing these less conventional approaches. PMID:26539353

  12. Random Matrix theory approach to Quantum mechanics

    E-print Network

    K. V. S. Shiv Chaitanya

    2015-01-27

    In this paper, we give random matrix theory approach to the quantum mechanics using the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. We show that the bound state problems in quantum mechanics are analogous to solving Gaussian unitary ensemble of random matrix theory. This study helps in identify the potential appear in the joint probability distribution function in the random matrix theory as a super potential. This approach allows to extend the random matrix theory to the newly discovered exceptional polynomials.

  13. Dictyostelium discoideum: Molecular approaches to cell biology

    SciTech Connect

    Spudich, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The central point of this book is to present Dictyostelium as a valuable eukaryotic organism for those interested in molecular studies that require a combined biochemical, structural, and genetic approach. The book is not meant to be a comprehensive compilation of all methods involving Dictyostelium, but instead is a selective set of chapters that demonstrates the utility of the organism for molecular approaches to interesting cell biological problems.

  14. Portfolio optimization using median-variance approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Mohd, Wan Rosanisah; Mohamad, Daud; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2013-04-01

    Optimization models have been applied in many decision-making problems particularly in portfolio selection. Since the introduction of Markowitz's theory of portfolio selection, various approaches based on mathematical programming have been introduced such as mean-variance, mean-absolute deviation, mean-variance-skewness and conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) mainly to maximize return and minimize risk. However most of the approaches assume that the distribution of data is normal and this is not generally true. As an alternative, in this paper, we employ the median-variance approach to improve the portfolio optimization. This approach has successfully catered both types of normal and non-normal distribution of data. With this actual representation, we analyze and compare the rate of return and risk between the mean-variance and the median-variance based portfolio which consist of 30 stocks from Bursa Malaysia. The results in this study show that the median-variance approach is capable to produce a lower risk for each return earning as compared to the mean-variance approach.

  15. A Unified Approach to Attractor Reconstruction

    E-print Network

    Louis M. Pecora; Linda Moniz; Jonathan Nichols; Thomas L. Carroll

    2006-06-30

    In the analysis of complex, nonlinear time series, scientists in a variety of disciplines have relied on a time delayed embedding of their data, i.e. attractor reconstruction. The process has focused primarily on heuristic and empirical arguments for selection of the key embedding parameters, delay and embedding dimension. This approach has left several long-standing, but common problems unresolved in which the standard approaches produce inferior results or give no guidance at all. We view the current reconstruction process as unnecessarily broken into separate problems. We propose an alternative approach that views the problem of choosing all embedding parameters as being one and the same problem addressable using a single statistical test formulated directly from the reconstruction theorems. This allows for varying time delays appropriate to the data and simultaneously helps decide on embedding dimension. A second new statistic, undersampling, acts as a check against overly long time delays and overly large embedding dimension. Our approach is more flexible than those currently used, but is more directly connected with the mathematical requirements of embedding. In addition, the statistics developed guide the user by allowing optimization and warning when embedding parameters are chosen beyond what the data can support. We demonstrate our approach on uni- and multivariate data, data possessing multiple time scales, and chaotic data. This unified approach resolves all the main issues in attractor reconstruction.

  16. Childhood obesity: Current and novel approaches.

    PubMed

    Sabin, Matthew A; Kiess, Wieland

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased over the last fifty years by approximately 5% per decade, and approximately a quarter of all children are now either overweight or obese. These children have a significantly increased risk of many future health problems including adult obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Despite this relentless increase, common-sense approaches aimed at prevention and treatment have failed to solve the problem. Current approaches at prevention have faced major challenges with some progress in implementing smaller scale programs and social marketing, but little action on broad public policy approaches which often appears unpalatable to society or individual governments. Meanwhile, treatment approaches have mainly focused on lifestyle change, and novel approaches are urgently needed. Prevention needs to shift to improving maternal health prior to conception, with more research focussed on the impact of early years in programming offspring to future overweight/obesity. Likewise, treatment paradigms need to move from simply thinking that obesity can be solved by readdressing diet and activity levels. Novel approaches are needed which take into consideration the complex physiology which regulates early childhood growth and the development of obesity in susceptible individuals. PMID:26051294

  17. Evaluation of craniofacial surgery in the treatment of facial deformities.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, J E; Swanson, L T; Strand, R D; Hricko, G M

    1975-01-01

    Surgical access to the cranial, orbital, and facial areas, as developed by Tessier, has produced not only definitive repair of previously uncorrectable congenital deformities such as orbital hypertelorism and facial stenosis (e.g., Crouzon's, Apert's syndromes) but also has improved markedly the treatment of traumatic and neoplastic defects. The surgical approach allows complete dissection of facial soft tisses including the orbits from the underlying bones followed by corrective osteotomies and fixation. Mobilization of the frontal lobes through a frontal bone flap exposure may be required. The ramifications of this latest intrusion by surgeons into a previously inviolate anatomic area have involved neurosurgeons, ophthalmologists, anesthesiologists, and dental and psycho-social disciplines. The disciplines of genetics and embryology are being influenced by this new field of surgery, much as the study of immunology was influenced by transplantation surgery two decades ago. This report analyzes a 10 year experience with over 100 patients with emphasis on patient selection by disease, age, intellectual status, morbidity, complications, and the psycho-social reactions of patient and family. Procedures initially planned to correct dental and aesthetic defects are proving beneficial for other functions including hearing, taste and smell, articulation and tongue movement, respiratory function, vision, and possibly bone growth. The development of self image, a normal process always in operation, is also strikingly altered. These operations may last as long as 14 to 16 hours. We have had no deaths or postoperative blindness. One postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak was successfully repaired. Three partial losses of bone grafts and four instances of late cellulitis have occurred. Prevention of infection seems related to avoidance of dead spaces and primary closure of all mucosal, dural, conjunctival and skin surfaces. Images Figs. 1 a and b. Fig. 1c., Fig. 1d. Fig. 1f. Fig. 1g. Fig. 1h. Fig. 1i. Fig. 1m. Fig. 2a. Fig. 2b., Fig. 2c., Fig. 2d. Fig. 2e. Figs. 3 a and b. Fig. 3d., Fig. 3e. Fig. 3f. Fig. 4a., Fig. 4b. Fig. 5a. Fig. 5b., Fig. 5c. Figs. 5d and e. Fig. 5f. Figs. 5g. and 5h. Fig. 6a., Fig. 6b. Fig. 6c. Fig. 7a. Fig. 7b. Figs. 7e and f. Fig. 8a. Fig. 8b. Fig. 8c. Fig. 8d., Fig. 8e. Fig. 9a. Fig. 9b. Figs. 9c. and d. Fig. 9e. Fig. 9f. Figs. 9g. and h. Figs. 11a, b, and c. Figs. 11d, e, f. PMID:169753

  18. Determinants of physician empathy during medical education: hypothetical conclusions from an exploratory qualitative survey of practicing physicians

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Empathy is an outcome-relevant physician characteristic and thus a crucial component of high-quality communication in health care. However, the factors that promote and inhibit the development of empathy during medical education have not been extensively researched. Also, currently there is no explicit research on the perspective of practicing physicians on the subject. Therefore the aim of our study was to explore physicians’ views of the positive and negative influences on the development of empathy during their medical education, as well as in their everyday work as physicians. Method We administered a written Qualitative Short Survey to 63 physicians in seven specialties. They were able to respond anonymously. Our open-ended question was: “What educational content in the course of your studies and/or your specialist training had a positive or negative effect on your empathy?” We analyzed the data using thematic content analysis following Mayring’s approach. Results Forty-two physicians took part in our survey. All together, they mentioned 68 specific factors (37 positive, 29 negative, 2 neutral) from which six themes emerged: 1. In general, medical education does not promote the development of empathy. 2. Recognizing the psycho-social dimensions of care fosters empathy. 3. Interactions with patients in medical practice promote empathy. 4. Physicians’ active self-development through reflective practice helps the development of empathy. 5. Interactions with colleagues can both promote and inhibit empathy through their role modeling of empathic and non-empathic behavior. 6. Stress, time pressure, and adverse working conditions are detrimental to empathy development. Conclusions Our results provide an overview of what might influence the development of clinical empathy, as well as hypothetical conclusions about how to promote it. Reflective practice seems to be lacking in current medical curricula and could be incorporated. Raising physicians’ awareness of the psycho-social dimension of disease, and of the impact of peer influence and role modeling, seems promising in this regard, too. Stress and well-being seem to be closely related to physician empathy, and their modulation must take into account individual, social, and organizational factors. Further research should investigate whether or how these hypothetical conclusions can deepen our understanding of the determinants of physician empathy in order to help its promotion. PMID:24952736

  19. [The retromandibular approach in fractures of the mandibular condyle].

    PubMed

    Cheynet, F; Aldegheri, A; Chossegros, C; Bourezak, Z; Blanc, J L

    1997-12-01

    Various approaches have been proposed for surgical treatment of displaced condylar fractures included submandibular approach, preauricular approach, rhytidectomy approach or intraoral approach. Since 1992, we used a short retromandibular approach to treat displaced subcondylar fractures with a miniplate. When open reduction and osteosynthesis are required, the retro-mandibular approach is an easy and safe technique for displaced condylar fractures. The aim of this article was to describe the short retro-mandibular approach. Indications for surgical treatment, surgical approach and techniques of osteosynthesis for condylar fractures are discussed. PMID:9471672

  20. Introduction to Approaches in Music Therapy. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrow, Alice Ann, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The second edition of "Introduction to Approaches in Music Therapy" includes a new introductory chapter that addresses historical perspectives on the approaches, a rationale for the categorization of approaches, and discussion on professional issues related to the use of these approaches. Each of the chapters addressing approaches includes updated…

  1. Vegetative states--an integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Elad; Kim, Yoon-Hang; Maizes, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    The integrative approach to vegetative state remains a challenge. In this article we have presented the evidence for conventional and alternative therapies that can be applied to this condition. Some are intended to support the patient and prevent complications; others enhance the ability of relatives to interact with their loved ones; while others are intended to shorten the vegetative state period. The approaches we reviewed were based on availability of data on MEDLINE and/or their potential to broaden our conceptual approach to vegetative state. Some approaches highlighted within the article including nutritional support, acupuncture, and homeopathy, seem to have a reasonable risk/benefit ratio. Yet, the complexity of vegetative state makes it challenging to recommend an integrative protocol. Rather we recommend an individualized approach, based on patient co-morbidities, caregiver and health professional preferences, and availability of therapists. Other approaches, including herbal medicine, mind-body therapies, intercessory prayer, energy medicine, and shamanism were not included due to the lack of available information and evidence. We acknowledge that a lack of evidence for efficacy is not equivalent to evidence for a lack of efficacy. Further research is critically needed to advance our treatment approach to this challenging state. Vegetative state is a condition that continues to humble the medical world. What we do not know eclipses that which we know. The critical question of what the vegetative state patient experiences continues to mystify us. Our philosophical stance insists that we treat the patient as one who is aware. Simultaneously we struggle with what, if anything, we can successfully do to "reawaken" the patient. PMID:15712763

  2. Entrainment and motor emulation approaches to joint action: Alternatives or complementary approaches?

    PubMed Central

    Colling, Lincoln J.; Williamson, Kellie

    2014-01-01

    Joint actions, such as music and dance, rely crucially on the ability of two, or more, agents to align their actions with great temporal precision. Within the literature that seeks to explain how this action alignment is possible, two broad approaches have appeared. The first, what we term the entrainment approach, has sought to explain these alignment phenomena in terms of the behavioral dynamics of the system of two agents. The second, what we term the emulator approach, has sought to explain these alignment phenomena in terms of mechanisms, such as forward and inverse models, that are implemented in the brain. They have often been pitched as alternative explanations of the same phenomena; however, we argue that this view is mistaken, because, as we show, these two approaches are engaged in distinct, and not mutually exclusive, explanatory tasks. While the entrainment approach seeks to uncover the general laws that govern behavior the emulator approach seeks to uncover mechanisms. We argue that is possible to do both and that the entrainment approach must pay greater attention to the mechanisms that support the behavioral dynamics of interest. In short, the entrainment approach must be transformed into a neuroentrainment approach by adopting a mechanistic view of explanation and by seeking mechanisms that are implemented in the brain. PMID:25309403

  3. Managing Approach Plate Information Study (MAPLIST): An Information Requirements Analysis of Approach Chart Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Wendell R.; Jonnson, Jon E.; Barry, John S.

    1996-01-01

    Adequately presenting all necessary information on an approach chart represents a challenge for cartographers. Since many tasks associated with using approach charts are cognitive (e.g., planning the approach and monitoring its progress), and since the characteristic of a successful interface is one that conforms to the users' mental models, understanding pilots' underlying models of approach chart information would greatly assist cartographers. To provide such information, a new methodology was developed for this study that enhances traditional information requirements analyses by combining psychometric scaling techniques with a simulation task to provide quantifiable links between pilots' cognitive representations of approach information and their use of approach information. Results of this study should augment previous information requirements analyses by identifying what information is acquired, when it is acquired, and what presentation concepts might facilitate its efficient use by better matching the pilots' cognitive model of the information. The primary finding in this study indicated that pilots mentally organize approach chart information into ten primary categories: communications, geography, validation, obstructions, navigation, missed approach, final items, other runways, visibility requirement, and navigation aids. These similarity categories were found to underlie the pilots' information acquisitions, other mental models, and higher level cognitive processes that are used to accomplish their approach and landing tasks.

  4. Testing the TPF Interferometry Approach before Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabyn, Eugene; Mennesson, Bertrand

    2006-01-01

    One way to directly detect nearby extra-solar planets is via their thermal infrared emission, and with this goal in mind, both NASA and ESA are investigating cryogenic infrared interferometers. Common to both agencies' approaches to faint off-axis source detection near bright stars is the use of a rotating nulling interferometer, such as the Terrestrial Planet Finder interferometer (TPF-I), or Darwin. In this approach, the central star is nulled, while the emission from off-axis sources is transmitted and modulated by the rotation of the off-axis fringes. Because of the high contrasts involved, and the novelty of the measurement technique, it is essential to gain experience with this technique before launch. Here we describe a simple ground-based experiment that can test the essential aspects of the TPF signal measurement and image reconstruction approaches by generating a rotating interferometric baseline within the pupil of a large singleaperture telescope. This approach can mimic potential space-based interferometric configurations, and allow the extraction of signals from off-axis sources using the same algorithms proposed for the space-based missions. This approach should thus allow for testing of the applicability of proposed signal extraction algorithms for the detection of single and multiple near-neighbor companions...

  5. New modification in otoplasty: anterior approach.

    PubMed

    Erol, O O

    2001-01-01

    After harvesting the conchal cartilage in a large series of secondary rhinoplasties using the anterior approach, there was a marked improvement in the shape of the auricle, with unnoticeable scarring hidden under the convolution of the antihelix. In this series of 250 cases, there were no hypertrophic scars or keloid formations. Based on these favorable results, a new modification of otoplasty was developed using only the anterior approach. Between 1992 and 2000, 108 otoplasties were performed on 55 patients to correct the prominent ear using only the anterior approach. All maneuvers used in modern otoplasty, such as conchal reduction, scaphal cartilage scoring and folding, placement of horizontal mattress buried sutures, conchal setback, and the positioning of the tail and upper pole, can be easily and effectively performed using only the anterior approach as described in this article. The use of an anterior approach does not disturb the neurovascular system of the ear because it is located on the ear's posterior side. Overall, patient and physician satisfaction has continued to be very high during the 8 years that this technique has been used. Some patients experienced a few minor complications, such as postoperative pain (16.3 percent), late suture reaction (1.8 percent), hidden helix (3.6 percent), and partial relapse (3.6 percent), that were easily corrected by the application of a Kaye-type buried suture and that were not directly related to the technique. PMID:11176623

  6. Computational Approaches to Improving Storm Surge Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandli, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal hazards related to strong storms are one of the most frequently recurring and wide spread hazards to coastal communities today. In particular storm surge, the rise of the sea surface in response to wind and pressure forcing from these storms, can have a devastating effect on the coastline. Therefore, the ability to predict these events quickly and accurately is critical to the protection and sustainability of these coastal areas. Computational approaches to the forecasting of storm surge must be able to represent the inherent multi-scale nature of the surge while remaining computationally tractable and physically relevant. This has commonly been accomplished by solving a depth-averaged set of fluid equations on a non-uniform, unstructured grid. These approaches, however, have often had shortcomings due to computational expense, the need for involved model tuning, and missing physics. In this talk, I will outline some of the approaches being developed to address several of these shortcomings through the use of advanced computational approaches including adaptive mesh refinement, higher levels of parallelism including many-core technologies, and more accurate model equations such as the multilayer shallow water equations. Combining these approaches promises to address some of the pressing issues with current state-of-the-art models while continuing to decrease the computational overhead needed to calculate a forecast.

  7. Healthcare financing: approaches and trends in India.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Vikas; Saraya, Anoop

    2010-01-01

    Despite the importance of healthcare for the well-being of society, there is little public debate in India on issues relating to it. The 'human capital approach' to finance healthcare largely relies on private investment in health, while the 'human development approach' envisages the State as the guarantorof preventive as well as curative care to achieve universalization of healthcare. The prevailing health indices of India and challenges in the field of public health require a human developmentapproach to healthcare. On the eve of independence, India adopted the human development approach, with the report of the Bhore Committee emphasizing the role of the State in the development and provision of healthcare. However, more recently, successive governments have moved towards the human capital approach. Instead of increasing state spending on health and expanding the public health infrastructure, the government has been relying more and more on the private sector. The public-private partnership has been touted as the new-age panacea for the ills of the Indian healthcare system. This approach has led to a stagnation of public health indices and a decrease in the access of the poor to healthcare. PMID:21192520

  8. Fermion bag approach to lattice field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekharan, Shailesh

    2010-07-15

    We propose a new approach to the fermion sign problem in systems where there is a coupling U such that when it is infinite the fermions are paired into bosons, and there is no fermion permutation sign to worry about. We argue that as U becomes finite, fermions are liberated but are naturally confined to regions which we refer to as fermion bags. The fermion sign problem is then confined to these bags and may be solved using the determinantal trick. In the parameter regime where the fermion bags are small and their typical size does not grow with the system size, construction of Monte Carlo methods that are far more efficient than conventional algorithms should be possible. In the region where the fermion bags grow with system size, the fermion bag approach continues to provide an alternative approach to the problem but may lose its main advantage in terms of efficiency. The fermion bag approach also provides new insights and solutions to sign problems. A natural solution to the ''silver blaze problem'' also emerges. Using the three-dimensional massless lattice Thirring model as an example, we introduce the fermion bag approach and demonstrate some of these features. We compute the critical exponents at the quantum phase transition and find {nu}=0.87(2) and {eta}=0.62(2).

  9. Heat-kernel approach for scattering

    E-print Network

    Li, Wen-Du

    2015-01-01

    An approach for solving scattering problems, based on two quantum field theory methods, the heat kernel method and the scattering spectral method, is constructed. This approach has a special advantage: it is not only one single approach; it is indeed a set of approaches for solving scattering problems. Concretely, we build a bridge between a scattering problem and the heat kernel method, so that each method of calculating heat kernels can be converted into a method of solving a scattering problem. As applications, we construct two approaches for solving scattering problems based on two heat-kernel expansions: the Seeley-DeWitt expansion and the covariant perturbation theory. In order to apply the heat kernel method to scattering problems, we also calculate two off-diagonal heat-kernel expansions in the frames of the Seeley-DeWitt expansion and the covariant perturbation theory, respectively. Moreover, as an alternative application of the relation between heat kernels and partial-wave phase shifts presented in...

  10. A neural network approach to cloud classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan; Weger, Ronald C.; Sengupta, Sailes K.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that, using high-spatial-resolution data, very high cloud classification accuracies can be obtained with a neural network approach. A texture-based neural network classifier using only single-channel visible Landsat MSS imagery achieves an overall cloud identification accuracy of 93 percent. Cirrus can be distinguished from boundary layer cloudiness with an accuracy of 96 percent, without the use of an infrared channel. Stratocumulus is retrieved with an accuracy of 92 percent, cumulus at 90 percent. The use of the neural network does not improve cirrus classification accuracy. Rather, its main effect is in the improved separation between stratocumulus and cumulus cloudiness. While most cloud classification algorithms rely on linear parametric schemes, the present study is based on a nonlinear, nonparametric four-layer neural network approach. A three-layer neural network architecture, the nonparametric K-nearest neighbor approach, and the linear stepwise discriminant analysis procedure are compared. A significant finding is that significantly higher accuracies are attained with the nonparametric approaches using only 20 percent of the database as training data, compared to 67 percent of the database in the linear approach.

  11. Treatment of Children's Fears: A Strategic Utilization Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protinsky, Howard

    1985-01-01

    Describes briefly Milton Erickson's strategic utilization approach to therapy. Discusses the usefulness of this approach in treating children's fears. Presents two case histories in which the approach successfully eliminated the fear of the child. (BH)

  12. Simulator evaluation of manually flown curved instrument approaches

    E-print Network

    Sager, Dennis Wayne

    1973-01-01

    Pilot performance in flying horizontally curved instrument approaches was analyzed by having nine test subjects fly curved approaches in a fixed-base simulator. Approaches were flown without an autopilot and without a ...

  13. Heat-kernel approach for scattering

    E-print Network

    Wen-Du Li; Wu-Sheng Dai

    2015-07-02

    An approach for solving scattering problems, based on two quantum field theory methods, the heat kernel method and the scattering spectral method, is constructed. This approach converts a method of calculating heat kernels into a method of solving scattering problems. This allows us to establish a method of scattering problems from a method of heat kernels. As an application, we construct an approach for solving scattering problems based on the covariant perturbation theory of heat-kernel expansions. In order to apply the heat-kernel method to scattering problems, we first calculate the off-diagonal heat-kernel expansion in the frame of the covariant perturbation theory. Moreover, as an alternative application of the relation between heat kernels and partial-wave phase shifts presented in this paper, we give an example of how to calculate a global heat kernel from a known scattering phase shift.

  14. New Approach to Quantum Error Correction

    E-print Network

    Ri Qu; Bing-jian Shang; Yan-ru Bao; Yi-ping Ma

    2014-04-24

    Operator quantum error correction provides a unified framework for the known techniques of quantum error correction such as the standard error correction model, the method of decoherence-free subspaces, and the noiseless subsystem method. We first show an example of a new quantum error correction scheme which can not be described by operation quantum error correction. Then we introduce a different notion of noiseless subsystems according to the example. Base on this notion, we present a more unified approach which incorporates operator quantum error correction as a special case. Moreover, we also give a sufficient and necessary condition of quantum error correction using this approach. We show that this approach provides more recovery operations than operator quantum error correction, which possibly leads to simpler decoding procedures.

  15. Pseudospectral approach to relativistic molecular theory.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takahito; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2004-08-22

    The efficient relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) and Dirac-Kohn-Sham (DKS) methods are proposed by an application of the pseudospectral (PS) approach. The present PS-DHF/DKS method is a relativistic extension of the PS-HF/KS method of Friesner, though we aim at higher numerical accuracy by elimination of superfluous arbitrariness. The relativistic PS-DHF/DKS method is implemented into our REL4D programs. Several PS applications to molecular systems show that the relativistic PS-DHF/DKS approach is more efficient than the traditional approach without a loss of accuracy. The present PS-DKS method successfully assigns and predicts the photoelectron spectra of hexacarbonyl complexes of tungsten and seaborgium theoretically. PMID:15303907

  16. Epilogue: Systems Approaches and Systems Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Martin; Holwell, Sue

    Each of the five systems approaches discussed in this volume: system dynamics (SD), the viable systems model (VSM), strategic options development and analysis (SODA), soft systems methodology (SSM) and critical systems heuristics (CSH) has a pedigree. Not in the sense of the sometimes absurd spectacle of animals paraded at dog shows. Rather, their pedigree derives from their systems foundations, their capacity to evolve and their flexibility in use. None of the five approaches has developed out of use in restricted and controlled contexts of either low or high levels of complicatedness. Neither has any one of them evolved as a consequence of being applied only to situations with either presumed stakeholder agreement on purpose, or courteous disagreement amongst stakeholders, or stakeholder coercion. The compilation is not a celebration of abstract ‘methodologies', but of theoretically robust approaches that have a genuine pedigree in practice.

  17. [CLINICAL APPROACH TO PEDIATRIC SEROUS OTITIS MEDIA].

    PubMed

    Gruber, Maayan; Honigman, Tal; Cohen-Kerem, Raanan

    2015-06-01

    Serous otitis media (also known as otitis media with effusion) is one of the most prevalent pediatric diagnoses. However, the recommended clinical approach and significance of this entity are controversial. Pathogenesis is usually based upon a combination of factors as overviewed in the body of the article. The cognitive and behavioral effects amongst children suffering serous otitis media were extensively studied and data points to little if any effects during long term follow-ups in otherwise healthy children. The therapeutic approach can be divided into watchful waiting, systemic drugs, topical drugs, mechanical therapies and surgical therapy (i.e. ventilation tube insertion). The reviewed literature mainly supports the effectiveness of the surgical approach in carefully selected cohorts of patients. PMID:26281082

  18. Multiscale approaches to high efficiency photovoltaics

    E-print Network

    Connolly, J P; Mencaraglia, D; Rimada, Julio C; Nejim, Ahmed; Sanchez, G

    2015-01-01

    While renewable energies are achieving parity around the globe, efforts to reach higher solar cell efficiencies becomes ever more difficult as they approach the limiting efficiency. The so-called third generation concepts attempt to break this limit through a combination of novel physical processes and new materials and concepts in organic and inorganic systems. Some examples of semi-empirical modelling in the field are reviewed, in particular for multispectral solar cells on silicon (french ANR project MULTISOLSI). Their achievements are outlined, and the limits of these approaches shown. This introduces the main topic of this contribution, which is the use of multiscale experimental and theoretical techniques to go beyond the semi-empirical understanding of these systems. This approach has already led to great advances at modelling which have led to modelling software which is widely known. Yet a survey of the topic reveals a fragmentation of efforts across disciplines, firstly, such as organic and inorgani...

  19. Management Approach for Earth Venture Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hope, Diane L.; Dutta, Sanghamitra

    2013-01-01

    The Earth Venture Instrument (EVI) element of the Earth Venture Program calls for developing instruments for participation on a NASA-arranged spaceflight mission of opportunity to conduct innovative, integrated, hypothesis or scientific question-driven approaches to pressing Earth system science issues. This paper discusses the EVI element and the management approach being used to manage both an instrument development activity as well as the host accommodations activity. In particular the focus will be on the approach being used for the first EVI (EVI-1) selected instrument, Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO), which will be hosted on a commercial GEO satellite and some of the challenges encountered to date and corresponding mitigations that are associated with the management structure for the TEMPO Mission and the architecture of EVI.

  20. A Hybrid Approach to Protect Palmprint Templates

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dongmei; Xiong, Ke; Qiu, Zhengding

    2014-01-01

    Biometric template protection is indispensable to protect personal privacy in large-scale deployment of biometric systems. Accuracy, changeability, and security are three critical requirements for template protection algorithms. However, existing template protection algorithms cannot satisfy all these requirements well. In this paper, we propose a hybrid approach that combines random projection and fuzzy vault to improve the performances at these three points. Heterogeneous space is designed for combining random projection and fuzzy vault properly in the hybrid scheme. New chaff point generation method is also proposed to enhance the security of the heterogeneous vault. Theoretical analyses of proposed hybrid approach in terms of accuracy, changeability, and security are given in this paper. Palmprint database based experimental results well support the theoretical analyses and demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed hybrid approach. PMID:24982977